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Sample records for acute lung injury

  1. Pediatric acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahlem, P.; van Aalderen, W. M. C.; Bos, A. P.

    2007-01-01

    Among ventilated children, the incidence of acute lung injury (ALI) was 9%; of that latter group 80% developed the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The population-based prevalence of pediatric ARDS was 5.5 cases/100.000 inhabitants. Underlying diseases in children were septic shock (34%),

  2. Extravascular Lung Water and Acute Lung Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ritesh Maharaj

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury carries a high burden of morbidity and mortality and is characterised by nonhydrostatic pulmonary oedema. The aim of this paper is to highlight the role of accurate quantification of extravascular lung water in diagnosis, management, and prognosis in “acute lung injury” and “acute respiratory distress syndrome”. Several studies have verified the accuracy of both the single and the double transpulmonary thermal indicator techniques. Both experimental and clinical studies were...

  3. Toluene-induced acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Singhai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Toluene inhalation is an important occupational health hazard in persons working in factories manufacturing paint, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and rubber. The present report describes an unusual case of toluene-induced acute lung injury threatening life.

  4. Contribution of neutrophils to acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grommes, Jochen; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of acute lung injury (ALI) and its most severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), remain unsolved problems of intensive care medicine. ALI/ARDS are characterized by lung edema due to increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier and subsequent impairment of arterial oxygenation. Lung edema, endothelial and epithelial injury are accompanied by an influx of neutrophils into the interstitium and broncheoalveolar space. Hence, activation and recruitment of neutrophils are regarded to play a key role in progression of ALI/ARDS. Neutrophils are the first cells to be recruited to the site of inflammation and have a potent antimicrobial armour that includes oxidants, proteinases and cationic peptides. Under pathological circumstances, however, unregulated release of these microbicidal compounds into the extracellular space paradoxically can damage host tissues. This review focuses on the mechanisms of neutrophil recruitment into the lung and on the contribution of neutrophils to tissue damage in ALI.

  5. CXCR2 in Acute Lung Injury

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    F. M. Konrad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In pulmonary inflammation, recruitment of circulating polymorphonuclear leukocytes is essential for host defense and initiates the following specific immune response. One pathological hallmark of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome is the uncontrolled transmigration of neutrophils into the lung interstitium and alveolar space. Thereby, the extravasation of leukocytes from the vascular system into the tissue is induced by chemokines that are released from the site of inflammation. The most relevant chemokine receptors of neutrophils are CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR 1 and CXCR2. CXCR2 is of particular interest since several studies implicate a pivotal role of this receptor in development and promotion of numerous inflammatory disorders. CXCR2 gets activated by ELR+ chemokines, including MIP-2, KC (rodents and IL-8 (human. Since multiple ELR+ CXC chemokines act on both receptors—CXCR1 and CXCR2—a pharmacologic agent blocking both receptors seems to be advantageous. So far, several CXCR1/2 antagonists have been developed and have been tested successfully in experimental studies. A newly designed CXCR1 and CXCR2 antagonist can be orally administered and was for the first time found efficient in humans. This review highlights the role of CXCR2 in acute lung injury and discusses its potential as a therapeutic target.

  6. Inspiratory resistive breathing induces acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toumpanakis, Dimitris; Kastis, George A; Zacharatos, Panagiotis; Sigala, Ioanna; Michailidou, Tatiana; Kouvela, Maroussa; Glynos, Constantinos; Divangahi, Maziar; Roussos, Charis; Theocharis, Stamatios E; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros

    2010-11-01

    Resistive breathing is associated with large negative intrathoracic pressures. Increased mechanical stress induces high-permeability pulmonary edema and lung inflammation. To determine the effects of resistive breathing on the healthy lung. Anesthetized rats breathed through a two-way nonrebreathing valve. The inspiratory line was connected to a resistance setting peak inspiratory tracheal pressure at 50% of maximum (inspiratory resistive breathing), while 100% oxygen was supplied to prevent hypoxemia. Quietly breathing animals (100% oxygen) served as controls. Lung injury was evaluated after 3 and 6 hours of resistive breathing. After both 3 and 6 hours of resistive breathing, lung permeability was increased, as assessed by (99m)Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scintigraphy and Evans blue dye extravasation. Tissue elasticity, measured on the basis of static pressure-volume curves and by the low-frequency forced oscillation technique, was also increased. After both 3 and 6 hours of resistive breathing, gravimetric measurements revealed the presence of pulmonary edema and analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage showed increased total protein content, whereas the total cell count was elevated only after 6 hours of resistive breathing. Cytokine levels were assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue by ELISA and were increased after 6 hours compared with controls. Western blot analysis showed early activation of Src kinase via phosphorylation (at 30 min), and Erk1/2 and IκBα (nuclear factor-κB inhibitor) were phosphorylated at 3 and 6 hours. Pathology revealed the presence of lung injury after resistive breathing. Resistive breathing induces acute lung injury and inflammation.

  7. Predictors of Acute Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    related to development of ARDS were chest trauma, femoral fracture , Acute Physiology 11 Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution...Contusions 16 62 5 83.7 8 53 NS Rib Fractures 16 62 3 50 9 60 NS Pelvic Fractures 2 7.7 1 16.7 1 6.7 NS Femur Fractures 4 15.4 0...intubation. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2012; 138(9):854-8. 8. Puyo CA, Tricomi SM, Dahms TE. Early biochemical markers of inflammation in a swine

  8. Acute and subacute chemical-induced lung injuries: HRCT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akira, Masanori, E-mail: Akira@kch.hosp.go.jp [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center, 1180 Nagasone-cho, Kita-ku, Sakai City, Osaka 591-8555 (Japan); Suganuma, Narufumi [Department of Environmental Medicine, Kochi Medical School (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Lung injury caused by chemicals includes bronchitis, bronchiolitis, chemical pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, and sarcoid-like granulomatous lung disease. Each chemical induces variable pathophysiology and the situation resembles to the drug induced lung disease. The HRCT features are variable and nonspecific, however HRCT may be useful in the evaluation of the lung injuries and so we should know about HRCT features of lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by chemicals.

  9. Lung injury in acute pancreatitis: mechanisms, prevention, and therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    Lung injury is the most pertinent manifestation of extra-abdominal organ dysfunction in pancreatitis. The propensity of this retroperitoneal inflammatory condition to engender a diffuse and life-threatening lung injury is significant. Approximately one third of patients will develop acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which account for 60% of all deaths within the first week. The variability in the clinical course of pancreatitis renders it a vexing entity and makes demonstration of the efficacy of any specific intervention difficult. The distinct pathologic entity of pancreatitis-associated lung injury is reviewed with a focus on etiology and potential therapeutic maneuvers.

  10. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI – acase report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Łata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion-related acute lung injury is defined as acute respiratory failure which develops during or within 6 hours after transfusion of a blood component in a patient with no risk factors for respiratory insufficiency. Transfusion-related acute lung injury is diagnosed based on clinical manifestation and by excluding other causes of acute lung injury. Unambiguous diagnosis is difficult. Looking for anti-HLA and/or anti-HNA antibodies in donors and sometimes in recipients plays an important role in lab tests. Negative antibody findings, either in a donor or in a recipient, do not exclude transfusion-related acute lung injury, which, however, does not exempt from performing leukocyte antibody tests since they are extremely important for transfusion-related acute lung injury prophylaxis. The ways to prevent this reaction include: disqualifying donors with anti-HLA/HNA antibodies, screening for antibodies in multiparous women and in individuals after transfusion, modifying the way blood components are prepared and limiting blood transfusion in clinical practice. The paper presents a case of a 38-year-old woman with acute myeloid leukaemia, hospitalised at the Department of Internal Diseases and Haematology of the Military Institute of Medicine for subsequent courses of chemotherapy. During treatment, the patient had red cells and platelets concentrates transfused several times with no transfusion-related reactions. Eight days after the last chemotherapy infusion, the patient developed high temperature and her platelet count was 14 × 103 /mL. Therefore, the patient received a platelet concentrate again. About 1 hour after transfusion, the patient complained about chest pain and dyspnoea. She needed oxygen therapy. Chest X-ray revealed lung oedema with no signs of left ventricular failure. Once other causes of acute lung injury were excluded, transfusion-related acute lung injury was diagnosed.

  11. Ventilator induced lung injury (VILI) in acute respiratory distress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is the most severe manifestation of acute lung injury and it is associated with high mortality rate. ARDS is characterized by the acute onset of diffuse neutrophilic alveolar infiltrates protein-rich edema due to enhanced alveolar-capillary permeability and hypoxemic respiratory failure.

  12. Glutamine Attenuates Acute Lung Injury Caused by Acid Aspiration

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    Chih-Cheng Lai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate ventilator settings may cause overwhelming inflammatory responses associated with ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Here, we examined potential benefits of glutamine (GLN on a two-hit model for VILI after acid aspiration-induced lung injury in rats. Rats were intratracheally challenged with hydrochloric acid as a first hit to induce lung inflammation, then randomly received intravenous GLN or lactated Ringer’s solution (vehicle control thirty min before different ventilator strategies. Rats were then randomized to receive mechanical ventilation as a second hit with a high tidal volume (TV of 15 mL/kg and zero positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP or a low TV of 6 mL/kg with PEEP of 5 cm H2O. We evaluated lung oxygenation, inflammation, mechanics, and histology. After ventilator use for 4 h, high TV resulted in greater lung injury physiologic and biologic indices. Compared with vehicle treated rats, GLN administration attenuated lung injury, with improved oxygenation and static compliance, and decreased respiratory elastance, lung edema, extended lung destruction (lung injury scores and lung histology, neutrophil recruitment in the lung, and cytokine production. Thus, GLN administration improved the physiologic and biologic profiles of this experimental model of VILI based on the two-hit theory.

  13. A review of pulmonary coagulopathy in acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Laurens; de Groot, Philip G.; Grutters, Jan C.; Biesma, Douwe H.

    Enhanced bronchoalveolar coagulation is a hallmark of many acute inflammatory lung diseases such as acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia. Intervention with natural anticoagulants in these diseases has therefore become a topic of interest. Recently, new data on the

  14. RAGE inhibition reduces acute lung injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondonnet, Raiko; Audard, Jules; Belville, Corinne; Clairefond, Gael; Lutz, Jean; Bouvier, Damien; Roszyk, Laurence; Gross, Christelle; Lavergne, Marilyne; Fournet, Marianne; Blanchon, Loic; Vachias, Caroline; Damon-Soubeyrand, Christelle; Sapin, Vincent; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Jabaudon, Matthieu

    2017-08-03

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is involved in inflammatory response during acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Growing body of evidence support strategies of RAGE inhibition in experimental lung injury, but its modalities and effects remain underinvestigated. Anesthetised C57BL/6JRj mice were divided in four groups; three of them underwent orotracheal instillation of acid and were treated with anti-RAGE monoclonal antibody (mAb) or recombinant soluble RAGE (sRAGE), acting as a decoy receptor. The fourth group served as a control. Lung injury was assessed by the analysis of blood gases, alveolar permeability, histology, AFC, and cytokines. Lung expression and distribution epithelial channels ENaC, Na,K-ATPase, and aquaporin (AQP)-5 were assessed. Treatment with either anti-RAGE mAb or sRAGE improved lung injury, arterial oxygenation and decreased alveolar inflammation in acid-injured animals. Anti-RAGE therapies were associated with restored AFC and increased lung expression of AQP-5 in alveolar cell. Blocking RAGE had potential therapeutic effects in a translational mouse model of ARDS, possibly through a decrease in alveolar type 1 epithelial cell injury as shown by restored AFC and lung AQP-5 expression. Further mechanistic studies are warranted to describe intracellular pathways that may control such effects of RAGE on lung epithelial injury and repair.

  15. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: a change of perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaar, A. P.; Schultz, M. J.; Juffermans, N. P.

    2009-01-01

    Two decades ago, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) was considered a rare complication of transfusion medicine. Nowadays, TRALI has emerged as the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality, presumably as a consequence of reaching international agreement on defining TRALI with

  16. Autotaxin and Endotoxin-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios-Angelos Mouratis

    Full Text Available Acute Lung Injury (ALI is a life-threatening, diffuse heterogeneous lung injury characterized by acute onset, pulmonary edema and respiratory failure. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is a common cause of both direct and indirect lung injury and when administered to a mouse induces a lung phenotype exhibiting some of the clinical characteristics of human ALI. Here, we report that LPS inhalation in mice results in increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF levels of Autotaxin (ATX, Enpp2, a lysophospholipase D largely responsible for the conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA in biological fluids and chronically inflamed sites. In agreement, gradual increases were also detected in BALF LPA levels, following inflammation and pulmonary edema. However, genetic or pharmacologic targeting of ATX had minor effects in ALI severity, suggesting no major involvement of the ATX/LPA axis in acute inflammation. Moreover, systemic, chronic exposure to increased ATX/LPA levels was shown to predispose to and/or to promote acute inflammation and ALI unlike chronic inflammatory pathophysiological situations, further suggesting a differential involvement of the ATX/LPA axis in acute versus chronic pulmonary inflammation.

  17. Autotaxin and Endotoxin-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomou, Nikos; Katsifa, Aggeliki; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Kaffe, Eleanna; Aidinis, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    Acute Lung Injury (ALI) is a life-threatening, diffuse heterogeneous lung injury characterized by acute onset, pulmonary edema and respiratory failure. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a common cause of both direct and indirect lung injury and when administered to a mouse induces a lung phenotype exhibiting some of the clinical characteristics of human ALI. Here, we report that LPS inhalation in mice results in increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) levels of Autotaxin (ATX, Enpp2), a lysophospholipase D largely responsible for the conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in biological fluids and chronically inflamed sites. In agreement, gradual increases were also detected in BALF LPA levels, following inflammation and pulmonary edema. However, genetic or pharmacologic targeting of ATX had minor effects in ALI severity, suggesting no major involvement of the ATX/LPA axis in acute inflammation. Moreover, systemic, chronic exposure to increased ATX/LPA levels was shown to predispose to and/or to promote acute inflammation and ALI unlike chronic inflammatory pathophysiological situations, further suggesting a differential involvement of the ATX/LPA axis in acute versus chronic pulmonary inflammation. PMID:26196781

  18. Types of Acute Lung Injury and Fat Embolism

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    Ye. A. Kameneva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to enhance the efficiency of diagnosing acute lung injury (ALI and fat embolism (FE. Subjects and methods: Forty-seven patients with severe concomitant trauma (SCT, divided into three groups by the severity of shock and injury, were examined. The parameters of the scales rating ALI severity, lipid metabolism, hemostatic system, and hemodynamic monitoring were analyzed. Results. Three types of acute lung injury were identified in FE depending on clinical laboratory parameters: the patients having a shockogenicity index of less than 14 scores had significantly activated coagulation hemostasis and suppressed fibrinolytic system. Those with a shockogenicity index of 15 to 22 scores developed hemostatic disorders as activated coagulation hemostasis throughout the study and considerably activated fibrinolytic system, the levels of atherogenic very low density lipoproteins (LVDL and triglycerides increased. The patients with a shockogenicity index of more than 23 scores developed hemostatic disorders, such as pronounced activation of the blood coagulation system and suppression of the fibrinolytic system. The manifestation of ALI increased with the elevated concentrations of LVDL and triglycerides, hypercoagulation by hemo-viscosimetric parameters and reduced platelets, lower oxygenation index, and decreased oxygen consumption. Conclusion. A scheme of development of the types of ALI and FE has been proposed. Key words: severe injury, acute lung injury, fat embolism, types of diagnosis.

  19. Pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension in acute lung injury

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    Price, Laura C.; McAuley, Danny F.; Marino, Philip S.; Finney, Simon J.; Griffiths, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome are characterized by protein rich alveolar edema, reduced lung compliance, and acute severe hypoxemia. A degree of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is also characteristic, higher levels of which are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The increase in right ventricular (RV) afterload causes RV dysfunction and failure in some patients, with associated adverse effects on oxygen delivery. Although the introduction of lung protective ventilation strategies has probably reduced the severity of PH in ALI, a recent invasive hemodynamic analysis suggests that even in the modern era, its presence remains clinically important. We therefore sought to summarize current knowledge of the pathophysiology of PH in ALI. PMID:22246001

  20. Vildagliptin-induced acute lung injury: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Nobumasa; Kaneko, Masanori; Sato, Kazuhiro; Maruyama, Ryoko; Furukawa, Tomoyasu; Tanaka, Junta; Kaneko, Kenzo; Kamoi, Kyuzi

    2016-08-12

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are a class of oral hypoglycemic drugs and are used widely to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus in many countries. Adverse effects include nasopharyngitis, headache, elevated serum pancreatic enzymes, and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition, a few cases of interstitial pneumonia associated with their use have been reported in the Japanese literature. Here we describe a patient who developed drug-induced acute lung injury shortly after the administration of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor vildagliptin. A 38-year-old Japanese woman with diabetes mellitus developed acute respiratory failure 1 day after administration of vildagliptin. Chest computed tomography revealed nonsegmental ground-glass opacities in her lungs. There was no evidence of bacterial pneumonia or any other cause of her respiratory manifestations. After discontinuation of vildagliptin, she recovered fully from her respiratory disorder. She received insulin therapy for her diabetes mellitus, and her subsequent clinical course has been uneventful. The period of drug exposure in previously reported cases of patients with drug-induced interstitial pneumonia caused by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor varied from several days to over 6 months. In the present case, our patient developed interstitial pneumonia only 1 day after the administration of vildagliptin. The precise mechanism of her vildagliptin-induced lung injury remains uncertain, but physicians should consider that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor-induced lung injury, although rare, may appear acutely, even within days after administration of this drug.

  1. Life-threatening acute lung injury after gamma butyrolactone ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gerwen, M; Scheper, H; Touw, D J; van Nieuwkoop, C

    2015-03-01

    We describe a case of a 44-year-old woman with a borderline personality disorder and chronic gamma- butyrolactone (GBL) use who presented with progressive dyspnoea and an altered mental status. A high anion gap metabolic acidosis and acute lung injury was diagnosed. We hypothesise this was caused by GBL. In this case report we describe the diagnostic process and possible pathophysiological mechanisms that may have led to this life-threatening condition.

  2. Open Tracheostomy Gastric Acid Aspiration Murine Model of Acute Lung Injury Results in Maximal Acute Nonlethal Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alluri, Ravi; Kutscher, Hilliard L; Mullan, Barbara A; Davidson, Bruce A; Knight, Paul R

    2017-02-26

    Acid pneumonitis is a major cause of sterile acute lung injury (ALI) in humans. Acid pneumonitis spans the clinical spectrum from asymptomatic to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), characterized by neutrophilic alveolitis, and injury to both alveolar epithelium and vascular endothelium. Clinically, ARDS is defined by acute onset of hypoxemia, bilateral patchy pulmonary infiltrates and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Human studies have provided us with valuable information about the physiological and inflammatory changes in the lung caused by ARDS, which has led to various hypotheses about the underling mechanisms. Unfortunately, difficulties determining the etiology of ARDS, as well as a wide range of pathophysiology have resulted in a lack of critical information that could be useful in developing therapeutic strategies. Translational animal models are valuable when their pathogenesis and pathophysiology accurately reproduce a concept proven in both in vitro and clinical settings. Although large animal models (e.g., sheep) share characteristics of the anatomy of human trachea-bronchial tree, murine models provide a host of other advantages including: low cost; short reproductive cycle lending itself to greater data acquisition; a well understood immunologic system; and a well characterized genome leading to the availability of a variety of gene deletion and transgenic strains. A robust model of low pH induced ARDS requires a murine ALI that targets mainly the alveolar epithelium, secondarily the vascular endothelium, as well as the small airways leading to the alveoli. Furthermore, a reproducible injury with wide differences between different injurious and non-injurious insults is important. The murine gastric acid aspiration model presented here using hydrochloric acid employs an open tracheostomy and recreates a pathogenic scenario that reproduces the low pH pneumonitis injury in humans. Additionally, this model can be used to examine interaction of a

  3. Epidemiology of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome in The Netherlands : A survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Jan; Versteegt, Jens; Twisk, Jos; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Bindels, Alexander J. G. H.; Spijkstra, Jan-Jaap; Girbes, Armand R. J.; Groeneveld, A. B. Johan

    2007-01-01

    Background: The characteristics, incidence and risk factors for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may depend on definitions and geography. Methods: A prospective, 3-day point-prevalence study was performed by a survey of all intensive care units (ICU) in the

  4. Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase II overexpression attenuates LPS-mediated lung leak in acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine M; Kumar, Sanjiv; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Sharma, Shruti; Gorshkov, Boris A; Sridhar, Supriya; Lu, Qing; Bogatcheva, Natalia V; Jezierska-Drutel, Agnieszka J; Lucas, Rudolf; Verin, Alexander D; Catravas, John D; Black, Stephen M

    2014-03-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe hypoxemic respiratory insufficiency associated with lung leak, diffuse alveolar damage, inflammation, and loss of lung function. Decreased dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) activity and increases in asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), together with exaggerated oxidative/nitrative stress, contributes to the development of ALI in mice exposed to LPS. Whether restoring DDAH function and suppressing ADMA levels can effectively ameliorate vascular hyperpermeability and lung injury in ALI is unknown, and was the focus of this study. In human lung microvascular endothelial cells, DDAH II overexpression prevented the LPS-dependent increase in ADMA, superoxide, peroxynitrite, and protein nitration. DDAH II also attenuated the endothelial barrier disruption associated with LPS exposure. Similarly, in vivo, we demonstrated that the targeted overexpression of DDAH II in the pulmonary vasculature significantly inhibited the accumulation of ADMA and the subsequent increase in oxidative/nitrative stress in the lungs of mice exposed to LPS. In addition, augmenting pulmonary DDAH II activity before LPS exposure reduced lung vascular leak and lung injury and restored lung function when DDAH activity was increased after injury. Together, these data suggest that enhancing DDAH II activity may prove a useful adjuvant therapy to treat patients with ALI.

  5. Splenectomy exacerbates lung injury after ischemic acute kidney injury in mice

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    Andrés-Hernando, Ana; Altmann, Christopher; Ahuja, Nilesh; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Nemenoff, Raphael; He, Zhibin; Ishimoto, Takuji; Simpson, Pete A.; Weiser-Evans, Mary C.; Bacalja, Jasna

    2011-01-01

    Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) have increased serum proinflammatory cytokines and an increased occurrence of respiratory complications. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of renal and extrarenal cytokine production on AKI-mediated lung injury in mice. C57Bl/6 mice underwent sham surgery, splenectomy, ischemic AKI, or ischemic AKI with splenectomy and kidney, spleen, and liver cytokine mRNA, serum cytokines, and lung injury were examined. The proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, CXCL1, IL-1β, and TNF-α were increased in the kidney, spleen, and liver within 6 h of ischemic AKI. Since splenic proinflammatory cytokines were increased, we hypothesized that splenectomy would protect against AKI-mediated lung injury. On the contrary, splenectomy with AKI resulted in increased serum IL-6 and worse lung injury as judged by increased lung capillary leak, higher lung myeloperoxidase activity, and higher lung CXCL1 vs. AKI alone. Splenectomy itself was not associated with increased serum IL-6 or lung injury vs. sham. To investigate the mechanism of the increased proinflammatory response, splenic production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was determined and was markedly upregulated. To confirm that splenic IL-10 downregulates the proinflammatory response of AKI, IL-10 was administered to splenectomized mice with AKI, which reduced serum IL-6 and improved lung injury. Our data demonstrate that AKI in the absence of a counter anti-inflammatory response by splenic IL-10 production results in an exuberant proinflammatory response and lung injury. PMID:21677145

  6. Acute lung injury: what have we learned from animal models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, A C; Mullen, P G; Fowler, A A

    1993-08-01

    In 1950, Carl John Wiggers, philosopher and physiologist, wrote, "Reactions to definite types of stimulation may be observed or recorded, and concealed phenomena may be revealed by the use of apparatus that transforms them into forms that are recognizable by human senses. But complete understanding of physiological reactions often necessitates extensive operative procedures and sometimes the ultimate sacrifice of life. For this reason experimentation on animals is indispensable." Acute lung injury is still a significant cause of death in the developed world, and modern pharmacology and intensive care have failed to alter the clinical course of this complex condition. In the past decade, there was an explosion in understanding of the pathophysiology of acute lung injury, and with this has come the development of a new generation of agents that may provide a tool with which to combat this disorder. Use of animal model systems led to this greater understanding and is currently at the heart of evaluating the new therapeutic agents. This review briefly addresses the contribution animal model systems have made to what appear to be a watershed in attempts to obviate the effects of this mortal condition.

  7. Obesity-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Causes Lung Endothelial Dysfunction and Promotes Acute Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Guo, Zhi; Sun, Jianxin; Li, Jonathan; Kallen, Caleb B; Naik, Ulhas P; Summer, Ross

    2017-08-01

    Obesity is a significant risk factor for acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanisms underlying this association are unknown. We recently showed that diet-induced obese mice exhibit pulmonary vascular endothelial dysfunction, which is associated with enhanced susceptibility to LPS-induced acute lung injury. Here, we demonstrate that lung endothelial dysfunction in diet-induced obese mice coincides with increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Specifically, we observed enhanced expression of the major sensors of misfolded proteins, including protein kinase R-like ER kinase, inositol-requiring enzyme α, and activating transcription factor 6, in whole lung and in primary lung endothelial cells isolated from diet-induced obese mice. Furthermore, we found that primary lung endothelial cells exposed to serum from obese mice, or to saturated fatty acids that mimic obese serum, resulted in enhanced expression of markers of ER stress and the induction of other biological responses that typify the lung endothelium of diet-induced obese mice, including an increase in expression of endothelial adhesion molecules and a decrease in expression of endothelial cell-cell junctional proteins. Similar changes were observed in lung endothelial cells and in whole-lung tissue after exposure to tunicamycin, a compound that causes ER stress by blocking N-linked glycosylation, indicating that ER stress causes endothelial dysfunction in the lung. Treatment with 4-phenylbutyric acid, a chemical protein chaperone that reduces ER stress, restored vascular endothelial cell expression of adhesion molecules and protected against LPS-induced acute lung injury in diet-induced obese mice. Our work indicates that fatty acids in obese serum induce ER stress in the pulmonary endothelium, leading to pulmonary endothelial cell dysfunction. Our work suggests that reducing protein load in the ER of pulmonary endothelial cells might protect against acute respiratory distress syndrome in obese

  8. Independent lung ventilation in a newborn with asymmetric acute lung injury due to respiratory syncytial virus: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Di Nardo Matteo; Perrotta Daniela; Stoppa Francesca; Cecchetti Corrado; Marano Marco; Pirozzi Nicola

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Independent lung ventilation is a form of protective ventilation strategy used in adult asymmetric acute lung injury, where the application of conventional mechanical ventilation can produce ventilator-induced lung injury and ventilation-perfusion mismatch. Only a few experiences have been published on the use of independent lung ventilation in newborn patients. Case presentation We present a case of independent lung ventilation in a 16-day-old infant of 3.5 kg body weig...

  9. VEGF Promotes Malaria-Associated Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapau, Daniel; Pena, Ana C.; Ataíde, Ricardo; Monteiro, Carla A. A.; Félix, Nuno; Costa-Silva, Artur; Marinho, Claudio R. F.; Dias, Sérgio; Mota, Maria M.

    2010-01-01

    The spectrum of the clinical presentation and severity of malaria infections is broad, ranging from uncomplicated febrile illness to severe forms of disease such as cerebral malaria (CM), acute lung injury (ALI), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) or severe anemia (SA). Rodent models that mimic human CM, PAM and SA syndromes have been established. Here, we show that DBA/2 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA constitute a new model for malaria-associated ALI. Up to 60% of the mice showed dyspnea, airway obstruction and hypoxemia and died between days 7 and 12 post-infection. The most common pathological findings were pleural effusion, pulmonary hemorrhage and edema, consistent with increased lung vessel permeability, while the blood-brain barrier was intact. Malaria-associated ALI correlated with high levels of circulating VEGF, produced de novo in the spleen, and its blockage led to protection of mice from this syndrome. In addition, either splenectomization or administration of the anti-inflammatory molecule carbon monoxide led to a significant reduction in the levels of sera VEGF and to protection from ALI. The similarities between the physiopathological lesions described here and the ones occurring in humans, as well as the demonstration that VEGF is a critical host factor in the onset of malaria-associated ALI in mice, not only offers important mechanistic insights into the processes underlying the pathology related with malaria but may also pave the way for interventional studies. PMID:20502682

  10. Aspiration-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Victims with Isolated Severe Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Gorodovikova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the time and development rate of acute lung injury (ALI in severe brain injury (SBI complicated by aspiration of gastric contents or blood. Subjects and methods. Twenty-nine patients aged 19 to 70 years, who had isolated SBI, of whom there were 24 males and 5 females, were examined. The patients were divided into 2 groups: those with aspiration of gastric contents (n=9 or blood (n=10. A control group included 10 patients with SBI without aspiration. A PiCCO plus device was used to determine pulmonary extravascular fluid. ALI was diagnosed in accordance with the recommendations of the Research Institute of General Reanimatology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. Results. SBI patients with aspiration of gastric contents or blood were found to have significantly increased pulmonary extravascular water (p<0.01 and a lower oxygenation index (<300, which correlated with each other. ALI was recorded in the first hours after injury in about 50% of cases in both patients with gastric contents aspiration and those with blood aspiration. Conclusion. In patients with SBI complicated by aspiration of gastric contents or blood, pulmonary extravascular fluid accumulation concurrent with other signs of injury may be regarded as a criterion for acute lung injury. Key words: severe brain injury, aspiration, acute lung lesion.

  11. Risk Factors for Mortality and Outcomes in Pediatric Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panico, Flávia F; Troster, Eduardo J; Oliveira, Cindy S; Faria, Aline; Lucena, Michelle; João, Paulo R D; Saad, Everardo D; Foronda, Flávia A K; Delgado, Artur F; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow

    2015-09-01

    Children admitted to PICUs often present with or develop respiratory failure that requires mechanical ventilation. We prospectively identified children admitted to three general PICUs, with the goal of identifying risk factors for mortality. Prospective multicenter observational study. Three general PICUs, two in São Paulo and one in Curitiba, Brazil. Children aged between 1 month and 15 years, consecutively admitted between August 2008 and July 2010, with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome that developed at least 12 hours after invasive or noninvasive mechanical ventilation. None. We used logistic regression models to explore the relationship between death and independent variables. Of 3,046 patients admitted to the three PICUs, 1,658 patients underwent mechanical ventilation, and 84 fulfilled the acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Nearly 60% were boys, and the median age was 31 months. Pressure control/assist control was the initial mode of mechanical ventilation in 86% of cases, and the median durations of mechanical ventilation and PICU stay were 12 and 15 days, respectively. None of the eight patients with acute lung injury died, whereas 33 of 76 of the remaining patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome died, for an overall mortality rate of 39.3% (95% CI, 28.8-50.6%). In different multivariate logistic regression model, the number of organ dysfunctions at admission, peak inspiratory pressure, airway pressure gradient on day 1, and the mean airway pressure gradient over the first 7 days of mechanical ventilation were significantly associated with mortality. Mortality is high in pediatric acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mechanical ventilation-associated risk factors for death among such patients are potential targets for intervention.

  12. Inhaled nitric oxide exacerbated phorbol-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hen I; Chu, Shi Jye; Hsu, Kang; Wang, David

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we determined the effect of inhaled nitric oxide (NO) on the acute lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in isolated rat lung. Typical acute lung injury was induced successfully by PMA during 60 min of observation. PMA (2 microg/kg) elicited a significant increase in microvascular permeability, (measured using the capillary filtration coefficient Kfc), lung weight gain, lung weight/body weight ratio, pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and protein concentration of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Pretreatment with inhaled NO (30 ppm) significantly exacerbated acute lung injury. All of the parameters reflective of lung injury increased significantly except PAP (P<0.05). Coadministration of Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (5 mM) attenuated the detrimental effect of inhaled NO in PMA-induced lung injury, except for PAP. In addition, L-NAME (5 mM) significantly attenuated PMA-induced acute lung injury except for PAP. These experimental data suggest that inhaled NO significantly exacerbated acute lung injury induced by PMA in rats. L-NAME attenuated the detrimental effect of inhaled NO.

  13. Biomarkers of acute lung injury: worth their salt?

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    Proudfoot Alastair G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The validation of biomarkers has become a key goal of translational biomedical research. The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of biomarkers in the management of acute lung injury (ALI and related research. Biomarkers should be sensitive and specific indicators of clinically important processes and should change in a relevant timeframe to affect recruitment to trials or clinical management. We do not believe that they necessarily need to reflect pathogenic processes. We critically examined current strategies used to identify biomarkers and which, owing to expedience, have been dominated by reanalysis of blood derived markers from large multicenter Phase 3 studies. Combining new and existing validated biomarkers with physiological and other data may add predictive power and facilitate the development of important aids to research and therapy.

  14. Role of gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in tissue remodeling following acute lung injury

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    Corbel M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury is characterized by a severe disruption of alveolo-capillary structures and includes a variety of changes in lung cell populations. Evidence suggests the occurrence of rupture of the basement membranes and interstitial matrix remodeling during acute lung injury. The dynamic equilibrium of the extracellular matrix (ECM under physiological conditions is a consequence of the balance between the regulation of synthesis and degradation of ECM components. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs represent a group of enzymes involved in the degradation of most of the components of the ECM and therefore participate in tissue remodeling associated with pathological situations such as acute lung injury. MMP activity is regulated by proteolytic activation of the latent secreted proenzyme and by interaction with specific tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases. This review details our knowledge of the involvement of MMPs, namely MMP-2 and MMP-9, in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  15. Inhibition of Pyk2 blocks lung inflammation and injury in a mouse model of acute lung injury

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    Duan Yingli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2 is essential in neutrophil degranulation and chemotaxis in vitro. However, its effect on the process of lung inflammation and edema formation during LPS induced acute lung injury (ALI remains unknown. The goal of the present study was to determine the effect of inhibiting Pyk2 on LPS-induced acute lung inflammation and injury in vivo. Methods C57BL6 mice were given either 10 mg/kg LPS or saline intratracheally. Inhibition of Pyk2 was effected by intraperitoneal administration TAT-Pyk2-CT 1 h before challenge. Bronchoalveolar lavage analysis of cell counts, lung histology and protein concentration in BAL were analyzed at 18 h after LPS treatment. KC and MIP-2 concentrations in BAL were measured by a mouse cytokine multiplex kit. The static lung compliance was determined by pressure-volume curve using a computer-controlled small animal ventilator. The extravasated Evans blue concentration in lung homogenate was determined spectrophotometrically. Results Intratracheal instillation of LPS induced significant neutrophil infiltration into the lung interstitium and alveolar space, which was attenuated by pre-treatment with TAT-Pyk2-CT. TAT-Pyk2-CT pretreatment also attenuated 1 myeloperoxidase content in lung tissues, 2 vascular leakage as measured by Evans blue dye extravasation in the lungs and the increase in protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage, and 3 the decrease in lung compliance. In each paradigm, treatment with control protein TAT-GFP had no blocking effect. By contrast, production of neutrophil chemokines MIP-2 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine in the bronchoalveolar lavage was not reduced by TAT-Pyk2-CT. Western blot analysis confirmed that tyrosine phosphorylation of Pyk2 in LPS-challenged lungs was reduced to control levels by TAT-Pyk2-CT pretreatment. Conclusions These results suggest that Pyk2 plays an important role in the development of acute lung injury in mice and

  16. Independent lung ventilation in a newborn with asymmetric acute lung injury due to respiratory syncytial virus: a case report

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    Di Nardo Matteo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Independent lung ventilation is a form of protective ventilation strategy used in adult asymmetric acute lung injury, where the application of conventional mechanical ventilation can produce ventilator-induced lung injury and ventilation-perfusion mismatch. Only a few experiences have been published on the use of independent lung ventilation in newborn patients. Case presentation We present a case of independent lung ventilation in a 16-day-old infant of 3.5 kg body weight who had an asymmetric lung injury due to respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis. We used independent lung ventilation applying conventional protective pressure controlled ventilation to the less-compromised lung, with a respiratory frequency proportional to the age of the patient, and a pressure controlled high-frequency ventilation to the atelectatic lung. This was done because a single tube conventional ventilation protective strategy would have exposed the less-compromised lung to a high mean airways pressure. The target of independent lung ventilation is to provide adequate gas exchange at a safe mean airways pressure level and to expand the atelectatic lung. Independent lung ventilation was accomplished for 24 hours. Daily chest radiograph and gas exchange were used to evaluate the efficacy of independent lung ventilation. Extubation was performed after 48 hours of conventional single-tube mechanical ventilation following independent lung ventilation. Conclusion This case report demonstrates the feasibility of independent lung ventilation with two separate tubes in neonates as a treatment of an asymmetric acute lung injury.

  17. Keratinocyte growth factor-2 is protective in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Lin; Bi, Jing; Zhu, Xiaodan; Wang, Guifang; Liu, Jie; Rong, Linyi; Wang, Qin; Xu, Nuo; Zhong, Ming; Zhu, Duming; Song, Yuanlin; Bai, Chunxue

    2014-09-15

    Keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2) plays a key role in lung development, but its role in acute lung injury has not been well characterized. Lipopolysaccharide instillation caused acute lung injury, which significantly elevated lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, protein and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), inhibited surfactant protein A and C expression in lung tissue, and increased pathological injury. Pretreatment with KGF-2 improved the above lung injury parameters, partially restored surfactant protein A and C expression, and KGF-2 given 2-3 days before LPS challenge showed maximum lung injury improvement. Pretreatment with KGF-2 also markedly reduced the levels of TNF-α, MIP-2, IL-1β and IL-6 in BALF and the levels of IL-1β and IL-6 in lung tissue. Histological analysis showed there was increased proliferation of alveolar type II epithelial cells in lung parenchyma, which reached maximal 2 days after KGF-2 instillation. Intratracheal administration of KGF-2 attenuates lung injury induced by LPS, suggesting KGF-2 may be potent in the intervention of acute lung injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Lung-protective mechanical ventilation does not protect against acute kidney injury in patients without lung injury at onset of mechanical ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortjens, Bart; Royakkers, Annick A. N. M.; Determann, Rogier M.; van Suijlen, Jeroen D. E.; Kamphuis, Stephan S.; Foppen, Jannetje; de Boer, Anita; Wieland, Cathrien W.; Spronk, Peter E.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Bouman, Catherine S. C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that mechanical ventilation contributes to the development of acute kidney injury (AKI), particularly in the setting of lung-injurious ventilator strategies. Objective: To determine whether ventilator settings in critically ill patients without

  19. Effect of Thoracentesis on Intubated Patients with Acute Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Matthew B; Serna-Gallegos, Derek; Ault, Mark; Khan, Ahsan; Chung, Rex; Ley, Eric J; Melo, Nicolas; Margulies, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    Pleural effusions occur frequently in mechanically ventilated patients, but no consensus exists regarding the clinical benefit of effusion drainage. We sought to determine the impact of thoracentesis on gas exchange in patients with differing severities of acute lung injury (ALI). A retrospective analysis was conducted on therapeutic thoracenteses performed on intubated patients in an adult surgical intensive care unit of a tertiary center. Effusions judged by ultrasound to be 400 mL or larger were drained. Subjects were divided into groups based on their initial P:F ratios: normal >300, ALI 200 to 300, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) gases, and ventilator settings before and after the intervention were analyzed. The primary end point was the change in measures of oxygenation. Significant improvements in P:F ratios (mean ± SD) were seen only in patients with ARDS (50.4 ± 38.5, P = 0.001) and ALI (90.6 ± 161.7, P = 0.022). Statistically significant improvement was observed in the pO2 (31.1, P = 0.005) and O2 saturation (4.1, P < 0.001) of the ARDS group. The volume of effusion removed did not correlate with changes in individual patient's oxygenation. These data support the role of therapeutic thoracentesis for intubated patients with abnormal P:F ratios.

  20. Implication of Acute Lung Injury in the Pathogenesis of Hemostatic Disorders

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    S. V. Sinkov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate the implication of acute lung injury (ALI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in the pathogenesis of hemostatic disorders, by studying the arteriovenous difference between hemostatic parameters. Subjects and methods. Venous and arterial hemostases were studied in 95 patients treated in an intensive care unit. Three groups were identified, which included: 1 50 patients with an uncomplicated postoperative period and without any organ incompetence; 2 21 patients with primary lung injury; and 3 24 patients with secondary lung injury. Groups 2 and 3 patients were divided according to the degree of acute lung injury. Results. The arterial blood of patients with the uncomplicated postoperative period shows a lower coagulability than venous blood; there is no arteriovenous difference between fibrinolytic activity and platelet levels. The coagulation activity of arterial blood increases in primary lung injury; the higher fibrinolytic activity of arterial blood is a compensatory mechanism in moderate lung injury. Later on, in evolving ARDS, the hemostasiological balance between the pulmonary and systemic circulations impairs; disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC develops in both arterial and venous beds. Venous blood coagulability increases in secondary lung injury. By regulating the hemostatic system, the lungs produce a lower coagulation activity of and a higher fibrinolytic activity of arterial blood in ALI. With the development of ARDS, this function triples and DIC spreads to the arterial bed. Conclusion. The lung maintains the hemostasiological balance between the pulmonary and systemic circulations, by holding activated platelets and by enhancing the fibrinolytic activity of the blood flowing from it. The inducer of DIC is the suppressed fibrinolysis of the lesser circulation in patients with primary lung injury and hyperco-agulation in the greater circulation in patients with secondary lung injury. Key words

  1. Niacinamide mitigated the acute lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate in isolated rat's lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Chih; Hsieh, Nan-Kuang; Liou, Huey Ling; Chen, Hsing I

    2012-03-01

    Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) is a strong neutrophil activator and has been used to induce acute lung injury (ALI). Niacinamide (NAC) is a compound of B complex. It exerts protective effects on the ALI caused by various challenges. The purpose was to evaluate the protective effects of niacinamide (NAC) on the PMA-induced ALI and associated changes. The rat's lungs were isolated in situ and perfused with constant flow. A total of 60 isolated lungs were randomized into 6 groups to received Vehicle (DMSO 100 μg/g), PMA 4 μg/g (lung weight), cotreated with NAC 0, 100, 200 and 400 mg/g (lung weight). There were 10 isolated lungs in each group. We measured the lung weight and parameters related to ALI. The pulmonary arterial pressure and capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) were determined in isolated lungs. ATP (adenotriphosphate) and PARP [poly(adenosine diphophate-ribose) polymerase] contents in lung tissues were detected. Real-time PCR was employed to display the expression of inducible and endothelial NO synthases (iNOS and eNOS). The neutrophil-derived mediators in lung perfusate were determined. PMA caused increases in lung weight parameters. This agent produced pulmonary hypertension and increased microvascular permeability. It resulted in decrease in ATP and increase in PARP. The expression of iNOS and eNOS was upregulated following PMA. PMA increased the neutrophil-derived mediators. Pathological examination revealed lung edema and hemorrhage with inflammatory cell infiltration. Immunohistochemical stain disclosed the presence of iNOS-positive cells in macrophages and endothelial cells. These pathophysiological and biochemical changes were diminished by NAC treatment. The NAC effects were dose-dependent. Our results suggest that neutrophil activation and release of neutrophil-derived mediators by PMA cause ALI and associated changes. NO production through the iNOS-producing cells plays a detrimental role in the PMA-induced lung injury. ATP is beneficial

  2. Dexmedetomidine Alleviates Hyperoxia-Induced Acute Lung Injury via Inhibiting NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuyue; Wu, Di; Yang, Yang; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Hongyu

    2017-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine (Dex), a specific agonist of α2-adrenoceptor, has been reported to have extensive pharmacological effects. In this study, we focused on the protective effect of Dex on hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury and further explored its possible molecular mechanisms. The model of hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury was established by continuous inhalation of oxygen (FiO2= 0.90) for 7 d in neonatal rats in vivo. The in vitro experiments were carried out in LPS/ATP or hyperoxia-treated RAW264.7 cells. ELISA, western blot, TUNEL staining, and immunohistochemistry staining assays were performed and the commercial kits were used to assess the beneficial effect of Dex on hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury. According to our results, Dex treatment attenuated hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury via decreasing the lung wet/dry(W/D) weight ratio and mitigating pathomorphologic changes. Moreover, the oxidative stress injury, inflammatory reaction, and apoptosis in lung epithelial cells were inhibited by Dex treatment. In addition, the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome was restrained by Dex both in lung tissue in vivo and RAW264.7 cells in vitro. These data provide evidence that Dex may ameliorate hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury, which suggests a potential clinical application of Dex in long-term supplemental oxygen therapy. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Cannabidiol improves lung function and inflammation in mice submitted to LPS-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, A; Almeida, V I; Costola-de-Souza, C; Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Pinheiro, M L; Vitoretti, L B; Gimenes-Junior, J A; Akamine, A T; Crippa, J A; Tavares-de-Lima, W; Palermo-Neto, J

    2015-02-01

    We have previously shown that the prophylactic treatment with cannabidiol (CBD) reduces inflammation in a model of acute lung injury (ALI). In this work we analyzed the effects of the therapeutic treatment with CBD in mice subjected to the model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI on pulmonary mechanics and inflammation. CBD (20 and 80 mg/kg) was administered (i.p.) to mice 6 h after LPS-induced lung inflammation. One day (24 h) after the induction of inflammation the assessment of pulmonary mechanics and inflammation were analyzed. The results show that CBD decreased total lung resistance and elastance, leukocyte migration into the lungs, myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissue, protein concentration and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF and IL-6) and chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage supernatant. Thus, we conclude that CBD administered therapeutically, i.e. during an ongoing inflammatory process, has a potent anti-inflammatory effect and also improves the lung function in mice submitted to LPS-induced ALI. Therefore the present and previous data suggest that in the future cannabidiol might become a useful therapeutic tool for the attenuation and treatment of inflammatory lung diseases.

  4. Nebulized anticoagulants for acute lung injury - a systematic review of preclinical and clinical investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinman, Pieter R.; Dixon, Barry; Levi, Marcel; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2012-01-01

    Data from interventional trials of systemic anticoagulation for sepsis inconsistently suggest beneficial effects in case of acute lung injury (ALI). Severe systemic bleeding due to anticoagulation may have offset the possible positive effects. Nebulization of anticoagulants may allow for improved

  5. Monitoring of recruitment and derecruitment by electrical impedance tomography in a model of acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, P. W.; Vazquez de Anda, G.; Böhm, S. H.; Faes, T. J.; Lachmann, B.; Postmus, P. E.; de Vries, P. M.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a noninvasive system for obtaining information about alveolar recruitment and derecruitment in a model of acute lung injury. DESIGN: Prospective experimental study. SETTING: Animal research laboratory. SUBJECTS: Nine anesthetized pigs. INTERVENTIONS: Electrical impedance

  6. Targeting Extracellular Histones with Novel RNA Bio drugs for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0179 TITLE: Targeting Extracellular Histones with Novel RNA Bio- drugs for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting Extracellular Histones with Novel RNA Bio- drugs for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...preclinical animal models and human clinical trials. Furthermore, as a drug to prevent the development of MODS/ARDS and ALI in high risk patients, these bio

  7. Erythropoietin-Derived Peptide Protects Against Acute Lung Injury After Rat Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Yuan Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI can be complicated by TBI-triggered acute lung injury (ALI, in which inflammation plays a central role. It has been reported that an Erythropoietin-derived peptide (pHBSP was able to ameliorate TBI; however, its function in TBI-caused ALI has not been reported yet. Methods: In this study, we studied the effect of pHBSP on TBI-caused ALI by using a weight-drop induced TBI model. At 8 h and 24 h post-TBI, pulmonary edema (PE and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF proteins were measured, and haematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining of lung sections was carried out. At 24 h following TBI, the lungs were harvested for immunofluorescence staining and qRT-PCR analysis. Results: At 8 h and 24 h post-TBI, pHBSP treatment significantly decreased wet/dry ratios, decreased total BALF protein, and attenuated the histological signs of pulmonary injury. At 24 h post-TBI, pHBSP treatment decreased the accumulation of CD68+ macrophages in the lung and reduced the mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and iNOS in the lung. Conclusions: We identified the protective role that pHBSP played in TBI-caused ALI, suggesting that pHBSP is a potent candidate for systemic therapy in TBI patients.

  8. Microarray analysis of regional cellular responses to local mechanical stress in acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Brett A; Easley, R Blaine; Grigoryev, Dmitry N; Ma, Shwu-Fan; Ye, Shui Q; Lavoie, Tera; Tuder, Rubin M; Garcia, Joe G N

    2006-11-01

    Human acute lung injury is characterized by heterogeneous tissue involvement, leading to the potential for extremes of mechanical stress and tissue injury when mechanical ventilation, required to support critically ill patients, is employed. Our goal was to establish whether regional cellular responses to these disparate local mechanical conditions could be determined as a novel approach toward understanding the mechanism of development of ventilator-associated lung injury. We utilized cross-species genomic microarrays in a unilateral model of ventilator-associated lung injury in anesthetized dogs to assess regional cellular responses to local mechanical conditions that potentially contribute pathogenic mechanisms of injury. Highly significant regional differences in gene expression were observed between lung apex/base regions as well as between gravitationally dependent/nondependent regions of the base, with 367 and 1,544 genes differentially regulated between these regions, respectively. Major functional groupings of differentially regulated genes included inflammation and immune responses, cell proliferation, adhesion, signaling, and apoptosis. Expression of genes encoding both acute lung injury-associated inflammatory cytokines and protective acute response genes were markedly different in the nondependent compared with the dependent regions of the lung base. We conclude that there are significant differences in the local responses to stress within the lung, and consequently, insights into the cellular responses that contribute to ventilator-associated lung injury development must be sought in the context of the mechanical heterogeneity that characterizes this syndrome.

  9. Inhaled nitric oxide for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure (AHRF), defined as acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are critical conditions. AHRF results from a number of systemic conditions and is associated with high mortality and morbidity in all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) has...

  10. THE 5-LIPOXYGENASE PATHWAY IS REQUIRED FOR ACUTE LUNG INJURY FOLLOWING HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, John C.; Moore, Ernest E.; Mauchley, David C.; Johnson, Chris A.; Meng, Xianzhong; Banerjee, Anirban; Wohlauer, Max V.; Zarini, Simona; Gijón, Miguel A.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    The cellular and biochemical mechanisms leading to acute lung injury and subsequent multiple organ failure are only partially understood. In order to study the potential role of eicosanoids, particularly leukotrienes, as possible mediators of acute lung injury, we used a murine experimental model of acute lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock after blood removal via cardiac puncture. Neutrophil sequestration as shown by immunofluorescence, and protein leakage into the alveolar space, were measured as markers of injury. We used liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry to unequivocally identify several eicosanoids in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of experimental animals. MK886, a specific inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway, as well as transgenic mice deficient in 5-lipoxygenase, were used to determine the role of this enzymatic pathway in this model. Leukotriene B4 and leukotriene C4 were consistently elevated in shock-treated mice compared to sham-treated mice. MK886 attenuated neutrophil infiltration and protein extravasation induced by hemorrhagic shock. 5-lipoxygenase-deficient mice showed reduced neutrophil infiltration and protein extravasation after shock treatment, indicating greatly reduced lung injury. These results support the hypothesis that 5-lipoxygenase, most likely through the generation of leukotrienes, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock in mice. This pathway could represent a new target for pharmacological intervention to reduce lung damage following severe primary injury. PMID:22392149

  11. Inhibition of adenosine kinase attenuates acute lung injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, David; Streißenberger, Ariane; Morote-García, Julio C.; Granja, Tiago F.; Schneider, Mariella; Straub, Andreas; Boison, Detlev; Rosenberger, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective Extracellular adenosine has tissue protective potential in several conditions. Adenosine levels are regulated by a close interplay between nucleoside transporters and adenosine kinase (ADK). Based on evidence of the role of ADK in regulating adenosine levels during hypoxia, we evaluated the effect of ADK on lung injury. Furthermore, we tested the influence of a pharmacological approach to blocking ADK on the extent of lung injury. Design Prospective experimental animal study. Setting University based research laboratory. Subjects In vitro cell lines, wildtype (Wt) and ADK+/− mice. Methods We tested the expression of ADK during inflammatory stimulation in vitro and in a model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhalation in vivo. Studies using the ADK promoter were performed in vitro. Wt and ADK+/− mice were subjected to LPS inhalation. Pharmacological inhibition of ADK was performed in vitro, and its effect on adenosine uptake was evaluated. The pharmacological inhibition was also performed in vivo, and the effect on lung injury was assessed. Measurements and Results We observed the repression of ADK by pro-inflammatory cytokines and found a significant influence of NF-κB on regulation of the ADK promoter. Mice with endogenous ADK repression (ADK+/−) showed reduced infiltration of leukocytes into the alveolar space, decreased total protein and myeloperoxidase levels, and lower cytokine levels in the alveolar lavage fluid. The inhibition of ADK by 5-iodotubercidine increased the extracellular adenosine levels in vitro, diminished the transmigration of neutrophils and improved the epithelial barrier function. The inhibition of ADK in vivo showed protective properties, reducing the extent of pulmonary inflammation during lung injury. Conclusions Taken together, these data show that ADK is a valuable target for reducing the inflammatory changes associated with lung injury and should be pursued as a therapeutic option. PMID:26491864

  12. Strategies to improve oxygenation in experimental acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hartog (Arthur)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractOne of the most important clinical syndromes, in which failure of oxygen uptake in the lung leads to severe hypoxia, is the so-called acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). ARDS is a complex of clinical signs and symptoms which occur following diverse pulmonary or systemic insults,

  13. Hypertonic saline reduces inflammation and enhances the resolution of oleic acid induced acute lung injury

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    Costello Joseph F

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypertonic saline (HTS reduces the severity of lung injury in ischemia-reperfusion, endotoxin-induced and ventilation-induced lung injury. However, the potential for HTS to modulate the resolution of lung injury is not known. We investigated the potential for hypertonic saline to modulate the evolution and resolution of oleic acid induced lung injury. Methods Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were used in all experiments. Series 1 examined the potential for HTS to reduce the severity of evolving oleic acid (OA induced acute lung injury. Following intravenous OA administration, animals were randomized to receive isotonic (Control, n = 12 or hypertonic saline (HTS, n = 12, and the extent of lung injury assessed after 6 hours. Series 2 examined the potential for HTS to enhance the resolution of oleic acid (OA induced acute lung injury. Following intravenous OA administration, animals were randomized to receive isotonic (Control, n = 6 or hypertonic saline (HTS, n = 6, and the extent of lung injury assessed after 6 hours. Results In Series I, HTS significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL neutrophil count compared to Control [61.5 ± 9.08 versus 102.6 ± 11.89 × 103 cells.ml-1]. However, there were no between group differences with regard to: A-a O2 gradient [11.9 ± 0.5 vs. 12.0 ± 0.5 KPa]; arterial PO2; static lung compliance, or histologic injury. In contrast, in Series 2, hypertonic saline significantly reduced histologic injury and reduced BAL neutrophil count [24.5 ± 5.9 versus 46.8 ± 4.4 × 103 cells.ml-1], and interleukin-6 levels [681.9 ± 190.4 versus 1365.7 ± 246.8 pg.ml-1]. Conclusion These findings demonstrate, for the first time, the potential for HTS to reduce pulmonary inflammation and enhance the resolution of oleic acid induced lung injury.

  14. Blood transfusion : Transfusion-related acute lung injury: back to basics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening disease affecting the lungs. TRALI can develop within 6 hours after transfusion and almost all patients with TRALI require mechanical ventilation at the intensive care department. Nevertheless up to 40% of patients do not recover

  15. Intravenous dexamethasone attenuated inflammation and influenced apoptosis of lung cells in an experimental model of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosutova, P; Mikolka, P; Balentova, S; Adamkov, M; Kolomaznik, M; Calkovska, A; Mokra, D

    2016-12-22

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by diffuse alveolar damage, inflammation, and transmigration and activation of inflammatory cells. This study evaluated if intravenous dexamethasone can influence lung inflammation and apoptosis in lavage-induced ALI. ALI was induced in rabbits by repetitive saline lung lavage (30 ml/kg, 9+/-3-times). Animals were divided into 3 groups: ALI without therapy (ALI), ALI treated with dexamethasone i.v. (0.5 mg/kg, Dexamed; ALI+DEX), and healthy non-ventilated controls (Control). After following 5 h of ventilation, ALI animals were overdosed by anesthetics. Total and differential counts of cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) were estimated. Lung edema was expressed as wet/dry weight ratio. Concentrations of IL-1beta, IL-8, esRAGE, S1PR3 in the lung were analyzed by ELISA methods. In right lung, apoptotic cells were evaluated by TUNEL assay and caspase-3 immunohistochemically. Dexamethasone showed a trend to improve lung functions and histopathological changes, reduced leak of neutrophils (P<0.001) into the lung, decreased concentrations of pro-inflammatory IL-1beta (P<0.05) and marker of lung injury esRAGE (P<0.05), lung edema formation (P<0.05), and lung apoptotic index (P<0.01), but increased immunoreactivity of caspase-3 in the lung (P<0.001). Considering the action of dexamethasone on respiratory parameters and lung injury, the results indicate potential of this therapy in ALI.

  16. Acute lung injury in children : from viral infection and mechanical ventilation to inflammation and apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bern, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI), ook bekend als acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), is een uitgebreide ontstekingsreactie in beide longen door een longziekte of een aandoening elders in het lichaam. Kinderen lijken minder gevoelig voor de ziekte dan volwassenen, wellicht door de manier waarop de

  17. Time course of early histopathological lung changes in an ovine model of acute lung injury and pulmonary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Matthias; Cox, Robert A; Traber, Daniel L; Hamahata, Atsumori; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Traber, Lillian D; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei

    2013-01-01

    Large animal models are valuable tools in biological and medical lung research. Despite the existence of established large animal models, the scientific progress requires more detailed description and expansion of established methods. Previously, we established an ovine model of acute lung injury and subsequent bacterial instillation into the lungs. The current study was designed to assess the time course of early lung histopathological alterations in a large animal model. Injury was induced by smoke inhalation and instillation of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa into the lungs. After 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 hours, respectively, lung tissue was harvested and histopathological changes were evaluated (n = 4 each). Additional four sheep received no injury and only lung tissue was taken. In injured animals, bronchial obstruction score increased over time and was significantly elevated from 12 to 24 hours (P lung histopathological alterations following acute lung injury and pulmonary infection and may help optimizing the timing of study interventions and evaluation time points in future experiments with this model.

  18. ROS-Mediated NLRP3 Inflammasome Activity Is Essential for Burn-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Shichao Han; Weixia Cai; Xuekang Yang; Yanhui Jia; Zhao Zheng; Hongtao Wang; Jun Li; Yan Li; Jianxin Gao; Lei Fan; Dahai Hu

    2015-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is necessary for initiating acute sterile inflammation. However, its role in the pathogenesis of burn-induced acute lung injury (ALI) is unknown. This study aimed to determine the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome and the signaling pathways involved in burn-induced ALI. We observed that the rat lungs exhibited enhanced inflammasome activity after burn, as evidenced by increased levels of NLRP3 expression and Caspase-1 activity and augmented inflammatory cytokines. Inhibiti...

  19. FIRST REPORT OF TRANSFUSION-RELATED ACUTE LUNG INJURY (TRALI)IN SLOVENIA

    OpenAIRE

    Vesna Galvani; Slavica Maver; Gordana Soldatović; Irena Kramar

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a major cause of lethal side effects associated with transfusion of blood and blood components. TRALI is defined as a new acutenoncardiogenic pulmonary oedema as seen on the frontal radiography of lungs, manifested with the shortness of breath, hypoxemia, hypotension and fever, all occurring duringor within 6 h after transfusion.TRALI is rarely diagnosed and can be confused with other causes of acute respiratoryfailure. It occurs ...

  20. Differential Expression of Aquaporins in Experimental Models of Acute Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, Alice G; Manitsopoulos, Nikolaos; Kardara, Matina; Maniatis, Nikolaos A; Orfanos, Stylianos E; Kotanidou, Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian lung expresses at least three aquaporin (AQP) water channels whose precise role in lung injury or inflammation is still controversial. Three murine models of lung inflammation and corresponding controls were used to evaluate the expression of Aqp1, Aqp4, Aqp5 and Aqp9: lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury; HCl-induced lung injury; and ventilation-induced lung injury (VILI). All models yielded increased lung vascular permeability, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid; VILI additionally produced altered lung mechanics. Lung expression of Aqp4 decreased in the models that targeted primarily the alveolar epithelium, i.e. acid aspiration and mechanical ventilation, while Aqp5 expression decreased in the model that appeared to target both the capillary endothelium and alveolar epithelium, i.e. LPS. Participation of aquaporins in the acute inflammatory process depends on localization and the type of lung injury. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  1. The Epidemiology of Transfusion-related Acute Lung Injury Varies According to the Applied Definition of Lung Injury Onset Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Vusse, Lisa K; Caldwell, Ellen; Tran, Edward; Hogl, Laurie; Dinwiddie, Steven; López, José A; Maier, Ronald V; Watkins, Timothy R

    2015-09-01

    Research that applies an unreliable definition for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) may draw false conclusions about its risk factors and biology. The effectiveness of preventive strategies may decrease as a consequence. However, the reliability of the consensus TRALI definition is unknown. To prospectively study the effect of applying two plausible definitions of acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time on TRALI epidemiology. We studied 316 adults admitted to the intensive care unit and transfused red blood cells within 24 hours of blunt trauma. We identified patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, and defined acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time two ways: (1) the time at which the first radiographic or oxygenation criterion was met, and (2) the time both criteria were met. We categorized two corresponding groups of TRALI cases transfused in the 6 hours before acute respiratory distress syndrome onset. We used Cohen's kappa to measure agreement between the TRALI cases and implicated blood components identified by the two acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time definitions. In a nested case-control study, we examined potential risk factors for each group of TRALI cases, including demographics, injury severity, and characteristics of blood components transfused in the 6 hours before acute respiratory distress syndrome onset. Forty-two of 113 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome were TRALI cases per the first acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time definition and 63 per the second definition. There was slight agreement between the two groups of TRALI cases (κ = 0.16; 95% confidence interval, -0.01 to 0.33) and between the implicated blood components (κ = 0.15, 95% confidence interval, 0.11-0.20). Age, Injury Severity Score, high plasma-volume components, and transfused plasma volume were risk factors for TRALI when applying the second acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time definition

  2. Potential Application of Viral Empty Capsids for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Prof. Ariella Oppenheim CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Hebrew University of Jerusalem...Lung / 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Prof. Ariella...Particles (VLPs), may attenuate ARDS, increasing survival and recovery from this severe clinical condition. The hypothesis was successfully

  3. Does airway pressure release ventilation alter lung function after acute lung injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R A; Smith, D B

    1995-03-01

    During airway pressure release ventilation (APRV), tidal ventilation occurs between the increased lung volume established by the application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and the relaxation volume of the respiratory system. Concern has been expressed that release of CPAP may cause unstable alveoli to collapse and not reinflate when airway pressure is restored. To compare pulmonary mechanics and oxygenation in animals with acute lung injury during CPAP with and without APRV. Experimental, subject-controlled, randomized crossover investigation. Anesthesiology research laboratory, University of South Florida College of Medicine Health Sciences Center. Ten pigs of either sex. Acute lung injury was induced with an intravenous infusion of oleic acid (72 micrograms/kg) followed by randomly alternated 60-min trials of CPAP with and without APRV. Continuous positive airway pressure was titrated to produce an arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation of at least 95% (FIO2 = 0.21). Airway pressure release ventilation was arbitrarily cycled to atmospheric pressure 10 times per minute with a release time titrated to coincide with attainment of respiratory system relaxation volume. Cardiac output, arterial and mixed venous pH, blood gas tensions, hemoglobin concentration and oxyhemoglobin saturation, central venous pressure, pulmonary and systemic artery pressures, pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, airway gas flow, airway pressure, and pleural pressure were measured. Tidal volume (VT), dynamic lung compliance, intrapulmonary venous admixture, pulmonary vascular resistance, systemic vascular resistance, oxygen delivery, oxygen consumption, and oxygen extraction ratio were calculated. Central venous infusion of oleic acid reduced PaO2 from 94 +/- 4 mm Hg to 52 +/- 9 mm Hg (mean +/- 1 SD) (p arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (96.6 +/- 1.4% vs 96.9 +/- 1.3%) did not. Intrapulmonary venous admixture (9 +/- 3% vs 11 +/- 5%) and oxygen delivery (469 +/- 67 mL/min vs 479

  4. Effect of corticosteroid on lung parenchyma remodeling at an early phase of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Patricia R M; Souza, Alba B; Faffe, Debora S; Pássaro, Caroline P; Santos, Flávia B; Negri, Elnara M; Lima, Januário G M; Contador, Renata S; Capelozzi, Vera L; Zin, Walter A

    2003-09-15

    In vivo (lung resistive and viscoelastic pressures and static elastance) and in vitro (tissue resistance, elastance, and hysteresivity) respiratory mechanics were analyzed 1 and 30 days after saline (control) or paraquat (P [10 and 25 mg/kg intraperitoneally]) injection in rats. Additionally, P10 and P25 were treated with methylprednisolone (2 mg/kg intravenously) at 1 or 6 hours after acute lung injury (ALI) induction. Collagen and elastic fibers were quantified. Lung resistive and viscoelastic pressures and static elastance were higher in P10 and P25 than in the control. Tissue elastance and resistance augmented from control to P10 (1 and 30 days) and P25. Hysteresivity increased in only P25. Methylprednisolone at 1 or 6 hours attenuated in vivo and in vitro mechanical changes in P25, whereas P10 parameters were similar to the control. Collagen increment was dose and time dependent. Elastic fibers increased in P25 and at 30 days in P10. Corticosteroid prevented collagen increment and avoided elastogenesis. In conclusion, methylprednisolone led to a complete maintenance of in vivo and in vitro respiratory mechanics in mild lesion, whereas it minimized the changes in tissue impedance and extracellular matrix in severe ALI. The beneficial effects of the early use of steroids in ALI remained unaltered at Day 30.

  5. Action mechanism of apoptosis in the development of acute lung injury after severe acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan-li SHI

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the role of apoptosis in the development of acute lung injury (ALI after severe acute pancreatitis (SAP and its mechanism via Notch/Hes signal transduction pathway in the pathologic process. Methods Fifty healthy male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into, sham group (n=8 and model group (n=42. Tissue samples of model group were collected randomly at 3 (n=10, 6 (n=10, 12 (n=10 and 24h (n=12 after model establishment. Tissue collection of Sham group was conducted at 3h. Left lung wet/dry weight ratio (W/D was calculated; Histological scores of pancreatic and lung tissues were assessed under microscope; myeloperoxidase (MPO and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α of lung tissues were determined by enzymatic-chemical method and radioimmunoassay method respectively. Apoptosis of lung cells was evaluated by TUNEL assay followed by calculation of apoptosis index. Protein levels of Notch-1, Hes-1 and Hes-5 were also detected semi-quantitatively by Western blotting. Results The lung tissue W/D of model rats exhibited a gradual increment at the prior 12 hours, and the ratio was significantly higher than that of sham group at each time point (P<0.01 while it reached the peak at 12h time point. Pancreatic and lung pathological scores of model groups were increased at all time points and significantly higher than sham group (P<0.01. Lung pathological scores of model groups achieved a peak at 12h. Meanwhile, lung MPO and TNF-α of model groups showed the same increment trend at each time points. The apoptosis index (AI of lung cells in model groups were higher than that in sham group (P<0.01. Compared with sham group, the model groups showed lower protein expression levels of Notch-1, especially at 3, 6 and 12h (P<0.05. Notch-1 protein expression level of 12h group was lower than that of 3, 6 and 24h groups (P<0.01. Correlation analysis found that apoptosis of lung cells was significantly negatively related to histopathological

  6. High-dose heparin fails to improve acute lung injury following smoke inhalation in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kazunori; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Shimoda, Katsumi; Mizutani, Akio; Cox, Robert A; Schmalstieg, Frank C; Jodoin, Jeffrey M; Hawkins, Hal K; Traber, Lillian D; Traber, Daniel L

    2003-04-01

    Thrombin is involved in various inflammatory responses. In sepsis, coagulation abnormalities are major complications. Acute lung injury is one of the most life-threatening problems that can result from sepsis. We hypothesized that high-dose heparin might be effective in attenuating acute lung injury in our sepsis model. Female sheep ( n =16) were surgically prepared for the study. After a tracheotomy, 48 breaths of cotton smoke (heparin infusion group ( n =6), a Ringer's lactate infusion group ( n =6), and a sham-injury group ( n =4; surgically prepared in the same fashion but receiving no inhalation injury or bacteria). The treatment was started 1 h after the insult, and was continued thereafter for 24 h. The dose of heparin was adjusted by monitoring to target an activated clotting time of between 300 and 400 s (baseline=approx. 150 s). Sheep exposed to lung injury presented with typical hyperdynamic cardiovascular changes, including an increased cardiac output and a fall in systemic vascular resistance. There was a decrease in the arterial partial pressure of O(2). In conclusion, high-dose heparin did not prevent lung dysfunction in this model, in which acute lung injury was induced by combined smoke and septic challenge.

  7. Acute lung injury: effects of prone positioning on cephalocaudal distribution of lung inflation--CT assessment in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Ju; Im, Jung-Gi; Goo, Jin Mo; Kim, Young Il; Lee, Min Woo; Ryu, Ho-Geol; Bahk, Jae-Hyon; Yoo, Chul-Gyu

    2005-01-01

    To quantify cephalocaudal gradient of lung inflation in acute lung injury in a dog model in prone versus supine position. Experiments were performed in accordance with Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, as approved by National Research Council (National Institutes of Health), and were approved by committee on care and use of animals in research at Seoul National University Hospital. After induction of acute lung injury with intravenous injection of oleic acid, dogs were randomized to be ventilated in either prone (n = 6) or supine (n = 6) position. Spiral computed tomography (CT) and hemodynamic measurement were performed sequentially on an hourly basis. Volume and mean attenuation of lung were measured quantitatively by using software to evaluate each CT section. Cephalocaudal gradient of mean lung attenuation, distribution of gas and tissue, and alveolar expansion were assessed. Functional residual capacity and net alveolar expansion of entire lung were measured. Statistical analysis was performed with Friedman, sign, and Mann-Whitney tests. Mean lung attenuation increased gradually from apex to base of lung in supine position. Thus, inflation gradient along cephalocaudal axis was found. Gas was located predominantly in upper lung, whereas tissue was dominant in lower lung in supine position. In supine group, cephalocaudal inflation gradient showed no significant change from baseline up to 4 hours. After prone positioning, cephalocaudal inflation gradient was reduced, and gas and tissue proportions became more uniform along cephalocaudal axis. In prone group, absolute values of cephalocaudal inflation gradient at time points of prone positioning for 1, 2, and 3 hours were significantly lower than baseline values (P lung was not altered significantly. Functional residual capacity was unchanged by prone positioning. In acute lung injury, prone positioning induced more uniform distribution of gas and tissue along cephalocaudal axis by reducing

  8. NLRP3 deletion protects from hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Fukumoto, Jutaro; Fukumoto, Itsuko; Parthasarathy, Prasanna Tamarapu; Cox, Ruan; Huynh, Bao; Ramanathan, Gurukumar Kollongod; Venugopal, Rajan Babu; Allen-Gipson, Diane S.; Lockey, Richard F.; Kolliputi, Narasaiah

    2013-01-01

    Inspiration of a high concentration of oxygen, a therapy for acute lung injury (ALI), could unexpectedly lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury (HALI). Nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat PYD-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) senses the ROS, triggering inflammasome activation and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production and secretion. However, the role of NLRP3 inflammasome in HALI is unclear. The main aim of this study is to determine the e...

  9. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) for quantification of pulmonary edema in acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepte, Constantin J C; Phillips, Charles R; Solà, Josep; Adler, Andy; Haas, Sebastian A; Rapin, Michael; Böhm, Stephan H; Reuter, Daniel A

    2016-01-22

    Assessment of pulmonary edema is a key factor in monitoring and guidance of therapy in critically ill patients. To date, methods available at the bedside for estimating the physiologic correlate of pulmonary edema, extravascular lung water, often are unreliable or require invasive measurements. The aim of the present study was to develop a novel approach to reliably assess extravascular lung water by making use of the functional imaging capabilities of electrical impedance tomography. Thirty domestic pigs were anesthetized and randomized to three different groups. Group 1 was a sham group with no lung injury. Group 2 had acute lung injury induced by saline lavage. Group 3 had vascular lung injury induced by intravenous injection of oleic acid. A novel, noninvasive technique using changes in thoracic electrical impedance with lateral body rotation was used to measure a new metric, the lung water ratioEIT, which reflects total extravascular lung water. The lung water ratioEIT was compared with postmortem gravimetric lung water analysis and transcardiopulmonary thermodilution measurements. A significant correlation was found between extravascular lung water as measured by postmortem gravimetric analysis and electrical impedance tomography (r = 0.80; p electrical impedance tomograms during lateral body rotation. The novel lung water ratioEIT holds promise to become a noninvasive bedside measure of pulmonary edema.

  10. Propofol attenuates oxidant-induced acute lung injury in an isolated perfused rabbit-lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, Masato; Nishida, Osamu; Nakamura, Fujio; Katsuya, Hirotada

    2005-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). Some animal studies suggest that free radical scavengers inhibit the onset of oxidant-induced ALI. Propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) is chemically similar to phenol-based free radical scavengers such as the endogenous antioxidant vitamin E. Both in vivo and in vitro studies have suggested that propofol has antioxidant potential. We hypothesized that propofol may attenuate ALI by acting as a free-radical scavenger. We investigated the effects of propofol on oxidant-induced ALI induced by purine and xanthine oxidase (XO), in isolated perfused rabbit lung, in two series of experiments. In series 1, we examined the relationship between the severity of ALI and the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). In series 2, we evaluated the effects of propofol on attenuating ALI and the dose dependence of these effects. The lungs were perfused for 90 min, and we evaluated the effects on the severity of ALI by monitoring the pulmonary capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc), pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa), and the pulmonary capillary hydrostatic pressure (Ppc). In series 1, treatment with catalase (an H2O2 scavenger) prior to the addition of purine and XO resulted in complete prevention of ALI, suggesting that H2O2 may be involved closely in the pathogenesis of ALI. In series 2, pretreatment with propofol at concentrations in excess of 0.5 mM significantly inhibited the increases in the Kfc values, and that in excess of 0.75 mM significantly inhibited the increase in the Ppa values. Propofol attenuates oxidant-induced ALI in an isolated perfused rabbit lung model, probably due to its antioxidant action.

  11. Effects of adiponectin on acute lung injury in cecal ligation and puncture-induced sepsis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Bao, Hong-Guang; Si, Yan-Na; Han, Liu; Zhang, Rui; Cai, Meng-Meng; Shen, Yan

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the possible beneficial effects of adiponectin (APN) on acute lung injury in a rat model of sepsis. We subjected male Sprague-Dawley rats to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to establish sepsis models. We randomly animals divided into four groups: control (C), model (CLP), preemptive APN administration (APN plus CLP), and delayed APN administration (CLP plus APN). We killed the animals 24 h after CLP and collected blood samples to determine PaO2 and PaCO2. Lung samples were taken for histologic assessment and measurement of myeloperoxidase activity. We measured neutrophil and macrophage count and cytokine production (tumor necrosis factor-α and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Histology findings and lung injury score analysis revealed acute lung injury in rats in the CLP group, whereas those in the APN-treated group had mild lung injury. The effects of sepsis on the increasing cell number in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as well as the wet/dry weight ratio, neutrophil infiltration, and myeloperoxidase activity of lung tissue were significantly attenuated by APN administration. Adiponectin also significantly alleviated hypoxemia and hypercapnia resulting from the development of lung injury. In addition, in APN-treated rats, the levels of pulmonary inflammatory molecule (macrophage inflammatory protein-2) and cytokine (tumor necrosis factor-α) were down-regulated compared with the CLP group. Adiponectin administration ameliorates acute lung injury in a rat model of sepsis induced by CLP, no matter whether it is administrated before or after the onset of sepsis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Praeruptorin D and E attenuate lipopolysaccharide/hydrochloric acid induced acute lung injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peng-Jiu; Li, Jing-Rong; Zhu, Zheng-Guang; Kong, Huan-Yu; Jin, Hong; Zhang, Jun-Yan; Tian, Yuan-Xin; Li, Zhong-Huang; Wu, Xiao-Yun; Zhang, Jia-Jie; Wu, Shu-Guang

    2013-06-15

    Acute lung injury is a life-threatening syndrome characterized by overwhelming lung inflammation and increased microvascular permeability, which causes a high mortality rate worldwide. The dry root of Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn has been long used to treat respiratory diseases in China. In the present study, Praeruptorin A, C, D and E (PA, PC, PD and PE), four pyranocoumarins extracted from this herb, have been investigated for the pharmacological effects in experimental lung injury mouse models. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenged mice, PA and PC did not show protective effect against lung injury at the dose of 80 mg/kg. However, PD and PE significantly inhibited the infiltration of activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and decreased the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid at the same dose. There was no statistically significant difference between PD and PE group. Further study demonstrated that PD and PE suppressed protein extravasations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, attenuated myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and the pathological changes in the lung. Both PD and PE suppressed LPS induced Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway activation in the lung by decreasing the cytoplasmic loss of Inhibitor κB-α (IκB-α) protein and inhibiting the translocation of p65 from cytoplasm to nucleus. We also extended our study to acid-induced acute lung injury and found that these two compounds protected mice from hydrochloric acid (HCl)-induced lung injury by inhibiting PMNs influx, IL-6 release and protein exudation. Taken together, these results suggested that PD and PE might be useful in the therapy of lung injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute lung injury after inhalation of water-proofing spray while smoking a cigarette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinn, Y; Akizuki, N; Ohkouchi, M; Inase, N; Ichioka, M; Marumo, F

    1998-01-01

    A 34-year-old Japanese woman developed acute lung injury soon after inhaling a water-proofing spray which she applied onto her ski suit while smoking a cigarette at the same time. She initially demonstrated arterial hypoxemia (PaO2 = 59 mm Hg) and ground-glass opacities in both lung fields on the CT scan, which both returned to normal without any medication. Several water-proofing sprays, which are easily obtainable in Japan, contain 1,1,1-trichloroethane, liquefied petroleum gas and fluoride resin. Although these components have not been reported to be toxic to the lung yet, high concentrations of these components and/or the pyrolytic products of fluoride resin may have caused acute lung injury in this case.

  14. Nebulised heparin: a new approach to the treatment of acute lung injury?

    OpenAIRE

    Suter, Peter M

    2008-01-01

    The administration of heparin by nebulisation has been proposed for the 'local' treatment of pulmonary coagulation disturbances in acute lung injury (ALI). Alveolar and lung micro-vascular fibrin accumulation and breakdown inhibition indeed play a central role in the development and clinical course of this disease. Preclinical studies provide some evidence of the beneficial effects of heparin inhalation in several animal models of ALI. Clinical investigations are sparse, and trials such as th...

  15. Nebulized anticoagulants for acute lung injury - a systematic review of preclinical and clinical investigations

    OpenAIRE

    Tuinman, Pieter R; Dixon, Barry; Levi, Marcel; Juffermans, Nicole P; Schultz, Marcus J

    2012-01-01

    Background Data from interventional trials of systemic anticoagulation for sepsis inconsistently suggest beneficial effects in case of acute lung injury (ALI). Severe systemic bleeding due to anticoagulation may have offset the possible positive effects. Nebulization of anticoagulants may allow for improved local biological availability and as such may improve efficacy in the lungs and lower the risk of systemic bleeding complications. Method We performed a systematic review of preclinical st...

  16. Piperine Ameliorates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury via Modulating NF-κB Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying; Liu, Jingyao; Li, Hongyan; Gu, Lina

    2016-02-01

    Piperine, one of the active components of black pepper, has been reported to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the effects of piperine on lipolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) have not been reported. Thus, the protective effects of piperine against LPS-induced ALI were investigated in this study. LPS-induced lung injury was assessed by histological study, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and inflammatory cytokine production. Our results demonstrated that piperine attenuated LPS-induced MPO activity, lung edema, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production. Histological studies showed that piperine obviously attenuated LPS-induced lung injury. In addition, piperine significantly inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB activation. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that piperine had a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of piperine is through inhibition of NF-κB activation. Piperine may be a potential therapeutic agent for ALI.

  17. Hemodynamic effects of partial liquid ventilation with perfluorocarbon in acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.M. Houmes (Robert Jan); S.J.C. Verbrugge (Serge); E. Hendrik (Edwin); B.F. Lachmann (Burkhard)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To assess the effect of partial liquid ventilation with perfluorocarbons on hemodynamics and gas exchange in large pigs with induced acute lung injury (ALI). Design: Randomized, prospective, double-control, experimental study. Setting: Experimental intensive care unit of a

  18. Transfusion-related acute lung injury : etiological research and its methodological challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, Rutger Anton

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the most common serious side effect of blood transfusion. TRALI could be caused by donor leukocyte antibodies, present primarily in female and transfused donors (Chapters 1 and 2). In The Netherlands this led to the exclusion of female and transfused

  19. Reporting transfusion-related acute lung injury by clinical and preclinical disciplines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Anna L.; van de Weerdt, Emma K.; Goudswaard, Eline J.; Binnekade, Jan M.; Zwaginga, Jaap J.; Beckers, Erik A. M.; Zeerleder, Sacha S.; van Kraaij, Marian G. J.; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Vlaar, Alexander P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Disciplines involved in diagnosing transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) report according to a "one-hit" theory. However, studies showed that patients with an underlying condition are at increased risk of the development of TRALI. We investigated whether accumulating evidence on the

  20. Bench to bedside: targeting coagulation and fibrinolysis in acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ware, Lorraine B.; Camerer, Eric; Welty-Wolf, Karen; Schultz, Marcus J.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in understanding the contribution of alterations in coagulation and fibrinolysis to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). Findings from mouse, rat, baboon, and human studies indicate that alterations in coagulation and fibrinolysis may be of major

  1. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) in acute lung injury in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanley, T P; Schmal, H; Friedl, H P

    1995-01-01

    The role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury in rats after intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes or intratracheal administration of LPS has been assessed. Critical to these studies was the cloning and functional expression ...

  2. Predictors of Early Acute Lung Injury at a Combat Support Hospital: A Prospective Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    FWB) are associated with immunosuppression ,8 transfusion- related acute lung injury (TRALI), and worse outcomes following trauma.9 Of these, TRALI...Trauma. 2003;54:898–907. 9. Marik PE, Raghavan M. Anemia, allogenic blood transfusion, and immunomodulation in the critically ill. Chest. 2005;127:295

  3. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury : The role of donor antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Mathijssen-van Stein (Danielle)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious complication of blood transfusion, which causes serious morbidity and is the leading cause of transfusion-associated mortality according to the FDA. The majority of TRALI cases (up to 89%) are thought to be

  4. CORM-2 inhibits TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome pathway in LPS-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; Fei, Dongsheng; Gong, Rui; Yang, Wei; Yu, Wei; Pan, Shangha; Zhao, Mingran; Zhao, Mingyan

    2016-11-01

    Accumulated studies suggest that exogenously administered carbon monoxide is beneficial for the resolution of acute lung inflammation. The present study aimed to examine the effects and the underlying mechanisms of CORM-2 on thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP)/NLRP3 inflammasome pathway in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). ALI was intratracheally induced by LPS in C57BL6 mice. CORM-2 or iCORM-2 (30mg/kg i.p.) was administered immediately before LPS instillation. 6 h later, lung bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids were acquired for IL-18, IL-1β, and cell measurement, and lung issues were collected for histologic examination, wet/dry weight ratio, and determination of TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome expression, NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-ΚB activity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. LPS triggered significant lung edema, lung injury, and leukocyte infiltration, and elevated the levels of IL-1β and IL-18 in lung BAL fluids. CORM-2 pretreatment resulted in a marked amelioration of lung injury and reduced IL-1β and IL-18 secretion in BAL fluids. In lung tissues; CORM-2 down-regulated mRNA and protein level of TXNIP, NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1. Furthermore, CORM-2 reduced ROS production, inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB activity, and interaction of TXNIP-NLRP3. However, no significant differences were detected between the LPS and iCORM-2 (an inactive variant of CORM-2) group. CORM-2 suppresses TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome pathway and protects against LPS-induced lung injury.

  5. Immature monocytes contribute to cardiopulmonary bypass-induced acute lung injury by generating inflammatory descendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhichen; Han, Junyan; Hao, Xing; Wang, Jinhong; Jiang, Chunjing; Hao, Yu; Wang, Hong; Wu, Xueying; Shen, Liwei; Dong, Xiaojun; Li, Tong; Li, Guoli; Zhang, Jianping; Hou, Xiaotong; Zeng, Hui

    2017-03-01

    As immune regulatory and effector cells, monocytes play an important role in the blood-extracorporeal circuit contact-related acute lung injury in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, circulating monocytes are phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous, so we characterised how immature monocytes affect acute lung injury induced by CPB. The identification and dynamic changes in monocyte subsets were monitored by flow cytometry in patients undergoing CPB and in a rat model of CPB. The differentiation and migration of monocyte subsets were explored by in vitro cultures and adoptive transfer in the CPB rat model. We observed a dramatic increase of two monocyte subsets in the peripheral blood of patients undergoing CPB, involving tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α-producing, mature intermediate CD14(high)CD16(+) monocytes and a novel immature CD14(low)CD16(-) subset. The immature CD14(low)CD16(-) monocytes possessed limited ability for TNF-α production, and failed to suppress T-cell proliferation mediated by T-cell receptor signalling. However, these immature cells were highly proliferative and could differentiate into TNF-α producing, mature CD14(high)CD16(+) monocytes. In the rat model of CPB, we further demonstrated that CPB induced migration of immature monocytes into the lungs, either from the bone marrow or from the spleen. Moreover, we confirmed the hypothesis that immature subsets could contribute to CPB-induced acute lung injury by giving rise to TNF-α producing descendants. The immature CD14(low)CD16(-) monocytes might contribute to blood-circuit contact-induced acute lung injury by generating TNF-α-producing, mature monocytes. New strategies based on monocyte manipulation could be a promising therapeutic approach for minimising CPB-related lung injury. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Translational toxicological research: investigating and preventing acute lung injury in organophosphorus insecticide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Elspeth J; Clutton, R E; Drummond, G; Eddleston, M

    2014-06-01

    Poisoning through ingestion of organophosphorus (OP) insecticide is a leading cause of suicide globally. Severe poisoning with OP compounds creates an unconscious, paralysed patient with respiratory failure. These symptoms make pulmonary aspiration of stomach contents highly likely, potentially causing an acute lung injury. To explore this hypothesis, we created a Gottingen minipig pulmonary aspiration model (n=26) to investigate the mechanism and severity of lung injury created through pulmonary instillation of 0.5 mL/kg mixtures of porcine gastric juice (GJ), OP and/or its solvent. Early results show that aspiration of OP and GJ causes pulmonary neutrophil sequestration, alveolar haemorrhage and interstitial oedema, with disruption of the alveolar-capillary membrane. Further measurements will include quantitative CT imaging, histopathology scoring, acute lung injury biomarkers and respiratory function. In order to test the validity of the minipig model, a pilot study in Sri Lanka has been devised to observe signs of lung injury in human patients who have ingested OP insecticide with or without clinical evidence of pulmonary aspiration. Lung injury will be assessed with PaO2/FIO2 ratios and physiological dead space measurement. Blood, bronchoalveolar lavage and urine will be taken at 24 and 48 h after poisoning and at 3-4 h in surgical control patients to measure acute lung injury biomarkers. An unpublished toxicology study from Sri Lanka, 2011-2012, showed that over 40% of unconscious poisoned patients with a GCS poisoned patients. We hypothesise that non-drug assisted placement of supraglottic airways may be a good tool for use in unconscious poisoned patients requiring transfer from small rural hospitals in Asia. They could confer better airway protection than no airway intervention and reduce both morbidity and mortality. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. NLRP3 deletion protects from hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Jutaro; Fukumoto, Itsuko; Parthasarathy, Prasanna Tamarapu; Cox, Ruan; Huynh, Bao; Ramanathan, Gurukumar Kollongod; Venugopal, Rajan Babu; Allen-Gipson, Diane S; Lockey, Richard F; Kolliputi, Narasaiah

    2013-07-15

    Inspiration of a high concentration of oxygen, a therapy for acute lung injury (ALI), could unexpectedly lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury (HALI). Nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat PYD-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) senses the ROS, triggering inflammasome activation and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production and secretion. However, the role of NLRP3 inflammasome in HALI is unclear. The main aim of this study is to determine the effect of NLRP3 gene deletion on inflammatory response and lung epithelial cell death. Wild-type (WT) and NLRP3(-/-) mice were exposed to 100% O2 for 48-72 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissues were examined for proinflammatory cytokine production and lung inflammation. Hyperoxia-induced lung pathological score was suppressed in NLRP3(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. Hyperoxia-induced recruitment of inflammatory cells and elevation of IL-1β, TNFα, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were attenuated in NLRP3(-/-) mice. NLRP3 deletion decreased lung epithelial cell death and caspase-3 levels and a suppressed NF-κB levels compared with WT controls. Taken together, this research demonstrates for the first time that NLRP3-deficient mice have suppressed inflammatory response and blunted lung epithelial cell apoptosis to HALI.

  8. Leptin attenuates lipopolysaccharide or oleic acid-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hai-Ying; Xu, Min; Ji, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Yan-Xia; Dong, Ming-Qing; Liu, Man-Ling; Xu, Dun-Quan; Zhao, Peng-Tao; Liu, Yi; Luo, Ying; Niu, Wen; Zhang, Bo; Ye, Jing; Li, Zhi-Chao

    2013-12-01

    Leptin is reported to be involved in acute lung injury (ALI). However, the role and underlying mechanisms of leptin in ALI remain unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether leptin deficiency promoted the development of ALI. LPS or oleic acid (OA) were administered to wild-type and leptin deficient (ob/ob) mice to induce ALI. Leptin level, survival rate, and lung injury were examined. Results showed that leptin levels were predominantly increased in the lung, but also in the heart, liver, kidney, and adipose tissue after LPS adminiatration. Compared with wild-type mice, LPS- or OA-induced lung injury was worse and the survival rate was lower in ob/ob mice. Moreover, leptin deficiency promoted the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Exogenous administration of leptin reduced lethality in ob/ob mice and ameliorated lung injury partly through inhibiting the activation of NF-κB, p38, and ERK pathways. These results indicated that leptin deficiency contributed to the development of lung injury by enhancing inflammatory response, and a high level of leptin improved survival and protected against ALI.

  9. Treatment with H2S-releasing diclofenac protects mice against acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Madhav; Sidhapuriwala, Jenab N; Sparatore, Anna; Moore, Philip K

    2008-01-01

    Impaired lung function in severe acute pancreatitis is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in this condition. Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a naturally occurring gas that has been shown to be a potent vasodilator. Diclofenac is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic activity. ACS15 is an H(2)S-releasing derivative of diclofenac. Little is known about its effectiveness as an anti-inflammatory drug. In this report, we describe the effect of diclofenac and its H(2)S-releasing derivative on acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury in the mouse. Acute pancreatitis was induced in mice by hourly i.p. injections of cerulein. Diclofenac and ACS15 were administered either 1 hour before or 1 hour after starting cerulein injections, and the severity of acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury was assessed. The severity of acute pancreatitis was determined by hyperamylasemia, neutrophil sequestration in the pancreas (pancreatic myeloperoxidase activity), and pancreatic acinar cell injury/necrosis on histological examination of pancreas sections. The severity of acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury was assessed by neutrophil sequestration in the lungs (lung myeloperoxidase activity) and by histological examination of lung sections. ACS15, given prophylactically and therapeutically, significantly reduced lung inflammation without having any significant effect on pancreatic injury. These results suggest the usefulness of H(2)S-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as potential treatments for pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

  10. Heparin nebulization attenuates acute lung injury in sepsis following smoke inhalation in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kazunori; McGuire, Roy; Cox, Robert A; Jodoin, Jeffrey M; Bjertnaes, Lars J; Katahira, Jiro; Traber, Lillian D; Schmalstieg, Frank C; Hawkins, Hal K; Herndon, David N; Traber, Daniel L

    2002-09-01

    Pseudomonas pneumonia is a common complication of smoke inhalation injury. Airway casts formed from clotted mucous occur frequently in this condition. A recent report shows that intravenous heparin improves oxygenation and reduces lung damage in a sheep model of smoke inhalation. We hypothesized that nebulized heparin could be an effective means of reducing cast formation. Female sheep (n = 19) were surgically prepared for a study of acute lung injury (ALI). After a tracheotomy, 48 breaths of cotton smoke (heparin-nebulized group (n = 5; animals received aerosolized heparin [10,000 I.U.] 1 h after the bacterial instillation and subsequently every 4 h thereafter), an intravenous heparin group (n = 5,300 U/kg/23 h, infusion was started 1 h after the injury), a saline-nebulization group (n = 5; animals received inhaled nebulized saline), and a sham injury group (n = 4, treated in the same fashion, but no injury). The animals were sacrificed after 24 h of mechanical ventilation, and lung samples were harvested. Sheep exposed to lung injury presented with typical hyperdynamic cardiovascular changes and a corresponding drop in PaO2. These changes were significantly attenuated in the heparin groups. Histological changes consisting of cellular infiltrates, lung edema, congestion, and cast formation were reduced by heparin. These data suggest that nebulized inhaled heparin is a beneficial therapy for sepsis-induced ALI.

  11. The effects of morin on lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury by suppressing the lung NLRP3 inflammasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tianzhu, Zhang; Shihai, Yang; Juan, Du

    2014-12-01

    In previous study, the anti-inflammatory effect of morin had been found. In this study, we investigated anti-inflammatory effects of morin on acute lung injury using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The cell counting in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured. The animal lung edema degree was evaluated by wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio. The superoxidase dismutase (SOD) activity and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were assayed by SOD and MPO kits, respectively. The levels of inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Pathological changes of lung tissues were observed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The protein level of lung NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome was measured by Western blotting. The data showed that treatment with the morin markedly attenuated inflammatory cell numbers in the BALF, decreased lung NLRP3 inflammasome protein level, and improved SOD activity and inhibited MPO activity. Histological studies demonstrated that morin substantially inhibited LPS-induced neutrophils in lung tissue compared with model group. The results indicated that the morin had a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in mice.

  12. OPTICAL IMAGING OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY FROM HYPEROXIA AND SEPSIS

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    REYHANEH SEPEHR

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic pulmonary disorders such as acute lung injury (ALI in adults and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD in premature infants. Bacterial infection and oxygen toxicity, which result in pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, contribute to impaired vascular growth and alveolar simplification seen in the lungs of premature infants with BPD. Hyperoxia induces ALI, reduces cell proliferation, causes DNA damage and promotes cell death by causing mitochondrial dysfunction. The objective of this study was to use an optical imaging technique to evaluate the variations in fluorescence intensities of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes, NADH and FAD in four different groups of rats. The ratio of these fluorescence signals (NADH/FAD, referred to as NADH redox ratio (NADH RR has been used as an indicator of tissue metabolism in injuries. Here, we investigated whether the changes in metabolic state can be used as a marker of oxidative stress caused by hyperoxia and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS exposure in neonatal rat lungs. We examined the tissue redox states of lungs from four groups of rat pups: normoxic (21% O2 pups, hyperoxic (90% O2 pups, pups treated with LPS (normoxic + LPS, and pups treated with LPS and hyperoxia (hyperoxic + LPS. Our results show that hyperoxia oxidized the respiratory chain as reflected by a ~ 31% decrease in lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic lungs. LPS treatment alone or with hyperoxia had no significant effect on lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic or hyperoxic lungs, respectively. Thus, NADH RR serves as a quantitative marker of oxidative stress level in lung injury caused by two clinically important conditions: hyperoxia and LPS exposure.

  13. Macrophage micro-RNA-155 promotes lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Liu, Zhi; Su, Jie; Chen, Wen-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Wu; Bai, San-Xing; Zhang, Jin-Zhou; Yu, Shi-Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Micro-RNA (miR)-155 is a novel gene regulator with important roles in inflammation. Herein, our study aimed to explore the role of miR-155 in LPS-induced acute lung injury(ALI). ALI in mice was induced by intratracheally delivered LPS. Loss-of-function experiments performed on miR-155 knockout mice showed that miR-155 gene inactivation protected mice from LPS-induced ALI, as manifested by preserved lung permeability and reduced lung inflammation compared with wild-type controls. Bone marrow transplantation experiments identified leukocytes, but not lung parenchymal-derived miR-155-promoted acute lung inflammation. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of miR-155 in lung tissue was greatly elevated in wild-type mice after LPS stimulation. In situ hybridization showed that miR-155 was mainly expressed in alveolar macrophages. In vitro experiments performed in isolated alveolar macrophages and polarized bone marrow-derived macrophages confirmed that miR-155 expression in macrophages was increased in response to LPS stimulation. Conversely, miR-155 gain-of-function in alveolar macrophages remarkably exaggerated LPS-induced acute lung injury. Molecular studies identified the inflammation repressor suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS-1) as the downstream target of miR-155. By binding to the 3'-UTR of the SOCS-1 mRNA, miR-155 downregulated SOCS-1 expression, thus, permitting the inflammatory response during lung injury. Finally, we generated a novel miR-155 knockout rat strain and showed that the proinflammatory role of miR-155 was conserved in rats. Our study identified miR-155 as a proinflammatory factor after LPS stimulation, and alveolar macrophages-derived miR-155 has an important role in LPS-induced ALI. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Potential Application of Viral Empty Capsids for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    harvested 24 hrs post insult; C. VLP-treated and 2CLP-operated harvested 24 hrs post insult; D1,2. VLPtreated and 2CLP-operated harvested 4 days post ...insult; E. VLP-treated and 2CLP-operated harvested 12 days post insult. Magnification x400. 11 12 Lungs of the sacrificed rats were...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0125 TITLE: "Potential Application of Viral Empty Capsids for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory

  15. DNaseI Protects against Paraquat-Induced Acute Lung Injury and Pulmonary Fibrosis Mediated by Mitochondrial DNA

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    Guo Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Paraquat (PQ poisoning is a lethal toxicological challenge that served as a disease model of acute lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis, but the mechanism is undetermined and no effective treatment has been discovered. Methods and Findings. We demonstrated that PQ injures mitochondria and leads to mtDNA release. The mtDNA mediated PBMC recruitment and stimulated the alveolar epithelial cell production of TGF-β1 in vitro. The levels of mtDNA in circulation and bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF were elevated in a mouse of PQ-induced lung injury. DNaseI could protect PQ-induced lung injury and significantly improved survival. Acute lung injury markers, such as TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6, and marker of fibrosis, collagen I, were downregulated in parallel with the elimination of mtDNA by DNaseI. These data indicate a possible mechanism for PQ-induced, mtDNA-mediated lung injury, which may be shared by other causes of lung injury, as suggested by the same protective effect of DNaseI in bleomycin-induced lung injury model. Interestingly, increased mtDNA in the BALF of patients with amyopathic dermatomyositis-interstitial lung disease can be appreciated. Conclusions. DNaseI targeting mtDNA may be a promising approach for the treatment of PQ-induced acute lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis that merits fast tracking through clinical trials.

  16. Activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 ameliorates systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seong Ho, E-mail: yoosh@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute and Institute of Forensic Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A. [Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD (United States); Song, Byoung-Joon, E-mail: bj.song@nih.gov [Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Activation of PPARα attenuated LPS-mediated acute lung injury. •Pretreatment with Wy-14643 decreased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-6 in ALI. •Nitrosative stress and lipid peroxidation were downregulated by PPARα activation. •PPARα agonists may be potential therapeutic targets for acute lung injury. -- Abstract: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) by its ligands, which include Wy-14643, has been implicated as a potential anti-inflammatory therapy. To address the beneficial efficacy of Wy-14643 for ALI along with systemic inflammation, the in vivo role of PPARα activation was investigated in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Using age-matched Ppara-null and wild-type mice, we demonstrate that the activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 attenuated LPS-mediated ALI. This was evidenced histologically by the significant alleviation of inflammatory manifestations and apoptosis observed in the lung tissues of wild-type mice, but not in the corresponding Ppara-null mice. This protective effect probably resulted from the inhibition of LPS-induced increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitroxidative stress levels. These results suggest that the pharmacological activation of PPARα might have a therapeutic effect on LPS-induced ALI.

  17. Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI) in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): Volutrauma and Molecular Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco Loza, R; Villamizar Rodríguez, G; Medel Fernández, N

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a clinical condition secondary to a variety of insults leading to a severe acute respiratory failure and high mortality in critically ill patients. Patients with ARDS generally require mechanical ventilation, which is another important factor that may increase the ALI (acute lung injury) by a series of pathophysiological mechanisms, whose common element is the initial volutrauma in the alveolar units, and forming part of an entity known clinically as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Injured lungs can be partially protected by optimal settings and ventilation modes, using low tidal volume (VT) values and high positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP). The benefits in ARDS outcomes caused by these interventions have been confirmed by several prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and are attributed to reduction in volutrauma. The purpose of this article is to present an approach to VILI pathophysiology focused on the effects of volutrauma that lead to lung injury and the ‘mechanotransduction’ mechanism. A more complete understanding about the molecular effects that physical forces could have, is essential for a better assessment of existing strategies as well as the development of new therapeutic strategies to reduce the damage resulting from VILI, and thereby contribute to reducing mortality in ARDS. PMID:26312103

  18. Ghrelin attenuates acute pancreatitis-induced lung injury and inhibits substance P expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaolei; Xue, Chengrui

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of ghrelin administration on the severity of acute lung injury and on the production of proinflammatory cytokines and Substance P (SP) in rats with acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced in rats by sodium taurocholate injection through pancreaticobiliary duct. Ghrelin 20 nmol/kg was given before and after the treatment. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, and -6 levels in the serum were measured using the radioimmunoassay method. Morphological signs of lung injury, pulmonary water content, microvascular permeability, and myeloperoxidase activity were measured. Meanwhile, the determination of pulmonary SP mRNA level and its expression were performed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. The serum proinflammatory cytokines, pulmonary water content, microvascular permeability, and myeloperoxidase activity were increased, and morphological damages were observed in the lung of AP rats. SP mRNA level and its expression were significantly higher in sham-operated rats (P ghrelin. Pulmonary SP expression was also significantly down-regulated by ghrelin (P Ghrelin attenuates the severity of acute lung injury induced by AP. The reduction of neutrophil sequestration, limitation of proinflammatory cytokines release, and inhibition of pulmonary SP expression may be the mechanisms involved in the therapeutic effect of ghrelin.

  19. Effects of biliverdin administration on acute lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Junko; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Toru; Shimizu, Hiroko; Kawanishi, Susumu; Omori, Emiko; Endo, Yasumasa; Tamaki, Naofumi; Morita, Manabu; Morita, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation induces pulmonary inflammation that leads to acute lung injury. Biliverdin, a metabolite of heme catabolism, has been shown to have potent cytoprotective, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant effects. This study aimed to examine the effects of intravenous biliverdin administration on lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in rats. Biliverdin or vehicle was administered to the rats 1 h before sham or hemorrhagic shock-inducing surgery. The sham-operated rats underwent all surgical procedures except bleeding. To induce hemorrhagic shock, rats were bled to achieve a mean arterial pressure of 30 mmHg that was maintained for 60 min, followed by resuscitation with shed blood. Histopathological changes in the lungs were evaluated by histopathological scoring analysis. Inflammatory gene expression was determined by Northern blot analysis, and oxidative DNA damage was assessed by measuring 8-hydroxy-2' deoxyguanosine levels in the lungs. Hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation resulted in prominent histopathological damage, including congestion, edema, cellular infiltration, and hemorrhage. Biliverdin administration prior to hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation significantly ameliorated these lung injuries as judged by histopathological improvement. After hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation, inflammatory gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and inducible nitric oxide synthase were increased by 18- and 8-fold, respectively. Inflammatory gene expression significantly decreased when biliverdin was administered prior to hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. Moreover, after hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation, lung 8-hydroxy-2' deoxyguanosine levels in mitochondrial DNA expressed in the pulmonary interstitium increased by 1.5-fold. Biliverdin administration prior to hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation decreased mitochondrial 8-hydroxy-2' deoxyguanosine levels to almost the same level as that in the control animals. We also

  20. Effects of biliverdin administration on acute lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Kosaka

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation induces pulmonary inflammation that leads to acute lung injury. Biliverdin, a metabolite of heme catabolism, has been shown to have potent cytoprotective, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant effects. This study aimed to examine the effects of intravenous biliverdin administration on lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in rats. Biliverdin or vehicle was administered to the rats 1 h before sham or hemorrhagic shock-inducing surgery. The sham-operated rats underwent all surgical procedures except bleeding. To induce hemorrhagic shock, rats were bled to achieve a mean arterial pressure of 30 mmHg that was maintained for 60 min, followed by resuscitation with shed blood. Histopathological changes in the lungs were evaluated by histopathological scoring analysis. Inflammatory gene expression was determined by Northern blot analysis, and oxidative DNA damage was assessed by measuring 8-hydroxy-2' deoxyguanosine levels in the lungs. Hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation resulted in prominent histopathological damage, including congestion, edema, cellular infiltration, and hemorrhage. Biliverdin administration prior to hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation significantly ameliorated these lung injuries as judged by histopathological improvement. After hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation, inflammatory gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and inducible nitric oxide synthase were increased by 18- and 8-fold, respectively. Inflammatory gene expression significantly decreased when biliverdin was administered prior to hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. Moreover, after hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation, lung 8-hydroxy-2' deoxyguanosine levels in mitochondrial DNA expressed in the pulmonary interstitium increased by 1.5-fold. Biliverdin administration prior to hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation decreased mitochondrial 8-hydroxy-2' deoxyguanosine levels to almost the same level as that in the

  1. Nebulized anticoagulants for acute lung injury - a systematic review of preclinical and clinical investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuinman, Pieter R; Dixon, Barry; Levi, Marcel; Juffermans, Nicole P; Schultz, Marcus J

    2012-12-12

    Data from interventional trials of systemic anticoagulation for sepsis inconsistently suggest beneficial effects in case of acute lung injury (ALI). Severe systemic bleeding due to anticoagulation may have offset the possible positive effects. Nebulization of anticoagulants may allow for improved local biological availability and as such may improve efficacy in the lungs and lower the risk of systemic bleeding complications. We performed a systematic review of preclinical studies and clinical trials investigating the efficacy and safety of nebulized anticoagulants in the setting of lung injury in animals and ALI in humans. The efficacy of nebulized activated protein C, antithrombin, heparin and danaparoid has been tested in diverse animal models of direct (for example, pneumonia-, intra-pulmonary lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-, and smoke inhalation-induced lung injury) and indirect lung injury (for example, intravenous LPS- and trauma-induced lung injury). Nebulized anticoagulants were found to have the potential to attenuate pulmonary coagulopathy and frequently also inflammation. Notably, nebulized danaparoid and heparin but not activated protein C and antithrombin, were found to have an effect on systemic coagulation. Clinical trials of nebulized anticoagulants are very limited. Nebulized heparin was found to improve survival of patients with smoke inhalation-induced ALI. In a trial of critically ill patients who needed mechanical ventilation for longer than two days, nebulized heparin was associated with a higher number of ventilator-free days. In line with results from preclinical studies, nebulization of heparin was found to have an effect on systemic coagulation, but without causing systemic bleedings. Local anticoagulant therapy through nebulization of anticoagulants attenuates pulmonary coagulopathy and frequently also inflammation in preclinical studies of lung injury. Recent human trials suggest nebulized heparin for ALI to be beneficial and safe, but data

  2. Sodium butyrate protects against severe burn-induced remote acute lung injury in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Liang

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1, a ubiquitous nuclear protein, drives proinflammatory responses when released extracellularly. It plays a key role as a distal mediator in the development of acute lung injury (ALI. Sodium butyrate, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, has been demonstrated to inhibit HMGB1 expression. This study investigates the effect of sodium butyrate on burn-induced lung injury. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: 1 sham group, sham burn treatment; 2 burn group, third-degree burns over 30% total body surface area (TBSA with lactated Ringer's solution for resuscitation; 3 burn plus sodium butyrate group, third-degree burns over 30% TBSA with lactated Ringer's solution containing sodium butyrate for resuscitation. The burned animals were sacrificed at 12, 24, and 48 h after burn injury. Lung injury was assessed in terms of histologic changes and wet weight to dry weight (W/D ratio. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-8 protein concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and HMGB1 expression in the lung was determined by Western blot analysis. Pulmonary myeloperoxidase (MPO activity and malondialdehyde (MDA concentration were measured to reflect neutrophil infiltration and oxidative stress in the lung, respectively. As a result, sodium butyrate significantly inhibited the HMGB1 expressions in the lungs, reduced the lung W/D ratio, and improved the pulmonary histologic changes induced by burn trauma. Furthermore, sodium butyrate administration decreased the TNF-α and IL-8 concentrations in BALF and serum, suppressed MPO activity, and reduced the MDA content in the lungs after severe burn. These results suggest that sodium butyrate attenuates inflammatory responses, neutrophil infiltration, and oxidative stress in the lungs, and protects against remote ALI induced by severe burn, which is associated with inhibiting HMGB1

  3. Risk factors and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in the critically ill: A nested case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; Binnekade, Jan M.; Prins, David; van Stein, Danielle; Hofstra, Jorrit J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the incidence, risk factors, and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in a cohort of critically ill patients. Design: In a retrospective cohort study, patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury were identified using the consensus criteria of acute lung

  4. Biomarkers for oxidative stress in acute lung injury induced in rabbits submitted to different strategies of mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative damage has been said to play an important role in pulmonary injury, which is associated with the development and progression of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We aimed to identify biomarkers to determine the oxidative stress in an animal model of acute lung injury (ALI) using ...

  5. Acute Lung Injury: Making the Injured Lung Perform Better and Rebuilding Healthy Lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    chemotherapeutic agents, themselves, cause a syndrome with features of ALI. The pathology and pathophysiology of ALI are very complex and include features...pediatric lung disease, hypothyroidism , and neurological impairment (Krude et al., 2002). Inability to access the presumed very rare, multipo- tent...Schnabel, D., Neitzel, H., Tönnies, H., Weise, D., Lafferty, A., Schwarz, S., et al. (2002). Choreoathetosis, hypothyroidism , and pulmonary

  6. Acute Lung Injury: Making Injured Lungs Perform Better and Rebuilding Healthy Lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    derived, highly scalable, and since they can be readily derived from individual mice (or humans) they thereby circumvent immune and ethical issues... placentas collected during delivery, and mucosal cells collected by scraping or swab)? N/A Will the research data in this study be gathered through non...is typically depleted in ALI/ARDS, resulting in decreased lung compliance and increased risk of barotrauma. In vivo studies using normal guinea pigs

  7. Preventive effects of valnemulin on lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhibao; Zhang, Xuemei; Chu, Xiao; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Song, Keji; Jiang, Youshuai; Yu, Lu; Deng, Xuming

    2010-10-01

    Valnemulin reportedly regulates inflammatory responses in addition to its in vitro antibacterial activity. In this study, we established a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory lung injury and investigated the effect of valnemulin (100 mg/kg) on acute lung injury (ALI) 8 h after LPS challenge. We prepared bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) for measuring protein concentrations, cytokine levels, and superoxidase dismutase (SOD) activity, and collected lungs for assaying wet-to-dry weight (W/D) ratios, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, cytokine mRNA expression, and histological change. We found that the pre-administration of valnemulin significantly decreases the W/D ratio of lungs, protein concentrations, and the number of total cells, neutrophils, macrophages, and leukomonocytes, and histologic analysis indicates that valnemulin significantly attenuates tissue injury. Furthermore, valnemulin significantly increases LPS-induced SOD activity in BALF and decreases lung MPO activity as well. In addition, valnemulin also inhibits the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1beta, which is consistent with mRNA expression in lung. The results showed that valnemulin had a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in mice.

  8. Inhaled aerosolized insulin ameliorates hyperglycemia-induced inflammatory responses in the lungs in an experimental model of acute lung injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have shown that patients with diabetes mellitus appear to have a lower prevalence of acute lung injury. We assumed that insulin prescribed to patients with diabetes has an anti-inflammatory property and pulmonary administration of insulin might exert beneficial effects much more than intravenous administration. Methods Twenty-eight mechanically ventilated rabbits underwent lung injury by saline lavage, and then the animals were allocated into a normoglycemia group (NG), a hyperglycemia group (HG), an HG treated with intravenous insulin (HG-VI) group or an HG treated with aerosolized insulin (HG-AI) group with continuous infusion of different fluid solutions and treatments: normal saline, 50% glucose, 50% glucose with intravenous insulin, or 50% glucose with inhaled aerosolized insulin, respectively. After four hours of treatment, the lungs and heart were excised en bloc, and then high-mobility group B1 concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, interleukin-8 and toll-like receptor 4 mRNA expression in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells, and lung myeloperoxidase activity were measured. Results Treatment with both aerosolized insulin and intravenous insulin attenuated toll-like receptor 4 mRNA expressions in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells. Interleukin-8 and toll-like receptor 4 mRNA expression was significantly lower in the HG-AI group than in the HG-IV group. The lung myeloperoxidase activity in the normal healthy group showed significantly lower levels compared to the NG group but not different compared to those of the HG, HG-VI and HG-AI groups. Conclusions The results suggest that insulin attenuates inflammatory responses in the lungs augmented by hyperglycemia in acute lung injury and the insulin's efficacy may be better when administered by aerosol. PMID:23622115

  9. Protective effect of sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide on LPS-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, You Jin; Back, Moon Jung; Fu, Zhicheng; Lee, Joo Hyun; Won, Jong Hoon; Ha, Hae Chan; Lee, Hae Kyung; Jang, Ji Min; Choi, Jong Min; Kim, Dae Kyong

    2016-12-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a respiratory failure disease and the major source of mortality in the critically ill patients. The main pathological changes involved in ALI include the excessive recruitment and activation of neutrophils by increased pro-inflammatory mediators. However, any specific therapy for ALI has not been developed. The objective of this study was to investigate protective effects of parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone produced in feverfew, on LPS-induced lung injury. In the present study, parthenolide treatment reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells, airway permeability and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in LPS-induced ALI mouse model. Further, LPS-stimulated phosphorylation of NF-κB, the key regulatory transcription factor in ALI, was inhibited by parthenolide treatment in lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells and alveolar macrophage MH-S cells. These results suggest that parthenolide may provide a beneficial therapeutic strategy for ALI.

  10. Acute lung injury and persistent small airway disease in a rabbit model of chlorine inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musah, Sadiatu; Schlueter, Connie F; Humphrey, David M; Powell, Karen S; Roberts, Andrew M; Hoyle, Gary W

    2017-01-15

    Chlorine is a pulmonary toxicant to which humans can be exposed through accidents or intentional releases. Acute effects of chlorine inhalation in humans and animal models have been well characterized, but less is known about persistent effects of acute, high-level chlorine exposures. In particular, animal models that reproduce the long-term effects suggested to occur in humans are lacking. Here, we report the development of a rabbit model in which both acute and persistent effects of chlorine inhalation can be assessed. Male New Zealand White rabbits were exposed to chlorine while the lungs were mechanically ventilated. After chlorine exposure, the rabbits were extubated and were allowed to survive for up to 24h after exposure to 800ppm chlorine for 4min to study acute effects or up to 7days after exposure to 400ppm for 8min to study longer term effects. Acute effects observed 6 or 24h after inhalation of 800ppm chlorine for 4min included hypoxemia, pulmonary edema, airway epithelial injury, inflammation, altered baseline lung mechanics, and airway hyperreactivity to inhaled methacholine. Seven days after recovery from inhalation of 400ppm chlorine for 8min, rabbits exhibited mild hypoxemia, increased area of pressure-volume loops, and airway hyperreactivity. Lung histology 7days after chlorine exposure revealed abnormalities in the small airways, including inflammation and sporadic bronchiolitis obliterans lesions. Immunostaining showed a paucity of club and ciliated cells in the epithelium at these sites. These results suggest that small airway disease may be an important component of persistent respiratory abnormalities that occur following acute chlorine exposure. This non-rodent chlorine exposure model should prove useful for studying persistent effects of acute chlorine exposure and for assessing efficacy of countermeasures for chlorine-induced lung injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment for sulfur mustard lung injuries; new therapeutic approaches from acute to chronic phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poursaleh Zohreh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Sulfur mustard (SM is one of the major potent chemical warfare and attractive weapons for terrorists. It has caused deaths to hundreds of thousands of victims in World War I and more recently during the Iran-Iraq war (1980–1988. It has ability to develop severe acute and chronic damage to the respiratory tract, eyes and skin. Understanding the acute and chronic biologic consequences of SM exposure may be quite essential for developing efficient prophylactic/therapeutic measures. One of the systems majorly affected by SM is the respiratory tract that numerous clinical studies have detailed processes of injury, diagnosis and treatments of lung. The low mortality rate has been contributed to high prevalence of victims and high lifetime morbidity burden. However, there are no curative modalities available in such patients. In this review, we collected and discussed the related articles on the preventive and therapeutic approaches to SM-induced respiratory injury and summarized what is currently known about the management and therapeutic strategies of acute and long-term consequences of SM lung injuries. Method This review was done by reviewing all papers found by searching following key words sulfur mustard; lung; chronic; acute; COPD; treatment. Results Mustard lung has an ongoing pathological process and is active disorder even years after exposure to SM. Different drug classes have been studied, nevertheless there are no curative modalities for mustard lung. Conclusion Complementary studies on one hand regarding pharmacokinetic of drugs and molecular investigations are mandatory to obtain more effective treatments.

  12. Treatment for Sulfur Mustard Lung Injuries; New Therapeutic Approaches from Acute to Chronic Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Poursaleh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Sulfur mustard (SM is one of the major potent chemical warfare and attractive weapons for terrorists. It has caused deaths to hundreds of thousands of victims in World War I and more recently during the Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988. It has ability to develop severe acute and chronic damage to the respiratory tract, eyes and skin. Understanding the acute and chronic biologic consequences of SM exposure may be quite essential for developing efficient prophylactic/therapeutic measures. One of the systems majorly affected by SM is the respiratory tract that numerous clinical studies have detailed processes of injury, diagnosis and treatments of lung. The low mortality rate has been contributed to high prevalence of victims and high lifetime morbidity burden. However, there are no curative modalities available in such patients. In this review, we collected and discussed the related articles on the preventive and therapeutic approaches to SM-induced respiratory injury and summarized what is currently known about the management and therapeutic strategies of acute and long-term consequences of SM lung injuries.Method:This review was done by reviewing all papers found by searching following key words sulfur mustard; lung; chronic; acute; COPD; treatment.Results:Mustard lung has an ongoing pathological process and is active disorder even years after exposure to SM. Different drug classes have been studied, nevertheless there are no curative modalities for mustard lung. Conclusion:Complementary studies on one hand regarding pharmacokinetic of drugs and molecular investigations are mandatory to obtain more effective treatments.

  13. Using bosentan to treat paraquat poisoning-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongchen Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Paraquat poisoning is well known for causing multiple organ function failure (MODS and high mortality. Acute lung injury and advanced pulmonary fibrosis are the most serious complications. Bosentan is a dual endothelin receptor antagonist. It plays an important role in treating PF. There is no related literature on the use of bosentan therapy for paraquat poisoning. OBJECTIVE: To study the use of bosentan to treat acute lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis as induced by paraquat. METHOD: A total of 120 adult Wister male rats were randomly assigned to three groups: the paraquat poisoning group (rats were intragastrically administered with paraquat at 50 mg/kg body weight once at the beginning; the bosentan therapy group (rats were administered bosentan at 100 mg/kg body weight by intragastric administration half an hour after paraquat was administered, then the same dose was administered once a day; and a control group (rats were administered intragastric physiological saline. On the 3rd, 7th, 14th, and 21st days following paraquat exposure, rats were sacrificed, and samples of lung tissue and venous blood were collected. The levels of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1, endothelin-1 (ET-1, and hydroxyproline (HYP in the plasma and lung homogenate were determined. Optical and electronic microscopes were used to examine pathological changes. RESULT: The TGF-β1, ET-1, and HYP of the paraquat poisoning group were significantly higher than in the control group, and they were significantly lower in the 21st day therapy group than in the paraquat poisoning group on the same day. Under the optical and electronic microscopes, lung tissue damage was observed to be more severe but was then reduced after bosentan was administered. CONCLUSION: Bosentan can reduce inflammation factor release. It has a therapeutic effect on acute lung injury as induced by paraquat.

  14. NLRP3 inflammasome activation is essential for paraquat-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenning; Zhao, Hongyu; Liu, Wei; Li, Tiegang; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Min

    2015-02-01

    The innate immune response is important in paraquat-induced acute lung injury, but the exact pathways involved are not elucidated. The objectives of this study were to determine the specific role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in the process. Acute lung injury was induced by administering paraquat (PQ) intraperitoneally. NLRP3 inflammasome including NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 mRNA and protein expression in lung tissue and IL-1β and IL-18 levels in BALF were detected at 4, 8, 24, and 72 h after PQ administration in rats. Moreover, rats were pretreated with 10, 30, and 50 mg/kg NLRP3 inflammasome blocker glybenclamide, respectively, 1 h before PQ exposure. At 72 h after PQ administration, lung histopathology changes, NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 protein expression, as well as secretion of cytokines including IL-1β and IL-18 in BALF were investigated. The NLRP3 inflammasome including NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1 expression, and cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 levels in PQ poisoning rats were significantly higher than that in the control group. NLRP3 inflammasome blocker glybenclamide pretreatment attenuated lung edema, inhibited the NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 activation, and reduced IL-1β and IL-18 levels in BALF. In the in vitro experiments, IL-1β and IL-18 secreted from RAW264.7 mouse macrophages treated with paraquat were attenuated by glybenclamide. In conclusion, paraquat can induce IL-1β/IL-18 secretion via NLRP3-ASC-caspase-1 pathway, and the NLRP3 inflammasome is essential for paraquat-induced acute lung injury.

  15. Hydroxysafflor yellow A suppress oleic acid-induced acute lung injury via protein kinase A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chaoyun [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai, Shandong 264003 (China); Huang, Qingxian [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Yantai Yuhuangding Hospital, Yantai, Shandong 264000 (China); Wang, Chunhua; Zhu, Xiaoxi; Duan, Yunfeng; Yuan, Shuai [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai, Shandong 264003 (China); Bai, Xianyong, E-mail: xybai2012@163.com [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai, Shandong 264003 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Inflammation response and oxidative stress play important roles in acute lung injury (ALI). Activation of the cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway may attenuate ALI by suppressing immune responses and inhibiting the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) is a natural flavonoid compound that reduces oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine-mediated damage. In this study, we examined whether HSYA could protect the lungs from oleic acid (OA)-induced injury, which was used to mimic ALI, and determined the role of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway in this process. Arterial oxygen tension (PaO{sub 2}), carbon dioxide tension, pH, and the PaO{sub 2}/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio in the blood were detected using a blood gas analyzer. We measured wet/dry lung weight ratio and evaluated tissue morphology. The protein and inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum were determined using enzyme-linked immunoassay. The activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, PKA, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, and the concentrations of cAMP and malondialdehyde in the lung tissue were detected using assay kits. Bcl-2, Bax, caspase 3, and p22{sup phox} levels in the lung tissue were analyzed using Western blotting. OA increased the inflammatory cytokine and ROS levels and caused lung dysfunction by decreasing cAMP synthesis, inhibiting PKA activity, stimulating caspase 3, and reducing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. H-89 increased these effects. HSYA significantly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, inhibited the inflammatory response via cAMP/PKA pathway activation, and attenuated OA-induced lung injury. Our results show that the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway is required for the protective effect of HSYA against ALI. - Highlights: • Oleic acid (OA) cause acute lung injury (ALI) via inhibiting cAMP/PKA signal pathway. • Blocking protein kinase A (PKA) activation may

  16. Influence of nebulized unfractionated heparin and N-acetylcysteine in acute lung injury after smoke inhalation injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew C; Rivero, Abel; Ziad, Sophia; Smith, David J; Elamin, Elamin M

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether the combination of aerosolized unfractionated heparin and N-acetylcystine reduces 28-days mortality and lung injury scores (LISs) in adult patients with smoke inhalation injury requiring mechanical ventilation. The study was a single-center retrospective study with historical control. The authors included 30 mechanically ventilated adult subjects who were admitted within 48 hours of their bronchoscopy confirmed smoke inhalation injury over a 5-year period. The experimental group was treated with nebulized heparin sulfate, N-acetylcystine, and albuterol sulfate. Controls received ventilation support and albuterol sulfate. The authors calculated acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE)-III scores on admission in addition to daily LIS for 7 days. The experimental group was divided into five APACHE-III subgroups and matched with inhalation lung injury patients in the historical control group. There was no significant difference in initial APACHE-III scores or LISs between groups (alpha = 0.05) upon entry to the study. The experimental group showed significant improvement in LISs, respiratory resistance and compliance measurements, and hypoxia scores as compared with controls throughout the duration of the study. There was a statistically significant survival benefit in the experimental group that was most pronounced in patients with APACHE-III scores >35. Survival for the control vs experimental group was 0.5714 +/- 0.1497 vs 0.9375 +/- 0.0605, respectively, (risk ratio -0.0055; 95% confidence interval -0.0314-0.0204; hazard ratio 1.003; number needed to treat 2.7). The use of aerosolized unfractionated heparin and N-acetylcystine attenuates lung injury and the progression of acute respiratory distress syndrome in ventilated adult patients with acute lung injury following smoke inhalation.

  17. Immune-Replacement Therapy in the Complex Treatment of Acute Lung Injury in Patients with Severe Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    K. B. Grigoryev; S. I. Apevalov; A. E. Matyukov; L. V. Okhinko

    2007-01-01

    Objective: to improve the results of intensive care in patients with acute lung injury in the presence of severe sepsis. Subjects and methods. Complex intensive therapy was analyzed in 87 patients with severe sepsis and acute lung injury. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1) 43 patients treated without immune-replacement therapy; 2) 44 were additionally given the intravenous immunoglobulin G Gamimun H. The laboratory parameters, mortality, and intensive care duration in an intensive ca...

  18. Acute Lung Injury: Making the Injured Lung Perform Better and Rebuilding Healthy Lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    original application was to derive new approaches to treat ALI with an emphasis on developing new modes of mechanical ventilation and developing cell...minimizing the known injurious effects of conventional mechanical ventilation in patients with ALI. In this past year, where this grant has been in a...supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation to ensure adequate oxygenation. Type I cells, which comprise the vast majority of the gas exchange surface

  19. KGFR promotes Na+ channel expression in a rat acute lung injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KGFR-adenovirus-transduction reduced damage of the lung injury. To investigate the roles of the KGFR in lung injury, we established a lung injury animal model of four groups as describing in material and method. Thoracotomy showed enlargement of and lesions in the lung tissue, indicating successful establishment of an ...

  20. Ventilatory support in children with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome: proceedings from the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimensberger, Peter C; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2015-06-01

    To describe the recommendations of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference for mechanical ventilation management of pediatric patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Consensus Conference of experts in pediatric acute lung injury. The Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference experts developed and voted on a total of 27 recommendations focused on the optimal mechanical ventilation approach of the patient with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Topics included ventilator mode, tidal volume delivery, inspiratory plateau pressure, high-frequency ventilation, cuffed endotracheal tubes, and gas exchange goals. When experimental data were lacking, a modified Delphi approach emphasizing the strong professional agreement was used. There were 17 recommendations with strong agreement and 10 recommendations with weak agreement. There were no recommendations with equipoise or disagreement. There was weak agreement on recommendations concerning approach to tidal volume and inspiratory pressure limitation (88% to 72% agreement, respectively), whereas strong agreement could be achieved for accepting permissive hypercapnia. Using positive end-expiratory pressure levels greater than 15 cm H2O in severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome, under the condition that the markers of oxygen delivery, respiratory system compliance, and hemodynamics are closely monitored as positive end-expiratory pressure is increased, is strongly recommended. The concept of exploring the effects of careful recruitment maneuvers during conventional ventilation met an agreement level of 88%, whereas the use of recruitment maneuvers during rescue high-frequency oscillatory ventilation is highly recommended (strong agreement). The Consensus Conference developed pediatric-specific recommendations regarding mechanical ventilation of the patient with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome as well as future research priorities. These recommendations are

  1. Deletion of ASK1 Protects against Hyperoxia-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutaro Fukumoto

    Full Text Available Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1, a member of the MAPK kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K family, is activated by various stimuli, which include oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, calcium influx, DNA damage-inducing agents and receptor-mediated signaling through tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR. Inspiration of a high concentration of oxygen is a palliative therapy which counteracts hypoxemia caused by acute lung injury (ALI-induced pulmonary edema. However, animal experiments so far have shown that hyperoxia itself could exacerbate ALI through reactive oxygen species (ROS. Our previous data indicates that ASK1 plays a pivotal role in hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury (HALI. However, it is unclear whether or not deletion of ASK1 in vivo protects against HALI. In this study, we investigated whether ASK1 deletion would lead to attenuation of HALI. Our results show that ASK1 deletion in vivo significantly suppresses hyperoxia-induced elevation of inflammatory cytokines (i.e. IL-1β and TNF-α, cell apoptosis in the lung, and recruitment of immune cells. In summary, the results from the study suggest that deletion of ASK1 in mice significantly inhibits hyperoxic lung injury.

  2. Lung Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) Response and Regulation During Acute and Chronic Lung Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunsbaek, Maria Quisgaard; Rasmussen, Karina Juhl; Beers, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a collection that plays important roles in modulating host defense functions and maintaining phospholipid homeostasis in the lung. The aim of current study was to characterize comparatively the SP-D response in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum...... in three murine models of lung injury, using a validated ELISA technology for estimation of SP-D levels. METHODS: Mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide, bleomycin, or Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) and sacrificed at different time points. RESULTS: In lipopolysaccharide-challenged mice, the level of SP...

  3. Citral inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury by activating PPAR-γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yongbin; Sun, Zhanfeng; Guo, Xiaotong

    2015-01-15

    Citral, a component of lemongrass oil, has been reported to have many pharmacological activities such as anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the effects of citral on acute lung injury (ALI) and the molecular mechanisms have not been reported. The aim of this study was to detect the effects of citral on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury and investigate the molecular mechanisms. LPS-induced acute lung injury model was used to detect the anti-inflammatory effect of citral in vivo. The alveolar macrophages were used to investigate the molecular mechanism of citral in vitro. The results showed that pretreatment with citral remarkably attenuated pulmonary edema, histological severities, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production in LPS-induced ALI in vivo. In vitro, citral inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production in alveolar macrophages. LPS-induced NF-κB activation was also inhibited by citral. Furthermore, we found that citral activated PPAR-γ and the anti-inflammatory effects of citral can be reversed by PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662. In conclusion, this is the first to demonstrate that citral protects LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of citral is associated with activating PPAR-γ, thereby inhibiting LPS-induced inflammatory response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Protective effect of U74500A on phorbol myristate acetate-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shi-Jye; Chang, Deh-Ming; Wang, David; Lin, Hen-I; Lin, Shih-Hua; Hsu, Kang

    2004-08-01

    1. The present study was designed to determine whether U74500A could ameliorate acute lung injury (ALI) induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in our rat isolated lung model compared with any amelioration induced by dimethylthiourea (DMTU), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. 2. Acute lung injury was induced successfully by PMA during 60 min of observation. At 2 microg/kg, PMA elicited a significant increase in microvascular permeability (measured using the capillary filtration coefficient Kfc), lung weight gain, the lung weight/bodyweight ratio, pulmonary arterial pressure and protein concentration of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. 3. Pretreatment with 1.5 mg/kg U74500A significantly attenuated ALI; there was no significant increase in any parameters measured, except for pulmonary arterial pressure. The protective effect of U74500A was approximately the same as that of 600 mg/kg DMTU. However, 6000 U/kg SOD, 50,000 U/kg catalase and 6000 U/kg SOD + 50,000 U/kg catalase had no protective effect. 4. These experimental data suggest that U74500A significantly ameliorates ALI induced by PMA in rats.

  5. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Is Critical in Alcohol-Enhanced Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Lauren G; Massey, Veronica L; Siow, Deanna L; Torres-Gonzáles, Edilson; Warner, Nikole L; Luyendyk, James P; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roman, Jesse; Arteel, Gavin E

    2017-09-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure is a clinically important risk factor for the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome, the most severe form of acute lung injury (ALI). However, the mechanisms by which alcohol sensitizes the lung to development of this disease are poorly understood. We determined the role of the antifibrinolytic protein plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in alcohol enhancement of experimental endotoxin-induced ALI. Wild-type, PAI-1-/-, and integrin β3-/- mice were fed ethanol-containing Lieber-DeCarli liquid or a control diet for 6 weeks, followed by systemic LPS challenge. LPS administration triggered coagulation cascade activation as evidenced by increased plasma thrombin-antithrombin levels and pulmonary fibrin deposition. Ethanol-exposed animals showed enhanced PAI-1 expression and pulmonary fibrin deposition with coincident exaggeration of pulmonary inflammatory edematous injury. PAI-1 deficiency markedly reduced pulmonary fibrin deposition and greatly reduced inflammation and injury without impacting upstream coagulation. Interestingly, pulmonary platelet accumulation was effectively abolished by PAI-1 deficiency in ethanol/LPS-challenged mice. Moreover, mice lacking integrin αIIBβ3, the primary platelet receptor for fibrinogen, displayed a dramatic reduction in early inflammatory changes after ethanol/LPS challenge. These results indicate that the mechanism whereby alcohol exaggerates LPS-induced lung injury requires PAI-1-mediated pulmonary fibrin accumulation, and suggest a novel mechanism whereby alcohol contributes to inflammatory ALI by enhancing fibrinogen-platelet engagement.

  6. Paraquat poisoning: Acute lung injury – a missed diagnosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    event were found to have interstitial pulmonary fibrosis with decreased lung capacity. In the same study,[7] patients who developed pneumomediastinum within 7 days all died. Some of these patients had pneumothoraces. The mortality rate for patients who had used paraquat in a suicide attempt was 96% (26/27), while that ...

  7. RAGE deficiency attenuates the protective effect of Lidocaine against sepsis-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuo; Zhou, Jie; Liao, Changli; Li, Xiaobing; Liu, Minghua; Song, Daqiang; Jiang, Xian

    2017-04-01

    Lidocaine (Lido) is reported to suppress inflammatory responses and exhibit a therapeutic effect in models of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). The receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE) exerts pro-inflammatory effects by enhancing pro-inflammatory cytokine production. However, the precise mechanism by which Lido confers protection against ALI is not clear. ALI was induced in RAGE WT and RAGE knockout (KO) rats using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) operations for 24 h. The results showed that Lido significantly inhibited CLP-induced lung inflammation and histopathological lung injury. Furthermore, Lido significantly reduced CLP-induced upregulation of HMGB1 and RAGE expression and activation of the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. With the use of RAGE KO rats, we demonstrate here that RAGE deficiency attenuates the protective effect of Lido against CLP-induced lung inflammatory cell infiltration and histopathological lung injury. These results suggest that RAGE deficiency attenuates the protective effect of Lido against CLP-induced ALI by attenuating the pro-inflammatory cytokines production.

  8. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia: a rare histopathological variant of chemotherapy-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arjun; Sen, Shiraj; Naina, Harris

    2016-04-06

    Bleomycin-induced lung injury is the most common chemotherapy-associated lung disease, and is linked with several histopathological patterns. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia (AFOP) is a relatively new and rare histological pattern of diffuse lung injury. We report the first known case of bleomycin-induced AFOP. A 36-year-old man with metastatic testicular cancer received three cycles of bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin, before being transitioned to paclitaxel, ifosfamide and cisplatin. He subsequently presented with exertional dyspnoea, cough and pleuritic chest pain. CT of the chest demonstrated bilateral ground glass opacities with peribronchovascular distribution and pulmonary function tests demonstrated a restrictive pattern of lung disease with impaired diffusion. Transbronchial biopsy revealed intra-alveolar fibrin deposits with organising pneumonia, consisting of intraluminal loose connective tissue consistent with AFOP. The patient received high-dose corticosteroids with symptomatic and radiographic improvement. AFOP should be recognised as a histopathological variant of bleomycin-induced lung injury. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  9. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitor attenuates ischemia-reperfusion induced acute lung injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou-Chin Lan

    Full Text Available Ischemia-reperfusion (IR-induced acute lung injury (ALI is implicated in several clinical conditions including lung transplantation, cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, re-expansion of collapsed lung from pneumothorax or pleural effusion and etc. IR-induced ALI remains a challenge in the current treatment. Carbonic anhydrase has important physiological function and influences on transport of CO2. Some investigators suggest that CO2 influences lung injury. Therefore, carbonic anhydrase should have the role in ALI. This study was undertaken to define the effect of a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide (AZA, in IR-induced ALI, that was conducted in a rat model of isolated-perfused lung with 30 minutes of ischemia and 90 minutes of reperfusion. The animals were divided into six groups (n = 6 per group: sham, sham + AZA 200 mg/kg body weight (BW, IR, IR + AZA 100 mg/kg BW, IR + AZA 200 mg/kg BW and IR+ AZA 400 mg/kg BW. IR caused significant pulmonary micro-vascular hyper-permeability, pulmonary edema, pulmonary hypertension, neutrophilic sequestration, and an increase in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Increases in carbonic anhydrase expression and perfusate pCO2 levels were noted, while decreased Na-K-ATPase expression was noted after IR. Administration of 200mg/kg BW and 400mg/kg BW AZA significantly suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6 and IL-17 and attenuated IR-induced lung injury, represented by decreases in pulmonary hyper-permeability, pulmonary edema, pulmonary hypertension and neutrophilic sequestration. AZA attenuated IR-induced lung injury, associated with decreases in carbonic anhydrase expression and pCO2 levels, as well as restoration of Na-K-ATPase expression.

  10. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitor attenuates ischemia-reperfusion induced acute lung injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chou-Chin; Peng, Chung-Kan; Tang, Shih-En; Huang, Kun-Lun; Wu, Chin-Pyng

    2017-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) is implicated in several clinical conditions including lung transplantation, cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, re-expansion of collapsed lung from pneumothorax or pleural effusion and etc. IR-induced ALI remains a challenge in the current treatment. Carbonic anhydrase has important physiological function and influences on transport of CO2. Some investigators suggest that CO2 influences lung injury. Therefore, carbonic anhydrase should have the role in ALI. This study was undertaken to define the effect of a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide (AZA), in IR-induced ALI, that was conducted in a rat model of isolated-perfused lung with 30 minutes of ischemia and 90 minutes of reperfusion. The animals were divided into six groups (n = 6 per group): sham, sham + AZA 200 mg/kg body weight (BW), IR, IR + AZA 100 mg/kg BW, IR + AZA 200 mg/kg BW and IR+ AZA 400 mg/kg BW. IR caused significant pulmonary micro-vascular hyper-permeability, pulmonary edema, pulmonary hypertension, neutrophilic sequestration, and an increase in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Increases in carbonic anhydrase expression and perfusate pCO2 levels were noted, while decreased Na-K-ATPase expression was noted after IR. Administration of 200mg/kg BW and 400mg/kg BW AZA significantly suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6 and IL-17) and attenuated IR-induced lung injury, represented by decreases in pulmonary hyper-permeability, pulmonary edema, pulmonary hypertension and neutrophilic sequestration. AZA attenuated IR-induced lung injury, associated with decreases in carbonic anhydrase expression and pCO2 levels, as well as restoration of Na-K-ATPase expression. PMID:28644844

  11. [Protective effect of rupatadine against oleic acid-induced acute lung injury in rabbits].

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    Zhang, Lin-Li; Lu, Jing; Yu, Shu-Qin; He, Jian-Lin; Zhou, Min; Xu, Guang-Lin

    2007-03-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) makes up a spectrum of disease that is commonly defined as "acute non-cardiogenic edematous lung injury". It may contribute to morbidity and mortality in the critically ill patient in the intensive care unit. ALI was induced by oleic acid in rabbits. During the experiment, blood samples were taken from cervical artery and subjected to blood-gas analysis at different time points after oleic acid injection. Shortly after the rabbits were killed at 3 hour after iv OA injection, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was colleted, and the concentrations of protein, platelet-activating factor (PAF), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), interleukin 8 (IL-8) in BALF were then measured by ELISA. The ratio of wet to dry weight (W/D) of left lung was calculated to assess alveolar edema. Lung tissue was fixed in formaldehyde and stained with HE, and examined under a light microscope. The OA-induced elevation of arterial blood oxygen pressure was inhibited, as well as PAF, ICAM-1, IL-8 in BALF in rupatadine group. Furthermore, rupatadine also decreased the concentration of protein in BALF and inhibited the increase of the W/D weight ratio significantly. Light microscopic findings showed that the damage in rupatadine groups was far less severe than that in OA model group. Pretreatment with rupatadine has a beneficial effect on acute lung injury induced by oleic acid in rabbits. The ultimate reduction of inflammatory factors was involved, at least in part, in the mechanism of action of rupatadine effects.

  12. Dexmedetomidine mitigates CLP-stimulated acute lung injury via restraining the RAGE pathway.

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    Hu, Hongyi; Shi, Dongsheng; Hu, Chenlu; Yuan, Xiao; Zhang, Juan; Sun, Huaqin

    2017-01-01

    RAGE pathway plays crucial effects in causing acute lung injury (ALI). Dexmedetomidine (DEX) is showed to mitigate sepsis-stimulated ALI. However, its mechanisms have not been verified. The study was to evaluate whether the RAGE pathway participated in the actions of DEX on sepsis-stimulated ALI in rats. Male rats were administrated with intravenously DEX 30 min after sepsis. At 24 h of sepsis, lung myeloperoxidase (MPO) and macrophages in the bronchoalveolarlavage fluid (BALF) were observed. The actions of DEX on pro-inflammatory molecules and related mechanisms were determined by immunological methods. It was indicated that DEX markedly attenuated CLP-stimulated augment of lung inflammatory cells infiltration, along with significantly mitigated MPO activity. Besides, DEX obviously reduced lung wet/dry weight ratio and the levels of HMGB1 and RAGE in BALF and lung tissue. Moreover, DEX post-treatment apparently attenuated the histopathological lung injury compared with CLP model group. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed that DEX efficiently restrained the activation of IκB-α, NF-κB p65, and MAPK. Our studies demonstrated that DEX attenuates the aggravation of sepsis-stimulated ALI via down regulation of RAGE pathway, which has a potential value in the clinical therapy.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell derived secretome and extracellular vesicles for acute lung injury and other inflammatory lung diseases.

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    Monsel, Antoine; Zhu, Ying-Gang; Gudapati, Varun; Lim, Hyungsun; Lee, Jae W

    2016-07-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a major cause of respiratory failure in critically ill patients. Despite extensive research into its pathophysiology, mortality remains high. No effective pharmacotherapy exists. Based largely on numerous preclinical studies, administration of mesenchymal stem or stromal cell (MSC) as a therapeutic for acute lung injury holds great promise, and clinical trials are currently underway. However, concern for the use of stem cells, specifically the risk of iatrogenic tumor formation, remains unresolved. Accumulating evidence now suggest that novel cell-free therapies including MSC-derived conditioned medium and extracellular vesicles released from MSCs might constitute compelling alternatives. The current review summarizes the preclinical studies testing MSC conditioned medium and/or MSC extracellular vesicles as treatment for acute lung injury and other inflammatory lung diseases. While certain logistical obstacles limit the clinical applications of MSC conditioned medium such as the volume required for treatment, the therapeutic application of MSC extracellular vesicles remains promising, primarily due to ability of extracellular vesicles to maintain the functional phenotype of the parent cell. However, utilization of MSC extracellular vesicles will require large-scale production and standardization concerning identification, characterization and quantification.

  14. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors and Acute Lung Injury

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    Rosanna Di Paola

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are ligand-activated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PPARs regulate several metabolic pathways by binding to sequence-specific PPAR response elements in the promoter region of target genes, including lipid biosynthesis and glucose metabolism. Recently, PPARs and their respective ligands have been implicated as regulators of cellular inflammatory and immune responses. These molecules are thought to exert anti-inflammatory effects by negatively regulating the expression of proinflammatory genes. Several studies have demonstrated that PPAR ligands possess anti-inflammatory properties and that these properties may prove helpful in the treatment of inflammatory diseases of the lung. This review will outline the anti-inflammatory effects of PPARs and PPAR ligands and discuss their potential therapeutic effects in animal models of inflammatory lung disease.

  15. Inflammasome-regulated cytokines are critical mediators of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinay, Tamás; Kim, Young Sam; Howrylak, Judie; Hunninghake, Gary M; An, Chang Hyeok; Fredenburgh, Laura; Massaro, Anthony F; Rogers, Angela; Gazourian, Lee; Nakahira, Kiichi; Haspel, Jeffrey A; Landazury, Roberto; Eppanapally, Sabitha; Christie, Jason D; Meyer, Nuala J; Ware, Lorraine B; Christiani, David C; Ryter, Stefan W; Baron, Rebecca M; Choi, Augustine M K

    2012-06-01

    Despite advances in clinical management, there are currently no reliable diagnostic and therapeutic targets for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The inflammasome/caspase-1 pathway regulates the maturation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-18). IL-18 is associated with injury in animal models of systemic inflammation. We sought to determine the contribution of the inflammasome pathway in experimental acute lung injury and human ARDS. We performed comprehensive gene expression profiling on peripheral blood from patients with critical illness. Gene expression changes were assessed using real-time polymerase chain reaction, and IL-18 levels were measured in the plasma of the critically ill patients. Wild-type mice or mice genetically deficient in IL-18 or caspase-1 were mechanically ventilated using moderate tidal volume (12 ml/kg). Lung injury parameters were assessed in lung tissue, serum, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In mice, mechanical ventilation enhanced IL-18 levels in the lung, serum, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. IL-18-neutralizing antibody treatment, or genetic deletion of IL-18 or caspase-1, reduced lung injury in response to mechanical ventilation. In human patients with ARDS, inflammasome-related mRNA transcripts (CASP1, IL1B, and IL18) were increased in peripheral blood. In samples from four clinical centers, IL-18 was elevated in the plasma of patients with ARDS (sepsis or trauma-induced ARDS) and served as a novel biomarker of intensive care unit morbidity and mortality. The inflammasome pathway and its downstream cytokines play critical roles in ARDS development.

  16. Integrative Assessment of Chlorine-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

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    Pope-Varsalona, Hannah; Concel, Vincent J.; Liu, Pengyuan; Bein, Kiflai; Berndt, Annerose; Martin, Timothy M.; Ganguly, Koustav; Jang, An Soo; Brant, Kelly A.; Dopico, Richard A.; Upadhyay, Swapna; Di, Y. P. Peter; Hu, Zhen; Vuga, Louis J.; Medvedovic, Mario; Kaminski, Naftali; You, Ming; Alexander, Danny C.; McDunn, Jonathan E.; Prows, Daniel R.; Knoell, Daren L.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic basis for the underlying individual susceptibility to chlorine-induced acute lung injury is unknown. To uncover the genetic basis and pathophysiological processes that could provide additional homeostatic capacities during lung injury, 40 inbred murine strains were exposed to chlorine, and haplotype association mapping was performed. The identified single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations were evaluated through transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling. Using ≥ 10% allelic frequency and ≥ 10% phenotype explained as threshold criteria, promoter SNPs that could eliminate putative transcriptional factor recognition sites in candidate genes were assessed by determining transcript levels through microarray and reverse real-time PCR during chlorine exposure. The mean survival time varied by approximately 5-fold among strains, and SNP associations were identified for 13 candidate genes on chromosomes 1, 4, 5, 9, and 15. Microarrays revealed several differentially enriched pathways, including protein transport (decreased more in the sensitive C57BLKS/J lung) and protein catabolic process (increased more in the resistant C57BL/10J lung). Lung metabolomic profiling revealed 95 of the 280 metabolites measured were altered by chlorine exposure, and included alanine, which decreased more in the C57BLKS/J than in the C57BL/10J strain, and glutamine, which increased more in the C57BL/10J than in the C57BLKS/J strain. Genetic associations from haplotype mapping were strengthened by an integrated assessment using transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling. The leading candidate genes associated with increased susceptibility to acute lung injury in mice included Klf4, Sema7a, Tns1, Aacs, and a gene that encodes an amino acid carrier, Slc38a4. PMID:22447970

  17. Resolution of pulmonary edema with variable mechanical ventilation in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, M Ruth; Gulati, Harleena; Kha, Lan; Girling, Linda G; Goertzen, Andrew; Mutch, W Alan C

    2011-08-01

    Resolution of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requires clearance of pulmonary edema. Biologically variable ventilation (BVV) strategies that improve gas exchange, lung mechanics, and inflammatory mediators in ARDS may be beneficial in this regard. We used quantitative computed tomography (CT), a single indicator thermodilution system (PiCCO®) to determine extravascular lung water (EVLW), and the change in edema protein concentration over time to compare edema clearance with BVV vs conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) in a porcine ARDS model. Sixteen pigs with oleic acid lung injury were randomized to four hours of ventilation with either CMV (n = 8) or BVV (n = 8) at identical low tidal volume and minute ventilation over time. Hemodynamic variables, gas exchange, lung mechanics, and PiCCO derived EVLW were determined hourly. Computed tomography images and edema fluid samples were obtained at baseline lung injury and after four hours of ventilation. Wet and dry lung weights were determined postmortem. At four hours with BVV, peak airway pressure was decreased significantly and lung compliance improved compared with CMV (P = 0.003; P lung weight and global lung density (P = 0.005; P = 0.04 respectively) with BVV. These findings were associated with a significant increase in the gas volume of normally aerated lung regions (P lung regions (P = 0.001). No change in any CT parameter occurred with CMV. The lung weights derived from computed tomography correlated well with postmortem wet weights (R(2) = 0.79; P lung water showed no correlation with postmortem wet weights and significantly underestimated lung water. Average alveolar fluid clearance rates were positive (1.4%·hr(-1) (3%)) with BVV and negative with CMV (-2.0%·hr(-1) (4%)). In a comparison between BVV and CMV, computed tomography evidence suggests that BVV facilitates enhanced clearance and/or redistribution of edema fluid with improved recruitment of atelectatic and

  18. Assessing gas exchange in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome: diagnostic techniques and prognostic relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattinoni, Luciano; Carlesso, Eleonora; Cressoni, Massimo

    2011-02-01

    To provide the most recent insights on the assessment of gas exchange in acute lung injury. Central venous blood may be used as a surrogate of arterial blood to assess carbon dioxide tension and acid-base status. In contrast arterial oxygenation cannot be estimated with confidence from venous blood. However, the use of venous blood associated with pulse oximetry may provide the SvO2 which is useful for monitoring and targeting the resuscitation therapy. Impaired CO2 clearance and increased dead space have been confirmed as useful prognostic indices of structural lung damage and mortality in acute respiratory failure. A simplified technique based on multiple inert gas technique has been described to assess ventilation-perfusion mismatch while a new analysis of pulse oximetry has been suggested to detect lung opening and closing. Finally, new insight has been provided on the relationship between lung anatomy, as detected by computed tomography, oxygenation and CO2 clearance. Although oxygenation assessment is of primary importance during respiratory lung injury, dead space and CO2 retention are more strictly associated with outcome. The association of central venous blood analysis and pulse oximetry may provide more information than arterial blood alone.

  19. Alleviation of Lipopolysaccharides-Induced Acute Lung Injury by MiR-454

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengang Tao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Although acute lung injury (ALI is an important and common disease in humans, its pathogenesis is poorly understood and its therapeutic outcome has not been significantly improved in the past years. Here, we examined whether application of microRNAs might inhibit the ALI-associated lung inflammatory, and subsequently reduce the injury. Methods: In vitro, we performed bioinformatics analyses to identify the miRNAs that target the most important chemo-attractive factor CXCL12, and confirmed that the binding was functional by luciferase reporter assay. We prepared adeno-associated virus (AAV carrying miRNA mimics or null control. We expressed miRNA in mouse lung through i.v. injection of AAV and then we used Lipopolysaccharides (LPS to induce ALI in mice. We analyzed the changes in permeability index and production of inflammatory cytokines in mouse lung, and we also verified the effects of virus-mediated gene expression by examining the levels of miRNAs and CXCL12 in lung by RT-qPCR and ELISA, and by quantifying the recruited inflammatory cells in mouse lung by flow cytometry. Results: We found that miR-454 targeted the 3'-UTR of CXCL12 mRNA to inhibit its protein translation in human lung epithelial cells. Overexpression of miR-454 in mouse lung significantly reduced the LPS-induced increases in permeability index and production of inflammatory cytokines CXCL1, CXCL2, IL6 and TNFα, possibly through suppression of CXCL12/CXCR4-mediated recruitment of inflammatory cells. Conclusion: Overexpression of miR-454 in lung may be a promising therapeutic approach to reduce the severity of ALI.

  20. [Protective effect of synthetic salidroside on acute lung injury in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qian; Cai, Yan-Chun; Wei, Xiao-Li; Wu, Jin-Long; Mei, Ru-Huan; Hu, Xiao-Lan

    2017-06-25

    To study the protective effect and mechanism of synthetic salidroside on acute lung injury (ALI) induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into saline control group, 3 mg/kg LPS model group, different doses of salidroside groups (5, 20 and 80 mg/kg), and 5 mg/kg dexamethasone group. Intratracheal LPS instillation was used to establish the ALI model 0.5 h after intraperitoneal injection of salidroside or dexamethasone, and the rats were sacrificed 6 h later. Lung wet/dry weight ratio (W/D) was calculated. Lung tissue pathology and lung injury score (LIS) were observed and evaluated through hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The centrifugal sediment of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was used to count the polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) number by Wright's staining, and the centrifugal supernatant of BALF was used to determine the contents of protein and inflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6). The contents of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in lung tissue were determined. Western blot was used to detect the expression levels of phosphorylated and total nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)/p65 protein in lung tissue. The results showed that, compared with LPS group, the intervention of synthetic salidroside alleviated the pathological damage in lung tissue, decreased the LIS and lung W/D ratio (P salidroside has a protective effect on ALI induced by LPS, and its mechanism is related to inhibiting the phosphorylation of NF-κB and reducing the aggregation of PMN in the lung.

  1. Intratracheal synthetic CpG oligodeoxynucleotide causes acute lung injury with systemic inflammatory response

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    Hasegawa Naoki

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacterial genome is characterized by frequent unmethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG motifs. Deleterious effects can occur when synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN with unmethylated CpG dinucleotides (CpG-ODN are administered in a systemic fashion. We aimed to evaluate the effect of intratracheal CpG-ODN on lung inflammation and systemic inflammatory response. C57BL/6J mice received intratracheal administration of CpG-ODN (0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 10, or 100 μM or control ODN without CpG motif. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid was obtained 3 or 6 h or 1, 2, 7, or 14 days after the instillation and subjected to a differential cell count and cytokine measurement. Lung permeability was evaluated as the BAL fluid-to-plasma ratio of the concentration of human serum albumin that was injected 1 h before euthanasia. Nuclear factor (NF-κB DNA binding activity was also evaluated in lung homogenates. Intratracheal administration of 10 μM or higher concentration of CpG-ODN induced significant inflammatory cell accumulation into the airspace. The peak accumulation of neutrophils and lymphocytes occurred 1 and 2 days after the CpG-ODN administration, respectively. Lung permeability was increased 1 day after the 10 μM CpG-ODN challenge. CpG-ODN also induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and upregulation of various inflammatory cytokines in BAL fluid and plasma. Histopathology of the lungs and liver revealed acute lung injury and liver damage with necrosis, respectively. Control ODN without CpG motif did not induce any inflammatory change. Since intratracheal CpG-ODN induced acute lung injury as well as systemic inflammatory response, therapeutic strategies to neutralize bacterial DNA that is released after administration of bactericidal agents should be considered.

  2. [Significance of the NLRP3 inflammasome expression in rats with acute lung injury induced by phosgene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, D K; Shao, Y R; Shen, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, J; Zhang, F

    2017-07-20

    Objective: To investigate changes of NLRP3 signal transduction pathway of acute lung injury induced by phosgene to analyze NLRP3-mediated IL-1β release inflammatory process in rats. Methods: Rats were randomly divided into two groups, 10 rats in the Air group that consists of the rats with air exposure, 10 rats in the Psg group that consists of the rats with phosgene exposure at 8.33 g/m(3) for 5 min. The specimens of serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung were collected after 6h. Morphological changes were observed by HE staining. The expression of NLRP3 in the lung of two groups was detected by immunohistochemistry. NLRP3、ASC and caspase-1 expression in the lung tissue was quantified by Western blot. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to detect the expression of NLRP3、ASC and caspase-1 mRNA in the lung tissue. The concentrations of IL-1β、IL-18 and IL-33 in the serum and BALF were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RT-PCR were used to detect the expression of IL-1β、IL-18 and IL-33 mRNA in the lung tissue. Results: We successfully replicated the model of phosgene-induced ALI in rats. Morphological of HE staining after phosgene exposure to 6 h observed inflammatory cell infiltration in lung tissue in Phosgene group. Immunohistochemical staining results showed that there were many NLRP3 positive cells in lung tissue in Phosgene group. The levels of NLRP3 and caspase-1 mRNA and protein expression in lung were significantly increased ( P lung ASC mRNA and protein expression ( P >0.05) . Compared with Air group, the serum, BALF and lung tissue of IL-1β、IL-18 and IL-33 mRNA and protein expression were significantly increased ( P NLRP3-mediated inflammatory response probably involved in the process of the phosgene, so it maybe one of the pathogenesis of acute lung injury.

  3. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin prevents acute lung injury in a rat cardiopulmonary bypass model.

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    Hirao, Shingo; Minakata, Kenji; Masumoto, Hidetoshi; Yamazaki, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Tadashi; Minatoya, Kenji; Sakata, Ryuzo

    2017-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may induce systemic inflammatory responses causing acute lung injury. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rTM) is reported to attenuate the secretion of inflammatory cytokines and the high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, which is critical in controlling systemic inflammation and apoptosis. We investigated the protective effects of rTM on CPB-induced lung injury in a rat model. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: sham, control (CPB alone), and rTM (CPB + rTM). CPB was conducted in the control group and the rTM group. A bolus of rTM (3 mg/kg) was administered to the rTM group rats before CPB establishment. The ratio of partial pressure of arterial oxygen to the fraction of inspired oxygen only dropped markedly from before CPB in the control group (P rTM group. The number of apoptotic cells and the protein of cleaved Caspase-3 were reduced in the rTM group. These results suggest that rTM prevents acute lung injury through attenuating inflammation and apoptosis during and after CPB in a rat model. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Combined anticoagulants ameliorate acute lung injury in sheep after burn and smoke inhalation.

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    Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Esechie, Aimalohi; Wang, Jianpu; Cox, Robert A; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Hamahata, Atsumori; Lange, Matthias; Traber, Lillian D; Prough, Donald S; Herndon, David N; Traber, Daniel L

    2008-02-01

    Burn and smoke inhalation-related multiple organ dysfunction is associated with a severe fall in the plasma concentration of antithrombin. Therefore the aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that intravenous administration of recombinant human antithrombin in combination with aerosolized heparin will ameliorate acute lung injury in sheep exposed to cutaneous burn and smoke inhalation. Sheep were prepared operatively for study and, 7 days post-surgery, sheep were given a cutaneous burn (40% of total body surface area, third-degree burn) and insufflated with cotton smoke (48 breaths, injury, sheep were placed on a ventilator and resuscitated with Ringer's lactate solution. The animals were divided into three groups: sham group (non-injured and non-treated; n=6), saline group (injured and received saline; n=6) and rhAT.iv.+Hep group [injured and treated with rhAT (recombinant human antithrombin) and heparin; n=6]. In the rhAT.iv.+Hep group, rhAT was infused continuously for 48 h starting 1 h post-injury with a dose of 0.34 mg.h(-1).kg(-1) of body weight and heparin (10000 units) was aerosolized every 4 h starting at 1 h post-injury. The experiment lasted 48 h. Haemodynamics were stable in sham group, whereas the saline-treated sheep developed multiple signs of acute lung injury, including decreased pulmonary gas exchange, increased inspiratory pressures, extensive airway obstruction and increased pulmonary oedema. These pathological changes were associated with a severe fall in plasma antithrombin concentration, lung tissue accumulation of leucocytes and excessive production of NO. Treatment of injured sheep with anticoagulants attenuated all of the pulmonary pathophysiology observed. In conclusion, the results provide definitive evidence that anticoagulant therapy may be a novel and effective treatment tool in the management of burn patients with concomitant smoke inhalation injury.

  5. Phagocytosis of microparticles by alveolar macrophages during acute lung injury requires MerTK.

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    Mohning, Michael P; Thomas, Stacey M; Barthel, Lea; Mould, Kara J; McCubbrey, Alexandria L; Frasch, S Courtney; Bratton, Donna L; Henson, Peter M; Janssen, William J

    2018-01-01

    Microparticles are a newly recognized class of mediators in the pathophysiology of lung inflammation and injury, but little is known about the factors that regulate their accumulation and clearance. The primary objective of our study was to determine whether alveolar macrophages engulf microparticles and to elucidate the mechanisms by which this occurs. Alveolar microparticles were quantified in bronchoalveolar fluid of mice with lung injury induced by LPS and hydrochloric acid. Microparticle numbers were greatest at the peak of inflammation and declined as inflammation resolved. Isolated, fluorescently labeled particles were placed in culture with macrophages to evaluate ingestion in the presence of endocytosis inhibitors. Ingestion was blocked with cytochalasin D and wortmannin, consistent with a phagocytic process. In separate experiments, mice were treated intratracheally with labeled microparticles, and their uptake was assessed though microscopy and flow cytometry. Resident alveolar macrophages, not recruited macrophages, were the primary cell-ingesting microparticles in the alveolus during lung injury. In vitro, microparticles promoted inflammatory signaling in LPS primed epithelial cells, signifying the importance of microparticle clearance in resolving lung injury. Microparticles were found to have phosphatidylserine exposed on their surfaces. Accordingly, we measured expression of phosphatidylserine receptors on macrophages and found high expression of MerTK and Axl in the resident macrophage population. Endocytosis of microparticles was markedly reduced in MerTK-deficient macrophages in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, microparticles are released during acute lung injury and peak in number at the height of inflammation. Resident alveolar macrophages efficiently clear these microparticles through MerTK-mediated phagocytosis.

  6. Abdominal Muscle Activity during Mechanical Ventilation Increases Lung Injury in Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

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    Xianming Zhang

    Full Text Available It has proved that muscle paralysis was more protective for injured lung in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, but the precise mechanism is not clear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation increases lung injury in severe ARDS.Eighteen male Beagles were studied under mechanical ventilation with anesthesia. Severe ARDS was induced by repetitive oleic acid infusion. After lung injury, Beagles were randomly assigned into spontaneous breathing group (BIPAPSB and abdominal muscle paralysis group (BIPAPAP. All groups were ventilated with BIPAP model for 8h, and the high pressure titrated to reached a tidal volume of 6ml/kg, the low pressure was set at 10 cmH2O, with I:E ratio 1:1, and respiratory rate adjusted to a PaCO2 of 35-60 mmHg. Six Beagles without ventilator support comprised the control group. Respiratory variables, end-expiratory volume (EELV and gas exchange were assessed during mechanical ventilation. The levels of Interleukin (IL-6, IL-8 in lung tissue and plasma were measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA respectively. Lung injury scores were determined at end of the experiment.For the comparable ventilator setting, as compared with BIPAPSB group, the BIPAPAP group presented higher EELV (427±47 vs. 366±38 ml and oxygenation index (293±36 vs. 226±31 mmHg, lower levels of IL-6(216.6±48.0 vs. 297.5±71.2 pg/ml and IL-8(246.8±78.2 vs. 357.5±69.3 pg/ml in plasma, and lower express levels of IL-6 mRNA (15.0±3.8 vs. 21.2±3.7 and IL-8 mRNA (18.9±6.8 vs. 29.5±7.9 in lung tissues. In addition, less lung histopathology injury were revealed in the BIPAPAP group (22.5±2.0 vs. 25.2±2.1.Abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation is one of the injurious factors in severe ARDS, so abdominal muscle paralysis might be an effective strategy to minimize ventilator-induce lung injury.

  7. Abdominal Muscle Activity during Mechanical Ventilation Increases Lung Injury in Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianming; Wu, Weiliang; Zhu, Yongcheng; Jiang, Ying; Du, Juan; Chen, Rongchang

    2016-01-01

    Objective It has proved that muscle paralysis was more protective for injured lung in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the precise mechanism is not clear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation increases lung injury in severe ARDS. Methods Eighteen male Beagles were studied under mechanical ventilation with anesthesia. Severe ARDS was induced by repetitive oleic acid infusion. After lung injury, Beagles were randomly assigned into spontaneous breathing group (BIPAPSB) and abdominal muscle paralysis group (BIPAPAP). All groups were ventilated with BIPAP model for 8h, and the high pressure titrated to reached a tidal volume of 6ml/kg, the low pressure was set at 10 cmH2O, with I:E ratio 1:1, and respiratory rate adjusted to a PaCO2 of 35–60 mmHg. Six Beagles without ventilator support comprised the control group. Respiratory variables, end-expiratory volume (EELV) and gas exchange were assessed during mechanical ventilation. The levels of Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 in lung tissue and plasma were measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA respectively. Lung injury scores were determined at end of the experiment. Results For the comparable ventilator setting, as compared with BIPAPSB group, the BIPAPAP group presented higher EELV (427±47 vs. 366±38 ml) and oxygenation index (293±36 vs. 226±31 mmHg), lower levels of IL-6(216.6±48.0 vs. 297.5±71.2 pg/ml) and IL-8(246.8±78.2 vs. 357.5±69.3 pg/ml) in plasma, and lower express levels of IL-6 mRNA (15.0±3.8 vs. 21.2±3.7) and IL-8 mRNA (18.9±6.8 vs. 29.5±7.9) in lung tissues. In addition, less lung histopathology injury were revealed in the BIPAPAP group (22.5±2.0 vs. 25.2±2.1). Conclusion Abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation is one of the injurious factors in severe ARDS, so abdominal muscle paralysis might be an effective strategy to minimize ventilator-induce lung injury. PMID:26745868

  8. Noninvasive In Vivo Quantification of Neutrophil Elastase Activity in Acute Experimental Mouse Lung Injury

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    Sylvie Kossodo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a neutrophil elastase-specific near-infrared fluorescence imaging agent, which, combined with fluorescence molecular tomographic imaging, allowed us to detect and quantify neutrophil elastase activity in vivo, in real time, and noninvasively in an acute model of lung injury (ALI. Significantly higher fluorescent signal was quantified in mice with LPS/fMLP-induced ALI as compared to healthy controls, correlating with increases in the number of bronchoalveolar lavage cells, neutrophils, and elastase activity. The agent was significantly activated ex vivo in lung sections from ALI but not from control mice, and this activation was ablated by the specific inhibitor sivelestat. Treatment with the specific inhibitor sivelestat significantly reduced lung signal in mice with ALI. These results underscore the unique ability of fluorescence molecular imaging to quantify specific molecular processes in vivo, crucial for understanding the mechanisms underlying disease progression and for assessing and monitoring novel pharmacological interventions.

  9. Mechanical ventilation guided by electrical impedance tomography in experimental acute lung injury.

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    Wolf, Gerhard K; Gómez-Laberge, Camille; Rettig, Jordan S; Vargas, Sara O; Smallwood, Craig D; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Vitali, Sally H; Zurakowski, David; Arnold, John H

    2013-05-01

    To utilize real-time electrical impedance tomography to guide lung protective ventilation in an animal model of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Prospective animal study. Animal research center. Twelve Yorkshire swine (15 kg). Lung injury was induced with saline lavage and augmented using large tidal volumes. The control group (n = 6) was ventilated using ARDSnet guidelines, and the electrical impedance tomography-guided group (n = 6) was ventilated using guidance with real-time electrical impedance tomography lung imaging. Regional electrical impedance tomography-derived compliance was used to maximize the recruitment of dependent lung and minimize overdistension of nondependent lung areas. Tidal volume was 6 mL/kg in both groups. Computed tomography was performed in a subset of animals to define the anatomic correlates of electrical impedance tomography imaging (n = 5). Interleukin-8 was quantified in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage samples. Sections of dependent and nondependent regions of the lung were fixed in formalin for histopathologic analysis. Positive end-expiratory pressure levels were higher in the electrical impedance tomography-guided group (14.3 cm H₂O vs. 8.6 cm H₂O; p electrical impedance tomography-guided group (6.9 mL/cm H₂O vs. 4.7 mL/cm H₂O; p = 0.013). Regional electrical impedance tomography-derived compliance of the most dependent lung region was increased in the electrical impedance tomography group (1.78 mL/cm H₂O vs. 0.99 mL/cm H₂O; p = 0.001). Pao₂/FIO₂ ratio was higher and oxygenation index was lower in the electrical impedance tomography-guided group (Pao₂/FIO₂: 388 mm Hg vs. 113 mm Hg, p electrical impedance tomography-guided group (HMEIT 42% samples vs. HMCONTROL 67% samples, p electrical impedance tomography and computed tomography were ± 16%. Electrical impedance tomography-guided ventilation resulted in improved respiratory mechanics, improved gas exchange, and reduced histologic evidence of ventilator

  10. Aerosolized anticoagulants ameliorate acute lung injury in sheep after exposure to burn and smoke inhalation.

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    Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Cox, Robert A; Traber, Lillian D; Westphal, Martin; Aimalohi, Esechie; Morita, Naoki; Prough, Donald S; Herndon, David N; Traber, Daniel L

    2007-12-01

    Acute lung injury is a detrimental complication for victims of burn accidents. Airway obstruction plays an important role in pulmonary dysfunction in these patients. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that aerosolized anticoagulants will reduce the degree of airway obstruction and improve pulmonary function in sheep with severe combined burn and smoke inhalation injury by preventing the formation of airway fibrin clots. Prospective, randomized, controlled, experimental animal study. Investigational intensive care unit at a university hospital. Adult female sheep. After 7 days of surgical recovery, sheep were given a cutaneous burn (40% of total body surface, third degree) and insufflated with cotton smoke (48 breaths, injury, sheep were placed on ventilators and resuscitated with lactated Ringer's solution. Sheep were randomly divided into five groups: sham, noninjured and nontreated (n = 6); control, injured and aerosolized with saline (n = 6); recombinant human antithrombin (rhAT) + heparin, injured and aerosolized with rhAT (290 units for each) and heparin (10,000 units for each) (n = 6); rhAT, injured and aerosolized with rhAT alone (290 units for each; n = 5); and heparin, injured and aerosolized with heparin alone (10,000 units for each; n = 5). rhAT and heparin were aerosolized every 4 hrs, starting at 2 hrs postinjury. Cardiopulmonary hemodynamics were monitored during a 48-hr experimental time period. Control sheep developed multiple signs of acute lung injury. This pathophysiology included decreased pulmonary gas exchange and lung compliance, increased pulmonary edema, and extensive airway obstruction. These variables were stable in sham animals. The aerosolization of rhAT or heparin alone did not significantly improve deteriorated pulmonary gas exchange. However, aerosolization of these anticoagulants in combination significantly attenuated all the observed pulmonary pathophysiology. The results provide definitive evidence that aerosolized rhAT and

  11. Human mesenchymal stromal cells reduce influenza A H5N1-associated acute lung injury in vitro and in vivo

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    Chan, Michael C. W.; Kuok, Denise I. T.; Leung, Connie Y. H.; Hui, Kenrie P. Y.; Valkenburg, Sophie A.; Lau, Eric H. Y.; Nicholls, John M.; Fang, Xiaohui; Guan, Yi; Lee, Jae W.; Chan, Renee W. Y.; Webster, Robert G.; Matthay, Michael A.; Peiris, J. S. Malik

    2016-01-01

    Influenza can cause acute lung injury. Because immune responses often play a role, antivirals may not ensure a successful outcome. To identify pathogenic mechanisms and potential adjunctive therapeutic options, we compared the extent to which avian influenza A/H5N1 virus and seasonal influenza A/H1N1 virus impair alveolar fluid clearance and protein permeability in an in vitro model of acute lung injury, defined the role of virus-induced soluble mediators in these injury effects, and demonstr...

  12. Therapeutic Effect of the Tuber of Alisma orientale on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury

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    Kyun Ha Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Alisma orientale, an ethnic herb, has been prescribed for treating various diseases in Asian traditional medicine, experimental evidence to support its therapeutic effects is lacking. Here, we sought to determine whether A. orientale has a therapeutic effect on acute lung injury (ALI. Ethanol extract of the tuber of A. orientale (EEAO was prepared and fingerprinted by HPLC for its constituents. Mice received an intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS for the induction of ALI. At 2 h after LPS treatment, mice received an intratracheal (i.t. spraying of various amounts of EEAO to the lung. Bioluminescence imaging of transgenic NF-κB/luciferase reporter mice shows that i.t. EEAO posttreatment suppressed lung inflammation. In similar experiments with C57BL/6 mice, EEAO posttreatment significantly improved lung inflammation, as assessed by H&E staining of lung sections, counting of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and semiquantitative RT-PCR analyses of proinflammatory cytokines and Nrf2-dependent genes in the inflamed lungs. Furthermore, EEAO posttreatment enhanced the survival of mice that received a lethal dose of LPS. Together, our results provide evidence that A. orientale has a therapeutic effect on ALI induced by sepsis.

  13. Contributions of high mobility group box protein in experimental and clinical acute lung injury.

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    Ueno, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Satoru; Amaya, Fumimasa; Kitamura, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Masaki; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Maruyama, Ikuro; Yamada, Shingo; Hasegawa, Naoki; Soejima, Junko; Koh, Hidefumi; Ishizaka, Akitoshi

    2004-12-15

    This study was performed to examine the putative role of high mobility group box (HMGB) protein in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). Observations were made (1) in 21 patients who were septic with ALI and 15 patients with normal lung function and (2) in a mouse model 24 hours after intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The concentrations of HMGB1 were increased in plasma and lung epithelial lining fluid of patients with ALI and mice instilled with LPS. LPS-induced ALI was mitigated by anti-HMGB1 antibody. Although this protein was not detected in the plasma of control humans or mice, the concentrations of HMGB1 in lung epithelial lining fluid or in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were unexpectedly high. The nuclear expression of HMGB1 was apparent in epithelial cells surrounding terminal bronchioles in normal mice, whereas its nuclear and cytoplasmic expression was observed in alveolar macrophages in LPS-instilled mice. Lung instillation of HMGB2 did not cause as much inflammation as HMGB1. Extracellular HMGB1 may play a key role in the pathogenesis of clinical and experimental ALI. However, its expression in normal airways is noteworthy and suggests that it also plays a physiologic role in the lung.

  14. Niacinamide abrogates the organ dysfunction and acute lung injury caused by endotoxin.

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    Kao, Shang-Jyh; Liu, Demeral David; Su, Chain-Fa; Chen, Hsing I

    2007-09-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) synthabse (PARS) or polymerase (PARP) is a cytotoxic enzyme causing cellular damage. Niacinamide inhibits PARS or PARP. The present experiment tests the effects of niacinamide (NCA) on organ dysfunction and acute lung injury (ALI) following lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS was administered to anesthetized rats and to isolated rat lungs. In anesthetized rats, LPS caused systemic hypotension and increased biochemical factors, nitrate/nitrite (NOx), methyl guanidine (MG), tumor necrosis factoralpha (TNFalpha), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). In isolated lungs, LPS increased lung weight (LW) to body weight ratio, LW gain, protein and dye tracer leakage, and capillary permeability. The insult also increased NOx, MG, TNFalpha, and IL-1beta in lung perfusate, while decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content with an increase in PARP activity in lung tissue. Pathological examination revealed pulmonary edema with inflammatory cell infiltration. These changes were abrogated by posttreatment (30 min after LPS) with NCA. Following LPS, the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression was increased. NCA reduced the iNOS expression. Niacinamide exerts protective effects on the organ dysfunction and ALI caused by endotoxin. The mechanisms may be mediated through the inhibition on the PARP activity, iNOS expression and the subsequent suppression of NO, free radicals, and proinflammatory cytokines with restoration of ATP.

  15. Respiratory impact of paracentesis in cirrhotic patients with acute lung injury.

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    Levesque, Eric; Hoti, Emir; Jiabin, Jin; Dellamonica, Jean; Ichai, Philippe; Saliba, Faouzi; Azoulay, Daniel; Samuel, Didier

    2011-06-01

    Ascites may contribute to the loss of lung volume and alter the gas exchange in cirrhotic patients with acute lung injury (ALI). The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of paracentesis on respiratory parameters in ventilated cirrhotic patients with ALI. This was a prospective trial in an intensive care unit of a university hospital. Thirty-one cirrhotic patients on mechanical ventilation (with ALI) requiring paracentesis were included in this study. Arterial blood gases, intraabdominal pressures, ventilator parameters, and lung volumes were measured before and after the ascitic drainage. Following paracentesis, the intraabdominal pressure decreased (24.1 ± 7.0 vs 12.3 ± 8.9 mm Hg, P < .0001) and the Pao(2)/Fio(2) improved significantly (190.0 ± 65.2 vs 284.9 ± 76.1 mm Hg, P < .0001), without hemodynamic disturbances. End-expiratory lung volume, markedly reduced before drainage, increased significantly following paracentesis (Δ end-expiratory lung volume: +463 ± 249 mL, P = .0009). No adverse effects related to the paracentesis were encountered. In contrast to ventilatory recruitment maneuvers, paracentesis is a simple and well-tolerated technique able to improve oxygenation and alveolar recruitment without the risk of the lung overdistension in severely hypoxemic cirrhotic patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. ACE2 Antagonizes VEGFa to Reduce Vascular Permeability During Acute Lung Injury

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    Xiaobo Yu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2 treatment suppresses the severity of acute lung injury (ALI, through antagonizing hydrolyzing angiotensin II (AngII and the ALI-induced apoptosis of pulmonary endothelial cells. Nevertheless, the effects of ACE2 on vessel permeability and its relationship with vascular endothelial growth factor a (VEGFa remain ill-defined. In the current study, we examined the relationship between ACE2 and VEGFa in ALI model in mice. Methods: Here, we used a previously published bleomycin method to induce ALI in mice, and treated the mice with ACE2. We analyzed the levels of VEGFa in these mice. The mouse lung vessel permeability was determined by a fluorescence pharmacokinetic assay following i.v. injection of 62.5µg/kg Visudyne. VEGFa pump or SU5416 pump was given to increase or decrease VEGFa effects, respectively. The long-term effects on lung function were determined by measurement of lung resistance using methacholine. Results: ACE2 treatment did not alter VEGFa levels in lung, but antagonized the effects of VEGFa on increases of lung vessel permeability. Ectogenic VEGFa abolished the antagonizing effects of ACE2 on the vessel permeability against VEGFa. On the other hand, suppression of VEGF signaling mimicked the effects of ACE2 on the vessel permeability against VEGFa. The suppression of vessel permeability resulted in improvement of lung function after ALI. Conclusion: ACE2 may antagonize the VEGFa-mediated increases in lung vessel permeability during ALI, resulting in improvement of lung function after ALI.

  17. Antiplatelet antibody may cause delayed transfusion-related acute lung injury

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    Torii Y

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Yoshitaro Torii1, Toshiki Shimizu1, Takashi Yokoi1, Hiroyuki Sugimoto1, Yuichi Katashiba1, Ryotaro Ozasa1, Shinya Fujita1, Yasushi Adachi2, Masahiko Maki3, Shosaku Nomura11The First Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Osaka, 2Department of Clinical Pathology, Toyooka Hospital, Hyogo, 3First Department of Pathology, Kansai Medical University, Osaka, JapanAbstract: A 61-year-old woman with lung cancer developed delayed transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI syndrome after transfusion of plasma- and leukoreduced red blood cells (RBCs for gastrointestinal bleeding due to intestinal metastasis. Acute lung injury (ALI recurred 31 days after the first ALI episode. Both ALI episodes occurred 48 hours after transfusion. Laboratory examinations revealed the presence of various antileukocyte antibodies including antiplatelet antibody in the recipient's serum but not in the donors' serum. The authors speculate that antiplatelet antibodies can have an inhibitory effect in the recipient, which can modulate the bona fide procedure of ALI and lead to a delay in the onset of ALI. This case illustrates the crucial role of a recipient's platelets in the development of TRALI.Keywords: delayed TRALI syndrome, recurrence, anti-platelet antibody

  18. Melatonin alleviates acute lung injury through inhibiting the NLRP3 inflammasome.

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    Zhang, Yong; Li, Xiru; Grailer, Jamison J; Wang, Na; Wang, Mingming; Yao, Jianfei; Zhong, Rui; Gao, George F; Ward, Peter A; Tan, Dun-Xian; Li, Xiangdong

    2016-05-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are clinically severe respiratory disorders, and there are currently no Food and Drug Administration-approved drug therapies. Melatonin is a well-known anti-inflammatory molecule, which has proven to be effective in ALI induced by many conditions. Emerging studies suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role during ALI. How melatonin directly blocks activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in ALI remains unclear. In this study, using an LPS-induced ALI mouse model, we found intratracheal (i.t.) administration of melatonin markedly reduced the pulmonary injury and decreased the infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into lung. During ALI, the NLRP3 inflammasome is significantly activated with a large amount of IL-1β and the activated caspase-1 occurring in the lung. Melatonin inhibits the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by both suppressing the release of extracellular histones and directly blocking histone-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Notably, i.t. route of melatonin administration opens a more efficient therapeutic approach for treating ALI. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Resveratrol ameliorates LPS-induced acute lung injury via NLRP3 inflammasome modulation.

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    Jiang, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Kang, Kai; Fei, Dongsheng; Gong, Rui; Cao, Yanhui; Pan, Shangha; Zhao, Mingran; Zhao, Mingyan

    2016-12-01

    NLRP3 inflammasome plays a pivotal role in the development of acute lung injury (ALI), accelerating IL-1β and IL-18 release and inducing lung inflammation. Resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin, has anti-inflammatory properties via inhibition of oxidation, leukocyte priming, and production of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of resveratrol on NLRP3 inflammasome in lipopolysaccharide-induced ALI. Mice were intratracheally instilled with 3mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce ALI. Resveratrol treatment alleviated the LPS-induced lung pathological damage, lung edema and neutrophil infiltration. In addition, resveratrol reversed the LPS-mediated elevation of IL-1β and IL-18 level in the BAL fluids. In lung tissue, resveratrol also inhibited the LPS-induced NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1 mRNA and protein expression, and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Moreover, resveratrol administration not only suppressed the NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, NF-κB activity and ROS production in the LPS-treated mice, but also inhibited the LPS-induced thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) protein expression and interaction of TXNIP-NLRP3 in lung tissue. Meanwhile, resveratrol obviously induced SIRT1 mRNA and protein expression in the LPS-challenged mice. Taken together, our study suggests that resveratrol protects against LPS-induced lung injury by NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition. These findings further suggest that resveratrol may be of great value in the treatment of ALI and a potential and an effective pharmacological agent for inflammasome-relevant diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of the acute phase protein PTX3 in the ventilator-induced lung injury

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    JM Real

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The pentraxin 3 (PTX3 is an acute phase proinflammatory protein produced by fibroblasts and alveolar epithelial cells. We have previously demonstrated that PTX3 is a key modulator of inflammation. Mechanical ventilation (MV is a life saving therapeutic approach for patients with acute lung injury that, nevertheless could lead to an inflammatory response and tissue injury (ventilator-induced lung injury: VILI, representing a major cause of iatrogenic lung damage in intensive units. Our objective was to investigate the role of PTX3 in VILI. PTX3 transgenic, knockout and Wt control mice (n = 12/group were ventilated (45ml·kg–1 until respiratory system Elastance increased 50% (Ers150%, an indicator of VILI. Histological analysis demonstrated that using a Ers150% was appropriate for our analysis since identical degrees of inflammation were observed in Tg, KO and Wt mice as assessed by leukocyte infiltration, oedema, alveolar collapse and number of breaks in alveolar septa. However, Tg mice reached Ers150% faster than Wt controls (p = 0.0225. We also showed that the lack of PTX3 does not abolish the occurrence of VILI in KOs. Gene expression profile of PTX3, IL-1beta, IL-6, KC, IFNgamma, TGFbeta and PCIII were investigated by QPCR. MV drastically up modulated PTX3 as well as IL-1beta, IL-6, IFNgamma and KC. Alternatively, mice were ventilated for 20, 40 and 60 min. The faster kinetics of Tg mice to reach Ers150% was accompanied by an earlier augmentation of IL-1b and PTX3 expression. The kinetics of local PTX3 expression in the lungs of ventilated mice strongly suggests the involvement of this pentraxin in the pathogenesis of VILI.

  1. Human mesenchymal stem cells attenuate early damage in a ventilated pig model of acute lung injury

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    Yuben Moodley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS is a major cause of global morbidity and mortality. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC have shown promise in treating inflammatory lung conditions. We hypothesised that human MSC (hMSC can improve ALI/ARDS through their anti-inflammatory actions. We subjected pigs (n = 6 to intravenous oleic acid (OA injury, ventilation and hMSC infusion, while the controls (n = 5 had intravenous OA, ventilation and an infusion vehicle control. hMSC were infused 1 h after the administration of OA. The animals were monitored for additional 4 h. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB, a transcription factor that mediates several inflammatory pathways was reduced in hMSC treated pigs compared to controls (p = 0.04. There was no significant difference in lung injury, assessed by histological scoring in hMSC treated pigs versus controls (p = 0.063. There was no difference in neutrophil counts between hMSC-treated pigs and controls. Within 4 h, there was no difference in the levels of IL-10 and IL-8 pre- and post-treatment with hMSC. In addition, there was no difference in hemodynamics, lung mechanics or arterial blood gases between hMSC treated animals and controls. Subsequent studies are required to determine if the observed decrease in inflammatory transcription factors will translate into improvement in inflammation and in physiological parameters over the long term.

  2. CD73+ regulatory T cells contribute to adenosine-mediated resolution of acute lung injury.

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    Ehrentraut, Heidi; Clambey, Eric T; McNamee, Eoin N; Brodsky, Kelley S; Ehrentraut, Stefan F; Poth, Jens M; Riegel, Ann K; Westrich, Joseph A; Colgan, Sean P; Eltzschig, Holger K

    2013-06-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by alveolar injury and uncontrolled inflammation. Since most cases of ALI resolve spontaneously, understanding the endogenous mechanisms that promote ALI resolution is important to developing effective therapies. Previous studies have implicated extracellular adenosine signaling in tissue adaptation and wound healing. Therefore, we hypothesized a functional contribution for the endogenous production of adenosine during ALI resolution. As a model, we administered intratracheal LPS and observed peak lung injury at 3 d, with resolution by d 14. Treatment with pegylated adenosine-deaminase to enhance extracellular adenosine breakdown revealed impaired ALI resolution. Similarly, genetic deletion of cd73, the pacemaker for extracellular adenosine generation, was associated with increased mortality (0% wild-type and 40% in cd73(-/-) mice; P<0.05) and failure to resolve ALI adequately. Studies of inflammatory cell trafficking into the lungs during ALI resolution revealed that regulatory T cells (Tregs) express the highest levels of CD73. While Treg numbers in cd73(-/-) mice were similar to controls, cd73-deficient Tregs had attenuated immunosuppressive functions. Moreover, adoptive transfer of cd73-deficient Tregs into Rag(-/-) mice emulated the observed phenotype in cd73(-/-) mice, while transfer of wild-type Tregs was associated with normal ALI resolution. Together, these studies implicate CD73-dependent adenosine generation in Tregs in promoting ALI resolution.

  3. The treatment of acidosis in acute lung injury with tris-hydroxymethyl aminomethane (THAM).

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    Kallet, R H; Jasmer, R M; Luce, J M; Lin, L H; Marks, J D

    2000-04-01

    Mechanical hyperventilation of acidemic patients with acute lung injury (ALI) requires the use of high volumes and pressures that may worsen lung injury. However, permissive hypercapnia in the presence of shock, metabolic acidosis, and multi-organ system dysfunction may compromise normal cellular function. Tris-hydroxymethyl aminomethane (THAM) may be an effective method to control acidosis in this circumstance. Protonated THAM is excreted by the kidneys, so that carbon dioxide production is not raised. In an uncontrolled study, we administered THAM to 10 patients with acidosis (mean pH = 7.14) and ALI (mean lung injury score = 3.28) in whom adequate control of arterial pH could not be maintained during either eucapnic ventilation or permissive hypercapnia ventilation. THAM was given at a mean dose of 0.55 mmol/kg/h. Administration of THAM was associated with significant improvements in arterial pH and base deficit, and a decrease in arterial carbon dioxide tension that could not be fully accounted for by ventilation. Although further studies are needed to confirm these observations, THAM appears to be an effective alternative to sodium bicarbonate for treating acidosis during ALI.

  4. Regional pulmonary inflammation in an endotoxemic ovine acute lung injury model.

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    Fernandez-Bustamante, A; Easley, R B; Fuld, M; Mulreany, D; Chon, D; Lewis, J F; Simon, B A

    2012-08-15

    The regional distribution of inflammation during acute lung injury (ALI) is not well known. In an ovine ALI model we studied regional alveolar inflammation, surfactant composition, and CT-derived regional specific volume change (sVol) and specific compliance (sC). 18 ventilated adult sheep received IV lipopolysaccharide (LPS) until severe ALI was achieved. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from apical and basal lung regions were obtained at baseline and injury time points, for analysis of cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β), BAL protein and surfactant composition. Whole lung CT images were obtained in 4 additional sheep. BAL protein and IL-1β were significantly higher in injured apical vs. basal regions. No significant regional surfactant composition changes were observed. Baseline sVol and sC were lower in apex vs. base; ALI enhanced this cranio-caudal difference, reaching statistical significance only for sC. This study suggests that apical lung regions show greater inflammation than basal ones during IV LPS-induced ALI which may relate to differences in regional mechanical events. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Gene expression profiles characterize inflammation stages in the acute lung injury in mice.

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    Isabelle Lesur

    Full Text Available Acute Lung Injury (ALI carries about 50 percent mortality and is frequently associated with an infection (sepsis. Life-support treatment with mechanical ventilation rescues many patients, although superimposed infection or multiple organ failure can result in death. The outcome of a patient developing sepsis depends on two factors: the infection and the pre-existing inflammation. In this study, we described each stage of the inflammation process using a transcriptional approach and an animal model. Female C57BL6/J mice received an intravenous oleic acid injection to induce an acute lung injury (ALI. Lung expression patterns were analyzed using a 9900 cDNA mouse microarray (MUSV29K. Our gene-expression analysis revealed marked changes in the immune and inflammatory response metabolic pathways, notably lipid metabolism and transcription. The early stage (1 hour-1.5 hours is characterized by a pro-inflammatory immune response. Later (3 hours-4 hours, the immune cells migrate into inflamed tissues through interaction with vascular endothelial cells. Finally, at late stages of lung inflammation (18 hours-24 hours, metabolism is deeply disturbed. Highly expressed pro-inflammatory cytokines activate transcription of many genes and lipid metabolism. In this study, we described a global overview of critical events occurring during lung inflammation which is essential to understand infectious pathologies such as sepsis where inflammation and infection are intertwined. Based on these data, it becomes possible to isolate the impact of a pathogen at the transcriptional level from the global gene expression modifications resulting from the infection associated with the inflammation.

  6. Paraquat poisoning: an experimental model of dose-dependent acute lung injury due to surfactant dysfunction

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    M.F.R. Silva

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the most characteristic feature of paraquat poisoning is lung damage, a prospective controlled study was performed on excised rat lungs in order to estimate the intensity of lesion after different doses. Twenty-five male, 2-3-month-old non-SPF Wistar rats, divided into 5 groups, received paraquat dichloride in a single intraperitoneal injection (0, 1, 5, 25, or 50 mg/kg body weight 24 h before the experiment. Static pressure-volume (PV curves were performed in air- and saline-filled lungs; an estimator of surface tension and tissue works was computed by integrating the area of both curves and reported as work/ml of volume displacement. Paraquat induced a dose-dependent increase of inspiratory surface tension work that reached a significant two-fold order of magnitude for 25 and 50 mg/kg body weight (P<0.05, ANOVA, sparing lung tissue. This kind of lesion was probably due to functional abnormalities of the surfactant system, as was shown by the increase in the hysteresis of the paraquat groups at the highest doses. Hence, paraquat poisoning provides a suitable model of acute lung injury with alveolar instability that can be easily used in experimental protocols of mechanical ventilation

  7. Protective effects of salidroside from Rhodiola rosea on LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice.

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    Guan, Shuang; Xiong, Ying; Song, Bocui; Song, Yu; Wang, Dacheng; Chu, Xiao; Chen, Na; Huo, Meixia; Deng, Xuming; Lu, Jing

    2012-08-01

    Salidroside is a major component extracted from Rhodiola rosea. In this study, we investigated protective effects of salidroside on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. In the mouse model, we found that pretreatment with a single 120 mg/kg dose of salidroside prior to the administration of intratracheal LPS induced a significant decrease in the W/D ratio and mouse myeloperoxidase activity of lung, reduction protein concentration, the number of total cells, neutrophils and macrophages in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In addition, salidroside also inhibited the production of several inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-1β, and the NF-κB DNA-binding activation after LPS challenge. These results indicated that salidroside possess a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in mice.

  8. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome.

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    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses.

  9. Protective effect of adenosine receptors against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

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    Gorshkov, Boris; Varn, Matthew N.; Zemskova, Marina A.; Zemskov, Evgeny A.; Sridhar, Supriya; Lucas, Rudolf; Verin, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) affect 200,000 people a year in the USA. Pulmonary vascular and specifically endothelial cell (EC) barrier compromise is a hallmark of these diseases. We have recently shown that extracellular adenosine enhances human pulmonary (EC) barrier via activation of adenosine receptors (ARs) in cell cultures. On the basis of these data, we hypothesized that activation of ARs might exert barrier-protective effects in a model of ALI/ARDS in mice. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of pre- and posttreatment of adenosine and 5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), a nonselective stable AR agonist, on LPS-induced lung injury. Mice were given vehicle or LPS intratracheally followed by adenosine, NECA, or vehicle instilled via the internal jugular vein. Postexperiment cell counts, Evans Blue Dye albumin (EBDA) extravasation, levels of proteins, and inflammatory cytokines were analyzed. Harvested lungs were used for histology and myeloperoxidase studies. Mice challenged with LPS alone demonstrated an inflammatory response typical of ALI. Cell counts, EBDA extravasation, as well as levels of proteins and inflammatory cytokines were decreased in adenosine-treated mice. Histology displayed reduced infiltration of neutrophils. NECA had a similar effect on LPS-induced vascular barrier compromise. Importantly, posttreatment with adenosine or NECA recovers lung vascular barrier and reduces inflammation induced by LPS challenge. Furthermore, adenosine significantly attenuated protein degradation of A2A and A3 receptors induced by LPS. Collectively, our results demonstrate that activation of ARs protects and restores vascular barrier functions and reduces inflammation in LPS-induced ALI. PMID:24414256

  10. Hydrogen Gas Inhalation Attenuates Seawater Instillation-Induced Acute Lung Injury via the Nrf2 Pathway in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Mengyuan; Zhang, Sheng; Wu, Lifeng; Huan, Le; Huang, Fenglou; Cui, Yunliang; Lin, Zhaofen

    2016-12-01

    Seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury involves oxidative stress and apoptosis. Although hydrogen gas inhalation is reportedly protective in multiple types of lung injury, the effect of hydrogen gas inhalation on seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury remains unknown. This study investigated the effect of hydrogen gas on seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury and explored the mechanisms involved. Rabbits were randomly assigned to control, hydrogen (2 % hydrogen gas inhalation), seawater (3 mL/kg seawater instillation), and seawater + hydrogen (3 mL/kg seawater instillation + 2 % hydrogen gas inhalation) groups. Arterial partial oxygen pressure and lung wet/dry weight ratio were detected. Protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum as well as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 levels were determined. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was used to monitor changes in lung specimens, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were assayed. In addition, NF-E2-related factor (Nrf) 2 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA and protein expression were measured, and apoptosis was assessed by measuring caspase-3 expression and using terminal deoxy-nucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining. Hydrogen gas inhalation markedly improved lung endothelial permeability and decreased both MDA content and MPO activity in lung tissue; these changes were associated with decreases in TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in BALF. Hydrogen gas also alleviated histopathological changes and cell apoptosis. Moreover, Nrf2 and HO-1 expressions were significantly activated and caspase-3 expression was inhibited. These results demonstrate that hydrogen gas inhalation attenuates seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury in rabbits and that the protective effects observed may be related to the activation of the Nrf2 pathway.

  11. Prognostic and Pathogenetic Value of Combining Clinical and Biochemical Indices in Patients With Acute Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Tatsuki; Billheimer, D. Dean; Wu, William; Bernard, Gordon R.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Brower, Roy G.; Standiford, Theodore J.; Martin, Thomas R.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: No single clinical or biologic marker reliably predicts clinical outcomes in acute lung injury (ALI)/ARDS. We hypothesized that a combination of biologic and clinical markers would be superior to either biomarkers or clinical factors alone in predicting ALI/ARDS mortality and would provide insight into the pathogenesis of clinical ALI/ARDS. Methods: Eight biologic markers that reflect endothelial and epithelial injury, inflammation, and coagulation (von Willebrand factor antigen, surfactant protein D [SP-D]), tumor necrosis factor receptor-1, interleukin [IL]-6, IL-8, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, protein C, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) were measured in baseline plasma from 549 patients in the ARDSNet trial of low vs high positive end-expiratory pressure. Mortality was modeled with multivariable logistic regression. Predictors were selected using backward elimination. Comparisons between candidate models were based on the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and tests of integrated discrimination improvement. Results: Clinical predictors (Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation III [APACHE III], organ failures, age, underlying cause, alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient, plateau pressure) predicted mortality with an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.82; a combination of eight biomarkers and the clinical predictors had an AUC of 0.85. The best performing biomarkers were the neutrophil chemotactic factor, IL-8, and SP-D, a product of alveolar type 2 cells, supporting the concept that acute inflammation and alveolar epithelial injury are important pathogenetic pathways in human ALI/ARDS. Conclusions: A combination of biomarkers and clinical predictors is superior to clinical predictors or biomarkers alone for predicting mortality in ALI/ARDS and may be useful for stratifying patients in clinical trials. From a pathogenesis perspective, the degree of acute inflammation and alveolar epithelial injury are highly associated with the

  12. HIF1A reduces acute lung injury by optimizing carbohydrate metabolism in the alveolar epithelium.

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    Tobias Eckle

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available While acute lung injury (ALI contributes significantly to critical illness, it resolves spontaneously in many instances. The majority of patients experiencing ALI require mechanical ventilation. Therefore, we hypothesized that mechanical ventilation and concomitant stretch-exposure of pulmonary epithelia could activate endogenous pathways important in lung protection.To examine transcriptional responses during ALI, we exposed pulmonary epithelia to cyclic mechanical stretch conditions--an in vitro model resembling mechanical ventilation. A genome-wide screen revealed a transcriptional response similar to hypoxia signaling. Surprisingly, we found that stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor 1A (HIF1A during stretch conditions in vitro or during ventilator-induced ALI in vivo occurs under normoxic conditions. Extension of these findings identified a functional role for stretch-induced inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH in mediating normoxic HIF1A stabilization, concomitant increases in glycolytic capacity, and improved tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle function. Pharmacologic studies with HIF activator or inhibitor treatment implicated HIF1A-stabilization in attenuating pulmonary edema and lung inflammation during ALI in vivo. Systematic deletion of HIF1A in the lungs, endothelia, myeloid cells, or pulmonary epithelia linked these findings to alveolar-epithelial HIF1A. In vivo analysis of ¹³C-glucose metabolites utilizing liquid-chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry demonstrated that increases in glycolytic capacity, improvement of mitochondrial respiration, and concomitant attenuation of lung inflammation during ALI were specific for alveolar-epithelial expressed HIF1A.These studies reveal a surprising role for HIF1A in lung protection during ALI, where normoxic HIF1A stabilization and HIF-dependent control of alveolar-epithelial glucose metabolism function as an endogenous feedback loop to dampen lung inflammation.

  13. Characterization of inflammation in a rat model of acute lung injury after repeated pulmonary lavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menk, Mario; Graw, Jan Adriaan; Steinkraus, Henrik; Haefen, Clarissa von; Sifringer, Marco; Spies, Claudia D; Lachmann, Burkhard; Schwaiberger, David

    2015-01-01

    Repeated pulmonary lavage allows to reliably reproduce failure of gas exchange and major histological findings of acute lung injury (ALI). However, because the capacity of pulmonary lavage to induce pulmonary inflammation is not well established in rodents, this study aims to characterize the induction of pulmonary inflammation in a rat model of ALI. Male adult rats were divided into a treatment group (n = 9) that received pulmonary lavage with consecutive mechanical ventilation, and a control group that received mechanical ventilation only (n = 9). Arterial blood gas analyses were performed every 30 min throughout the study. Pressure-volume curves, and lung tissue and plasma samples, were obtained at 240 min after the start of mechanical ventilation. Protein content and surface activity of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was assessed. Transcriptional and translational regulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 was determined in lungs and plasma. Markers of cellular stress were measured in lung tissue. Pulmonary lavage significantly decreased lung compliance, induced hypoxia and hypercapnia, and mediated respiratory acidosis. Protein content of lavage fluid was significantly increased and contained washed out surfactant. Expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 mRNA and protein expression of IL-1β and TNF-α was significantly induced in lavaged lungs, without spillover into the systemic circulation. Markers of cellular stress were significantly upregulated in lavaged lungs. This model of ALI applied in rats can induce pulmonary inflammation. The model might be used to develop therapeutic strategies that target pulmonary inflammation in ALI.

  14. Acute ozone-induced lung injury in rats: Structural-functional relationships of developing alveolar edema

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    Paterson, J.F.; Hammond, M.D.; Montgomery, M.R.; Sharp, J.T.; Farrier, S.E.; Balis, J.U. (James A. Haley Veterans Hospital Research Service, Tampa, FL (United States))

    1992-11-01

    As part of a study on the effects of acute ozone stress on the lung surfactant system, we correlated morphometric, biochemical, and functional indices of lung injury using male rats exposed to 3 ppm ozone for 1, 2, 4, and 8 hr. Evaluation of lung mechanics, using the Pulmonary Evaluation and Diagnostic Laboratory System, revealed a significant decrease in dynamic lung compliance (ml/cmH[sub 2]O/kg) from a control value of 0.84 [plus minus] 0.02 (SEM) to 0.72 [plus minus] 0.04 and 0.57 [plus minus] 0.06 at 4 and 8 hr, respectively. At 2 hr there was a transient increase in PaO[sub 2] to 116 torr (control = 92 torr) followed by a decrease at 4 hr (65 torr) and 8 hr (55 torr). Morphometry of lung tissue, fixed by perfusion of fixative via the pulmonary artery at 12 cm H[sub 2]O airway distending pressure, demonstrated an increase in the area of the intravascular compartment at 8 hr, in association with a 65 and 39% replacement of the alveolar area by fluid in ventral and dorsal lung regions, respectively. There was a positive correlation (r = 0.966) between alveolar edema and transudated proteins in lavage fluid. A stepwise multiple regression model, with edema as the dependent variable, suggested that pulmonary vasodilatation, hypoxemia, and depletion of surfactant tubular myelin in lavage fluid were indices for predicting alveolar edema. In a second model, with lavage protein concentration as the dependent variable, decreasing dynamic compliance and hypoxemia were predictors of progressive, intraalveolar transudation of plasma proteins. The above structural-functional relationships support the concept that ozone-induced high-protein alveolar edema is pathogenetically linked to pulmonary hyperemia, deficiency of surfactant tubular myelin, and associated lung dysfunctions.

  15. Indoxyl Sulfate as a Mediator Involved in Dysregulation of Pulmonary Aquaporin-5 in Acute Lung Injury Caused by Acute Kidney Injury

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    Nozomi Yabuuchi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available High mortality of acute kidney injury (AKI is associated with acute lung injury (ALI, which is a typical complication of AKI. Although it is suggested that dysregulation of lung salt and water channels following AKI plays a pivotal role in ALI, the mechanism of its dysregulation has not been elucidated. Here, we examined the involvement of a typical oxidative stress-inducing uremic toxin, indoxyl sulfate (IS, in the dysregulation of the pulmonary predominant water channel, aquaporin 5 (AQP-5, in bilateral nephrectomy (BNx-induced AKI model rats. BNx evoked AKI with the increases in serum creatinine (SCr, blood urea nitrogen (BUN and serum IS levels and exhibited thickening of interstitial tissue in the lung. Administration of AST-120, clinically-used oral spherical adsorptive carbon beads, resulted in a significant decrease in serum IS level and thickening of interstitial tissue, which was accompanied with the decreases in IS accumulation in various tissues, especially lung. Interestingly, a significant decrease in AQP-5 expression of lung was observed in BNx rats. Moreover, the BNx-induced decrease in pulmonary AQP-5 protein expression was markedly restored by oral administration of AST-120. These results suggest that BNx-induced AKI causes dysregulation of pulmonary AQP-5 expression, in which IS could play a toxico-physiological role as a mediator involved in renopulmonary crosstalk.

  16. Indoxyl Sulfate as a Mediator Involved in Dysregulation of Pulmonary Aquaporin-5 in Acute Lung Injury Caused by Acute Kidney Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuuchi, Nozomi; Sagata, Masataka; Saigo, Chika; Yoneda, Go; Yamamoto, Yuko; Nomura, Yui; Nishi, Kazuhiko; Fujino, Rika; Jono, Hirofumi; Saito, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    High mortality of acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with acute lung injury (ALI), which is a typical complication of AKI. Although it is suggested that dysregulation of lung salt and water channels following AKI plays a pivotal role in ALI, the mechanism of its dysregulation has not been elucidated. Here, we examined the involvement of a typical oxidative stress-inducing uremic toxin, indoxyl sulfate (IS), in the dysregulation of the pulmonary predominant water channel, aquaporin 5 (AQP-5), in bilateral nephrectomy (BNx)-induced AKI model rats. BNx evoked AKI with the increases in serum creatinine (SCr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum IS levels and exhibited thickening of interstitial tissue in the lung. Administration of AST-120, clinically-used oral spherical adsorptive carbon beads, resulted in a significant decrease in serum IS level and thickening of interstitial tissue, which was accompanied with the decreases in IS accumulation in various tissues, especially lung. Interestingly, a significant decrease in AQP-5 expression of lung was observed in BNx rats. Moreover, the BNx-induced decrease in pulmonary AQP-5 protein expression was markedly restored by oral administration of AST-120. These results suggest that BNx-induced AKI causes dysregulation of pulmonary AQP-5 expression, in which IS could play a toxico-physiological role as a mediator involved in renopulmonary crosstalk. PMID:28025487

  17. Heme Attenuation Ameliorates Irritant Gas Inhalation-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

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    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Lam, Adam; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Carlisle, Matthew A; Traylor, Amie; Agarwal, Anupam; Matalon, Sadis

    2016-01-10

    Exposure to irritant gases, such as bromine (Br2), poses an environmental and occupational hazard that results in severe lung and systemic injury. However, the mechanism(s) of Br2 toxicity and the therapeutic responses required to mitigate lung damage are not known. Previously, it was demonstrated that Br2 upregulates the heme degrading enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Since heme is a major inducer of HO-1, we determined whether an increase in heme and heme-dependent oxidative injury underlies the pathogenesis of Br2 toxicity. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to Br2 gas (600 ppm, 30 min) and returned to room air. Thirty minutes postexposure, mice were injected intraperitoneally with a single dose of the heme scavenging protein, hemopexin (Hx) (3 μg/gm body weight), or saline. Twenty-four hours postexposure, saline-treated mice had elevated total heme in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma and acute lung injury (ALI) culminating in 80% mortality after 10 days. Hx treatment significantly lowered heme, decreased evidence of ALI (lower protein and inflammatory cells in BALF, lower lung wet-to-dry weight ratios, and decreased airway hyperreactivity to methacholine), and reduced mortality. In addition, Br2 caused more severe ALI and mortality in mice with HO-1 gene deletion (HO-1-/-) compared to wild-type controls, while transgenic mice overexpressing the human HO-1 gene (hHO-1) showed significant protection. This is the first study delineating the role of heme in ALI caused by Br2. The data suggest that attenuating heme may prove to be a useful adjuvant therapy to treat patients with ALI.

  18. Potential Effects of Medicinal Plants and Secondary Metabolites on Acute Lung Injury

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    Daniely Cornélio Favarin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a life-threatening syndrome that causes high morbidity and mortality worldwide. ALI is characterized by increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary membrane, edema, uncontrolled neutrophils migration to the lung, and diffuse alveolar damage, leading to acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Although corticosteroids remain the mainstay of ALI treatment, they cause significant side effects. Agents of natural origin, such as medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites, mainly those with very few side effects, could be excellent alternatives for ALI treatment. Several studies, including our own, have demonstrated that plant extracts and/or secondary metabolites isolated from them reduce most ALI phenotypes in experimental animal models, including neutrophil recruitment to the lung, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, edema, and vascular permeability. In this review, we summarized these studies and described the anti-inflammatory activity of various plant extracts, such as Ginkgo biloba and Punica granatum, and such secondary metabolites as epigallocatechin-3-gallate and ellagic acid. In addition, we highlight the medical potential of these extracts and plant-derived compounds for treating of ALI.

  19. ROS-Mediated NLRP3 Inflammasome Activity Is Essential for Burn-Induced Acute Lung Injury

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    Shichao Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The NLRP3 inflammasome is necessary for initiating acute sterile inflammation. However, its role in the pathogenesis of burn-induced acute lung injury (ALI is unknown. This study aimed to determine the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome and the signaling pathways involved in burn-induced ALI. We observed that the rat lungs exhibited enhanced inflammasome activity after burn, as evidenced by increased levels of NLRP3 expression and Caspase-1 activity and augmented inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome by BAY11-7082 attenuated burn-induced ALI, as demonstrated by the concomitant remission of histopathologic changes and the reduction of myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, inflammatory cytokines in rat lung tissue, and protein concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF. In the in vitro experiments, we used AMs (alveolar macrophages challenged with burn serum to mimic the postburn microenvironment and noted that the serum significantly upregulated NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS production. The use of ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC partially reversed NLRP3 inflammasome activity in cells exposed to burn serum. These results indicate that the NLRP3 inflammasome plays an essential role in burn-induced ALI and that burn-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activity is a partly ROS-dependent process. Targeting this axis may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of burn-induced ALI.

  20. ROS-Mediated NLRP3 Inflammasome Activity Is Essential for Burn-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shichao; Cai, Weixia; Yang, Xuekang; Jia, Yanhui; Zheng, Zhao; Wang, Hongtao; Li, Jun; Li, Yan; Gao, Jianxin; Fan, Lei; Hu, Dahai

    2015-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is necessary for initiating acute sterile inflammation. However, its role in the pathogenesis of burn-induced acute lung injury (ALI) is unknown. This study aimed to determine the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome and the signaling pathways involved in burn-induced ALI. We observed that the rat lungs exhibited enhanced inflammasome activity after burn, as evidenced by increased levels of NLRP3 expression and Caspase-1 activity and augmented inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome by BAY11-7082 attenuated burn-induced ALI, as demonstrated by the concomitant remission of histopathologic changes and the reduction of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, inflammatory cytokines in rat lung tissue, and protein concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In the in vitro experiments, we used AMs (alveolar macrophages) challenged with burn serum to mimic the postburn microenvironment and noted that the serum significantly upregulated NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The use of ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) partially reversed NLRP3 inflammasome activity in cells exposed to burn serum. These results indicate that the NLRP3 inflammasome plays an essential role in burn-induced ALI and that burn-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activity is a partly ROS-dependent process. Targeting this axis may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of burn-induced ALI.

  1. Kinetics and Role of Plasma Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Expression in Acute Lung Injury and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Albert T; Barrett, Christopher D; DeBusk, George M; Ellson, Christian D; Gautam, Shiva; Talmor, Daniel S; Gallagher, Diana C; Yaffe, Michael B

    2015-08-01

    Primed neutrophils that are capable of releasing matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) into the circulation are thought to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We hypothesized that direct measurement of plasma MMP-9 activity may be a predictor of incipient tissue damage and subsequent lung injury, which was investigated in both an animal model of ARDS and a small cohort of 38 critically ill human patients. In a mouse model of ARDS involving instillation of intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce lung inflammation, we measured neutrophil-mediated inflammation, along with MMP-9 activity in the airways and lung tissue and MMP-9 expression in the plasma. Neutrophil recruitment, inflammation, and MMP-9 activity in the airways and lung tissue increased throughout the 72 h after LPS instillation, whereas plasma MMP-9 expression was greatest at 12 to 24 h after LPS instillation. The results suggest that the peak in plasma MMP-9 activity may precede the peak of neutrophil inflammation in the airways and lung tissue in the setting of ARDS. Based on this animal study, a retrospective observational cohort study involving 38 patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit at a tertiary care university hospital with acute respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation was conducted. Plasma samples were collected daily, and MMP-9 activity was compared with lung function as determined by the PaO2/FiO2 ratio. In patients who developed ARDS, a notable increase in plasma MMP-9 activity on a particular day correlated with a decrease in the PaO2/FiO2 ratio on the following day (r = -0.503, P critically ill patients.

  2. Postmortem changes in lungs in severe closed traumatic brain injury complicated by acute respiratory failure

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    V. A. Tumanskiy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available V.А. Tumanskіy, S.І. Ternishniy, L.M. Tumanskaya Pathological changes in the lungs were studied in the work of 42 patiens who died from severe closed intracranial injury (SCII. It was complicated with acute respiratory insufficient (ARI. The most modified subpleural areas were selected from every lobe of the lungs for pathological studies. Prepared histological sections were stained by means of hemotoxylin and eosin and by Van Giеson for light microscopy. The results of the investigation have shown absence of the significant difference of pathological changes in the lungs of patients who died from ARI because of severe brain injury and traumatic intracranial hemorrhage. Pathognomic pathological changes in the lungs as a result of acute lung injury syndrome (ALIS were found in deceased patients on the third day since the SCII (n=8. There was a significant bilateral interstitial edema and mild alveolar edema with the presence of red and blood cells in the alveoli, vascular plethora of the septum interalveolar and stasis of blood in the capillaries, the slight pericapillary leukocyte infiltration, subpleural hemorrhage and laminar pulmonary atelectasis. In deceased patients on 4-6 days after SCII that was complicated with ARI (n=14, morphological changes had been detected in the lungs. It was pathognomic for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS with local pneumonic to be layered. A significant interstitial pulmonary edema was observed in the respiratory part of the lungs. The edema has spread from the walls of the alveoli into the interstitial spaces of the bronchioles and blood vessels, and also less marked serous-hemorrhagic alveolar edema with presence of the fibrin in the alveoli and macrophages. The ways of intrapleural lymphatic drainage were dilatated. Histopathological changes in the lungs of those who died on the 7-15th days after severe closed craniocerebral injury with ARI to be complicated (n=12 have been indicative of two

  3. Effects of S-Nitroso-N-Acetyl-Penicillamine (SNAP) on Inflammation, Lung Tissue Apoptosis and iNOS Activity in a Rabbit Model of Acute Lung Injury.

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    Kosutova, P; Mikolka, P; Kolomaznik, M; Balentova, S; Calkovska, A; Mokra, D

    2016-01-01

    Acute lung injury is characterized by lung edema, surfactant dysfunction, and inflammation. The main goal of our study was to evaluate effects of S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP) on migration of cells into the lung and their activation, inducible NO synthase (iNOS) activity, and apoptosis in experimental acute lung injury (ALI) in rabbits. ALI was induced by repetitive lung lavage with saline. The animals were divided into the following groups: (1) ALI without therapy, (2) lung injury treated with SNAP (ALI + SNAP), and (3) healthy animals (Control). After 5 h of ventilation, total and differential counts of cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were assessed. Concentrations of interleukins (IL)-1ß, IL-6, and IL-8, endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (esRAGE), sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1PR)3, caspase-3, and mRNA expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in lung tissue and nitrite/nitrate in plasma were analyzed. In the right lung, apoptotic cells were evaluated by TUNEL assay. In the animals with ALI, higher counts of cells, mainly neutrophils, in BALF and increased production of pro-inflammatory substances were observed compared with controls. SNAP therapy reduced a leak of cells into the lung and decreased concentrations of pro-inflammatory and apoptotic markers, reduced mRNA expression of iNOS, and decreased apoptotic index in the lung.

  4. [Effects and mechanisms of high-volume hemofiltration on endotoxin-induced acute lung injury of piglets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W M; Yan, G F; Lu, Z J; Lu, G P

    2017-05-04

    Objective: To compare the effects of high-volume hemofiltration (HVHF) and continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH) on cardiopulmonary functions, lung fluid balance, lung damage and cytokine expression in endotoxin-induced acute lung injury piglet model, and to further evaluate the value of high-volume hemofiltration in acute lung injury. Method: Eighteen piglets were randomly divided into the control group (6 piglets), the CVVH group (6 piglets) and the HVHF group (6 piglets). By general anesthesia, the intravenous infusion of 0.15 mg/kg endotoxin were received in all the animals and induced acute lung injury.High-volume hemofiltration and continuous veno-venous hemofiltration were addressed to different groups.Subsequently, hemodynamic parameters (heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, central venous pressure, pulse contour cardiac index, systemic venous resistance index and extravascular lung water index) as well as gas exchange and lung mechanics parameters (respiratory rate, partial pressure of carbon dioxide, partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen, dynamic lung compliance and airway resistance) were intermittently measured.Lung tissues were collected for further analysis (the lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, lung injury scoring). The plasma protein levels of cytokines (interleukin(IL) -6, 10 and tumor necrosis factors alpha(TNF-α)) were also assessed.Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni post-test were conducted to identify significant differences among the control, CVVH and HVHF group. Result: Compared with CVVH, HVHF had the capacity to improve significantly the index of Cdyn(HVHF (2.3±0.5) vs. CVVH (1.5±0.5) ml/(cmH(2)O·kg), 1 cmH(2)O=0.098 kPa, Plung water accumulation(index of EVLWI in HVHF (22.7±2.1) vs.CVVH (39.5±2.6) ml/m(2,) Plung injury scoring of HVHF group was significantly lower than those of CVVH group((7.8±1.9) vs. (11.3±2.2) scores, Pvolume hemofiltration can improve respiratory function of piglets

  5. Effects of Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury on Lung Water Balance: Nephrogenic Pulmonary Edema?

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    Rajit K. Basu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary edema worsens the morbidity and increases the mortality of critically ill patients. Mechanistically, edema formation in the lung is a result of net flow across the alveolar capillary membrane, dependent on the relationship of hydrostatic and oncotic pressures. Traditionally, the contribution of acute kidney injury (AKI to the formation of pulmonary edema has been attributed to bulk fluid accumulation, increasing capillary hydrostatic pressure and the gradient favoring net flow into the alveolar spaces. Recent research has revealed more subtle, and distant, effects of AKI. In this review we discuss the concept of nephrogenic pulmonary edema. Pro-inflammatory gene upregulation, chemokine over-expression, altered biochemical channel function, and apoptotic dysregulation manifest in the lung are now understood as “extra-renal” and pulmonary effects of AKI. AKI should be counted as a disease process that alters the endothelial integrity of the alveolar capillary barrier and has the potential to overpower the ability of the lung to regulate fluid balance. Nephrogenic pulmonary edema, therefore, is the net effect of fluid accumulation in the lung as a result of both the macroscopic and microscopic effects of AKI.

  6. Characterization of a murine model of monocrotaline pyrrole-induced acute lung injury

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    Pullamsetti Soni S

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New animal models of chronic pulmonary hypertension in mice are needed. The injection of monocrotaline is an established model of pulmonary hypertension in rats. The aim of this study was to establish a murine model of pulmonary hypertension by injection of the active metabolite, monocrotaline pyrrole. Methods Survival studies, computed tomographic scanning, histology, bronchoalveolar lavage were performed, and arterial blood gases and hemodynamics were measured in animals which received an intravenous injection of different doses of monocrotaline pyrrole. Results Monocrotaline pyrrole induced pulmonary hypertension in Sprague Dawley rats. When injected into mice, monocrotaline pyrrole induced dose-dependant mortality in C57Bl6/N and BALB/c mice (dose range 6–15 mg/kg bodyweight. At a dose of 10 mg/kg bodyweight, mice developed a typical early-phase acute lung injury, characterized by lung edema, neutrophil influx, hypoxemia and reduced lung compliance. In the late phase, monocrotaline pyrrole injection resulted in limited lung fibrosis and no obvious pulmonary hypertension. Conclusion Monocrotaline and monocrotaline pyrrole pneumotoxicity substantially differs between the animal species.

  7. Comparison of exogenous surfactant therapy, mechanical ventilation with high end-expiratory pressure and partial liquid ventilation in a model of acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hartog (Anneke); G.F. Vazquez de Anda; D.A.M.P.J. Gommers (Diederik); U. Kaisers; S.J.C. Verbrugge (Serge); R. Schnabel; B.F. Lachmann (Burkhard)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWe have compared three treatment strategies, that aim to prevent repetitive alveolar collapse, for their effect on gas exchange, lung mechanics, lung injury, protein transfer into the alveoli and surfactant system, in a model of acute lung injury. In adult

  8. Clinical review: Exogenous surfactant therapy for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome - where do we go from here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterised by severe hypoxemic respiratory failure and poor lung compliance. Despite advances in clinical management, morbidity and mortality remains high. Supportive measures including protective lung ventilation confer a survival advantage in patients with ARDS, but management is otherwise limited by the lack of effective pharmacological therapies. Surfactant dysfunction with quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of both phospholipids and proteins are characteristic of patients with ARDS. Exogenous surfactant replacement in animal models of ARDS and neonatal respiratory distress syndrome shows consistent improvements in gas exchange and survival. However, whilst some adult studies have shown improved oxygenation, no survival benefit has been demonstrated to date. This lack of clinical efficacy may be related to disease heterogeneity (where treatment responders may be obscured by nonresponders), limited understanding of surfactant biology in patients or an absence of therapeutic effect in this population. Crucially, the mechanism of lung injury in neonates is different from that in ARDS: surfactant inhibition by plasma constituents is a typical feature of ARDS, whereas the primary pathology in neonates is the deficiency of surfactant material due to reduced synthesis. Absence of phenotypic characterisation of patients, the lack of an ideal natural surfactant material with adequate surfactant proteins, coupled with uncertainty about optimal timing, dosing and delivery method are some of the limitations of published surfactant replacement clinical trials. Recent advances in stable isotope labelling of surfactant phospholipids coupled with analytical methods using electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry enable highly specific molecular assessment of phospholipid subclasses and synthetic rates that can be utilised for phenotypic characterisation and individualisation of exogenous surfactant

  9. Alpha glucocorticoid receptor expression in different experimental rat models of acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertorelli, Giuseppina; Pesci, Alberto; Peveri, Silvia; Mergoni, Mario; Corradi, Attilio; Cantoni, Anna Maria; Tincani, Giovanni; Bobbio, Antonio; Rusca, Michele; Carbognani, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a frequent form of hypoxiemic respiratory failure caused by the acute development of diffuse lung inflammation. Dysregulated systemic inflammation with persistent elevation of circulating inflammatory cytokines is the

  10. Role of Claudin-5 in the Attenuation of Murine Acute Lung Injury by Simvastatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiguo; Sharma, Rajesh; Rizzo, Alicia N.; Siegler, Jessica H.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2014-01-01

    The statins are now recognized to have pleiotropic properties, including augmentation of endothelial barrier function. To explore the mechanisms involved, we investigated the effect of simvastatin on endothelial cell (EC) tight junctions. Western blotting of human pulmonary artery ECs treated with simvastatin (5 μM) confirmed a significant time-dependent increase (16–48 h) in claudin-5 protein expression compared with controls, without detectable alterations in zonula occludens-1 or occludin. These effects were associated with membrane translocation of VE-cadherin, whereas translocation of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin; silencing RNA) inhibited simvastatin-induced claudin-5 up-regulation. Moreover, simvastatin treatment of ECs induced increased phosphorylation of both FoxO1 and β-catenin, transcriptional regulators of claudin-5 expression mediated by VE-cadherin. Subsequently, we found no effect of claudin-5 silencing on EC barrier protection by simvastatin in response to thrombin stimulation, as measured by either transendothelial electrical resistance or by EC monolayer flux of FITC-dextran (2,000 kD). However, silencing of claudin-5 did significantly attenuate simvastatin-mediated EC barrier protection in response to thrombin, as measured by monolayer flux of sodium fluorescein (376 Da). Finally, employing a murine model of LPS-induced acute lung injury, there was no effect of claudin-5 silencing in vivo (intratracheal injection) on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein or cell counts, but LPS-induced lung tissue extravasation of the small molecular weight markers, sodium fluorescein and Hochst stain (562 Da), were significantly increased in claudin-5–silenced animals compared with simvastatin-treated control animals. These findings implicate a distinct mechanism underlying size-selective endothelial barrier–protective properties of statins, and may ultimately lead to new novel therapeutic targets for patients with acute lung injury. PMID

  11. Sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury in mice: Implications for acute and chronic lung disease in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingappan, Krithika, E-mail: lingappa@bcm.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, MC: FC530.01, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I. [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, MC: FC530.01, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Barrios, Roberto [Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine, The Methodist Hospital Physician Organization, 6565 Fannin Street, Suite M227, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Moorthy, Bhagavatula [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, MC: FC530.01, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO{sub 2} > 0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha (8-iso-PGF 2α) (LC–MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2α levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F > M) and VEGF (M > F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. - Highlights: • Male mice were more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than females. • Sex differences in inflammatory markers were observed. • CYP1A expression was higher in females after hyperoxia exposure.

  12. [Current approaches to the treatment of severe hypoxic respiratory insufficiency (acute lung injury; acute respiratory distress syndrome)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, S; Müller, T; Pfeifer, M

    2011-02-01

    Lung-protective ventilation with a low tidal volume, plateau pressure 90% and permissive hypercapnia results in reduction of the mortality rate in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The level of the positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) must be chosen in relation to oxygen requirement. High frequency oscillatory ventilation and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist are promising methods. However, further studies with firm end-points have to be awaited before a final judgment is possible. Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can ensure life-sustaining gas exchange in patients with severe vitally compromised pulmonary failure, to provide time for lung tissue to heal and reduce ventilatory stress. The latest guidelines for analgesia and sedation in intensive care medicine demand consistent monitoring of the level of sedation and the intensity of pain. The sedation should be interrupted daily, with phases of awakenings and, if possible, spontaneous breathing. Methods of supportive treatment: Positional treatment (prone position) and inhalation of vasodilators can improve ventilation/perfusion mismatch and thus oxygenation. However, administration of surfactant is currently not advised in adult respiratory failure. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Ghrelin ameliorates acute lung injury induced by oleic acid via inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiuli; Liu, Zhijun; Yu, Ting; Yang, Haitao; Feng, Linlin

    2018-03-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is associated with excessive mortality and lacks appropriate therapy. Ghrelin is a novel peptide that protects the lung against ALI. This study aimed to investigate whether endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) mediates the protective effect of ghrelin on ALI. We used a rat oleic acid (OA)-induced ALI model. Pulmonary impairment was detected by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining, lung mechanics, wet/dry weight ratio, and arterial blood gas analysis. Plasma and lung content of ghrelin was examined by ELISA, and mRNA expression was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Protein levels were detected by western blot. Rats with OA treatment showed significant pulmonary injury, edema, inflammatory cellular infiltration, cytokine release, hypoxia and CO 2 retention as compared with controls. Plasma and pulmonary content of ghrelin was reduced in rats with ALI, and mRNA expression was downregulated. Ghrelin (10nmol/kg) treatment ameliorated the above symptoms, but treatment with the ghrelin antagonists D-Lys 3 GHRP-6 (1μmol/kg) and JMV 2959 (6mg/kg) exacerbated the symptoms. ERS induced by OA was prevented by ghrelin and augmented by ghrelin antagonist treatment. The ERS inducer, tunicamycin (Tm) prevented the ameliorative effect of ghrelin on ALI. The decreased ratio of p-Akt and Akt induced by OA was improved by ghrelin treatment, and was further exacerbated by ghrelin antagonists. Ghrelin protects against ALI by inhibiting ERS. These results provide a new target for prevention and therapy of ALI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ventilator „Chirana Aura V“ In Two Models Of Neonatal Acute Lung Injury - A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomclkova L.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In severe respiratory insufficiency, neonatal and pediatric patients should be ventilated artificially by a ventilator. Aim of this experimental study was to evaluate whether the newly developed ventilator Chirana Aura V may effectively ventilate the lungs of animals with two different models of acute lung injury: acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS induced by repetitive saline lavage and meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS induced by intratracheal instillation of neonatal meconium. The experiments were performed on 10 adult rabbits (New Zealand white. In ARDS group (n=5, the lungs were repetitively lavaged with saline (30 ml/kg until partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2 in arterial blood was under 26.7 kPa at inspiratory fraction of oxygen FiO2=1.0. In MAS group (n=5, animals were instilled 4 ml/kg of suspension of human meconium (25 mg/ml. When the model of acute lung injury was developed, animals were ventilated for additional 2 hours with pressure control ventilation (PCV regime by ventilator Chirana Aura V. Ventilatory parameters, blood gases, acid-base balance, end-tidal CO2, O2 saturation of hemoglobin, oxygenation indexes, ventilation efficiency index, dynamic lung compliance, and right-to-left pulmonary shunts were measured and calculated in regular time intervals. In both experimental groups, used ventilatory settings provided acceptable gas exchange within the period of observation. Thus, the results indicate that ventilator Chirana Aura V might be suitable for ventilation of animal models of acute lung injury. However, further pre-clinical investigation is needed before its use may be recommended in neonatal and/or pediatric patients with acute lung injury.

  15. Prevention of immune-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury; from bloodbank to patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Műller, Marcella C A; Porcelijn, Leendert; Vlaar, Alexander P J

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion related morbidity and mortality. Immune-mediated TRALI is caused by leucocyte and neutrophil antibodies in the transfused blood products that react with white blood cell antigens of the recipient, hereby inducing endothelial damage and lung injury. About two thirds of TRALI cases are thought to be immune-mediated. Both Human Leucocyte Antibodies (HLA Class I and II) and Human Neutrophil Antibodies (HNA) are involved in TRALI. Most antibodies result from allo-exposure of the blood donor, with multiparous donors having the highest incidence of antibodies. Detection of anti-leucocyte and anti-neutrophil antibodies is complex and many uncertainties still exist regarding the interpretation of the test results. In this review we discuss the evidence and effectiveness of measurements to prevent immune-mediated TRALI from a bloodbank and bedside perspective. From a bloodbank perspective various preventive measures have been implicated. In some countries bloodbanks have successfully implemented donor selection strategies, ranging from testing of allo-exposed donors for leucocyte antibodies to the exclusion of all females from donating high plasma volume products. Another strategy involves dilution of antibodies present by pooling of plasma donations of multiple donors. From a bedside view, the most important measure to prevent TRALI is to limit patients' exposure to allogenic bloodproducts. Furthermore recognition and awareness of the syndrome need to be heightened among clinicians.

  16. Age-, sex-, and race-based differences among patients enrolled versus not enrolled in acute lung injury clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Colin R; Erickson, Sara E; Watkins, Timothy R; Matthay, Michael A; Hudson, Leonard D; Rubenfeld, Gordon D

    2010-06-01

    Little is known about the participation of racial/ethnic minorities, women, and the elderly into critical care clinical trials. We sought to characterize the representation of racial and ethnic minorities, women, and older patients in clinical trials of patients with acute lung injury and to determine the reasons for nonenrollment. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of pooled screening logs from 44 academic hospitals participating in three multicentered, randomized, controlled trials conducted by the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network from 1996 to 2005. None. We calculated odds ratios of enrollment for age, sex, racial groups, and the odds ratio for the presence of each exclusion criterion by age, sex, and race adjusted for demographics, acute lung injury risk factor, study, and study center. A total of 10.4% of 17,459 screened patients with acute lung injury were enrolled. The median (range) enrollment by center was 15% (2% to 88%). Older patients of both sexes were less likely to be enrolled, but older women were more likely to be enrolled than older men. The adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for enrollment among men > or =75 yrs of age was 0.59 (0.45 to 0.77) and for women > or =75 yrs of age was 0.45 (0.32 to 0.62) compared with men enrollment among all racial/ethnic groups. Older patients and men were less likely to be enrolled because of medical comorbidity. Among all patients who were not enrolled, black patients and their families refused participation more often than white patients. Older patients are less likely to be enrolled in acute lung injury clinical trials. There is no evidence that women or racial/ethnic minorities are underrepresented in acute lung injury clinical trials.

  17. Effects of an endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor on phorbol myristate acetate-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hen I; Chu, Shi Jye; Wang, David; Chen, Hsing I; Hsu, Kang

    2003-01-01

    1. In the present study, we determined whether the endogenous nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) inhibitor Nomega-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) could ameliorate the acute lung injury (ALI) induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in rat isolated lung. 2. Typical ALI was induced successfully by PMA during 60 min of observation. At 2 micro g/kg, PMA elicited a significant increase in microvascular permeability (measured using the capillary filtration coefficient Kfc), lung weight gain, lung weight/bodyweight ratio, pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and protein concentration of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. 3. Pretreatment with the NOS inhibitor l-NAME (5 mmol/L) significantly attenuated ALI. None of the parameters reflective of lung injury showed significant increase, except for PAP (P < 0.001). The addition of l-arginine (4 mmol/L) blocked the protective effective of l-NAME. Pretreatment with l-arginine exacerbated PMA-induced lung injury. 4. These data suggest that l-NAME significantly ameliorates ALI induced by PMA in rats, indicating that endogenous NO plays a key role in the development of lung oedema in PMA-induced lung injury.

  18. Protective Effects of Cucurbitacin B on Acute Lung Injury Induced by Sepsis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Shu; Liu, Xing; Lv, Shuguang; Wang, Zhifang

    2017-03-18

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of cucurbitacin B (CuB) on sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats. MATERIAL AND METHODS An ALI model was made by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in SD rats. Rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n=15 per group): animals undergoing a sham CLP (sham group); animals undergoing CLP (CLP control group); animals undergoing CLP and treated with CuB at 1 mg/kg of body weight (bw) (low-dose CuB [L-CuB] group), animals undergoing CuB at 2 mg/kg of bw (mid-dose CuB [M-CuB] group); and animals undergoing CuB at 5 mg/kg of bw (high-dose CuB [H-CuB] group). Samples of blood and lung tissue were harvested at different time points (6, 12, and 24 hour post-CLP surgery) for the detection of indicators which represented ALI. Five rats were respectively sacrificed at each time point. Pathological changes of lung tissue were observed by H&E staining. Another 50 rats were distributed into the same five groups to record the 72 hour survival rates. RESULTS Treatment with CuB significantly increased the blood gas PaO2 levels and decreased lung wet/dry (W/D) ratio (pCuB. In addition, CuB performed its pulmonary protection effects in a dose-depended manner. CONCLUSIONS CuB can effectively improve the pulmonary gas exchange function, reduce pulmonary edema, and inhibit the inflammatory response in the lung, revealing that CuB may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for sepsis-induced ALI.

  19. Recruitment maneuver: RAMP versus CPAP pressure profile in a model of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, D R; Contador, R S; Baez-Garcia, C S N; Xisto, D G; Cagido, V R; Martini, S V; Morales, M M; Rocco, P R M; Faffe, D S; Zin, W A

    2009-10-31

    We examined whether recruitment maneuvers (RMs) with gradual increase in airway pressure (RAMP) provide better outcome than continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Wistar rats received saline intraperitoneally (0.5 mL, CTRL) or paraquat (15 mg/kg, ALI). Twenty-four hours later lung mechanics [static elastance, viscoelastic component of elastance, resistive, viscoelastic and total pressures] were determined before and after recruitment with 40cmH2O CPAP for 40s or 40-s-long slow increase in pressure up to 40cmH2O (RAMP) followed by 0 or 5 cmH2O PEEP. Fractional area of alveolar collapse and PCIII mRNA were determined. All mechanical parameters and the fraction area of alveolar collapse were higher in ALI compared to CTRL. Only RAMP-PEEP maneuver significantly improved lung mechanics and decreased PCIII mRNA expression (53%) compared with ALI, while both RMs followed by PEEP decreased alveolar collapse. In conclusion, in the present experimental ALI model, RAMP followed by 5cm H2O PEEP yields a better outcome.

  20. Incidence, risk factors, and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in critically ill children: a retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Hilde D.; Augustijn, Quinten J. J.; van Woensel, Job B.; Bos, Albert P.; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) that develops within 6 hours after transfusion (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. Both incidence and patient and transfusion-related risk factors are well studied in the adult critically ill patient population. Clinical data on TRALI

  1. Non-invasive measurement of cardiac output in patients with acute lung injury using the carbon dioxide rebreathing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neviere, R; Mathieu, D; Riou, Y; Chagnon, J L; Wattel, F

    1994-01-01

    To compare measurement of cardiac output by the CO2 rebreathing method with the thermodilution cardiac output technique in mechanically ventilated patients with acute lung injury. Prospective study comparing two methods of cardiac output measurement in 22 consecutive patients with acute lung injury. Intensive care unit of a university hospital. Twenty-two mechanically ventilated patients with acute lung injury monitored with systemic and pulmonary artery catheters. Cardiac output was determined using both the thermodilution technique and an indirect CO2 Fick method. Veno-arterial CO2 content difference was calculated from an estimated mixed venous CO2 tension obtained by an equilibrium CO2 rebreathing method and measured arterial CO2 tension. Carbon dioxide pressure was converted to content using the equation of the CO2 dissociation curve described by McHardy. A wide range of cardiac index was studied from 2.7-5.7 l/min/m2. There was a significant correlation between thermodilution and CO2 rebreathing methods (r2 = 0.82, p non-invasive technique to determine cardiac output in mechanically ventilated patients with acute lung injury.

  2. Toll-like receptor 4 mediates acute lung injury induced by high mobility group box-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxiao Deng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute lung injury (ALI is considered to be the major cause of respiratory failure in critically ill patients. Clinical studies have found that in patients with sepsis and after hemorrhage, the elevated level of high mobility group box-1(HMGB-1 in their circulation is highly associated with ALI, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Extracellular HMGB-1 has cytokine-like properties and can bind to Toll-like Receptor-4 (TLR4, which was reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of ALI. The aim of this study was to determine whether HMGB-1 directly contributes to ALI and whether TLR4 signaling pathway is involved in this process. METHODS: Recombinant human HMGB-1 (rhHMGB-1 was used to induce ALI in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Lung specimens were collected 2 h after HMGB-1 treatment. The levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, TLR4 protein, and TLR4 mRNA in lungs as well as pathological changes of lung tissue were assessed. In cell studies, the alveolar macrophage cell line, NR8383, was collected 24 h after rhHMGB-1 treatment and the levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in cultured medium as well as TLR4 protein and mRNA levels in the cell were examined. TLR4-shRNA-lentivirus was used to inhibit TLR4 expression, and a neutralizing anti-HMGB1 antibody was used to neutralize rhHMGB-1 both in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS: Features of lung injury and significant elevation of IL-1β and TNF-α levels were found in lungs of rhHMGB-1-treated animals. Cultured NR8383 cells were activated by rhHMGB-1 treatment and resulted in the release of IL-1β and TNF-α. TLR4 expression was greatly up-regulated by rhHMGB-1. Inhibition of TLR4 or neutralization of HMGB1 with a specific antibody also attenuated the inflammatory response induced by HMGB-1 both in vivo and in vitro. CONCLUSION: HMGB-1 can activate alveolar macrophages to produce proinflammatory cytokines and induce ALI through a mechanism that relies on TLR-4.

  3. The Nitrated Fatty Acid 10-Nitro-oleate Diminishes Severity of LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind T. Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is an inflammatory condition culminating in respiratory failure. There is currently no effective pharmacological treatment. Nitrated fatty acids (NFAs have been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects. We therefore hypothesized that delivery of NFAs directly to the site of inflammation would reduce the severity of ALI. Pulmonary delivery of 10-nitro-oleate following endotoxin-induced ALI in mice reduced markers of lung inflammation and injury, including capillary leakage, lung edema, infiltration of neutrophils into the lung, and oxidant stress, as well as plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Nitro-oleate delivery likewise downregulated expression of proinflammatory genes by alveolar macrophages, key cells in regulation of lung inflammation. These effects may be accounted for by the observed increases in the activity of PPAR-γ and the PPAR-γ-induced antioxidant transcription factor Nrf2, together with the decreased activity of NF-κB. Our results demonstrate that pulmonary delivery of NFAs reduces severity of acute lung injury and suggest potential utility of these molecules in other inflammatory lung diseases.

  4. Thalidomide alleviates acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury via down-regulation of NFκB induced TNF-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Peng; Li, Hong-Yun; Ji, Shu-Sheng; Li, Wen; Fan, Li-Juan

    2014-09-01

    We studied the effect of thalidomide on NFκB-induced TNF-α in acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury in the rat. Rats were intragastrically administered thalidomide (100mg/kg) daily for 8 days and then acute pancreatitis was induced by retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the rat biliopancreatic duct. Serum amylase (AMY), blood oxygen partial pressure (PaO2), ratios of lung wet/dry weight, and cytoplasmic IκBα and TNF-α protein and nuclear NFκBp65 protein were measured. Also, lung NFκBp65 and TNF-α mRNA were measured. Compared with the model group, the pathological score of the pancreas and lung, serum AMY, ratios of lung wet/dry weight, and lung NFκBp65 and TNF-α mRNA and protein of rats given thalidomide were decreased significantly (PThalidomide may inhibit TNF-α expression via down-regulation of the NFκB signaling pathway to alleviate acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury in rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Multiple parametric approaches to assess acute radiation lung injury of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Soni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of whole body gamma irradiation (WBI in single fraction was studied, as well as its influen­ce on the secretion of various biochemical markers and cellular component that could be used as acute radiation lung injury marker. Sprague dawley rats were treated with WBI (60Co of radiation dose from 1 Gy to 5 Gy (dose rate – 0.95 Gy/min. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was retrieved from all animals in control and radiation treated groups up to 72 h post radiation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF was analyzed for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, acid phosphatase (AP, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, cell count and total protein. Intragroup and intergroup comparison of BALF parameters at different radiation doses showed significant difference. LDH was significantly increased as the dose increased from 1Gy to 5Gy (P = 0.00 after 2 h with effect size of difference (r > 0.3. ALP was significantly altered after 3Gy and 4Gy (P < 0.05. AP was significantly altered at 2Gy-5Gy (P < 0.05. Total protein level changed significantly from 1Gy to 5Gy (P < 0.00. Cellular content of BALF showed significant changes after radiation exposure. BALF parameters like LDH, AP, ALP, neutrophils, lymphocytes, total leukocyte count and total protein were sensitive to radiation exposure and their levels vary significantly up to 72 h after single whole body radiation exposure in Sprague dawley rats. It can be concluded that the biochemical indices in BALF have more wide application in evaluation of acute radiation induced lung injury.

  6. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on the sigmoid equation in experimental acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayle, Frederique; Guerin, Claude; Viale, Jean-Paul; Richard, Jean-Christophe; Annat, Guy

    2004-11-01

    To describe inflation and deflation volume-pressure (V-P) curves of the respiratory system by the sigmoidal equation at different levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in acute lung injury. Experimental study. Physiological laboratory in a university setting. Six pigs of 25 kg each. Acute lung injury was induced by oleic acid. PEEP was applied from 0 to 15 cm H(2)O and from 15 to 0 cm H(2)O for 10 min in steps of 5 cmH(2)O. Inflation and deflation V-P curves were constructed from an automated super-syringe that delivers a constant flow of 7 l/min in both inspiratory and expiratory directions. V-P curves were obtained at each level of PEEP without disconnecting the animal from the ventilator. The experimental data were fitted to the sigmoid equation which provided the true inflection point (c), the point of maximal compliance increase (Pmci) reflecting opening/closure and the point of maximal compliance decrease (Pmcd) reflecting end of recruitment/onset of de-recruitment. The sigmoid equation provided an excellent fit. The values of the coefficients of determination were greater than 0.970 (median 0.996, IQR 0.994-0.997 for the 84 determinations). Negative values of Pmci in the deflation limb of the V-P curve were recorded in five pigs, suggesting closure below the volume range studied. Inflation and deflation V-P curves at different PEEPs can be fitted by the sigmoid equation. However, further work is needed to investigate the meaning of negative values for Pmci.

  7. Spontaneous breathing with biphasic positive airway pressure attenuates lung injury in hydrochloric acid-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jingen; Zhang, Heng; Sun, Bing; Yang, Rui; He, Hangyong; Zhan, Qingyuan

    2014-06-01

    It has been proved that spontaneous breathing (SB) with biphasic positive airway pressure (BIPAP) can improve lung aeration in acute respiratory distress syndrome compared with controlled mechanical ventilation. The authors hypothesized that SB with BIPAP would attenuate lung injury in acute respiratory distress syndrome compared with pressure-controlled ventilation. Twenty male New Zealand white rabbits with hydrochloric acid aspiration-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome were randomly ventilated using the BIPAP either with SB (BIPAP plus SB group) or without SB (BIPAP minus SB group) for 5 h. Inspiration pressure was adjusted to maintain the tidal volume at 6 ml/kg. Both groups received the same positive end-expiratory pressure level at 5 cm H2O for hemodynamic goals. Eight healthy animals without ventilatory support served as the control group. The BIPAP plus SB group presented a lower ratio of dead space ventilation to tidal volume, a lower respiratory rate, and lower minute ventilation. No significant difference in the protein levels of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 in plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung tissue were measured between the two experimental groups. However, SB resulted in lower messenger ribonucleic acid levels of interleukin-6 (mean ± SD; 1.8 ± 0.7 vs. 2.6 ± 0.5; P = 0.008) and interleukin-8 (2.2 ± 0.5 vs. 2.9 ± 0.6; P = 0.014) in lung tissues. In addition, lung histopathology revealed less injury in the BIPAP plus SB group (lung injury score, 13.8 ± 4.6 vs. 21.8 ± 5.7; P hydrochloric acid-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome, SB with BIPAP attenuated lung injury and improved respiratory function compared with controlled ventilation with low tidal volume.

  8. Arginase 1: an unexpected mediator of pulmonary capillary barrier dysfunction in models of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rudolf; Czikora, Istvàn; Sridhar, Supriya; Zemskov, Evgeny A; Oseghale, Aluya; Circo, Sebastian; Cederbaum, Stephen D; Chakraborty, Trinad; Fulton, David J; Caldwell, Robert W; Romero, Maritza J

    2013-01-01

    The integrity of epithelial and endothelial barriers in the lower airspaces of the lungs has to be tightly regulated, in order to prevent leakage and to assure efficient gas exchange between the alveoli and capillaries. Both G(-) and G(+) bacterial toxins, such as lipopolysaccharide and pneumolysin, respectively, can be released in high concentrations within the pulmonary compartments upon antibiotic treatment of patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or severe pneumonia. These toxins are able to impair endothelial barrier function, either directly, or indirectly, by induction of pro-inflammatory mediators and neutrophil sequestration. Toxin-induced endothelial hyperpermeability can involve myosin light chain phosphorylation and/or microtubule rearrangement. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was proposed to be a guardian of basal barrier function, since eNOS knock-out mice display an impaired expression of inter-endothelial junction proteins and as such an increased vascular permeability, as compared to wild type mice. The enzyme arginase, the activity of which can be regulated by the redox status of the cell, exists in two isoforms - arginase 1 (cytosolic) and arginase 2 (mitochondrial) - both of which can be expressed in lung microvascular endothelial cells. Upon activation, arginase competes with eNOS for the substrate l-arginine, as such impairing eNOS-dependent NO generation and promoting reactive oxygen species generation by the enzyme. This mini-review will discuss recent findings regarding the interaction between bacterial toxins and arginase during acute lung injury and will as such address the role of arginase in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction.

  9. [Acute respiratory insufficiency due to severe lung injury - ARDS and ALI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, M

    2010-09-01

    As a consequence of the novel therapeutic option of mechanical ventilation in early intensive care medicine, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was defined as a disease entity of its own representing the most severe form of acute lung injury (ALI). Since its first description four decades ago, our knowledge about the aetiology, physiology, histology and epidemiology of this lethal pulmonary complication of severe acute diseases such as pneumonia or sepsis has been increasing steadily. The initial major therapeutic advances were due to improvements in intensive care medical procedures and monitoring. The large ARDS Network clinical trial on the magnitude of tidal volume impressively demonstrated the feasibility of targeted clinical trials in patients with ARDS that provide robust evidence in this field. This clinical trial, as well as following large-scale trials in ARDS patients, led to significant changes of ventilation therapy and therapeutic strategies that improve the outcome of this disease entity. Advances in the standardisation of care for ARDS patients involving innovative therapeutic procedures such as extracorporeal gas exchange systems will lead to a further improvement in ARDS management and outcome. Modern pulmonary medicine can play a pivotal role in this process and can contribute its rich experiences in all areas of the respiratory system. Copyright Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York.

  10. Agmatine Protects against Zymosan-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice by Inhibiting NF-κB-Mediated Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanfei Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is characterized by overwhelming lung inflammation and anti-inflammation treatment is proposed to be a therapeutic strategy for ALI. Agmatine, a cationic polyamine formed by decarboxylation of L-arginine, is an endogenous neuromodulator that plays protective roles in diverse central nervous system (CNS disorders. Consistent with its neuromodulatory and neuroprotective properties, agmatine has been reported to have beneficial effects on depression, anxiety, hypoxic ischemia, Parkinson’s disease, and gastric disorder. In this study, we tested the effect of agmatine on the lung inflammation induced by Zymosan (ZYM challenge in mice. We found that agmatine treatment relieved ZYM-induced acute lung injury, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, wet/dry weight ratio, and myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissue. This was accompanied by reduced levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in lung and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and decreased iNOS expression in lung. Furthermore, agmatine inhibited the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB and subsequently blocked the activation of nuclear factor (NF-κB induced by Zymosan. Taken together, our results showed that agmatine treatment inhibited NF-κB signaling in lungs and protected mice against ALI induced by Zymosan, suggesting agmatine may be a potential safe and effective approach for the treatment of ALI.

  11. Ketamine attenuates sepsis-induced acute lung injury via regulation of HMGB1-RAGE pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kehan; Yang, Jianxue; Han, Xuechang

    2016-05-01

    High mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) and receptor for the advanced glycation end product (RAGE) play important roles in the development of sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Ketamine is considered to confer protective effects on ALI during sepsis. In this study, we investigated the effects of ketamine on HMGB1-RAGE activation in a rat model of sepsis-induced ALI. ALI was induced in wild type (WT) and RAGE deficient (RAGE(-/-)) rats by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or HMGB1 to mimic sepsis-induced ALI. Rats were randomly divided to six groups: sham-operation+normal saline (NS, 10 mL/kg), sham-operation+ketamine (10 mg/kg), CLP/HMGB1+NS (10 mL/kg), CLP/HMGB1+ketamine (5 mg/kg), CLP/HMGB1+ketamine (7.5 mg/kg), and CLP/HMGB1+ketamine (10 mg/kg) groups. NS and ketamine were administered at 3 and 12 h after CLP/HMGB1 via intraperitoneal injection. Pathological changes of lung, inflammatory cell counts, expression of HMGB1 and RAGE, and concentrations of various inflammatory mediators in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) and lung tissue were then assessed. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathways in the lung were also evaluated. CLP/HMGB1 increased the wet to dry weight ratio and myeloperoxidase activity in lung, the number of total cells, neutrophils, and macrophages in the BALF, and inflammatory mediators in the BALF and lung tissues. Moreover, expression of HMGB1 and RAGE in lung tissues was increased after CLP. Ketamine inhibited all the above effects. It also inhibited the activation of IκB-α, NF-κB p65, and MAPK. Ketamine protects rats against HMGB1-RAGE activation in a rat model of sepsis-induced ALI. These effects may partially result from reductions in NF-κB and MAPK. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Increased claudin-3, -4 and -18 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid reflect severity of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wenting; Rong, Linyi; Liu, Yinkun; Song, Yuanlin; Li, Yan; Pan, Jue

    2013-05-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by disruption of lung epithelial and endothelial cells, leading to increased membrane permeability and loss of barrier function. Claudins are key components of tight junctions (TJ) that regulate paracellular permeability, and play an important role in alveolar epithelial barrier function and fluid clearance. However, whether claudin-3, -4, -18 or -5 expression changes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA)-induced ALI and the clinical significance of such change is unknown. Rats underwent intratracheal instillation of PA, and samples were collected prior to and 3, 9 and 24 h after instillation. Lung injury was evaluated by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) total protein, arterial blood gas analysis, lung injury score, and expression of surfactant protein and von Willebrand factor. Claudin expression in lung was measured with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, and in BALF by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The relationship between claudins in BALF and lung injury grade were analysed with Spearman's rank correlation. Alveolar epithelium, endothelium and TJ ultrastructure were observed with electron microscopy. Claudin-4, -18 and -5 mRNA levels increased significantly 24 h after PA instillation in the most severe lung injury cases, whereas there was no significant change in protein levels. Claudin-3, -4 and -18 levels in BALF increased most 24 h after PA instillation; this paralleled alveolar epithelial disruption and lung injury severity. Claudin-3, -4 and -18 released into the alveolar compartment is highly associated with barrier function loss caused by alveolar epithelial injury. © 2012 The Authors. Respirology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  13. Acute brain trauma, lung injury, and pneumonia: more than just altered mental status and decreased airway protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Parker J; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Bosarge, Patrick L; Wagener, Brant M

    2017-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Even when patients survive the initial insult, there is significant morbidity and mortality secondary to subsequent pulmonary edema, acute lung injury (ALI), and nosocomial pneumonia. Whereas the relationship between TBI and secondary pulmonary complications is recognized, little is known about the mechanistic interplay of the two phenomena. Changes in mental status secondary to acute brain injury certainly impair airway- and lung-protective mechanisms. However, clinical and translational evidence suggests that more specific neuronal and cellular mechanisms contribute to impaired systemic and lung immunity that increases the risk of TBI-mediated lung injury and infection. To better understand the cellular mechanisms of that immune impairment, we review here the current clinical data that support TBI-induced impairment of systemic and lung immunity. Furthermore, we also review the animal models that attempt to reproduce human TBI. Additionally, we examine the possible role of damage-associated molecular patterns, the chlolinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, and sex dimorphism in post-TBI ALI. In the last part of the review, we discuss current treatments and future pharmacological therapies, including fever control, tracheostomy, and corticosteroids, aimed to prevent and treat pulmonary edema, ALI, and nosocomial pneumonia after TBI. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Low tidal volume protects pulmonary vasomotor function from “second-hit” injury in acute lung injury rats

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    Pan Chun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sepsis could induce indirect acute lung injury(ALI, and pulmonary vasomotor dysfunction. While low tidal volume is advocated for treatment of ALI patients. However, there is no evidence for low tidal volume that it could mitigate pulmonary vasomotor dysfunction in indirect ALI. Our study is to evaluate whether low tidal volume ventilation could protect the pulmonary vascular function in indirect lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced acute lung injury rats. Methods An indirect ALI rat model was induced by intravenous infusion of LPS. Thirty rats (n = 6 in each group were randomly divided into (1Control group; (2 ALI group; (3 LV group (tidal volume of 6mL/kg; (4 MV group (tidal volume of 12mL/kg; (5VLV group (tidal volume of 3mL/kg. Mean arterial pressure and blood gas analysis were monitored every 2 hours throughout the experiment. Lung tissues and pulmonary artery rings were immediately harvested after the rats were bled to be killed to detect the contents of endothelin-1 (ET-1, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and TNF-α. Acetylcholine (Ache-induced endothelium-dependent and sodium nitroprusside (SNP-induced endothelium-independent relaxation of isolated pulmonary artery rings were measured by tensiometry. Results There was no difference within groups concerning blood pressure, PaCO2 and SNP-induced endothelium-independent relaxation of pulmonary artery rings. Compared with MV group, LV group significantly reduced LPS-induced expression of ET-1 level (113.79 ± 7.33pg/mL vs. 152.52 ± 12.75pg/mL, P P P -7mol/L-10-4mol/L-induced vasodilatation was ameliorated 30% more in LV group than in MV group. Conclusions Low tidal volume could protect the pulmonary vasodilative function during indirect ALI by decreasing vasoconstrictor factors, increasing expressions of vasodilator factors in pulmonary endothelial cells, and inhibiting inflammation injuries.

  15. Diet‐induced obese mice exhibit altered immune responses to acute lung injury induced by Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Taomei; Yuan, Guiqiang; Ren, Yi; Wang, Zhengyi; Jia, Yiping; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Deng, Junliang; Yu, Shumin; Hu, Yanchun; Shen, Liuhong; Ma, Xiaoping; Wang, Ya; Ren, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obesity has been associated with impaired immunity and increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. It also exerts protective effects against mortality secondary to acute lung injury. The effects of obesity on immune responses to acute lung injury induced by Escherichia coli were investigated to determine if the above‐mentioned differences in its effects were related to infection severity. Methods Diet‐induced obesity (DIO) and lean control mice received intranasal instillations of 109 or 1010 CFUs of E. coli. The immune responses were examined at 0 h (uninfected), 24 h, and 96 h postinfection. Results Following infection, the DIO mice exhibited higher leukocyte, interleukin (IL)−10, IL‐6, and tumor necrosis factor‐α levels and more severe lung injury than the lean mice. Following inoculation with 1010 CFUs of E. coli, the DIO mice exhibited higher mortality and more severe inflammation‐induced injury than the lean mice, but no differences in E. coli counts were noted between the two groups. However, inoculated with 109 CFUs of E. coli, the DIO mice exhibited smaller E. coli burdens at 24 h and 96 h after infection, as well as lower concentrations of IL‐10 and tumor necrosis factor‐α and less severe lung injury at 96 h after infection. Conclusions The results support the emerging view that obesity may be beneficial in the setting of milder infection but detrimental in the setting of more severe infection. PMID:27558300

  16. RGD peptides protects against acute lung injury in septic mice through Wisp1-integrin β6 pathway inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xibing; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Xiang; Jin, Shuqing; Tong, Yao; Ren, Hao; Chen, Zhixia; Li, Quan

    2015-04-01

    Acute lung injury is a common consequence of sepsis, a life-threatening inflammatory response caused by severe infection. In this study, we elucidate the attenuating effects of synthetic Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptides (RGDs) on acute lung injury in a sepsis mouse model. We further reveal that the beneficial effects of RGDs stem from their negative regulation of the Wisp1 (WNT1-inducible signaling pathway)-integrin β6 pathway. After inducing sepsis using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), mice were randomized into experimental and control groups, and survival rates were recorded over 7 days, whereas only 20% of mice subjected to CLP survived when compared with untreated controls; the addition of RGDs to this treatment regimen dramatically increased the survival rate to 80%. Histological analysis revealed acute lung injury in CLP-treated mice, whereas those subjected to the combined treatment of CLP and RGDs showed a considerable decrease in lung injury severity. The addition of RGDs also dramatically attenuated other common sepsis-associated effects, such as increased white blood cell number in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and decreased pulmonary capillary barrier function. Furthermore, treatment with RGDs decreased the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid levels of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6, contrary to the CLP treatment alone that increased the levels of these proteins. Interestingly, however, RGDs had no detectable effect on bacterial invasion following sepsis induction. In addition, mice treated with RGDs showed decreased levels of wisp1 and integrin β6 when compared with CLP-treated mice. In the present study, a linkage between Wisp1 and integrin β6 was evaluated in vivo. Most strikingly, RGDs resulted in a decreased association of Wisp1 with integrin β6 based on coimmunoprecipitation analyses. These data suggest that RGDs ameliorate acute lung injury in a sepsis mouse model by inhibiting the Wisp1-integrin β6

  17. Rabdosia japonica var. glaucocalyx Flavonoids Fraction Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

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    Chun-jun Chu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rabdosia japonica var. glaucocalyx (Maxim. Hara, belonging to the Labiatae family, is widely used as an anti-inflammatory and antitumor drug for the treatment of different inflammations and cancers. Aim of the Study. To investigate therapeutic effects and possible mechanism of the flavonoids fraction of Rabdosia japonica var. glaucocalyx (Maxim. Hara (RJFs in acute lung injury (ALI mice induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Materials and Methods. Mice were orally administrated with RJFs (6.4, 12.8, and 25.6 mg/kg per day for 7 days, consecutively, before LPS challenge. Lung specimens and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF were isolated for histopathological examinations and biochemical analysis. The level of complement 3 (C3 in serum was quantified by a sandwich ELISA kit. Results. RJFs significantly attenuated LPS-induced ALI via reducing productions of the level of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β, and significantly reduced complement deposition with decreasing the level of C3 in serum, which was exhibited together with the lowered myeloperoxidase (MPO activity and nitric oxide (NO and protein concentration in BALF. Conclusions. RJFs significantly attenuate LPS-induced ALI via reducing productions of proinflammatory mediators, decreasing the level of complement, and reducing radicals.

  18. Nebulised heparin: a new approach to the treatment of acute lung injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Peter M

    2008-01-01

    The administration of heparin by nebulisation has been proposed for the 'local' treatment of pulmonary coagulation disturbances in acute lung injury (ALI). Alveolar and lung micro-vascular fibrin accumulation and breakdown inhibition indeed play a central role in the development and clinical course of this disease. Preclinical studies provide some evidence of the beneficial effects of heparin inhalation in several animal models of ALI. Clinical investigations are sparse, and trials such as the one presented by Dixon and colleagues in a recent issue of Critical Care are welcome as they provide insight into the possible clinical use of nebulised heparin in this situation. This phase 1 trial involved 16 patients with early ALI, and showed the feasibility of the approach. In addition, non-significant changes in respiratory functions and systemic anticoagulant effects were documented with the four doses tested. The study of Dixon and colleagues adds to data that helps pave the way towards a possible clinical use of heparin by nebulisation in ALI. It remains to be clarified in which clinical situations, at what time points and with which dosages the best chances exist for a beneficial effect on the prognosis of these patients.

  19. Astilbin alleviates sepsis-induced acute lung injury by inhibiting the expression of macrophage inhibitory factor in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Bo; Sun, Li-Chao; Zhi, Li-da; Wen, Qian-Kuan; Qi, Zhi-Wei; Yan, Sheng-Tao; Li, Wen; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2017-10-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome caused by severe infections. Astilbin is a dihydroflavonol derivative found in many medicinal and food plants with multiple pharmacological functions. To investigate the effects of astilbin on sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI), cecal ligation and puncture was performed on rats to establish a sepsis-induced ALI model; these rats were then treated with astilbin at different concentrations. Lung injury scores, including lung wet/dry ratio, protein leakage, myeloperoxidase activity, and inflammatory cell infiltration were determined to evaluate the effects of astilbin on sepsis-induced ALI. We found that astilbin treatment significantly attenuates sepsis-induced lung injury and improves survival rate, lung injury scores, lung wet/dry ratio, protein leakage, myeloperoxidase activity, and inflammatory cell infiltration. Astilbin treatment also dramatically decreased the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Further, astilbin treatment inhibited the expression and production of macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF), which inhibits the inflammatory response. Collectively, these data suggest that astilbin has a protective effect against sepsis-induced ALI by inhibiting MIF-mediated inflammatory responses. This study provides a molecular basis for astilbin as a new medical treatment for sepsis-induced ALI.

  20. Role of hydrogen sulfide in acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Madhav; Wong, Fei Ling; Fu, Di; Lau, Hon Yen; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Moore, Philip K

    2005-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a naturally occurring gas with potent vasodilator activity. Cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) utilize L-cysteine as substrate to form H2S. Of these two enzymes, cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE) is believed to be the key enzyme that forms H2S in the cardiovascular system. Whilst H2S has been reported to relax precontracted rat arteries in vitro and to lower blood pressure in the rat, its effect in an inflammatory condition such as acute pancreatitis has not previously been reported. In this paper, we report the presence of H2S synthesizing enzyme activity and CSE (as determined by mRNA signal) in the pancreas. Also, prophylactic, as well as therapeutic, treatment with the CSE inhibitor, DL-propargylglycine (PAG), significantly reduced the severity of caerulein-induced pancreatitis and associated lung injury, as determined by 1) hyperamylasemia [plasma amylase (U/L) (control, 1204+/-59); prophylactic treatment: placebo, 10635+/-305; PAG, 7904+/-495; therapeutic treatment: placebo, 10427+/-470; PAG, 7811+/-428; Psequestration in the pancreas [pancreatic myeloperoxidase oxidase (MPO) activity (fold increase over control) (prophylactic treatment: placebo, 5.78+/-0.63; PAG, 2.97+/-0.39; therapeutic treatment: placebo, 5.48+/-0.52; PAG, 3.03+/-0.47; PH2S in regulating the severity of pancreatitis and associated lung injury and raise the possibility that H2S may exert similar activity in other forms of inflammation.

  1. Ventilation with lower tidal volumes as compared to conventional tidal volumes for patients without acute lung injury - a preventive randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Determann, Rogier M.; Royakkers, Annick; Wolthuis, Esther K.; Vlaar, Alexander P.; Choi, Goda; Paulus, Frederique; Hofstra, Jorrit-Jan; de Graaff, Mart J.; Korevaar, Johanna C.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Recent cohort studies have identified use of large tidal volumes as a major risk factor for development of lung injury in mechanically ventilated patients without acute lung injury (ALI). We compared the effect of conventional versus lower tidal volumes on pulmonary

  2. Ventilation with lower tidal volumes as compared with conventional tidal volumes for patients without acute lung injury: a preventive randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Determann, R.M.; Royakkers, A.; Wolthuis, E.K.; Vlaar, A.P.; Choi, G.; Paulus, F.; Hofstra, J.J.; Graaff, M.J. de; Korevaar, J.C.; Schultz, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Recent cohort studies have identified the use of large tidal volumes as a major risk factor for development of lung injury in mechanically ventilated patients without acute lung injury (ALI). We compared the effect of conventional with lower tidal volumes on pulmonary inflammation and

  3. Ventilation with lower tidal volumes as compared with conventional tidal volumes for patients without acute lung injury : a preventive randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Determann, Rogier M; Royakkers, Annick; Wolthuis, Esther K; Vlaar, Alexander P; Choi, Goda; Paulus, Frederique; Hofstra, Jorrit-Jan; de Graaff, Mart J; Korevaar, Johanna C; Schultz, Marcus J

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Recent cohort studies have identified the use of large tidal volumes as a major risk factor for development of lung injury in mechanically ventilated patients without acute lung injury (ALI). We compared the effect of conventional with lower tidal volumes on pulmonary inflammation and

  4. Low tidal volume ventilation preconditioning ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Gao, J; Wang, C-J; Zhou, L-J; Fang, X-Z; Yang, L-Q

    2016-07-01

    Effects of low tidal volume (LTV) ventilation preconditioning in endotoxin-induced acute lung injury (ALI) have not been studied. We investigated the effect of LTV ventilation pre-treatment on ALI induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to four groups (n = 8 each): (1) sham rats injected (i.p.) with 0.9% (physiologic) saline; sham rats pre-treated with tidal volume 6 ml/kg ventilation for 1 h followed by injection (i.p.) of physiologic saline (mechanical ventilation; MV-saline group); (2) LPS group (rats injected with LPS (i.p.); rats pre-treated with tidal volume 6 ml/kg ventilation for 1 h before injection (i.p.) with LPS (MV-LPS group). Animals were observed for 6 h. ALI extent was evaluated by lung wet-to-dry ratio, Evans Blue Dye extravasation, and histologic examination. We measured levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6. Apoptotic index (AI) and the expression of pulmonary RhoA, ROCK2 mRNA, and ROCK1 protein in lung alveolar cells was determined. Lipopolysaccharide caused severe ALI, as evidenced by increases in ALI extent, impairment of pulmonary functions, and increases in pulmonary levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and AI. LTV ventilation preconditioning mitigated LPS-induced increases in release of pulmonary pro-inflammatory cytokines and AI of alveolar cells. Expression of pulmonary RhoA, ROCK2 mRNA, and ROCK1 protein was upregulated by LPS and reduced by LTV ventilation pre-treatment. Low tidal volume ventilation preconditioning can attenuate release of pulmonary pro-inflammatory cytokines and decrease the AI induced by severe sepsis. Early protection seems to be mediated partly through inhibition of activation of a Rho pathway. © 2016 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Incidence of Early Acute Kidney Injury in Lung Transplant Patients: A Single-Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, M K; Vayvada, M; Salturk, C; Kutlu, C A; Ari, E

    2017-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in the early period of lung transplantation (LTx). We aimed to describe the incidence and perioperative risk factors associated with AKI following LTx. Clinical data of 30 patients who underwent LTx were retrospectively reviewed. Primary outcomes were development of AKI and patient mortality within 30 postoperative days. Postoperative AKI is determined based on creatinine criteria from Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) classification. Secondary outcomes included the association between AKI and demographic and clinical parameters of patients and treatment modalities in the pre- and postoperative periods. Of the 30 LTx recipients included, AKI occurred in 16 patients (53.4%) within the first 30 days. Length of intensive care unit (P = .06) and hospital stay (P = .008) and mechanical ventilation duration (P = .03) were significantly higher in patients with AKI compared with patients without AKI. Factors independently associated with AKI were intraoperative hypotension (odds ratio [OR] 0.500; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.145 to 26.412, P = .02), longer duration of mechanical ventilation (OR 1.204; 95% CI 0.870 to 1.665, P = .03), and systemic infection (OR 8.067; 95% CI 1.538 to 42.318, P = .014) in the postoperative period. Short-term mortality was similar in patients with and patients without AKI. By the AKIN definition, AKI occurred in half of the patients following LTx. Several variables including intraoperative hypotension, longer duration of mechanical ventilation, and systemic infection in the postoperative period independently predict AKI in LTx recipients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. CD166(pos) subpopulation from differentiated human ES and iPS cells support repair of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Boon Seng; Zheng, Dahai; Li Yeo, Julie Su; Yang, Henry He; Ng, Shi Yan; Wong, Lan Hiong; Zhang, Wencai; Li, Pin; Nichane, Massimo; Asmat, Atasha; Wong, Poo Sing; Wong, Peng Cheang; Su, Lin Lin; Mantalaris, Sakis A; Lu, Jia; Xian, Wa; McKeon, Frank; Chen, Jianzhu; Lim, Elaine Hsuen; Lim, Bing

    2012-12-01

    Previous efforts to derive lung progenitor cells from human embryonic stem (hES) cells using embryoid body formation or stromal feeder cocultures had been limited by low efficiencies. Here, we report a step-wise differentiation method to drive both hES and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells toward the lung lineage. Our data demonstrated a 30% efficiency in generating lung epithelial cells (LECs) that expresses various distal lung markers. Further enrichment of lung progenitor cells using a stem cell marker, CD166 before transplantation into bleomycin-injured NOD/SCID mice resulted in enhanced survivability of mice and improved lung pulmonary functions. Immunohistochemistry of lung sections from surviving mice further confirmed the specific engraftment of transplanted cells in the damaged lung. These cells were shown to express surfactant protein C, a specific marker for distal lung progenitor in the alveoli. Our study has therefore demonstrated the proof-of-concept of using iPS cells for the repair of acute lung injury, demonstrating the potential usefulness of using patient's own iPS cells to prevent immune rejection which arise from allogenic transplantation.

  7. CD166pos Subpopulation From Differentiated Human ES and iPS Cells Support Repair of Acute Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Boon Seng; Zheng, Dahai; Li Yeo, Julie Su; Yang, Henry He; Ng, Shi Yan; Wong, Lan Hiong; Zhang, Wencai; Li, Pin; Nichane, Massimo; Asmat, Atasha; Wong, Poo Sing; Wong, Peng Cheang; Su, Lin Lin; Mantalaris, Sakis A; Lu, Jia; Xian, Wa; McKeon, Frank; Chen, Jianzhu; Lim, Elaine Hsuen; Lim, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Previous efforts to derive lung progenitor cells from human embryonic stem (hES) cells using embryoid body formation or stromal feeder cocultures had been limited by low efficiencies. Here, we report a step-wise differentiation method to drive both hES and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells toward the lung lineage. Our data demonstrated a 30% efficiency in generating lung epithelial cells (LECs) that expresses various distal lung markers. Further enrichment of lung progenitor cells using a stem cell marker, CD166 before transplantation into bleomycin-injured NOD/SCID mice resulted in enhanced survivability of mice and improved lung pulmonary functions. Immunohistochemistry of lung sections from surviving mice further confirmed the specific engraftment of transplanted cells in the damaged lung. These cells were shown to express surfactant protein C, a specific marker for distal lung progenitor in the alveoli. Our study has therefore demonstrated the proof-of-concept of using iPS cells for the repair of acute lung injury, demonstrating the potential usefulness of using patient's own iPS cells to prevent immune rejection which arise from allogenic transplantation. PMID:22968480

  8. Diosmetin Alleviates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury through Activating the Nrf2 Pathway and Inhibiting the NLRP3 Inflammasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qinmei; Ci, Xinxin; Wen, Zhongmei; Peng, Liping

    2017-04-06

    Acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common clinical syndrome of diffuse lung inflammation with high mortality rates and limited therapeutic methods. Diosmetin, an active component from Chinese herbs, has long been noticed because of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of diosmetin on LPS-induced ALI model and unveil the possible mechanisms. Our results revealed that pretreatment with diosmetin effectively alleviated lung histopathological changes, which were further evaluated by lung injury scores. Diosmetin also decreased lung wet/ dry ratios, as well as total protein levels, inflammatory cell infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine (eg. TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) overproduction in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Additionally, increased MPO, MDA and ROS levels induced by LPS were also markly suppressed by diosmetin. Furthermore, diosmetin significantly increased the expression of Nrf2 along with its target gene HO-1 and blocked the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in the lung tissues, which might be central to the protective effects of diosmetin. Further supporting these results, in vitro experiments also showed that diosmetin activated Nrf2 and HO-1, as well as inhibited the NLRP3 inflammasome in both RAW264.7 and A549 cells. The present study highlights the protective effects of diosmetin on LPS-induced ALI via activation of Nrf2 and inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome, bringing up the hope of its application as a therapeutic drug towards LPS-induced ALI.

  9. Overexpression of IL-38 protein in anticancer drug-induced lung injury and acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Masaki; Okamoto, Masaki; Kawayama, Tomotaka; Matsuoka, Masanobu; Kaieda, Shinjiro; Sakazaki, Yuki; Kinoshita, Takashi; Mori, Daisuke; Inoue, Akira; Hoshino, Tomoaki

    2017-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-38, a member of the IL-1 family, shows high homology to IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and IL-36 receptor antagonist (IL-36Ra). Its function in interstitial lung disease (ILD) is still unknown. To determine the expression pattern of IL-38 mRNA, a panel of cDNAs derived from various tissues was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Immunohistochemical reactivity with anti-human IL-38 monoclonal antibody (clone H127C) was evaluated semi-quantitatively in lung tissue samples from 12 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia (IPF/UIP), 5 with acute exacerbation of IPF, and 10 with anticancer drug-induced ILD (bleomycin in 5 and epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor in 5). Control lung tissues were obtained from areas of normal lung in 22 lung cancer patients who underwent extirpation surgery. IL-38 transcripts were strongly expressed in the lung, spleen, synoviocytes, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and at a lower level in pancreas and muscle. IL-38 protein was not strongly expressed in normal pulmonary alveolar tissues in all 22 control lungs. In contrast, IL-38 was overexpressed in the lungs of 4 of 5 (80%) patients with acute IPF exacerbation and 100% (10/10) of the patients with drug-induced ILD. IL-38 overexpression was limited to hyperplastic type II pneumocytes, which are considered to reflect regenerative change following diffuse alveolar damage in ILD. IL-38 may play an important role in acute and/or chronic inflammation in anticancer drug-induced lung injury and acute exacerbation of IPF. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Protective Ventilation of Preterm Lambs Exposed to Acute Chorioamnionitis Does Not Reduce Ventilation-Induced Lung or Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Samantha K.; Moss, Timothy J. M.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Crossley, Kelly J.; Gill, Andrew W.; Kluckow, Martin; Zahra, Valerie; Wong, Flora Y.; Pichler, Gerhard; Galinsky, Robert; Miller, Suzanne L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The onset of mechanical ventilation is a critical time for the initiation of cerebral white matter (WM) injury in preterm neonates, particularly if they are inadvertently exposed to high tidal volumes (VT) in the delivery room. Protective ventilation strategies at birth reduce ventilation-induced lung and brain inflammation and injury, however its efficacy in a compromised newborn is not known. Chorioamnionitis is a common antecedent of preterm birth, and increases the risk and severity of WM injury. We investigated the effects of high VT ventilation, after chorioamnionitis, on preterm lung and WM inflammation and injury, and whether a protective ventilation strategy could mitigate the response. Methods Pregnant ewes (n = 18) received intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 2 days before delivery, instrumentation and ventilation at 127±1 days gestation. Lambs were either immediately euthanased and used as unventilated controls (LPSUVC; n = 6), or were ventilated using an injurious high VT strategy (LPSINJ; n = 5) or a protective ventilation strategy (LPSPROT; n = 7) for a total of 90 min. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate and cerebral haemodynamics and oxygenation were measured continuously. Lungs and brains underwent molecular and histological assessment of inflammation and injury. Results LPSINJ lambs had poorer oxygenation than LPSPROT lambs. Ventilation requirements and cardiopulmonary and systemic haemodynamics were not different between ventilation strategies. Compared to unventilated lambs, LPSINJ and LPSPROT lambs had increases in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression within the lungs and brain, and increased astrogliosis (p<0.02) and cell death (p<0.05) in the WM, which were equivalent in magnitude between groups. Conclusions Ventilation after acute chorioamnionitis, irrespective of strategy used, increases haemodynamic instability and lung and cerebral inflammation and injury. Mechanical ventilation is a potential contributor

  11. Protective ventilation of preterm lambs exposed to acute chorioamnionitis does not reduce ventilation-induced lung or brain injury.

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    Samantha K Barton

    Full Text Available The onset of mechanical ventilation is a critical time for the initiation of cerebral white matter (WM injury in preterm neonates, particularly if they are inadvertently exposed to high tidal volumes (VT in the delivery room. Protective ventilation strategies at birth reduce ventilation-induced lung and brain inflammation and injury, however its efficacy in a compromised newborn is not known. Chorioamnionitis is a common antecedent of preterm birth, and increases the risk and severity of WM injury. We investigated the effects of high VT ventilation, after chorioamnionitis, on preterm lung and WM inflammation and injury, and whether a protective ventilation strategy could mitigate the response.Pregnant ewes (n = 18 received intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide (LPS 2 days before delivery, instrumentation and ventilation at 127±1 days gestation. Lambs were either immediately euthanased and used as unventilated controls (LPSUVC; n = 6, or were ventilated using an injurious high VT strategy (LPSINJ; n = 5 or a protective ventilation strategy (LPSPROT; n = 7 for a total of 90 min. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate and cerebral haemodynamics and oxygenation were measured continuously. Lungs and brains underwent molecular and histological assessment of inflammation and injury.LPSINJ lambs had poorer oxygenation than LPSPROT lambs. Ventilation requirements and cardiopulmonary and systemic haemodynamics were not different between ventilation strategies. Compared to unventilated lambs, LPSINJ and LPSPROT lambs had increases in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression within the lungs and brain, and increased astrogliosis (p<0.02 and cell death (p<0.05 in the WM, which were equivalent in magnitude between groups.Ventilation after acute chorioamnionitis, irrespective of strategy used, increases haemodynamic instability and lung and cerebral inflammation and injury. Mechanical ventilation is a potential contributor to WM injury in infants exposed

  12. I-FABP as biomarker for the early diagnosis of acute mesenteric ischemia and resultant lung injury.

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    Rachel G Khadaroo

    Full Text Available Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI is a life-threatening condition that can result in multiple organ injury and death. A timely diagnosis and treatment would have a significant impact on the morbidity and mortality in high-risk patient population. The purpose of this study was to investigate if intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP and α-defensins can be used as biomarkers for early AMI and resultant lung injury. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to intestinal ischemia by occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery. A time course of intestinal ischemia from 0.5 to 3 h was performed and followed by reperfusion for 2 h. Additional mice were treated with N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC at 300 mg/kg given intraperitoneally prior to reperfusion. AMI resulted in severe intestinal injury characterized by neutrophil infiltrate, myeloperoxidase (MPO levels, cytokine/chemokine levels, and tissue histopathology. Pathologic signs of ischemia were evident at 1 h, and by 3 h of ischemia, the full thickness of the intestine mucosa had areas of coagulative necrosis. It was noted that the levels of α-defensins in intestinal tissue peaked at 1 h and I-FABP in plasma peaked at 3 h after AMI. Intestinal ischemia also resulted in lung injury in a time-dependent manner. Pretreatment with NAC decreased the levels of intestinal α-defensins and plasma I-FABP, as well as lung MPO and cytokines. In summary, the concentrations of intestinal α-defensins and plasma I-FABP predicted intestinal ischemia prior to pathological evidence of ischemia and I-FABP directly correlated with resultant lung injury. The antioxidant NAC reduced intestinal and lung injury induced by AMI, suggesting a role for oxidants in the mechanism for distant organ injury. I-FABP and α-defensins are promising biomarkers, and may guide the treatment with antioxidant in early intestinal and distal organ injury.

  13. I-FABP as Biomarker for the Early Diagnosis of Acute Mesenteric Ischemia and Resultant Lung Injury

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    Khadaroo, Rachel G.; Fortis, Spyridon; Salim, Saad Y.; Streutker, Catherine; Churchill, Thomas A.; Zhang, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is a life-threatening condition that can result in multiple organ injury and death. A timely diagnosis and treatment would have a significant impact on the morbidity and mortality in high-risk patient population. The purpose of this study was to investigate if intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) and α-defensins can be used as biomarkers for early AMI and resultant lung injury. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to intestinal ischemia by occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery. A time course of intestinal ischemia from 0.5 to 3 h was performed and followed by reperfusion for 2 h. Additional mice were treated with N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) at 300 mg/kg given intraperitoneally prior to reperfusion. AMI resulted in severe intestinal injury characterized by neutrophil infiltrate, myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels, cytokine/chemokine levels, and tissue histopathology. Pathologic signs of ischemia were evident at 1 h, and by 3 h of ischemia, the full thickness of the intestine mucosa had areas of coagulative necrosis. It was noted that the levels of α-defensins in intestinal tissue peaked at 1 h and I-FABP in plasma peaked at 3 h after AMI. Intestinal ischemia also resulted in lung injury in a time-dependent manner. Pretreatment with NAC decreased the levels of intestinal α-defensins and plasma I-FABP, as well as lung MPO and cytokines. In summary, the concentrations of intestinal α-defensins and plasma I-FABP predicted intestinal ischemia prior to pathological evidence of ischemia and I-FABP directly correlated with resultant lung injury. The antioxidant NAC reduced intestinal and lung injury induced by AMI, suggesting a role for oxidants in the mechanism for distant organ injury. I-FABP and α-defensins are promising biomarkers, and may guide the treatment with antioxidant in early intestinal and distal organ injury. PMID:25541714

  14. Fibroblast Growth Factor-10 (FGF-10) Mobilizes Lung-resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Protects Against Acute Lung Injury.

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    Tong, Lin; Zhou, Jian; Rong, Linyi; Seeley, Eric J; Pan, Jue; Zhu, Xiaodan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Qin; Tang, Xinjun; Qu, Jieming; Bai, Chunxue; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-02-12

    FGF-10 can prevent or reduce lung specific inflammation due to traumatic or infectious lung injury. However, the exact mechanisms are poorly characterized. Additionally, the effect of FGF-10 on lung-resident mesenchymal stem cells (LR-MSCs) has not been studied. To better characterize the effect of FGF-10 on LR-MSCs, FGF-10 was intratracheally delivered into the lungs of rats. Three days after instillation, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and plastic-adherent cells were cultured, characterized and then delivered therapeutically to rats after LPS intratracheal instillation. Immunophenotyping analysis of FGF-10 mobilized and cultured cells revealed expression of the MSC markers CD29, CD73, CD90, and CD105, and the absence of the hematopoietic lineage markers CD34 and CD45. Multipotency of these cells was demonstrated by their capacity to differentiate into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Delivery of LR-MSCs into the lungs after LPS injury reduced the inflammatory response as evidenced by decreased wet-to-dry ratio, reduced neutrophil and leukocyte recruitment and decreased inflammatory cytokines compared to control rats. Lastly, direct delivery of FGF-10 in the lungs of rats led to an increase of LR-MSCs in the treated lungs, suggesting that the protective effect of FGF-10 might be mediated, in part, by the mobilization of LR-MSCs in lungs.

  15. A comparison of biologically variable ventilation to recruitment manoeuvres in a porcine model of acute lung injury

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    Rector Edward S

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biologically variable ventilation (return of physiological variability in rate and tidal volume using a computer-controller was compared to control mode ventilation with and without a recruitment manoeuvre – 40 cm H2O for 40 sec performed hourly; in a porcine oleic acid acute lung injury model. Methods We compared gas exchange, respiratory mechanics, and measured bronchoalveolar fluid for inflammatory cytokines, cell counts and surfactant function. Lung injury was scored by light microscopy. Pigs received mechanical ventilation (FIO2 = 0.3; PEEP 5 cm H2O in control mode until PaO2 decreased to 60 mm Hg with oleic acid infusion (PaO2/FIO2 2O was added after injury. Animals were randomized to one of the 3 modes of ventilation and followed for 5 hr after injury. Results PaO2 and respiratory system compliance was significantly greater with biologically variable ventilation compared to the other 2 groups. Mean and mean peak airway pressures were also lower. There were no differences in cell counts in bronchoalveolar fluid by flow cytometry, or interleukin-8 and -10 levels between groups. Lung injury scoring revealed no difference between groups in the regions examined. No differences in surfactant function were seen between groups by capillary surfactometry. Conclusions In this porcine model of acute lung injury, various indices to measure injury or inflammation did not differ between the 3 approaches to ventilation. However, when using a low tidal volume strategy with moderate levels of PEEP, sustained improvements in arterial oxygen tension and respiratory system compliance were only seen with BVV when compared to CMV or CMV with a recruitment manoeuvre.

  16. Deviations from Haber’s Law for Multiple Measures of Acute Lung Injury in Chlorine-Exposed Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Gary W.; Chang, Weiyuan; Chen, Jing; Schlueter, Connie F.; Rando, Roy J.

    2010-01-01

    Chlorine gas is considered a chemical threat agent that can cause acute lung injury. Studies in the early 20th century on war gases led Haber to postulate that the dose of an inhaled chemical expressed as the product of gas concentration and exposure time leads to a constant toxicological effect (Haber’s Law). In the present work, mice were exposed to a constant dose of chlorine (100 ppm-h) delivered using different combinations of concentration and time (800 ppm/7.5 min, 400 ppm/15 min, 200 ppm/30 min, and 100 ppm/60 min). Significant effects of exposure protocol on survival evaluated 6 h after exposure were observed, ranging from 0% for the 7.5-min exposure to 100% for the 30- and 60-min exposures. Multiple parameters indicative of lung injury were examined to determine if any aspects of lung injury were differentially affected by the exposure protocols. Most parameters (pulmonary edema, neutrophil influx, and levels of protein, immunoglobulin M, and the chemokine KC [Cxcl1] in lavage fluid) indicated that lung injury was most pronounced for the 15-min exposure and least for the 60-min exposure. In contrast, changes in pulmonary function at baseline and in response to inhaled methacholine were similar following the three exposure regimens. The results indicate that the extent of lung injury following chlorine inhalation depends not only on total dose but also on the specifics of exposure concentration and time, and they suggest that evaluation of countermeasures against chlorine-induced lung injury should be performed using multiple types of exposure scenarios. PMID:20819911

  17. Critical Role for CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein β in Immune Complex-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chunguang; Wu, Min; Cao, Jay; Tang, Huifang; Zhu, Mei; Johnson, Peter F.; Gao, Hongwei

    2012-01-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs), particularly C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ, are known to participate in the regulation of many genes associated with inflammation. However, very little is known regarding the activation and functions of C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ in acute lung inflammation and injury. Here we show that both C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ activation are triggered in lungs and in alveolar macrophages following intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes. We further show that mice carrying a targeted deletion of the C/EBPβ gene displayed significant attenuation of the permeability index (lung vascular leak of albumin), lung neutrophil accumulation (MPO activity), total number of white blood cells, and neutrophils in bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL) fluids compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, the mutant mice expressed considerably less TNF-α, IL-6, and CXC/CC chemokine and sICAM-1 proteins in BAL fluids, and corresponding mRNAs in the IgG immune complex-injured lung, compared to wild-type mice. These phenotypes were associated with a significant reduction in morphological lung injury. In contrast, C/EBPδ deficiency had no effect on IgG immune complex-induced lung injury. IgG immune complex-stimulated C/EBPβ-deficient alveolar macrophages released significantly less TNF-α, IL-6, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, keratinocyte cell-derived chemokine (KC), and MIP-1α compared to wild-type cells. Similar decreases in IgG immune complex-induced inflammatory mediator production were observed following siRNA ablation of C/EBPβ in a murine alveolar macrophage cell line. These findings implicate C/EBPβ as a critical regulator of IgG immune complex-induced inflammatory responses and injury in the lung. PMID:22732594

  18. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate alleviates paraquat-induced acute lung injury and inhibits upregulation of toll-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Haitao; Wu, Na; Liu, Zhenning; Zhao, Hongyu; Zhao, Min

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the detoxifying effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on paraquat (PQ)-induced acute lung injury in mice, and to explore the action mechanisms. Following administration of PQ, the mice received a low, a medium or a high dose of EGCG daily for three days. Histopathology of the lungs were examined by H&E staining. The levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Activation of NF-κB was assessed by Western blot and electrophoretic mobility gel shift assay. The expression of toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, 4, 9 and TLR adaptors (MyD88 and TRAF6) was detected by Western blot and immunohistochemical staining. The protective effect of EGCG against PQ toxicity was validated in vitro using A549 lung cancer cell line. Treatment with EGCG dose-dependently attenuated PQ-induced acute lung injury in mice by reducing alveolar edema, hemorrhage, inflammatory cell infiltration and production of inflammatory cytokines. EGCG inhibited the activation of NF-κB and the upregulation of TLR 2, 4 and 9 as well as their adaptors MyD88 and TRAF6 in the lungs following PQ challenge. In addition, EGCG significantly reduced PQ-induced cell death, cytokine production, activation of NF-κB, and upregulation of TLRs and adaptors in A549 cells. Our data suggest that TLR-mediated activation of NF-κB in the non-immune pulmonary cells could be involved in PQ-induced acute lung injury, and it may serve as a target of EGCG against PQ pulmonary toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Salidroside alleviates paraquat-induced rat acute lung injury by repressing TGF-β1 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuoyi; Ding, Limin; Wu, Liqun; Xu, Liying; Zheng, Lanzhi; Huang, Xiaomin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of salidroside (SDS) via suppressing the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in rat acute lung injury (ALI) induced by paraquat (PQ) and to explore the potential molecular mechanisms. Methods: A total of 90 male rats (190-210 g) were randomly and evenly divided into 9 groups: control group, PQ groups (4 groups), and PQ + SDS groups (4 groups). The rats in control group were treated with equal volume of saline intraperitoneally. The rats in PQ groups were exposed to PQ solution (20 mg/kg) by gastric gavage for 1, 6, 24, and 72 hours, respectively. The rats in PQ + SDS groups were intraperitoneally injected once with SDS (10 mg/kg) every 12 hours after PQ perfusion. Pulmonary pathological changes were observed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The expression of TGF-β1 and the mRNA were evaluated by immunohistochemical (IHC) scoring and real time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time qRT-PCR), respectively. Results: SDS alleviated the symptoms of PQ induced ALI. Moreover, SDS reduced the expression of the inflammatory cytokine TGF-β1 including TGF-β1 IHC scores (at each time point from 6 to 72 hours after PQ perfusion) and mRNA level (at each time point from 1 to 72 hours after PQ perfusion) compared with PQ groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: SDS alleviated the pulmonary symptoms of PQ-induced ALI, at least partially, by repressing inflammatory cell infiltration and the expression of TGF-β1 resulting in delayed lung fibrosis. PMID:25674253

  20. Biomarkers for oxidative stress in acute lung injury induced in rabbits submitted to different strategies of mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchi, Carlos Fernando; Fioretto, Jose Roberto; Ferreira, Ana Lucia Anjos; Berchieri-Ronchi, Carolina Bragiola; Correa, Camila Renata; Kurokawa, Cilmery Suemi; Carpi, Mário Ferreira; Moraes, Marcos Aurélio; Yeum, Kyung-Jin

    2012-04-01

    Oxidative damage has been said to play an important role in pulmonary injury, which is associated with the development and progression of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We aimed to identify biomarkers to determine the oxidative stress in an animal model of acute lung injury (ALI) using two different strategies of mechanical ventilation. Rabbits were ventilated using either conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) or high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). Lung injury was induced by tracheal saline infusion (30 ml/kg, 38°C). In addition, five healthy rabbits were studied for oxidative stress. Isolated lymphocytes from peripheral blood and lung tissue samples were analyzed by alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) to determine DNA damage. Total antioxidant performance (TAP) assay was applied to measure overall antioxidant performance in plasma and lung tissue. HFOV rabbits had similar results to healthy animals, showing significantly higher antioxidant performance and lower DNA damage compared with CMV in lung tissue and plasma. Total antioxidant performance showed a significant positive correlation (r = 0.58; P = 0.0006) in plasma and lung tissue. In addition, comet assay presented a significant positive correlation (r = 0.66; P = 0.007) between cells recovered from target tissue and peripheral blood. Moreover, antioxidant performance was significantly and negatively correlated with DNA damage (r = -0.50; P = 0.002) in lung tissue. This study indicates that both TAP and comet assay identify increased oxidative stress in CMV rabbits compared with HFOV. Antioxidant performance analyzed by TAP and oxidative DNA damage by comet assay, both in plasma, reflects oxidative stress in the target tissue, which warrants further studies in humans.

  1. Effect of curcumin (Curcuma longa extract) on LPS-induced acute lung injury is mediated by the activation of AMPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joungmin; Jeong, Seong-Wook; Quan, Hui; Jeong, Cheol-Won; Choi, Jeong-Il; Bae, Hong-Beom

    2016-02-01

    Curcumin, a biphenolic compound extracted from turmeric (Curcuma longa), possesses potent anti-inflammatory activity. The present study investigated whether curcumin could increase 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in macrophages and modulate the severity of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. Macrophages were treated with curcumin and then exposed (or not) to LPS. Acute lung injury was induced by intratracheal administration of LPS in BALB/c mice. Curcumin increased phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a downstream target of AMPK, in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Curcumin did not increase phosphorylation of liver kinase B1, a primary kinase upstream of AMPK. STO-609, an inhibitor of calcium(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase, diminished curcumin-induced AMPK phosphorylation, but transforming growth factor-beta-activated kinase 1 inhibitor did not. Curcumin also diminished the LPS-induced increase in phosphorylation of inhibitory κB-alpha and the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, and interleukin (IL)-6 by macrophages. Systemic administration of curcumin significantly decreased the production of TNF-α, MIP-2, and IL-6 as well as neutrophil accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and also decreased pulmonary myeloperoxidase levels and the wet/dry weight ratio in mice subjected to LPS treatment. These results suggest that the protective effect of curcumin on LPS-induced acute lung injury is associated with AMPK activation.

  2. Effects of probiotics on ghrelin and lungs in children with acute lung injury: A double-blind randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Gao, Li; Yang, Zhongwen; Chen, Fengmin; Zhang, Yuhua

    2017-11-29

    To assess the effects of probiotics on serum ghrelin levels and protection for lungs in children with acute lung injury (ALI). This study was performed as a double-blind, randomized, and controlled trial in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). The eligible children with ALI were assigned to either probiotic treatment or an identical placebo for 10 days. Serum ghrelin, SP-A(surfactant protein-A), TNF-α, and IL-6 concentrations were assessed at baseline and at the end of trial. Meanwhile, pulmonary function test and echocardiography were examined, then VPEF (volume to peak tidal expiratory flow), TPEF/TE (the ratio of time taken to reach peak expiratory flow to total expiratory time), MAP (mean arterial pressure), and PAP (pulmonary artery pressure) were recorded. Eighty participants fulfilled the study requirements with 40 children for each group. The groups were comparable in baseline characteristics. Serum SP-A, TNF-α, and IL-6 levels in the probiotic group were 212.6 ± 52.9 ng/mL, 401.9 ± 56.4 pg/mL, and 245.1 ± 55.1 pg/mL on day 10, respectively, significantly lower levels compared to the control group where the same parameters were 248.2 ± 57 ng/mL, 449.4 ± 60.1 pg/mL, and 308.3 ± 92.2 pg/mL (P measurement of pulmonary function, the probiotic group demonstrated a VPEF of 26.1 ± 4.2 mL and TPEF/TE of 29.1 ± 4.7%, which were higher than the control group (24.7 ± 4.3 mL and 26.9 ± 4.7%, respectively) (P children with ALI alleviates the inflammation of lungs, improves pulmonary function and circulation by ghrelin. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Factors secreted from dental pulp stem cells show multifaceted benefits for treating acute lung injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakayama, Hirotaka; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Matsushita, Yoshihiro; Matsubara, Kohki; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Ueda, Minoru; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2015-08-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a severe inflammatory disorder characterized by acute respiratory failure, resulting from severe, destructive lung inflammation and irreversible lung fibrosis. We evaluated the use of stem cells derived from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) or SHED-derived serum-free conditioned medium (SHED-CM) as treatments for bleomycin (BLM)-induced mice acute lung injury (ALI), exhibiting several pathogenic features associated with the human disease ARDS. Mice with BLM-induced ALI with or without SHED or SHED-CM treatment were examined for weight loss and survival. The lung tissue was characterized by histological and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The effects of SHED-CM on macrophage differentiation in vitro were also assessed. A single intravenous administration of either SHEDs or SHED-CM attenuated the lung injury and weight loss in BLM-treated mice and improved their survival rate. Similar recovery levels were seen in the SHEDs and SHED-CM treatment groups, suggesting that SHED improves ALI by paracrine mechanisms. SHED-CM contained multiple therapeutic factors involved in lung-regenerative mechanisms. Importantly, SHED-CM attenuated the BLM-induced pro-inflammatory response and generated an anti-inflammatory/tissue-regenerating environment, accompanied by the induction of anti-inflammatory M2-like lung macrophages. Furthermore, SHED-CM promoted the in vitro differentiation of bone marrow-derived macrophages into M2-like cells, which expressed high levels of Arginase1, CD206 and Ym-1. Our results suggest that SHED-secreted factors provide multifaceted therapeutic effects, including a strong M2-inducing activity, for treating BLM-induced ALI. This work may open new avenues for research on stem cell-based ARDS therapies. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Psychometric evaluation of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale 3 months after acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutte, Jennifer E; Needham, Dale M; Pfoh, Elizabeth R; Bienvenu, O Joseph

    2015-08-01

    To conduct a psychometric evaluation of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and to evaluate associations of 2 measures of psychological distress with the HADS Anxiety (HADS-A) and HADS Depression (HADS-D) subscales in acute lung injury (ALI) survivors. We used 3-month post-ALI follow-up data from 151 participants in a multisite prospective cohort study to evaluate the internal consistency and structure of the HADS subscales and items, respectively. We used Spearman ρ correlations and other statistics to relate the 3-level version of the EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D-3L) anxiety/depression item and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36) "mental health"-related domains to the HADS subscales. Internal consistency was good for each of the HADS subscales (α ≥ .70). Exploratory factor analysis revealed a 2-factor structure (anxiety and depression). The EQ-5D-3L item and the SF-36 mental health-related domain scores were associated with HADS-A (ρ = 0.54 and -0.48 to -0.70, respectively) and HADS-D (ρ = 0.41 and -0.48 to -0.52, respectively) scores (all P anxiety/depression item and SF-36 mental health-related domain scores, suggesting convergent validity for these measures of psychological distress in ALI survivors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. MSCs with ACE II gene affect apoptosis pathway of acute lung injury induced by bleomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomiao; Gao, Fengying; Li, Qian; Dong, Zhixia; Sun, Bo; Hou, Lili; Li, Zhuozhe; Liu, Zhenwei

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect and related mechanisms of Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and Angiotensin converting enzyme II (ACE II) on acute lung injury (ALI). MSCs were separated from umbilical cord cells, and the changes of phenotype before and after ACE II silence were observed using Flow Cytometer. ALI model was induced by 10 mg/mL bleomycin in 60 Balb/c mice, and the rest 8 mice were regarded as the baseline group. The mice were randomly divided into four groups (n = 15): control, ACE II, stem, and stem + ACE II. The apoptotic index (AI) was calculated using TUNEL, and the detection of protein and mRNA of Bax, Bak and p53, Bcl-2, Grp78, CHOP and Caspase 12 were used by western-blot and RT-PCR, respectively. The umbilical cord cells differentiated into stable MSCs about 14 days, and ACE II transfection reached a peak at the 5th day after transfection. ACE II silence did not affect the phenotype of MSCs. All the proteins and mRNAs expression except Bcl-2 in the stem and stem + ACE II were significantly lower than those in control from 8 h (p ACE II performed a better effect than single stem in most indexes, including AI (p ACE II can significantly suppress apoptosis in ALI mice, and may be an effective clinical treatment for ALI.

  6. Genipin alleviates LPS-induced acute lung injury by inhibiting NF-κB and NLRP3 signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ao; Wang, Shiji; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Hui

    2016-09-01

    Genipin has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effect. However, its role on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) has not been explored. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of genipin on murine model of acute lung injury induced by LPS. The mice were treated with genipin 1h before LPS administration. 12h later, the myeloperoxidase (MPO) in lung tissues and lung wet/dry ratio were detected. The levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured by ELISA. Apart from this, we use western blot to detect the protein expression in the NF-κB and NLRP3 signaling pathways. The results showed that the treatment of genipin markedly attenuated the lung wet/dry ratio and the MPO activity. Moreover, it also inhibited the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 in the BALF. In addition, genipin significantly inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB and NLRP3 activation. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that genipin protected against LPS-induced ALI through inhibiting NF-κB and NLRP3 signaling pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) for Lung Injury in Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolone, Summer

    2017-12-01

    Despite advances in mechanical ventilation, severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates ranging from 26% to 58%. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a modified cardiopulmonary bypass circuit that serves as an artificial membrane lung and blood pump to provide gas exchange and systemic perfusion for patients when their own heart and lungs are unable to function adequately. ECMO is a complex network that provides oxygenation and ventilation and allows the lungs to rest and recover from respiratory failure while minimizing iatrogenic ventilator-induced lung injury. In critical care settings, ECMO is proven to improve survival rates and outcomes in patients with severe ARDS. This review defines severe ARDS; describes the ECMO circuit; and discusses recent research, optimal use of the ECMO circuit, limitations of therapy including potential complications, economic impact, and logistical factors; and discusses future research considerations.

  8. Effect of N-Acetylcystein in ICU patients with acute lung injury requiring mechanical ventilation

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    Mojtahed Zadeh

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available "n Background: Acute lung injury (ALI is a pulmonary pathology occuring in context of infection, trauma, burn, and sepsis. Tissue injury and release of chemical mediators result in tissue damage and organ failure especially respiratory failure. Many therapeutic modalities including vitamin E, allopurinol, and N-acetylcystein (NAC have been used to decrease levels of inflammatory factors and to control and improve signs and symptoms. The antioxidant feature of NAC induces synthesis of glutathione- the scavenger of free radicals- and increase respiratory drive and PaO2. In time diagnosis of ALI, prompt institution of treatment will reduce mortality and morbidity in critical illness."n"nMethods: This open label analytical clinical trial included a total of 50 patients admitted in the ICU ward of Sina University Hospital. They were randomly divided into two groups of 25, the case group received NAC 150mg/kg in 100ml Normal saline within 20 minutes then 50mg/kg in 100ml Normal saline within 4 hr after that 50mg/kg daily for three days. The controls received only normal saline. Oxygenation and ventilation parameters were studied In both groups."n"nResults: There were no significant difference between the groups in terms of demographic indices, mean SpO2, ABG values, mortality rates, and clearing of chest x-rays. The best outcome was seen in young traumatic patients."n"nConclusion: In this relatively small group of patients presenting with an established ALI/ ARDS subsequent to a variety of underlying disease, intravenous NAC treatment during first four days neither significantly improved systemic oxygenation nor reduced the need for ventilatory support.

  9. Parecoxib reduces systemic inflammation and acute lung injury in burned animals with delayed fluid resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Si Jack; Wong, Yong Chiat; Wu, Jian; Tan, Mui Hong; Lu, Jia; Moochhala, Shabbir M

    2014-01-01

    Burn injuries result in the release of proinflammatory mediators causing both local and systemic inflammation. Multiple organ dysfunctions secondary to systemic inflammation after severe burn contribute to adverse outcome, with the lungs being the first organ to fail. In this study, we evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of Parecoxib, a parenteral COX-2 inhibitor, in a delayed fluid resuscitation burned rat model. Anaesthetized Sprague Dawley rats were inflicted with 45% total body surface area full-thickness scald burns and subsequently subjected to delayed resuscitation with Hartmann's solution. Parecoxib (0.1, 1.0, and 10 mg/kg) was delivered intramuscularly 20 min after injury followed by 12 h interval and the rats were sacrificed at 6 h, 24 h, and 48 h. Burn rats developed elevated blood cytokines, transaminase, creatinine, and increased lung MPO levels. Animals treated with 1 mg/kg Parecoxib showed significantly reduced plasma level of CINC-1, IL-6, PGEM, and lung MPO. Treatment of 1 mg/kg Parecoxib is shown to mitigate systemic and lung inflammation without significantly affecting other organs. At present, no specific therapeutic agent is available to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response secondary to burn injury. The results suggest that Parecoxib may have the potential to be used both as an analgesic and ameliorate the effects of lung injury following burn.

  10. High-Frequency Jet Ventilation against Small-Volume Conventional Mechanical Ventilation in the Rabbit Models of Neonatal Acute Lung Injury.

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    Mokra, D; Mikusiakova, L Tomcikova; Mikolka, P; Kosutova, P; Jurcek, M; Kolomaznik, M; Calkovska, A

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute lung injury are ventilated by conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) rather than high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV). This study estimated the potential usefulness of HFJV in acute lung injury. The issue was addressed by comparing the effects on lung function of CMV and HFJV in two rabbit models of neonatal acute lung injury: repetitive saline lung lavage (LAV) and meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) induced by intratracheal meconium instillation. The animals were then ventilated with either HFJV or CMV for 4 h. Ventilatory pressures, blood gases, and indexes of gas exchange were assessed. Lung edema formation was expressed as wet-dry lung weight ratio. Both LAV and MAS significantly decreased lung compliance, increased airway resistance, and caused severe hypoxemia, hypercarbia, and acidosis. Although CMV was superior to HFJV at 1 h of ventilation, there were no clinically relevant differences in lung function or edema formation between CMV and LAV in both models of respiratory insufficiency at 4 h of ventilation. We conclude that, HFJV may be used for ventilation in acute non-homogenous lung injury.

  11. Pharmacological inhibition of leukotrienes in an animal model of bleomycin-induced acute lung injury

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    Crimi Nunzio

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Leukotrienes are increased locally in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Furthermore, a role for these arachidonic acid metabolites has been thoroughly characterized in the animal bleomycin model of lung fibrosis by using different gene knock-out settings. We investigated the efficacy of pharmacological inhibition of leukotrienes activity in the development of bleomycin-induced lung injury by comparing the responses in wild-type mice with mice treated with zileuton, a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor and MK-571, a cys-leukotrienes receptor antagonist. Mice were subjected to intra-tracheal administration of bleomycin or saline and were assigned to receive either MK-571 at 1 mg/Kg or zileuton at 50 mg/Kg daily. One week after bleomycin administration, BAL cell counts, lung histology with van Gieson for collagen staining and immunohistochemical analysis for myeloperoxidase, IL-1 and TNF-α were performed. Following bleomycin administration both MK-571 and zileuton treated mice exhibited a reduced degree of lung damage and inflammation when compared to WT mice as shown by the reduction of:(i loss of body weight, (ii mortality rate, (iii lung infiltration by neutrophils (myeloperoxidase activity, BAL total and differential cell counts, (iv lung edema, (v histological evidence of lung injury and collagen deposition, (vi lung myeloperoxidase, IL-1 and TNF-α staining. This is the first study showing that the pharmacological inhibition of leukotrienes activity attenuates bleomycin-induced lung injury in mice. Given our results as well as those coming from genetic studies, it might be considered meaningful to trial this drug class in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis, a disease that still represents a major challenge to medical treatment.

  12. Effect of continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration on endotoxin-induced acute lung injury of the piglets.

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    Lu, Guo-ping; Gong, Jing-yu; Lu, Zhu-jin; Zhang, Lin-en; Kissoon, Niranjan

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of continuous veno-venous hemodialysis filtration (CVVHDF) on cardiopulmonary function and clearance of inflammatory mediators in piglets with endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. A randomized controlled trial. An animal laboratory in a tertiary care pediatric center. : Eighteen piglets, weighing 6-8 kg. The piglets were anesthetized, ventilated, and received an intravenous infusion of 150 μg/kg of endotoxin. They were then randomly divided into three groups: control group (n = 6) received Ringer's lactate solution; the heparin group (n = 6) received heparin infusion plus Ringer's lactate solution; and the CVVHDF group (n = 6) received CVVHDF plus heparin infusion and Ringer's lactate solution. Parameters measured simultaneously were: heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, central venous pressure, pulse contour cardiac index, cardiac function index, left ventricular contractile index, and systemic vascular resistance index; extra vascular lung water index, respiratory rate, dynamic pulmonary compliance, airway resistance, Pao2/Fio2 ratio, serum tumor necrosis factor-α, and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor. Lung tissue was obtained for pathologic lung injury scoring and wet/dry weight ratio. Endotoxin challenge decreased oxygenation and pulmonary mechanics, suppressed cardiac function, increased extravascular lung water, and elevated serum inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor-α and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor). After CVVHDF, pulmonary function and oxygenation improved (Pao2/Fio2, 291.5 ± 75.9 vs. 217.2 ± 45.4, respectively, p < .05); arterial blood pressure and cardiac function were restored (pulse contour cardiac index, 3.95 ± 0.52 L/min/m(2) vs. 2.69 ± 0.49 L/min/m(2), respectively, p < .05); extravascular lung water decreased, and serum inflammatory markers also decreased. Lung injury score improved and wet/dry weight ratio decreased. Early CVVHDF has a beneficial effect on acute lung injury in piglets

  13. Prvi primer s transfuzijo povezane akutne poškodbe pljuč (TRALI) v Sloveniji: First report of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) in Slovenia:

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    Galvani, Vesna; Kramar, Irena; Maver, Slavica; Soldatović, Gordana

    2008-01-01

    Background Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a major cause of lethal side effects associated with transfusion of blood and blood components.TRALI is defined as a new acute noncardiogenic pulmonary oedema as seen on the frontal radiography of lungs, manifested with the shortness of breath, hypoxemia, hypotension and fever, all occurring during or within 6h after transfusion. TRALI is rarely diagnosed and can be confused with other causes of acute respiratory failure. It occurs a...

  14. High tidal volume mechanical ventilation-induced lung injury in rats is greater after acid instillation than after sepsis-induced acute lung injury, but does not increase systemic inflammation: an experimental study

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    Kuiper Jan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine whether acute lung injury from direct and indirect origins differ in susceptibility to ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI and resultant systemic inflammatory responses. Methods Rats were challenged by acid instillation or 24 h of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture, followed by mechanical ventilation (MV with either a low tidal volume (Vt of 6 mL/kg and 5 cm H2O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP; LVt acid, LVt sepsis or with a high Vt of 15 mL/kg and no PEEP (HVt acid, HVt sepsis. Rats sacrificed immediately after acid instillation and non-ventilated septic animals served as controls. Hemodynamic and respiratory variables were monitored. After 4 h, lung wet to dry (W/D weight ratios, histological lung injury and plasma mediator concentrations were measured. Results Oxygenation and lung compliance decreased after acid instillation as compared to sepsis. Additionally, W/D weight ratios and histological lung injury scores increased after acid instillation as compared to sepsis. MV increased W/D weight ratio and lung injury score, however this effect was mainly attributable to HVt ventilation after acid instillation. Similarly, effects of HVt on oxygenation were only observed after acid instillation. HVt during sepsis did not further affect oxygenation, compliance, W/D weight ratio or lung injury score. Plasma interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α concentrations were increased after acid instillation as compared to sepsis, but plasma intercellular adhesion molecule-1 concentration increased during sepsis only. In contrast to lung injury parameters, no additional effects of HVt MV after acid instillation on plasma mediator concentrations were observed. Conclusions During MV more severe lung injury develops after acid instillation as compared to sepsis. HVt causes VILI after acid instillation, but not during sepsis. However, this differential effect was not observed in the systemic release of

  15. Propofol pretreatment attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats by activating the phosphoinositide-3-kinase/Akt pathway

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    Zhao, L.L. [Department of Anesthesiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Hu, G.C. [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Zhu, S.S. [Department of Anesthesiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Li, J.F. [Department of Anesthesiology, Tengzhou Central People' s Hospital, Liaocheng, Shandong Province (China); Liu, G.J. [Department of Anesthesiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2014-10-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of propofol pretreatment on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) and the role of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) pathway in this procedure. Survival was determined 48 h after LPS injection. At 1 h after LPS challenge, the lung wet- to dry-weight ratio was examined, and concentrations of protein, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were determined using the bicinchoninic acid method or ELISA. Lung injury was assayed via lung histological examination. PI3K and p-Akt expression levels in the lung tissue were determined by Western blotting. Propofol pretreatment prolonged survival, decreased the concentrations of protein, TNF-α, and IL-6 in BALF, attenuated ALI, and increased PI3K and p-Akt expression in the lung tissue of LPS-challenged rats, whereas treatment with wortmannin, a PI3K/Akt pathway specific inhibitor, blunted this effect. Our study indicates that propofol pretreatment attenuated LPS-induced ALI, partly by activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway.

  16. Human mesenchymal stromal cells reduce influenza A H5N1-associated acute lung injury in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Michael C W; Kuok, Denise I T; Leung, Connie Y H; Hui, Kenrie P Y; Valkenburg, Sophie A; Lau, Eric H Y; Nicholls, John M; Fang, Xiaohui; Guan, Yi; Lee, Jae W; Chan, Renee W Y; Webster, Robert G; Matthay, Michael A; Peiris, J S Malik

    2016-03-29

    Influenza can cause acute lung injury. Because immune responses often play a role, antivirals may not ensure a successful outcome. To identify pathogenic mechanisms and potential adjunctive therapeutic options, we compared the extent to which avian influenza A/H5N1 virus and seasonal influenza A/H1N1 virus impair alveolar fluid clearance and protein permeability in an in vitro model of acute lung injury, defined the role of virus-induced soluble mediators in these injury effects, and demonstrated that the effects are prevented or reduced by bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. We verified the in vivo relevance of these findings in mice experimentally infected with influenza A/H5N1. We found that, in vitro, the alveolar epithelium's protein permeability and fluid clearance were dysregulated by soluble immune mediators released upon infection with avian (A/Hong Kong/483/97, H5N1) but not seasonal (A/Hong Kong/54/98, H1N1) influenza virus. The reduced alveolar fluid transport associated with down-regulation of sodium and chloride transporters was prevented or reduced by coculture with mesenchymal stromal cells. In vivo, treatment of aged H5N1-infected mice with mesenchymal stromal cells increased their likelihood of survival. We conclude that mesenchymal stromal cells significantly reduce the impairment of alveolar fluid clearance induced by A/H5N1 infection in vitro and prevent or reduce A/H5N1-associated acute lung injury in vivo. This potential adjunctive therapy for severe influenza-induced lung disease warrants rapid clinical investigation.

  17. Flexible bronchoscopy during mechanical ventilation in the prone position to treat acute lung injury

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    F. Guarracino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients with severe acute lung injury (ALI or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS the prone position has been shown to improve survival of patients who are severely hypoxemic with an arterial oxygen tension to inspiratory oxygen fraction ratio (PaO2/FiO2 < 100. In those patients tracheobronchial toilette is crucial in preventing or treating airways obstructed by secretions and deterioration of oxygenation. Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy is widely recognized as an effective technique to perform bronchial toilette in the intensive care unit (ICU.Flexible bronchoscopy performed during prone mechanical ventilation in two cardiosurgical patients who developed ALI after complex surgery, proved feasible and safe and helped to avoid undesirable earlier cessation of prone mechanical ventilation. However decision making about bronchoscopy in severe hypoxia should be even more cautious than in the supine patient, as dangerous delay in resuscitation manoeuvres due to postponed switching the patient to the supine position should always be prevented. Resumo: Em pacientes com lesão pulmonar aguda grave (LPA ou síndrome de dificuldade respiratória aguda (ARDS, foi demonstrado que a posição de decúbito ventral melhora a sobrevivência de pacientes que sejam gravemente hipoxémicos com uma relação entre a pressão de oxigénio no sangue arterial e a fração inspirada de oxigénio (PaO2/FiO2 <100. Nesses pacientes, a toilette traqueobrônquica é fundamental para a prevenção ou tratamento das vias respiratórias obstruídas por secreções e a deterioração da oxigenação. A fibrobroncoscopia flexível é amplamente reconhecida como uma técnica eficaz para realizar a toilette brônquica na unidade de cuidados intensivos (UCI. A broncoscopia flexível realizada durante a ventilação mecânica em posição de decúbito ventral em 2 pacientes de cirurgia cardíaca que desenvolveram LPA após cirurgias complicadas, provaram ser viáveis e

  18. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic plant-derived cannabinoid, decreases inflammation in a murine model of acute lung injury: role for the adenosine A(2A) receptor.

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    Ribeiro, Alison; Ferraz-de-Paula, Viviane; Pinheiro, Milena L; Vitoretti, Luana B; Mariano-Souza, Domenica P; Quinteiro-Filho, Wanderley M; Akamine, Adriana T; Almeida, Vinícius I; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Hallak, Jaime E; Zuardi, Antônio W; Crippa, José A; Palermo-Neto, João

    2012-03-05

    Acute lung injury is an inflammatory condition for which treatment is mainly supportive because effective therapies have not been developed. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic cannabinoid component of marijuana (Cannabis sativa), has potent immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, we investigated the possible anti-inflammatory effect of cannabidiol in a murine model of acute lung injury. Analysis of total inflammatory cells and differential in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was used to characterize leukocyte migration into the lungs; myeloperoxidase activity of lung tissue and albumin concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were analyzed by colorimetric assays; cytokine/chemokine production in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was also analyzed by Cytometric Bead Arrays and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). A single dose of cannabidiol (20mg/kg) administered prior to the induction of LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-induced acute lung injury decreases leukocyte (specifically neutrophil) migration into the lungs, albumin concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissue, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF and IL-6) and chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) 1, 2, and 4days after the induction of LPS-induced acute lung injury. Additionally, adenosine A(2A) receptor is involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of cannabidiol on LPS-induced acute lung injury because ZM241385 (4-(2-[7-Amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol) (a highly selective antagonist of adenosine A(2A) receptor) abrogated all of the anti-inflammatory effects of cannabidiol previously described. Thus, we show that cannabidiol has anti-inflammatory effects in a murine model of acute lung injury and that this effect is most likely associated with an increase in the extracellular adenosine offer and signaling through adenosine A(2A) receptor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  19. Partial ventilatory support modalities in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome-a systematic review.

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    Sarah M McMullen

    Full Text Available The efficacy of partial ventilatory support modes that allow spontaneous breathing in patients with acute lung injury (ALI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is unclear. The objective of this scoping review was to assess the effects of partial ventilatory support on mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, and both hospital and intensive care unit (ICU lengths of stay (LOS for patients with ALI and ARDS; the secondary objective was to describe physiologic effects on hemodynamics, respiratory system and other organ function.MEDLINE (1966-2009, Cochrane, and EmBase (1980-2009 databases were searched using common ventilator modes as keywords and reference lists from retrieved manuscripts hand searched for additional studies. Two researchers independently reviewed and graded the studies using a modified Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine grading system. Studies in adult ALI/ARDS patients were included for primary objectives and pre-clinical studies for supporting evidence.Two randomized controlled trials (RCTs were identified, in addition to six prospective cohort studies, one retrospective cohort study, one case control study, 41 clinical physiologic studies and 28 pre-clinical studies. No study was powered to assess mortality, one RCT showed shorter ICU length of stay, and the other demonstrated more ventilator free days. Beneficial effects of preserved spontaneous breathing were mainly physiological effects demonstrated as improvement of gas exchange, hemodynamics and non-pulmonary organ perfusion and function.The use of partial ventilatory support modalities is often feasible in patients with ALI/ARDS, and may be associated with short-term physiological benefits without appreciable impact on clinically important outcomes.

  20. Effects of pressure support and pressure-controlled ventilation on lung damage in a model of mild extrapulmonary acute lung injury with intra-abdominal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Cintia L; Santos, Raquel S; Moraes, Lillian; Samary, Cynthia S; Felix, Nathane S; Silva, Johnatas D; Morales, Marcelo M; Huhle, Robert; Abreu, Marcelo G; Schanaider, Alberto; Silva, Pedro L; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2017-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) may co-occur with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), with significant impact on morbidity and mortality. Lung-protective controlled mechanical ventilation with low tidal volume and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has been recommended in ARDS. However, mechanical ventilation with spontaneous breathing activity may be beneficial to lung function and reduce lung damage in mild ARDS. We hypothesized that preserving spontaneous breathing activity during pressure support ventilation (PSV) would improve respiratory function and minimize ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) compared to pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) in mild extrapulmonary acute lung injury (ALI) with IAH. Thirty Wistar rats (334±55g) received Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide intraperitoneally (1000μg) to induce mild extrapulmonary ALI. After 24h, animals were anesthetized and randomized to receive PCV or PSV. They were then further randomized into subgroups without or with IAH (15 mmHg) and ventilated with PCV or PSV (PEEP = 5cmH2O, driving pressure adjusted to achieve tidal volume = 6mL/kg) for 1h. Six of the 30 rats were used for molecular biology analysis and were not mechanically ventilated. The main outcome was the effect of PCV versus PSV on mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-6 in lung tissue. Regardless of whether IAH was present, PSV resulted in lower mean airway pressure (with no differences in peak airway or peak and mean transpulmonary pressures) and less mRNA expression of biomarkers associated with lung inflammation (IL-6) and fibrogenesis (type III procollagen) than PCV. In the presence of IAH, PSV improved oxygenation; decreased alveolar collapse, interstitial edema, and diffuse alveolar damage; and increased expression of surfactant protein B as compared to PCV. In this experimental model of mild extrapulmonary ALI associated with IAH, PSV compared to PCV improved lung function and morphology and reduced type 2 epithelial

  1. Trapa japonica Pericarp Extract Reduces LPS-Induced Inflammation in Macrophages and Acute Lung Injury in Mice

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    Yon-Suk Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we found that chloroform fraction (CF from TJP ethanolic extract inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO and intracellular ROS in RAW264.7 cells. In addition, expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS genes was reduced, as evidenced by western blot. Our results indicate that CF exerts anti-inflammatory effects by down-regulating expression of iNOS and COX-2 genes through inhibition of MAPK (ERK, JNK and p38 and NF-κB signaling. Similarly we also evaluated the effects of CF on LPS-induced acute lung injury. Male Balb/c mice were pretreated with dexamethasone or CF 1 h before intranasal instillation of LPS. Eight hours after LPS administration, the inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF were determined. The results indicated that CF inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production in a dose dependent manner. It was also observed that CF attenuated LPS-induced lung histopathologic changes. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the protective effect of CF on LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI in mice might relate to the suppression of excessive inflammatory responses in lung tissue. Thus, it can be suggested that CF might be a potential therapeutic agent for ALI.

  2. Oleic acid vs saline solution lung lavage-induced acute lung injury: effects on lung morphology, pressure-volume relationships, and response to positive end-expiratory pressure.

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    Luecke, Thomas; Meinhardt, Juergen P; Herrmann, Peter; Weiss, Andreas; Quintel, Michael; Pelosi, Paolo

    2006-08-01

    To compare two lung injury models (oleic acid [OA] and saline solution washout [SW]) regarding lung morphology, regional inflation, and recruitment during static pressure-volume (PV) curves, and the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) below and above the lower inflection point (Pflex). Fourteen adult pigs underwent OA or SW lung injury. Lung volumes were measured using CT. PV curves were obtained with simultaneous CT scanning at lung apex and base. Fractional inflation and recruitment were compared to data on PEEP above and below Pflex. Severity of lung injury was comparable. At zero PEEP, SW showed an increased amount of edema and poorly aerated lung volume, recruitment during inspiration, and a better oxygenation response with PEEP. Whole-lung PV curves were similar in both models, reflecting changes in alveolar inflation or deflation. On the inspiratory PV limb, recruitment and inflation were on the same line, while there was a substantial difference between deflation and derecruitment on the expiratory limb. PEEP-induced recruitment at lung apex and base was at or above the derecruitment line on the expiratory limb and showed no relationship to the whole-lung expiratory PV curve. The following conclusions were made: (1) OA and SW models are comparable in mechanics but not in lung injury characteristics; (2) neither inspiratory nor expiratory whole-lung PV curves are useful to select PEEP in order to optimize recruitment; and (3) after recruitment, there is no difference in derecruitment between the models at high PEEP, while more collapse occurs at lower PEEP in the basal sections of SW lungs.

  3. Critical role for the NLRP3 inflammasome during acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grailer, Jamison J; Canning, Bethany A; Kalbitz, Miriam; Haggadone, Mikel D; Dhond, Rasika M; Andjelkovic, Anuska V; Zetoune, Firas S; Ward, Peter A

    2014-06-15

    The inflammasome is a key factor in innate immunity and senses soluble pathogen and danger-associated molecular patterns as well as biological crystals (urate, cholesterol, etc.), resulting in expression of IL-1β and IL-18. Using a standard model of acute lung injury (ALI) in mice featuring airway instillation of LPS, ALI was dependent on availability of NLRP3 as well as caspase-1, which are known features of the NLRP3 inflammasome. The appearance of IL-1β, a product of NLRP3 inflammasome activation, was detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) in a macrophage- and neutrophil-dependent manner. Neutrophil-derived extracellular histones appeared in the BALF during ALI and directly activated the NLRP3 inflammasome. Ab-mediated neutralization of histones significantly reduced IL-1β levels in BALF during ALI. Inflammasome activation by extracellular histones in LPS-primed macrophages required NLRP3 and caspase-1 as well as extrusion of K(+), increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, and generation of reactive oxygen species. NLRP3 and caspase-1 were also required for full extracellular histone presence during ALI, suggesting a positive feedback mechanism. Extracellular histone and IL-1β levels in BALF were also elevated in C5a-induced and IgG immune complex ALI models, suggesting a common inflammatory mechanism. These data indicate an interaction between extracellular histones and the NLRP3 inflammasome, resulting in ALI. Such findings suggest novel targets for treatment of ALI, for which there is currently no known efficacious drug. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Hemin inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation in sepsis-induced acute lung injury, involving heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yun-peng; Jiang, Lei; Kang, Kai; Fei, Dong-sheng; Meng, Xiang-lin; Nan, Chuan-chuan; Pan, Shang-ha; Zhao, Ming-ran; Zhao, Ming-yan

    2014-05-01

    NLRP3 inflammasome activation contributes to acute lung injury (ALI), accelerating caspase-1 maturation, and resulting in IL-1β and IL-18 over-production. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays a protective role in ALI. This study investigated the effect of hemin (a potent HO-1 inducer) on NLRP3 inflammasome in sepsis-induced ALI. The sepsis model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was used in C57BL6 mice. In vivo induction and suppression of HO-1 were performed by pretreatment with hemin and zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP, a HO-1 competitive inhibitor) respectively. CLP triggered significant pulmonary damage, neutrophil infiltration, increased levels of IL-1β and IL-18, and edema formation in the lung. Hemin pretreatment exerted inhibitory effect on lung injury and attenuated IL-1β and IL-18 secretion in serum and lung tissue. In lung tissues, hemin down-regulated mRNA and protein levels of NLRP3, ASC and caspase-1. Moreover, hemin reduced malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species production, and inhibited NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammasome activity. Meanwhile, hemin significantly increased HO-1 mRNA and protein expression and HO-1 enzymatic activity. In contrast, no significant differences were observed between the CLP and ZnPP groups. Our study suggests that hemin-inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation involved HO-1, reducing IL-1β and IL-18 secretion and limiting the inflammatory response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of roflumilast, a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, on the lung functions in a saline lavage-induced model of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosutova, P; Mikolka, P; Kolomaznik, M; Rezakova, S; Calkovska, A; Mokra, D

    2017-09-22

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is associated with deterioration of alveolar-capillary lining and transmigration and activation of inflammatory cells. Whereas a selective phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) inhibitor roflumilast has exerted potent anti-inflammatory properties, this study evaluated if its intravenous delivery can influence inflammation, edema formation, and respiratory parameters in rabbits with a lavage-induced model of ALI. ALI was induced by repetitive saline lung lavage (30 ml/kg). Animals were divided into 3 groups: ALI without therapy (ALI), ALI treated with roflumilast i.v. (1 mg/kg; ALI+Rofl), and healthy ventilated controls (Control), and were ventilated for following 4 h. Respiratory parameters (blood gases, ventilatory pressures, lung compliance, oxygenation indexes etc.) were measured and calculated regularly. At the end of experiment, animals were overdosed by anesthetics. Total and differential counts of cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) were estimated microscopically. Lung edema was expressed as wet/dry lung weight ratio. Treatment with roflumilast reduced leak of cells (P<0.01), particularly of neutrophils (P<0.001), into the lung, decreased lung edema formation (P<0.01), and improved respiratory parameters. Concluding, the results indicate a future potential of PDE4 inhibitors also in the therapy of ALI.

  6. Microarray meta-analysis identifies acute lung injury biomarkers in donor lungs that predict development of primary graft failure in recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingzhao Hu

    Full Text Available To perform a meta-analysis of gene expression microarray data from animal studies of lung injury, and to identify an injury-specific gene expression signature capable of predicting the development of lung injury in humans.We performed a microarray meta-analysis using 77 microarray chips across six platforms, two species and different animal lung injury models exposed to lung injury with or/and without mechanical ventilation. Individual gene chips were classified and grouped based on the strategy used to induce lung injury. Effect size (change in gene expression was calculated between non-injurious and injurious conditions comparing two main strategies to pool chips: (1 one-hit and (2 two-hit lung injury models. A random effects model was used to integrate individual effect sizes calculated from each experiment. Classification models were built using the gene expression signatures generated by the meta-analysis to predict the development of lung injury in human lung transplant recipients.Two injury-specific lists of differentially expressed genes generated from our meta-analysis of lung injury models were validated using external data sets and prospective data from animal models of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI. Pathway analysis of gene sets revealed that both new and previously implicated VILI-related pathways are enriched with differentially regulated genes. Classification model based on gene expression signatures identified in animal models of lung injury predicted development of primary graft failure (PGF in lung transplant recipients with larger than 80% accuracy based upon injury profiles from transplant donors. We also found that better classifier performance can be achieved by using meta-analysis to identify differentially-expressed genes than using single study-based differential analysis.Taken together, our data suggests that microarray analysis of gene expression data allows for the detection of "injury" gene predictors that can

  7. Mechanical breath profile of airway pressure release ventilation: the effect on alveolar recruitment and microstrain in acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Emr, Bryanna; Smith, Bradford; Roy, Shreyas; Jain, Sumeet; Satalin, Joshua; Snyder, Kathy; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader; Bates, Jason; Marx, William; Nieman, Gary; Gatto, Louis A

    2014-11-01

    Improper mechanical ventilation settings can exacerbate acute lung injury by causing a secondary ventilator-induced lung injury. It is therefore important to establish the mechanism by which the ventilator induces lung injury to develop protective ventilation strategies. It has been postulated that the mechanism of ventilator-induced lung injury is the result of heterogeneous, elevated strain on the pulmonary parenchyma. Acute lung injury has been associated with increases in whole-lung macrostrain, which is correlated with increased pathology. However, the effect of mechanical ventilation on alveolar microstrain remains unknown. To examine whether the mechanical breath profile of airway pressure release ventilation (APRV), consisting of a prolonged pressure-time profile and brief expiratory release phase, reduces microstrain. In a randomized, nonblinded laboratory animal study, rats were randomized into a controlled mandatory ventilation group (n = 3) and an APRV group (n = 3). Lung injury was induced by polysorbate lavage. A thoracotomy was performed and an in vivo microscope was placed on the lungs to measure alveolar mechanics. In the controlled mandatory ventilation group, multiple levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP; 5, 10, 16, 20, and 24 cm H2O) were tested. In the APRV group, decreasing durations of expiratory release (time at low pressure [T(low)]) were tested. The T(low) was set to achieve ratios of termination of peak expiratory flow rate (T-PEFR) to peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) of 10%, 25%, 50%, and 75% (the smaller this ratio is [ie, 10%], the more time the lung is exposed to low pressure during the release phase, which decreases end-expiratory lung volume and potentiates derecruitment). Alveolar perimeters were measured at peak inspiration and end expiration using digital image analysis, and strain was calculated by normalizing the change in alveolar perimeter length to the original length. Macrostrain was measured by volume

  8. Low molecular weight heparin prevents CLP-Induced acute lung injury in rats by anti-inflammatory coagulation

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    Xiao Lu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to observe the influence of low molecular Weight heparin (LMWH on systemic inflammation, including high mobility group box 1 protern (HMGB1 and protective effect on acute lung injury induced by cecal ligation and puncture(CLP. Discuss the mechanism of this effect. 144 male SD rats were randomly divided into sham operation group (A, normal treatment group (B, the LMWH treatment group (C, n=48. Group A received a sham operation and the other groups were underwent CLP operation. Groups A and B accepted intraperitoneal injection (i.p. of normal saline (NS at a dose of 2.oml/kg and ceftriaxone (30 mg/kg, Group C were intraperitoneal injection additional LMWH (isoU/kg except saline and ceftriaxone. Observe points were made at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 48 h, the rats were anesthetized and killed, mortality, lungs wet/dry ratio and Pathology change were determined. HMGB-1 mRNA, protein of lung tissues was calculated by RT-PCR and Western blot. TNF-α and IL-6 of blood plasma calculated by ELSIA. There was significantly different in each index between A and B group (p<0.05. Compared with CLP group, there was a significant decrease in the lung injury, the mortality, HMGB1 mRNA and protein expression on lung tissues (p<0.05. LMWH can decreases cytokine, HMGB1 levels of lung tissue during CLP-induced inflammation. As a result, LMWH ameliorated lung pathology and reduces mortality in CLP-induced systemic inflammation in a rat model. This effect may be mediated through the inhibition of axis of inflammation and coagulation.

  9. Inhibition of inflammatory responses by ambroxol, a mucolytic agent, in a murine model of acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiao; Wang, Ling; Song, Yuanlin; Bai, Chunxue

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether ambroxol inhibits inflammatory responses in a murine model of lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Mice (n=295) were first intratracheally instilled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce ALI and then received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of either normal saline (NS), ambroxol (30 or 90 mg/kg per day) or dexamethasone (2.5 or 5 mg/kg per day) for 7 days. Metabolism (n=10, each), lung morphology (n=5, each) and wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (n=10, each) were studied. The levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and transforming growth factor (TGF-beta1) and the protein concentration (n=5 or 7, each) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were measured. Mice with LPS-induced ALI that were treated with ambroxol at a dosage of 90 mg/kg per day significantly gained weight compared to the control and dexamethasone-treated groups. Ambroxol and dexamethasone significantly reduced the lung hemorrhage, edema, exudation, neutrophil infiltration and total lung injury histology score at 24 and 48 h. In addition, ambroxol and dexamethasone significantly attenuated the lung wet-to-dry weight ratio at 24 and 48 h (pambroxol- and dexamethasone-treated groups were significantly reduced at 24 and 48 h. The protein in BAL, an index of vascular permeability, was also significantly decreased in the ambroxol- and dexamethasone-treated groups (pAmbroxol inhibited proinflammatory cytokines, reduced lung inflammation and accelerated recovery from LPS-induced ALI.

  10. Polysaccharides from Arnebia euchroma Ameliorated Endotoxic Fever and Acute Lung Injury in Rats Through Inhibiting Complement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Ying-Ye; Jiang, Yun; Li, Hong; Zhang, Yun-Yi; Lu, Yan; Chen, Dao-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Arnebiaeuchroma (Royle) Johnst (Ruanzicao) is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine (TCM). It is extensively used in China and other countries for treatment of inflammatory diseases. It is known that hyper-activated complement system involves in the fever and acute lung injury (ALI) in rats. In our preliminary studies, anti-complementary activity of crude Arnebiaeuchroma polysaccharides (CAEP) had been demonstrated in vitro. This study aimed to investigate the role and mechanism of crude Arnebiaeuchroma polysaccharides (CAEP) using two animal models, which relate with inappropriate activation of complement system. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fever model, the body temperature and leukocytes of peripheral blood in rats were significantly increased, while the complement levels of serum were remarkably decreased. CAEP administration alleviated the LPS-induced fever, reduced the number of leukocytes, and improved the levels of complement. Histological assay showed that there were severe damages and complement depositions in lung of the ALI rats. Further detection displayed that the oxidant stress was enhanced, and total hemolytic activity and C3/C4 levels in serum were decreased significantly in the ALI model group. Remarkably, CAEP not only attenuated the morphological injury, edema, and permeability in the lung but also significantly weakened the oxidant stress in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in the ALI rats. The levels of complement and complement depositions were improved by the CAEP treatment. In conclusion, the CAEP treatment ameliorated febrile response induced by LPS and acute lung injury induced by LPS plus ischemia-reperfusion. CAEP exerted beneficial effects on inflammatory disease potentially via inhibiting the inappropriate activation of complement system.

  11. NF-κB induced the donor liver cold preservation related acute lung injury in rat liver transplantation model.

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    An Jiang

    Full Text Available We have observed at our clinical work that acute lung injury (ALI often occurs in patients transplanted with donor livers persevered for long time. So, we conducted this study to investigate the influence of cold preservation time (CPT of donor liver on ALI induced by liver transplantation (LT, and further study the role of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB in the process.Wistar rats were used as donors and recipients to establish orthotopic rat liver transplantation models. Donor livers were preserved at 4°C for different lengths of time. The effect of NF-κB inhibitor, ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC, on ALI was detected. All samples were harvested after 3 h reperfusion. The severity of liver injury was evaluated first. The expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-1β (IL-1β in liver tissue and liver outflow serum were measured respectively. The severity indexes of ALI, the activity of NF-κB and inhibitor-κBα (I-κBα in lung/liver were measured accordingly.With the prolonged liver CPT, the liver damage associated indexes and ALI-related indexes all increased significantly. TNF-α and IL-1β in liver outflow serum increased accordingly, and the activity of NF-κB in liver/lung increased correspondingly. All these ALI-associated indexes could be partially reversed by the use of PDTC.Extended CPT aggravates the damage of donor liver and induces the expressions of TNF-α and IL-1β in liver. These inflammatory factors migrate to lung via liver outflow blood and activate NF-κB in lung, inducing ALI finally. NF-κB may play a critical role in LT-related ALI. Patients with or at risk of ALI may benefit from acute anti-inflammatory treatment with PDTC.

  12. Transplantation of Menstrual Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promotes the Repair of LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury

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    Bingyu Xiang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Menstrual blood-derived stem cells (MenSCs have been shown to be good therapeutic tools in diseases such as ovarian failure and cardiac fibrosis. However, relevant studies of MenSCs in ALI have not yet proceeded. We hypothesized that MenSC could attenuate the inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced ALI and promote the repair of damaged lung. ALI model was induced by LPS in C57 mice, and saline or MenSCs were administered via tail vein after four hours. The MenSCs were subsequently detected in the lungs by a live imaging system. The MenSCs not only improved pulmonary microvascular permeability and attenuated histopathological damage, but also mediated the downregulation of IL-1β and the upregulation of IL-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and the damaged lung. Immunohistochemistry revealed the increased expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA and the reduced expression of caspase-3 indicating the beneficial effect of MenSCs. Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF was also upregulated after MenSCs administrated. As shown using transwell co-culture, the MenSCs also could improve the viability of BEAS-2B cells and inhibit LPS-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that MenSC-based therapies could be promising strategies for treating ALI.

  13. APACHE III Outcome Prediction in Patients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit with Sepsis Associated Acute Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongheng; Chen, Kun; Chen, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) III score has been widely used for prediction of clinical outcomes in mixed critically ill patients. However, it has not been validated in patients with sepsis-associated acute lung injury (ALI). The aim of the study was to explore the calibration and predictive value of APACHE III in patients with sepsis-associated ALI. The study was a secondary analysis of a prospective randomized controlled trial investigating the efficacy of rosuvastatin in sepsis-associated ALI (Statins for Acutely Injured Lungs from Sepsis, SAILS). The study population was sepsis-related ALI patients. The primary outcome of the current study was the same as in the original trial, 60-day in-hospital mortality, defined as death before hospital discharge, censored 60 days after enrollment. Discrimination of APACHE III was assessed by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) with its 95% CI. Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit statistic was used to assess the calibration of APACHE III. The Brier score was reported to represent the overall performance of APACHE III in predicting outcome. A total of 745 patients were included in the study, including 540 survivors and 205 non-survivors. Non-survivors were significantly older than survivors (59.71 ± 16.17 vs 52.00 ± 15.92 years, p APACHE III score was higher in non-survivors than in survivors (106.72 ± 27.30 vs. 88.42 ± 26.86; p APACHE III to predict mortality in ALI patients was moderate with an AUC of 0.68 (95% confidence interval: 0.64-0.73). this study for the first time validated the discrimination of APACHE III in sepsis associated ALI patients. The result shows that APACHE III score has moderate predictive value for in-hospital mortality among adults with sepsis-associated acute lung injury.

  14. Factors associated with swallowing assessment after oral endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation for acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Martin B; González-Fernández, Marlís; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A; Shanholtz, Carl; Palmer, Jeffrey B; Needham, Dale M

    2014-12-01

    Endotracheal intubation is associated with postextubation swallowing dysfunction, but no guidelines exist for postextubation swallowing assessments. We evaluated the prevalence, patient demographic and clinical factors, and intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital organizational factors associated with swallowing assessment after oral endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation in patients with acute lung injury (ALI). We performed a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study in which investigators evaluated 178 eligible patients with ALI who were mechanically ventilated via oral endotracheal tube. The patients were recruited from 13 ICUs at four teaching hospitals in Baltimore, Maryland. Patient demographic and clinical factors, types of ICU, and hospital study sites were evaluated for their association with completion of a swallowing assessment both in the ICU and after the ICU stay before hospital discharge. Factors significantly associated with a swallow assessment were evaluated in a multivariable logistic regression model. Before hospital discharge, 79 (44%) patients completed a swallowing assessment, among whom 59 (75%) had their assessments initiated in ICU and 20 (25%) had their assessments initiated on the hospital ward. Female sex (odds ratio [OR] = 2.01; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.03-3.97), orotracheal intubation duration (OR = 1.13 per day; 95% CI = 1.05-1.22), and hospital study site (Site 3: OR = 2.41; 95% CI = 1.00-5.78) were independently associated with swallowing assessment. Although Site 3 had a twofold increase in swallowing assessments in the ICU, there was no significant difference between hospitals in the frequency of swallowing assessments completed after ICU discharge (P = 0.287) or in the proportion of patients who failed a swallowing assessment conducted in the ICU (P = 0.468) or on the ward (P = 0.746). In this multisite prospective study, female sex, intubation duration, and

  15. Low molecular weight heparin prevents CLP-induced acute lung injury in rats by anti-inflammatory coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao; Zhao, Liang; Xu, Yong-Hua

    2013-02-01

    The aim of our study was to observe the influence of low molecular Weight heparin (LMWH) on systemic inflammation, including high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) and protective effect on acute lung injury induced by cecal ligation and puncture(CLP). Discuss the mechanism of this effect. 144 male SD rats were randomly divided into sham operation group (A), normal treatment group (B), the LMWH treatment group (C), n=48.Group A received a sham operation and the other groups were underwent CLP operation. Groups A and B accepted intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) of normal saline (NS) at a dose of 2.0 ml/kg and ceftriaxone (30 mg/kg), Group C were intraperitoneal injection additional LMWH (150 U/kg) except saline and ceftriaxone. Observe points were made at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 48 h, the rats were anesthetized and killed, mortality, lungs wet/dry ratio and Pathology change were determined. HMGB-1 mRNA, protein of lung tissues was calculated by RT-PCR and Western blot. TNF-α and IL-6 of blood plasma calculated by ELSIA. There was significantly different in each index between A and B group (pCLP group, there was a significant decrease in the lung injury, the mortality, HMGB1 mRNA and protein expression on lung tissues (pCLP-induced inflammation. As a result, LMWH ameliorated lung pathology and reduces mortality in CLP-induced systemic inflammation in a rat model. This effect may be mediated through the inhibition of axis of inflammation and coagulation.

  16. Inhaled Nitric Oxide for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Acute Lung Injury in Adults and Children: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis and Trial Sequential Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, defined as acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, are critical conditions associated with frequent mortality and morbidity in all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has been used to improve oxygenation, but its role remains...... be recommended for patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. iNO results in a transient improvement in oxygenation but does not reduce mortality and may be harmful....... to fraction of inspired oxygen (mean difference [MD] 15.91, 95% CI 8.25 to 23.56; I² = 25%). However, iNO appears to increase the risk of renal impairment among adults (RR 1.59, 95% CI 1.17 to 2.16; I² = 0) but not the risk of bleeding or methemoglobin or nitrogen dioxide formation. CONCLUSION: iNO cannot...

  17. Suppression of RAGE and TLR9 by Ketamine Contributes to Attenuation of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunyan; Song, Yulong; Wang, Hui

    2017-06-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the protective role of ketamine in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) by the inhibition of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). ALI was induced in rats by intratracheal instillation of LPS (5 mg/kg), and ketamine (5, 7.5, and 10 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 1 h after LPS administration. Meanwhile, A549 alveolar epithelial cells were incubated with LPS in the presence or absence of ketamine. After 24 h, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were collected. Ketamine posttreatment at doses of 5, 7.5, and 10 mg/kg decreased LPS-induced evident lung histopathological changes, lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, and lung myeloperoxidase activity. In addition, posttreatment with ketamine-inhibited inflammatory cells and inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and high-mobility group box 1 in BALF. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ketamine-inhibited LPS-induced RAGE and TLR9 protein up-expressions and the phosphorylation of I-κB-α and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 in vivo and in vitro. The results presented here suggest that the protective mechanism of ketamine may be attributed partly to decreased production of inflammatory mediators through the inhibition of RAGE/TLR9-NF-κB pathway.

  18. Role of Complement C5 in Experimental Blunt Chest Trauma-Induced Septic Acute Lung Injury (ALI.

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    Miriam Kalbitz

    Full Text Available Severe blunt chest trauma is associated with high mortality. Sepsis represents a serious risk factor for mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. In septic patients with ARDS complement activation products were found to be elevated in the plasma. In single models like LPS or trauma complement has been studied to some degree, however in clinically highly relevant double hit models such as the one used here little data is available. Here, we hypothesized that absence of C5 is correlated with a decreased inflammatory response in trauma induced septic acute lung injury.12 hrs after DH in mice the local and systemic cytokines and chemokines were quantified by multiplex bead array or ELISA, activated caspase-3 by western blot. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Sidak's multiple comparison test (significance, p≤ 0.05.In lung tissue interleukin (IL-6, monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF was elevated in both C5-/- mice and wildtype littermates (wt, whereas caspase-3 was reduced in lungs after DH in C5-/- mice. Systemically, reduced keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC levels were observed after DH in C5-/- compared to wt mice. Locally, lung myeloperoxidase (MPO, protein, IL-6, MCP-1 and G-CSF in brochoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF were elevated after DH in C5-/- compared to wt.In the complex but clinically relevant DH model the local and systemic inflammatory immune response features both, C5-dependent and C5-independent characteristics. Activation of caspase-3 in lung tissue after DH was C5-dependent whereas local inflammation in lung tissue was C5-independent.

  19. Role of Complement C5 in Experimental Blunt Chest Trauma-Induced Septic Acute Lung Injury (ALI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbitz, Miriam; Karbach, Michael; Braumueller, Sonja; Kellermann, Philipp; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus; Perl, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Severe blunt chest trauma is associated with high mortality. Sepsis represents a serious risk factor for mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In septic patients with ARDS complement activation products were found to be elevated in the plasma. In single models like LPS or trauma complement has been studied to some degree, however in clinically highly relevant double hit models such as the one used here little data is available. Here, we hypothesized that absence of C5 is correlated with a decreased inflammatory response in trauma induced septic acute lung injury. 12 hrs after DH in mice the local and systemic cytokines and chemokines were quantified by multiplex bead array or ELISA, activated caspase-3 by western blot. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Sidak's multiple comparison test (significance, p≤ 0.05). In lung tissue interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) was elevated in both C5-/- mice and wildtype littermates (wt), whereas caspase-3 was reduced in lungs after DH in C5-/- mice. Systemically, reduced keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) levels were observed after DH in C5-/- compared to wt mice. Locally, lung myeloperoxidase (MPO), protein, IL-6, MCP-1 and G-CSF in brochoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were elevated after DH in C5-/- compared to wt. In the complex but clinically relevant DH model the local and systemic inflammatory immune response features both, C5-dependent and C5-independent characteristics. Activation of caspase-3 in lung tissue after DH was C5-dependent whereas local inflammation in lung tissue was C5-independent.

  20. Interleukin-6 displays lung anti-inflammatory properties and exerts protective hemodynamic effects in a double-hit murine acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voiriot, Guillaume; Razazi, Keyvan; Amsellem, Valérie; Tran Van Nhieu, Jeanne; Abid, Shariq; Adnot, Serge; Mekontso Dessap, Armand; Maitre, Bernard

    2017-04-19

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a predictive factor of poor prognosis in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, its acute pulmonary hemodynamic effects and role in lung injury have not been investigated in a clinically relevant murine model of ARDS. We used adult C57Bl6 wild-type (WT) and IL-6 knock-out (IL-6KO) mice. The animals received intravenous recombinant human IL-6 (rHuIL-6) or vehicle followed by intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline before undergoing low tidal volume mechanical ventilation (MV) for 5 h. Before sacrifice, right ventricular systolic pressure and cardiac output were measured and total pulmonary resistance was calculated. After sacrifice, lung inflammation, edema and injury were assessed with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and histology. In other experiments, right ventricular systolic pressure was recorded during hypoxic challenges in uninjured WT mice pretreated with rHuIL-6 or rHuIL-6 + non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME or vehicle. IL-6KO (LPS+MV) mice showed a faster deterioration of lung elastic properties and more severe bronchoalveolar cellular inflammation as compared to WT (LPS+MV) . Treatment with rHuIL-6 partially prevented this lung deterioration. Total pulmonary resistance was higher in IL-6KO (LPS+MV) mice and this increase was abolished in rHuIL-6-treated IL-6KO mice. Finally, rHuIL-6 reduced hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in uninjured WT mice, an effect that was abolished by co-treatment with L-NAME. In a double-hit murine model of ARDS, IL-6 deficient mice experienced more severe bronchoalveolar cellular inflammation as compared to wild-type littermates. Furthermore, IL-6 deficiency caused marked acute pulmonary hypertension, which may be, at least partially, due to vasoactive mechanisms. A dysregulation of nitric oxide synthase may account for this observation, a hypothesis that will need to be investigated in future studies.

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Lung Tissue in a Rat Acute Lung Injury Model: Identification of PRDX1 as a Promoter of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS remains a high morbidity and mortality disease entity in critically ill patients, despite decades of numerous investigations into its pathogenesis. To obtain global protein expression changes in acute lung injury (ALI lung tissues, we employed a high-throughput proteomics method to identify key components which may be involved in the pathogenesis of ALI. In the present study, we analyzed lung tissue proteomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced ALI rats and identified eighteen proteins whose expression levels changed more than twofold as compared to normal controls. In particular, we found that PRDX1 expression in culture medium was elevated by a lipopolysaccharide (LPS challenge in airway epithelial cells in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of PRDX1 increased the expression of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6, interleukin-8 (IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, whereas knockdown of PRDX1 led to downregulated expression of cytokines induced by LPS. In conclusion, our findings provide a global alteration in the proteome of lung tissues in the ALI rat model and indicate that PRDX1 may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ARDS by promoting inflammation and represent a novel strategy for the development of new therapies against ALI.

  2. Inhaled anticoagulation regimens for the treatment of smoke inhalation-associated acute lung injury: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew C; Elamin, Elamin M; Suffredini, Anthony F

    2014-02-01

    Inhaled anticoagulation regimens are increasingly being used to manage smoke inhalation-associated acute lung injury. We systematically reviewed published and unpublished preclinical and clinical trial data to elucidate the effects of these regimens on lung injury severity, airway obstruction, ventilation, oxygenation, pulmonary infections, bleeding complications, and survival. PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, and Web of Science were searched to identify relevant published studies. Relevant unpublished studies were identified by searching the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, Cochrane Library, ClinicalTrials.gov, MINDCULL.com, Current Controlled Trials, and Google. Inclusion criteria were any preclinical or clinical study in which 1) animals or subjects experienced smoke inhalation exposure, 2) they were treated with nebulized or aerosolized anticoagulation regimens, including heparin, heparinoids, antithrombins, or fibrinolytics (e.g., tissue plasminogen activator), 3) a control and/or sham group was described for preclinical studies, and 4) a concurrent or historical control group described for clinical studies. Exclusion criteria were 1) the absence of a group treated with a nebulized or aerosolized anticoagulation regimen, 2) the absence of a control or sham group, and 3) case reports. Ninety-nine potentially relevant references were identified. Twenty-seven references met inclusion criteria including 19 preclinical references reporting 18 studies and eight clinical references reporting five clinical studies. A systematic review of the literature is provided. Both clinical and methodological diversity precluded combining these studies in a meta-analysis. The high mortality associated with smoke inhalation-associated acute lung injury results from airway damage, mucosal dysfunction, neutrophil infiltration, airway coagulopathy with cast formation, ventilation

  3. Pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome: definition, incidence, and epidemiology: proceedings from the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemani, Robinder G; Smith, Lincoln S; Zimmerman, Jerry J; Erickson, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Although there are similarities in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults and children, pediatric-specific practice patterns, comorbidities, and differences in outcome necessitate a pediatric-specific definition. We sought to create such a definition. A subgroup of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome investigators who drafted a pediatric-specific definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome based on consensus opinion and supported by detailed literature review tested elements of the definition with patient data from previously published investigations. International PICUs. Children enrolled in published investigations of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. None. Several aspects of the proposed pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome definition align with the Berlin Definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults: timing of acute respiratory distress syndrome after a known risk factor, the potential for acute respiratory distress syndrome to coexist with left ventricular dysfunction, and the importance of identifying a group of patients at risk to develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. There are insufficient data to support any specific age for "adult" acute respiratory distress syndrome compared with "pediatric" acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, children with perinatal-related respiratory failure should be excluded from the definition of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Larger departures from the Berlin Definition surround 1) simplification of chest imaging criteria to eliminate bilateral infiltrates; 2) use of pulse oximetry-based criteria when PaO2 is unavailable; 3) inclusion of oxygenation index and oxygen saturation index instead of PaO2/FIO2 ratio with a minimum positive end-expiratory pressure level for invasively ventilated patients; 4) and specific inclusion of children with preexisting chronic lung disease or cyanotic congenital heart disease. This

  4. Protective effect of Astragaloside IV against sepsis-induced acute lung injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiqin Huang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to explore the protective effects of AS-IV against sepsis-induced ALI. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP method in Sprague Dawley rats. Rats were randomly assigned into five groups: animals undergoing a sham CLP (sham group; animals undergoing CLP (CLP group; animals undergoing CLP and treated with AS-IV at 2.5 mg/kg bw (low-dose AS-IV [L-AS] group, at 5 mg/kg bw (mid-dose AS-IV [M-AS] group, and at 10 mg/kg bw (high-dose AS-IV [H-AS] group. At 6 h, 12 h and 24 h post-CLP surgery, six rats were respectively sacrificed to collect blood and lung tissue samples. The levels of arterial blood gas index, lung water content, protein level and leukocyte counts (total amount, neutrophils and lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6 in BALF were measured at each time point in different groups. HE-staining and optical microscopy were performed to examine the pathological changes in lungs. The 72 h-survival rate of each group was also recorded. PaO2 was decreased significantly, while the lung water content, BALF protein level, cell numbers, BALF cytokine TNF-α and IL-6 levels were increased significantly for CLP group as compared with sham group. Moreover, pathological injury was observed in lung tissue indicating the successful sepsis-induced ALI model. Speaking of the effect of AS-IV, we founded that, compared with the CLP group, the AS-IV treatment groups could significantly alleviate all the above negative changes exited in the CLP group in a dose-dependent manner. What’s more, the pathological injury was also gradually improved by AS-IV treatment compared with the CLP rats. AS-IV exerts its protective effect against sepsis-induced ALI in rats via improving pulmonary ventilation function, decreasing the permeability of alveolar epithelium and capillary as well as repressing lung inflammation.

  5. Effects of sigh during pressure control and pressure support ventilation in pulmonary and extrapulmonary mild acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Lillian; Santos, Cíntia Lourenco; Santos, Raquel Souza; Cruz, Fernanda Ferreira; Saddy, Felipe; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza; Silva, Pedro Leme; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2014-08-12

    Sigh improves oxygenation and lung mechanics during pressure control ventilation (PCV) and pressure support ventilation (PSV) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, so far, no study has evaluated the biological impact of sigh during PCV or PSV on the lung and distal organs in experimental pulmonary (p) and extrapulmonary (exp) mild acute lung injury (ALI). In 48 Wistar rats, ALI was induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide either intratracheally (ALIp) or intraperitoneally (ALIexp). After 24 hours, animals were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated with PCV or PSV with a tidal volume of 6 mL/kg, FiO2 = 0.4, and PEEP = 5 cmH2O for 1 hour. Both ventilator strategies were then randomly assigned to receive periodic sighs (10 sighs/hour, Sigh) or not (non-Sigh, NS). Ventilatory and mechanical parameters, arterial blood gases, lung histology, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, caspase-3, and type III procollagen (PCIII) mRNA expression in lung tissue, and number of apoptotic cells in lung, liver, and kidney specimens were analyzed. In both ALI etiologies: (1) PCV-Sigh and PSV-Sigh reduced transpulmonary pressure, and (2) PSV-Sigh reduced the respiratory drive compared to PSV-NS. In ALIp: (1) PCV-Sigh and PSV-Sigh decreased alveolar collapse as well as IL-1β, IL-6, caspase-3, and PCIII expressions in lung tissue, (2) PCV-Sigh increased alveolar-capillary membrane and endothelial cell damage, and (3) abnormal myofibril with Z-disk edema was greater in PCV-NS than PSV-NS. In ALIexp: (1) PSV-Sigh reduced alveolar collapse, but led to damage to alveolar-capillary membrane, as well as type II epithelial and endothelial cells, (2) PCV-Sigh and PSV-Sigh increased IL-1β, IL-6, caspase-3, and PCIII expressions, and (3) PCV-Sigh increased the number of apoptotic cells in the lung compared to PCV-NS. In these models of mild ALIp and ALIexp, sigh reduced alveolar collapse and transpulmonary pressures during both PCV and PSV; however, improved lung

  6. Blockage of P2X7 attenuates acute lung injury in mice by inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome.

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    Wang, Shuang; Zhao, Jijun; Wang, Hongyue; Liang, Yingjie; Yang, Niansheng; Huang, Yuefang

    2015-07-01

    NLRP3 inflammasome is engaged in the inflammatory response during acute lung injury (ALI). Purinergic receptor P2X7 has been reported to be upstream of NLRP3 activation. However, the therapeutic implication of P2X7 in ALI remains to be explored. The present study used lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mouse model to investigate the therapeutic potential of P2X7 blockage in ALI. Our results showed that P2X7/NLRP3 inflammasome pathway was significantly upregulated in the lungs of ALI mice as compared with control mice. P2X7 antagonist A438079 suppressed NLRP3/ASC/caspase 1 activation, production of IL-1β, IL-17A and IFN-γ and neutrophil infiltration but not the production of IL-10, resulting in a significant amelioration of lung injury. Moreover, blockage of P2X7 significantly inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β production in bone marrow derived macrophages. Similar results were obtained using another P2X7 inhibitor brilliant blue G (BBG) in vivo. Thus, pharmacological blockage of P2X7/NLRP3 pathway can be considered as a potential therapeutic strategy in patients with ALI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mast cell stabilization alleviates acute lung injury after orthotopic autologous liver transplantation in rats by downregulating inflammation.

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    Ailan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute lung injury (ALI is one of the most severe complications after orthotopic liver transplantation. Amplified inflammatory response after transplantation contributes to the process of ALI, but the mechanism underlying inflammation activation is not completely understood. We have demonstrated that mast cell stabilization attenuated inflammation and ALI in a rodent intestine ischemia/reperfusion model. We hypothesized that upregulation of inflammation triggered by mast cell activation may be involve in ALI after liver transplantation. METHODS: Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received orthotopic autologous liver transplantation (OALT and were executed 4, 8, 16, and 24 h after OALT. The rats were pretreated with the mast cell stabilizers cromolyn sodium or ketotifen 15 min before OALT and executed 8 h after OALT. Lung tissues and arterial blood were collected to evaluate lung injury. β-hexosaminidase and mast cell tryptase levels were assessed to determine the activation of mast cells. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β and IL-6 in serum and lung tissue were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB p65 translocation was assessed by Western blot. RESULTS: The rats that underwent OALT exhibited severe pulmonary damage with a high wet-to-dry ratio, low partial pressure of oxygen, and low precursor surfactant protein C levels, which corresponded to the significant elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, β-hexosaminidase, and tryptase levels in serum and lung tissues. The severity of ALI progressed and maximized 8 h after OALT. Mast cell stabilization significantly inhibited the activation of mast cells, downregulated pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and translocation of NF-κB, and attenuated OALT-induced ALI. CONCLUSIONS: Mast cell activation amplified inflammation and played an important role in the process of post-OALT related ALI.

  8. Pressure-controlled versus volume-controlled ventilation for acute respiratory failure due to acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

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    Chacko, Binila; Peter, John V; Tharyan, Prathap; John, George; Jeyaseelan, Lakshmanan

    2015-01-14

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) account for one-quarter of cases of acute respiratory failure in intensive care units (ICUs). A third to half of patients will die in the ICU, in hospital or during follow-up. Mechanical ventilation of people with ALI/ARDS allows time for the lungs to heal, but ventilation is invasive and can result in lung injury. It is uncertain whether ventilator-related injury would be reduced if pressure delivered by the ventilator with each breath is controlled, or whether the volume of air delivered by each breath is limited. To compare pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) versus volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) in adults with ALI/ARDS to determine whether PCV reduces in-hospital mortality and morbidity in intubated and ventilated adults. In October 2014, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2014, Isssue 9), MEDLINE (1950 to 1 October 2014), EMBASE (1980 to 1 October 2014), the Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (1994 to 1 October 2014) and Science Citation Index-Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) at the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science (1990 to 1 October 2014), as well as regional databases, clinical trials registries, conference proceedings and reference lists. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs (irrespective of language or publication status) of adults with a diagnosis of acute respiratory failure or acute on chronic respiratory failure and fulfilling the criteria for ALI/ARDS as defined by the American-European Consensus Conference who were admitted to an ICU for invasive mechanical ventilation, comparing pressure-controlled or pressure-controlled inverse-ratio ventilation, or an equivalent pressure-controlled mode (PCV), versus volume-controlled ventilation, or an equivalent volume-controlled mode (VCV). Two review authors independently screened and selected trials, assessed risk of bias and extracted

  9. Pulmonary permeability assessed by fluorescent-labeled dextran instilled intranasally into mice with LPS-induced acute lung injury.

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    Honglei Chen

    Full Text Available Several different methods have been used to assess pulmonary permeability in response to acute lung injury (ALI. However, these methods often involve complicated procedures and algorithms that are difficult to precisely control. The purpose of the current study is to establish a feasible method to evaluate alterations in lung permeability by instilling fluorescently labeled dextran (FITC-Dextran intranasally.For the mouse model of direct ALI, lipopolysaccharide (LPS was administered intranasally. FITC-Dextran was instilled intranasally one hour before the mice were euthanized. Plasma fluorescence intensities from the LPS group were significantly higher than in the control group. To determine the reliability and reproducibility of the procedure, we also measured the lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, the protein concentration of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, tight and adherens junction markers and pathological changes. Consistent results were observed when the LPS group was compared with the control group. Simultaneously, we found that the concentration of plasma FITC-Dextran was LPS dose-dependent. The concentration of plasma FITC-Dextran also increased with initial intranasal FITC-Dextran doses. Furthermore, increased fluorescence intensity of plasma FITC-Dextran was found in the intraperitoneally LPS-induced ALI model.In conclusion, the measurement of FITC-Dextran in plasma after intranasal instillation is a simple, reliable, and reproducible method to evaluate lung permeability alterations in vivo. The concentration of FITC-Dextran in the plasma may be useful as a potential peripheral biomarker of ALI in experimental clinical studies.

  10. Inhibition of P38 MAPK Downregulates the Expression of IL-1β to Protect Lung from Acute Injury in Intestinal Ischemia Reperfusion Rats

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    De-Yi Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (II/R has high incidence and mortality, in which IL-1β was essential for the full development of ALI. However, the detailed regulating mechanism for this phenomenon remains to be unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether inhibition of P38 MAPK could downregulate the expression of IL-1β to protect lung from acute injury in II/R rats. Here, we found that the level of pulmonary edema at 16 hours after operation (hpo was obviously enhanced compared to that in 8hpo and sham groups. Immunofluorescent staining demonstrated that IL-1β and P38 MAPK were detected in lung tissues. And rats with II/R have the highest translation level for IL-1β and phosphorylation of P38 MAPK in lung tissues at 16hpo compared with 8hpo and sham groups. Moreover, administration of SB239063, an inhibitor of P38 α and β, could effectively downregulate the expressions of IL-1β and protects lung tissues from injury in II/R rats. Our findings indicate that the inhibition of P38 α and β may downregulate the expression of IL-1β to protect lung from acute injury in II/R, which could be used as a potential target for reducing ALI induced by II/R in the future clinical trial.

  11. Chronic ethanol ingestion impairs alveolar type II cell glutathione homeostasis and function and predisposes to endotoxin-mediated acute edematous lung injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguin, F; Moss, I; Brown, L A; Guidot, D M

    1998-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse increases the incidence and mortality of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in septic patients. To examine a potential mechanism, we hypothesized that ethanol ingestion predisposes to sepsis-mediated acute lung injury by decreasing alveolar type II cell glutathione homeostasis and function. Lungs isolated from rats fed ethanol (20% in water for >/= 3 wk), compared with lungs from control-fed rats, had greater (P Ethanol ingestion decreased (P glutathione levels in the plasma, lung tissue, and lung lavage fluid, and increased (P glutathione levels in the lung lavage fluid. Furthermore, ethanol ingestion decreased type II cell glutathione content by 95% (P glutathione precursors S-adenosyl-L-methionine and N-acetylcysteine in the final week of ethanol ingestion significantly reduced lung edema during perfusion ex vivo. We conclude that ethanol ingestion in rats alters alveolar type II cell glutathione levels and function, thereby predisposing the lung to acute edematous injury after endotoxemia. We speculate that chronic alcohol abuse in humans predisposes to ARDS through similar mechanisms. PMID:9466970

  12. Association between insertion/deletion polymorphism in angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome: a meta-analysis

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    Matsuda Akihisa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A previous meta-analysis reported a positive association between an insertion/deletion (I/D polymorphism in the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (ACE and the risk of acute lung injury (ALI/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Here, we updated this meta-analysis and additionally assessed the association of this polymorphism with ALI/ARDS mortality. Methods We searched electronic databases through October 2011 for the terms “angiotensin-converting enzyme gene”, “acute lung injury”, and “acute respiratory distress syndrome,” and reviewed all studies that reported the relationship of the I/D polymorphism in ACE with ALI/ARDS in humans. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria, comprising 532 ALI/ARDS patients, 3032 healthy controls, and 1432 patients without ALI/ARDS. We used three genetic models: the allele, dominant, and recessive models. Results The ACE I/D polymorphism was not associated with susceptibility to ALI/ARDS for any genetic model. However, the ACE I/D polymorphism was associated with the mortality risk of ALI/ARDS in Asian subjects ( Pallele Pdominant = 0.001, Precessive = 0.002. This finding remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusions There is a possible association between the ACE I/D polymorphism genotype and the mortality risk of ALI/ARDS in Asians.

  13. Immunomodulatory Effect of Chinese Herbal Medicine Formula Sheng-Fei-Yu-Chuan-Tang in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chia-Hung Lin; Ching-Hua Yeh; Li-Jen Lin; Shulhn-Der Wang; Jen-Shu Wang; Shung-Te Kao

    2013-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine formula Sheng-Fei-Yu-Chuan-Tang (SFYCT), consisting of 13 medicinal plants, was used to treat patients with lung diseases. This study investigated the immunoregulatory effect of SFYCT on intratracheal lipopolysaccharides- (LPS-) challenged acute lung injury (ALI) mice. SFYCT attenuated pulmonary edema, macrophages, and neutrophils infiltration in the airways. SFYCT decreased inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor- ? (TNF ? ), interleukin-1 ? , and...

  14. Isoflurane attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury by inhibiting ROS-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

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    Yin, Ning; Peng, Zhendan; Li, Bin; Xia, Jiangyan; Wang, Zhen; Yuan, Jing; Fang, Lei; Lu, Xinjiang

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding domains and leucine-rich repeat (NLR) pyrin domains containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome are highly involved in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) wherein alveolar macrophages (AMs) play a crucial role. Isoflurane (ISO) has been shown to attenuate ALI. However, the inhibitory effects of ISO on NLRP3 activation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI remain unknown. Here, we showed that 1.4% ISO post-treatment reduced LPS-induced body weight loss, pulmonary histopathological injury, edema, and vascular permeability in rats. ISO attenuated LPS-triggered inflammation, as evidenced by reductions in the number of total cells, neutrophils, and macrophages, and the release of IL-1β and IL-18 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. ISO treatment decreased the myeloperoxidase activity, F4/80-positive cells, and the mRNA expression of IL-1β and IL-18 in the lung tissues of LPS-treated rats. Mechanistically, ISO reduced NLRP3 activation and caspase-1 activity in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent manner. An in vitro study that ISO inhibited LPS-induced AM activation partly confirmed in vivo findings. Overall, these results indicate that ISO post-conditioning alleviated LPS-induced ALI possibly by inhibiting ROS-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

  15. Acute pulmonary injury: high-resolution CT and histopathological spectrum

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    Obadina, E T; Torrealba, J M

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury usually causes hypoxaemic respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although diffuse alveolar damage is the hallmark of ARDS, other histopathological patterns of injury, such as acute and fibrinoid organising pneumonia, can be associated with acute respiratory failure. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia can also cause acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure and mimic ARDS. This pictorial essay reviews the high-resolution CT findings of acute lung injury and the correlative histopathological findings. PMID:23659926

  16. Targeting delivery of simvastatin using ICAM-1 antibody-conjugated nanostructured lipid carriers for acute lung injury therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Juan; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Hu, Jing-Bo; Kang, Xu-Qi; Chen, Li; Xu, Xiao-Ling; Ying, Xiao-Ying; Jiang, Sai-Ping; Du, Yong-Zhong

    2017-11-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a critical illness without effective therapeutic modalities currently. Recent studies indicated potential efficacy of statins for ALI, while high-dose statins was suggested to be significant for attenuating inflammation in vivo. Therefore, a lung-targeted drug delivery system (DDS) delivering simvastatin (SV) for ALI therapy was developed, attempting to improve the disease with a decreased dose and minimize potential adverse effects. SV-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (SV/NLCs) with different size were prepared primarily. With particle size increasing from 143.7 nm to 337.8 nm, SV/NLCs showed increasing drug-encapsulated efficiency from 66.70% to 91.04%. Although larger SV/NLCs exhibited slower in vitro cellular uptake by human vascular endothelial cell line EAhy926 at initial stage, while in vivo distribution demonstrated higher pulmonary accumulation of the larger ones. Thus, the largest size SV/NLCs (337.8 nm) were conjugated with intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) antibody (anti-ICAM/SV/NLCs) for lung-targeted study. The anti-ICAM/SV/NLCs exhibited ideal lung-targeted characteristic in lipopolysaccharide-induced ALI mice. In vivo i.v. administration of anti-ICAM/SV/NLCs attenuated TNF-α, IL-6 and inflammatory cells infiltration more effectively than free SV or non-targeted SV/NLCs after 48-h administration. Significant histological improvements by anti-ICAM/SV/NLCs were further revealed by H&E stain. Therefore, ICAM-1 antibody-conjugated NLCs may represent a potential lung-targeted DDS contributing to ALI therapy by statins.

  17. Inspiratory vs. expiratory pressure-volume curves to set end-expiratory pressure in acute lung injury.

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    Albaiceta, Guillermo M; Luyando, Luis H; Parra, Diego; Menendez, Rafael; Calvo, Juan; Pedreira, Paula Rodríguez; Taboada, Francisco

    2005-10-01

    To study the effects of two levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), 2 cm H(2)O above the lower inflection point of the inspiratory limb and equal to the point of maximum curvature on the expiratory limb of the pressure-volume curve, in gas exchange, respiratory mechanics, and lung aeration. Prospective clinical study in the intensive care unit and computed tomography ward of a university hospital. Eight patients with early acute lung injury. Both limbs of the static pressure-volume curve were traced and inflection points calculated using a sigmoid model. During ventilation with a tidal volume of 6 ml/kg we sequentially applied a PEEP 2 cm H(2)O above the inspiratory lower inflection point (15.5+/-3.1 cm H(2)O) and a PEEP equal to the expiratory point of maximum curvature (23.5+/-4.1 cmH(2)O). Arterial blood gases, respiratory system compliance and resistance and changes in lung aeration (measured on three computed tomography slices during end-expiratory and end-inspiratory pauses) were measured at each PEEP level. PEEP according to the expiratory point of maximum curvature was related to an improvement in oxygenation, increase in normally aerated, decrease in nonaerated lung volumes, and greater alveolar stability. There was also an increase in PaCO(2), airway pressures, and hyperaerated lung volume. High PEEP levels according to the point of maximum curvature of the deflation limb of the pressure-volume curve have both benefits and drawbacks.

  18. Klebsiella pneumoniae alleviates influenza-induced acute lung injury via limiting NK cell expansion.

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    Wang, Jian; Li, Fengqi; Sun, Rui; Gao, Xiang; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2014-08-01

    A protective effect induced by bacterial preinfection upon a subsequent lethal influenza virus infection has been observed, but the underlying immune mechanisms have not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we used a mouse model of Klebsiella pneumoniae preinfection to gain insight into how bacterial preinfection influences the subsequent lethal influenza virus infection. We found that K. pneumoniae preinfection significantly attenuated lung immune injury and decreased mortality during influenza virus infection, but K. pneumoniae-specific immunity was not involved in this cross-protection against influenza virus. K. pneumoniae preinfection limited NK cell expansion, which was involved in influenza-induced immune injury and death. Furthermore, K. pneumoniae preinfection could not control NK cell expansion and death during influenza virus infection in Rag1(-/-) mice, but adoptive transfer of T cells from wild-type mice was able to restore this protective effect. Our data suggest that the adaptive immune response activated by bacterial infection limits the excessive innate immune response induced by a subsequent influenza infection, ultimately protecting mice from death. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Transfusion-related acute lung injury em pós-operatório de neurocirurgia: relato de caso Transfusion-related acute lung injury after following neurosurgery: case report

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    Salomón Soriano Ordinola Rojas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: O Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI, é definido como um edema pulmonar não cardiogênico, relacionado à transfusão de sangue ou derivados, evoluindo com necessidade de ventilação mecânica na grande maioria dos casos. O objetivo deste estudo foi apresentar um caso de TRALI em pós-operatório imediato de neurocirurgia. RELATO DO CASO: Paciente do sexo masculino, 69 anos, sem comprometimento pulmonar prévio, foi submetido à ressecção cirúrgica de glioblastoma multiforme, apresentando complicações intra-operatórias (broncoespasmo e diminuição da saturação de oxigênio, após ter recebido plasma fresco congelado, sendo diagnosticado TRALI. O paciente foi mantido sedado, sob ventilação mecânica e monitorização hemodinâmica invasiva, com melhora progressiva do quadro, recebendo alta da unidade de terapia intensiva (UTI no 8º dia de pós-operatório. CONCLUSÕES: O TRALI deve ser investigado nos pacientes que recebem hemoderivados e apresentam alterações pulmonares.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI, is defined as noncardiogenic pulmonary edema temporally related to transfusion therapy, evolving with ventilation necessity mechanics in the great majority of the cases. This objective of this study was to present case of TRALI in the immediate postoperative of neurosurgery. CASE REPORT: We describe the case of a patient who presented broncoespasm and decreased oxygen saturation after to have received fresh-frozen plasma in the neurosurgery, who presented TRALI. The patient was submitted a invasive hemodynamic monitoring, sedation and supplemental oxygen with mechanical ventilation, with gradual improvement, leaving the intensive care unit in the eight day of postoperative. CONCLUSIONS: The TRALI must be investigated in the patients who receive transfusion therapy and present lung injury.

  20. Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B turnover in human acute lung injury and in control patients.

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    Simonato, Manuela; Baritussio, Aldo; Ori, Carlo; Vedovelli, Luca; Rossi, Sandra; Dalla Massara, Lorenza; Rizzi, Sabina; Carnielli, Virgilio P; Cogo, Paola E

    2011-03-24

    Patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury (ALI) have low concentrations of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. No information is available on their turnover. To analyze disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B turnover in patients with ARDS/ALI and in human adults with normal lungs (controls). 2H2O as precursor of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine-palmitate and 113C-Leucine as precursor of surfactant protein-B were administered intravenously to 12 patients with ARDS/ALI and to 8 controls. Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B were isolated from serial tracheal aspirates, and their fractional synthetic rate was derived from the 2H and 13C enrichment curves, obtained by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine, surfactant protein-B, and protein concentrations in tracheal aspirates were also measured. 1) Surfactant protein-B turned over at faster rate than disaturated-phosphatidylcholine both in ARDS/ALI patients and in controls. 2) In patients with ARDS/ALI the fractional synthesis rate of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine was 3.1 times higher than in controls (p phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B in tracheal aspirates were markedly and significantly reduced (17% and 40% of the control values respectively). 1) Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B have a different turnover both in healthy and diseased lungs. 2) In ARDS/ALI the synthesis of these two surfactant components may be differently regulated.

  1. Effects of a Natural Prolyl Oligopeptidase Inhibitor, Rosmarinic Acid, on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

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    Miaomiao Wei

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Rosmarinic acid (RA, a polyphenolic phytochemical, is a natural prolyl oligopeptidase inhibitor. In the present study, we found that RA exerted potent anti-inflammatory effects in in vivo models of acute lung injury (ALI induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Mice were pretreated with RA one hour before challenge with a dose of 0.5 mg/kg LPS. Twenty-four hours after LPS was given, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF was obtained to measure pro-inflammatory mediator and total cell counts. RA significantly decreased the production of LPS-induced TNF-a, IL-6, and IL-1β compare with the LPS group. When pretreated with RA (5, 10, or 20 mg/kg the lung wet-to-dry weight (W/D ratio of the lung tissue and the number of total cells, neutrophils and macrophages in the BALF were decreased significantly. Furthermore, RA may enhance oxidase dimutase (SOD activity during the inflammatory response to LPS-induced ALI. And we further demonstrated that RA exerts anti-inflammation effect in vivo models of ALI through suppresses ERK/MAPK signaling in a dose dependent manner. These studies have important implications for RA administration as a potential treatment for ALI.

  2. Pachymic acid improves survival and attenuates acute lung injury in septic rats induced by cecal ligation and puncture.

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    Li, J-Y; Wu, H-X; Yang, G

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the possible beneficial effects of pachymic acid (PA) on acute lung injury (ALI) in a rat model of sepsis. A rat model of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was used. Rats were randomly divided into five groups: sham, CLP, CLP + PA 1 mg/kg, CLP + PA 5 mg/kg, CLP + PA 10 mg/kg. CLP + PA groups received PA by intraperitoneal injection daily for consecutive 3 days, respectively, and the rats in sham and CLP groups were given equivalent volume of olive oil. We killed the animals 12 h after CLP and collected blood samples to determine PaO2, PaCO2, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6. Lung samples were taken for wet/dry weight ratios and histologic assessment. Meanwhile, the levels of lung tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were determined. The results revealed that PA treatment significantly improved the survival of septic rats and attenuated CLP-induced ALI. In PA-treated rats, the wet/dry weight ratios and the serum levels of TNF-a, IL-1β and IL-6 were down-regulated compared with the CLP group. PA also markedly decreased MDA and MPO contents and increased SOD level. These findings indicate that PA administration ameliorates ALI in a rat model of sepsis induced by CLP.

  3. Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and Surfactant protein-B turnover in human acute lung injury and in control patients

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    Rizzi Sabina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS and Acute Lung Injury (ALI have low concentrations of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. No information is available on their turnover. Objectives To analyze disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B turnover in patients with ARDS/ALI and in human adults with normal lungs (controls. Methods 2H2O as precursor of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine-palmitate and 113C-Leucine as precursor of surfactant protein-B were administered intravenously to 12 patients with ARDS/ALI and to 8 controls. Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B were isolated from serial tracheal aspirates, and their fractional synthetic rate was derived from the 2H and 13C enrichment curves, obtained by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine, surfactant protein-B, and protein concentrations in tracheal aspirates were also measured. Results 1 Surfactant protein-B turned over at faster rate than disaturated-phosphatidylcholine both in ARDS/ALI patients and in controls. 2 In patients with ARDS/ALI the fractional synthesis rate of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine was 3.1 times higher than in controls (p Conclusions 1 Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B have a different turnover both in healthy and diseased lungs. 2 In ARDS/ALI the synthesis of these two surfactant components may be differently regulated.

  4. Non-polar lipids accumulate during storage of transfusion products and do not contribute to the onset of transfusion-related acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, A. L.; Vervaart, M. A. T.; van Bruggen, R.; de Korte, D.; Nieuwland, R.; Kulik, W.; Vlaar, A. P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and ObjectivesThe accumulation of non-polar lipids arachidonic acid, 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), 12-HETE and 15-HETE during storage of transfusion products may play a role in the onset of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), a syndrome of respiratory distress after

  5. The incidence, risk factors, and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in a cohort of cardiac surgery patients: a prospective nested case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; Hofstra, Jorrit J.; Determann, Rogier M.; Veelo, Denise P.; Paulus, Frederique; Kulik, Wim; Korevaar, Johanna; de Mol, Bas A.; Koopman, Marianne M. W.; Porcelijn, Leendert; Binnekade, Jan M.; Vroom, Margreeth B.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. Both antibodies and bioactive lipids that have accumulated during storage of blood have been implicated in TRALI pathogenesis. In a single-center, nested, case-control study, patients

  6. The incidence, risk factors, and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in a cohort of cardiac surgery patients: a prospective nested case-control study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaar, A.P.J.; Hofstra, J.J.; Determann, R.M.; Veelo, D.P.; Paulus, F.; Kulik, W.; Korevaar, J.; Mol, B.A. de; Koopman, M.M.W.; Porcelijn, L.; Binnekade, J.M.; Vroom, M.B.; Schultz, M.J.; Juffermans, N.P.

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. Both antibodies and bioactive lipids that have accumulated during storage of blood have been implicated in TRALI pathogenesis. In a single-center, nested, case-control study, patients

  7. ASSESSMENT OF ACUTE LUNG INJURY INDUCED BY PM 2.5 SAMPLES FROM TWO CITIES IN GERMANY WITH DIFFERING INCIDENCE OF ALLERGIES AND ASTHMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ASSESSMENT OF ACUTE LUNG INJURY INDUCED BY PM 2.5 SAMPLES FROM TWO CITIES IN GERMANY WITH DIFFERING INCIDENCE OF ALLERGIES AND ASTHMA.LR Bishop, J Heinrich*, MK Selgrade & MI Gilmour. Experimental Toxicology Division, ORD/ NHEERL, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC. *GSF, Neuherberg,...

  8. Human amnion cells reverse acute and chronic pulmonary damage in experimental neonatal lung injury

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    Dandan Zhu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite advances in neonatal care, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD remains a significant contributor to infant mortality and morbidity. While human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs have shown promise in small and large animal models of BPD, there is scarce information on long-term benefit and clinically relevant questions surrounding administration strategy remain unanswered. In assessing the therapeutic potential of hAECs, we investigated the impact of cell dosage, administration routes and timing of treatment in a pre-clinical model of BPD. Methods Lipopolysaccharide was introduced intra-amniotically at day 16 of pregnancy prior to exposure to 65% oxygen (hyperoxia at birth. hAECs were administered either 12 hours (early or 4 days (late after hyperoxia commenced. Collective lung tissues were subjected to histological analysis, multikine ELISA for inflammatory cytokines, FACS for immune cell populations and 3D lung stem cell culture at neonatal stage (postnatal day 7 and 14. Invasive lung function test and echocardiography were applied at 6 and 10 weeks of age. Results hAECs improved the tissue-to-airspace ratio and septal crest density in a dose-dependent manner, regardless of administration route. Early administration of hAECs, coinciding with the commencement of postnatal hyperoxia, was associated with reduced macrophages, dendritic cells and natural killer cells. This was not the case if hAECs were administered when lung injury was established. Fittingly, early hAEC treatment was more efficacious in reducing interleukin-1β, tumour necrosis factor alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels. Early hAEC treatment was also associated with reduced airway hyper-responsiveness and normalisation of pressure–volume loops. Pulmonary hypertension and right ventricle hypertrophy were also prevented in the early hAEC treatment group, and this persisted until 10 weeks of age. Conclusions Early hAEC treatment appears to

  9. [Experimental treatment of acute lung injury caused by inundation of thoracic cavity by seawater following open chest wound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yun-You; Xue, Zhi-Qiang; Meng, Ji-Guang; Ding, Xin-Min; Peng, Chao-Sheng; Wang, Da-Peng

    2007-04-01

    To study the effects of lung protective ventilation and pentoxifylline (PTX) on acute lung injury (ALI) caused by open chest wound with seawater inundation of the thoracic cavity. A model of ALI caused by open chest wound and seawater inundation of thoracic cavity was reproduced in dogs. Twenty-four healthy dogs were randomly divided into four groups: no-treatment group (group A), ordinary treatment group (group B), lung protective ventilation treatment group (group C), and lung protective ventilation and PTX treatment group (group D). The parameters of hemodynamics, arterial blood gas analysis, plasma osmotic pressure and serum electrolytes in dogs were determined at 0 and 6 hours after injury and at 2 and 4 hours after treatment. Blood samples and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected to assess the changes in cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8. The arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO(2)) and oxygenation index (PaO(2)/FiO(2)) in group B were still lower than normal values at 2 and 4 hours after treatment, but those parameters in group C and group D distinctly recovered. The parameters of hemodynamics, plasma osmotic pressure and serum electrolytes were all normalized in group B, C and D at 2 and 4 hours after treatment compared with those in group A. The levels of TNF-alpha in peripheral blood in group C and the TNF-alpha and IL-8 levels in peripheral blood and IL-6, IL-8 levels in BALF in group D were significantly lower than those in group A and group B after treatment. The TNF-alpha in peripheral blood and IL-8 levels in BALF in group D were also significantly lower than those in group C after treatment. Lung protective ventilation is an effective method in the treatment of ALI caused by open chest wound with inundation of seawater in thoracic cavity. PTX can inhibit inflammatory reaction in the lung and peripheral blood.

  10. Occupational therapy for patients with acute lung injury: factors associated with time to first intervention in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinglas, Victor D; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Ciesla, Nancy; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A; Shanholtz, Carl; Needham, Dale M

    2013-01-01

    Very early occupational therapy intervention in the intensive care unit (ICU) improves patients' physical recovery. We evaluated the association of patient, ICU, and hospital factors with time to first occupational therapy intervention in ICU patients with acute lung injury (ALI). We conducted a prospective cohort study of 514 consecutive patients with ALI from 11 ICUs in three hospitals in Baltimore, MD. Only 30% of patients ever received occupational therapy during their ICU stay. Worse organ failure, continuous hemodialysis, and uninterrupted continuous infusion of sedation were independently associated with delayed occupational therapy initiation, and hospital study site and admission to a trauma ICU were independently associated with earlier occupational therapy. Severity of illness and ICU practices for sedation administration were associated with delayed occupational therapy. Both hospital study site and type of ICU were independently associated with timing of occupational therapy, indicating modifiable environmental factors for promoting early occupational therapy in the ICU. Copyright © 2013 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  11. Do corticosteroids have a role in preventing or reducing acute toxic lung injury caused by inhalation of chemical agents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Dylan W; Meulenbelt, Jan

    2011-02-01

    To assess the evidence that treatment with corticosteroids improves the outcome in those exposed to lung-damaging agents. We searched Pubmed, Toxnet, Cochrane database, Google Scholar, and Embase from 1966 to January 2010 using the search terms "steroid", "corticosteroid", "lung injury", "lung damage", and "inhalation". These searches identified 287 papers of which 118 contained information on animal studies. However, most were reviews or case reports and only a few were controlled animal experiments of which 13 were considered relevant. ROLE OF CORTICOSTEROIDS: Corticosteroids have no beneficial effect at the alveolar level on acute lung injury, which is caused by inhalation of poorly water-soluble compounds (e.g. nitrogen dioxide, ozone, phosgene) or following severe exposure to water-soluble compounds (e.g. chlorine, ammonia). In the recovery phase, corticosteroids may even be harmful, because corticosteroids hamper the division of type II alveolar cells and hamper the differentiation from type II into type I alveolar cells. The latter is important for the re-epithelialization of the alveolus and removal of excess of water in the alveolus. Furthermore, the quality of animal studies does not always allow extrapolation to human exposures. Differences between humans and animals in anatomy, pulmonary defense systems, breathing physiology, as well as the way the animals have been exposed, and the timing and route of corticosteroids in animal studies make predictions difficult. ROLE OF CORTICOSTEROIDS: An abundance of uncontrolled case reports and a few human crossover studies have evaluated the outcome of human volunteers exposed to various lung-damaging agents. Only a few reports contained systematic information on corticosteroid treatment. Data on the efficacy of corticosteroids after human exposure to lung-damaging agents are inconclusive. Often the number of patients involved is small or the severity of exposure is unclear or not well determined. These reports

  12. Topical application of phosphatidyl-inositol-3,5-bisphosphate for acute lung injury in neonatal swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuß, Stefanie; Omam, Friede D; Scheiermann, Julia; Stadelmann, Sabrina; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; von Bismarck, Philipp; Adam-Klages, Sabine; Knerlich-Lukoschus, Friederike; Lex, Dennis; Wesch, Daniela; Held-Feindt, Janka; Uhlig, Stefan; Schütze, Stefan; Krause, Martin F

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxemic respiratory failure of the neonatal organism involves increased acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) activity and production of ceramide, a second messenger of a pro-inflammatory pathway that promotes increased vascular permeability, surfactant alterations and alveolar epithelial apoptosis. We comparatively assessed the benefits of topical aSMase inhibition by either imipramine (Imi) or phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) when administered into the airways together with surfactant (S) for fortification. In this translational study, a triple-hit acute lung injury model was used that entails repeated airway lavage, injurious ventilation and tracheal lipopolysaccharide instillation in newborn piglets subject to mechanical ventilation for 72 hrs. After randomization, we administered an air bolus (control), S, S+Imi, or S+PIP2. Only in the latter two groups we observed significantly improved oxygenation and ventilation, dynamic compliance and pulmonary oedema. S+Imi caused systemic aSMase suppression and ceramide reduction, whereas the S+PIP2 effect remained compartmentalized in the airways because of the molecule's bulky structure. The surfactant surface tensions improved by S+Imi and S+PIP2 interventions, but only to a minor extent by S alone. S+PIP2 inhibited the migration of monocyte-derived macrophages and granulocytes into airways by the reduction of CD14/CD18 expression on cell membranes and the expression of epidermal growth factors (amphiregulin and TGF-β1) and interleukin-6 as pro-fibrotic factors. Finally we observed reduced alveolar epithelial apoptosis, which was most apparent in S+PIP2 lungs. Exogenous surfactant “fortified” by PIP2, a naturally occurring surfactant component, improves lung function by topical suppression of aSMase, providing a potential treatment concept for neonates with hypoxemic respiratory failure. PMID:22882773

  13. rPSGL-1-Ig, a recombinant PSGL-1-Ig fusion protein, ameliorates LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice by inhibiting neutrophil migration.

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    Shao, H-Z; Qin, B-Y

    2015-02-28

    The binding of selectin to P—selectin glycoprotein ligand—1 (PSGL—1) mediates the tethering and rolling of leukocytes on the endothelium during leukocyte migration and inflammation. Recombinant human PSGL—1—Ig fusion protein (rPSGL—1—Ig) is a widely used selectin inhibitor that prevents neutrophil entry into inflamed or reperfused tissues. We hypothesized that rPSGL—1—Ig could be used to as a drug for the treatment of acute lung injury (ALI). We induced murine ALI by injecting mice with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and then treated the mice with rPSGL—1—Ig. We determined the lung injury index, wet/dry ratio, and inflammatory cytokine level in differentially treated mice. The symptoms of LPS—induced lung injury were alleviated by rPSGL—1—Ig treatment. The histopathological index of LPS—induced lung injury improved after rPSGL—1—Ig treatment. rPSGL—1—Ig treatment also reduced the recruitment of inflammatory cells, including neutrophils, into the lung, as well as reducing the level of inflammatory cytokines. These data suggest that rPSGL—1—Ig protein has a therapeutic effect on LPS—induced lung injury.

  14. Heat Shock Protein A12B Protects Vascular Endothelial Cells Against Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

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    Yi Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary endothelial injury is a critical process in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI during sepsis. Heat shock protein A12B (HSPA12B is mainly expressed in endothelial cells and protects against several harmful factors. However, the effects of HSPA12B in sepsis-induced ALI and its potential mechanisms of action remain unclear. Methods: For in vivo experiments, C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into four groups (n=15: a sham operation group, a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP group, a HSPA12B siRNA-CLP group and a negative control (NC siRNA-CLP group. The mice were treated by nasal inhalation of 2-OMe-modified HSPA12B siRNA or NC siRNA. Sepsis was induced by CLP. Samples were harvested 24 and 48 hours post-CLP surgery. Pathological changes and scoring of lung tissue samples were monitored using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., interleukin (IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, and IL-6 and myeloperoxidase activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were analyzed by ELISA. Pulmonary edema was assessed using a wet-to-dry weight ratio. Neutrophils and alveolar macrophages were counted using flow cytometry. Pulmonary endothelial cell apoptosis was detected by TUNEL staining. Expression levels of MAPK family signaling molecules and caspase-3 were measured by Western blot analysis. In addition, 7-day survival was recorded. For in vitro experiments, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were pre-transfected with HSPA12B siRNA or pIRES2-EGFP-HSPA12B-Flag plasmid and treated with lipopolysaccharide; subsequently, the expression levels of MAPK family signaling molecules and caspase-3 were measured by Western blotting. Results: Nasal inhalation of nano-polymer-encapsulated HSPA12B siRNA specifically downregulated mRNA and protein expression levels of HSPA12B in lung tissues. The administration of HSPA12B siRNA aggravated lung pathological injury, upregulated pro-inflammatory cytokine (e

  15. Some cases of transfusion-related acute lung injury in clinical practice

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    B. B. Bakhovadinov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of this publication was motivated by a desire to present contemporary authors look at one of the most important branches of critical care medicine - transfusion therapy and related complications, such as transfusion-related lung injury (TRALI. The article describes the causes, pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of TRALI patients in critical condition. In this article attention is paid to the diagnosis of TRALI, associated with transfusion of blood components, modern diagnosis criteria. The authors describe the clinical symptoms, treatment schema and propose prevention protocol of TRALI. In order to determine the incidence of TRALI in medical practice transfusion therapy data in 1900 patients was analyzed. The development of this complication was found in 12 patients, 5 patients had «possible TRALI», which is comparable with the literature data. In 5 patients and 11 donors at a laboratory study anti-leukocyte antibodies were found. The important role of prevention, based on the immune mechanisms of the pathogenesis of TRALI is marked.

  16. Overexpression of Brg1 Alleviates Hepatic Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Lung Injury through Antioxidative Stress Effects

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    Mian Ge

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate whether overexpression of Brahma-related gene-1 (Brg1 can alleviate lung injury induced by hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (HIR and its precise mechanism. Methods. Cytomegalovirus-transgenic Brg1-overexpressing (CMV-Brg1 mice and wild-type (WT C57BL/6 mice underwent HIR. Lung histology, oxidative injury markers, and antioxidant enzyme concentrations in the lung were assessed. The protein expression levels of Brg1, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, and NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 in the lung were analyzed by Western blotting. Results. In the WT group, histopathological analysis revealed that lung damage peaked at 6 h after HIR. Meanwhile, the lung reactive oxygen species (ROS and 8-isoprostane levels were significantly increased. The protein expression of Brg1 in lung tissue decreased to a minimum at 6 h. Overexpression of Brg1 alleviated lung injury and decreased the amounts of oxidative products, including the levels of 8-isoprostane and ROS, as well as the percentage of positive cells for 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE and 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG. Brg1 overexpression increased the expression and nuclear translocation of Nrf2 as well as activated the antioxidases. In addition, it decreased the expression of inflammatory factors. Conclusion. Overexpression of Brg1 alleviates oxidative lung injury induced by HIR, likely through the Nrf2 pathway.

  17. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI in two thalassaemia patients caused by the same multiparous blood donor

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    George J Kontoghiorghes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Two separate episodes of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI in thalassaemia patients caused by red blood cell transfusions from the same multiparous blood donor are reported. Both cases had the same symptomatology and occurred 10-60 minutes of transfusion. The patients presented dyspnea, sweating, fatigue, dizziness, fever, and sense of losing consciousness. The chest x-ray showed a pulmonary oedema-like picture with both lungs filled with fluid. The patients were treated in the intensive therapy unit. They were weaned off the ventilator and discharged following hospitalization 7 and 9 days respectively. The TRALI syndrome was diagnosed to be associated with HLA-specific donor antibodies against mismatched HLA-antigens of the transfused patients. Haemovigilance improvements are essential for reducing the morbidity and mortality in transfused patients. Blood from multiparous donors should be tested for the presence of IgG HLA-Class I and –Class II antibodies before being transfused in thalassaemia and other chronically transfused patients.

  18. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI) in two Thalassaemia Patients Caused by the Same Multiparous Blood Donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolnagou, Annita; Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2017-01-01

    We report two separate episodes of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) in two thalassaemia patients who received red blood cell transfusions from the same multiparous donor. Both cases had the same symptomatology and occurred within 60 minutes of transfusion. The patients presented dyspnoea, sweating, fatigue, dizziness, fever, and sense of losing consciousness. The chest x-ray showed a pulmonary oedema-like picture with both lungs filled with fluid. The patients were treated in the intensive therapy unit. They were weaned off the ventilator and discharged following hospitalization 7 and 9 days respectively. The TRALI syndrome was diagnosed to be associated with HLA-specific donor antibodies against mismatched HLA-antigens of the transfused patients. Haemovigilance improvements are essential for reducing the morbidity and mortality in transfused patients. Blood from multiparous donors should be tested for the presence of IgG HLA-Class I and -Class II antibodies before being transfused in thalassaemia and other chronically transfused patients.

  19. Chemomics-Integrated Proteomics Analysis of Jie-Geng-Tang to Ameliorate Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

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    Jin Tao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Jie-Geng-Tang (JGT, a classic and famous traditional Chinese medicine (TCM prescription composed of Platycodon grandiflorum (Jacq. A. DC. (PG and Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. (GU, is well known for “clearing heat and relieving toxicity” and its ability to “diffuse the lung and relieve sore throat.” However, the mechanism underlying its action remains unclear. In this study, potential anti-inflammatory ingredients were screened and submitted to PharmMapper and the KEGG bioinformatics website to predict the target proteins and related pathways, respectively. Differentially expressed candidate proteins from acute lung injury (ALI mice treated with JGT were identified by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ and LC Triple-TOF. Eleven potential anti-inflammatory ingredients were found, including the derivatives of glycyrrhizic acid, licorice-saponin, liquiritin, and platycodigenin. A total of sixty-seven differentially expressed proteins were confirmed after JGT treatment with four therapeutic functions, including immunoregulation, anti-inflammation, ribosome, and muscle contraction. PG and GU comediate PI3K/Akt signal pathway inhibition of NF-κB, VCAM1, and ICAM1 release which primarily act on PI3K, PDK1, AKT, and GSK3β. GU markedly inhibits the ERK/MAPK signaling pathways and primarily acts on LCK, RAS, and MEK. A network was constructed using bioactive ingredients, targets, and pathways to determine the mechanism underlying JGT treatment of ALI.

  20. Lesão pulmonar aguda associada à transfusão Transfusion-related acute lung injury

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    Antonio Fabron Junior

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Lesão pulmonar aguda associada à transfusão (transfusion-related acute lung injury, TRALI é uma complicação clínica grave relacionada à transfusão de hemocomponentes que contêm plasma. Recentemente, TRALI foi considerada a principal causa de morte associada à transfusão nos Estados Unidos e Reino Unido. É manifestada tipicamente por dispnéia, hipoxemia, hipotensão, febre e edema pulmonar não cardiogênico, que ocorre durante ou dentro de 6 h, após completada a transfusão. Embora o exato mecanismo não tenha sido totalmente elucidado, postula-se que TRALI esteja associada à infusão de anticorpos contra antígenos leucocitários (classes I ou II ou aloantígenos específicos de neutrófilos e a mediadores biologicamente ativos presentes em componentes celulares estocados. A maioria dos doadores implicados em casos da TRALI são mulheres multíparas. TRALI, além de ser pouco diagnosticada, pode ainda ser confundida com outras situações de insuficiência respiratória aguda. Um melhor conhecimento sobre TRALI pode ser crucial na prevenção e tratamento desta severa complicação transfusional.Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI is a serious clinical syndrome associated with the transfusion of plasma-containing blood components. Recently, TRALI has come to be recognized as the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States and United Kingdom. This complication typically presents as shortness of breath, hypoxemia, hypotension, fever and noncardiogeneic pulmonary edema, all occurring during or within 6 h after transfusion. Although the mechanism of TRALI has not been fully elucidated, it has been associated with human leukocyte antigen antibodies (class I, class II or neutrophil alloantigens and with biologically active mediators in stored cellular blood components. Most of the donors implicated in cases of TRALI are multiparous women. Rarely diagnosed, TRALI can be confused with other causes of acute

  1. Sarcandra glabra combined with lycopene protect rats from lipopolysaccharide induced acute lung injury via reducing inflammatory response.

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    Liu, Tian-Yin; Chen, Shi-Biao

    2016-12-01

    Sarcandra glabra (Chinese name, Zhongjiefeng) is an important herb widely used in traditional Chinese medicine. Lycopene has been shown to be a powerful antioxidant. This study aims to test the hypothesis that Sarcandra glabra combined with lycopene protect rats from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced acute lung injury (ALI). Metabolomics approach combined with pathological inspection, serum biochemistry examination, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting were used to explore the protective effects of Sarcandra glabra and lycopene on LPS-induced ALI, and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Results showed that Sarcandra glabra and lycopene could significantly ameliorate LPS-induced histopathological injuries, improve the anti-oxidative activities of rats, decrease the levels of TNF-α and IL-6, suppress the activations of MAPK and transcription factor NF-κB and reverse the disturbed metabolism towards the normal status. Taken together, this integrated study revealed that Sarcandra glabra combined with lycopene had great potential in protecting rats from LPS-induced ALI, which would be helpful to guide the clinical medication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. [Acute kidney injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, D.; Kooman, J.P.; Lance, M.D.; Heurn, L.W. van; Snoeijs, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    - 'Acute kidney injury' is modern terminology for a sudden decline in kidney function, and is defined by the RIFLE classification (RIFLE is an acronym for Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-stage kidney disease).- Acute kidney injury occurs as a result of the combination of reduced perfusion in the

  3. Targeting myeloid differentiation protein 2 by the new chalcone L2H21 protects LPS-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yali; Xu, Tingting; Wu, Beibei; Chen, Hongjin; Pan, Zheer; Huang, Yi; Mei, Liqin; Dai, Yuanrong; Liu, Xing; Shan, Xiaoou; Liang, Guang

    2017-04-01

    Acute inflammatory diseases are the leading causes of mortality in intensive care units. Myeloid differentiation 2 (MD-2) is required for recognizing lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), and represents an attractive therapeutic target for LPS-induced inflammatory diseases. In this study, we report a chalcone derivative, L2H21, as a new MD2 inhibitor, which could inhibit LPS-induced inflammation both in vitro and in vivo. We identify that L2H21 as a direct inhibitor of MD-2 by binding to Arg(90) and Tyr(102) residues in MD-2 hydrophobic pocket using a series of biochemical experiments, including surface plasmon response, molecular docking and amino acid mutation. L2H21 dose dependently inhibited LPS-induced inflammatory cytokine expression in primary macrophages. In mice with LPS intratracheal instillation, L2H21 significantly decreased LPS-induced pulmonary oedema, pathological changes in lung tissue, protein concentration increase in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, inflammatory cells infiltration and inflammatory gene expression, accompanied with the decrease in pulmonary TLR4/MD-2 complex. Meanwhile, administration with L2H21 protects mice from LPS-induced mortality at a degree of 100%. Taken together, this study identifies a new MD2 inhibitor L2H21 as a promising candidate for the treatment of acute lung injury (ALI) and sepsis, and validates that inhibition of MD-2 is a potential therapeutic strategy for ALI. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  4. Protective Effects of the Ethanol Extract of Viola tianshanica Maxim against Acute Lung Injury Induced by Lipopolysaccharides in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Yang, Qiao-Li; Shi, Yu-Zhu; Hou, Bi-Yu; Yang, Sheng-Qian; Huang, Hua; Zhang, Li; Du, Guan-Hua

    2017-09-28

    Viola tianshanica Maxim, belonging to the Violaceae plant family, is traditionally used in Uighur medicine for treating pneumonia, headache, and fever. There is, however, a lack of basic understanding of its pharmacological activities. This study was designed to observe the effects of the ethanol extract (TSM) from Viola tianshanica Maxim on the inflammation response in acute lung injury (ALI) induced by LPS and the possible underlying mechanisms. We found that TSM (200 and 500 mg/kg) significantly decreased inflammatory cytokine production and the number of inflammatory cells, including macrophages and neutrophils, in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. TSM also markedly inhibited the lung wet-to-dry ratio and alleviated pathological changes in lung tissues. In vitro, after TSM (12.5-100 μg/ml) treatment to RAW 264.7 cells for 1 h, LPS (1 μg/ml) was added and the cells were further incubated for 24 h. TSM dose-dependently inhibited the levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as NO, PGE2, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β, and remarkably decreased the protein and mRNA expression of TNF-α and IL-6 in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. TSM also suppressed protein expression of p-IκBa and p-ERK1/2 and blocked nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. The results indicate that TSM exerts anti-inflammatory effects related with inhibition on NF-κB and MAPK (p-ERK1/2) signaling pathways. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that TSM might be a potential agent for the treatment of ALI.

  5. Role of timing and dose of energy received in patients with acute lung injury on mortality in the Intensive Nutrition in Acute Lung Injury Trial (INTACT): a post hoc analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunschweig, Carol L; Freels, Sally; Sheean, Patricia M; Peterson, Sarah J; Perez, Sandra Gomez; McKeever, Liam; Lateef, Omar; Gurka, David; Fantuzzi, Giamila

    2017-02-01

    Our trial INTACT (Intensive Nutrition in Acute Lung Injury Trial) was designed to compare the impact of feeding from acute lung injury (ALI) diagnosis to hospital discharge, an interval that, to our knowledge, has not yet been explored. It was stopped early because participants who were randomly assigned to energy intakes at nationally recommended amounts via intensive medical nutrition therapy experienced significantly higher mortality hazards than did those assigned to standard nutrition support care that provided energy at 55% of recommended concentrations. We assessed the influence of dose and timing of feeding on hospital mortality. Participants (n = 78) were dichotomized as died or discharged alive. Associations between the energy and protein received overall, early (days 1-7), and late (days ≥8) and the hazards of hospital mortality were evaluated between groups with multivariable analysis methods. Higher overall energy intake predicted significantly higher mortality (OR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.27). Among participants enrolled for ≥8 d (n = 66), higher early energy intake significantly increased the HR for mortality (HR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.28), whereas higher late energy intake was significantly protective (HR: 0.91, 95% CI: 0.83, 1.0). Results were similar for early but not late protein (grams per kilogram) exposure (early-exposure HR: 8.9, 95% CI: 2.3, 34.3; late-exposure HR: 0.15, 95% CI: 0.02, 1.1). Threshold analyses indicated early mean intakes ≥18 kcal/kg significantly increased subsequent mortality. Providing kilocalories per kilogram or grams of protein per kilogram early post-ALI diagnosis at recommended levels was associated with significantly higher hazards for mortality, whereas higher late energy intakes reduced mortality hazards. This time-varying effect violated the Cox proportionality assumption, indicating that feeding trials in similar populations should extend beyond 7 d and use time-varying statistical methods. Future trials are

  6. Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Therapy for Acute Lung Injury in Preclinical Animal Models: A Systematic Review.

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    Lauralyn A McIntyre

    Full Text Available The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS is a devastating clinical condition that is associated with a 30-40% risk of death, and significant long term morbidity for those who survive. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC have emerged as a potential novel treatment as in pre-clinical models they have been shown to modulate inflammation (a major pathophysiological hallmark of ARDS while enhancing bacterial clearance and reducing organ injury and death. A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS and Web of Science was performed to identify pre-clinical studies that examined the efficacy MSCs as compared to diseased controls for the treatment of Acute Lung Injury (ALI (the pre-clinical correlate of human ARDS on mortality, a clinically relevant outcome. We assessed study quality and pooled results using random effect meta-analysis. A total of 54 publications met our inclusion criteria of which 17 (21 experiments reported mortality and were included in the meta-analysis. Treatment with MSCs, as compared to controls, significantly decreased the overall odds of death in animals with ALI (Odds Ratio 0.24, 95% Confidence Interval 0.18-0.34, I2 8%. Efficacy was maintained across different types of animal models and means of ALI induction; MSC origin, source, route of administration and preparation; and the clinical relevance of the model (timing of MSC administration, administration of fluids and or antibiotics. Reporting of standard MSC characterization for experiments that used human MSCs and risks of bias was generally poor, and although not statistically significant, a funnel plot analysis for overall mortality suggested the presence of publication bias. The results from our meta-analysis support that MSCs substantially reduce the odds of death in animal models of ALI but important reporting elements were sub optimal and limit the strength of our conclusions.

  7. Dopamine D1 receptor agonist A-68930 inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation and protects rats from spinal cord injury-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, W; Li, M; He, F; Bian, Z; Liu, J; He, Q; Wang, X; Sun, T; Zhu, L

    2016-11-01

    Randomized experimental study. The study aimed to investigate the therapeutic efficacy and molecular mechanisms of A-68930 in a rat model of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). China. The influences of A-68930 on the pulmonary edema, histological changes, proinflammatory cytokines levels, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and NLRP3 inflammasome protein expression were estimated. SCI significantly promoted NLRP3 inflammasome activation, increased proinflammatory cytokine productions and MPO activity, and induced pulmonary edema and tissue damage in the SCI group as compared with the control group. A-68930 administration significantly inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation and reduced inflammatory cytokines levels and MPO activity. Moreover, A-68930 administration attenuated pulmonary edema and histopathology. Our experimental findings indicated that A-68930 exhibited a protective effect on SCI-induced ALI by the alleviations of inflammatory response with the inhibition NLRP3 inflammasome activation 72 h post injury. The present study indicated that A-68930 could be a potentially efficient therapeutic strategy for the treatment of SCI-induced ALI.

  8. Combined effects of ventilation mode and positive end-expiratory pressure on mechanics, gas exchange and the epithelium in mice with acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammanomai, Apiradee; Hamakawa, Hiroshi; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Suki, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The accepted protocol to ventilate patients with acute lung injury is to use low tidal volume (V(T)) in combination with recruitment maneuvers or positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). However, an important aspect of mechanical ventilation has not been considered: the combined effects of PEEP and ventilation modes on the integrity of the epithelium. Additionally, it is implicitly assumed that the best PEEP-V(T) combination also protects the epithelium. We aimed to investigate the effects of ventilation mode and PEEP on respiratory mechanics, peak airway pressures and gas exchange as well as on lung surfactant and epithelial cell integrity in mice with acute lung injury. HCl-injured mice were ventilated at PEEPs of 3 and 6 cmH(2)O with conventional ventilation (CV), CV with intermittent large breaths (CV(LB)) to promote recruitment, and a new mode, variable ventilation, optimized for mice (VV(N)). Mechanics and gas exchange were measured during ventilation and surfactant protein (SP)-B, proSP-B and E-cadherin levels were determined from lavage and lung homogenate. PEEP had a significant effect on mechanics, gas exchange and the epithelium. The higher PEEP reduced lung collapse and improved mechanics and gas exchange but it also down regulated surfactant release and production and increased epithelial cell injury. While CV(LB) was better than CV, VV(N) outperformed CV(LB) in recruitment, reduced epithelial injury and, via a dynamic mechanotransduction, it also triggered increased release and production of surfactant. For long-term outcome, selection of optimal PEEP and ventilation mode may be based on balancing lung physiology with epithelial injury.

  9. Combined Effects of Ventilation Mode and Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on Mechanics, Gas Exchange and the Epithelium in Mice with Acute Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammanomai, Apiradee; Hamakawa, Hiroshi; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Suki, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The accepted protocol to ventilate patients with acute lung injury is to use low tidal volume (VT) in combination with recruitment maneuvers or positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). However, an important aspect of mechanical ventilation has not been considered: the combined effects of PEEP and ventilation modes on the integrity of the epithelium. Additionally, it is implicitly assumed that the best PEEP-VT combination also protects the epithelium. We aimed to investigate the effects of ventilation mode and PEEP on respiratory mechanics, peak airway pressures and gas exchange as well as on lung surfactant and epithelial cell integrity in mice with acute lung injury. HCl-injured mice were ventilated at PEEPs of 3 and 6 cmH2O with conventional ventilation (CV), CV with intermittent large breaths (CVLB) to promote recruitment, and a new mode, variable ventilation, optimized for mice (VVN). Mechanics and gas exchange were measured during ventilation and surfactant protein (SP)-B, proSP-B and E-cadherin levels were determined from lavage and lung homogenate. PEEP had a significant effect on mechanics, gas exchange and the epithelium. The higher PEEP reduced lung collapse and improved mechanics and gas exchange but it also down regulated surfactant release and production and increased epithelial cell injury. While CVLB was better than CV, VVN outperformed CVLB in recruitment, reduced epithelial injury and, via a dynamic mechanotransduction, it also triggered increased release and production of surfactant. For long-term outcome, selection of optimal PEEP and ventilation mode may be based on balancing lung physiology with epithelial injury. PMID:23326543

  10. Salidroside ameliorates sepsis-induced acute lung injury and mortality via downregulating NF-κB and HMGB1 pathways through the upregulation of SIRT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Kuo-Cheng; Chao, Sung-Chuan; Wu, Hsiao-Yi; Chiang, Chia-Lien; Wang, Ching-Chia; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Weng, Te-I

    2017-09-20

    Sepsis is a life-threatening medical condition. Salidroside, a substance isolated from Rhodiola rosea, possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The effect and mechanism of salidroside on sepsis-induced acute lung injury still remains to be well clarified. Here, we investigated the effect and mechanism of salidroside on septic mouse models and explored the role of salidroside-upregulated SIRT1. Salidroside inhibited the inflammatory responses and HMGB1 productions in bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated macrophages and mice. Salidroside could also reverse the decreased SIRT1 protein expression in LPS-treated macrophages and mice. Salidroside also alleviated the sepsis-induced lung edema, lipid peroxidation, and histopathological changes and the mortality, and improved the lung PaO2/FiO2 ratio in cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced septic mice. Salidroside significantly decreased the serum TNF-α, IL-6, NO, and HMGB1 productions, pulmonary inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and phosphorylated NF-κB-p65 protein expressions, and pulmonary HMGB1 nuclear translocation in CLP septic mice. Moreover, sepsis decreased the SIRT1 protein expression in the lungs of CLP septic mice. Salidroside significantly upregulated the SIRT1 expression and inhibited the inflammatory responses in CLP septic mouse lungs. These results suggest that salidroside protects against sepsis-induced acute lung injury and mortality, which might be through the SIRT1-mediated repression of NF-κB activation and HMGB1 nucleocytoplasmic translocation.

  11. The NLRP3 inflammasome is required for the development of hypoxemia in LPS/mechanical ventilation acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Heather D; Crother, Timothy R; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A; Jupelli, Madhulika; Chen, Shuang; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Arditi, Moshe; Shimada, Kenichi

    2014-02-01

    IL-1β is a potent proinflammatory cytokine that is implicated in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome. We hypothesized that LPS and mechanical ventilation (MV) together could lead to IL-1β secretion and the development of acute lung injury (ALI), and that this process would be dependent on caspase-1 and the nucleotide binding domain and leucine-rich repeat (NLR) pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation. The objectives of this study were to determine the specific role of IL-1β, caspase-1, and the NLRP3 inflammasome in a two-hit model of ALI due to LPS plus MV. We used a two-hit murine model of ALI in which both inhaled LPS and MV were required for the development of hypoxemia, pulmonary neutrophil infiltration, and alveolar leakage. Nlrp3-deficent and Casp1-deficient mice had significantly diminished IL-1β levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and were specifically protected from hypoxemia, despite similar alveolar neutrophil infiltration and leakage. The IL-1 receptor antagonist, Anakinra, significantly improved the specific development of hypoxemia without significant effects on neutrophil infiltration or alveolar leakage. MV resulted in increased bronchoalveolar lavage extracellular ATP and alveolar macrophage apoptosis as triggers of NLRP3 inflammasome activation. NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β production play a key role in ALI caused by the combination of LPS and MV, particularly in the hypoxemia associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Blocking IL-1 signaling in this model specifically ameliorates hypoxemia, without affecting neutrophil infiltration and alveolar leakage, disassociating these readouts of ALI. MV causes alveolar macrophage apoptosis, a key step in the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome and production of IL-1β.

  12. Acute Lung Injury Following Smoke Inhalation: Predictive Value of Sputum Biomarkers and Time Course of Lung Inflammation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burgess, Jefferey L

    2007-01-01

    ...: Bronchial secretions from 200-250 intubated patients with smoke inhalation injury will be evaluated for initial and longitudinal changes concentrations of substance P, TNF- , IL-1, IL-8, and IL-10...

  13. Allicin Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of allicin, an active component of garlic, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- induced acute lung injury. Methods: Wistar rats were subjected to LPS intravenous injection with or without allicin treatment to induce acute lung injury (ALI) model. Also, A549 cells were stimulated with LPS in the ...

  14. Abdominal paracentesis drainage protects rats against severe acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury by reducing the mobilization of intestinal XDH/XOD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Huang, Zhu; Lin, Ning; Liu, Weihui; Yang, Guan; Wu, Dongye; Xiao, Heda; Sun, Hongyu; Tang, Lijun

    2016-10-01

    Our previous study showed that abdominal paracentesis drainage (APD) benefits patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) by delaying or avoiding multiple organ failure. However, the role of APD treatment in SAP-associated lung injury (PALI) remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the impact of APD on PALI in rats to explore the mechanisms underlying its potential treatment benefits. A drainage tube was inserted into the right lower quadrant of rats immediately after SAP induction via the retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. Mortality rates, histological scores, wet-to-dry weight (W/D) ratios, inflammatory infiltration and oxidative stress in lung tissues were then examined. Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and xanthine oxidase (XOD) activities in the sera, intestines and lungs were assessed, as was P-selectin expression. APD treatment significantly decreased pathological damage scores, oxidative stress and neutrophil infiltration in lung tissues, indicating that APD has protective effects against PALI in rats. Moreover, APD decreased the levels of serum α-amylase and trypsin and resulted in a significant decrease in XDH mobilization from the intestines, which suppressed P-selectin expression in lung tissues following SAP induction. APD treatment exerts a significant protective effect against lung injury secondary to SAP by reducing the mobilization of intestinal XDH or XOD (XDH/XOD) and the expression of P-selectin in the lungs. These findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of APD in patients with SAP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY EFFECT OF ANTI-TNF-ALPHA siRNA CATIONIC PHOSPHOROUS DENDRIMERS NANOCOMPLEXES ADMINISTERED INTRANASALLY IN A MURINE ACUTE LUNG INJURY MODEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Adam; Tsapis, Nicolas; Andreana, Ilaria

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation is an essential component of many lung diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or acute lung injury. Our purpose was to design efficient carriers for lung delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alphain an acute...... demonstrated a stronger siRNA complexation, a higher cellular uptake and enhanced in vitro silencing efficiency of TNF-alpha in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7, compared to morpholinium-containing dendriplexes. The better performance of the pyrrolidium dendriplexes...... was attributed to their higher pKa value leading to a stronger siRNA complexation and improved protection against enzymatic degradation resulting in a higher cellular uptake. The superior silencing effect of the pyrrolidinium dendriplexes, compared to non-complexed siRNA, was confirmed in vivo in an LPS...

  16. Chest Physiotherapy on the Respiratory Mechanics and Elimination of Sputum in Paralyzed and Mechanically Ventilated Patients With Acute Lung Injury: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Suh, Minhee; Heitkemper, Margaret; Smi, Choi-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Chest physiotherapy (CPT) is commonly used for mechanically ventilated patients, but little is known about its physiological effects, particularly in patients with acute lung injury (ALI). The aim of the study was to determine the benefits and risks of delivering multimodal respiratory physiotherapy to mechanically ventilated patients with ALI receiving paralytic agents. Methods: A repeated measure-experimental design using a counterbalancing method was employed. Fifteen patients received ...

  17. Therapeutic Effect of C-Phycocyanin Extracted from Blue Green Algae in a Rat Model of Acute Lung Injury Induced by Lipopolysaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Pak-on; Lee, Hao-Hsien; Kung, Yu-Chien; Tsai, Ming-Fan; Chou, Tz-Chong

    2013-01-01

    C-Phycocyanin (CPC), extracted from blue green algae, is a dietary nutritional supplement due to its several beneficial pharmacological effects. This study was conducted to evaluate whether CPC protects against lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats. Rats were challenged with LPS (5?mg/kg body weight) intratracheally to induce ALI. After 3?h LPS instillation, rats were administrated with CPC (50?mg/kg body weight, i.p.) for another 3?h. Our results showed that post...

  18. Salidroside ameliorates sepsis-induced acute lung injury and mortality via downregulating NF-κB and HMGB1 pathways through the upregulation of SIRT1

    OpenAIRE

    Lan, Kuo-Cheng; Chao, Sung-Chuan; Wu, Hsiao-Yi; Chiang, Chia-Lien; Wang, Ching-Chia; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Weng, Te-I

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening medical condition. Salidroside, a substance isolated from Rhodiola rosea, possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The effect and mechanism of salidroside on sepsis-induced acute lung injury still remains to be well clarified. Here, we investigated the effect and mechanism of salidroside on septic mouse models and explored the role of salidroside-upregulated SIRT1. Salidroside inhibited the inflammatory responses and HMGB1 productions in bacterial l...

  19. Autologous Transplantation of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Markedly Reduced Acute Ischemia-Reperfusion Lung Injury in a Rodent Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Morgan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study tested the hypothesis that autologous transplantation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs can effectively attenuate acute pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats (n = 24 were equally randomized into group 1 (sham control, group 2 (IR plus culture medium only, and group 3 (IR plus intravenous transplantation of 1.5 × 106 autologous ADMSCs at 1h, 6h, and 24h following IR injury. The duration of ischemia was 30 minutes, followed by 72 hours of reperfusion prior to sacrificing the animals. Blood samples were collected and lungs were harvested for analysis. Results Blood gas analysis showed that oxygen saturation (% was remarkably lower, whereas right ventricular systolic pressure was notably higher in group 2 than in group 3 (all p Conclusion ADMSC therapy minimized lung damage after IR injury in a rodent model through suppressing oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction.

  20. The Posterior Cricoarytenoid Muscle Is Spared from MuRF1-Mediated Muscle Atrophy in Mice with Acute Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, D. Clark; Xiao, Kunhong; Zhang, Tan; Liu, Chun; Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Weiling; Morris, Peter E.; Delbono, Osvaldo; Feng, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Background Skeletal muscle wasting in acute lung injury (ALI) patients increases the morbidity and mortality associated with this critical illness. The contribution of laryngeal muscle wasting to these outcomes is unknown, though voice impairments and aspiration are common in intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. We evaluated the intrinsic laryngeal abductor (PCA, posterior cricoarytenoid), adductor (CT, cricothyroid) and limb (EDL, extensor digitorum longus) muscles in a mouse model of ALI. Methods Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharides were instilled into the lungs of adult male C57Bl6J mice (ALI mice). Limb and intrinsic laryngeal muscles were analyzed for fiber size, type, protein expression and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition by SDS-PAGE and mass spectroscopy. Results Marked muscle atrophy occurred in the CT and EDL muscles, while the PCA was spared. The E3 ubiquitin ligase muscle ring finger-1 protein (MuRF1), a known mediator of limb muscle atrophy in this model, was upregulated in the CT and EDL, but not in the PCA. Genetic inhibition of MuRF1 protected the CT and EDL from ALI-induced muscle atrophy. MyHC-Extraocular (MyHC-EO) comprised 27% of the total MyHC in the PCA, distributed as hybrid fibers throughout 72% of PCA muscle fibers. Conclusion The vocal cord abductor (PCA) contains a large proportion of fibers expressing MyHC-EO and is spared from muscle atrophy in ALI mice. The lack of MuRF1 expression in the PCA suggests a previously unrecognized mechanism whereby this muscle is spared from atrophy. Atrophy of the vocal cord adductor (CT) may contribute to the impaired voice and increased aspiration observed in ICU survivors. Further evaluation of the sparing of muscles involved in systemic wasting diseases may lead to potential therapeutic targets for these illnesses. PMID:24498144

  1. The Prognostic Value of Soluble Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 Plasma Level in Children With Acute Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Biltagi, Mohammed A; Abo-Elezz, Ahmed Ahmed Abd ElBasset; Abu-Ela, Khaled Talaat; Suliman, Ghada Abudelmomen; Sultan, Tamer Gomaa Hassan

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1) measurement in plasma for the prediction of outcome of acute lung injury (ALI) in children that may allow early recognition of critical cases. The study was performed as a prospective, controlled cohort study involving 40 children with ALI and 30 healthy children. The plasma level of sICAM-1 was measured at days 1 and 3 of development of ALI for the patient group and measured only once for the control group. C-Reactive protein was measured in both groups on day 1 only. There was significant increase in sICAM-1 in the patient group than in the control group ( P = .001*). The mortality rate reached 55% in children with ALI. The ceased group had significantly higher plasma sICAM-1 levels both at days 1 and 3 than the survived group ( P < .001*), and there was positive correlation between plasma sICAM-1 level and both duration of mechanical ventilation and the death rate, but more significant correlation was observed with plasma sICAM-1 levels at day 3 than day 1. Plasma sICAM-1 level served as a good predictor biomarker for both mechanical ventilation duration and the mortality risk in children with ALI.

  2. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: critical neutrophil activation by anti-HLA-A2 antibodies for endothelial permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoy, Kathy; Nguyen, Minh Vu Chuong; Masson, Dominique; Bardy, Béatrice; Drouet, Christian; Paclet, Marie-Hélène

    2017-07-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a major complication of hemotherapy that may occur after the transfusion of any blood type component. Several clinical reports have suggested the presence of anti-HLA antibodies in the blood product. This study sought to examine the role of anti-HLA-A2 antibodies in polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) activation and thus in endothelial permeability. PMN activation was assessed by both nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase) activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. A coculture assay of EA.hy926 endothelial cells with PMNs or differentiated-PLB-985 cells, a model of neutrophil-like cells, was performed to estimate the impact of ROS on endothelial permeability. Anti-HLA-A2 antibodies significantly increased PMN activation, with subsequent endothelial dysfunction. Phagocyte NADPH oxidase (NOX2) activity was shown to be involved in this process and ROS themselves were demonstrated to induce VE-cadherin cleavage and endothelial permeability. Our data may support the existence of a critical anti-HLA-A2 antibody threshold for PMN activation, with NOX2 activity and subsequent endothelial permeability in the two-hit model of TRALI. © 2017 AABB.

  3. Lung Injury Prediction Score Is Useful in Predicting Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Mortality in Surgical Critical Care Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary M. Bauman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lung injury prediction score (LIPS is valuable for early recognition of ventilated patients at high risk for developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. This study analyzes the value of LIPS in predicting ARDS and mortality among ventilated surgical patients. Methods. IRB approved, prospective observational study including all ventilated patients admitted to the surgical intensive care unit at a single tertiary center over 6 months. ARDS was defined using the Berlin criteria. LIPS were calculated for all patients and analyzed. Logistic regression models evaluated the ability of LIPS to predict development of ARDS and mortality. A receiver operator characteristic (ROC curve demonstrated the optimal LIPS value to statistically predict development of ARDS. Results. 268 ventilated patients were observed; 141 developed ARDS and 127 did not. The average LIPS for patients who developed ARDS was 8.8±2.8 versus 5.4±2.8 for those who did not (p<0.001. An ROC area under the curve of 0.79 demonstrates LIPS is statistically powerful for predicting ARDS development. Furthermore, for every 1-unit increase in LIPS, the odds of developing ARDS increase by 1.50 (p<0.001 and odds of ICU mortality increase by 1.22 (p<0.001. Conclusion. LIPS is reliable for predicting development of ARDS and predicting mortality in critically ill surgical patients.

  4. Positive Fluid Balance Is Associated with Higher Mortality and Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation in Pediatric Patients with Acute Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi R. Flori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We analyzed a database of 320 pediatric patients with acute lung injury (ALI, to test the hypothesis that positive fluid balance is associated with worse clinical outcomes in children with ALI. Methods. This is a post-hoc analysis of previously collected data. Cumulative fluid balance was analyzed in ml per kilogram per day for the first 72 hours after ALI while in the PICU. The primary outcome was mortality; the secondary outcome was ventilator-free days. Results. Positive fluid balance (in increments of 10 mL/kg/24 h was associated with a significant increase in both mortality and prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation, independent of the presence of multiple organ system failure and the extent of oxygenation defect. These relationships remained unchanged when the subgroup of patients with septic shock (n=39 were excluded. Conclusions. Persistently positive fluid balance may be deleterious to pediatric patients with ALI. A confirmatory, prospective randomized controlled trial of fluid management in pediatric patients with ALI is warranted.

  5. Identification of target proteins of mangiferin in mice with acute lung injury using functionalized magnetic microspheres based on click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajia; Nie, Yan; Li, Yunjuan; Hou, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Wei; Deng, Jiagang; Wang, Peng George; Bai, Gang

    2015-11-18

    Prevention of the occurrence and development of inflammation is a vital therapeutic strategy for treating acute lung injury (ALI). Increasing evidence has shown that a wealth of ingredients from natural foods and plants have potential anti-inflammatory activity. In the present study, mangiferin, a natural C-glucosyl xanthone that is primarily obtained from the peels and kernels of mango fruits and the bark of the Mangifera indica L. tree, alleviated the inflammatory responses in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI mice. Mangiferin-modified magnetic microspheres (MMs) were developed on the basis of click chemistry to capture the target proteins of mangiferin. Mass spectrometry and molecular docking identified 70 kDa heat-shock protein 5 (Hspa5) and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase (Ywhae) as mangiferin-binding proteins. Furthermore, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) indicated that mangiferin exerted its anti-inflammatory effect by binding Hspa5 and Ywhae to suppress downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. Thoroughly revealing the mechanism and function of mangiferin will contribute to the development and utilization of agricultural resources from M. indica L.

  6. Protective Effect of Amygdalin on LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Inhibiting NF-κB and NLRP3 Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ao; Pan, Weiyun; Lv, Juan; Wu, Hui

    2017-06-01

    The acute lung injury (ALI) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Amygdalin is derived from the bitter apricot kernel, an efficacious Chinese herbal medicine. Although amygdalin is used by many cancer patients as an antitumor agent, there is no report about the effect of amygdalin on acute lung injury. Here we explored the protective effect of amygdalin on ALI using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced murine model by detecting the lung wet/dry ratio, the myeloperoxidase (MPO) in lung tissues, inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), inflammatory cytokines production, as well as NLRP3 and NF-κB signaling pathways. The results showed that amygdalin significantly reduced LPS-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells and the production of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in the BALF. The activity of MPO and lung wet/dry ratio were also attenuated by amygdalin. Furthermore, the western blotting analysis showed that amygdalin remarkably inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB and NLRP3 activation. These findings indicate that amygdalin has a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in mice. The mechanism may be related to the inhibition of NF-κB and NLRP3 signaling pathways.

  7. Diagnostic and prognostic utility of tissue factor for severe sepsis and sepsis-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mingming; Sun, Zhan; Shao, Mian; Yin, Jun; Deng, Zhi; Zhang, Jin; Xing, Lingyu; Yang, Xiaoliang; Chen, Bin; Dong, Zhimin; Han, Yi; Sun, Si; Wang, Yuxin; Yao, Chenling; Chu, Xun; Tong, Chaoyang; Song, Zhenju

    2015-05-30

    Tissue factor (TF) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) play a central role in the endothelial permeability regulation and dysfunction, which is associated with the development of sepsis and acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). The aim of this study is to assess the diagnostic and prognostic values of TF and TFPI in patients with sepsis and sepsis-induced ARDS. A total of 62 patients with sepsis, 167 patients with severe sepsis and 32 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this prospective observational study. TF and TFPI levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Patients with sepsis-induced ARDS showed significantly higher median levels of TF compared with patients without ARDS (1425.5 (1019.9 to 2595.2) pg/ml vs 916.2 (724.1 to 1618.2) pg/ml, P 0.05). The AUC of TF for the diagnosis of sepsis-induced ARDS was 0.749 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.675-0.822). Plasma TF levels in the non-survivors of severe sepsis were significantly higher than those of survivors (1618.6 (1017.1 to 2900.8) pg/ml vs. 979.9 (757.2 to 1645.5) pg/ml, P 0.05). Our data showed that tissue factor is a valuable diagnostic biomarker for the diagnosis of sepsis-induced ARDS. Moreover, tissue factor is a strong prognostic marker for short-term mortality in severe sepsis and sepsis-induced ARDS patients.

  8. FMS-Like Tyrosine Kinase 3 Ligand Treatment of Mice Aggravates Acute Lung Injury in Response to Streptococcus pneumoniae: Role of Pneumolysin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumshagen, Christina; Maus, Regina; Bischof, Andrea; Ueberberg, Bianca; Bohling, Jennifer; Osterholzer, John J.; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D.; Paton, James C.; Welte, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand (Flt3L) is a dendritic cell (DC) growth and differentiation factor with potential in antitumor therapies and antibacterial immunization strategies. However, the effect of systemic Flt3L treatment on lung-protective immunity against bacterial infection is incompletely defined. Here, we examined the impact of deficient (in Flt3L knockout [KO] mice), normal (in wild-type [WT] mice), or increased Flt3L availability (in WT mice pretreated with Flt3L for 3, 5, or 7 days) on lung DC subset profiles and lung-protective immunity against the major lung-tropic pathogen, Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although in Flt3L-deficient mice the numbers of DCs positive for CD11b (CD11bpos DCs) and for CD103 (CD103pos DCs) were diminished, lung permeability, a marker of injury, was unaltered in response to S. pneumoniae. In contrast, WT mice pretreated with Flt3L particularly responded with increased numbers of CD11bpos DCs and with less pronounced numbers of CD103pos DCs and impaired bacterial clearance and with increased lung permeability following S. pneumoniae challenge. Notably, infection of Flt3L-pretreated mice with S. pneumoniae lacking the pore-forming toxin, pneumolysin (PLY), resulted in substantially less lung CD11bpos DCs activation and reduced lung permeability. Collectively, this study establishes that Flt3L treatment enhances the accumulation of proinflammatory activated lung CD11bpos DCs which contribute to acute lung injury in response to PLY released by S. pneumoniae. PMID:23006850

  9. KGFR promotes Na+ channel expression in a rat acute lung injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ALI model was induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. Recombinant adenovirus (AdEasy-KGFR) was injected via the tail vein. Expression of the sodium (Na+) channel in rat alveolar type II (ATII) epithelial cells was determined by PCR, immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy of rat lung tissues.

  10. Role of CC chemokines (macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, RANTES) in acute lung injury in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bless, N M; Huber-Lang, M; Guo, R F

    2000-01-01

    . Treatment of rats with anti-MIP-1 beta Ab significantly decreased vascular permeability by 37% (p = 0.012), reduced neutrophil recruitment into lung by 65% (p = 0.047), and suppressed levels of TNF-alpha in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids by 61% (p = 0.008). Treatment of rats with anti-rat MCP-1 or anti......, exogenously MIP-1 beta, but not RANTES or MCP-1, caused enhancement of the lung vascular leak. These data indicate that MIP-1 beta, but not MCP-1 or RANTES, plays an important role in intrapulmonary recruitment of neutrophils and development of lung injury in the model employed. The findings suggest...

  11. [Clinical effects of different ways of mechanical ventilation combined with pulmonary surfactant in treatment of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome in neonates: a comparative analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming; Lu, Hong-Yan; Xiang, Hong; Lan, Hou-Ping

    2016-11-01

    To compare the therapeutic effects of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation+pulmonary surfactant (HFOV+PS), conventional mechanical ventilation+pulmonary surfactant (CMV+PS), and conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) alone for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) in neonates. A total of 136 neonates with ALI/ARDS were enrolled, among whom 73 had ALI and 63 had ARDS. They were divided into HFOV+PS group (n=45), CMV+PS group (n=53), and CMV group (n=38). The neonates in the first two groups were given PS at a dose of 70-100 mg/kg. The partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2), PaO2/fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2), oxygenation index (OI), and respiratory index (RI) were measured at 0, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours of mechanical ventilation. At 12, 24, and 48 hours of mechanical ventilation, the HFOV+PS group had higher PaO2 and lower PaCO2 than the CMV+PS and CMV groups (Pneonates with ALI/ARDS, HFOV combined with PS can improve pulmonary function more effectively and shorten the durations of mechanical ventilation and oxygen use compared with CMV+PS and CMV alone. It does not increase the incidence of complications.

  12. Respiratory care year in review 2011: long-term oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, airway management, acute lung injury, education, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Patrick J; Macintyre, Neil R; Schmidt, Ulrich H; Haas, Carl F; Jones-Boggs Rye, Kathy; Kauffman, Garry W; Hess, Dean R

    2012-04-01

    For the busy clinician, educator, or manager, it is becoming an increasing challenge to filter the literature to what is relevant to one's practice and then update one's practice based on the current evidence. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent literature related to long-term oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, airway management, acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, respiratory care education, and respiratory care management. These topics were chosen and reviewed in a manner that is most likely to have interest to the readers of Respiratory Care.

  13. Protective Effects of Alpha-Lipoic Acid on Oleic Acid-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Gülcü Bulmuş

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxidative stress is believed to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective role of alpha-lipoic acid (α-LA on oleic acid (OA-induced ALI in rats. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: A total of thirty-five rats were divided into five groups in the study. Group 1 served as a control group. Rats in Group 2 (α-LA were administered α-LA intraperitoneally at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight (BW. Rats in Group 3 (OA were administered OA intravenously at a dose of 100 mg/kg BW. In Group 4 (pre-OA-α-LA, α-LA was given 15 minutes prior to OA infusion, and in Group 5 (post-OA-α-LA, α-LA was given two hours after OA infusion. Four hours after the OA infusion, rats were decapitated. Blood samples were collected to measure serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and glutathione (GSH, and the levels of activity for superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px. Lung tissue samples were taken for histopathological examination. Results: Exposure to OA resulted in increases in serum MDA levels (p<0.001, as well as histopathological lesions in lung tissue, and decreases in CAT (p<0.05, GSH-Px (p<0.05 activities and GSH (p<0.05 levels. On the other hand, MDA levels were decreased significantly (p<0.001, while CAT (p<0.05, GSH-Px (p<0.01 activities and GSH (p<0.05 levels were increased significantly in the pre-OA-α-LA group compared with the OA group. Conclusion: α-LA was found to lessen oxidative stress and to have positive effects on antioxidants in cases of OA-induced ALI. In conclusion, α-LA appears to have protective effects against ALI and potential for the prevention of ALI.

  14. Targeting Extracellular Histones with Novel RNA Biodrugs for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    The lung was saline perfused in vivo, inflated prior to fixation, and will be examined for pathologic changes and immunostained for histones. Future...by neutralization of extracellular histones with nucleic acid aptamers. Kevin Urak, MS, University of Iowa, Iowa City IA. USA (poster) Posters...University of Iowa, Iowa City IA. USA (poster) 2. 11th Annual RNA Consortium, RNA Consortium, Duarte CA, May 5-6, 2017. Treatment of myocardial depression

  15. Ghrelin attenuates sepsis-associated acute lung injury oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Mian; He, Wanmei; Li, Lijun; Li, Bin; Luo, Liang; Huang, Xubin; Guan, Kaipan; Chen, Weiling

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of ghrelin on oxidative stress in septic rat lung tissue. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into sham-operation, sepsis, and ghrelin groups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. Ghrelin was administered intraperitoneally at 3 and 15 h post-operation. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed to collect alveolar macrophages (AMs). Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in alveolar macrophages and iNOS protein levels were measured by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Pulmonary pathology was analyzed and nitrotyrosine expression was examined by immunohistochemistry. Plasma superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lung wet/dry weight were measured. In the sepsis group, iNOS mRNA expression in AMs was 1.33 ± 0.05, 1.44 ± 0.08, and 1.57 ± 0.11 at 6, 12, and 20 h post-surgery, respectively, and were higher compared with the sham-operation group (pdry weight ratios between sepsis and ghrelin groups. iNOS mRNA expression in AMs was elevated between 6 and 20 h after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), but did not progress. Ghrelin attenuated pulmonary iNOS protein expression and tended to increase plasma SOD activity. Ghrelin suppressed pulmonary nitrosative stress in septic rats, but did not improve lung wet/dry weight ratios.

  16. [Effects of ambroxol combined with low-dose heparin on TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in rabbits with acute lung injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Fang-Yan; Pan, Zhan; Dai, Yong-Yue; Xu, He-Jing; Jin, Ke-Ke; Wang, Wan-Tie

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the intervention and mechanism of ambroxol combined with low-dose heparin on oxidative stress, TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in rabbits with acute lung injury (ALI). Twenty-four healthy Japanese rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: (1) Normal saline control group (NC), (2) Oleic acid injury group (OA), (3) Ambroxol + low-dose heparin therapy group (AH). After the success of ALI model, AH group was injected ambroxol + low-dose heparin, while the NC group and OA group were injected the same dose of normal saline by the same method. Arterial oxygen tension (PaO2), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) at different time points were determined. The pathological manifestation of both side lungs was observed at the end of expeiment. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD), xanthine oxidase (XO) and the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue homogenate were tested. The apoptosis index was detected. The lung wet/dry (W/D) ratio was calculated. The pathological changes in lung tissue were observed by light microscopy, and the ultrastructural changes of lung tissue were observed by electron microscopy. (1) The instructive injury induced by ALI observed under electron microscope and light microscope and W/D was decreased significantly in AH group. (2) PaO2 was improved significantly in AH group, compared with that in OA group (P Ambroxol combined with low-dose heparin can reduce lung cells oxidative stress to inhibit the release of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha, which play a role in the treatment of ALI.

  17. Genome wide association identifies PPFIA1 as a candidate gene for acute lung injury risk following major trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason D Christie

    Full Text Available Acute Lung Injury (ALI is a syndrome with high associated mortality characterized by severe hypoxemia and pulmonary infiltrates in patients with critical illness. We conducted the first investigation to use the genome wide association (GWA approach to identify putative risk variants for ALI. Genome wide genotyping was performed using the Illumina Human Quad 610 BeadChip. We performed a two-stage GWA study followed by a third stage of functional characterization. In the discovery phase (Phase 1, we compared 600 European American trauma-associated ALI cases with 2266 European American population-based controls. We carried forward the top 1% of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs at p<0.01 to a replication phase (Phase 2 comprised of a nested case-control design sample of 212 trauma-associated ALI cases and 283 at-risk trauma non-ALI controls from ongoing cohort studies. SNPs that replicated at the 0.05 level in Phase 2 were subject to functional validation (Phase 3 using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL analyses in stimulated B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCL in family trios. 159 SNPs from the discovery phase replicated in Phase 2, including loci with prior evidence for a role in ALI pathogenesis. Functional evaluation of these replicated SNPs revealed rs471931 on 11q13.3 to exert a cis-regulatory effect on mRNA expression in the PPFIA1 gene (p = 0.0021. PPFIA1 encodes liprin alpha, a protein involved in cell adhesion, integrin expression, and cell-matrix interactions. This study supports the feasibility of future multi-center GWA investigations of ALI risk, and identifies PPFIA1 as a potential functional candidate ALI risk gene for future research.

  18. Benefit of transfusion-related acute lung injury risk-minimization measures--German haemovigilance data (2006-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, M B; Guenay, S; Lohmann, A; Henseler, O; Heiden, M; Hanschmann, K M O; Keller-Stanislawski, B

    2012-05-01

    Based on the frequency of immune-mediated and non-immune-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), the effect of risk-minimization measures was evaluated during a period of 5 years (2006-2010). Risk-minimization measures were implemented in 2008/2009, consisting of exclusion of female donors with a history of pregnancy or exclusion of female donors with human leucocyte antigen (HLA)/human neutrophil alloantigen (HNA) antibodies. TRALI was confirmed according to the criteria of the International Haemovigilance Network. Based upon the results of donor testing of white-blood-cell antibodies (WBC-Ab) against HLA or HNAs, confirmed cases were classified as immune- or non-immune-mediated TRALI. Reporting rates were calculated on the basis of the annually transfused blood components, and pre- and post-implementation periods were compared. In total, 60 immune-mediated (75%) and 20 non-immune-mediated (25%) TRALI reactions were confirmed. A total of 68 (64 women and four men) donors were involved: seven red-blood-cell concentrates donors (13%), six platelet concentrate donors (10%), and 48 fresh frozen plasma (FFP) donors (77%). The reporting rate of immune-mediated TRALI caused by FFP decreased continuously; from 12·71 per million units in 2006/2007 to 6·81 per million units in 2008/2009 and no case in 2010. The comparison of the pre- and the post-implementation period demonstrated a significantly reduced risk of TRALI events comparing 2006/2007 with 2010 (P-value: <0·01). Furthermore, no case of TRALI-induced fatality occurred after the implementation of risk-minimization measures. © 2011 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2011 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  19. Veronicastrum axillare Alleviates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury via Suppression of Proinflammatory Mediators and Downregulation of the NF-κB Signaling Pathway

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    Quanxin Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Veronicastrum axillare is a traditional medical plant in China which is widely used in folk medicine due to its versatile biological activities, especially for its anti-inflammatory effects. However, the detailed mechanism underlying this action is not clear. Here, we studied the protective effects of V. axillare against acute lung injury (ALI, and we further explored the pharmacological mechanisms of this action. We found that pretreatment with V. axillare suppressed the release of proinflammatory cytokines in the serum of ALI mice. Histological analysis of lung tissue demonstrated that V. axillare inhibited LPS-induced lung injury, improved lung morphology, and reduced the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB in the lungs. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory actions of V. axillare were investigated in vitro. We observed that V. axillare suppressed the mRNA expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β, IL-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α in RAW264.7 cells challenged with LPS. Furthermore, pretreatment of V. axillare in vitro reduced the phosphorylation of p65 and IκB-α which is activated by LPS. In conclusion, our data firstly demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effects of V. axillare against ALI were achieved through downregulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, thereby reducing the production of inflammatory mediators.

  20. Role of tachykinins in ozone-induced acute lung injury in guinea pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tepper, J.S.; Costa, D.L.; Fitzgerald, S.; Doerfler, D.L.; Bromberg, P.A. (ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1993-09-01

    To examine the hypothesis that the acute reversible changes caused by ozone (O3) exposure are mediated by tachykinin release, guinea pigs were depleted of tachykinins by use of repeated capsaicin (CAP) injections before O3 exposure in an attempt to prevent O3-induced functional changes. Unexpectedly, CAP pretreatment caused divergent results in the functional responses to O3. Ventilatory measurements obtained from CAP-pretreated O3-exposed (CAP-O3) animals were exacerbated rather than diminished compared with the effects of O3 alone. Similarly, lavage fluid protein accumulation was enhanced in the CAP-O3 group compared with the O3-exposed group. In better agreement with our initial hypothesis, the CAP-O3 group was less responsive than the O3-exposed animals to histamine aerosol challenge. Additionally, Evans blue dye accumulation, a hallmark of tachykinin release, was increased in O3-exposed animals and was partially blocked in the CAP-O3 group. These data suggest that tachykinin-containing sensory fibers are unlikely to mediate the acute effects of O3 exposure on tidal breathing and lavage fluid protein accumulation but may play a role in causing post-O3 airway hyperreactivity and protein extravasation into the trachea.

  1. Effects of acteoside on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in acute lung injury via regulation of NF-κB pathway in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Wang; Chunhua, Ma, E-mail: machunhuabest@126.com; Shumin, Wang, E-mail: wangshuminch@126.com

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the protective role of acteoside (AC) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). BalB/c mice intraperitoneally received AC (30, and 60 mg/kg) or dexamethasone (2 mg/kg) 2 h prior to or after intratracheal instillation of LPS. Treatment with AC significantly decreased lung wet-to-dry weight (W/D) ratio and lung myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and ameliorated LPS-induced lung histopathological changes. In addition, AC increased super oxide dismutase (SOD) level and inhibited malondialdehyde (MDA) content, total cell and neutrophil infiltrations, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in LPS-stimulated mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that AC inhibited the phosphorylation of IκBα, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65, inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa-B kinase-α (IKK-α) and inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa-B kinase-β (IKKβ) in LPS-induced inflammation in A549 cells. Our data suggested that LPS evoked the inflammatory response in lung epithelial cells A549. The experimental results indicated that the protective mechanism of AC might be attributed partly to the inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine production and NF-κB activation. - Highlights: • Acteoside inhibited inflammation in LPS-induced lung injury in mice. • Acteoside inhibited inflammation in lung epithelial cells A549. • Acteoside inhibited NF-kB activation in LPS-induced mice and lung epithelial cells A549.

  2. Pulmonary Specific Ancillary Treatment for Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome : Proceedings From the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamburro, Robert F.; Kneyber, Martin C. J.

    Objective: To provide an overview of the current literature on pulmonary-specific therapeutic approaches to pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome to determine recommendations for clinical practice and/or future research. Data Sources: PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, SCOPUS, and the Cochrane Library

  3. Novel variants in the PRDX6 Gene and the risk of Acute Lung Injury following major trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Localio A Russell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6 is involved in redox regulation of the cell and is thought to be protective against oxidant injury. Little is known about genetic variation within the PRDX6 gene and its association with acute lung injury (ALI. In this study we sequenced the PRDX6 gene to uncover common variants, and tested association with ALI following major trauma. Methods To examine the extent of variation in the PRDX6 gene, we performed direct sequencing of the 5' UTR, exons, introns and the 3' UTR in 25 African American cases and controls and 23 European American cases and controls (selected from a cohort study of major trauma, which uncovered 80 SNPs. In silico modeling was performed using Patrocles and Transcriptional Element Search System (TESS. Thirty seven novel and tagging SNPs were tested for association with ALI compared with ICU at-risk controls who did not develop ALI in a cohort study of 259 African American and 254 European American subjects that had been admitted to the ICU with major trauma. Results Resequencing of critically ill subjects demonstrated 43 novel SNPs not previously reported. Coding regions demonstrated no detectable variation, indicating conservation of the protein. Block haplotype analyses reveal that recombination rates within the gene seem low in both Caucasians and African Americans. Several novel SNPs appeared to have the potential for functional consequence using in silico modeling. Chi2 analysis of ALI incidence and genotype showed no significant association between the SNPs in this study and ALI. Haplotype analysis did not reveal any association beyond single SNP analyses. Conclusions This study revealed novel SNPs within the PRDX6 gene and its 5' and 3' flanking regions via direct sequencing. There was no association found between these SNPs and ALI, possibly due to a low sample size, which was limited to detection of relative risks of 1.93 and above. Future studies may focus on the role of

  4. Very low tidal volume ventilation with associated hypercapnia--effects on lung injury in a model for acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Fuchs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ventilation using low tidal volumes with permission of hypercapnia is recommended to protect the lung in acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, the most lung protective tidal volume in association with hypercapnia is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of different tidal volumes with associated hypercapnia on lung injury and gas exchange in a model for acute respiratory distress syndrome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this randomized controlled experiment sixty-four surfactant-depleted rabbits were exposed to 6 hours of mechanical ventilation with the following targets: Group 1: tidal volume = 8-10 ml/kg/PaCO(2 = 40 mm Hg; Group 2: tidal volume = 4-5 ml/kg/PaCO(2 = 80 mm Hg; Group 3: tidal volume = 3-4 ml/kg/PaCO(2 = 120 mm Hg; Group 4: tidal volume = 2-3 ml/kg/PaCO(2 = 160 mm Hg. Decreased wet-dry weight ratios of the lungs, lower histological lung injury scores and higher PaO(2 were found in all low tidal volume/hypercapnia groups (group 2, 3, 4 as compared to the group with conventional tidal volume/normocapnia (group 1. The reduction of the tidal volume below 4-5 ml/kg did not enhance lung protection. However, oxygenation and lung protection were maintained at extremely low tidal volumes in association with very severe hypercapnia and no adverse hemodynamic effects were observed with this strategy. CONCLUSION: Ventilation with low tidal volumes and associated hypercapnia was lung protective. A tidal volume below 4-5 ml/kg/PaCO(2 80 mm Hg with concomitant more severe hypercapnic acidosis did not increase lung protection in this surfactant deficiency model. However, even at extremely low tidal volumes in association with severe hypercapnia lung protection and oxygenation were maintained.

  5. Paediatric ventilation treatment of acute lung injury in Nordic intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, L L; Baratt-Due, A; Englund, P N; Harju, J A; Sigurðsson, T S; Liberg, J-P

    2015-05-01

    Treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children is largely based on extrapolated knowledge obtained from adults and which varies between different hospitals. This study explores ventilation treatment strategies for children with ARDS in the Nordic countries, and compares these with international practice. In October 2012, a questionnaire covering ventilation treatment strategies for children aged 1 month to 6 years of age with ARDS was sent to 21 large Nordic intensive care units that treat children with ARDS. Pre-terms and children with congenital conditions were excluded. Eighteen of the 21 (86%) targeted intensive care units responded to the questionnaire. Fifty per cent of these facilities were paediatric intensive care units. Written guidelines existed in 44% of the units. Fifty per cent of the units frequently used cuffed endotracheal tubes. Ventilation was achieved by pressure control for 89% vs. volume control for 11% of units. Bronchodilators were used by all units, whereas steroids usage was 83% and surfactant 39%. Inhaled nitric oxide and high frequency oscillation were available in 94% of the units. Neurally adjusted ventilator assist was used by 44% of the units. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation could be started in 44% of the units. Ventilation treatment strategies for paediatric ARDS in the Nordic countries are relatively uniform and largely in accordance with international practice. The use of steroids and surfactant is more frequent than shown in other studies. © 2015 The Authors. The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Meta-analysis of high doses of ambroxol treatment for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome based on randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangdong; Li, Suwei; Zhang, Jiuzhi; Zhang, Yongli; Han, Lili; Deng, Qiuming; Wan, Xianyao

    2014-11-01

    This study seeks to evaluate the potential benefits of high doses of ambroxol treatment for acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) by conducting a meta-analysis based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We searched the Pubmed, Embase, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang databases through December 2013. Only RCTs evaluating high doses of ambroxol (≥15 mg/kg or 1000 mg/day) treatment for patients with ALI/ARDS were selected. We included 10 RCTs involving 508 patients. Adjuvant treatment with high doses of ambroxol increased PaO(2)/FiO(2) (weight mean differences [WMD] = 69.18, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 41.71-96.65), PO(2) (WMD = 11.74, 95% CI: 8.50-14.99), and SaO(2) (WMD = 2.15, 95% CI: 1.60-2.71) compared with usual treatment. Treatment with high doses of ambroxol appeared to reduce serum tumor necrosis factor-α level (WMD -7.92 µg/L; 95% CI, -10.94 to -4.9) and interleukin-6 level (WMD = -20.65 µg/L, 95% CI: -24.74 to -16.55) and to increase serum superoxide dismutase level (WMD = 19.07 NU/mL, 95% CI: 6.16-31.97). The findings suggest that treatment with high doses of ambroxol appears to improve PaO(2)/FiO(2), PO(2), and SaO(2), and the benefits might be related to ambroxol's anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  7. Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome requiring tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit: impact on managing uncertainty for patient-centered communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert F; Gustin, Jillian

    2013-09-01

    A case of acute lung injury (ALI) progressing to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation (ETMV) is presented. The palliative medicine service was asked to address concerns expressed by the patient's spouse reflecting uncertainty regarding outcome expectations. Acknowledging and confronting the uncertainties of a critical illness is an essential component of patient-centered communication. Addressing and managing uncertainty for the case scenario requires consideration of both short- and long-term outcomes including mortality, ventilator independence, and adverse effects on quality of life for survivors. In this paper, ALI/ARDS requiring ETMV in the ICU was used as a focal point for preparing a prognostic assessment incorporating these issues. This assessment was based on a review of recently published literature regarding mortality and ventilator independence of survivors for adult patients receiving ETMV for ALI/ARDS in the ICU. In the studies reviewed, long-term survival reported at 60 days to 1 year was 50-73% with greater than 84% of the survivors in each study breathing independently. Selected articles discussing outcomes other than mortality or recovery of respiratory function, particularly quality of life implications for ALI/ARDS survivors, were also reviewed. A case of of ALI/ARDS requiring ETMV in the ICU is used to illustrate the situation of an incapacitated critically ill patient where the outcome is uncertain. Patient-centered communication should acknowledge and address this uncertainty. Managing uncertainty consists of effectively expressing a carefully formulated prognostic assessment and using sound communication principles to alleviate the distress associated with the uncertain outcome probabilities.

  8. Immunomodulatory Effect of Chinese Herbal Medicine Formula Sheng-Fei-Yu-Chuan-Tang in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hung Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine formula Sheng-Fei-Yu-Chuan-Tang (SFYCT, consisting of 13 medicinal plants, was used to treat patients with lung diseases. This study investigated the immunoregulatory effect of SFYCT on intratracheal lipopolysaccharides- (LPS- challenged acute lung injury (ALI mice. SFYCT attenuated pulmonary edema, macrophages, and neutrophils infiltration in the airways. SFYCT decreased inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 and inhibited nitric oxide (NO production but increased anti-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-4, and interleukin-10, in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of LPS-challenged mice. TNFα and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 mRNA expression in the lung of LPS-challenged mice as well as LPS-stimulated lung epithelial cell and macrophage were decreased by SFYCT treatment. SFYCT treatment also decreased the inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB in the lung of mice and macrophage with LPS stimulation. SFYCT treatment dose dependently decreased the LPS-induced NO and reactive oxygen species generation in LPS-stimulated macrophage. In conclusion, SFYCT attenuated lung inflammation during LPS-induced ALI through decreasing inflammatory cytokines production while increasing anti-inflammatory cytokines production. The immunoregulatory effect of SFYCT is related to inhibiting NF-κB phosphorylation.

  9. Immunomodulatory effect of chinese herbal medicine formula sheng-fei-yu-chuan-tang in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Yeh, Ching-Hua; Lin, Li-Jen; Wang, Shulhn-Der; Wang, Jen-Shu; Kao, Shung-Te

    2013-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine formula Sheng-Fei-Yu-Chuan-Tang (SFYCT), consisting of 13 medicinal plants, was used to treat patients with lung diseases. This study investigated the immunoregulatory effect of SFYCT on intratracheal lipopolysaccharides- (LPS-) challenged acute lung injury (ALI) mice. SFYCT attenuated pulmonary edema, macrophages, and neutrophils infiltration in the airways. SFYCT decreased inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF α ), interleukin-1 β , and interleukin-6 and inhibited nitric oxide (NO) production but increased anti-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-4, and interleukin-10, in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of LPS-challenged mice. TNF α and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 mRNA expression in the lung of LPS-challenged mice as well as LPS-stimulated lung epithelial cell and macrophage were decreased by SFYCT treatment. SFYCT treatment also decreased the inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and phosphorylation of nuclear factor- κ B (NF- κ B) in the lung of mice and macrophage with LPS stimulation. SFYCT treatment dose dependently decreased the LPS-induced NO and reactive oxygen species generation in LPS-stimulated macrophage. In conclusion, SFYCT attenuated lung inflammation during LPS-induced ALI through decreasing inflammatory cytokines production while increasing anti-inflammatory cytokines production. The immunoregulatory effect of SFYCT is related to inhibiting NF- κ B phosphorylation.

  10. Heat-Processed Scutellariae Radix Enhances Anti-Inflammatory Effect against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice via NF-κB Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ock Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to examine whether heat-processed Scutellariae Radix has an ameliorative effect on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced acute lung injury in mice. The effects of Scutellariae Radix heat-processed at 160°C (HSR were compared with those of nonheat-processed Scutellariae Radix (NSR. The LPS-treated group displayed a markedly decreased body weight and significantly increased lung weight; however, the administration of NSR or HSR improved both the body and lung weights. The increased oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarker levels in the serum and lung were reduced significantly with HSR. The reduced superoxide dismutase and catalase increased significantly by both NSR and HSR. Also, the dysregulated oxidative stress and inflammation were significantly ameliorated by NSR and HSR. The expression of inflammatory mediators and cytokines by nuclear factor-kappa B activation was modulated through inhibition of a nuclear factor kappa Bα degradation. Also, lung histological change was markedly suppressed by HSR rather than NSR. Overall, the ameliorative effects of HSR were superior to those when being nonheat-processed. The representative flavonoid contents of Scutellariae Radix that include baicalin, baicalein, and wogonin were greater by heat process. These data reveal heat-processed Scutellariae Radix may be a critical factor involved in the improvement of lung disorders caused by LPS.

  11. Mechanical ventilation strategies for intensive care unit patients without acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Wang, Weiwei; Zhao, Nana; Guo, Libo; Chi, Chunjie; Hou, Wei; Wu, Anqi; Tong, Hongshuang; Wang, Yue; Wang, Changsong; Li, Enyou

    2016-07-22

    It has been shown that the application of a lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategy can improve the prognosis of patients with acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, the optimal mechanical ventilation strategy for intensive care unit (ICU) patients without ALI or ARDS is uncertain. Therefore, we performed a network meta-analysis to identify the optimal mechanical ventilation strategy for these patients. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Web of Science for studies published up to July 2015 in which pulmonary compliance or the partial pressure of arterial oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FIO2) ratio was assessed in ICU patients without ALI or ARDS, who received mechanical ventilation via different strategies. The data for study characteristics, methods, and outcomes were extracted. We assessed the studies for eligibility, extracted the data, pooled the data, and used a Bayesian fixed-effects model to combine direct comparisons with indirect evidence. Seventeen randomized controlled trials including a total of 575 patients who received one of six ventilation strategies were included for network meta-analysis. Among ICU patients without ALI or ARDS, strategy C (lower tidal volume (VT) + higher positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP)) resulted in the highest PaO2/FIO2 ratio; strategy B (higher VT + lower PEEP) was associated with the highest pulmonary compliance; strategy A (lower VT + lower PEEP) was associated with a shorter length of ICU stay; and strategy D (lower VT + zero end-expiratory pressure (ZEEP)) was associated with the lowest PaO2/FiO2 ratio and pulmonary compliance. For ICU patients without ALI or ARDS, strategy C (lower VT + higher PEEP) was associated with the highest PaO2/FiO2 ratio. Strategy B (higher VT + lower PEEP) was superior to the other strategies in improving pulmonary

  12. The clinical usefulness of extravascular lung water and pulmonary vascular permeability index to diagnose and characterize pulmonary edema: a prospective multicenter study on the quantitative differential diagnostic definition for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushimoto, Shigeki; Taira, Yasuhiko; Kitazawa, Yasuhide; Okuchi, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Teruo; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Endo, Tomoyuki; Yamanouchi, Satoshi; Tagami, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Junko; Yoshikawa, Kazuhide; Sugita, Manabu; Kase, Yoichi; Kanemura, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kuroki, Yuichi; Izumino, Hiroo; Rinka, Hiroshi; Seo, Ryutarou; Takatori, Makoto; Kaneko, Tadashi; Nakamura, Toshiaki; Irahara, Takayuki; Saito, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Akihiro

    2012-12-11

    Acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by features other than increased pulmonary vascular permeability. Pulmonary vascular permeability combined with increased extravascular lung water content has been considered a quantitative diagnostic criterion of ALI/ARDS. This prospective, multi-institutional, observational study aimed to clarify the clinical pathophysiological features of ALI/ARDS and establish its quantitative diagnostic criteria. The extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) and the pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) were measured using the transpulmonary thermodilution method in 266 patients with PaO2/FiO2 ratio ≤ 300 mmHg and bilateral infiltration on chest radiography, in 23 ICUs of academic tertiary referral hospitals. Pulmonary edema was defined as EVLWI ≥ 10 ml/kg. Three experts retrospectively determined the pathophysiological features of respiratory insufficiency by considering the patients' history, clinical presentation, chest computed tomography and radiography, echocardiography, EVLWI and brain natriuretic peptide level, and the time course of all preceding findings under systemic and respiratory therapy. Patients were divided into the following three categories on the basis of the pathophysiological diagnostic differentiation of respiratory insufficiency: ALI/ARDS, cardiogenic edema, and pleural effusion with atelectasis, which were noted in 207 patients, 26 patients, and 33 patients, respectively. EVLWI was greater in ALI/ARDS and cardiogenic edema patients than in patients with pleural effusion with atelectasis (18.5 ± 6.8, 14.4 ± 4.0, and 8.3 ± 2.1, respectively; P definitive diagnosis of ALI/ARDS (specificity, 0.90 to 0.95), and a value < 1.7 ruled out an ALI/ARDS diagnosis (specificity, 0.95). PVPI may be a useful quantitative diagnostic tool for ARDS in patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and radiographic infiltrates. UMIN-CTR ID UMIN000003627.

  13. Ginkgo biloba extracts attenuate lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in acute lung injury by inhibiting the COX-2 and NF-κB pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin; Chen, Nan; Ma, Chun-Hua; Tao, Jing; Bao, Jian-An; Zong-Qi, Cheng; Chen, Zu-Tao; Miao, Li-Yan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the role of Ginkgo biloba extract in lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). ALI was induced in mice by intratracheal instillation of LPS. G. biloba extract (12 and 24 mg·kg(-1)) and dexamethasone (2 mg·kg(-1)), as a positive control, were given by i.p. injection. The cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were counted. The degree of animal lung edema was evaluated by measuring the wet/dry weight ratio. The superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities were assayed by SOD and MPO kits, respectively. The levels of inflammatory mediators, tumor necrosis factor-a, interleukin-1b, and interleukin-6, were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pathological changes of lung tissues were observed by H&E staining. The levels of NF-κB p65 and COX-2 expression were detected by Western blotting. Compared to the LPS group, the treatment with the G. biloba extract at 12 and 24 mg·kg(-1) markedly attenuated the inflammatory cell numbers in the BALF, decreased NF-κB p65 and COX-2 expression, and improved SOD activity, and inhibited MPO activity. The histological changes of the lungs were also significantly improved. The results indicated that G. biloba extract has a protective effect on LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice. The protective mechanism of G. biloba extract may be partly attributed to the inhibition of NF-κB p65 and COX-2 activation. Copyright © 2015 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Boussignac CPAP system for brain death confirmation with apneic test in case of acute lung injury/adult respiratory distress syndrome – series of cases

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    Wieczorek A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Andrzej Wieczorek,1 Tomasz Gaszynski2 1Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland; 2Department of Emergency Medicine and Disaster Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland Introduction: There are some patients with severe respiratory disturbances like adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS and suspicion of brain death, for whom typical performance of the apneic test is difficult to complete because of quick desaturation and rapid deterioration without effective ventilation. To avoid failure of brain death confirmation and possible loss of organ donation another approach to apneic test is needed. We present two cases of patients with clinical symptoms of brain death, with lung pathology (acute lung injury, ARDS, lung embolism and lung infection, in whom apneic tests for recognizing brain death were difficult to perform. During typical performance of apneic test involving the use of oxygen catheter for apneic oxygenation we observed severe desaturation with growing hypotension and hemodynamic destabilization. But with the use of Boussignac CPAP system all necessary tests were successfully completed, confirming the patient’s brain death, which gave us the opportunity to perform procedures for organ donation. The main reason of apneic test difficulties was severe gas exchange disturbances secondary to ARDS. Thus lack of positive end expiratory pressure during classical performance of apneic test leads to quick desaturation and rapid hemodynamic deterioration, limiting the observation period below dedicated at least 10-minute interval.  Conclusion: The Boussignac CPAP system may be an effective tool for performing transparent apneic test in case of serious respiratory disturbances, especially in the form of acute lung injury or ARDS. Keywords: brain death, organ donor, ARDS, ALI, Boussignac CPAP

  15. Blockage of glycolysis by targeting PFKFB3 alleviates sepsis-related acute lung injury via suppressing inflammation and apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yuanqi; Lan, Haibing; Yu, Zhihong; Wang, Meng; Wang, Shu; Chen, Yu; Rao, Haiwei; Li, Jingying; Sheng, Zhiyong; Shao, Jianghua

    2017-09-16

    Sepsis-related acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by excessive lung inflammation and apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells resulting in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Recent studies indicated that anaerobic glycolysis play an important role in sepsis. However, whether inhibition of aerobic glycolysis exhibits beneficial effect on sepsis-induced ALI is not known. In vivo, a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced ALI mouse model was set up and mice treated with glycolytic inhibitor 3PO after CLP. The mice treated with the 3PO ameliorated the survival rate, histopathological changes, lung inflammation, lactate increased and lung apoptosis of mice with CLP-induced sepsis. In vitro, the exposure of human alveolar epithelial A549 cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulted in cell apoptosis, inflammatory cytokine production, enhanced glycolytic flux and reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased. While these changes were attenuated by 3PO treatment. Sequentially, treatment of A549 cells with lactate caused cell apoptosis and enhancement of ROS. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) significantly lowered LPS and lactate-induced the generation of ROS and cell apoptosis in A549 cells. Therefore, these results indicate that anaerobic glycolysis may be an important contributor in cell apoptosis of sepsis-related ALI. Moreover, LPS specifically induces apoptotic insults to A549 cell through lactate-mediated enhancement of ROS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Blocking triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury via inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Tian; Zhou, Yong; Li, Ping; Duan, Jia-Xi; Liu, Yong-Ping; Sun, Guo-Ying; Wan, Li; Dong, Liang; Fang, Xiang; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Guan, Cha-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is associated with high mortality and uncontrolled inflammation plays a critical role in ALI. TREM-1 is an amplifier of inflammatory response, and is involved in the pathogenesis of many infectious diseases. NLRP3 inflammasome is a member of NLRs family that contributes to ALI. However, the effect of TREM-1 on NLRP3 inflammasome and ALI is still unknown. This study aimed to determine the effect of TREM-1 modulation on LPS-induced ALI and activation of the NLRP3 inflamm...

  17. Acute exacerbations of fibrotic interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churg, Andrew; Wright, Joanne L; Tazelaar, Henry D

    2011-03-01

    An acute exacerbation is the development of acute lung injury, usually resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome, in a patient with a pre-existing fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. By definition, acute exacerbations are not caused by infection, heart failure, aspiration or drug reaction. Most patients with acute exacerbations have underlying usual interstitial pneumonia, either idiopathic or in association with a connective tissue disease, but the same process has been reported in patients with fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia, fibrotic hypersensitivity pneumonitis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia and asbestosis. Occasionally an acute exacerbation is the initial manifestation of underlying interstitial lung disease. On biopsy, acute exacerbations appear as diffuse alveolar damage or bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) superimposed upon the fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. Biopsies may be extremely confusing, because the acute injury pattern can completely obscure the underlying disease; a useful clue is that diffuse alveolar damage and organizing pneumonia should not be associated with old dense fibrosis and peripheral honeycomb change. Consultation with radiology can also be extremely helpful, because the fibrosing disease may be evident on old or concurrent computed tomography scans. The aetiology of acute exacerbations is unknown, and the prognosis is poor; however, some patients survive with high-dose steroid therapy. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  18. The effect of pulmonary artery catheter use on costs and long-term outcomes of acute lung injury.

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    Gilles Clermont

    Full Text Available The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC remains widely used in acute lung injury (ALI despite known complications and little evidence of improved short-term mortality. Concurrent with NHLBI ARDS Clinical Trials Network Fluid and Catheters Treatment Trial (FACTT, we conducted a prospectively-defined comparison of healthcare costs and long-term outcomes for care with a PAC vs. central venous catheter (CVC. We explored if use of the PAC in ALI is justified by a beneficial cost-effectiveness profile.We obtained detailed bills for the initial hospitalization. We interviewed survivors using the Health Utilities Index Mark 2 questionnaire at 2, 6, 9 and 12 m to determine quality of life (QOL and post-discharge resource use. Outcomes beyond 12 m were estimated from federal databases. Incremental costs and outcomes were generated using MonteCarlo simulation.Of 1001 subjects enrolled in FACTT, 774 (86% were eligible for long-term follow-up and 655 (85% consented. Hospital costs were similar for the PAC and CVC groups ($96.8k vs. $89.2k, p = 0.38. Post-discharge to 12 m costs were higher for PAC subjects ($61.1k vs. 45.4k, p = 0.03. One-year mortality and QOL among survivors were similar in PAC and CVC groups (mortality: 35.6% vs. 31.9%, p = 0.33; QOL [scale: 0-1]: 0.61 vs. 0.66, p = 0.49. MonteCarlo simulation showed PAC use had a 75.2% probability of being more expensive and less effective (mean cost increase of $14.4k and mean loss of 0.3 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs and a 94.2% probability of being higher than the $100k/QALY willingness-to-pay threshold.PAC use increased costs with no patient benefit and thus appears unjustified for routine use in ALI.www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00234767.

  19. Anti-human tissue factor antibody ameliorated intestinal ischemia reperfusion-induced acute lung injury in human tissue factor knock-in mice.

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    Xiaolin He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interaction between the coagulation and inflammation systems plays an important role in the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Anti-coagulation is an attractive option for ARDS treatment, and this has promoted development of new antibodies. However, preclinical trials for these antibodies are often limited by the high cost and availability of non-human primates. In the present study, we developed a novel alternative method to test the role of a humanized anti-tissue factor mAb in acute lung injury with transgenic mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human tissue factor knock-in (hTF-KI transgenic mice and a novel humanized anti-human tissue factor mAb (anti-hTF mAb, CNTO859 were developed. The hTF-KI mice showed a normal and functional expression of hTF. The anti-hTF mAb specifically blocked the pro-coagulation activity of brain extracts from the hTF-KI mice and human, but not from wild type mice. An extrapulmonary ARDS model was used by intestinal ischemia-reperfusion. Significant lung tissue damage in hTF-KI mice was observed after 2 h reperfusion. Administration of CNTO859 (5 mg/kg, i.v. attenuated the severity of lung tissue injury, decreased the total cell counts and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and reduced Evans blue leakage. In addition, the treatment significantly reduced alveolar fibrin deposition, and decreased tissue factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity in the serum. This treatment also down-regulated cytokine expression and reduced cell death in the lung. CONCLUSIONS: This novel anti-hTF antibody showed beneficial effects on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion induced acute lung injury, which merits further investigation for clinical usage. In addition, the use of knock-in transgenic mice to test the efficacy of antibodies against human-specific proteins is a novel strategy for preclinical studies.

  20. Radionuclide injury to the lung.

    OpenAIRE

    Dagle, G E; Sanders, C L

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide injury to the lung has been studied in rats, hamsters, dogs, mice and baboons. Exposure of the lung to high dose levels of radionuclides produces a spectrum of progressively more severe functional and morphological changes, ranging from radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis to lung tumors. These changes are somewhat similar for different species. Their severity can be related to the absorbed radiation dose (measured in rads) produced by alpha, beta or gamma radiation emanating from ...

  1. Medical countermeasure against respiratory toxicity and acute lung injury following inhalation exposure to chemical warfare nerve agent VX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Gordon, Richard K; Rezk, Peter E; Katos, Alexander M; Wajda, Nikolai A; Moran, Theodore S; Steele, Keith E; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Sciuto, Alfred M

    2007-03-01

    To develop therapeutics against lung injury and respiratory toxicity following nerve agent VX exposure, we evaluated the protective efficacy of a number of potential pulmonary therapeutics. Guinea pigs were exposed to 27.03 mg/m(3) of VX or saline using a microinstillation inhalation exposure technique for 4 min and then the toxicity was assessed. Exposure to this dose of VX resulted in a 24-h survival rate of 52%. There was a significant increase in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein, total cell number, and cell death. Surprisingly, direct pulmonary treatment with surfactant, liquivent, N-acetylcysteine, dexamethasone, or anti-sense syk oligonucleotides 2 min post-exposure did not significantly increase the survival rate of VX-exposed guinea pigs. Further blocking the nostrils, airway, and bronchioles, VX-induced viscous mucous secretions were exacerbated by these aerosolized treatments. To overcome these events, we developed a strategy to protect the animals by treatment with atropine. Atropine inhibits muscarinic stimulation and markedly reduces the copious airway secretion following nerve agent exposure. Indeed, post-exposure treatment with atropine methyl bromide, which does not cross the blood-brain barrier, resulted in 100% survival of VX-exposed animals. Bronchoalveolar lavage from VX-exposed and atropine-treated animals exhibited lower protein levels, cell number, and cell death compared to VX-exposed controls, indicating less lung injury. When pulmonary therapeutics were combined with atropine, significant protection to VX-exposure was observed. These results indicate that combinations of pulmonary therapeutics with atropine or drugs that inhibit mucous secretion are important for the treatment of respiratory toxicity and lung injury following VX exposure.

  2. Phosgene- and chlorine-induced acute lung injury in rats: comparison of cardiopulmonary function and biomarkers in exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Sa; Trübel, Hubert; Wang, Chen; Pauluhn, Jürgen

    2014-12-04

    This study compares changes in cardiopulmonary function, selected endpoints in exhaled breath, blood, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) following a single, high-level 30-min nose-only exposure of rats to chlorine and phosgene gas. The time-course of lung injury was systematically examined up to 1-day post-exposure with the objective to identify early diagnostic biomarkers suitable to guide countermeasures to accidental exposures. Chlorine, due to its water solubility, penetrates the lung concentration-dependently whereas the poorly water-soluble phosgene reaches the alveolar region without any appreciable extent of airway injury. Cardiopulmonary endpoints were continually recorded by telemetry and barometric plethysmography for 20h. At several time points blood was collected to evaluate evidence of hemoconcentration, changes in hemostasis, and osteopontin. One day post-exposure, protein, osteopontin, and cytodifferentials were determined in BAL. Nitric oxide (eNO) and eCO2 were non-invasively examined in exhaled breath 5 and 24h post-exposure. Chlorine-exposed rats elaborated a reflexively-induced decreased respiratory rate and bradycardia whereas phosgene-exposed rats developed minimal changes in lung function but a similar magnitude of bradycardia. Despite similar initial changes in cardiac function, the phosgene-exposed rats showed different time-course changes of hemoconcentration and lung weights as compared to chlorine-exposed rats. eNO/eCO2 ratios were most affected in chlorine-exposed rats in the absence of any marked time-related changes. This outcome appears to demonstrate that nociceptive reflexes with changes in cardiopulmonary function resemble typical patterns of mixed airway-alveolar irritation in chlorine-exposed rats and alveolar irritation in phosgene-exposed rats. The degree and time-course of pulmonary injury was reflected best by eNO/eCO2 ratios, hemoconcentration, and protein in BAL. Increased fibrin in blood occurred only in chlorine

  3. Bench-to-bedside review: Damage-associated molecular patterns in the onset of ventilator-induced lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Maria T.; van der Poll, Tom; Schultz, Marcus J.; Wieland, Catharina W.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) has the potential to worsen pre-existing lung injury or even to initiate lung injury. Moreover, it is thought that injurious MV contributes to the overwhelming inflammatory response seen in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  4. Suscetibilidade genética na lesão pulmonar aguda e síndrome da angústia respiratória aguda Genetic susceptibility in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Suparregui Dias

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A lesão pulmonar aguda e sua forma mais grave, a síndrome da angústia respiratória aguda, são o denominador comum de várias doenças que podem provocar uma inflamação exagerada nos pulmões. Nos últimos anos, essa variabilidade tem sido atribuída, pelo menos em parte, a fatores genéticos. O presente estudo tem por objetivos revisar o papel dos principais genes envolvidos na suscetibilidade, morbidade e mortalidade na lesão pulmonar aguda e na síndrome da angústia respiratória aguda. Através de pesquisa nas bases de dados PubMed e LiLACS, empregando-se os unitermos lesão pulmonar aguda, síndrome da angústia respiratória aguda e síndrome da angústia respiratória do adulto em combinação com polimorfismos genéticos, foram selecionados 69 artigos, dos quais 38 foram incluídos nesta revisão. Foram também considerados artigos relevantes extraídos das referências bibliográficas nos artigos selecionados das bases de dados. Os polimorfismos genéticos são variantes gênicas presentes em pelo menos 1% da população. A presença destas variantes genéticas pode influenciar a expressão de mediadores da resposta inflamatória, afetando diretamente a suscetibilidade à lesão pulmonar aguda, a intensidade da inflamação no parênquima pulmonar, a evolução e o desfecho destes pacientes. Estudos de associação com grandes populações e passíveis de reprodução permitirão de modo definitivo a inclusão da genômica no arsenal diagnóstico, prognóstico e terapêutico de pacientes com lesão pulmonar aguda/síndrome da angústia respiratória agudaAcute lung injury and its most severe presentation, acute respiratory distress syndrome, are a common denominator for several diseases which can lead to exaggerated lung inflammation. In the last years this variability has been ascribed, at least partially, to genetic issues. This study aims to review the role of the main genes involved in acute lung injury and acute respiratory

  5. Administration of intrapulmonary sodium polyacrylate to induce lung injury for the development of a porcine model of early acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, William R; Barnbrook, Julian; Dominelli, Paolo B; Griesdale, Donald Eg; Arndt, Tara; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Foster, Glen; Ackland, Gareth L; Xu, James; Ayas, Najib T; Sheel, Andrew W

    2014-12-01

    The loss of alveolar epithelial and endothelial integrity is a central component in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); however, experimental models investigating the mechanisms of epithelial injury are lacking. The purpose of the present study was to design and develop an experimental porcine model of ARDS by inducing lung injury with intrapulmonary administration of sodium polyacrylate (SPA). The present study was performed at the Centre for Comparative Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia. Human alveolar epithelial cells were cultured with several different concentrations of SPA; a bioluminescence technique was used to assess cell death associated with each concentration. In the anesthetized pig model (female Yorkshire X pigs (n = 14)), lung injury was caused in 11 animals (SPA group) by injecting sequential aliquots (5 mL) of 1% SPA gel in aqueous solution into the distal airway via a rubber catheter through an endotracheal tube. The SPA was dispersed throughout the lungs by manual bag ventilation. Three control animals (CON group) underwent all experimental procedures and measurements with the exception of SPA administration. The mean (± SD) ATP concentration after incubation of human alveolar epithelial cells with 0.1% SPA (0.92 ± 0.27 μM/well) was approximately 15% of the value found for the background control (6.30 ± 0.37 μM/well; p < 0.001). Elastance of the respiratory system (E RS) and the lung (E L) increased in SPA-treated animals after injury (p = 0.003 and p < 0.001, respectively). Chest wall elastance (E CW) did not change in SPA-treated animals. There were no differences in E RS, E L, or E CW in the CON group when pre- and post-injury values were compared. Analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed a significant shift toward neutrophil predominance from before to after injury in SPA-treated animals (p < 0.001) but not in the CON group (p = 0.38). Necropsy revealed

  6. Synthetic surfactant containing SP-B and SP-C mimics is superior to single-peptide formulations in rabbits with chemical acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans J. Walther

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chemical spills are on the rise and inhalation of toxic chemicals may induce chemical acute lung injury (ALI/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Although the pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS is well understood, the absence of specific antidotes has limited the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions.Objectives. Surfactant inactivation and formation of free radicals are important pathways in (chemical ALI. We tested the potential of lipid mixtures with advanced surfactant protein B and C (SP-B and C mimics to improve oxygenation and lung compliance in rabbits with lavage- and chemical-induced ALI/ARDS.Methods. Ventilated young adult rabbits underwent repeated saline lung lavages or underwent intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid to induce ALI/ARDS. After establishment of respiratory failure rabbits were treated with a single intratracheal dose of 100 mg/kg of synthetic surfactant composed of 3% Super Mini-B (S-MB, a SP-B mimic, and/or SP-C33 UCLA, a SP-C mimic, in a lipid mixture (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by weight, the clinical surfactant Infasurf®, a bovine lung lavage extract with SP-B and C, or synthetic lipids alone. End-points consisted of arterial oxygenation, dynamic lung compliance, and protein and lipid content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Potential mechanism of surfactant action for S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA were investigated with captive bubble surfactometry (CBS assays.Results. All three surfactant peptide/lipid mixtures and Infasurf equally lowered the minimum surface tension on CBS, and also improved oxygenation and lung compliance. In both animal models, the two-peptide synthetic surfactant with S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA led to better arterial oxygenation and lung compliance than single peptide synthetic surfactants and Infasurf. Synthetic surfactants and Infasurf improved lung function further in lavage- than in chemical-induced respiratory failure, with the difference probably due to greater capillary

  7. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate Ameliorates Seawater Aspiration-Induced Acute Lung Injury via Regulating Inflammatory Cytokines and Inhibiting JAK/STAT1 Pathway in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transducers and activators of transcriptions 1 (STAT1 play an important role in the inflammation process of acute lung injury (ALI. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG exhibits a specific and strong anti-STAT1 activity. Therefore, our study is to explore whether EGCG pretreatment can ameliorate seawater aspiration-induced ALI and its possible mechanisms. We detected the arterial partial pressure of oxygen, lung wet/dry weight ratios, protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and the histopathologic and ultrastructure staining of the lung. The levels of IL-1, TNF-α, and IL-10 and the total and the phosphorylated protein level of STAT1, JAK1, and JAK2 were assessed in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that EGCG pretreatment significantly improved hypoxemia and histopathologic changes, alleviated pulmonary edema and lung vascular leak, reduced the production of TNF-α and IL-1, and increased the production of IL-10 in seawater aspiration-induced ALI rats. EGCG also prevented the seawater aspiration-induced increase of TNF-α and IL-1 and decrease of IL-10 in NR8383 cell line. Moreover, EGCG pretreatment reduced the total and the phosphorylated protein level of STAT1 in vivo and in vitro and reduced the phosphorylated protein level of JAK1 and JAK2. The present study demonstrates that EGCG ameliorates seawater aspiration-induced ALI via regulating inflammatory cytokines and inhibiting JAK/STAT1 pathway in rats.

  8. Therapeutic effects of silibinin on LPS-induced acute lung injury by inhibiting NLRP3 and NF-κB signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lin; Li, Weimin; Wang, Tan

    2017-07-01

    Silibinin, a natural product extracted from Silybum marianum (milk thistle), has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effect. The aim of this study was to explore the therapeutic effects and potential mechanisms of silibinin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated inflammatory responses in acute lung injury (ALI). Male BALB/c mice were conditioned with silibinin 1 h after intranasal instillation of LPS. After 12 h, the myeloperoxidase (MPO) level in lung tissues, the wet/dry (W/D) ratio, inflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and histopathological examination of lung were detected. Our results showed that silibinin inhibited LPS-induced histopathological changes and MPO activity, as well as the wet/dry (W/D) ratio in the lung tissues. Furthermore, silibinin significantly inhibited LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines production in the BALF. In addition, silibinin suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activation and the expression of NLRP3 inflammasome. These results indicate that silibinin exerts its anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting NF-κB and NLRP3 signaling pathways. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. [The role of disequilibrium of expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2/9 and their tissue inhibitors in pathogenesis of hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang-feng; Zhu, Guang-fa; Liu, Shuang; Foda, Hussein D

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the role of matrix metalloproteinase-2/9 (MMP-2/9) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMP-1/2) in pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by hyperoxia. Seventy-two C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into normal control group, hyperoxia for 24 hours group, hyperoxia for 48 hours group, and hyperoxia for 72 hours group, with 18 mice in each group. The mice in hyperoxia groups were exposed to >98% oxygen in sealed cages, and the normal control group were placed outside of the cage to breathe room air. At the end of the exposure time the animals were euthanized, the right lung was removed and phosphate buffer solution (PBS) was used to lavage the lung through the endotracheal catheter. The wet/dry weight ratio, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein content and the volume of pleural fluid were measured, the severity of lung injury was assessed; the expression of MMP-2/9 and TIMP-1/2 mRNA in lung tissue at 24, 48 and 72 hours of hyperoxia were assessed by reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR); the amount of MMP-2/9 and TIMP-1/2 protein in lung tissue were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Hyperoxia caused ALI as evidenced by the increase in lung wet/dry weight ratio, BALF protein content and the volume of pleural fluid as compared with the normal control group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). RT-PCR study showed increased expression of MMP-2/9 and TIMP-1 mRNA in lung tissues (P<0.05 or P<0.01), and ELISA assay also demonstrated upregulation of MMP-2/9 and an increase in TIMP-1 amount in BALF compared with their normal control group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). The ratios of both MMP-2 mRNA/TIMP-2 mRNA and MMP-2 protein/TIMP-2 protein were all increased in hyperoxia groups as compared with their normal control group (all P<0.01). Hyperoxia causes ALI in mice, and disturbance of MMP-2/TIMP-2 balance plays an important role in the development of hyperoxia-induced ALI in mice.

  10. Activation of A1-adenosine receptors promotes leukocyte recruitment to the lung and attenuates acute lung injury in mice infected with influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeffner, Famke; Woods, Parker S; Davis, Ian C

    2014-09-01

    We have shown that bronchoalveolar epithelial A1-adenosine receptors (A1-AdoR) are activated in influenza A virus-infected mice. Alveolar macrophages and neutrophils also express A1-AdoRs, and we hypothesized that activation of A1-AdoRs on these cells will promote macrophage and neutrophil chemotaxis and activation and thereby play a role in the pathogenesis of influenza virus-induced acute lung injury. Wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice, congenic A1-AdoR knockout (A1-KO) mice, and mice that had undergone reciprocal bone marrow transfer were inoculated intranasally with 10,000 PFU/mouse influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus. Alternatively, WT mice underwent daily treatment with the A1-AdoR antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) from 1 day prior to inoculation. Infection increased bronchoalveolar lining fluid (BALF) adenosine comparably in WT and A1-KO mice. Infection of WT mice resulted in reduced carotid arterial O2 saturation (hypoxemia), lung pathology, pulmonary edema, reduced lung compliance, increased basal airway resistance, and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. These effects were absent or significantly attenuated in A1-KO mice. Levels of BALF leukocytes, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and interleukin 10 (IL-10) were significantly reduced in infected A1-KO mice, but levels of KC, IP-10, and MCP-1 were increased. Reciprocal bone marrow transfer resulted in WT-like lung injury severity, but BALF leukocyte levels increased only in WT and A1-KO mice with WT bone barrow. Hypoxemia, pulmonary edema, and levels of BALF alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, IFN-γ, and IL-10 were reduced in DPCPX-treated WT mice. Levels of viral replication did not differ between mouse strains or treatment groups. These findings indicate that adenosine activation of leukocyte A1-AdoRs plays a significant role in their recruitment to the infected lung and contributes to influenza pathogenesis. A1-AdoR inhibitor therapy may therefore be beneficial in patients with influenza virus

  11. Prospectively defined murine mesenchymal stem cells inhibit Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced acute lung injury and improve pneumonia survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackstein, Holger; Lippitsch, Anne; Krug, Philipp; Schevtschenko, Inna; Kranz, Sabine; Hecker, Matthias; Dietert, Kristina; Gruber, Achim D; Bein, Gregor; Brendel, Cornelia; Baal, Nelli

    2015-10-06

    Numerous studies have described the immunosuppressive capacity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) but these studies use mixtures of heterogeneous progenitor cells for in vitro expansion. Recently, multipotent MSC have been prospectively identified in murine bone marrow (BM) on the basis of PDFGRa(+) SCA1(+) CD45(-) TER119(-) (PαS) expression but the immunomodulatory capacity of these MSC is unknown. We isolated PαS MSC by high-purity FACS sorting of murine BM and after in vitro expansion we analyzed the in vivo immunomodulatory activity during acute pneumonia. PαS MSC (1 × 10(6)) were applied intratracheally 4 h after acute respiratory Klebsiella pneumoniae induced infection. PαS MSC treatment resulted in significantly reduced alveolitis and protein leakage in comparison to mock-treated controls. PαS MSC-treated mice exhibited significantly reduced alveolar TNF-α and IL-12p70 expression, while IL-10 expression was unaffected. Dissection of respiratory dendritic cell (DC) subsets by multiparameter flow cytometry revealed significantly reduced lung DC infiltration and significantly reduced CD86 costimulatory expression on lung CD103(+) DC in PαS MSC-treated mice. In the post-acute phase of pneumonia, PαS MSC-treated animals exhibited significantly reduced respiratory IL-17(+) CD4(+) T cells and IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) T cells. Moreover, PαS MSC treatment significantly improved overall pneumonia survival and did not increase bacterial load. In this study we demonstrated for the first time the feasibility and in vivo immunomodulatory capacity of prospectively defined MSC in pneumonia.

  12. Role of oxidant stress in the adult respiratory distress syndrome: evaluation of a novel antioxidant strategy in a porcine model of endotoxin-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, P K; Zhuang, J; Doctrow, S R; Malfroy, B; Benson, P F; Menconi, M J; Fink, M P

    1996-01-01

    Reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs) are thought to play a key role in the pathogenesis of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Accordingly, the use of ROM scavengers, such as N-acetyl-cysteine or dimethylthiourea, as therapeutic adjuncts to prevent oxidant-mediated damage to the lung have been evaluated extensively in animal models of ARDS. Results with this approach have been quite variable among studies. Another strategy that has been examined in animal models of ARDS is the administration of various enzymes, particularly superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase (CAT), in an effort to promote the conversion of ROMs to inactive metabolites. In theory, this strategy should be more effective than the use of ROM scavengers since a single molecule of a catalytically active molecule can neutralize a large number of molecules of a reactive species, whereas most scavengers act in a stoichiometric fashion to neutralize radicals on a mole-for-mole basis. This notion is supported by studies showing that prophylactic treatment with CAT provides impressive protection against acute lung injury induced in experimental animals by the administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Results with SOD have been more variable. Recently, we have utilized a porcine model of LPS-induced ARDS to investigate the therapeutic potential of EUK-8, a novel, synthetic, low molecular salen-manganese complex that exhibits both SOD-like and CAT-like activities in vitro. Using both pre- and post-treatment designs, we have documented that treatment with EUK-8 significantly attenuates many of the features of LPS-induced acute lung injury, including arterial hypoxemia, pulmonary hypertension, decreased dynamic pulmonary compliance, and pulmonary edema. These findings support the view that salen-manganese complexes warrant further evaluation as therapeutic agents for treatment or prevention of sepsis-related ARDS in humans.

  13. Surgical repair of acute type A aortic dissection: continuous pulmonary perfusion during retrograde cerebral perfusion prevents lung injury in a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santo, Luca Salvatore; Romano, Gianpaolo; Amarelli, Cristiano; Onorati, Francesco; Torella, Michele; Renzulli, Attilio; Galdieri, Nicola; Cotrufo, Maurizio

    2003-09-01

    Postoperative respiratory failure is a frequent and serious complication in patients with type A acute aortic dissection operated on with deep systemic hypothermia. Interaction between neutrophils and pulmonary endothelium along with ischemic insult and reperfusion are the major determinants of lung injury. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effect of continuous pulmonary perfusion during retrograde cerebral perfusion on lung function. Twenty-two patients referred for acute type A aortic dissection, who were free from preoperative respiratory dysfunction, were assigned prospectively and alternately to one of 2 treatment groups. Pulmonary perfusion was performed during retrograde cerebral perfusion in group B (11 patients), whereas the conventional Ueda technique was applied in group A (11 patients). Lung function was evaluated on the basis of intubation time, scoring of chest radiographs at 12 hours after cardiopulmonary bypass, and Pao(2)/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio assessed from immediately before the operation to 72 hours after termination of cardiopulmonary bypass. Study groups were homogeneous for age, sex, interval between symptom onset and surgical operation, previous aortic surgery, preoperative ejection fraction and pulmonary gas exchange function, extent of aortic repair, and concomitant procedures. Cardiopulmonary bypass time, length of retrograde cerebral perfusion, operation time, need for blood substitutes, and surgical revision for bleeding did not differ between treatment groups. Postoperative Pao(2)/fraction of inspired oxygen ratios were higher in group B than in group A, and the difference remained statistically significant throughout the study period. The incidence of prolonged ventilator support (>72 hours) and the severity of the radiographic pulmonary infiltrate score were lower in the perfused group (18.2% vs 72.7% [P =.015] and 0.81 +/- 0.75 vs 1.8 +/- 0.78 [P =.028], respectively). Continuous pulmonary perfusion

  14. Manipulations of core temperatures in ischemia-reperfusion lung injury in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hung; Huang, Kun-Lun; Li, Min-Hui; Hsu, Ching-Wang; Tsai, Shih-Hung; Chu, Shi-Jye

    2008-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effect of various core temperatures on acute lung injury induced by ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) in our isolated rabbit lung model. Typical acute lung injury was successfully induced by 30 min of ischemia followed by 90 min of reperfusion observation. The I/R elicited a significant increase in pulmonary arterial pressure, microvascular permeability (measured by using the capillary filtration coefficient, Kfc), Delta Kfc ratio, lung weight gain and the protein concentration of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Mild hypothermia significantly attenuated acute lung injury induced by I/R, all parameters having decreased significantly (p<0.05); conversely, mild hyperthermia did not further exacerbate acute lung injury. These experimental data suggest that mild hypothermia significantly ameliorated acute lung injury induced by ischemia-reperfusion in rabbits.

  15. Production and application of HMGB1 derived recombinant RAGE-antagonist peptide for anti-inflammatory therapy in acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seonyeong; Piao, Chunxian; Kim, Gyeungyun; Kim, Ji Yeon; Choi, Eunji; Lee, Minhyung

    2018-03-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is an inflammatory lung disease caused by sepsis, infection, or ischemia-reperfusion. The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) signaling pathway plays an important role in ALI. In this study, a novel RAGE-antagonist peptide (RAP) was produced as an inhibitor of the RAGE signaling pathway based on the RAGE-binding domain of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1). Recombinant RAP was over-expressed and purified using nickel-affinity chromatography. In lipopolysaccharide- or HMGB1-activated RAW264.7 macrophage cells, RAP reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). RAP decreased the levels of cell surface RAGE and inhibited the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). These results imply that RAP decreases RAGE-mediated NF-κB activation and subsequent inflammatory reaction. For in vivo evaluation, RAP was delivered to the lungs of ALI-model animals via intratracheal administration. As a result, RAGE was down-regulated in the lung tissues by pulmonary delivery of RAP. Consequently, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β were also reduced in broncoalveolar lavage fluid and the lung tissues of RAP-treated animals. Hematoxylin and eosin staining indicated that inflammation was decreased in RAP-treated animals. Collectively, these results suggest that RAP may be a useful treatment for ALI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Bigelovii A Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Blocking NF-κB and CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Protein δ Pathways

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    Chunguang Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimal methods are applied to acute lung injury (ALI and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, but the mortality rate is still high. Accordingly, further studies dedicated to identify novel therapeutic approaches to ALI are urgently needed. Bigelovii A is a new natural product and may exhibit anti-inflammatory activity. Therefore, we sought to investigate its effect on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced ALI and the underlying mechanisms. We found that LPS-induced ALI was significantly alleviated by Bigelovii A treatment, characterized by reduction of proinflammatory mediator production, neutrophil infiltration, and lung permeability. Furthermore, Bigelovii A also downregulated LPS-stimulated inflammatory mediator expressions in vitro. Moreover, both NF-κB and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein δ (C/EBPδ activation were obviously attenuated by Bigelovii A treatment. Additionally, phosphorylation of both p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 (upstream signals of C/EBPδ activation in response to LPS challenge was also inhibited by Bigelovii A. Therefore, Bigelovii A could attenuate LPS-induced inflammation by suppression of NF-κB, inflammatory mediators, and p38 MAPK/ERK1/2—C/EBPδ, inflammatory mediators signaling pathways, which provide a novel theoretical basis for the possible application of Bigelovii A in clinic.

  17. Qi-Dong-Huo-Xue-Yin Inhibits Inflammation in Acute Lung Injury in Mice via Toll-Like Receptor 4/Caveolin-1 Signaling

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    Li-Ying Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a critical illness with no current effective treatment. Caveolin-1 indirectly activates inflammation-associated signaling pathways by inhibiting endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS. This induces an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels, which are involved in the pathogenesis of ALI. The compound Chinese prescription Qi-Dong-Huo-Xue-Yin (QDHXY is efficacious for ALI treatment via an anti-inflammatory effect; however, the exact underlying mechanism is unknown. Therefore, we explored the protective effect of QDHXY against lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced ALI in mice. Histopathological changes in mouse lung tissues were studied. Furthermore, alterations in the serum levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were investigated. The levels of tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-α, interleukin- (IL- 6, IL-1β, and interferon-γ-induced protein 10 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were measured. Additionally, the expression levels of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88, caveolin-1, and eNOS were assessed. QDHXY significantly reduced lung infiltration with inflammatory cells and the production of serum pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and inhibited the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, caveolin-1, and MyD88 but not eNOS. These indicate that QDHXY significantly improved the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels, possibly by inhibiting the caveolin-1 signaling pathway. Therefore, QDHXY may be a potential treatment for ALI.

  18. Blocking triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury via inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian; Zhou, Yong; Li, Ping; Duan, Jia-Xi; Liu, Yong-Ping; Sun, Guo-Ying; Wan, Li; Dong, Liang; Fang, Xiang; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Guan, Cha-Xiang

    2016-12-22

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is associated with high mortality and uncontrolled inflammation plays a critical role in ALI. TREM-1 is an amplifier of inflammatory response, and is involved in the pathogenesis of many infectious diseases. NLRP3 inflammasome is a member of NLRs family that contributes to ALI. However, the effect of TREM-1 on NLRP3 inflammasome and ALI is still unknown. This study aimed to determine the effect of TREM-1 modulation on LPS-induced ALI and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. We showed that LR12, a TREM-1 antagonist peptide, significantly improved survival of mice after lethal doses of LPS. LR12 also attenuated inflammation and lung tissue damage by reducing histopathologic changes, infiltration of the macrophage and neutrophil into the lung, and production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, and oxidative stress. LR12 decreased expression of the NLRP3, pro-caspase-1 and pro-IL-1β, and inhibited priming of the NLRP3 inflammasome by inhibiting NF-κB. LR12 also reduced the expression of NLRP3 and caspase-1 p10 protein, and secretion of the IL-1β, inhibited activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by decreasing ROS. For the first time, these data show that TREM-1 aggravates inflammation in ALI by activating NLRP3 inflammasome, and blocking TREM-1 may be a potential therapeutic approach for ALI.

  19. Mechanical ventilation with lower tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure prevents alveolar coagulation in patients without lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, Goda; Wolthuis, Esther K.; Bresser, Paul; Levi, Marcel; van der Poll, Tom; Dzoljic, Misa; Vroom, Margreeth B.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alveolar fibrin deposition is a hallmark of acute lung injury, resulting from activation of coagulation and inhibition of fibrinolysis. Previous studies have shown that mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes may aggravate lung injury in patients with sepsis and acute lung injury.

  20. Decreased respiratory system compliance on the sixth day of mechanical ventilation is a predictor of death in patients with established acute lung injury

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    Matthay Michael A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple studies have identified single variables or composite scores that help risk stratify patients at the time of acute lung injury (ALI diagnosis. However, few studies have addressed the important question of how changes in pulmonary physiologic variables might predict mortality in patients during the subacute or chronic phases of ALI. We studied pulmonary physiologic variables, including respiratory system compliance, P/F ratio and oxygenation index, in a cohort of patients with ALI who survived more than 6 days of mechanical ventilation to see if changes in these variables were predictive of death and whether they are informative about the pathophysiology of subacute ALI. Methods Ninety-three patients with ALI who were mechanically ventilated for more than 6 days were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. Patients were enrolled at two medical centers in the US, a county hospital and a large academic center. Bivariate analyses were used to identify pulmonary physiologic predictors of death during the first 6 days of mechanical ventilation. Predictors on day 1, day 6 and the changes between day 1 and day 6 were compared in a multivariate logistic regression model. Results The overall mortality was 35%. In multivariate analysis, the PaO2/FiO2 (OR 2.09, p th day of acute lung injury. In addition, a decrease in respiratory system compliance between days 1 and days 6 (OR 2.14, p Conclusions A low respiratory system compliance on day 6 or a decrease in the respiratory system compliance between the 1st and 6th day of mechanical ventilation were associated with increased mortality in multivariate analysis of this cohort of patients with ALI. We suggest that decreased respiratory system compliance may identify a subset of patients who have persistent pulmonary edema, atelectasis or the fibroproliferative sequelae of ALI and thus are less likely to survive their hospitalization.

  1. Ly6G+ neutrophil-derived miR-223 inhibits the NLRP3 inflammasome in mitochondrial DAMP-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zunyong; Qi, Shimei; Zhang, Yue; Qi, Zhilin; Yan, Liang; Zhou, Jing; He, Fang; Li, Qianqian; Yang, Yanyan; Chen, Qun; Xiao, Shi; Li, Qiang; Chen, Yang; Zhang, Yao

    2017-11-16

    MicroRNA (miRNA) mediates RNA interference to regulate a variety of innate immune processes, but how miRNAs coordinate the mechanisms underlying acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) in patients with pulmonary inflammatory injury is still unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that miR-223 limits the number of Ly6G+ neutrophils and inhibits the activity of the NLRP3 inflammasome to alleviate ALI induced by mitochondrial damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) (MTDs). miR-223 expression is increased in the lungs of MTD-induced mice or ARDS patients following trauma/transfusion or following the physiological remission of ALI/ARDS. miR-223-/+ mice exhibited more severe ALI and cytokine dysregulation. Other studies have shown that MTD-induced increases in miR-223 expression are mainly contributed by Ly6G+ neutrophils from the haematopoietic system. miR-223 blocks bone marrow-derived Ly6G+ neutrophil differentiation and inhibits peripheral cytokine release. In addition, MTD-induced miR-223 expression activates a negative feedback pathway that targets the inhibition of NLRP3 expression and IL-1β release; therefore, miR-223 deficiency can lead to the sustained activation of NLRP3-IL-1β. Finally, elimination of peripheral Ly6G+ neutrophils and pharmacological blockade of the miR-223-NLRP3-IL-1β signalling axis could alleviate MTD-induced ALI. In summary, miR-223 is essential for regulating the pathogenesis of DAMP-induced ALI.

  2. Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibition with simvastatin in Acute lung injury to Reduce Pulmonary dysfunction (HARP-2 trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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    McAuley Daniel F

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute lung injury (ALI is a common devastating clinical syndrome characterized by life-threatening respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation and multiple organ failure. There are in vitro, animal studies and pre-clinical data suggesting that statins may be beneficial in ALI. The Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibition with simvastatin in Acute lung injury to Reduce Pulmonary dysfunction (HARP-2 trial is a multicenter, prospective, randomized, allocation concealed, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial which aims to test the hypothesis that treatment with simvastatin will improve clinical outcomes in patients with ALI. Methods/Design Patients fulfilling the American-European Consensus Conference Definition of ALI will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive enteral simvastatin 80 mg or placebo once daily for a maximum of 28 days. Allocation to randomized groups will be stratified with respect to hospital of recruitment and vasopressor requirement. Data will be recorded by participating ICUs until hospital discharge, and surviving patients will be followed up by post at 3, 6 and 12 months post randomization. The primary outcome is number of ventilator-free days to day 28. Secondary outcomes are: change in oxygenation index and sequential organ failure assessment score up to day 28, number of non pulmonary organ failure free days to day 28, critical care unit mortality; hospital mortality; 28 day post randomization mortality and 12 month post randomization mortality; health related quality of life at discharge, 3, 6 and 12 months post randomization; length of critical care unit and hospital stay; health service use up to 12 months post-randomization; and safety. A total of 540 patients will be recruited from approximately 35 ICUs in the UK and Ireland. An economic evaluation will be conducted alongside the trial. Plasma and urine samples will be taken up to day 28 to investigate potential mechanisms

  3. Xanthohumol ameliorates lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced acute lung injury via induction of AMPK/GSK3β-Nrf2 signal axis

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    Hongming Lv

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abundant natural flavonoids can induce nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2 and/or AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation, which play crucial roles in the amelioration of various inflammation- and oxidative stress-induced diseases, including acute lung injury (ALI. Xanthohumol (Xn, a principal prenylflavonoid, possesses anti-inflammation and anti-oxidant activities. However, whether Xn could protect from LPS-induced ALI through inducing AMPK/Nrf2 activation and its downstream signals, are still poorly elucidated. Accordingly, we focused on exploring the protective effect of Xn in the context of ALI and the involvement of underlying molecular mechanisms. Our findings indicated that Xn effectively alleviated lung injury by reduction of lung W/D ratio and protein levels, neutrophil infiltration, MDA and MPO formation, and SOD and GSH depletion. Meanwhile, Xn significantly lessened histopathological changes, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, several cytokines secretion, and iNOS and HMGB1 expression, and inhibited Txnip/NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB signaling pathway activation. Additionally, Xn evidently decreased t-BHP-stimulated cell apoptosis, ROS generation and GSH depletion but increased various anti-oxidative enzymes expression regulated by Keap1-Nrf2/ARE activation, which may be associated with AMPK and GSK3β phosphorylation. However, Xn-mediated inflammatory cytokines and ROS production, histopathological changes, Txnip/NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB signaling pathway in WT mice were remarkably abrogated in Nrf2-/- mice. Our experimental results firstly provided a support that Xn effectively protected LPS-induced ALI against oxidative stress and inflammation damage which are largely dependent upon upregulation of the Nrf2 pathway via activation of AMPK/GSK3β, thereby suppressing LPS-activated Txnip/NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB signaling pathway.

  4. Vascular effects of Endothelin in Experimental lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Björn P.

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury remains a frequent and life threatening consequence of severe sepsis. This thesis has investigated the role of the endothelin (ET) system in sepsis-induced lung injury, with special reference to its effects on two hallmarks of this syndrome - formation of edema and pulmonary hypertension. This was explored in a porcine endotoxin model of sepsis in vivo, as well as in vitro using isolated porcine pulmonary vessels. In paper I we show that endotoxemia vi...

  5. Aerosolized KL4 surfactant improves short-term survival and gas exchange in spontaneously breathing newborn pigs with hydrochloric acid-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampland, Andrea L; Wolfson, Marla R; Mazela, Jan; Henderson, Christopher; Gregory, Timothy J; Meyers, Patricia; Plumm, Brenda; Worwa, Cathy; Mammel, Mark C

    2014-05-01

    Surfactant therapy may be beneficial in acute lung injury (ALI). In spontaneously breathing newborn pigs with ALI supported with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), we evaluated the hypothesis that aerosolized KL4 surfactant (AERO KL4 S) would provide a similar therapeutic effect as intratracheal KL4 surfactant (ETT KL4 S) when compared to controls. We randomized pigs with HCl-induced ALI to: (1) 175 mg/kg KL4 surfactant via endotracheal tube (ETT); (2) AERO KL4 S (22.5 mg/min phospholipid) for 60 min via continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP); or (3) sham procedure on CPAP. We obtained physiologic data and arterial blood gases throughout the 3-hr study. At study end, lungs were excised for analysis of interleukin-8 (IL-8), myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels and histomorphometric data. Pigs treated with ETT KL4 S and AERO KL4 S had improved survival and sustained pO2 compared to controls. The AERO KL4 S group had higher pH compared to controls. Lung IL-8 levels were lower in the AERO KL4 S group compared to controls. Histomorphometric analysis showed less hemorrhage in the ETT and AERO KL4 S groups compared to controls. The AERO KL4 S group had more open lung units per fixed-field than the ETT KL4 S or controls. AERO KL4 S produced similar improvements in survival, physiology, inflammatory markers, and morphology as ETT KL4 S in an ALI model. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Experimental acute lung injury induces multi-organ epigenetic modifications in key angiogenic genes implicated in sepsis-associated endothelial dysfunction.

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    Bomsztyk, Karol; Mar, Daniel; An, Dowon; Sharifian, Roya; Mikula, Michal; Gharib, Sina A; Altemeier, William A; Liles, W Conrad; Denisenko, Oleg

    2015-05-11

    The Tie2/angiopoietin (Tie2/Ang) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-ligand systems (VEGFR/VEGF) are recognized to play important roles in the regulation of microvascular endothelial function. Downregulation of these genes during sepsis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of sepsis-related microvascular leak and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Mechanisms responsible for dysregulation of angiogenic genes in sepsis are poorly defined. Western blot, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and multiplex chromatin immunoprecipitation platform (Matrix ChIP) were used to investigate serum albumin leak, changes in gene expression, and associated epigenetic alterations in a murine model of acute lung injury-induced sepsis (ALI-sepsis). Experimental ALI-sepsis induced microvascular leak and downregulation of expression of Angpt1 (Ang1), Tek (Tie2), and Kdr (Vegfr2 or Flk-1) genes in the lung, kidney, and liver. These changes correlate with a decrease in RNA polymerase II density at these genes, and the greatest response was observed in the lung. ALI-sepsis reduced levels of transcription-permissive histone H3 lysine acetylation (H3KAc) at these loci in all examined tissues. Decreases in permissive H3K4m3 and H3Km2 marks were detected only in the lung. In contrast, only minimal alterations in transcription-repressive histone modifications (H3K27m3, H3K9m2, H3K9m3, and H4K20m3) were observed in all tissues. Our results demonstrate that decreases in transcription-permissive, but not increases in transcription-repressive, histone modifications at Angpt1, Tek, and Kdr are a systemic, rather than a lung-restricted, response, involving key end-organs in experimental ALI-sepsis. Given that ventilator-associated pneumonia is a major cause of sepsis in critically ill patients, elucidation of mechanisms mediating epigenetic alterations during sepsis provides fundamental new insights into the pathogenesis of sepsis-induced microvascular leak and subsequent

  7. Ulinastatin is a novel candidate drug for sepsis and secondary acute lung injury, evidence from an optimized CLP rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Xinchuan; Cao, Hongwei; Wei, Guo; Zhu, Yuanfeng; Fan, Shijun; Zhou, Hong; Zheng, Jiang

    2013-11-01

    Ulinastatin is a potent multivalent serine protease inhibitor, which was recently found with therapeutic potentials in treating sepsis, and the most life-threatening complication of critically ill population. However, the pharmacological features and possible mechanisms need to be further elucidated in reliable and clinical relevant sepsis models. As known, sepsis induced by surgery of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) is widely accepted as the gold standard animal model, but the inconsistency of outcomes is the most obvious problem. In the present experiments, we reported an improved rat CLP model with much more consistent outcomes using self-made three edged puncture needles in our lab. Results from this optimized model revealed that ulinastatin improved survivals of CLP rats, attenuated proinflammatory response and prevented systemic disorder and organ dysfunction. Ulinastatin was also found to be effective in ameliorating sepsis-related ALI, a syndrome most frequent and fatal in sepsis. The molecular mechanism investigation showed that ulinastatin's protection against ALI was probably related to the down-regulation of NF-κB activity and inhibition of TNF-α, IL-6 and elastase expressions in the lung tissue. In conclusion, based on a successful establishment of optimized rat CLP model ulinastatin is proved to be an effective candidate for sepsis treatment, due to its anti-inflammation and anti-protease activities that ameliorate systemic disorders, prevent organ injuries and thus improve the survival outcomes of sepsis in animals. © 2013.

  8. B-lines score on lung ultrasound as a direct measure of respiratory dysfunction in ICU patients with acute kidney injury.

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    Ciumanghel, Adi; Siriopol, Ianis; Blaj, Mihaela; Siriopol, Dimitrie; Gavrilovici, Cristina; Covic, Adrian

    2017-10-30

    Fluid overload is frequently found in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) and is associated with adverse outcomes. Lung ultrasonography (LUS) and bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) are potentially useful tools for the noninvasive volume assessment. We evaluated the utility of these measures, alone or in combination, in estimating the PaO2/FiO2 ratio in critical patients with AKI. In a prospective pilot observational study we included 45 patients who presented on admission or developed at any time during intensive care unit stay AKI defined according to KDIGO criteria. Patients were studied at baseline and after 48 h with LUS, BIS and arterial blood gas. In the univariable analysis, the PaO2/FiO2 ratio was negatively correlated with the B-lines score, and this association was maintained even after adjustments. A cutoff value of 17 for the B-lines score has a sensibility of 76% and a specificity of 65% in identifying patients with PaO2/FiO2 < 300. LUS can be used for functional lung evaluation and identification of patients with increase pulmonary water content and decrease PaO2/FiO2 ratio.

  9. Soluble Factors from Lactobacillus reuteri CRL1098 Have Anti-Inflammatory Effects in Acute Lung Injury Induced by Lipopolysaccharide in Mice

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    Mateos, Melina Valeria; Salva, Susana; Juarez, Guillermo Esteban; de Valdez, Graciela Font; Villena, Julio; Salvador, Gabriela Alejandra; Rodriguez, Ana Virginia

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Lactobacillus reuteri CRL1098 soluble factors were able to reduce TNF-α production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The aims of this study were to determine whether L. reuteri CRL1098 soluble factors were able to modulate in vitro the inflammatory response triggered by LPS in murine macrophages, to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunoregulatory effect, and to evaluate in vivo its capacity to exert anti-inflammatory actions in acute lung injury induced by LPS in mice. In vitro assays demonstrated that L. reuteri CRL1098 soluble factors significantly reduced the production of pro-inflammatory mediators (NO, COX-2, and Hsp70) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, and IL-6) caused by the stimulation of macrophages with LPS. NF-kB and PI3K inhibition by L. reuteri CRL1098 soluble factors contributed to these inhibitory effects. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt pathway and the diminished expression of CD14 could be involved in the immunoregulatory effect. In addition, our in vivo data proved that the LPS-induced secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory cells recruitment to the airways and inflammatory lung tissue damage were reduced in L. reuteri CRL1098 soluble factors treated mice, providing a new way to reduce excessive pulmonary inflammation. PMID:25329163

  10. Regulation of ENaC-mediated alveolar fluid clearance by insulin via PI3K/Akt pathway in LPS-induced acute lung injury

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    Deng Wang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stimulation of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC increases Na+ transport, a driving force of alveolar fluid clearance (AFC to keep alveolar spaces free of edema fluid that is beneficial for acute lung injury (ALI. It is well recognized that regulation of ENaC by insulin via PI3K pathway, but the mechanism of this signaling pathway to regulate AFC and ENaC in ALI remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of insulin on AFC in ALI and clarify the pathway in which insulin regulates the expression of ENaC in vitro and in vivo. Methods A model of ALI (LPS at a dose of 5.0 mg/kg with non-hyperglycemia was established in Sprague-Dawley rats receiving continuous exogenous insulin by micro-osmotic pumps and wortmannin. The lungs were isolated for measurement of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid(BALF, total lung water content(TLW, and AFC after ALI for 8 hours. Alveolar epithelial type II cells were pre-incubated with LY294002, Akt inhibitor and SGK1 inhibitor 30 minutes before insulin treatment for 2 hours. The expressions of α-,β-, and γ-ENaC were detected by immunocytochemistry, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and western blotting. Results In vivo, insulin decreased TLW, enchanced AFC, increased the expressions of α-,β-, and γ-ENaC and the level of phosphorylated Akt, attenuated lung injury and improved the survival rate in LPS-induced ALI, the effects of which were blocked by wortmannin. Amiloride, a sodium channel inhibitor, significantly reduced insulin-induced increase in AFC. In vitro, insulin increased the expressions of α-,β-, and γ-ENaC as well as the level of phosphorylated Akt but LY294002 and Akt inhibitor significantly prevented insulin-induced increase in the expression of ENaC and the level of phosphorylated Akt respectively. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that levels of Nedd4-2 binding to ENaC were decreased by insulin via PI3K/Akt pathway. Conclusions Our study

  11. Decreased respiratory system compliance on the sixth day of mechanical ventilation is a predictor of death in patients with established acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Eric J; McAuley, Daniel F; Eisner, Mark; Miletin, Michael; Zhuo, Hanjing; Matthay, Michael A; Kallet, Richard H

    2011-04-22

    Multiple studies have identified single variables or composite scores that help risk stratify patients at the time of acute lung injury (ALI) diagnosis. However, few studies have addressed the important question of how changes in pulmonary physiologic variables might predict mortality in patients during the subacute or chronic phases of ALI. We studied pulmonary physiologic variables, including respiratory system compliance, P/F ratio and oxygenation index, in a cohort of patients with ALI who survived more than 6 days of mechanical ventilation to see if changes in these variables were predictive of death and whether they are informative about the pathophysiology of subacute ALI. Ninety-three patients with ALI who were mechanically ventilated for more than 6 days were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. Patients were enrolled at two medical centers in the US, a county hospital and a large academic center. Bivariate analyses were used to identify pulmonary physiologic predictors of death during the first 6 days of mechanical ventilation. Predictors on day 1, day 6 and the changes between day 1 and day 6 were compared in a multivariate logistic regression model. The overall mortality was 35%. In multivariate analysis, the PaO2/FiO2 (OR 2.09, p lung injury. In addition, a decrease in respiratory system compliance between days 1 and days 6 (OR 2.14, p ventilation were associated with increased mortality in multivariate analysis of this cohort of patients with ALI. We suggest that decreased respiratory system compliance may identify a subset of patients who have persistent pulmonary edema, atelectasis or the fibroproliferative sequelae of ALI and thus are less likely to survive their hospitalization.

  12. Comparison of a New Miniaturized Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation System With Integrated Rotary Blood Pump to a Standard System in a Porcine Model of Acute Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarczyk, Kevin; Heckmann, Jens; Lyskawa, Kathrin; Strauß, Andreas; Haake, Nils; Wiese, Ingo; Jakob, Heinz; Kamler, Markus; Pizanis, Nikolaus

    2016-07-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is used for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, available ECMO systems are large and not well designed for fast delivery, emergency implantation, and interhospital transfer. Therefore, a new miniaturized oxygenator with integrated rotary blood pump (ILIAS) was developed and compared with a standard ECMO system in a large animal model. Acute lung injury was induced with repeated pulmonary saline lavage in 14 pigs until PaO2 /FiO2 -ratio was plasmatic coagulation was not observed. However, hemolysis was significantly higher in the ILIAS group compared with the conventional ECMO. As the ILIAS prototype provided excellent gas exchange with hemodynamic stability comparable with a standard ECMO system, we believe this study serves as a proof of concept. Further development and design modifications (optimized rotation speed and surface coating of rotor) are already done and another experiment is projected to reduce hemolysis and platelet consumption for clinical application. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Acute hand injuries in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Yoseph A; Awan, Hisham M

    2017-05-01

    Hand and wrist injuries in athletes are common, representing between 3 and 25% of all sports injuries. As many as a quarter of all sports injuries involve the hand or wrist. We review the recent literature regarding acute hand injuries in athletes based on the structures involved - bone, muscle/tendon, ligament, and neurovascular - including diagnosis and pathophysiology of these injuries, focusing on athlete-specific facets of treatment, and when available, opinions on return to play.

  14. Body Temperature Effects on Lung Injury in Ventilated Preterm Lambs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Molly K.; Hillman, Noah H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Polglase, Graeme R.; Jobe, Alan H.; Pillow, J. Jane

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Mechanical ventilation causes lung injury in premature infants. Hypothermia may protect against and hyperthermia may augment lung injury. We tested the effects of hypo- and hyperthermia on ventilation induced acute lung injury in preterm lambs. Methods: Twin sheep fetuses at 128 d GA (term 150 d) were surgically delivered and randomized to unventilated control (UVC), normothermia (38-39 °C) without lung injury (NTNI), or to 1 of 3 injurious ventilation groups: hypothermic (33-34 °C, LT), normothermic (38-39 °C, NT) or hyperthermic (40-41 °C, HT). NT, LT and HT groups had 15 min of injurious ventilation (PEEP 0 cmH2O, VT escalation to 15 mL/kg) following delivery and prior to surfactant. The animals were then gently ventilated (PEEP 5 cmH2O, VT 7.5 mL/kg) for 2 h 45 min. NTNI lambs received surfactant at birth prior to gentle ventilation. The lambs were then euthanized, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue were used to evaluate lung injury, inflammatory cell counts, inflammatory markers and cytokine mRNA. Results: Target temperatures were achieved by 15 min of age and maintained for 3 h. All ventilated groups had increased BAL protein, lung inflammation and increased cytokine mRNA. HT animals developed acidosis, premature death, pneumothoraces, impaired lung function and increased inflammatory mRNA expression. LT animals remained clinically stable without pneumothoraces or death, had improved ventilatory efficiency and trended toward lower inflammatory mRNA expression than NT animals. Conclusion: Hyperthermia exacerbated ventilator induced lung injury, while hypothermia may protect against lung injury in the preterm lamb. PMID:20299144

  15. Lung function after acute bronchiolitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Henry, R L; Milner, A. D.; Stokes, G M; Hodges, I G; Groggins, R C

    1983-01-01

    We performed 211 lung function measurements on 93 children in the first year after they had been admitted with acute bronchiolitis. During the convalescent phase of the illness, 77% of the infants were hyperinflated with a thoracic gas volume greater than 40 ml/kg and 3 months later 43% were hyperinflated. Twelve months after the initial illness, 17% still had lung function abnormalities and most of these children have had lower respiratory tract symptoms. For the group as a whole about 60% h...

  16. Lung Transplantation for Chronic Humidifier Disinfectant-Associated Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Young Kim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the spring of 2011, a cluster of lung injuries caused by humidifier disinfectant (HD usage were reported in Korea. Many patients required mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and even lung transplantation (LTPL. However, the long-term course of HD-associated lung injury remains unclear because the majority of survivors recovered normal lung function. Here we report a 33-year-old woman who underwent LTPL approximately four years after severe HD-associated lung injury. The patient was initially admitted to the intensive care unit and was supported by a high-flow nasal cannula. Although she had been discharged, she was recurrently admitted to our hospital due to progressive lung fibrosis and a persistent decline in lung function. Finally, sequential double LTPL was successfully performed, and the patient’s clinical and radiological findings showed significant improvement. Therefore, we conclude that LTPL can be a therapeutic option for patients with chronic inhalation injury.

  17. Perioperative acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvert Stacey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI is a serious complication in the perioperative period, and is consistently associated with increased rates of mortality and morbidity. Two major consensus definitions have been developed in the last decade that allow for easier comparison of trial evidence. Risk factors have been identified in both cardiac and general surgery and there is an evolving role for novel biomarkers. Despite this, there has been no real change in outcomes and the mainstay of treatment remains preventive with no clear evidence supporting any therapeutic intervention as yet. This review focuses on definition, risk factors, the emerging role of biomarkers and subsequent management of AKI in the perioperative period, taking into account new and emerging strategies.

  18. Acute Liver Injury and Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thawley, Vincent

    2017-05-01

    Acute liver injury and acute liver failure are syndromes characterized by a rapid loss of functional hepatocytes in a patient with no evidence of pre-existing liver disease. A variety of inciting causes have been identified, including toxic, infectious, neoplastic, and drug-induced causes. This article reviews the pathophysiology and clinical approach to the acute liver injury/acute liver failure patient, with a particular emphasis on the diagnostic evaluation and care in the acute setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Lung Morphological Changes in Closed Chest Injury (an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Golubev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study lung morphological changes in a closed chest injury model in laboratory animals. Material and methods. Experiments were carried out in 30 male albino nonbred rats weighing 350—380 g. Closed chest injury was simulated, by exposing the chest of anesthetized rats to a 300-g metal cylinder falling from a height of 30 cm. The observation periods were 1, 3, 6, and 24 hours. Results. The signs of evident perivenular edema that was uncharas-teristic to acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by other causes are an important peculiarity of lung morphological changes in this experimental model of closed chest injury. Conclusion. The experimental studies clarified the pattern of lung morphological changes in the early period after closed chest injury. Key words: closed chest injury, pulmonary edema.

  20. Neonate acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huandan; Zhu, Bingbing; Zhang, Ruifeng

    2017-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is characterized by the abrupt inability of the kidneys to adequately excrete waste products and regulate fluid and electrolyte homeostasis appropriately. This results in an at least partially reversible increase in the blood concentration of creatinine and nitrogenous waste products. Moreover, medication eliminated via renal routes will accumulate that in turn result in a "second hit" to the already injured kidneys. Furthermore, fluid management and nutrition will be hampered by oliguria. Neonatal AKI is a frequent complication in children admitted to an ICU and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Moreover, in newborns the diagnosis of AKI is more difficult since at birth serum creatinine (SCr) predominantly reflects maternal renal function. Furthermore, neonates are especially susceptible to hypovolemic kidney injury due to an inadequate renal auto regulation Thus, accurate assessment of renal function in children is important in numerous clinical situations including screening and/or monitoring of renal disease. The present narrative review article will deal with the latest innovations in diagnostic as well as management options available for AKI in children.

  1. Obesity, Inflammation, and Lung Injury (OILI: The Good

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity becomes pandemic, predisposing these individuals to great risk for lung injury. In this review, we focused on the anti-inflammatories and addressed the following aspects: adipocytokines and obesity, inflammation and other mechanisms, adipocytokines and lung injury in obesity bridged by inflammation, and potential therapeutic targets. To sum up, the majority of evidence supported that adiponectin, omentin, and secreted frizzled-related protein 5 (SFRP5 were reduced significantly in obesity, which is associated with increased inflammation, indicated by increase of TNFα and IL-6, through activation of toll-like receptor (TLR4 and nuclear factor light chain κB (NF-κB signaling pathways. Administration of these adipocytokines promotes weight loss and reduces inflammation. Zinc-α2-glycoprotein (ZAG, vaspin, IL-10, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β1, and growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15 are also regarded as anti-inflammatories. There were controversial reports. Furthermore, there is a huge lack of studies for obesity related lung injury. The effects of adiponectin on lung transplantation, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD, and pneumonia were anti-inflammatory and protective in lung injury. Administration of IL-10 agonist reduces mortality of acute lung injury in rabbits with acute necrotizing pancreatitis, possibly through inhibiting proinflammation and strengthening host immunity. Very limited information is available for other adipocytokines.

  2. Obesity, inflammation, and lung injury (OILI): the good.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Obesity becomes pandemic, predisposing these individuals to great risk for lung injury. In this review, we focused on the anti-inflammatories and addressed the following aspects: adipocytokines and obesity, inflammation and other mechanisms, adipocytokines and lung injury in obesity bridged by inflammation, and potential therapeutic targets. To sum up, the majority of evidence supported that adiponectin, omentin, and secreted frizzled-related protein 5 (SFRP5) were reduced significantly in obesity, which is associated with increased inflammation, indicated by increase of TNF α and IL-6, through activation of toll-like receptor (TLR4) and nuclear factor light chain κ B (NF- κ B) signaling pathways. Administration of these adipocytokines promotes weight loss and reduces inflammation. Zinc-α 2-glycoprotein (ZAG), vaspin, IL-10, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β1), and growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) are also regarded as anti-inflammatories. There were controversial reports. Furthermore, there is a huge lack of studies for obesity related lung injury. The effects of adiponectin on lung transplantation, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD), and pneumonia were anti-inflammatory and protective in lung injury. Administration of IL-10 agonist reduces mortality of acute lung injury in rabbits with acute necrotizing pancreatitis, possibly through inhibiting proinflammation and strengthening host immunity. Very limited information is available for other adipocytokines.

  3. Sulforaphane exerts anti-inflammatory effects against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice through the Nrf2/ARE pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Tianjie; Xu, Fei; Yan, Xixin; Li, Shuai; Li, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Sulforaphane (1-isothiocyanate-4-methyl sulfonyl butane) is a plant extract (obtained from cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli and cabbage) and is known to exert anticancer, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. It stimulates the generation of human or animal cells, which is beneficial to the body. The aim of the current study was to determine whether sulforaphane protects against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‑induced acute lung injury (ALI) through its anti-inflammatory effects, and to investigate the signaling pathways involved. For this purpose, male BALB/c mice were treated with sulforaphane (50 mg/kg) and 3 days later, ALI was induced by the administration of LPS (5 mg/kg) and we thus established the model of ALI. Our results revealed that sulforaphane significantly decreased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity (as shown by LDH assay), the wet-to-dry ratio of the lungs and the serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) (measured by ELISA), as well as nuclear factor-κB protein expression in mice with LPS-induced ALI. Moreover, treatment with sulforaphane significantly inhibited prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) protein expression (as shown by western blot analysis), as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity in mice with LPS-induced ALI. Lastly, we noted that pre-treatment with sulforaphane activated the nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway in the mice with LPS-induced ALI. These findings demonstrate that sulforaphane exerts protective effects against LPS-induced ALI through the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Thus, sulforaphane may be a potential a candidate for use in the treatment of ALI.

  4. Chest physiotherapy on the respiratory mechanics and elimination of sputum in paralyzed and mechanically ventilated patients with acute lung injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Minhee; Heitkemper, Margaret; Smi, Choi-Kwon

    2011-03-01

    Chest physiotherapy (CPT) is commonly used for mechanically ventilated patients, but little is known about its physiological effects, particularly in patients with acute lung injury (ALI). The aim of the study was to determine the benefits and risks of delivering multimodal respiratory physiotherapy to mechanically ventilated patients with ALI receiving paralytic agents. A repeated measure-experimental design using a counterbalancing method was employed. Fifteen patients received CPT (vibration, percussion, or palm-cup percussion) in addition to the routine CPT in a randomized order. Another 15 patients, contraindicated for the percussion technique, received routine CPT including manual hyperinflation and position change, and were observed as a comparative group. The effects of CPT were evaluated by measuring the volume of aspirated secretions and the dynamic lung compliance (Cd) over time. For the adverse effects, peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) was recorded. Cd and SpO2 were recorded at the baseline period, immediately after the physiotherapy treatment, and at 10, 20, 30 and 60 minutes posttreatment. The volume of collected secretions did not differ significantly when compared between the groups (p = .838). Cd increased significantly over time in the manual percussion (p = .042) and palm-cup percussion (p = .046) group, where Cd in the latter remained elevated twice longer than in the former. None of the CPT techniques exerted major detrimental effects on SpO2. We found that the palm-cup percussion technique was the most effective in increasing Cd without any accompanying detrimental effects on SpO2. However, additional CPT did not affect the volume of aspirated secretions. Copyright © 2011 Korean Society of Nursing Science. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Propofol Potentiates Sevoflurane-Induced Inhibition of Nuclear Factor--κB-Mediated Inflammatory Responses and Regulation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Pathways via Toll-like Receptor 4 Signaling in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zhu, Honghua; Fang, Hao

    2017-11-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-induced initiation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling cascade is reportedly involved in inflammatory responses during lung injury. Studies have found that volatile anesthetics, such as isoflurane and sevoflurane, inhibit inflammation. This investigation explored the protective effects of propofol and whether propofol potentiates the protective effects of sevoflurane against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. Male BALB/c mice were treated with LPS (10μg/mouse; intranasal instillation) to induce acute lung injury. Mice were exposed to sevoflurane (3%; 6 hours) alone or combined with propofol (10 or 20mg/kg body weight; subcutaneously) followed by sevoflurane for 1 hour before the LPS challenge. Sevoflurane with or without propofol attenuated pulmonary edema, restored altered lung architecture and reduced influx of inflammatory cells into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after the LPS challenge. LPS-mediated overproduction of the proinflammatory cytok