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Sample records for activity potential clinical

  1. Potentiating antibiotics in drug-resistant clinical isolates via stimuli-activated superoxide generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Colleen M; Goodman, Samuel M; Nagy, Toni A; Levy, Max; Bhusal, Pallavi; Madinger, Nancy E; Detweiler, Corrella S; Nagpal, Prashant; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2017-10-01

    The rise of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria is a growing concern to global health and is exacerbated by the lack of new antibiotics. To treat already pervasive MDR infections, new classes of antibiotics or antibiotic adjuvants are needed. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to play a role during antibacterial action; however, it is not yet understood whether ROS contribute directly to or are an outcome of bacterial lethality caused by antibiotics. We show that a light-activated nanoparticle, designed to produce tunable flux of specific ROS, superoxide, potentiates the activity of antibiotics in clinical MDR isolates of Escherichia coli , Salmonella enterica , and Klebsiella pneumoniae . Despite the high degree of antibiotic resistance in these isolates, we observed a synergistic interaction between both bactericidal and bacteriostatic antibiotics with varied mechanisms of action and our superoxide-producing nanoparticles in more than 75% of combinations. As a result of this potentiation, the effective antibiotic concentration of the clinical isolates was reduced up to 1000-fold below their respective sensitive/resistant breakpoint. Further, superoxide-generating nanoparticles in combination with ciprofloxacin reduced bacterial load in epithelial cells infected with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and increased Caenorhabditis elegans survival upon infection with S. enterica serovar Enteriditis, compared to antibiotic alone. This demonstration highlights the ability to engineer superoxide generation to potentiate antibiotic activity and combat highly drug-resistant bacterial pathogens.

  2. BADERI: an online database to coordinate handsearching activities of controlled clinical trials for their potential inclusion in systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Hernandez, Hector; Urrútia, Gerard; Barajas-Nava, Leticia A; Buitrago-Garcia, Diana; Garzón, Julieth Vanessa; Martínez-Zapata, María José; Bonfill, Xavier

    2017-06-13

    Systematic reviews provide the best evidence on the effect of health care interventions. They rely on comprehensive access to the available scientific literature. Electronic search strategies alone may not suffice, requiring the implementation of a handsearching approach. We have developed a database to provide an Internet-based platform from which handsearching activities can be coordinated, including a procedure to streamline the submission of these references into CENTRAL, the Cochrane Collaboration Central Register of Controlled Trials. We developed a database and a descriptive analysis. Through brainstorming and discussion among stakeholders involved in handsearching projects, we designed a database that met identified needs that had to be addressed in order to ensure the viability of handsearching activities. Three handsearching teams pilot tested the proposed database. Once the final version of the database was approved, we proceeded to train the staff involved in handsearching. The proposed database is called BADERI (Database of Iberoamerican Clinical Trials and Journals, by its initials in Spanish). BADERI was officially launched in October 2015, and it can be accessed at www.baderi.com/login.php free of cost. BADERI has an administration subsection, from which the roles of users are managed; a references subsection, where information associated to identified controlled clinical trials (CCTs) can be entered; a reports subsection, from which reports can be generated to track and analyse the results of handsearching activities; and a built-in free text search engine. BADERI allows all references to be exported in ProCite files that can be directly uploaded into CENTRAL. To date, 6284 references to CCTs have been uploaded to BADERI and sent to CENTRAL. The identified CCTs were published in a total of 420 journals related to 46 medical specialties. The year of publication ranged between 1957 and 2016. BADERI allows the efficient management of handsearching

  3. Resveratrol exhibits a strong cytotoxic activity in cultured cells and has an antiviral action against polyomavirus: potential clinical use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galati Gaspare

    2009-07-01

    cytotoxic and inhibits, in a dose dependent fashion, the synthesis of polyomavirus DNA in the infected cell. Furthermore, this inhibition is observed at non cytotoxic concentrations of the drug. Our data imply that cyto-toxicity may be attributed to the membrane damage caused by the drug and that the transfer of polyomavirus from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytoplasm may be hindered. In conclusion, the cytotoxic and antiviral properties of resveratrol make it a potential candidate for the clinical control of proliferative as well as viral pathologies.

  4. Acetyl aspartic acid, a novel active ingredient, demonstrates potential to improve signs of skin ageing: from consumer need to clinical proof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavon, A

    2015-10-01

    The megatrend of population ageing is leading to a growing demand for "anti-ageing" treatments, especially to prevent or treat skin ageing. Facing an increasing offer, consumers are choosing more and more skin care products supported by a scientific rationale, active ingredients and clinical proof of efficacy. Considering consumer expectations, this research led to the discovery of acetyl aspartic acid (A-A-A), a novel active ingredient to improve sagging skin and loss of skin firmness. This supplement is featuring seven manuscripts aiming at presenting the research and investigations from consumer insights, discovery of A-A-A, its in vitro activity confirmation, safety assessment, formulation and its dermal absorption to the clinical proof of efficacy, investigated through two pilots' double bind randomized and placebo controlled studies on photo-aged skin. This extensive research enabled us to discover A-A-A, as an active ingredient with potential to repair sign of skin ageing and supported by clinical proof of efficacy. This active ingredient will be soon launched in a commercial innovative skin care range, delivering desirable anti-wrinkle and skin lifting benefits. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  5. Growing insights into the potential benefits and risks of activated protein C administration in sepsis: a review of preclinical and clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laith Altaweel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Laith Altaweel, Daniel Sweeney, Xizhong Cui, Amisha Barochia, Charles Natanson, Peter Q EichackerCritical Care Medicine Department, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC was developed to reduce excessive coagulant and inflammatory activity during sepsis. Basic and clinical research has suggested these pathways contribute to the pathogenesis of this lethal syndrome and are inhibited by rhAPC. Based in large part on the results of a single multicenter randomized controlled trial, rhAPC was first approved in 2001 by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA as adjunctive therapy in septic patients with a high risk of death. This was followed closely by approval in Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. At the original FDA review of rhAPC, concerns were raised as to whether a confirmatory trial should be done before final regulatory approval because of concerns that rhAPCs bleeding risk might outweigh its potential benefit during clinical use. Since 2001, continuing basic and clinical research has further elucidated the complex role activated protein C may have in both adaptive and maladaptive responses during sepsis. Moreover, subsequent controlled trials in other types of septic patients and observational studies appear to support earlier concerns that the benefit-to-risk ratio of rhAPC may not support its clinical use. This experience has prompted additional trials presently underway, to define whether treatment with rhAPC as it was originally indicated in septic patients with persistent shock, is safe and effective. Until such trials are complete, physicians employing this agent must carefully consider which patients may be appropriate candidates for rhAPC administration.Keywords: rhAPC, treatment, sepsis

  6. Hyperosmolarity response of ocular standing potential as a clinical test for retinal pigment epithelium activity. Chorioretinal dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonemura, D; Kawasaki, K; Madachi-Yamamoto, S

    1984-05-30

    The hyperosmolarity response of the standing potential was recorded in retinitis pigmentosa (20 eyes), central (pericentral) retinitis pigmentosa (4 eyes), pigmented paravenous retinochoroidal atrophy (2 eyes), fundus albipunctatus (8 eyes), and Stargardt's disease (or fundus flavimaculatus) (14 eyes). The light peak/dark trough ratio (the L/D ratio) and the Diamox response were also determined. The hyperosmolarity response was greatly suppressed (less than M-4SD; M and SD indicate respectively the mean and the standard deviation in normal control subjects) in all examined eyes with retinitis pigmentosa (20 eyes) including retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento (8 eyes), central (pericentral) retinitis pigmentosa (4 eyes), and pigmented paravenous retinochoroidal atrophy (2 eyes). The L/D ratio was larger than 1.26 (M-2.5 SD) in the half of the eyes with the above-described diseases. The hyperosmolarity response was abnormal (less than M-2 SD) in 4 of 8 eyes with fundus albipunctatus. The L/D ratio was normal in all 8 eyes. The hyperosmolarity response was abnormal (less than M-2 SD) in all 14 eyes with Stargardt's disease or fundus flavimaculatus. The L/D ratio was abnormal in 5 of these 14 eyes. The hyperosmolarity response was more frequently abnormal than the L/D ratio in the chorioretinal dystrophies mentioned above, and hence is useful particularly for early diagnosis of these disorders.

  7. Comparative analysis of novel and conventional Hsp90 inhibitors on HIF activity and angiogenic potential in clear cell renal cell carcinoma: implications for clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohonowych, Jessica ES; Peng, Shuping; Gopal, Udhayakumar; Hance, Michael W; Wing, Shane B; Argraves, Kelley M; Lundgren, Karen; Isaacs, Jennifer S

    2011-01-01

    Perturbing Hsp90 chaperone function targets hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) function in a von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) independent manner, and represents an approach to combat the contribution of HIF to cell renal carcinoma (CCRCC) progression. However, clinical trials with the prototypic Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG have been unsuccessful in halting the progression of advanced CCRCC. Here we evaluated a novel next generation small molecule Hsp90 inhibitor, EC154, against HIF isoforms and HIF-driven molecular and functional endpoints. The effects of EC154 were compared to those of the prototypic Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG and the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor LBH589. The findings indicate that EC154 is a potent inhibitor of HIF, effective at doses 10-fold lower than 17-AAG. While EC154, 17-AAG and the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor LBH589 impaired HIF transcriptional activity, CCRCC cell motility, and angiogenesis; these effects did not correlate with their ability to diminish HIF protein expression. Further, our results illustrate the complexity of HIF targeting, in that although these agents suppressed HIF transcripts with differential dynamics, these effects were not predictive of drug efficacy in other relevant assays. We provide evidence for EC154 targeting of HIF in CCRCC and for LBH589 acting as a suppressor of both HIF-1 and HIF-2 activity. We also demonstrate that 17-AAG and EC154, but not LBH589, can restore endothelial barrier function, highlighting a potentially new clinical application for Hsp90 inhibitors. Finally, given the discordance between HIF activity and protein expression, we conclude that HIF expression is not a reliable surrogate for HIF activity. Taken together, our findings emphasize the need to incorporate an integrated approach in evaluating Hsp90 inhibitors within the context of HIF suppression

  8. Comparative analysis of novel and conventional Hsp90 inhibitors on HIF activity and angiogenic potential in clear cell renal cell carcinoma: implications for clinical evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohonowych Jessica ES

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perturbing Hsp90 chaperone function targets hypoxia inducible factor (HIF function in a von Hippel-Lindau (VHL independent manner, and represents an approach to combat the contribution of HIF to cell renal carcinoma (CCRCC progression. However, clinical trials with the prototypic Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG have been unsuccessful in halting the progression of advanced CCRCC. Methods Here we evaluated a novel next generation small molecule Hsp90 inhibitor, EC154, against HIF isoforms and HIF-driven molecular and functional endpoints. The effects of EC154 were compared to those of the prototypic Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG and the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor LBH589. Results The findings indicate that EC154 is a potent inhibitor of HIF, effective at doses 10-fold lower than 17-AAG. While EC154, 17-AAG and the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor LBH589 impaired HIF transcriptional activity, CCRCC cell motility, and angiogenesis; these effects did not correlate with their ability to diminish HIF protein expression. Further, our results illustrate the complexity of HIF targeting, in that although these agents suppressed HIF transcripts with differential dynamics, these effects were not predictive of drug efficacy in other relevant assays. Conclusions We provide evidence for EC154 targeting of HIF in CCRCC and for LBH589 acting as a suppressor of both HIF-1 and HIF-2 activity. We also demonstrate that 17-AAG and EC154, but not LBH589, can restore endothelial barrier function, highlighting a potentially new clinical application for Hsp90 inhibitors. Finally, given the discordance between HIF activity and protein expression, we conclude that HIF expression is not a reliable surrogate for HIF activity. Taken together, our findings emphasize the need to incorporate an integrated approach in evaluating Hsp90 inhibitors within the context of HIF suppression.

  9. Zolpidem, a clinical hypnotic that affects electronic transfer, alters synaptic activity through potential GABA receptors in the nervous system without significant free radical generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2009-01-01

    Zolpidem (trade name Ambien) has attracted much interest as a sleep-inducing agent and also in research. Attention has been centered mainly on receptor binding and electrochemistry in the central nervous system which are briefly addressed herein. A novel integrated approach to mode of action is presented. The pathways to be discussed involve basicity, reduction potential, electrostatics, cell signaling, GABA receptor binding, electron transfer (ET), pharmacodynamics, structure activity relationships (SAR) and side effects. The highly conjugated pyridinium salt formed by protonation of the amidine moiety is proposed to be the active form acting as an ET agent. Extrapolation of reduction potentials for related compounds supports the premise that zolpidem may act as an ET species in vivo. From recent literature reports, electrostatics is believed to play a significant role in drug action. The pyridinium cation displays molecular electrostatic potential which may well play a role energetically or as a bridging mechanism. An SAR analysis points to analogy with other physiologically active xenobiotics, namely benzodiazepines and paraquat in the conjugated iminium category. Inactivity of metabolites indicates that the parent is the active form of zolpidem. Absence of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress is in line with minor side effects. In contrast, generally, the prior literature contains essentially no discussion of these fundamental biochemical relationships. Pharmacodynamics may play an important role. Concerning behavior at the blood-brain barrier, useful insight can be gained from investigations of the related cationic anesthetics that are structurally related to acetyl choline. Evidently, the neutral form of the drug penetrates the neuronal membrane, with the salt form operating at the receptor. The pathways of zolpidem have several clinical implications since the agent affects sedation, electroencephalographic activity, oxidative metabolites and

  10. Potential benefits and risks of clinical xenotransplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper DKC

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available David KC Cooper,1 David Ayares21Thomas E Starzl Transplantation Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Revivicor, Blacksburg, VA, USAAbstract: The transplantation of organs and cells from pigs into humans could overcome the critical and continuing problem of the lack of availability of deceased human organs and cells for clinical transplantation. Developments in the genetic engineering of pigs have enabled considerable progress to be made in the experimental laboratory in overcoming the immune barriers to successful xenotransplantation. With regard to pig organ xenotransplantation, antibody- and cell-mediated rejection have largely been overcome, and the current major barrier is the development of coagulation dysregulation. This is believed to be due to a combination of immune activation of the vascular endothelial cells of the graft and molecular incompatibilities between the pig and primate coagulation–anticoagulation systems. Pigs with new genetic modifications specifically directed to this problem are now becoming available. With regard to less complex tissues, such as islets (for the treatment of diabetes, neuronal cells (for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and corneas, the remaining barriers are less problematic, and graft survival in nonhuman primate models extends for >1 year in all three cases. In planning the initial clinical trials, consideration will be concentrated on the risk–benefit ratio, based to a large extent on the results of preclinical studies in nonhuman primates. If the benefit to the patient is anticipated to be high, eg, insulin-independent control of glycemia, and the potential risks low, eg, minimal risk of transfer of a porcine infectious agent, then a clinical trial would be justified.Keywords: infection, pigs, genetically-engineered, xenotransplantation, islets, xenotransplantation, organs

  11. Toxicology and clinical potential of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirimer, Lara; Thanh, Nguyen T.K.; Loizidou, Marilena; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary In recent years, nanoparticles (NPs) have increasingly found practical applications in technology, research and medicine. The small particle size coupled to their unique chemical and physical properties is thought to underlie their exploitable biomedical activities. Here, we review current toxicity studies of NPs with clinical potential. Mechanisms of cytotoxicity are discussed and the problem of extrapolating knowledge gained from cell-based studies into a human scenario is highlighted. The so-called ‘proof-of-principle’ approach, whereby ultra-high NP concentrations are used to ensure cytotoxicity, is evaluated on the basis of two considerations; firstly, from a scientific perspective, the concentrations used are in no way related to the actual doses required which, in many instances, discourages further vital investigations. Secondly, these inaccurate results cast doubt on the science of nanomedicine and thus, quite dangerously, encourage unnecessary alarm in the public. In this context, the discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo results are described along with the need for a unifying protocol for reliable and realistic toxicity reports. PMID:23293661

  12. Zolpidem, A Clinical Hypnotic that Affects Electronic Transfer, Alters Synaptic Activity Through Potential Gaba Receptors in the Nervous System Without Significant Free Radical Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kovacic

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Zolpidem (trade name Ambien has attracted much interest as a sleep-inducing agent and also in research. Attention has been centered mainly on receptor binding and electrochemistry in the central nervous system which are briefly addressed herein. A novel integrated approach to mode of action is presented. The pathways to be discussed involve basicity, reduction potential, electrostatics, cell signaling, GABA receptor binding, electron transfer (ET, pharmacodynamics, structure activity relationships (SAR and side effects. The highly conjugated pyridinium salt formed by protonation of the amidine moiety is proposed to be the active form acting as an ET agent. Extrapolation of reduction potentials for related compounds supports the premise that zolpidem may act as an ET species in vivo. From recent literature reports, electrostatics is believed to play a significant role in drug action.

  13. Zolpidem, a clinical hypnotic that affects electronic transfer, alters synaptic activity through potential GABA receptors in the nervous system without significant free radical generation

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2009-01-01

    Zolpidem (trade name Ambien) has attracted much interest as a sleep-inducing agent and also in research. Attention has been centered mainly on receptor binding and electrochemistry in the central nervous system which are briefly addressed herein. A novel integrated approach to mode of action is presented. The pathways to be discussed involve basicity, reduction potential, electrostatics, cell signaling, GABA receptor binding, electron transfer (ET), pharmacodynamics, structure activity relati...

  14. Integrative Potential of Architectural Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydova, O. V.

    2017-11-01

    The architectural activity integrative potential is considered through the combination as well as the organization of necessary universal human and professional, artificial and natural, social and individual architectural activities in the multidimensional unity of its components reflecting and influencing the public thinking with the artistic-figurative language of international communication using experimental form-building, interactive presentations, theatrical and gaming expressiveness to organize an easier contact with the consumer, methods of design and advertising. The methodology is used to reflect the mutual influence of personal and social problems through globalization and identification of their problem in the public, to study the existing methods of the problem solving, to analyze their effectiveness, to search for actual problems and new solutions to them using the latest achievements of technological progress, artistic patterns, creation of a holistic architectural image reflecting the author’s worldview in the general picture of the modern world with its inherent tendencies “Surah” and “entertainment”. The operative communication means in the chain of social experience are developed - the teacher - the trainee - the new educational result used to transmit the updated information in a generalized form, the current and final control through the use of feedback sheets, supporting summaries, info cards, its decisions. The paper considers the study time efficiency due to the organization of the research activity which allows students to obtain a theoretical generalized information (the creator’s limitation) in the process of filling or compiling informative and diagnostic maps that provide the theoretical framework for the creative activity through gaming activity that turns into a work activity which has a diagnosed result.

  15. [Research activity in clinical biochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, H.L.; Larsen, B.; Ingwersen, P.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical Biochemistry, 57 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Each of these 57 was matched according to medical title with two randomly chosen specialists from other specialities, totaling 114. Using Medline and the Web of Science, the number of publications and the number of citations were then ascertained......BACKGROUND: Quantitative bibliometric measurements of research activity are frequently used, e.g. for evaluating applicants for academic positions. The purpose of this investigation is to assess research activity within the medical speciality of Clinical Biochemistry by comparing it with a matched....... RESULTS: 25% of the 11,691 specialists held a PhD degree or doctoral degree, DMSci, (Clinical Biochemistry: 61%). The 171 specialists included in the study had 9,823 papers in Medline and 10,140 papers in the Web of Science. The number of Medline papers per specialist was 71 for Clinical Biochemistry...

  16. [Research activity in clinical biochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, H.L.; Larsen, B.; Ingwersen, P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantitative bibliometric measurements of research activity are frequently used, e.g. for evaluating applicants for academic positions. The purpose of this investigation is to assess research activity within the medical speciality of Clinical Biochemistry by comparing it with a matched...... Clinical Biochemistry, 57 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Each of these 57 was matched according to medical title with two randomly chosen specialists from other specialities, totaling 114. Using Medline and the Web of Science, the number of publications and the number of citations were then ascertained....... RESULTS: 25% of the 11,691 specialists held a PhD degree or doctoral degree, DMSci, (Clinical Biochemistry: 61%). The 171 specialists included in the study had 9,823 papers in Medline and 10,140 papers in the Web of Science. The number of Medline papers per specialist was 71 for Clinical Biochemistry...

  17. Activating clinical trials: a process improvement approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Diego A; Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Yalcin, Ali; Zayas-Castro, José L; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2016-02-24

    The administrative process associated with clinical trial activation has been criticized as costly, complex, and time-consuming. Prior research has concentrated on identifying administrative barriers and proposing various solutions to reduce activation time, and consequently associated costs. Here, we expand on previous research by incorporating social network analysis and discrete-event simulation to support process improvement decision-making. We searched for all operational data associated with the administrative process of activating industry-sponsored clinical trials at the Office of Clinical Research of the University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida. We limited the search to those trials initiated and activated between July 2011 and June 2012. We described the process using value stream mapping, studied the interactions of the various process participants using social network analysis, and modeled potential process modifications using discrete-event simulation. The administrative process comprised 5 sub-processes, 30 activities, 11 decision points, 5 loops, and 8 participants. The mean activation time was 76.6 days. Rate-limiting sub-processes were those of contract and budget development. Key participants during contract and budget development were the Office of Clinical Research, sponsors, and the principal investigator. Simulation results indicate that slight increments on the number of trials, arriving to the Office of Clinical Research, would increase activation time by 11 %. Also, incrementing the efficiency of contract and budget development would reduce the activation time by 28 %. Finally, better synchronization between contract and budget development would reduce time spent on batching documentation; however, no improvements would be attained in total activation time. The presented process improvement analytic framework not only identifies administrative barriers, but also helps to devise and evaluate potential improvement scenarios. The strength

  18. Phase Ib Study of Lumretuzumab Plus Cetuximab or Erlotinib in Solid Tumor Patients and Evaluation of HER3 and Heregulin as Potential Biomarkers of Clinical Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meulendijks, Didier; Jacob, Wolfgang; Voest, Emile E

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the safety, clinical activity, and target-associated biomarkers of lumretuzumab, a humanized, glycoengineered, anti-HER3 monoclonal antibody (mAb), in combination with the EGFR-blocking agents erlotinib or cetuximab in patients with advanced HER3-positive carcinomas.......Experimental Design: The study included two parts: dose escalation and dose extension phases with lumretuzumab in combination with either cetuximab or erlotinib, respectively. In both parts, patients received lumretuzumab doses from 400 to 2,000 mg plus cetuximab or erlotinib according to standard posology......) in the cetuximab part and two DLTs in the erlotinib part were reported. The most frequent adverse events were gastrointestinal and skin toxicities, which were manageable. The objective response rate (ORR) was 6.1% in the cetuximab part and 4.2% in the erlotinib part. In the sqNSCLC extension cohort...

  19. Modulation of the activity of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors as a novel treatment option for depression: current clinical evidence and therapeutic potential of rapastinel (GLYX-13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilescu AN

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Andrei-Nicolae Vasilescu,1,* Nina Schweinfurth,2,* Stefan Borgwardt,2,* Peter Gass,1 Undine E Lang,2,* Dragos Inta,1,2,* Sarah Eckart2,* 1Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany; 2Department of Psychiatry (Universitäre Psychiatrische Kliniken, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Classical monoaminergic antidepressants show several disadvantages, such as protracted onset of therapeutic action. Conversely, the fast and sustained antidepressant effect of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR antagonist ketamine raises vast interest in understanding the role of the glutamate system in mood disorders. Indeed, numerous data support the existence of glutamatergic dysfunction in major depressive disorder (MDD. Drawback to this short-latency therapy is its side effect profile, especially the psychotomimetic action, which seriously hampers the common and widespread clinical use of ketamine. Therefore, there is a substantial need for alternative glutamatergic antidepressants with milder side effects. In this article, we review evidence that implicates NMDARs in the prospective treatment of MDD with focus on rapastinel (formerly known as GLYX-13, a novel synthetic NMDAR modulator with fast antidepressant effect, which acts by enhancing NMDAR function as opposed to blocking it. We summarize and discuss current clinical and animal studies regarding the therapeutic potential of rapastinel not only in MDD but also in other psychiatric disorders, such as obsessive–compulsive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. Additionally, we discuss current data concerning the molecular mechanisms underlying the antidepressant effect of rapastinel, highlighting common aspects as well as differences to ketamine. In 2016, rapastinel received the Breakthrough Therapy designation for the treatment

  20. Defibrotide, a polydisperse mixture of single-stranded phosphodiester oligonucleotides with lifesaving activity in severe hepatic veno-occlusive disease: clinical outcomes and potential mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornblum, Noah; Ayyanar, Kanyalakshmi; Benimetskaya, Luba; Richardson, Paul; Iacobelli, Massimo; Stein, C A

    2006-01-01

    Veno-occlusive disease of the liver (VOD) remains a troubling and potentially fatal complication of high-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation conditioning regimens. No effective therapy has been available for these patients to date, and the best supportive care measures remain woefully inadequate. Defibrotide (DF) (Gentium, S.p.A., Como, Italy), a polydisperse mixture of all the single-stranded phosphodiester oligodeoxyribonucleotides that can be obtained from the controlled depolymerization of porcine intestinal mucosal genomic DNA, seems to offer a safe and effective treatment for some patients suffering from severe VOD, a condition for which no accepted standard therapy currently exists. Early clinical studies evaluating the efficacy of DF for the treatment of severe VOD in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have been very encouraging. Approximately 45% of the patients treated in multiple initial phase II clinical trials achieved a complete response at day +100, demonstrating normalization of serum bilirubin and resolution of the clinical syndrome. However, although multi-institutional, these represented single arm studies. A large, FDA-approved, pivotal, prospective, multi-institutional, global phase III trial of DF vs. historical controls (best available therapy) commenced in the first quarter of 2006 and should provide further validation of DF's efficacy. The drug seems to have few significant side effects, and almost all test subjects who have received this treatment have tolerated it well. Although the mechanism of action remains unclear, the drug exerts minimal systemic anticoagulant effects yet appears to induce numerous antithrombotic and profibrinolytic effects both in vitro and in vivo. It may function as an adenosine receptor agonist and causes increased concentrations of endogenous prostaglandins, which modulate thrombomodulin, platelets, and fibrinolysis. It also appears to block lipopolysaccharide

  1. [Research activity in clinical biochemistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Henrik L; Larsen, Birger; Ingwersen, Peter; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2008-09-01

    Quantitative bibliometric measurements of research activity are frequently used, e.g. for evaluating applicants for academic positions. The purpose of this investigation is to assess research activity within the medical speciality of Clinical Biochemistry by comparing it with a matched control group from other medical specialities in Denmark. A list of all physicians registered in Denmark (23,127 persons) was drawn from the database "Laeger.dk". Of these, 5,202 were generalists (not included) while 11,691 were from other specialities. Of the 126 specialists from Clinical Biochemistry, 57 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Each of these 57 was matched according to medical title with two randomly chosen specialists from other specialities, totaling 114. Using Medline and the Web of Science, the number of publications and the number of citations were then ascertained. 25% of the 11,691 specialists held a PhD degree or doctoral degree, DMSci, (Clinical Biochemistry: 61%). The 171 specialists included in the study had 9,823 papers in Medline and 10,140 papers in the Web of Science. The number of Medline papers per specialist was 71 for Clinical Biochemistry compared to 51 for the control group. The number of citations per specialist was 1,844 for Clinical Biochemistry compared to 816 for the control group. The top ten H-indices (of which 8 were in Clinical Biochemistry) ranged from 30 to 69. Both the number of papers and the number of citations were higher for Clinical Biochemistry than for the control group. The difference was most pronounced among professors.

  2. Synergistic mutual potentiation of antifungal activity of Zuccagnia punctata Cav. and Larrea nitida Cav. extracts in clinical isolates of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butassi, Estefanía; Svetaz, Laura A; Ivancovich, Juan J; Feresin, Gabriela E; Tapia, Alejandro; Zacchino, Susana A

    2015-06-01

    Zuccagnia punctata Cav. (Fabaceae) and Larrea nitida Cav. (Zygophyllaceae) are indistinctly or jointly used in traditional medicine for the treatment of fungal-related infections. Although their dichloromethane (DCM) extract have demonstrated moderate antifungal activities when tested on their own, antifungal properties of combinations of both plants have not been assessed previously. The aim of this study was to establish with statistical rigor whether Z. punctata (ZpE) and L. nitida DCM extract (LnE) interact synergistically against the clinically important fungi Candida albicans and Candida glabrata and to characterize the most synergistic combinations. For synergism assessment, the statistical-based Boik's design was applied. Eight ZpE-LnE fixed-ratio mixtures were prepared from four different months of 1 year and tested against Candida strains. Lϕ (Loewe index) of each mixture at different fractions affected (ϕ) allowed for the finding of the most synergistic combinations, which were characterized by HPLC fingerprint and by the quantitation of the selected marker compounds. Lϕ and confidence intervals were determined in vitro with the MixLow method, once the estimated parameters from the dose-response curves of independent extracts and mixtures, were obtained. Markers (four flavonoids for ZpE and three lignans for LnE) were quantified in each extract and their combinations, with a valid HPLC-UV method. The 3D-HPLC profiles of the most synergistic mixtures were obtained by HPLC-DAD. Three over four IC50ZpE/IC50LnE fixed-ratio mixtures displayed synergistic interactions at effect levels ϕ > 0.5 against C. albicans. The dosis of the most synergistic (Lϕ = 0.62) mixture was 65.96 µg/ml (ZpE = 28%; LnE = 72%) containing 8 and 36% of flavonoids and lignans respectively. On the other hand, one over four IC50ZpE/IC50LnE mixtures displays synergistic interactions at ϕ > 0.5 against C. glabrata. The dosis of the most synergistic (Lϕ = 0.67) mixture was 168

  3. Optical coherence tomography: potentialities in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagaynova, Elena; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Shakhov, Andrey; Terentjeva, Anna; Snopova, Ludmila B.; Kuznetzova, Irina A.; Streltzova, Olga; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Kuranov, Roman V.; Myakov, Alex

    2004-08-01

    Clinical studies using OCT involved 2000 patients in various fields of medicine such as gastroenterology, urology, laryngology, gynecology, dermatology, stomatology, etc. Layered high-contrast images were typical for benign epithelial conditions. OCT distinguish in mucosae: epithelium, connective tissue layer, and smooth-muscle layer. Various benign processes occurring in mucosa manifest in OCT images as changes in the epithelial height, scattering properties and the course of the basement membrane. Lack of the layered structural pattern is the main criterion for dysplastic / malignant images. In clinic: OCT data may be critical for choosing a tissue site for excisional biopsy, OCT can detect tumor borders and their linear dimensions, OCT can be used to plan a resection line in operations and to control adequacy of resection, to monitor whether reparative processes are timely and adequate. OCT sensitivity of the uterine cervix, urinary bladder and larynx is 82, 98, 77%, respectively, specificity - 78, 71, 96%, diagnostic accuracy - 81, 85, 87% with significantly good agreement index of clinicians kappa - 0.65, 0.79, 0.83 (confidence intervals: 0.57-0.73; 0.71-0.88; 0.74-0.91). Error in detection of high grade dysplasia and microinvasive cancer is 21.4% in average. Additional modification of OCT (cross-polarisation OCT, OCM), development of the procedure (biotissue compression, application of chemical agents) can improve the specificity and sensitivity of traditional modality.

  4. Antimicrobial activities, toxinogenic potential and sensitivity to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial activities, toxinogenic potential and sensitivity to antibiotics of ... Bacillus species showed variable ability to inhibit bacterial and/or fungal species. ... to produce Mbuja in order to better control the fermentation process of Mbuja ...

  5. Characterisation of the clinical and activated T cell response to repeat delayed-type hypersensitivity skin challenges in human subjects, with KLH and PPD, as a potential model to test T cell-targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belson, Alexandra; Schmidt, Tim; Fernando, Disala; Hardes, Kelly; Scott, Nicola; Brett, Sara; Clark, Deborah; Oliveira, João Joaquim; Davis, Bill; McHugh, Simon; Stone, John

    2016-05-01

    To characterise the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin reaction to repeated challenges of keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) in healthy volunteers, as a potential model to test T cell-targeted investigational agents. Forty-nine subjects received either KLH, PPD, or PBS repeat skin challenges, and clinical assessments including induration, erythema and Laser Doppler Imaging. Skin biopsies or suction blisters were taken after challenge to investigate the cellular infiltrate of the challenge site, the T cell activation status, as determined by LAG-3 expression, and, specifically for the blister, the concentrations of inflammatory cytokines. Point estimates, estimates of variation and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were constructed for each type of challenge and timepoint. The DTH response could be measured at 48 and 120 h post-KLH and PPD challenge with induration, erythema and Laser Doppler Imaging, with 48 h post-challenge demonstrating the peak of the response. PPD was well tolerated in subjects after multiple challenges, however, a significant number of KLH-treated subjects demonstrated an injection site reaction 6-7 days following the SC injection. PPD demonstrated a boost effect on the second challenge as measured by increased induration, where as this was not noted consistently for KLH. Compared to unchallenged and PBS control-injected skin, increased T cell numbers were detected in the challenge site by both the skin suction blister and biopsy technique, at either time point following KLH or PPD challenge. Use of the T cell activation marker LAG-3 demonstrated the activated phenotype of these cells. In skin blisters, higher numbers of LAG-3+ T cells were detected at 48 h post-challenge, whereas in the biopsies, similar numbers of LAG-3+ cells were observed at both 48 and 120 h. Analysis of blister T cell subpopulations revealed some differences in phenotypes between the time points and between the CD4

  6. Potential fluid mechanic pathways of platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadden, Shawn C; Hendabadi, Sahar

    2013-06-01

    Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which plays leading roles in many vascular complications and causes of death. Platelets can be activated by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Mechanically, platelet activation has been shown to be a function of elevated shear stress and exposure time. These contributions can be combined by considering the cumulative stress or strain on a platelet as it is transported. Here, we develop a framework for computing a hemodynamic-based activation potential that is derived from a Lagrangian integral of strain rate magnitude. We demonstrate that such a measure is generally maximized along, and near to, distinguished material surfaces in the flow. The connections between activation potential and these structures are illustrated through stenotic flow computations. We uncover two distinct structures that may explain observed thrombus formation at the apex and downstream of stenoses. More broadly, these findings suggest fundamental relationships may exist between potential fluid mechanic pathways for mechanical platelet activation and the mechanisms governing their transport.

  7. Spinal Cord Stimulation: Clinical Efficacy and Potential Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sdrulla, Andrei D; Guan, Yun; Raja, Srinivasa N

    2018-03-11

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a minimally invasive therapy used for the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain. SCS is a safe and effective alternative to medications such as opioids, and multiple randomized controlled studies have demonstrated efficacy for difficult-to-treat neuropathic conditions such as failed back surgery syndrome. Conventional SCS is believed mediate pain relief via activation of dorsal column Aβ fibers, resulting in variable effects on sensory and pain thresholds, and measurable alterations in higher order cortical processing. Although potentiation of inhibition, as suggested by Wall and Melzack's gate control theory, continues to be the leading explanatory model, other segmental and supraspinal mechanisms have been described. Novel, non-standard, stimulation waveforms such as high-frequency and burst have been shown in some studies to be clinically superior to conventional SCS, however their mechanisms of action remain to be determined. Additional studies are needed, both mechanistic and clinical, to better understand optimal stimulation strategies for different neuropathic conditions, improve patient selection and optimize efficacy. © 2018 World Institute of Pain.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of some potential active compounds against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial activities of six potential active compounds (acetic acid, chitosan, catechin, gallic acid, lysozyme, and nisin) at the concentration of 500 g/ml against the growth of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria innocua, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were determined. Lysozyme showed the highest ...

  9. In Vitro Activity of the New Fluoroketolide Solithromycin (CEM-101) against a Large Collection of Clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates and International Reference Strains, Including Those with High-Level Antimicrobial Resistance: Potential Treatment Option for Gonorrhea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golparian, Daniel; Fernandes, Prabhavathi; Ohnishi, Makoto; Jensen, Jörgen S.

    2012-01-01

    Gonorrhea may become untreatable, and new treatment options are essential. We investigated the in vitro activity of the first fluoroketolide, solithromycin. Clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates and reference strains (n = 246), including the two extensively drug-resistant strains H041 and F89 and additional isolates with clinical cephalosporin resistance and multidrug resistance, were examined. The activity of solithromycin was mainly superior to that of other antimicrobials (n = 10) currently or previously recommended for gonorrhea treatment. Solithromycin might be an effective treatment option for gonorrhea. PMID:22354296

  10. Clinical Potential of Hyperbaric Pressure-Treated Whey Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolomini, André F.; Kubow, Stan; Lands, Larry C.

    2015-01-01

    Whey protein (WP) from cow’s milk is a rich source of essential and branched chain amino acids. Whey protein isolates (WPI) has been demonstrated to support muscle accretion, antioxidant activity, and immune modulation. However, whey is not readily digestible due to its tight conformational structure. Treatment of WPI with hyperbaric pressure results in protein unfolding. This enhances protein digestion, and results in an altered spectrum of released peptides, and greater release of essential and branched chain amino acids. Pressurized whey protein isolates (pWPI), through a series of cell culture, animal models and clinical studies, have been demonstrated to enhance muscle accretion, reduce inflammation, improve immunity, and decrease fatigue. It is also conceivable that pWPI would be more accessible to digestive enzymes, which would allow for a more rapid proteolysis of the proteins and an increased or altered release of small bioactive peptides. The altered profile of peptides released from WP digestion could thus play a role in the modulation of the immune response and tissue glutathione (GSH) concentrations. The research to date presents potentially interesting applications for the development of new functional foods based on hyperbaric treatment of WPI to produce products with more potent nutritional and nutraceutical properties. PMID:27417773

  11. Pharmacogenetics: progress, pitfalls and clinical potential for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Steve E; Hingorani, Aroon

    2006-02-01

    Much has been written about the potential of pharmacogenetic testing to inform therapy based on an individual's genetic makeup, and to decide the most effective choice of available drugs, or to avoid dangerous side effects. Currently, there is little hard data for either in the field of cardiovascular disease. The usual approach has been opportunistic use of drug trials in unrelated patients, and to look for differences in response or outcome by "candidate gene" genotype, for example genes coding for drug metabolising enzymes (activators and metabolisers), and enzymes and receptors involved in lipid metabolism, adrenergic response, etc. As with all association studies, initially promising results have often failed the test of replication in larger studies, and the relationship between the CETP Taq-I variant and response to statins has now been disproved. The strongest data to date is the report [Chasman, D.I., Posada, D., Subrahmanyan, L., Cook, N.R., Stanton Jr., V.P., Ridker, P.M., 2004. Pharmacogenetic study of statin therapy and cholesterol reduction. J. Am. Med. Assoc. 291, 2821-2827] of a poorer cholesterol-lowering response to Pravastatin in the 7% of patients carrying a certain haplotype of the HMG CoA reductase gene (14% fall versus 19%), but if this is overcome simply by a higher dose, it is of little clinical relevance. Currently, the best example of avoiding side effects is determining genotype at the CYP2C9 locus with respect of warfarin treatment, since carriers for functional variants (>20% of the population) require lower doses for optimal anticoagulation, and homozygotes, although rare, may well experience serious bleeding if given a usual dose. The full potential of this field will only be realised with much further work.

  12. Active, capable, and potentially active faults - a paleoseismic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machette, M.N.

    2000-01-01

    Maps of faults (geologically defined source zones) may portray seismic hazards in a wide range of completeness depending on which types of faults are shown. Three fault terms - active, capable, and potential - are used in a variety of ways for different reasons or applications. Nevertheless, to be useful for seismic-hazards analysis, fault maps should encompass a time interval that includes several earthquake cycles. For example, if the common recurrence in an area is 20,000-50,000 years, then maps should include faults that are 50,000-100,000 years old (two to five typical earthquake cycles), thus allowing for temporal variability in slip rate and recurrence intervals. Conversely, in more active areas such as plate boundaries, maps showing faults that are Group II-2 Project on Major Active Faults of the World our maps and database will show five age categories and four slip rate categories that allow one to select differing time spans and activity rates for seismic-hazard analysis depending on tectonic regime. The maps are accompanied by a database that describes evidence for Quaternary faulting, geomorphic expression, and paleoseismic parameters (slip rate, recurrence interval and time of most recent surface faulting). These maps and databases provide an inventory of faults that would be defined as active, capable, and potentially active for seismic-hazard assessments.

  13. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Pharmacologically active: clinical trials and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-01-22

    Jan 22, 2008 ... companies to manufacture pharmaceuticals, 24 to carry out quality control and ... represents a 3% real growth from 2004/2005, it represents a slight decline from ... manufacturer for the pharmas, or can it leverage strengths in medical ... increased clinical trials activity, R&D investment is too low to make it a ...

  14. Potential use of recombinant human interleukin-6 in clinical oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, GJ; Willemse, PHB; Mulder, NH; Limburg, PC; deVries, EGE

    Recombinant human IL-6 (rhIL-6) is a pleiotropic cytokine with stimulatory actions on the hematopoietic system, the immune system and hepatocytes. Clinical interest in the use of this cytokine was raised because of its thrombopoietic properties and also because of its anti-tumor activity, which was

  15. Miniaturization and globalization of clinical laboratory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Murilo R; Clark, Samantha; Barrio, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    Clinical laboratories provide an invaluable service to millions of people around the world in the form of quality diagnostic care. Within the clinical laboratory industry the impetus for change has come from technological development (miniaturization, nanotechnology, and their collective effect on point-of-care testing; POCT) and the increasingly global nature of laboratory services. Potential technological gains in POCT include: the development of bio-sensors, microarrays, genetics and proteomics testing, and enhanced web connectivity. In globalization, prospective opportunities lie in: medical tourism, the migration of healthcare workers, cross-border delivery of testing, and the establishment of accredited laboratories in previously unexplored markets. Accompanying these impressive opportunities are equally imposing challenges. Difficulty transitioning from research to clinical use, poor infrastructure in developing countries, cultural differences and national barriers to global trade are only a few examples. Dealing with the issues presented by globalization and the impact of developing technology on POCT, and on the clinical laboratory services industry in general, will be a daunting task. Despite such concerns, with appropriate countermeasures it will be possible to address the challenges posed. Future laboratory success will be largely dependent on one's ability to adapt in this perpetually shifting landscape.

  16. 7T: Physics, safety, and potential clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraff, Oliver; Quick, Harald H

    2017-12-01

    With more than 60 installed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems worldwide operating at a magnetic field strength of 7T or higher, ultrahigh-field (UHF) MRI has been established as a platform for clinically oriented research in recent years. Profound technical and methodological developments have helped overcome the inherent physical challenges of UHF radiofrequency (RF) signal homogenization in the human body. The ongoing development of dedicated RF coil arrays was pivotal in realizing UHF body MRI, beyond mere brain imaging applications. Another precondition to clinical application of 7T MRI is the safety testing of implants and the establishment of safety concepts. Against this backdrop, 7T MRI and MR spectroscopy (MRS) recently have demonstrated capabilities and potentials for clinical diagnostics in a variety of studies. This article provides an overview of the immanent physical challenges of 7T UHF MRI and discusses recent technical solutions and safety concepts. Furthermore, recent clinically oriented studies are highlighted that span a broad application spectrum from 7T UHF brain to body MRI. 4 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1573-1589. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Potential fluid mechanic pathways of platelet activation

    OpenAIRE

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Hendabadi, Sahar

    2012-01-01

    Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which plays leading roles in many vascular complications and causes of death. Platelets can be activated by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Mechanically, platelet activation has been shown to be a function of elevated shear stress and exposure time. These contributions can be combined by considering the cumulative stress or strain on a platelet as it is transported. Here we develop a framework for computing a hemodynamic-based activation ...

  18. Conducting qualitative research within Clinical Trials Units: avoiding potential pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Cindy; O'Cathain, Alicia; Hind, Danny; Adamson, Joy; Lawton, Julia; Baird, Wendy

    2014-07-01

    The value of using qualitative research within or alongside randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is becoming more widely accepted. Qualitative research may be conducted concurrently with pilot or full RCTs to understand the feasibility and acceptability of the interventions being tested, or to improve trial conduct. Clinical Trials Units (CTUs) in the United Kingdom (UK) manage large numbers of RCTs and, increasingly, manage the qualitative research or collaborate with qualitative researchers external to the CTU. CTUs are beginning to explicitly manage the process, for example, through the use of standard operating procedures for designing and implementing qualitative research with trials. We reviewed the experiences of two UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC) registered CTUs of conducting qualitative research concurrently with RCTs. Drawing on experiences gained from 15 studies, we identify the potential for the qualitative research to undermine the successful completion or scientific integrity of RCTs. We show that potential problems can arise from feedback of interim or final qualitative findings to members of the trial team or beyond, in particular reporting qualitative findings whilst the trial is on-going. The problems include: We make recommendations for improving the management of qualitative research within CTUs. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Clinical implications from monitoring fetal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayburn, W F

    1982-12-15

    The monitoring of fetal motion in high-risk pregnancies has been shown to be worthwhile in predicting fetal distress and impending fetal death. The maternal recording of perceived fetal activity is an inexpensive surveillance technique which is most useful when there is chronic uteroplacental insufficiency or when a stillbirth may be expected. The presence of an active, vigorous fetus is reassuring, but documented fetal inactivity required a reassessment of the underlying antepartum complication and further fetal evaluation with real-time ultrasonography, fetal heart rate testing, and biochemical testing. Fetal distress from such acute changes as abruptio placentae or umbilical cord compression may not be predicted by monitoring fetal motion. Although not used for routine clinical investigation, electromechanical devices such as tocodynamometry have provided much insight into fetal behavioral patterns at many stages of pregnancy and in pregnancies with an antepartum complication.

  20. Do Urinary Cystine Parameters Predict Clinical Stone Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Justin I; Antonelli, Jodi A; Canvasser, Noah E; Morgan, Monica S C; Mollengarden, Daniel; Best, Sara; Pearle, Margaret S

    2018-02-01

    An accurate urinary predictor of stone recurrence would be clinically advantageous for patients with cystinuria. A proprietary assay (Litholink, Chicago, Illinois) measures cystine capacity as a potentially more reliable estimate of stone forming propensity. The recommended capacity level to prevent stone formation, which is greater than 150 mg/l, has not been directly correlated with clinical stone activity. We investigated the relationship between urinary cystine parameters and clinical stone activity. We prospectively followed 48 patients with cystinuria using 24-hour urine collections and serial imaging, and recorded stone activity. We compared cystine urinary parameters at times of stone activity with those obtained during periods of stone quiescence. We then performed correlation and ROC analysis to evaluate the performance of cystine parameters to predict stone activity. During a median followup of 70.6 months (range 2.2 to 274.6) 85 stone events occurred which could be linked to a recent urine collection. Cystine capacity was significantly greater for quiescent urine than for stone event urine (mean ± SD 48 ± 107 vs -38 ± 163 mg/l, p stone activity (r = -0.29, p r = -0.88, p r = -0.87, p stone quiescence. Decreasing the cutoff to 90 mg/l or greater improved sensitivity to 25.2% while maintaining specificity at 90.9%. Our results suggest that the target for capacity should be lower than previously advised. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification and Pathogenic Potential of Clinical Bacillus and Paenibacillus Isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Celandroni

    Full Text Available The soil-related Bacillus and Paenibacillus species have increasingly been implicated in various human diseases. Nevertheless, their identification still poses problems in the clinical microbiology laboratory and, with the exception of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus, little is known on their pathogenicity for humans. In this study, we evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS in the identification of clinical isolates of these genera and conducted genotypic and phenotypic analyses to highlight specific virulence properties. Seventy-five clinical isolates were subjected to biochemical and MALDI-TOF MS identification. 16S rDNA sequencing and supplemental tests were used to solve any discrepancies or failures in the identification results. MALDI-TOF MS significantly outperformed classical biochemical testing for correct species identification and no misidentification was obtained. One third of the collected strains belonged to the B. cereus species, but also Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis were isolated at high rate. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that all the B. cereus, B. licheniformis, B. simplex, B. mycoides, Paenibacillus glucanolyticus and Paenibacillus lautus isolates are resistant to penicillin. The evaluation of toxin/enzyme secretion, toxin-encoding genes, motility, and biofilm formation revealed that B. cereus displays the highest virulence potential. However, although generally considered nonpathogenic, most of the other species were shown to swim, swarm, produce biofilms, and secrete proteases that can have a role in bacterial virulence. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS appears useful for fast and accurate identification of Bacillus and Paenibacillus strains whose virulence properties make them of increasing clinical relevance.

  2. Human reporter genes: potential use in clinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serganova, Inna [Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Ponomarev, Vladimir [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Blasberg, Ronald [Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States)], E-mail: blasberg@neuro1.mskcc.org

    2007-10-15

    The clinical application of positron-emission-tomography-based reporter gene imaging will expand over the next several years. The translation of reporter gene imaging technology into clinical applications is the focus of this review, with emphasis on the development and use of human reporter genes. Human reporter genes will play an increasingly more important role in this development, and it is likely that one or more reporter systems (human gene and complimentary radiopharmaceutical) will take leading roles. Three classes of human reporter genes are discussed and compared: receptors, transporters and enzymes. Examples of highly expressed cell membrane receptors include specific membrane somatostatin receptors (hSSTrs). The transporter group includes the sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and the norepinephrine transporter (hNET). The endogenous enzyme classification includes human mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (hTK2). In addition, we also discuss the nonhuman dopamine 2 receptor and two viral reporter genes, the wild-type herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene and the HSV1-tk mutant (HSV1-sr39tk). Initial applications of reporter gene imaging in patients will be developed within two different clinical disciplines: (a) gene therapy and (b) adoptive cell-based therapies. These studies will benefit from the availability of efficient human reporter systems that can provide critical monitoring information for adenoviral-based, retroviral-based and lenteviral-based gene therapies, oncolytic bacterial and viral therapies, and adoptive cell-based therapies. Translational applications of noninvasive in vivo reporter gene imaging are likely to include: (a) quantitative monitoring of gene therapy vectors for targeting and transduction efficacy in clinical protocols by imaging the location, extent and duration of transgene expression; (b) monitoring of cell trafficking, targeting, replication and activation in adoptive T-cell and stem/progenitor cell therapies

  3. Human reporter genes: potential use in clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serganova, Inna; Ponomarev, Vladimir; Blasberg, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    The clinical application of positron-emission-tomography-based reporter gene imaging will expand over the next several years. The translation of reporter gene imaging technology into clinical applications is the focus of this review, with emphasis on the development and use of human reporter genes. Human reporter genes will play an increasingly more important role in this development, and it is likely that one or more reporter systems (human gene and complimentary radiopharmaceutical) will take leading roles. Three classes of human reporter genes are discussed and compared: receptors, transporters and enzymes. Examples of highly expressed cell membrane receptors include specific membrane somatostatin receptors (hSSTrs). The transporter group includes the sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and the norepinephrine transporter (hNET). The endogenous enzyme classification includes human mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (hTK2). In addition, we also discuss the nonhuman dopamine 2 receptor and two viral reporter genes, the wild-type herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene and the HSV1-tk mutant (HSV1-sr39tk). Initial applications of reporter gene imaging in patients will be developed within two different clinical disciplines: (a) gene therapy and (b) adoptive cell-based therapies. These studies will benefit from the availability of efficient human reporter systems that can provide critical monitoring information for adenoviral-based, retroviral-based and lenteviral-based gene therapies, oncolytic bacterial and viral therapies, and adoptive cell-based therapies. Translational applications of noninvasive in vivo reporter gene imaging are likely to include: (a) quantitative monitoring of gene therapy vectors for targeting and transduction efficacy in clinical protocols by imaging the location, extent and duration of transgene expression; (b) monitoring of cell trafficking, targeting, replication and activation in adoptive T-cell and stem/progenitor cell therapies

  4. Antioxidant potentialities and Antiradical Activities of Oxalis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2017-08-31

    Aug 31, 2017 ... biologically active chemicals of medical importance. These findings ... medicinal plant to treat different human ailments. A recent work by ..... antioxidants and nutrition. Nutr Res. ... from additive and synergistic combinations of.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells: biological characteristics and potential clinical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha

    2004-01-01

    are among the first stem cell types to be introduced in the clinic. Several studies have demonstrated the possible use of MSC in systemic transplantation for systemic diseases, local implantation for local tissue defects, as a vehicle for genes in gene therapy protocols or to generate transplantable tissues...... and organs in tissue engineering protocols. Before their widespread use in therapy, methods allowing the generation of large number of cells without affecting their differentiation potential as well as technologies that overcome immunological rejection (in case allogenic transplantation) must be developed.......Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are clonogenic, non-hematpoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow and are able to differentiate into multiple mesoderm-type cell lineages, for example, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, endothelial-cells and also non-mesoderm-type lineages, for example, neuronal...

  6. Clinical diagnostic potentials of thyroid ultrasonography and scintigraphy; An evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torizuka, Tatsuo; Kasagi, Kanji; Hatabu, Hiroto; Misaki, Takashi; Iida, Yasuhiro; Konishi, Junji (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Hospital); Endo, Keigo

    1993-06-01

    This prospective study was designed to evaluate the potential contributions of high resolution ultrasonography (US) and Tc-99m scintigraphy in the routine diagnosis of thyroid disease. The diagnostic impacts of US and Tc-99m scintigraphy results in 177 patients visiting our thyroid clinic were assessed and scored according to the following criteria: when the information provided by either test supported, confirmed or changed the initial clinical diagnosis, they received scores of 2, 3 and 4 respectively, while score 1 was given when the test itself was useless for the differential diagnosis. US identified focal lesions that both palpation and scintigraphy had failed to detect in 14 (12.1%) of 116 patients with diffuse thyroid diseases, suggesting the necessity of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, adenoma, adenocarcinoma and adenomatous goiter, and vice versa in the diagnosis of hyperthyroid and euthyroid Graves's diseases. Thus, the advantages of US over scintigraphy for morphological evaluation were confirmed. US was particularly useful for the differential diagnosis of adenomatous goiter from Hashimoto's thyroiditis or a single nodular disease. In contrast, scintigraphy gave functional images, being especially helpful for the differential diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. (author).

  7. Antioxidant activity potential of gamma irradiated carrageenan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abad, Lucille V.; Relleve, Lorna S.; Racadio, Charles Darwin T.; Aranilla, Charito T.; De la Rosa, Alumanda M.

    2013-01-01

    The antioxidant capacity of irradiated κ-, ι-, λ-carrageenans were investigated using the hydroxyl radical scavenging assay, reducing power assay and DPPH radical scavenging capacity assay. The degree of oxidative inhibition increased with increasing concentration and dose. The type of carrageenan had also an influence on its antioxidant activity which followed the order of lambda< iota< kappa. Increase in oxidative property with radiation dose can be attributed mainly to the depolymerization of the carrageenans with corresponding increase in reducing sugar. The antioxidant properties of these carrageenan oligomers were lower than that of ascorbic acid and galactose sugar. - Highlights: • The antioxidant capacity of gamma irradiated κ-, ι-, λ-carrageenans increased with increasing concentration and dose. • The type of carrageenan had an influence on its antioxidant activity which followed the order of lambda< iota< kappa. • Increase in oxidative property with radiation dose can be attributed mainly to the depolymerization of the carrageenans with corresponding increase in reducing sugar

  8. Molecular biology of breast cancer stem cells: potential clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nam P; Almeida, Fabio S; Chi, Alex; Nguyen, Ly M; Cohen, Deirdre; Karlsson, Ulf; Vinh-Hung, Vincent

    2010-10-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (CSC) have been postulated recently as responsible for failure of breast cancer treatment. The purpose of this study is to review breast CSCs molecular biology with respect to their mechanism of resistance to conventional therapy, and to develop treatment strategies that may improve survival of breast cancer patients. A literature search has identified in vitro and in vivo studies of breast CSCs. Breast CSCs overexpress breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) which allows cancer cells to transport actively chemotherapy agents out of the cells. Radioresistance is modulated through activation of Wnt signaling pathway and overexpression of genes coding for glutathione. Lapatinib can selectively target HER-2 positive breast CSCs and improves disease-free survival in these patients. Metformin may target basal type breast CSCs. Parthenolide and oncolytic viruses are promising targeting agents for breast CSCs. Future clinical trials for breast cancer should include anti-cancer stem cells targeting agents in addition to conventional chemotherapy. Hypofractionation radiotherapy may be indicated for residual disease post chemotherapy. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pharmacological Activity and Clinical Use of PDRN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Squadrito

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available PDRN is a proprietary and registered drug that possesses several activities: tissue repairing, anti-ischemic, and anti-inflammatory. These therapeutic properties suggest its use in regenerative medicine and in diabetic foot ulcers. PDRN holds a mixture of deoxyribonucleotides with molecular weights ranging between 50 and 1,500 KDa, it is derived from a controlled purification and sterilization process of Oncorhynchus mykiss (Salmon Trout or Oncorhynchus keta (Chum Salmon sperm DNA. The procedure guarantees the absence of active protein and peptides that may cause immune reactions. In vitro and in vivo experiments have suggested that PDRN most relevant mechanism of action is the engagement of adenosine A2A receptors. Besides engaging the A2A receptor, PDRN offers nucleosides and nucleotides for the so called “salvage pathway.” The binding to adenosine A2A receptors is a unique property of PDRN and seems to be linked to DNA origin, molecular weight and manufacturing process. In this context, PDRN represents a new advancement in the pharmacotherapy. In fact adenosine and dipyridamole are non-selective activators of adenosine receptors and they may cause unwanted side effects; while regadenoson, the only other A2A receptor agonist available, has been approved by the FDA as a pharmacological stress agent in myocardial perfusion imaging. Finally, defibrotide, another drug composed by a mixture of oligonucleotides, has different molecular weight, a DNA of different origin and does not share the same wound healing stimulating effects of PDRN. The present review analyses the more relevant experimental and clinical evidences carried out to characterize PDRN therapeutic effects.

  10. Pharmacological Activity and Clinical Use of PDRN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squadrito, Francesco; Bitto, Alessandra; Irrera, Natasha; Pizzino, Gabriele; Pallio, Giovanni; Minutoli, Letteria; Altavilla, Domenica

    2017-01-01

    PDRN is a proprietary and registered drug that possesses several activities: tissue repairing, anti-ischemic, and anti-inflammatory. These therapeutic properties suggest its use in regenerative medicine and in diabetic foot ulcers. PDRN holds a mixture of deoxyribonucleotides with molecular weights ranging between 50 and 1,500 KDa, it is derived from a controlled purification and sterilization process of Oncorhynchus mykiss (Salmon Trout) or Oncorhynchus keta (Chum Salmon) sperm DNA. The procedure guarantees the absence of active protein and peptides that may cause immune reactions. In vitro and in vivo experiments have suggested that PDRN most relevant mechanism of action is the engagement of adenosine A2A receptors. Besides engaging the A2A receptor, PDRN offers nucleosides and nucleotides for the so called “salvage pathway.” The binding to adenosine A2A receptors is a unique property of PDRN and seems to be linked to DNA origin, molecular weight and manufacturing process. In this context, PDRN represents a new advancement in the pharmacotherapy. In fact adenosine and dipyridamole are non-selective activators of adenosine receptors and they may cause unwanted side effects; while regadenoson, the only other A2A receptor agonist available, has been approved by the FDA as a pharmacological stress agent in myocardial perfusion imaging. Finally, defibrotide, another drug composed by a mixture of oligonucleotides, has different molecular weight, a DNA of different origin and does not share the same wound healing stimulating effects of PDRN. The present review analyses the more relevant experimental and clinical evidences carried out to characterize PDRN therapeutic effects. PMID:28491036

  11. Active stabilization of ion trap radiofrequency potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K. G.; Wong-Campos, J. D.; Restelli, A.; Landsman, K. A.; Neyenhuis, B.; Mizrahi, J.; Monroe, C. [Joint Quantum Institute and University of Maryland Department of Physics, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We actively stabilize the harmonic oscillation frequency of a laser-cooled atomic ion confined in a radiofrequency (rf) Paul trap by sampling and rectifying the high voltage rf applied to the trap electrodes. We are able to stabilize the 1 MHz atomic oscillation frequency to be better than 10 Hz or 10 ppm. This represents a suppression of ambient noise on the rf circuit by 34 dB. This technique could impact the sensitivity of ion trap mass spectrometry and the fidelity of quantum operations in ion trap quantum information applications.

  12. Mammography - recent technical developments and their clinical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemdal, Bengt; Mattsson, Soeren [Malmoe Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Andersson, Ingvar [Malmoe Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Thilander Klang, Anne [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering; Bengtsson, Gert; Jarlman, O. [Lund Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Leitz, Wolfram [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden); Bjurstam, Nils [Univ. of North Norway, Troms (Norway). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-05-01

    The recent technical developments in digital as well as screen-film X-ray mammography have been reviewed in order to evaluate their clinical potential and to analyse possible lines for future development. Material and methods: The scientific literature has been reviewed, conferences covered and contacts with colleagues developed. Companies in the field have been inquired and invited for presentations. Own experience has been gathered from different screen-film and digital mammography systems. Results and conclusions: Although there are important complementary techniques such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray mammography is still the golden standard for breast imaging. It is relatively simple and cost-effective, and it is presently the only realistic technique for screening in a large scale. It is still largely the only technique that can detect breast cancer in a pre invasive stage. Equipment for digital mammography is commercially available both with small area and full field technique (FFDM). The development of FFDM systems is now intense, as well as the development of dedicated workstations and computer-aided detection (CAD). In spite of this, the introduction of digital mammography has been very slow compared to most other X-ray examinations due to high costs and technical challenges to meet the high demands on image quality and dose in mammography as well as the demands on specialised workflow support for screening mammography and suitable display techniques. Film reading of digital mammograms has been the most common display mode so far, but to take full advantage of the digital concept, diagnostic as well as logistic, monitor reading must be applied. There is a potential of FFDM systems for significantly higher image quality or significantly lower dose than screen-film mammography (SFM), or both. Further research is necessary to fully use this potential. The investment costs are much higher for digital than screen-film mammography

  13. Mammography - recent technical developments and their clinical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemdal, Bengt; Mattsson, Soeren; Bjurstam, Nils

    2002-05-01

    The recent technical developments in digital as well as screen-film X-ray mammography have been reviewed in order to evaluate their clinical potential and to analyse possible lines for future development. Material and methods: The scientific literature has been reviewed, conferences covered and contacts with colleagues developed. Companies in the field have been inquired and invited for presentations. Own experience has been gathered from different screen-film and digital mammography systems. Results and conclusions: Although there are important complementary techniques such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray mammography is still the golden standard for breast imaging. It is relatively simple and cost-effective, and it is presently the only realistic technique for screening in a large scale. It is still largely the only technique that can detect breast cancer in a pre invasive stage. Equipment for digital mammography is commercially available both with small area and full field technique (FFDM). The development of FFDM systems is now intense, as well as the development of dedicated workstations and computer-aided detection (CAD). In spite of this, the introduction of digital mammography has been very slow compared to most other X-ray examinations due to high costs and technical challenges to meet the high demands on image quality and dose in mammography as well as the demands on specialised workflow support for screening mammography and suitable display techniques. Film reading of digital mammograms has been the most common display mode so far, but to take full advantage of the digital concept, diagnostic as well as logistic, monitor reading must be applied. There is a potential of FFDM systems for significantly higher image quality or significantly lower dose than screen-film mammography (SFM), or both. Further research is necessary to fully use this potential. The investment costs are much higher for digital than screen-film mammography

  14. Terbinafine: novel formulations that potentiate antifungal activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y; Chen, X; Guan, S

    2015-03-01

    Terbinafine, an orally and topically active antifungal agent, has been available for the treatment of dermatophytic infections and onychomycosis for more than a decade. In addition, oral administration has been shown to be associated with drug-drug interactions, hepatotoxicity, low concentration at the infected sites, gastrointestinal and systemic side effects and other adverse effects. Since topical drug delivery can provide higher patient compliance, allow immediate access to the infected site and reduce unwanted systemic drug exposure, an improved topical drug delivery approach with high permeability, sustained release and prolonged retainment could overcome the limitations and side effects caused by oral administration. Conventional topical formulations cannot keep the drug in the targeted sites for a long duration of time and hence a novel drug delivery that can avoid the side effects while still providing sustained efficacy in treatment should be developed. This brief review of novel formulations based on polymers and nanostructure carriers provides insight into the efficacy and topical delivery of terbinafine. Copyright 2015 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  15. Targeted treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clinical potential of obinutuzumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolej L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lukáš Smolej 4th Department of Internal Medicine – Hematology, University Hospital Hradec Králové and Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Králové, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic Abstract: Introduction of targeted agents revolutionized the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL in the past decade. Addition of chimeric monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab to chemotherapy significantly improved efficacy including overall survival (OS in untreated fit patients; humanized anti-CD52 antibody alemtuzumab and fully human anti-CD20 antibody ofatumumab lead to improvement in refractory disease. Novel small molecule inhibitors such as ibrutinib and idelalisib demonstrated excellent activity and were very recently licensed in relapsed/refractory CLL. Obinutuzumab (GA101 is the newest monoclonal antibody approved for the treatment of CLL. This novel, glycoengineered, type II humanized anti-CD20 antibody is characterized by enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and direct induction of cell death compared to type I antibodies. Combination of obinutuzumab and chlorambucil yielded significantly better OS in comparison to chlorambucil monotherapy in untreated comorbid patients. These results led to approval of obinuzutumab for the treatment of CLL. Numerous clinical trials combining obinutuzumab with other cytotoxic drugs and novel small molecules are currently under way. This review focuses on the role of obinutuzumab in the treatment of CLL. Keywords: chronic lymphocytic leukemia, anti-CD20 antibodies, chlorambucil, rituximab, ofatumumab, obinutuzumab, overall survival

  16. The Methodical Approaches to Activation of Innovative Potential of Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berveno Oksana V.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at developing theoretical provisions and practical recommendations on methods of management and activation of innovative potential of enterprises. Assessment of innovative potential of enterprise should be carried out from different positions, taking into consideration all external and internal possibilities of enterprise as to carrying out an innovation activity. The system of management of innovation activity and implementation of innovative potential at enterprise should be closely woven in the general management of the enterprise. Activation of innovative potential of enterprise foresees adoption of the whole system of strategic decisions, which are aimed at creation of the most favorable conditions for implementation of innovative potential with obtaining of planned results. The system of activization of innovative potential should develop a number of organizational decisions on interaction of elements of the most innovative potential in the process of innovation activity and cooperation of innovative potential with other subsystems of the enterprise. Results of these organizational decisions in many respects determine efficiency of innovation activity of the enterprise.

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Pharmacologically active: clinical trials and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-01-22

    Jan 22, 2008 ... The US database, on the other hand, clearly identifies 172 ... operating within extended clinical trials R&D value chains. Companies often ... Source: CeSTII Survey Management and Results System internal database. Table III.

  18. Clinical potential of implantable wireless sensors for orthopedic treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karipott, Salil Sidharthan; Nelson, Bradley D; Guldberg, Robert E; Ong, Keat Ghee

    2018-04-01

    Implantable wireless sensors have been used for real-time monitoring of chemicals and physical conditions of bones, tendons and muscles to diagnose and study orthopedic diseases and injuries. Due to the importance of these sensors in orthopedic care, a critical review, which not only analyzes the underlying technologies but also their clinical implementations and challenges, will provide a landscape view on their current state and their future clinical role. Areas covered: By conducting an extensive literature search and following the leaders of orthopedic implantable wireless sensors, this review covers the battery-powered and battery-free wireless implantable sensor technologies, and describes their implementation for hips, knees, spine, and shoulder stress/strain monitoring. Their advantages, limitations, and clinical challenges are also described. Expert commentary: Currently, implantable wireless sensors are mostly limited for scientific investigations and demonstrative experiments. Although rapid advancement in sensors and wireless technologies will push the reliability and practicality of these sensors for clinical realization, regulatory constraints and financial viability in medical device industry may curtail their continuous adoption for clinical orthopedic applications. In the next five years, these sensors are expected to gain increased interest from researchers, but wide clinical adoption is still unlikely.

  19. Maximising the potential of part-time clinical teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patston, Philip; Holmes, David; Maalhagh-Fard, Ahmad; Ting, Kang; Ziccardi, Vincent B

    2010-12-01

    A problem faced by health professions education throughout the world is a lack of full-time clinical teachers. This is particularly serious in dentistry and nursing, but is increasingly also true in medicine. To make up for this shortfall there is a growing reliance on part-time clinical teachers. Part-time clinical teachers are essential for the education of students. However, compared with their full-time counterparts, the part-time teachers are often not adequately prepared for their roles as educators within the context of the clinical curriculum. They might not be trained in the latest educational practices, and may be unprepared for the time needed to excel as teachers and mentors. As part-time teachers take on more responsibility, it is important that they take part in orientation and training sessions to assist them in developing the skills they need to succeed. This will require a significant commitment from the institution as well as the part-time teacher, but is critical for maintaining the academic quality of the clinical training programmes. This also represents an untapped area for research into how to ensure the success of part-time clinical teachers. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010.

  20. Checkpoint inhibitors in endometrial cancer: preclinical rationale and clinical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittica, Gloria; Ghisoni, Eleonora; Giannone, Gaia; Aglietta, Massimo; Genta, Sofia; Valabrega, Giorgio

    2017-10-27

    Treatment of advanced and recurrent endometrial cancer (EC) is still an unmet need for oncologists and gynecologic oncologists. The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network (TCGA) recently provided a new genomic classification, dividing EC in four subgroups. Two types of EC, the polymerase epsilon (POLE)-ultra-mutated and the microsatellite instability-hyper-mutated (MSI-H), are characterized by a high mutation rate providing the rationale for a potential activity of checkpoint inhibitors. We analyzed all available evidence supporting the role of tumor microenvironment (TME) in EC development and the therapeutic implications offered by immune checkpoint inhibitors in this setting. We performed a review on Pubmed with Mesh keywords 'endometrial cancer' and the name of each checkpoint inhibitor discussed in the article. The same search was operated on clinicaltrial.gov to identify ongoing clinical trials exploring PD-1/PD-L1 and CTLA-4 axis in EC, particularly focusing on POLE-ultra-muted and MSI-H cancer types. POLE-ultra-mutated and MSI-H ECs showed an active TME expressing high number of neo-antigens and an elevated amount of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). Preliminary results from a phase-1 clinical trial (KEYNOTE-028) demonstrated antitumor activity of Pembrolizumab in EC. Moreover, both Pembrolizumab and Nivolumab reported durable clinical responses in POLE-ultra-mutated patients. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are an attractive option in POLE-ultra-mutated and MSI-H ECs. Future investigations in these subgroups include combinations of checkpoints inhibitors with chemotherapy and small tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) to enhance a more robust intra-tumoral immune response.

  1. Pharmacoligaclly Active: Clinical Trials and the Pharmaceuticals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multinational pharmaceutical companies ('pharmas') import and produce pharmaceuticals and also conduct clinical trials which are an important aspect of research and development (R&D). This may raise the question: Is South Africa a guinea pig for the pharmas? The Department of Trade and Industry National Industrial ...

  2. Clinical monitoring of 'autoimmune' chronic active hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, Bart van

    1989-01-01

    This thesis describes the outcome- survival of a large group of 186 consecutive patients with chronic active hepatitis of variouse tiologies, and describes in detail the progress of 21 patients from this group with 'autoimmunie' chronic active hepatitis maintained on standardized immunosuppressive

  3. The potential role for a pharmacist in a multidisciplinary general practitioner super clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajorek, Beata; LeMay, Kate; Gunn, Kate; Armour, Carol

    2015-01-01

    The Australian government's General Practitioner (GP) super clinics programme aims to provide well-integrated, multidisciplinary, patient-centred care for people with chronic disease. However, there is no research into the current role of pharmacists in this setting. To explore the perspectives of GP super clinic staff on current and potential (future) pharmacist-led services provided in this setting. Individual interviews (facilitated using a semi-structured interview guide and thematically analysed) were conducted with purposively sampled staff of a GP super clinic in a semirural location in the state of New South Wales, until theme saturation. Participating staff included (n=9): three GPs, one pharmacist, one nurse, one business manager, and three reception staff. Three themes emerged conveying perspectives on: working relationships between staff; a pharmacist's current role; and potential future roles for a pharmacist. All clinic staff actively engaged the pharmacist in their "team approach". Currently established roles for home medicines reviews (HMRs) and drug information were well supported, but needed to be expanded, for example, with formalised case conferences between GPs, pharmacists, and other staff. New roles needed be explored in auditing medication use, optimising medication records, specialised drug information, dispensing, and prescribing. Although GPs had differing views about opportunities for pharmacists' prescribing in this setting, they saw several benefits to this service, such as reducing the time pressure on GPs to enable more effective consultations. Results suggest a pharmacist's services can potentially be better used within the multidisciplinary super clinic model of care to address current gaps within the semi-rural practice setting. Any future role for the pharmacist could be addressed as part of a formalised, strategic approach to creating an integrated healthcare team, with attention to funding and government legislation.

  4. Immunomodulatory nutraceuticals with potential clinical use for dogs and cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Zaine

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of nutraceuticals in veterinary medicine is growing and is assumed that they could aid in clinical treatment. This review aims to describe some nutraceuticals that act on the immunity of dogs and cats and show the possible benefits as an adjuvant treatment for some diseases. The action of some yeast derivates as immunomodulators, especially the beta-glucan fraction, was already proved to occur in dogs and cats, being beneficial as an adjuvant therapy in many clinical conditions. Omega-3 polyunsatured fatty acids, possibly the mostly used nutraceuticals, can improve the condition in some diseases, such as hypertension, renal, cardiac, gastrointestinal and autoimmune diseases, arthritis and cancer. Vitamin E has antioxidant and immunomodulatory action and can aid in the treatment of dermatologic and hepatobiliar conditions. The use of carotenoids, which have similar action to vitamin E, can be of interest for being potent antioxidants and might be helpful for enhancing immune response against microorganisms and also act preventing tumors. Despite it are still needed clinical trials to better understand the real benefits of nutraceuticals supplementation in each specific disease, the comprehension of the mechanisms by which they act indicates they are promising for clinical use.

  5. Potential biomarkers for the clinical prognosis of severe dengue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Marques Carneiro da Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, several assays can confirm acute dengue infection at the point-of-care. However, none of these assays can predict the severity of the disease symptoms. A prognosis test that predicts the likelihood of a dengue patient to develop a severe form of the disease could permit more efficient patient triage and treatment. We hypothesise that mRNA expression of apoptosis and innate immune response-related genes will be differentially regulated during the early stages of dengue and might predict the clinical outcome. Aiming to identify biomarkers for dengue prognosis, we extracted mRNA from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of mild and severe dengue patients during the febrile stage of the disease to measure the expression levels of selected genes by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The selected candidate biomarkers were previously identified by our group as differentially expressed in microarray studies. We verified that the mRNA coding for CFD, MAGED1, PSMB9, PRDX4 and FCGR3B were differentially expressed between patients who developed clinical symptoms associated with the mild type of dengue and patients who showed clinical symptoms associated with severe dengue. We suggest that this gene expression panel could putatively serve as biomarkers for the clinical prognosis of dengue haemorrhagic fever.

  6. Clinical potential of lixisenatide once daily treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Andreas Brønden; Christensen, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonist lixisenatide (Lyxumia(®)) was approved for marketing by the European Medicines Agency in February 2013 and has been evaluated in a clinical study program called GetGoal. Lixisenatide activates the GLP-1 receptor and thereby exercises the range of...... of lixisenatide seems to be in combination with basal insulin. A large multicenter study will determine the future potential of lixisenatide in preventing cardiovascular events and mortality, in patients with type 2 diabetes and recent acute coronary syndrome....

  7. Results from active spacecraft potential control on the Geotail spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.; Arends, H.; Pedersen, A.

    1995-01-01

    A low and actively controlled electrostatic potential on the outer surfaces of a scientific spacecraft is very important for accurate measurements of cold plasma electrons and ions and the DC to low-frequency electric field. The Japanese/NASA Geotail spacecraft carriers as part of its scientific payload a novel ion emitter for active control of the electrostatic potential on the surface of the spacecraft. The aim of the ion emitter is to reduce the positive surface potential which is normally encountered in the outer magnetosphere when the spacecraft is sunlit. Ion emission clamps the surface potential to near the ambient plasma potential. Without emission control, Geotail has encountered plasma conditions in the lobes of the magnetotail which resulted in surface potentials of up to about +70 V. The ion emitter proves to be able to discharge the outer surfaces of the spacecraft and is capable of keeping the surface potential stable at about +2 V. This potential is measured with respect to one of the electric field probes which are current biased and thus kept at a potential slightly above the ambient plasma potential. The instrument uses the liquid metal field ion emission principle to emit indium ions. The ion beam energy is about 6 keV and the typical total emission current amounts to about 15 μA. Neither variations in the ambient plasma conditions nor operation of two electron emitters on Geotail produce significant variations of the controlled surface potential as long as the resulting electron emission currents remain much smaller than the ion emission current. Typical results of the active potential control are shown, demonstrating the surface potential reduction and its stability over time. 25 refs., 5 figs

  8. The potential implication of eosinophil activation in the pathogenesis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    The potential implication of eosinophil activation in the pathogenesis of childhood asthma. INTRODUCTION. Asthma is recognized as an eosinophil mediated inflammation of the airways1. Eosinophils are major contributors to the damage in the airways of asthmatic patients which when activated, degranulate and release ...

  9. Sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds with potential antidiabetic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Savateeva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The essential link in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and its complications is a non-enzymatic glycosylation of proteins. However, modern endocrinology lacks of clinically effective pharmaceuticals for its correction. The screening of 23 derivatives of 1,3,4-thiadiazine the ability to inhibit the reaction of non-enzymatic glycosylation of proteins in vitro was held, and 11 the most active compounds of them were selected, also the relationship «structure – activity» was investigated. An essential part of the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and its complications is non-enzymatic glycosylation of proteins. However, modern endocrinology lacks clinically effective medicines for its correction.

  10. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the clinical potential of dexpramipexole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corcia P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Philippe Corcia,1 Paul H Gordon21Centre SLA, CHRU de Tours, Tours, France; UMR INSERM U930, Université François Rabelais de Tours (PC, Tours, France; 2AP-HP, Hôpital de la Pitié-Salpêtrière, Département des Maladies du Système Nerveux (PHG, Paris, FranceAbstract: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disorder that leads to progressive weakness from loss of motor neurons and death on average in less than 3 years after symptom onset. No clear causes have been found and just one medication, riluzole, extends survival. Researchers have identified some of the cellular processes that occur after disease onset, including mitochondrial dysfunction, protein aggregation, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, inflammation, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial disease may be a primary event in neurodegeneration or occur secondary to other cellular processes, and may itself contribute to oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, and apoptosis. Clinical trials currently aim to slow disease progression by testing drugs that impact one or more of these pathways. While every agent tested in the 18 years after the approval of riluzole has been ineffective, basic and clinical research methods in ALS have become dramatically more sophisticated. Dexpramipexole (RPPX, the R(+ enantiomer of pramiprexole, which is approved for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson disease, carries perhaps the currently largest body of pre- and early clinical data that support testing in ALS. The neuroprotective properties of RPPX in various models of neurodegeneration, including the ALS murine model, may be produced through protective actions on mitochondria. Early phase trials in human ALS suggest that the drug can be taken safely by patients in doses that provide neuroprotection in preclinical models. A Phase III trial to test the efficacy of RPPX in ALS is underway.Keywords: dexpramipexole, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, survival, clinical trials, neurodegeneration

  11. Antimicrobial potentials of silver colloidal (nanorods) on clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial resistance in developing countries has long been an issue of major concern. Nanotechnology has become an eye opener for the intervention on multiple drug resistance organisms. In this study we investigated the antimicrobial potentials of Silver Nitrate (nanorods) solution used in managing infectious ...

  12. Active surveillance for clinically localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik B; Brasso, Klaus; Klotz, Laurence H

    2014-01-01

    Active surveillance (AS) has been introduced as an observational strategy to delay or avoid curative treatment without compromising long-term cancer-specific survival. The 10 studies included in this review, published between 2008 and 2013, generally agreed upon patients selection for the AS stra......Active surveillance (AS) has been introduced as an observational strategy to delay or avoid curative treatment without compromising long-term cancer-specific survival. The 10 studies included in this review, published between 2008 and 2013, generally agreed upon patients selection...

  13. Development of a portable blood irradiator for potential clinical uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hungate, F.P.

    1988-12-01

    This document provides an account of the development of a fully portable blood irradiator and the evaluation of its safety and efficacy when implanted in goats, sheep, a baboon and dogs. The program was initiated because the control of lymphocyte populations by irradiation is a potential method for improving success in organ or tissue transplantation and for treating a variety of blood diseases. 15 refs., 27 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Breath acetone as a potential marker in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzsányi, Veronika; Péter Kalapos, Miklós

    2017-06-01

    In recent decades, two facts have changed the opinion of researchers about the function of acetone in humans. Firstly, it has turned out that acetone cannot be regarded as simply a waste product of metabolism, because there are several pathways in which acetone is produced or broken down. Secondly, methods have emerged making possible its detection in exhaled breath, thereby offering an attractive alternative to investigation of blood and urine samples. From a clinical point of view the measurement of breath acetone levels is important, but there are limitations to its wide application. These limitations can be divided into two classes, technical and biological limits. The technical limits include the storage of samples, detection threshold, standardization of clinical settings, and the price of instruments. When considering the biological ranges of acetone, personal factors such as race, age, gender, weight, food consumption, medication, illicit drugs, and even profession/class have to be taken into account to use concentration information for disorders. In some diseases such as diabetes mellitus and lung cancer, as well as in nutrition-related behavior such as starvation and ketogenic diet, breath acetone has been extensively examined. At the same time, there is a lack of investigations in other cases in which ketosis is also evident, such as in alcoholism or an inborn error of metabolism. In summary, the detection of acetone in exhaled breath is a useful and promising tool for diagnosis and it can be used as a marker to follow the effectiveness of treatments in some disorders. However, further endeavors are needed for clarification of the exact distribution of acetone in different body compartments and evaluation of its complex role in humans, especially in those cases in which a ketotic state also occurs.

  15. Intermittent Feeding Schedules—Behavioural Consequences and Potential Clinical Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Murphy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Food availability and associated sensory cues such as olfaction are known to trigger a range of hormonal and behavioural responses. When food availability is predictable these physiological and behavioural responses can become entrained to set times and occur in anticipation of food rather than being dependent on the food-related cues. Here we summarise the range of physiological and behavioural responses to food when the time of its availability is unpredictable, and consider the potential to manipulate feeding patterns for benefit in metabolic and mental health.

  16. Clinically Relevant Pharmacological Strategies That Reverse MDMA-Induced Brain Hyperthermia Potentiated by Social Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Ren, Suelynn; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2016-01-01

    MDMA-induced hyperthermia is highly variable, unpredictable, and greatly potentiated by the social and environmental conditions of recreational drug use. Current strategies to treat pathological MDMA-induced hyperthermia in humans are palliative and marginally effective, and there are no specific pharmacological treatments to counteract this potentially life-threatening condition. Here, we tested the efficacy of mixed adrenoceptor blockers carvedilol and labetalol, and the atypical antipsychotic clozapine, in reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia. We injected rats with a moderate non-toxic dose of MDMA (9 mg/kg) during social interaction, and we administered potential treatment drugs after the development of robust hyperthermia (>2.5 °C), thus mimicking the clinical situation of acute MDMA intoxication. Brain temperature was our primary focus, but we also simultaneously recorded temperatures from the deep temporal muscle and skin, allowing us to determine the basic physiological mechanisms of the treatment drug action. Carvedilol was modestly effective in attenuating MDMA-induced hyperthermia by moderately inhibiting skin vasoconstriction, and labetalol was ineffective. In contrast, clozapine induced a marked and immediate reversal of MDMA-induced hyperthermia via inhibition of brain metabolic activation and blockade of skin vasoconstriction. Our findings suggest that clozapine, and related centrally acting drugs, might be highly effective for reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia in emergency clinical situations, with possible life-saving results.

  17. Potential clinical impact of normal-tissue intrinsic radiosensitivity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentzen, Soeren M.

    1997-01-01

    A critical appraisal is given of the possible benefit from a reliable pre-treatment knowledge of individual normal-tissue sensitivity to radiotherapy. The considerations are in part, but not exclusively, based on the recent experience with in vitro colony-forming assays of the surviving fraction at 2 Gy, the SF 2 . Three strategies are reviewed: (1) to screen for rare cases with extreme radiosensitivity, so-called over-reactors, and treat these with reduced total dose, (2) to identify the sensitive tail of the distribution of 'normal' radiosensitivities, refer these patients to other treatment, and to escalate the dose to the remaining patients, or (3) to individualize dose prescriptions based on individual radiosensitivity, i.e. treating to isoeffect rather than to a specific dose-fractionation schedule. It is shown that these strategies will have a small, if any, impact on routine radiotherapy. Screening for over-reactors is hampered by the low prevalence of these among otherwise un-selected patients that leads to a low positive predictive value of in vitro radiosensitivity assays. It is argued, that this problem may persist even if the noise on current assays could be reduced to (the unrealistic value of) zero, simply because of the large biological variation in SF 2 . Removing the sensitive tail of the patient population, will only have a minor effect on the dose that could be delivered to the remaining patients, because of the sigmoid shape of empirical dose-response relationships. Finally, individualizing dose prescriptions based exclusively on information from a normal-tissue radiosensitivity assay, leads to a nearly symmetrical distribution of dose-changes that would produce a very small gain, or even a loss, of tumor control probability if implemented in the clinic. From a theoretical point of view, other strategies could be devised and some of these are considered in this review. Right now the most promising clinical use of in vitro radiosensitivity

  18. Fructose use in clinical nutrition: metabolic effects and potential consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Sandra; Seematter, Gérald; Seyssel, Kevin

    2017-07-01

    The current article presents recent findings on the metabolic effects of fructose. Fructose has always been considered as a simple 'caloric' hexose only metabolized by splanchnic tissues. Nevertheless, there is growing evidence that fructose acts as a second messenger and induces effects throughout the human body. Recent discoveries made possible with the evolution of technology have highlighted that fructose induces pleiotropic effects on different tissues. The fact that all these tissues express the specific fructose carrier GLUT5 let us reconsider that fructose is not only a caloric hexose, but could also be a potential actor of some behaviors and metabolic pathways. The physiological relevance of fructose as a metabolic driver is pertinent regarding recent scientific literature.

  19. Potential and clinical utility of stem cells in cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korff Krause

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Korff Krause, Carsten Schneider, Kai Jaquet, Karl-Heinz KuckHanseatic Heart Center Hamburg, Department of Cardiology, Asklepios Hospital St. Georg, Hamburg, GermanyAbstract: The recent identification of bone marrow-derived adult stem cells and other types of stem cells that could improve heart function after transplantation have raised high expectations. The basic mechanisms have been studied mostly in murine models. However, these experiments revealed controversial results on transdifferentiation vs transfusion of adult stem cells vs paracrine effects of these cells, which is still being debated. Moreover, the reproducibility of these results in precisely translated large animal models is still less well investigated. Despite these weaknesses results of several clinical trials including several hundreds of patients with ischemic heart disease have been published. However, there are no solid data showing that any of these approaches can regenerate human myocardium. Even the effectiveness of cell therapy in these approaches is doubtful. In future we need in this important field of regenerative medicine: i more experimental data in large animals that are closer to the anatomy and physiology of humans, including data on dose effects, comparison of different cell types and different delivery routes; ii a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the fate of transplanted cells; iii more intensive research on genuine regenerative medicine, applying genetic regulation and cell engineering.Keywords: stem cells, cardiovascular disease

  20. Clinical Activity in General Practice and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter

    2015-01-01

    , and to analyse how a suspicion influenced the demand for health care services and predicted a future diagnosis of serious disease - to investigate whether variation in GPs’ diagnostic activity influences cancer patients’ prognosis in relation to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and prostate cancer....... In the future, we need to learn to differentiate between indolent and aggressive prostate cancers. This may, again, leave room for PSA testing as a screening tool. Our findings do indicate a small positive effect of more lower endoscopies, which could be investigated in an intervention study where some GPs...... are randomised to a more liberal access to lower endoscopies. Alongside this, we need to keep on exploring alternative approaches including the use of iFOBT in symptomatic patients. Overall, this thesis indicates that the role of GPs in the diagnosis of cancer should be strengthened through easy access...

  1. Potential antibacterial activity of some Saudi Arabia honey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed G. Hegazi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential antibacterial activity of some Saudi Arabia honey against selected bacterial strains of medical importance. Materials and Methods: A total of 10 Saudi Arabia honey used to evaluate their antimicrobial activity against some antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacterial strains. The bacterial strains were Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results: The antibacterial activity of Saudi honey against five bacterial strains showed different levels of inhibition according to the type of honey. The overall results showed that the potential activity was differing according to the pathogen and honey type. Conclusion: It could be concluded that the Saudi honey inhibit the growth of bacterial strains and that honey can be used as complementary antimicrobial agent against selected pathogenic bacteria.

  2. Potential Clinical Implications of the Urotensin II Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Kane

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Urotensin-II (UII, which binds to its receptor UT, plays an important role in the heart, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal gland and CNS. In the vasculature, it acts as a potent endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor and endothelium-dependent vasodilator. In disease states, this constriction-dilation equilibrium is disrupted. There is an upregulation of the UII system in heart disease, metabolic syndrome and kidney failure. The increase in UII release and UT expression suggest that UII system may be implicated in the pathology and pathogenesis of these diseases by causing an increase in ACAT-1 activity leading to SMC proliferation and foam cell infiltration, insulin resistance (DMII, as well as inflammation, high blood pressure and plaque formation. Recently, UT antagonists such as SB-611812, palosuran, and most recently a piperazino-isoindolinone based antagonist have been developed in the hope of better understanding the UII system and treating its associated diseases.

  3. Long-term potentiation and long-term depression: a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy V.P. Bliss

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term potentiation and long-term depression are enduring changes in synaptic strength, induced by specific patterns of synaptic activity, that have received much attention as cellular models of information storage in the central nervous system. Work in a number of brain regions, from the spinal cord to the cerebral cortex, and in many animal species, ranging from invertebrates to humans, has demonstrated a reliable capacity for chemical synapses to undergo lasting changes in efficacy in response to a variety of induction protocols. In addition to their physiological relevance, long-term potentiation and depression may have important clinical applications. A growing insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes, and technological advances in non-invasive manipulation of brain activity, now puts us at the threshold of harnessing long-term potentiation and depression and other forms of synaptic, cellular and circuit plasticity to manipulate synaptic strength in the human nervous system. Drugs may be used to erase or treat pathological synaptic states and non-invasive stimulation devices may be used to artificially induce synaptic plasticity to ameliorate conditions arising from disrupted synaptic drive. These approaches hold promise for the treatment of a variety of neurological conditions, including neuropathic pain, epilepsy, depression, amblyopia, tinnitus and stroke.

  4. The developmental potential of art activities at the preschool age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Večanski Vera D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In traditional approaches to the teaching of art and arts activities at the preschool age, art has been viewed mostly in terms of emotional self-expression and development. According to this view, art and arts activities foster the development of creativity, imagination and emotions, but little consideration is given to their link to cognitive processes and to their synthetic character. In general education, art and arts activities are often relegated to marginal status. This paper presents a theoretical examination of the potential of arts activities to enhance the development of a well-rounded personality in children. Through a theoretical analysis of the relevant literature, research and ideas in recent theory which emphasize the synthetic character of art, the potential of arts activities in all segments of development and creativity at the preschool age has been examined. However, in obtaining the full benefit of arts activities in practice, the manner in which arts activities with children at this age are carried out is extremely important. Of particular importance in this process is the influence and role of early childhood educators, who should act as mediators, partners and co-explorers, facilitating, supporting, enriching and participating in the process of free exploration and creativity. Giving primacy to these roles of a teacher would help bring about a change in the child's position in early childhood education and would also change and expand the child's range of activities.

  5. Structurally modified fatty acids - clinical potential as tracers of metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudczak, R.; Schmoliner, R.; Angelberger, P.; Knapp, F.F.; Goodman, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Recently 15-p-iodophenyl-betamethyl-pentadecanoic acid (BMPPA) was proposed for myocardial scintigraphy, as possible probe of metabolic processes other than β-oxidation. In 19 patients myocardial scintigraphy was done after i.v. BMPPA (2 to 4 mCi). Data were collected (LAO 45 0 /14; anterior/5) for 100 minutes in the fasted patients. From heart (H) and liver (L) organ to background (BG) ratios were calculated, and the elimination (E) behavior was analyzed from BG (V. cava region) corrected time activity curves. In 10 patients plasma and urine were examined. By CHCl 3 /MeOH extraction of plasma samples (90 min. pi) both in water and in organic medium soluble catabolites were found. TLC fractionation showed that those were co-migrating, compared to standards, with benzoic acid, BMPPA and triglycerides. In urine (0 to 2h pi: 4.1% dose) hippuric acid was found. It is concluded that BMPPA is a useful agent for myocardial scintigraphy. Its longer retention in the heart compared to unbranched radioiodinated fatty acids may facilitate SPECT studies. Rate of elimination and plasma analysis indicate the metabolic breakdown of BMPPA. Yet, the complexity of the supposed mechanism may impede curve interpretation in terms of specific metabolic pathways. 19 refs., 5 tabs

  6. Antibacterial activity of essential oils: potential applications in food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burt, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Due to its antibacterial activity, oregano oil has lately become interesting as a potential 'natural' food preservative. Oregano oil was found to be a fast acting and effective inhibitor of a strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7, the causative agent of a serious gastro-enteritis, and was lethal to

  7. Potential clinical efficacy of intensity-modulated conformal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeks, Sanford L.; Buatti, John M.; Bova, Francis J.; Friedman, William A.; Mendenhall, William M.; Zlotecki, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the potential benefit of using intensity-modulated conformal therapy for a variety of lesions currently treated with stereotactic radiosurgery or conventional radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated conformal treatment plans were generated for small intracranial lesions, as well as head and neck, lung, breast, and prostate cases, using the Peacock Plan[reg] treatment-planning system (Nomos Corporation). For small intracranial lesions, intensity-modulated conformal treatment plans were compared with stereotactic radiosurgery treatment plans generated for patient treatment at the University of Florida Shands Cancer Center. For other sites (head and neck, lung, breast, and prostate), plans generated using the Peacock Plan[reg] were compared with conventional treatment plans, as well as beam's-eye-view conformal treatment plans. Plan comparisons were accomplished through conventional qualitative review of two-dimensional (2D) dose distributions in conjunction with quantitative techniques, such as dose-volume histograms, dosimetric statistics, normal tissue complication probabilities, tumor control probabilities, and objective numerical scoring. Results: For small intracranial lesions, there is little difference between intensity-modulated conformal treatment planning and radiosurgery treatment planning in the conformation of high isodose lines with the target volume. However, stereotactic treatment planning provides a steeper dose gradient outside the target volume and, hence, a lower normal tissue toxicity index. For extracranial sites, objective numerical scores for beam's-eye-view and intensity-modulated conformal planning techniques are superior to scores for conventional treatment plans. The beam's-eye-view planning technique prevents geographic target misses and better excludes healthy tissues from the treatment portal. Compared with scores for the beam's-eye-view planning technique, scores for

  8. Research-active clinical nurses: against all odds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedlecki, Sandra L; Albert, Nancy M

    2017-03-01

    To develop a theoretical understanding of factors that impact decisions of clinical nurses to conduct a research study. Only a small percentage of all nurses are research-active and even fewer clinical nurses are research-active. Several researchers have explored barriers to research activity by clinical nurses, but few have examined why, in spite of all odds, some clinical nurses are research-active. As the purpose of this study was to develop a theoretical understanding of the research-active nurse, a grounded theory approach was used. The sample interviewed for this study consisted of registered nurses (n = 26) who worked in a hospital or ambulatory setting, had daily direct patient contact and had participated as principal investigator on at least one completed clinical nursing research study that was not in fulfilment of an educational requirement. The interviews were digitally recorded and analysed by two researchers using the constant comparative method. The findings from this study suggest that the conduct of research by clinical nurses was the direct result of a clinical trigger, characteristics and beliefs of the nurse about research and their role in generating knowledge, and the presence of support conditions, such as a research mentor. Clinical nurses can and do conduct research, in spite of constraints due to a lack of time, money and/or knowledge, if they have access to research mentors and are practising in a research-supportive environment. Nurses at the bedside are in a unique position to identify problems most in need of solutions. Findings from this study provide a foundation upon which to develop and test various programmes that seek to increase the number of clinical nurses who are research-active. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Cooperative activity and its potential for learning in tertiary education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cirila Peklaj

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A learning situation can be structured in different ways, as an individual, competitive, or cooperative activity. Each of these structures can be used for different purposes and can lead to different learning outcomes. This paper focuses on cooperative activity and its potential for learning in tertiary education. After defining cooperative activity (or, in a broader sense, learning in interaction and introducing the CAMS theoretical framework to analyse cooperative activity, the main discussion focuses on the theoretical reasons for the usefulness of group learning and on the research of effects of cooperative learning on cognitive (metacognitive, affective-motivational and social processes in university students. The key elements that should be established for successful cooperation are also discussed. At the end, a new direction in using cooperative activity in learning—computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL, which emerged with rapid technology development in the last two decades—is presented and discussed.

  10. Improving the Clinical Pharmacologic Assessment of Abuse Potential: Part 1: Regulatory Context and Risk Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Edward M

    2018-02-01

    This article brings to the attention of drug developers the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) recent final Guidance to Industry on Assessment of Abuse Potential and provides practical suggestions about compliance with the Guidance. The Guidance areas are reviewed, analyzed, and placed in the context of current scientific knowledge and best practices to mitigate regulatory risk. The Guidance provides substantial new detail on what needs to be done at all stages of drug development for central nervous system-active drugs. However, because many psychopharmacologic agents have unique preclinical and clinical features, the plan for each agent needs to be not only carefully prepared but also reviewed and approved by the FDA. Examples are provided where assumptions about interpretation of the Guidance can delay development. If the expertise and experience needed for assessing abuse potential during drug development do not exist within a company, external preclinical and clinical expert should be involved. Consultation with the FDA is encouraged and important because the specific requirements for each drug will vary.

  11. Profile of bosutinib and its clinical potential in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller-von Amsberg G

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Gunhild Keller-von Amsberg,1 Steffen Koschmieder21Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Cancer Center Hamburg, University Hospital Hamburg Eppendorf, 2Department of Medicine (Hematology, Oncology, and Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center of Aachen and RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, GermanyAbstract: Bosutinib (SKI-606 is an orally available, once-daily, dual Src and Abl kinase inhibitor with promising clinical potential in first-, second-, and third-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Bosutinib effectively inhibits wild-type BCR-ABL and most imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL mutations except for V299L and T315I. Low hematologic toxicity is a remarkable characteristic of this novel second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and this has been ascribed to its minimal activity against the platelet-derived growth factor receptor and KIT. Low-grade, typically self-limiting diarrhea, which usually appears within the first few weeks after treatment initiation, represents the predominant toxicity of bosutinib. Other treatment-associated adverse events are mostly mild to moderate. Bosutinib has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of chronic, accelerated, or blast phase Philadelphia chromosome-positive CML in adult patients with resistance or intolerance to prior therapy. This review summarizes the main properties of bosutinib and the currently available data on its clinical potential in the treatment of CML.Keywords: bosutinib, chronic myeloid leukemia, BCR-ABL, Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, point mutation, imatinib resistance

  12. Anodal sensory nerve action potentials: From physiological understanding to potential clinical applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leote, Joao; Pereira, Pedro; Cabib, Christopher; Cipullo, Federica; Valls-Sole, Josep

    2016-06-01

    Low-intensity electrical stimuli of digital nerves may generate a double peak potential (DPp), composed of a cathodal (caAP) and an anodal (anAP) potential in orthodromic recordings. We studied the effects on caAP and anAP of stimuli of variable intensity, duration, and frequency. We also applied a conditioning stimulus to study potential differences in recovery time. The anAP was obtained in 33 of 40 healthy subjects (82.5%) and 4 of 20 patients with various types of sensory neuropathies (20%). Changes in stimulus duration and intensity had reciprocal effects on the amplitude of the anAP and the caAP. There were significant differences in recovery time between caAP and anAP after a conditioning stimulus. The caAP and anAP are 2 interdependent waveforms generated by different effects of the same stimulus over axons at the verge of depolarization. Muscle Nerve 53: 897-905, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Potential Moderators of Physical Activity on Brain Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina L. Leckie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related cognitive decline is linked to numerous molecular, structural, and functional changes in the brain. However, physical activity is a promising method of reducing unfavorable age-related changes. Physical activity exerts its effects on the brain through many molecular pathways, some of which are regulated by genetic variants in humans. In this paper, we highlight genes including apolipoprotein E (APOE, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT along with dietary omega-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, as potential moderators of the effect of physical activity on brain health. There are a growing number of studies indicating that physical activity might mitigate the genetic risks for disease and brain dysfunction and that the combination of greater amounts of DHA intake with physical activity might promote better brain function than either treatment alone. Understanding whether genes or other lifestyles moderate the effects of physical activity on neurocognitive health is necessary for delineating the pathways by which brain health can be enhanced and for grasping the individual variation in the effectiveness of physical activity interventions on the brain and cognition. There is a need for future research to continue to assess the factors that moderate the effects of physical activity on neurocognitive function.

  14. Operationalizing physical literacy: The potential of active video games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haichun Sun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The core idea of physical literacy is a mind-body integrated, holistic approach to physical activity. A physically literate individual is expected to be cognitively knowledgeable, physically competent, and mentally motivated for a physically active life throughout the lifespan. The advancement of technology in recent years, especially those in active video games (AVGs, seems to have allowed the mind-body integrated physical activity accessible to children at all ages. This article reviews findings from research and critique research on AVGs in light with the theoretical and pedagogical tenets of physical literacy and, on the basis of the review, elaborates the potential that AVGs could contribute to enhancing children's physical literacy.

  15. Potentiation of antibiotic activity by Eugenia uniflora and Eugenia jambolanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Henrique D M; Costa, José G M; Falcão-Silva, Vivyanne S; Siqueira-Júnior, José P; Lima, Edeltrudes O

    2010-08-01

    This is the first report about the modifying antibiotic activity of Eugenia uniflora L. and Eugenia jambolanum L. In this study the ethanol extract of E. uniflora and E. jambolanum was tested for their antimicrobial activity against strains of Escherichia coli. The growth of the two strains of E. coli bacteria tested was not inhibited in a clinically relevant form by the extract. The minimal inhibitory concentration was >or=1,024 microg/mL for both strains of E. coli assayed. Synergism between this extract and gentamicin was demonstrated. In the same extract synergism was observed between chlorpromazine and kanamycin and between amikacin and tobramycin, indicating the involvement of an efflux system in the resistance to these aminoglycosides. It is therefore suggested that extracts from E. uniflora L. and E. jambolanum L. could be used as a source of plant-derived natural products with modifying antibiotic activity to gentamicin.

  16. Are research papers reporting results from nutrigenetics clinical research a potential source of biohype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenne, R; Hurlimann, T; Godard, Béatrice

    2012-01-01

    Nutrigenetics is a promising field, but the achievability of expected benefits is challenged by the methodological limitations that are associated with clinical research in that field. The mere existence of these limitations suggests that promises about potential outcomes may be premature. Thus, benefits claimed in scientific journal articles in which these limitations are not acknowledged might stimulate biohype. This article aims to examine whether nutrigenetics clinical research articles are a potential source of biohype. Of the 173 articles identified, 16 contained claims in which clinical applications were extrapolated from study results. The methodological limitations being incompletely acknowledged, these articles could potentially be a source of biohype.

  17. Clinical potential of regulatory T cell therapy in liver diseases: An overview and current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Claire Jeffery

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for liver transplantation and the decline in donor organs has highlighted the need for alternative novel therapies to prevent chronic active hepatitis, which eventually leads to liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Liver histology of chronic hepatitis is composed of both effector and regulatory lymphocytes. The human liver contains different subsets of effector lymphocytes, that are kept in check by a subpopulation of T cells known as Regulatory T cells (Treg. The balance of effector and regulatory lymphocytes generally determines the outcome of hepatic inflammation: resolution, fulminant hepatitis or chronic active hepatitis. Thus, maintaining and adjusting this balance is crucial in immunological manipulation of liver diseases. One of the options to restore this balance is to enrich Treg in the liver disease patients.Advances in the knowledge of Treg biology and development of clinical grade isolation reagents, cell sorting equipment and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP facilities have paved the way to apply Treg cells as a potential therapy to restore peripheral self-tolerance in autoimmune liver diseases, chronic rejection and post-transplantation. Past and on-going studies have applied Treg in type-1 diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, graft versus host diseases (GVHD and solid organ transplantations. There have not been any new therapies for the autoimmune liver diseases for more than three decades; thus the clinical potential for the application of autologous Treg cell therapy to treat autoimmune liver disease is an attractive and novel option. However, it is fundamental to understand the deep immunology, genetic profiles, biology, homing behavior and microenvironment of Treg before applying the cells to the patients.

  18. Antimicrobial potential of Dialium guineense (Wild.) stem bark on some clinical isolates in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olajubu, Fa; Akpan, I; Ojo, DA; Oluwalana, Sa

    2012-01-01

    The persistent increase in the number of antibiotic-resistant strains of microorganisms has led to the development of more potent but also more expensive antibiotics. In most developing countries of the world these antibiotics are not readily affordable, thus making compliance difficult. This calls for research into alternative sources of antimicrobials. Dialium guineense is a shrub of the family Leguminosae. Its stem bark is used for the treatment of cough, toothache, and bronchitis. Despite the acclaimed efficacy of D guineense, there is no scientific evidence in its support. This work was carried out to assess the antimicrobial activity of D guineense in vitro against some clinical isolates. D guineense stem bark was collected and 50 gm of air-dried and powdered stem bark of the plant was soaked for 72 hours in 1 l of each of the six solvents used in this study. Each mixture was refluxed, agitated at 200 rpm for 1 hour, filtered using Whatman No. 1 filter paper and, finally, freeze dried. The extracts were then tested for antimicrobial activity using the agar diffusion method. The highest percentage yield of 23.2% was obtained with ethanol. Phytochemical screening showed that D guineense contains anthraquinone, alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, and saponins. The antimicrobial activity of the extracts revealed a broad spectrum of activity, with Salmonella typhi and Staphylococcus aureusa showing the greatest zones of inhibition (18.0 mm). Only Candida albicans among the fungi tested was inhibited by the extract. The greatest zone of inhibition among the fractions was 16.0 mm. D guineense exhibited bactericidal activity at the 7th and 9th hours against Streptococcus pneumoniae and S. aureus 25923 while the 10th hour against S. typhi and C. albicans. The greatest activity was noted against S pneumoniae, where there was reduced viable cell count after 6 hours of exposure. Stem bark extract of D guineense (Wild.) has the potential to be developed into an antimicrobial

  19. Active tectonics and earthquake potential of the Myanmar region

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yu; Sieh, Kerry; Tun, Soe Thura; Lai, Kuang-Yin; Myint, Than

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes geomorphologic evidence for the principal neotectonic features of Myanmar and its immediate surroundings. We combine this evidence with published structural, geodetic, and seismic data to present an overview of the active tectonic architecture of the region and its seismic potential. Three tectonic systems accommodate oblique collision of the Indian plate with Southeast Asia and extrusion of Asian territory around the eastern syntaxis of the Himalayan mountain range. Subd...

  20. Microenvironmental influence on pre-clinical activity of polo-like kinase inhibition in multiple myeloma: implications for clinical translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas W McMillin

    Full Text Available Polo-like kinases (PLKs play an important role in cell cycle progression, checkpoint control and mitosis. The high mitotic index and chromosomal instability of advanced cancers suggest that PLK inhibitors may be an attractive therapeutic option for presently incurable advanced neoplasias with systemic involvement, such as multiple myeloma (MM. We studied the PLK 1, 2, 3 inhibitor BI 2536 and observed potent (IC50<40 nM and rapid (commitment to cell death <24 hrs in vitro activity against MM cells in isolation, as well as in vivo activity against a traditional subcutaneous xenograft mouse model. Tumor cells in MM patients, however, don't exist in isolation, but reside in and interact with the bone microenvironment. Therefore conventional in vitro and in vivo preclinical assays don't take into account how interactions between MM cells and the bone microenvironment can potentially confer drug resistance. To probe this question, we performed tumor cell compartment-specific bioluminescence imaging assays to compare the preclinical anti-MM activity of BI 2536 in vitro in the presence vs. absence of stromal cells or osteoclasts. We observed that the presence of these bone marrow non-malignant cells led to decreased anti-MM activity of BI 2536. We further validated these results in an orthotopic in vivo mouse model of diffuse MM bone lesions where tumor cells interact with non-malignant cells of the bone microenvironment. We again observed that BI 2536 had decreased activity in this in vivo model of tumor-bone microenvironment interactions highlighting that, despite BI 2536's promising activity in conventional assays, its lack of activity in microenvironmental models raises concerns for its clinical development for MM. More broadly, preclinical drug testing in the absence of relevant tumor microenvironment interactions may overestimate potential clinical activity, thus explaining at least in part the gap between preclinical vs. clinical efficacy in MM

  1. Clinically relevant potential drug-drug interactions among outpatients: A nationwide database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazbar, Janja; Locatelli, Igor; Horvat, Nejc; Kos, Mitja

    2018-06-01

    Adverse drug events due to drug-drug interactions (DDIs) represent a considerable public health burden, also in Slovenia. A better understanding of the most frequently occurring potential DDIs may enable safer pharmacotherapy and minimize drug-related problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and predictors of potential DDIs among outpatients in Slovenia. An analysis of potential DDIs was performed using health claims data on prescription drugs from a nationwide database. The Lexi-Interact Module was used as the reference source of interactions. The influence of patient-specific predictors on the risk of potential clinically relevant DDIs was evaluated using logistic regression model. The study population included 1,179,803 outpatients who received 15,811,979 prescriptions. The total number of potential DDI cases identified was 3,974,994, of which 15.6% were potentially clinically relevant. Altogether, 9.3% (N = 191,213) of the total population in Slovenia is exposed to clinically relevant potential DDIs, and the proportion is higher among women and the elderly. After adjustment for cofactors, higher number of medications and older age are associated with higher odds of clinically relevant potential DDIs. The burden of DDIs is highest with drug combinations that increase risk of bleeding, enhance CNS depression or anticholinergic effects or cause cardiovascular complications. The current study revealed that 1 in 10 individuals in the total Slovenian population is exposed to clinically relevant potential DDIs yearly. Taking into account the literature based conservative estimate that approximately 1% of potential DDIs result in negative health outcomes, roughly 1800 individuals in Slovenia experience an adverse health outcome each year as a result of clinically relevant potential interactions alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. In vitro activity of ivermectin against Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoaib Ashraf

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ivermectin is an endectocide against many parasites. Though being a macrocyclic lactone, its activity against bacteria has been less known, possibly due to the fact that micromolar concentrations at tissue levels are required to achieve a therapeutic effect. Among pathogenic bacteria of major medical significance, Staphylococcus aureus cause a number of diseases in a wide variety of hosts including humans and animals. It has been attributed as one of the most pathogenic organisms. The emergence of methicillin resistance has made the treatment of S. aureus even more difficult as it is now resistant to most of the available antibiotics. Thus, search for alternate anti-staphylococcal agents requires immediate attention. Methods Twenty-one clinical isolates of S. aureus were isolated from bovine milk collected from Lahore and Faisalabad Pakistan. Different anthelmintics including levamisole, albendazole and ivermectin were tested against S. aureus to determine their minimum inhibitory concentrations. This was followed-up by growth curve analysis, spot assay and time-kill kinetics. Results The results showed that ivermectin but not levamisole or albendazole exhibited a potent anti-staphylococcal activity at the concentrations of 6.25 and 12.5 μg/ml against two isolates. Interestingly, one of the isolate was sensitive while the other was resistant to methicillin/cefoxitin. Conclusions Our novel findings indicate that ivermectin has an anti-bacterial effect against certain S. aureus isolates. However, to comprehend why ivermectin did not inhibit the growth of all Staphylococci needs further investigation. Nevertheless, we have extended the broad range of known pharmacological effects of ivermectin. As pharmacology and toxicology of ivermectin are well known, its further development as an anti-staphylococcal agent is potentially appealing.

  3. Evaluation of Potential Impacts of Microbial Activity on Drift Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Wang

    2004-11-18

    ''Evaluation of Potential Impacts of Microbial Activity on Drift Chemistry'' focuses on the potential for microbial communities that could be active in repository emplacement drifts to influence the in-drift bulk chemical environment. This report feeds analyses to support the inclusion or exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), but this work is not expected to generate direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. The purpose was specified by, and the evaluation was performed and is documented in accordance with, ''Technical Work Plan For: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Analyses'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172402], Section 2.1). This report addresses all of the FEPs assigned by the technical work plan (TWP), including the development of exclusion arguments for FEPs that are not carried forward to the TSPA-LA. Except for an editorial correction noted in Section 6.2, there were no other deviations from the TWP. This report documents the completion of all assigned tasks, as follows (BSC 2004 DIRS 172402, Section 1.2.1): (1) Perform analyses to evaluate the potential for microbial activity in the waste emplacement drift under the constraints of anticipated physical and chemical conditions. (2) Evaluate uncertainties associated with these analyses. (3) Determine whether the potential for microbes warrants a feed to TSPA-LA to account for predicted effects on repository performance. (4) Provide information to address the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NUREG-1804) (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) and Key Technical Issues and agreements, as appropriate. (5) Develop information for inclusion or exclusion of FEPs.

  4. Evaluation of Potential Impacts of Microbial Activity on Drift Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Wang

    2004-01-01

    ''Evaluation of Potential Impacts of Microbial Activity on Drift Chemistry'' focuses on the potential for microbial communities that could be active in repository emplacement drifts to influence the in-drift bulk chemical environment. This report feeds analyses to support the inclusion or exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), but this work is not expected to generate direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. The purpose was specified by, and the evaluation was performed and is documented in accordance with, ''Technical Work Plan For: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Analyses'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172402], Section 2.1). This report addresses all of the FEPs assigned by the technical work plan (TWP), including the development of exclusion arguments for FEPs that are not carried forward to the TSPA-LA. Except for an editorial correction noted in Section 6.2, there were no other deviations from the TWP. This report documents the completion of all assigned tasks, as follows (BSC 2004 DIRS 172402, Section 1.2.1): (1) Perform analyses to evaluate the potential for microbial activity in the waste emplacement drift under the constraints of anticipated physical and chemical conditions. (2) Evaluate uncertainties associated with these analyses. (3) Determine whether the potential for microbes warrants a feed to TSPA-LA to account for predicted effects on repository performance. (4) Provide information to address the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NUREG-1804) (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) and Key Technical Issues and agreements, as appropriate. (5) Develop information for inclusion or exclusion of FEPs

  5. Potentially three distinct roles for hypoxic cell sensitizers in the clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J.D.; Raleigh, J.A.; Pedersen, J.E.; Ngan, J.; Shum, F.Y.

    1979-01-01

    Nitroaromatic drugs have been applied to radiation therapy on the basis of their effectiveness to enhance radiation damages selectively in hypoxic mammalian cells at nontoxic concentration. Such sensitizers could improve the rate of local tumor control by conventional radiotherapy in such cases that the resistance due to hypoxia in a limiting factor. The selective cytotoxicity of the drug to hypoxic cells is the second distinct action. A third potential role for nitroaromatic drugs could involve their use for the diagnosis of the number and location of hypoxic cells within tumors. The gain in therapeutic ratio by a factor from 5 to 10 is necessary before the full clinical impact of hypoxic cell radiosensitizers can be evaluated. The drugs selected for the use as clinical radiosensitizers were originally developed as the antibacterial agents with selective activity against anaerobes. The hypoxic cells in tumors are usually resistant to chemotherapy as well as resistant to radiation, and this specific drug action of sensitizers combined with that of an agent effective against oxygenated and cycling cells could possibly produce improved tumor cures. Electron-affinitive chemicals become selectively bound to the macromolecules of hypoxic mammalian cells by radiation-induced chemical reaction. This technique was used to identify by autoradiographic procedures the location of the radioactive nitrofurazone bound to hypoxic cells within multicellular spheroids. (Yamashita, S.)

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis disease activity measures: American College of Rheumatology recommendations for use in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jaclyn; Caplan, Liron; Yazdany, Jinoos; Robbins, Mark L; Neogi, Tuhina; Michaud, Kaleb; Saag, Kenneth G; O'Dell, James R; Kazi, Salahuddin

    2012-05-01

    Although the systematic measurement of disease activity facilitates clinical decision making in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), no recommendations currently exist on which measures should be applied in clinical practice in the US. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) convened a Working Group (WG) to comprehensively evaluate the validity, feasibility, and acceptability of available RA disease activity measures and derive recommendations for their use in clinical practice. The Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Disease Activity Measures Working Group conducted a systematic review of the literature to identify RA disease activity measures. Using exclusion criteria, input from an Expert Advisory Panel (EAP), and psychometric analysis, a list of potential measures was created. A survey was administered to rheumatologists soliciting input. The WG used these survey results in conjunction with the psychometric analyses to derive final recommendations. Systematic review of the literature resulted in identification of 63 RA disease activity measures. Application of exclusion criteria and ratings by the EAP narrowed the list to 14 measures for further evaluation. Practicing rheumatologists rated 9 of these 14 measures as most useful and feasible. From these 9 measures, the WG selected 6 with the best psychometric properties for inclusion in the final set of ACR-recommended RA disease activity measures. We recommend the Clinical Disease Activity Index, Disease Activity Score with 28-joint counts (erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein), Patient Activity Scale (PAS), PAS-II, Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data with 3 measures, and Simplified Disease Activity Index because they are accurate reflections of disease activity; are sensitive to change; discriminate well between low, moderate, and high disease activity states; have remission criteria; and are feasible to perform in clinical settings. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Fasting potentiates the anticancer activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors by strengthening MAPK signaling inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffa, Irene; D'Agostino, Vito; Damonte, Patrizia; Soncini, Debora; Cea, Michele; Monacelli, Fiammetta; Odetti, Patrizio; Ballestrero, Alberto; Provenzani, Alessandro; Longo, Valter D.; Nencioni, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are now the mainstay of treatment in many types of cancer. However, their benefit is frequently short-lived, mandating the search for safe potentiation strategies. Cycles of fasting enhance the activity of chemo-radiotherapy in preclinical cancer models and dietary approaches based on fasting are currently explored in clinical trials. Whether combining fasting with TKIs is going to be potentially beneficial remains unknown. Here we report that starvation conditions increase the ability of commonly administered TKIs, including erlotinib, gefitinib, lapatinib, crizotinib and regorafenib, to block cancer cell growth, to inhibit the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway and to strengthen E2F-dependent transcription inhibition. In cancer xenografts models, both TKIs and cycles of fasting slowed tumor growth, but, when combined, these interventions were significantly more effective than either type of treatment alone. In conclusion, cycles of fasting or of specifically designed fasting-mimicking diets should be evaluated in clinical studies as a means to potentiate the activity of TKIs in clinical use. PMID:25909220

  8. Potential Role of Activating Transcription Factor 5 during Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Vicari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stem cells are an abundant population of stem cells readily isolated from human adipose tissue that can differentiate into connective tissue lineages including bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle. Activating transcription factor 5 is a transcription factor of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB family. It is transcribed in two types of mRNAs (activating transcription factor 5 isoform 1 and activating transcription factor 5 isoform 2, encoding the same single 30-kDa protein. Although it is well demonstrated that it regulates the proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, little is known about its potential role in osteogenic differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of the two isoforms and protein during osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells. Our data indicate that activating transcription factor 5 is differentially expressed reaching a peak of expression at the stage of bone mineralization. These findings suggest that activating transcription factor 5 could play an interesting regulatory role during osteogenesis, which would provide a powerful tool to study bone physiology.

  9. Potential Role of Activating Transcription Factor 5 during Osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, Luisa; Calabrese, Giovanna; Forte, Stefano; Giuffrida, Raffaella; Colarossi, Cristina; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells are an abundant population of stem cells readily isolated from human adipose tissue that can differentiate into connective tissue lineages including bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle. Activating transcription factor 5 is a transcription factor of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) family. It is transcribed in two types of mRNAs (activating transcription factor 5 isoform 1 and activating transcription factor 5 isoform 2), encoding the same single 30-kDa protein. Although it is well demonstrated that it regulates the proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, little is known about its potential role in osteogenic differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of the two isoforms and protein during osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells. Our data indicate that activating transcription factor 5 is differentially expressed reaching a peak of expression at the stage of bone mineralization. These findings suggest that activating transcription factor 5 could play an interesting regulatory role during osteogenesis, which would provide a powerful tool to study bone physiology.

  10. Harnessing Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Clinical Trials for Treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases: Potential and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dana; Kim, Young Sam; Shin, Dong Wun; Park, Chang Shin; Kang, Ju Hee

    2016-10-01

    No disease-modifying therapies (DMT) for neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) have been established, particularly for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). It is unclear why candidate drugs that successfully demonstrate therapeutic effects in animal models fail to show disease-modifying effects in clinical trials. To overcome this hurdle, patients with homogeneous pathologies should be detected as early as possible. The early detection of AD patients using sufficiently tested biomarkers could demonstrate the potential usefulness of combining biomarkers with clinical measures as a diagnostic tool. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for NDs are being incorporated in clinical trials designed with the aim of detecting patients earlier, evaluating target engagement, collecting homogeneous patients, facilitating prevention trials, and testing the potential of surrogate markers relative to clinical measures. In this review we summarize the latest information on CSF biomarkers in NDs, particularly AD and PD, and their use in clinical trials. The large number of issues related to CSF biomarker measurements and applications has resulted in relatively few clinical trials on CSF biomarkers being conducted. However, the available CSF biomarker data obtained in clinical trials support the advantages of incorporating CSF biomarkers in clinical trials, even though the data have mostly been obtained in AD trials. We describe the current issues with and ongoing efforts for the use of CSF biomarkers in clinical trials and the plans to harness CSF biomarkers for the development of DMT and clinical routines. This effort requires nationwide, global, and multidisciplinary efforts in academia, industry, and regulatory agencies to facilitate a new era.

  11. Reassessing the Potential Activities of Plant CGI-58 Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Khatib

    Full Text Available Comparative Gene Identification-58 (CGI-58 is a widespread protein found in animals and plants. This protein has been shown to participate in lipolysis in mice and humans by activating Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL, the initial enzyme responsible for the triacylglycerol (TAG catabolism cascade. Human mutation of CGI-58 is the cause of Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome, an orphan disease characterized by a systemic accumulation of TAG which engenders tissue disorders. The CGI-58 protein has also been shown to participate in neutral lipid metabolism in plants and, in this case, a mutation again provokes TAG accumulation. Although its roles as an ATGL coactivator and in lipid metabolism are quite clear, the catalytic activity of CGI-58 is still in question. The acyltransferase activities of CGI-58 have been speculated about, reported or even dismissed and experimental evidence that CGI-58 expressed in E. coli possesses an unambiguous catalytic activity is still lacking. To address this problem, we developed a new set of plasmids and site-directed mutants to elucidate the in vivo effects of CGI-58 expression on lipid metabolism in E. coli. By analyzing the lipid composition in selected E. coli strains expressing CGI-58 proteins, and by reinvestigating enzymatic tests with adequate controls, we show here that recombinant plant CGI-58 has none of the proposed activities previously described. Recombinant plant and mouse CGI-58 both lack acyltransferase activity towards either lysophosphatidylglycerol or lysophosphatidic acid to form phosphatidylglycerol or phosphatidic acid and recombinant plant CGI-58 does not catalyze TAG or phospholipid hydrolysis. However, expression of recombinant plant CGI-58, but not mouse CGI-58, led to a decrease in phosphatidylglycerol in all strains of E. coli tested, and a mutation of the putative catalytic residues restored a wild-type phenotype. The potential activities of plant CGI-58 are subsequently discussed.

  12. Reassessing the Potential Activities of Plant CGI-58 Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatib, Abdallah; Arhab, Yani; Bentebibel, Assia; Abousalham, Abdelkarim; Noiriel, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Comparative Gene Identification-58 (CGI-58) is a widespread protein found in animals and plants. This protein has been shown to participate in lipolysis in mice and humans by activating Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the initial enzyme responsible for the triacylglycerol (TAG) catabolism cascade. Human mutation of CGI-58 is the cause of Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome, an orphan disease characterized by a systemic accumulation of TAG which engenders tissue disorders. The CGI-58 protein has also been shown to participate in neutral lipid metabolism in plants and, in this case, a mutation again provokes TAG accumulation. Although its roles as an ATGL coactivator and in lipid metabolism are quite clear, the catalytic activity of CGI-58 is still in question. The acyltransferase activities of CGI-58 have been speculated about, reported or even dismissed and experimental evidence that CGI-58 expressed in E. coli possesses an unambiguous catalytic activity is still lacking. To address this problem, we developed a new set of plasmids and site-directed mutants to elucidate the in vivo effects of CGI-58 expression on lipid metabolism in E. coli. By analyzing the lipid composition in selected E. coli strains expressing CGI-58 proteins, and by reinvestigating enzymatic tests with adequate controls, we show here that recombinant plant CGI-58 has none of the proposed activities previously described. Recombinant plant and mouse CGI-58 both lack acyltransferase activity towards either lysophosphatidylglycerol or lysophosphatidic acid to form phosphatidylglycerol or phosphatidic acid and recombinant plant CGI-58 does not catalyze TAG or phospholipid hydrolysis. However, expression of recombinant plant CGI-58, but not mouse CGI-58, led to a decrease in phosphatidylglycerol in all strains of E. coli tested, and a mutation of the putative catalytic residues restored a wild-type phenotype. The potential activities of plant CGI-58 are subsequently discussed. PMID:26745266

  13. Controversies surrounding the clinical potential of cinnamon for the management of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafehi, H; Ververis, K; Karagiannis, T C

    2012-06-01

    Obesity levels have increased significantly in the past five decades and are predicted to continue rising, resulting in important health implications. In particular, this has translated to an increase in the occurrence of type II diabetes mellitus (T2D). To alleviate associated problems, certain nutraceuticals have been considered as potential adjuncts or alternatives to conventional prescription drugs. Cinnamon, a commonly consumed spice originating from South East Asia, is currently being investigated as a potential preventative supplement and treatment for insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and T2D. Extensive in vitro evidence has shown that cinnamon may improve insulin resistance by preventing and reversing impairments in insulin signalling in skeletal muscle. In adipose tissue, it has been shown that cinnamon increases the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors including, PPARγ. This is comparable to the action of commonly used thiazolinediones, which are PPAR agonists. Studies have also shown that cinnamon has potent anti-inflammatory properties. However, numerous human clinical trials with cinnamon have been conducted with varying findings. While some studies have showed no beneficial effect, others have indicated improvements in cholesterol levels, systolic blood pressure, insulin sensitivity and postprandial glucose levels with cinnamon. However, the only measurement consistently improved by cinnamon consumption is fasting glucose levels. While it is still premature to suggest the use of cinnamon supplementation based on the evidence, further investigation into mechanisms of action is warranted. Apart from further characterization of genetic and epigenetic changes in model systems, systematic large-scale clinical trials are required. In this study, we discuss the mechanisms of action of cinnamon in the context of T2D and we highlight some of the associated controversies. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Antimicrobial Potential of Momordica charantia L. against Multiresistant Standard Species and Clinical Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena Filho, José Hardman Sátiro de; Lima, Rennaly de Freitas; Medeiros, Ana Claudia Dantas de; Pereira, Jozinete Vieira; Granville-Garcia, Ana Flávia; Costa, Edja Maria Melo de Brito

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial and antifungal potential in vitro of Momordica charantia L. against the microorganisms of clinical interest (standard strains and multiresistant isolates) in order to aggregate scientific information in relation to its use as a therapeutic product. M. charantia L. plant material was acquired in municipality of Malta, Paraiba, Brazil. The extract was obtained through maceration, filtration and then concentrated under reduced pressure in a rotary evaporator, resulting in a dough, and was then dried in an oven for 72 hours at 40°C. Antimicrobial action of ethanolic extract of seed M. charantia L. was evaluated based on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) against standard strains of bacteria, isolates multiresistant bacteria and Candida species, by microdilution in broth method. All organisms were sensitive to the extract, being considered strong antimicrobial activity (MIC and MBC/MFC charantia L. showed strong antimicrobial potential, with bactericidal and fungicidal profile, there is the prospect to constitute a new therapeutic strategy for the control of infections, particularly in multiresistant strains. The use of medicinal plants in treatment of infectious processes have an important function nowadays, due to the limitations of the use of synthetic antibiotics available, related specifically to the microbial resistance emergence.

  15. Clinical investigations of the therapeutic potential of ayahuasca: rationale and regulatory challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Dennis J

    2004-05-01

    Ayahuasca is a hallucinogenic beverage that is prominent in the ethnomedicine and shamanism of indigenous Amazonian tribes. Its unique pharmacology depends on the oral activity of the hallucinogen, N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), which results from inhibition of monoamine oxidase (MAO) by beta-carboline alkaloids. MAO is the enzyme that normally degrades DMT in the liver and gut. Ayahuasca has long been integrated into mestizo folk medicine in the northwest Amazon. In Brazil, it is used as a sacrament by several syncretic churches. Some of these organizations have incorporated in the United States. The recreational and religious use of ayahuasca in the United States, as well as "ayahuasca tourism" in the Amazon, is increasing. The current legal status of ayahuasca or its source plants in the United States is unclear, although DMT is a Schedule I controlled substance. One ayahuasca church has received favorable rulings in 2 federal courts in response to its petition to the Department of Justice for the right to use ayahuasca under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. A biomedical study of one of the churches, the Uñiao do Vegetal (UDV), indicated that ayahuasca may have therapeutic applications for the treatment of alcoholism, substance abuse, and possibly other disorders. Clinical studies conducted in Spain have demonstrated that ayahuasca can be used safely in normal healthy adults, but have done little to clarify its potential therapeutic uses. Because of ayahuasca's ill-defined legal status and variable botanical and chemical composition, clinical investigations in the United States, ideally under an approved Investigational New Drug (IND) protocol, are complicated by both regulatory and methodological issues. This article provides an overview of ayahuasca and discusses some of the challenges that must be overcome before it can be clinically investigated in the United States.

  16. Intestinal microflora as potential modifiers of sensitizer activity in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheldon, P.W.; Clarke, C.; Dawson, K.B.; Simpson, W.; Simmons, D.J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of mice (some bearing Lewis lung tumors), with penicillin (PEN) at 500 mg/l drinking water for one week prior to treatment with misonidazole (MIS), resulted in: the elimination of their anaerobic cecal flora; a decrease in MIS-induced neurotoxicity; an increase in pharmacological exposure to MIS; a decrease in MIS chemopotentiation; a probable increase in MIS radiosensitization; an increase in MIS induced hypothermia. Assuming no chemical interaction between PEN and MIS, these observations indicate that the intestinal microflora can influence the activity of MIS in vivo. The observed reduction in the neurotoxic but not the radiosensitizing potential of MIS following PEN treatment indicates a therapeutic benefit

  17. Exploring the efficiency potential for an active magnetic regenerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Dan; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Haffenden Bahl, Christian Robert

    2016-01-01

    A novel rotary state of the art active magnetic regenerator refrigeration prototype was used in an experimental investigation with special focus on efficiency. Based on an applied cooling load, measured shaft power, and pumping power applied to the active magnetic regenerator, a maximum second-la...... and replacing the packed spheres with a theoretical parallel plate regenerator. Furthermore, significant potential efficiency improvements through optimized regenerator geometries are estimated and discussed......., especially for the pressure drop, significant improvements can be made to the machine. However, a large part of the losses may be attributed to regenerator irreversibilities. Considering these unchanged, an estimated upper limit to the second-law efficiency of 30% is given by eliminating parasitic losses...

  18. Exploring Patient Activation in the Clinic: Measurement from Three Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, Christy J. W.; Ledford, Christopher C.; Childress, Marc A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To further conceptualize and operationalize patient activation (PA), using measures from patient, physician, and researcher perspectives. Data Source/Study Setting. Multimethod observation in 2010 within a family medicine clinic. Study Design. Part of an intervention with 130 patients with type 2 diabetes, this observational study…

  19. Interrelationship among physical activity, quality of life, clinical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A number of complexities surround the health and well-being of patients with type 2 diabetes. These difficulties relate to self-care efforts and outcomes, and several other factors play regulatory functions. This study was carried out to investigate the inter-relationship among physical activity, quality of life, and clinical and ...

  20. Active Interventions in Clinical Practice: Contributions of Gestalt Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Marilyn; Dolan, Mary M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes two dimensions of Gestalt therapy that can enhance clinical practice--orientation to the present and active-experimental style--and examines them in relation to some traditional principles of practice. Gestalt theory offers a method of discovery that is a combination of phenomenology and behaviorism. (JAC)

  1. Polymeric micelles for potentiated antiulcer and anticancer activities of naringin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Elham Abdelmonem; Abu Hashim, Irhan Ibrahim; Yusif, Rehab Mohammad; Shaaban, Ahmed Abdel Aziz; El-Sheakh, Ahmed Ramadan; Hamed, Mohammed Fawzy; Badria, Farid Abd Elreheem

    2018-01-01

    Naringin is one of the most interesting phytopharmaceuticals that has been widely investigated for various biological actions. Yet, its low water solubility, limited permeability, and suboptimal bioavailability limited its use. Therefore, in this study, polymeric micelles of naringin based on pluronic F68 (PF68) were developed, fully characterized, and optimized. The optimized formula was investigated regarding in vitro release, storage stability, and in vitro cytotoxicity vs different cell lines. Also, cytoprotection against ethanol-induced ulcer in rats and antitumor activity against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma in mice were investigated. Nanoscopic and nearly spherical 1:50 micelles with the mean diameter of 74.80±6.56 nm and narrow size distribution were obtained. These micelles showed the highest entrapment efficiency (EE%; 96.14±2.29). The micelles exhibited prolonged release up to 48 vs 10 h for free naringin. The stability of micelles was confirmed by insignificant changes in drug entrapment, particle size, and retention (%) (91.99±3.24). At lower dose than free naringin, effective cytoprotection of 1:50 micelles against ethanol-induced ulcer in rat model has been indicated by significant reduction in mucosal damage, gastric level of malondialdehyde, gastric expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, caspase-3, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, and interleukin-6 with the elevation of gastric reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase when compared with the positive control group. As well, these micelles provoked pronounced antitumor activity assessed by potentiated in vitro cytotoxicity particularly against colorectal carcinoma cells and tumor growth inhibition when compared with free naringin. In conclusion, 1:50 naringin–PF68 micelles can be represented as a potential stable nanodrug delivery system with prolonged release and enhanced antiulcer as well as antitumor activities. PMID:29497294

  2. Antioxidant activity and potential photoprotective from amazon native flora extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Francislene J; Caneschi, César A; Vieira, José L F; Barbosa, Wagner; Raposo, Nádia R B

    2016-08-01

    Plant species are sources of active compounds that can fight and/or prevent damage caused by reactive oxygen species, which enables the development of natural products that can help to prevent premature aging caused by exposure to solar radiation. This study assessed the antioxidant and photoprotective activities of six dried extracts of plants from the Brazilian Amazon biome. Plant extracts were prepared in 70% (v/v) ethanol by dynamic maceration for 72h in the dark, and then filtered, concentrated and lyophilized. The extracts were subjected to a phytochemical screening. The antioxidant activity was measured using a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay and the photoprotection assay was performed using the diffuse transmittance technique. The data obtained from the antioxidant activity assay was evaluated by Student's t-test for independent samples, with the aid of Statistical Package for Social Sciences v.14.0 for Windows software. The flavonoids represent a special metabolites class present in all analyzed extracts. The antioxidant activity (μgmL(-1)) decreased in the following order: Aniba canelilla (1.80±0.16), Brosimum acutifolium (2.84±0.38), Dalbergia monetaria (5.46±0.17) or Caesalpinia pyramidalis (6.45±1.18), Arrabidaea chica (15.35±0.86), and Aspidosperma nitidum (99.14±2.3). Only D. monetaria showed a considerable sun protection factor allowing for labeling (6.0±0.3). The D. monetaria extract was considered the most promising sample because it had optimal antioxidant and photoprotective activities against solar radiation, considering the limit established by regulatory agencies. These extracts with antioxidant potential can be used in photoprotective formulations, providing synergistic photoprotective effect or elevating the adeed value of the product. Additionally, these formulations are attractive to a population who searchs for products made with natural ingredients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Innovating information-delivery for potential clinical trials participants. What do patients want from multi-media resources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shneerson, Catherine; Windle, Richard; Cox, Karen

    2013-01-01

    To discover whether the provision of clinical trials information via a multi-media platform could better meet the needs, preferences and practices of potential cancer trial participants. A mixed qualitative and quantitative questionnaire was delivered to 72 participants from cancer support groups to elicit views on the provision and design features of multimedia resources in delivering clinical trials information. Perceived lack of information is an expressed barrier to clinical trials participation. Multimedia resources were viewed positively as a way to address this barrier by most potential clinical trials participants; in particular by helping to align information to individual needs, promote active engagement with information, and by allowing more control of the learning experience. Whilst text remained the most valued attribute of any resource, other highly rated attributes included the resource being simple to use, easily accessible, having a clear focus, incorporating examples and visual aids, and being interactive. Provision of support for the learning resource was also rated highly. As in other areas, such as education, multimedia resources may enhance the delivery and acceptance of information regarding clinical trials. Better alignment of information may have a positive impact on recruitment and retention into clinical trials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Decreased antitoxic activities among children with clinical episodes of malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; McKay, V; N'Jie, R

    1998-01-01

    Healthy Gambian children, children with clinical Plasmodium falciparum malaria, and children with asymptomatic P. falciparum infections were studied to investigate whether antitoxic activities may contribute to protection against malarial symptoms. Markers of inflammatory reactions, soluble tumor...... necrosis factor receptor I, and C-reactive protein were found in high concentrations in children with symptomatic P. falciparum malaria compared with levels in children with asymptomatic P. falciparum infections or in healthy children, indicating that inflammatory reactions are induced only in children...... decreased capacity to block induction of LAL activation by P. falciparum exoantigen. The decreased blocking activity was restored in the following dry season, when the children had no clinical malaria. Symptomatic children also had the highest immunoglobulin G (IgG) reactivities to conserved P. falciparum...

  5. Evaluating sub-clinical cognitive dysfunction and event-related potentials (P300) in clinically isolated syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocer, Belgin; Unal, Tugba; Nazliel, Bijen; Biyikli, Zeynep; Yesilbudak, Zulal; Karakas, Sirel; Irkec, Ceyla

    2008-12-01

    This study investigated the presence of sub-clinical cognitive dysfunction in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and the abnormalities of cognitive event-related potentials (ERPs). Subclinical cognitive dysfunction was assessed in 20 patients with CIS and in 20 healthy controls. Patients had impairments in verbal learning and long-term memory, evaluating attention, executive function and visuospatial skills, in decreasing order of frequency. SDLT and SIT were the most, and COWAT and BNT were the least affected tests. The N200 and P200 latencies were prolonged, and N100, N200 and P200 amplitudes were reduced in the patients relative to the controls, from the Fz, Cz and Pz electrode positions (p<0.05). Detailed cognitive testing is valuable in determining subclinical cognitive dysfunction in CIS patients. ERP abnormalities as well as abnormalities in detailed cognitivetesting in patients with CIS are helpful in the diagnosis of sub-clinical cognitive dysfunction.

  6. Piper betle extracts exhibit antitumor activity by augmenting antioxidant potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Badrul; Majumder, Rajib; Akter, Shahina; Lee, Sang-Han

    2015-02-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the methanolic extract of Piper betle leaves (MPBL) and its organic fractions with regard to antitumor activity against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) in Swiss albino mice and to confirm their antioxidant activities. At 24 h post-intraperitoneal inoculation of tumor cells into mice, extracts were administered at 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight for nine consecutive days. The antitumor effects of the extracts were then assessed according to tumor volume, packed cell count, viable and non-viable tumor cell count, median survival time and increase in life span of EAC-bearing mice. Next, hematological profiles and serum biochemical parameters were calculated, and antioxidant properties were assessed by estimating lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) levels. MPBL and the ethylacetate fraction (EPBL) at a dose of 100 mg/kg induced a significant decrease in tumor volume, packed cell volume and viable cell count and increased the life span of the EAC-bearing mice (PPiper betle extracts exhibit significant antitumor activity, which may be attributed to the augmentation of endogenous antioxidant potential.

  7. The potential significance of microbial activity in radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, A.M.

    1987-12-01

    The aim of this report is to assess the potential significance of microbial activity in radioactive waste disposal. It outlines the major factors which need to be considered in order to evaluate the importance of microbiological action. These include water and nutritional sources (particularly carbon) hostile conditions (particularly the effects of radiation and pH), the establishment of pH micro-environments and the degradative effect of microbial metabolic by-products on the disposed waste forms. Before an active microbial population can develop there are certain basic requirements for life. These are outlined and the possibility of colonisation occurring within the chemical, radiological and nutritional constraints of a repository are considered. Once colonisation is assumed, the effect of microbial activity is discussed under five headings, i.e. (i) direct attack, (ii) physical disruption (which includes consideration of fissuring processes and void formation), (iii) gas generation (which may be of particular importance), (iv) radionuclide uptake and finally (v) alteration of groundwater chemistry. Particular attention is paid to the possibility of environments becoming established both within the waste form itself (allowing microbes to attack from the inside of the repository outward) or attack on the encapsulant materials (microbes attacking from the outside inward). (author)

  8. Enriching Orphans’ Potentials through Interpersonal and Intrapersonal Intelligence Enrichment Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurulwahida Hj Azid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Orphans are considered a minority and they should be given a greater emphasis so that they do not feel left out and can build their own lives without a sense of humility. This does not mean that the orphans should be pampered instead they should be given the confidence and motivation to strive for success in later life. Humility among orphans can be associated with interpersonal and intrapersonal intelligences. This study aims to evaluate the impact of problem-solving activity treatment based on the interpersonal and intrapersonal intelligences. 46 students from two orphanages were involved as the treatment group. The research design used was a one-group pretest-posttest design applied through a combination of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Enrichment activities that provided interpersonal and intrapersonal skills as evidenced in this study should be carried out regularly at orphanages. Our study has proven that orphans‟ rights to learn cannot be neglected and „no child left behind „policy needs to be carried through by everybody involved with orphans‟ well-being. Teachers and carers need to be trained to use these enrichment activities at their orphanages to help maximize the orphans‟ potentials.

  9. Monophasic action potentials and activation recovery intervals as measures of ventricular action potential duration: experimental evidence to resolve some controversies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coronel, Ruben; de Bakker, Jacques M. T.; Wilms-Schopman, Francien J. G.; Opthof, Tobias; Linnenbank, André C.; Belterman, Charly N.; Janse, Michiel J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Activation recovery intervals (ARIs) and monophasic action potential (MAP) duration are used as measures of action potential duration in beating hearts. However, controversies exist concerning the correct way to record MAPs or calculate ARIs. We have addressed these issues

  10. Active ingredients of ginger as potential candidates in the prevention and treatment of diseases via modulation of biological activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Arshad H; shabrmi, Fahad M Al; Aly, Salah M

    2014-01-01

    The current mode of treatment based on synthetic drugs is expensive and also causes genetic and metabolic alterations. However, safe and sound mode of treatment is needed to control the diseases development and progression. In this regards, medicinal plant and its constituents play an important role in diseases management via modulation of biological activities. Ginger, the rhizome of the Zingiber officinale, has shown therapeutic role in the health management since ancient time and considered as potential chemopreventive agent. Numerous studies based on clinical trials and animal model has shown that ginger and its constituents shows significant role in the prevention of diseases via modulation of genetic and metabolic activities. In this review, we focused on the therapeutics effects of ginger and its constituents in the diseases management, and its impact on genetic and metabolic activities. PMID:25057339

  11. Therapeutic potential of carbohydrates as regulators of macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundahl, Mimmi L E; Scanlan, Eoin M; Lavelle, Ed C

    2017-12-15

    It is well established for a broad range of disease states, including cancer and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, that pathogenesis is bolstered by polarisation of macrophages towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype, known as M2. As these innate immune cells are relatively long-lived, their re-polarisation to pro-inflammatory, phagocytic and bactericidal "classically activated" M1 macrophages is an attractive therapeutic approach. On the other hand, there are scenarios where the resolving inflammation, wound healing and tissue remodelling properties of M2 macrophages are beneficial - for example the successful introduction of biomedical implants. Although there are numerous endogenous and exogenous factors that have an impact on the macrophage polarisation spectrum, this review will focus specifically on prominent macrophage-modulating carbohydrate motifs with a view towards highlighting structure-function relationships and therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Active tectonics and earthquake potential of the Myanmar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Sieh, Kerry; Tun, Soe Thura; Lai, Kuang-Yin; Myint, Than

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes geomorphologic evidence for the principal neotectonic features of Myanmar and its immediate surroundings. We combine this evidence with published structural, geodetic, and seismic data to present an overview of the active tectonic architecture of the region and its seismic potential. Three tectonic systems accommodate oblique collision of the Indian plate with Southeast Asia and extrusion of Asian territory around the eastern syntaxis of the Himalayan mountain range. Subduction and collision associated with the Sunda megathrust beneath and within the Indoburman range and Naga Hills accommodate most of the shortening across the transpressional plate boundary. The Sagaing fault system is the predominant locus of dextral motion associated with the northward translation of India. Left-lateral faults of the northern Shan Plateau, northern Laos, Thailand, and southern China facilitate extrusion of rocks around the eastern syntaxis of the Himalaya. All of these systems have produced major earthquakes within recorded history and continue to present major seismic hazards in the region.

  13. Fungal phytotoxins with potential herbicidal activity: chemical and biological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimmino, Alessio; Masi, Marco; Evidente, Marco; Superchi, Stefano; Evidente, Antonio

    2015-12-19

    Covering: 2007 to 2015 Fungal phytotoxins are secondary metabolites playing an important role in the induction of disease symptoms interfering with host plant physiological processes. Although fungal pathogens represent a heavy constraint for agrarian production and for forest and environmental heritage, they can also represent an ecofriendly alternative to manage weeds. Indeed, the phytotoxins produced by weed pathogenic fungi are an efficient tool to design natural, safe bioherbicides. Their use could avoid that of synthetic pesticides causing resistance in the host plants and the long term impact of residues in agricultural products with a risk to human and animal health. The isolation and structural and biological characterization of phytotoxins produced by pathogenic fungi for weeds, including parasitic plants, are described. Structure activity relationships and mode of action studies for some phytotoxins are also reported to elucidate the herbicide potential of these promising fungal metabolites.

  14. Potential Impact on Clinical Decision Making via a Genome-Wide Expression Profiling: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Kim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Management of men with prostate cancer is fraught with uncertainty as physicians and patients balance efficacy with potential toxicity and diminished quality of life. Utilization of genomics as a prognostic biomarker has improved the informed decision-making process by enabling more rationale treatment choices. Recently investigations have begun to determine whether genomic information from tumor transcriptome data can be used to impact clinical decision-making beyond prognosis. Here we discuss the potential of genomics to alter management of a patient who presented with high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma. We suggest that this information help selecting patients for advanced imaging, chemotherapies, or clinical trial.

  15. Alterations in neuropeptides in aging and disease. Pathophysiology and potential for clinical intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, A; Ferrier, I N

    1993-01-01

    Marked specific and selective changes in the levels of some neuropeptides in age-related diseases, such as senile dementia of the Alzheimer (SDAT) or Lewy body (SDLT) types, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and major depressive disorder, versus normal aging have been noted. However, the levels of most neuropeptides are normal. The only 2 peptides consistently altered in SDAT are somatostatin and corticotrophin-releasing hormone both of which are reduced. In Huntington's disease, the level of substance P in the basal ganglia is reduced suggesting a preferential vulnerability of spiny neurones in this disease. In Parkinson's disease, substance P is attenuated in the basal ganglia while somatostatin is reduced in the neocortex. These and other results suggest that substance P deficits are related to movement disorders while somatostatin deficits are related to cognitive impairment. SDLT is a type of dementia with features common to both SDAT and Parkinson's disease, although the changes in neuropeptides suggest that neurochemically the disease is more closely related to SDAT. In major depressive disorder, the level of corticotrophin-releasing hormone is reduced while there is a reciprocal increase in corticotrophin-releasing hormone receptors suggesting that the neurones remain functional. Potential clinical intervention has been limited by problems such as poor penetration of agents into the brain and the short half-lives of neuropeptide agonists and antagonists. However, some currently available agents may act, at least in part, through modulation of neuropeptide pathways, e.g. carbamazepine and alprazolam both modulate the corticotrophin-releasing hormone system in animals, and both have clinically proven antidepressant activity.

  16. [Chronic active hepatitis: clinical, biochemical, and histopathologic correlation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subauste, M C

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study over 26 female patients with chronic active hepatitis was made. The mean age was 39 years old, the mean length of illness of 8 months; 5 patients had positive markers for hepatitis B. Patients were selected with the grade of histological activity: 8 patients had a mild form from disease (2A) and 16 with a severe one (2B). The predominant group was 2B. Severe inflammatory infiltration was the hallmark and multiobulillar necrosis, bridging, eosinophils and hiperplasia of kuppfer cells were found only in this group. Clinical features range from hepatic manifestations to systemic ones. Chronic active hepatitis may present with cholestasis, but the latter is not always related with the grade of activity. Group 2B had elevated aminotransferases and a low concentration for protrobine.

  17. Clinical management of musculoskeletal injuries in active children and youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazer, Barbara; Shrier, Ian; Feldman, Debbie Ehrmann; Swaine, Bonnie; Majnemer, Annette; Kennedy, Eileen; Chilingaryan, Gevorg

    2010-07-01

    To describe how different health care specialists manage musculoskeletal injury in children and examine factors influencing return to play decisions. National survey. Secure Web site hosting online questionnaire. Medical doctors, physical therapists, and athletic therapists who were members of their respective sport medicine specialty organizations. Professional affiliation and the effect of the following factors were examined: pushy parent, cautious parent, protective equipment, previous injury, musculoskeletal maturity, game importance, position played, team versus individual sport, and time since injury. Recommendation of return to activity after common injuries seen in children and adolescents as described in 5 vignettes; consistency of responses across vignettes. The survey was completed by 464 respondents (34%). There were several differences between the professional groups in their recommendations to return to activity. Most factors studied did not tend to influence the decision to return to activity, although protective equipment often increased the response to return sooner. The number of participants who would return a child to activity sooner or later for each factor varied greatly across the 5 vignettes, except for pushy parent or cautious parent. Management practices of sport medicine clinicians vary according to profession, child, clinical factors, and sport-related factors. Decisions regarding return to play vary according to 5 specific characteristics of each clinical case. These findings help establish areas of consensus and disagreement in the management of children with injuries and safe return to physical activity.

  18. ATF1 and RAS in exosomes are potential clinical diagnostic markers for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yanhua; Wang, Wei; Yang, Baozhi; Tian, Hongge

    2017-10-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers among women worldwide. It is highly lethal yet can be treated when found in early stage. Thus, early detection is of significant important for early diagnosis of cervical cancer. Exosomes have been used as biomarkers in clinical diagnosis. It is unknown that whether blood exosomes associated with cervical cancer can be detected and if these exosomes can accurately represent the developmental stage of cervical cancer. Mouse models were made out of a relapsed cervical cancer patient's tumour sample for original and recurrent cervical cancer, and gene analysis in both tumours and exosomes in these mouse models were performed. We found that activating transcription factor 1 (ATF1) and RAS genes were significantly up-regulated in tumours of both primary and recurrent cervical cancer mouse model, and they can also be detected in the blood exosomes of the mouse model. Our results indicated that ATF1 and RAS could be potential candidate biomarkers for cervical cancer in early diagnosis. ATF1 and RAS genes were found significantly elevated in tumours of primary and recurrent cervical cancer mouse model, and they were also detected in the blood exosomes. Therefore, ATF1 and RAS could be used as a diagnostic marker for cervical cancer in the future. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. High-throughput molecular analysis in lung cancer: insights into biology and potential clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocak, S; Sos, M L; Thomas, R K; Massion, P P

    2009-08-01

    During the last decade, high-throughput technologies including genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic and proteomic have been applied to further our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this heterogeneous disease, and to develop strategies that aim to improve the management of patients with lung cancer. Ultimately, these approaches should lead to sensitive, specific and noninvasive methods for early diagnosis, and facilitate the prediction of response to therapy and outcome, as well as the identification of potential novel therapeutic targets. Genomic studies were the first to move this field forward by providing novel insights into the molecular biology of lung cancer and by generating candidate biomarkers of disease progression. Lung carcinogenesis is driven by genetic and epigenetic alterations that cause aberrant gene function; however, the challenge remains to pinpoint the key regulatory control mechanisms and to distinguish driver from passenger alterations that may have a small but additive effect on cancer development. Epigenetic regulation by DNA methylation and histone modifications modulate chromatin structure and, in turn, either activate or silence gene expression. Proteomic approaches critically complement these molecular studies, as the phenotype of a cancer cell is determined by proteins and cannot be predicted by genomics or transcriptomics alone. The present article focuses on the technological platforms available and some proposed clinical applications. We illustrate herein how the "-omics" have revolutionised our approach to lung cancer biology and hold promise for personalised management of lung cancer.

  20. POTENTIALS OF IMAGE BASED ACTIVE RANGING TO CAPTURE DYNAMIC SCENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jutzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining a 3D description of man-made and natural environments is a basic task in Computer Vision and Remote Sensing. To this end, laser scanning is currently one of the dominating techniques to gather reliable 3D information. The scanning principle inherently needs a certain time interval to acquire the 3D point cloud. On the other hand, new active sensors provide the possibility of capturing range information by images with a single measurement. With this new technique image-based active ranging is possible which allows capturing dynamic scenes, e.g. like walking pedestrians in a yard or moving vehicles. Unfortunately most of these range imaging sensors have strong technical limitations and are not yet sufficient for airborne data acquisition. It can be seen from the recent development of highly specialized (far-range imaging sensors – so called flash-light lasers – that most of the limitations could be alleviated soon, so that future systems will be equipped with improved image size and potentially expanded operating range. The presented work is a first step towards the development of methods capable for application of range images in outdoor environments. To this end, an experimental setup was set up for investigating these proposed possibilities. With the experimental setup a measurement campaign was carried out and first results will be presented within this paper.

  1. The multielement potential of fast neutron cyclic activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonie, S.E.; Randle, K.

    1994-01-01

    Cyclic neutron activation analysis (CNAA) has, in recent years been developed as a useful analytical tool for the assay of short-lived isotopes in single element situations. The work described in this paper investigates the potential of the technique for composite samples having a wide range of elements that produce short-lived and long-lived isotopes on neutron irradiation. Accelerator-derived neutrons with average energies of 3 MeV, 6 MeV and 14 MeV were employed in what has been dubbed 'Fast Neutron Cyclic Neutron Activation Analysis' (FNCAA). The approach to multi-element analysis entailed: determination of cycle parameters in single element samples via the reactions 27 Al(n,p) 27 Mg(9.6 min,E γ =840keV), and 137 Ba(n,n 'γ137m Ba(2.3 min,E γ 137m Ba(2.3 min,E γ =662 keV), a test of the method on a composite rock sample, determination of analytical sensitivities using both powdered kale and rock standards and a comparison of analytical results with other techniques. The results obtained in all these measurements are presented and discussed. (author) 10 refs.; 3 figs.; 5 tabs

  2. Potential active materials for photo-supercapacitor: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C. H.; Lim, H. N.; Hayase, S.; Harrison, I.; Pandikumar, A.; Huang, N. M.

    2015-11-01

    The need for an endless renewable energy supply, typically through the utilization of solar energy in most applications and systems, has driven the expansion, versatility, and diversification of marketed energy storage devices. Energy storage devices such as hybridized dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC)-capacitors and DSSC-supercapacitors have been invented for energy reservation. The evolution and vast improvement of these devices in terms of their efficiencies and flexibilities have further sparked the invention of the photo-supercapacitor. The idea of coupling a DSSC and supercapacitor as a complete energy conversion and storage device arose because the solar energy absorbed by dye molecules can be efficiently transferred and converted to electrical energy by adopting a supercapacitor as the energy delivery system. The conversion efficiency of a photo-supercapacitor is mainly dependent on the use of active materials during its fabrication. The performances of the dye, photoactive metal oxide, counter electrode, redox electrolyte, and conducting polymer are the primary factors contributing to high-energy-efficient conversion, which enhances the performance and shelf-life of a photo-supercapacitor. Moreover, the introduction of compact layer as a primary adherent film has been earmarked as an effort in enhancing power conversion efficiency of solar cell. Additionally, the development of electrolyte-free solar cell such as the invention of hole-conductor or perovskite solar cell is currently being explored extensively. This paper reviews and analyzes the potential active materials for a photo-supercapacitor to enhance the conversion and storage efficiencies.

  3. Engaging clinical nurses in quality and performance improvement activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Madeline P; Evans, Dietra A; Schantz, Cathy A; Bowen, Margaret; Disbot, Maureen; Moffa, Joseph S; Piesieski, Patricia; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2010-01-01

    Nursing performance measures are an integral part of quality initiatives in acute care; however, organizations face numerous challenges in developing infrastructures to support quality improvement processes and timely dissemination of outcomes data. At the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, a Magnet-designated organization, extensive work has been conducted to incorporate nursing-related outcomes in the organization's quality plan and to integrate roles for clinical nurses into the Department of Nursing and organization's core performance-based programs. Content and strategies that promote active involvement of nurses and prepare them to be competent and confident stakeholders in quality initiatives are presented. Engaging clinical nurses in the work of quality and performance improvement is essential to achieving excellence in clinical care. It is important to have structures and processes in place to bring meaningful data to the bedside; however, it is equally important to incorporate outcomes into practice. When nurses are educated about performance and quality measures, are engaged in identifying outcomes and collecting meaningful data, are active participants in disseminating quality reports, and are able to recognize the value of these activities, data become one with practice.

  4. In vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies of tedizolid to assess the potential for peripheral or central monoamine oxidase interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, S; Bartizal, K; Minassian, S L; Fang, E; Prokocimer, P

    2013-07-01

    Tedizolid phosphate is a novel oxazolidinone prodrug whose active moiety, tedizolid, has improved potency against Gram-positive pathogens and pharmacokinetics, allowing once-daily administration. Given linezolid warnings for drug-drug and drug-food interactions mediated by monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition, including sporadic serotonergic toxicity, these studies evaluated tedizolid for potential MAO interactions. In vitro, tedizolid and linezolid were reversible inhibitors of human MAO-A and MAO-B; the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for tedizolid was 8.7 μM for MAO-A and 5.7 μM for MAO-B and 46.0 and 2.1 μM, respectively, with linezolid. Tedizolid phosphate was negative in the mouse head twitch model of serotonergic activity. Two randomized placebo-controlled crossover clinical studies assessed the potential of 200 mg/day tedizolid phosphate (at steady state) to enhance pressor responses to coadministered oral tyramine or pseudoephedrine. Sensitivity to tyramine was determined by comparing the concentration of tyramine required to elicit a ≥ 30-mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure (TYR30) when administered with placebo versus tedizolid phosphate. The geometric mean tyramine sensitivity ratio (placebo TYR30/tedizolid phosphate TYR30) was 1.33; a ratio of ≥ 2 is considered clinically relevant. In the pseudoephedrine study, mean maximum systolic blood pressure was not significantly different when pseudoephedrine was coadministered with tedizolid phosphate versus placebo. In summary, tedizolid is a weak, reversible inhibitor of MAO-A and MAO-B in vitro. Provocative testing in humans and animal models failed to uncover significant signals that would suggest potential for hypertensive or serotonergic adverse consequences at the therapeutic dose of tedizolid phosphate. Clinical studies are registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01539473 (tyramine interaction study conducted at Covance Clinical Research Center, Evansville, IN) and NCT01577459

  5. A rat retinal damage model predicts for potential clinical visual disturbances induced by Hsp90 inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Dan; Liu, Yuan; Ye, Josephine; Ying, Weiwen; Ogawa, Luisa Shin; Inoue, Takayo; Tatsuta, Noriaki; Wada, Yumiko; Koya, Keizo; Huang, Qin; Bates, Richard C.; Sonderfan, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    In human trials certain heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors, including 17-DMAG and NVP-AUY922, have caused visual disorders indicative of retinal dysfunction; others such as 17-AAG and ganetespib have not. To understand these safety profile differences we evaluated histopathological changes and exposure profiles of four Hsp90 inhibitors, with or without clinical reports of adverse ocular effects, using a rat retinal model. Retinal morphology, Hsp70 expression (a surrogate marker of Hsp90 inhibition), apoptotic induction and pharmacokinetic drug exposure analysis were examined in rats treated with the ansamycins 17-DMAG and 17-AAG, or with the second-generation compounds NVP-AUY922 and ganetespib. Both 17-DMAG and NVP-AUY922 induced strong yet restricted retinal Hsp70 up-regulation and promoted marked photoreceptor cell death 24 h after the final dose. In contrast, neither 17-AAG nor ganetespib elicited photoreceptor injury. When the relationship between drug distribution and photoreceptor degeneration was examined, 17-DMAG and NVP-AUY922 showed substantial retinal accumulation, with high retina/plasma (R/P) ratios and slow elimination rates, such that 51% of 17-DMAG and 65% of NVP-AUY922 present at 30 min post-injection were retained in the retina 6 h post-dose. For 17-AAG and ganetespib, retinal elimination was rapid (90% and 70% of drugs eliminated from the retina at 6 h, respectively) which correlated with lower R/P ratios. These findings indicate that prolonged inhibition of Hsp90 activity in the eye results in photoreceptor cell death. Moreover, the results suggest that the retina/plasma exposure ratio and retinal elimination rate profiles of Hsp90 inhibitors, irrespective of their chemical class, may predict for ocular toxicity potential. - Highlights: • In human trials some Hsp90 inhibitors cause visual disorders, others do not. • Prolonged inhibition of Hsp90 in the rat eye results in photoreceptor cell death. • Retina/plasma ratio and retinal

  6. Potentiation of the gastric antisecretory activity of histamine H2-receptor antagonists by clebopride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, A G; Massingham, R; Roberts, D J

    1988-05-01

    The substituted benzamide, clebopride, at doses (0.03-3 mg kg-1 i.p.) that were without effect per se on the secretion of gastric acid in pylorus ligated (Shay) rats, potentiated the antisecretory effects of the histamine H2 receptor antagonists cimetidine and ranitidine in this model but not those of the muscarine receptor antagonist pirenzepine nor those of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole. By contrast, clebopride was without influence on the inhibitory effects of cimetidine on pentagastrin-induced secretion in perfused stomach (Ghosh and Schild) preparations in anaesthetized rats. The significance of these findings is discussed in relation to the previously described potentiating effects of clebopride on the anti-ulcer activity of cimetidine in various experimental models, and the potential beneficial effects of such combined therapy in the clinic.

  7. Potential Immune Biomarkers in Diagnosis and Clinical Management for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zecevic Lamija

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is still no reliable, specific biomarker for precision diagnosis and clinical monitoring of systemic lupus erythematosus. The aim of this study was to investigate the importance of the determination of immunofenotypic profiles (T, B lymphocytes and NK cells and serum cytokine concentrations (IL-17 and IFN-alpha as potential biomarkers for this disease.

  8. Proton therapy for head and neck cancer: Rationale, potential indications, practical considerations, and current clinical evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Malyapa, Robert S.; Su, Zhong; Yeung, Daniel; Mendenhall, William M.; Li, Zuofeng

    2011-01-01

    There is a strong rationale for potential benefits from proton therapy (PT) for selected cancers of the head and neck because of the opportunity to improve the therapeutic ratio by improving radiation dose distributions and because of the significant differences in radiation dose distribution achievable with x-ray-based radiation therapy (RT) and PT. Comparisons of dose distributions between x-ray-based and PT plans in selected cases show specific benefits in dose distribution likely to translate into improved clinical outcomes. However, the use of PT in head and neck cancers requires special considerations in the simulation and treatment planning process, and currently available PT technology may not permit realization of the maximum potential benefits of PT. To date, few clinical data are available, but early clinical experiences in sinonasal tumors in particular suggest significant improvements in both disease control and radiation-related toxicity

  9. Proton therapy for head and neck cancer: Rationale, potential indications, practical considerations, and current clinical evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Malyapa, Robert S.; Su, Zhong; Yeung, Daniel; Mendenhall, William M.; Li, Zuofeng (Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Inst., Jacksonville, Florida (United States)), e-mail: menden@shands.ufl.edu

    2011-08-15

    There is a strong rationale for potential benefits from proton therapy (PT) for selected cancers of the head and neck because of the opportunity to improve the therapeutic ratio by improving radiation dose distributions and because of the significant differences in radiation dose distribution achievable with x-ray-based radiation therapy (RT) and PT. Comparisons of dose distributions between x-ray-based and PT plans in selected cases show specific benefits in dose distribution likely to translate into improved clinical outcomes. However, the use of PT in head and neck cancers requires special considerations in the simulation and treatment planning process, and currently available PT technology may not permit realization of the maximum potential benefits of PT. To date, few clinical data are available, but early clinical experiences in sinonasal tumors in particular suggest significant improvements in both disease control and radiation-related toxicity

  10. Seismic activity parameters of the Finnish potential repository sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saari, J.

    2000-10-01

    Posiva Oy has started a project for estimating the possible earthquake induced rock movements on the deposition holes containing canisters of spent nuclear fuel. These estimates will be made for the four investigation sites, Romuvaara, Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Haestholmen. This study deals with the current and future seismicity associated with the above mentioned sites. Seismic belts that participate the seismic behaviour of the studied sites have been identified and the magnitude-frequency distributions of these belts have been estimated. The seismic activity parameters of the sites have been deduced from the characteristics of the seismic belts in order to forecast the seismicity during the next 100,000 years. The report discusses the possible earthquakes induced by future glaciation. The seismic interpretation seems to indicate that the previous postglacial faults in Finnish Lapland have been generated in compressional environment. The orientation of the rather uniform compression has been NW-SE, which coincide with the current stress field. It seems that, although the impact of postglacial crustal rebound must have been significant, the impact of plate tectonics has been dominant. A major assumption of this study has been that future seismicity will generally resemble the current seismicity. However, when the postglacial seismicity is concerned, the magnitude-frequency distribution is likely different and the expected maximum magnitude will be higher. Maximum magnitudes of future postglacial earthquakes have been approximated by strain release examinations. Seismicity has been examined within the framework of the lineament maps, in order to associate the future significant earthquakes with active fault zones in the vicinity of the potential repository sites. (orig.)

  11. Active learning reduces annotation time for clinical concept extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholghi, Mahnoosh; Sitbon, Laurianne; Zuccon, Guido; Nguyen, Anthony

    2017-10-01

    To investigate: (1) the annotation time savings by various active learning query strategies compared to supervised learning and a random sampling baseline, and (2) the benefits of active learning-assisted pre-annotations in accelerating the manual annotation process compared to de novo annotation. There are 73 and 120 discharge summary reports provided by Beth Israel institute in the train and test sets of the concept extraction task in the i2b2/VA 2010 challenge, respectively. The 73 reports were used in user study experiments for manual annotation. First, all sequences within the 73 reports were manually annotated from scratch. Next, active learning models were built to generate pre-annotations for the sequences selected by a query strategy. The annotation/reviewing time per sequence was recorded. The 120 test reports were used to measure the effectiveness of the active learning models. When annotating from scratch, active learning reduced the annotation time up to 35% and 28% compared to a fully supervised approach and a random sampling baseline, respectively. Reviewing active learning-assisted pre-annotations resulted in 20% further reduction of the annotation time when compared to de novo annotation. The number of concepts that require manual annotation is a good indicator of the annotation time for various active learning approaches as demonstrated by high correlation between time rate and concept annotation rate. Active learning has a key role in reducing the time required to manually annotate domain concepts from clinical free text, either when annotating from scratch or reviewing active learning-assisted pre-annotations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Activities of Intellectual Disability Clinical Nurse Specialists in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, Owen; Slevin, Eamonn; Taggart, Laurence

    The aim of this study was to identify the contribution of Irish intellectual disability clinical nurse specialists (ID CNSs) to service delivery. A nonexperimental descriptive design was selected to survey ID CNSs presently working in Ireland. The questionnaire was developed based on focus group interviews, available literature, and expert panel views. Ethical approval and access were granted to all ID CNSs in Ireland. Thirty-two responded (33.68% response rate) from all work areas (voluntary organizations or health service executive) practicing within residential, community, or school services. Respondents were surveyed across a range of areas (demographic details and support to client, staff, family, organization, community, other agencies, and professional development). Findings identify that ID CNSs are active in all aspects of their roles as clinical specialist, educator, communicator, researcher, change agent, and leader, thus supporting person-centered care and improving service delivery. To meet changing healthcare demands, promote person-centered care, and improve service delivery, the CNS role in ID should be developed and supported. The findings merit a further study on ID CNS role activity, possible variables influencing role activity, and team members' views.

  13. Potential Future Igneous Activity at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, M.; Perry, F.; Valentine, G.; Smistad, E.

    2005-01-01

    Location, timing, and volumes of post-Miocene volcanic activity, along with expert judgment, provide the basis for assessing the probability of future volcanism intersecting a proposed repository for nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Analog studies of eruptive centers in the region that may represent the style and extent of possible future igneous activity at Yucca Mountain have aided in defining the consequence scenarios for intrusion into and eruption through a proposed repository. Modeling of magmatic processes related to magma/proposed repository interactions has been used to assess the potential consequences of a future igneous event through a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. Results of work to date indicate future igneous activity in the Yucca Mountain region has a very low probability of intersecting the proposed repository. Probability of a future event intersecting a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is approximately 1.7 x 10 -8 per year. Since completion of the Probabilistic Volcanic Hazard Assessment (PVHA) in 1996, anomalies representing potential buried volcanic centers have been identified from aeromagnetic surveys. A re-assessment of the hazard is currently underway to evaluate the probability of intersection in light of new information and to estimate the probability of one or more volcanic conduits located in the proposed repository along a dike that intersects the proposed repository. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for siting and licensing a proposed repository require that the consequences of a disruptive event (igneous event) with annual probability greater than 1 x 10 -8 be evaluated. Two consequence scenarios are considered: (1) igneous intrusion-poundwater transport case and (2) volcanic eruptive case. These scenarios equate to a dike or dike swarm intersecting repository drifts containing waste packages, formation of a conduit leading to a volcanic eruption through the repository that carries the contents of

  14. Genomic biomarkers and clinical outcomes of physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzotti, Alberto

    2011-07-01

    Clinical and experimental studies in humans provide evidence that moderate physical activity significantly decreases artery oxidative damage to nuclear DNA, DNA-adducts related to age and dyslipedemia, and mitochondrial DNA damage. Maintenance of adequate mitochondrial function is crucial for preventing lipid accumulation and peroxidation occurring in atherosclerosis. Studies performed on human muscle biopsies analyzing gene expression in living humans reveal that physically active subjects improve the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial function and of related microRNAs. The attenuation of oxidative damage to nuclear and mitochondrial DNA by physical activity resulted in beneficial effects due to polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferases genes. Subjects bearing null GSTM1/T1 polymorphisms have poor life expectancy in the case of being sedentary, which was increased 2.6-fold in case they performed physical activity. These findings indicate that the preventive effect of physical activity undergoes interindividual variation affected by genetic polymorphisms. © 2011 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Measures of rheumatoid arthritis disease activity in Australian clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew; Bagga, Hanish

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate which rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity measures are being collected in patients receiving glucocorticoids, non-biologic or biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in Australian rheumatology practice. Methods. A retrospective audit of medical records was conducted from eight rheumatology practices around Australia. Each rheumatologist recruited 30 consecutive eligible patients into the review, 10 of whom must have been receiving a biological agent for rheumatoid arthritis. Disease activity measures and radiographic assessments were collected from each patient's last consultation. For biologic patients, disease activity measures were also collected from when the patient was first initiated on the biological agent. Results. At last consultation, the disease measures that were recorded most often were ESR (89.2%), haemoglobin (87.5%), and CRP (84.2%). DAS28 was infrequently recorded (16.3%). The rate of recording disease activity measures for patients receiving biologic DMARDs decreased over time (mean 27 months). Conclusion. This review has shown inconsistency of RA activity measures being recorded in Australian rheumatology clinical practice. An accurate assessment of the disease process is necessary to effectively target rheumatoid arthritis patients to treat in order to achieve optimal outcomes.

  16. Prevalence of Potential and Clinically Relevant Statin-Drug Interactions in Frail and Robust Older Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Michele; Hilmer, Sarah; Pearson, Sallie-Anne; Reeve, Emily; Gnjidic, Danijela

    2015-10-01

    A significant proportion of older people are prescribed statins and are also exposed to polypharmacy, placing them at increased risk of statin-drug interactions. To describe the prevalence rates of potential and clinically relevant statin-drug interactions in older inpatients according to frailty status. A cross-sectional study of patients aged ≥65 years who were prescribed a statin and were admitted to a teaching hospital between 30 July and 10 October 2014 in Sydney, Australia, was conducted. Data on socio-demographics, comorbidities and medications were collected using a standardized questionnaire. Potential statin-drug interactions were defined if listed in the Australian Medicines Handbook and three international drug information sources: the British National Formulary, Drug Interaction Facts and Drug-Reax(®). Clinically relevant statin-drug interactions were defined as interactions with the highest severity rating in at least two of the three international drug information sources. Frailty was assessed using the Reported Edmonton Frail Scale. A total of 180 participants were recruited (median age 78 years, interquartile range 14), 35.0% frail and 65.0% robust. Potential statin-drug interactions were identified in 10% of participants, 12.7% of frail participants and 8.5% of robust participants. Clinically relevant statin-drug interactions were identified in 7.8% of participants, 9.5% of frail participants and 6.8% of robust participants. Depending on the drug information source used, the prevalence rates of potential and clinically relevant statin-drug interactions ranged between 14.4 and 35.6% and between 14.4 and 20.6%, respectively. In our study of frail and robust older inpatients taking statins, the overall prevalence of potential statin-drug interactions was low and varied significantly according to the drug information source used.

  17. Immunosuppression by hypoxic cell radiosensitizers: a phenomenon of potential clinical importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell, S.; Kapp, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    The nitroimidazoles metronidazole, misonidazol, and desmethyl misonidazole are currently undergoing clinical trials as possible adjuncts to radiotherapy. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the effectiveness of these agents and also documenting the pharmacokinetics and toxicities of radiosensitizing doses of these drugs in man. A variety of toxic effects have been noted in man, including anorexia, nausea and vomiting, peripheral neuropathy, central nervous system symptoms, ototoxicity, allergy, and fear. Laboratory studies have also suggested that these agents have potential to be mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic. In the editorial presented, the author attempts to draw attention to an additional toxic effect of nitroimidazoles - the inhibition of cell-mediated immune responses

  18. Danish research-active clinical nurses overcome barriers in research utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamsen, Lis; Larsen, Kristian; Bjerregaard, Lene; Madsen, Jan K

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether there was a difference between clinical nurses who were research-active, and clinical nurses who were nonresearch-active in utilization of research. A further aim was to identify the most significant barriers faced by a group of Danish clinical nurses in their use of research. Discrepancy between the improved quality of research results and the lack of implementing them was the starting point for a series of studies which showed the types of barriers clinical nurses found especially cumbersome when applying the research results of other researchers. This study investigates whether the clinical nurses' own engagement in research had any impact on their perception of research utilization. The study had an exploratory and descriptive design. Seventy-nine Danish clinical nurses participated and semi-structured interviewing was used as the research method. There was a statistically significant difference between the research-active and nonresearch-active nurses on various variables. The study showed that, to a larger extent, research-active nurses used evidence-based knowledge and were generally more internationally orientated. Furthermore, two important barriers for research utilization were identified by all 79 clinical nurses included in the study, i.e. 90% of the nurses explained that the quantity of research results was overwhelming, and 75% of them found that they were unable to evaluate the quality of the research. Clinical nurses, who were research-active themselves, experienced more success in overcoming some of the barriers, which existed in applying research to practice. The research potential found amongst clinical nurses in Denmark needed to be further supported through training and guidance in research methodology, establishing introductory stipends and part-time research positions. By doing so, some of the barriers affecting research utilization and the so-called theory-practice gap might be reduced. Further

  19. A protocol for a randomized clinical trial of interactive video dance: potential for effects on cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovancevic, Jelena; Rosano, Caterina; Perera, Subashan; Erickson, Kirk I; Studenski, Stephanie

    2012-06-06

    Physical exercise has the potential to affect cognitive function, but most evidence to date focuses on cognitive effects of fitness training. Cognitive exercise also may influence cognitive function, but many cognitive training paradigms have failed to provide carry-over to daily cognitive function. Video games provide a broader, more contextual approach to cognitive training that may induce cognitive gains and have carry over to daily function. Most video games do not involve physical exercise, but some novel forms of interactive video games combine physical activity and cognitive challenge. This paper describes a randomized clinical trial in 168 postmenopausal sedentary overweight women that compares an interactive video dance game with brisk walking and delayed entry controls. The primary endpoint is adherence to activity at six months. Additional endpoints include aspects of physical and mental health. We focus this report primarily on the rationale and plans for assessment of multiple cognitive functions. This randomized clinical trial may provide new information about the cognitive effects of interactive videodance. It is also the first trial to examine physical and cognitive effects in older women. Interactive video games may offer novel strategies to promote physical activity and health across the life span.The study is IRB approved and the number is: PRO08080012ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01443455.

  20. A protocol for a randomized clinical trial of interactive video dance: potential for effects on cognitive function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovancevic Jelena

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical exercise has the potential to affect cognitive function, but most evidence to date focuses on cognitive effects of fitness training. Cognitive exercise also may influence cognitive function, but many cognitive training paradigms have failed to provide carry-over to daily cognitive function. Video games provide a broader, more contextual approach to cognitive training that may induce cognitive gains and have carry over to daily function. Most video games do not involve physical exercise, but some novel forms of interactive video games combine physical activity and cognitive challenge. Methods/Design This paper describes a randomized clinical trial in 168 postmenopausal sedentary overweight women that compares an interactive video dance game with brisk walking and delayed entry controls. The primary endpoint is adherence to activity at six months. Additional endpoints include aspects of physical and mental health. We focus this report primarily on the rationale and plans for assessment of multiple cognitive functions. Discussion This randomized clinical trial may provide new information about the cognitive effects of interactive videodance. It is also the first trial to examine physical and cognitive effects in older women. Interactive video games may offer novel strategies to promote physical activity and health across the life span. The study is IRB approved and the number is: PRO08080012 ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01443455

  1. Adhesion molecules levels in blood correlate with MRI activity and clinical activity in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millers, A.; Enina, G.; Platkajis, A.; Metra, M.; Kukaine, R.

    2002-01-01

    Research into pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) has prompted efforts to identify immunological markers associated with disease activity. Adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 are associated with inflammatory mediated blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. In this study investigates the correlation between blood level of circulating ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) activity in different clinical phases of patients with MS. We show that RRMS and SPMS patients in clinically active phase with Gd-enhancing lesions in CNS had higher blood levels of cICAM-1 and cVCAM-1 compared these parameters levers of RRMS patients in remission stage. These results suggest that cICAM-1 and cVCAM-1 is a sensitive indicator of disease activity associated with BBB inflammatory dysfunction. Elevated blood level of cICAM-1 more strongly correlated with clinical activity and BBB damage, than cVCAM-1 and that could be used as biological marker of disease activity. Circulating VCAM-1 as an early indicator of BBB disturbance, may also serve as marker of beneficial activity in relapses phase of MS course. (authors)

  2. The potential of telehealth for 'business as usual' in outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Karen; Kerr, Patricia

    2012-04-01

    A six-month pilot study was conducted to ascertain the value of using high-definition videoconferencing equipment in an outpatients' setting. The videoconferencing equipment, which included digital biometric equipment, was installed in the outpatient clinics of a remote health service in New Zealand. Use of the equipment was evaluated using action research techniques. Clinicians were interviewed about their assessment of the equipment's usefulness. Patients and their carers completed questionnaires about their clinic experience. During the pilot trial, 109 patients were seen in 25 clinics of six different specialities. Questionnaire results showed that patients and their companions had a good user experience, similar to a face-to-face appointment. Clinicians found that the large screen, sense of proximity, video clarity and definition, and lack of sound/picture lag worked well for certain types of outpatients' clinics, e.g. methadone maintenance clinics. The need for process changes made it difficult to turn telehealth into business as usual in an environment built for face-to-face appointments. We conclude that videoconference equipment has potential to become integral to outpatients' clinics.

  3. [Clinical treatment adherence of health care workers and students exposed to potentially infectious biological material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Maria Cristina Mendes de; Canini, Silvia Rita Marin da Silva; Reis, Renata Karina; Toffano, Silmara Elaine Malaguti; Pereira, Fernanda Maria Vieira; Gir, Elucir

    2015-04-01

    To assess adherence to clinical appointments by health care workers (HCW) and students who suffered accidents with potentially infectious biological material. A retrospective cross-sectional study that assessed clinical records of accidents involving biological material between 2005 and 2010 in a specialized unit. A total of 461 individuals exposed to biological material were treated, of which 389 (84.4%) were HCWs and 72 (15.6%) students. Of the 461 exposed individuals, 307 (66.6%) attended a follow-up appointment. Individuals who had suffered an accident with a known source patient were 29 times more likely to show up to their scheduled follow-up appointments (OR: 29.98; CI95%: 16.09-55.83). The predictor in both univariate and multivariate analyses for adherence to clinical follow-up appointment was having a known source patient with nonreactive serology for the human immunodeficiency virus and/or hepatitis B and C.

  4. Opportunities for Cancer-relevant Innovative Technologies with Transformative Potential | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is seeking input from the community on identifying priorities with regards to supporting innovative technology development for cancer-relevant research. While the NCI provides support for technology development through a variety of mechanisms, it is important to understand whether or not these are sufficient for catalyzing and supporting the development of tools with significant potential for advancing important fields of cancer research or clinical care.

  5. [Recommendations for the clinical use of motor evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, V; Valls-Sole, J; Relova, J L; Raguer, N; Miralles, F; Dinca, L; Taramundi, S; Costa-Frossard, L; Ferrandiz, M; Ramió-Torrentà, Ll; Villoslada, P; Saiz, A; Calles, C; Antigüedad, A; Alvarez-Cermeño, J C; Prieto, J M; Izquierdo, G; Montalbán, X; Fernández, O

    2013-09-01

    To establish clinical guidelines for the clinical use and interpretation of motor evoked potentials (MEP) in diagnosing and monitoring patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Recommendations for MEP use and interpretation will help us rationalise and optimise resources used in MS patient diagnosis and follow up. We completed an extensive literature review and pooled our own data to produce a consensus statement with recommendations for the clinical use of MEPs in the study of MS. MEPs, in addition to spinal and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), help us diagnose and assess MS patients whose disease initially presents as spinal cord syndrome and those with non-specific brain MRI findings, or a normal brain MRI and clinical signs of MS. Whenever possible, a multimodal evoked potential study should be performed on patients with suspected MS in order to demonstrate involvement of the motor pathway which supports a diagnosis of dissemination in space. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Updates on ultrasound research in implant dentistry: a systematic review of potential clinical indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Vaishnavi; Chan, Hsun-Liang; MacEachern, Mark; Kripfgans, Oliver D

    2018-05-23

    Ultrasonography has shown promising diagnostic value in dental implant imaging research; however, exactly how ultrasound was used and at what stage of implant therapy it can be applied has not been systematically evaluated. Therefore, the aim of this review is to investigate potential indications of ultrasound use in the three implant treatment phases, namely planning, intraoperative and postoperative phase. Eligible manuscripts were searched in major databases with a combination of key words related to the use of ultrasound imaging in implant therapy. An initial search yielded 414 articles, after further review, 28 articles were finally included for this systematic review. Ultrasound was found valuable, though at various development stages, for evaluating (1) soft tissues, (2) hard tissues (3) vital structures and (4) implant stability. B-mode, the main function to image anatomical structures of interest, has been evaluated in pre-clinical and clinical studies. Quantitative ultrasound parameters, e.g. sound speed and amplitude, are being developed to evaluate implant-bone stability, mainly in simulation and pre-clinical studies. Ultrasound could be potentially useful in all 3 treatment phases. In the planning phase, ultrasound could evaluate vital structures, tissue biotype, ridge width/density, and cortical bone thickness. During surgery, it can provide feedback by identifying vital structures and bone boundary. At follow-up visits, it could evaluate marginal bone level and implant stability. Understanding the current status of ultrasound imaging research for implant therapy would be extremely beneficial for accelerating translational research and its use in dental clinics.

  7. Caveolin-1 influences vascular protease activity and is a potential stabilizing factor in human atherosclerotic disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Rodriguez-Feo

    Full Text Available Caveolin-1 (Cav-1 is a regulatory protein of the arterial wall, but its role in human atherosclerosis remains unknown. We have studied the relationships between Cav-1 abundance, atherosclerotic plaque characteristics and clinical manisfestations of atherosclerotic disease.We determined Cav-1 expression by western blotting in atherosclerotic plaques harvested from 378 subjects that underwent carotid endarterectomy. Cav-1 levels were significantly lower in carotid plaques than non-atherosclerotic vascular specimens. Low Cav-1 expression was associated with features of plaque instability such as large lipid core, thrombus formation, macrophage infiltration, high IL-6, IL-8 levels and elevated MMP-9 activity. Clinically, a down-regulation of Cav-1 was observed in plaques obtained from men, patients with a history of myocardial infarction and restenotic lesions. Cav-1 levels above the median were associated with absence of new vascular events within 30 days after surgery [0% vs. 4%] and a trend towards lower incidence of new cardiovascular events during longer follow-up. Consistent with these clinical data, Cav-1 null mice revealed elevated intimal hyperplasia response following arterial injury that was significantly attenuated after MMP inhibition. Recombinant peptides mimicking Cav-1 scaffolding domain (Cavtratin reduced gelatinase activity in cultured porcine arteries and impaired MMP-9 activity and COX-2 in LPS-challenged macrophages. Administration of Cavtratin strongly impaired flow-induced expansive remodeling in mice. This is the first study that identifies Cav-1 as a novel potential stabilizing factor in human atherosclerosis. Our findings support the hypothesis that local down-regulation of Cav-1 in atherosclerotic lesions contributes to plaque formation and/or instability accelerating the occurrence of adverse clinical outcomes. Therefore, given the large number of patients studied, we believe that Cav-1 may be considered as a novel target

  8. Equol, a Dietary Daidzein Gut Metabolite Attenuates Microglial Activation and Potentiates Neuroprotection In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalita Subedi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen deficiency has been well characterized in inflammatory disorders including neuroinflammation. Daidzein, a dietary alternative phytoestrogen found in soy (Glycine max as primary isoflavones, possess anti‐inflammatory activity, but the effect of its active metabolite Equol (7‐hydroxy‐3‐(4′‐hydroxyphenyl‐chroman has not been well established. In this study, we investigated the anti‐neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective effect of Equol in vitro. To evaluate the potential effects of Equol, three major types of central nervous system (CNS cells, including microglia (BV‐2, astrocytes (C6, and neurons (N2a, were used. Effects of Equol on the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, cyclooxygenase (COX‐2, Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling proteins, and apoptosis‐related proteins were measured by western blot analysis. Equol inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS‐induced TLR4 activation, MAPK activation, NF‐kB‐mediated transcription of inflammatory mediators, production of nitric oxide (NO, release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE‐2, secretion of tumor necrosis factor‐α (TNF‐α and interleukin 6 (IL‐6, in Lipopolysaccharide (LPS‐activated murine microglia cells. Additionally, Equol protects neurons from neuroinflammatory injury mediated by LPS‐activated microglia through downregulation of neuronal apoptosis, increased neurite outgrowth in N2a cell and neurotrophins like nerve growth factor (NGF production through astrocytes further supporting its neuroprotective potential. These findings provide novel insight into the anti‐neuroinflammatory effects of Equol on microglial cells, which may have clinical significance in cases of neurodegeneration.

  9. Clinical and Laboratory Potential Predictors of Blood Culture Positivity in Under Five Children with Clinically Severe Pneumonia - Khartoum -Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Karimeldin Mohamed Ali; El-Samani, El-Fatih; Bilal, Jalal Ali; Eldouch, Widad; Ibrahim, Salah Ahmed

    2015-08-01

    Blood culture is necessary for appropriate management of clinically severe pneumonia in children under five years of age. However, in limited resource countries it might be unduly costly and waste of valuable time because of the high negative culture rate. This study aims to identify clinical and laboratory parameters that potentially predict a positive blood culture in cases of severe pneumonia. A hospital based study, enrolled 189 cases satisfying the WHO definition of severe pneumonia. Age, gender, clinical history, physical examination, temperature, complete blood count, C-reactive protein, blood culture and Chest X Ray for all the patients were recorded. Forty one patients had positive blood culture giving a prevalence of 21.7%. All variables were used in a dichotomous manner. White Blood Count (WBC) more than 20 000, very high C-reactive protein (C-RP ≥8mg/L) and Temperature more than 40(o)C, had a positive predictive value of 46.1%, 44.3% and 40.0% respectively for a positive culture as well as a Negative Predictive Value of 91.1%, 91.6% and 91.7% respectively. The WBC more than 20 000 and temperature above 40(o)C had a significant association with a positive blood culture. Their adjusted Odds Ratios were 3.9 (95% CI: 1.4-10.90) and 3.1 (95% CI: 1.2-8.4) respectively. This was not the case for C-RP (Odds Ratio=2.2, 95% CI: 0.7-2.2) or positive Chest X Ray (Odds Ratio=1.5, 95% CI: 0.6-3.6). Temperature of more than 40(o)C, Very high C-RP and WBC of more than 20 000 are good indicators of a potential positive blood culture. It is therefore recommended that further research be undertaken to refine these predictors as screening tools before resorting to blood culture. It is also recommended that antibiotic treatment may be initiated on the basis of the high temperature and WBC, while waiting for the culture results.

  10. Potential of Mass Spectrometry in Developing Clinical Laboratory Biomarkers of Nonvolatiles in Exhaled Breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Olof; Olin, Anna-Carin; Mirgorodskaya, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Exhaled breath contains nonvolatile substances that are part of aerosol particles of submicrometer size. These particles are formed and exhaled as a result of normal breathing and contain material from distal airways of the respiratory system. Exhaled breath can be used to monitor biomarkers of both endogenous and exogenous origin and constitutes an attractive specimen for medical investigations. This review summarizes the present status regarding potential biomarkers of nonvolatile compounds in exhaled breath. The field of exhaled breath condensate is briefly reviewed, together with more recent work on more selective collection procedures for exhaled particles. The relation of these particles to the surfactant in the terminal parts of the respiratory system is described. The literature on potential endogenous low molecular weight compounds as well as protein biomarkers is reviewed. The possibility to measure exposure to therapeutic and abused drugs is demonstrated. Finally, the potential future role and importance of mass spectrometry is discussed. Nonvolatile compounds exit the lung as aerosol particles that can be sampled easily and selectively. The clinical applications of potential biomarkers in exhaled breath comprise diagnosis of disease, monitoring of disease progress, monitoring of drug therapy, and toxicological investigations. © 2015 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  11. Physical Activity of Nurse Clinical Practitioners and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirathananuwat, Areeya; Pongpirul, Krit

    2017-11-01

    This study was aimed (1) to compare the level of physical activity (PA) between working and nonworking hours and (2) to compare the level of PA during working hours of nurse clinical practitioners (NCPs) with that of nurse managers (NMs). This cross-sectional survey was conducted at a Thai university hospital from October 2015 to March 2016. All randomly selected participants wore an activity tracker on their hip for 5 days, except during bathing and sleeping periods, to record step counts and time points. Of 884 nurses, 289 (142 NCPs and 147 NMs) were randomly selected. The average age was 35.87 years. They spent 9.76 and 6.01 hours on work and nonwork activities, respectively. Daily steps per hour were significantly lower during work than nonwork periods (P work period of NCP was significantly higher than that of NM even after adjusting for age, work experience, and body mass index (P = .034). NCP had higher overall PA than NM, which was partly contributed by work-related PA. Level of PA for a professional with variation of actual work hours should be measured on hourly basis.

  12. Potential consequences of clinical application of artificial gametes: a systematic review of stakeholder views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Saskia; Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido; Hamer, Geert; Repping, Sjoerd; Dancet, Eline A F

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the formation of artificial gametes, i.e. gametes generated from progenitors or somatic cells, has led to scientific and societal discussion about their use in medically assisted reproduction. In animals, live births have already been achieved using artificial gametes of varying (cell type) sources and biological research seems to be progressing steadily toward clinical application in humans. Artificial gametes could potentially help not only infertile heterosexual couples of reproductive age of which one or both partners lacks functional gametes, but also post-menopausal women and same-sex couples, to conceive a child who will be genetically related to them. But as clinical application of these new technologies may have wider societal consequences, a proactive consideration of the possible impact seems timely and important. This review aims to contribute to this by providing a systematic overview of the potential consequences of clinical application of artificial gametes anticipated by different stakeholders. The electronic database 'Medline/Pubmed' was systematically searched with medical subject heading terms (MesH) for articles published in English between January 1970 and December 2013. Articles were selected based on eligibility and reference lists of eligible studies were hand searched. The reported potential consequences of clinical application of artificial gametes were extracted from the articles and were grouped into categories by content analysis. Per category, we noted which stakeholders referred to which potential consequences, based on author affiliations and, if applicable, study participants. The systematic search yielded 2424 articles, and 84 studies were included after screening. Nine positive consequences, 21 specific consequences requiring consideration and 22 recommendations referring to clinical application of artificial gametes were documented. All positive consequences, consequences requiring consideration and

  13. A diterpenoid taxodone from Metasequoia glyptostroboides with antimycotic potential against clinical isolates of Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, V K; Park, Y-H; Kang, S C

    2015-03-01

    The increasing importance of clinical isolates of Candida species and emerging resistance of Candida species to current synthetic antifungal agents have stimulated the search for safer and more effective alternative drugs from natural sources. This study was directed towards exploring the antimycotic potential of a diterpenoid compound taxodone isolated from Metasequoia glyptostroboides against pathogenic isolates of Candida species. Antimycotic efficacy of taxodone was evaluated by disc diffusion assay, determination of minimum inhibitory (MIC) and minimum fungicidal (MFC) concentrations, and cell viability assay. To confirm a partial antimycotic mode of action of taxodone, the efficacy of taxodone was determined by measuring the release of 260 nm absorbing materials from the selected Candida species as compared to control. The taxodone at the concentration of 400 μg/disc displayed potential antimycotic effect against the tested clinical and pathogenic isolates of Candida species as diameters of zones of inhibitions, which were found in the range of 11 ± 0.0 to 12.6 ± 0.5mm. The MIC and MFC values of taxodone against the tested clinical isolates were found in the range of 250 to 1000 and 500 to 2000μ g/mL, respectively. On the other hand, the MIC and MFC values of positive control (amphotericin B) against the tested Candida isolates were found in the range of 62.5 to 250 and 500 to 2000 μg/mL. On the viable counts of the tested fungal isolates, the taxodone exerted significant antimycotic effect. Elaborative study of partial mode of action conducted onto the release of 260nm materials (DNA and RNA) revealed potential detrimental effect of taxodone on the membrane integrity of the tested pathogens at MIC concentration. With respect to the antimycotic effect of taxodone against pathogenic and clinical isolates of Candida species, it might be confirmed that bioactive compound taxodone present in M. glyptostroboides holds therapeutic value of medicinal

  14. Profiles in fibromyalgia: algometry, auditory evoked potentials and clinical characterization of different subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triñanes, Yolanda; González-Villar, Alberto; Gómez-Perretta, Claudio; Carrillo-de-la-Peña, María T

    2014-11-01

    The heterogeneity found in fibromyalgia (FM) patients has led to the investigation of disease subgroups, mainly based on clinical features. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that clinical FM subgroups are associated with different underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Sixty-three FM patients were classified in type I or type II, according to the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and in mild/moderate versus severe FM, according to the severity of three cardinal symptoms considered in the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 2010 criteria (unrefreshed sleep, cognitive problems and fatigue). To validate the subgroups obtained by these two classifications, we calculated the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves for various clinical variables and for two potential biomarkers of FM: Response to experimental pressure pain (algometry) and the amplitude/intensity slopes of the auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) obtained to stimuli of increasing intensity. The variables that best discriminated type I versus type II were those related to depression, while the indices of clinical or experimental pain (threshold or tolerance) did not significantly differ between them. The variables that best discriminated the mild/moderate versus severe subgroups were those related to the algometry. The AEPs did not allow discrimination among the generated subsets. The FIQ-based classification allows the identification of subgroups that differ in psychological distress, while the index based on the ACR 2010 criteria seems to be useful to characterize the severity of FM mainly based on hyperalgesia. The incorporation of potential biomarkers to generate or validate classification criteria is crucial to advance in the knowledge of FM and in the understanding of pathophysiological pathways.

  15. Autonomic regulation of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis in health and disease: potential clinical applications for altering BAT thermogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupone, Domenico; Madden, Christopher J.; Morrison, Shaun F.

    2014-01-01

    From mouse to man, brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a significant source of thermogenesis contributing to the maintenance of the body temperature homeostasis during the challenge of low environmental temperature. In rodents, BAT thermogenesis also contributes to the febrile increase in core temperature during the immune response. BAT sympathetic nerve activity controlling BAT thermogenesis is regulated by CNS neural networks which respond reflexively to thermal afferent signals from cutaneous and body core thermoreceptors, as well as to alterations in the discharge of central neurons with intrinsic thermosensitivity. Superimposed on the core thermoregulatory circuit for the activation of BAT thermogenesis, is the permissive, modulatory influence of central neural networks controlling metabolic aspects of energy homeostasis. The recent confirmation of the presence of BAT in human and its function as an energy consuming organ have stimulated interest in the potential for the pharmacological activation of BAT to reduce adiposity in the obese. In contrast, the inhibition of BAT thermogenesis could facilitate the induction of therapeutic hypothermia for fever reduction or to improve outcomes in stroke or cardiac ischemia by reducing infarct size through a lowering of metabolic oxygen demand. This review summarizes the central circuits for the autonomic control of BAT thermogenesis and highlights the potential clinical relevance of the pharmacological inhibition or activation of BAT thermogenesis. PMID:24570653

  16. Autonomic regulation of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis in health and disease: potential clinical applications for altering BAT thermogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupone, Domenico; Madden, Christopher J; Morrison, Shaun F

    2014-01-01

    From mouse to man, brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a significant source of thermogenesis contributing to the maintenance of the body temperature homeostasis during the challenge of low environmental temperature. In rodents, BAT thermogenesis also contributes to the febrile increase in core temperature during the immune response. BAT sympathetic nerve activity controlling BAT thermogenesis is regulated by CNS neural networks which respond reflexively to thermal afferent signals from cutaneous and body core thermoreceptors, as well as to alterations in the discharge of central neurons with intrinsic thermosensitivity. Superimposed on the core thermoregulatory circuit for the activation of BAT thermogenesis, is the permissive, modulatory influence of central neural networks controlling metabolic aspects of energy homeostasis. The recent confirmation of the presence of BAT in human and its function as an energy consuming organ have stimulated interest in the potential for the pharmacological activation of BAT to reduce adiposity in the obese. In contrast, the inhibition of BAT thermogenesis could facilitate the induction of therapeutic hypothermia for fever reduction or to improve outcomes in stroke or cardiac ischemia by reducing infarct size through a lowering of metabolic oxygen demand. This review summarizes the central circuits for the autonomic control of BAT thermogenesis and highlights the potential clinical relevance of the pharmacological inhibition or activation of BAT thermogenesis.

  17. Clinical research in dermatology: resources and activities associated with a higher scientific productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Leyva, Alejandro; Descalzo, Miguel A; García-Doval, Ignacio

    2018-03-06

    Clinical research papers and their derived metrics can be useful to assess the scientific production of medical and research centers. Diverse factors are probably associated to differences in scientific production. But there are scarce studies analyzing them. Resources are limited and have to be distributed efficiently. The objective of this study is to explore what resources and activities are potentially associated with a higher scientific productivity. A bibliometric study was performed to obtain information about scientific productivity. Papers included had to meet criteria to be considered clinical research in dermatology, additionally had to be published between the years 2005-2014, had to be included in Pubmed or Embase and had to include a Spanish center of dermatology as the correspondence address. Information about research resources and activities of the year 2015 was gathered by means of an online survey sent to the authors identified in the bibliometric study. The search strategy returned 8617 papers and only 1104 of them (12.81%) met the inclusion criteria. 63 out of 113 centers responded to the survey (55.75%). Factors associated with a higher scientific productivity were: the size of the resident program, the amount of time specifically dedicated to research, a lower clinical workload, and the number of clinical trials performed in the last year. We have demonstrated that some factors are associated with a higher scientific productivity. Residency program, more research staff, clinical workload redistribution and research motivation/initiatives are key strategies that could improve scientific productivity of a center.

  18. The Potential for Development of Russian Youth Social Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savotina, Nataliya

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with scientific and applied topicality of studying the problem of children and youth social activity. Spheres of social activity display in European tradition, in particular, the European Charter, Great Britain, have been revealed. Comparative analysis of understanding the essence of such a phenomenon in Western theories and…

  19. Activity theory as a potential framework for technology research in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article attempts to expand and elaborate Activity Theory as a theory for studying human computer interaction in South Africa. It first sketches ways in which. Russian activity theory arising out of the work of Vygotsky may expand understandings of learning before elaborating the theory in terms of Engestrom's

  20. In-vivo neutron activation analysis: principles and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress. It seems likely that by the end of this century there will have been significant progress with this research tool, and exciting insights obtained into the nature and dynamics of human body composition

  1. Clinical applications of in vivo neutron-activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress

  2. Linear Energy Transfer-Guided Optimization in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy: Feasibility Study and Clinical Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula, E-mail: dgiantsoudi@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Grassberger, Clemens; Craft, David; Niemierko, Andrzej; Trofimov, Alexei; Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and potential clinical benefit of linear energy transfer (LET) guided plan optimization in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Methods and Materials: A multicriteria optimization (MCO) module was used to generate a series of Pareto-optimal IMPT base plans (BPs), corresponding to defined objectives, for 5 patients with head-and-neck cancer and 2 with pancreatic cancer. A Monte Carlo platform was used to calculate dose and LET distributions for each BP. A custom-designed MCO navigation module allowed the user to interpolate between BPs to produce deliverable Pareto-optimal solutions. Differences among the BPs were evaluated for each patient, based on dose–volume and LET–volume histograms and 3-dimensional distributions. An LET-based relative biological effectiveness (RBE) model was used to evaluate the potential clinical benefit when navigating the space of Pareto-optimal BPs. Results: The mean LET values for the target varied up to 30% among the BPs for the head-and-neck patients and up to 14% for the pancreatic cancer patients. Variations were more prominent in organs at risk (OARs), where mean LET values differed by a factor of up to 2 among the BPs for the same patient. An inverse relation between dose and LET distributions for the OARs was typically observed. Accounting for LET-dependent variable RBE values, a potential improvement on RBE-weighted dose of up to 40%, averaged over several structures under study, was noticed during MCO navigation. Conclusions: We present a novel strategy for optimizing proton therapy to maximize dose-averaged LET in tumor targets while simultaneously minimizing dose-averaged LET in normal tissue structures. MCO BPs show substantial LET variations, leading to potentially significant differences in RBE-weighted doses. Pareto-surface navigation, using both dose and LET distributions for guidance, provides the means for evaluating a large variety of deliverable plans and aids in

  3. Linear Energy Transfer-Guided Optimization in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy: Feasibility Study and Clinical Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Craft, David; Niemierko, Andrzej; Trofimov, Alexei; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and potential clinical benefit of linear energy transfer (LET) guided plan optimization in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Methods and Materials: A multicriteria optimization (MCO) module was used to generate a series of Pareto-optimal IMPT base plans (BPs), corresponding to defined objectives, for 5 patients with head-and-neck cancer and 2 with pancreatic cancer. A Monte Carlo platform was used to calculate dose and LET distributions for each BP. A custom-designed MCO navigation module allowed the user to interpolate between BPs to produce deliverable Pareto-optimal solutions. Differences among the BPs were evaluated for each patient, based on dose–volume and LET–volume histograms and 3-dimensional distributions. An LET-based relative biological effectiveness (RBE) model was used to evaluate the potential clinical benefit when navigating the space of Pareto-optimal BPs. Results: The mean LET values for the target varied up to 30% among the BPs for the head-and-neck patients and up to 14% for the pancreatic cancer patients. Variations were more prominent in organs at risk (OARs), where mean LET values differed by a factor of up to 2 among the BPs for the same patient. An inverse relation between dose and LET distributions for the OARs was typically observed. Accounting for LET-dependent variable RBE values, a potential improvement on RBE-weighted dose of up to 40%, averaged over several structures under study, was noticed during MCO navigation. Conclusions: We present a novel strategy for optimizing proton therapy to maximize dose-averaged LET in tumor targets while simultaneously minimizing dose-averaged LET in normal tissue structures. MCO BPs show substantial LET variations, leading to potentially significant differences in RBE-weighted doses. Pareto-surface navigation, using both dose and LET distributions for guidance, provides the means for evaluating a large variety of deliverable plans and aids in

  4. Periodontal bacteria in human carotid atherothrombosis as a potential trigger for neutrophil activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangé, Hélène; Labreuche, Julien; Louedec, Liliane; Rondeau, Philippe; Planesse, Cynthia; Sebbag, Uriel; Bourdon, Emmanuel; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Bouchard, Philippe; Meilhac, Olivier

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiological, biological and clinical links between periodontal and cardiovascular diseases are now well established. Several human studies have detected bacterial DNA corresponding to periodontal pathogens in cardiovascular samples. Intraplaque hemorrhage has been associated with a higher risk of atherosclerotic plaque rupture, potentially mediated by neutrophil activation. In this study, we hypothesized that plaque composition may be related to periodontal pathogens. Carotid culprit plaque samples were collected from 157 patients. Macroscopic characterization was performed at the time of collection: presence of blood, lipid core, calcification and fibrosis. Markers of neutrophil activation released by carotid samples were quantified (myeloperoxidase or MPO, cell-free DNA and DNA-MPO complexes). PCR analysis using specific primers for Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcommitans, Treponema denticola, Prevotella intermedia and Tannerella forsythia was used to detect DNA from periodontal pathogens in carotid tissues. In addition, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Immunoglobulins G against T. forsythia were quantified in atherosclerotic carotid conditioned medium. Intraplaque hemorrhage was present in 73/157 carotid samples and was associated with neutrophil activation, reflected by the release of MPO, cell-free DNA and MPO-DNA complexes. LPS levels were also linked to intraplaque hemorrhage but not with the neutrophil activation markers. Seventy-three percent of the carotid samples were positive for periodontal bacterial DNA. Furthermore, hemoglobin levels were associated with the detection of T. forsythia and neutrophil activation/inflammation markers. This study suggests a potential role of periodontal microorganisms, especially T. forsythia, in neutrophil activation within hemorrhagic atherosclerotic carotid plaques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Potential Anticonvulsant Activity of Ethanol Extracts of Cichorium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the acticonvulsant activity of Cichorium intybus (C. intybus) and Taraxacum serotinum (T. ..... In addition, substances with LD50 values higher than 5000 mg/kg by ... neurotransmitter GABA in the central nervous system ...

  6. Potential Biosignificant Interest and Surface Activity of Efficient Heterocyclic Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Refat; Althagafi, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Some functionalized pyridine and fused system derivatives were synthesized using enaminonitrile derivative 5 as a starting material for the reaction, with various reagents under different conditions. Propoxylation of these compounds using different moles of propylene oxide (3, 5 and 7 moles) leads to a novel group of surface active agents. The antimicrobial and surface activities of the synthesized compounds were investigated. Most of the evaluated compounds proved to be active as antibacterial and antifungal agents and showed good surface activity, which makes them suitable for diverse applications such as the manufacturing of emulsifiers, cosmetics, drugs, pesticides, etc. Additionally, biodegradation testing exhibits significant breakdown within six to seven days, and hence, lowers the toxicity to human beings and becomes environmentally friendly.

  7. Technetium labelled plasminogen activator - a potential reagent for thrombus detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsma-De Waal, J.H.; Boer, A.C. de; Cox, P.H.; Pillay, M.; Stassen, J.H.; Collen, D.

    1987-12-01

    The preparation of a technetium labelled plasminogen activator complex using a solid phase labelling technique is described. The labelled complex showed no significant loss of fibrinolytic activity in vitro and showed in vivo a rapid uptake in thrombi in an animal model and in human volunteer patients with known thrombi when injected into a vein draining to the thrombotic region. Systemic injection showed no uptake in the thrombi probably due to rapid sequestration of the complex by the liver.

  8. Cyclin D3 interacts with human activating transcription factor 5 and potentiates its transcription activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenjin; Sun Maoyun; Jiang Jianhai; Shen Xiaoyun; Sun Qing; Liu Weicheng; Shen Hailian; Gu Jianxin

    2004-01-01

    The Cyclin D3 protein is a member of the D-type cyclins. Besides serving as cell cycle regulators, D-type cyclins have been reported to be able to interact with several transcription factors and modulate their transcriptional activations. Here we report that human activating transcription factor 5 (hATF5) is a new interacting partner of Cyclin D3. The interaction was confirmed by in vivo coimmunoprecipitation and in vitro binding analysis. Neither interaction between Cyclin D1 and hATF5 nor interaction between Cyclin D2 and hATF5 was observed. Confocal microscopy analysis showed that Cyclin D3 could colocalize with hATF5 in the nuclear region. Cyclin D3 could potentiate hATF5 transcriptional activity independently of its Cdk4 partner. But Cyclin D1 and Cyclin D2 had no effect on hATF5 transcriptional activity. These data provide a new clue to understand the new role of Cyclin D3 as a transcriptional regulator

  9. Clinical potential of naloxegol in the management of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulsen JL

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Jakob Lykke Poulsen,1 Christina Brock,1,2 Anne Estrup Olesen,1,2 Matias Nilsson,1 Asbjørn Mohr Drewes1,3 1Mech-Sense, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 2Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 3Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, DenmarkAbstract: Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD is a burdensome condition which limits the therapeutic benefit of analgesia. It affects the entire gastrointestinal tract, predominantly by activating opioid receptors in the enteric nervous system, resulting in a wide range of symptoms, such as reflux, bloating, abdominal cramping, hard, dry stools, and incomplete evacuation. The majority of studies evaluating OIBD focus on constipation experienced in approximately 60% of patients. Nevertheless, other presentations of OIBD seem to be equally frequent. Furthermore, laxative treatment is often insufficient, which in many patients results in decreased quality of life and discontinuation of opioid treatment. Novel mechanism-based pharmacological approaches targeting the gastrointestinal opioid receptors have been marketed recently and even more are in the pipeline. One strategy is prolonged release formulation of the opioid antagonist naloxone (which has limited systemic absorption and oxycodone in a combined tablet. Another approach is peripherally acting, µ-opioid receptor antagonists (PAMORAs that selectively target µ-opioid receptors in the gastrointestinal tract. However, in Europe the only PAMORA approved for OIBD is the subcutaneously administered methylnaltrexone. Alvimopan is an oral PAMORA, but only approved in the US for postoperative ileus in hospitalized patients. Finally, naloxegol is a novel, oral PAMORA expected to be approved soon. In this review, the prevalence and pathophysiology of OIBD is presented. As PAMORAs seem to be a promising approach, their potential

  10. Clinical potential of eliglustat tartrate in the treatment of type 1 Gaucher disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan P

    2014-05-01

    counts, and bone density, as well as decreases in biomarkers of Gaucher disease activity. Few adverse events, none of which was serious, have been reported. Eliglustat tartrate has the clinical potential to enable a larger number of patients with type 1 Gaucher disease to be treated successfully.Keywords: type 1 Gaucher disease, substrate reduction therapy, eliglustat tartrate

  11. Clinical usefulness and feasibility of time-frequency analysis of chemosensory event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huart, C; Rombaux, Ph; Hummel, T; Mouraux, A

    2013-09-01

    The clinical usefulness of olfactory event-related brain potentials (OERPs) to assess olfactory function is limited by the relatively low signal-to-noise ratio of the responses identified using conventional time-domain averaging. Recently, it was shown that time-frequency analysis of the obtained EEG signals can markedly improve the signal-to-noise ratio of OERPs in healthy controls, because it enhances both phase-locked and non phase-locked EEG responses. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical usefulness of this approach and evaluate its feasibility in a clinical setting. We retrospectively analysed EEG recordings obtained from 45 patients (15 anosmic, 15 hyposmic and 15 normos- mic). The responses to olfactory stimulation were analysed using conventional time-domain analysis and joint time-frequency analysis. The ability of the two methods to discriminate between anosmic, hyposmic and normosmic patients was assessed using a Receiver Operating Characteristic analysis. The discrimination performance of OERPs identified using conventional time-domain averaging was poor. In contrast, the discrimination performance of the EEG response identified in the time-frequency domain was relatively high. Furthermore, we found a significant correlation between the magnitude of this response and the psychophysical olfactory score. Time-frequency analysis of the EEG responses to olfactory stimulation could be used as an effective and reliable diagnostic tool for the objective clinical evaluation of olfactory function in patients.

  12. Post-use assay of vaginal rings (VRs) as a potential measure of clinical trial adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Patrick; Nel, Annalene; van Niekerk, Neliëtte; Derrick, Tiffany; Wilder, Susan; Devlin, Bríd

    2016-06-05

    Adherence measurement for microbicide use within the clinical trial setting remains a challenge for the HIV prevention field. This paper describes an assay method used for determining residual dapivirine levels in post-use vaginal rings from clinical trials conducted with the Dapivirine Vaginal Matrix Ring-004 developed by the International Partnership for Microbicides to prevent male to female HIV transmission. Post-use assay results from three Ring-004 clinical trials showed that of the 25mg drug load, approximately 4mg of dapivirine is released from the matrix ring over a 28-day use period. Data obtained by both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that dapivirine is released according to a diffusion mechanism, as determined by conformance of both data sets to the Higuchi equation. This, coupled with the low variability associated with batch production over two manufacturing sites and 20 batches of material, provides evidence that post-use ring analysis can contribute to the assessment of adherence to ring use. Limitations of this method include the potential of intra-participant and inter-participant variability and uncertainty associated with measuring the low amount of dapivirine actually released relative to the drug load. Therefore, residual drug levels should not serve as the only direct measurement for microbicide adherence in vaginal ring clinical trials but should preferably be used as part of a multi-pronged approach towards understanding and assessing adherence to vaginal ring use. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanism of Action and Clinical Potential of Fingolimod for the Treatment of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentao Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fingolimod (FTY720 is an orally bio-available immunomodulatory drug currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Currently, there is a significant interest in the potential benefits of FTY720 on stroke outcomes. FTY720 and the sphingolipid signaling pathway it modulates has a ubiquitous presence in the central nervous system and both rodent models and pilot clinical trials seem to indicate that the drug may improve overall functional recovery in different stroke subtypes. Although the precise mechanisms behind these beneficial effects are yet unclear, there is evidence that FTY720 has a role in regulating cerebrovascular responses, blood brain barrier permeability, and cell survival in the event of cerebrovascular insult. In this article, we critically review the data obtained from the latest laboratory findings and clinical trials involving both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and attempt to form a cohesive picture of FTY720’s mechanisms of action in stroke

  14. PATIENTS WITH SUSPECTED METAL IMPLANT ALLERGY: POTENTIAL CLINICAL PICTURES AND ALLERGOLOGICAL DIAGNOSTIC APPROACH (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this review are allergic complications following insertion of metallic orthopedic implants. Such potential allergic reactions encompass eczema, impaired wound and fracture healing, infection-mimicking reactions, effusions, pain and loosening. Nickel, cobalt and chromium seem to be the predominant eliciting allergens. Allergy might be considered prior to planned orthopaedic surgery or in patients with complications following arthroplasty We recommend, that differential diagnoses - in particular infection -should always be excluded in cooperation with surgery collegues. The clinical work up of a patient suspected of suffering from metal implant allergy should include a combined evaluation of medical history, clinical findings, patch testing and histology In vitro testing, namely the lymphocyte transformation test (LTT, can indicate metal sensitization, but needs careful interpretation.

  15. TH-B-BRC-01: How to Identify and Resolve Potential Clinical Errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, I. [NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Radiation treatment consists of a chain of events influenced by the quality of machine operation, beam data commissioning, machine calibration, patient specific data, simulation, treatment planning, imaging and treatment delivery. There is always a chance that the clinical medical physicist may make or fail to detect an error in one of the events that may impact on the patient’s treatment. In the clinical scenario, errors may be systematic and, without peer review, may have a low detectability because they are not part of routine QA procedures. During treatment, there might be errors on machine that needs attention. External reviews of some of the treatment delivery components by independent reviewers, like IROC, can detect errors, but may not be timely. The goal of this session is to help junior clinical physicists identify potential errors as well as the approach of quality assurance to perform a root cause analysis to find and eliminate an error and to continually monitor for errors. A compilation of potential errors will be presented by examples of the thought process required to spot the error and determine the root cause. Examples may include unusual machine operation, erratic electrometer reading, consistent lower electron output, variation in photon output, body parts inadvertently left in beam, unusual treatment plan, poor normalization, hot spots etc. Awareness of the possibility and detection of error in any link of the treatment process chain will help improve the safe and accurate delivery of radiation to patients. Four experts will discuss how to identify errors in four areas of clinical treatment. D. Followill, NIH grant CA 180803.

  16. TH-B-BRC-01: How to Identify and Resolve Potential Clinical Errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, I.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation treatment consists of a chain of events influenced by the quality of machine operation, beam data commissioning, machine calibration, patient specific data, simulation, treatment planning, imaging and treatment delivery. There is always a chance that the clinical medical physicist may make or fail to detect an error in one of the events that may impact on the patient’s treatment. In the clinical scenario, errors may be systematic and, without peer review, may have a low detectability because they are not part of routine QA procedures. During treatment, there might be errors on machine that needs attention. External reviews of some of the treatment delivery components by independent reviewers, like IROC, can detect errors, but may not be timely. The goal of this session is to help junior clinical physicists identify potential errors as well as the approach of quality assurance to perform a root cause analysis to find and eliminate an error and to continually monitor for errors. A compilation of potential errors will be presented by examples of the thought process required to spot the error and determine the root cause. Examples may include unusual machine operation, erratic electrometer reading, consistent lower electron output, variation in photon output, body parts inadvertently left in beam, unusual treatment plan, poor normalization, hot spots etc. Awareness of the possibility and detection of error in any link of the treatment process chain will help improve the safe and accurate delivery of radiation to patients. Four experts will discuss how to identify errors in four areas of clinical treatment. D. Followill, NIH grant CA 180803

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of clinical and blood examination for sepsis in potentially infected neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Mulyani

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Neonatal sepsis remains a diagnostic challenge due to its nonspesific symptoms and signs. Blood culture as the gold standard is still a problem because it takes time, is expensive, and not every health facility is able to perionn. Objective To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of clinical symptoms, hematologic findings, and C-reactive protein (CRP in neonatal sepsis. Methods Samples were taken from potentially infected neonates admitted to the Matemal-Perinatal Unit of Sardjito Hospital, between December 1st, 2000 and March 31st, 2001 using at least one of the criteria: prematurity, very low birth weight infants, matemal pyrexia during delivery, premature membrane rupture, or thick, cloudy amniotic fluid. Clinical symptoms, total leukocyte, neutrophil, platelet count, CRP, and blood culture as the gold standard were examined. Results Among 99 neonates enrolled, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of clinical symptoms were 79.3%, 75.7%, 57.5%, and 89.9%, respectively; leukopenia/leukocytosis were 27.6%, 85.7%, 44.4%, and 74.1%; neutropenia! neutrophilia were 41.4%, 71.4%, 37.5%, and 74.6%; thrombocytopenia were 79.3%, 51.8%, 40.4%, and 85.7%; positive CRP were 58.6%,78.6%,53.1%, and 82.1%. Parallel tests increased the sensitivity up to 89.7%. Specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and likelihood ratio were 44.3%, 40%, 91.2%, and 1.6, respectively. Serial tests increased the specificity up to 88.6%. Sensitivity, positive and negative predictive value, and likelihood ratio were 58.6%, 68%, 83.8%, and 5.1, respectively. Conclusion Clinical sepsis, thrombocytopenia, and CRP are sufficiently accurate as diagnostic tests for sepsis in potentially infected neonates. Parallel tests will increase the sensitivity, while serial tests increase the specificity.

  18. Potential Role of Activated Nonparenchymal Cells in Acetaminophen-Induced Potentiation of Hepatotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-14

    ALT is either being degraded or the activity is inhibited by something in the 133 media. AST activity in cocultures of NPCs and hepatocytes was... Paracetamol Hepatotoxicity: IN VITRO Studies in Isolated Mouse Hepatocytes. Toxicology Letters. 2229: 37-48. Casini, A. M., P. A. Ferrali and M...Acute Liver Necrosis Following Overdose of Paracetamol . British Medical Journal. 2: 497-499. Decker, T., M. L. Lohmann-Matthes, U. Karck, T. Peters

  19. Radotinib and its clinical potential in chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskazan, Ahmet Emre; Keskin, Dilek

    2017-09-01

    Although imatinib has dramatically improved major outcomes in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), there are newer tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) approved worldwide for the treatment of resistant cases, and two second-generation TKIs (dasatinib, nilotinib) are approved in some nations for treating patients in the upfront setting. Radotinib (IY5511HCL, Supect® ) is a novel and selective second-generation BCR-ABL1 TKI, which is currently approved in Korea for the treatment of patients with CML both in the upfront and salvage settings. This review mainly focuses on the clinical potential of radotinib in patients with CML in chronic phase in terms of efficacy and safety.

  20. Clearance potential of ITER vacuum vessel activated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepraga, D.G.; Cambi, G.; Frisoni, M.

    2002-01-01

    To demonstrate fusion's environmental attractiveness over the entire life cycle, a waste analysis is mandatory. The clearance is recommended by IAEA for releasing activated solid materials from regulatory control and for waste management policy. The paper focuses on the approach used to support waste analyses for ITER Generic Site Safety Report. The Material Unconditional Clearance Index of all the materials/zones on the equatorial mid-plane of ITER machine have been evaluated, based on IAEA-TECDOC-855. The Bonami-Nitawl-XSDNRPM sequence of the Scale-4.4a code system (using Vitenea-J library) has been firstly used for radiation transport analyses. Then the Anita-2000 code package is used for the activation calculation. The paper presents also, as an example, an application of the clearance indexes estimation for the ITER vacuum vessel materials. The results of the Anita-2000 have been compared with those obtained using the Fispact-99 activation code. (author)

  1. A scoping review of the potential for chart stimulated recall as a clinical research method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnott, Carol; Kelly, Martina A; Bradley, Colin P

    2017-08-22

    Chart-stimulated recall (CSR) is a case-based interviewing technique, which is used in the assessment of clinical decision-making in medical education and professional certification. Increasingly, clinical decision-making is a concern for clinical research in primary care. In this study, we review the prior application and utility of CSR as a technique for research interviews in primary care. Following Arksey & O'Malley's method for scoping reviews, we searched seven databases, grey literature, reference lists, and contacted experts in the field. We excluded studies on medical education or competence assessment. Retrieved citations were screened by one reviewer and full texts were ordered for all potentially relevant abstracts. Two researchers independently reviewed full texts and performed data extraction and quality appraisal if inclusion criteria were met. Data were collated and summarised using a published framework on the reporting of qualitative interview techniques, which was chosen a priori. The preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines informed the review report. From an initial list of 789 citations, eight studies using CSR in research interviews were included in the review: six from North America, one from the Netherlands, and one from Ireland. The most common purpose of included studies was to examine the influence of guidelines on physicians' decisions. The number of interviewees ranged from seven to twenty nine, while the number of charts discussed per interview ranged from one to twelve. CSR gave insights into physicians' reasoning for actions taken or not taken; the unrecorded social and clinical influences on decisions; and discrepancies between physicians' real and perceived practice. Ethical concerns and the training and influence of the researcher were poorly discussed in most of the studies. Potential pitfalls included the risk of recall, selection and observation biases. Despite the proven validity

  2. Prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma: potential targets, experimental models, and clinical challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshida, Yujin; Fuchs, Bryan C.; Tanabe, Kenneth K.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic fibrotic liver diseases such as viral hepatitis eventually develop liver cirrhosis, which causes occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Given the limited therapeutic efficacy in advanced HCC, prevention of HCC development could be an effective strategy for improving patient prognosis. However, there is still no established therapy to meet the goal. Studies have elucidated a wide variety of molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in HCC development. Genetically-engineered or chemically-treated experimental models of cirrhosis and HCC have been developed and shown their potential value in investigating molecular therapeutic targets and diagnostic biomarkers for HCC prevention. In this review, we overview potential targets of prevention and currently available experimental models, and discuss strategies to translate the findings into clinical practice. PMID:22873223

  3. Activating the working behavior of citizens by motivation potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Nikolayevna Lobanova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to study the possibility to change the working behavior of employees by actualizing their motivational potential. Methods the methods of survey questionnaires focus groups coaching and interview were used in the study. Results the studies have shown that the employeesrsquo motivational potential is revealed through a complex system of labor motivation taking into account the needs and interests of a particular employee and forming the motivational and stimulating environment. Scientific novelty the research includes the development of methods to analyze the employeesrsquo interests and dominant motives and building of the structural system of employeesrsquo motivation to effective action. Practical value developing a method to increase the employeesrsquo motivation for efficient work in the form of a systematic set of actions. The application of this method allows to increase the efficiency and productivity of workers to gain additional profit which is especially important in the context of the economic crisis and the lack of additional investment. nbsp

  4. Effect of Dexmedetomidine and Propofol on Basal Ganglia Activity in Parkinson Disease: A Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Simon, Antonio; Alegre, Manuel; Honorato-Cia, Cristina; Nuñez-Cordoba, Jorge M; Cacho-Asenjo, Elena; Trocóniz, Iñaki F; Carmona-Abellán, Mar; Valencia, Miguel; Guridi, Jorge

    2017-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation electrodes can record oscillatory activity from deep brain structures, known as local field potentials. The authors' objective was to evaluate and quantify the effects of dexmedetomidine (0.2 μg·kg·h) on local field potentials in patients with Parkinson disease undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery compared with control recording (primary outcome), as well as the effect of propofol at different estimated peak effect site concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 μg/ml) from control recording. A nonrandomized, nonblinded controlled clinical trial was carried out to assess the change in local field potentials activity over time in 10 patients with Parkinson disease who underwent deep brain stimulation placement surgery (18 subthalamic nuclei). The relationship was assessed between the activity in nuclei in the same patient at a given time and repeated measures from the same nucleus over time. No significant difference was observed between the relative beta power of local field potentials in dexmedetomidine and control recordings (-7.7; 95% CI, -18.9 to 7.6). By contrast, there was a significant decline of 12.7% (95% CI, -21.3 to -4.7) in the relative beta power of the local field potentials for each increment in the estimated peak propofol concentrations at the effect site relative to the control recordings. Dexmedetomidine (0.2 μg·kg·h) did not show effect on local field potentials compared with control recording. A significant deep brain activity decline from control recording was observed with incremental doses of propofol.

  5. New Potentially Active Pyrazinamide Derivatives Synthesized Under Microwave Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Jandourek

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of 18 N-alkyl substituted 3-aminopyrazine-2-carboxamides was prepared in this work according to previously experimentally set and proven conditions using microwave assisted synthesis methodology. This approach for the aminodehalogenation reaction was chosen due to higher yields and shorter reaction times compared to organic reactions with conventional heating. Antimycobacterial, antibacterial, antifungal and photosynthetic electron transport (PET inhibiting in vitro activities of these compounds were investigated. Experiments for the determination of lipophilicity were also performed. Only a small number of substances with alicyclic side chain showed activity against fungi which was the same or higher than standards and the biological efficacy of the compounds increased with rising lipophilicity. Nine pyrazinamide derivatives also inhibited PET in spinach chloroplasts and the IC50 values of these compounds varied in the range from 14.3 to 1590.0 μmol/L. The inhibitory activity was connected not only with the lipophilicity, but also with the presence of secondary amine fragment bounded to the pyrazine ring. Structure-activity relationships are discussed as well.

  6. In vitro assay of potential antifungal and antibacterial activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the dermatophytes strains Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton interdigitale, Trichophyton soudanense, Microsporum langeronii, and Epidermophyton floccosum were used. The E2F2 extract showed strong inhibitory activity on four of the five fungal species used against ketoconazole, a standard antifungal drug. However ...

  7. Lipolytic activity of potential probiotic enterococci and additive staphylococci

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Simonová, M.; Sirotek, Kamil; Marounek, Milan; Lauková, A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 5 (2008), s. 575-580 ISSN 0001-7213 Grant - others:Slovenská Akademie věd(SK) VEGA 2/0008/28 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : bacteria * lipase * metabolic activity Subject RIV: GH - Livestock Nutrition Impact factor: 0.395, year: 2008

  8. Antibacterial activities and toxicological potentials of crude ethanolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leaves of Euphorbia hirta used in traditional medicine for the treatments of boils, wounds and control of diarrhoea and dysentery were extracted by maceration in ethanol. The agar diffusion method was used to determine the antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, ...

  9. Activity of innate antimicrobial peptides and ivacaftor against clinical cystic fibrosis respiratory pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Joanna E; Dubois, Alice V; Ingram, Rebecca J; Weldon, Sinead; Taggart, Clifford C; Elborn, J Stuart; Tunney, Michael M

    2017-09-01

    There is a clear need for new antimicrobials to improve current treatment of chronic lung infection in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). This study determined the activities of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and ivacaftor, a novel CF transmembrane conductance regulator potentiator, for CF treatment. Antimicrobial activities of AMPs [LL37, human β-defensins (HβD) 1-4 and SLPI] and ivacaftor against clinical respiratory isolates (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus spp., Achromobacter spp. and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia) were determined using radial diffusion and time-kill assays, respectively. Synergy of LL37 and ivacaftor with tobramycin was determined by time-kill, with in vivo activity of ivacaftor and tobramycin compared using a murine infection model. LL37 and HβD3 were the most active AMPs tested, with MICs ranging from 3.2- ≥ 200 mg/L and 4.8- ≥ 200 mg/L, respectively, except for Achromobacter that was resistant. HβD1 and SLPI demonstrated no antimicrobial activity. LL37 demonstrated synergy with tobramycin against 4/5 S. aureus and 2/5 Streptococcus spp. isolates. Ivacaftor demonstrated bactericidal activity against Streptococcus spp. (mean log 10 decrease 3.31 CFU/mL) and bacteriostatic activity against S. aureus (mean log 10 change 0.13 CFU/mL), but no activity against other genera. Moreover, ivacaftor demonstrated synergy with tobramycin, with mean log 10 decreases of 5.72 CFU/mL and 5.53 CFU/mL at 24 h for S. aureus and Streptococcus spp., respectively. Ivacaftor demonstrated immunomodulatory but no antimicrobial activity in a P. aeruginosa in vivo murine infection model. Following further modulation to enhance activity, AMPs and ivacaftor offer real potential as therapeutics to augment antibiotic therapy of respiratory infection in CF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  10. [Potential antimicrobial drug interactions in clinical practice: consequences of polypharmacy and multidrug resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Múgica, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    Polypharmacy is a growing problem nowadays, which can increase the risk of potential drug interactions, and result in a loss of effectiveness. This is particularly relevant to the anti-infective therapy, especially when infection is produced by resistant bacteria, because therapeutic options are limited and interactions can cause treatment failure. All antimicrobial prescriptions were retrospectively reviewed during a week in the Pharmacy Department, in order to detect potential drug-interactions and analysing their clinical significance. A total of 314 antimicrobial prescriptions from 151 patients were checked. There was at least one potential interaction detected in 40% of patients, being more frequent and severe in those infected with multidrug-resistant microorganisms. Drugs most commonly involved were quinolones, azoles, linezolid and vancomycin. Potential drug interactions with antimicrobial agents are a frequent problem that can result in a loss of effectiveness. This is why they should be detected and avoided when possible, in order to optimize antimicrobial therapy, especially in case of multidrug resistant infections.

  11. Motor Unit Action Potential Clustering—Theoretical Consideration for Muscle Activation during a Motor Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Asmussen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During dynamic or sustained isometric contractions, bursts of muscle activity appear in the electromyography (EMG signal. Theoretically, these bursts of activity likely occur because motor units are constrained to fire temporally close to one another and thus the impulses are “clustered” with short delays to elicit bursts of muscle activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a sequence comprised of “clustered” motor unit action potentials (MUAP can explain spectral and amplitude changes of the EMG during a simulated motor task. This question would be difficult to answer experimentally and thus, required a model to study this type of muscle activation pattern. To this end, we modeled two EMG signals, whereby a single MUAP was either convolved with a randomly distributed impulse train (EMG-rand or a “clustered” sequence of impulses (EMG-clust. The clustering occurred in windows lasting 5–100 ms. A final mixed signal of EMG-clust and EMG-rand, with ratios (1:1–1:10, was also modeled. A ratio of 1:1 would indicate that 50% of MUAP were randomly distributed, while 50% of “clustered” MUAP occurred in a given time window (5–100 ms. The results of the model showed that clustering MUAP caused a downshift in the mean power frequency (i.e., ~30 Hz with the largest shift occurring with a cluster window of 10 ms. The mean frequency shift was largest when the ratio of EMG-clust to EMG-rand was high. Further, the clustering of MUAP also caused a substantial increase in the amplitude of the EMG signal. This model potentially explains an activation pattern that changes the EMG spectra during a motor task and thus, a potential activation pattern of muscles observed experimentally. Changes in EMG measurements during fatiguing conditions are typically attributed to slowing of conduction velocity but could, per this model, also result from changes of the clustering of MUAP. From a clinical standpoint, this type of muscle

  12. Constructing a Local Potential Participant Registry to Improve Alzheimer's Disease Clinical Research Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Joshua D; Hoang, Dan; Gillen, Daniel L; Cox, Chelsea G; Gombosev, Adrijana; Klein, Kirsten; O'Leary, Steve; Witbracht, Megan; Pierce, Aimee

    2018-01-01

    Potential participant registries are tools to address the challenge of slow recruitment to clinical research. In particular, registries may aid recruitment to secondary prevention clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease (AD), which enroll cognitively normal older individuals meeting specific genetic or biomarker criteria. Evidence of registry effectiveness is sparse, as is guidance on optimal designs or methods of conduct. We report our experiences of developing a novel local potential participant registry that implemented online enrollment and data collection. In the first year of operation, 957 individuals submitted email addresses to the registry, of whom 592 self-reported demographic, family history, and medical data. In addition, registrants provided information related to their interest and willingness to be contacted about studies. Local earned media and community education were the most effective methods of recruitment into the registry. Seventy-six (26%) of 298 registrants contacted about studies in the first year enrolled in those studies. One hundred twenty-nine registrants were invited to enroll in a preclinical AD trial, of whom 25 (18%) screened and 6 were randomized. These results indicate that registries can aid recruitment and provide needed guidance for investigators initiating new local registries.

  13. Human iPS Cell-Derived Germ Cells: Current Status and Clinical Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Ishii

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, fertile spermatozoa and oocytes were generated from mouse induced pluripotent (iPS cells using a combined in vitro and in vivo induction system. With regard to germ cell induction from human iPS cells, progress has been made particularly in the male germline, demonstrating in vitro generation of haploid, round spermatids. Although iPS-derived germ cells are expected to be developed to yield a form of assisted reproductive technology (ART that can address unmet reproductive needs, genetic and/or epigenetic instabilities abound in iPS cell generation and germ cell induction. In addition, there is still room to improve the induction protocol in the female germline. However, rapid advances in stem cell research are likely to make such obstacles surmountable, potentially translating induced germ cells into the clinical setting in the immediate future. This review examines the current status of the induction of germ cells from human iPS cells and discusses the clinical potential, as well as future directions.

  14. Clinical potential of meningioma genomic insights: a practical review for neurosurgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsy, Michael; Azab, Mohammed A; Abou-Al-Shaar, Hussam; Guan, Jian; Eli, Ilyas; Jensen, Randy L; Ormond, D Ryan

    2018-06-01

    Meningiomas are among the most common intracranial pathological conditions, accounting for 36% of intracranial lesions treated by neurosurgeons. Although the majority of these lesions are benign, the classical categorization of tumors by histological type or World Health Organization (WHO) grade has not fully captured the potential for meningioma progression and recurrence. Many targeted treatments have failed to generate a long-lasting effect on these tumors. Recently, several seminal studies evaluating the genomics of intracranial meningiomas have rapidly changed the understanding of the disease. The importance of NF2 (neurofibromin 2), TRAF7 (tumor necrosis factor [TNF] receptor-associated factor 7), KLF4 (Kruppel-like factor 4), AKT1, SMO (smoothened), PIK3CA (phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha), and POLR2 (RNA polymerase II subunit A) demonstrates that there are at least 6 distinct mutational classes of meningiomas. In addition, 6 methylation classes of meningioma have been appreciated, enabling improved prediction of prognosis compared with traditional WHO grades. Genomic studies have shed light on the nature of recurrent meningioma, distinct intracranial locations and mutational patterns, and a potential embryonic cancer stem cell-like origin. However, despite these exciting findings, the clinical relevance of these findings remains elusive. The authors review the key findings from recent genomic studies in meningiomas, specifically focusing on how these findings relate to clinical insights for the practicing neurosurgeon.

  15. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Basic Research to Potential Clinical Applications in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa de Souza Fernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs are derived from a direct reprogramming of human somatic cells to a pluripotent stage through ectopic expression of specific transcription factors. These cells have two important properties, which are the self-renewal capacity and the ability to differentiate into any cell type of the human body. So, the discovery of hiPSCs opens new opportunities in biomedical sciences, since these cells may be useful for understanding the mechanisms of diseases in the production of new diseases models, in drug development/drug toxicity tests, gene therapies, and cell replacement therapies. However, the hiPSCs technology has limitations including the potential for the development of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities leading to tumorigenicity. Nowadays, basic research in the hiPSCs field has made progress in the application of new strategies with the aim to enable an efficient production of high-quality of hiPSCs for safety and efficacy, necessary to the future application for clinical practice. In this review, we show the recent advances in hiPSCs’ basic research and some potential clinical applications focusing on cancer. We also present the importance of the use of statistical methods to evaluate the possible validation for the hiPSCs for future therapeutic use toward personalized cell therapies.

  16. Recent Progress in Lab-on-a-Chip Technology and Its Potential Application to Clinical Diagnoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nae Yoon Lee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the construction of the lab-on-a-chip (LOC system, a state-of-the-art technology that uses polymer materials (i.e., poly[dimethylsiloxane] for the miniaturization of conventional laboratory apparatuses, and show the potential use of these microfluidic devices in clinical applications. In particular, we introduce the independent unit components of the LOC system and demonstrate how each component can be functionally integrated into one monolithic system for the realization of a LOC system. In specific, we demonstrate microscale polymerase chain reaction with the use of a single heater, a microscale sample injection device with a disposable plastic syringe and a strategy for device assembly under environmentally mild conditions assisted by surface modification techniques. In this way, we endeavor to construct a totally integrated, disposable microfluidic system operated by a single mode, the pressure, which can be applied on-site with enhanced device portability and disposability and with simple and rapid operation for medical and clinical diagnoses, potentially extending its application to urodynamic studies in molecular level.

  17. A clinically feasible method for the detection of potential collision in proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou Wei; Lin Haibo; Plastaras, John P.; Wang Huanshu; Bui, Viet; Vapiwala, Neha; McDonough, James; Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States) and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Potential collision between the patient/couch and the gantry could delay the start of the treatment and reduce clinical efficiency. The ability to accurately detect possible collisions during the treatment planning phase is desired. Such collision detection should account for the specific proton gantry design, the treatment beam configuration, couch orientation, and the patient specific geometry. In this paper the authors developed an approach to detect possible patient-machine collisions using patient treatment plan data. Methods: The geometry of the machine and the patient was reconstructed relative to the isocenter of the proton treatment room. The surface contour of the gantry was first captured from the proton computer aided design and reconstructed to account for specific gantry rotation, snout position, collimator rotation, and range compensator dimensions based on the patient treatment plan data. The patient body and couch contours were captured from the patient's CT DICOM structure file. They were reconstructed relative to the isocenter taking into account treatment couch rotation. For potential collision that occurs at body portions where no CT images exist, scout images are used to construct the body contour. A software program was developed using a ray casting algorithm that was applied to detect collisions by determining if any of the patient and couch contour points fall into the spatial polygons formed by the proton gantry surfaces. Results: Twenty-four patient plans with or without potential collisions were retrospectively identified and analyzed using the collision detection software. In addition, five collision cases were artificially generated using an anthropomorphic phantom. The program successfully detected the collisions in all cases. The calculation time for each case was within 20 s. The software program was implemented in the authors' clinic to detect patient-gantry or gantry-couch collisions in the treatment planning

  18. Clinical treatment adherence of health care workers and students exposed to potentially infectious biological material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Mendes de Almeida

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To assess adherence to clinical appointments by health care workers (HCW and students who suffered accidents with potentially infectious biological material. METHOD A retrospective cross-sectional study that assessed clinical records of accidents involving biological material between 2005 and 2010 in a specialized unit. RESULTS A total of 461 individuals exposed to biological material were treated, of which 389 (84.4% were HCWs and 72 (15.6% students. Of the 461 exposed individuals, 307 (66.6% attended a follow-up appointment. Individuals who had suffered an accident with a known source patient were 29 times more likely to show up to their scheduled follow-up appointments (OR: 29.98; CI95%: 16.09-55.83. CONCLUSION The predictor in both univariate and multivariate analyses for adherence to clinical follow-up appointment was having a known source patient with nonreactive serology for the human immunodeficiency virus and/or hepatitis B and C.

  19. Epicardial fat and atrial fibrillation: current evidence, potential mechanisms, clinical implications, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Christopher X; Ganesan, Anand N; Selvanayagam, Joseph B

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is increasingly recognized as a major modifiable determinant of atrial fibrillation (AF). Although body mass index and other clinical measures are useful indications of general adiposity, much recent interest has focused on epicardial fat, a distinct adipose tissue depot that can be readily assessed using non-invasive imaging techniques. A growing body of data from epidemiological and clinical studies has demonstrated that epicardial fat is consistently associated with the presence, severity, and recurrence of AF across a range of clinical settings. Evidence from basic science and translational studies has also suggested that arrhythmogenic mechanisms may involve adipocyte infiltration, pro-fibrotic, and pro-inflammatory paracrine effects, oxidative stress, and other pathways. Despite these advances, however, significant uncertainty exists and many questions remain unanswered. In this article, we review our present understanding of epicardial fat, including its classification and quantification, existing evidence implicating its role in AF, potential mechanisms, implications for clinicians, and future directions for research. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Construction and Potential Applications of Biosensors for Proteins in Clinical Laboratory Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan; Jiang, Hui

    2017-12-04

    Biosensors for proteins have shown attractive advantages compared to traditional techniques in clinical laboratory diagnosis. In virtue of modern fabrication modes and detection techniques, various immunosensing platforms have been reported on basis of the specific recognition between antigen-antibody pairs. In addition to profit from the development of nanotechnology and molecular biology, diverse fabrication and signal amplification strategies have been designed for detection of protein antigens, which has led to great achievements in fast quantitative and simultaneous testing with extremely high sensitivity and specificity. Besides antigens, determination of antibodies also possesses great significance for clinical laboratory diagnosis. In this review, we will categorize recent immunosensors for proteins by different detection techniques. The basic conception of detection techniques, sensing mechanisms, and the relevant signal amplification strategies are introduced. Since antibodies and antigens have an equal position to each other in immunosensing, all biosensing strategies for antigens can be extended to antibodies under appropriate optimizations. Biosensors for antibodies are summarized, focusing on potential applications in clinical laboratory diagnosis, such as a series of biomarkers for infectious diseases and autoimmune diseases, and an evaluation of vaccine immunity. The excellent performances of these biosensors provide a prospective space for future antibody-detection-based disease serodiagnosis.

  1. Application of the MALDI Biotyper to clinical microbiology: progress and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrzewa, Markus

    2018-03-01

    The introduction of the MALDI Biotyper in laboratories substantially changed microbiology practice, this has been called a revolution. The system accelerated diagnostic while costs were reduced and accuracy was increased. In just a few years MALDI-TOF MS became the first-line identification tool for microorganisms. Ten years after its introduction, more than 2000 MALDI Biotyper systems are installed in laboratories which are performing routine diagnostic, and the number is still increasing. Areas covered: This article summarises changes in clinical microbiology introduced by the MALDI Biotyper and its effects, as it has been published in peer reviewed articles found in PubMed. Further, the potential of novel developments to increase the value of the system is described. Expert commentary: The MALDI Biotyper has significantly improved clinical microbiology in the area of microorganism identification. Now new developments and applications, e.g. for typing and resistance testing, might further increase its value in clinical microbiology. The systems might get the central diagnostic analyser which is getting integrated into the widely automated microbiology laboratories of the future.

  2. Stem cell transplantation for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: therapeutic potential and perspectives on clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faravelli, Irene; Riboldi, Giulietta; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Zanetta, Chiara; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P; Corti, Stefania

    2014-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurological disease characterized by degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. There are currently no clinically impactful treatments for this disorder. Death occurs 3-5 years after diagnosis, usually due to respiratory failure. ALS pathogenesis seems to involve several pathological mechanisms (i.e., oxidative stress, inflammation, and loss of the glial neurotrophic support, glutamate toxicity) with different contributions from environmental and genetic factors. This multifaceted combination highlights the concept that an effective therapeutic approach should counteract simultaneously different aspects: stem cell therapies are able to maintain or rescue motor neuron function and modulate toxicity in the central nervous system (CNS) at the same time, eventually representing the most comprehensive therapeutic approach for ALS. To achieve an effective cell-mediated therapy suitable for clinical applications, several issues must be addressed, including the identification of the most performing cell source, a feasible administration protocol, and the definition of therapeutic mechanisms. The method of cell delivery represents a major issue in developing cell-mediated approaches since the cells, to be effective, need to be spread across the CNS, targeting both lower and upper motor neurons. On the other hand, there is the need to define a strategy that could provide a whole distribution without being too invasive or burdened by side effects. Here, we review the recent advances regarding the therapeutic potential of stem cells for ALS with a focus on the minimally invasive strategies that could facilitate an extensive translation to their clinical application.

  3. Potential functional and pathological side effects related to off-target pharmacological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, James J; Van Vleet, Terry R; Mittelstadt, Scott W; Blomme, Eric A G

    2017-09-01

    Most pharmaceutical companies test their discovery-stage proprietary molecules in a battery of in vitro pharmacology assays to try to determine off-target interactions. During all phases of drug discovery and development, various questions arise regarding potential side effects associated with such off-target pharmacological activity. Here we present a scientific literature curation effort undertaken to determine and summarize the most likely functional and pathological outcomes associated with interactions at 70 receptors, enzymes, ion channels and transporters with established links to adverse effects. To that end, the scientific literature was reviewed using an on-line database, and the most commonly reported effects were summarized in tabular format. The resultant table should serve as a practical guide for research scientists and clinical investigators for the prediction and interpretation of adverse side effects associated with molecules interacting with components of this screening battery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Medicinal plants with potential anti-arthritic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Manjusha; Kumar, Vipin; Malhotra, Hitesh; Singh, Surender

    2015-01-01

    Traditional medicinal plants are practiced worldwide for treatment of arthritis especially in developing countries where resources are meager. This review presents the plants profiles inhabiting throughout the world regarding their traditional usage by various tribes/ethnic groups for treatment of arthritis. Bibliographic investigation was carried out by analyzing classical text books and peer reviewed papers, consulting worldwide accepted scientific databases from the last six decades. Plants/their parts/extracts/polyherbal formulations, toxicity studies for arthritis have been included in the review article. The profiles presented also include information about the scientific name, family, dose, methodology along with mechanism of action and toxicity profile. Research status of 20 potential plant species has been discussed. Further, geographical distribution of research, plants distribution according to families has been given in graphical form. 485 plant species belonging to 100 families, traditionally used in arthritis are used. Among 100 plant families, malvaceae constitute 16, leguminasae 7, fabaceae 13, euphorbiaceae 7, compositae 20, araceae 7, solanaceae 12, liliaceae 9, apocynaceae, lauraceae, and rubiaceae 10, and remaining in lesser proportion. It was observed in our study that majority of researches are carried mainly in developing countries like India, China, Korea and Nigeria. This review clearly indicates that list of medicinal plants presented in this review might be useful to researchers as well as practioners. This review can be useful for preliminary screening of potential anti-arthritis plants. Further toxicity profile given in the review can be useful for the researchers for finding the safe dose.

  5. Activated signature of antiphospholipid syndrome neutrophils reveals potential therapeutic target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jason S.; Meng, He; Coit, Patrick; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Sule, Gautam; Gandhi, Alex A.; Grenn, Robert C.; Mazza, Levi F.; Ali, Ramadan A.; Renauer, Paul; Wren, Jonathan D.; Bockenstedt, Paula L.; Wang, Hui; Eitzman, Daniel T.; Sawalha, Amr H.

    2017-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies, present in one-third of lupus patients, increase the risk of thrombosis. We recently reported a key role for neutrophils — neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), in particular — in the thrombotic events that define antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). To further elucidate the role of neutrophils in APS, we performed a comprehensive transcriptome analysis of neutrophils isolated from patients with primary APS. Moreover, APS-associated venous thrombosis was modeled by treating mice with IgG prepared from APS patients, followed by partial restriction of blood flow through the inferior vena cava. In patients, APS neutrophils demonstrated a proinflammatory signature with overexpression of genes relevant to IFN signaling, cellular defense, and intercellular adhesion. For in vivo studies, we focused on P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), a key adhesion molecule overexpressed in APS neutrophils. The introduction of APS IgG (as compared with control IgG) markedly potentiated thrombosis in WT mice, but not PSGL-1–KOs. PSGL-1 deficiency was also associated with reduced leukocyte vessel wall adhesion and NET formation. The thrombosis phenotype was restored in PSGL-1–deficient mice by infusion of WT neutrophils, while an anti–PSGL-1 monoclonal antibody inhibited APS IgG–mediated thrombosis in WT mice. PSGL-1 represents a potential therapeutic target in APS. PMID:28931754

  6. Potential Antioxidant Anthraquinones Isolated from Rheum emodi Showing Nematicidal Activity against Meloidogyne incognita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh Tripathi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant and nematicidal properties were evaluated for R. emodi extractives which are extracted by standardizing and adopting accelerated solvent extraction (ASE method along with traditional Soxhlet extraction. The extracted material was separated using flash chromatography and the separation conditions and solvents were standardized for the extracted plant constituents. The purity was detected by using analytical reverse phase high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC. LC-MS/MS detection in the direct infusion mode of the isolated, purified products afforded four anthraquinones, characterized by their infrared spectra (IR and 1H spectra as chrysophanol, physcion, emodin, and aloe-emodin. Five antraquinone glucoside derivatives and piceatannol-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside have also been detected from the extracted product. During in vitro evaluation the antioxidant potential of methanolic crude extract (CE1 was the highest, followed by ethyl acetate crude extract (CE2 and chloroform extract (CE3 in DPPH radical scavenging activity. The CE1 also demonstrated outstanding nematicidal activity as compared with other extracts, pure anthraquinones, and even positive control azadirachtin. The study conclusively demonstrated the antioxidant potential of R. emodi extracts and also its ability in extenuating the Meloidogyne incognita (root-knot nematode. The bioassay results can be extrapolated to actual field condition and clinical studies.

  7. Potential Clinical and Economic Impact of Switching Branded Medications to Generics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Robert J.; Keohane, Denis J.; Liu, Larry Z.

    2017-01-01

    Switching branded to generic medications has become a common cost-containment measure. Although this is an important objective for health care systems worldwide, the impact of this practice on patient outcomes needs to be carefully considered. We reviewed the literature summarizing the potential clinical and economic consequences of switching from branded to generic medications on patient outcomes. A literature search of peer-reviewed articles published 2003–2013 using key words of “generic switching” or “substitution” was conducted using PubMed, OvidSP, and ScienceDirect. Of 30 articles identified and reviewed, most were related to the diseases of the central nervous system, especially epilepsy. Based on our review, potential impacts of switching fell into 3 broad categories: patient attitudes and adherence, clinical and safety outcomes, and cost and resource utilization. Although in many cases generics may represent an appropriate alternative to branded products, this may not always be the case. Specifically, several studies suggested that switching may negatively impact medication adherence, whereas other studies found that generic switching was associated with poorer clinical outcomes and more adverse events. In some instances, switching accomplished cost savings but did so at increased total cost of care because of increased physician visits or hospitalizations. Although in many cases generics may represent an appropriate alternative, mandatory generic switching may lead to unintended consequences, especially in certain therapeutic areas. Although further study is warranted, based on our review, it may be medically justifiable for physicians and patients to retain the right to request the branded product in certain cases. PMID:26099048

  8. MDM2 antagonist Nutlin-3a potentiates antitumour activity of cytotoxic drugs in sarcoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lothe Ragnhild A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frequent failure and severe side effects of current sarcoma therapy warrants new therapeutic approaches. The small-molecule MDM2 antagonist Nutlin-3a activates the p53 pathway and efficiently induces apoptosis in tumours with amplified MDM2 gene and overexpression of MDM2 protein. However, the majority of human sarcomas have normal level of MDM2 and the therapeutic potential of MDM2 antagonists in this group is still unclear. We have investigated if Nutlin-3a could be employed to augment the response to traditional therapy and/or reduce the genotoxic burden of chemotherapy. Methods A panel of sarcoma cell lines with different TP53 and MDM2 status were treated with Nutlin-3a combined with Doxorubicin, Methotrexate or Cisplatin, and their combination index determined. Results Clear synergism was observed when Doxorubicin and Nutlin-3a were combined in cell lines with wild-type TP53 and amplified MDM2, or with Methotrexate in both MDM2 normal and amplified sarcoma cell lines, allowing for up to tenfold reduction of cytotoxic drug dose. Interestingly, Nutlin-3a seemed to potentiate the effect of classical drugs as Doxorubicin and Cisplatin in cell lines with mutated TP53, but inhibited the effect of Methotrexate. Conclusion The use of Nutlin in combination with classical sarcoma chemotherapy shows promising preclinical potential, but since clear biomarkers are still lacking, clinical trials should be followed up with detailed tumour profiling.

  9. Do Changes in Muscle Architecture Affect Post-Activation Potentiation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Reardon, Jay R. Hoffman, Gerald T. Mangine, Adam J. Wells, Adam M. Gonzalez, Adam R. Jajtner, Jeremy R. Townsend, William P. McCormack, Jeffrey R. Stout, Maren S. Fragala, David H. Fukuda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this randomized, cross-over design study was to examine the effect of three different muscle potentiation protocols on acute changes in muscle architecture and vertical jump performance. Eleven experienced, resistance trained men (25.2±3.6y completed three potentiation squat protocols using moderate intensity (MI; 75%, 3 sets x 10 repetitions, high intensity (HI; 90%, 3 sets x 3 repetitions and 100% (1RM; 1 set x 1repetition of their 1RM. In addition, all participants completed a control session (CTL in which no protocol was performed. During each testing session, muscle architecture and vertical jump testing were assessed at baseline (BL, 8min post (8P and 20min post (20P workout. Ultrasound measures included cross sectional area (CSA and pennation angle (PANG of both the rectus femoris (RF and vastus lateralis (VL. Following each ultrasound measure, peak vertical jump power (PVJP and mean (MVJP power was assessed using an accelerometer. Magnitude based inferences were used to make comparisons between trials. The MI trial resulted in a likely greater increase from BL to 8P and 20P in RF-CSA and VL-CSA, while the HI trial resulted in a likely greater change from BL to 20P in both RF-CSA and VL-CSA. Meanwhile, changes in PVJP and MVJP for the MI trial was likely decreased at BL-8P and BL–20P, while the HI trial was shown to result in a likely or possible decrease compared to CTL at BL-8P and BL–20P, respectively. A likely negative relationship was observed between changes in VL-PANG and MVJP (r = -0.35; p , 0.018 at BL-8P, and between changes in PVJP and RF-CSA (r = -0.37; p , 0.014 at BL–20P. Results of this study were unable to demonstrate any potentiation response from the trials employed, however these protocols did result in acute muscle architectural changes.

  10. Emotion potentiates response activation and inhibition in masked priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocanegra, Bruno R; Zeelenberg, René

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that emotion can have 2-fold effects on perception. At the object-level, emotional stimuli benefit from a stimulus-specific boost in visual attention at the relative expense of competing stimuli. At the visual feature-level, recent findings indicate that emotion may inhibit the processing of small visual details and facilitate the processing of coarse visual features. In the present study, we investigated whether emotion can boost the activation and inhibition of automatic motor responses that are generated prior to overt perception. To investigate this, we tested whether an emotional cue affects covert motor responses in a masked priming task. We used a masked priming paradigm in which participants responded to target arrows that were preceded by invisible congruent or incongruent prime arrows. In the standard paradigm, participants react faster, and commit fewer errors responding to the directionality of target arrows, when they are preceded by congruent vs. incongruent masked prime arrows (positive congruency effect, PCE). However, as prime-target SOAs increase, this effect reverses (negative congruency effect, NCE). These findings have been explained as evidence for an initial activation and a subsequent inhibition of a partial response elicited by the masked prime arrow. Our results show that the presentation of fearful face cues, compared to neutral face cues, increased the size of both the PCE and NCE, despite the fact that the primes were invisible. This is the first demonstration that emotion prepares an individual's visuomotor system for automatic activation and inhibition of motor responses in the absence of visual awareness.

  11. Active and retired public employees' health insurance: potential data sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Melinda Sandler

    2014-12-01

    Employer-provided health insurance for public sector workers is a significant public policy issue. Underfunding and the growing costs of benefits may hinder the fiscal solvency of state and local governments. Findings from the private sector may not be applicable because many public sector workers are covered by union contracts or salary schedules and often benefit modifications require changes in legislation. Research has been limited by the difficulty in obtaining sufficiently large and representative data on public sector employees. This article highlights data sources researchers might utilize to investigate topics concerning health insurance for active and retired public sector employees. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Religious Activities and their Tourism Potential in Sukur Kingdom, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeka Okonkwo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Religious tourism is a form of tourism whereby people of the same faith travel individually or in groups for religious purposes. This form of tourism comprises many facets of the travel industry ranging from pilgrimages, missionary travel, leisure (fellowship, vacations, faith-based cruising, crusades, conventions and rallies, retreats, monastery visits and guest-stays, Christian and faith-based camps, to religious tourist attractions. In Sukur Kingdom, most tourists embark on religious travel for the primary purpose of sharing faith and fellowship together as they explore the various religious sites within Sukur and Adamawa State at large. Others still seek inspiration and desire to witness significant religious events while assisting others with humanitarian and spiritual needs. This paper examines the tourism potentials of religion/religious sites and belief systems in Sukur Kingdom with a view to harnessing them for sustainable tourism development. The study uses ethnographic methods to elicit information and analyze the data collected from respondents.

  13. Examining the potential clinical value of curcumin in the prevention and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goozee, K G; Shah, T M; Sohrabi, H R; Rainey-Smith, S R; Brown, B; Verdile, G; Martins, R N

    2016-02-14

    Curcumin derived from turmeric is well documented for its anti-carcinogenic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Recent studies show that curcumin also possesses neuroprotective and cognitive-enhancing properties that may help delay or prevent neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Currently, clinical diagnosis of AD is onerous, and it is primarily based on the exclusion of other causes of dementia. In addition, phase III clinical trials of potential treatments have mostly failed, leaving disease-modifying interventions elusive. AD can be characterised neuropathologically by the deposition of extracellular β amyloid (Aβ) plaques and intracellular accumulation of tau-containing neurofibrillary tangles. Disruptions in Aβ metabolism/clearance contribute to AD pathogenesis. In vitro studies have shown that Aβ metabolism is altered by curcumin, and animal studies report that curcumin may influence brain function and the development of dementia, because of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, as well as its ability to influence Aβ metabolism. However, clinical studies of curcumin have revealed limited effects to date, most likely because of curcumin's relatively low solubility and bioavailability, and because of selection of cohorts with diagnosed AD, in whom there is already major neuropathology. However, the fresh approach of targeting early AD pathology (by treating healthy, pre-clinical and mild cognitive impairment-stage cohorts) combined with new curcumin formulations that increase bioavailability is renewing optimism concerning curcumin-based therapy. The aim of this paper is to review the current evidence supporting an association between curcumin and modulation of AD pathology, including in vitro and in vivo studies. We also review the use of curcumin in emerging retinal imaging technology, as a fluorochrome for AD diagnostics.

  14. Fasting inhibits hepatic stellate cells activation and potentiates anti-cancer activity of Sorafenib in hepatocellular cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Re, Oriana; Panebianco, Concetta; Porto, Stefania; Cervi, Carlo; Rappa, Francesca; Di Biase, Stefano; Caraglia, Michele; Pazienza, Valerio; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2018-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a poor outcome. Most HCCs develop in the context of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis caused by chronic inflammation. Short-term fasting approaches enhance the activity of chemotherapy in preclinical cancer models, other than HCC. Multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor Sorafenib is the mainstay of treatment in HCC. However, its benefit is frequently short-lived. Whether fasting can alleviate liver fibrosis and whether combining fasting with Sorafenib is beneficial remains unknown. A 24 hr fasting (2% serum, 0.1% glucose)-induced changes on human hepatic stellate cells (HSC) LX-2 proliferation/viability/cell cycle were assessed by MTT and flow cytometry. Expression of lypolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation markers (vimentin, αSMA) was evaluated by qPCR and immunoblotting. Liver fibrosis and inflammation were evaluated in a mouse model of steatohepatitis exposed to cycles of fasting, by histological and biochemical analyses. A 24 hr fasting-induced changes were also analyzed on the proliferation/viability/glucose uptake of human HCC cells exposed to Sorafenib. An expression panel of genes involved in survival, inflammation, and metabolism was examined by qPCR in HCC cells exposed to fasting and/or Sorafenib. Fasting decreased the proliferation and the activation of HSC. Repeated cycles of short term starvation were safe in mice but did not improve fibrosis. Fasting synergized with Sorafenib in hampering HCC cell growth and glucose uptake. Finally, fasting normalized the expression levels of genes which are commonly altered by Sorafenib in HCC cells. Fasting or fasting-mimicking diet diets should be evaluated in preclinical studies as a mean to potentiate the activity of Sorafenib in clinical use. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Beat-to-beat variability of cardiac action potential duration: underlying mechanism and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nánási, Péter P; Magyar, János; Varró, András; Ördög, Balázs

    2017-10-01

    Beat-to-beat variability of cardiac action potential duration (short-term variability, SV) is a common feature of various cardiac preparations, including the human heart. Although it is believed to be one of the best arrhythmia predictors, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood at present. The magnitude of SV is basically determined by the intensity of cell-to-cell coupling in multicellular preparations and by the duration of the action potential (APD). To compensate for the APD-dependent nature of SV, the concept of relative SV (RSV) has been introduced by normalizing the changes of SV to the concomitant changes in APD. RSV is reduced by I Ca , I Kr , and I Ks while increased by I Na , suggesting that ion currents involved in the negative feedback regulation of APD tend to keep RSV at a low level. RSV is also influenced by intracellular calcium concentration and tissue redox potential. The clinical implications of APD variability is discussed in detail.

  16. Clinical PET activities in European and Asia-Oceanian Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Manabu; Ito, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Kubota, Kazuo; Fujimoto, Toshihiko; Sasaki, Hidetada; Moser, E.

    2001-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis using positron emission tomography (PET) requires high costs. Therefore, sociomedical evaluation is very important for spread of clinical PET. In this report, sociomedical situation in European and Asia-Oceanian countries, especially concerning transportation of 18 F-FDG and reimbursement of medical costs for clinical PET indications, is reported. It seems that UK, Germany and Belgium are the most advanced in clinical PET in Europe. In these countries, many PET investigations are reimbursed though systems are different among the countries. In UK, both public and private insurance gives authorization for clinical PET to some extent. In Germany, private health insurance companies give authorization but public insurance has not. In Belgium, private health insurance does not exist and public insurance gives authorization for clinical PET. Other European countries seem to be in transitional stages. Transportation of 18 F-FDG has been already started in almost every country in Europe and Asia-Oceania. In Japan, neither transportation of FDG nor full reimbursement of clinical PET has not started yet and this situation seems to be exceptional. To promote clinical PET in Japan, there is the need of at least establishing a list of clinical indications for PET investigations and establishing commercial-based 18 F-FDG supplying system. They could be regarded as a kind of infrastructure for spread of clinical PET. (author)

  17. Potential hypoglycaemic activity phenolic glycosides from Moringa oleifera seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Zhong, Huan-Huan; Chen, Wei-Ke; Liu, Qing-Pu; Li, Cun-Yu; Zheng, Yun-Feng; Peng, Guo-Ping

    2017-08-01

    Moringa oleifera seed has remarkable curative effects on reducing blood pressure, blood sugar and enhancing human immunity. In this study, one novel phenolic glycoside (1) together with four known compounds 2-5 were isolated from the macroporous resin adsorption extract of M. oleifera seeds, and the compound 3 was reported for the first time from this plant. The structure of the new crystalline compound was determined on the basis of spectroscopic analyses including mass spectrometry, 1D and 2D NMR experiments. The hypoglycaemic activity of isolated compounds was investigated with HepG2 cell and STZ-induced mice. It was found that compound 1, 4 and 5 could promote the glucose consumption of insulin resistance cells and reduce blood glucose levels of STZ-induced mice. This study concludes that compound 1, 4 and 5 may be developed as new and safe hypoglycaemic drugs.

  18. Instrumental neutron activation analysis potentialities in archaeological ceramics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva, Rosemeire P.; Munita, Casimirio S.; Alves, Marcia A.

    1999-01-01

    In this work, precision and sensitivity of the determination of As, Ba, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Na, Nd, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb and Zn in ceramic samples by INAA were evaluated. Two clay samples Brick Clay (NIST-SRM-697 reference material)and Ohio Red Clay (a well known clay sample) were analyzed for this purpose. Archaeological ceramic fragments from Agua Limpa Site, in Monte Alto city, SP were also analyzed. The archaeological ceramics were produced in the quotidian activities of non writing preterite societies, in sedentarization process. The ceramic chemical information are used to identify raw material sources and to study production and distribution models, which allow the reconstruction of the socio-cultural development and integration of extinguished societies. (author)

  19. Synthesis of geranylhydroquinone derivatives with potential cytotoxic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeza, Evelyn; Catalan, Karen; Pena-Cortes, Hugo; Espinoza, Luis, E-mail: luis.espinozac@usm.cl [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile); Villena, Joan [Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Valparaiso, Centro Regional de Estudios en Alimentos Saludables, Valparaiso (Chile); Carrasco, Hector [Departamento de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Campus Vina del Mar (Chile)

    2012-07-01

    Natural geranylhydroquinone 1 and geranyl-p-methoxyphenol 2 were prepared by Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution (EAS) reactions between geraniol and 1,4-hydroquinone or p-methoxyphenol respectively, using BF{sub 3} {center_dot}Et{sub 2}O as a catalyst. Furthermore, natural geranylquinone 3, geranyl-1,4-dimethoxyquinone 4 and the new geranyl-4-methoxyphenyl acetate 5 were obtained by chemical transformations of 1 and 2. The compounds were evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxicity activities against cultured human cancer cells of PC-3 human prostate cancer, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma, and Dermal Human ibroblasts DHF. IC{sub 50} values were in the {mu}M range. (author)

  20. Pollution effects on fisheries — potential management activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindermann, C. J.

    1980-03-01

    Management of ocean pollution must be based on the best available scientific information, with adequate consideration of economic, social, and political realities. Unfortunately, the best available scientific information about pollution effects on fisheries is often fragmentary, and often conjectural; therefore a primary concern of management should be a critical review and assessment of available factual information about effects of pollutants on fish and shellfish stocks. A major problem in any such review and assessment is the separation of pollutant effects from the effects of all the other environmental factors that influence survival and well-being of marine animals. Data from long-term monitoring of resource abundance, and from monitoring of all determinant environmental variables, will be required for analyses that lead to resolution of the problem. Information must also be acquired about fluxes of contaminants through resource-related ecosystems, and about contaminant effects on resource species as demonstrated in field and laboratory experiments. Other possible management activities include: (1) encouragement of continued efforts to document clearly the localized and general effects of pollution on living resources; (2) continued pressure to identify and use reliable biological indicators of environmental degradation (indicators of choice at present are: unusually high levels of genetic and other anomalies in the earliest life history stages; presence of pollution-associated disease signs, particularly fin erosion and ulcers, in fish; and biochemical/physiological changes); and (3) major efforts to reduce inputs of pollutants clearly demonstrated to be harmful to living resources, from point sources as well as ocean dumping. Such pollution management activities, based on continuous efforts in stock assessment, environmental assessment, and experimental studies, can help to insure that rational decisions will be made about uses and abuses of coastal

  1. Potential role of a pharmacist to enhance medication-related aspects of clinical trials conducted in a dedicated clinical research unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Redic, PharmD

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: This pilot study showed potential roles for pharmacy personnel involvement in medication reconciliation in the clinical research setting. Pharmacists have the opportunity to ensure that IDs are accurately included in patient medication lists and to identify the use of potential protocol prohibited concomitant medications.

  2. Purification of a lectin from Eugenia uniflora L. seeds and its potential antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, M D L; Andrade, C A S; Santos-Magalhães, N S; Coelho, L C B B; Teixeira, J A; Carneiro-da-Cunha, M G; Correia, M T S

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this work was to analyse the antimicrobial properties of a purified lectin from Eugenia uniflora L. seeds. The E. uniflora lectin (EuniSL) was isolated from the seed extract and purified by ion-exchange chromatography in DEAE-Sephadex with a purification factor of 11.68. The purified lectin showed a single band on denaturing electrophoresis, with a molecular mass of 67 kDa. EuniSL agglutinated rabbit and human erythrocytes with a higher specificity for rabbit erythrocytes. The haemagglutination was not inhibited by the tested carbohydrates but glycoproteins exerted a strong inhibitory action. The lectin proved to be thermo resistant with the highest stability at pH 6.5 and divalent ions did not affect its activity. EuniSL demonstrated a remarkable nonselective antibacterial activity. EuniSL strongly inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella sp. with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 1.5 microg ml(-1), and moderately inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus sp. and Escherichia coli with a MIC of 16.5 microg ml(-1). EuniSL was found to be effective against bacteria. The strong antibacterial activity of the studied lectin indicates a high potential for clinical microbiology and therapeutic applications.

  3. Browser Based Platform in Maintaining Clinical Activities - Use of The iPads in Head and Neck Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W. Y.; Moore, J.; Quon, H.; Evans, K.; Sharabi, A.; Herman, J.; Hacker-Prietz, A.; McNutt, T.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Incompatibility between documentation and clinical workflow causes physician resistance in organized data collection, which in turn complicates the use of data in patient care improvement. To resolve the gap, we developed an iPad compatible in situ browser-based platform that integrates clinical activity with data collection and analysis presentation. The ability to perform in-clinic activities and monitor decision making using the iPad was evaluated. Methods: A browser-based platform that can exchange and present analysed data from the MOSAIQ database was developed in situ, the iPads were distributed in head and neck clinics to present the browser for clinical activities, data collection and assessment monitoring. Performance of the iPads for in-clinic activities was observed. Results: All in-clinic documentation activities can be performed without workstation computers. Accessing patient record and previous assessments was significantly faster without having to open the MOSAIQ application. Patient assessments can be completed with the physician facing the patient. Graphical presentation of toxicity progression and patient radiation plans to the patient can be performed in single interface without patient leaving the seating area. Updates in patient treatment status and medical history were presented in real time without having to move paper charts around. Conclusions: The iPad can be used in clinical activities independent of computer workstations. Improvements in clinical workflow can be critical in reducing physician resistance in data maintenance. Using the iPad in providing real-time quality monitoring is intuitive to both providers and patients.

  4. Browser based platform in maintaining clinical activities – use of the iPads in head and neck clinics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W Y; Moore, J; Quon, H; Evans, K; Sharabi, A; Herman, J; Hacker-Prietz, A; McNutt, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Incompatibility between documentation and clinical workflow causes physician resistance in organized data collection, which in turn complicates the use of data in patient care improvement. To resolve the gap, we developed an iPad compatible in situ browser-based platform that integrates clinical activity with data collection and analysis presentation. The ability to perform in-clinic activities and monitor decision making using the iPad was evaluated. Methods: A browser-based platform that can exchange and present analysed data from the MOSAIQ database was developed in situ, the iPads were distributed in head and neck clinics to present the browser for clinical activities, data collection and assessment monitoring. Performance of the iPads for in-clinic activities was observed. Results: All in-clinic documentation activities can be performed without workstation computers. Accessing patient record and previous assessments was significantly faster without having to open the MOSAIQ application. Patient assessments can be completed with the physician facing the patient. Graphical presentation of toxicity progression and patient radiation plans to the patient can be performed in single interface without patient leaving the seating area. Updates in patient treatment status and medical history were presented in real time without having to move paper charts around. Conclusions: The iPad can be used in clinical activities independent of computer workstations. Improvements in clinical workflow can be critical in reducing physician resistance in data maintenance. Using the iPad in providing real-time quality monitoring is intuitive to both providers and patients.

  5. [Health care activity in a headache-specific clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Escrivà, A; Asensio-Asensio, M; López-Hernández, N; González-Aznar, O J; Oliver-Navarrete, C; Alvarez-Saúco, M; Pampliega-Pérez, A

    It is reckoned that headaches affect, at least once a year, around 90% of the population. The socioeconomic repercussion occasioned by this malady justifies the appearance in recent years of headache units. To conduct a descriptive epidemiological and health care study of the activity carried out in a headache-specific clinic. All the relevant points from the histories of patients who visited our surgery over a period of two years were collected prospectively and consecutively. The different types of headaches were classified according to the 1988 IHS criteria. Both the symptomatic and the preventive treatment were analysed. In all, a total of 866 patients were found; 691 (79.8%) were females and the mean age was 39.8 +/- 15.9 years (range: 6-90 years); 208 (24%) had a history of migraine in the family; 399 (49.9%) were diagnosed as suffering from migraine: 256 (64.2%) had migraine without aura, 152 (19%) were diagnosed as having tension-type headache, and 218 (27.3%) presented chronic daily headache (CDH). The most frequently used symptomatic treatments were NSAI drugs (36.7%) and triptanes (28.4%). Amitriptyline (47.7%), beta-blockers (14.5%) and calcium antagonists (11.3%) were the main drugs used as preventive treatment. After several years' operation of our Headache Unit, we thought there was a need to analyse the population seen in the visits. The fact that the majority of our patients were middle-aged females matched our expectations. Although most of the patients were diagnosed as suffering from M, we also want to highlight the high proportion of cases of CDH, above all associated with the abuse of analgesics.

  6. In vitro and clinical evaluation of OATP-mediated drug interaction potential of sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalasomayajula, S; Han, Y; Langenickel, T; Malcolm, K; Zhou, W; Hanna, I; Alexander, N; Natrillo, A; Goswami, B; Hinder, M; Sunkara, G

    2016-08-01

    Sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) has been recently approved for the treatment of heart failure (HF) patients with reduced ejection fraction. Several HF patients receive statins as co-medication. Because clearance of statins is meditated via OATP1B1/1B3, the inhibition potential of these transporters by LCZ696 analytes was evaluated in vitro. Furthermore, an open-label, fixed-sequence clinical study was conducted to determine the effect of LCZ696 on the exposure of simvastatin and its active metabolite simvastatin acid. In this clinical study, 26 healthy subjects received simvastatin 40 mg alone or in combination with LCZ696 or after 1 or 2 h of LCZ696 dosing. Although no significant inhibition by LBQ657 (an active metabolite of sacubitril) and valsartan was observed, sacubitril inhibited OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 in vitro, with IC50 of 1·91 and 3·81 μm, respectively. Upon co-administration of simvastatin with LCZ696, the Cmax of simvastatin and simvastatin acid decreased by 7% and 13%, respectively. When administered 1 h after LCZ696 dosing, the corresponding Cmax of simvastatin and simvastatin acid decreased by 16% and 4%, respectively. When administered 2 h after LCZ696 dosing, the Cmax of simvastatin decreased by 33% and that of simvastatin acid increased by 16%. However, no notable changes were observed in the AUCs of simvastatin or simvastatin acid upon co-administration or time-separated administration with LCZ696. No notable impact of simvastatin co-administration was observed on the pharmacokinetics of LCZ696 analytes. LCZ696 and simvastatin were generally well tolerated when administered alone or in combination. Overall, the results of this study suggest that although sacubitril inhibited OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 in vitro, it does not translate into any clinically relevant in vivo effect. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Astragalin: A Bioactive Phytochemical with Potential Therapeutic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammara Riaz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural products, an infinite treasure of bioactive chemical entities, persist as an inexhaustible resource for discovery of drugs. This review article intends to emphasize on one of the naturally occurring flavonoids, astragalin (kaempferol 3-glucoside, which is a bioactive constituent of various traditional medicinal plants such as Cuscuta chinensis. This multifaceted compound is well known for its diversified pharmacological applications such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, neuroprotective, cardioprotective, antiobesity, antiosteoporotic, anticancer, antiulcer, and antidiabetic properties. It carries out the aforementioned activities by the regulation and modulation of various molecular targets such as transcription factors (NF-κB, TNF-α, and TGF-β1, enzymes (iNOS, COX-2, PGE2, MMP-1, MMP-3, MIP-1α, COX-2, PGE-2, HK2, AChe, SOD, DRP-1, DDH, PLCγ1, and GPX, kinases (JNK, MAPK, Akt, ERK, SAPK, IκBα, PI3K, and PKCβ2, cell adhesion proteins (E-cadherin, vimentin PAR-2, and NCam, apoptotic and antiapoptotic proteins (Beclin-1, Bcl-2, Bax, Bcl-xL, cytochrome c, LC3A/B, caspase-3, caspase-9, procaspase-3, procaspase-8, and IgE, and inflammatory cytokines (SOCS-3, SOCS-5, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-13, MCP-1, CXCL-1, CXCL-2, and IFN-γ. Although researchers have reported multiple pharmacological applications of astragalin in various diseased conditions, further experimental investigations are still mandatory to fully understand its mechanism of action. It is contemplated that astragalin could be subjected to structural optimization to ameliorate its chemical accessibility, to optimize its absorption profiles, and to synthesize its more effective analogues which will ultimately lead towards potent drug candidates.

  8. Miscellaneous conditions of the shoulder: Anatomical, clinical, and pictorial review emphasizing potential pitfalls in imaging diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farid, Nikdokht; Bruce, Dean; Chung, Christine B.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint including hydroxyapatite deposition disease, rotator cuff interval pathology, acromioclavicular joint pathology, glenohumeral osteoarthrosis, and synovial inflammatory processes, with specific emphasis on findings that have associated pitfalls in imaging diagnosis. The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of the above mentioned categories of pathology will be reviewed, followed in each section by a detailed pictorial review of the key imaging findings in each category including plain film, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings as applicable. Imaging challenges that relate to both diagnosis and characterization will be addressed with each type of pathology. The goal is that after reading this article, the reader will be able to recognize the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint and will become familiar with the potential pitfalls in their imaging diagnosis

  9. Miscellaneous conditions of the shoulder: Anatomical, clinical, and pictorial review emphasizing potential pitfalls in imaging diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, Nikdokht [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 West Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States); Bruce, Dean [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 West Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States); University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Chung, Christine B. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 West Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States)], E-mail: cbchung@ucsd.edu

    2008-10-15

    The purpose of this article is to review the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint including hydroxyapatite deposition disease, rotator cuff interval pathology, acromioclavicular joint pathology, glenohumeral osteoarthrosis, and synovial inflammatory processes, with specific emphasis on findings that have associated pitfalls in imaging diagnosis. The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of the above mentioned categories of pathology will be reviewed, followed in each section by a detailed pictorial review of the key imaging findings in each category including plain film, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings as applicable. Imaging challenges that relate to both diagnosis and characterization will be addressed with each type of pathology. The goal is that after reading this article, the reader will be able to recognize the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint and will become familiar with the potential pitfalls in their imaging diagnosis.

  10. Diffusion and Perfusion MR Imaging in Acute Stroke: Clinical Utility and Potential Limitations for Treatment Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bateman, Mathew; Slater, Lee-Anne; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) offer unique insight into acute ischemic stroke pathophysiology. These techniques may offer the ability to apply pathophysiology to accurately individualize acute stroke reperfusion treatment, including ...... to be investigated in ongoing randomized controlled trials, and continued research into these techniques will help achieve the goal of tissue-based decision making and individualized acute stroke treatment....... extending the opportunity of reperfusion treatment to well beyond the current time-based treatment windows. This review examines the use of DWI and PWI in the major stroke trials, their current clinical utility, and potential limitations for reperfusion treatment selection. DWI and PWI continue...

  11. Transforming Experience: The Potential of Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality for Enhancing Personal and Clinical Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Giuseppe; Baños, Rosa M; Botella, Cristina; Mantovani, Fabrizia; Gaggioli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    During life, many personal changes occur. These include changing house, school, work, and even friends and partners. However, the daily experience shows clearly that, in some situations, subjects are unable to change even if they want to. The recent advances in psychology and neuroscience are now providing a better view of personal change, the change affecting our assumptive world: (a) the focus of personal change is reducing the distance between self and reality (conflict); (b) this reduction is achieved through (1) an intense focus on the particular experience creating the conflict or (2) an internal or external reorganization of this experience; (c) personal change requires a progression through a series of different stages that however happen in discontinuous and non-linear ways; and (d) clinical psychology is often used to facilitate personal change when subjects are unable to move forward. Starting from these premises, the aim of this paper is to review the potential of virtuality for enhancing the processes of personal and clinical change. First, the paper focuses on the two leading virtual technologies - augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) - exploring their current uses in behavioral health and the outcomes of the 28 available systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Then the paper discusses the added value provided by VR and AR in transforming our external experience by focusing on the high level of personal efficacy and self-reflectiveness generated by their sense of presence and emotional engagement. Finally, it outlines the potential future use of virtuality for transforming our inner experience by structuring, altering, and/or replacing our bodily self-consciousness. The final outcome may be a new generation of transformative experiences that provide knowledge that is epistemically inaccessible to the individual until he or she has that experience, while at the same time transforming the individual's worldview.

  12. Transforming Experience: The Potential of Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality for Enhancing Personal and Clinical Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Riva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During our life we undergo many personal changes: we change our house, our school, our work and even our friends and partners. However, our daily experience shows clearly that in some situations subjects are unable to change even if they want to. The recent advances in psychology and neuroscience are now providing a better view of personal change, the change affecting our assumptive world: a the focus of personal change is reducing the distance between self and reality (conflict; b this reduction is achieved through (1 an intense focus on the particular experience creating the conflict or (2 an internal or external reorganization of this experience; c personal change requires a progression through a series of different stages; d clinical psychology is often used to facilitate personal change when subjects are unable to move forward. Starting from these premises, the aim of this paper is to review the potential of virtuality for enhancing the processes of personal and clinical change. First, the paper will focus on the two leading virtual technologies – Augmented Reality (AR and Virtual Reality (VR – exploring their current uses in behavioral health and the outcomes of the 28 available systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Then the paper discusses the added value provided by VR and AR in transforming our external experience, by focusing on the high level of self-reflectiveness and personal efficacy induced by their emotional engagement and sense of presence. Finally, it outlines the potential future use of virtuality for transforming our inner experience by structuring, altering and/or replacing our bodily self-consciousness. The final outcome may be a new generation of transformative experiences that provide knowledge that is epistemically inaccessible to the individual until he or she has that experience, while at the same time transforming the individual’s worldview.

  13. Fear Extinction Memory Consolidation Requires Potentiation of Pontine-Wave Activity during REM Sleep

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    Datta, Subimal; O'Malley, Matthew W .

    2013-01-01

    Sleep plays an important role in memory consolidation within multiple memory systems including contextual fear extinction memory, but little is known about the mechanisms that underlie this process. Here, we show that fear extinction training in rats, which extinguished conditioned fear, increased both slow-wave sleep and rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Surprisingly, 24 h later, during memory testing, only 57% of the fear-extinguished animals retained fear extinction memory. We found that these animals exhibited an increase in phasic pontine-wave (P-wave) activity during post-training REM sleep, which was absent in the 43% of animals that failed to retain fear extinction memory. The results of this study provide evidence that brainstem activation, specifically potentiation of phasic P-wave activity, during post-training REM sleep is critical for consolidation of fear extinction memory. The results of this study also suggest that, contrary to the popular hypothesis of sleep and memory, increased sleep after training alone does not guarantee consolidation and/or retention of fear extinction memory. Rather, the potentiation of specific sleep-dependent physiological events may be a more accurate predictor for successful consolidation of fear extinction memory. Identification of this unique mechanism will significantly improve our present understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the sleep-dependent regulation of emotional memory. Additionally, this discovery may also initiate development of a new, more targeted treatment method for clinical disorders of fear and anxiety in humans that is more efficacious than existing methods such as exposure therapy that incorporate only fear extinction. PMID:23467372

  14. In vitro antimicrobial activity of five essential oils on multidrug resistant Gram-negative clinical isolates.

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    Sakkas, Hercules; Gousia, Panagiota; Economou, Vangelis; Sakkas, Vassilios; Petsios, Stefanos; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant pathogens has drawn attention on medicinal plants for potential antimicrobial properties. The objective of the present study was the investigation of the antimicrobial activity of five plant essential oils on multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Basil, chamomile blue, origanum, thyme, and tea tree oil were tested against clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 6), Escherichia coli (n = 4), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 7), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 5) using the broth macrodilution method. The tested essential oils produced variable antibacterial effect, while Chamomile blue oil demonstrated no antibacterial activity. Origanum, Thyme, and Basil oils were ineffective on P. aeruginosa isolates. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration values ranged from 0.12% to 1.50% (v/v) for tea tree oil, 0.25-4% (v/v) for origanum and thyme oil, 0.50% to >4% for basil oil and >4% for chamomile blue oil. Compared to literature data on reference strains, the reported MIC values were different by 2SD, denoting less successful antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant isolates. The antimicrobial activities of the essential oils are influenced by the strain origin (wild, reference, drug sensitive, or resistant) and it should be taken into consideration whenever investigating the plants' potential for developing new antimicrobials.

  15. Hepatocellular carcinoma displays distinct DNA methylation signatures with potential as clinical predictors.

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    Hector Hernandez-Vargas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is characterized by late detection and fast progression, and it is believed that epigenetic disruption may be the cause of its molecular and clinicopathological heterogeneity. A better understanding of the global deregulation of methylation states and how they correlate with disease progression will aid in the design of strategies for earlier detection and better therapeutic decisions. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We characterized the changes in promoter methylation in a series of 30 HCC tumors and their respective surrounding tissue and identified methylation signatures associated with major risk factors and clinical correlates. A wide panel of cancer-related gene promoters was analyzed using Illumina bead array technology, and CpG sites were then selected according to their ability to classify clinicopathological parameters. An independent series of HCC tumors and matched surrounding tissue was used for validation of the signatures. We were able to develop and validate a signature of methylation in HCC. This signature distinguished HCC from surrounding tissue and from other tumor types, and was independent of risk factors. However, aberrant methylation of an independent subset of promoters was associated with tumor progression and etiological risk factors (HBV or HCV infection and alcohol consumption. Interestingly, distinct methylation of an independent panel of gene promoters was strongly correlated with survival after cancer therapy. CONCLUSION: Our study shows that HCC tumors exhibit specific DNA methylation signatures associated with major risk factors and tumor progression stage, with potential clinical applications in diagnosis and prognosis.

  16. Automation of the consensus guidelines in diabetes care: potential impact on clinical inertia.

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    Albisser, A Michael; Inhaber, Francine

    2010-01-01

    To propose that automation of the consensus guidelines and mandated targets (CG&MT) in glycemia, hemoglobin A1c, and body weight will facilitate optimal clinical management of patients with diabetes. (1) A simplified method for capturing diabetes outcomes at home was devised, (2) relevant portions of the CG&MT were translated into computer code and automated, and (3) algorithms were applied to transform data from self-monitoring of blood glucose into circadian profiles and hemoglobin A1c levels. (4) The resulting procedures were integrated into a USB memory drive for use by health-care providers at the point of care. For input from patients, a simple form is used to capture data on diabetes outcomes, including blood glucose measurements before and after meals and at bedtime, medication, and lifestyle events in a structured fashion. At each encounter with a health-care provider, the patient's data are transferred into the device and become available to assist in identifying deviations from mandated targets, potential risks of hypoglycemia, and necessary prescription changes. Preliminary observations during a 2 1/2-year period from a community support group dedicated to glycemic control on 20 unselected patients (10 with and 10 without use of the device) are summarized. With use of the automated information, the health professional is supported at the point of care to achieve better, safer outcomes and practice evidence-based medicine entirely in lockstep with the CG&MT. This automation helps to overcome clinical inertia.

  17. Potential facilitators and barriers to adopting standard treatment guidelines in clinical practice.

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    Sharma, Sangeeta; Pandit, Ajay; Tabassum, Fauzia

    2017-04-18

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess medicines information sources accessed by clinicians, if sources differed in theory and practice and to find out the barriers and facilitators to effective guideline adoption. Design/methodology/approach In all, 183 doctors were surveyed. Barriers and facilitators were classified as: communication; potential adopters; innovation; organization characteristics and environmental/social/economic context. Findings Most of the clinicians accessed multiple information sources including standard treatment guidelines, but also consulted seniors/colleagues in practice. The top three factors influencing clinical practice guideline adoption were innovation characteristics, environmental context and individual characteristics. The respondents differed in the following areas: concerns about flexibility offered by the guideline; denying patients' individuality; professional autonomy; insights into gaps in current practice and evidence-based practice; changing practices with little or no benefit. Barriers included negative staff attitudes/beliefs, guideline integration into organizational structures/processes, time/resource constraints. Fearing third parties (government and insurance companies) restricting medicines reimbursement and poor liability protection offered by the guidelines emerged as the barriers. Facilitators include aligning organizational structures/processes with the innovation; providing leadership support to guide diffusion; increasing awareness and enabling early innovation during pre/in-service training, with regular feedback on outcomes and use. Practical implications Guideline adoption in clinical practice is partly within doctors' control. There are other key prevailing factors in the local context such as environmental, social context, professional and organizational culture affecting its adoption. Organizational policy and accreditation standards necessitating adherence can serve as a driver. Originality

  18. Potential cost effectiveness of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator versus streptokinase for acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, V; Naylor, C D

    1992-01-01

    An economic evaluation of the potential incremental benefits of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) versus streptokinase (SK) for treatment of acute myocardial infarction. Cost effectiveness analysis from a third-party payer perspective (Ontario Ministry of Health). ECONOMIC INPUTS: Fully allocated costs for cardiovascular procedures and hospitalization for myocardial infarction were obtained anonymously for four Ontario teaching hospitals and converted to 1988 Canadian dollars. Professional charges were taken from the provincial health insurance fee schedule and drug costs obtained from the manufacturers. CLINICAL INPUTS: The baseline analysis was for nonelderly patients with uncomplicated myocardial infarctions; sensitivity analyses allowed extrapolation to higher risk subgroups. Short and longer term mortality and short term invasive procedure rates were estimated using data from clinical trials. If tPA achieves a 1% short term mortality advantage over SK with no advantages for other survivors, cost per life-year gained can be comparable to other cardiovascular interventions at $58,600. In the absence of immediate survival advantages, but assuming greater left ventricular preservation, the constant annual hazard rate advantage must be about 0.5% per year for competitive cost effectiveness ratios. A full range of projections is presented to help guide the policy decisions that will arise in the wake of the Global Utilization of SK and tPA for Occluded Coronary Arteries (GUSTO) trial. The analysis also illustrates the general importance of considering longer term effects of in-hospital therapies for acute myocardial infarction.

  19. Clinical potential of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors in the management of type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Y

    2012-08-01

    insulin, and as a monotherapy for metformin-intolerant patients. Clinical research also remains to be carried out on the long-term effects of glucosuria and other potential effects of SGLT2 inhibitors, especially in view of the observed increase in the incidence of bladder and breast cancer. SGLT2 inhibitors represent a promising approach for the treatment of diabetes, and could potentially be an addition to existing therapies.Keywords: sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2, SGLT2, inhibitors, kidney, glucosuria, oral diabetes agent, weight loss

  20. Potential clinical and economic effects of homocyst(e)ine lowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallamothu, B K; Fendrick, A M; Rubenfire, M; Saint, S; Bandekar, R R; Omenn, G S

    Elevated total homocyst(e)ine levels (>/=11 micromol/L) have been identified as a potential risk factor for coronary heart disease. However, the benefits expected from lowering homocyst(e)ine levels with folic acid and vitamin B(12) supplementation have yet to be demonstrated in clinical trials. We constructed a decision analytic model to estimate the clinical benefits and economic costs of 2 homocyst(e)ine-lowering strategies: (1) "treat all"-no screening, daily supplementation with folic acid (400 microg) and vitamin B(12) (cyanocobalamin; 500 microg) for all; (2) "screen and treat"-screening, followed by daily supplementation with folic acid and vitamin B(12) for individuals with elevated homocyst(e)ine levels. Simulated cohorts of 40-year-old men and 50-year-old women in the general population were evaluated. In the base-case analysis, we assumed that lowering elevated levels would reduce excess coronary heart disease risk by 40%; however, this assumption and others were evaluated across a broad range of potential values using sensitivity analysis. Primary outcomes were discounted costs per life-year saved. Although the treat-all strategy was slightly more effective overall, the screen and treat strategy resulted in a much lower cost per life-year saved ($13,600 in men and $27,500 in women) when compared with no intervention. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for the treat-all strategy compared with the screen and treat strategy were more than $500,000 per life-year saved in both cohorts. Sensitivity analysis showed that cost-effectiveness ratios for the screen and treat strategy remained less than $50,000 per life-year saved under several unfavorable scenarios, such as when effective homocyst(e)ine lowering was assumed to reduce the relative risk of coronary heart disease-related death by only 11% in men or 23% in women. Homocyst(e)ine lowering with folic acid and vitamin B(12) supplementation could result in substantial clinical benefits at reasonable

  1. A novel design for randomized immuno-oncology clinical trials with potentially delayed treatment effects

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    Pei He

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The semi-parametric proportional hazards model is widely adopted in randomized clinical trials with time-to-event outcomes, and the log-rank test is frequently used to detect a potential treatment effect. Immuno-oncology therapies pose unique challenges to the design of a trial as the treatment effect may be delayed, which violates the proportional hazards assumption, and the log-rank test has been shown to markedly lose power under the non-proportional hazards setting. A novel design and analysis approach for immuno-oncology trials is proposed through a piecewise treatment effect function, which is capable of detecting a potentially delayed treatment effect. The number of events required for the trial will be determined to ensure sufficient power for both the overall log-rank test without a delayed effect and the test beyond the delayed period when such a delay exists. The existence of a treatment delay is determined by a likelihood ratio test with resampling. Numerical results show that the proposed design adequately controls the Type I error rate, has a minimal loss in power under the proportional hazards setting and is markedly more powerful than the log-rank test with a delayed treatment effect.

  2. Clinically targeted screening for congenital CMV - potential for integration into the National Hearing Screening Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadambari, S; Luck, S; Davis, A; Williams, Ej; Berrington, J; Griffiths, Pd; Sharland, M

    2013-10-01

    Screening for a condition should only be undertaken if certain strict criteria are met. Congenital CMV (cCMV) is a leading cause of sensorineuronal hearing loss (SNHL) and meets many of these criteria, but is not currently screened for in the UK. Ganciclovir reduces CMV-induced progressive SNHL if treatment is begun in the first month of life. The Newborn Hearing Screening Programme (NHSP) has been shown to identify SNHL at the earliest possible age. The potential of integrating screening for cCMV into the NHSP is discussed to consolidate the link between screening, early diagnosis and management. The early diagnosis and treatment of cCMV may prevent a small proportion of late SNHL. In the absence of any screening programme, we provide evidence that clinically targeted screening through the NHSP is a potential option in the UK, enhancing the diagnostic pathway and enabling appropriate early treatment to reduce long-term morbidity. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Emerging treatments for advanced pancreatic cancer: clinical potential of albumin-bound paclitaxel

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    Fontana E

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Elisa Fontana, Francesco Sclafani, David Cunningham Department of Medicine, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London and Surrey, UK Abstract: The management of pancreatic cancer has historically represented a major challenge for oncologists. The inherent aggressiveness of this tumor and the fibrotic features of the surrounding stromal tissue have significantly limited the impact of standard chemotherapy. Moreover, the paucity of available tumor tissue has hampered a better understanding of the biology of this disease as well as the development of new treatment strategies. Recently, the therapeutic landscape of metastatic pancreatic cancer has been enriched by two new combination regimens (FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine-nab-paclitaxel which have been demonstrated to improve the outcome in patients with good performance status. Moreover, the peritumoral stroma has been increasingly recognized as a potential therapeutic target for this disease, and several new agents targeting stromal components are currently under investigation. In this paper, we review the current treatment options for advanced pancreatic cancer, highlight the role of the peritumoral stroma, and discuss the clinical potential of nab-paclitaxel and antistromal treatment strategies. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, nab-paclitaxel, stroma, SPARC

  4. The potential of volatile organic compounds for the detection of active disease in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolinska, A; Bodelier, A G L; Dallinga, J W; Masclee, A A M; Jonkers, D M; van Schooten, F-J; Pierik, M J

    2017-05-01

    To optimise treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC), patients need repeated assessment of mucosal inflammation. Current non-invasive biomarkers and clinical activity indices do not accurately reflect disease activity in all patients and cannot discriminate UC from non-UC colitis. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled air could be predictive of active disease or remission in Crohn's disease. To investigate whether VOCs are able to differentiate between active UC, UC in remission and non-UC colitis. UC patients participated in a 1-year study. Clinical activity index, blood, faecal and breath samples were collected at each out-patient visit. Patients with clear defined active faecal calprotectin >250 μg/g and inactive disease (Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index Non-UC colitis was confirmed by stool culture or radiological evaluation. Breath samples were analysed by gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry and kernel-based method to identify discriminating VOCs. In total, 72 UC (132 breath samples; 62 active; 70 remission) and 22 non-UC-colitis patients (22 samples) were included. Eleven VOCs predicted active vs. inactive UC in an independent internal validation set with 92% sensitivity and 77% specificity (AUC 0.94). Non-UC colitis patients could be clearly separated from active and inactive UC patients with principal component analysis. Volatile organic compounds can accurately distinguish active disease from remission in UC and profiles in UC are clearly different from profiles in non-UC colitis patients. VOCs have demonstrated potential as new non-invasive biomarker to monitor inflammation in UC. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Improving the Clinical Pharmacologic Assessment of Abuse Potential: Part 2: Optimizing the Design of Human Abuse Potential Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Edward M

    2018-04-01

    This article discusses the conduct of a human abuse potential study as outlined in the Food and Drug Administration Final Guidance to Industry on Assessment of Abuse Potential. In addition, areas where alternative approaches should be considered are proposed. The design, end points, conduct, and interpretation of the human abuse potential study were reviewed, analyzed, and placed in the context of current scientific knowledge and best practices to mitigate regulatory risk and expedite drug development. The guidance is based on regulatory needs and current scientific practices. However, the reliability and utility of such studies can be improved with better subject selection, data collection, standardization of data collection and staff training, and a better understanding of the measurement properties of the dependent measures. The guidance provides a useful framework for conduct of human abuse potential studies. However, design assumptions, poor choice of end points, failure to consider alternate approaches, and limited experience with interpretation can result in an inadequate study or one that does not fairly represent the abuse potential of a new chemical entity. Methodologic development is needed to strengthen the regulatory framework. The Food and Drug Administration or the National Institutes on Drug Abuse could take a targeted initiative to encourage this work.

  6. Therapeutic Potential of Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells in IBD: From Animal Models to Clinical Application

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    Raquel Cabezón

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The gut mucosa undergoes continuous antigenic exposure from food antigens, commensal flora derived ligands, and pathogens. This constant stimulation results in controlled inflammatory responses that are effectively suppressed by multiple factors. This tight regulation, necessary to maintain intestinal homeostasis, is affected during inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD resulting in altered immune responses to harmless microorganisms. Dendritic cells (DCs are sentinels of immunity, located in peripheral and lymphoid tissues, which are essential for homeostasis of T cell-dependent immune responses. The expression of a particular set of pathogen recognition receptors allows DCs to initiate immune responses. However, in the absence of danger signals, different DC subsets can induce active tolerance by inducing regulatory T cells (Treg, inhibiting inflammatory T helper cell responses, or both. Interestingly, several protocols to generate clinical grade tolerogenic DC (tol-DCs in vitro have been described, opening the possibility to restore the intestinal homeostasis to bacterial flora by cellular therapy. In this review, we discuss different DC subsets and their role in IBD. Additionally, we will review preclinical studies performed in animal models while describing recent characterization of tol-DCs from Crohn’s disease patients for clinical application.

  7. Antifungal potential of eugenyl acetate against clinical isolates of Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musthafa, Khadar Syed; Hmoteh, Jutharat; Thamjarungwong, Benjamas; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2016-10-01

    The study evaluated the efficiency of eugenyl acetate (EA), a phytochemical in clove essential oil, against clinical isolates of Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, and Candida glabrata. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of EA against Candida isolates were in the range between 0.1% and 0.4% (v/v). Spot assay further confirmed the susceptibility of Candida isolates to the compound upon treatment with respective 1 × MIC. Growth profile measured in time kill study evidence that the compound at 1 × MIC and 1/2 × MIC retarded the growth of Candida cells, divulging the fungicidal activity. Light microscopic observation demonstrated that upon treated with EA, rough cell morphology, cell damage, and fragmented patterns were observed in C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata. Furthermore, unusual morphological changes of the organism were observed in scanning electron microscopic study. Therefore, it is validated that the compound could cause cell damage resulting in the cell death of Candida clinical isolates. Eventually, the compound at sub-MIC (0.0125% v/v) significantly inhibited serum-induced germ tube formation by C. albicans. Eugenyl acetate inhibited biofilm forming ability of the organisms as well as reduced the adherence of Candida cells to HaCaT keratinocytes cells. In addition, upon treatment with EA, the phagocytic activity of macrophages was increased significantly against C. albicans (P Candida infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Reviewing Clinical Effectiveness of Active Training Strategies of Platform-Based Ankle Rehabilitation Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangfeng Zeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This review aims to provide a systematical investigation of clinical effectiveness of active training strategies applied in platform-based ankle robots. Method. English-language studies published from Jan 1980 to Aug 2017 were searched from four databases using key words of “Ankle∗” AND “Robot∗” AND “Effect∗ OR Improv∗ OR Increas∗.” Following an initial screening, three rounds of discrimination were successively conducted based on the title, the abstract, and the full paper. Result. A total of 21 studies were selected with 311 patients involved; of them, 13 studies applied a single group while another eight studies used different groups for comparison to verify the therapeutic effect. Virtual-reality (VR game training was applied in 19 studies, while two studies used proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF training. Conclusion. Active training techniques delivered by platform ankle rehabilitation robots have been demonstrated with great potential for clinical applications. Training strategies are mostly combined with one another by considering rehabilitation schemes and motion ability of ankle joints. VR game environment has been commonly used with active ankle training. Bioelectrical signals integrated with VR game training can implement intelligent identification of movement intention and assessment. These further provide the foundation for advanced interactive training strategies that can lead to enhanced training safety and confidence for patients and better treatment efficacy.

  9. Intra-oral orthosis vs amitriptyline in chronic tension-type headache: a clinical and laser evoked potentials study

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    Sardaro Michele

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the present study, we examined clinical and laser-evoked potentials (LEP features in two groups of chronic tension-type headache (CTTH patients treated with two different approaches: intra-oral appliance of prosthesis, aiming to reduce muscular tenderness, and 10 mg daily amitriptyline. Methods Eighteen patients with diagnosed CTTH participated in this open label, controlled study. A baseline evaluation was performed for clinical features, Total Tenderness Score (TTS and a topographic analysis of LEPs obtained manually and the pericranial points stimulation in all patients vs. healthy subjects. Thereafter, patients were randomly assigned to a two-month treatment by either amitriptyline or intra-oral appliance. Results and discussion Both the intra-oral appliance and amitriptyline significantly reduced headache frequency. The TTS was significantly reduced in the group treated with the appliance. The amplitude of P2 response elicited by stimulation of pericranial zones showed a reduction after amitriptyline treatment. Both therapies were effective in reducing headache severity, the appliance with a prevalent action on the pericranial muscular tenderness, amitriptyline reducing the activity of the central cortical structures subtending pain elaboration Conclusion The results of this study may suggest that in CTTH both the interventions at the peripheral and central levels improve the outcome of headache.

  10. Pharmacological modulations of cardiac ultra-rapid and slowly activating delayed rectifier currents: potential antiarrhythmic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammed A

    2010-01-01

    Despite the emerging new insights into our understandings of the cellular mechanisms underlying cardiac arrhythmia, medical therapy for this disease remains unsatisfactory. Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most prevalent arrhythmia, is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. On the other hand, ventricular fibrillation results in sudden cardiac deaths in many instances. Prolongation of cardiac action potential (AP) is a proven principle of antiarrhythmic therapy. Class III antiarrhythmic agents prolong AP and QT interval by blocking rapidly activating delayed rectifier current (I(Kr)). However, I(Kr) blocking drugs carry the risk of life-threatening proarrhythmia. Recently, modulation of atrial-selective ultra-rapid delayed rectifier current (I(Kur)), has emerged as a novel therapeutic approach to treat AF. A number of I(Kur) blockers are being evaluated for the treatment of AF. The inhibition of slowly activating delayed rectifier current (I(Ks)) has also been proposed as an effective and safer antiarrhythmic approach because of its distinguishing characteristics that differ in remarkable ways from other selective class III agents. Selective I(Ks) block may prolong AP duration (APD) at rapid rates without leading to proarrhythmia. This article reviews the pathophysiological roles of I(Kur) and I(Ks) in cardiac repolarization and the implications of newly developed I(Kur) and I(Ks) blocking agents as promising antiarrhythmic approaches. Several recent patents pertinent to antiarrhythmic drug development have been discussed. Further research will be required to evaluate the efficacy and safety of these agents in the clinical setting.

  11. Harnessing the potential clinical use of medicinal plants as anti-diabetic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell-Tofte JI

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Joan IA Campbell-Tofte,1 Per Mølgaard,2 Kaj Winther11Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark; 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder arising from complex interactions between multiple genetic and/or environmental factors. The characteristic high blood sugar levels result from either lack of the hormone insulin (type 1 diabetes, T1D, or because body tissues do not respond to the hormone (type 2 diabetes, T2D. T1D patients currently need exogenous insulin for life, while for T2D patients who do not respond to diet and exercise regimes, oral anti-diabetic drugs (OADs and sometimes insulin are administered to help keep their blood glucose as normal as possible. As neither the administration of insulin nor OADs is curative, many patients develop tissue degenerative processes that result in life-threatening diabetes comorbidities. Several surveys of medicinal plants used as anti-diabetic agents amongst different peoples have been published. Some of this interest is driven by the ongoing diabetes pandemic coupled with the inadequacies associated with the current state of-the-art care and management of the syndrome. However, there is a huge cleft between traditional medicine and modern (Western medicine, with the latter understandably demanding meaningful and scientific validation of anecdotal evidence for acceptance of the former. The main problems for clinical evaluation of medicinal plants with promising anti-diabetic properties reside both with the complexity of components of the plant materials and with the lack of full understanding of the diabetes disease etiology. This review is therefore focused on why research activities involving an integration of Systems Biology-based technologies of pharmacogenomics, metabolomics, and bioinformatics with standard clinical data

  12. Clinical assessment of the effect of digital filtering on the detection of ventricular late potentials

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    P.R. Benchimol-Barbosa

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular late potentials are low-amplitude signals originating from damaged myocardium and detected on the body surface by ECG filtering and averaging. Digital filters present in commercial equipment may interfere with the ability of arrhythmia stratification. We compared 40-Hz BiSpec (BI and classical 40- to 250-Hz band-pass Butterworth bidirectional (BD filters in terms of impact on time domain variables and diagnostic properties. In a transverse retrospective age-adjusted case-control study, 221 subjects with sinus rhythm without bundle branch block were divided into three groups after signal-averaged ECG acquisition: GI (N = 40, clinically normal controls, GII (N = 158, subjects with coronary heart disease without sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (SMVT, and GIII (N = 23, subjects with heart disease and documented SMVT. Conventional variables analyzed from vector magnitude data after averaging to 0.3 µV final noise were obtained by application of each filter to the averaged signal, and evaluated in pairs by numerical comparison and by diagnostic agreement assessment, using conventional and optimized thresholds of normality. Significant differences were found between BI and BD variables in all groups, with diagnostic results showing significant disagreement between both filters [kappa value of 0.61 (P<0.05 for GII and 0.31 for GIII (P = NS]. Sensitivity for SMVT was lower with BI than with BD (65.2 vs 91.3%, respectively, P<0.05. Filters provided significantly different numerical and diagnostic results and the BI filter showed only limited clinical application to risk stratification of ventricular arrhythmia.

  13. Clinical definition of respiratory viral infections in young children and potential bronchiolitis misclassification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megalaa, Rosemary; Perez, Geovanny F; Kilaikode-Cheruveettara, Sasikumar; Kotwal, Nidhi; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Nino, Gustavo

    2018-01-01

    Viral respiratory infections are often grouped as a single respiratory syndrome named 'viral bronchiolitis', independently of the viral etiology or individual risk factors. Clinical trials and guidelines have used a more stringent definition of viral bronchiolitis, including only the first episode of wheezing in children less than 12 months of age without concomitant respiratory comorbidities. There is increasing evidence suggesting that this definition is not being followed by pediatric care providers, but it is unclear to what extent viral respiratory infections are currently misclassified as viral bronchiolitis using standard definitions. We conducted a retrospective analysis of hospitalized young children (≤3 years) due to viral respiratory infections. Bronchiolitis was defined as the first wheezing episode less than 12 months of age. Demographic variables and comorbidities were obtained by electronic medical record review. The study comprised a total of 513 hospitalizations (n=453). Viral bronchiolitis was diagnosed in 144 admissions (28.1%). Notably, we identified that the majority of children diagnosed with bronchiolitis (63%) were misclassified as they had prior episodes of wheezing. Many children with bronchiolitis misclassification had significant comorbidities, including prematurity (51%), neuromuscular conditions (9.8%), and congenital heart disease (9.8%). Misclassification of bronchiolitis is a common problem that may lead to inappropriate management of viral respiratory infections in young children. A comprehensive approach that takes into consideration viral etiology and individual risk factors may lead to a more accurate clinical assessment of this condition and would potentially prevent bronchiolitis misclassification. © American Federation for Medical Research (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Clinical realism: a new literary genre and a potential tool for encouraging empathy in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Paula; Ashton, Katy; Barratt, Rachel; Doyle, Simon; Imeson, Dorrie; Meir, Amos; Risser, Gregoire

    2015-07-03

    Empathy has been re-discovered as a desirable quality in doctors. A number of approaches using the medical humanities have been advocated to teach empathy to medical students. This paper describes a new approach using the medium of creative writing and a new narrative genre: clinical realism. Third year students were offered a four week long Student Selected Component (SSC) in Narrative Medicine and Creative Writing. The creative writing element included researching and creating a character with a life-changing physical disorder without making the disorder the focus of the writing. The age, gender, social circumstances and physical disorder of a character were randomly allocated to each student. The students wrote repeated assignments in the first person, writing as their character and including details of living with the disorder in all of their narratives. This article is based on the work produced by the 2013 cohort of students taking the course, and on their reflections on the process of creating their characters. Their output was analysed thematically using a constructivist approach to meaning making. This preliminary analysis suggests that the students created convincing and detailed narratives which included rich information about living with a chronic disorder. Although the writing assignments were generic, they introduced a number of themes relating to illness, including stigma, personal identity and narrative wreckage. Some students reported that they found it difficult to relate to "their" character initially, but their empathy for the character increased as the SSC progressed. Clinical realism combined with repeated writing exercises about the same character is a potential tool for helping to develop empathy in medical students and merits further investigation.

  15. Potential clinical applications of halichondrins in breast cancer and other neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortega V

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Vanesa Ortega1, Javier Cortés1,21Department of Oncology, Vall d’Hebrón University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain; 2Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Halichondrin B is a large polyether macrolide found in a rare Japanese sponge, Halichondria okadai and has been shown to have anticancer activity. Eribulin mesylate is a completely synthetic analog of halichondrin B with a unique mechanism of action relative to other antimicrotubule agents. This new agent has demonstrated activity in preclinical studies, and it is being developed for the treatment of different tumor types. Eribulin has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency as late-line therapy for metastatic breast cancer patients previously treated with an anthracycline and a taxane. It has demonstrated superiority over other treatments in overall survival (OS (hazard ratio: 0.81, P = 0.041, leading to its regulatory approbation for clinical practice use. Median OS for the eribulin-treated group was 13.1 months versus 10.6 months in the physician’s treatment-of-choice group. Eribulin demonstrated a manageable toxicity profile. Most common adverse events associated with treatment were mild neutropenia and fatigue, mainly of grade 1 or 2. In contrast to other antimicrotubule agents, eribulin has a relatively low incidence of peripheral neuropathy and alopecia. Eribulin has been extensively studied in breast cancer and is currently being developed for treatment of other cancer types. Eribulin has demonstrated activity in Phase II trials in non-small cell lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, urothelial tract cancer, and sarcomas. Further studies in these cancers are ongoing. This article reviews pharmacology, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics and efficacy of eribulin in breast cancer and other neoplasms.Keywords: halichondrin B, eribulin, antimicrotubule, metastatic breast cancer

  16. Detection of activated platelets using activation-specific monoclonal antibody (SZ-51) in clinical disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Guoxin; Li Fugang; Li Jianyong; Ruan Changgeng

    1991-10-01

    A direct test for activated platelets in whole blood was developed by radioimmunoassay with 125 I labeled SZ-51, an antibody specific for an α-granule membrane protein (GMP-140) that associates with the platelet surface during secretion. The assay had sufficient sensitivity to detect as few as 2% activated platelets. In 50 normal subjects, minimal GMP-140 molecules per platelet were expressed on the surface of circulating platelets. Ten patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass had transiently increased expression of GMP-140 molecules during the bypass procedure, especially at the end of bypass. Evaluation of 18 patients with epidemic hemorrhagic fever (EHF) has shown that the number of GMP-140 molecules on the platelet surface was closely related to the four different phases of EHF. In six patients suffered from acute myocardial infarction (AMI), the number of GMP-140 molecules changed with the procession of AMI and the highest occurred 48 h after AMI. The GMP-140 molecules were also increased in patients with asthma attack (n = 14), but not in patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (n = 11) and diabetic mellitus (n = 48). Taken together, these studies suggest that activated platelet can be reliably measured in whole blood using radiolabeled SZ-51 antibody and the detection of activated platelets is potentially useful in identifying patients with certain thrombotic disorders and others

  17. Cleveland Clinic television series enhances branding in active market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    "Medical Miracles" premiered April 26. It is an information-packed series of programs showcasing The Cleveland Clinic's advanced medical practices. The Cleveland Clinic teamed with local NBC-affiliate, WKYC to develop half-hour shows on topics including neuro-sciences, orthopedics, eye, heart, pediatrics and cancer. As of this writing, three of the half-hour shows already have aired. They will resume in September, October and November, following a summer break. The collaboration is a healthy prospect all the way around. For Cleveland Clinic, it provides highly credible visibility in a competitive marketplace. And, according to WKYC president and general manager, Brooke Spectorsky, " Medical news and information is a high priority among our viewers."

  18. Major adverse cardiovascular event reduction with GLP-1 and SGLT2 agents: evidence and clinical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røder, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes is directed against treating symptoms of hyperglycemia, minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia, and the risk of microvascular and macrovascular complications. The majority of patients with type 2 diabetes die from cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease. Future therapies should therefore focus on reducing cardiovascular morbidity in this high-risk population. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RA) and sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2-i) are two drug classes with proven antihyperglycemic effect in type 2 diabetes. However, these drugs seem to have other effects such as weight reduction, low risk of hypoglycemia, and blood pressure reduction. Emerging evidence suggests pleiotropic effects, which potentially could be important in reducing cardiovascular risk. Prompted by regulatory authorities demanding cardiovascular outcome trials (CVOTs) assessing the cardiovascular safety of new antihyperglycemic drug candidates, many CVOTs are ongoing and a few of these are finalized. Somewhat surprising recent CVOTs in both drug classes have shown promising data on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with a very high risk of cardiovascular events. It is uncertain whether this is a class effect of the two drug classes, and it is yet unproven whether long-term cardiovascular benefits of these drugs can be extrapolated to populations at lower risk of cardiovascular disease. The aim of the present review is to give an overview of our current knowledge of the GLP-1RA and SGLT2-i classes, with specific focus on mechanisms of action, effects on cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality from the CVOTs presently available. The clinical potential of these data is discussed. PMID:29344329

  19. Proven and potential clinical benefits of washing red blood cells before transfusion: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt AE

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Amy E Schmidt, Majed A Refaai, Scott A Kirkley, Neil Blumberg Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA Abstract: Red blood cells (RBCs are washed for a variety of reasons such as to remove excess potassium, cytokines, and other allergen proteins from the supernatant and/or to mitigate the effects of the storage lesion. The storage lesion is a product of RBC aging and include leakage of potassium and chloride from the RBCs, depletion of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and adenosine triphosphate, loss of phospholipids and cholesterol, exposure of phosphatidylserine, elaboration of lipid mediators, loss of glutathione, autoxidation of hemoglobin to methemoglobin contributing to decreased blood flow viscosity and adherence to endothelial cells, increased microparticle formation, and disruption of NO-mediated vasodilation. A storage lesion is thought to be caused in part by oxidative stress, which is characterized by functional and structural changes to the RBCs. The effects of the RBC storage lesion on patient morbidity and mortality have been studied intensively with mixed results. Here, we will summarize the potential benefits of RBC washing. Notably, all patient-based studies on washed RBCs are single-center, small randomized studies or observational data, which await replication and tests of generalizability. Some of the most promising preliminary data suggest that washed transfusions of red cells and platelets reduce mortality in low risk, younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia, mitigate lung injury, and substantially reduce mortality in cardiac surgery. Larger randomized trials to replicate or refute these findings are urgently needed and, most importantly, have the potential to strikingly improve clinical outcomes following transfusion. Keywords: washed blood, transfusion, immunomodulation, red blood cell

  20. Aging Adults Learning New Avocations: Potential Increases in Activity among Educated Baby-Boomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marcus Lee; Bungum, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    The potential benefits, drawbacks, and preferences of activity (both physical and nonphysical) among Baby-Boomers were the foci of this study. This study included 56 survey participants and 5 interviewees. Descriptive statistics illustrated a preference towards low impact physical activity and cognitively enriching nonphysical activities. Time…

  1. Frozen blood products: clinically effective and potentially ideal for remote Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, A; Marks, D C; Johnson, L; Reade, M C; Badloe, J F; Noorman, F

    2013-01-01

    The development of effective cryopreservation techniques for both red blood cells and platelets, which maintain ex vivo biological activity, in combination with frozen plasma, provides for a unique blood banking strategy. This technology greatly enhances the storage life of these products. The rationale and potential advantages of using cryopreservation techniques for the provision of blood products to remote and military environments have been effectively demonstrated in several conflicts over the last decade. Current haemostatic resuscitation doctrine for the exsanguinating patient supports the use of red blood cells, platelets and frozen plasma early in the resuscitation. We believe an integrated fresh-frozen blood bank inventory could facilitate provision of blood products, not only in the military setting but also in regional Australia, by overcoming many logistic and geographical challenges. The processes involved in production and point of care thawing are sufficiently well developed and achievable to make this technology a viable option. The potential limitations of cryopreservation and subsequent product thawing need to be considered if such a strategy is to be developed. A substantial body of international experience using cryopreserved products in remote settings has already been accrued. This experience provides a template for the possible creation of an Australian integrated fresh-frozen blood bank inventory that could conceivably enhance the care of patients in both regional Australia and in the military setting.

  2. Activism or Slacktivism? The Potential and Pitfalls of Social Media in Contemporary Student Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Nolan L.; Matias, Cheryl E.; Montoya, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of social media has greatly influenced 21st-century student activism. It has also given rise to the birth of "slacktivism," an online form of self-aggrandizing, politically ineffective activism. This theoretical article delves into the conceptualizations of what constitutes student activism versus slacktivism in a digital…

  3. Oral hygiene teaching in clinical activities at the department of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes and practices of students related to oral hygiene teaching by mean of a questionnaire submitted to patients attending the clinics of the Department of Dentistry of Dakar. Method: A KPC study (Knowledge, Practices and Coverage) focusing on dental students was conducted ...

  4. The potential of SGLT2 inhibitors in phase II clinical development for treating type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafili, K; Maltezos, E; Papanas, N

    2016-10-01

    There is now an abundance of anti-diabetic agents. However, only few patients achieve glycemic targets. Moreover, current glucose-lowering agents mainly depend upon insulin secretion or function. Sodium glucose co-transporter type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors present a novel glucose-lowering therapy, inducing glycosuria in an insulin-independent fashion. In this review, the authors discuss the key efficacy and safety data from phase II clinical trials in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) of the main SGLT2 inhibitors approved or currently in development, and provide a rationale for their use in T2DM. Despite the very promising characteristics of this new therapeutic class, a number of issues await consideration. One important question is what to expect from head-to-head comparison data. We also need to know if dual inhibition of SGLT1/SGLT2 is more efficacious in reducing HbA1c and how this therapy affects metabolic and cardiovascular parameters. Additionally, several SGLT2 agents that have not yet come to market have hitherto been evaluated in Asian populations, whereas approved SGLT2 inhibitors have been frequently studied in other populations, including Caucasian subjects. Thus, we need more information on the potential role of ethnicity on their efficacy and safety.

  5. What are the potential benefits of clinical beta-cell imaging in diabetes mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göke, Burkhard

    2010-05-01

    Previously, studies of the endocrine pancreatic beta-cell were mainly performed ex vivo by morphological means. This data supported the analysis of pathophysiological changes in the pancreatic islet during insults such as diabetes mellitus. Metabolic testing of the pancreatic islet by assaying hormone parameters such als plasma insulin or C-peptide combined with more or less sophisticated calculations allowed conclusions about states of insulin resistance or secretory failure. It also allowed certain correlations of endocrine function with beta-cell mass. Today, with firmer pathophysiological concepts about beta-cell failure, modern protocols of islet transplantation, and drugs on the market coming with promises of preservation or even expansion of beta-cell mass in diabetes mellitus it has become very attractive to search for tools measuring beta-cell mass, if possible even repeatingly in the same organism in vivo. From a clinical point of view, the potential of pancreatic beta-cell mass imaging technologies is looked upon with high expectations. Methodologically, the decisive question is whether it is likely that future beta-cell imaging will provide significant advantages over the metabolic methods already in hand. With new in vivo tools, studies of beta-cell mass and function may offer even new approaches stratifying patients to anti-diabetic therapies.

  6. Clinical investigation of TROP-2 as an independent biomarker and potential therapeutic target in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Yu, Hai-Zheng; Cai, Jian-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Colon cancer is associated with a severe demographic and economic burden worldwide. The pathogenesis of colon cancer is highly complex and involves sequential genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Despite extensive investigation, the pathogenesis of colon cancer remains to be elucidated. As the third most common type of cancer worldwide, the treatment options for colon cancer are currently limited. Human trophoblast cell‑surface marker (TROP‑2), is a cell‑surface transmembrane glycoprotein overexpressed by several types of epithelial carcinoma. In addition, TROP‑2 has been demonstrated to be associated with tumorigenesis and invasiveness in solid types of tumor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protein expression of TROP‑2 in colon cancer tissues, and further explore the association between the expression of TROP‑2 and clinicopathological features of patients with colon cancer. The expression and localization of the TROP‑2 protein was examined using western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. Finally, the expression of TROP‑2 expression was correlated to conventional clinicopathological features of colon cancer using a χ2 test. The results revealed that TROP‑2 protein was expressed at high levels in the colon cancer tissues, which was associated with the development and pathological process of colon cancer. Therefore, TROP‑2 may be used as a biomarker to determine the clinical prognosis, and as a potential therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  7. Proton therapy of cancer: Potential clinical advantages and cost-effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundkvist, Jonas; Ekman, Mattias; Rehn Ericsson, Suzanne; Glimelius, Bengt; Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala

    2005-01-01

    Proton therapy may offer potential clinical advantages compared with conventional radiation therapy for many cancer patients. Due to the large investment costs for building a proton therapy facility, however, the treatment cost with proton radiation is higher than with conventional radiation. It is therefore important to evaluate whether the medical benefits of proton therapy are large enough to motivate the higher costs. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of proton therapy in the treatment of four different cancers: left-sided breast cancer, prostate cancer, head and neck cancer, and childhood medulloblastoma. A Markov cohort simulation model was created for each cancer type and used to simulate the life of patients treated with radiation. Cost and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) were used as primary outcome measures. The results indicated that proton therapy was cost-effective if appropriate risk groups were chosen. The average cost per QALY gained for the four types of cancer assessed was about Euro 10,130. If the value of a QALY was set to Euro 55,000, the total yearly net benefit of treating 925 cancer patients with the four types of cancer was about Euro 20.8 million. Investment in a proton facility may thus be cost-effective. The results must be interpreted with caution, since there is a lack of data, and consequently large uncertainties in the assumptions used

  8. Methodology optimization and diversification for the investigation of virulence potential in Haemophilus influenzae clinical strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giucă, Mihaela Cristina; Străuţ, Monica; Surdeanu, Maria; Nica, Maria; Ungureanu, Vasilica; Mihăescu, Grigore

    2011-01-01

    Ten Haemophilus influenzae strains were isolated from patients aged between 1.6 - 24 years, with various diagnoses (acute meningitis, acute upper respiratory infection, otitis media and acute sinusitis). Identification was based on phenotypic and molecular characteristics; antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by diffusion method according to CLSI standards 2011 for seven antibiotics. The results of molecular testing showed that all the studied strains produced an amplicon of 1000 bp with ompP2 primers indicating that all strains were H. influenzae. For six strains, the PCR amplicon obtained with bexA specific primers, proving that the strains were capsulated. The results of phenotypic testing showed that four strains were ampicillin nonsusceptible and (beta-lactamase-positive. The virulence potential of H. influenzae clinical strains was investigated by phenotypic methods, including the assessment of the soluble virulence factors on specific media containing the biochemical substratum for the investigated enzymatic factor, as well as the adherence and invasion capacity to HeLa cells monolayer using Cravioto modified method. The studied strains exhibited mainly a diffuse adherence pattern and different adherence indexes. Interestingly, two strains isolated from the same pacient (blood and CSF) showed a different degree of invasiveness, the strain isolated from blood being 20 times more invasive than the one isolated from CSF.

  9. Nanoparticles as potential clinical therapeutic agents in Alzheimer's disease: focus on selenium nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Muhamad, Salina; Pecze, Laszlo

    2017-07-01

    In etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), involvement of amyloid β (Aβ) plaque accumulation and oxidative stress in the brain have important roles. Several nanoparticles such as titanium dioxide, silica dioxide, silver and zinc oxide have been experimentally using for treatment of neurological disease. In the last decade, there has been a great interest on combination of antioxidant bioactive compounds such as selenium (Se) and flavonoids with the oxidant nanoparticles in AD. We evaluated the most current data available on the physiological effects of oxidant and antioxidant nanoparticles. Areas covered: Oxidative nanoparticles decreased the activities of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in the brain of rats and mice. However, Se-rich nanoparticles in small size (5-15 nm) depleted Aβ formation through decreasing ROS production. Reports on low levels of Se in blood and tissue samples and the low activities of GSH-Px, catalase and SOD enzymes in AD patients and animal models support the proposed crucial role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of AD. Expert commentary: In conclusion, present literature suggests that Se-rich nanoparticles appeared to be a potential therapeutic compound for the treatment of AD.

  10. Drug-drug interactions involving lysosomes: mechanisms and potential clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Randall; Funk, Ryan S; Axcell, Erick; Krise, Jeffrey P

    2012-08-01

    Many commercially available, weakly basic drugs have been shown to be lysosomotropic, meaning they are subject to extensive sequestration in lysosomes through an ion trapping-type mechanism. The extent of lysosomal trapping of a drug is an important therapeutic consideration because it can influence both activity and pharmacokinetic disposition. The administration of certain drugs can alter lysosomes such that their accumulation capacity for co-administered and/or secondarily administered drugs is altered. In this review the authors explore what is known regarding the mechanistic basis for drug-drug interactions involving lysosomes. Specifically, the authors address the influence of drugs on lysosomal pH, volume and lipid processing. Many drugs are known to extensively accumulate in lysosomes and significantly alter their structure and function; however, the therapeutic and toxicological implications of this remain controversial. The authors propose that drug-drug interactions involving lysosomes represent an important potential source of variability in drug activity and pharmacokinetics. Most evaluations of drug-drug interactions involving lysosomes have been performed in cultured cells and isolated tissues. More comprehensive in vivo evaluations are needed to fully explore the impact of this drug-drug interaction pathway on therapeutic outcomes.

  11. The treatment of Alzheimer's disease using Chinese medicinal plants: from disease models to potential clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yang; Wang, Qiuhong; Wang, Changfu; Chan, Kelvin; Sun, Yanping; Kuang, Haixue

    2014-03-28

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the sustained higher nervous disorders of the activities and functions of the brain. Due to its heavy burden on society and the patients' families, it is urgent to review the treatments for AD to provide basic data for further research and new drug development. Among these treatments, Chinese Material Medica (CMM) has been traditionally clinical used in China to treat AD for a long time with obvious efficacy. With the further research reports of CMM, new therapeutic materials may be recovered from troves of CMM. However, So far, little or no review work has been reported to conclude anti-AD drugs from CMM in literature. Therefore, a systematic introduction of CMM anti-AD research progress is of great importance and necessity. This paper strives to systematically describe the progress of CMM in the treatment of AD, and lays a basis data for anti-AD drug development from CMM, and provides the essential theoretical support for the further development and utilization of CMM resources through a more comprehensive research of the variety of databases regarding CMM anti-AD effects reports. Literature survey was performed via electronic search (SciFinder®, Pubmed®, Google Scholar and Web of Science) on papers and patents and by systematic research in ethnopharmacological literature at various university libraries. This review mainly introduces the current research on the Chinese Material Medica (CMM) theoretical research on Alzheimer's disease (AD), anti-AD active constituent of CMM, anti-AD effects on AD models, anti-AD mechanism of CMM, and anti-AD effect of CMM formula. Scholars around the world have made studies on the anti-AD molecular mechanism of CMM from different pathways, and have made substantial progress. The progress not only enriched the anti-AD theory of CMM, but also provided clinical practical significance and development prospects in using CMM to treat AD. Western pure drugs cannot replace the advantages of

  12. [Antibacterial activity of rare Streptomyces species against clinical resistant bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughachiche, Faiza; Reghioua, Sihem; Zerizer, Habiba; Boulahrouf, Abderrahmane

    2012-01-01

    In the search for new antibiotics from Steptomyces, investigating extremes habitats enhances the probability of isolating novel producers. In this context, the antibacterial activity of four Streptomyces strains isolated from Ezzmoul saltpans was studied. Two of them showed antibacterial activity against antibiotic's resistant bacteria (Bacillus cereus: β-lactamines and sulfamides resistant, Streptococcus faecalis: penicillin, tetracycline and cotrimoxazole resistant, and Staphylococcus aureus Mu 50: vancomycine resistant). The most active Streptomyces strain produces one type of polar bioactive molecules that resists to temperature variation and light exposition. Its activity appears in the first culture day and reaches its maximal value in the fourth day. The second strain presents themoresistant activity that reaches its maximal value in the first culture day. It produces two types of bioactive molecules, one is polar and the second is non polar (according to thin layer chromatography technique results).

  13. Learning from clinical placement experience: Analysing nursing students' final reflections in a digital storytelling activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliadelis, Penny; Wood, Pamela

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports on the learning potential of a reflective activity undertaken by final year nursing students, in which they were asked to recount two meaningful events that occurred during their clinical placements over the duration of their 3-year nursing degree program and reflect on how these events contributed to their learning to become beginning level Registered Nurses (RNs). This descriptive qualitative study gathered narratives from 92 students as individual postings in an online forum created within the University's learning management system. An analysis of the students' reflections are the focus of this paper particularly in relation to the value of reflecting on the identified events. Four themes emerged that clearly highlight the way in which these students interpreted and learned from both positive and negative clinical experiences, their strong desire to fit into their new role and their ability to re-imagine how they might respond to clinical events when they become Registered Nurses. The findings of this study may contribute to developing nursing curricula that better prepares final year students for the realities of practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. National physical activity surveillance: Users of wearable activity monitors as a potential data source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Omura, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess usage patterns of wearable activity monitors among US adults and how user characteristics might influence physical activity estimates from this type of sample. We analyzed data on 3367 respondents to the 2015 HealthStyles survey, an annual consumer mail panel survey conducted on a nationwide sample. Approximately 1 in 8 respondents (12.5% reported currently using a wearable activity monitor. Current use varied by sex, age, and education level. Use increased with physical activity level from 4.3% for inactive adults to 17.4% for active adults. Overall, 49.9% of all adults met the aerobic physical activity guideline, while this prevalence was 69.5% among current activity monitor users. Our findings suggest that current users of wearable activity monitors are not representative of the overall US population. Estimates of physical activity levels using data from wearable activity monitors users may be an overestimate and therefore data from users alone may have a limited role in physical activity surveillance.

  15. Calcium sensing receptor as a novel mediator of adipose tissue dysfunction: mechanisms and potential clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bravo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is currently a serious worldwide public health problem, reaching pandemic levels. For decades, dietary and behavioral approaches have failed to prevent this disease from expanding, and health authorities are challenged by the elevated prevalence of co-morbid conditions. Understanding how obesity-associated diseases develop from a basic science approach is recognized as an urgent task to face this growing problem. White adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ, with a crucial influence on whole-body homeostasis. White adipose tissue dysfunction plays a key role linking obesity with its associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. Among the regulators of white adipose tissue physiology, the calcium-sensing receptor has arisen as a potential mediator of white adipose tissue dysfunction. Expression of the receptor has been described in human preadipocytes, adipocytes, and the human adipose cell lines LS14 and SW872. The evidence suggests that calcium-sensing receptor activation in the visceral (i.e. unhealthy white adipose tissue is associated with an increased proliferation of adipose progenitor cells and elevated adipocyte differentiation. In addition, exposure of adipose cells to calcium-sensing receptor activators in vitro elevates proinflammatory cytokine expression and secretion. An increased proinflammatory environment in white adipose tissue plays a key role in the development of white adipose tissue dysfunction that leads to peripheral organ fat deposition and insulin resistance, among other consequences. We propose that calcium-sensing receptor may be one relevant therapeutic target in the struggle to confront the health consequences of the current worldwide obesity pandemic.

  16. Potentiation of insulin release in response to amino acid methyl esters correlates to activation of islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Hans; Lernmark, A; Hedeskov, C J

    1986-01-01

    Column perifusion of mouse pancreatic islets was used to study the ability of amino acids and their methyl esters to influence insulin release and activate islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity. In the absence of L-glutamine, L-serine and the methyl ester of L-phenylalanine, but neither L...... glutamate dehydrogenase activity showed that only the two methyl esters of L-phenylalanine and L-serine activated the enzyme. It is concluded that the mechanism by which methyl esters of amino acids potentiate insulin release is most likely to be mediated by the activation of pancreatic beta-cell glutamate...

  17. Fern extracts potentiate fluconazole activity and inhibit morphological changes in Candida species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Freitas

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: The extracts obtained from the fern species L. venustum and P. calomelanos dose not present significant antifungal activity. However, P. calomelanos potentiates the activity of fluconazole and both extracts inhibits the morphological changes in Candida species, indicating that they have potential pharmacological activity as modulators of fungal biology. Therefore, novel studies are required to characterize the interference of these extracts in the virulence and pathogenicity of Candida species as well as the potential of fern species to treat fungal infections.

  18. Liver afferents contribute to water drinking-induced sympathetic activation in human subjects: a clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus May

    Full Text Available Water drinking acutely increases sympathetic activity in human subjects. In animals, the response appears to be mediated through transient receptor potential channel TRPV4 activation on osmosensitive hepatic spinal afferents, described as osmopressor response. We hypothesized that hepatic denervation attenuates water drinking-induced sympathetic activation. We studied 20 liver transplant recipients (44±2.6 years, 1.2±0.1 years post transplant as model of hepatic denervation and 20 kidney transplant recipients (43±2.6 years, 0.8±0.1 years post transplant as immunosuppressive drug matched control group. Before and after 500 ml water ingestion, we obtained venous blood samples for catecholamine analysis. We also monitored brachial and finger blood pressure, ECG, and thoracic bioimpedance. Plasma norepinephrine concentration had changed by 0.01±0.07 nmol/l in liver and by 0.21±0.07 nmol/l in kidney transplant recipients (p<0.05 between groups after 30-40 minutes of water drinking. While blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance increased in both groups, the responses tended to be attenuated in liver transplant recipients. Our findings support the idea that osmosensitive hepatic afferents are involved in water drinking-induced sympathetic activation in human subjects.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01237431.

  19. Liver Afferents Contribute to Water Drinking-Induced Sympathetic Activation in Human Subjects: A Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Marcus; Gueler, Faikah; Barg-Hock, Hannelore; Heiringhoff, Karl-Heinz; Engeli, Stefan; Heusser, Karsten; Diedrich, André; Brandt, André; Strassburg, Christian P.; Tank, Jens; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; Jordan, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Water drinking acutely increases sympathetic activity in human subjects. In animals, the response appears to be mediated through transient receptor potential channel TRPV4 activation on osmosensitive hepatic spinal afferents, described as osmopressor response. We hypothesized that hepatic denervation attenuates water drinking-induced sympathetic activation. We studied 20 liver transplant recipients (44±2.6 years, 1.2±0.1 years post transplant) as model of hepatic denervation and 20 kidney transplant recipients (43±2.6 years, 0.8±0.1 years post transplant) as immunosuppressive drug matched control group. Before and after 500 ml water ingestion, we obtained venous blood samples for catecholamine analysis. We also monitored brachial and finger blood pressure, ECG, and thoracic bioimpedance. Plasma norepinephrine concentration had changed by 0.01±0.07 nmol/l in liver and by 0.21±0.07 nmol/l in kidney transplant recipients (pwater drinking. While blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance increased in both groups, the responses tended to be attenuated in liver transplant recipients. Our findings support the idea that osmosensitive hepatic afferents are involved in water drinking-induced sympathetic activation in human subjects. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01237431 PMID:22016786

  20. Developing Clinical Competency in Crisis Event Management: An Integrated Simulation Problem-Based Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, S. Y.; Chen, F. G.; Klainin, P.; Brammer, J.; O'Brien, A.; Samarasekera, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the integration of a simulation based learning activity on nursing students' clinical crisis management performance in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. It was hypothesized that the clinical performance of first year nursing students who participated in a simulated learning activity during the PBL session…

  1. Activity and potential role of licofelone in the management of osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arrigo FG Cicero

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Arrigo FG Cicero, Luca Laghi“D. Campanacci” Clinical Medicine & Applied Biotechnology Dept. Sant’Orsola-Malpighi Hospital – University of Bologna Via Massarenti, 9, 40138 Bologna, ItalyAbstract: Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It is a progressive joint disease associated with aging. It may be found in the knees, hips, or other joints. It is estimated that costs associated with osteoarthritis exceed 2% of the gross national product in developed countries. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are a mainstay in the treatment of inflammatory disease and are among the most widely used drugs worldwide. The main limitation in using NSAIDs consists in their side-effects, including gastrointestinal ulcerogenic activity and bronchospasm. The mechanism of action of these drugs is attributed to the inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX, and, consequently, the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandins. It is hypothesized that the undesirable side-effects of NSAIDs are due to the inhibition of COX-1 (constitutive isoform, whereas the beneficial effects are related to the inhibition of COX-2 (inducible isoform. Arachidonic acid can also be converted to leukotrienes (LTs by the action of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX. Licofelone, a LOX/COX competitive inhibitor, decreases the production of proinflammatory leukotrienes and prostaglandins (which are involved in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis and in gastrointestinal (GI damage induced by NSAIDs and has the potential to combine good analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects with excellent GI tolerability. Preliminary data with this drug seem promising, but further well-designed clinical trials of this agent in the elderly will be necessary before a final evaluation is possible.Keywords: LOX/COX inhibitor, Licofelone, leukotrienes, osteoarthritis, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

  2. [Radiation-induced bystander effect: the important part of ionizing radiation response. Potential clinical implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideł, Maria; Przybyszewski, Waldemar; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna

    2009-08-18

    It has long been a central radiobiological dogma that the damaging effects of ionizing radiation, such as cell death, cytogenetic changes, apoptosis, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis, are the results of the direct ionization of cell structures, particularly DNA, or indirect damage via water radiolysis products. However, several years ago attention turned to a third mechanism of radiation, termed the "bystander effect" or "radiation-induced bystander effect" (RIBE). This is induced by agents and signals emitted by directly irradiated cells and manifests as a lowering of survival, cytogenetic damage, apoptosis enhancement, and biochemical changes in neighboring non-irradiated cells. The bystander effect is mainly observed in in vitro experiments using very low doses of alpha particles (range; mGy, cGy), but also after conventional irradiation (X-rays, gamma rays) at low as well as conventional doses. The mechanisms responsible for the bystander effect are complex and still poorly understood. It is believed that molecular signals released from irradiated cells induce different signaling ways in non-irradiated neighboring cells, leading to the observed events. The molecular signals may be transmitted through gap junction intercellular communication and through a medium transfer mechanism. The nature of these transmitted factors are diverse, and still not definitely established. It seems that RIBE may have important clinical implications for health risk associated with radiation exposure. Potentially, this effect may have important implications in the creation of whole-body or localized side effects in tissues beyond the irradiation field and also in low-dose radiological and radioisotope diagnostics. Factors emitted by irradiated cells may result in the risk of genetic instability, mutations, and second primary cancer induction. They might also have their own part in inducing and extending post-radiation side effects in normal tissue. The bystander effect may be a

  3. Radiation-induced bystander effect: The important part of ionizing radiation response. Potential clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wideł

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available It has long been a central radiobiological dogma that the damaging effects of ionizing radiation, such as cell death, cytogenetic changes, apoptosis, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis, are the results of the direct ionization of cell structures, particularly DNA, or indirect damage via water radiolysis products. However, several years ago attention turned to a third mechanism of radiation, termed the “bystander effect” or “radiation-induced bystander effect” (RIBE. This is induced by agents and signals emitted by directly irradiated cells and manifests as a lowering of survival, cytogenetic damage, apoptosis enhancement, and biochemical changes in neighboring non-irradiated cells. The bystander effect is mainly observed in in vitro experiments using very low doses of alpha particles (range; mGy, cGy, but also after conventional irradiation (X-rays, gamma rays at low as well as conventional doses. The mechanisms responsible for the bystander effect are complex and still poorly understood. It is believed that molecular signals released from irradiated cells induce different signaling ways in non-irradiated neighboring cells, leading to the observed events. The molecular signals may be transmitted through gap junction intercellular communication and through a medium transfer mechanism. The nature of these transmitted factors are diverse, and still not defi nitely established. It seems that RIBE may have important clinical implications for health risk associated with radiation exposure. Potentially, this effectmay have important implications in the creation of whole-body or localized side effects in tissues beyond the irradiation fi eld and also in low-dose radiological and radioisotope diagnostics. Factors emitted by irradiated cells may result in the risk of genetic instability, mutations, and second primary cancer induction. They might also have their own part in inducing and extending post-radiation side effects in normal tissue. The

  4. A dual potassium channel activator improves repolarization reserve and normalizes ventricular action potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calloe, Kirstine; Di Diego, José M; Hansen, Rie Schultz

    2016-01-01

    in cultured canine cardiac myocytes and determined whether a dual K(+) current activator can normalize K(+) currents and restore action potential (AP) configuration. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ventricular myocytes were isolated and cultured for up to 48h. Current and voltage clamp recordings were made using patch...... of EADs. Our results suggest a potential benefit of K(+) current activators under conditions of reduced repolarization reserve including heart failure....

  5. In vitro antimicrobial activity of five essential oils on multi-drug resistant Gram-negative clinical isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Hercules Sakkas; Panagiota Gousia; Vangelis Economou; Vassilios Sakkas; Stefanos Petsios; Chrissanthy Papadopoulou

    2016-01-01

    Aim/Background: The emergence of drug-resistant pathogens has drawn attention on medicinal plants for potential antimicrobial properties. The objective of the present study was the investigation of the antimicrobial activity of five plant essential oils on multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Materials and Methods: Basil, chamomile blue, origanum, thyme, and tea tree oil were tested against clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 6), Escherichia coli (n = 4), Klebsiella pneum...

  6. Antimicrobial activity of some sulfonamide derivatives on clinical isolates of Staphylococus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekdemir Yunus

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a non-motile, gram positive, non-sporforming, facultative anaerobic microorganism. It is one of the important bacteria as a potential pathogen specifically for nosocomial infections. The sulfonamide derivative medicines are preferred to cure infection caused by S. aureus due to methicillin resistance. Methods Antimicrobial activity of four sulfonamide derivatives have been investigated against 50 clinical isolates of S. aureus and tested by using MIC and disc diffusion methods. 50 clinical isolate which collected from specimens of patients who are given medical treatment in Ondokuz Mayis University Medical School Hospital. A control strain of S. aureus ATCC 29213 was also tested. Results The strongest inhibition was observed in the cases of I [N-(2-hydroxy-4-nitro-phenyl-4-methyl-benzensulfonamid], and II [N-(2-hydroxy-5-nitro-phenyl-4-methyl-benzensulfonamid] against S. aureus. Compound I [N-(2-hydroxy-4-nitro-phenyl-4-methyl-benzensulfonamid] showed higher effect on 21 S. aureus MRSAisolates than oxacillin antibiotic. Introducing an electron withdrawing on the ring increased the antimicrobial activity remarkably. Conclusion This study may help to suggest an alternative possible leading compound for development of new antimicrobial agents against MRSA and MSSA resistant S. aureus. It was also shown here that that clinical isolates of 50 S. aureus have various resistance patterns against to four sulfonamide derivatives. It may also be emphasized here that in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing results for S. aureus need standardization with further studies and it should also have a correlation with in vivo therapeutic response experiments.

  7. Maitotoxin Is a Potential Selective Activator of the Endogenous Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Type 1 Channel in Xenopus laevis Oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro L. Flores

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Maitotoxin (MTX is the most potent marine toxin known to date. It is responsible for a particular human intoxication syndrome called ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP. Several reports indicate that MTX is an activator of non-selective cation channels (NSCC in different cell types. The molecular identity of these channels is still an unresolved topic, and it has been proposed that the transient receptor potential (TRP channels are involved in this effect. In Xenopus laevis oocytes, MTX at picomolar (pM concentrations induces the activation of NSCC with functional and pharmacological properties that resemble the activity of TRP channels. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular identity of the TRP channel involved in the MTX response, using the small interference RNA (siRNA approach and the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique (TEVC. The injection of a specifically designed siRNA to silence the transient receptor potential canonical type 1 (TRPC1 protein expression abolished the MTX response. MTX had no effect on oocytes, even at doses 20-fold higher compared to cells without injection. Total mRNA and protein levels of TRPC1 were notably diminished. The TRPC4 siRNA did not change the MTX effect, even though it was important to note that the protein level was reduced by the silencing of TRPC4. Our results suggest that MTX could be a selective activator of TRPC1 channels in X. laevis oocytes and a useful pharmacological tool for further studies on these TRP channels.

  8. Can the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System (SART CORS) be used to accurately report clinic total reproductive potential (TRP)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Judy E; Hickman, Timothy N; Kinzer, Donna; Penzias, Alan S; Ball, G David; Gibbons, William E

    2012-04-01

    To assess whether total reproductive potential (TRP), the chance of a live birth from each fresh cycle (fresh cycle plus frozen transfers), could be calculated from the national Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System (SART CORS) database and whether information not available in SART CORS resulted in significant changes to the TRP calculation. Retrospective study using SART CORS and clinic data. Three assisted reproductive technology clinics. Women undergoing ART. None. Two- and three-year TRPs for 2005 and 2006 were calculated according to patient age at cycle start by linking fresh to frozen cycles up to first live birth. Clinic records were used to adjust for (remove) frozen cycles that used more than one fresh cycle as a source of embryos and for any embryos donated to other patients or research or shipped to another facility before a live birth. TRP was higher than fresh per-cycle rates for most ages at all clinics, although accuracy was compromised when there were fewer than 20 cycles per category. Two- and 3-year TRPs differed in only 2 of 24 calculations. Adjusted TRPs differed less than three percentage points from unadjusted TRPs when volume was sufficient. Clinic TRP can be calculated from SART CORS. Data suggest that calculations of clinic TRP from the national dataset would be meaningful. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Explorative investigation of biomarkers of brain damage and coagulation system activation in clinical stroke differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Undén, Johan; Strandberg, Karin; Malm, Jan

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A simple and accurate method of differentiating ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is potentially useful to facilitate acute therapeutic management. Blood measurements of biomarkers of brain damage and activation of the coagulation system may potentially serve as nov...

  10. Validity and reliability of instruments to assess potential mediators of children's physical activity: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, H.; Hume, C.; Chin A Paw, J.M.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper aimed to (1) identify potential mediators reported in children's physical activity interventions; and (2) review the psychometric properties of measures of potential mediators included in such interventions. A systematic search of the literature was conducted and studies that reported

  11. Antibacterial activity of Eucalpytus citriodora Hk. oil on few clinically ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-01-04

    Jan 4, 2008 ... The antibacterial activity of Eucalyptus citriodora oil was evaluated. The volatile oil was extracted by steam distillation method. The tested bacterial strains were Escherichia coli ATCC 25922,. Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis NCIM2241, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853, Proteus vulgaris ...

  12. Predicting activities after stroke : what is clinically relevant?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakkel, G.; Kollen, B. J.

    Knowledge about factors that determine the final outcome after stroke is important for early stroke management, rehabilitation goals, and discharge planning. This narrative review provides an overview of current knowledge about the prediction of activities after stroke. We reviewed the pattern of

  13. Detection of efflux pump activity among clinical isolates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To detect efflux pump activity (EPA) and screening a suspected efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) [1- (3-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-piperazine (TFMBP)], which could help in reducing multi-drug resistance (MDR). Methods: Eighteen isolates, viz, 14 S. aureus, 2 S. lentus, 1 S. xylosus and 1 Micrococcus species from various ...

  14. Potentiation of antibiotic activity of aminoglycosides by natural products from Cordia verbenacea DC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Edinardo F F; Alves, Erivania F; Silva, Maria K N; Carvalho, Victoria R A; Medeiros, Cassio R; Santos, Francisco A V; Bitu, Vanessa C N; Souza, Celestina E S; Figueredo, Fernando G; Boligon, Aline A; Athayde, Margareth L; Costa, José G M; Coutinho, Henrique D M

    2016-06-01

    Medicinal plants are often the only therapeutic resource for many communities and ethnic groups. Cordia verbenacea DC., "Erva-baleeira," is one of the species of plants currently used to produce a phytotherapeutic product extracted from its leaves. The present study aimed to establish its chemical profile, antibacterial activity and resistance-modulating potential. The C. verbenacea extracts were prepared from fresh leaves using solvents as methanol and hexane. Ethyl Acetate was used for the preparation of the fraction. Phytochemical screening was carried out using HPLC-DAD for determination and quantification of the secondary metabolites present in the fractions. Antibacterial and resistance-modulation assays were performed to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using a microdilution assay. The data were subjected to statistical analysis with two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni posttests. Results of phytochemical prospecting and HPLC analysis of the fractions were in agreement with the literature. The natural products presented moderate antibacterial activity when considering the clinical relevance of a MIC of 256 μg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 512 μg/mL against P. aeruginosa. However, when the fractions were combined with antibiotics we observed a synergic effect, as natural products enhanced the antibacterial effect of aminoglycosides, significantly decreasing the MIC of antibiotics at 12.5%-98.4%. We believe that the data obtained from phytochemical analysis and from antibacterial and resistance modulation assays of C. verbenacea extracts new can open perspectives in the search for new alternatives for the treatment of bacterial infections and stimulate the renewed use of antibiotics with reduced effectiveness due to resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Estrogen Receptor β in Melanoma: From Molecular Insights to Potential Clinical Utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Marzagalli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous melanoma is an aggressive tumor with its incidence increasing faster than any other cancer in the past decades. Melanoma is a heterogeneous tumor, with most patients harboring mutations in the BRAF or NRAS oncogenes, leading to the overactivation of the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt pathways. The current therapeutic approaches are based on therapies targeting mutated BRAF and the downstream pathway, and on monoclonal antibodies against the immune checkpoint blockade. However, treatment resistance and side effects are common events of these therapeutic strategies.Increasing evidence supports that melanoma is a hormone-related cancer. Melanoma incidence is higher in males than in females and females have a significant survival advantage over men. Estrogens exert their effects through estrogen receptors (ER and ERβ that exert opposite effects on cancer growth: ER is associated with a proliferative action and ERβ with an anticancer effect. ERβ is the predominant estrogen receptor in melanoma and its expression decreases in melanoma progression, supporting its role as a tumor suppressor. Thus, ERβ is now considered as an effective molecular target for melanoma treatment. 17β-estradiol was reported to inhibit melanoma cells proliferation. However, clinical trials did not provide the expected survival benefits. In vitro studies demonstrate that ERβ ligands inhibit the proliferation of melanoma cells harboring the NRAS (but not the BRAF mutation, suggesting that ERβ activation might impair melanoma development through the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway. These data suggest that ERβ agonists might be considered as an effective treatment strategy, in combination with MAPK inhibitors, for NRAS mutant melanomas. In an era of personalized medicine, pretreatment evaluation of the expression of ER isoforms together with the concurrent oncogenic mutations should be considered before selecting the most appropriate therapeutic intervention

  16. Estrogen Receptor β in Melanoma: From Molecular Insights to Potential Clinical Utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzagalli, Monica; Montagnani Marelli, Marina; Casati, Lavinia; Fontana, Fabrizio; Moretti, Roberta Manuela; Limonta, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is an aggressive tumor; its incidence has been reported to increase fast in the past decades. Melanoma is a heterogeneous tumor, with most patients harboring mutations in the BRAF or NRAS oncogenes, leading to the overactivation of the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt pathways. The current therapeutic approaches are based on therapies targeting mutated BRAF and the downstream pathway, and on monoclonal antibodies against the immune checkpoint blockade. However, treatment resistance and side effects are common events of these therapeutic strategies. Increasing evidence supports that melanoma is a hormone-related cancer. Melanoma incidence is higher in males than in females, and females have a significant survival advantage over men. Estrogens exert their effects through estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) that affect cancer growth in an opposite way: ERα is associated with a proliferative action and ERβ with an anticancer effect. ERβ is the predominant ER in melanoma, and its expression decreases in melanoma progression, supporting its role as a tumor suppressor. Thus, ERβ is now considered as an effective molecular target for melanoma treatment. 17β-estradiol was reported to inhibit melanoma cells proliferation; however, clinical trials did not provide the expected survival benefits. In vitro studies demonstrate that ERβ ligands inhibit the proliferation of melanoma cells harboring the NRAS (but not the BRAF) mutation, suggesting that ERβ activation might impair melanoma development through the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway. These data suggest that ERβ agonists might be considered as an effective treatment strategy, in combination with MAPK inhibitors, for NRAS mutant melanomas. In an era of personalized medicine, pretreatment evaluation of the expression of ER isoforms together with the concurrent oncogenic mutations should be considered before selecting the most appropriate therapeutic intervention. Natural compounds that specifically bind to

  17. IN VITRO MODELS TO EVALUATE DRUG-INDUCED HYPERSENSITIVITY: POTENTIAL TEST BASED ON ACTIVATION OF DENDRITIC CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Galbiati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs are the adverse effect of pharmaceuticals that clinically resemble allergy. HDRs account for approximately 1/6 of drug-induced adverse effects, and include immune-mediated ('allergic' and non immune-mediated ('pseudo allergic' reactions. In recent years, the severe and unpredicted drug adverse events clearly indicate that the immune system can be a critical target of drugs. Enhanced prediction in preclinical safety evaluation is, therefore, crucial. Nowadays, there are no validated in vitro or in vivo methods to screen the sensitizing potential of drugs in the pre-clinical phase. The problem of non-predictability of immunologically-based hypersensitivity reactions is related to the lack of appropriate experimental models rather than to the lack of -understanding of the adverse phenomenon.We recently established experimental conditions and markers to correctly identify drug associated with in vivo hypersensitivity reactions using THP-1 cells and IL-8 production, CD86 and CD54 expression. The proposed in vitro method benefits from a rationalistic approach with the idea that allergenic drugs share with chemical allergens common mechanisms of cell activation. This assay can be easily incorporated into drug development for hazard identification of drugs, which may have the potential to cause in vivo hypersensitivity reactions. The purpose of this review is to assess the state of the art of in vitro models to assess the allergenic potential of drugs based on the activation of dendritic cells.

  18. HIV-induced immune activation - pathogenesis and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stellbrink HJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This manuscript is communicated by the German AIDS Society (DAIG http://www.daignet.de. It summarizes a series of presentations and discussions during a workshop on immune activation due to HIV infection. The workshop was held on November 22nd 2008 in Hamburg, Germany. It was organized by the ICH Hamburg under the auspices of the German AIDS Society (DAIG e.V..

  19. Measures of Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity in Australian Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Andrew; Bagga, Hanish

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate which rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity measures are being collected in patients receiving glucocorticoids, non-biologic or biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in Australian rheumatology practice. Methods. A retrospective audit of medical records was conducted from eight rheumatology practices around Australia. Each rheumatologist recruited 30 consecutive eligible patients into the review, 10 of whom must have been receiving a biological...

  20. Active compounds from cyanobacteria and microalgae: properties and potential applications in biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Llopiz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria and microalgae are source of many chemicals substances with potential applications on biopharmaceutical industry. Many structures have been characterized in these organism, such as: peptides, proteins, carbohydrates, terpenoids, polyinsatured fatty acids, flavonoids, phenolic compounds, vitamins, porfirins and other organic substances. Chemicals structures of isolated compounds are diverse and it depends of microalgae habitats. Pharmacological activities located in microalgae are bactericides, immunomodulatory, antioxidants, cytoprotective, fungicides and antivirals. These properties may possible the potential treatment of many diseases including autoimmunes disorders, tumoral, and infectious process. In this review are presented and discussed some elements associated to chemical structure and biological activities around of compounds with potential uses as biopharmaceuticals.

  1. Preclinical Evaluation of Raman Nanoparticle Biodistribution for their Potential Use in Clinical Endoscopy Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zavaleta, Cristina L; Hartman, Keith B; Miao, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Raman imaging offers unsurpassed sensitivity and multiplexing capabilities. However, its limited depth of light penetration makes direct clinical translation challenging. Therefore, a more suitable way to harness its attributes in a clinical setting would be to couple Raman spectroscopy with endo...

  2. Applying a soft-robotic glove as assistive device and training tool with games to support hand function after stroke: Preliminary results on feasibility and potential clinical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prange-Lasonder, Gerdienke B; Radder, Bob; Kottink, Anke I R; Melendez-Calderon, Alejandro; Buurke, Jaap H; Rietman, Johan S

    2017-07-01

    Recent technological developments regarding wearable soft-robotic devices extend beyond the current application of rehabilitation robotics and enable unobtrusive support of the arms and hands during daily activities. In this light, the HandinMind (HiM) system was developed, comprising a soft-robotic, grip supporting glove with an added computer gaming environment. The present study aims to gain first insight into the feasibility of clinical application of the HiM system and its potential impact. In order to do so, both the direct influence of the HiM system on hand function as assistive device and its therapeutic potential, of either assistive or therapeutic use, were explored. A pilot randomized clinical trial was combined with a cross-sectional measurement (comparing performance with and without glove) at baseline in 5 chronic stroke patients, to investigate both the direct assistive and potential therapeutic effects of the HiM system. Extended use of the soft-robotic glove as assistive device at home or with dedicated gaming exercises in a clinical setting was applicable and feasible. A positive assistive effect of the soft-robotic glove was proposed for pinch strength and functional task performance 'lifting full cans' in most of the five participants. A potential therapeutic impact was suggested with predominantly improved hand strength in both participants with assistive use, and faster functional task performance in both participants with therapeutic application.

  3. Exploiting biological activities of brown seaweed Ecklonia cava for potential industrial applications: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, W A J P; Jeon, You-Jin

    2012-03-01

    Seaweeds are rich in vitamins, minerals, dietary fibres, proteins, polysaccharides and various functional polyphenols. Many researchers have focused on brown algae as a potential source of bioactive materials in the past few decades. Ecklonia cava is a brown seaweed that is abundant in the subtidal regions of Jeju Island in the Republic of Korea. This seaweed attracted extensive interest due to its multiple biological activities. E. cava has been identified as a potential producer of wide spectrum of natural substances such as carotenoids, fucoidans and phlorotannins showing different biological activities in vital industrial applications including pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, cosmeceutical and functional food. This review focuses on biological activities of the brown seaweed E. cava based on latest research results, including antioxidant, anticoagulative, antimicrobial, antihuman immunodeficiency virus, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, antimutagenic, antitumour and anticancer effects. The facts summarized here may provide novel insights into the functions of E. cava and its derivatives and potentially enable their use as functional ingredients in potential industrial applications.

  4. Naturally Occurring Nrf2 Activators: Potential in Treatment of Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravirajsinh N. Jadeja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays a major role in acute and chronic liver injury. In hepatocytes, oxidative stress frequently triggers antioxidant response by activating nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, a transcription factor, which upregulates various cytoprotective genes. Thus, Nrf2 is considered a potential therapeutic target to halt liver injury. Several studies indicate that activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway ameliorates liver injury. The hepatoprotective potential of naturally occurring compounds has been investigated in various models of liver injuries. In this review, we comprehensively appraise various phytochemicals that have been assessed for their potential to halt acute and chronic liver injury by enhancing the activation of Nrf2 and have the potential for use in humans.

  5. Learning Environments’ Activity Potential for Preschoolers (LEAPP): Study Rationale and Design

    OpenAIRE

    Tucker, Patricia; Vanderloo, Leigh M.; Newnham-Kanas, Courtney; Burke, Shauna M.; Irwin, Jennifer D.; Johnson, Andrew M.; van Zandvoort, Melissa M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the study protocol for the Learning Environments’ Activity Potential for Preschoolers (LEAPP) study, the goal of which is to describe the activity levels of preschoolers attending various early learning venues and explore which attributes of these facilities (e.g. curriculum, policies, equipment, etc.) support activity participation. Design and methods This cross-sectional study aimed to recruit approximately 30 early learning ...

  6. Activated sewage sludge, a potential animal foodstuff. Part I. Nutritional characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacon, A.G.J.

    1979-08-01

    The nutritive value of activated sewage sludge is discussed in terms of its amino acid N, non-amino acid N, carbohydrate, fat, mineral, vitamin and microbial content. Processed activated sewage sludge is described as a stable dark brown material of relatively uniform quality, having a nutritive value broadly equivalent to brewers yeast or a protein-rich cereal. The potential hazards associated with the use of activated sewage sludge as a feed ingredient are discussed. 29 references

  7. Pinostrobin Derivatives from PrenylationReaction and their Antibacterial Activity against Clinical Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marliyana, S. D.; Mujahidin, D.; Syah, Y. M.

    2018-04-01

    Kaempferia pandurata (syn. Boesenbergia rotunda, B. pandurata (Roxb.)Schltr), locally known as "TemuKunci"in Indonesia, is one of the medicinal plants of the family Zingiberaceae. Phytochemical studies on the rhizome of K. pandurata showed the presence of flavonoid derivative, namely flavanones, which constitute as the main components of this plant. Bioactivity studies on this species exhibited various biological activities, such as antibacteria, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, antidiarrhea, antidisentri, anti-HIV, antioxidant, antipyretic, analgesic and insecticides. Among the biological activities, the antibacterial activity results are important as an attempt to answer the emergence of resistance of some bacteria against existing drugs, as well as the emergence of a number of outbreaks of disease caused by bacteria. Therefore, a search to find new compounds that are potential as an antibacterial is an urgent matter. The present study was aimed at the chemical transformation of pinostrobin (1) from K. pandurata rhizome and an antibacterial activity.The chemical transformation was performed through a prenylation reaction of pinostrobin (1) which is the main component of K. pandurata rhizome. The prenylation reaction was carried out by reacting pinostrobin (1) with prenyl bromide and potassium carbonat (K2CO3). The purification of product was done using the radial chromatography with mix solvent n-hexane and ethyl acetate (97.5:2.5; 9.5:0.5; 9.0:1.0.; 8.0:2.0). The purity test of isolated compound was analysedby TLC using different types of eluent. The identification of compounds was determined based on NMR data and mass spectra analysis. Five compounds were obtained from the prenylation reaction, i.e. monooxyprenylated pinostrobin (2), monooxyprenylated chalcone (3), diprenylated chalcone (4), triprenylated chalcone (5), and triprenylated cyclohexene chalcone (6). These compounds were tested for antibacterial activities against four clinical bacteria, namely

  8. Clinical activity of pazopanib in metastatic extraosseous Ewing sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Attia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a response to pazopanib in a 69-year-old man with heavily pre-treated metastatic extraosseous Ewing sarcoma in addition to molecular profiling of his tumor. To our knowledge, this case is the earliest to demonstrate activity of an oral multi-targeted kinase inhibitor in Ewing sarcoma. This case provides rationale for adding a Ewing sarcoma arm to SARC024, a phase II study of regorafenib, another multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, in patients with liposarcoma, osteosarcoma and Ewing and Ewing-like sarcomas (NCT02048371. This national multi-institutional study is ongoing.

  9. Disease activity indices in coeliac disease: systematic review and recommendations for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindryckx, Pieter; Levesque, Barrett G; Holvoet, Tom; Durand, Serina; Tang, Ceen-Ming; Parker, Claire; Khanna, Reena; Shackelton, Lisa M; D'Haens, Geert; Sandborn, William J; Feagan, Brian G; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Leffler, Daniel A; Jairath, Vipul

    2018-01-01

    Although several pharmacological agents have emerged as potential adjunctive therapies to a gluten-free diet for coeliac disease, there is currently no widely accepted measure of disease activity used in clinical trials. We conducted a systematic review of coeliac disease activity indices to evaluate their operating properties and potential as outcome measures in registration trials. MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane central library were searched from 1966 to 2015 for eligible studies in adult and/or paediatric patients with coeliac disease that included coeliac disease activity markers in their outcome measures. The operating characteristics of histological indices, patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and endoscopic indices were evaluated for content and construct validity, reliability, responsiveness and feasibility using guidelines proposed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Of 19 123 citations, 286 studies were eligible, including 24 randomised-controlled trials. Three of five PROs identified met most key evaluative criteria but only the Celiac Disease Symptom Diary (CDSD) and the Celiac Disease Patient-Reported Outcome (CeD PRO) have been approved by the FDA. All histological and endoscopic scores identified lacked content validity. Quantitative morphometric histological analysis had better reliability and responsiveness compared with qualitative scales. Endoscopic indices were infrequently used, and only one index demonstrated responsiveness to effective therapy. Current best evidence suggests that the CDSD and the CeD PRO are appropriate for use in the definition of primary end points in coeliac disease registration trials. Morphometric histology should be included as a key secondary or co-primary end point. Further work is needed to optimise end point configuration to inform efficient drug development. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Learning in Activity: Exploring the Methodological Potential of Action Research in Activity Theorising of Social Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT), founded on the seminal work of Vygotsky and evolving in the subsequent work of Leont'ev and Engestrom, continues to emerge as a robust and increasingly widely used conceptual framework for the research and analysis of the complex social mediation of human learning and development. Yet there remains…

  11. Electrochemical activities of Geobacter biofilms growing on electrodes with various potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dao-Bo; Huang, Yu-Xi; Li, Jie; Li, Ling-Li; Tian, Li-Jiao; Yu, Han-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Dependence of current generation on potentials by G. sulfurreducens is complex with the optimum at +0.1 V. • Unfavorable spatial distribution of biological activity within the biofilm at high potentials limits the current generation. • Same cytochrome c species are used for electron transfer in the biofilms developed at all potentials. - Abstract: Exoelectrogenic bacteria (EEB) play a central role in bioenergy recovery, biogeochemistry of elements, and polluting remediation. The electrochemical activity of EEB biofilm on electrode was proven to be dependent on the electrode potential, but the mechanism behind such a phenomenon is unclear. In this work, Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms were developed at potentials ranging from −0.1 V to +0.6 V vs. standard hydrogen electrode to explore the profiles of potential regulation on G. sulfurreducens biofilm development and the electrochemical activity. We found that elevating the developing potential could improve the current generation by G. sulfurreducens biofilm until +0.1 V. At higher potentials less current was generated, although more biomass was formed on the electrode. The same cytochrome c species were synthesized for electron transfer in all biofilms, independent of the developing potential. Electrochemical experimental results and redox-sensitive staining imagings proved that the biofilms developed at +0.2 V–+0.4 V had greater cytochrome c contents and reducing capacities than the others. Current generation at high potentials was likely to be limited by both the metabolic rate and the electron transfer kinetics. These findings are useful for tuning the electrochemical activity of biofilm in catalyzing redox processes or generating electricity, which is crucial for the environmental and electrochemical application of EEB.

  12. In vitro antibacterial activity of onion (allium cepa) against clinical isolates of vibrio cholera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannan, A.; Humayun, T.; Hussain, M.B.; Yasir, M.; Sikandar, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cholera is a major public health problem in developing countries of the world. Bacterial resistance, lack of surveillance data and proper microbiological facilities are major problems regarding diagnosis of cholera. The spread of microbial drug resistance is a global public health challenge that results in increased illness and death rate. Newer antimicrobials or agents are urgently required to overcome this problem. This work was therefore done to investigate the antimicrobial potential of onion against thirty-three clinical isolates of Vibrio cholera. Methods: The extract was prepared by reflux extraction method. Antibacterial screening of clinical isolates of V. cholerae was done by agar well diffusion method. Agar dilution method was used to assess the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). Results: All tested strains of V. cholerae were sensitive to onion (Allium cepa) extracts of two types (purple and yellow). Purple type of extract had MIC range of 19.2-21.6 mg/ml. The extract of yellow type onion had an MIC range of 66-68.4 mg/ml. Conclusion: The results indicated that onion (Allium cepa) has an inhibitory effect on V. cholerae. Keeping in view the anti-bacterial activity of this compound can be exploited as a therapeutic agent in an animal model. This finding is a positive point for further investigation of this herb of traditional medicine. (author)

  13. Understanding the value added to clinical care by educational activities. Value of Education Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrinc, G S; Headrick, L A; Boex, J R

    1999-10-01

    In an era of competition in health care delivery, those who pay for care are interested in supporting primarily those activities that add value to the clinical enterprise. The authors report on their 1998 project to develop a conceptual model for assessing the value added to clinical care by educational activities. Through interviews, nine key stakeholders in patient care identified five ways in which education might add value to clinical care: education can foster higher-quality care, improve work satisfaction of clinicians, have trainees provide direct clinical services, improve recruitment and retention of clinicians, and contribute to the future of health care. With this as a base, an expert panel of 13 clinical educators and investigators defined six perspectives from which the value of education in clinical care might be studied: the perspectives of health-care-oriented organizations, clinician-teachers, patients, education organizations, learners, and the community. The panel adapted an existing model to create the "Education Compass" to portray education's effects on clinical care, and developed a new set of definitions and research questions for each of the four major aspects of the model (clinical, functional, satisfaction, and cost). Working groups next drafted proposals to address empirically those questions, which were critiqued at a national conference on the topic of education's value in clinical care. The next step is to use the methods developed in this project to empirically assess the value added by educational activities to clinical care.

  14. The next generation of sepsis clinical trial designs: what is next after the demise of recombinant human activated protein C?*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opal, Steven M; Dellinger, R Phillip; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Masur, Henry; Angus, Derek C

    2014-07-01

    The developmental pipeline for novel therapeutics to treat sepsis has diminished to a trickle compared to previous years of sepsis research. While enormous strides have been made in understanding the basic molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathophysiology of sepsis, a long list of novel agents have now been tested in clinical trials without a single immunomodulating therapy showing consistent benefit. The only antisepsis agent to successfully complete a phase III clinical trial was human recumbent activated protein C. This drug was taken off the market after a follow-up placebo-controlled trial (human recombinant activated Protein C Worldwide Evaluation of Severe Sepsis and septic Shock [PROWESS SHOCK]) failed to replicate the favorable results of the initial registration trial performed ten years earlier. We must critically reevaluate our basic approach to the preclinical and clinical evaluation of new sepsis therapies. We selected the major clinical studies that investigated interventional trials with novel therapies to treat sepsis over the last 30 years. Phase II and phase III trials investigating new treatments for sepsis and editorials and critiques of these studies. Selected manuscripts and clinical study reports were analyzed from sepsis trials. Specific shortcomings and potential pit falls in preclinical evaluation and clinical study design and analysis were reviewed and synthesized. After review and discussion, a series of 12 recommendations were generated with suggestions to guide future studies with new treatments for sepsis. We need to improve our ability to define appropriate molecular targets for preclinical development and develop better methods to determine the clinical value of novel sepsis agents. Clinical trials must have realistic sample sizes and meaningful endpoints. Biomarker-driven studies should be considered to categorize specific "at risk" populations most likely to benefit from a new treatment. Innovations in clinical trial design

  15. Quality of clinical supervision and counselor emotional exhaustion: the potential mediating roles of organizational and occupational commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Hannah K; Roman, Paul M; Abraham, Amanda J

    2013-01-01

    Counselor emotional exhaustion has negative implications for treatment organizations as well as the health of counselors. Quality clinical supervision is protective against emotional exhaustion, but research on the mediating mechanisms between supervision and exhaustion is limited. Drawing upon data from 934 counselors affiliated with treatment programs in the National Institute on Drug Abuse's Clinical Trials Network (CTN), this study examined commitment to the treatment organization and commitment to the counseling occupation as potential mediators of the relationship between quality clinical supervision and emotional exhaustion. The final ordinary least squares (OLS) regression model, which accounted for the nesting of counselors within treatment organizations, indicated that these two types of commitment were plausible mediators of the association between clinical supervision and exhaustion. Higher quality clinical supervision was strongly correlated with commitment to the treatment organization as well as commitment to the occupation of SUD counseling. These findings suggest that quality clinical supervision has the potential to yield important benefits for counselor well-being by strengthening ties to both their employing organization as well the larger treatment field, but longitudinal research is needed to establish these causal relationships. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The potentially beneficial central nervous system activity profile of ivacaftor and its metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena K. Schneider

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ivacaftor–lumacaftor and ivacaftor are two new breakthrough cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance modulators. The interactions of ivacaftor and its two metabolites hydroxymethylivacaftor (iva-M1 and ivacaftorcarboxylate (iva-M6 with neurotransmitter receptors were investigated in radioligand binding assays. Ivacaftor displayed significant affinity to the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin 5-HT2C receptor (pKi=6.06±0.03, β3-adrenergic receptor (pKi=5.71±0.07, δ-opioid receptor (pKi=5.59±0.06 and the dopamine transporter (pKi=5.50±0.20; iva-M1 displayed significant affinity to the 5-HT2C receptor (pKi=5.81±0.04 and the muscarinic M3 receptor (pKi=5.70±0.10; iva-M6 displayed significant affinity to the 5-HT2A receptor (pKi=7.33±0.05. The in vivo central nervous system activity of ivacaftor (40 mg·kg−1 intraperitoneally for 21 days was assessed in a chronic mouse model of depression. In the forced swim test, the ivacaftor-treated group displayed decreased immobility (52.8±7.6 s, similarly to fluoxetine (33.8±11.0 s, and increased climbing/swimming activity (181.5±9.2 s. In the open field test, ivacaftor produced higher locomotor activity than the fluoxetine group, measured both as mean number of paw touches (ivacaftor 81.1±9.6 versus fluoxetine 57.9±9.5 and total distance travelled (ivacaftor 120.6±16.8 cm versus fluoxetine 84.5±16.0 cm in 600 s. Treatment of 23 cystic fibrosis patients with ivacaftor–lumacaftor resulted in significant improvements in quality of life (including anxiety in all five domains of the AweScoreCF questionnaire (p=0.092–0.096. Our findings suggest ivacaftor displays potential clinical anxiolytic and stimulating properties, and may have beneficial effects on mood.

  17. TEACHERS' VIEWS ON THE POTENTIAL USE OF ONLINE IN-SERVICE EDUCATION AND TRAINING ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet KOKOC

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined teacher’s views on the potential use of online in-service education and training (INSET activities. The study used a qualitative approach. A total of 13 in-service teachers from primary school, vocational school, science and art center, high school in Trabzon (on the Black Sea coast of Turkey participated in the study. To determine opinions of participants about the potential use of online INSET activities, a online conference was held to determine teachers’ views. The participants who had experienced traditional and face to face INSET courses discussed their INSET experiences and thoughts about online INSET activities. These views were transcribed and then analyzed using content analysis. The main conclusions are: with online INSET activities, especially time and place dependency can be overcome, and accommodation and transportation issues can be resolved. Teachers feel that online INSET activities can promote effective use of resources.

  18. The mTOR signalling pathway in cancer and the potential mTOR inhibitory activities of natural phytochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Heng Kean; Moad, Ahmed Ismail Hassan; Tan, Mei Lan

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase plays an important role in regulating cell growth and cell cycle progression in response to cellular signals. It is a key regulator of cell proliferation and many upstream activators and downstream effectors of mTOR are known to be deregulated in various types of cancers. Since the mTOR signalling pathway is commonly activated in human cancers, many researchers are actively developing inhibitors that target key components in the pathway and some of these drugs are already on the market. Numerous preclinical investigations have also suggested that some herbs and natural phytochemicals, such as curcumin, resveratrol, timosaponin III, gallic acid, diosgenin, pomegranate, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCC), genistein and 3,3'-diindolylmethane inhibit the mTOR pathway either directly or indirectly. Some of these natural compounds are also in the clinical trial stage. In this review, the potential anti-cancer and chemopreventive activities and the current status of clinical trials of these phytochemicals are discussed.

  19. Selective activation of heteromeric SK channels contributes to action potential repolarization in mouse atrial myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Jane M; Weatherall, Kate L; Choisy, Stéphanie C; James, Andrew F; Hancox, Jules C; Marrion, Neil V

    2015-05-01

    Activation of small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels is proposed to contribute to repolarization of the action potential in atrial myocytes. This role is controversial, as these cardiac SK channels appear to exhibit an uncharacteristic pharmacology. The objectives of this study were to resolve whether activation of SK channels contributes to atrial action potential repolarization and to determine the likely subunit composition of the channel. The effect of 2 SK channel inhibitors was assessed on outward current evoked in voltage clamp and on action potential duration in perforated patch and whole-cell current clamp recording from acutely isolated mouse atrial myocytes. The presence of SK channel subunits was assessed using immunocytochemistry. A significant component of outward current was reduced by the SK channel blockers apamin and UCL1684. Block by apamin displayed a sensitivity indicating that this current was carried by homomeric SK2 channels. Action potential duration was significantly prolonged by UCL1684, but not by apamin. This effect was accompanied by an increase in beat-to-beat variability and action potential triangulation. This pharmacology was matched by that of expressed heteromeric SK2-SK3 channels in HEK293 cells. Immunocytochemistry showed that atrial myocytes express both SK2 and SK3 channels with an overlapping expression pattern. Only proposed heteromeric SK2-SK3 channels are physiologically activated to contribute to action potential repolarization, which is indicated by the difference in pharmacology of evoked outward current and prolongation of atrial action potential duration. The effect of blocking this channel on the action potential suggests that SK channel inhibition during cardiac function has the potential to be proarrhythmic. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Doxorubicin, mesenchymal stem cell toxicity and antitumour activity: implications for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter-Holland, Mia; Dass, Crispin R

    2018-03-01

    The use of doxorubicin, an antineoplastic medication used for the treatment of cancers via mechanisms that prevent replication of cells or lead to their death, can result in damage to healthy cells as well as malignant. Among the affected cells are mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are involved in the maintenance and repair of tissues in the body. This review explores the mechanisms of biological effects and damage attributed to doxorubicin on MSCs. The PubMed database was used as a source of literature for this review. Doxorubicin has the potential to lead to significant and irreversible damage to the human bone marrow environment, including MSCs. The primary known mechanism of these changes is through free radical damage and activation of apoptotic pathways. The presence of MSCs in culture or in vivo appears to either suppress or promote tumour growth. Interactions between doxorubicin and MSCs have the potential to increase chemotherapy resistance. Doxorubicin-induced damage to MSCs is of concern clinically. However, MSCs also have been associated with resistance of tumour cells to drugs including doxorubicin. Further studies, particularly in vivo, are needed to provide consistent results of how the doxorubicin-induced changes to MSCs affect treatment and patient health. © 2018 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  1. In Vitro activity of novel glycopolymer against clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya P Narayanaswamy

    Full Text Available The incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR organisms, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, is a serious threat to public health. Progress in developing new therapeutics is being outpaced by antibiotic resistance development, and alternative agents that rapidly permeabilize bacteria hold tremendous potential for treating MDR infections. A new class of glycopolymers includes polycationic poly-N (acetyl, arginyl glucosamine (PAAG is under development as an alternative to traditional antibiotic strategies to treat MRSA infections. This study demonstrates the antibacterial activity of PAAG against clinical isolates of methicillin and mupirocin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Multidrug-resistant S. aureus was rapidly killed by PAAG, which completely eradicated 88% (15/17 of all tested strains (6-log reduction in CFU in ≤ 12-hours at doses that are non-toxic to mammalian cells. PAAG also sensitized all the clinical MRSA strains (17/17 to oxacillin as demonstrated by the observed reduction in the oxacillin MIC to below the antibiotic resistance breakpoint. The effect of PAAG and standard antibiotics including vancomycin, oxacillin, mupirocin and bacitracin on MRSA permeability was studied by measuring propidium iodide (PI uptake by bacterial cells. Antimicrobial resistance studies showed that S. aureus developed resistance to PAAG at a rate slower than to mupirocin but similar to bacitracin. PAAG was observed to resensitize drug-resistant S. aureus strains sampled from passage 13 and 20 of the multi-passage resistance study, reducing MICs of mupirocin and bacitracin below their clinical sensitivity breakpoints. This class of bacterial permeabilizing glycopolymers may provide a new tool in the battle against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  2. In Vitro activity of novel glycopolymer against clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Vidya P; Giatpaiboon, Scott A; Uhrig, John; Orwin, Paul; Wiesmann, William; Baker, Shenda M; Townsend, Stacy M

    2018-01-01

    The incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), is a serious threat to public health. Progress in developing new therapeutics is being outpaced by antibiotic resistance development, and alternative agents that rapidly permeabilize bacteria hold tremendous potential for treating MDR infections. A new class of glycopolymers includes polycationic poly-N (acetyl, arginyl) glucosamine (PAAG) is under development as an alternative to traditional antibiotic strategies to treat MRSA infections. This study demonstrates the antibacterial activity of PAAG against clinical isolates of methicillin and mupirocin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Multidrug-resistant S. aureus was rapidly killed by PAAG, which completely eradicated 88% (15/17) of all tested strains (6-log reduction in CFU) in ≤ 12-hours at doses that are non-toxic to mammalian cells. PAAG also sensitized all the clinical MRSA strains (17/17) to oxacillin as demonstrated by the observed reduction in the oxacillin MIC to below the antibiotic resistance breakpoint. The effect of PAAG and standard antibiotics including vancomycin, oxacillin, mupirocin and bacitracin on MRSA permeability was studied by measuring propidium iodide (PI) uptake by bacterial cells. Antimicrobial resistance studies showed that S. aureus developed resistance to PAAG at a rate slower than to mupirocin but similar to bacitracin. PAAG was observed to resensitize drug-resistant S. aureus strains sampled from passage 13 and 20 of the multi-passage resistance study, reducing MICs of mupirocin and bacitracin below their clinical sensitivity breakpoints. This class of bacterial permeabilizing glycopolymers may provide a new tool in the battle against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  3. PSGL-1–mediated activation of EphB4 increases the proangiogenic potential of endothelial progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foubert, Philippe; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Souttou, Boussad; Barateau, Véronique; Martin, Coralie; Ebrahimian, Téni G.; Leré-Déan, Carole; Contreres, Jean Olivier; Sulpice, Eric; Levy, Bernard I.; Plouët, Jean; Tobelem, Gérard; Le Ricousse-Roussanne, Sophie

    2007-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) transplantation has beneficial effects for therapeutic neovascularization; however, only a small proportion of injected cells home to the lesion and incorporate into the neocapillaries. Consequently, this type of cell therapy requires substantial improvement to be of clinical value. Erythropoietin-producing human hepatocellular carcinoma (Eph) receptors and their ephrin ligands are key regulators of vascular development. We postulated that activation of the EphB4/ephrin-B2 system may enhance EPC proangiogenic potential. In this report, we demonstrate in a nude mouse model of hind limb ischemia that EphB4 activation with an ephrin-B2–Fc chimeric protein increases the angiogenic potential of human EPCs. This effect was abolished by EphB4 siRNA, confirming that it is mediated by EphB4. EphB4 activation enhanced P selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) expression and EPC adhesion. Inhibition of PSGL-1 by siRNA reversed the proangiogenic and adhesive effects of EphB4 activation. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies to E selectin and P selectin blocked ephrin-B2–Fc–stimulated EPC adhesion properties. Thus, activation of EphB4 enhances EPC proangiogenic capacity through induction of PSGL-1 expression and adhesion to E selectin and P selectin. Therefore, activation of EphB4 is an innovative and potentially valuable therapeutic strategy for improving the recruitment of EPCs to sites of neovascularization and thereby the efficiency of cell-based proangiogenic therapy. PMID:17510705

  4. Motor activation SPECT for the neurosurgical diseases. Clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Shoichiro; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Imai, Teruhiko; Ohishi, Hajime

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated and analyzed the motor activation single photon emission computed tomography (M-SPECT) findings on patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). The M-SPECT studies were carried out on 91 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. The M-SPECT study was performed using the finger opposition task in each case. The SPECT images were superimposed on the magnetic resonance images (MRIs) for each case using Image Fusion Software. The result of the M-SPECT was expressed as positive or negative. The cases with a marked increase of blood flow in the sensorio-motor cortex after the finger opposition task were categorized as positive, and those cases showing no marked increase of blood flow were categorized as negative. Among the 91 cases examined, 53 (58%) were categorized as positive in the M-SPECT study. Among the negative M-SPECT cases treated with revascularization surgery, there were some cases showing positive M-SPECT results postoperatively. The cases without any revascularization surgery did not change the M-SPECT findings in each during the follow-up period. The M-SPECT procedure for examining intracranial lesions could provide the cortical localization of the motor function. The M-SPECT procedure in the ischemic CVDs contributes to knowledge about the choices of treatment and the evaluation of the treatment result. (author)

  5. Motor activation SPECT for the neurosurgical diseases. Clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Shoichiro; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Imai, Teruhiko; Ohishi, Hajime [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We evaluated and analyzed the motor activation single photon emission computed tomography (M-SPECT) findings on patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). The M-SPECT studies were carried out on 91 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. The M-SPECT study was performed using the finger opposition task in each case. The SPECT images were superimposed on the magnetic resonance images (MRIs) for each case using Image Fusion Software. The result of the M-SPECT was expressed as positive or negative. The cases with a marked increase of blood flow in the sensorio-motor cortex after the finger opposition task were categorized as positive, and those cases showing no marked increase of blood flow were categorized as negative. Among the 91 cases examined, 53 (58%) were categorized as positive in the M-SPECT study. Among the negative M-SPECT cases treated with revascularization surgery, there were some cases showing positive M-SPECT results postoperatively. The cases without any revascularization surgery did not change the M-SPECT findings in each during the follow-up period. The M-SPECT procedure for examining intracranial lesions could provide the cortical localization of the motor function. The M-SPECT procedure in the ischemic CVDs contributes to knowledge about the choices of treatment and the evaluation of the treatment result. (author)

  6. Vision Restoration in Glaucoma by Activating Residual Vision with a Holistic, Clinical Approach: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Bernhard A; Cárdenas-Morales, Lizbeth; Gao, Ying

    2018-01-01

    How to cite this article: Sabel BA, Cárdenas-Morales L, Gao Y. Vision Restoration in Glaucoma by activating Residual Vision with a Holistic, Clinical Approach: A Review. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2018;12(1):1-9.

  7. A Measure of the Potential Impact of Hospital Community Health Activities on Population Health and Equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begun, James W; Kahn, Linda M; Cunningham, Brooke A; Malcolm, Jan K; Potthoff, Sandra

    2017-12-13

    Many hospitals in the United States are exploring greater investment in community health activities that address upstream causes of poor health. Develop and apply a measure to categorize and estimate the potential impact of hospitals' community health activities on population health and equity. We propose a scale of potential impact on population health and equity, based on the cliff analogy developed by Jones and colleagues. The scale is applied to the 317 activities reported in the community health needs assessment implementation plan reports of 23 health care organizations in the Minneapolis-St Paul, Minnesota metropolitan area in 2015. Using a 5-point ordinal scale, we assigned a score of potential impact on population health and equity to each community health activity. A majority (50.2%) of health care organizations' community health activities are classified as addressing social determinants of health (level 4 on the 5-point scale), though very few (5.4%) address structural causes of health equity (level 5 on the 5-point scale). Activities that score highest on potential impact fall into the topic categories of "community health and connectedness" and "healthy lifestyles and wellness." Lower-scoring activities focus on sick or at-risk individuals, such as the topic category of "chronic disease prevention, management, and screening." Health care organizations in the Minneapolis-St Paul metropolitan area vary substantially in the potential impact of their aggregated community health activities. Hospitals can be significant contributors to investment in upstream community health programs. This article provides a scale that can be used not only by hospitals but by other health care and public health organizations to better align their community health strategies, investments, and partnerships with programming and policies that address the foundational causes of population health and equity within the communities they serve.

  8. The role of active efflux in antibiotic - resistance of clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falsafi T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In gram-negative bacteria, active efflux pumps that excrete drugs can confer resistance to antibiotics however, in Helicobacter pylori this role is not well established. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of active efflux in resistance of H. pylori isolates to antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Twelve multiple antibiotic resistant (MAR isolates resistant to at least four antibiotics, including β-lactams, metronidazole, tetracycline, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin; three resistant to only β-lactams, and two hyper-susceptible isolates, were obtained from screening of 96 clinical isolates of H. pylori . Their minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs for antibiotics and ethidium-bromide (EtBr were compared in the presence- and absence of a proton-conductor, carbonyl cyanide-m chlorophenyl-hydrazone (CCCP using agar-dilution and disc diffusion. Drug accumulation studies for EtBr and antibiotics were assessed in the presence and absence of CCCP using spectrofluorometry. Results: MIC of EtBr for eight MAR-isolates was decreased two- to four-folds in the presence of CCCP, of which five showed reduced MICs for β-lactam, metronidazole, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin with CCCP. Accumulation of EtBr by the MAR-isolates was rapid and not dependant on the pattern of multiple resistance. Antibiotic accumulation assay confirmed the presence of energy-dependant efflux of β-lactam, metronidazole, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin, but no erythromycin in five MAR isolates. Energy-dependant efflux of EtBr or antibiotics was not observed for four MAR-isolates, and three isolates were resistant only to β-lactams. Conclusion: Energy-dependant efflux plays a role in the resistance of H. pylori clinical isolates to structurally unrelated antibiotics in a broadly specific multidrug efflux manner. Difference in the efflux potential of MAR isolates may be related to the presence or absence of functional efflux-pumps in diverse H. pylori

  9. Altered expression of signalling lymphocyte activation molecule receptors in T-cells from lupus nephritis patients-a potential biomarker of disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratigou, Victoria; Doyle, Anne F; Carlucci, Francesco; Stephens, Lauren; Foschi, Valentina; Castelli, Marco; McKenna, Nicola; Cook, H Terence; Lightstone, Liz; Cairns, Thomas D; Pickering, Matthew C; Botto, Marina

    2017-07-01

    The aim was to investigate whether the signalling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) signalling pathways contribute to LN and whether SLAM receptors could be valuable biomarkers of disease activity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 30National Research Ethics Service SLE patients with biopsy-proven LN were analysed by flow cytometry. Clinical measures of disease activity were assessed. The expression of the SLAM family receptors on T-cell subpopulations [CD4, CD8 and double negative (DN) T cells] was measured and compared between lupus patients with active renal disease and those in remission. The frequency of CD8 T cells expressing SLAMF3, SLAMF5 and SLAMF7 was significantly lower in LN patients who were in remission. In contrast, these subsets were similar in patients with active renal disease and in healthy individuals. Patients with active nephritis had an increased percentage of circulating monocytes, consistent with a potential role played by these cells in glomerular inflammation. Changes in the frequency of DN T cells positive for SLAMF2, SLAMF4 and SLAMF7 were observed in lupus patients irrespective of the disease activity. We detected alterations in the cellular expression of the SLAM family receptors, but these changes were less obvious and did not reveal any specific pattern. The percentage of DN T cells expressing SLAMF6 could predict the clinical response to B-cell depletion in patients with LN. Our study demonstrates altered expression of the SLAM family receptors in SLE T lymphocytes. This is consistent with the importance of the SLAM-associated pathways in lupus pathogenesis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology.

  10. Potentiation by cholinesterase inhibitors of cholinergic activity in rat isolated stomach and colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvie, Emma M; Cellek, Selim; Sanger, Gareth J

    2008-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors stimulate gastrointestinal (GI) motility and are potential treatments of conditions associated with inadequate GI motility. The ability of itopride to facilitate neuronally (predominantly cholinergic) mediated contractions of rat isolated stomach, evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS), has been compared with other cholinesterase inhibitors and with tegaserod, a clinically effective prokinetic and non-selective 5-HT(4) receptor agonist which also facilitates GI cholinergic function. Neostigmine greatly increased EFS-evoked contractions over a narrow concentration range (0.01-1 microM; 754+/-337% facilitation at 1 microM); higher concentrations (1, 3 microM) also increased muscle tension. Donepezil increased EFS-evoked contractions gradually over the full range of concentrations (0.01-10 microM; maximum increase 516+/-20% at 10 microM). Itopride increased the contractions even more gradually, rising to 188+/-84% at 10 microM. The butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor iso-OMPA 0.01-10 microM also increased EFS-evoked contractions, to a maximum of 36+/-5.0% at 10 microM, similar to that caused by tegaserod (35+/-5.2% increase at 1 microM). The effects of tegaserod, but not itopride were inhibited by the 5-HT(4) receptor antagonist SB-204070A 0.3 microM. In rat isolated colon, neostigmine was again the most efficacious, causing a defined maximum increase in EFS-evoked contractions (343+/-82% at 10 microM), without changing muscle tension. Maximum increases caused by donepezil and itopride were, respectively, 57.6+/-20 and 43+/-15% at 10 microM. These data indicate that the abilities of different AChE inhibitors to increase GI cholinergic activity differ markedly. Understanding the reasons is essential if AChE inhibitors are to be optimally developed as GI prokinetics.

  11. Neuroprotective activities of curcumin and quercetin with potential relevance to mitochondrial dysfunction induced by oxaliplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Mohammad; Parvez, Suhel

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral neurotoxicity is one of the serious dose-limiting side effects of oxaliplatin (Oxa) when used in the treatment of malignant conditions. It is documented that it elicits major side effects specifically neurotoxicity due to oxidative stress forcing the patients to limit its clinical use in long-term treatment. Oxidative stress has been proven to be involved in Oxa-induced toxicity including neurotoxicity. The mitochondria have recently emerged as targets for anticancer drugs in various kinds of toxicity including neurotoxicity that can lead to neoplastic disease. However, there is paucity of literature involving the role of the mitochondria in mediating Oxa-induced neurotoxicity and its underlying mechanism is still debatable. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-dependent damage caused by Oxa on isolated brain mitochondria under in vitro conditions. The study was also designed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of nutraceuticals, curcumin (CMN), and quercetin (QR) on Oxa-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress and respiratory chain complexes in the brain of rats. Oxidative stress biomarkers, levels of nonenzymatic antioxidants, activities of enzymatic antioxidants, and mitochondrial complexes were evaluated against the neurotoxicity induced by Oxa. Pretreatment with CMN and QR significantly replenished the mitochondrial lipid peroxidation levels and protein carbonyl content induced by Oxa. CMN and QR ameliorated altered nonenzymatic and enzymatic antioxidants and complex enzymes of mitochondria. We conclude that CMN and QR, by attenuating oxidative stress as evident by mitochondrial dysfunction, hold promise as agents that can potentially reduce Oxa-induced adverse effects in the brain.

  12. [Feedback on the evaluation of clinical pharmacy activities developed in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarfaut, A; Clauzel-Montserrat, M; Vigouroux, D; Kehrli, P; Gaudias, J; Kempf, J-F; Levêque, D; Nivoix, Y; Gourieux, B

    2015-03-01

    Our current development strategy integrates clinical pharmacy activities prioritized in surgical services. Patients in these services are typically risk patients: transfers, multiple prescribers, frequent medication change, pharmacotherapeutic risk classes. Three clinical pharmacy activities (admission reconciliation, pharmaceutical analysis, participation doctors round) have been developed in orthopaedic surgery and neurosurgery. Pharmacists prospectively recorded data describing their activities: number of reconciliations and analyzed requirements and time required to achieve them. Data on pharmaceutical interventions were recorded on the basis ActIP®. The clinical significance of interventions was retrospectively rated by a team of two pharmacists and two physicians on the scale adapted Hatoum et al. Four thousand five hundred pharmaceutical analysis and 248 reconciliations were conducted. One hundred and fifty-six pharmaceutical interventions were issued. The average acceptance rate was 80%. A total of 5.8% of pharmaceutical interventions have been listed with a very significant clinical importance and 48.1% with at least significant clinical importance. The activities and documentation required pharmaceutical average daily time (senior pharmacist, resident and external pharmacist) about 6 hours. Other studies, including comparative and medico-economic, must be conducted to support these results. Nevertheless, the indicators obtained attend a better readability of the clinical importance of the activities performed by clinical pharmacists and this particularly in surgical services, both by prescribers and authorities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Endophytic Nocardiopsis sp. from Zingiber officinale with both antiphytopathogenic mechanisms and antibiofilm activity against clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabu, Rohini; Soumya, K R; Radhakrishnan, E K

    2017-06-01

    Novel and potential antimicrobial compounds are essential to tackle the frequently emerging multidrug-resistant pathogens and also to develop environment friendly agricultural practices. In the current study, endophytic actinomycetes from rhizome of Zingiber officinale were explored in terms of its diversity and bioactive properties. Fourteen different organisms were isolated, identified and screened for activity against Pythium myriotylum and human clinical pathogens. Among these, Nocardiopsis sp. ZoA1 was found to have highest inhibition with excellent antibacterial effects compared to standard antibiotics. Remarkable antibiofilm property was also shown by the extract of ZoA1. Its antifungal activity against Pythium and other common phytopathogens was also found to be promising as confirmed by scanning electron microscopic analysis. By PCR-based sequence analysis of phz E gene, the organism was confirmed for the genetic basis of phenazine biosynthesis. Further GC-MS analysis of Nocardiopsis sp. revealed the presence of various compounds including Phenol, 2,4-bis (1,1-dimethylethyl) and trans cinnamic acid which can have significant role in the observed result. The current study is the first report on endophytic Nocardiopsis sp. from ginger with promising applications. In vivo treatment of Nocardiopsis sp. on ginger rhizome has revealed its inhibition towards the colonization of P. myriotylum which makes the study to have promises to manage the severe diseases in ginger like rhizome rot.

  14. Bactericidal activities of GM flax seedcake extract on pathogenic bacteria clinical strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuk, Magdalena; Dorotkiewicz-Jach, Agata; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Arendt, Malgorzata; Kulma, Anna; Szopa, Jan

    2014-07-29

    The antibiotic resistance of pathogenic microorganisms is a worldwide problem. Each year several million people across the world acquire infections with bacteria that are antibiotic-resistant, which is costly in terms of human health. New antibiotics are extremely needed to overcome the current resistance problem. Transgenic flax plants overproducing compounds from phenylpropanoid pathway accumulate phenolic derivatives of potential antioxidative, and thus, antimicrobial activity. Alkali hydrolyzed seedcake extract containing coumaric acid, ferulic acid, caffeic acid, and lignan in high quantities was used as an assayed against pathogenic bacteria (commonly used model organisms and clinical strains). It was shown that the extract components had antibacterial activity, which might be useful as a prophylactic against bacterial infection. Bacteria topoisomerase II (gyrase) inhibition and genomic DNA disintegration are suggested to be the main reason for rendering antibacterial action. The data obtained strongly suggest that the seedcake extract preparation is a suitable candidate for antimicrobial action with a broad spectrum and partial selectivity. Such preparation can be applied in cases where there is a risk of multibacterial infection and excellent answer on global increase in multidrug resistance in pathogenic bacteria.

  15. Influence of the Ambient Electric Field on Measurements of the Actively Controlled Spacecraft Potential by MMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkar, K.; Nakamura, R.; Andriopoulou, M.; Giles, B. L.; Jeszenszky, H.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Torbert, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    Space missions with sophisticated plasma instrumentation such as Magnetospheric Multiscale, which employs four satellites to explore near-Earth space benefit from a low electric potential of the spacecraft, to improve the plasma measurements and therefore carry instruments to actively control the potential by means of ion beams. Without control, the potential varies in anticorrelation with plasma density and temperature to maintain an equilibrium between the plasma current and the one of photoelectrons produced at the surface and overcoming the potential barrier. A drawback of the controlled, almost constant potential is the difficulty to use it as convenient estimator for plasma density. This paper identifies a correlation between the spacecraft potential and the ambient electric field, both measured by double probes mounted at the end of wire booms, as the main responsible for artifacts in the potential data besides the known effect of the variable photoelectron production due to changing illumination of the surface. It is shown that the effect of density variations is too weak to explain the observed correlation with the electric field and that a correction of the artifacts can be achieved to enable the reconstruction of the uncontrolled potential and plasma density in turn. Two possible mechanisms are discussed: the asymmetry of the current-voltage characteristic determining the probe to plasma potential and the fact that a large equipotential structure embedded in an electric field results in asymmetries of both the emission and spatial distribution of photoelectrons, which results in an increase of the spacecraft potential.

  16. Expanded therapeutic potential in activity space of next-generation 5-nitroimidazole antimicrobials with broad structural diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yukiko; Kalisiak, Jarosław; Korthals, Keith; Lauwaet, Tineke; Cheung, Dae Young; Lozano, Ricardo; Cobo, Eduardo R.; Upcroft, Peter; Upcroft, Jacqueline A.; Berg, Douglas E.; Gillin, Frances D.; Fokin, Valery V.; Sharpless, K. Barry; Eckmann, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Metronidazole and other 5-nitroimidazoles (5-NI) are among the most effective antimicrobials available against many important anaerobic pathogens, but evolving resistance is threatening their long-term clinical utility. The common 5-NIs were developed decades ago, yet little 5-NI drug development has since taken place, leaving the true potential of this important drug class unexplored. Here we report on a unique approach to the modular synthesis of diversified 5-NIs for broad exploration of their antimicrobial potential. Many of the more than 650 synthesized compounds, carrying structurally diverse functional groups, have vastly improved activity against a range of microbes, including the pathogenic protozoa Giardia lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis, and the bacterial pathogens Helicobacter pylori, Clostridium difficile, and Bacteroides fragilis. Furthermore, they can overcome different forms of drug resistance, and are active and nontoxic in animal infection models. These findings provide impetus to the development of structurally diverse, next-generation 5-NI drugs as agents in the antimicrobial armamentarium, thus ensuring their future viability as primary therapeutic agents against many clinically important infections. PMID:24101497

  17. Curcumin Conjugated with PLGA Potentiates Sustainability, Anti-Proliferative Activity and Apoptosis in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghela, Bhargav N.; Sharma, Anupama; Dhumale, Suhashini; Pandey, Shashibahl M.; Pathak, Chandramani

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, an ingredient of turmeric, exhibits a variety of biological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-proliferative, anti-oxidant, anti-cancer and anti-metastatic. It is a highly pleiotropic molecule that inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in cancer cells. Despite its imperative biological activities, chemical instability, photo-instability and poor bioavailability limits its utilization as an effective therapeutic agent. Therefore, enhancing the bioavailability of curcumin may improve its therapeutic index for clinical setting. In the present study, we have conjugated curcumin with a biodegradable polymer Poly (D, L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) and evaluated its apoptotic potential in human colon carcinoma cells (HCT 116). The results show that curcumin-PLGA conjugate efficiently inhibits cell proliferation and cell survival in human colon carcinoma cells as compared to native curcumin. Additionally, curcumin conjugated with PLGA shows improved cellular uptake and exhibits controlled release at physiological pH as compared to native curcumin. The curcumin-PLGA conjugate efficiently activates the cascade of caspases and promotes intrinsic apoptotic signaling. Thus, the results suggest that conjugation potentiates the sustainability, anti-proliferative and apoptotic activity of curcumin. This approach could be a promising strategy to improve the therapeutic index of cancer therapy. PMID:25692854

  18. Analysis of Potential Drug-Drug Interactions and Its Clinical Manifestation of Pediatric Prescription on 2 Pharmacies in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa I. Barliana

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential of Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI in prescription have high incidence around the world, including Indonesia. However, scientific evidence regarding DDI in Indonesia is not available. Therefore, in this study we have conducted survey in 2 pharmacies in Bandung against pediatric prescription given by pediatrician. These prescriptions then analyzed the potential for DDI contained in the prescription and clinical manifestation. The analysis showed that in pharmacy A, there are 33 prescriptions (from a total of 155 prescriptions that have potential DDI, or approximately 21.19% (2 prescriptions have the potential DDI major categories, 23 prescriptions categorized as moderate, and 8 prescriptions as minor. In Pharmacy B, there are 6 prescriptions (from a total of 40 prescriptions or 15% of potential DDI (4 prescriptions categorized as moderate and 2 prescriptions as minor. This result showed that potential DDI happened less than 50% in pediatric prescription from both pharmacies. However, this should get attention because DDI should not happen in a prescription considering its clinical manifestations caused by DDI. Moreover, current pharmaceutical care refers to patient oriented than product oriented. In addition, further study for the pediatric prescription on DDI incidence in large scale need to be investigated.

  19. The mPED randomized controlled clinical trial: applying mobile persuasive technologies to increase physical activity in sedentary women protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukuoka Yoshimi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the significant health benefits of regular physical activity, approximately half of American adults, particularly women and minorities, do not meet the current physical activity recommendations. Mobile phone technologies are readily available, easily accessible and may provide a potentially powerful tool for delivering physical activity interventions. However, we need to understand how to effectively apply these mobile technologies to increase and maintain physical activity in physically inactive women. The purpose of this paper is to describe the study design and protocol of the mPED (mobile phone based physical activity education randomized controlled clinical trial that examines the efficacy of a 3-month mobile phone and pedometer based physical activity intervention and compares two different 6-month maintenance interventions. Methods A randomized controlled trial (RCT with three arms; 1 PLUS (3-month mobile phone and pedometer based physical activity intervention and 6-month mobile phone diary maintenance intervention, 2 REGULAR (3-month mobile phone and pedometer based physical activity intervention and 6-month pedometer maintenance intervention, and 3 CONTROL (pedometer only, but no intervention will be conducted. A total of 192 physically inactive women who meet all inclusion criteria and successfully complete a 3-week run-in will be randomized into one of the three groups. The mobile phone serves as a means of delivering the physical activity intervention, setting individualized weekly physical activity goals, and providing self-monitoring (activity diary, immediate feedback and social support. The mobile phone also functions as a tool for communication and real-time data capture. The primary outcome is objectively measured physical activity. Discussion If efficacy of the intervention with a mobile phone is demonstrated, the results of this RCT will be able to provide new insights for current behavioral

  20. The mPED randomized controlled clinical trial: applying mobile persuasive technologies to increase physical activity in sedentary women protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Yoshimi; Komatsu, Judith; Suarez, Larry; Vittinghoff, Eric; Haskell, William; Noorishad, Tina; Pham, Kristin

    2011-12-14

    Despite the significant health benefits of regular physical activity, approximately half of American adults, particularly women and minorities, do not meet the current physical activity recommendations. Mobile phone technologies are readily available, easily accessible and may provide a potentially powerful tool for delivering physical activity interventions. However, we need to understand how to effectively apply these mobile technologies to increase and maintain physical activity in physically inactive women. The purpose of this paper is to describe the study design and protocol of the mPED (mobile phone based physical activity education) randomized controlled clinical trial that examines the efficacy of a 3-month mobile phone and pedometer based physical activity intervention and compares two different 6-month maintenance interventions. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) with three arms; 1) PLUS (3-month mobile phone and pedometer based physical activity intervention and 6-month mobile phone diary maintenance intervention), 2) REGULAR (3-month mobile phone and pedometer based physical activity intervention and 6-month pedometer maintenance intervention), and 3) CONTROL (pedometer only, but no intervention will be conducted). A total of 192 physically inactive women who meet all inclusion criteria and successfully complete a 3-week run-in will be randomized into one of the three groups. The mobile phone serves as a means of delivering the physical activity intervention, setting individualized weekly physical activity goals, and providing self-monitoring (activity diary), immediate feedback and social support. The mobile phone also functions as a tool for communication and real-time data capture. The primary outcome is objectively measured physical activity. If efficacy of the intervention with a mobile phone is demonstrated, the results of this RCT will be able to provide new insights for current behavioral sciences and mHealth. ClinicalTrials.gov#:NCTO1280812.

  1. Clinical potential for imaging in patients with asthma and other lung disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoer, Emily M; Spielberg, David R; Brody, Alan S

    2017-01-01

    The ability of lung imaging to phenotype patients, determine prognosis, and predict response to treatment is expanding in clinical and translational research. The purpose of this perspective is to describe current imaging modalities that might be useful clinical tools in patients with asthma and other lung disorders and to explore some of the new developments in imaging modalities of the lung. These imaging modalities include chest radiography, computed tomography, lung magnetic resonance imaging, electrical impedance tomography, bronchoscopy, and others. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Potential clinical usefulness of new glandular and circulating parathyroid peptides illuminated by sequence specific radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindall, A.W.; Cecchettin, M.

    1981-01-01

    It is now well known that human PTH peptides constitute a heterogeneous population of fragments of the eighty-four amino acid molecules. Over the years, considerable confusion has resulted from measurements made in both clinical and experimental settings with radioimmunoassays of either undefined or partially-defined specificity for a particular region of the intact molecule. The approach of the authors has been to make use of modern technology to synthesize peptide fragments that mimic portions of native molecules, and to use these fragments in RIA. A more detailed description of a portion of this work will appear in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. (Auth.)

  3. Comparative study of genetic activity of chlorambucil's active metabolite steroidal esters: The role of steroidal skeleton on aneugenic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimiou, M.; Ouranou, D.; Stephanou, G.; Demopoulos, N.A.; Nikolaropoulos, S.S.; Alevizos, Ph.

    2010-01-01

    p-N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)aminophenylacetic acid (PHE), a nitrogen mustard analogue and chlorambucil's active metabolite used as chemotherapeutic agent, has been shown that, in addition to its clastogenic activity, induces chromosome delay. In the present study an efford has been made (a) to investigate if the steroidal analogues of PHE (EA-92, EA-97, AK-333, AK-409 and AK-433) exert the same genetic activity as the parent compound, (b) to further analyze the aneugenic activity of nitrogen mustard analogues, (c) to investigate the mechanism by which they exert aneugenic potential and (d) to correlate the genetic activity with chemical structure. For this purpose the Cytokinesis Block Micronucleus (CBMN) assay was conducted in human lymphocytes in vitro and the micronucleus (MN) frequency was determined to investigate their genetic activity. The mechanism of micronucleation was determined in combination with Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) using pancentromeric DNA probe. Since one of the mechanisms that chemicals cause aneuploidy is through alterations in the mitotic spindle, we also investigated the effect of the above compounds on the integrity and morphology of the mitotic spindle using double immunofluorescence of β- and γ-tubulin in C 2 C 12 mouse cell line. We found that PHE and its steroidal analogues, EA-92, EA-97, AK-333, AK-409 and AK-433, affect cell proliferation in human lymphocytes and C 2 C 12 mouse cells. All studied compounds are capable of inducing chromosome breakage events, as indicated by the enhanced C - MN frequencies. The less lipophilic compounds are the most genetically active molecules. PHE and only two of the studied analogues, AK-409 and AK-433, the most hydrophilic ones, showed aneugenic potential, by increasing the frequencies of MN containing a whole chromosome. The aneugenic potential of the above referred analogues is associated with amplification of centrosome number, since they caused high multipolar metaphase

  4. 5,6-Dihydro-5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine potentiates the anti-HIV-1 activity of ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Rawson, Jonathan M.; Heineman, Richard H.; Beach, Lauren B.; Martin, Jessica L.; Schnettler, Erica K.; Dapp, Michael J.; Patterson, Steven E.; Mansky, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    The nucleoside analog 5,6-dihydro-5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (KP-1212) has been investigated as a first-in-class lethal mutagen of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Since a prodrug monotherapy did not reduce viral loads in Phase II clinical trials, we tested if ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors (RNRIs) combined with KP-1212 would improve antiviral activity. KP-1212 potentiated the activity of gemcitabine and resveratrol and simultaneously increased the viral mutant frequency. G-to-C ...

  5. Potentiated antibodies to mu-opiate receptors: effect on integrative activity of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiko, V V; Vorob'eva, T M; Berchenko, O G; Epstein, O I

    2003-01-01

    The effect of homeopathically potentiated antibodies to mu-receptors (10(-100) wt %) on integrative activity of rat brain was studied using the models of self-stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus and convulsions produced by electric current. Electric current was delivered through electrodes implanted into the ventromedial hypothalamus. Single treatment with potentiated antibodies to mu-receptors increased the rate of self-stimulation and decreased the threshold of convulsive seizures. Administration of these antibodies for 7 days led to further activation of the positive reinforcement system and decrease in seizure thresholds. Distilled water did not change the rate of self-stimulation and seizure threshold.

  6. Synaptic input correlations leading to membrane potential decorrelation of spontaneous activity in cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graupner, Michael; Reyes, Alex D

    2013-09-18

    Correlations in the spiking activity of neurons have been found in many regions of the cortex under multiple experimental conditions and are postulated to have important consequences for neural population coding. While there is a large body of extracellular data reporting correlations of various strengths, the subthreshold events underlying the origin and magnitude of signal-independent correlations (called noise or spike count correlations) are unknown. Here we investigate, using intracellular recordings, how synaptic input correlations from shared presynaptic neurons translate into membrane potential and spike-output correlations. Using a pharmacologically activated thalamocortical slice preparation, we perform simultaneous recordings from pairs of layer IV neurons in the auditory cortex of mice and measure synaptic potentials/currents, membrane potentials, and spiking outputs. We calculate cross-correlations between excitatory and inhibitory inputs to investigate correlations emerging from the network. We furthermore evaluate membrane potential correlations near resting potential to study how excitation and inhibition combine and affect spike-output correlations. We demonstrate directly that excitation is correlated with inhibition thereby partially canceling each other and resulting in weak membrane potential and spiking correlations between neurons. Our data suggest that cortical networks are set up to partially cancel correlations emerging from the connections between neurons. This active decorrelation is achieved because excitation and inhibition closely track each other. Our results suggest that the numerous shared presynaptic inputs do not automatically lead to increased spiking correlations.

  7. Localization of higher grade tumor foci in potential candidates for active surveillance who opt for radical prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Kyu; Eastham, James A.; Fine, Samson W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate actual intraprostatic location of higher graded tumor foci undetected via standard transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy amongst patients who would be clinically considered appropriate candidates for active surveillance (AS) but underwent radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods: We reviewed entirely-submitted and whole-mounted RP specimens from 169 men who were deemed appropriate for AS clinically, but opted for RP and were found to have higher grade tumors. For each case, tumor nodules were circled and color-coded in a grade-specific manner and digitally scanned to created tumor maps. The locations of tumor foci with Gleason grade ≥4 were stratified by specific sites: anterior, anterolateral, lateral only (not clearly anterior or posterior), posterior, and posterolateral area. Results: Of 169 patients, 86% had clinical stage T1c and 14% T2a. RP Gleason score 7 in all but two men. Higher-grade tumor foci were localized to: anterior (n=66, 39%), anterolateral (n=4, 2%), lateral only (not clearly anterior or posterior) (n=5, 3%), posterior (n=52, 31%), and posterolateral (n=42, 25%) prostate, respectively. Conclusions: Among patients deemed clinically appropriate for AS, higher-grade tumor foci missed by standard prostate biopsies were localized to both the anterior and posterior prostate, without predominance of a particular area. These findings lend additional support to performing repeat standard prostate biopsy in potential candidates for AS and should be considered in efforts to optimize current biopsy strategies for the selection of AS patients. PMID:24392439

  8. Assessment by human research ethics committees of potential conflicts of interest arising from pharmaceutical sponsorship of clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcombe, J P; Kerridge, I H

    2007-01-01

    Conflicts of interest arising from pharmaceutical industry sponsorship of clinical research have the potential to bias research outcomes and ultimately prejudice patient care. It is unknown how Australian Human Research Ethics Committees (HREC) assess and manage such conflicts of interest. We aimed to gain an understanding of how HREC approach the problem of potential conflicts of interest arising from pharmaceutical sponsorship of clinical research. We conducted a survey of HREC chairpersons in New South Wales. HREC vary widely in their approaches to conflicts of interest, including in their use of National Health and Medical Research Council guidelines, which were often misinterpreted or overlooked. Many committees rely primarily on researchers disclosing potential conflicts of interest, whereas a majority of HREC use disclosure to research participants as the primary tool for preventing and managing conflicts of interest. Almost no HREC place limitations on researcher relationships with pharmaceutical companies. These findings suggest reluctance on the part of HREC to regulate many potential conflicts of interest between researchers and pharmaceutical sponsors, which may arise from uncertainty regarding the meaning or significance of conflicts of interest in research, from ambiguity surrounding the role of HREC in assessing and managing conflicts of interest in research or from misinterpretation or ignorance of current National Health and Medical Research Council guidelines. Further review of policies and practices in this important area may prove beneficial in safeguarding clinical research and patient care while promoting continuing constructive engagement with the pharmaceutical industry.

  9. Potential of adaptive clinical trial designs in pharmacogenetic research, A simulation based on the IPASS trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Baan, Frederieke H.; Knol, Mirjam J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304820350; Klungel, Olaf H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/181447649; Egberts, Toine C.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/162850050; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Roes, Kit C.B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: An adaptive clinical trial design that allows population enrichment after interim analysis can be advantageous in pharmacogenetic research if previous evidence is not strong enough to exclude part of the patient population beforehand.With this design, underpowered studies or unnecessary

  10. Applying Active Learning to Assertion Classification of Concepts in Clinical Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yukun; Mani, Subramani; Xu, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Supervised machine learning methods for clinical natural language processing (NLP) research require a large number of annotated samples, which are very expensive to build because of the involvement of physicians. Active learning, an approach that actively samples from a large pool, provides an alternative solution. Its major goal in classification is to reduce the annotation effort while maintaining the quality of the predictive model. However, few studies have investigated its uses in clinical NLP. This paper reports an application of active learning to a clinical text classification task: to determine the assertion status of clinical concepts. The annotated corpus for the assertion classification task in the 2010 i2b2/VA Clinical NLP Challenge was used in this study. We implemented several existing and newly developed active learning algorithms and assessed their uses. The outcome is reported in the global ALC score, based on the Area under the average Learning Curve of the AUC (Area Under the Curve) score. Results showed that when the same number of annotated samples was used, active learning strategies could generate better classification models (best ALC – 0.7715) than the passive learning method (random sampling) (ALC – 0.7411). Moreover, to achieve the same classification performance, active learning strategies required fewer samples than the random sampling method. For example, to achieve an AUC of 0.79, the random sampling method used 32 samples, while our best active learning algorithm required only 12 samples, a reduction of 62.5% in manual annotation effort. PMID:22127105

  11. Potential Strategies to Address the Major Clinical Barriers Facing Stem Cell Regenerative Therapy for Cardiovascular Disease: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Patricia K; Neofytou, Evgenios; Rhee, June-Wha; Wu, Joseph C

    2016-11-01

    Although progress continues to be made in the field of stem cell regenerative medicine for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, significant barriers to clinical implementation still exist. To summarize the current barriers to the clinical implementation of stem cell therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease and to discuss potential strategies to overcome them. Information for this review was obtained through a search of PubMed and the Cochrane database for English-language studies published between January 1, 2000, and July 25, 2016. Ten randomized clinical trials and 8 systematic reviews were included. One of the major clinical barriers facing the routine implementation of stem cell therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease is the limited and inconsistent benefit observed thus far. Reasons for this finding are unclear but may be owing to poor cell retention and survival, as suggested by numerous preclinical studies and a small number of human studies incorporating imaging to determine cell fate. Additional studies in humans using imaging to determine cell fate are needed to understand how these factors contribute to the limited efficacy of stem cell therapy. Treatment strategies to address poor cell retention and survival are under investigation and include the following: coadministration of immunosuppressive and prosurvival agents, delivery of cardioprotective factors packaged in exosomes rather than the cells themselves, and use of tissue-engineering strategies to provide structural support for cells. If larger grafts are achieved using these strategies, it will be imperative to carefully monitor for the potential risks of tumorigenicity, immunogenicity, and arrhythmogenicity. Despite important achievements to date, stem cell therapy is not yet ready for routine clinical implementation. Significant research is still needed to address the clinical barriers outlined herein before the next wave of large clinical trials is under way.

  12. Potentiation of Artemisinin Activity against Chloroquine-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum Strains by Using Heme Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Robert, Anne; Meunier, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    The influence of different metalloporphyrin derivatives on the antimalarial activity of artemisinin was studied with two chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum (FcB1-Colombia and FcM29-Cameroon) cultured in human erythrocytes. This potentiation study indicates that the manganese complex of meso-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin has a significant synergistic effect on the activity of artemisinin against both Plasmodium strains. PMID:10508044

  13. In vitro antimicrobial activities of cinnamon bark oil, anethole, carvacrol, eugenol and guaiazulene against Mycoplasma hominis clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleha, Radek; Mosio, Petra; Vydrzalova, Marketa; Jantovska, Alexandra; Bostikova, Vanda; Mazurova, Jaroslava

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of five natural substances against 50 clinical isolates of Mycoplasma hominis. The in vitro activity of selected natural compounds, cinnamon bark oil, anethole, carvacrol, eugenol and guaiazulene, was investigated against 50 M. hominis isolates cultivated from cervical swabs by the broth dilution method. All showed valuable antimicrobial activity against the tested isolates. Oil from the bark of Cinnamomum zeylanicum (MBC90 = 500 µg/mL) however was found to be the most effective. Carvacrol (MBC90 = 600 µg/mL) and eugenol (MBC90 = 1000 µg/mL) also possessed strong antimycoplasmal activity. The results indicate that cinnamon bark oil, carvacrol and eugenol have strong antimycoplasmal activity and the potential for use as antimicrobial agents in the treatment of mycoplasmal infections.

  14. Cell-mediated immune response: a clinical review of the therapeutic potential of human papillomavirus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sonja Izquierdo; Fuglsang, Katrine; Blaakaer, Jan

    2014-12-01

    This clinical review aims to assess the efficacy of human papillomavirus 16/18 (HPV16/18) vaccination on the cell-mediated immune response in women with existing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cervical cancer induced by HPV16 or HPV18. A focused and thorough literature search conducted in five different databases found 996 publications. Six relevant articles were chosen for further review. In total, 154 patients (>18 years of age) were enrolled in prospective study trials with 3-15 months of follow up. The vaccine applications were administered two to four times. The vaccines contained different combinations of HPV16 and HPV18 and early proteins, E6 and E7. The primary outcome was the cell-mediated immune response. Correlation to clinical outcome (histopathology) and human leukocyte antigen genes were secondary endpoints. All vaccines triggered a detectable cell-mediated immune response, some of which were statistically significant. Correlations between immunological response and clinical outcome (histopathology) were not significant, so neoplasms may not be susceptible to vaccine-generated cytotoxic T cells (CD8(+)). Prophylactic HPV vaccines have been introduced to reduce the incidence of cervical cancer in young women. Women already infected with HPV could benefit from a therapeutic HPV vaccination. Hence, it is important to continue the development of therapeutic HPV vaccines to lower the rate of HPV-associated malignancies and crucial to evaluate vaccine efficacy clinically. This clinical review represents an attempt to elucidate the theories supporting the development of an HPV vaccine with a therapeutic effect on human papillomavirus-induced malignancies of the cervix. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  15. Channel sialic acids limit hERG channel activity during the ventricular action potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norring, Sarah A; Ednie, Andrew R; Schwetz, Tara A; Du, Dongping; Yang, Hui; Bennett, Eric S

    2013-02-01

    Activity of human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) 1 voltage-gated K(+) channels is responsible for portions of phase 2 and phase 3 repolarization of the human ventricular action potential. Here, we questioned whether and how physiologically and pathophysiologically relevant changes in surface N-glycosylation modified hERG channel function. Voltage-dependent hERG channel gating and activity were evaluated as expressed in a set of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines under conditions of full glycosylation, no sialylation, no complex N-glycans, and following enzymatic deglycosylation of surface N-glycans. For each condition of reduced glycosylation, hERG channel steady-state activation and inactivation relationships were shifted linearly by significant depolarizing ∼9 and ∼18 mV, respectively. The hERG window current increased significantly by 50-150%, and the peak shifted by a depolarizing ∼10 mV. There was no significant change in maximum hERG current density. Deglycosylated channels were significantly more active (20-80%) than glycosylated controls during phases 2 and 3 of action potential clamp protocols. Simulations of hERG current and ventricular action potentials corroborated experimental data and predicted reduced sialylation leads to a 50-70-ms decrease in action potential duration. The data describe a novel mechanism by which hERG channel gating is modulated through physiologically and pathophysiologically relevant changes in N-glycosylation; reduced channel sialylation increases hERG channel activity during the action potential, thereby increasing the rate of action potential repolarization.

  16. Administered activities of 18F-FDG PET clinics in pediatrics patients in Brazil- preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Cassio Miri; Sa, Lidia V. de

    2013-01-01

    A survey was conducted among the Brazilian clinical PET, with the purpose of investigating the activities administered to pediatric oncology patients and assess whether significant differences between the protocols adopted. In addition, this survey can cooperate to the suggestion diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in nuclear medicine. Although the methodology for delivering doses by most clinics be based on patient's weight, the results showed variations of up to 191, 6% between the activities administered in clinics, even for similar devices. The average value of the distribution of activities reported was 4.46 ± 1,6 MBq /kg. These data demonstrate the need for harmonization and optimization of 18 F-FDG/PET procedures, as well as training for professionals involved in the clinical routine

  17. Reaching their potential: Perceived impact of a collaborative academic-clinical partnership programme for early career nurses in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKillop, Ann; Doughty, Lesley; Atherfold, Cheryl; Shaw, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic nature of healthcare ensures that early career nurses enter an uncertain and complex world of practice and consequently require support to develop their practice, build confidence and reach their potential. The New Zealand Nurse Entry to Practice programme for registered nurses in their first year of practice has been operating since 2005 to enable safe and confident practice, improve the quality of care, and positively impact on recruitment and retention. This academic and clinical programme was offered as a partnership between a university and a clinical provider with postgraduate academic credits gained. The aim of this study was to explore the perceived impact of postgraduate university education for early career nurses in one regional health area of New Zealand. Participants were registered nurses who had completed the early career nurse programme and their clinical preceptors. The research was conducted via an online survey of 248 nurses and three focus groups to explore how the programme was experienced and its impact on knowledge and practice. Early career nurses and their preceptors found that the programme enables improved knowledge and skills of patient assessment, application of critical thinking to clinical practice, perceived improvement in patient care delivery and outcomes, enhanced interprofessional communication and knowledge sharing, and had a positive impact on professional awareness and career planning. This clinical-academic partnership positively impacted on the clinical practice and transition experience of early career nurses and was closely aligned to an organization's strategic plan for nursing workforce development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. NHS Trusts' clinical research activity and overall CQC performance - Is there a correlation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, L; Fisher, S J

    2015-11-01

    Since the late 2000's, the creation of the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) has transformed clinical research activity in the United Kingdom. This study sought to establish if there is a link between clinical research activity and overall NHS Trust performance. Retrospective cohort study. Data for NHS Trust performance were obtained from public databases, namely the Care Quality Commission (CQC) 2013 risk rating for overall performance, and 2012-13 NIHR records for clinical research activity. Applying Spearman's rank analysis, none of the Trust categories showed a correlation with CQC risk rating: small hospitals, r = -0.062 (P = 0.76; n = 27); medium, r = -0.224 (P = 0.13; n = 47); large, r = -0.008 (P = 0.96; n = 57); academic, r = -0.18 (P = 0.41; n = 24). Similar results were observed when CQC risk rating was compared with the number of different clinical research studies conducted per Trust. The degree of NIHR National Portfolio clinical research activity is not significantly related to CQC risk rating, used as an indicator of overall NHS Trust performance. Other studies have previously shown that increased research activity correlates with improved mortality rates, one component of CQC risk rating scores. Alternative tools may have to be explored to evaluate the impact of clinical research on NHS Trusts and its patients. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Data-mining of potential antitubercular activities from molecular ingredients of traditional Chinese medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Salma; Scaria, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Background. Traditional Chinese medicine encompasses a well established alternate system of medicine based on a broad range of herbal formulations and is practiced extensively in the region for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases. In recent years, several reports describe in depth studies of the molecular ingredients of traditional Chinese medicines on the biological activities including anti-bacterial activities. The availability of a well-curated dataset of molecular ingredients of traditional Chinese medicines and accurate in-silico cheminformatics models for data mining for antitubercular agents and computational filters to prioritize molecules has prompted us to search for potential hits from these datasets. Results. We used a consensus approach to predict molecules with potential antitubercular activities from a large dataset of molecular ingredients of traditional Chinese medicines available in the public domain. We further prioritized 160 molecules based on five computational filters (SMARTSfilter) so as to avoid potentially undesirable molecules. We further examined the molecules for permeability across Mycobacterial cell wall and for potential activities against non-replicating and drug tolerant Mycobacteria. Additional in-depth literature surveys for the reported antitubercular activities of the molecular ingredients and their sources were considered for drawing support to prioritization. Conclusions. Our analysis suggests that datasets of molecular ingredients of traditional Chinese medicines offer a new opportunity to mine for potential biological activities. In this report, we suggest a proof-of-concept methodology to prioritize molecules for further experimental assays using a variety of computational tools. We also additionally suggest that a subset of prioritized molecules could be used for evaluation for tuberculosis due to their additional effect against non-replicating tuberculosis as well as the additional hepato-protection offered by

  20. Investigation of tenuous plasma environment using Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) on Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Rumi; Jeszenszky, Harald; Torkar, Klaus; Andriopoulou, Maria; Fremuth, Gerhard; Taijmar, Martin; Scharlemann, Carsten; Svenes, Knut; Escoubet, Philippe; Prattes, Gustav; Laky, Gunter; Giner, Franz; Hoelzl, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    The NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Mission is planned to be launched on March 12, 2015. The scientific objectives of the MMS mission are to explore and understand the fundamental plasma physics processes of magnetic reconnection, particle acceleration and turbulence in the Earth's magnetosphere. The region of scientific interest of MMS is in a tenuous plasma environment where the positive spacecraft potential reaches an equilibrium at several tens of Volts. An Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) instrument neutralizes the spacecraft potential by releasing positive charge produced by indium ion emitters. ASPOC thereby reduces the potential in order to improve the electric field and low-energy particle measurement. The method has been successfully applied on other spacecraft such as Cluster and Double Star. Two ASPOC units are present on each of the MMS spacecraft. Each unit contains four ion emitters, whereby one emitter per instrument is operated at a time. ASPOC for MMS includes new developments in the design of the emitters and the electronics enabling lower spacecraft potentials, higher reliability, and a more uniform potential structure in the spacecraft's sheath compared to previous missions. Model calculations confirm the findings from previous applications that the plasma measurements will not be affected by the beam's space charge. A perfectly stable spacecraft potential precludes the utilization of the spacecraft as a plasma probe, which is a conventional technique used to estimate ambient plasma density from the spacecraft potential. The small residual variations of the potential controlled by ASPOC, however, still allow to determine ambient plasma density by comparing two closely separated spacecraft and thereby reconstructing the uncontrolled potential variation from the controlled potential. Regular intercalibration of controlled and uncontrolled potentials is expected to increase the reliability of this new method.

  1. Discriminating active from latent tuberculosis in patients presenting to community clinics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurjinder Sandhu

    Full Text Available Because of the high global prevalence of latent TB infection (LTBI, a key challenge in endemic settings is distinguishing patients with active TB from patients with overlapping clinical symptoms without active TB but with co-existing LTBI. Current methods are insufficiently accurate. Plasma proteomic fingerprinting can resolve this difficulty by providing a molecular snapshot defining disease state that can be used to develop point-of-care diagnostics.Plasma and clinical data were obtained prospectively from patients attending community TB clinics in Peru and from household contacts. Plasma was subjected to high-throughput proteomic profiling by mass spectrometry. Statistical pattern recognition methods were used to define mass spectral patterns that distinguished patients with active TB from symptomatic controls with or without LTBI.156 patients with active TB and 110 symptomatic controls (patients with respiratory symptoms without active TB were investigated. Active TB patients were distinguishable from undifferentiated symptomatic controls with accuracy of 87% (sensitivity 84%, specificity 90%, from symptomatic controls with LTBI (accuracy of 87%, sensitivity 89%, specificity 82% and from symptomatic controls without LTBI (accuracy 90%, sensitivity 90%, specificity 92%.We show that active TB can be distinguished accurately from LTBI in symptomatic clinic attenders using a plasma proteomic fingerprint. Translation of biomarkers derived from this study into a robust and affordable point-of-care format will have significant implications for recognition and control of active TB in high prevalence settings.

  2. Recurrence or rebound of clinical relapses after discontinuation of natalizumab therapy in highly active MS patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, P. S.; Koch-Henriksen, N.; Petersen, T.

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies have reported flare-up of multiple sclerosis (MS) disease activity after cessation of natalizumab, increasing to a level beyond the pre-natalizumab treatment level. Our aim was to describe the development in clinical disease activity following cessation of natalizumab therapy...

  3. Clinical measurements of part-body calcium using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tothill, P.; Smith, M.A.; Simpson, J.D.; Chew, I.; MacPherson, J.N.; Winney, R.J.; Strong, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    Californium-252 sources have been used in a clinical environment for neutron activation analysis studies for a period of 2 1/2 years. During this period, changes in bone calcium in response to different treatment regimes have been measured in patients suffering from primary or secondary bone disease. The first measurements were performed on peripheral bone, in particular the forearm, using two sources of 252 Cf, minimum total activity 56mCi, for bilateral irradiation and two 15cmx10cm NaI crystals for detection. Optimization of the irradiation geometry and the patient irradiation programme enabled measurements to be performed with a precision of 1.6% and a dose of 3 rem. The precision estimate was based on 64 sets of repeated patient measurements and included errors due to patient movement. Apparatus was also developed to measure changes of calcium in the lumbar spine, particular attention being devoted to obtaining uniformity of sensitivity in the vertebrae. Unilateral irradiation with two 252 Cf sources, activity 100mCi each, separated by 20cm, and detection in whole-body counter with four 15cmx10cm NaI detectors gave a precision of 2% based on repeated measurements of 10 patients, with a dose of 1.3 rem to the spine and 10 rem to the skin surface. The following studies were undertaken: the effect of 1 α-hydroxycholecalciferol on 19 patients undergoing chronic haemodialysis, the use of vitamin D 2 and vitamin D 3 in the treatment of 33 patients with potential anticonvulsant osteomalacia, the effect of lithium carbonate in 20 patients with manic depression and the efficacy of conventional treatments in combating thyrotoxic osteodystrophy. (author)

  4. Exploring the potential duty of care in clinical genomics under UK law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Colin; Ploem, Corrette; Chico, Victoria; Ormondroyd, Elizabeth; Hall, Alison; Wallace, Susan; Fay, Michael; Goodwin, Deirdre; Bell, Jessica; Phillips, Simon; Taylor, Jenny C; Hennekam, Raoul; Kaye, Jane

    2017-09-01

    Genome-wide sequencing technologies are beginning to be used in projects that have both clinical diagnostic and research components. The clinical application of this technology, which generates a huge amount of information of varying diagnostic certainty, involves addressing a number of challenges to establish appropriate standards. In this article, we explore the way that UK law may respond to three of these key challenges and could establish new legal duties in relation to feedback of findings that are unrelated to the presenting condition (secondary, additional or incidental findings); duties towards genetic relatives as well as the patient and duties on the part of researchers and professionals who do not have direct contact with patients. When considering these issues, the courts will take account of European and international comparisons, developing guidance and relevant ethical, social and policy factors. The UK courts will also be strongly influenced by precedent set in case law.

  5. Harnessing Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Clinical Trials for Treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases: Potential and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dana; Kim, Young-Sam; Shin, Dong Wun; Park, Chang-Shin; Kang, Ju-Hee

    2016-01-01

    No disease-modifying therapies (DMT) for neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) have been established, particularly for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). It is unclear why candidate drugs that successfully demonstrate therapeutic effects in animal models fail to show disease-modifying effects in clinical trials. To overcome this hurdle, patients with homogeneous pathologies should be detected as early as possible. The early detection of AD patients using sufficiently tested bio...

  6. Prehospital Ultrasound in Trauma: A Review of Current and Potential Future Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharwat El Zahran

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US is an essential tool for evaluating trauma patients in the hospital setting. Many previous in-hospital studies have been extrapolated to out of hospital setting to improve diagnostic accuracy in prehospital and austere environments. This review article presents the role of prehospital US in blunt and penetrating trauma management with emphasis on its current clinical applications, challenges, and future implications of such use.

  7. Genetics in endocrinology: genetic variation in deiodinases: a systematic review of potential clinical effects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verloop, Herman; Dekkers, Olaf M; Peeters, Robin P; Schoones, Jan W; Smit, Johannes W A

    2014-09-01

    Iodothyronine deiodinases represent a family of selenoproteins involved in peripheral and local homeostasis of thyroid hormone action. Deiodinases are expressed in multiple organs and thyroid hormone affects numerous biological systems, thus genetic variation in deiodinases may affect multiple clinical endpoints. Interest in clinical effects of genetic variation in deiodinases has clearly increased. We aimed to provide an overview for the role of deiodinase polymorphisms in human physiology and morbidity. In this systematic review, studies evaluating the relationship between deiodinase polymorphisms and clinical parameters in humans were eligible. No restrictions on publication date were imposed. The following databases were searched up to August 2013: Pubmed, EMBASE (OVID-version), Web of Science, COCHRANE Library, CINAHL (EbscoHOST-version), Academic Search Premier (EbscoHOST-version), and ScienceDirect. Deiodinase physiology at molecular and tissue level is described, and finally the role of these polymorphisms in pathophysiological conditions is reviewed. Deiodinase type 1 (D1) polymorphisms particularly show moderate-to-strong relationships with thyroid hormone parameters, IGF1 production, and risk for depression. D2 variants correlate with thyroid hormone levels, insulin resistance, bipolar mood disorder, psychological well-being, mental retardation, hypertension, and risk for osteoarthritis. D3 polymorphisms showed no relationship with inter-individual variation in serum thyroid hormone parameters. One D3 polymorphism was associated with risk for osteoarthritis. Genetic deiodinase profiles only explain a small proportion of inter-individual variations in serum thyroid hormone levels. Evidence suggests a role of genetic deiodinase variants in certain pathophysiological conditions. The value for determination of deiodinase polymorphism in clinical practice needs further investigation. © 2014 European Society of Endocrinology.

  8. Theileriosis in six dogs in South Africa and its potential clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal T. Rosa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Theileriosis is a tick-borne disease caused by a piroplasma of the genus Theileria that can causeanaemia and thrombocytopenia. Its clinical importance for dogs’ remains poorly understood,as only some develop clinical signs. In this study, physical and laboratory findings, treatment and outcomes of six client-owned diseased dogs presented at the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital are described retrospectively. In the dogs, Theileria species (n = 4and Theileria equi (n = 2 were detected by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR-reverse blothybridisation assay in blood samples, whilst PCR for Babesia, Anaplasma and Ehrlichia were negative. The most common physical findings were pale mucous membranes (five out of six dogs, bleeding tendencies (five out of six dogs and lethargy (three out of six dogs. All dogs were thrombocytopenic [median 59.5 x 109/L (range 13–199] and five out of six dogs were anaemic [median haematocrit 18% (range 5–32]. Bone marrow core biopsies performed in two dogs showed myelofibrosis. Theileriosis was treated with imidocarb dipropionate and the suspected secondary immune-mediated haematological disorders with prednisolone and azathioprine. Five dogs achieved clinical cure and post-treatment PCR performed in three out of five dogs confirmed absence of circulating parasitaemia. An immune-mediated response to Theileria species is thought to result in anaemia and/or thrombocytopenia in diseased dogs with theileriosis. A bleeding tendency, most likely secondary to thrombocytopenia and/or thrombocytopathy, was the most significant clinical finding in these cases. The link between thrombocytopenia, anaemia and myelofibrosis in theileriosis requires further investigation and theileriosis should be considered a differential diagnosis for dogs presenting with anaemia and/or thrombocytopenia in endemic tick-borne disease areas.

  9. The potential of predictive analytics to provide clinical decision support in depression treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald C

    2018-01-01

    To review progress developing clinical decision support tools for personalized treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). Over the years, a variety of individual indicators ranging from biomarkers to clinical observations and self-report scales have been used to predict various aspects of differential MDD treatment response. Most of this work focused on predicting remission either with antidepressant medications versus psychotherapy, some antidepressant medications versus others, some psychotherapies versus others, and combination therapies versus monotherapies. However, to date, none of the individual predictors in these studies has been strong enough to guide optimal treatment selection for most patients. Interest consequently turned to decision support tools made up of multiple predictors, but the development of such tools has been hampered by small study sample sizes. Design recommendations are made here for future studies to address this problem. Recommendations include using large prospective observational studies followed by pragmatic trials rather than smaller, expensive controlled treatment trials for preliminary development of decision support tools; basing these tools on comprehensive batteries of inexpensive self-report and clinical predictors (e.g., self-administered performance-based neurocognitive tests) versus expensive biomarkers; and reserving biomarker assessments for targeted studies of patients not well classified by inexpensive predictor batteries.

  10. Reflective THz and MR imaging of burn wounds: a potential clinical validation of THz contrast mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Neha; Nowroozi, Bryan; Sung, Shijun; Garritano, James; Maccabi, Ashkan; Tewari, Priyamvada; Culjat, Martin; Singh, Rahul; Alger, Jeffry; Grundfest, Warren; Taylor, Zachary

    2012-10-01

    Terahertz (THz) imaging is an expanding area of research in the field of medical imaging due to its high sensitivity to changes in tissue water content. Previously reported in vivo rat studies demonstrate that spatially resolved hydration mapping with THz illumination can be used to rapidly and accurately detect fluid shifts following induction of burns and provide highly resolved spatial and temporal characterization of edematous tissue. THz imagery of partial and full thickness burn wounds acquired by our group correlate well with burn severity and suggest that hydration gradients are responsible for the observed contrast. This research aims to confirm the dominant contrast mechanism of THz burn imaging using a clinically accepted diagnostic method that relies on tissue water content for contrast generation to support the translation of this technology to clinical application. The hydration contrast sensing capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically T2 relaxation times and proton density values N(H), are well established and provide measures of mobile water content, lending MRI as a suitable method to validate hydration states of skin burns. This paper presents correlational studies performed with MR imaging of ex vivo porcine skin that confirm tissue hydration as the principal sensing mechanism in THz burn imaging. Insights from this preliminary research will be used to lay the groundwork for future, parallel MRI and THz imaging of in vivo rat models to further substantiate the clinical efficacy of reflective THz imaging in burn wound care.

  11. Hsp90 as a Gatekeeper of Tumor Angiogenesis: Clinical Promise and Potential Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Bohonowych

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor vascularization is an essential modulator of early tumor growth, progression, and therapeutic outcome. Although antiangiogenic treatments appear promising, intrinsic and acquired tumor resistance contributes to treatment failure. Clinical inhibition of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 provides an opportunity to target multiple aspects of this signaling resiliency, which may elicit more robust and enduring tumor repression relative to effects elicited by specifically targeted agents. This review highlights several primary effectors of angiogenesis modulated by Hsp90 and describes the clinical challenges posed by the redundant circuitry of these pathways. The four main topics addressed include (1 Hsp90-mediated regulation of HIF/VEGF signaling, (2 chaperone-dependent regulation of HIF-independent VEGF-mediated angiogenesis, (3 Hsp90-dependent targeting of key proangiogenic receptor tyrosine kinases and modulation of drug resistance, and (4 consideration of factors such as tumor microenvironment that pose several challenges for the clinical efficacy of anti-angiogenic therapy and Hsp90-targeted strategies.

  12. [G-protein potentiates the activation of TNF-alpha on calcium-activated potassium channel in ECV304].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L; Zheng, Y; Qu, J; Bao, G

    2000-06-01

    Observe the effect of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) on calcium-activated potassium channel in ECV304 and the possible involvement of G-protein mediation in the action of TNF-alpha. Using the cell-attached configuration of patch clamp technique. (1) the activity of high-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BKca) was recorded. Its conductance is (202.54 +/- 16.62) pS; (2) the activity of BKca was potentiated by 200 U/ml TNF-alpha; (3) G-protein would intensify this TNF-alpha activation. TNF-alpha acted on vascular endothelial cell ECV304 could rapidly activate the activity of BKca. Opening of BKca resulted in membrane hyper-polarization which could increase electro-chemical gradient for the resting Ca2+ influx and open leakage calcium channel, thus resting cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration could be elevated. G-protein may exert an important regulation in this process.

  13. Iranian Clinical Nurses' Activities for Self-Directed Learning: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Malekian, Morteza; Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali

    2015-09-01

    Clinical nurses need lifelong learning skills for responding to the rapid changes of clinical settings. One of the best strategies for lifelong learning is self-directed learning. The aim of this study was to explore Iranian clinical nurses' activities for self-directed learning. In this qualitative study, 23 semi-structured personal interviews were conducted with nineteen clinical nurses working in all four hospitals affiliated to Isfahan Social Security Organization, Isfahan, Iran. Study data were analyzed by using the content analysis approach. The study was conducted from June 2013 to October 2014. Study participants' activities for self-directed learning fell into two main categories of striving for knowledge acquisition and striving for skill development. The main theme of the study was 'Revising personal performance based on intellectual-experiential activities'. Study findings suggest that Iranian clinical nurses continually revise their personal performance by performing self-directed intellectual and experiential activities to acquire expertise. The process of acquiring expertise is a linear process which includes two key steps of knowledge acquisition and knowledge development. In order to acquire and advance their knowledge, nurses perform mental learning activities such as sensory perception, self-evaluation, and suspended judgment step-by-step. Moreover, they develop their skills through doing activities like apprenticeship, masterly performance, and self-regulation. The absolute prerequisite to expertise acquisition is that a nurse needs to follow these two steps in a sequential manner.

  14. RECEPTOR POTENTIAL AND LIGHT-INDUCED MITOCHONDRIAL ACTIVATION IN BLOWFLY PHOTORECEPTOR MUTANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOJET, MH; TINBERGEN, J; STAVENGA, DG

    1991-01-01

    1. Simultaneous measurements of the receptor potential and the light-induced mitochondrial activation were performed in white-eyed blowflies Calliphora vicina, mutant chalky, and Lucilia cuprina, mutants w(F) and w'nss. The intensity dependence and the temporal dynamics were investigated. 2. The

  15. Efficacy of Aqueous and Methanol Extracts of Some Medicinal Plants for Potential Antibacterial Activity

    OpenAIRE

    PAREKH, Jigna; JADEJA, Darshana; CHANDA, Sumitra

    2014-01-01

    Twelve medicinal plants were screened, namely Abrus precatorius L., Caesalpinia pulcherrima Swartz., Cardiospermum halicacabum L., Casuarina equisetifolia L., Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers., Delonix regia L., Euphorbia hirta L., Euphorbia tirucalli L., Ficus benghalensis L., Gmelina asiatica L., Santalum album L., and Tecomella undulata (Sm.) Seem, for potential antibacterial activity against 5 medically important bacterial strains, namely Bacillus subtilis ATCC6633, Staphylococcus epidermidis A...

  16. The Potential of Using Virtual Reality Technology in Physical Activity Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasco, Denis

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, virtual reality technology has been successfully used for learning purposes. The purposes of the article are to examine current research on the role of virtual reality in physical activity settings and discuss potential application of using virtual reality technology to enhance learning in physical education. The article starts…

  17. Brain activity and cognitive transition during childhood: A longitudinal event-related brain potential study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stauder, J.E.A.; Molenaar, P.C.M.; van der Molen, M.W.

    1998-01-01

    Examined the relation between brain activation and cognitive development using event-related brain potentials (ERPs) and a longitudinal design. 5 yr old females performed a visual recognition ('oddball') task and an experimental analogue of the Piagetian conservation of liquid quantity task At three

  18. Single-active-electron potentials for molecules in intense laser fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    Single-active-electron potentials are computed for selected molecules, and molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behavior are produced. Asymptotic expansion coefficients are extracted from the wave functions and used to compute alignment-dependent ionization yields from molecular...

  19. Comparison of clinical, magnetic resonance and evoked potentials data in a case of valproic-acid-related hyperammonemic coma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hantson, Philippe; Grandin, Cecile; Duprez, Thierry; Nassogne, Marie-Cecile; Guerit, Jean-Michel

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) multimodality evoked potentials (MEPs) and clinical findings were correlated in a 47-year-old epileptic man in whom parenteral valproic acid (VPA) therapy induced severe comatose hyperammonemic encephalopathy without biological signs of hepatotoxicity (or hepatocytic dysfunction). Although the plasma VPA level remained within a normal therapeutic range, the ammoniemia increased to a toxic peak level at 411 μmol/l 24 h after symptom onset, requiring VPA therapy discontinuation. Brain MR monitoring demonstrated early cytotoxic edema evolving into delayed vasogenic edema and final brain atrophy. Concomitantly to abnormalities within the brainstem on MR images, an increase in brainstem conduction at MEPs and clinical disturbance of brainstem reflexes were observed at the initial phase of the disease course. Later, the resolution of the MR and MEPs abnormalities paralleled the clinical recovery of the reflexes. (orig.)

  20. Comparison of clinical, magnetic resonance and evoked potentials data in a case of valproic-acid-related hyperammonemic coma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantson, Philippe [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Intensive Care, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Grandin, Cecile; Duprez, Thierry [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Neuroradiology, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Nassogne, Marie-Cecile [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Guerit, Jean-Michel [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Laboratory of Neurophysiology, Cliniques Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) multimodality evoked potentials (MEPs) and clinical findings were correlated in a 47-year-old epileptic man in whom parenteral valproic acid (VPA) therapy induced severe comatose hyperammonemic encephalopathy without biological signs of hepatotoxicity (or hepatocytic dysfunction). Although the plasma VPA level remained within a normal therapeutic range, the ammoniemia increased to a toxic peak level at 411 {mu}mol/l 24 h after symptom onset, requiring VPA therapy discontinuation. Brain MR monitoring demonstrated early cytotoxic edema evolving into delayed vasogenic edema and final brain atrophy. Concomitantly to abnormalities within the brainstem on MR images, an increase in brainstem conduction at MEPs and clinical disturbance of brainstem reflexes were observed at the initial phase of the disease course. Later, the resolution of the MR and MEPs abnormalities paralleled the clinical recovery of the reflexes. (orig.)

  1. Preliminary clinical results: an analyzing tool for 2D optical imaging in detection of active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adi Aizudin Bin Radin Nasirudin, Radin; Meier, Reinhard; Ahari, Carmen; Sievert, Matti; Fiebich, Martin; Rummeny, Ernst J.; No"l, Peter B.

    2011-03-01

    Optical imaging (OI) is a relatively new method in detecting active inflammation of hand joints of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). With the high number of people affected by this disease especially in western countries, the availability of OI as an early diagnostic imaging method is clinically highly relevant. In this paper, we present a newly in-house developed OI analyzing tool and a clinical evaluation study. Our analyzing tool extends the capability of existing OI tools. We include many features in the tool, such as region-based image analysis, hyper perfusion curve analysis, and multi-modality image fusion to aid clinicians in localizing and determining the intensity of inflammation in joints. Additionally, image data management options, such as the full integration of PACS/RIS, are included. In our clinical study we demonstrate how OI facilitates the detection of active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. The preliminary clinical results indicate a sensitivity of 43.5%, a specificity of 80.3%, an accuracy of 65.7%, a positive predictive value of 76.6%, and a negative predictive value of 64.9% in relation to clinical results from MRI. The accuracy of inflammation detection serves as evidence to the potential of OI as a useful imaging modality for early detection of active inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. With our in-house developed tool we extend the usefulness of OI imaging in the clinical arena. Overall, we show that OI is a fast, inexpensive, non-invasive and nonionizing yet highly sensitive and accurate imaging modality.-

  2. Antioxidant activity, acetylcholinesterase and tyrosinase inhibitory potential of Pulmonaria officinalis and Centarium umbellatum extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Neagu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study several investigations and tests were performed to determine the antioxidant activity and the acetylcholinesterase and tyrosinase inhibitory potential of Pulmonaria officinalis and Centarium umbellatum aqueous extracts (10% mass and ethanolic extracts (10% mass and 70% ethanol, respectively. Moreover, for each type of the prepared extracts of P. officinalis and of C. umbellatum the content in the biologically active compounds – polyphenols, flavones and proanthocyanidins was determined. The antioxidant activity was assessed using two methods, namely the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay and reducing power assay. The analyzed plant extracts showed a high acetylcholinesterase and tyrosinase inhibitory activity in the range of 72.24–94.24% (at the highest used dose – 3 mg/mL, 66.96% and 94.03% (at 3 mg/mL, respectively correlated with a high DPPH radical inhibition – 70.29–84.9% (at 3 mg/mL. These medicinal plants could provide a potential natural source of bioactive compounds and could be beneficial to the human health, especially in the neurodegenerative disorders and as sources of natural antioxidants in food industry. Keywords: Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity, Tyrosinase inhibitory activity, Antioxidant activity, Pulmonaria officinalis and Centarium umbellatum

  3. Prevalence and clinical outcomes of patients with multiple potential causes of syncope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Lin Y.; Gersh, Bernard J.; Hodge, David O.; Wieling, Wouter; Hammill, Stephen C.; Shen, Win-Kuang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence, predictors, and prognosis of patients with multiple potential causes of syncope. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study with prospective follow-up of consecutive patients with syncope of uncertain cause who were referred to the

  4. Usefulness of ventricular endocardial electric reconstruction from body surface potential maps to noninvasively localize ventricular ectopic activity in patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Dakun; Sun, Jian; Li, Yigang; He, Bin

    2013-06-01

    As radio frequency (RF) catheter ablation becomes increasingly prevalent in the management of ventricular arrhythmia in patients, an accurate and rapid determination of the arrhythmogenic site is of important clinical interest. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the inversely reconstructed ventricular endocardial current density distribution from body surface potential maps (BSPMs) can localize the regions critical for maintenance of a ventricular ectopic activity. Patients with isolated and monomorphic premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) were investigated by noninvasive BSPMs and subsequent invasive catheter mapping and ablation. Equivalent current density (CD) reconstruction (CDR) during symptomatic PVCs was obtained on the endocardial ventricular surface in six patients (four men, two women, years 23-77), and the origin of the spontaneous ectopic activity was localized at the location of the maximum CD value. Compared with the last (successful) ablation site (LAS), the mean and standard deviation of localization error of the CDR approach were 13.8 and 1.3 mm, respectively. In comparison, the distance between the LASs and the estimated locations of an equivalent single moving dipole in the heart was 25.5 ± 5.5 mm. The obtained CD distribution of activated sources extending from the catheter ablation site also showed a high consistency with the invasively recorded electroanatomical maps. The noninvasively reconstructed endocardial CD distribution is suitable to predict a region of interest containing or close to arrhythmia source, which may have the potential to guide RF catheter ablation.

  5. Biochemical and Functional Characterization of Parawixia bistriata Spider Venom with Potential Proteolytic and Larvicidal Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Gizeli S.; Coutinho-Neto, Antonio; Kayano, Anderson M.; Simões-Silva, Rodrigo; Trindade, Frances; de Almeida e Silva, Alexandre; Marcussi, Silvana; da Silva, Saulo L.; Fernandes, Carla F. C.; Zuliani, Juliana P.; Calderon, Leonardo A.; Soares, Andreimar M.; Stábeli, Rodrigo G.

    2014-01-01

    Toxins purified from the venom of spiders have high potential to be studied pharmacologically and biochemically. These biomolecules may have biotechnological and therapeutic applications. This study aimed to evaluate the protein content of Parawixia bistriata venom and functionally characterize its proteins that have potential for biotechnological applications. The crude venom showed no phospholipase, hemorrhagic, or anti-Leishmania activities attesting to low genotoxicity and discrete antifungal activity for C. albicans. However the following activities were observed: anticoagulation, edema, myotoxicity and proteolysis on casein, azo-collagen, and fibrinogen. The chromatographic and electrophoretic profiles of the proteins revealed a predominance of acidic, neutral, and polar proteins, highlighting the presence of proteins with high molecular masses. Five fractions were collected using cation exchange chromatography, with the P4 fraction standing out as that of the highest purity. All fractions showed proteolytic activity. The crude venom and fractions P1, P2, and P3 showed larvicidal effects on A. aegypti. Fraction P4 showed the presence of a possible metalloprotease (60 kDa) that has high proteolytic activity on azo-collagen and was inhibited by EDTA. The results presented in this study demonstrate the presence of proteins in the venom of P. bistriata with potential for biotechnological applications. PMID:24895632

  6. Design of potentially active ligands for SH2 domains by molecular modeling methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurmach V. V.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Search for new chemical structures possessing specific biological activity is a complex problem that needs the use of the latest achievements of molecular modeling technologies. It is well known that SH2 domains play a major role in ontogenesis as intermediaries of specific protein-protein interactions. Aim. Developing an algorithm to investigate the properties of SH2 domain binding, search for new potential active compounds for the whole SH2 domains class. Methods. In this paper, we utilize a complex of computer modeling methods to create a generic set of potentially active compounds targeting universally at the whole class of SH2 domains. A cluster analysis of all available three-dimensional structures of SH2 domains was performed and general pharmacophore models were formulated. The models were used for virtual screening of collection of drug-like compounds provided by Enamine Ltd. Results. The design technique for library of potentially active compounds for SH2 domains class was proposed. Conclusions. The original algorithm of SH2 domains research with molecular docking method was developed. Using our algorithm, the active compounds for SH2 domains were found.

  7. Voltage Gated Calcium Channel Activation by Backpropagating Action Potentials Downregulates NMDAR Function

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    Anne-Kathrin Theis

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The majority of excitatory synapses are located on dendritic spines of cortical glutamatergic neurons. In spines, compartmentalized Ca2+ signals transduce electrical activity into specific long-term biochemical and structural changes. Action potentials (APs propagate back into the dendritic tree and activate voltage gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs. For spines, this global mode of spine Ca2+ signaling is a direct biochemical feedback of suprathreshold neuronal activity. We previously demonstrated that backpropagating action potentials (bAPs result in long-term enhancement of spine VGCCs. This activity-dependent VGCC plasticity results in a large interspine variability of VGCC Ca2+ influx. Here, we investigate how spine VGCCs affect glutamatergic synaptic transmission. We combined electrophysiology, two-photon Ca2+ imaging and two-photon glutamate uncaging in acute brain slices from rats. T- and R-type VGCCs were the dominant depolarization-associated Ca2+conductances in dendritic spines of excitatory layer 2 neurons and do not affect synaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs measured at the soma. Using two-photon glutamate uncaging, we compared the properties of glutamatergic synapses of single spines that express different levels of VGCCs. While VGCCs contributed to EPSP mediated Ca2+ influx, the amount of EPSP mediated Ca2+ influx is not determined by spine VGCC expression. On a longer timescale, the activation of VGCCs by bAP bursts results in downregulation of spine NMDAR function.

  8. Potential to increase active commuting level in university area (Case study: Universitas Gadjah Mada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, M. K.

    2017-06-01

    In order to alleviate the negative impacts of motorized vehicle use as well as create sustainable environment within campus area, it is pivotal to encourage mode shifting among university students. Active transport modes such as walking, cycling, and using public transport can be considered as alternative modes. This paper tried to identify the potential to increase active commuting in UGM by understanding student’s travel behavior. ANOVA test was employed to identify the perceptions between students across residential zones toward motivators and barriers to actively commute. The findings were used to propose strategies for increasing active commuting level in UGM, which are: reducing barriers to actively commute, improving public transport services, improving walking and cycling facilities, and introducing programs to discourage motorized vehicle use.

  9. THEORETICAL AND PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF EXPLORATION THE INNOVATIVE ACTIVE ORGANIZATIONS’ POTENTIAL OF A BALANCED DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Khorev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The concept of "potential" put into practice as a method of study permits the uncertainty associated with the absence of any information about the conditions of functioning in the future. Critical importance is the study of the potential development of an economic entity. S.I. Ozhegov noted that development - natural process changes, the transition from one state to another, more perfect, the transition from an old qualitative state to a new, simple to complex, from lowest to highest. The essential content of balanced development potential based on study of the relationship concepts of «potential of the company», «the development of an economic entity», «balanced development» have been considered in the article. Particular attention is paid to the specifics of development of innovation-active organizations. Conclusion has been made that to the timely detection of potential balanced development need a comprehensive analysis of the conditions and factors functioning economic entity, which have been grouped into three groups: factors of macro, meso and micro level. A comprehensive study of the factors determining the future development of innovation-active enterprises has been conducted in the article. It is shown that the effectiveness of the balanced development of innovation-active organizations in general, and the object of research , in particular , is determined by such factors as the structure and needs of the market , the resource base of innovative development , effective management system development, innovation activity . The authors believe that the inclusion of the multifaceted impact of factors will allow innovative active organizations to build a control system which allows more accurately predict the perspective direction of their future development.

  10. Date palm and the activated sludge co-composting actinobacteria sanitization potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fels, Loubna; Hafidi, Mohamed; Ouhdouch, Yedir

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find a connection between the development of the compost actinobacteria and the potential involvement of antagonistic thermophilic actinomycetes in compost sanitization as high temperature additional role. An abundance of actinobacteria and coliforms during the activated sludge and date palm co-composting is determined. Hundred actinomycete isolates were isolated from the sample collected at different composting times. To evaluate the antagonistic effects of the different recovered actinomycete isolates, several wastewater-linked microorganisms known as human and plant potential pathogens were used. The results showed that 12 isolates have an in vitro inhibitory effect on at least 9 of the indicator microorganisms while only 4 active strains inhibit all these pathogens. The antimicrobial activities of sterilized composting time extracts are also investigated.

  11. Active action potential propagation but not initiation in thalamic interneuron dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Amanda E.; McCormick, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus modulate the activity of thalamocortical cells in response to excitatory input through the release of inhibitory neurotransmitter from both axons and dendrites. The exact mechanisms by which release can occur from dendrites are, however, not well understood. Recent experiments using calcium imaging have suggested that Na/K based action potentials can evoke calcium transients in dendrites via local active conductances, making the back-propagating action potential a candidate for dendritic neurotransmitter release. In this study, we employed high temporal and spatial resolution voltage-sensitive dye imaging to assess the characteristics of dendritic voltage deflections in response to Na/K action potentials in interneurons of the mouse dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus. We found that trains or single action potentials elicited by somatic current injection or local synaptic stimulation led to action potentials that rapidly and actively back-propagated throughout the entire dendritic arbor and into the fine filiform dendritic appendages known to release GABAergic vesicles. Action potentials always appeared first in the soma or proximal dendrite in response to somatic current injection or local synaptic stimulation, and the rapid back-propagation into the dendritic arbor depended upon voltage-gated sodium and TEA-sensitive potassium channels. Our results indicate that thalamic interneuron dendrites integrate synaptic inputs that initiate action potentials, most likely in the axon initial segment, that then back-propagate with high-fidelity into the dendrites, resulting in a nearly synchronous release of GABA from both axonal and dendritic compartments. PMID:22171033

  12. Relationship between hospital pharmacists' job satisfaction and involvement in clinical activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D S; Lawson, K A

    1996-02-01

    Job satisfaction among hospital pharmacists employed by a national hospital pharmacy management company was measured by using a mail questionnaire. A previously validated survey that measured pharmacists' job satisfaction was adapted for use in this study. Additional questions determined the pharmacist's clinical pharmacy training and participation in clinical pharmacy services. Questionnaires were mailed to all full-time hospital pharmacists employed by the pharmacy management company. Of the 606 mailed, deliverable questionnaires, 354 usable responses were returned, for a response rate of 58.4%. The respondent hospital pharmacists' level of job satisfaction showed a positive association with clinical pharmacy involvement. Of the nine items in the questionnaire that measured the pharmacists' involvement in clinical pharmacy services, seven items showed a positive relationship between involvement in that clinical activity and job satisfaction. Mean job satisfaction increased as the percentage of time spent performing clinical pharmacy activities increased. Job satisfaction decreased as time spent performing distributive functions increased. The percentage of time hospital pharmacists were engaged in clinical activities was significantly associated with job satisfaction.

  13. Antifungal Activity of Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom against Clinically Isolated Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Bae Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the antifungal effect of bee venom (BV and sweet bee venom (SBV against Candida albicans (C. albicans clinical isolates. Methods: In this study, BV and SBV were examined for antifungal activities against the Korean Collection for Type Cultures (KCTC strain and 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans. The disk diffusion method was used to measure the antifungal activity and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC assays were performed by using a broth microdilution method. Also, a killing curve assay was conducted to investigate the kinetics of the anti- fungal action. Results: BV and SBV showed antifungal activity against 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans that were cultured from blood and the vagina by using disk diffusion method. The MIC values obtained for clinical isolates by using the broth microdilution method varied from 62.5 μg/ mL to 125 μg/mL for BV and from 15.63 μg/mL to 62.5 μg/mL for SBV. In the killing-curve assay, SBV behaved as amphotericin B, which was used as positive control, did. The antifungal efficacy of SBV was much higher than that of BV. Conclusion: BV and SBV showed antifungal activity against C. albicans clinical strains that were isolated from blood and the vagina. Especially, SBV might be a candidate for a new antifungal agent against C. albicans clinical isolates.

  14. High throughput static and dynamic small animal imaging using clinical PET/CT: potential preclinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aide, Nicolas; Desmonts, Cedric; Agostini, Denis; Bardet, Stephane; Bouvard, Gerard; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Roselt, Peter; Neels, Oliver; Beyer, Thomas; Kinross, Kathryn; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate state-of-the-art clinical PET/CT technology in performing static and dynamic imaging of several mice simultaneously. A mouse-sized phantom was imaged mimicking simultaneous imaging of three mice with computation of recovery coefficients (RCs) and spillover ratios (SORs). Fifteen mice harbouring abdominal or subcutaneous tumours were imaged on clinical PET/CT with point spread function (PSF) reconstruction after injection of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose or [18F]fluorothymidine. Three of these mice were imaged alone and simultaneously at radial positions -5, 0 and 5 cm. The remaining 12 tumour-bearing mice were imaged in groups of 3 to establish the quantitative accuracy of PET data using ex vivo gamma counting as the reference. Finally, a dynamic scan was performed in three mice simultaneously after the injection of 68 Ga-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). For typical lesion sizes of 7-8 mm phantom experiments indicated RCs of 0.42 and 0.76 for ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) and PSF reconstruction, respectively. For PSF reconstruction, SOR air and SOR water were 5.3 and 7.5%, respectively. A strong correlation (r 2 = 0.97, p 2 = 0.98; slope = 0.89, p 2 = 0.96; slope = 0.62, p 68 Ga-EDTA dynamic acquisition. New generation clinical PET/CT can be used for simultaneous imaging of multiple small animals in experiments requiring high throughput and where a dedicated small animal PET system is not available. (orig.)

  15. Proteomic profiling in multiple sclerosis clinical courses reveals potential biomarkers of neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Liguori

    Full Text Available The aim of our project was to perform an exploratory analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF proteomic profiles of Multiple Sclerosis (MS patients, collected in different phases of their clinical course, in order to investigate the existence of peculiar profiles characterizing the different MS phenotypes. The study was carried out on 24 Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS, 16 Relapsing Remitting (RR MS, 11 Progressive (Pr MS patients. The CSF samples were analysed using the Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time Of Flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer in linear mode geometry and in delayed extraction mode (m/z range: 1000-25000 Da. Peak lists were imported for normalization and statistical analysis. CSF data were correlated with demographic, clinical and MRI parameters. The evaluation of MALDI-TOF spectra revealed 348 peak signals with relative intensity ≥ 1% in the study range. The peak intensity of the signals corresponding to Secretogranin II and Protein 7B2 were significantly upregulated in RRMS patients compared to PrMS (p<0.05, whereas the signals of Fibrinogen and Fibrinopeptide A were significantly downregulated in CIS compared to PrMS patients (p<0.04. Additionally, the intensity of the Tymosin β4 peak was the only signal to be significantly discriminated between the CIS and RRMS patients (p = 0.013. Although with caution due to the relatively small size of the study populations, and considering that not all the findings remained significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, in our opinion this mass spectrometry evaluation confirms that this technique may provide useful and important information to improve our understanding of the complex pathogenesis of MS.

  16. Tying knots: an activity theory analysis of student learning goals in clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Douglas P; Wesevich, Austin; Lichtenfeld, Jana; Artino, Antony R; Brydges, Ryan; Varpio, Lara

    2017-07-01

    Learning goal programmes are often created to help students develop self-regulated learning skills; however, these programmes do not necessarily consider the social contexts surrounding learning goals or how they fit into daily educational practice. We investigated a high-frequency learning goal programme in which students generated and shared weekly learning goals with their clinical teams in core Year 3 clerkships. Our study explores: (i) how learning goals were incorporated into the clinical work, and (ii) the factors that influenced the use of students' learning goals in work-based learning. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 14 students and 14 supervisors (attending physicians and residents) sampled from all participating core clerkships. Interviews were coded for emerging themes. Using cultural historical activity theory and knotworking as theoretical lenses, we developed a model of the factors that influenced students' learning goal usage in a work-based learning context. Students and supervisors often faced the challenge of reconciling contradictions that arose when the desired outcomes of student skill development, grading and patient care were not aligned. Learning goals could function as tools for developing new ways of acting that overcame those contradictions by facilitating collaborative effort between students and their supervisors. However, for new collaborations to take place, both students and supervisors had to engage with the goals, and the necessary patients needed to be present. When any one part of the system did not converge around the learning goals, the impact of the learning goals programme was limited. Learning goals are potentially powerful tools to mediate interactions between students, supervisors and patients, and to reconcile contradictions in work-based learning environments. Learning goals provide a means to develop not only learners, but also learning systems. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the

  17. Dihydrotestosterone Potentiates EGF-Induced ERK Activation by Inducing SRC in Fetal Lung Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan M.; Murray, Sandy; Pham, Lucia D.; Minoo, Parviz; Nielsen, Heber C.

    2014-01-01

    Lung maturation is regulated by interactions between mesenchymal and epithelial cells, and is delayed by androgens. Fibroblast–Type II cell communications are dependent on extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 activation by the ErbB receptor ligands epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-α, and neuregulin (Nrg). In other tissues, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) has been shown to activate SRC by a novel nontranscriptional mechanism, which phosphorylates EGF receptors to potentiate EGF-induced ERK1/2 activation. This study sought to determine if DHT potentiates EGFR signaling by a nontranscriptional mechanism. Embryonic day (E)17 fetal lung cells were isolated from dams treated with or without DHT since E12. Cells were exposed to 30 ng/ml DHT for periods of 30 minutes to 3 days before being stimulated with 100 ng/ml EGF, TGF-α, or Nrg for up to 30 minutes. Lysates were immunoblotted for ErbB and SRC pathway signaling intermediates. DHT increased ERK1/2 activation by EGF, TGF-α, and Nrg in fibroblasts and Type II cells. Characterization in fibroblasts showed that potentiation of the EGF pathway was significant after 60 minutes of DHT exposure and persisted in the presence of the translational inhibitor cycloheximide. SRC and EGF receptor phosphorylation was increased by DHT, as was EGF-induced SHC1 phosphorylation and subsequent association with GRB2. Finally, SRC silencing, SRC inhibition with PP2, and overexpression of a dominant-negative SRC each prevented DHT from increasing EGF-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. These results suggest that DHT activates SRC to potentiate the signaling pathway leading from the EGF receptor to ERK activation in primary fetal lung fibroblasts. PMID:24484548

  18. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α Activation Suppresses Cytochrome P450 Induction Potential in Mice Treated with Gemfibrozil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Cunzhong; Min, Luo; Yang, Julin; Dai, Manyun; Song, Danjun; Hua, Huiying; Xu, Gangming; Gonzalez, Frank J; Liu, Aiming

    2017-09-01

    Gemfibrozil, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, is widely used for hypertriglyceridaemia and mixed hyperlipidaemia. Drug-drug interaction of gemfibrozil and other PPARα agonists has been reported. However, the role of PPARα in cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction by fibrates is not well known. In this study, wild-type mice were first fed gemfibrozil-containing diets (0.375%, 0.75% and 1.5%) for 14 days to establish a dose-response relationship for CYP induction. Then, wild-type mice and Pparα-null mice were treated with a 0.75% gemfibrozil-containing diet for 7 days. CYP3a, CYP2b and CYP2c were induced in a dose-dependent manner by gemfibrozil. In Pparα-null mice, their mRNA level, protein level and activity were induced more than those in wild-type mice. So, gemfibrozil induced CYP, and this action was inhibited by activated PPARα. These data suggested that the induction potential of CYPs was suppressed by activated PPARα, showing a potential role of this receptor in drug-drug interactions and metabolic diseases treated with fibrates. © 2017 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  19. Introducing the potential of antimicrobial materials for human and robotic spaceflight activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Claudia; Reitz, Guenther; Moeller, Ralf; Rettberg, Petra; Hans, Michael; Muecklich, Frank

    their relative short reaction time, long efficiency and functionality, broad application to reduce (micro-)biological contamination, high inactivation rates, sustainability, and avoidance of microbial resistance. Methods like contact killing measurement are one of the reliable ways to examine the effect of metal surfaces on the inactivation of microorganisms. We conducted contact killing experiments, in which we exposed human-associated microorganisms like Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus sp. on copper and stainless steel to detect and evaluate the potential incorporation of those materials in future spacecraft components. In contrast to an exposure on stainless steel microorganisms exposed on copper died within a few hours and therefore do not have the ability to proliferate, build protecting biofilms or even survive. The application of different surfaces and antimicrobial substances such as copper and silver, as well as testing other model organisms are still under examination. The results of our experiments are also very promising to other research areas, e.g., clinical application. Here, we would like to present our first data and ideas on the utilization of antimicrobial metal-based surfaces for human and robotic spaceflight activities as a beneficial method to reduce microbial contamination. \\underline{References} Horneck G et al. (2010) Space microbiology. Microbiol. Mol. Biol. Rev. 74:121-156. Vaishampayan P et al. (2013) New perspectives on viable microbial communities in low-biomass cleanroom environments. ISME J. 7:312-324. van Houdt R et al. (2012) Microbial contamination monitoring and control during human space missions. Planet. Space Sci. 60:115-120.

  20. Research nurse manager perceptions about research activities performed by non-nurse clinical research coordinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carolynn Thomas; Hastings, Clare; Wilson, Lynda Law

    2015-01-01

    There has been limited research to document differences in roles between nurses and non-nurses who assume clinical research coordination and management roles. Several authors have suggested that there is no acknowledged guidance for the licensure requirements for research study coordinators and that some non-nurse research coordinators may be assuming roles that are outside of their legal scopes of practice. There is a need for further research on issues related to the delegation of clinical research activities to non-nurses. This study used nominal group process focus groups to identify perceptions of experienced research nurse managers at an academic health science center in the Southern United States about the clinical research activities that are being performed by non-nurse clinical research coordinators without supervision that they believed should only be performed by a nurse or under the supervision of a nurse. A total of 13 research nurse managers volunteered to be contacted about the study. Of those, 8 participated in two separate nominal group process focus group sessions. The group members initially identified 22 activities that they felt should only be performed by a nurse or under the direct supervision of a nurse. After discussion and clarification of results, activities were combined into 12 categories of clinical research activities that participants believed should only be performed by a nurse or under the direct supervision of a nurse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical evidence of the efficacy of everolimus and its potential in the treatment of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saksena R

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rujuta Saksena, Serena T WongThe Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, USAAbstract: The PI3K/Akt/mTOR (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway regulates several key cellular functions and its dysregulation creates an environment that promotes tumorigenesis as well as resistance to therapy. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has emerged as a promising agent in the treatment of breast cancer and was recently approved in combination with exemestane for advanced hormone receptor–positive disease after progression on a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor. Everolimus may also be effective in combination with cytotoxic and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-directed therapies for the treatment of other subtypes of breast cancer. This paper highlights preclinical and clinical data that have emerged on the role of mTOR inhibition in breast cancer. Although generally well tolerated, everolimus carries a unique side effect profile of which both patients and providers should be made aware. Recommendations related to the administration of everolimus in the clinical setting are also discussed.Keywords: everolimus, breast cancer, mTOR inhibition

  2. Diffusion weighted imaging demystified. The technique and potential clinical applications for soft tissue imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlawat, Shivani [The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fayad, Laura M. [The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Department of Oncology, Baltimore, MD (United States); The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2018-03-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a fast, non-contrast technique that is readily available and easy to integrate into an existing imaging protocol. DWI with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping offers a quantitative metric for soft tissue evaluation and provides information regarding the cellularity of a region of interest. There are several available methods of performing DWI, and artifacts and pitfalls must be considered when interpreting DWI studies. This review article will review the various techniques of DWI acquisition and utility of qualitative as well as quantitative methods of image interpretation, with emphasis on optimal methods for ADC measurement. The current clinical applications for DWI are primarily related to oncologic evaluation: For the assessment of de novo soft tissue masses, ADC mapping can serve as a useful adjunct technique to routine anatomic sequences for lesion characterization as cyst or solid and, if solid, benign or malignant. For treated soft tissue masses, the role of DWI/ADC mapping in the assessment of treatment response as well as recurrent or residual neoplasm in the setting of operative management is discussed, especially when intravenous contrast medium cannot be given. Emerging DWI applications for non-neoplastic clinical indications are also reviewed. (orig.)

  3. Diffusion weighted imaging demystified. The technique and potential clinical applications for soft tissue imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlawat, Shivani; Fayad, Laura M.

    2018-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a fast, non-contrast technique that is readily available and easy to integrate into an existing imaging protocol. DWI with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping offers a quantitative metric for soft tissue evaluation and provides information regarding the cellularity of a region of interest. There are several available methods of performing DWI, and artifacts and pitfalls must be considered when interpreting DWI studies. This review article will review the various techniques of DWI acquisition and utility of qualitative as well as quantitative methods of image interpretation, with emphasis on optimal methods for ADC measurement. The current clinical applications for DWI are primarily related to oncologic evaluation: For the assessment of de novo soft tissue masses, ADC mapping can serve as a useful adjunct technique to routine anatomic sequences for lesion characterization as cyst or solid and, if solid, benign or malignant. For treated soft tissue masses, the role of DWI/ADC mapping in the assessment of treatment response as well as recurrent or residual neoplasm in the setting of operative management is discussed, especially when intravenous contrast medium cannot be given. Emerging DWI applications for non-neoplastic clinical indications are also reviewed. (orig.)

  4. Bicuspid aortic valve syndrome and fibrillinopathies: potential impact on clinical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosina De Cario

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is a common heterogeneous disorder whose natural history is determined by hemodynamic valvular impairment and/or increased prevalence of aortic abnormalities ranging from dilatation to aneurysm and dissection. BAV-related aortopathy is frequently associated with relevant aortic pathologic changes leading to structural alterations, characteristic degenerative lesions and histological changes of the aorta very similar to those identified and described in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS, an inherited connective tissue disorder associated with mutations in fibrillin 1 (FBN1 gene in more than 90% of patients. Recently, a 4-fold increase in the prevalence of BAV in MFS patients has been reported. Subsequently, pathogenetic FBN1 mutations in patients with BAV and aortic dilatation/aneurysm in whom MFS and other more severe type 1 fibrillinopathies were clinically excluded have been identified. In this review we discuss how this evidence, together with that of the wide heterogeneity in pathogenetic mechanisms of BAV-related aortopathy, may impact the clinical management of BAV.

  5. Microscope use in clinical veterinary practice and potential implications for veterinary school curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sherry M; Dowers, Kristy L; Cerda, Jacey R; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina M; Kogan, Lori R

    2014-01-01

    Microscopy (skill of using a microscope) and the concepts of cytology (study of cells) and histology (study of tissues) are most often taught in professional veterinary medicine programs through the traditional method of glass slides and light microscopes. Several limiting factors in veterinary training programs are encouraging educators to explore innovative options for teaching microscopy skills and the concepts of cytology and histology. An anonymous online survey was administered through the Colorado Veterinary Medical Association to Colorado veterinarians working in private practice. It was designed to assess their current usage of microscopes for cytological and histological evaluation of specimens and their perceptions of microscope use in their veterinary education. The first part of the survey was answered by 183 veterinarians, with 104 indicating they had an onsite diagnostic lab. Analysis pertaining to the use of the microscope in practice and in veterinary programs was conducted on this subset. Most respondents felt the amount of time spent in the curriculum using a microscope was just right for basic microscope use and using the microscope for viewing and learning about normal and abnormal histological sections and clinical cytology. Participants felt more emphasis could be placed on clinical and diagnostic cytology. Study results suggest that practicing veterinarians frequently use microscopes for a wide variety of cytological diagnostics. However, only two respondents indicated they prepared samples for histological evaluation. Veterinary schools should consider these results against the backdrop of pressure to implement innovative teaching techniques to meet the changing needs of the profession.

  6. Amniotic membrane-derived stem cells: immunomodulatory properties and potential clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insausti CL

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carmen L Insausti,1 Miguel Blanquer,1 Ana M García-Hernández,1 Gregorio Castellanos,2 José M Moraleda11Unidad de Trasplante Hematopoyético y Terapia Celular, 2Servicio de Cirugía, Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, IMIB, Campus Mare Nostrum, Universidad de Murcia, El Palmar, Murcia, SpainAbstract: Epithelial and mesenchymal cells isolated from the amniotic membrane (AM possess stem cell characteristics, differentiation potential toward lineages of different germ layers, and immunomodulatory properties. While their expansion and differentiation potential have been well studied and characterized, knowledge about their immunomodulatory properties and the mechanisms involved is still incomplete. These mechanisms have been evaluated on various target cells of the innate and the adaptive system and in animal models of different inflammatory diseases. Some results have evidenced that the immunomodulatory effect of AM-derived cells is dependent on cell-cell contact, but many of them have demonstrated that these properties are mediated through the secretion of suppressive molecules. In this review, we present an update on the described immunomodulatory properties of the derived amniotic cells and some of the proposed involved mechanisms. Furthermore, we describe some assays in animal models of different inflammatory diseases which reveal the potential use of these cells to treat such diseases.Keywords: epithelial cells, mesenchymal cells, cell therapy, immunomodulation

  7. Impact of accelerated electrons on activating process and foaming potential of sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuba, V.; Pospisil, M.; Mucka, V.; Silber, R.; Jenicek, P.; Dohanyos, M.; Zabranska, J.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Presently, anaerobic and/or aerobic biological treatment is the cheapest and the most effective method of wastewater and sludge processing. However, due to some non-biodegradable substances present in wastewater and also due to limited capacity of wastewater treatment plants, it is necessary to find effective processes, that would be complementary to existing sludge treatment methods. Beside chemical and physical processes, radiation technology seems to offer improvement of effectivity of biological treatment. The paper describes possibilities of irradiation in activating process. Activated sludge can be affected in all its parameters, including physico chemical properties, such as sedimentation rate, or resulting volume of sludge. For the purpose of this research, laboratory experimental reactors simulating activating process were operated. According to previous results, accelerated electrons were used for irradiation, for e-beam seems to be more expedient than gamma irradiation. Reactor with irradiated sludge has been compared with the one without irradiation. It is shown, that pre-irradiation of sludge can positively affect following process of activation. Beside the activating process, another goal has been pursued. Radiation can strongly affect sludge foaming potential. Biological foaming caused by surfactant microorganisms, represents quite serious problem in many wastewater treatment plants, especially in digesters. It was proved that after irradiation foaming potential of sludge decreases. Pre-irradiation of activated sludge with relatively low doses also results in reduction of number of pathogenic microorganisms, presented in sludge

  8. [Clinical research activity of the French cancer cooperative network: Overview and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Claire; Morin, Franck; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Langlais, Alexandra; Seitz, Jean-François; Girault, Cécile; Salles, Gilles; Haioun, Corinne; Deschaseaux, Pascal; Casassus, Philippe; Mathiot, Claire; Pujade-Lauraine, Éric; Votan, Bénédicte; Louvet, Christophe; Delpeut, Christine; Bardet, Étienne; Vintonenko, Nadejda; Hoang Xuan, Khê; Vo, Maryline; Michon, Jean; Milleron, Bernard

    The French Cancer Plan 2014-2019 stresses the importance of strengthening collaboration between all stakeholders involved in the fight against cancer, including cancer cooperative groups and intergroups. This survey aimed to describe the basics characteristics and clinical research activity among the Cancer Cooperative Groups (Groupes coopérateurs en oncologie). The second objective was to identify facilitators and barriers to their research activity. A questionnaire was sent to all the clinicians involved in 2014 as investigators in a clinical trial sponsored by one of the ten members of the Cancer Cooperative Groups network. The questions were related to their profile, research activity and the infrastructure existing within their healthcare center to support clinical research and related compliance activities. In total, 366 investigators responded to our survey. The academic clinical trials sponsored by the Cancer Cooperative Groups represented an important part of the research activity of the investigators in France in 2014. These academic groups contributed to the opening of many research sites throughout all regions in France. Factors associated with a higher participation of investigators (more than 10 patients enrolled in a trial over a year) include the existing support of healthcare professionals (more than 2 clinical research associate (CRA) OR=11.16 [3.82-32.6] compared to none) and the practice of their research activity in a University Hospital Center (CHU) rather than a Hospital Center (CH) (OR=2.15 [1.20-3.83]). This study highlighted factors that can strengthen investigator clinical research activities and subsequently improve patient access to evidence-based new cancer therapies in France. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Curcumin, an active component of turmeric in the prevention and treatment of ulcerative colitis: preclinical and clinical observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath; Joseph, Nandhini; Venkataranganna, Marikunte V; Saxena, Arpit; Ponemone, Venkatesh; Fayad, Raja

    2012-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprising of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) is a major ailment affecting the small and large bowel. In clinics, IBD is treated using 5-amninosalicylates, antibiotics, the steroids and immunomodulators. Unfortunately, the long term usages of these agents are associated with undue side effects and compromise the therapeutic advantage. Accordingly, there is a need for novel agents that are effective, acceptable and non toxic to humans. Preclinical studies in experimental animals have shown that curcumin, an active principle of the Indian spice turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn) is effective in preventing or ameliorating UC and inflammation. Over the last few decades there has been increasing interest in the possible role of curcumin in IBD and several studies with various experimental models of IBD have shown it to be effective in mediating the inhibitory effects by scavenging free radicals, increasing antioxidants, influencing multiple signaling pathways, especially the kinases (MAPK, ERK), inhibiting myeloperoxidase, COX-1, COX-2, LOX, TNF-α, IFN-γ, iNOS; inhibiting the transcription factor NF-κB. Clinical studies have also shown that co-administration of curcumin with conventional drugs was effective, to be well-tolerated and treated as a safe medication for maintaining remission, to prevent relapse and improve clinical activity index. Large randomized controlled clinical investigations are required to fully understand the potential of oral curcumin for treating IBD.

  10. Active video games to promote physical activity in children with cancer: a randomized clinical trial with follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauhanen, Lotta; Järvelä, Liisa; Lähteenmäki, Päivi M; Arola, Mikko; Heinonen, Olli J; Axelin, Anna; Lilius, Johan; Vahlberg, Tero; Salanterä, Sanna

    2014-04-05

    Low levels of physical activity, musculoskeletal morbidity and weight gain are commonly reported problems in children with cancer. Intensive medical treatment and a decline in physical activity may also result in reduced motor performance. Therefore, simple and inexpensive ways to promote physical activity and exercise are becoming an increasingly important part of children's cancer treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of active video games in promotion of physical activity in children with cancer. The research is conducted as a parallel randomized clinical trial with follow-up. Patients between 3 and 16 years old, diagnosed with cancer and treated with vincristine in two specialized medical centers are asked to participate. Based on statistical estimates, the target enrollment is 40 patients. The intervention includes playing elective active video games and, in addition, education and consultations for the family. The control group will receive a general recommendation for physical activity for 30 minutes per day. The main outcomes are the amount of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Other outcomes include motor performance, fatigue and metabolic risk factors. The outcomes are examined with questionnaires, diaries, physical examinations and blood tests at baseline and at 2, 6, 12 and 30 months after the baseline. Additionally, the children's perceptions of the most enjoyable activation methods are explored through an interview at 2 months. This trial will help to answer the question of whether playing active video games is beneficial for children with cancer. It will also provide further reasoning for physical activity promotion and training of motor skills during treatment. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01748058 (October 15, 2012).

  11. NEW METABOLIC INDEX USE POTENTIALITIES IN EVALUATION OF INSULIN RESISTANCE IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Roytberg

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnostics of insulin resistance (IR is one of the methods of primary prevention of cardio-vascular diseases and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The HOMA-IR index and ratio of plasma triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration are the most frequently used indices in clinical and epidemiological scientific research. Prognostic value and efficacy of these tests as a screening method are not high. What method of IR detection should be used in clinical practice and how to interpret received values of the indices is still a matter of dispute.Aim. To evaluate informative value, sensitivity and specificity of a new metabolic index (MI for IR estimation in comparison with the calculated HOMA-IR index.Material and methods. A total of 845 patients (298 men, 547 women were enrolled into the further study after an outpatient regular medical check-up of 2,615 persons. Mean age of the patients was 45.77±12.18 years, body mass index – 28.95±1.44 kg/m2. To evaluate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism blood chemistry parameters were assessed. IR was determined by the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA-IR and an oblique calculated index based on lipid metabolism parameters. In accordance with the developed screening method of IR detection (invention patent № 2493566 MI considering carbohydrate and lipid changes was proposed.Results. Calculation of MI and its threshold level was performed by analysis of a characteristic curve. Graphical dependence between sensitivity and specificity of the proposed index was demonstrated: sensitivity of the test was 75.7%, specificity – 89.1%. Probability of IR at MI value >7.0 was 63.5% (positive predictive value, probability of IR absence at the index value ≤7.0 was 93.6% (negative predictive value. The general accuracy of the test, which is characterized by the area under the characteristic curve, was 0.881 with 95%-confidence interval within 0.854-0.905.Conclusion. The importance of negative

  12. NEW METABOLIC INDEX USE POTENTIALITIES IN EVALUATION OF INSULIN RESISTANCE IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Roytberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnostics of insulin resistance (IR is one of the methods of primary prevention of cardio-vascular diseases and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The HOMA-IR index and ratio of plasma triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration are the most frequently used indices in clinical and epidemiological scientific research. Prognostic value and efficacy of these tests as a screening method are not high. What method of IR detection should be used in clinical practice and how to interpret received values of the indices is still a matter of dispute.Aim. To evaluate informative value, sensitivity and specificity of a new metabolic index (MI for IR estimation in comparison with the calculated HOMA-IR index.Material and methods. A total of 845 patients (298 men, 547 women were enrolled into the further study after an outpatient regular medical check-up of 2,615 persons. Mean age of the patients was 45.77±12.18 years, body mass index – 28.95±1.44 kg/m2. To evaluate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism blood chemistry parameters were assessed. IR was determined by the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA-IR and an oblique calculated index based on lipid metabolism parameters. In accordance with the developed screening method of IR detection (invention patent № 2493566 MI considering carbohydrate and lipid changes was proposed.Results. Calculation of MI and its threshold level was performed by analysis of a characteristic curve. Graphical dependence between sensitivity and specificity of the proposed index was demonstrated: sensitivity of the test was 75.7%, specificity – 89.1%. Probability of IR at MI value >7.0 was 63.5% (positive predictive value, probability of IR absence at the index value ≤7.0 was 93.6% (negative predictive value. The general accuracy of the test, which is characterized by the area under the characteristic curve, was 0.881 with 95%-confidence interval within 0.854-0.905.Conclusion. The importance of negative

  13. Predicting PTSD using the New York Risk Score with genotype data: potential clinical and research opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boscarino JA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Joseph A Boscarino,1,2 H Lester Kirchner,3,4 Stuart N Hoffman,5 Porat M Erlich1,4 1Center for Health Research, Geisinger Clinic, Danville, 2Department of Psychiatry, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, 3Division of Medicine, Geisinger Clinic, Danville, 4Department of Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, 5Department of Neurology, Geisinger Clinic, Danville, PA, USA Background: We previously developed a post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD screening instrument, ie, the New York PTSD Risk Score (NYPRS, that was effective in predicting PTSD. In the present study, we assessed a version of this risk score that also included genetic information. Methods: Utilizing diagnostic testing methods, we hierarchically examined different prediction variables identified in previous NYPRS research, including genetic risk-allele information, to assess lifetime and current PTSD status among a population of trauma-exposed adults. Results: We found that, in predicting lifetime PTSD, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC for the Primary Care PTSD Screen alone was 0.865. When we added psychosocial predictors from the original NYPRS to the model, including depression, sleep disturbance, and a measure of health care access, the AUC increased to 0.902, which was a significant improvement (P = 0.0021. When genetic information was added in the form of a count of PTSD risk alleles located within FKBP, COMT, CHRNA5, and CRHR1 genetic loci (coded 0–6, the AUC increased to 0.920, which was also a significant improvement (P = 0.0178. The results for current PTSD were similar. In the final model for current PTSD with the psychosocial risk factors included, genotype resulted in a prediction weight of 17 for each risk allele present, indicating that a person with six risk alleles or more would receive a PTSD risk score of 17 × 6 = 102, the highest risk score for any of the predictors studied. Conclusion: Genetic

  14. Development of Optically Active Nanostructures for Potential Applications in Sensing, Therapeutics and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Padmanabh

    Materials at nanoscale are finding manifold applications in the various fields like sensing, plasmonics, therapeutics, to mention a few. Large amount of development has taken place regarding synthesis and exploring the novel applications of the various types of nanomaterials like organic, inorganic and hybrid of both. Yet, it is believed that the full potential of different nanomaterials is yet to be fully established stimulating researchers to explore more in the field of nanotechnology. Building on the same premise, in the following studies we have developed the nanomaterials in the class of optically active nanoparticles. First part of the study we have successfully designed, synthesized, and characterized Ag-Fe3O4 nanocomposite substrate for potential applications in quantitative Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) measurements. Quantitative SERS-based detection of dopamine was performed successfully. In subsequent study, facile, single-step synthesis of polyethyleneimine (PEI) coated lanthanide based NaYF4 (Yb, Er) nanoparticles was developed and their application as potential photodynamic therapy agent was studied using excitations by light in near infra-red and visible region. In the following and last study, synthesis and characterization of the conjugated polymer nanoparticles was attempted successfully. Functionalization of the conjugated nanoparticles, which is a bottleneck for their potential applications, was successfully performed by encapsulating them in the silica nanoparticles, surface of which was then functionalized by amine group. Three types of optically active nanoparticles were developed for potential applications in sensing, therapeutics and imaging.

  15. Physical activity in type II Diabetes Mellitus, an effective therapeutic element: review of the clinical impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Iván Arias-Vázquez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A review was conducted in databases (PubMed, PEDro of type studies clinical trial, cohort study, systematic reviews, meta-analysis and clinical practice guidelines based on evidence they have studied the benefits of physical activity in the prevention , treatment and decreased risk of complications and death in patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus. Realization regular physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of developing Diabetes Mellitus; likewise was associated with decrease in glycated hemoglobin percentage A1C values. Diabetic patients undergoing high levels of physical activity had decreased risk of complications and death from cardiovascular disease and all causes. At present the scientific evidence on the impact of physical activity in the prevention and treatment of Diabetes Mellitus is solid, so it must be emphasized promoting physical activity as a fundamental part of the therapeutic regimens for this disease.

  16. A prospective phase II trial exploring the association between tumor microenvironment biomarkers and clinical activity of ipilimumab in advanced melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Omid

    2011-11-01

    ipilimumab clinical activity. The observed pharmacodynamic changes in gene expression warrant further analysis to determine whether treatment-emergent changes in gene expression may be associated with clinical efficacy. Further studies are required to determine the predictive value of these and other potential biomarkers associated with clinical response to ipilimumab.

  17. Clinical evaluation of chitotriosidase enzyme activity in Gaucher and Niemann Pick A/B diseases: A retrospective study from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadali, Srilatha; Kolusu, Anusha; Sunkara, Satish; Gummadi, Maheshwar Reddy; Undamatla, Jayanthi

    2016-06-01

    Plasma chitotriosidase originates from activated macrophages and is reported to be elevated in many Lysosomal Storage Disorders. Measurement of this enzyme activity has been an available tool for monitoring therapy of Gaucher disease. The degree of elevation of chitotriosidase is useful for differential diagnosis of Gaucher disease and Niemann Pick A/B. However the potential utility of this chitotriosidase assay depends on the frequency of deficient chitotriosidase activity in a particular population. We therefore aim to study the clinical utility of this assay Gaucher and Niemann Pick A/B diseases in the backdrop of chitotriosidase deficiency in our population. The study comprises 173 patients with clinical suspicion of either Gaucher disease (n=108) or Niemann Pick A/B (n=65) and 92 healthy controls. The plasma samples of controls, Gaucher disease, and Niemann Pick A/B showed chitotriosidase deficiency of 12%, 25% and 27% respectively. The degree of elevation of chitotriosidase in Gaucher disease and Niemann Pick A/B patients is 40-326 (11,325.7±6395.4nmol/h/ml) and 7-22 folds (1192.5±463.0nmol/h/ml) respectively. In view of these findings of distinguishable fold elevation of chitotriosidase in Gaucher disease or Niemann Pick A/B, it can be a potential surrogate differential diagnostic marker for these groups of diseases, except in the patients in whom this enzyme is deficient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Complexities and potential pitfalls of clinical study design and data analysis in assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patounakis, George; Hill, Micah J

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of the current review is to describe the common pitfalls in design and statistical analysis of reproductive medicine studies. It serves to guide both authors and reviewers toward reducing the incidence of spurious statistical results and erroneous conclusions. The large amount of data gathered in IVF cycles leads to problems with multiplicity, multicollinearity, and over fitting of regression models. Furthermore, the use of the word 'trend' to describe nonsignificant results has increased in recent years. Finally, methods to accurately account for female age in infertility research models are becoming more common and necessary. The pitfalls of study design and analysis reviewed provide a framework for authors and reviewers to approach clinical research in the field of reproductive medicine. By providing a more rigorous approach to study design and analysis, the literature in reproductive medicine will have more reliable conclusions that can stand the test of time.

  19. Biology and potential clinical implications of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 in colorectal cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nanna Møller; Sørensen, irene Vejgaard; Würtz, Sidse Ørnbjerg

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the industrialized world. About half of "curatively" resected patients develop recurrent disease within the next 3-5 years despite the lack of clinical, histological and biochemical evidence of remaining overt disease...... after resection of the primary tumour. Availability of validated biological markers for early detection, selection for adjuvant therapy, prediction of treatment efficacy and monitoring of treatment efficacy would most probably increase survival. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) may...... patients, suggesting that TIMP-1 could have a tumour-promoting function. Furthermore, measurement of plasma TIMP-1 has been shown to be useful for disease detection, with a high sensitivity and high specificity for early-stage colon cancer. This review describes some basic information on the current...

  20. Towards Achieving the Full Clinical Potential of Proton Therapy by Inclusion of LET and RBE Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Bleddyn [Gray Laboratory, CRUK/MRC Oxford Oncology Institute, The University of Oxford, ORCRB-Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-17

    Despite increasing use of proton therapy (PBT), several systematic literature reviews show limited gains in clinical outcomes, with publications mostly devoted to recent technical developments. The lack of randomised control studies has also hampered progress in the acceptance of PBT by many oncologists and policy makers. There remain two important uncertainties associated with PBT, namely: (1) accuracy and reproducibility of Bragg peak position (BPP); and (2) imprecise knowledge of the relative biological effect (RBE) for different tissues and tumours, and at different doses. Incorrect BPP will change dose, linear energy transfer (LET) and RBE, with risks of reduced tumour control and enhanced toxicity. These interrelationships are discussed qualitatively with respect to the ICRU target volume definitions. The internationally accepted proton RBE of 1.1 was based on assays and dose ranges unlikely to reveal the complete range of RBE in the human body. RBE values are not known for human (or animal) brain, spine, kidney, liver, intestine, etc. A simple efficiency model for estimating proton RBE values is described, based on data of Belli et al. and other authors, which allows linear increases in α and β with LET, with a gradient estimated using a saturation model from the low LET α and β radiosensitivity parameter input values, and decreasing RBE with increasing dose. To improve outcomes, 3-D dose-LET-RBE and bio-effectiveness maps are required. Validation experiments are indicated in relevant tissues. Randomised clinical studies that test the invariant 1.1 RBE allocation against higher values in late reacting tissues, and lower tumour RBE values in the case of radiosensitive tumours, are also indicated.

  1. Clinical potentials of methylator phenotype in stage 4 high-risk neuroblastoma: an open challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Banelli

    Full Text Available Approximately 20% of stage 4 high-risk neuroblastoma patients are alive and disease-free 5 years after disease onset while the remaining experience rapid and fatal progression. Numerous findings underline the prognostic role of methylation of defined target genes in neuroblastoma without taking into account the clinical and biological heterogeneity of this disease. In this report we have investigated the methylation of the PCDHB cluster, the most informative member of the "Methylator Phenotype" in neuroblastoma, hypothesizing that if this epigenetic mark can predict overall and progression free survival in high-risk stage 4 neuroblastoma, it could be utilized to improve the risk stratification of the patients, alone or in conjunction with the previously identified methylation of the SFN gene (14.3.3sigma that can accurately predict outcome in these patients. We have utilized univariate and multivariate models to compare the prognostic power of PCDHB methylation in terms of overall and progression free survival, quantitatively determined by pyrosequencing, with that of other markers utilized for the patients' stratification utilizing methylation thresholds calculated on neuroblastoma at stage 1-4 and only on stage 4, high-risk patients. Our results indicate that PCDHB accurately distinguishes between high- and intermediate/low risk stage 4 neuroblastoma in agreement with the established risk stratification criteria. However PCDHB cannot predict outcome in the subgroup of stage 4 patients at high-risk whereas methylation levels of SFN are suggestive of a "methylation gradient" associated with tumor aggressiveness as suggested by the finding of a higher threshold that defines a subset of patients with an extremely severe disease (OS <24 months. Because of the heterogeneity of neuroblastoma we believe that clinically relevant methylation markers should be selected and tested on homogeneous groups of patients rather than on patients at all stages.

  2. The human immune response to streptococcal extracellular antigens: clinical, diagnostic, and potential pathogenetic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dwight R; Kurlan, Roger; Leckman, James; Kaplan, Edward L

    2010-02-15

    Determination of an immune response to group A Streptococcus (GAS) antigens, frequently anti-streptolysin O and anti-DNase B, is crucial for documentation of bona fide GAS infection. Although the importance of immunologic confirmation of infection is widely accepted, the immediate and long-term immunokinetics of the human antibody response are incompletely documented and poorly understood. Pediatric study participants (n = 160) were followed during a 2-year study with monthly throat cultures (n = 3491) and blood samples (n = 1679) obtained every 13 weeks. Recovered GAS were characterized; serum anti-streptolysin O and anti-DNase B antibody titers were determined. Antibody titers and GAS culture results were temporally correlated and analyzed. The analyses clearly document, in some instances for the first time, that an increase in antibody titer more accurately defines infection than does an absolute titer (eg, "upper limit of normal"), that antibody titers can remain elevated for many months even without GAS, and that some individuals may harbor GAS continuously for months or years without symptoms of infection and without an associated immune response. Measuring 2 different antibodies is more accurate in defining infection. Single time-point cultures and single antibody titers are often misleading. Sequential samples more accurately define infection, allowing correlation of titer increases with temporal confirmation of GAS acquisition. Understanding kinetics of the immune response(s) to GAS infection is necessary in formulating accurate clinical diagnostic conclusions, to appropriate design of clinical and epidemiological studies examining the association of GAS with subsequent sequelae, and to providing insight into pathogenetic mechanisms associated with this important human pathogen.

  3. Towards Achieving the Full Clinical Potential of Proton Therapy by Inclusion of LET and RBE Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Bleddyn

    2015-01-01

    Despite increasing use of proton therapy (PBT), several systematic literature reviews show limited gains in clinical outcomes, with publications mostly devoted to recent technical developments. The lack of randomised control studies has also hampered progress in the acceptance of PBT by many oncologists and policy makers. There remain two important uncertainties associated with PBT, namely: (1) accuracy and reproducibility of Bragg peak position (BPP); and (2) imprecise knowledge of the relative biological effect (RBE) for different tissues and tumours, and at different doses. Incorrect BPP will change dose, linear energy transfer (LET) and RBE, with risks of reduced tumour control and enhanced toxicity. These interrelationships are discussed qualitatively with respect to the ICRU target volume definitions. The internationally accepted proton RBE of 1.1 was based on assays and dose ranges unlikely to reveal the complete range of RBE in the human body. RBE values are not known for human (or animal) brain, spine, kidney, liver, intestine, etc. A simple efficiency model for estimating proton RBE values is described, based on data of Belli et al. and other authors, which allows linear increases in α and β with LET, with a gradient estimated using a saturation model from the low LET α and β radiosensitivity parameter input values, and decreasing RBE with increasing dose. To improve outcomes, 3-D dose-LET-RBE and bio-effectiveness maps are required. Validation experiments are indicated in relevant tissues. Randomised clinical studies that test the invariant 1.1 RBE allocation against higher values in late reacting tissues, and lower tumour RBE values in the case of radiosensitive tumours, are also indicated

  4. Clinical Drug-Drug Pharmacokinetic Interaction Potential of Sucralfate with Other Drugs: Review and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulochana, Suresh P; Syed, Muzeeb; Chandrasekar, Devaraj V; Mullangi, Ramesh; Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-10-01

    Sucralfate, a complex of aluminium hydroxide with sulfated sucrose, forms a strong gastrointestinal tract (GIT) mucosal barrier with excellent anti-ulcer property. Because sucralfate does not undergo any significant oral absorption, sucralfate resides in the GIT for a considerable length of time. The unabsorbed sucralfate may alter the pharmacokinetics of the oral drugs by impeding its absorption and reducing the oral bioavailability. Because of the increased use of sucralfate, it was important to provide a reappraisal of the published clinical drug-drug interaction studies of sucralfate with scores of drugs. This review covers several category of drugs such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, fluoroquinolones, histamine H2-receptor blockers, macrolides, anti-fungals, anti-diabetics, salicylic acid derivatives, steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and provides pharmacokinetic data summary along with study design, objectives and key remarks. While the loss of oral bioavailability was significant for the fluoroquinolone class, it generally varied for other classes of drugs, suggesting that impact of the co-administration of sucralfate is manageable in clinical situations. Given the technology advancement in formulation development, it may be in order feasible to develop appropriate formulation strategies to either avoid or minimize the absorption-related issues when co-administered with sucralfate. It is recommended that consideration of both in vitro and preclinical studies may be in order to gauge the level of interaction of a drug with sucralfate. Such data may aid in the development of appropriate strategies to navigate the co-administration of sucralfate with other drugs in this age of polypharmacy.

  5. Antimicrobial activity of the imipenem/rifampicin combination against clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii grown in planktonic and biofilm cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Bao, Wanguo; Guo, Na; Chen, Haiying; Cheng, Wei; Jin, Kunqi; Shen, Fengge; Xu, Jiancheng; Zhang, Qiaoli; Wang, Chao; An, Yanan; Zhang, Kaiyu; Wang, Feng; Yu, Lu

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the antimicrobial activity of imipenem and rifampicin alone and in combination against clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii grown in planktonic and biofilm cultures. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for each isolate grown in suspension and in biofilm using a microbroth dilution method. Chequerboard assays and the agar disk diffusion assay were used to determine synergistic, indifferent or antagonistic interactions between imipenem and rifampicin. We used the tissue culture plate method for A. baumannii biofilm formation to measure the percentage of biofilm inhibition and the amount of extracellular DNA after the treatment. To understand the synergistic mechanisms, we conducted hydroxyl radical formation assays. The results were verified by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Imipenem and rifampicin showed effective antimicrobial activity against suspensions and biofilm cultures of A. baumannii, respectively. Synergistic antimicrobial effects between imipenem and rifampicin were observed in 13 and 17 of the 20 clinical isolates when in suspension and in biofilms, respectively. Imipenem and rifampicin alone and in combination generated hydroxyl radicals, which are highly reactive oxygen forms and the major components of bactericidal agents. Furthermore, treatment with imipenem and rifampicin individually or in combination has obvious antibiofilm effects. The synergistic activity of imipenem and rifampicin against clinical isolates of A. baumannii (in suspension and in biofilms) was observed in vitro. Therefore, we conclude that imipenem combined with rifampicin has the potential to be used as a combinatorial therapy for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by A. baumannii.

  6. Potential Anti-Cancer Activities and Mechanisms of Costunolide and Dehydrocostuslactone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejing Lin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Costunolide (CE and dehydrocostuslactone (DE are derived from many species of medicinal plants, such as Saussurea lappa Decne and Laurus nobilis L. They have been reported for their wide spectrum of biological effects, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, antimicrobial, antifungal, antioxidant, antidiabetic, antiulcer, and anthelmintic activities. In recent years, they have caused extensive interest in researchers due to their potential anti-cancer activities for various types of cancer, and their anti-cancer mechanisms, including causing cell cycle arrest, inducing apoptosis and differentiation, promoting the aggregation of microtubule protein, inhibiting the activity of telomerase, inhibiting metastasis and invasion, reversing multidrug resistance, restraining angiogenesis has been studied. This review will summarize anti-cancer activities and associated molecular mechanisms of these two compounds for the purpose of promoting their research and application.

  7. Midazolam inhibits hippocampal long-term potentiation and learning through dual central and peripheral benzodiazepine receptor activation and neurosteroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Kazuhiro; O'Dell, Kazuko A; Izumi, Yukitoshi; Zorumski, Charles F

    2010-12-15

    Benzodiazepines (BDZs) enhance GABA(A) receptor inhibition by direct actions on central BDZ receptors (CBRs). Although some BDZs also bind mitochondrial receptors [translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO)] and promote the synthesis of GABA-enhancing neurosteroids, the role of neurosteroids in the clinical effects of BDZs is unknown. In rat hippocampal slices, we compared midazolam, an anesthetic BDZ, with clonazepam, an anticonvulsant/anxiolytic BDZ that activates CBRs selectively. Midazolam, but not clonazepam, increased neurosteroid levels in CA1 pyramidal neurons without changing TSPO immunostaining. Midazolam, but not clonazepam, also augmented a form of spike inhibition after stimulation adjacent to the pyramidal cell layer and inhibited induction of long-term potentiation. These effects were prevented by finasteride, an inhibitor of neurosteroid synthesis, or 17PA [17-phenyl-(3α,5α)-androst-16-en-3-ol], a blocker of neurosteroid effects on GABA(A) receptors. Moreover, the synaptic effects were mimicked by a combination of clonazepam with FGIN (2-[2-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]-N,N-dihexylacetamide), a selective TSPO agonist, or a combination of clonazepam with exogenous allopregnanolone. Consistent with these in vitro results, finasteride abolished the effects of midazolam on contextual fear learning when administrated 1 d before midazolam injection. Thus, dual activation of CBRs and TSPO appears to result in unique actions of clinically important BDZs. Furthermore, endogenous neurosteroids are shown to be important regulators of pyramidal neuron function and synaptic plasticity.

  8. Modifying the Clinical Research Infrastructure at a Dedicated Clinical Trials Unit: Assessment of Trial Development, Activation, and Participant Accrual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chad; Hess, Kenneth R; Sanders, Dwana; Davis, Suzanne E; Buzdar, Aman U; Kurzrock, Razelle; Lee, J Jack; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hong, David S

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: Information on processes for trials assessing investigational therapeutics is sparse. We assessed the trial development processes within the Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics (ICT) at MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX) and analyzed their effects on the trial activation timeline and enrolment. Experimental Design: Data were from a prospectively maintained registry that tracks all clinical studies at MD Anderson. From this database, we identified 2,261 activated phase I-III trials; 221 were done at the ICT. ICT trials were matched to trials from other MD Anderson departments by phase, sponsorship, and submission year. Trial performance metrics were compared with paired Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Results: We identified three facets of the ICT research infrastructure: parallel processing of trial approval steps; a physician-led research team; and regular weekly meetings to foster research accountability. Separate analyses were conducted stratified by sponsorship [industry (133 ICT and 133 non-ICT trials) or institutional (68 ICT and 68 non-ICT trials)]. ICT trial development was faster from IRB approval to activation (median difference of 1.1 months for industry-sponsored trials vs. 2.3 months for institutional) and from activation to first enrolment (median difference of 0.3 months for industry vs. 1.2 months for institutional; all matched P infrastructure within a large academic cancer center was associated with efficient trial development and participant accrual. Clin Cancer Res; 23(6); 1407-13. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Otolithic disease: clinical features and the role of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

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    Curthoys, Ian S; Manzari, Leonardo

    2013-07-01

    Through selective tests of the function of the canal and otolith sense organs, it is possible to assert that patient conditions are purely otolithic and that the canals are not involved. The video head impulse test selectively tests each semicircular canal; the ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential to 500 Hz Fz (Fz is the location on the forehead in the midline at the hairline) bone-conducted vibration (BCV) selectively tests the utricular macula and the cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential to 500 Hz Fz BCV selectively tests the saccular macula. The development of new specific tests of otolith function has shown that some patients may have specific deficits of just otolithic function. In the authors' experience, patients who complain strongly of postural unsteadiness should be suspected to have otolithic deficits. They may also have vertigo and in some cases have spontaneous nystagmus of peripheral origin, even though their semicircular canal function is normal. The prognosis for such patients is good. They usually appear to regain their postural stability spontaneously over weeks (or longer), even though they still have an otolithic deficit as shown by objective tests when they are free of symptoms. It is not known what procedures may accelerate the recovery of otolith function. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine: determining clinical impact and potential harm from overuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnuk, Nathan M; Alkasab, Tarik K; Rosenthal, Daniel I

    2018-04-18

    Lumbar spine MRI is frequently said to be "overused" in the evaluation of low-back pain, yet data concerning the extent of overuse and on potential harmful effects are lacking. To determine the proportion of examinations with a detectable impact on patient care (actionable outcomes). Retrospective cohort study PATIENT SAMPLE: 5,365 outpatient lumbar spine MR examinations OUTCOME MEASURES: Actionable outcomes included: 1) findings leading to an intervention making use of anatomical information such as surgery; 2) new diagnoses of cancer, infection, or fracture; or 3) following known lumbar spine pathology. Potential harm was assessed by identifying examinations where suspicion of cancer or infection was raised but no positive diagnosis made. A medical record aggregation/search system was used to identify lumbar spine MR examinations with positive outcome measures. Patient notes were examined to verify outcomes. A random sample was manually inspected to identify missed positive outcomes. The proportion of actionable lumbar spine MRIs was 13%, although 93% were appropriate according to American College of Radiology guidelines. Of 36 suspected cases of cancer/infection 81% were false positives. Further investigations were ordered on 59% of suspicious exams, 86% of which were false positives. The proportion of lumbar spine MR examinations that inform management is small. The false positive rate and proportion of false positives involving further investigation is high. Further study to improve the efficiency of imaging is warranted. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. ANALYSIS OF OBSERVED BEHAVIORS DISPLAYED BY DEPRESSED-PATIENTS DURING A CLINICAL INTERVIEW - RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN BEHAVIORAL-FACTORS AND CLINICAL CONCEPTS OF ACTIVATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOUHUYS, AL; JANSEN, CJ; VANDENHOOFDAKKER, RH

    In 61 drug-free depressed patients, relationships were studied between observed behaviors and measures of common clinical concepts of activation. The behaviors were observed during a clinical interview and analyzed with ethological methods. Activation was assessed by means of self-ratings (Thayer,

  12. Antimalarial activity of potential inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase enzyme selected by docking studies.

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    Julia Penna-Coutinho

    Full Text Available The Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase enzyme (PfLDH has been considered as a potential molecular target for antimalarials due to this parasite's dependence on glycolysis for energy production. Because the LDH enzymes found in P. vivax, P. malariae and P. ovale (pLDH all exhibit ∼90% identity to PfLDH, it would be desirable to have new anti-pLDH drugs, particularly ones that are effective against P. falciparum, the most virulent species of human malaria. Our present work used docking studies to select potential inhibitors of pLDH, which were then tested for antimalarial activity against P. falciparum in vitro and P. berghei malaria in mice. A virtual screening in DrugBank for analogs of NADH (an essential cofactor to pLDH and computational studies were undertaken, and the potential binding of the selected compounds to the PfLDH active site was analyzed using Molegro Virtual Docker software. Fifty compounds were selected based on their similarity to NADH. The compounds with the best binding energies (itraconazole, atorvastatin and posaconazole were tested against P. falciparum chloroquine-resistant blood parasites. All three compounds proved to be active in two immunoenzymatic assays performed in parallel using monoclonals specific to PfLDH or a histidine rich protein (HRP2. The IC(50 values for each drug in both tests were similar, were lowest for posaconazole (<5 µM and were 40- and 100-fold less active than chloroquine. The compounds reduced P. berghei parasitemia in treated mice, in comparison to untreated controls; itraconazole was the least active compound. The results of these activity trials confirmed that molecular docking studies are an important strategy for discovering new antimalarial drugs. This approach is more practical and less expensive than discovering novel compounds that require studies on human toxicology, since these compounds are already commercially available and thus approved for human use.

  13. TRIENNIAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT SYMPOSIUM: Dedifferentiated fat cells: Potential and perspectives for their use in clinical and animal science purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, M S; Bueno, R; Silva, W; Campos, C F; Gionbelli, M P; Guimarães, S E F; Silva, F F; Lopes, P S; Hausman, G J; Dodson, M V

    2017-05-01

    An increasing body of evidences has demonstrated the ability of the mature adipocyte to dedifferentiate into a population of proliferative-competent cells known as dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. As early as the 1970s, in vitro studies showed that DFAT cells may be obtained by ceiling culture, which takes advantage of the buoyancy property of lipid-filled cells. It was documented that DFAT cells may acquire a phenotype similar to mesenchymal stem cells and yet may differentiate into multiple cell lineages, such as skeletal and smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, osteoblasts, and adipocytes. Additionally, recent studies showed the ability of isolated mature adipocytes to dedifferentiate in vivo and the capacity of the progeny cells to redifferentiate into mature adipocytes, contributing to the increase of body fatness. These findings shed light on the potential for use of DFAT cells, not only for clinical purposes but also within the animal science field, because increasing intramuscular fat without excessive increase in other fat depots is a challenge in livestock production. Knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the dedifferentiation and redifferentiation of DFAT cells will allow the development of strategies for their use for clinical and animal science purposes. In this review, we highlight several aspects of DFAT cells, their potential for clinical purposes, and their contribution to adipose tissue mass in livestock.

  14. Comparison of the Developmental Potential and Clinical Results of In Vivo Matured Oocytes Cryopreserved with Different Vitrification Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oocyte vitrification is widely used throughout the world, but its clinical efficacy is inconsistent and depends on the vitrification media. This study compared the developmental potential and clinical results of in vivo matured oocytes cryopreserved with different vitrification media. Methods: This retrospective study involved vitrified-warmed oocytes at one in vitro fertilization laboratory. Vitrification media kits comprised the MC kit (ethylene glycol [EG] plus 1,2-propanediol [PROH], the KT kit (EG plus dimethyl sulphoxide [DMSO], and the Modified kit (EG plus DMSO and PROH kit. Rates of oocyte survival and subsequent developmental potential were recorded and analyzed. The t-test and the Chi-square test were used to evaluate each method′s efficacy. Results: Oocyte survival rate was significantly higher for the Modified kit (92.0% than for the MC kit (88.2% (P 0.05. The high-quality embryo rate per warmed oocyte was significantly higher (23.4% in the Modified kit group than in the other groups (P 0.05. Conclusions: Modified vitrification media are efficient for oocyte vitrification and, with further verification, may be able to replace commercially available media in future clinical applications.

  15. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity regulates the proliferative potential of growth plate chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuwei; Ahrens, Molly J; Wu, Amy; Liu, Jennifer; Dudley, Andrew T

    2011-01-01

    For tissues that develop throughout embryogenesis and into postnatal life, the generation of differentiated cells to promote tissue growth is at odds with the requirement to maintain the stem cell/progenitor cell population to preserve future growth potential. In the growth plate cartilage, this balance is achieved in part by establishing a proliferative phase that amplifies the number of progenitor cells prior to terminal differentiation into hypertrophic chondrocytes. Here, we show that endogenous calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CamkII, also known as Camk2) activity is upregulated prior to hypertrophy and that loss of CamkII function substantially blocks the transition from proliferation to hypertrophy. Wnt signaling and Pthrp-induced phosphatase activity negatively regulate CamkII activity. Release of this repression results in activation of multiple effector pathways, including Runx2- and β-catenin-dependent pathways. We present an integrated model for the regulation of proliferation potential by CamkII activity that has important implications for studies of growth control and adult progenitor/stem cell populations.

  16. Potentiation of aminoglycoside antibiotic activity using the body fat from the snake Boa constrictor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe S. Ferreira

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Boa constrictor is widely used in traditional communities in many different folk remedies and products derived from it are sold in public markets throughout northeastern Brazil and as its body fat has many different therapeutic indications as a folk remedy. The present work evaluates the antibacterial activity of the body fat from the snake Boa constrictor when employed either alone or in combination with antibiotics and discusses the ecological implications of the use of this traditional remedy. Oil (OBC was extracted from body fat located in the ventral region of B. constrictor using hexane as a solvent. The antibacterial activity of OBC was tested against standard as well as multi-resistant lines, either alone and in combination with antibiotics. OBC did not demonstrate any relevant antibacterial activity against standard or multidrug-resistant bacterial strains. OBC showed synergistic activity when combined with the aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our results indicate that the body fat of Boa constrictor does not possess bactericidal activity, from the clinical point of view, but when combined with an antibiotic, the fat demonstrated a significant synergistic activity.

  17. Potentiation of aminoglycoside antibiotic activity using the body fat from the snake Boa constrictor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe S. Ferreira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Boa constrictor is widely used in traditional communities in many different folk remedies and products derived from it are sold in public markets throughout northeastern Brazil and as its body fat has many different therapeutic indications as a folk remedy. The present work evaluates the antibacterial activity of the body fat from the snake Boa constrictor when employed either alone or in combination with antibiotics and discusses the ecological implications of the use of this traditional remedy. Oil (OBC was extracted from body fat located in the ventral region of B. constrictor using hexane as a solvent. The antibacterial activity of OBC was tested against standard as well as multi-resistant lines, either alone and in combination with antibiotics. OBC did not demonstrate any relevant antibacterial activity against standard or multidrug-resistant bacterial strains. OBC showed synergistic activity when combined with the aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our results indicate that the body fat of Boa constrictor does not possess bactericidal activity, from the clinical point of view, but when combined with an antibiotic, the fat demonstrated a significant synergistic activity.

  18. Patient care and administrative activities of nurses in clinical/surgical units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Moura Luvisotto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify the administrative and nursing care activities most performed by nurses in clinical/surgical units and to determine which are most and least pleasant to them. Methods: A descriptive-exploratory field study, with a quantitative approach and with a sample made up of 40 nurses working in clinical/surgical units who answered a three-part questionnaire composed of identification data and characterization of the professional; a list of nursing and administrative activities for the nurse to grade according to the numbers: “0 = I do not perform it”, “1 = I perform it occasionally”, “2 = I perform it often”, “3 = I perform it daily”; two open-ended questions, in which the nurse listed the activities he/she enjoyed the most and the least. Results: The administrative activities most performed by the nurses were: changing work shifts, preparing employee daily task charts and managing tests; the most performed nursing care activities were related to the stages of the Nursing Care Systematization and the interaction with the multi-professional team; the most enjoyable activities were direct patient care, patient evaluation and implementation of the systematization; the least enjoyable activities were administrative and bureaucratic routines, justification of complaints/problem-solving and preparation of employee task charts. Conclusion: Compared to administrative activities, nursing activities were performed most during the daily routine of the nurse, and the most enjoyable activities were those related to patient care, according to the opinions of the professionals.

  19. YC-1 potentiates cAMP-induced CREB activation and nitric oxide production in alveolar macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Tsong-Long, E-mail: htl@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chinese Herbal Medicine Research Team, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Tang, Ming-Chi [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Liang-Mou [Department of General Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Chia-Yi, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wen-De; Chung, Pei-Jen; Chang, Ya-Wen; Fang, Yao-Ching [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2012-04-15

    Alveolar macrophages play significant roles in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory lung diseases. Increases in exhaled nitric oxide (NO) are well documented to reflect disease severity in the airway. In this study, we investigated the effect of 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1), a known activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase, on prostaglandin (PG)E{sub 1} (a stable PGE{sub 2} analogue) and forskolin (a adenylate cyclase activator) induced NO production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383). YC-1 did not directly cause NO production or iNOS expression, but drastically potentiated PGE{sub 1}- or forskolin-induced NO production and iNOS expression in NR8383 alveolar macrophages. Combination treatment with YC-1 and PGE{sub 1} significantly increased phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), but not nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. The combined effect on NO production, iNOS expression, and CREB phosphorylation was reversed by a protein kinase (PK)A inhibitor (H89), suggesting that the potentiating functions were mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Consistent with this, cAMP analogues, but not the cGMP analogue, caused NO release, iNOS expression, and CREB activation. YC-1 treatment induced an increase in PGE{sub 1}-induced cAMP formation, which occurred through the inhibition of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. Furthermore, the combination of rolipram (an inhibitor of PDE4), but not milronone (an inhibitor of PDE3), and PGE{sub 1} also triggered NO production and iNOS expression. In summary, YC-1 potentiates PGE{sub 1}-induced NO production and iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages through inhibition of cAMP PDE activity and activation of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. Highlights: ► YC-1 potentiated PGE1-induced iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages. ► The combination of YC-1 and PGE1 increased CREB but not NFκB activation.

  20. Carbonate Precipitation through Microbial Activities in Natural Environment, and Their Potential in Biotechnology: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tingting; Dittrich, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate represents a large portion of carbon reservoir and is used commercially for a variety of applications. Microbial carbonate precipitation, a by-product of microbial activities, plays an important metal coprecipitation and cementation role in natural systems. This natural process occurring in various geological settings can be mimicked and used for a number of biotechnologies, such as metal remediation, carbon sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and construction restoration. In this study, different metabolic activities leading to calcium carbonate precipitation, their native environment, and potential applications and challenges are reviewed. PMID:26835451

  1. Pre-Activation Negativity (PrAN) in Brain Potentials to Unfolding Words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderström, Pelle; Horne, Merle; Frid, Johan; Roll, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    <