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Sample records for active tuberculosis disease

  1. Addison's Disease Caused by Tuberculosis with Atypical Hyperpigmentation and Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

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    Namikawa, Hiroki; Takemoto, Yasuhiko; Kainuma, Shigeto; Umeda, Sakurako; Makuuchi, Ayako; Fukumoto, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Masanori; Kinuhata, Shigeki; Isaka, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Hiromitsu; Kamata, Noriko; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Hiura, Yoshikazu; Morimura, Mina; Shuto, Taichi

    2017-01-01

    We herein report a case of Addison's disease caused by tuberculosis characterized by atypical hyperpigmentation, noted as exacerbation of the pigmentation of freckles and the occurrence of new freckles, that was diagnosed in the presence of active pulmonary tuberculosis. The clinical condition of the patient was markedly ameliorated by the administration of hydrocortisone and anti-tuberculosis agents. When exacerbation of the pigmentation of the freckles and/or the occurrence of new freckles are noted, Addison's disease should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis. In addition, the presence of active tuberculosis needs to be assumed whenever we treat patients with Addison's disease caused by tuberculosis, despite its rarity.

  2. Increased complement C1q level marks active disease in human tuberculosis.

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    Yi Cai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Complement functions as an important host defense system and complement C5 and C7 have been implicated in immunopathology of tuberculosis. However, little is known about the role of other complement components in tuberculosis. METHODS: Complement gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of tuberculosis patients and controls were determined using whole genome transcriptional microarray assays. The mRNA and protein levels of three C1q components, C1qA, C1qB, and C1qC, were further validated by qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The percentages of C1q expression in CD14 positive cells were determined by flow cytometry. Finally, C1qC protein level was quantified in the pleural fluid of tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis pleurisy. RESULTS: C1q expression increases significantly in the peripheral blood of patients with active tuberculosis compared to healthy controls and individuals with latent TB infection. The percentage of C1q-expressing CD14 positive cells is significantly increased in active TB patients. C1q expression in the peripheral blood correlates with sputum smear positivity in tuberculosis patients and is reduced after anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy. Notably, receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that C1qC mRNA levels in peripheral blood efficiently discriminate active from latent tuberculosis infection and healthy controls. Additionally, C1qC protein level in pleural effusion shows improved power in discriminating tuberculosis from non-tuberculosis pleurisy when compared to other inflammatory markers, such as IL-6 and TNF-α. CONCLUSIONS: C1q expression correlates with active disease in human tuberculosis. C1q could be a potential diagnostic marker to discriminate active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection as well as tuberculosis pleurisy from non-tuberculosis pleurisy.

  3. Tuberculosis as occupational disease

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    Mendoza-Ticona, Alberto; Instituto de Medicina Tropical Alexander von Humboldt, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Médico infectólogo tropicalista magister en Epidemiología Clínica.

    2014-01-01

    There is enough evidence to declare tuberculosis as an occupational disease among healthcare workers. In Peru, there are regulations granting employment rights regarding tuberculosis as an occupational disease, such as healthcare coverage for temporary or permanent disability. However, these rights have not been sufficiently socialized. This study presents information on the risk of acquiring tuberculosis in the workplace, and a review of the evidence to declare tuberculosis as an occupationa...

  4. Chronic destructive pulmonary tuberculosis: assessment of disease activity by computed tomography

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    Nam, Kyung Jin; Jeong, Yeon Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Pusan National Univ. School of Medicine and Medical Research Inst., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jeongyj@pusan.ac.kr; Kim, Yeong Dae; I, Hoseok [Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Pusan National Univ. School of Medicine and Medical Research Inst., Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kun-Il; Lee, Jun Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Pusan National Univ. Yangsan Hospital, Pusan National Univ. School of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hye Kyung [Internal Medicine, and Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Pusan National Univ. School of Medicine and Medical Research Inst., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Background Determination of disease activity of chronic destructive pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) on imaging studies can be difficult because several imaging findings due to disease chronicity such as a residual cavity can be misinterpreted as an active disease. Purpose To evaluate computed tomography (CT) findings to predict active disease in patients with chronic destructive pulmonary TB. Material and Methods CT findings of 36 patients with chronic active destructive pulmonary TB and 78 patients with chronic inactive destructive pulmonary TB were reviewed and their patterns of lung lesions were compared. Statistical comparisons were performed using chi-square and Student's T tests for univariate analyses, and a stepwise logistic regression method was used for multivariate analysis. Results Based on univariate analyses, cavitary destruction (P = 0.015), non-branching centrilobular nodules (P < 0.001), tree-in-bud pattern (P < 0.001), airspace nodules (P < 0.001), and cavities in other lobes (P = 0.001) were more frequently seen in chronic active destructive pulmonary TB. A stepwise logistic regression analysis demonstrated that tree-in-bud pattern (odds ratio, 52.3; 95% confidence interval, 6.2-437.2; P < 0.001) were significant CT findings associated with active disease. Conclusion Tree-in-bud pattern were the most characteristic CT findings to predict active disease in patients with chronic destructive pulmonary TB.

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Active disease and latent infection in a renal transplant cohort.

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    Rafiei, Nastaran; Williams, Jackie; Mulley, William R; Trauer, James M; Jenkin, Grant A; Rogers, Benjamin A

    2018-04-16

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious opportunistic infection in renal transplant recipients associated with high mortality. Screening and treatment of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI) offers an opportunity to prevent subsequent active disease. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all adult patients who underwent renal transplantation at our centre from 2005 to 2014 to assess current screening practices, the risks for and burden of active TB. A total of 660 individuals underwent renal transplantation during this period, totalling 3647 person years of follow up. Three patients were diagnosed with active TB after renal transplant, resulting in an incidence of 82 per 100,000 person-years. Of 656 transplant recipients, 102 (15.5%) were born in high TB incidence countries and 89 (13.5%) had an interferon gamma release assay (IGRA) at any point. Individuals born in high TB risk countries had a much higher incidence of active TB (530 per 100,000 person-years). Ten individuals had positive IGRA tests, of whom two were treated for active TB, two received chemoprophylaxis and six were not treated. In the absence of formal guidelines, IGRA-based screening for LTBI was infrequently performed. Our data suggests that screening and treatment of renal transplant recipients born in high incidence countries is an important preventive measure. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Reverse translation in tuberculosis: neutrophils as clues for development of active disease

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    Anca eDorhoi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a major health issue globally. Although typically the disease can be cured by chemotherapy and prevented – at least in part, in newborn by vaccination, general consensus exists that development of novel intervention measures requires better understanding of disease mechanisms. Human TB is characterized by polarity between host resistance as seen in 2 billion individuals with latent TB infection and susceptibility occurring in 9 million individuals who develop active TB disease every year. Experimental animal models often do not reflect this polarity adequately, calling for a reverse translational approach. Gene expression profiling has allowed identification of biomarkers that discriminate between latent infection and active disease. Functional analysis of most relevant markers in experimental animal models can help to better understand mechanisms driving disease progression. We have embarked on in-depth characterization of candidate markers of pathology and protection hereby harnessing mouse mutants with defined gene deficiencies. Analysis of mutants deficient in miR223 expression and CXCL5 production allowed elucidation of relevant pathogenic mechanisms. Intriguingly, these deficiencies were linked to aberrant neutrophil activities. Our findings point to a detrimental potential of neutrophils in TB. Reciprocally, measures that control neutrophils should be leveraged for amelioration of TB in adjunct to chemotherapy.

  7. Challenges with diagnosing and investigating suspected active tuberculosis disease in military trainees.

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    Chang, David; Webber, Bryant J; Hetrick, Steven M; Owen, Jerry B; Blasi, Audra A; Steele, Bernadette M; Yun, Heather C

    2017-08-01

    Between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2016, a total of 14 U.S. and international military personnel in training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, TX, were hospitalized due to suspected pulmonary tuberculosis (TB); of these, five personnel were diagnosed with active TB disease. Only one TB case had pulmonary symptoms, but these symptoms were not suggestive of TB. The incidence rate in the training population was 1.89 per 100,000 population (95% CI: 0.81, 4.42), with a higher rate when restricted to international military students attending the Defense Language Institute English Language Center. No instances of TB transmission were identified. The variety of atypical presentations and their resulting diagnostic and public health challenges prompted this retrospective review of all hospitalized cases. This case series highlights both the importance of a high index of clinical suspicion when TB is being considered in close congregate settings as well as the risk of overreliance on acid-fast bacilli staining and nucleic acid amplification testing for ruling out active pulmonary disease in young, otherwise healthy trainees. Practical solutions are suggested.

  8. Bovine Tuberculosis, A Zoonotic Disease

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    Tarmudji

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bovine tuberculosis is caused by the infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis var. bovis (M. bovis. This species is one of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, can infect wide range of hosts: cattle and other domesticated animals, wild mammals and humans (zoonotic. M. bovis bacterium from infected hosts can be transmitted to other susceptible animals and humans through respiratory excretes and secretion materials. Humans can be infected with M. bovis by ingested M. bovis contaminated animal products, unpasteurised milk from tuberculosis cows or through respiratory route of contaminated aerosol. Bovine tuberculosis at the first stage does not show any clinical sign but as the disease progress in the next stage which may take several months or years, clinical signs may arise, suh as: fluctuative body temperature, anorexia, lost body weight, coughing, oedema of lymph nodes, increased respiratory frequencies. Pathological lesion of bovine tuberculosis is characterised by the formation of granulomas (tubercles, in which bacterial cells have been localised, most in lymph nodes and pulmonum, but can occur in other organs. The granulomas usually arise in small nodules or tubercles appear yellowish either caseus, caseo-calcareus or calcified. In Indonesia, bovine tuberculosis occurred in dairy cattle since 1905 through the imported dairy cows from Holland and Australian. It was unfortunate that until recently, there were not many research and surveilances of bovine tuberculosis conducted in this country, so the distribution of bovine tuberculosis is unknown. Early serological diagnosis can be done on live cattle by means of tuberculin tests under field conditions. Confirmation can be done by isolation and identification of excreted and secreted samples from the slaughter house. Antibiotic treatment and vaccination were uneffective, therefore the effective control of bovine tuberculosis is suggested by tuberculin tests and by slaughtering the selected

  9. Tuberculosis.

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    Tabbara, Khalid F

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to present an update on the manifestations and management of ocular tuberculosis. Tuberculosis affects one-third of the world's population. The incidence of tuberculosis has increased with the increase in the HIV infected population. Following a resurgence of the disease in the US, the incidence has recently declined. Patients may develop scleritis that can be focal, nodular or diffuse with or without keratitis. Anterior granulomatous uveitis may occur. The posterior segment reveals vitritis, choroiditis, and can mimic serpiginous choroiditis and other entities. Patients who are immunosuppressed or HIV infected may develop active mycobacterial disease in the eye leading to rapid destruction of the ocular structures. The diagnosis of ocular tuberculosis is made by isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Löwestein-Jensen medium or by PCR. The diagnosis is supported by the clinical findings, imaging techniques including optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green and ultrasonography. Tuberculin skin test helps to confirm the diagnosis. Ocular tuberculosis may occur in the absence of pulmonary disease. Patients present with a spectrum of clinical signs. The disease may mimic several clinical entities. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of ocular tuberculosis may prevent ocular morbidity and blindness.

  10. Tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional Tuberculosis as occupational disease

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    Alberto Mendoza-Ticona

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Existe evidencia suficiente para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en diversos profesionales especialmente entre los trabajadores de salud. En el Perú están normados y reglamentados los derechos laborales inherentes a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional, como la cobertura por discapacidad temporal o permanente. Sin embargo, estos derechos aún no han sido suficientemente socializados. En este trabajo se presenta información sobre el riesgo de adquirir tuberculosis en el lugar de trabajo, se revisan las evidencias para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en trabajadores de salud y se presenta la legislación peruana vigente al respecto.There is enough evidence to declare tuberculosis as an occupational disease among healthcare workers. In Peru, there are regulations granting employment rights regarding tuberculosis as an occupational disease, such as healthcare coverage for temporary or permanent disability. However, these rights have not been sufficiently socialized. This study presents information on the risk of acquiring tuberculosis in the workplace, and a review of the evidence to declare tuberculosis as an occupational disease among health care workers, presenting the current Peruvian law related.

  11. Tuberculosis

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    Aleksandrova, A.V.

    1983-01-01

    Classification of clinical forms of tuberculosis of respiratory organs is m ade. It is shown, that diagnosis, determination of the clinical form of pulmona ry tuberculosis, extent and phase of the process are mainly based on the data of roentgenologic studies and in certain cases tomography is preferable. Roentgenologic picture of primary tuberculosis, tuberculosis of intrathoracis l ymp nodes, dissemenated tuberculosis, focal and infiltrative tuberculosis of lungs, tuberculomas of lungs, cavernous and fibrocavernous form of pulmonary tub erculosis, cirrhotic tuberculosis of lungs, tuberculosis of upper respiratory tracks, tuberculous pleurite and tuberculosis of respiratory organs, combined wi th dust occupational diseases, has been described

  12. A prospective blood RNA signature for tuberculosis disease risk

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    Zak, Daniel E.; Penn-Nicholson, Adam; Scriba, Thomas J.; Thompson, Ethan; Suliman, Sara; Amon, Lynn M.; Mahomed, Hassan; Erasmus, Mzwandile; Whatney, Wendy; Hussey, Gregory D.; Abrahams, Deborah; Kafaar, Fazlin; Hawkridge, Tony; Verver, Suzanne; Hughes, E. Jane; Ota, Martin; Sutherland, Jayne; Howe, Rawleigh; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Boom, W. Henry; Thiel, Bonnie; Ottenhoff, Tom H.M.; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Crampin, Amelia C; Downing, Katrina; Hatherill, Mark; Valvo, Joe; Shankar, Smitha; Parida, Shreemanta K; Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.; Walzl, Gerhard; Aderem, Alan; Hanekom, Willem A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of blood biomarkers that prospectively predict progression of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection to tuberculosis disease may lead to interventions that impact the epidemic. Methods Healthy, M. tuberculosis infected South African adolescents were followed for 2 years; blood was collected every 6 months. A prospective signature of risk was derived from whole blood RNA-Sequencing data by comparing participants who ultimately developed active tuberculosis disease (progressors) with those who remained healthy (matched controls). After adaptation to multiplex qRT-PCR, the signature was used to predict tuberculosis disease in untouched adolescent samples and in samples from independent cohorts of South African and Gambian adult progressors and controls. The latter participants were household contacts of adults with active pulmonary tuberculosis disease. Findings Of 6,363 adolescents screened, 46 progressors and 107 matched controls were identified. A 16 gene signature of risk was identified. The signature predicted tuberculosis progression with a sensitivity of 66·1% (95% confidence interval, 63·2–68·9) and a specificity of 80·6% (79·2–82·0) in the 12 months preceding tuberculosis diagnosis. The risk signature was validated in an untouched group of adolescents (p=0·018 for RNA-Seq and p=0·0095 for qRT-PCR) and in the independent South African and Gambian cohorts (p values Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, Aeras, the European Union and the South African Medical Research Council (detail at end of text). PMID:27017310

  13. [Tuberculosis and mycobacteriosis important opportunistic disease in AIDS patients].

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    Zalewska-Schönthaler, N; Schönthaler-Humiecka, J; Podlasin, R; Cholewińska, G; Rzeszkowicz, T; Mikuła, T; Horban, A

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the search was investigation of tuberculosis in AIDS patients. Each year 8-9 mln people fall ill of tuberculosis and one third of them die. To the infection of tuberculosis and fast development into active state are especially exposed people with AIDS. 696 people were examined on tuberculosis most of which were AIDS patients hospitalized and cured in Hospital of Infection Diseases and Prison Hospital. 159 patients were women and 537 were men. The average age was between 25 and 45 (70%). The investigated population was characterized according to age, social and living conditions, using drugs and former contact with tuberculosis. All patients suspected of tuberculosis had chest X-rayed, sputum, BAL and pleural liquor were taken to bacteriological examination when extrapulmonary tuberculosis was suspected. The material was taken adequately to the disease process: CSF, urine, lymph nodes, peritoneal fluids, blood, stool, swabs and other. Bacteriological investigations have been carried out by fast cultivating method since 1998 and rapid genetic method since 1999. Apart from modern, fast diagnostic methods, routine bacteriological procedures were applied in tuberculosis diagnosis. More than 30% of the examined population were from bad social-living conditions, 78% had risk factors, 65% were drug users. The analysis of the tuberculosis illness from 1997 to July 2001 shows growing tendency. Nowadays it is 20% cases proved by bacteriological diagnosis. The structure of falling ill with tuberculosis has changed. Considerable increase of extrapulmonary tuberculosis was observed, 20 patients died due to tuberculosis and 8 patients due to mycobacteriosis. Resistance of M.tub.complex occurred within the range of 10% cases.

  14. Characteristics and outcomes of end-stage renal disease patients with active tuberculosis followed in intensive care units

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    Ulasli, Sevinc Sarinc; Ulubay, Gaye; Arslan, Nevra Gullu; Akcay, Sule; Eyuboglu, Fusun Oner; Sezer, Siren; Haberal, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a common problem in patients with chronic renal failure. In intensive care units, misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis of TB is common. Therefore, a description of characteristics of active TB in patients with renal failure followed in intensive care units is important to reduce mortality and transmission of the disease. This study was performed to describe the characteristics of patients with renal failure admitted to the intensive care units and having active TB and evaluate predictive factors for in hospital mortality. The hospital records of 24 patients (11 women, 13 men) having ESRD and TB between 2001-2006 were reviewed. Clinical, radiological, and laboratory data on admission were recorded. Possible parameters contributing to in-hospital mortality were obtained from the medical records. In-hospital mortality rate was 66.6%. Factors associated with mortality were decreased partial pressure of oxygen and malnutrition. Fever was reported in 8 patients and hemoptysis was reported in 3 patients. Eight patients had consolidation on chest radiograph, while 4 had normal findings Seventeen patients had pulmonary involvement, and 11 had extra pulmonary involvement. The mortality rate in TB patients followed in intensive care units is high, with 3 factors contributing to in-hospital mortality. Clinicians should consider active TB in renal failure patients being followed in the intensive care unit, even when results of a chest radiograph are normal especially in patients with unexplained poor general health or respiratory failure. (author)

  15. MDCT abnormalities of small- and medium-sized bronchus in active tuberculosis: a new angle on an old disease

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    Oh, Jin Kyoung; Ahn, Myeong Im; Jung, Jung Im; Han, Dae Hee; Kim, Young Kyoon; Oh, Eun-Jee; Park, Yeon-Joon

    2011-01-01

    Background: The incidence and findings of tuberculous invasion of the peripheral bronchus have not been fully investigated with MDCT. Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence and findings of MDCT abnormalities of small- and medium-sized bronchus (SMB) in active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Material and Methods: Using multiplanar reformation, 35 consecutive MDCT scans (follow-up exams available in 14 patients with a mean interval of 8.1 months) were assessed for following abnormalities of SMB: bronchial impaction (BI), wall thickening, dilatation, peribronchial cuff of soft tissue, and bronchocavitary fistula. It was also assessed whether tree-in-buds (TIB) have a tendency to distribute in the territories of diseased SMB, and whether SMB abnormalities are present in patients with relatively mild disease. Results: SMB abnormalities were observed in 23 (65.7%) patients with active TB. The most frequent finding was wall thickening (n=18, 51.4%), followed by BI (n=13, 37.1%; zigzag-shaped in four), dilatation (n =11, 31.4%), amputated appearance of air column (n=11, 31.4%), peribronchial cuff of soft tissue (n=10, 28.6%), and bronchocavitary fistula (n=8, 22.9%). TIB (n=29; absent in two patients with SMB) was mainly within (n=14) or close to (n=4) the territory of diseased SMB. Follow-up CT frequently showed improvement of wall thickening (11/12) and persistence of bronchial dilatation (11/13). SMB abnormality was present in all of six patients with mild disease. Conclusion: MDCT shows that tuberculous invasion of the peripheral bronchus may be more frequent than previously thought, of which findings include wall thickening, BI, dilatation, amputated appearance of air column, peribronchial cuff of soft tissue and bronchocavitary fistula

  16. MDCT abnormalities of small- and medium-sized bronchus in active tuberculosis: a new angle on an old disease

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    Oh, Jin Kyoung; Ahn, Myeong Im; Jung, Jung Im; Han, Dae Hee (Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)), email: lepolder@gmail.com; Kim, Young Kyoon (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Seoul St Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Oh, Eun-Jee; Park, Yeon-Joon (Dept. of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul St Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of))

    2011-02-15

    Background: The incidence and findings of tuberculous invasion of the peripheral bronchus have not been fully investigated with MDCT. Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence and findings of MDCT abnormalities of small- and medium-sized bronchus (SMB) in active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Material and Methods: Using multiplanar reformation, 35 consecutive MDCT scans (follow-up exams available in 14 patients with a mean interval of 8.1 months) were assessed for following abnormalities of SMB: bronchial impaction (BI), wall thickening, dilatation, peribronchial cuff of soft tissue, and bronchocavitary fistula. It was also assessed whether tree-in-buds (TIB) have a tendency to distribute in the territories of diseased SMB, and whether SMB abnormalities are present in patients with relatively mild disease. Results: SMB abnormalities were observed in 23 (65.7%) patients with active TB. The most frequent finding was wall thickening (n=18, 51.4%), followed by BI (n=13, 37.1%; zigzag-shaped in four), dilatation (n =11, 31.4%), amputated appearance of air column (n=11, 31.4%), peribronchial cuff of soft tissue (n=10, 28.6%), and bronchocavitary fistula (n=8, 22.9%). TIB (n=29; absent in two patients with SMB) was mainly within (n=14) or close to (n=4) the territory of diseased SMB. Follow-up CT frequently showed improvement of wall thickening (11/12) and persistence of bronchial dilatation (11/13). SMB abnormality was present in all of six patients with mild disease. Conclusion: MDCT shows that tuberculous invasion of the peripheral bronchus may be more frequent than previously thought, of which findings include wall thickening, BI, dilatation, amputated appearance of air column, peribronchial cuff of soft tissue and bronchocavitary fistula

  17. A case of skeletal tuberculosis and psoas abscess: disease activity evaluated using (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

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    Kimizuka, Yoshifumi; Ishii, Makoto; Murakami, Koji; Ishioka, Kota; Yagi, Kazuma; Ishii, Ken; Watanabe, Kota; Soejima, Kenzo; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Naoki

    2013-11-14

    Psoas abscess complicating tuberculous spondylitis is a rare morbidity in extrapulmonary tuberculosis. There are no established guidelines for evaluating the clinical response of psoas abscess. Although several studies have shown that positron emission tomography-computed tomography with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose can play a potential role in diagnosing multifocal tuberculosis and monitoring the clinical response of pulmonary tuberculosis, to our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that positron emission tomography-computed tomography is useful for evaluating local inflammation and disease activity of a tuberculous psoas abscess. We report a case of multifocal bone and lymph node tuberculosis with concomitant lumbar psoas abscess in a 77-year-old man, along with a literature review. An initial positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan showed intense 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose accumulation in the sternum, ribs, vertebrae, and lymph nodes. The patient was successfully treated with antitubercular agents and computed tomography-guided drainage therapy. A follow-up positron emission tomography-computed tomography after abscess drainage and 9 months of antitubercular drug treatment revealed that the majority of lesions improved; however, protracted inflammation surrounding the psoas abscess was still observed. These results indicate that disease activity of psoas abscess can remain, even after successful drainage and antitubercular medication regime of appropriate duration. We have successfully followed up the extent of skeletal tuberculosis complicated with psoas abscess by positron emission tomography-computed tomography. In this patient, positron emission tomography-computed tomography is useful for evaluating the disease activity of tuberculous psoas abscess and for assessing the appropriate duration of antitubercular drug therapy in psoas abscess.

  18. A case of skeletal tuberculosis and psoas abscess: disease activity evaluated using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimizuka, Yoshifumi; Hasegawa, Naoki; Ishii, Makoto; Murakami, Koji; Ishioka, Kota; Yagi, Kazuma; Ishii, Ken; Watanabe, Kota; Soejima, Kenzo; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    Psoas abscess complicating tuberculous spondylitis is a rare morbidity in extrapulmonary tuberculosis. There are no established guidelines for evaluating the clinical response of psoas abscess. Although several studies have shown that positron emission tomography-computed tomography with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose can play a potential role in diagnosing multifocal tuberculosis and monitoring the clinical response of pulmonary tuberculosis, to our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that positron emission tomography-computed tomography is useful for evaluating local inflammation and disease activity of a tuberculous psoas abscess. We report a case of multifocal bone and lymph node tuberculosis with concomitant lumbar psoas abscess in a 77-year-old man, along with a literature review. An initial positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan showed intense 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose accumulation in the sternum, ribs, vertebrae, and lymph nodes. The patient was successfully treated with antitubercular agents and computed tomography-guided drainage therapy. A follow-up positron emission tomography-computed tomography after abscess drainage and 9 months of antitubercular drug treatment revealed that the majority of lesions improved; however, protracted inflammation surrounding the psoas abscess was still observed. These results indicate that disease activity of psoas abscess can remain, even after successful drainage and antitubercular medication regime of appropriate duration. We have successfully followed up the extent of skeletal tuberculosis complicated with psoas abscess by positron emission tomography-computed tomography. In this patient, positron emission tomography-computed tomography is useful for evaluating the disease activity of tuberculous psoas abscess and for assessing the appropriate duration of antitubercular drug therapy in psoas abscess

  19. Deterministic SLIR model for tuberculosis disease mapping

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    Aziz, Nazrina; Diah, Ijlal Mohd; Ahmad, Nazihah; Kasim, Maznah Mat

    2017-11-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) occurs worldwide. It can be transmitted to others directly through air when active TB persons sneeze, cough or spit. In Malaysia, it was reported that TB cases had been recognized as one of the most infectious disease that lead to death. Disease mapping is one of the methods that can be used as the prevention strategies since it can displays clear picture for the high-low risk areas. Important thing that need to be considered when studying the disease occurrence is relative risk estimation. The transmission of TB disease is studied through mathematical model. Therefore, in this study, deterministic SLIR models are used to estimate relative risk for TB disease transmission.

  20. Tuberculosis

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    Mochammad, Hatta

    2008-01-01

    This book chapter for medical students and researcher Tuberculosis is still one of the leading causes of death by infectious diseases with 2 million deaths per year and 9.2 million new cases of tuberculosis disease annually [1-3]. Besides, more than 2 milliard people are infected with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) [1-3]. Despite continuous effort in the prevention, monitoring and treatment of tuberculosis, the disease remains a major health problem in many countries [4-6...

  1. Tuberculosis--a notifiable disease.

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    Roy, Sukhendu; Rai, D R; Suresh, Gutta

    2012-10-01

    In a landmark development, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, has taken important steps to establish the compulsory notification of tuberculosis in the country. A Government Order to this effect was issued on 7 May 2012. In addition to this IMA passed a resolution on TB notification in CWC on 22nd April 2012 at Mumbai: "In conformity with the requirements of ISTC, Indian Medical Association (IMA) desires that Notification of TB patient to the National Programme be made mandatory. IMA also recommends to the medical practitioner to follow the ISTC guidelines in diagnosis and management of TB care". Notification of TB will facilitate early diagnosis and treatment, prevention of MDR and XDR, reduce TB deaths, better quality diagnostic and treatment services for the TB patients. RNTCP will realistically estimateTB burden, plan resources and control measures to commensurate with the actual burden of disease.

  2. 38 CFR 3.374 - Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

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    2010-07-01

    ... active tuberculosis. 3.374 Section 3.374 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.374 Effect of diagnosis of active tuberculosis. (a) Service diagnosis. Service department diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis will be accepted unless a board of...

  3. Mathematical Modeling of Tuberculosis Granuloma Activation

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    Steve M. Ruggiero

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is one of the most common infectious diseases worldwide. It is estimated that one-third of the world’s population is infected with TB. Most have the latent stage of the disease that can later transition to active TB disease. TB is spread by aerosol droplets containing Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. Mtb bacteria enter through the respiratory system and are attacked by the immune system in the lungs. The bacteria are clustered and contained by macrophages into cellular aggregates called granulomas. These granulomas can hold the bacteria dormant for long periods of time in latent TB. The bacteria can be perturbed from latency to active TB disease in a process called granuloma activation when the granulomas are compromised by other immune response events in a host, such as HIV, cancer, or aging. Dysregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1 has been recently implicated in granuloma activation through experimental studies, but the mechanism is not well understood. Animal and human studies currently cannot probe the dynamics of activation, so a computational model is developed to fill this gap. This dynamic mathematical model focuses specifically on the latent to active transition after the initial immune response has successfully formed a granuloma. Bacterial leakage from latent granulomas is successfully simulated in response to the MMP-1 dynamics under several scenarios for granuloma activation.

  4. CD209 genetic polymorphism and tuberculosis disease.

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    Fredrik O Vannberg

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. DC-SIGN, encoded by CD209, is a receptor capable of binding and internalizing Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Previous studies have reported that the CD209 promoter single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-336A/G exerts an effect on CD209 expression and is associated with human susceptibility to dengue, HIV-1 and tuberculosis in humans. The present study investigates the role of the CD209 -336A/G variant in susceptibility to tuberculosis in a large sample of individuals from sub-Saharan Africa.A total of 2,176 individuals enrolled in tuberculosis case-control studies from four sub-Saharan Africa countries were genotyped for the CD209 -336A/G SNP (rs4804803. Significant overall protection against pulmonary tuberculosis was observed with the -336G allele when the study groups were combined (n = 914 controls vs. 1262 cases, Mantel-Haenszel 2 x 2 chi(2 = 7.47, P = 0.006, odds ratio = 0.86, 95%CI 0.77-0.96. In addition, the patients with -336GG were associated with a decreased risk of cavitory tuberculosis, a severe form of tuberculosis disease (n = 557, Pearson's 2x2 chi(2 = 17.34, P = 0.00003, odds ratio = 0.42, 95%CI 0.27-0.65. This direction of association is opposite to a previously observed result in a smaller study of susceptibility to tuberculosis in a South African Coloured population, but entirely in keeping with the previously observed protective effect of the -336G allele.This study finds that the CD209 -336G variant allele is associated with significant protection against tuberculosis in individuals from sub-Saharan Africa and, furthermore, cases with -336GG were significantly less likely to develop tuberculosis-induced lung cavitation. Previous in vitro work demonstrated that the promoter variant -336G allele causes down-regulation of CD209 mRNA expression. Our present work suggests that decreased levels of the DC-SIGN receptor may therefore be

  5. Tuberculosis: Learn the Signs and Symptoms of TB Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Tuberculosis (TB) Disease: Symptoms and Risk Factors Language: English ( ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria that ...

  6. CCL2 responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis are associated with disease severity in tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Hasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leucocyte activating chemokines such as CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL8 together with proinflammatory IFNgamma, TNFalpha and downmodulatory IL10 play a central role in the restriction of M. tuberculosis infections, but is unclear whether these markers are indicative of tuberculosis disease severity. METHODOLOGY: We investigated live M. tuberculosis- and M. bovis BCG-induced peripheral blood mononuclear cell responses in patients with tuberculosis (TB and healthy endemic controls (ECs, n = 36. TB patients comprised pulmonary (PTB, n = 34 and extrapulmonary groups, subdivided into those with less severe localized extrapulmonary TB (L-ETB, n = 16 or severe disseminated ETB (D-ETB, n = 16. Secretion of CCL2, IFNgamma, IL10 and CCL3, and mRNA expression of CCL2, TNFalpha, CCL3 and CXCL8 were determined. RESULTS: M. tuberculosis- and BCG-induced CCL2 secretion was significantly increased in both PTB and D-ETB (p<0.05, p<0.01 as compared with L-ETB patients. CCL2 secretion in response to M. tuberculosis was significantly greater than to BCG in the PTB and D-ETB groups. M. tuberculosis-induced CCL2 mRNA transcription was greater in PTB than L-ETB (p = 0.023, while CCL2 was reduced in L-ETB as compared with D-ETB (p = 0.005 patients. M. tuberculosis-induced IFNgamma was greater in L-ETB than PTB (p = 0.04, while BCG-induced IFNgamma was greater in L-ETB as compared with D-ETB patients (p = 0.036. TNFalpha mRNA expression was raised in PTB as compared with L-ETB group in response to M. tuberculosis (p = 0.02 and BCG (p = 0.03. Mycobacterium-induced CCL3 and CXCL8 was comparable between TB groups. CONCLUSIONS: The increased CCL2 and TNFalpha in PTB patients may support effective leucocyte recruitment and M. tuberculosis localization. CCL2 alone is associated with severity of TB, possibly due to increased systemic inflammation found in severe disseminated TB or due to increased monocyte infiltration to lung parenchyma in pulmonary disease.

  7. Progression to active tuberculosis, but not transmission, varies by Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineage in The Gambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Bouke C.; Hill, Philip C.; Aiken, Alex; Awine, Timothy; Antonio, Martin; Adetifa, Ifedayo M.; Jackson-Sillah, Dolly J.; Fox, Annette; Deriemer, Kathryn; Gagneux, Sebastien; Borgdorff, Martien W.; McAdam, Keith P. W. J.; Corrah, Tumani; Small, Peter M.; Adegbola, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is considerable variability in the outcome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. We hypothesized that Mycobacterium africanum was less likely than M. tuberculosis to transmit and progress to tuberculosis disease. METHODS: In a cohort study of patients with tuberculosis and their

  8. TUBERCULOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Tarik Bajrović; Mahmud Nurkić; Šukrija Zvizdić

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis, known as the "White Plague" in the early 19th century, is the infectious disease, which is being researched today even in some of the most developed countries in the world. Epidemiological- epizootiological research points to the importance of pasteurizing milk as well as the transmission in aerosolized droplets in humans and animals. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), M. bovis, M. africanum and M. microti are the mycobacteria that cause tuberculosis. Other mycobacteria cause dis...

  9. Tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ankrah, Alfred O; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Maes, Alex; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Vorster, Mariza; Sathekge, Mike M

    Tuberculosis (TB) is currently the world's leading cause of infectious mortality. Imaging plays an important role in the management of this disease. The complex immune response of the human body to Mycobacterium tuberculosis results in a wide array of clinical manifestations, making clinical and

  10. Sequential inflammatory processes define human progression from M. tuberculosis infection to tuberculosis disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriba, Thomas J; Penn-Nicholson, Adam; Shankar, Smitha; Hraha, Tom; Thompson, Ethan G; Sterling, David; Nemes, Elisa; Darboe, Fatoumatta; Suliman, Sara; Amon, Lynn M; Mahomed, Hassan; Erasmus, Mzwandile; Whatney, Wendy; Johnson, John L; Boom, W Henry; Hatherill, Mark; Valvo, Joe; De Groote, Mary Ann; Ochsner, Urs A; Aderem, Alan; Hanekom, Willem A; Zak, Daniel E

    2017-11-01

    Our understanding of mechanisms underlying progression from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection to pulmonary tuberculosis disease in humans remains limited. To define such mechanisms, we followed M. tuberculosis-infected adolescents longitudinally. Blood samples from forty-four adolescents who ultimately developed tuberculosis disease (“progressors”) were compared with those from 106 matched controls, who remained healthy during two years of follow up. We performed longitudinal whole blood transcriptomic analyses by RNA sequencing and plasma proteome analyses using multiplexed slow off-rate modified DNA aptamers. Tuberculosis progression was associated with sequential modulation of immunological processes. Type I/II interferon signalling and complement cascade were elevated 18 months before tuberculosis disease diagnosis, while changes in myeloid inflammation, lymphoid, monocyte and neutrophil gene modules occurred more proximally to tuberculosis disease. Analysis of gene expression in purified T cells also revealed early suppression of Th17 responses in progressors, relative to M. tuberculosis-infected controls. This was confirmed in an independent adult cohort who received BCG re-vaccination; transcript expression of interferon response genes in blood prior to BCG administration was associated with suppression of IL-17 expression by BCG-specific CD4 T cells 3 weeks post-vaccination. Our findings provide a timeline to the different immunological stages of disease progression which comprise sequential inflammatory dynamics and immune alterations that precede disease manifestations and diagnosis of tuberculosis disease. These findings have important implications for developing diagnostics, vaccination and host-directed therapies for tuberculosis. Clincialtrials.gov, NCT01119521.

  11. Risk for latent and active tuberculosis in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzmann, Christian; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Bellinger, Oswald; Diel, Roland; Gerdes, Silke; Goetsch, Udo; Heykes-Uden, Helga; Schaberg, Tom; Lange, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Few individuals that are latently infected with M. tuberculosis latent tuberculosis infection(LTBI) progress to active disease. We investigated risk factors for LTBI and active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in Germany. Healthy household contacts (HHCs), health care workers (HCWs) exposed to M. tuberculosis and PTB patients were recruited at 18 German centres. Interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) testing was performed. LTBI risk factors were evaluated by comparing IGRA-positive with IGRA-negative contacts. Risk factors for tuberculosis were evaluated by comparing PTB patients with HHCs. From 2008-2014, 603 HHCs, 295 HCWs and 856 PTBs were recruited. LTBI was found in 34.5% of HHCs and in 38.9% of HCWs. In HCWs, care for coughing patients (p = 0.02) and longstanding nursing occupation (p = 0.04) were associated with LTBI. In HHCs, predictors for LTBI were a diseased partner (odds ratio 4.39), sexual contact to a diseased partner and substance dependency (all p < 0.001). PTB was associated with male sex, low body weight (p < 0.0001), alcoholism (15.0 vs 5.9%; p < 0.0001), glucocorticoid therapy (7.2 vs 2.0%; p = 0.004) and diabetes (7.8 vs. 4.0%; p = 0.04). No contact developed active tuberculosis within 2 years follow-up. Positive IGRA responses are frequent among exposed HHCs and HCWs in Germany and are poor predictors for the development of active tuberculosis.

  12. [Increased IL-4 production in response to virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis in tuberculosis patients with advanced disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordway, Diane J; Martins, Marta S; Costa, Leonor M; Freire, Mónica S; Arroz, Maria J; Dockrell, Hazel M; Ventura, Fernando A

    2005-01-01

    The study was designed to compare immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli and antigens in healthy Portuguese subjects and pulmonary tuberculosis patients (TB), and to correlate immune status with clinical severity of tuberculosis disease. PBMC were cultured and stimulated with live and killed M. tuberculosis H37Rv and purified protein derivative (PPD) and lymphoproliferation and production of IFN-gamma and IL-5/IL-4 by these cultures were evaluated by the use of ELISA and multi-parameter flow cytometry. PBMC from 30 tuberculosis patients demonstrated significantly reduced amounts of proliferation and IFN-gamma when stimulated with live M. tuberculosis compared the control group. Of 15 tuberculosis patients tested for intracellular IL-4 following stimulation with M. tuberculosis, 7 showed greatly increased IL-4 production in CD8+ and gammadelta+ T cells. Tuberculosis patients demonstrated an increase of intracellular IL-4 after PBMC were stimulated with live M. tuberculosis in the CD4+ phenotype, but more notably in CD8+ and gammadelta TCR+ subsets. Increased production of IL-4 in tuberculosis patients was primarily in individuals with advanced involvement of lung parenchymal with high bacterial loads in sputum. These results suggest that an alteration in type 1 and type 2 cytokine balance can occur in patients with tuberculosis at an advanced clinical stage of disease.

  13. Tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional Tuberculosis as occupational disease

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Mendoza-Ticona

    2012-01-01

    Existe evidencia suficiente para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en diversos profesionales especialmente entre los trabajadores de salud. En el Perú están normados y reglamentados los derechos laborales inherentes a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional, como la cobertura por discapacidad temporal o permanente. Sin embargo, estos derechos aún no han sido suficientemente socializados. En este trabajo se presenta información sobre el riesgo de adquirir tuberculosis ...

  14. Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Milton

    1999-01-01

    Avian tuberculosis is usually caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium. At least 20 different types of M. avium have been identified, only three of which are known to cause disease in birds. Other types of Mycobacterium rarely cause tuberculosis in most avian species; however, parrots, macaws, and other large perching birds are susceptible to human and bovine types of tuberculosis bacilli. Avian tuberculosis generally is transmitted by direct contact with infected birds, ingestion of contaminated feed and water, or contact with a contaminated environment. Inhalation of the bacterium can cause respiratory tract infections. Wild bird studies in the Netherlands disclosed tuberculosis-infected puncture-type injuries in birds of prey that fight at the nest site (kestrels) or on the ground (buteo-type buzzards), but tuberculosisinfected injuries were not found in accipiters (falco

  15. Association-rule-based tuberculosis disease diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asha, T.; Natarajan, S.; Murthy, K. N. B.

    2010-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It usually spreads through the air and attacks low immune bodies such as patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). This work focuses on finding close association rules, a promising technique in Data Mining, within TB data. The proposed method first normalizes of raw data from medical records which includes categorical, nominal and continuous attributes and then determines Association Rules from the normalized data with different support and confidence. Association rules are applied on a real data set containing medical records of patients with TB obtained from a state hospital. The rules determined describes close association between one symptom to another; as an example, likelihood that an occurrence of sputum is closely associated with blood cough and HIV.

  16. TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Bajrović

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis, known as the "White Plague" in the early 19th century, is the infectious disease, which is being researched today even in some of the most developed countries in the world. Epidemiological- epizootiological research points to the importance of pasteurizing milk as well as the transmission in aerosolized droplets in humans and animals. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, M. bovis, M. africanum and M. microti are the mycobacteria that cause tuberculosis. Other mycobacteria cause diseases commonly known as mycobacteriosae. Pathogenesis of tuberculosis includes both host- related and mycobacterium-related factors (virulence. Mtb acts through the expression of various genes and their proteins that are detectable in the serums of the diseased only, proving these proteins are formed in the course of the disease. In humans, a diagnosis is established by the detection of antigens (and antibodies, and in animals, with the allergy tests. As far as the bovine tuberculosis is concerned, the combination of skin tuberculin and blood gamma interferon test is recommended. Sequential genome (Mtb analysis has given the basis for further research of the new vaccines.Key words: Tuberculosis, pathogenesis, immunity

  17. Risk factors for tuberculosis in inflammatory bowel disease: anti-tumor necrosis factor and hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabino Riestra

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine risk factors for active tuberculosis in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. Methods: Retrospective, case-control study at 4 referral hospitals in Spain. Cases developed tuberculosis after a diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. Controls were inflammatory bowel disease patients who did not develop tuberculosis. For each case, we randomly selected 3 controls matched for sex, age (within 5 years and time of inflammatory bowel disease diagnosis (within 3 years. Inflammatory bowel disease characteristics, candidate risk factors for tuberculosis and information about the tuberculosis episode were recorded. Multivariate analysis and a Chi-squared automatic interaction detector were used. Results: Thirty-four cases and 102 controls were included. Nine of the 34 cases developed active tuberculosis between 1989 and 1999, and 25 became ill between 2000 and 2012. Multivariate regression showed an association between active tuberculosis and anti-TNF (tumor necrosis factor therapy in the previous 12 months (OR 7.45; 95% CI, 2.39-23.12; p = 0.001; hospitalization in the previous 6 months (OR 4.38; 95% CI, 1.18-16.20; p = 0.027; and albumin levels (OR 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.95; p = 0.001. The median time between the start of biologic therapy and the onset of active tuberculosis was 13 (interquartile range, 1-58 months. Tuberculosis developed after a year of anti-TNF therapy in 53%, and late reactivation occurred in at least 3 of 8 patients. Conclusions: The main risks factors for developing tuberculosis were anti-TNF therapy and hospitalization. Over half the cases related to anti-TNF treatment occurred after a year.

  18. Differential Recognition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific Epitopes as a Function of Tuberculosis Disease History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriba, Thomas J; Carpenter, Chelsea; Pro, Sebastian Carrasco; Sidney, John; Musvosvi, Munyaradzi; Rozot, Virginie; Seumois, Grégory; Rosales, Sandy L; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Goletti, Delia; Makgotlho, Edward; Hanekom, Willem; Hatherill, Mark; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro; Arlehamn, Cecilia S Lindestam

    2017-09-15

    Individuals with a history of tuberculosis (TB) disease are at elevated risk of disease recurrence. The underlying cause is not known, but one explanation is that previous disease results in less-effective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We hypothesized that the repertoire of Mtb-derived epitopes recognized by T cells from individuals with latent Mtb infection differs as a function of previous diagnosis of active TB disease. T-cell responses to peptide pools in samples collected from an adult screening and an adolescent validation cohort were measured by IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assay or intracellular cytokine staining. We identified a set of "type 2" T-cell epitopes that were recognized at 10-fold-lower levels in Mtb-infected individuals with a history of TB disease less than 6 years ago than in those without previous TB. By contrast, "type 1" epitopes were recognized equally well in individuals with or without previous TB. The differential epitope recognition was not due to differences in HLA class II binding, memory phenotypes, or gene expression in the responding T cells. Instead, "TB disease history-sensitive" type 2 epitopes were significantly (P < 0.0001) more homologous to sequences from bacteria found in the human microbiome than type 1 epitopes. Preferential loss of T-cell reactivity to Mtb epitopes that are homologous to bacteria in the microbiome in persons with previous TB disease may reflect long-term effects of antibiotic TB treatment on the microbiome.

  19. Serum adenosine deaminase activity and its isoenzyme in patients treated for tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rokayan, S.A

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Increased serum adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity, mainly associated with tuberculosis can also occur in a number of other diseases thus negatively affecting the diagnostic utility of ADA measurements in tuberculosis. The aim of the study was to determine whether or not the combined use of the activity of ADA, its isoenzymes and differential cell counts would provide a more efficient means of diagnosing tuberculosis than the use of ADA levels alone. Results: Data suggested significant (p 0.75) of ADA/sub 2/ADA was found to be better indicator of tuberculosis. Lymphocyte neutrophil ratio (L/N)> 0.69 gave additional benefit to increase the sensitivity and specificity for the use of ADA as marker in diagnosing tuberculosis. Conclusion: The combined use of activity of ADA, its isoenzymes and total and differential cell counts is a better indicator and gives better understanding to diagnose and evaluate tuberculosis and response to therapy. (author)

  20. [Immigrants treated for tuberculosis in Mazovian Center for Treatment of Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis in Otwock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagodziński, Jacek; Zielonka, Tadeusz M

    2010-01-01

    Migration of population contributes to the transmission of tuberculosis (TB), particularly multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. In the countries of Western Europe, the immigrants' inflow contributes to the deterioration of the epidemiological situation. Majority of newly detected TB cases in some countries were affirmed among immigrant and foreign born population. In Poland, this problem has not been investigated up to 2005. The aim of the study was the assessment of the occurrence of tuberculosis in foreigners treated in the Mazovian Centre for Treatment of Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis in Otwock. This work had a retrospective character. The number of cases of tuberculosis in foreigners admitted between 2002 and 2007 was calculated from the data base of the Mazovian Centre for Treatment of Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis; 125 patients, whose basic demographic data, bacteriological status and the radiological changes suggested TB, were included in the study. The foreigners made up to 0.5-1.7% all tuberculosis cases treated in Mazovian Centre for Treatment of Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis. Among confirmed cases, twenty four nationalities were seen. Nationals of the Russian Federation (coming from the Republic of Chechnya) formed the biggest group (24%), followed by the Vietnamese (21%) and the Ukrainians (12%). Most of all cases were young men (77%; average age - 34 years). Children made up to 12% of all cases. Tuberculosis of lungs was predominating, and there were culture confirmed extrapulmonary locations in 13.6% of cases. Bacteriological confirmation was achieved in 53% of cases, but up to 22.7% cases were resistant to one of the antituberculosis medicines and 13.6% was multidrug-resistant. Despite the fact, that foreigners made up a small proportion among all the patient treated for tuberculosis in Mazovia, their number systematically increases. High proportion of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis reported in foreign-born cases is a concern.

  1. Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Morán López

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available En la actualidad la incidencia de la tuberculosis ha aumentado. El Mycobacterium tuberculosis infecta frecuentemente a las personas con SIDA, debido a que en estos pacientes hay una reducción de la resistencia mediada por células T, lo que propicia que este bacilo pueda desarrollar la enfermedad con una frecuencia superior a la de las personas sanas. La transmisión de la enfermedad puede ser por vía directa, de un individuo afectado a otro, fundamentalmente por las gotitas de saliva que contengan a este microorganismo, o por vía indirecta por la inhalación del bacilo que se puede encontrar por meses en los objetos de uso diario, debido a su gran resistencia. Las micobacterias que producen tuberculosis en el hombre inmunocompetente son la Mycobacterium tuberculosis y la bovis, otros tipos pueden provocar tuberculosis en individuos inmunocomprometidos. La patogenicidad de este bacilo está relacionada con su capacidad para escapar de la destrucción inducida por los macrófagos y para provocar hipersensibilidad de tipo retardado. Esta enfermedad tiene muy pocas manifestaciones bucales, lo que se observa generalmente es una úlcera que toma como asiento fundamental el dorso de la lengua. La tuberculosis amenaza con convertirse en una enfermedad incurable por la deficiente administración de los programas contra ésta, por lo que la OMS plantea para su detección y tratamiento el DOTS (tratamiento observado directamente, de corta duración que comienza a tener resultados satisfactorios, aunque en el último quinquenio, el 88 % de los pacientes que se estimaban como infectados por tuberculosis no recibieron DOTS.At present, the incidence of tuberculosis is on the rise. Mycobacterium tuberculosis often infests AIDS patients due to the fact that these persons´T-cell mediated resistance is reduced, which favors the development of the disease at a higher rate than in healthy people. The disease can be transmitted directly, that is , from an

  2. Socio-economic status and the duration of pulmonary tuberculosis symptoms in women treated at the Mazovian Treatment Centre of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in Otwock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błachnio, Maria; Zielonka, Tadeusz M; Błachnio, Antoni; Jagodziński, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of tuberculosis depends on various factors such as migration, homelessness, malnutrition, unemployment, bad life conditions and the aging of a society. The aim of this study was to evaluate tuberculosis in females treated at the Mazovian Treatment Centre of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (Mazowieckie Centrum Leczenia Chorób Płuc i Gruźlicy) in Otwock, regarding the context of demographic, social and professional status of female patients. The duration of the illness and the extent of radiographic changes were also taken into consideration. The study was carried out retrospectively. The medical documentation that was evaluated concerned 100 women, aged between 20 and 92, hospitalized at the Mazovian Treatment Centre of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in Otwock in the years 2005 and 2006 due to bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis. Most women with tuberculosis lived in cities (65%), 32% of the evaluated patients lived in villages and 3% were homeless. 1/3 of females were under 40 years of age, and 1/3 were over 60 years of age. Only 29% of the women were professionally active and 25% were unemployed. 60% of women were not married. 35% of women with tuberculosis were bringing up children and 7% had abandoned their offspring. More than 1/3 of women had had tuberculosis symptoms for more than half a year before tuberculosis was diagnosed. 40% of women with tuberculosis had small radiological changes (1 to 2 lung fields); however, 26% of them had extensive changes covering 4 to 6 lung fields. The majority of women with tuberculosis in the Mazovian district are single, over 40 years old, unemployed inhabitants of cities. 30% of women in the study group had had symptoms for more than 6 months before tuberculosis was diagnosed. 40% of women with tuberculosis had very extensive radiological changes covering 4 to 6 lung fields.

  3. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Rating Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.378 Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will not...

  4. Protective activity of Lentinan in experimental tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, Nadya; Kussovski, Vesselin; Drandarska, Ivanka; Nikolaeva, Sascha; Georgieva, Neli; Radoucheva, Tatyana

    2003-10-01

    Protective effects of Lentinan (Ajinomoto, Japan) against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection were studied by in vitro and in vivo mouse models. The effectiveness of Lentinan administrated intraperitoneally (i.p.) before infection at a dose of 1 mg/kg three times at 2-day intervals was monitored in vivo by several parameters (body temperature; spleen weight; CFU counts of M. tuberculosis in spleen, liver and lung; and histomorphological observations). Peritoneal macrophages obtained from animals treated with Lentinan were greatly stimulated, as assayed by establishing their number, acid phosphatase activity, H2O2 production and killing ability against M. tuberculosis in vitro. The in vivo model demonstrated that administration of Lentinan before infection can mobilize host defense potential and reduce mycobacterial infection.

  5. The relationship between chitotriosidase activity and tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M; Deng, J; Li, W; Su, C; Xia, Y; Wang, M; Li, X; Abuaku, B K; Tan, H; Wen, S W

    2015-11-01

    Chitotriosidase, secreted by activated macrophages, is a biomarker of activated macrophages. In this study, we explored whether chitotriosidase could be adopted as a biomarker to evaluate the curative effect on tuberculosis (TB). Five counties were randomly selected out of 122 counties/cities/districts in Hunan Province, China. Our cases were all TB patients who were newly diagnosed or had been receiving treatment at the Centers for Disease Control (CDCs) of these five counties between April and August in 2009. Healthy controls were selected from a community health facility in the Kaifu district of Changsha City after frequency-matching of gender and age with the cases. Chitotriosidase activity was evaluated by a fluorometric assay. Categorical variables were analysed with the χ 2 test. Measurement data in multiple groups were tested with analysis of variance and least significant difference (LSD). Correlation between chitotriosidase activity and the degree of radiological extent (DRE) was examined by Spearman's rank correlation test. The average chitotriosidase activity levels of new TB cases, TB cases with different periods of treatment (6 months) and the control group were 54·47, 34·77, 21·54, 12·73 and 10·53 nmol/h.ml, respectively. Chitotriosidase activity in TB patients declined along with the continuity of treatment. The chitotriosidase activity of both smear-positive and the smear-negative pulmonary TB patients decreased after 6 months' treatment to normal levels (P activity was positively correlated with DRE (r = 0·607, P < 0·001). Our results indicate that chitotriosidase might be a marker of TB treatment effects. However, further follow-up study of TB patients is needed in the future.

  6. Nutritional supplements for people being treated for active tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobler, Liesl; Nagpal, Sukrti; Sudarsanam, Thambu D; Sinclair, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis and malnutrition are linked in a complex relationship. Tuberculosis may cause undernutrition through increased metabolic demands and decreased intake, and nutritional deficiencies may worsen the disease, or delay recovery by depressing important immune functions. At present, there is no evidence-based nutritional guidance for adults and children being treated for tuberculosis. Objectives To assess the effects of oral nutritional supplements in people being treated with antituberculous drug therapy for active tuberculosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Issue 1, 2016), MEDLINE (from 1946 to 4 February 2016), EMBASE (from 1980 to 4 February 2016), LILACS (from 1982 to 4 February 2016), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT), the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the Indian Journal of Tuberculosis up to 4 February 2016, and checked the reference lists of all included studies. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that compared any oral nutritional supplement given for at least four weeks with no nutritional intervention, placebo, or dietary advice only for people being treated for active tuberculosis. The primary outcomes of interest were all-cause death, and cure at six and 12 months. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, and extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the included trials. We presented the results as risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous variables, and mean differences (MD) for continuous variables, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Where appropriate, we pooled data from trials with similar interventions and outcomes. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Main results Thirty-five trials

  7. The usefulness of 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of active pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. J.; Jeon, D. S.; Yoo, S. D.; Lee, M. K.; Park, S. K.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, I. J.; Kim, Y. K.

    1998-01-01

    The use of radiopharmaceuticals in evaluation of pulmonary tuberculosis may help to resolve difficult diagnostic problems such as discordance between sputum examinations and chest roentgenographic findings. We investigated the usefulness of 99m Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) scintigraphy in the detection of active pulmonary tuberculosis. Forty-six patients with suspected active pulmonary tuberculosis were studied with sputum smear of AFB, sputum AFB culture, chest X-ray and MIBI scan. MIBI image was obtained 15 and 60 min after intravenous injection of 370MBq(10mCi) 99m Tc-MIBI. In 16 patients of them Ga scans were performed in addition to MIBI scan. Repeated MIBI scans were done in 7 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis after 4∼6 months of antituberculous chemotherapy. Thirty-two patients were confirmed as active tuberculosis by sputum culture. Sensitivity of MIBI scan to active tuberculosis was 87.5%(28/32) and MIBI findings were negative in all of 14 patients with inactive disease. Focal uptake of MIBI was dense in the area that was strongly suggested active tuberculous lesions by chest roentgenogram. There was no discordance between MIBI and Ga image in 16 patients. But the uptake areas of Ga images were broader than that of MIBI images. After 4∼6 months of antituberculous treatment all repeated MIBI scans revealed negative findings except 1 patient with persistent active pulmonary tuberculosis due to drug resistance. MIBI scan could be used in the detection of active pulmonary tuberculosis as a useful noninvasive diagnostic tool

  8. Tuberculosis, a re-emergent disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valadas, Emilia; Antunes, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In Western Europe, regions with a high incidence of TB usually also have a high incidence of HIV infection; TB and HIV co-infection have increased over the past decade and among HIV infected patients, nearly half also develop TB. In settings where HIV is prevalent, TB drug resistance has also increased and several reports of TB and multi-drug resistant TB outbreaks, especially in health care settings, raise serious concerns about nosocomial transmission. Further research and new developments into more rapid diagnostic methods and sensitivity testing as well as the development of new anti-TB drugs are important to fight the disease. In addition, public health infrastructures have to be strengthened in order to increase adherence to TB treatment, where directly observed treatment strategy is the cornerstone for a successful outcome

  9. Tuberculosis in patients with end-stage renal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Cheol; Goo, Jin Mo; Chung, Myung Jin; Moon, Min Hoan; Koh, Young Hwan; Im, Jung Gi

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the clinical and radiological manifestations of tuberculosis in patients with end-stage renal disease. The medical records, chest radiographs, and CT scans of 42 patients with tuberculosis among 871 consecutive patients with end-stage renal disease were reviewed. Patterns of initial chest radiographs were categorized as primary, postprimary, miliary, or atypical, according to the predominant radiologic findings. Chest radiographs and CT scans revealed pulmonary tuberculosis in 28 patients and extrapulmonary tuberculosis in 15. The pattern of chest radiographs indicative of pulmonary tuberculosis was primary in 12 cases, postprimary in 11, miliary in one, demonstrated atypical infiltrates in three, and was normal in one. Tuberculosis involved the extrathoracic lymph nodes in six cases, the peritoneum in four, the spine in three, and the bone marrow in two. The primary pattern, seen in 12 patients, manifested as pleural effusion or segmental consolidation, and in ten of the twelve the former was dominant. The radiological pattern of pulmonary tuberculosis in end-stage renal disease is often primary, and extrapulmonary involvement is frequent

  10. Arginine Adjunctive Therapy in Active Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasghar Farazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dietary supplementation has been used as a mechanism to augment the immune system. Adjunctive therapy with L-arginine has the potential to improve outcomes in active tuberculosis. Methods. In a randomized clinical trial 63 participants with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in Markazi Province of Iran were given arginine or placebo for 4 weeks in addition to conventional chemotherapy. The final treatment success, sputum conversion, weight gain, and clinical symptoms after one and two months were considered as primary outcomes and secondary outcomes were ESR, CRP, and Hg. Data were collected and analyzed with SPSS software (ver. 18. Results. Arginine supplementation reduced constitutional symptoms (P=0.032 in patients with smear-positive TB at the end of the first month of treatment. Arginine treated patients had significantly increased BMI at the end of the first and second months of treatment (P=0.032 and P=0.04 and a reduced CRP at the end of the first month of treatment (P=0.03 versus placebo group. Conclusion. Arginine is useful as an adjunctive therapy in patients with active tuberculosis, in which the effects are more likely mediated by the increased production of nitric oxide and improved constitutional symptoms and weight gain. This trial is registered with Clinical Trials Registry of Iran: IRCT201211179855N2.

  11. Poncet's disease: Reactive arthritis accompanying tuberculosis. Two case reports and a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.-J.A. Kroot (Eric-Jan); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); E.M. Colin (Edgar); R.J.E.M. Dolhain (Radboud)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractObjective. Reactive arthritis (ReA) in tuberculosis (TB) is known as Poncet's disease. It is a rare aseptic form of arthritis observed in patients with active TB. We present two such patients and review the literature on Poncet's disease. Methods. Two patients who were identified with

  12. European framework for tuberculosis control and elimination in countries with a low incidence. Recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO), International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (IUATLD) and Royal Netherlands Tuberculosis Association (KNCV) Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekmans, J F; Migliori, G B; Rieder, H L; Lees, J; Ruutu, P; Loddenkemper, R; Raviglione, M C

    2002-04-01

    As countries approach the elimination phase of tuberculosis, specific problems and challenges emerge, due to the steadily declining incidence in the native population, the gradually increasing importance of the importation of latent tuberculosis infection and tuberculosis from other countries and the emergence of groups at particularly high risk of tuberculosis. Therefore, a Working Group of the World Health Organization (WHO), the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (IUATLD) and the Royal Netherlands Tuberculosis Association (KNCV) have developed a new framework for low incidence countries based on concepts and definitions consistent with those of previous recommendations from WHO/IUATLD Working Groups. In low-incidence countries, a broader spectrum of interventions is available and feasible, including: 1) a general approach to tuberculosis which ensures rapid detection and treatment of all the cases and prevention of unnecessary deaths; 2) an overall control strategy aimed at reducing the incidence of tuberculosis infection (risk-group management and prevention of transmission of infection in institutional settings) and 3) a tuberculosis elimination strategy aimed at reducing the prevalence of tuberculosis infection (outbreak management and provision of preventive therapy for specified groups and individuals). Government and private sector commitment towards elimination, effective case detection among symptomatic individuals together with active case finding in special groups, standard treatment of disease and infection, access to tuberculosis diagnostic and treatment services, prevention (e.g. through screening and bacille Calmette-Guéria immunization in specified groups), surveillance and treatment outcome monitoring are prerequisites to implementing the policy package recommended in this new framework document.

  13. Active case finding of tuberculosis in Europe: a Tuberculosis Network European Trials Group (TBNET) survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothamley, G H; Ditiu, L; Migliori, G B

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis control depends on successful case finding and treatment of individuals infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Passive case finding is widely practised: the present study aims to ascertain the consensus and possible improvements in active case finding across Europe. Recommendations...... from national guidelines were collected from 50 countries of the World Health Organization European region using a standard questionnaire. Contacts are universally screened for active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Most countries (>70%) screen those with HIV infection, prisoners...... and in-patient contacts. Screening of immigrants is related to their contribution to national rates of tuberculosis. Only 25 (50%) out of 50 advise a request for symptoms in their guidelines. A total of 36 (72%) out of 50 countries recommend sputum examination for those with a persistent cough; 13...

  14. [Clinical evaluation on causes of death in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuba, M; Nakasone, K; Miyagi, S; Kyan, K; Shinzato, T; Kohagura, N; Futenma, M; Genka, K

    1996-04-01

    Seventy one patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis who died during the past 5 years (1989 to 1993) were evaluated on their causes of death. Twenty two patients (31%) died directly of tuberculosis, and among them, 18 patients (81%) of 22 patients who died of tuberculosis) had very advanced tuberculosis. The majority of them (64%) were old age over 70 years and were bedridden due mostly to cerebrovascular injuries. The serum level of albumin was low in all 17 patients in whom it was measured. Establishment of diagnosis of tuberculosis was delayed over one month after the onset of symptoms in 59% of patients who died of severe disease. Sixty one percent (11/18) of patients died within the first month after the initiation of chemotherapy and about 90% (16/18) died within 3 months. Two patients died from massive hemoptysis and other patients died of either respiratory failure or tuberculosis meningitis. From these observations it was found that very advanced tuberculosis was the major cause of death in patients who died of tuberculosis and that the advanced disease was chiefly caused by the delay on the establishment of diagnosis, and it was most important to detect tuberculosis as early as possible, with regular check up of chest X-ray and frequent examination for AFB (acid-fast bacilli) for tuberculosis suspected patients. On the other hand, the majority of patients (49/71) died of complicating medical problem unrelated to tuberculosis. Seventeen patients died from malignancy (seven lung cancer, four lymphoma, two laryngeal cancer, etc). Ten deaths were the result of bacterial superinfection. Other patients died from respiratory failure due to COPD, arteiosclerotic heart disease, or cerebrovascular injuries, etc. Two patients of old age died of hepatic failure possibly caused by adverse reaction of TB chemotherapy. It was found that diseases unrelated to tuberculosis were the cause of death in approximately 70% of patients with active tuberculosis, and it should

  15. Living with Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Tuberculosis (TB) Living With Tuberculosis What to Expect You will need regular checkups ... XML file."); } }); } } --> Blank Section Header Lung Disease Lookup Tuberculosis (TB) Learn About Tuberculosis Tuberculosis Symptoms, Causes & Risk ...

  16. Variation in C - reactive protein response according to host and mycobacterial characteristics in active tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, James; Clark, Kristina; Smith, Colette; Hopwood, Jennifer; Lynard, Oliver; Toolan, Michael; Creer, Dean; Barker, Jack; Breen, Ronan; Brown, Tim; Cropley, Ian; Lipman, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Background The C - reactive protein (CRP) response is often measured in patients with active tuberculosis (TB) yet little is known about its relationship to clinical features in TB, or whether responses differ between ethnic groups or with different Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) strain types. We report the relationship between baseline serum CRP prior to treatment and disease characteristics in a metropolitan population with TB resident in a low TB incidence region. Methods People treated...

  17. Active case finding of tuberculosis in Europe: a Tuberculosis Network European Trials Group (TBNET) survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothamley, G.H.; Ditiu, L.; Migliori, G.B.

    2008-01-01

    countries do not, even if the chest radiograph suggests tuberculosis. Nearly all countries (49 out of 50) use tuberculin skin testing (TST); 27 (54%) out of 50 countries also perform chest radiography irrespective of the TST result. Interpretation of the TST varies widely. All countries use 6-9 months...... of isoniazid for treatment of LTBI, with an estimated median (range) uptake of 55% (5-92.5%). Symptoms and sputum examination could be used more widely when screening for active tuberculosis. Treatment of latent tuberculosis infection might be better focused by targeted use of interferon-gamma release assays...

  18. [Clinical and radiological features of pulmonary tuberculosis manifested as interstitial lung diseases.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ju-Hong; Feng, Rui-E; Tian, Xin-Lun; Xu, Wen-Bing; Xu, Zuo-Jun; Liu, Hong-Rui; Zhu, Yuan-Jue

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the clinical and radiological features of pulmonary tuberculosis presenting as interstitial lung diseases (ILD). We analyzed the data of cases suspected of diffuse parenchyma lung diseases at this hospital between October 2003 and October 2007. The diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis was based on epithelioid granuloma or positive acid-fast bacilli in lung biopsy and changes on serial radiographs obtained during treatment. The data of a series of 230 consecutive patients with suspected ILD were retrospectively analyzed. The diagnosis was confirmed by lung biopsy. Twelve patients were confirmed to have pulmonary tuberculosis. There were 5 males and 7 females with a mean age of 38 +/- 11 years (range, 17 - 68). The median course of disease in these patients was 3 months (range, 0.5 - 18 months). Patients with pulmonary tuberculosis presented with fever (11/12), cough (9/12), weight loss (7/12), dyspnea (7/12), lymphadenopathy (4/12), and splenohepatomegaly (2/12). On chest CT scan, ground-glass attenuation was identified in 4, bilateral patchy infiltration in 5, tree-in-bud appearance 1, and centrilobular lesions in 2 of the 12 patients. During the follow-up period (median, 9 month, range from 3 to 12 month), 11 patients improved, but 1 died of diabetic ketoacidosis. The diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis should be considered in suspected ILD patients presenting with fever, splenohepatomegaly and lymphadenopathy.

  19. Renal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Džamić Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is still a significant health problem in the world, mostly in developing countries. The special significance lies in immunocompromised patients, particularly those suffering from the HIV. Urogenital tuberculosis is one of the most common forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, while the most commonly involved organ is the kidney. Renal tuberculosis occurs by hematogenous dissemination of mycobacterium tuberculosis from a primary tuberculosis foci in the body. Tuberculosis is characterized by the formation of pathognomonic lesions in the tissues - granulomata. These granulomata may heal spontaneously or remain stable for years. In certain circumstances in the body associated with immunosuppression, the disease may be activated. Central caseous necrosis occurs within tuberculoma, leading to formation of cavities that destroy renal parenchyma. The process may gain access to the collecting system, forming the caverns. In this way, infection can be spread distally to renal pelvis, ureter and bladder. Scaring of tissue by tuberculosis process may lead to development of strictures of the urinary tract. The clinical manifestations are presented by nonspecific symptoms and signs, so tuberculosis can often be overlooked. Sterile pyuria is characteristic for urinary tuberculosis. Dysuric complaints, flank pain or hematuria may be presented in patients. Constitutional symptoms of fever, weight loss and night sweats are presented in some severe cases. Diagnosis is made by isolation of mycobacterium tuberculosis in urine samples, by cultures carried out on standard solid media optimized for mycobacterial growth. Different imaging studies are used in diagnostics - IVU, CT and NMR are the most important. Medical therapy is the main modality of tuberculosis treatment. The first line anti-tuberculosis drugs include isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol. Surgical treatment is required in some cases, to remove severely damaged kidney, if

  20. [Practical issues in the management of tuberculosis disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimond, C; Orain, J-P; Tanguy, M

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis disease warrants standard therapeutic management as detailed in a guide published by the High Authority for Health (HAS) following the publication of the Public Health Law in 2004. The medical services of the régime social des indépendants (RSI) carried out a national survey by targeting patients who, in 2011, were reimbursed for tuberculosis treatment or were admitted for long-term tuberculosis disease. Their physicians were contacted to detail the care pathway and treatment they had received. A total of 148 tuberculosis disease patients were enrolled, of whom 71.6% had respiratory localization of their disease. The diagnosis was made in healthcare institutions in 84.5% of cases. Standard treatment (phases 1 and 2) was used in 30.1% of cases. The recommended quadruple therapy was given in 55.2% of treatments in phase 1 and in accordance with the time recommended in 62.9% of cases. Phase 2 was the recommended two drugs combination therapy 80.4% of the time with the treatment duration respected in 51.0% of treatments. The difference from standard treatment was explained by the detection of health or social events in only 39.0% of cases. This survey allows us to highlight a relative lack of knowledge of standard treatment as recommended by the HAS. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Tuberculosis in an inflammatory bowel disease cohort from South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Potent immunosuppressive therapy is standard treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but carries a risk of reactivating latent tuberculosis (TB). No data exist on the burden of TB in South African patients with IBD. Objective. To evaluate the burden of TB in IBD patients attending a large tertiary IBD clinic.

  2. Obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with previous tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with previous tuberculosis: Pathophysiology of a community-based cohort. B.W. Allwood, R Gillespie, M Galperin-Aizenberg, M Bateman, H Olckers, L Taborda-Barata, G.L. Calligaro, Q Said-Hartley, R van Zyl-Smit, C.B. Cooper, E van Rikxoort, J Goldin, N Beyers, E.D. Bateman ...

  3. Tuberculosis infection and disease in children living in households of Filipino patients with tuberculosis: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Vergara, R M L; Sia, I G; Tupasi, T E; Alcañeses, M R; Orillaza, R B; Co, V; Quelapio, M I D; Beltran, G; Legaspi, J D; Rostrata, M P C; Tecson, M E B; Corpuz, M L S B

    2003-12-01

    DOTS Clinic with a DOTS-Plus pilot project for the management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in a high burden country. To determine the prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) infection and disease among pediatric household contacts of patients with pulmonary TB (PTB). Cross-sectional study. One hundred and fifty-three children aged 0-15 years in the households of 62 bacteriologically confirmed PTB patients, including 44 with MDR-TB, were studied. BCG scars were noted, and tuberculin skin test (TST), screening chest radiography, and sputum or gastric aspirate smear and culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in those with radiographic findings suggestive of PTB were done. For children in this study, the prevalences of latent TB infection (LTBI), radiographically diagnosed pulmonary TB, and bacillary pulmonary TB were 69.2%, 3.3%, and 0.65%, respectively. Only age > or = 5 years was found to be a significant predictor of LTBI (OR 3.17, 95%CI 1.43-7.01). Contact investigation for active case-finding and early treatment of TB in children from households of patients with active PTB is essential for TB control. Further study on a more precise definition of TB infection and strategies for control in this population will be pursued.

  4. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    C. Robert Horsburgh, Jr

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the published literature on tuberculosis from September 2012 to August 2013 and describes important advances in tuberculosis epidemiology, microbiology, pathology, clinical pharmacology, genetics, treatment and prevention.

  5. The Transcriptional Signature of Active Tuberculosis Reflects Symptom Status in Extra-Pulmonary and Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Blankley

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is a leading cause of infectious death worldwide. Gene-expression microarray studies profiling the blood transcriptional response of tuberculosis (TB patients have been undertaken in order to better understand the host immune response as well as to identify potential biomarkers of disease. To date most of these studies have focused on pulmonary TB patients with gene-expression profiles of extra-pulmonary TB patients yet to be compared to those of patients with pulmonary TB or sarcoidosis.A novel cohort of patients with extra-pulmonary TB and sarcoidosis was recruited and the transcriptional response of these patients compared to those with pulmonary TB using a variety of transcriptomic approaches including testing a previously defined 380 gene meta-signature of active TB.The 380 meta-signature broadly differentiated active TB from healthy controls in this new dataset consisting of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB. The top 15 genes from this meta-signature had a lower sensitivity for differentiating extra-pulmonary TB from healthy controls as compared to pulmonary TB. We found the blood transcriptional responses in pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB to be heterogeneous and to reflect the extent of symptoms of disease.The transcriptional signature in extra-pulmonary TB demonstrated heterogeneity of gene expression reflective of symptom status, while the signature of pulmonary TB was distinct, based on a higher proportion of symptomatic individuals. These findings are of importance for the rational design and implementation of mRNA based TB diagnostics.

  6. Host transcriptional responses following ex vivo re-challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis vary with disease status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine A Yu

    Full Text Available The identification of immune correlates that are predictive of disease outcome for tuberculosis remains an ongoing challenge. To address this issue, we evaluated gene expression profiles from peripheral blood mononuclear cells following ex vivo challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, among participants with active TB disease (ATBD, n = 10, latent TB infection (LTBI, n = 10, and previous active TB disease (after successful treatment; PTBD, n = 10, relative to controls (n = 10. Differential gene expression profiles were assessed by suppression-subtractive hybridization, dot blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and the comparative cycle threshold methods. Comparing ATBD to control samples, greater fold-increases of gene expression were observed for a number of chemotactic factors (CXCL1, CXCL3, IL8, MCP1, MIP1α. ATBD was also associated with higher IL1B gene expression, relative to controls. Among LTBI samples, gene expression of several chemotactic factors (CXCL2, CXCL3, IL8 was similarly elevated, compared to individuals with PTBD. Our results demonstrated that samples from participants with ATBD and LTBI have distinct gene expression profiles in response to ex vivo M. tuberculosis infection. These findings indicate the value in further characterizing the peripheral responses to M. tuberculosis challenge as a route to defining immune correlates of disease status or outcome.

  7. Host transcriptional responses following ex vivo re-challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis vary with disease status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Elaine A; John, Serene H; Tablante, Elizabeth C; King, Christine A; Kenneth, John; Russell, David G; Mehta, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    The identification of immune correlates that are predictive of disease outcome for tuberculosis remains an ongoing challenge. To address this issue, we evaluated gene expression profiles from peripheral blood mononuclear cells following ex vivo challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, among participants with active TB disease (ATBD, n = 10), latent TB infection (LTBI, n = 10), and previous active TB disease (after successful treatment; PTBD, n = 10), relative to controls (n = 10). Differential gene expression profiles were assessed by suppression-subtractive hybridization, dot blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and the comparative cycle threshold methods. Comparing ATBD to control samples, greater fold-increases of gene expression were observed for a number of chemotactic factors (CXCL1, CXCL3, IL8, MCP1, MIP1α). ATBD was also associated with higher IL1B gene expression, relative to controls. Among LTBI samples, gene expression of several chemotactic factors (CXCL2, CXCL3, IL8) was similarly elevated, compared to individuals with PTBD. Our results demonstrated that samples from participants with ATBD and LTBI have distinct gene expression profiles in response to ex vivo M. tuberculosis infection. These findings indicate the value in further characterizing the peripheral responses to M. tuberculosis challenge as a route to defining immune correlates of disease status or outcome.

  8. Antibacterial Activity of Medicinal Aqueous Plant Extracts against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna Mohammed Buzayan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a serious health problem in many regions of the world, and the development of resistance to antibiotics by this microbe created the need for new drugs to replace those which have lost effectiveness. This study assesses the medicinal anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis properties of natural products obtained from plants collected from Eastern Libya. In this study aqueous extracts of nine different plants were assayed for their Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibitory activity using the BACTEC MGIT960 susceptibility test method. The aqueous extracts of Ceratonia siliqua L, Helichrysum stoechas (L. Moench and Thymus algeriensis did not show any activity against M. tuberculosis in different concentrations. The aqueous extract of Marrubium vulgare L. from Syria showed high activity against M. tuberculosis. Marrubium alysson L., Marrubium vulgare L., Pistacia lentiscus L, Quercus coccifera L, Thymus capitatus (L. Hoffm. & Link, showed varying degrees of activity against M. tuberculosis. The results of this study show that aqueous extracts from six different medicinal plants have different effects against M. tuberculosis in vitro.

  9. Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latorre Tortello, Pablo

    1998-01-01

    The tuberculosis is an infection bacterial chronicle of world distribution. Three organisms of the family of the mycobacterium, the m. tuberculosis, the m. bovis and m. africanum, phenotypic and genetically similar, produce it, but only the m. tuberculosis has importance; the others rarely produce illness in the human. By definition, the lung tuberculosis is the localization of the m. tuberculosis in the breathing tract, the most common and main form in the affection and the only able to contaminate to other people. The koch bacillus, transmits the illness directly person to person. The paper Includes topics like pathogenesis, natural history, epidemiology, diagnose, symptomatology and treatment

  10. Prevalence of Pulmonary Tuberculosis among Household Contacts in Hyderabad, Sindh: Active Contact Tracing in Children with Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, M.A.; Shah, S.A.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) in children is clearly linked to TB in adults therefore active household contact tracing is an important method of early diagnosis and treatment particularly in high-TB-burden countries. Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of TB among household contacts of children suffering from tuberculosis using active contact tracing and linking them to TB program for treatment. Subjects and Methods: A total of 125 children suffering from active tuberculosis (index cases)aged 12 years or less were randomly selected from the outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital of Hyderabad. Using their home address, all house hold members of the index cases (sharing one kitchen) were identified. The households were visited by a team including a doctor and the supported staff and were screened for TB using history, physical examination, sputum for AFB and X-ray of chest. Clinical suspects were divided in to two populations, equal to or less than 12 years of age and greater than this age. All suspected cases were brought to outpatient's department of the hospital where children were examined and diagnosed by pediatrician and adults were examined by the pulmonologist. Results: There were 125 children and 1365 household members. Prevalence of active TB in adult household contacts was 8.1 percent and among children was 5.7 percent. Mother, father, grand parents or siblings were the source of disease spread in children. Family history of TB was present in 95 percent (pulmonary 78 percent, extra-pulmonary 22 percent). Conclusion: Tuberculosis in children is mostly spreading from household member hence deeply required to undertake active contact tracing in each new case that is diagnosed or being treated. Policy message: National and Provincial TB programs should advocate and undertake active screening of all household contacts of all TB cases. (author)

  11. [On the way to shortening tuberculosis treatments: clinical trials of the Unitat d' Investagació en Tuberculosi de Barcelona supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Antonio; Sánchez, Francesca; Nelson, Jeanne; Miró, José M; Caylà, Joan A

    2010-01-01

    New treatment guidelines are required to improve the tuberculosis control strategies that have been used for 30 years. Seven centers of the Barcelona Tuberculosis Research Unit (BTRU) (Unitat d'Investigació en Tuberculosi de Barcelona) are collaborating with the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination of the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in a series of clinical trials on latent tuberculosis infection and tuberculosis disease. BTRU participation began in 2004 with Study 26, an evaluation of the efficacy and tolerability of rifapentine plus isoniazid administered once weekly for 3 months compared with the standard treatment for latent tuberculosis infection. The BTRU centers together enrolled 246 patients (3% of the total). General enrollment was completed in February, 2008. HIV-infected patient and child enrollment continues. Treatment with 12 doses instead of 270 doses is expected to be a clear success. However, the analysis will be completed in 2010. Study 28 (started in 2006), designed for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, compared standard treatment with an experimental regimen substituting moxifloxacin for isoniazid. BTRU centers together enrolled 15 patients (3.5% of the total). The provisional results (presented at the 47th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy in Chicago, 2007) showed no difference between the sputum conversion rate of each regimen at week 8 of treatment. Study 29 is currently underway, in which rifapentine was introduced in the experimental regimen for active tuberculosis treatment. Copyright (c) 2009 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence of latent tuberculosis and treatment adherence among patients with chronic kidney disease in Campo Grande, State of Mato Grosso do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aucely Corrêa Fernandes Chagas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The primary strategy for tuberculosis control involves identifying individuals with latent tuberculosis. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of latent tuberculosis in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients who were undergoing hemodialysis in Campo Grande, State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, to characterize the sociodemographic and clinical profiles of patients with latent tuberculosis, to verify the association between sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and the occurrence of latent tuberculosis, and to monitor patient adherence to latent tuberculosis treatment. Methods This epidemiological study involved 418 CKD patients who were undergoing hemodialysis and who underwent a tuberculin skin test. Results The prevalence of latent tuberculosis was 10.3%. The mean patient age was 53.43±14.97 years, and the patients were predominantly men (63.9%. The population was primarily Caucasian (58.6%; half (50% were married, and 49.8% had incomplete primary educations. Previous contact with tuberculosis patients was reported by 80% of the participants. Treatment adherence was 97.7%. Conclusions We conclude that the prevalence of latent tuberculosis in our study population was low. Previous contact with patients with active tuberculosis increased the occurrence of latent infection. Although treatment adherence was high in this study, it is crucial to monitor tuberculosis treatment administered to patients in health services to maintain this high rate.

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: approach to development of improved strategies for disease control through vaccination and immunodiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirlekar, B; Pathak, S; Pathade, G

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major health problem throughout the world causing large number of deaths, more than that from any other single infectious disease. Estimates till date ascertain the fact that Tuberculosis (TB) is continuing to be the leading cause of death worldwide. The infection from single infectious agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis is killing about 3 million individuals every year and accounts for around 18.5% of all deaths in adults between the age group of 15 and 65. An average of 1.79 billion people, which constitutes roughly one-third of the world's population, is infected with the causative agent M. tuberculosis and is at risk of developing the disease. This situation highlights the relative shortcomings of the current treatment and diagnosis strategies for TB and the limited effectiveness of public health systems, particularly in resource-poor countries where the main TB burden lies. The timely identification of persons infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and rapid laboratory confirmation of tuberculosis are two key factors for the treatment and prevention of the disease. Novel molecular assays for diagnosis and drug susceptibility testing offer several potential advantages over the above methods including faster turnaround times, very sensitive and specific detection of nucleic acids, and minimal, or possibly no, prior culture. The need for new technologies for rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis is clear. Most studies of mycobacterial immunity attributes focus on proliferation of T cells, production of cytokines and cytolytic activity. A proper vaccine for tuberculosis can be developed by using a combination of antigens and adjuvants capable of inducing appropriate and long-lasting T cell immunity. Development of new vaccines against TB should include some important aspects learned from BCG use such as mucosal routes of immunization; revaccination of BCG immunized subjects, booster immunization and prime-boost strategy with wild-type BCG, and other

  14. Primary lung cancer coexisting with active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varol, Y; Varol, U; Unlu, M; Kayaalp, I; Ayranci, A; Dereli, M S; Guclu, S Z

    2014-09-01

    Lung cancer and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) comorbidity is a clinical problem that presents a challenge for the diagnosis and treatment of both diseases. To clarify the clinical and survival characteristics of cases with both lung cancer and active pulmonary TB. From 2008 to 2013, 3350 TB patients admitted to the TB Department of the Chest Diseases Hospital of Izmir, Turkey, were evaluated. In 38 (1.1%) male patients, lung cancer and TB were found to coexist. Almost all of the patients were diagnosed at Stage III (n = 14, 36.8%) or IV (n = 17, 44.7%) lung cancer, whereas four (10.6%) had Stage II and three (7.9%) had Stage I disease. Squamous cell lung cancer was the predominant histology (n = 23, 60.7%). The median overall survival among patients was 13.4 months (95%CI 8.09-18.8). One-year survival rates for patients with Stages I, II, III and IV were respectively 100%, 75%, 57% and 40%. The present study demonstrates that lung cancer combined with active pulmonary TB most frequently presents as squamous cell carcinoma, with a male predominance. The overall survival of lung cancer patients did not change even with concomitant active TB.

  15. Dendritic Cells Activate and Mature after Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamo Gezahagne

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs can take up an array of different antigens, including microorganisms which they can process and present more effectively than any other antigen presenting cell. However, whether the interaction between the human DC and Mycobacterium tuberculosis represents a defense mechanism by the invaded host, or helping the invader to evade the defense mechanism of the host is still not clearly understood. Findings To analyze the interactions between M. tuberculosis and immune cells, human peripheral blood monocyte-derived immature DCs were infected with M. tuberculosis H37Rv wild type strain and flow cytometry was used to analyse cell surface expression markers. The ability of the M. tuberculosis infected DC to induce T cell proliferation using 5 and 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE dilution technique was also investigated. DCs were found to internalize the mycobacteria and show dose dependent infection and necrosis with different multiplicity of infection. Flow cytometry analysis of cell surface expression markers CD40, CD54, CD80, CD83, CD86 and HLA DR in infected DC revealed significant (p M. tuberculosis in comparison to immature DC with no stimulation. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS from Salmonella abortus equi, a known DC maturation agent, was used as a positive control and showed a comparable up regulation of cell surface markers as observed with M. tuberculosis infected DC. It was revealed that the M. tuberculosis infected DC induced T cell proliferation. Conclusion These data clearly demonstrate that M. tuberculosis induces activation and maturation of human monocyte-derived immature DC as well as induces T cell proliferation in vitro.

  16. Tuberculosis a disease that created and shaped thoracic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Inzirillo, Francesco; Giorgetta, Casimiro; Robustellini, Mario; Ravalli, Eugenio; Tiberi, Simon; Della Pona, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Today it is incredible to think that an infectious disease, Tuberculosis (TB) as the disease that shaped Thoracic Surgery. The history of TB has so far evolved similarities with that of the mythological Phoenix, where the resurgence of this never completely eradicated “Insidious Disease” has now re-emerged and brought new challenges to modern medicine that of multi drug resistance. The probability of success, in treating complicated multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB pushing us back to the pre-ant...

  17. Learn About Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Tuberculosis (TB) Learn About Tuberculosis Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacterial infection caused by the organism Mycobacterium tuberculosis that primarily affects the lungs, although other organs ...

  18. Differentiating Crohn's disease from intestinal tuberculosis at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients with non-caseating granulomas, as these suggest a very real possibility of ITB. ... There were no significant differences in smoking status, symptom duration or perianal disease. ..... CD, requires a degree of immune competence. This is ...

  19. CT findings of diffuse pleural diseases: differentiation of malignant disease from tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, In Gye; Kook, Shin Ho; Lee, Young Rae; Chin, Seung Bum; Park, Yoon Ok; Park, Hae Won

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate whether or not previously known CT criteria for differentiating malignant and benign pleural diseases are useful in the differentiation of diffuse malignant pleural diseases and tuberculosis. We retrospectively analyzed CT scans of 42 patients comprising 20 cases of malignant pleural diseases and 22 cases of tuberculous pleural diseases, according to previously known CT criteria for differentiating malignant and benign pleural diseases. The most common shape of pleural effusion was crescentic in malignant pleural diseases and loculated in tuberculosis. The aggressive nature of pleural effusion, pleural rind, and pleura thickening was 1.5 times more frequently observed in malignant pleural diseases than in tuberculosis. Smooth thickening or smooth nodular pleural thickening and extrapleural deposition of fat were 1.5 times more frequently found in tuberculous than in malignant pleural diseases. Interruption of pleural thickening was found twice as frequently in malignant pleural diseases as in tuberculosis. Decreased lung volume was found twice as frequently in tuberculous as in malignant pleural diseases. Anatomical mediastinal pleural involvement was three times, and irregular nodular pleural thickening nine times more frequent in malignant pleural diseases than in tuberculosis. The sensitivity and specificity of CT findings above 70%, and thus suggesting malignant pleural diseases, were as follows : 1) aggressive nature of pleural fluid collection extending to the azygoesophageal recess or tongue of the lung (51.5%, 75%); 2) involvement of anatomical mediastinal pleura (69.2%, 73.7%); 3) irregular nodular pleural thickening (87.5%, 69%). Although there in overlap between previously known CT criteria for the differentiation of benign and malignant pleural diseases, the aggressive nature of pleural fluid collection extending to the azygoesophageal recess or tongue of the lung, the involvement of anatomical mediastinal pleura and irregular nodular

  20. CT findings of pulmonary tuberculosis in adult patients with no underlying disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezoe, Junpei; Takeuchi, Noriyuki; Johkoh, Tsuyoshi

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the CT spectrum of pulmonary tuberculosis, we reviewed CT of the chest in 80 adult patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis who had not been treated for tuberculosis. Main patterns seen in patients with active tuberculosis were: (1) nodular shadow (56%), (2) confluent consolidation (15%), and (3) round consolidation (16%). Other CT patterns were: (1) miliary tuberculosis (n=4), (2) pleural effusion only (n=4), and (3) normal chest (n=2). Major features seen at CT included segmental distribution (97%), satellite lesions (86%), single cavity in each cavitary lesion (95%), ectatic change of the bronchi, tendency of distortion or contraction. (author)

  1. Circulating microRNAs in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yurong; Yi, Zhengjun; Wu, Xiaoyan; Li, Jianhua; Xu, Fuliang

    2011-12-01

    Emerging evidence shows that microRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in pathogen-host interactions. Circulating miRNAs have been repeatedly and stably detected in blood and hold promise to serve as molecular markers for diverse physiological and pathological conditions. To date, the relationship between circulating miRNAs and active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) has not been reported. Using microarray-based expression profiling followed by real-time quantitative PCR validation, the levels of circulating miRNAs were compared between patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis and matched healthy controls. The receiver operating characteristic curve was used to evaluate the diagnostic effect of selected miRNA. Bioinformatic analysis was used to explore the potential roles of these circulating miRNAs in active pulmonary tuberculosis infection. Among 92 miRNAs significantly detected, 59 miRNAs were downregulated and 33 miRNAs were upregulated in the TB serum compared to their levels in the control serum. Interestingly, only two differentially expressed miRNAs were increased not only in the serum but also in the sputum of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis compared to the levels for the healthy controls. Upregulated miR-29a could discriminate TB patients from healthy controls with reasonable sensitivity and specificity. A number of significantly enriched pathways regulated by these circulating miRNAs were predicted, and most of them were involved in acute-phase response, inflammatory response, and the regulation of the cytoskeleton. In all, for the first time our results revealed that a number of miRNAs were differentially expressed during active pulmonary tuberculosis infection, and circulating miR-29a has great potential to serve as a marker for the detection of active pulmonary tuberculosis infection.

  2. Are intestinal helminths risk factors for developing active tuberculosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elias, Daniel; Mengistu, Getahun; Akuffo, Hannah

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of intestinal helminth infections in active tuberculosis patients and their healthy household contacts and to assess its association with active TB in an area endemic for both types of infections. METHODS: Smear-positive pulmonary TB patients and healthy...

  3. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Childhood tuberculosis infection and disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-10-01

    Oct 1, 2009 ... Infection and disease in young children are therefore a measure ... While adult TB results from both recent and past infection, childhood TB results from recent infection and reflects ongoing transmission despite current TB control strategies. ... spatially and temporally define the relationships between TB.

  4. Prevalence of Tuberculosis among Household Contacts in Pondicherry: Active Case Finding Among New Smear Positive Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar VA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The risk of transmission from the index case to its contacts is more in case of smear positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis cases. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment increases the risk of disease transmission to their contacts. Contact screening is important for early detection of transmission of infection. Thus, active case finding of TB is needed to identify the case yield among household contacts. This study will yield the burden of Tuberculosis among the household contact. Objective: To identify the TB suspect and estimate the prevalence of TB among household contacts. Material and Methods: A two stage cross study was done in 472 households of 157 ‘Index cases’ registered in the State Tuberculosis Unit, Puducherry. The study duration was one year and eight months. Data was entered and analyzed by using Epi_Info (Version 3.4.3 software package. Results: A total of 96 (20.3% symptomatic was found from the 472 households contacts who participated in this study. Out of 90 symptomatics, 70 (72.9% were symptomatic within two months of visit and 26 (27.1% were found to have symptoms after eight months. The overall prevalence of tuberculosis in symptomatic household contacts was 4.3% and all tuberculosis confirmed cases were found at the end of in second month only. Conclusion: Considering the prevalence tuberculosis among the symptomatic of household contact to be 4.3%, their investigation to rule out TB in earlier stages is a need. It may help prevent further spread of M. tuberculosis infection in the local community.

  5. Anti-mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of polyherbal medicines used for the treatment of tuberculosis in Eastern Cape, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famewo, Elizabeth B; Clarke, Anna M; Wiid, Ian; Ngwane, Andile; van Helden, Paul; Afolayan, Anthony J

    2017-09-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has become a global public health problem. Polyherbal medicines offer great hope for developing alternative drugs for the treatment of tuberculosis. To evaluate the anti-tubercular activity of polyherbal medicines used for the treatment of tuberculosis. The remedies were screened against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv using Middlebrook 7H9 media and MGIT BACTEC 960 system. They were liquid preparations from King Williams Town site A (KWTa), King Williams Town site B (KWTb), King Williams Town site C (KWTc), Hogsback first site (HBfs), Hogsback second site (HBss), Hogsback third site (HBts), East London (EL), Alice (AL) and Fort Beaufort (FB). The susceptibility testing revealed that all the remedies contain anti-tubercular activity with KWTa, KWTb, KWTc, HBfs, HBts, AL and FB exhibiting more activity at a concentration below 25 µl/ml. Furthermore, MIC values exhibited inhibitory activity with the most active remedies from KWTa, HBfs and HBts at 1.562 µg/ml. However, isoniazid showed more inhibitory activity against M. tuberculosis at 0.05 µg/ml when compare to the polyherbal remedies. This study has indicated that these remedies could be potential sources of new anti-mycobacterial agents against M. tuberculosis . However, the activity of these preparations and their active principles still require in vivo study in order to assess their future as new anti-tuberculosis agents.

  6. 38 CFR 3.370 - Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pulmonary tuberculosis... Rating Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.370 Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in... connection for pulmonary tuberculosis. When under consideration, all available service department films and...

  7. Radiographic findings of pulmonary tuberculosis in adult diabetic patients: comparison of diabetics with nondiabetics of no other underlying diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Mee; Shin, Cheol Yong; Kim, Tae Hoon; Young Shin So; Lee, Shin Hyung; Lee, Chang Joon; Gang, Hye Jung

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to evaluate the plain radiographic features of pulmonary tuberculosis in adult diabetic patients compared with those in patients without any underlying diseases. We analyzed the chest PA and lateral views of 100 patients having active pulmonary tuberculosis; 14 patients had diabetes mellitus and 60 patients had no other underlying diseases. Their images were assesed for anatomical distributions, extents of lesions, size and number of cavity and patterns of radiographic findings. Diabetic tuberculosis had higher prevalence and wider involvement of unusual segments for the tuberculosis such as anterior segment, lingular segment of upper lobe and basal segment of the lower lobe, and they showed the tendency of having more cavities than those who had no other underlying diseases, but there were no meaningful differences in the cavity size between the two groups. Pulmonary tuberculosis in diabetic patients tends to have wider extent with unusual segmental involvement and multiple cavities than in the patients who had no other underlying diseases

  8. Delayed culture conversion due to cigarette smoking in active pulmonary tuberculosis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijenbandring de Boer, Renee; Oliveira e Souza Filho, João Baptista de; Cobelens, Frank; Ramalho, Daniela de Paula; Campino Miranda, Pryscilla Fernandes; Logo, Karina de; Oliveira, Hedi; Mesquita, Eliene; Oliveira, Martha Maria; Kritski, Afrânio

    2014-01-01

    Although many studies have assessed factors affecting culture conversion during tuberculosis treatment, few have looked into the effect of tobacco smoking. This study included 89 active pulmonary tuberculosis patients with positive sputum culture upon presentation and collected information regarding

  9. MicroRNA-365 in macrophages regulates Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced active pulmonary tuberculosis via interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qingzhang; Li, Hui; Shao, Hua; Li, Chunling; Lu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to investigate the relationship between microRNA (miR)-365 expression and the levels of interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA and protein in patients with active tuberculosis. From June 2011 to June 2014, 48 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis induced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis were included in the study. In addition, 23 healthy subjects were enrolled as control. Macrophages were collected by pulmonary alveolus lavage. In addition, serum and mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood. The levels of miR-365 and IL-6 in macrophages, mononuclear cells and serum were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of IL-6 in macrophages and mononuclear cells was measured using Western blotting, while that in serum was detected by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. Expression of IL-6 mRNA and protein was significantly enhanced in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Increase of IL-6 protein concentration in serum was probably due to the release of IL-6 protein from mononuclear cells in the blood. In addition, miR-365 levels were significantly lowered in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Up-regulated IL-6 expression in macrophages, mononuclear cells and serum in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis is related to the down-regulation of miR-365, suggesting that miR-365 may regulate the occurrence and immune responses of active pulmonary tuberculosis via IL-6.

  10. Nutritional supplements for people being treated for active tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-17

    Jan 17, 2018 ... review assessing the effects of oral nutritional supplements in people with active tuberculosis who are receiving antituberculosis drug therapy. The review ... 2 Cochrane Nutrition, hosted jointly by the Centre for Evidence-Based Health Care, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch. University ...

  11. Activity of Scottish plant, lichen and fungal endophyte extracts against Mycobacterium aurum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordien, Andréa Y; Gray, Alexander I; Ingleby, Kevin; Franzblau, Scott G; Seidel, Véronique

    2010-05-01

    With tuberculosis the leading bacterial killer worldwide and other mycobacterial diseases on the increase, the search for new antimycobacterial agents is timely. In this study, extracts from plants, lichens and fungal endophytes of Scottish provenance were screened for activity against Mycobacterium aurum and M. tuberculosis H(37)Rv. The best activity against M. aurum was observed for extracts of Juniperus communis roots and Cladonia arbuscula (MIC = 4 microg/mL), and a fungal endophyte isolated from Vaccinium myrtillus (MIC = 8 microg/mL). The best activity against M. tuberculosis was observed for extracts of C. arbuscula, Empetrum nigrum, J. communis roots, Calluna vulgaris aerial parts, Myrica gale roots and stems (93 to 99% inhibition at 100 microg/mL). Potent antitubercular activity (90 to 96% inhibition at 100 microg/mL) was also observed for the ethanol extracts of Xerocomus badius, Chalciporus piperatus, Suillus luteus and of endophytes isolated from C. vulgaris, E. nigrum, Vaccinium vitis-idaea and V. myrtillus. The results obtained this study provide, in part, some scientific basis for the traditional use of some of the selected plants in the treatment of tuberculosis. They also indicate that fungal endophytes recovered from Scottish plants are a source of antimycobacterial agents worthy of further investigation. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Latorre Tortello, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Por definición, la tuberculosis pulmonar es la localizaci6n del M. tuberculosis en el tracto respiratorio, la forma más común y principal de la afección y la única capaz de contagiar a otras personas. El M. tuberculosis, descubierto por Robert Koch en 1882, el bacilo de Koch, es un bacilo delgado, inmóvil, de 4 micras de longitud media, aerobio obligado, que se tiñe de rajo por la tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen. Debido a la coraza lipídica de su pared, lo hace resistente a la decoloración con ácido...

  13. Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Latorre Tortello

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Por definición, la tuberculosis pulmonar es la localizaci6n del M. tuberculosis en el tracto respiratorio, la forma más común y principal de la afección y la única capaz de contagiar a otras personas. El M. tuberculosis, descubierto por Robert Koch en 1882, el bacilo de Koch, es un bacilo delgado, inmóvil, de 4 micras de longitud media, aerobio obligado, que se tiñe de rajo por la tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen. Debido a la coraza lipídica de su pared, lo hace resistente a la decoloración con ácidos y alcohol, de ahí el nombre de bacilos ácido-alcohol resistente (BAAR. Su transmisión es directa, de persona a persona.

  14. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pablo Latorre Tortello

    1998-01-01

    Por definición, la tuberculosis pulmonar es la localizaci6n del M. tuberculosis en el tracto respiratorio, la forma más común y principal de la afección y la única capaz de contagiar a otras personas. El M. tuberculosis, descubierto por Robert Koch en 1882, el bacilo de Koch, es un bacilo delgado, inmóvil, de 4 micras de longitud media, aerobio obligado, que se tiñe de rajo por la tinción de Ziehl-Neelsen. Debido a la coraza lipídica de su pared, lo hace resistente a la decoloración con ácido...

  15. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza Zuñiga, Marleny; Bastidas Párraga, Gustavo; León Untiveros, Paúl Albert

    2013-01-01

    La tuberculosis es una enfermedad infectocontagiosa producida por el bacilo de Koch, que ataca a los pulmones pero puede ser difuminada por todo el cuerpo. El siguiente artículo de información nos da una visión amplia de la detección, diagnóstico y tratamiento de la misma.

  16. QuantiFERON® TB GOLD’ s applications in the tuberculosis disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Saladino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tuberculosis is the most frequent cause of death from a single infectious agent in humans and remains a serious global health problem. The latent tuberculosis (LTBI treatment can prevent progression to active disease. People infected with LTBI are a dangerous reservoir, since any immunosuppressive factor can cause a reactivation of Mycobacterium leading to overt disease. Recent production and introduction into the healthcare system, on the other hand, are the IGRAs (Interferon-Gamma Release Assay. Materials and Methods. The QuantiFERON-TB Gold test is an ELISA assay of IFN-γ produced by sensitized lymphocytes that allows to overcome some limitations of Mantoux test, being an in vitro test with specific antigens for M. tuberculosis. In the present study we examined a population of 150 patients tested with the Mantoux test and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test. The patients were divided into categories (contacts of the case, immigrants, health care personnel, and immunocompromised subjects in biological therapy. Results. The analysis of the obtained results from the comparison of the two tests showed a good concordance rate (47.3% in the case of double positivity and detected the highest percentage of discrepancy in the profile QuantiFERON negative/Mantoux positive. Conclusions. Our results allow to state that remains valid and effective use of the QuantiFERON test, provided it is flanked by the Mantoux test and a medical history of patients.

  17. Radiologic diagnosis of lung tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhuber, E.; Mostbeck, G.; Bankier, A.; Stadler, A.; Rumetshofer, R.

    2007-01-01

    The radiologic knowledge of tuberculosis-associated lung disease is an essential tool in the clinical diagnosis of tuberculosis. Chest radiography is the primary imaging method, but the importance of CT is still increasing, as CT is more sensitive in the detection of cavitation, of hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathie, of endobronchial spread and of complications in the course of the disease. In addition, CT has been proven as a valuable technique in the assessment of tuberculosis activity, especially in patients where M. tuberculosis has not been detected in the sputum or in patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Depending on the immune status of the patient, the morphologic spectrum of tuberculosis is quite variable. Early diagnosis of tuberculosis is essential to prevent further spread of the disease. (orig.) [de

  18. Mortality in Severe Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Tuberculosis Associates With Innate Immune Activation and Dysfunction of Monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Saskia; Schutz, Charlotte; Ward, Amy; Nemes, Elisa; Wilkinson, Katalin A; Scriven, James; Huson, Mischa A; Aben, Nanne; Maartens, Gary; Burton, Rosie; Wilkinson, Robert J; Grobusch, Martin P; Van der Poll, Tom; Meintjes, Graeme

    2017-07-01

    Case fatality rates among hospitalized patients diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated tuberculosis remain high, and tuberculosis mycobacteremia is common. Our aim was to define the nature of innate immune responses associated with 12-week mortality in this population. This prospective cohort study was conducted at Khayelitsha Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa. Hospitalized HIV-infected tuberculosis patients with CD4 counts tuberculosis blood cultures were performed in all. Ambulatory HIV-infected patients without active tuberculosis were recruited as controls. Whole blood was stimulated with Escherichia coli derived lipopolysaccharide, heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Biomarkers of inflammation and sepsis, intracellular (flow cytometry) and secreted cytokines (Luminex), were assessed for associations with 12-week mortality using Cox proportional hazard models. Second, we investigated associations of these immune markers with tuberculosis mycobacteremia. Sixty patients were included (median CD4 count 53 cells/µL (interquartile range [IQR], 22-132); 16 (27%) died after a median of 12 (IQR, 0-24) days. Thirty-one (52%) grew M. tuberculosis on blood culture. Mortality was associated with higher concentrations of procalcitonin, activation of the innate immune system (% CD16+CD14+ monocytes, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-ɑ and colony-stimulating factor 3), and antiinflammatory markers (increased interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and lower monocyte and neutrophil responses to bacterial stimuli). Tuberculosis mycobacteremia was not associated with mortality, nor with biomarkers of sepsis. Twelve-week mortality was associated with greater pro- and antiinflammatory alterations of the innate immune system, similar to those reported in severe bacterial sepsis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  19. Revisiting the natural history of tuberculosis. The inclusion of constant reinfection, host tolerance, and damage-response frameworks leads to a better understanding of latent infection and its evolution towards active disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2010-02-01

    Once Mycobacterium tuberculosis infects a person it can persist for a long time in a process called latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). LTBI has traditionally been considered to involve the bacilli remaining in a non-replicating state (dormant) in old lesions but still retaining their ability to induce reactivation and cause active tuberculosis (TB) once a disruption of the immune response takes place. The present review aims to challenge these concepts by including recent experimental data supporting LTBI as a constant endogenous reinfection process as well as the recently introduced concepts of damage-response and tolerance frameworks to explain TB induction. These frameworks highlight the key role of an exaggerated and intolerant host response against M. tuberculosis bacilli which induces the classical TB cavity in immunocompetent adults once the constant endogenous reinfection process has resulted in the presence of bacilli in the upper lobes, where they can grow faster and the immune response is delayed. This essay intends to provide new clues to understanding the induction of TB in non-immunosuppressed patients.

  20. Heterocyclic N-oxides - A Promising Class of Agents Against Tuberculosis, Malaria and Neglected Tropical Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos Fernandes, Guilherme Felipe; Pavan, Aline Renata; Dos Santos, Jean Leandro

    2018-04-17

    Heterocyclic N-oxides have emerged as promising agents against a number of diseases and disorders, especially infectious diseases. This review analyzes the emergence and development of this scaffold in the medicinal chemistry, focusing mainly on the discovery of new heterocyclic N-oxide compounds with potent activity against tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases (i.e. leishmaniasis and Chagas disease). A number of heterocyclic N-oxide are described herein, nevertheless, the following chemical classes deserve to be highlighted due to the large number of reports in the literature about their promising pharmacological effects: furoxan, benzofuroxan, quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxide, indolone N-oxide and benzimidazole N-oxide. In order to describe those most promising compounds, we included in this review only those most biologically active heterocyclic N-oxide published since 2000. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. The outcome of tuberculosis treatment in subjects with chronic kidney disease in Brazil: a multinomial analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Reis-Santos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the association between clinical/epidemiological characteristics and outcomes of tuberculosis treatment in patients with concomitant tuberculosis and chronic kidney disease (CKD in Brazil. METHODS: We used the Brazilian Ministry of Health National Case Registry Database to identify patients with tuberculosis and CKD, treated between 2007 and 2011. The tuberculosis treatment outcomes were compared with epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the subjects using a hierarchical multinomial logistic regression model, in which cure was the reference outcome. RESULTS: The prevalence of CKD among patients with tuberculosis was 0.4% (95% CI: 0.37-0.42%. The sample comprised 1,077 subjects. The outcomes were cure, in 58%; treatment abandonment, in 7%; death from tuberculosis, in 13%; and death from other causes, in 22%. The characteristics that differentiated the ORs for treatment abandonment or death were age; alcoholism; AIDS; previous noncompliance with treatment; transfer to another facility; suspected tuberculosis on chest X-ray; positive results in the first smear microscopy; and indications for/use of directly observed treatment, short-course strategy. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate the importance of sociodemographic characteristics for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in patients with CKD and underscore the need for tuberculosis control strategies targeting patients with chronic noncommunicable diseases, such as CKD.

  2. Tuberculosis post-liver transplantation: a rare but complicated disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W; Wai, C T; Da Costa, M; Tambyah, P A; Prabhakaran, K; Lee, K H

    2005-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a rare but serious complication after transplantation. We report a case and discuss its presentation and management. A 60-year-old Indonesian male presented initially with fever, acute confusion and rapidly progressive right upper lobe pneumonia 3.5 months post-liver transplant, and was diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis by positive sputum smear for acid-fast bacilli and tuberculosis culture. Standard anti-tuberculosis therapy was administered but was complicated by interaction with cyclosporine and drug-induced cholestasis. A high level of suspicion, prompt antituberculosis treatment and close follow-up are essential in management of post-transplant tuberculosis.

  3. The IL-17A rs2275913 single nucleotide polymorphism is associated with protection to tuberculosis but related to higher disease severity in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolandelli, A.; Hernández Del Pino, R. E.; Pellegrini, J. M.; Tateosian, N. L.; Amiano, N. O.; de la Barrera, S.; Casco, N.; Gutiérrez, M.; Palmero, D. J.; García, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) causes nearly 10 millions of new tuberculosis disease cases annually. However, most individuals exposed to Mtb do not develop tuberculosis, suggesting the influence of a human genetic component. Here, we investigated the association of the rs2275913 SNP (G → A) from IL-17A and tuberculosis in Argentina by a case-control study. Furthermore, we evaluated in vitro the functional relevance of this SNP during the immune response of the host against Mtb and analyzed its impact on clinical parameters of the disease. We found an association between the AA genotype and tuberculosis resistance. Additionally, within the healthy donors population, AA cells stimulated with a Mtb lysate (Mtb-Ag) produced the highest amounts of IL-17A and IFN-γ, which further support the genetic evidence found. In contrast, within the tuberculosis patients population, AA Mtb-Ag stimulated cells showed the lowest immunological parameters and we evidenced an association between the AA genotype and clinical parameters of disease severity, such as severe radiological lesions and higher bacilli burden in sputum. Overall, our findings demonstrated that the AA genotype from the IL-17A rs2275913 SNP is positively associated with protection to active tuberculosis but related to higher disease severity in the Argentinean population. PMID:28098168

  4. The Influence of Host and Bacterial Genotype on the Development of Disseminated Disease with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caws, Maxine; Thwaites, Guy; Dunstan, Sarah; Hawn, Thomas R.; Thi Ngoc Lan, Nguyen; Thuong, Nguyen Thuy Thuong; Stepniewska, Kasia; Huyen, Mai Nguyet Thu; Bang, Nguyen Duc; Huu Loc, Tran; Gagneux, Sebastien; van Soolingen, Dick; Kremer, Kristin; van der Sande, Marianne; Small, Peter; Thi Hoang Anh, Phan; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Thi Quy, Hoang; Thi Hong Duyen, Nguyen; Quang Tho, Dau; Hieu, Nguyen T.; Torok, Estee; Hien, Tran Tinh; Dung, Nguyen Huy; Thi Quynh Nhu, Nguyen; Duy, Phan Minh; van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Farrar, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    The factors that govern the development of tuberculosis disease are incompletely understood. We hypothesized that some strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) are more capable of causing disseminated disease than others and may be associated with polymorphisms in host genes responsible for the innate immune response to infection. We compared the host and bacterial genotype in 187 Vietnamese adults with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) and 237 Vietnamese adults with uncomplicated pulmonary tuberculosis. The host genotype of tuberculosis cases was also compared with the genotype of 392 cord blood controls from the same population. Isolates of M. tuberculosis were genotyped by large sequence polymorphisms. The hosts were defined by polymorphisms in genes encoding Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) and Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2). We found a significant protective association between the Euro-American lineage of M. tuberculosis and pulmonary rather than meningeal tuberculosis (Odds ratio (OR) for causing TBM 0.395, 95% confidence intervals (C.I.) 0.193–0.806, P = 0.009), suggesting these strains are less capable of extra-pulmonary dissemination than others in the study population. We also found that individuals with the C allele of TLR-2 T597C allele were more likely to have tuberculosis caused by the East-Asian/Beijing genotype (OR = 1.57 [95% C.I. 1.15–2.15]) than other individuals. The study provides evidence that M. tuberculosis genotype influences clinical disease phenotype and demonstrates, for the first time, a significant interaction between host and bacterial genotypes and the development of tuberculosis. PMID:18369480

  5. The influence of host and bacterial genotype on the development of disseminated disease with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxine Caws

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The factors that govern the development of tuberculosis disease are incompletely understood. We hypothesized that some strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis are more capable of causing disseminated disease than others and may be associated with polymorphisms in host genes responsible for the innate immune response to infection. We compared the host and bacterial genotype in 187 Vietnamese adults with tuberculous meningitis (TBM and 237 Vietnamese adults with uncomplicated pulmonary tuberculosis. The host genotype of tuberculosis cases was also compared with the genotype of 392 cord blood controls from the same population. Isolates of M. tuberculosis were genotyped by large sequence polymorphisms. The hosts were defined by polymorphisms in genes encoding Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain containing adaptor protein (TIRAP and Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2. We found a significant protective association between the Euro-American lineage of M. tuberculosis and pulmonary rather than meningeal tuberculosis (Odds ratio (OR for causing TBM 0.395, 95% confidence intervals (C.I. 0.193-0.806, P = 0.009, suggesting these strains are less capable of extra-pulmonary dissemination than others in the study population. We also found that individuals with the C allele of TLR-2 T597C allele were more likely to have tuberculosis caused by the East-Asian/Beijing genotype (OR = 1.57 [95% C.I. 1.15-2.15] than other individuals. The study provides evidence that M. tuberculosis genotype influences clinical disease phenotype and demonstrates, for the first time, a significant interaction between host and bacterial genotypes and the development of tuberculosis.

  6. Helminth-induced arginase-1 exacerbates lung inflammation and disease severity in tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monin, Leticia; Griffiths, Kristin L.; Lam, Wing Y.; Gopal, Radha; Kang, Dongwan D.; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Rajamanickam, Anuradha; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Babu, Subash; Kolls, Jay K.; Mitreva, Makedonka; Rosa, Bruce A.; Ramos-Payan, Rosalio; Morrison, Thomas E.; Murray, Peter J.; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Pearce, Edward J.; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic helminth worms, such as Schistosoma mansoni, are endemic in regions with a high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) among the population. Human studies suggest that helminth coinfections contribute to increased TB susceptibility and increased rates of TB reactivation. Prevailing models suggest that T helper type 2 (Th2) responses induced by helminth infection impair Th1 immune responses and thereby limit Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) control. Using a pulmonary mouse model of Mtb infection, we demonstrated that S. mansoni coinfection or immunization with S. mansoni egg antigens can reversibly impair Mtb-specific T cell responses without affecting macrophage-mediated Mtb control. Instead, S. mansoni infection resulted in accumulation of high arginase-1–expressing macrophages in the lung, which formed type 2 granulomas and exacerbated inflammation in Mtb-infected mice. Treatment of coinfected animals with an antihelminthic improved Mtb-specific Th1 responses and reduced disease severity. In a genetically diverse mouse population infected with Mtb, enhanced arginase-1 activity was associated with increased lung inflammation. Moreover, in patients with pulmonary TB, lung damage correlated with increased serum activity of arginase-1, which was elevated in TB patients coinfected with helminths. Together, our data indicate that helminth coinfection induces arginase-1–expressing type 2 granulomas, thereby increasing inflammation and TB disease severity. These results also provide insight into the mechanisms by which helminth coinfections drive increased susceptibility, disease progression, and severity in TB. PMID:26571397

  7. Over-expression of thymosin β4 in granulomatous lung tissue with active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yun-Jeong; Jo, Jin-Ok; Ock, Mee Sun; Yoo, Young-Bin; Chun, Bong-Kwon; Oak, Chul-Ho; Cha, Hee-Jae

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that thymosin β4 (Tβ4) stimulates angiogenesis by inducing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein. Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), a type of granulomatous disease, is accompanied by intense angiogenesis and VEGF levels have been reported to be elevated in serum or tissue inflamed by pulmonary tuberculosis. We investigated the expression of Tβ4 in granulomatous lung tissues at various stages of active pulmonary tuberculosis, and we also examined the expression patterns of VEGF and HIF-1α to compare their Tβ4 expression patterns in patients' tissues and in the tissue microarray of TB patients. Tβ4 was highly expressed in both granulomas and surrounding lymphocytes in nascent granulomatous lung tissue, but was expressed only surrounding tissues of necrotic or caseous necrotic regions. The expression pattern of HIF-1α was similar to that of Tβ4. VEGF was expressed in both granulomas and blood vessels surrounding granulomas. The expression pattern of VEGF co-localized with CD31 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule, PECAM-1), a blood endothelial cell marker, and partially co-localized with Tβ4. However, the expression of Tβ4 did not co-localize with alveolar macrophages. Stained alveolar macrophages were present surrounding regions of granuloma highly expressing Tβ4. We also analyzed mRNA expression in the sputum of 10 normal and 19 pulmonary TB patients. Expression of Tβ4 was significantly higher in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis than in normal controls. These data suggest that Tβ4 is highly expressed in granulomatous lung tissue with active pulmonary TB and is associated with HIF-1α- and VEGF-mediated inflammation and angiogenesis. Furthermore, the expression of Tβ4 in the sputum of pulmonary tuberculosis patients can be used as a potential marker for diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis among suspected patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tuberculosis is a major public health problem throughout the world. Nearly one third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and hence at risk of developing active disease. Tuberculosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Ethiopia, and the country belongs to one of ...

  9. Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Carlos Rodríguez, D.

    2014-01-01

    La tuberculosis sigue constituyendo un problema de salud pública a nivel mundial con casi nueve millones de casos nuevos en 2012 y se estima que un tercio de la humanidad está infectada. A nivel nacional, si bien las tasas son alentadoras, la variación regional es muy importante. En los últimos años se han registrado progresos importantes tanto en el conocimiento de la conducta del bacilo de Koch, el causante de la enfermedad, como en los métodos para detectarlo. Así los IGRAS (Interferon G R...

  10. [Spanish Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases guidelines on tuberculosis in pregnant women and neonates (i): Epidemiology and diagnosis. Congenital tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquero-Artigao, F; Mellado Peña, M J; Del Rosal Rabes, T; Noguera Julián, A; Goncé Mellgren, A; de la Calle Fernández-Miranda, M; Navarro Gómez, M L

    2015-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) screening in pregnancy using tuberculin skin test (TST) is recommended in case of symptoms of TB disease, close contact with a patient with infectious TB, or high risk of developing active disease. The new interferon gamma release assay (IGRA) tests are recommended in BCG-vaccinated pregnant women with positive TST and no known risk factors for TB, and in those immunocompromised, with clinical suspicion of TB but negative TST. TB diagnosis is difficult due to the non-specific symptoms, the increased frequency of extrapulmonary disease, the delay in radiological examinations, and the high rate of tuberculin anergy. Neonatal TB can be acquired in utero (congenital TB), or through airborne transmission after delivery (postnatal TB). Congenital TB is extremely rare and does not cause fetal malformations. It may be evident at birth, although it usually presents after the second week of life. In newborns with no family history of TB, the disease should be considered in cases of miliary pneumonia, hepatosplenomegaly with focal lesions, or lymphocytic meningitis with hypoglycorrhachia, especially in those born to immigrants from high TB-burden countries. TST is usually negative, and IGRAs have lower sensitivity than in older children. However, the yield of acid-fast smear and culture is higher, mostly in congenital TB. Molecular diagnosis techniques enable early diagnosis and detection of drug resistance mutations. There is a substantial risk of disseminated disease and death. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Genitourinary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Maria Joao; Bacelar, Maria Teresa; Pinto, Pedro; Ramos, Isabel

    2005-01-01

    Although uncommon, genitourinary tuberculosis is the most common site of extrapulmonary tuberculosis infection. Its diagnosis is often difficult. This article provides an overview of the pathologic and radiologic findings of this disease process

  12. Genome scan of M. tuberculosis infection and disease in Ugandans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M Stein

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, is an enduring public health problem globally, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Several studies have suggested a role for host genetic susceptibility in increased risk for TB but results across studies have been equivocal. As part of a household contact study of Mtb infection and disease in Kampala, Uganda, we have taken a unique approach to the study of genetic susceptibility to TB, by studying three phenotypes. First, we analyzed culture confirmed TB disease compared to latent Mtb infection (LTBI or lack of Mtb infection. Second, we analyzed resistance to Mtb infection in the face of continuous exposure, defined by a persistently negative tuberculin skin test (PTST-; this outcome was contrasted to LTBI. Third, we analyzed an intermediate phenotype, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha expression in response to soluble Mtb ligands enriched with molecules secreted from Mtb (culture filtrate. We conducted a full microsatellite genome scan, using genotypes generated by the Center for Medical Genetics at Marshfield. Multipoint model-free linkage analysis was conducted using an extension of the Haseman-Elston regression model that includes half sibling pairs, and HIV status was included as a covariate in the model. The analysis included 803 individuals from 193 pedigrees, comprising 258 full sibling pairs and 175 half sibling pairs. Suggestive linkage (p<10(-3 was observed on chromosomes 2q21-2q24 and 5p13-5q22 for PTST-, and on chromosome 7p22-7p21 for TB; these findings for PTST- are novel and the chromosome 7 region contains the IL6 gene. In addition, we replicated recent linkage findings on chromosome 20q13 for TB (p = 0.002. We also observed linkage at the nominal alpha = 0.05 threshold to a number of promising candidate genes, SLC11A1 (PTST- p = 0.02, IL-1 complex (TB p = 0.01, IL12BR2 (TNFalpha p = 0.006, IL12A (TB p = 0.02 and IFNGR2 (TNFalpha p = 0.002. These results confirm

  13. Colonic Tuberculosis Clinically Misdiagnosed as Anorexia Nervosa and Radiologically and Histopathologically as Crohn’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq A Madani

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of colonic tuberculosis presenting with severe wasting was misdiagnosed as anorexia nervosa at another institution. Double contrast barium enema showed strictures, and ulcerations of the cecum and ascending colon with a skip area. The radiologist believed that these findings were due to Crohn's disease. Colonoscopic biopsies from the involved area revealed histopathological changes typical of Crohn's disease and not tuberculosis. The patient completely recovered with antituberculous therapy without steroids. The case demonstrated the clinical, radiological and histopathological difficulties and misdiagnoses that may be associated with the diagnosis of colonic tuberculosis.

  14. Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of fungus Phomopsis stipata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Andrade de Prince

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Our purpose was to determine the anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of the metabolites produced by the endophitic fungus Phomopsis stipata (Lib. B. Sutton, (Diaporthaceae, cultivated in different media. The antimycobacterial activity was assessed through the Resazurin Microtiter Assay (REMA and the cytotoxicity test performed on macrophage cell line. The extracts derived from fungi grown on Corn Medium and Potato Dextrose Broth presented the smallest values of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and low cytotoxicity, which implies a high selectivity index. This is the first report on the chemical composition and antitubercular activity of metabolites of P. stipata, as well as the influence of culture medium on these properties.

  15. The endothelial protein C receptor and activated protein C play a limited role in host defense during experimental tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kager, Liesbeth M.; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; de Vos, Alex F.; Wieland, Catharina W.; Schouten, Marcel; Meijers, Joost C. M.; Isermann, Berend; van't Veer, Cornelis; Esmon, Charles T.; van der Poll, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The protein C (PC) system is an important regulator of both coagulation and inflammation. Activated PC (APC), together with its receptor the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR), has anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. During tuberculosis (TB), a devastating chronic pulmonary disease

  16. Synovial tuberculosis of the hand: An ancient disease in an unusual localisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Franz Matta Ramos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberculosis is the most prevalent infectious disease in the world. It is mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Osteoarticular tuberculosis represents 1%–3%. Tenosynovitis is the most common form of the disease in the hand. Aims: The aim of this study is to present an update of synovial tuberculosis. Materials and Methods: The authors present a literature review, the clinical and surgical management and case reports. Results: The outcomes were satisfactory and were not report complications. Conclusions: Early diagnosis, surgical transection of the transverse carpal ligament, debridement and complete excision of the infected synovium may be required, along with antituberculosis drugs. Knowledge of this disease in the hand can provide a better diagnosis and outcome.

  17. Determination of the activity of pulmonary tuberculosis : the utility of high-resolution computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Myung Hee; Lee, Hae Giu; Yu, Won Jong; Chung, Hong Jun; Yang, Bo Sung; Kwon, Soon Suck; Park, Seog Hee

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the utility of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), as used to determine the activity of tuberculosis, and to analyze the HRCT findings in active and in inactive tuberculosis. We analyzed the HRCT findings of 100 patients (54 men, 46 women; average age, 54 years) who according to the results of chest radiography had pulmonary tuberculosis of undetermined activity. We assessed HRCT findings such as the presence of a centrilobular, macro-, or micronodule; consolidation, ground-glass opacity, cavity, interlobular septal thickening, irregular linear opacities, bronchial wall thickening, bronchovascular bundle distortion, bronchiectasis, atelectasis, and pericicatrical emphysema. We compared the ratio of the area of nodule and consolidation to that of whole lung, and compared the findings between active and inactive tuberculosis. Eleven of 100 patients were excluded because the final diagnosis was other than tuberculosis. In 59 patients, the presence of active pulmonary tuberculosis was proven by positive sputum smear and/or culture for mycobacterium tuberculosis. On the basis of the negative results of these tests, pulmonary tuberculosis was found to be inactive in 30 patients; serial chest radiographs indicated that their condition remained stable over a 6-month period. For HRCT, sensitivity was 96.6%, specificity 56.7%, positive predictive value 81.4%, negative predictive value 89.5%, and accuracy 83.1%. For active tuberculosis, the presence of centrilobular nodules, tree-in-bud, macronodules, cavity within the nodule, and consolidations was statistically significant, while for inactive tuberculosis, that of irregular linear opacities, micronodules, bronchiectasis, and cicatrization atectasis was similarly significant. The CT score for the area of nodules and consolidations was higher in active than in inactive tuberculosis, but only the nodule score showed statistical significance. HRCT can be a useful diagnostic tool for evaluating the activity

  18. Controlling the Seedbeds of Tuberculosis: Diagnosis and Treatment of Tuberculosis Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaka, Molebogeng X.; Cavalcante, Solange C.; Marais, Ben J.; Thim, Sok; Martinson, Neil A.; Swaminathan, Soumya; Chaisson, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    The billions of people with latent tuberculosis infection serve as the seedbeds for future cases of active tuberculosis. Virtually all episodes of tuberculosis disease are preceded by a period of asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection; therefore, identifying infected individuals most likely to progress to disease and treating such subclinical infections to prevent future disease provides a critical opportunity to interrupt tuberculosis transmission and reduce the global burden of tuberculosis disease. Programs focusing on single strategies rather than comprehensive programs that deliver an integrated arsenal for tuberculosis control may continue to struggle. Tuberculosis preventive therapy is a poorly utilized tool that is essential for controlling the reservoirs of disease that drive the current epidemic. Comprehensive control strategies that combine preventive therapy for the most high-risk populations and communities with improved case-finding and treatment, control of transmission and health systems strengthening could ultimately lead to worldwide tuberculosis elimination. This paper outlines challenges to implementation of preventive therapy and provides pragmatic suggestions for overcoming them. It further advocates for tuberculosis preventive therapy as the core of a renewed global focus to implement a comprehensive epidemic control strategy that would reduce new tuberculosis cases to elimination targets. This strategy would be underpinned by accelerated research to further understand the biology of subclinical tuberculosis infections, develop novel diagnostics, and drug regimens specifically for subclinical tuberculosis infection, strengthen health systems, community engagement, and enhance sustainable large scale implementation of preventive therapy programs. PMID:26515679

  19. Circulatory disease mortality in the Massachusetts tuberculosis fluoroscopy cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, Mark P.; Zablotska, Lydia B.; Brenner, Alina V.; Lipshultz, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    High-dose ionizing radiation is associated with circulatory disease. Risks from lower-dose fractionated exposures, such as from diagnostic radiation procedures, remain unclear. In this study we aimed to ascertain the relationship between fractionated low-to-medium dose radiation exposure and circulatory disease mortality in a cohort of 13,568 tuberculosis patients in Massachusetts, some with fluoroscopy screenings, between 1916 and 1961 and follow-up until the end of 2002. Analysis of mortality was in relation to cumulative thyroid (cerebrovascular) or lung (all other circulatory disease) radiation dose via Poisson regression. Over the full dose range, there was no overall radiation-related excess risk of death from circulatory disease (n = 3221; excess relative risk/Gy −0.023; 95 % CI −0.067, 0.028; p = 0.3574). Risk was somewhat elevated in hypertensive heart disease (n = 89; excess relative risk/Gy 0.357; 95 % CI −0.043, 1.030, p = 0.0907) and slightly decreased in ischemic heart disease (n = 1950; excess relative risk/Gy −0.077; 95 % CI −0.130, −0.012; p = 0.0211). However, under 0.5 Gy, there was a borderline significant increasing trend for all circulatory disease (excess relative risk/Gy 0.345; 95 % CI −0.032, 0.764; p = 0.0743) and for ischemic heart disease (excess relative risk/Gy 0.465; 95 % CI, −0.032, 1.034, p = 0.0682). Pneumolobectomy increased radiation–associated risk (excess relative risk/Gy 0.252; 95 % CI 0.024, 0.579). Fractionation of dose did not modify excess risk. In summary, we found no evidence of radiation-associated excess circulatory death risk overall, but there are indications of excess circulatory death risk at lower doses (<0.5 Gy). Although consistent with other radiation-exposed groups, the indications of higher risk at lower doses are unusual and should be confirmed against other data.

  20. Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis Activity of Esters of Quinoxaline 1,4-Di-N-Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Palos

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis continues to be a public health problem in the world, and drug resistance has been a major obstacle in its treatment. Quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxide has been proposed as a scaffold to design new drugs to combat this disease. To examine the efficacy of this compound, this study evaluates methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, and n-propyl esters of quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxide derivatives in vitro against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (pansusceptible and monoresistant strains. Additionally, the inhibitory effect of esters of quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxide on M. tuberculosis gyrase supercoiling was examined, and a stability analysis by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS was also carried out. Results showed that eight compounds (T-007, T-018, T-011, T-069, T-070, T-072, T-085 and T-088 had an activity similar to that of the reference drug isoniazid (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC = 0.12 µg/mL with an effect on nonreplicative cells and drug monoresistant strains. Structural activity relationship analysis showed that the steric effect of an ester group at 7-position is key to enhancing its biological effects. Additionally, T-069 showed a high stability after 24 h in human plasma at 37 °C.

  1. Using giant African pouched rats to detect human tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-08-31

    Aug 31, 2015 ... Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. About one-third of Earth's population has latent TB, which means that they have been exposed to M. tuberculosis but not become ill. About 10% of people with latent TB develop active. TB, that is, they become ill with the disease, ...

  2. [Tuberculosis: plasma levels of vitamin D and its relation with infection and disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve Palau, Erika; Sánchez Martínez, Francesca; Knobel Freud, Hernando; López Colomés, José-Luís; Diez Pérez, Adolfo

    2015-02-02

    Vitamin D (vitD) is involved in the phosphor-calcium metabolism and bone pathology, but also in inflammatory and infectious processes such as tuberculosis. The present study evaluates the clinical and epidemiological aspects of active tuberculosis cases and latently infected contacts in whom plasma concentrations of vitD were obtained to determine whether the deficiency of vitD is a risk factor to develop active tuberculosis, especially the more severe forms. Observational, retrospective study that included 86 tuberculosis patients and 80 contacts with latent infection in a 2-year period. When comparing active tuberculosis cases with latent infection contacts, deficiency of vitD (vitD levels <10 ng/mL, odds ratio [OR]: 2.02, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04 to 3.93), male sex (OR: 1.9, 95% CI: 0.96 to 3.71) and non-white race (OR: 0.7, 95% CI: 0.34 to 1.42) were factors independently associated with the diagnosis of tuberculosis. Despite the limited number of subjects studied, there was a association between severe deficit of vitD and the presentation of tuberculosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Disease-related knowledge, attitude and practices of tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem. World Health ... hospitals were interviewed on their knowledge, attitude and practice related to TB using pre-tested ..... patients exercise care to limit the spread of. TB, only ...

  4. Different patterns of cytokines and chemokines combined with IFN-γ production reflect Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: IFN-γ is presently the only soluble immunological marker used to help diagnose latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb infection. However, IFN-γ is not available to distinguish latent from active TB infection. Moreover, extrapulmonary tuberculosis, such as tuberculous pleurisy, cannot be properly diagnosed by IFN-γ release assay. As a result, other disease- or infection-related immunological biomarkers that would be more effective need to be screened and identified. METHODOLOGY: A panel of 41 soluble immunological molecules (17 cytokines and 24 chemokines was tested using Luminex liquid array-based multiplexed immunoassays. Samples, including plasma and pleural effusions, from healthy donors (HD, n = 12 or patients with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI, n = 20, pulmonary tuberculosis (TB, n = 12, tuberculous pleurisy (TP, n = 15 or lung cancer (LC, n = 15 were collected and screened for soluble markers. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and pleural fluid mononuclear cells (PFMCs were also isolated to investigate antigen-specific immune factors. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For the 41 examined factors, our results indicated that three patterns were closely associated with infection and disease. (1 Significantly elevated plasma levels of IL-2, IP-10, CXCL11 and CXCL12 were present in both patients with tuberculosis and in a sub-group participant with latent tuberculosis infection who showed a higher level of IFN-γ producing cells by ELISPOT assay compared with other latently infected individuals. (2 IL-6 and IL-9 were only significantly increased in plasma from active TB patients, and the two factors were consistently highly secreted after M.tb antigen stimulation. (3 When patients developed tuberculous pleurisy, CCL1, CCL21 and IL-6 were specifically increased in the pleural effusions. In particular, these three factors were consistently highly secreted by pleural fluid mononuclear cells following M

  5. Risk Factors of Active Tuberculosis in People Living with HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Determinants of active tuberculosis among People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) are not well elucidated in countries with limited resources. The objective of this study was to assess distal and proximate determinants of active tuberculosis among people living with HIV/AIDS in southwest. Ethiopia.

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipolytic enzymes as potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Brust

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New diagnosis tests are urgently needed to address the global tuberculosis (TB burden and to improve control programs especially in resource-limited settings. An effective in vitro diagnostic of TB based on serological methods would be regarded as an attractive progress because immunoassays are simple, rapid, inexpensive, and may offer the possibility to detect cases missed by standard sputum smear microscopy. However, currently available serology tests for TB are highly variable in sensitivity and specificity. Lipolytic enzymes have recently emerged as key factors in lipid metabolization during dormancy and/or exit of the non-replicating growth phase, a prerequisite step of TB reactivation. The focus of this study was to analyze and compare the potential of four Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipolytic enzymes (LipY, Rv0183, Rv1984c and Rv3452 as new markers in the serodiagnosis of active TB. METHODS: Recombinant proteins were produced and used in optimized ELISA aimed to detect IgG and IgM serum antibodies against the four lipolytic enzymes. The capacity of the assays to identify infection was evaluated in patients with either active TB or latent TB and compared with two distinct control groups consisting of BCG-vaccinated blood donors and hospitalized non-TB individuals. RESULTS: A robust humoral response was detected in patients with active TB whereas antibodies against lipolytic enzymes were infrequently detected in either uninfected groups or in subjects with latent infection. High specifity levels, ranging from 93.9% to 97.5%, were obtained for all four antigens with sensitivity values ranging from 73.4% to 90.5%, with Rv3452 displaying the highest performances. Patients with active TB usually exhibited strong IgG responses but poor IgM responses. CONCLUSION: These results clearly indicate that the lipolytic enzymes tested are strongly immunogenic allowing to distinguish active from latent TB infections. They appear as potent

  7. Evaluation of coexistence of cancer and active tuberculosis; 16 case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyhan Çakar

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberculosis is an important risk factor for cancer. Pulmonary TB and lung cancer(LC may mimic each other especially in the aspect of the clinical and radiological features. The aim of the study was to evaluate the features and risk factors of cases with coexistence cancer and active TB. Methodology: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with coexisting TB and cancer a period from 2009 to 2014. We evaluated demographic data, the ways diagnosis of TB cases, the location of TB and cancer, TB treatment results of the cases. Results: We recorded 374 TB cases in our dyspensary at this study period. In 16 (4% of these cases, a coexistence of cancer and TB was detected. The male/female ratio was 12/4. The mean age was 62,12 ± 15,13 years. There were TST results except three cases. There were ten pulmonary TB and six extra-pulmonary TB (four peripheral lymphadenopathy TB, one abdominal TB lymphadenopathy and one salivary gland TB. Cancer types were as follows; eight lung cancer, two breast cancer, one base of tongue, one endometrium cancer, one hypopharyngeal cancer, one stomach cancer, one bladder cancer and one maxillary cancer. Diagnosis of all cases was confirmed by bacteriologic and/or histopathological examination. Squamous cell carcinoma was the most common type of cancers. This rate was 9/16. All TB cases were new. There were risk factors out of two case in the cases. Five cases were died during TB treatment. Others completed TB treatment without any complication. Conclusions: In our study, the coexistence of LC and pulmonary TB was more common. The local immunity is deteriorated in cancer cases. If there is pulmonary infiltrates in lung or peripheral lymphadenopathy, we must search tuberculosis too out of metastatic lesion and other infectious diseases. We should not make delay in the diagnosis of active TB in cancer cases. Keywords: Coexistent, Cancer, Tuberculosis, Tuberculosis treatment

  8. Common patterns and disease-related signatures in tuberculosis and sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maertzdorf, Jeroen; Weiner, January; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Bauer, Torsten; Prasse, Antje; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2012-05-15

    In light of the marked global health impact of tuberculosis (TB), strong focus has been on identifying biosignatures. Gene expression profiles in blood cells identified so far are indicative of a persistent activation of the immune system and chronic inflammatory pathology in active TB. Definition of a biosignature with unique specificity for TB demands that identified profiles can differentiate diseases with similar pathology, like sarcoidosis (SARC). Here, we present a detailed comparison between pulmonary TB and SARC, including whole-blood gene expression profiling, microRNA expression, and multiplex serum analytes. Our analysis reveals that previously disclosed gene expression signatures in TB show highly similar patterns in SARC, with a common up-regulation of proinflammatory pathways and IFN signaling and close similarity to TB-related signatures. microRNA expression also presented a highly similar pattern in both diseases, whereas cytokines in the serum of TB patients revealed a slightly elevated proinflammatory pattern compared with SARC and controls. Our results indicate several differences in expression between the two diseases, with increased metabolic activity and significantly higher antimicrobial defense responses in TB. However, matrix metallopeptidase 14 was identified as the most distinctive marker of SARC. Described communalities as well as unique signatures in blood profiles of two distinct inflammatory pulmonary diseases not only have considerable implications for the design of TB biosignatures and future diagnosis, but they also provide insights into biological processes underlying chronic inflammatory disease entities of different etiology.

  9. Association between Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineage and site of disease in Florida, 2009-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séraphin, Marie Nancy; Doggett, Richard; Johnston, Lori; Zabala, Jose; Gerace, Alexandra M; Lauzardo, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is characterized into four global lineages with strong geographical restriction. To date one study in the United States has investigated M. tuberculosis lineage association with tuberculosis (TB) disease presentation (extra-pulmonary versus pulmonary). We update this analysis using recent (2009-2015) data from the State of Florida to measure lineage association with pulmonary TB, the infectious form of the disease. M. tuberculosis lineage was assigned based on the spacer oligonucleotide typing (spoligotyping) patterns. TB disease site was defined as exclusively pulmonary or extra-pulmonary. We used ORs to measure the association between M. tuberculosis lineages and pulmonary compared to extra-pulmonary TB. The final multivariable model was adjusted for patient socio-demographics, HIV and diabetes status. We analyzed 3061 cases, 83.4% were infected with a Euro-American lineage, 8.4% Indo-Oceanic and 8.2% East-Asian lineage. The majority of the cases (86.0%) were exclusively pulmonary. Compared to the Indo-Oceanic lineage, infection with a Euro-American (AOR=1.87, 95% CI: 1.21, 2.91) or an East-Asian (AOR=2.11, 95% CI: 1.27, 3.50) lineage favored pulmonary disease compared to extra-pulmonary. In a sub-analysis among pulmonary cases, strain lineage was not associated with sputum smear positive status, indicating that the observed association with pulmonary disease is independent of host contagiousness. As an obligate pathogen, M. tuberculosis' fitness is directly correlated to its transmission potential. In this analysis, we show that M. tuberculosis lineage is associated with pulmonary disease presentation. This association may explain the predominance in a region of certain lineages compared to others. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Potential of DosR and Rpf antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis to discriminate between latent and active tuberculosis in a tuberculosis endemic population of Medellin Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Leonar; Marín, Diana; Franken, Kees L M C; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Barrera, Luis F

    2018-01-08

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the most deadly infectious diseases. One-third to one-fourth of the human population is estimated to be infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) without showing clinical symptoms, a condition called latent TB infection (LTBI). Diagnosis of Mtb infection is based on the immune response to a mixture of mycobacterial antigens (PPD) or to Mtb specific ESAT-6/CFP10 antigens (IGRA), highly expressed during the initial phase of infection. However, the immune response to PPD and IGRA antigens has a low power to discriminate between LTBI and PTB. The T-cell response to a group of so-called latency (DosR-regulon-encoded) and Resuscitation Promoting (Rpf) antigens of Mtb has been proved to be significantly higher in LTBI compared to active TB across many populations, suggesting their potential use as biomarkers to differentiate latent from active TB. PBMCs from a group LTBI (n = 20) and pulmonary TB patients (PTB, n = 21) from an endemic community for TB of the city of Medellín, Colombia, were in vitro stimulated for 7 days with DosR- (Rv1737c, Rv2029c, and Rv2628), Rpf- (Rv0867c and Rv2389c), the recombinant fusion protein ESAT-6-CFP10 (E6-C10)-, or PPD-antigen. The induced IFNγ levels detectable in the supernatants of the antigen-stimulated cells were then used to calculate specificity and sensitivity in discriminating LTBI from PTB, using different statistical approaches. IFNγ production in response to DosR and Rpf antigens was significantly higher in LTBI compared to PTB. ROC curve analyses of IFNγ production allowed differentiation of LTBI from PTB with areas under the curve higher than 0.70. Furthermore, Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA) revealed that LTBI is associated with higher levels of IFNγ in response to the different antigens compared to PTB. Analysis based on decision trees showed that the IFNγ levels produced in response to Rv2029c was the leading variable that best-classified disease status. Finally

  11. Evaluation of disease patterns, treatment and prognosis of tuberculosis in AIDS patient

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    Atomiya Angela Naomi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of disease, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of tuberculosis in 100 patients co-infected with AIDS at Casa da AIDS clinic was studied. Demographic characteristics were as follows: 76 male patients, 24 female patients, 67 caucasian, average 35.8 years-old (SD ± 8.5. Sexual transmission of HIV was reported in 68 patients. Pulmonary tuberculosis was seen in 40 patients, extrapulmonary in 11, and combined in 49 patients. In 63 patients, TCD4+ counts were below 200/mm³ when tuberculosis was diagnosed. Fifty-five patients had their diagnoses confirmed by bacteriological identification of Mycobacterium; either through direct observation and/or culture. Tuberculosis was treated with rifampin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide in 60 patients, reinforced treatment in 14 and alternative treatment in the other 13 patients. Tuberculosis therapy lasted up to 9 months in 66% of the patients. Fifty-four patients were treated with a two-drug antiretroviral regimen and the remaining 46 patients received a triple regimen, which included a protease inhibitor. Among the latter, 35 patients were co-treated with rifampin. The occurrence of hepatic liver enzyme abnormalities was statistically related to alternative antiretroviral regimens (p = 0.01 and to the co-administration of rifampin and protease inhibitor (p = 0.019. Clinical resolution of tuberculosis was obtained in 74 patients. Twelve patients died during tuberculosis treatment. Resolution of tuberculosis was statistically significant related to antituberculosis treatment adherence (p = 0.001. The risk of no response to the treatment was 1.84 times more frequent among patients treated with alternative regimens regardless of the duration of the therapy. We conclude that the characteristics of tuberculosis in HIV infected patients requires that special attention be directed to the types and duration of both antiretroviral and anti-TB therapy in order to achieve the highest level of care.

  12. The Risk of Tuberculosis Reinfection Soon after Cure of a First Disease Episode Is Extremely High in a Hyperendemic Community.

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    Pieter Uys

    Full Text Available Elevated rates of reinfection tuberculosis in various hyperendemic regions have been reported and, in particular, it has been shown that in a high-incidence setting near Cape Town, South Africa, the rate of reinfection tuberculosis (TB disease after cure of a previous TB disease episode is about four times greater than the rate of first-time TB disease. It is not known whether this elevated rate is caused by a high reinfection rate due, for instance, to living circumstances, or a high rate of progress to disease specific to the patients, or both. In order to address that question we analysed an extensive data set from clinics attended by TB patients in the high-incidence setting near Cape Town, South Africa and found that, in fact, the (average rate of reinfection (as opposed to the rate of reinfection disease after cure of a previous TB disease episode is initially about 0.85 per annum. This rate diminishes rapidly over time and after about ten years this rate is similar to the rate of infection in the general population. Also, the rate of progress to disease after reinfection is initially high but declines in subsequent years down to the figure typical for the general population. These findings suggest that the first few months after cure of a TB disease episode form a critical period for controlling reinfection disease in a hyperendemic setting and that monitoring such cured patients could pre-empt a reinfection progressing to active disease.

  13. Association of mycobacterium tuberculosis in the causation of Eales′ disease: An institutional experience

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    Rajpal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eales′ disease is an idiopathic retinal vasculitis characterized by retinal inflammation, ischemia, and neo-vascularisation. It frequently causes massive vitreous haemorrhage and retinal detachment leading to blindness. Although the exact etiology is unknown, this condition is considered to be a consequence of hypersensitivity reaction to tubercular protein due to previous Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis infection. This study is aimed at the detection of association of M. tuberculosis in patients with Eales′ disease. Materials and Methods: A prospective case-control study was undertaken in 65 clinically diagnosed cases of Eales′ disease. Patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy, neo-vascular proliferation, macular oedema, premacular fibrosis and tractional retinal detachment were taken as controls. M. tuberculosis DNA was detected (MPT64 gene by polymerase chain reaction, PCR in patients with Eales′ disease. Clinical symptoms along with tuberculin skin test (TST and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR were used as gold standard for comparing results of PCR. Result: PCR positivity was found in 12 (38.7% patients with Eales′ disease. The PCR positivity was significantly associated with the patients with high TST reading and high ESR values. Conclusion: Patients with a high TST reading and ESR value and a positive PCR in vitreous samples have a high likelihood of having M. tuberculosis as an etiology.

  14. The Small Breathing Amplitude at the Upper Lobes Favors the Attraction of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lesions and Helps to Understand the Evolution toward Active Disease in An Individual-Based Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Pere-Joan; Prats, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) can induce two kinds of lesions, namely proliferative and exudative. The former are based on the presence of macrophages with controlled induction of intragranulomatous necrosis, and are even able to stop its physical progression, thus avoiding the induction of active tuberculosis (TB). In contrast, the most significant characteristic of exudative lesions is their massive infiltration with polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), which favor enlargement of the lesions and extracellular growth of the bacilli. We have built an individual-based model (IBM) (known as "TBPATCH") using the NetLogo interface to better understand the progression from Mtb infection to TB. We have tested four main factors previously identified as being able to favor the infiltration of Mtb-infected lesions with PMNs, namely the tolerability of infected macrophages to the bacillary load; the capacity to modulate the Th17 response; the breathing amplitude (BAM) (large or small in the lower and upper lobes respectively), which influences bacillary drainage at the alveoli; and the encapsulation of Mtb-infected lesions by the interlobular septae that structure the pulmonary parenchyma into secondary lobes. Overall, although all the factors analyzed play some role, the small BAM is the major factor determining whether Mtb-infected lesions become exudative, and thus induce TB, thereby helping to understand why this usually takes place in the upper lobes. This information will be very useful for the design of future prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against TB.

  15. Evaluation of tuberculosis diagnostics in children: 1. Proposed clinical case definitions for classification of intrathoracic tuberculosis disease. Consensus from an expert panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Stephen M; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Amanullah, Farhana; Browning, Renee; Cardenas, Vicky; Casenghi, Martina; Cuevas, Luis E; Gale, Marianne; Gie, Robert P; Grzemska, Malgosia; Handelsman, Ed; Hatherill, Mark; Hesseling, Anneke C; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; Kampmann, Beate; Kabra, Sushil Kumar; Lienhardt, Christian; Lighter-Fisher, Jennifer; Madhi, Shabir; Makhene, Mamodikoe; Marais, Ben J; McNeeley, David F; Menzies, Heather; Mitchell, Charles; Modi, Surbhi; Mofenson, Lynne; Musoke, Philippa; Nachman, Sharon; Powell, Clydette; Rigaud, Mona; Rouzier, Vanessa; Starke, Jeffrey R; Swaminathan, Soumya; Wingfield, Claire

    2012-05-15

    There is a critical need for improved diagnosis of tuberculosis in children, particularly in young children with intrathoracic disease as this represents the most common type of tuberculosis in children and the greatest diagnostic challenge. There is also a need for standardized clinical case definitions for the evaluation of diagnostics in prospective clinical research studies that include children in whom tuberculosis is suspected but not confirmed by culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A panel representing a wide range of expertise and child tuberculosis research experience aimed to develop standardized clinical research case definitions for intrathoracic tuberculosis in children to enable harmonized evaluation of new tuberculosis diagnostic technologies in pediatric populations. Draft definitions and statements were proposed and circulated widely for feedback. An expert panel then considered each of the proposed definitions and statements relating to clinical definitions. Formal group consensus rules were established and consensus was reached for each statement. The definitions presented in this article are intended for use in clinical research to evaluate diagnostic assays and not for individual patient diagnosis or treatment decisions. A complementary article addresses methodological issues to consider for research of diagnostics in children with suspected tuberculosis.

  16. Evaluation of Tuberculosis Diagnostics in Children: 1. Proposed Clinical Case Definitions for Classification of Intrathoracic Tuberculosis Disease. Consensus From an Expert Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Stephen M.; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Amanullah, Farhana; Browning, Renee; Cardenas, Vicky; Casenghi, Martina; Cuevas, Luis E.; Gale, Marianne; Gie, Robert P.; Grzemska, Malgosia; Handelsman, Ed; Hatherill, Mark; Hesseling, Anneke C.; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; Kampmann, Beate; Kabra, Sushil Kumar; Lienhardt, Christian; Lighter-Fisher, Jennifer; Madhi, Shabir; Makhene, Mamodikoe; Marais, Ben J.; McNeeley, David F.; Menzies, Heather; Mitchell, Charles; Modi, Surbhi; Mofenson, Lynne; Musoke, Philippa; Nachman, Sharon; Powell, Clydette; Rigaud, Mona; Rouzier, Vanessa; Starke, Jeffrey R.; Swaminathan, Soumya; Wingfield, Claire

    2012-01-01

    There is a critical need for improved diagnosis of tuberculosis in children, particularly in young children with intrathoracic disease as this represents the most common type of tuberculosis in children and the greatest diagnostic challenge. There is also a need for standardized clinical case definitions for the evaluation of diagnostics in prospective clinical research studies that include children in whom tuberculosis is suspected but not confirmed by culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A panel representing a wide range of expertise and child tuberculosis research experience aimed to develop standardized clinical research case definitions for intrathoracic tuberculosis in children to enable harmonized evaluation of new tuberculosis diagnostic technologies in pediatric populations. Draft definitions and statements were proposed and circulated widely for feedback. An expert panel then considered each of the proposed definitions and statements relating to clinical definitions. Formal group consensus rules were established and consensus was reached for each statement. The definitions presented in this article are intended for use in clinical research to evaluate diagnostic assays and not for individual patient diagnosis or treatment decisions. A complementary article addresses methodological issues to consider for research of diagnostics in children with suspected tuberculosis. PMID:22448023

  17. Tuberculosis: General Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    TB Elimination Tuberculosis: General Information What is TB? Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by germs that are spread from person ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination CS227840_A What Does a Positive Test ...

  18. Systematic Expression Profiling Analysis Identifies Specific MicroRNA-Gene Interactions that May Differentiate between Active and Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin; Lee, Shih-Wei; Huang, Kai-Yao; Lee, Tzong-Yi; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Weng, Julia Tzu-Ya

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the second most common cause of death from infectious diseases. About 90% of those infected are asymptomatic—the so-called latent TB infections (LTBI), with a 10% lifetime chance of progressing to active TB. To further understand the molecular pathogenesis of TB, several molecular studies have attempted to compare the expression profiles between healthy controls and active TB or LTBI patients. However, the results vary due to diverse genetic backgrounds and study designs ...

  19. Analysis of the Phenotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific CD4+ T Cells to Discriminate Latent from Active Tuberculosis in HIV-Uninfected and HIV-Infected Individuals

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    Catherine Riou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Several immune-based assays have been suggested to differentiate latent from active tuberculosis (TB. However, their relative performance as well as their efficacy in HIV-infected persons, a highly at-risk population, remains unclear. In a study of 81 individuals, divided into four groups based on their HIV-1 status and TB disease activity, we compared the differentiation (CD27 and KLRG1, activation (HLA-DR, homing potential (CCR4, CCR6, CXCR3, and CD161 and functional profiles (IFNγ, IL-2, and TNFα of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells using flow cytometry. Active TB disease induced major changes within the Mtb-responding CD4+ T cell population, promoting memory maturation, elevated activation and increased inflammatory potential when compared to individuals with latent TB infection. Moreover, the functional profile of Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells appeared to be inherently related to their degree of differentiation. While these specific cell features were all capable of discriminating latent from active TB, irrespective of HIV status, HLA-DR expression showed the best performance for TB diagnosis [area-under-the-curve (AUC = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.82–1.01, specificity: 82%, sensitivity: 84% for HIV− and AUC = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.98–1.01, specificity: 94%, sensitivity: 93% for HIV+]. In conclusion, these data support the idea that analysis of T cell phenotype can be diagnostically useful in TB.

  20. Cellular immune responses to ESAT-6 discriminate between patients with pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium avium complex and those with pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lein, A D; von Reyn, C F; Ravn, P

    1999-01-01

    ESAT-6 (for 6-kDa early secreted antigenic target) is a secreted antigen found almost exclusively in organisms of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. We compared in vitro gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) responses by peripheral blood mononuclear cells to this antigen in patients with pulmonary...... disease due to either Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) or Mycobacterium tuberculosis with those in healthy, skin test-negative, control subjects. Significant IFN-gamma responses to ESAT-6 were detected in 16 (59%) of 27 M. tuberculosis pulmonary disease patients, 0 (0%) of 8 MAC disease patients, and 0...... (0%) of 8 controls. Significant IFN-gamma responses to M. tuberculosis purified protein derivative were detected in 23 (85%) of 27 M. tuberculosis disease patients, 2 (25%) of 8 MAC disease patients, and 5 (63%) of 8 healthy controls. M. avium sensitin was recognized in 24 (89%) of 27 M. tuberculosis...

  1. Plants and Fungal Products with Activity Against Tuberculosis

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    Marcus Vinicius Nora De Souza

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is becoming an ever more serious worldwide problem. This contagious disease kills four people every minute somewhere in the world and accounts for more than 2 million deaths per year. Due to the rapid spread of TB strains resistant to all the major anti-TB drugs on the market, and the association of TB with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection in AIDS, we urgently need to develop new drugs to fight against TB. In this context, due to the importance of nature in the development of new drugs, the aim of the present review is to highlight a series of new and promising anti-TB agents derived from plants and fungi discovered between 2001 and 2005.

  2. The burden of disease due to tuberculosis in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Glênio César Nunes; da Silva, Rosemeri Maurici; Ferrer, Kelian Tenfen; Traebert, Jefferson

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the burden of disease due to tuberculosis in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, in 2009. This was an epidemiological study with an ecological design. Data on tuberculosis incidence and mortality were collected from specific Brazilian National Ministry of Health databases. The burden of disease due to tuberculosis was based on the calculation of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). The DALYs were estimated by adding the years of life lost (YLLs) and years lived with disability (YLDs). Absolute values were transformed into rates per 100,000 population. The rates were calculated by gender, age group, and health care macroregion. The burden of disease due to tuberculosis was 5,644.27 DALYs (92.25 DALYs/100,000 population), YLLs and YLDs respectively accounting for 78.77% and 21.23% of that total. The highest rates were found in males in the 30-44 and 45-59 year age brackets, although that was not true in every health care macroregion. Overall, the highest estimated burden was in the Planalto Norte macroregion (179.56 DALYs/100,000 population), followed by the Nordeste macroregion (167.07 DALYs/100,000 population). In the majority of the health care macroregions of Santa Catarina, the burden of disease due to tuberculosis was concentrated in adult males, the level of that concentration varying among the various macroregions.

  3. The burden of disease due to tuberculosis in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil

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    Glenio Cesar Nunes Ferrer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate the burden of disease due to tuberculosis in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, in 2009. METHODS: This was an epidemiological study with an ecological design. Data on tuberculosis incidence and mortality were collected from specific Brazilian National Ministry of Health databases. The burden of disease due to tuberculosis was based on the calculation of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs. The DALYs were estimated by adding the years of life lost (YLLs and years lived with disability (YLDs. Absolute values were transformed into rates per 100,000 population. The rates were calculated by gender, age group, and health care macroregion. RESULTS: The burden of disease due to tuberculosis was 5,644.27 DALYs (92.25 DALYs/100,000 population, YLLs and YLDs respectively accounting for 78.77% and 21.23% of that total. The highest rates were found in males in the 30-44 and 45-59 year age brackets, although that was not true in every health care macroregion. Overall, the highest estimated burden was in the Planalto Norte macroregion (179.56 DALYs/100,000 population, followed by the Nordeste macroregion (167.07 DALYs/100,000 population. CONCLUSIONS: In the majority of the health care macroregions of Santa Catarina, the burden of disease due to tuberculosis was concentrated in adult males, the level of that concentration varying among the various macroregions.

  4. Personalized Medicine for Chronic Respiratory Infectious Diseases: Tuberculosis, Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Pulmonary Diseases, and Chronic Pulmonary Aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Helmut J F; Wassilew, Nasstasja; Köhler, Niklas; Olaru, Ioana D; Günther, Gunar; Herzmann, Christian; Kalsdorf, Barbara; Sanchez-Carballo, Patricia; Terhalle, Elena; Rolling, Thierry; Lange, Christoph; Heyckendorf, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic respiratory infectious diseases are causing high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Tuberculosis, a major cause of chronic pulmonary infection, is currently responsible for approximately 1.5 million deaths per year. Although important advances in the fight against tuberculosis have been made, the progress towards eradication of this disease is being challenged by the dramatic increase in multidrug-resistant bacilli. Nontuberculous mycobacteria causing pulmonary disease and chronic pulmonary aspergillosis are emerging infectious diseases. In contrast to other infectious diseases, chronic respiratory infections share the trait of having highly variable treatment outcomes despite longstanding antimicrobial therapy. Recent scientific progress indicates that medicine is presently at a transition stage from programmatic to personalized management. We explain current state-of-the-art management concepts of chronic pulmonary infectious diseases as well as the underlying methods for therapeutic decisions and their implications for personalized medicine. Furthermore, we describe promising biomarkers and techniques with the potential to serve future individual treatment concepts in this field of difficult-to-treat patients. These include candidate markers to improve individual risk assessment for disease development, the design of tailor-made drug therapy regimens, and individualized biomarker-guided therapy duration to achieve relapse-free cure. In addition, the use of therapeutic drug monitoring to reach optimal drug dosing with the smallest rate of adverse events as well as candidate agents for future host-directed therapies are described. Taken together, personalized medicine will provide opportunities to substantially improve the management and treatment outcome of difficult-to-treat patients with chronic respiratory infections. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Definition of drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to antituberculosis drugs in patients with multidrugresistant tuberculosis and TB with extremely drug resistant depending on the case of the disease

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    Kryzhanovsky D.G.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There was studied the profile of drug resistance to the main (I line and reserve (II line antituberculosis drugs in patients with MDR and XDR tuberculosis, depending of the case of the disease. According to the randomized retrospective research 200 patients with MDR and XDR tuberculosis, who received treatment in the clinic of hospital Municipal institution «Dnipropetrovsk rigional clinical association «Phthisiology» Dnipropetrovsk regional Council» during the period 2010 – 2012 were involved. Data about patients contained the data on a case of the disease and the results of the test of drug sensitivity to MBT. XDR – TB was revealed in 7.5% of patients with MDR tuberculosis. In patients with MDR tuberculosis as compared with patients with XDR tuberculosis «new cases» were diagnosed in 19.5% against 18.5% (p <0.05. In patients with MDR tuberculosis and with XDR tuberculosis resistance to the antituberculosis drug more commonly developed to S - 88.5%, E - 55% and Z - 24%. The presence of MDR-TB and XDR-TB prevails in patients, who underwent previous courses of treatment with anti-TB drugs in case history as compared with patients with «new cases» of treatment. The development of resistance to anti-TB drugs depends on the availability of these drugs in the previous treatment regimens.

  6. Factors influencing quality of life in patients with active tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Carlo A; Marra, Fawziah; Cox, Victoria C; Palepu, Anita; Fitzgerald, J Mark

    2004-10-20

    With effective treatment strategies, the focus of tuberculosis (TB) management has shifted from the prevention of mortality to the avoidance of morbidity. As such, there should be an increased focus on quality of life (QoL) experienced by individuals being treated for TB. The objective of our study was to identify areas of QoL that are affected by active TB using focus groups and individual interviews. English, Cantonese, and Punjabi-speaking subjects with active TB who were receiving treatment were eligible for recruitment into the study. Gender-based focus group sessions were conducted for the inner city participants but individual interviews were conducted for those who came to the main TB clinic or were hospitalized. Facilitators used open-ended questions and participants were asked to discuss their experiences of being diagnosed with tuberculosis, what impact it had on their lives, issues around adherence to anti-TB medications and information pertaining to their experience with side effects to these medications. All data were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using constant comparative analysis. 39 patients with active TB participated. The mean age was 46.2 years (SD 18.4) and 62% were male. Most were Canadian-born being either Caucasian or Aboriginal. Four themes emerged from the focus groups and interviews. The first describes issues related to the diagnosis of tuberculosis and sub-themes were identified as 'symptoms', 'health care provision', and 'emotional impact'. The second theme discusses TB medication factors and the sub-themes identified were 'adverse effects', 'ease of administration', and 'adherence'. The third theme describes social support and functioning issues for the individuals with TB. The fourth theme describes health behavior issues for the individuals with TB and the identified sub-themes were "behavior modification" and "TB knowledge." Despite the ability to cure TB, there remains a significant impact on QOL. Since much

  7. Factors influencing quality of life in patients with active tuberculosis

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    Cox Victoria C

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With effective treatment strategies, the focus of tuberculosis (TB management has shifted from the prevention of mortality to the avoidance of morbidity. As such, there should be an increased focus on quality of life (QoL experienced by individuals being treated for TB. The objective of our study was to identify areas of QoL that are affected by active TB using focus groups and individual interviews. Methods English, Cantonese, and Punjabi-speaking subjects with active TB who were receiving treatment were eligible for recruitment into the study. Gender-based focus group sessions were conducted for the inner city participants but individual interviews were conducted for those who came to the main TB clinic or were hospitalized. Facilitators used open-ended questions and participants were asked to discuss their experiences of being diagnosed with tuberculosis, what impact it had on their lives, issues around adherence to anti-TB medications and information pertaining to their experience with side effects to these medications. All data were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Results 39 patients with active TB participated. The mean age was 46.2 years (SD 18.4 and 62% were male. Most were Canadian-born being either Caucasian or Aboriginal. Four themes emerged from the focus groups and interviews. The first describes issues related to the diagnosis of tuberculosis and sub-themes were identified as 'symptoms', 'health care provision', and 'emotional impact'. The second theme discusses TB medication factors and the sub-themes identified were 'adverse effects', 'ease of administration', and 'adherence'. The third theme describes social support and functioning issues for the individuals with TB. The fourth theme describes health behavior issues for the individuals with TB and the identified sub-themes were "behavior modification" and "TB knowledge." Conclusion Despite the ability to

  8. [Morphological signs of inflammatory activity in different clinical forms of drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elipashev, A A; Nikolsky, V O; Shprykov, A S

    to determine whether the activity of tuberculous inflammation is associated with different clinical forms of drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis. The material taken from 310 patients operated on in 2010-2015 were retrospectively examined. The patients underwent economical lung resections of limited extent (typical and atypical ones of up to 3 segments) for circumscribed forms of tuberculosis with bacterial excretion. A study group consisted of 161 (51.9%) patients with drug-resistant variants of pulmonary tuberculosis. A control group included 149 (48.1%) patients with preserved susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to anti-TB drugs. The activity of specific changes in tuberculosis was morphologically evaluated in accordance with the classification proposed by B.M. Ariel in 1998. The highest activity of fourth-to-fifth degree specific inflammation, including that outside the primary involvement focus, was obtained in the drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis group due to the predominance of patients with cavernous and fibrous-cavernous tuberculosis versus those in whom the susceptibility to chemotherapeutic agents was preserved. A macroscopic study showed that the primary lesion focus had a median size in one-half of the all the examinees; but large tuberculomas, caverns, and fibrous caverns over 4 cm in diameter were multiple and detected in the drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis group. Multidrug resistance was observed in more than 60% of the patients with fibrous-cavernous pulmonary tuberculosis, extensive drug resistance was seen in those with cavernous tuberculosis, which is an aggravating factor. The data obtained from the morphological study of the intraoperative material can specify the clinical form of tuberculosis and evaluate the efficiency of preoperative specific therapy. The highest activity of specific inflammation was observed in patients with multiple drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis, the prevalence of third-to-fourth degree

  9. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

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    McNerney Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With almost 9 million new cases each year, tuberculosis remains one of the most feared diseases on the planet. Led by the STOP-TB Partnership and WHO, recent efforts to combat the disease have made considerable progress in a number of countries. However, the emergence of mutated strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are resistant to the major anti-tuberculosis drugs poses a deadly threat to control efforts. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB has been reported in all regions of the world. More recently, extensively drug resistant-tuberculosis (XDR-TB that is also resistant to second line drugs has emerged in a number of countries. To ensure that adequate resources are allocated to prevent the emergence and spread of drug resistance it is important to understand the scale of the problem. In this article we propose that current methods of describing the epidemiology of drug resistant tuberculosis are not adequate for this purpose and argue for the inclusion of population based statistics in global surveillance data. Discussion Whereas the prevalence of tuberculosis is presented as the proportion of individuals within a defined population having disease, the prevalence of drug resistant tuberculosis is usually presented as the proportion of tuberculosis cases exhibiting resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Global surveillance activities have identified countries in Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union and regions of China as having a high proportion of MDR-TB cases and international commentary has focused primarily on the urgent need to improve control in these settings. Other regions, such as sub-Saharan Africa have been observed as having a low proportion of drug resistant cases. However, if one considers the incidence of new tuberculosis cases with drug resistant disease in terms of the population then countries of sub-Saharan Africa have amongst the highest rates of transmitted MDR-TB in the world. We propose

  10. A rare case of occult abdominal tuberculosis with Poncet′s disease mimicking Adult onset Still′s disease

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    Isha Sood

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old female presented with fever, symmetrical arthralgias, rash, painful oral ulcerations and alopecia since 8 weeks. Examination showed mild hepatospleenomegaly. Investigations revealed leucocytosis, neutrophilia, elevated sedimentation rate and raised ferritin levels (3850 ng/ml. Computerized tomography (CT abdomen showed hepatospleenomegaly, mild ascitis and mild bilateral pleural-effusion. After ruling out occult infections, tuberculosis, malignancies and autoimmune diseases by appropriate investigations, and due to raised ferritin levels, adult onset stills disease (AOSD was diagnosed. Patient responded to oral steroids initially, but after 7 days developed severe abdominal pain. Repeat CT showed multiple enlarged, necrotic and matted retroperitoneal lymph nodes with caseating granuloma on histopathology suggesting tuberculosis. Patient was given four-drug anti-tubercular treatment and she improved. Thus our patient of occult abdominal tuberculosis with reactive arthritis (Poncet′s disease presented with hyperferritinemia mimicking AOSD. We postulate that extreme hyperferritinemia can be seen in tuberculosis and tuberculosis must be conclusively ruled out before diagnosing AOSD in tropics.

  11. Nutritional supplements for people being treated for active tuberculosis: A technical summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobler, L; Durao, S; Van der Merwe, S M; Wessels, J; Naude, C E

    2017-12-13

    Tuberculosis and nutrition are intrinsically linked in a complex relationship. Altered metabolism and loss of appetite associated with tuberculosis may result in undernutrition, which in turn may worsen the disease or delay recovery. We highlight an updated Cochrane review assessing the effects of oral nutritional supplements in people with active tuberculosis who are receiving antituberculosis drug therapy. The review authors conducted a comprehensive search (February 2016) for all randomised controlled trials comparing any oral nutritional supplement, given for at least 4 weeks, with no nutritional intervention, placebo or dietary advice only in people receiving antituberculosis treatment. Of the 35 trials (N=8 283 participants) included, seven assessed the provision of free food or high-energy supplements, six assessed multi-micronutrient supplementation, and 21 assessed single- or dual-micronutrient supplementation. There is currently insufficient evidence to indicate whether routinely providing free food or high-energy supplements improves antituberculosis treatment outcomes (i.e. reduced death and increased cure rates at 6 and 12 months), but it probably improves weight gain in some settings. Plasma levels of zinc, vitamin D, vitamin E and selenium probably improve with supplementation, but currently no reliable evidence demonstrates that routine supplementation with multi-, single or dual micronutrients above the recommended daily intake has clinical benefits (i.e. reduced death, increased cure rate at 6 and 12 months, improved nutritional status) in patients receiving antituberculosis treatment. In South Africa, most provinces implement a supplementation protocol based on nutritional assessment and classification of individuals rather than on disease diagnosis or treatment status.

  12. Hepatic tuberculosis presenting with extreme hyperferritinemia masquerading as adult-onset Still’s disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Edirisooriya

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated hepatic tuberculosis is an uncommon manifestation of one of the most common infections worldwide, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Extremely high serum ferritin, which is regarded as a marker of adult onset Still’s disease, has not been observed in patients with tuberculosis of the liver. We report a case of hepatic tuberculosis who presented with clinical criteria of adult-onset Still’s disease and extreme hyperferritinemia, which posed a diagnostic confusion. Case presentation Our patient was a 48-year-old Sri Lankan man who presented with fever, polyarthralgia and a generalized skin rash of three months duration. He had marked constitutional symptoms, oral ulcers, hair loss, anemia and hepatomegaly. Laboratory investigations disclosed an inflammatory syndrome, evidence of hepatic dysfunction, bone marrow suppression and a raised serum ferritin level of 34,674 ng/ml. A rapidly deteriorating course of illness prompted treatment based on a presumptive diagnosis of adult-onset Still’s disease until liver histology was available. The patient died of sepsis followed by multi-organ dysfunction. Later, the liver histology revealed tuberculosis. Conclusion Extrapulmonary tuberculosis, although well known to present with peculiar manifestations, has not been reported to be associated with extremely high levels of serum ferritin in immunocompetent individuals. Isolated hepatic tuberculosis presenting with clinical criteria of adult-onset Still’s disease is remarkable. Since tuberculosis remains a potentially curable disease, an awareness of its’ protean manifestations is essential.

  13. Alveolar Epithelial Cells in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection: Active Players or Innocent Bystanders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scordo, Julia M; Knoell, Daren L; Torrelles, Jordi B

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease that kills one person every 18 s. TB remains a global threat due to the emergence of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) strains and the lack of an efficient vaccine. The ability of M.tb to persist in latency, evade recognition following seroconversion, and establish resistance in vulnerable populations warrants closer examination. Past and current research has primarily focused on examination of the role of alveolar macrophages and dendritic cells during M.tb infection, which are critical in the establishment of the host response during infection. However, emerging evidence indicates that the alveolar epithelium is a harbor for M.tb and critical during progression to active disease. Here we evaluate the relatively unexplored role of the alveolar epithelium as a reservoir and also its capacity to secrete soluble mediators upon M.tb exposure, which influence the extent of infection. We further discuss how the M.tb-alveolar epithelium interaction instigates cell-to-cell crosstalk that regulates the immune balance between a proinflammatory and an immunoregulatory state, thereby prohibiting or allowing the establishment of infection. We propose that consideration of alveolar epithelia provides a more comprehensive understanding of the lung environment in vivo in the context of host defense against M.tb. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Alveolar epithelial cells in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: Active Players or Innocent Bystanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scordo, Julia M.; Knoell, Daren L.; Torrelles, Jordi B.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease that kills one person every 18 seconds. TB remains a global threat due to the emergence of drug resistance Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) strains and the lack of an efficient vaccine. The ability of M.tb to persist in latency, evade recognition following sero-conversion and establish resistance in vulnerable populations warrants closer examination. Past and current research has primarily focused on examination of the role of alveolar macrophages and dendritic cells during M.tb infection, which are critical in the establishment of the host response during infection. However, emerging evidence indicates that the alveolar epithelium is a harbor for M.tb and critical during progression to active disease. Here we evaluate the relatively unexplored role of the alveolar epithelium as a reservoir and also its capacity to secrete soluble mediators upon M.tb exposure that influence the extent of infection. We further discuss how the M.tb-alveolar epithelia interaction instigate cell to cell crosstalk that regulates immune balance between a pro-inflammatory or immunoregulatory state thereby prohibiting or allowing the establishment of infection. We propose that consideration of the alveolar epithelia provides a more comprehensive understanding of the lung environment in vivo in the context of host defense against M.tb. PMID:26384325

  15. US College and University Student Health Screening Requirements for Tuberculosis and Vaccine-Preventable Diseases, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Amy; Bell, Teal; Cohen, Nicole J.; Buckley, Kirsten; Leino, E. Victor; Even, Susan; Beavers, Suzanne; Brown, Clive; Marano, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Colleges are at risk for communicable disease outbreaks because of the high degree of person-to-person interactions and relatively crowded dormitory settings. This report describes the US college student health screening requirements among US resident and international students for tuberculosis (TB) and vaccine-preventable diseases…

  16. Tuberculosis Screening and Active Tuberculosis among HIV-Infected Persons in a Canadian Tertiary Care Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Brassard

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: HIV infection increases the risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis (TB. The present study evaluates how latent TB is detected and treated to determine the effectiveness of screening in HIV-infected patients with diverse risk profiles.

  17. Impaired pulmonary function after treatment for tuberculosis: the end of the disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chushkin, Mikhail Ivanovich; Ots, Oleg Nikolayevich

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of pulmonary function abnormalities and to investigate the factors affecting lung function in patients treated for pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: A total of 214 consecutive patients (132 men and 82 women; 20-82 years of age), treated for pulmonary tuberculosis and followed at a local dispensary, underwent spirometry and plethysmography at least one year after treatment. Results: Pulmonary impairment was present in 102 (47.7%) of the 214 patients evaluated. The most common functional alteration was obstructive lung disease (seen in 34.6%). Of the 214 patients, 60 (28.0%) showed reduced pulmonary function (FEV1 below the lower limit of normal). Risk factors for reduced pulmonary function were having had culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in the past, being over 50 years of age, having recurrent tuberculosis, and having a lower level of education. Conclusions: Nearly half of all tuberculosis patients evolve to impaired pulmonary function. That underscores the need for pulmonary function testing after the end of treatment. PMID:28380187

  18. Safety of Resuming Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors in Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients Concomitant with the Treatment of Active Tuberculosis: A Retrospective Nationwide Registry of the Korean Society of Spondyloarthritis Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Won; Kwon, Seong Ryul; Jung, Kyong-Hee; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Baek, Han Joo; Seo, Mi Ryung; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Suh, Chang-Hee; Jung, Ju Yang; Son, Chang-Nam; Shim, Seung Cheol; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Geun; Lee, Yeon-Ah; Lee, Eun Young; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds Patients who develop an active tuberculosis infection during tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor treatment typically discontinue TNF inhibitor and receive standard anti-tuberculosis treatment. However, there is currently insufficient information on patient outcomes following resumption of TNF inhibitor treatment during ongoing anti- tuberculosis treatment. Our study was designed to investigate the safety of resuming TNF inhibitors in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients who developed tuberculosis as a complication of the use of TNF inhibitors. Methods Through the nationwide registry of the Korean Society of Spondyloarthritis Research, 3929 AS patients who were prescribed TNF inhibitors were recruited between June 2003 and June 2014 at fourteen referral hospitals. Clinical information was analyzed about the patients who experienced tuberculosis after exposure to TNF inhibitors. The clinical features of resumers and non-resumers of TNF inhibitors were compared and the outcomes of tuberculosis were surveyed individually. Findings Fifty-six AS patients were treated for tuberculosis associated with TNF inhibitors. Among them, 23 patients resumed TNF inhibitors, and these patients were found to be exposed to TNF inhibitors for a longer period of time and experienced more frequent disease flare-up after discontinuation of TNF inhibitors compared with those who did not resume. Fifteen patients resumed TNF inhibitors during anti-tuberculosis treatment (early resumers) and 8 after completion of anti-tuberculosis treatment (late resumers). Median time to resuming TNF inhibitor from tuberculosis was 3.3 and 9.0 months in the early and late resumers, respectively. Tuberculosis was treated successfully in all resumers and did not relapse in any of them during follow-up (median 33.8 [IQR; 20.8–66.7] months). Conclusions Instances of tuberculosis were treated successfully in our AS patients, even when given concomitantly with TNF inhibitors. We suggest that early

  19. Humoral immunity in tuberculin skin test anergy and its role in high-risk persons exposed to active tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encinales, Liliana; Zuñiga, Joaquin; Granados-Montiel, Julio; Yunis, Maria; Granados, Julio; Almeciga, Ingrid; Clavijo, Olga; Awad, Carlos; Collazos, Vilma; Vargas-Rojas, María Inés; Bañales-Mendez, José Luis; Vazquez-Castañeda, Lilia; Stern, Joel N; Romero, Viviana; Fridkis-Hareli, Masha; Frindkis-Hareli, Masha; Terreros, Daniel; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo; Yunis, Edmond J

    2010-02-01

    The most common test to identify latent tuberculosis is the tuberculin skin test that detects T cell responses of delayed type hypersensitivity type IV. Since it produces false negative reactions in active tuberculosis or in high-risk persons exposed to tuberculosis patients as shown in this report, we studied antibody profiles to explain the anergy of such responses in high-risk individuals without active infection. Our results showed that humoral immunity against tuberculin, regardless of the result of the tuberculin skin test is important for protection from active tuberculosis and that the presence of high antibody titers is a more reliable indicator of infection latency suggesting that latency can be based on the levels of antibodies together with in vitro proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence of the purified protein derivative. Importantly, anti-tuberculin IgG antibody levels mediate the anergy described herein, which could also prevent reactivation of disease in high-risk individuals with high antibody titers. Such anti-tuberculin IgG antibodies were also found associated with blocking and/or stimulation of in vitro cultures of PBMC with tuberculin. In this regard, future studies need to establish if immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis can generate a broad spectrum of reactions either toward Th1 responses favoring stimulation by cytokines or by antibodies and those toward diminished responses by Th2 cytokines or blocking by antibodies; possibly involving mechanisms of antibody dependent protection from Mtb by different subclasses of IgG. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Concomitant active tuberculosis prolongs survival in non-small cell lung cancer: a study in a tuberculosis-endemic country.

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    Chih-Hsi Kuo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adjuvant tumor cell vaccine with chemotherapy against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC shows limited clinical response. Whether it provokes effective cellular immunity in tumor microenvironment is questionable. Concomitant active tuberculosis in NSCLC (TBLC resembles locoregional immunotherapy of tumor cell vaccine; thus, maximally enriches effective anti-tumor immunity. This study compares the survival and immunological cell profile in TBLC over NSCLC alone. METHODS: Retrospective review of NSCLC patients within 1-year-period of 2007 and follow-up till 2010. RESULTS: A total 276 NSCLC patients were included. The median survival of TBLC is longer than those of NSCLC alone (11.6 vs. 8.8 month, p<0.01. Active tuberculosis is an independent predictor of better survival with HR of 0.68 (95% CI, 0.48 ~ 0.97. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC (55.8 vs. 31.7%, p<0.01 is a significant risk factor for NSCLC with active TB. The median survival of SCC with active tuberculosis is significantly longer than adenocarcinoma or undetermined NSCLC with TB (14.2 vs. 6.6 and 2.8 months, p<0.05. Active tuberculosis in SCC increases the expression of CD3 (46.4 ± 24.8 vs. 24.0 ± 16.0, p<0.05, CXCR3 (35.1 ± 16.4 vs. 19.2 ± 13.3, p<0.01 and IP-10 (63.5 ± 21.9 vs. 35.5 ± 21.0, p<0.01, while expression of FOXP3 is decreased (3.5 ± 0.5 vs. 13.3 ± 3.7 p<0.05, p<0.05. Survival of SCC with high expression of CD3 (12.1 vs. 3.6 month, p<0.05 and CXCR3 (12.1 vs. 4.4 month, p<0.05 is longer than that with low expression. CONCLUSIONS: Active tuberculosis in NSCLC shows better survival outcome. The effective T lymphocyte infiltration in tumor possibly underlies the mechanism. Locoregional immunotherapy of tumor cell vaccine may deserve further researches.

  1. Addison's disease due to adrenal tuberculosis: Contrast-enhanced CT features and clinical duration correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yingkun; Yang Zhigang; Li Yuan; Ma Ensen; Deng Yuping; Min Pengqiu; Yin Longlin; Hu Jian; Zhang Xiaochun; Chen Tianwu

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe CT morphology of untreated adrenal tuberculosis during the different stages of the natural history of the disease and to evaluate the diagnostic implications of CT features. Materials and methods: We retrospectively evaluated CT features in 42 patients with documented adrenal tuberculosis for the location, size, morphology, and enhancement patterns shown on CT images. The clinical duration were correlated with the CT features. Results: Of the 42 patients with untreated adrenal tuberculosis, bilaterally enlarged adrenal glands were revealed in 38 cases (91%), unilaterally enlarged in 3 cases (7%), and normal size in 1 case (2%). Of the 41 cases (98%) with enlargement, mass-like enlargement was seen in 20 cases (49%) and enlargement with preserved contours in 21 cases (51%). Peripheral rim enhancement presented in 22 cases (52%) on contrast-enhanced CT. Non-enhanced CT scan revealed calcification in 21 cases (50%). As the duration of Addison's disease increased, the presence of calcification and contour preservation increased concomitantly (p < 0.001), whereas peripheral rim enhancement and mass-like enlargement decreased concomitantly on CT images (p < 0.001). Conclusion: CT may be helpful in diagnosing adrenal tuberculosis when clinically suspected, and CT features are correlated to the clinical duration of Addison's disease

  2. In vitro activities of DA-7157 and DA-7218 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Nocardia brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Gonzalez, Eva; Rendon, Adrian; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Welsh, Oliverio; Velazquez-Moreno, Victor M; Choi, Sung Hak; Molina-Torres, Carmen

    2006-09-01

    The in vitro activities of DA-7157, a novel oxazolidinone, against clinical isolates of Nocardia brasiliensis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were determined. Equal MIC(50)s and MIC(90)s (0.25 and 0.5 microg/ml, respectively) were found for susceptible and multidrug-resistant isolates of M. tuberculosis. The N. brasiliensis isolates showed an MIC(90) of 1 microg/ml and an MIC(50) of 1 microg/ml. The DA-7157 prodrug, DA-7218, exhibited similar MICs for M. tuberculosis but fivefold-higher MICs for N. brasiliensis.

  3. Arginine as an adjuvant to chemotherapy improves clinical outcome in active tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schön, T; Elias, D; Moges, F

    2003-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the host defence against tuberculosis (TB). Patients with TB exhibit increased catabolism and reduced energy intake. Thus the hypothesis for this study was that restoring a relative deficiency in the amino acid arginine, the substrate for mycobactericidal NO produ......Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the host defence against tuberculosis (TB). Patients with TB exhibit increased catabolism and reduced energy intake. Thus the hypothesis for this study was that restoring a relative deficiency in the amino acid arginine, the substrate for mycobactericidal...... virus-negative patients with active tuberculosis, most likely mediated by increased production of nitric oxide....

  4. Nutritional supplements for people being treated for active tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 108, No 1 (2018) > ... Altered metabolism and loss of appetite associated with tuberculosis may result in undernutrition, ... increased cure rates at 6 and 12 months), but it probably improves weight gain in some settings.

  5. En el camino para acortar los tratamientos de la tuberculosis: los ensayos clínicos de la Unitat d'Investigació en la Tuberculosi de Barcelona impulsados por los Centres for Disease Control and Prevention On the way to shortening tuberculosis treatments: clinical trials of the Unitat d' Investagació en Tuberculosi de Barcelona supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Moreno

    2010-04-01

    Control and Prevention in a series of clinical trials on latent tuberculosis infection and tuberculosis disease. BTRU participation began in 2004 with Study 26, an evaluation of the efficacy and tolerability of rifapentine plus isoniazid administered once weekly for 3 months compared with the standard treatment for latent tuberculos isinfection. The BTRU centers together enrolled 246 patients (3% of the total.General enrollment was completed in February, 2008. HIV-infected patient and child enrollment continues. Treatment with 12 doses instead of 270 doses is expected to be a clear success. However, the analysis will be completed in 2010. Study 28 (startedin2006, designed for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, compared standard treatment with an experimental regimen substituting moxifloxacin for isoniazid. BTRU centers together enrolled 15 patients (3.5 % of the total.The provisional results (presented at the 47th Interscience Conferenceon Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy in Chicago, 2007 showed no difference between the sputum conversion rate of each regimen at week 8 of treatment. Study 29 is currently underway,in which rifapentine was introduced in the experimental regimen for active tuberculosis treatment.

  6. Pathology of pulmonary tuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobacterial lung disease: Facts, misconceptions, and practical tips for pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Deepali; Ghosh, Subha; Teixeira, Lucileia; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay

    2017-11-01

    Most pathologists are familiar with the microscopic features of tuberculosis and the need to examine special stains for acid-fast bacteria (AFB) in cases of granulomatous lung disease. However, misconceptions do exist, including the concept that finding AFB in "caseating granulomas" confirms the diagnosis of tuberculosis. This dogma is attributable to the high prevalence of tuberculosis in many countries, as well as unfamiliarity with the microscopic spectrum of non-tuberculous mycobacterial lung disease. This review aims to provide surgical pathologists with practical tips to identify AFB, illustrate the histologic overlap between pulmonary tuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobacterial lung disease, and highlight the importance of cultures in this setting. M. tuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobacteria cannot be reliably differentiated either on the basis of the tissue reaction or by bacterial morphology on acid-fast stains. Although a presumptive clinical diagnosis of tuberculosis can be made without culture-confirmation, the only definitive means to determine the true identity of AFB is by cultures or molecular methods. Making this distinction is most critical when AFB are found in incidentally detected lung nodules in geographic locations where the incidence of tuberculosis is low, because in such settings AFB in necrotizing granulomas of the lung are more likely to be non-tuberculous mycobacteria than M. tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Re-thinking global health sector efforts for HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control: promoting integration of programme activities within a strengthened health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Dermot

    2010-07-05

    The global financial crisis threatens global health, particularly exacerbating diseases of inequality, e.g. HIV/AIDS, and diseases of poverty, e.g. tuberculosis. The aim of this paper is to reconsider established practices and policies for HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control, aiming at delivering better results and value for money. This may be achieved by promoting greater integration of HIV and tuberculosis control programme activities within a strengthened health system. HIV and tuberculosis share many similarities in terms of their disease burden and the recommended stratagems for their control. HIV and tuberculosis programmes implement similar sorts of control activities, e.g. case finding and treatment, which depend for success on generic health system issues, including vital registration, drug procurement and supply, laboratory network, human resources, and financing. However, the current health system approach to HIV and tuberculosis control often involves separate specialised services. Despite some recent progress, collaboration between the programmes remains inadequate, progress in obtaining synergies has been slow, and results remain far below those needed to achieve universal access to key interventions. A fundamental re-think of the current strategic approach involves promoting integrated delivery of HIV and tuberculosis programme activities as part of strengthened general health services: epidemiological surveillance, programme monitoring and evaluation, community awareness of health-seeking behavior, risk behaviour modification, infection control, treatment scale-up (first-line treatment regimens), drug-resistance surveillance, containing and countering drug-resistance (second-line treatment regimens), research and development, global advocacy and global partnership. Health agencies should review policies and progress in HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control, learn mutual lessons for policy development and scaling up interventions, and identify ways

  8. Re-thinking global health sector efforts for HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control: promoting integration of programme activities within a strengthened health system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Dermot

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The global financial crisis threatens global health, particularly exacerbating diseases of inequality, e.g. HIV/AIDS, and diseases of poverty, e.g. tuberculosis. The aim of this paper is to reconsider established practices and policies for HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control, aiming at delivering better results and value for money. This may be achieved by promoting greater integration of HIV and tuberculosis control programme activities within a strengthened health system. Discussion HIV and tuberculosis share many similarities in terms of their disease burden and the recommended stratagems for their control. HIV and tuberculosis programmes implement similar sorts of control activities, e.g. case finding and treatment, which depend for success on generic health system issues, including vital registration, drug procurement and supply, laboratory network, human resources, and financing. However, the current health system approach to HIV and tuberculosis control often involves separate specialised services. Despite some recent progress, collaboration between the programmes remains inadequate, progress in obtaining synergies has been slow, and results remain far below those needed to achieve universal access to key interventions. A fundamental re-think of the current strategic approach involves promoting integrated delivery of HIV and tuberculosis programme activities as part of strengthened general health services: epidemiological surveillance, programme monitoring and evaluation, community awareness of health-seeking behavior, risk behaviour modification, infection control, treatment scale-up (first-line treatment regimens, drug-resistance surveillance, containing and countering drug-resistance (second-line treatment regimens, research and development, global advocacy and global partnership. Health agencies should review policies and progress in HIV and tuberculosis epidemic control, learn mutual lessons for policy

  9. Bactericidal activity of an imidazo[1, 2-a]pyridine using a mouse M. tuberculosis infection model.

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    Yong Cheng

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains a global threat due in part to the long treatment regimen and the increased prevalence of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains. Therefore, new drug regimens are urgently required to combat this deadly disease. We previously synthesized and evaluated a series of new anti-tuberculosis compounds which belong to the family of imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines. This family of compounds showed low nM MIC (minimal inhibitory concentration values against M. tuberculosis in vitro. In this study, a derivative of imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines, (N-(4-(4-chlorophenoxybenzyl-2,7-dimethylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-carboxamide (ND-09759, was selected as a promising lead compound to determine its protective efficacy using a mouse infection model. Pharmacokinetic analysis of ND-09759 determined that at a dosage of 30 mg/kg mouse body weight (PO gave a maximum serum drug concentration (Cmax of 2.9 µg/ml and a half-life of 20.1 h. M. tuberculosis burden in the lungs and spleens was significantly decreased in mice treated once daily 6 days per week for 4-weeks with ND-09759 compared to untreated mice and this antibiotic activity was equivalent to isoniazid (INH and rifampicin (RMP, two first-line anti-TB drugs. We observed slightly higher efficacy when using a combination of ND-09759 with either INH or RMP. Finally, the histopathological analysis revealed that infected mice treated with ND-09759 had significantly reduced inflammation relative to untreated mice. In conclusion, our findings indicate ND-09759 might be a potent candidate for the treatment of active TB in combination with current standard anti-TB drugs.

  10. Drug-sensitive tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, and nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease in nonAIDS adults: comparisons of thin-section CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Myung Jin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Sung Mok; Koh, Won-Jung; Kwon, O Jung; Kang, Eun Young; Kim, Seonwoo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare thin-section CT (TSCT) findings of drug-sensitive (DS) tuberculosis (TB), multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB, and nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) pulmonary disease in nonAIDS adults. During 2003, 216 (113 DS TB, 35 MDR TB, and 68 NTM) patients with smear-positive sputum for acid-fast bacilli (AFB), and who were subsequently confirmed to have mycobacterial pulmonary disease, underwent thoracic TSCT. The frequency of lung lesion patterns on TSCT and patients' demographic data were compared. The commonest TSCT findings were tree-in-bud opacities and nodules. On a per-person basis, significant differences were found in the frequency of multiple cavities and bronchiectasis (P<0.001, chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis). Multiple cavities were more frequent in MDR TB than in the other two groups and extensive bronchiectasis in NTM disease (multiple logistic regression analysis). Patients with MDR TB were younger than those with DS TB or NTM disease (P<0.001, multiple logistic regression analysis). Previous tuberculosis treatment history was significantly more frequent in patients with MDR TB or NTM disease (P<0.001, chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis). In patients with positive sputum AFB, multiple cavities, young age, and previous tuberculosis treatment history imply MDR TB, whereas extensive bronchiectasis, old age, and previous tuberculosis treatment history NTM disease. (orig.)

  11. Drug-sensitive tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, and nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease in nonAIDS adults: comparisons of thin-section CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Myung Jin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Sung Mok [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Koh, Won-Jung; Kwon, O Jung [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Kang, Eun Young [Korea University Guro Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Seonwoo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Biostatistics Unit of the Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2006-09-15

    The aim of this work was to compare thin-section CT (TSCT) findings of drug-sensitive (DS) tuberculosis (TB), multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB, and nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) pulmonary disease in nonAIDS adults. During 2003, 216 (113 DS TB, 35 MDR TB, and 68 NTM) patients with smear-positive sputum for acid-fast bacilli (AFB), and who were subsequently confirmed to have mycobacterial pulmonary disease, underwent thoracic TSCT. The frequency of lung lesion patterns on TSCT and patients' demographic data were compared. The commonest TSCT findings were tree-in-bud opacities and nodules. On a per-person basis, significant differences were found in the frequency of multiple cavities and bronchiectasis (P<0.001, chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis). Multiple cavities were more frequent in MDR TB than in the other two groups and extensive bronchiectasis in NTM disease (multiple logistic regression analysis). Patients with MDR TB were younger than those with DS TB or NTM disease (P<0.001, multiple logistic regression analysis). Previous tuberculosis treatment history was significantly more frequent in patients with MDR TB or NTM disease (P<0.001, chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis). In patients with positive sputum AFB, multiple cavities, young age, and previous tuberculosis treatment history imply MDR TB, whereas extensive bronchiectasis, old age, and previous tuberculosis treatment history NTM disease. (orig.)

  12. Altered microRNA signatures in sputum of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis.

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    Zhengjun Yi

    Full Text Available Role of microRNA (miRNA has been highlighted in pathogen-host interactions recently. At present, their role in active pulmonary tuberculosis is unknown. The aim of the study was to delineate miRNA expression in sputum supernatant of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Expression of miRNAs was evaluated by microarray analysis and differentially expressed miRNAs were validated by RT-qPCR. Secreted cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 were measured by ELISA. We found that 95 miRNAs were differentially expressed between tuberculosis group and controls. More miRNAs (52 out of 95 miRNAs were underexpressed than overexpressed during tuberculosis infection. Overexpression of miR-3179, miR-147 and underexpression of miR-19b-2* in TB group compared with controls were confirmed in the validation cohort. TNF-α and IL-6 levels were not significantly altered between TB group and controls. For the first time, differential expression of miRNAs in sputum was found in active pulmonary tuberculosis. The study provides rationale for identifying the role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis and indicates potential for miRNA-based therapeutic strategies.

  13. Altered microRNA signatures in sputum of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhengjun; Fu, Yurong; Ji, Rui; Li, Ruifang; Guan, Zhiyu

    2012-01-01

    Role of microRNA (miRNA) has been highlighted in pathogen-host interactions recently. At present, their role in active pulmonary tuberculosis is unknown. The aim of the study was to delineate miRNA expression in sputum supernatant of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Expression of miRNAs was evaluated by microarray analysis and differentially expressed miRNAs were validated by RT-qPCR. Secreted cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 were measured by ELISA. We found that 95 miRNAs were differentially expressed between tuberculosis group and controls. More miRNAs (52 out of 95 miRNAs) were underexpressed than overexpressed during tuberculosis infection. Overexpression of miR-3179, miR-147 and underexpression of miR-19b-2* in TB group compared with controls were confirmed in the validation cohort. TNF-α and IL-6 levels were not significantly altered between TB group and controls. For the first time, differential expression of miRNAs in sputum was found in active pulmonary tuberculosis. The study provides rationale for identifying the role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis and indicates potential for miRNA-based therapeutic strategies.

  14. HRCT in the evaluation and diagnosis of the early/active pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Gao; Liu Xueguo; Zhang Qingwen; Wang Ying; Li Zhanjun; Zhang Cuiyun; Wang Jian; He Yanli; Hong Guobin

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the HRCT findings of early/active pulmonary tuberculosis before and after antituberculous chemotherapy. Methods: One hundred tuberculous patients were studied prospectively and they were divided into 2 groups according to the history. The diagnosis of early active pulmonary tuberculosis was based on positive acid-fast bacilli in sputum (75 patients) and changes on serial radiographs obtained during treatment (25 patients). The correlation between pathology and imaging was done in the lungs from the cadavers of five other patients who died of pulmonary tuberculosis. Results: Comparing with the presence of other HRCT findings, the presence of centrilobular lesions (93.0%), tree-in-bud appearance (76.0%), and wall thickening of bronchioles (70.0%) were most common signs in both the first group consisting of 66 patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis and the second group consisting of 34 patients with recent reactivation of pulmonary tuberculosis at examination by HRCT, and there was significant difference between the presence of those signs and other signs (P<0.001). Conclusion: Centrilobular lesion appeared to be the most commonly seen characteristic HRCT features of early active tuberculosis, and it may be helpful to the diagnosis and (or ) differential diagnosis if combined with other commonly seen characteristic HRCT features as well as clinical information

  15. Tuberculosis in pregnancy:a challenging differential diagnosisfor inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, E F M; Araujo Júnior, E; Campanharo, F F; Sarmento, S G P; Saito, C S; Moron, F A

    2014-08-01

    To describe a case of tuberculosis with intestinal variant in a pregnant woman in the 17th week of pregnancy. Case report. Department of Obstetrics, Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo-SP, Brazil. Tuberculosis is a public health problem that concerns many countries in the world. It was declareda public emergency by the World Health Organization in 2005. Its presence during pregnancy brings maternal risk and fetal impairment if not treated quickly and properly. The intestinal variant is not the most common form of the disease and may be confused with inflammatory bowel diseases, especially Crohns disease. Knowledge of the specific characteristics, combined with a detailed medical history and appropriate diagnostic methods can make all the difference in gestational prognosis. We report the case of a pregnant woman who wrongly underwent treatment for inflammatory bowel disease at another service. After admission to our university hospital, fruitful diagnostic clarification was achieved and the patient was diagnosed and treated for tuberculosis. We describe the details of the investigation and, in particular, review the main characteristics in the literature for differentiating the two diseases.

  16. Low nutrient intake among adult women and patients with severe tuberculosis disease in Uganda: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mupere Ezekiel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information regarding dietary nutrient intake during tuberculosis disease is lacking. We established the relationship between disease severity or wasting during pulmonary tuberculosis and nutrient intake. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 131 adults with or without pulmonary tuberculosis were screened for human immune-deficiency virus (HIV, wasting, disease severity using 13 item validated clinical TBscore, and 24-hour dietary intake recall. Results Of the 131 participants, 61 were males and 70 females. Overall men and women had similar age. In average 24-hour nutrient intake, the following nutrients: energy, protein, total fat, carbohydrate, calcium, vitamin A, and folate were low among patients with severe tuberculosis disease. Patients with moderate-to-severe clinical TBscore had lower average energy intake than patients with mild TBscores (6.11 vs. 9.27 MJ, respectively (p Conclusions Findings suggest that severity of pulmonary tuberculosis and female gender had reduced nutrient intake. Early tuberculosis diagnosis and nutritional support may be important in management of tuberculosis patients.

  17. Substituted aminopyrimidine protein kinase B (PknB) inhibitors show activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Timothy M.; Bouloc, Nathalie; Buxton, Roger S.; Chugh, Jasveen; Lougheed, Kathryn E.A.; Osborne, Simon A.; Saxty, Barbara; Smerdon, Stephen J.; Taylor, Debra L.; Whalley, David

    2012-01-01

    A high-throughput screen against PknB, an essential serine–threonine protein kinase present in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), allowed the identification of an aminoquinazoline inhibitor which was used as a starting point for SAR investigations. Although a significant improvement in enzyme affinity was achieved, the aminoquinazolines showed little or no cellular activity against M. tuberculosis. However, switching to an aminopyrimidine core scaffold and the introduction of a basic amine side chain afforded compounds with nanomolar enzyme binding affinity and micromolar minimum inhibitory concentrations against M. tuberculosis. Replacement of the pyrazole head group with pyridine then allowed equipotent compounds with improved selectivity against a human kinase panel to be obtained. PMID:22469702

  18. The exhausted CD4+CXCR5+ T cells involve the pathogenesis of human tuberculosis disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Munyemana Jean; Wei, Ming; Hou, Hongyan; Yu, Jing; Lin, Qun; Luo, Ying; Sun, Ziyong; Wang, Feng

    2018-06-21

    The CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells have been previously established. However, their decreased frequency during tuberculosis (TB) disease is partially understood. The aim of this study was to explore the depletion of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells in human TB. The frequency and function of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells were evaluated in active TB (ATB) patients and healthy control (HC) individuals. The function of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells was determined after blockade of inhibitory receptors. The frequency of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells was decreased in ATB patients. The expression of activation markers (HLA-DR and ICOS) and inhibitory receptors (Tim-3 and PD-1) on CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells was increased in ATB group. TB-specific antigen stimulation induced higher expression of inhibitory receptors than phytohemagglutinin stimulation in ATB group. In contrast, TB antigen stimulation did not induce a significantly increased expression of IL-21 and Ki-67 on CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells. However, blockade of inhibitory receptors Tim-3 and PD-1 not only increased the frequency of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells, but also restored their proliferation and cytokine secretion potential. An increased expression of inhibitory receptors involves the depletion of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells, and blockade of inhibitory receptors can restore the function of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells in ATB patients. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTICS OF PROSTATE TUBERCULOSIS

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    E. V. Brizhatyuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate tuberculosis is difficult to be diagnosed, especially if lesions are limited only by this organ. The article analyses the experience of differential diagnostics of prostate tuberculosis based on the data of examination of 84 patients. 45 of them were diagnosed with prostate tuberculosis, and 39 patients were diagnosed with chronic bacterial prostatitis. Pathognomonic diagnostics criteria of prostate tuberculosis were the following: detection of tuberculous mycobacteria in the prostatic fluid or ejaculate, signs of granulomatous prostatitis with areas of cavernous necrosis in prostate biopsy samples, and prostate cavities visualized by X-ray or ultrasound examinations. Should the above criteria be absent, the disease can be diagnosed based on the combination of indirect signs: symptoms of prostate inflammation with active tuberculosis of the other localization; large prostate calcification, extensive hyperechoic area of the prostate, spermatocystic lesions, leucospermia and hemospermia, failure of the adequate non-specific anti-bacterial therapy.

  20. Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Exposure to TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  1. Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Testing for TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  2. Symptom screening rules to identify active pulmonary tuberculosis: Findings from the Zambian South African Tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS Reduction (ZAMSTAR trial prevalence surveys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M M Claassens

    Full Text Available High tuberculosis (TB burden countries should consider systematic screening among adults in the general population. We identified symptom screening rules to be used in addition to cough ≥2 weeks, in a context where X-ray screening is not feasible, aiming to increase the sensitivity of screening while achieving a specificity of ≥85%.We used 2010 Zambia South Africa Tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS Reduction (ZAMSTAR survey data: a South African (SA training dataset, a SA testing dataset for internal validation and a Zambian dataset for external validation. Regression analyses investigated relationships between symptoms or combinations of symptoms and active disease. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for candidate rules.Among all participants, the sensitivity of using only cough ≥2 weeks as a screening rule was less than 25% in both SA and Zambia. The addition of any three of six TB symptoms (cough <2 weeks, night sweats, weight loss, fever, chest pain, shortness of breath, or 2 or more of cough <2 weeks, night sweats, and weight loss, increased the sensitivity to ~38%, while reducing specificity from ~95% to ~85% in SA and ~97% to ~92% in Zambia. Among HIV-negative adults, findings were similar in SA, whereas in Zambia the increase in sensitivity was relatively small (15% to 22%.High TB burden countries should investigate cost-effective strategies for systematic screening: one such strategy could be to use our rule in addition to cough ≥2 weeks.

  3. miR-30c is specifically repressed in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Silvana V; Fernández, Rocío Del V; Zoff, Luciana; Bongiovanni, Bettina; Díaz, Ariana; D'Attilio, Luciano; Santucci, Natalia; Alvarez, Tomás; Marchesini, Marcela M; Bogue, Cristina; Bay, Maria L; Bottasso, Oscar A

    2017-07-01

    Tuberculous pleurisy (PLTB) is a common form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It often resolves without chemotherapy being hence considered a rather benign manifestation of the disease. Patients with PLTB mount an effective anti-mycobacterial response, unlike those with active pulmonary TB (pTB) that were shown to present an imbalance in plasma immune and endocrine mediators. In this work, we explored whether expression of the active isoform of the glucocorticoid receptor (hGRα) in the context of the inflammatory-anti-inflammatory responses of TB patients may be associated to microRNA levels. As expected, the inflammatory response triggered in patients coexists with increased circulating cortisol and altered hGRα levels in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, while hGRα expression is significantly downregulated in PLTB, its levels in pTB patients are higher within the control values. These results point out to the existence of an additional mechanism tending to preserve hGRα levels probably to deal with the chronic inflammation observed in pTB. In this regard, we found that miR-30c is strongly downregulated in mononuclear cells of pTB patients compared to PLTB cases, showing an expression profile opposite to that seen with hGRα. Interestingly, low levels of miR-30c are specific for this active form of TB, as its expression is not altered in mononuclear cells from either healthy controls or patients with tuberculous or non-tuberculous pleurisy. Moreover, miR-30c and hGRα also showed an inverse expression pattern in M. tuberculosis-stimulated THP-1 macrophage cultures. In sum, our studies identify miR-30c as a specific correlate of pulmonary manifestations of TB, potentially involved in the altered glucocorticoid sensitivity observed in these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. IFNG-mediated immune responses enhance autophagy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in patients with active tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovetta, Ana I; Peña, Delfina; Hernández Del Pino, Rodrigo E; Recalde, Gabriela M; Pellegrini, Joaquín; Bigi, Fabiana; Musella, Rosa M; Palmero, Domingo J; Gutierrez, Marisa; Colombo, María I; García, Verónica E

    2015-01-01

    Protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires IFNG. Besides, IFNG-mediated induction of autophagy suppresses survival of virulent Mtb in macrophage cell lines. We investigated the contribution of autophagy to the defense against Mtb antigen (Mtb-Ag) in cells from tuberculosis patients and healthy donors (HD). Patients were classified as high responders (HR) if their T cells produced significant IFNG against Mtb-Ag; and low responders (LR) when patients showed weak or no T cell responses to Mtb-Ag. The highest autophagy levels were detected in HD cells whereas the lowest quantities were observed in LR patients. Interestingly, upon Mtb-Ag stimulation, we detected a positive correlation between IFNG and MAP1LC3B-II/LC3-II levels. Actually, blockage of Mtb-Ag-induced IFNG markedly reduced autophagy in HR patients whereas addition of limited amounts of IFNG significantly increased autophagy in LR patients. Therefore, autophagy collaborates with human immune responses against Mtb in close association with specific IFNG secreted against the pathogen. PMID:25426782

  5. In vitro and in vivo activities of the nitroimidazole TBA-354 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, A M; Cho, S; Yang, T J; Kim, Y; Wang, Y; Lu, Y; Wang, B; Xu, J; Mdluli, K; Ma, Z; Franzblau, S G

    2015-01-01

    Nitroimidazoles are a promising new class of antitubercular agents. The nitroimidazo-oxazole delamanid (OPC-67683, Deltyba) is in phase III trials for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, while the nitroimidazo-oxazine PA-824 is entering phase III for drug-sensitive and drug-resistant tuberculosis. TBA-354 (SN31354[(S)-2-nitro-6-((6-(4-trifluoromethoxy)phenyl)pyridine-3-yl)methoxy)-6,7-dihydro-5H-imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]oxazine]) is a pyridine-containing biaryl compound with exceptional efficacy against chronic murine tuberculosis and favorable bioavailability in preliminary rodent studies. It was selected as a potential next-generation antituberculosis nitroimidazole following an extensive medicinal chemistry effort. Here, we further evaluate the pharmacokinetic properties and activity of TBA-354 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. TBA-354 is narrow spectrum and bactericidal in vitro against replicating and nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with potency similar to that of delamanid and greater than that of PA-824. The addition of serum protein or albumin does not significantly alter this activity. TBA-354 maintains activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv isogenic monoresistant strains and clinical drug-sensitive and drug-resistant isolates. Spontaneous resistant mutants appear at a frequency of 3 × 10(-7). In vitro studies and in vivo studies in mice confirm that TBA-354 has high bioavailability and a long elimination half-life. In vitro studies suggest a low risk of drug-drug interactions. Low-dose aerosol infection models of acute and chronic murine tuberculosis reveal time- and dose-dependent in vivo bactericidal activity that is at least as potent as that of delamanid and more potent than that of PA-824. Its superior potency and pharmacokinetic profile that predicts suitability for once-daily oral dosing suggest that TBA-354 be studied further for its potential as a next-generation nitroimidazole. Copyright © 2015, American

  6. Loss of receptor on tuberculin-reactive T-cells marks active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Streitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculin-specific T-cell responses have low diagnostic specificity in BCG vaccinated populations. While subunit-antigen (e.g. ESAT-6, CFP-10 based tests are useful for diagnosing latent tuberculosis infection, there is no reliable immunological test for active pulmonary tuberculosis. Notably, all existing immunological tuberculosis-tests are based on T-cell response size, whereas the diagnostic potential of T-cell response quality has never been explored. This includes surface marker expression and functionality of mycobacterial antigen specific T-cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Flow-cytometry was used to examine over-night antigen-stimulated T-cells from tuberculosis patients and controls. Tuberculin and/or the relatively M. tuberculosis specific ESAT-6 protein were used as stimulants. A set of classic surface markers of T-cell naïve/memory differentiation was selected and IFN-gamma production was used to identify T-cells recognizing these antigens. The percentage of tuberculin-specific T-helper-cells lacking the surface receptor CD27, a state associated with advanced differentiation, varied considerably between individuals (from less than 5% to more than 95%. Healthy BCG vaccinated individuals had significantly fewer CD27-negative tuberculin-reactive CD4 T-cells than patients with smear and/or culture positive pulmonary tuberculosis, discriminating these groups with high sensitivity and specificity, whereas individuals with latent tuberculosis infection exhibited levels in between. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Smear and/or culture positive pulmonary tuberculosis can be diagnosed by a rapid and reliable immunological test based on the distribution of CD27 expression on peripheral blood tuberculin specific T-cells. This test works very well even in a BCG vaccinated population. It is simple and will be of great utility in situations where sputum specimens are difficult to obtain or sputum-smear is negative. It will also help

  7. Imaging in Tuberculosis abdominal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, Tatiana; Garcia, Vanessa; Tamara, Estrada; Acosta, Federico

    2010-01-01

    In this article we illustrate and discuss imaging features resulting from Tuberculosis abdominal affectation. We present patients evaluated with several imaging modalities who had abdominal symptoms and findings suggestive of granulomatous disease. Diagnosis was confirm including hystopatology and clinical outgoing. Cases involved presented many affected organs such as lymphatic system, peritoneum, liver, spleen, pancreas, kidneys, ureters, adrenal glands and pelvic organs Tuberculosis, Tuberculosis renal, Tuberculosis hepatic, Tuberculosis splenic Tomography, x-ray, computed

  8. Anti-tuberculosis activities of the crude methanolic extract and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: Tuberculosis (TB) is of great public health burden globally especially in developing countries of Africa and Asia . Current TB regimen involves multiple therapies and of long duration leading to poor patient adherence. There is also the challenge of multidrug resistant TB. Hence, there is a need for discovery of new ...

  9. Anti-tuberculosis activities of the crude methanolic extract and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    standard drugs. The petri dishes were sealed with a carbon-dioxide permeable tape, left overnight in biosafety hood to allow diffusion of the extract, fractions. It was then incubated at 370C in a carbon- dioxide incubator for 4 weeks. The susceptibility of. M. tuberculosis isolates to the extract and the drugs was determined by ...

  10. Immunotherapy Added to Antibiotic Treatment Reduces Relapse of Disease in a Mouse Model of Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourik, Bas C; Leenen, Pieter J M; de Knegt, Gerjo J; Huizinga, Ruth; van der Eerden, Bram C J; Wang, Jinshan; Krois, Charles R; Napoli, Joseph L; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A J M; de Steenwinkel, Jurriaan E M

    2017-02-01

    Immune-modulating drugs that target myeloid-derived suppressor cells or stimulate natural killer T cells have been shown to reduce mycobacterial loads in tuberculosis (TB). We aimed to determine if a combination of these drugs as adjunct immunotherapy to conventional antibiotic treatment could also increase therapeutic efficacy against TB. In our model of pulmonary TB in mice, we applied treatment with isoniazid, rifampicin, and pyrazinamide for 13 weeks alone or combined with immunotherapy consisting of all-trans retinoic acid, 1,25(OH) 2 -vitamin D3, and α-galactosylceramide. Outcome parameters were mycobacterial load during treatment (therapeutic activity) and 13 weeks after termination of treatment (therapeutic efficacy). Moreover, cellular changes were analyzed using flow cytometry and cytokine expression was assessed at the mRNA and protein levels. Addition of immunotherapy was associated with lower mycobacterial loads after 5 weeks of treatment and significantly reduced relapse of disease after a shortened 13-week treatment course compared with antibiotic treatment alone. This was accompanied by reduced accumulation of immature myeloid cells in the lungs at the end of treatment and increased TNF-α protein levels throughout the treatment period. We demonstrate, in a mouse model of pulmonary TB, that immunotherapy consisting of three clinically approved drugs can improve the therapeutic efficacy of standard antibiotic treatment.

  11. Targeting phenotypically tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ben; Nathan, Carl

    2016-01-01

    While the immune system is credited with averting tuberculosis in billions of individuals exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the immune system is also culpable for tempering the ability of antibiotics to deliver swift and durable cure of disease. In individuals afflicted with tuberculosis, host immunity produces diverse microenvironmental niches that support suboptimal growth, or complete growth arrest, of M. tuberculosis. The physiological state of nonreplication in bacteria is associated with phenotypic drug tolerance. Many of these host microenvironments, when modeled in vitro by carbon starvation, complete nutrient starvation, stationary phase, acidic pH, reactive nitrogen intermediates, hypoxia, biofilms, and withholding streptomycin from the streptomycin-addicted strain SS18b, render M. tuberculosis profoundly tolerant to many of the antibiotics that are given to tuberculosis patients in a clinical setting. Targeting nonreplicating persisters is anticipated to reduce the duration of antibiotic treatment and rate of post-treatment relapse. Some promising drugs to treat tuberculosis, such as rifampicin and bedaquiline, only kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis in vitro at concentrations far greater than their minimal inhibitory concentrations against replicating bacilli. There is an urgent demand to identify which of the currently used antibiotics, and which of the molecules in academic and corporate screening collections, have potent bactericidal action on nonreplicating M. tuberculosis. With this goal, we review methods of high throughput screening to target nonreplicating M. tuberculosis and methods to progress candidate molecules. A classification based on structures and putative targets of molecules that have been reported to kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis revealed a rich diversity in pharmacophores. However, few of these compounds were tested under conditions that would exclude the impact of adsorbed compound acting during the recovery phase of

  12. Radiological manifestations of intestinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Jae Hoon

    1974-01-01

    Radiological findings of 87 cases of intestinal tuberculosis are analyzed and presented. The diagnosis was based on histopathology in 29 cases, and on clinical ground and radiological findings in 58 cases. The radio of male and female patients was 4:6, and peak incidence is between 10 and 30. Abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, fever and general weakness are frequent symptoms, and tenderness of abdomen, ascites with abdominal distension, malnutrition and emaciation are frequent signs of the patients. Laboratory investigation reveal anemia, raised ESR, hypoalbuminaemia and positive occult blood reaction in the stool in most of the patients. Chest film show activity pulmonary tuberculosis in only 1/3 patients. There is no pathognomonic radiological findings in intestinal tuberculosis and their manifestations are protean, and differentiation from other inflammatory diseases and malignant tumors in gastrointestinal tract is very difficult on radiological ground alone. However, in patients with complaining vague abdominal symptoms and signs, the radiological diagnosis is most certain means in the decision of existence of organic lesion and suggestion of tuberculosis in the gastrointestinal tract and its extent as yet. Multiplicity of the lesion, involvement of adjacent organ such as peritoneum or mesenteric lymph nodes, typical nodularity or irregularity of mesenteric border and existence of active pulmonary tuberculosis are the suggestive findings of intestinal tuberculosis. In the diagnosis of inflammatory disease or malignant tumor of gastrointestinal tract, the possibility of tuberculosis should be borne in mind, and vice versa

  13. Radiological manifestations of intestinal tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Jae Hoon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-10-15

    Radiological findings of 87 cases of intestinal tuberculosis are analyzed and presented. The diagnosis was based on histopathology in 29 cases, and on clinical ground and radiological findings in 58 cases. The radio of male and female patients was 4:6, and peak incidence is between 10 and 30. Abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, fever and general weakness are frequent symptoms, and tenderness of abdomen, ascites with abdominal distension, malnutrition and emaciation are frequent signs of the patients. Laboratory investigation reveal anemia, raised ESR, hypoalbuminaemia and positive occult blood reaction in the stool in most of the patients. Chest film show activity pulmonary tuberculosis in only 1/3 patients. There is no pathognomonic radiological findings in intestinal tuberculosis and their manifestations are protean, and differentiation from other inflammatory diseases and malignant tumors in gastrointestinal tract is very difficult on radiological ground alone. However, in patients with complaining vague abdominal symptoms and signs, the radiological diagnosis is most certain means in the decision of existence of organic lesion and suggestion of tuberculosis in the gastrointestinal tract and its extent as yet. Multiplicity of the lesion, involvement of adjacent organ such as peritoneum or mesenteric lymph nodes, typical nodularity or irregularity of mesenteric border and existence of active pulmonary tuberculosis are the suggestive findings of intestinal tuberculosis. In the diagnosis of inflammatory disease or malignant tumor of gastrointestinal tract, the possibility of tuberculosis should be borne in mind, and vice versa.

  14. Childhood Tuberculosis in Nigeria: Disease Presentation and Treatment Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidubem L Ogbudebe

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Understanding the factors that influence tuberculosis (TB treatment outcomes in children is key to designing interventions to address them. This study aimed to determine the case category distribution of childhood TB in Nigeria and assess which clinical and demographic factors are associated with different treatment outcomes in childhood TB. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective cohort study involving a review of medical records of children (0-14 years with TB in 3 states in Nigeria in 2015. Results: Of 724 childhood TB cases registered during the review period, 220 (30.4% were aged 0–4 years. A high proportion of patients had pulmonary TB 420/724 (58.0%, new TB infection 713/724 (98.5%, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV coinfection 108/724 (14.7%. About 28% (n = 201 were bacteriologically diagnosed. The proportion of TB treatment success was 601/724 (83.0%. Treatment success was significantly higher in children aged 5–14 years than those 0–4 years (85.3% vs 77.7%, P  = .01. Factors associated with unsuccessful outcomes in patients aged 0–4 years are male sex (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.2, HIV-positive status (aOR: 1.2, and clinical method of diagnosis (aOR: 5.6. Conclusions: Efforts should be made to improve TB treatment outcomes in children by ensuring early and accurate diagnosis, focused training of health workers on childhood TB-HIV care, and effective adherence counseling of caregivers.

  15. Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Patrick; Johnston, James

    2017-01-01

    Opinion statement The treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is an essential component of tuberculosis (TB) elimination in regions that have a low incidence of TB. However, the decision to treat individuals with LTBI must consider the limitations of current diagnostic tests for LTBI, the risk of developing active TB disease, the potential adverse effects from chemoprophylactic therapy, and the importance of treatment adherence. When an individual has been diagnosed with LTBI and ac...

  16. A Serum Circulating miRNA Signature for Short-Term Risk of Progression to Active Tuberculosis Among Household Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergal J. Duffy

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers that predict who among recently Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB-exposed individuals will progress to active tuberculosis are urgently needed. Intracellular microRNAs (miRNAs regulate the host response to MTB and circulating miRNAs (c-miRNAs have been developed as biomarkers for other diseases. We performed machine-learning analysis of c-miRNA measurements in the serum of adult household contacts (HHCs of TB index cases from South Africa and Uganda and developed a c-miRNA-based signature of risk for progression to active TB. This c-miRNA-based signature significantly discriminated HHCs within 6 months of progression to active disease from HHCs that remained healthy in an independent test set [ROC area under the ROC curve (AUC 0.74, progressors < 6 Mo to active TB and ROC AUC 0.66, up to 24 Mo to active TB], and complements the predictions of a previous cellular mRNA-based signature of TB risk.

  17. A Serum Circulating miRNA Signature for Short-Term Risk of Progression to Active Tuberculosis Among Household Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Fergal J; Thompson, Ethan; Downing, Katrina; Suliman, Sara; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Boom, W Henry; Thiel, Bonnie; Weiner Iii, January; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Dover, Drew; Tabb, David L; Dockrell, Hazel M; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Tromp, Gerard; Scriba, Thomas J; Zak, Daniel E; Walzl, Gerhard

    2018-01-01

    Biomarkers that predict who among recently Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-exposed individuals will progress to active tuberculosis are urgently needed. Intracellular microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate the host response to MTB and circulating miRNAs (c-miRNAs) have been developed as biomarkers for other diseases. We performed machine-learning analysis of c-miRNA measurements in the serum of adult household contacts (HHCs) of TB index cases from South Africa and Uganda and developed a c-miRNA-based signature of risk for progression to active TB. This c-miRNA-based signature significantly discriminated HHCs within 6 months of progression to active disease from HHCs that remained healthy in an independent test set [ROC area under the ROC curve (AUC) 0.74, progressors < 6 Mo to active TB and ROC AUC 0.66, up to 24 Mo to active TB], and complements the predictions of a previous cellular mRNA-based signature of TB risk.

  18. Comparison of clinical and laboratory findings between those with pulmonary tuberculosis and those with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanachartwet, Vipa; Desakorn, Varunee; Duangrithi, Duangjai; Chunpongthong, Pongsak; Phojanamongkolkij, Kamol; Jitruckthai, Pasakorn; Kasetjaroen, Yuttichai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee

    2014-01-01

    In tuberculosis endemic areas, patients with sputum positive for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) are usually diagnosed and treated for pulmonary tuberculosis. The diagnosis of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) lung disease is often ascertained only after lung disease progression occurs, increasing the risk of severe morbidity and mortality. We conducted a matched case-control study among a prospective cohort of 300 patients with newly diagnosed AFB-positive sputum in Thailand during 2010-2012. We compared clinical and laboratory parameters and outcomes among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, NTM lung disease and NTM colonization. A mycobacterial culture was performed in all patients. Ten patients with NTM lung disease were compared to 50 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 10 patients with NTM colonization. The presence of diabetes mellitus or human immunodeficiency virus infection, were associated with NTM lung disease (p = 0.030). Patients with NTM lung disease had a significantly lower body weight prior to treatment (p = 0.021), a higher body weight change from baseline (p = 0.038), and were more likely to have cavitations on chest radiograph (p = 0.033) than those with NTM colonization. In tuberculosis endemic areas, mycobacterial identification should be performed among patients with impaired immune function. NTM lung disease treatment should be considered in patients with NTM sputum isolates who have a history of significant weight loss or cavitations on chest radiography.

  19. Altered microRNA Signatures in Sputum of Patients with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Zhengjun; Fu, Yurong; Ji, Rui; Li, Ruifang; Guan, Zhiyu

    2012-01-01

    Role of microRNA (miRNA) has been highlighted in pathogen-host interactions recently. At present, their role in active pulmonary tuberculosis is unknown. The aim of the study was to delineate miRNA expression in sputum supernatant of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Expression of miRNAs was evaluated by microarray analysis and differentially expressed miRNAs were validated by RT-qPCR. Secreted cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 were measured by ELISA. We found that 95 miRNAs were differenti...

  20. Epidemiological patterns of Tuberculosis disease in the Babol, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Ghaffari-Fam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Almost one-third of the world’s population is at risk of exposure to tuberculosis (TB infection. The aim of this study is to describe some patterns of TB in the Babol, Iran, to analyze the current situation and to improve the care of these patients. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. The data were obtained from medical records pertained to patients with TB of Health Network of Babol County. The variables of interest were demographic characteristics and some clinical patterns. To describe data, indices such as mean ± SD and frequency (percent was used. Furthermore, analysis of the data was performed by inferential statistical techniques of chi-square, independent samples t-test, and one-way analysis of variance test. Results: Two hundred patients with TB were enrolled. The average age of cases were 47.51 years [standard deviation (SD = 21.36] and 58.5% of them were males. Age groups of 18-40 and over 60 years old comprised the majority of patients with TB 39.0 and 31.5%, respectively. The median interval time between beginning symptoms and confirmed diagnosis of TB was 56.5 days with interquartile range (IQR of 56 days. The greatest of the time interval of beginning symptoms and diagnosis belonged to the age group of below 7 years old. The greatest time interval from confirmed diagnosis to treatment pertained to the age groups of 18-40 and 7-18, respectively. In terms of pulmonary TB, 120 (80.0% were smear positive and 30 (20.0 smear negative. In terms of medicines given to the patients with TB, 181 (90.5% were completed the treatment and improved, 6 (3.0% absence of treatment, and 13 (6.5% died as a result of TB and other causes.Conclusion: This study showed that adults and elderly comprise the highest proportion of TB. The primary prevention and control programs for education and timely referral to the Health Network may be effective in diminishing the morbidity due to TB.

  1. [An example of partnership cooperation. Cantonal League against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases/Association "Das Band"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, E

    1984-01-01

    Together with the Cantonal League against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases of Zurich, the Association "Das Band" has organized a first course for parents of children with asthma. The course is a component of the associations new "Prophylaxis Program for Children with Asthma and Their Parents". By exchanging ideas, the parents should become able to reflect their situation, characterized by excessive protectionism, aggressiveness, and guiltiness, and they also should learn to accept the disease as a part of their daily life. The first course, which meanwhile is followed by a second one, provided a first base for the solution of the many problems.

  2. Impaired CXCR1-dependent oxidative defence in active tuberculosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaridah, Nader; Winqvist, Niclas; Håkansson, Gisela; Tenland, Erik; Rönnholm, Anna; Sturegård, Erik; Björkman, Per; Godaly, Gabriela

    2015-12-01

    Much of the pronounced host inflammatory response that occurs in tuberculosis (TB) is related to failed immunity against the invading pathogen. The G-protein coupled receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 are implicated in important signal transduction pathways in lung inflammatory responses. We investigated the expression and function of these receptors in a simple whole blood model from 24 patients with pulmonary TB and in subjects with latent TB infection (LTBI). Healthy controls were recruited from close contacts to the pulmonary index patients. We found that pulmonary TB patients had significantly increased CXCR1 expression on blood cells compared to LTBI subjects and controls (p microRNA-223 was increased in pulmonary TB patients compared to LTBI (p tuberculosis (Mtb). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Contagion and Cultural Perceptions of Accepted Behaviour : Tuberculosis and Venereal Diseases in Scandinavia c.1900–c.1950

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    Blom, Ida

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article compares legislation in the three Scandinavian countries on tuberculosis and venereal disease during the first half of the twentieth century. It attempts to highlight what was perceived as unacceptable behaviour that might cause disease and consequently legitimise public coercion. According to the letter of the laws all citizens should be treated in the same way. But in the case of tuberculosis unacceptable behaviour exposing an individual to public coercion was found with the poor population: Where venereal disease was concerned extra-marital sex was seen as the risk factor for all citizens. Still, the primary target groups were prostitutes and certain groups of young women. It is suggested that, pending further comparative research, national differences in legal provisions may be explained by the prevalence of the disease, by political and economic circumstances, and in the case of tuberculosis by different perceptions of the contagious nature of the disease.

  4. The risk factor of false-negative and false-positive for T-SPOT.TB in active tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Li; Li, Yan

    2018-02-01

    T-SPOT.TB is a promising diagnosis tool to identify both pulmonary tuberculosis and extrapulmonary tuberculosis, as well as latent tuberculosis; however, the factors that affect the results of T-SPOT.TB remains unclear. In this study, we aim to figure out the risk factor of T-SPOT.TB for active TB. A total of 349 patients were recruited between January 1st, 2016 and January 22st, 2017 at Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, including 98 subjects with TB and 251 subjects with non-TB disease, and received T-SPOT.TB (Oxford Immunotec Ltd). Statistics were analyzed by SPSS 19.0 using logistic regression. The overall specificity and sensitivity of the T-SPOT.TB was 92.83% (233/251; 95%CI 0.8872-0.9557) and 83.67% (82/98; 95%CI 0.7454-0.9010), respectively. Patients with tuberculous meningitis were more likely to have false-negative results (OR 17.4, 95%CI 3.068-98.671; P.05). Tuberculous meningitis was a risk factor of false-negative for T-SPOT.TB, while cured TB was a risk factor of false-positive. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Hyperthermostable binding molecules on phage: Assay components for point-of-care diagnostics for active tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ning; Spencer, John; Schmitt, Margaret A; Fisk, John D

    2017-03-15

    Tuberculosis is the leading cause of death from infectious disease worldwide. The low sensitivity, extended processing time, and high expense of current diagnostics are major challenges to the detection and treatment of tuberculosis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis ornithine transcarbamylase (Mtb OTC, Rv1656) has been identified in the urine of patients with active TB infection and is a promising target for point-of-care diagnostics. Specific binding proteins with low nanomolar affinities for Mtb OTC were selected from a phage display library built upon a hyperthermostable Sso7d scaffold. Phage particles displaying Sso7d variants were utilized to generate a sandwich ELISA-based assay for Mtb OTC. The assay response is linear between 2 ng/mL and 125 ng/mL recombinant Mtb OTC and has a limit of detection of 400 pg/mL recombinant Mtb OTC. The assay employing a phage-based detection reagent is comparable to commercially-available antibody-based biosensors. Importantly, the assay maintains functionality at both neutral and basic pH in presence of salt and urea over the range of concentrations typical for human urine. Phage-based diagnostic systems may feature improved physical stability and cost of production relative to traditional antibody-based reagents, without sacrificing specificity and sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tuberculosis disease mapping in Kedah using standardized morbidity ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diah, Ijlal Mohd; Aziz, Nazrina; Kasim, Maznah Mat

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the results of relative risk estimation that applied to TB data in Kedah using the most common approach, Standardized Morbidity Ratio (SMR). Disease mapping has been recognized as one of the methods that can be used by government and public health in order to control diseases since it can give a clear picture of the risk areas. To get good disease mapping, relative risk estimation is an important issue that need to be considered. TB risk areas will be recognized through the map. From the result, Kulim shows the lowest risk areas of contracting TB while Kota Setar has the highest risk area.

  7. [Spanish Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases guidelines on tuberculosis in pregnant women and neonates (ii): Prophylaxis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquero-Artigao, F; Mellado Peña, M J; del Rosal Rabes, T; Noguera Julián, A; Goncé Mellgren, A; de la Calle Fernández-Miranda, M; Navarro Gómez, M L

    2015-10-01

    In pregnant women who have been exposed to tuberculosis (TB), primary isoniazid prophylaxis is only recommended in cases of immunosuppression, chronic medical conditions or obstetric risk factors, and close and sustained contact with a patient with infectious TB. Isoniazid prophylaxis for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is recommended in women who have close contact with an infectious TB patient or have risk factors for progression to active disease. Otherwise, it should be delayed until at least three weeks after delivery. Treatment of TB disease during pregnancy is the same as for the general adult population. Infants born to mothers with disseminated or extrapulmonary TB in pregnancy, with active TB at delivery, or with postnatal exposure to TB, should undergo a complete diagnostic evaluation. Primary isoniazid prophylaxis for at least 12 weeks is recommended for those with negative diagnostic tests and no evidence of disease. Repeated negative diagnostic tests are mandatory before interrupting prophylaxis. Isoniazid for 9 months is recommended in LTBI. Treatment of neonatal TB disease is similar to that of older children, but should be maintained for at least 9 months. Respiratory isolation is recommended in congenital TB, and in postnatal TB with positive gastric or bronchial aspirate acid-fast smears. Separation of mother and infant is only necessary when the mother has received treatment for less than 2 weeks, is sputum smear-positive, or has drug-resistant TB. Breastfeeding is not contraindicated, and in case of mother-infant separation expressed breast milk feeding is recommended. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. A bacterial cyclic dinucleotide activates the cytosolic surveillance pathway and mediates innate resistance to tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Bappaditya; Dey, Ruchi Jain; Cheung, Laurene S; Pokkali, Supriya; Guo, Haidan; Lee, Jong-Hee; Bishai, William R

    2015-04-01

    Detection of cyclic-di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP), a bacterial second messenger, by the host cytoplasmic surveillance pathway (CSP) is known to elicit type I interferon (IFN) responses, which are crucial to antimicrobial defense. However, the mechanisms and role of c-di-AMP signaling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence remain unclear. Here we show that resistance to tuberculosis requires CSP-mediated detection of c-di-AMP produced by M. tuberculosis and that levels of c-di-AMP modulate the fate of infection. We found that a di-adenylate cyclase (disA or dacA)-overexpressing M. tuberculosis strain that secretes excess c-di-AMP activates the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) pathway with enhanced levels of IFN-β, elicits increased macrophage autophagy, and exhibits substantial virulence attenuation in mice. We show that c-di-AMP-mediated IFN-β induction during M. tuberculosis infection requires stimulator of interferon genes (STING)-signaling. We observed that c-di-AMP induction of IFN-β is independent of the cytosolic nucleic acid receptor cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS), but cGAS nevertheless contributes substantially to the overall IFN-β response to M. tuberculosis infection. In sum, our results reveal c-di-AMP to be a key mycobacterial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) driving host type I IFN responses and autophagy. These findings suggest that modulating the levels of this small molecule may lead to novel immunotherapeutic strategies against tuberculosis.

  9. 38 CFR 3.372 - Initial grant following inactivity of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... inactivity of tuberculosis. 3.372 Section 3.372 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.372 Initial grant following inactivity of tuberculosis. When... tuberculosis and there is satisfactory evidence that the condition was active previously but is now inactive...

  10. Tuberculose pulmonar: achados na tomografia computadorizada de alta resolução do tórax em pacientes com doença em atividade comprovada bacteriologicamente Pulmonary tuberculosis: findings on high resolution computerized tomography of active disease on patients with bacteriological confirmation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTIANE ALÓ CAMPOS

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Descrever os achados em pacientes com tuberculose pulmonar em atividade na tomografia computadorizada de alta resolução e o padrão de distribuição das lesões pelo parênquima pulmonar. Casuística e método: Foram analisadas retrospectivamente as tomografias de alta resolução de 42 pacientes com diagnóstico bacteriológico de tuberculose pulmonar ou forte suspeita clínica, com posterior confirmação bacteriológica. Resultados: Os principais sinais sugestivos de atividade encontrados foram nódulos do espaço aéreo (83%, nódulos centrolobulares (74%, aspecto de árvore em brotamento (67%, cavitações (67%, espessamento das paredes brônquicas (55%, consolidações (48%, opacidade em vidro fosco (21%, e espessamento do interstício pulmonar (9%. Conclusão: A tomografia computadorizada de alta resolução do tórax pode sugerir fortemente atividade da doença, sendo particularmente útil nos pacientes com baciloscopias negativas e/ou radiografias indeterminadas, permitindo a instituição de tratamento adequado, antes mesmo do crescimento da micobactéria em meio de cultura.Background: The aim of this study was to describe the signs of active tuberculosis in patients submitted to high resolution computerized tomography and the distribution of lesions along the pulmonary parenchyma. Material and methods: The high resolution CTs performed on 42 patients with tuberculosis either bacteriologically diagnosed or clinical suspected and later confirmed by bacteriological tests were studied. Results: The signs of disease activity observed were airspace nodule (83%, centrilobular nodule (74%, tree-in-bud pattern (67%, cavitations (67%, bronchial thickening (55%, parenchymal consolidations (48%, ground glass opacity (21% and thickening of the inter and intralobular septa (9%. Conclusion: High resolution computed tomography can be strongly suggestive of disease activity, is particularly helpful in patients with negative smear and

  11. Essential and toxic metals in serum of individuals with active pulmonary tuberculosis in an endemic region

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    Zahra Sepehri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Trace elements play an important role in tuberculosis infection because their deficiencies can be associated with impaired immunity. Blood samples were collected from a total of 320 active pulmonary tuberculosis patients and healthy individuals. The serum concentrations of Zinc, Iron, Copper, Calcium, lead, Arsenic and Selenium were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry. The levels of trace elements were measured after 2, 4 and 6 months of anti-TB treatment initiation in TB infected groups. Compared to the control group, the concentrations of Zinc, Selenium, and Iron were significantly lower (P< 0.001 in tuberculosis patients; however, that of Arsenic, Lead, and copper was significantly higher (P< 0.001 in the serum of patients. Cu/Zn and Cu/Se ratios were also significantly higher (P< 0.001 in TB patients compared to the control group. In addition, serum concentration calcium was similar in both TB patients and healthy controls. Our results indicated that trace elements concentrations in tuberculosis patients are related to each element role in immune system. Wherever the element is essential for the pathogenesis of bacteria, its concentration will remain low; and contrariwise, when the element is toxic for the bacteria, its level will be regulated up to provide a perfect condition for bacterial growth. Keywords: Trace elements, Blood, Atomic absorption spectroscopy, Sistan, Pulmonary tuberculosis, Trace elements, Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, Sistan

  12. Adopted Korean woman with symptoms of cystitis – Delayed diagnosis of tuberculosis leading to disseminated disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mose M

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of miliary tuberculosis (TB in an adopted woman that developed following delayed diagnosis of presumed urogenital TB. The patient had a two year history of urological symptoms, diagnosed as interstitial cystitis and treated with cyclosporine. At admission, she presented with symptoms of pyelonephritis. Neck stiffness led to lumbar puncture that showed pleocytosis with lymphocytic predominance, high protein and low glucose levels, suggestive of TB meningitis. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans showed nodular lung changes, lumbar spine destructive lesions, a unilateral kidney abscess and a parietal lobe tuberculoma. Urine and cerebrospinal fluids were positive for TB by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and culture. The patient developed complications in the form of hydrocephalus. She was treated with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt and four drug anti-tuberculosis therapy. She was discharged to neurorehabilitation on continued anti-tuberculosis treatment, developing longer term sequelae in the form of severe cognitive disabilities. This case emphasizes the importance of continuing to include TB in the differential diagnosis of a variety of diseases, particularly in patients at possible increased risk of infection, and highlights the potentially serious consequences of delayed or missed TB diagnosis.

  13. Modelling Status Food Security Households Disease Sufferers Pulmonary Tuberculosis Uses the Method Regression Logistics Binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulandari, S. P.; Salamah, M.; Rositawati, A. F. D.

    2018-04-01

    Food security is the condition where the food fulfilment is managed well for the country till the individual. Indonesia is one of the country which has the commitment to create the food security becomes main priority. However, the food necessity becomes common thing means that it doesn’t care about nutrient standard and the health condition of family member, so in the fulfilment of food necessity also has to consider the disease suffered by the family member, one of them is pulmonary tuberculosa. From that reasons, this research is conducted to know the factors which influence on household food security status which suffered from pulmonary tuberculosis in the coastal area of Surabaya by using binary logistic regression method. The analysis result by using binary logistic regression shows that the variables wife latest education, house density and spacious house ventilation significantly affect on household food security status which suffered from pulmonary tuberculosis in the coastal area of Surabaya, where the wife education level is University/equivalent, the house density is eligible or 8 m2/person and spacious house ventilation 10% of the floor area has the opportunity to become food secure households amounted to 0.911089. While the chance of becoming food insecure households amounted to 0.088911. The model household food security status which suffered from pulmonary tuberculosis in the coastal area of Surabaya has been conformable, and the overall percentages of those classifications are at 71.8%.

  14. Most Influential Literature in Spinal Tuberculosis: A Global Disease Without Global Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Michael; Castelein, Sophie; Bruins, Marie-Fien; Laubscher, Maritz; Dunn, Robert; Keel, Marius; Ahmad, Sufian; Hoppe, Sven

    2018-02-01

    Bibliometric review of the literature. This bibliometric analysis aims to give an overview of the most influential academic literature written on spinal tuberculosis. All databases included in the Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge were searched for the most influential publications in spinal tuberculosis. The most cited articles published between 1950 and 2015, with the main focus on orthopedic surgery, were identified using a multistep approach, and a total of 100 articles were included. The publications were then analyzed in this bibliometric analysis. The number of citations ranged from 243 to 36, with an average of 77.11. The articles were published in 34 different journals, and the studies were conducted in 20 different countries. The top 3 countries, India, the United States, and China, published a total of 51% (n = 51) of all articles. Low-burden countries produced 60% (n = 60) of all articles in our list. African centers produced only 4% (n = 4) of all included articles. Indian and Chinese researchers dominate evidence in spinal tuberculosis. Other areas with high disease burden, such as Africa, do not feature. Most publications are retrospective studies with a low level of evidence.

  15. Quorum Sensing Extracellular Death Peptides Enhance the Endoribonucleolytic Activities of Mycobacterium tuberculosis MazF Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Akanksha; Kumar, Sathish

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT mazEF is a toxin-antitoxin module located on chromosomes of most bacteria. MazF toxins are endoribonucleases antagonized by MazE antitoxins. Previously, we characterized several quorum sensing peptides called "extracellular death factors" (EDFs). When secreted from bacterial cultures, EDFs induce interspecies cell death. EDFs also enhance the endoribonucleolytic activity of Escherichia coli MazF. Mycobacterium tuberculosis carries several mazEF modules. Among them, the endoribonucleolytic activities of MazF proteins mt-1, mt-3, and mt-6 were identified. MazF-mt6 and MazF-mt-3 cleave M. tuberculosis rRNAs. Here we report the in vitro effects of EDFs on the endoribonucleolytic activities of M. tuberculosis MazFs. Escherichia coli EDF (EcEDF) and the three Pseudomonas aeruginosa EDFs (PaEDFs) individually enhance the endoribonucleolytic activities of MazF-mt6 and MazF-mt3 and overcome the inhibitory effect of MazE-mt3 or MazE-mt6 on the endoribonucleolytic activities of the respective toxins. We propose that these EDFs can serve as a basis for a novel class of antibiotics against M. tuberculosis. PMID:29717013

  16. Tuberculosis at the human-animal interface: an emerging disease of elephants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikota, Susan K; Maslow, Joel N

    2011-05-01

    Over the past 15 years, cases of infection with organisms of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex have been diagnosed among captive elephants in the United States and worldwide. Outbreak investigations have documented that among staff employed at facilities housing infected animals, skin test conversion to purified protein derivative have been documented. Clonal spread among animals in close contact and even inter-species spread between elephant and human has been documented. Detection of actively infected animals relies on samples obtained by trunk wash. Diagnosis has been augmented by the development of a multi-antigen serologic assay with excellent specificity and sensitivity. Treatment regimens are still in development with efficacy largely unknown due to a paucity of both premortem follow-up and necropsy data of treated animals. The epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis in elephants require additional careful study of clinical data. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modifiable factors associated with active pulmonary tuberculosis in a Kenyan prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amwayi, A S; Kikuvi, G M; Muchiri, E M

    2010-02-01

    To establish modifiable factors associated with active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) among prisoners. Retrospective matched case-control study. Nakuru GK prison in Kenya. A total of 144 subjects (48 cases and 96 controls) were recruited into the study. Cases were adult prisoners who had at least two initial sputum specimens being Acid Fast Bacilli-positive (AFB+) on direct smear microscopy and hence recruited to PTB WHO DOTS Programme. Controls were adults with no chronic cough and not on PTB treatment six months prior to the study. Independent factors significantly associated with active PTB disease were: self reported HIV+ status (OR=11; 95% CI = 2.42-47.77), evidence of BCG vaccination (OR = 0.20; 95% CI = 0.05-0.60), contact with PTB case (OR = 7.0; 95% CI = 1.17-38.23), unemployment (OR = 9.0; 95% CI = 1.84-43.97) and sharing linen (OR = 4.32; 95%CI = 1.08-17.29). Modifiable factors associated with active PTB in Nakuru G.K prison are: HIV status, BCG vaccination, PTB case contact, poverty and poor personal hygiene. We recommend HIV counselling and testing of all PTB patients, screening for TB upon prison entry and TB contact investigation and improving personal hygiene of prisoners.

  18. Re-activation of bovine tuberculosis in a patient treated with infliximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Vang; Thomsen, V Ø; Sørensen, Inge Juul

    2008-01-01

    Treatment with tumour necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors increases the risk of tuberculosis (TB). Screening for latent TB infection (LTBI) and prophylactic treatment has become mandatory. A 79-yr-old female with a history of severe erosive sero-positive rheumatoid arthritis was screened for LTBI......-infected cattle. Re-activation of bovine tuberculosis is a risk in people with recent or previous exposure to unpasteurised dairy products. The QuantiFERON-TB test has the potential to detect Mycobacterium bovis infection. Indeterminate test results reflect either anergy, due to poor immunity, or technical...... problems and should be cautiously interpreted and as a minimum be repeated. Studies are ongoing to determine the role of QuantiFERON-TB testing in the screening for latent tuberculosis infection....

  19. Identification of 2-aminothiazole-4-carboxylate derivatives active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and the beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase mtFabH.

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    Qosay Al-Balas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB is a disease which kills two million people every year and infects approximately over one-third of the world's population. The difficulty in managing tuberculosis is the prolonged treatment duration, the emergence of drug resistance and co-infection with HIV/AIDS. Tuberculosis control requires new drugs that act at novel drug targets to help combat resistant forms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and reduce treatment duration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our approach was to modify the naturally occurring and synthetically challenging antibiotic thiolactomycin (TLM to the more tractable 2-aminothiazole-4-carboxylate scaffold to generate compounds that mimic TLM's novel mode of action. We report here the identification of a series of compounds possessing excellent activity against M. tuberculosis H(37R(v and, dissociatively, against the beta-ketoacyl synthase enzyme mtFabH which is targeted by TLM. Specifically, methyl 2-amino-5-benzylthiazole-4-carboxylate was found to inhibit M. tuberculosis H(37R(v with an MIC of 0.06 microg/ml (240 nM, but showed no activity against mtFabH, whereas methyl 2-(2-bromoacetamido-5-(3-chlorophenylthiazole-4-carboxylate inhibited mtFabH with an IC(50 of 0.95+/-0.05 microg/ml (2.43+/-0.13 microM but was not active against the whole cell organism. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings clearly identify the 2-aminothiazole-4-carboxylate scaffold as a promising new template towards the discovery of a new class of anti-tubercular agents.

  20. Genome-Based In Silico Identification of New Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens Activating Polyfunctional CD8+ T Cells in Human Tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Sheila Tuyet; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; Caccamo, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    8(+) T cell proliferation assays (CFSE dilution) in 41 M. tuberculosis-responsive donors identified 70 new M. tuberculosis epitopes. Using HLA/peptide tetramers for the 18 most prominently recognized HLA-A*0201-binding M. tuberculosis peptides, recognition by cured TB patients' CD8(+) T cells......-epitope/Ag repertoire for human CD8(+) T cells is much broader than hitherto suspected, and the newly identified M. tuberculosis Ags are recognized by (poly) functional CD8(+) T cells during control of infection. These results impact on TB-vaccine design and biomarker identification. The Journal of Immunology, 2011...

  1. The role of receptor-mediated T-cells activation disorders in pulmonary tuberculosis

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    Irina E. Esimova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze the peculiarities and mechanisms of receptor-mediated T-lymphocytes disorders in different clinical forms of pulmonary tuberculosis.Materials and мethods. The study involved 116 patients with first diagnosed infiltrative and disseminated drug-sensitive and drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis. The key stages in receptor-mediated activation of T-lymphocytes, isolated from blood, after their CD3/CD28-induction in vitro with addition of intracellular transport blocker were analyzed. Their immunotyping was carried out with the method of two- and threecolor flow cytofluorometry. The obtained results were statistically analyzed.Results. The breach of extracellular and intracellular stages of T-lymphocytes activation, shown by reduction in total number of CD3- and CD28-positive cells, and CD3+CD28+IL2+, CD3+CD28+IL2–, CD3+NF-kB+, CD3+NFAT2+ lymphocytes, and increase in number of CD3+CTLA4+ cells, was identified with most of their manifestations in disseminated drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis. It was shown that the content of CD3+AP-1+ lymphocytes is variable in drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis: it increases in the infiltrative form and decreases in the disseminated form.Conclusion. The results showed different mechanisms leading to a deficiency of IL-2-positive lymphocytes and T-lymphocytopenia: from “functional reserve” exhaustion of T-cells in drug-sensitive pulmonary tuberculosis to immunosuppression under the influence of suppressive cytokines (in case of the infiltrative form and inhibitory protein CTLA4 (in case of the disseminated form in drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis

  2. Transcriptional blood signatures distinguish pulmonary tuberculosis, pulmonary sarcoidosis, pneumonias and lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Chloe I; Graham, Christine M; Berry, Matthew P R; Rozakeas, Fotini; Redford, Paul S; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Zhaohui; Wilkinson, Katalin A; Wilkinson, Robert J; Kendrick, Yvonne; Devouassoux, Gilles; Ferry, Tristan; Miyara, Makoto; Bouvry, Diane; Valeyre, Dominique; Dominique, Valeyre; Gorochov, Guy; Blankenship, Derek; Saadatian, Mitra; Vanhems, Phillip; Beynon, Huw; Vancheeswaran, Rama; Wickremasinghe, Melissa; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Pascual, Virginia; Ho, Ling-Pei; Lipman, Marc; O'Garra, Anne

    2013-01-01

    New approaches to define factors underlying the immunopathogenesis of pulmonary diseases including sarcoidosis and tuberculosis are needed to develop new treatments and biomarkers. Comparing the blood transcriptional response of tuberculosis to other similar pulmonary diseases will advance knowledge of disease pathways and help distinguish diseases with similar clinical presentations. To determine the factors underlying the immunopathogenesis of the granulomatous diseases, sarcoidosis and tuberculosis, by comparing the blood transcriptional responses in these and other pulmonary diseases. We compared whole blood genome-wide transcriptional profiles in pulmonary sarcoidosis, pulmonary tuberculosis, to community acquired pneumonia and primary lung cancer and healthy controls, before and after treatment, and in purified leucocyte populations. An Interferon-inducible neutrophil-driven blood transcriptional signature was present in both sarcoidosis and tuberculosis, with a higher abundance and expression in tuberculosis. Heterogeneity of the sarcoidosis signature correlated significantly with disease activity. Transcriptional profiles in pneumonia and lung cancer revealed an over-abundance of inflammatory transcripts. After successful treatment the transcriptional activity in tuberculosis and pneumonia patients was significantly reduced. However the glucocorticoid-responsive sarcoidosis patients showed a significant increase in transcriptional activity. 144-blood transcripts were able to distinguish tuberculosis from other lung diseases and controls. Tuberculosis and sarcoidosis revealed similar blood transcriptional profiles, dominated by interferon-inducible transcripts, while pneumonia and lung cancer showed distinct signatures, dominated by inflammatory genes. There were also significant differences between tuberculosis and sarcoidosis in the degree of their transcriptional activity, the heterogeneity of their profiles and their transcriptional response to treatment.

  3. A Rare Case of Pott's Disease (Spinal Tuberculosis) Mimicking Metastatic Disease in the Southern Region of Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanagic, Azra; Emamifar, Amir; Christian Bang, Jacob; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2016-06-07

    Pott's disease (PD) or spinal tuberculosis is a rare condition which accounts for less than 1% of total tuberculosis (TB) cases. The incidence of PD has recently increased in Europe and the United States, mainly due to immigration; however, it is still a rare diagnosis in Scandinavian countries, and if overlooked it might lead to significant neurologic complications. A 78-year-old woman, originally from Eastern Europe, presented to the emergency department with a complaint of nausea, vomiting, weight loss, and severe back pain. On admission she was febrile and had leukocytosis and increased C-reactive protein. Initial spinal x-ray was performed and revealed osteolytic changes in the vertebral body of T11 and T12. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine illustrated spondylitis of T10, T11, and T12, with multiple paravertebral and epidural abscesses, which was suggestive of PD. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the patient's gastric fluid was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT). Based on MRI and PCR findings, standard treatment for TB was initiated. Results of the spine biopsy and culture showed colonies of MT and confirmed the diagnosis afterwards. Due to the instability of the spine and severe and continuous pain, spine-stabilizing surgery was performed. Her TB was cured after nine months of treatment. PD is an important differential diagnosis of malignancy that should be diagnosed instantly. History of exposure to TB and classic radiologic finding can help make the diagnosis.

  4. The use of mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing and whole genome sequencing to inform tuberculosis prevention and control activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2013-07-01

    Molecular strain typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been possible for only about 20 years; it has significantly improved our understanding of the evolution and epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and tuberculosis disease. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing, based on 24 variable number tandem repeat unit loci, is highly discriminatory, relatively easy to perform and interpret and is currently the most widely used molecular typing system for tuberculosis surveillance. Nevertheless, clusters identified by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing sometimes cannot be confirmed or adequately defined by contact tracing and additional methods are needed. Recently, whole genome sequencing has been used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms and other mutations, between genotypically indistinguishable isolates from the same cluster, to more accurately trace transmission pathways. Rapidly increasing speed and quality and reduced costs will soon make large scale whole genome sequencing feasible, combined with the use of sophisticated bioinformatics tools, for epidemiological surveillance of tuberculosis.

  5. Expanding the epidemiologic profile: risk factors for active tuberculosis in people immigrating to Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobeser, Wendy L.; Yuan, Lilian; Naus, Monika; Corey, Paul; Edelson, Jeff; Heywood, Neil; Holness, D. Linn

    2000-01-01

    Background Many people immigrating to Canada come from countries with a high burden of tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to develop a detailed epidemiologic profile of foreign-born people with tuberculosis living in Ontario. Methods In this population-based case-control study, cases of tuberculosis diagnosed in 1994-1995 were identified from the database of the Ontario Reportable Disease Information Service and were considered eligible for analysis if a record of landing (receipt of permission to establish residence in Canada) from the period 1986-1995 was found in the Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) database, if the person was at least 11 years of age at the time their visa was issued, and if the person had not been diagnosed with tuberculosis before becoming legally landed in Canada. Control subjects, who met the same criteria as the case subjects but who did not have tuberculosis in 1994-1995, were identified from a CIC database for landed immigrants. Results A total of 1341 cases of tuberculosis in foreign-born people were reported in Ontario in 1994-1995. A record of landing was found in CIC databases for 1099 of these people, 224 of whom were not legally landed at the time of diagnosis. In total, 602 cases met the inclusion criteria. The 2 strongest determinants of risk among those who had become landed within the preceding 10 years were referral for medical surveillance by immigration officials (odds ratio [OR] 3.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.6-6.0) and world region of origin (Somalia [OR 67.7, 95% CI 31.3-154.9], Vietnam [OR 25.0, 95% CI 12.5-50.0], the Philippines [OR 11.9, 95% CI 6.0-23.3], other sub-Saharan African countries [OR 11.6, 95% CI 5.7-23.2], India [OR 9.7, 95% CI 4.9-18.9], China [OR 6.1, 95% CI 3.1-12.1], other Asian countries [OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.4-9.1], the Middle East [OR 4.1, 95% CI 2.0-8.3], Latin America [OR 1.9, 95% CI 0.9-3.8), and the former socialist countries of Europe [OR 1.8, 95% CI 0.8-3.8]; the reference

  6. Chronic helminth infections may negatively influence immunity against tuberculosis and other diseases of public health importance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elias, Daniel; Britton, Sven; Kassu, Afework

    2007-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has once again become a major public health threat owing to the combined effects of deteriorating socioeconomic situations and the emergence of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The only vaccine available against TB, although effective in reducing the burden of childhood TB, shows enormous...... variability in its efficacy against pulmonary TB, which is the most common form of the disease in adults. Most areas of high TB incidence and poor TB vaccine efficacy have a high prevalence of intestinal helminth infections. Such infections have been shown to cause a range of immunomodulation characterized...

  7. Enhancement of antibiotic activity by efflux inhibitors against multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane eCoelho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistant tuberculosis continues to increase and new approaches for its treatment are necessary. The identification of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates presenting efflux as part of their resistant phenotype has a major impact in tuberculosis treatment. In this work, we used a checkerboard procedure combined with the tetrazolium microplate-based assay (TEMA to study single combinations between antituberculosis drugs and efflux inhibitors (EIs against multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis clinical isolates using the fully susceptible strain H37Rv as reference. Efflux activity was studied on a real-time basis by a fluorometric method that uses ethidium bromide as efflux substrate. Quantification of efflux pump genes mRNA transcriptional levels were performed by RT-qPCR. The fractional inhibitory concentrations (FIC indicated synergistic activity for the interactions between isoniazid, rifampicin, amikacin, ofloxacin, and ethidium bromide plus the EIs verapamil, thioridazine and chlorpromazine. The FICs ranged from 0.25, indicating a four-fold reduction on the MICs, to 0.015, 64-fold reduction. The detection of active efflux by real-time fluorometry showed that all strains presented intrinsic efflux activity that contributes to the overall resistance which can be inhibited in the presence of the EIs. The quantification of the mRNA levels of the most important efflux pump genes on these strains shows that they are intrinsically predisposed to expel toxic compounds as the exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics were not necessary to increase the pump mRNA levels when compared with the non-exposed counterpart. The results obtained in this study confirm that the intrinsic efflux activity contributes to the overall resistance in multidrug resistant clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis and that the inhibition of efflux pumps by the EIs can enhance the clinical effect of antibiotics that are their substrates.

  8. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation decreases survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

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    Xiyuan Bai

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB. However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy.

  9. Active tuberculosis among homeless persons, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 1998-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kamran; Rea, Elizabeth; McDermaid, Cameron; Stuart, Rebecca; Chambers, Catharine; Wang, Jun; Chan, Angie; Gardam, Michael; Jamieson, Frances; Yang, Jae; Hwang, Stephen W

    2011-03-01

    While tuberculosis (TB) in Canadian cities is increasingly affecting foreign-born persons, homeless persons remain at high risk. To assess trends in TB, we studied all homeless persons in Toronto who had a diagnosis of active TB during 1998-2007. We compared Canada-born and foreign-born homeless persons and assessed changes over time. We identified 91 homeless persons with active TB; they typically had highly contagious, advanced disease, and 19% died within 12 months of diagnosis. The proportion of homeless persons who were foreign-born increased from 24% in 1998-2002 to 39% in 2003-2007. Among foreign-born homeless persons with TB, 56% of infections were caused by strains not known to circulate among homeless persons in Toronto. Only 2% of infections were resistant to first-line TB medications. The rise in foreign-born homeless persons with TB strains likely acquired overseas suggests that the risk for drug-resistant strains entering the homeless shelter system may be escalating.

  10. Tuberculosis verrucosa cutis

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    Krishnabharath S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of 23-year-old male patient with tuberculosis verrucous cutis on the foot for a duration of six months without responding to routine treatment. Tuberculosis is a common disease worldwide. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis contributes to 10% of cases. Cutaneous tuberculosis occupies a small spectrum of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Tuberculosis verrucosa cutis is an exogenous infection occurring in a previously sensitized patient by direct inoculation of the organism. It occurs in sensitized patients with a moderate to high immune response. The diagnosis in our patient was confirmed by history, clinical examination, histopathological examination and the patient’s response to anti-tuberculous therapy.

  11. Impaired pulmonary function after treatment for tuberculosis: the end of the disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chushkin, Mikhail Ivanovich; Ots, Oleg Nikolayevich

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of pulmonary function abnormalities and to investigate the factors affecting lung function in patients treated for pulmonary tuberculosis. A total of 214 consecutive patients (132 men and 82 women; 20-82 years of age), treated for pulmonary tuberculosis and followed at a local dispensary, underwent spirometry and plethysmography at least one year after treatment. Pulmonary impairment was present in 102 (47.7%) of the 214 patients evaluated. The most common functional alteration was obstructive lung disease (seen in 34.6%). Of the 214 patients, 60 (28.0%) showed reduced pulmonary function (FEV1 below the lower limit of normal). Risk factors for reduced pulmonary function were having had culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in the past, being over 50 years of age, having recurrent tuberculosis, and having a lower level of education. Nearly half of all tuberculosis patients evolve to impaired pulmonary function. That underscores the need for pulmonary function testing after the end of treatment. Avaliar a prevalência de alterações da função pulmonar e investigar os fatores que afetam a função pulmonar em pacientes tratados para tuberculose pulmonar. Um total de 214 pacientes consecutivos (132 homens e 82 mulheres; 20-82 anos de idade), tratados para tuberculose pulmonar e acompanhados em um dispensário local, foi submetido a espirometria e pletismografia pelo menos um ano após o tratamento. O comprometimento pulmonar estava presente em 102 (47,7%) dos 214 pacientes avaliados. A alteração funcional mais comum foi o distúrbio ventilatório obstrutivo (observado em 34,6%). Dos 214 pacientes, 60 (28,0%) apresentaram função pulmonar reduzida (VEF1 abaixo do limite inferior de normalidade). Os fatores de risco para função pulmonar reduzida foram tuberculose pulmonar com cultura positiva no passado, idade acima de 50 anos, recidiva de tuberculose e menor nível de escolaridade. Quase metade de todos os pacientes com tuberculose

  12. Active case finding and treatment adherence in risk groups in the tuberculosis pre-elimination era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R K; Lipman, M; Story, A; Hayward, A; de Vries, G; van Hest, R; Erkens, C; Rangaka, M X; Abubakar, I

    2018-05-01

    Vulnerable populations, including homeless persons, high-risk drug and alcohol users, prison inmates and other marginalised populations, contribute a disproportionate burden of tuberculosis (TB) cases in low-incidence settings. Drivers of this disease burden include an increased risk of both TB transmission in congregate settings, and progression from infection to active disease. Late diagnosis and poor treatment completion further propagate the epidemic and fuel the acquisition of drug resistance. These groups are therefore a major priority for TB control programmes in low-incidence settings. Targeted strategies include active case finding (ACF) initiatives and interventions to improve treatment completion, both of which should be tailored to local populations. ACF usually deploys mobile X-ray unit screening, which allows sensitive, high-throughput screening with immediate availability of results. Such initiatives have been found to be effective and cost-effective, and associated with reductions in proxy measures of transmission in hard-to-reach groups. The addition of point-of-care molecular diagnostics and automated X-ray readers may further streamline the screening pathway. There is little evidence to support interventions to improve adherence among these risk groups. Such approaches include enhanced case management and directly observed treatment, while video-observed therapy (currently under evaluation) appears to be a promising tool for the future. Integrating outreach services to include both case detection and case-management interventions that share a resource infrastructure may allow cost-effectiveness to be maximised. Integrating screening and treatment for other diseases that are prevalent among targeted risk groups into TB outreach interventions may further improve cost-effectiveness. This article reviews the existing literature, and highlights priorities for further research.

  13. M. tuberculosis induces potent activation of IDO-1, but this is not essential for the immunological control of infection.

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    Antje Blumenthal

    Full Text Available Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenesae-1 (IDO-1 catalyses the initial, rate-limiting step in tryptophan metabolism, thereby regulating tryptophan availability and the formation of downstream metabolites, including picolinic and quinolinic acid. We found that Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection induced marked upregulation of IDO-1 expression in both human and murine macrophages in vitro and in the lungs of mice following aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis. The absence of IDO-1 in dendritic cells enhanced the activation of mycobacteria-specific T cells in vitro. Interestingly, IDO-1-deficiency during M. tuberculosis infection in mice was not associated with altered mycobacteria-specific T cell responses in vivo. The bacterial burden of infected organs, pulmonary inflammatory responses, and survival were also comparable in M. tuberculosis-infected IDO-1 deficient and wild type animals. Tryptophan is metabolised into either picolinic acid or quinolinic acid, but only picolinic acid inhibited the growth of M. tuberculosis in vitro. By contrast macrophages infected with pathogenic mycobacteria, produced quinolinic, rather than picolinic acid, which did not reduce M. tuberculosis growth in vitro. Therefore, although M. tuberculosis induces robust expression of IDO-1 and activation of tryptophan metabolism, IDO-1-deficiency fails to impact on the immune control and the outcome of the infection in the mouse model of tuberculosis.

  14. Role of digital tomosynthesis and dual energy subtraction digital radiography in detection of parenchymal lesions in active pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Madhurima; Sandhu, Manavjit Singh; Gorsi, Ujjwal; Gupta, Dheeraj; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Digital tomosynthesis and dual energy subtraction digital radiography are modifications of digital radiography. • These modalities perform better than digital radiography in detection of parenchymal lesions in active pulmonary tuberculosis. • Digital tomosynthesis has a sensitivity of 100% in detection of cavities. • Centrilobular nodules seen on CT in active pulmonary tuberculosis, were also demonstrated on digital tomosynthesis in our study. • Digital tomosynthesis can be used for diagnosis and follow up of patients in pulmonary tuberculosis, thereby reducing the number of CT examinations. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the role of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and dual energy subtraction digital radiography (DES-DR) in detection of parenchymal lesions in active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and to compare them with digital radiography (DR). Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by our institutional review committee. DTS and DES-DR were performed in 62 patients with active pulmonary TB within one week of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) study. Findings of active pulmonary TB, that is consolidation, cavitation and nodules were noted on digital radiography (DR), DTS and DES-DR in all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of all 3 modalities was calculated with MDCT as reference standard. In addition presence of centrilobular nodules was also noted on DTS. Results: Our study comprised of 62 patients (33 males, 29 females with age range 18–82 years). Sensitivity and specificity of DTS for detection of nodules and cavitation was better than DR and DES-DR. Sensitivity and specificity of DTS for detection of consolidation was comparable to DR and DES-DR. DES-DR performed better than DR in detection of nodules and cavitation. DTS was also able to detect centrilobular nodules with sensitivity and specificity of 57.4% and 86.5% respectively. Conclusion: DTS and DES-DR perform better

  15. Role of digital tomosynthesis and dual energy subtraction digital radiography in detection of parenchymal lesions in active pulmonary tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Madhurima, E-mail: madhurimashrm88@gmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, PGIMER, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Sandhu, Manavjit Singh, E-mail: manavjitsandhu@yahoo.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, PGIMER, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Gorsi, Ujjwal, E-mail: ujjwalgorsi@gmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, PGIMER, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Gupta, Dheeraj, E-mail: dheeraj1910@gmail.com [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, PGIMER, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Khandelwal, Niranjan, E-mail: khandelwaln@hotmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, PGIMER, Chandigarh 160012 (India)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Digital tomosynthesis and dual energy subtraction digital radiography are modifications of digital radiography. • These modalities perform better than digital radiography in detection of parenchymal lesions in active pulmonary tuberculosis. • Digital tomosynthesis has a sensitivity of 100% in detection of cavities. • Centrilobular nodules seen on CT in active pulmonary tuberculosis, were also demonstrated on digital tomosynthesis in our study. • Digital tomosynthesis can be used for diagnosis and follow up of patients in pulmonary tuberculosis, thereby reducing the number of CT examinations. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the role of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and dual energy subtraction digital radiography (DES-DR) in detection of parenchymal lesions in active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and to compare them with digital radiography (DR). Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by our institutional review committee. DTS and DES-DR were performed in 62 patients with active pulmonary TB within one week of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) study. Findings of active pulmonary TB, that is consolidation, cavitation and nodules were noted on digital radiography (DR), DTS and DES-DR in all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of all 3 modalities was calculated with MDCT as reference standard. In addition presence of centrilobular nodules was also noted on DTS. Results: Our study comprised of 62 patients (33 males, 29 females with age range 18–82 years). Sensitivity and specificity of DTS for detection of nodules and cavitation was better than DR and DES-DR. Sensitivity and specificity of DTS for detection of consolidation was comparable to DR and DES-DR. DES-DR performed better than DR in detection of nodules and cavitation. DTS was also able to detect centrilobular nodules with sensitivity and specificity of 57.4% and 86.5% respectively. Conclusion: DTS and DES-DR perform better

  16. The potential role of vitamin D for prevention and treatment of tuberculosis and infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, Catia; Bianchi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) is a common condition among several populations in the world. VDD is associated with higher incidence of immune system disorders and faster progression of some infectious diseases. Vitamin D is known to be of physiological importance, it is considered an essential micronutrient for the bone health and plays a beneficial role in the prevention and/or treatment of a number of chronic diseases. Vitamin D has a complex action on the immune system. Evidence that vitamin D protects against tuberculosis has been supported by in vitro, epidemiological and some preliminary clinical studies. Vitamin D has a potential effect on HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) and plays a crucial role in the defence against respiratory infections. Vitamin D supplementation could be a low-cost, practical method to protect groups of people with high incidence of those diseases. Public health education should stress the need for adequate dietary intake of vitamin D in those vulnerable groups.

  17. Implications of the global financial crisis for the response to diseases of poverty within overall health sector development: the case of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Dermot

    2010-01-01

    The global financial crisis poses a threat to global health, and may exacerbate diseases of poverty, e.g. HIV, malaria and tuberculosis. Exploring the implications of the global financial crisis for the health sector response to tuberculosis is useful to illustrate the practical problems and propose possible solutions. The response to tuberculosis is considered in the context of health sector development. Problems and solutions are considered in five key areas: financing, prioritization, government regulation, integration and decentralization. Securing health gains in global tuberculosis control depends on protecting expenditure by governments of countries badly affected by tuberculosis and by donors, taking measures to increase efficiencies, prioritizing health expenditures and strengthening government regulation. Lessons learned will be valuable for stakeholders involved in the health sector response to tuberculosis and other diseases of poverty.

  18. [Tuberculosis in compromised hosts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Recent development of tuberculosis in Japan tends to converge on a specific high risk group. The proportion of tuberculosis developing particularly from the compromised hosts in the high risk group is especially high. At this symposium, therefore, we took up diabetes mellitus, gastrectomy, dialysis, AIDS and the elderly for discussion. Many new findings and useful reports for practical medical treatment are submitted; why these compromised hosts are predisposed to tuberculosis, tuberculosis diagnostic and remedial notes of those compromised hosts etc. It is an important question for the future to study how to prevent tuberculosis from these compromised hosts. 1. Tuberculosis in diabetes mellitus: aggravation and its immunological mechanism: Kazuyoshi KAWAKAMI (Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Graduate School and Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus). It has been well documented that diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major aggravating factor in tuberculosis. The onset of this disease is more frequent in DM patients than in individuals with any underlying diseases. However, the precise mechanism of this finding remains to be fully understood. Earlier studies reported that the migration, phagocytosis and bactericidal activity of neutrophils are all impaired in DM patients, which is related to their reduced host defense to infection with extracellular bacteria, such as S. aureus and E. colli. Host defense to mycobacterial infection is largely mediated by cellular immunity, and Th1-related cytokines, such as IFN-gamma and IL-12, play a central role in this response. It is reported that serum level of these cytokines and their production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are reduced in tuberculosis patients with DM, and this is supposed to be involved in the high incidence of tuberculosis in DM. Our study observed similar findings and furthermore indicated that IFN-gamma and IL-12 production by BCG-stimulated PBMC was lower

  19. Antro-duodenal tuberculosis causing gastric outlet obstruction--a rare presentation of a protean disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghe, Liana; Băncilă, Ion; Gheorghe, Cristian; Herlea, Vlad; Vasilescu, Cătălin; Aposteanu, Gabriela

    2002-06-01

    Gastroduodenal tuberculosis is a rare location of abdominal tuberculosis. It usually occurs secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis. We report a case of a 63-year-old woman admitted to the referral center for symptoms of upper gastrointestinal obstruction caused by ulcerohypertrophic antroduodenal tuberculosis. The lesion was misdiagnosed as malignancy at endoscopy. Even at surgery, the lesion was considered gastric cancer and imposed an oncologic resection. The diagnosis was established in the presence of giant-cell granulomas with caseating necrosis in the surgical resected specimens. In our case, the rare gastroduodenal location of abdominal tuberculosis occurred as primary tuberculosis, in the absence of other identifiable locations.

  20. Duodenal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, M.R.; Sarwar, M.

    2004-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a world wide communicable disease caused by tubercle bacilli discovered by Robert Kock in 1882. In 1993 WHO declared TB as a global emergency due to its world wide resurgence. It can involve any organ of the body. Abdomen is the fourth commonest site of involvement in the extra pulmonary tuberculosis after the lymph-nodes, skeletal and Genito urinary variants. In the gastro intestinal tract tuberculosis can affect any part from the mouth to the anus but ileocaecal area is a favourite location. Duodenal involvement is uncommon and accounts for only 2.5% of tuberculous enteritis. Major pathogens are Mycobacterium Tuberculosis and bovis and the usual route of entry is by direct penetration of the intestinal mucosa by swallowed organisms. (author)

  1. A fatal case of spinal tuberculosis mistaken for metastatic lung cancer: recalling ancient Pott's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duchna Hans-Werner

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculous spondylitis (Pott's disease is an ancient human disease. Because it is rare in high-income, tuberculosis (TB low incidence countries, misdiagnoses occur as sufficient clinical experience is lacking. Case presentation We describe a fatal case of a patient with spinal TB, who was mistakenly irradiated for suspected metastatic lung cancer of the spine in the presence of a solitary pulmonary nodule of the left upper lobe. Subsequently, the patient progressed to central nervous system TB, and finally, disseminated TB before the accurate diagnosis was established. Isolation and antimycobacterial chemotherapy were initiated after an in-hospital course of approximately three months including numerous health care related contacts and procedures. Conclusion The rapid diagnosis of spinal TB demands a high index of suspicion and expertise regarding the appropriate diagnostic procedures. Due to the devastating consequences of a missed diagnosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis should be considered early in every case of spondylitis, intraspinal or paravertebral abscess. The presence of certain alarm signals like a prolonged history of progressive back pain, constitutional symptoms or pulmonary nodules on a chest radiograph, particularly in the upper lobes, may guide the clinical suspicion.

  2. Pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Beijing strain infection in a stray dog : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.D.C. Parsons

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in dogs is rarely reported and has not previously been documented in South Africa. A case of a stray Maltese crossbreed dog with extensive multifocal pulmonary tuberculosis due to M. tuberculosis is described. Pulmonary granulomas in this case were poorly encapsulated and contained large numbers of acid-fast bacteria, highlighting the potential for infected companion animals to excrete the pathogen. Treatment of canine tuberculosis is generally not advised, and for this reason, euthanasia of diseased animals must be advocated in most instances. Physicians and veterinarians must be aware that companion animals with active disease caused by M. tuberculosis could act as a potential source of infection.

  3. Tuberculosis and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    TUBERCULOSIS www.who.int/tb & DIABETES THE DUAL EPIDEMIC OF TB AND DIABETES DEADLY LINKAGES  People with ... higher risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis.  Diabetes triples a person’s risk of developing TB. ...

  4. Differential expression of miRNAs and their relation to active tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhihong; Zhou, Aiping; Ni, Jinjing; Zhang, Qiufen; Wang, Ying; Lu, Jie; Wu, Wenjuan; Karakousis, Petros C; Lu, Shuihua; Yao, Yufeng

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was to screen miRNA signatures dysregulated in tuberculosis to improve our understanding of the biological role of miRNAs involved in the disease. Datasets deposited in publically available databases from microarray studies on infectious diseases and malignancies were retrieved, screened, and subjected to further analysis. Effect sizes were combined using the inverse-variance model and between-study heterogeneity was evaluated by the random effects model. 35 miRNAs were differentially expressed (12 up-regulated, 23 down-regulated; p tuberculosis and other infectious diseases. 15 miRNAs were found to be significantly differentially regulated (7 up-regulated, 8 down-regulated; p tuberculosis and malignancies. Most of the miRNA signatures identified in this study were found to be involved in immune responses and metabolism. Expression of these miRNA signatures in serum samples from TB subjects (n = 11) as well as healthy controls (n = 10) was examined by TaqMan miRNA array. Taken together, the results revealed differential expression of miRNAs in TB, but available datasets are limited and these miRNA signatures should be validated in future studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Kinetics of T cell-activation molecules in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antas Paulo RZ

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic features acquired subsequent to antigen-specific stimulation in vitro were evaluated by means of the kinetic expressions of CD69 and CD25 activation molecules on T lymphocytes and assayed by flow cytometry in response to PPD, Ag85B, and ferritin in PPD-positive healthy control individuals. In response to PHA, CD69 staining on both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells became initially marked after 4 h, peaked at 24 h, and quickly decreased after 120 h. For CD25, a latter expression was detected around 8 h, having increased after 96 h. As expected, the response rate to the mycobacterial antigens was much lower than that to the mitogen. Positive staining was high after 96 h for CD25 and after 24 h for CD69. CD69 expression was significantly enhanced (p < 0.05 on CD8+ as compared to CD4+ T cells. High levels were also found between 96-120 h. Regarding Ag85B, CD25+ cells were mostly CD4+ instead of CD8+ T cells. Moreover, in response to ferritin, a lower CD25 expression was noted. The present data will allow further characterization of the immune response to new mycobacterial-specific antigens and their evaluation for possible inclusion in developing new diagnostic techniques for tuberculosis as well in a new vaccine to prevent the disease.

  6. Pulmonary Immune-Compartment-Specific Interferon Gamma Responses in HIV-Infected Individuals with Active Tuberculosis (TB in an Area of High TB Prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Buldeo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of data on the pulmonary immune-compartment interferon gamma (IFNγ response to M. tuberculosis, particularly in settings of high tuberculosis (TB prevalence and in HIV-coinfected individuals. This data is necessary to understand the diagnostic potential of commercially available interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs in both the pulmonary immune-compartment and peripheral blood. We used intracellular cytokine staining by flow cytometry to assess the IFNγ response to purified protein derivative (PPD and early secretory antigen 6 (ESAT6 in induced sputa (ISp and blood samples from HIV-infected, smear-negative, TB suspects. We found that individuals with active TB disease produced significantly less IFNγ in response to PPD in their induced sputa samples than individuals with non-active TB (control group. This difference was not reflected in the peripheral blood, even within the CD27− CD4+ memory T lymphocyte population. These findings suggest that progression to active TB disease may be associated with the loss of IFNγ secretion at the site of primary infection. Our findings highlight the importance of studying pulmonary immune-compartment M. tuberculosis specific responses to elucidate IFNγ secretion across the spectrum of TB disease.

  7. Impaired IFN-α-mediated signal in dendritic cells differentiates active from latent tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Parlato

    Full Text Available Individuals exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb may be infected and remain for the entire life in this condition defined as latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI or develop active tuberculosis (TB. Among the multiple factors governing the outcome of the infection, dendritic cells (DCs play a major role in dictating antibacterial immunity. However, current knowledge on the role of the diverse components of human DCs in shaping specific T-cell response during Mtb infection is limited. In this study, we performed a comparative evaluation of peripheral blood circulating DC subsets as well as of monocyte-derived Interferon-α DCs (IFN-DCs from patients with active TB, subjects with LTBI and healthy donors (HD. The proportion of circulating myeloid BDCA3+ DCs (mDC2 and plasmacytoid CD123+ DCs (pDCs declined significantly in active TB patients compared to HD, whereas the same subsets displayed a remarkable activation in LTBI subjects. Simultaneously, the differentiation of IFN-DCs from active TB patients resulted profoundly impaired compared to those from LTBI and HD individuals. Importantly, the altered developmental trait of IFN-DCs from active TB patients was associated with down-modulation of IFN-linked genes, marked changes in molecular signaling conveying antigen (Ag presentation and full inability to induce Ag-specific T cell response. Thus, these data reveal an important role of IFN-α in determining the induction of Mtb-specific immunity.

  8. Interferon-gamma response to the treatment of active pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, L; Shi, R; Liu, X; Yuan, X; Zheng, S; Zhang, G; Wang, W; Wang, J; England, K; Via, L E; Cai, Y; Goldfeder, L C; Dodd, L E; Barry, C E; Chen, R Y

    2017-10-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used to diagnose tuberculosis (TB) but not to measure treatment response. To measure IFN-γ response to active anti-tuberculosis treatment. Patients from the Henan Provincial Chest Hospital, Henan, China, with TB symptoms and/or signs were enrolled into this prospective, observational cohort study and followed for 6 months of treatment, with blood and sputum samples collected at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 16 and 24 weeks. The QuantiFERON® TB-Gold assay was run on collected blood samples. Participants received a follow-up telephone call at 24 months to determine relapse status. Of the 152 TB patients enrolled, 135 were eligible for this analysis: 118 pulmonary (PTB) and 17 extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB) patients. IFN-γ levels declined significantly over time among all patients (P = 0.002), with this decline driven by PTB patients (P = 0.001), largely during the initial 8 weeks of treatment (P = 0.019). IFN-γ levels did not change among EPTB patients over time or against baseline culture or drug resistance status. After 6 months of effective anti-tuberculosis treatment, IFN-γ levels decreased significantly in PTB patients, largely over the initial 8 weeks of treatment. IFN-γ concentrations may offer some value for monitoring anti-tuberculosis treatment response among PTB patients.

  9. Diagnostic value of pleural fluid adenosine deaminase activity in tuberculosis pleurisy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas ali Niazi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnosis of tuberculosis pleurisies is difficult because of its nonspecific clinical presentation and insufficient traditional diagnostic methods. We investigated the use of adenosine deaminase (ADA activity in tuberculosis pleurisies. Methods: A number of 85 patients were analyzed with exudative pleural effusions. Using the ROC curve, we determined the optimal cutoff for TB pleurisy. Results: A number of 58 exudative samples were nontuberculous (non-TB and 27 were tuberculosis (TB. There was statistically significant difference (p<0.0001 between the means of pleural fluid ADA levels among the TB and non-TB populations. The prevalence of TB pleurisy in the studied population was 31%. Using the cutoff point equal to 35 for diagnosing TB effusions the sensitivity and specificity 70.3% and 91.3%, respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV was 79.1% and the negative predictive value (NPV was 86.8%. A pleural fluid ADA value <19 IU/L suggests that a tuberculosis effusion is highly unlikely. Conclusion: Pleural fluid total ADA assay is a sensitive and specific test suitable for rapid diagnosis of TB pleurisy.

  10. Tuberculosis: looking beyond BCG vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Abu S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is an infectious disease of international importance and ranks among the top 10 causes of death in the World. About one-third of the world′s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Every year, approximately eight million people develop active disease and two million die of TB. The currently used BCG vaccines have shown variable protective efficacies against TB in different parts of the world. Moreover, being a live vaccine, BCG can be pathogenic in immunocompromised recipients. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new vaccines against TB. The comparative genome analysis has revealed the existence of several M. tuberculosis-specific regions that are deleted in BCG. The work carried out to determine the immunological reactivity of proteins encoded by genes located in these regions revealed several major antigens of M. tuberculosis, including the 6 kDa early secreted antigen target (ESAT6. Immunization with ESAT6 and its peptide (aa51-70 protects mice challenged with M. tuberculosis. The protective efficacy of immunization further improves when ESAT6 is recombinantly fused with M. tuberculosis antigen 85B. In addition, ESAT6 delivered as a DNA vaccine is also protective in mice. Whether these vaccines would be safe or not cannot be speculated. The answer regarding the safety and efficacy of these vaccines has to await human trials in different parts of the world.

  11. Tc-99m-MIBI Uptake in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Ho; Park, Chan Hee; Hwang, Hee Sung; Bae, Moon Sun

    1996-01-01

    Technetium-99m MIBI was developed as a myocardiac perfusion imagine agent and has been used effectively in the detection and post-therapeutic evaluation of various neoplasm such as thyroid, lung, bone and breast tumors. As an infrequent findings, Tc-99m MIBI agent has shown in non-neoplastic pulmonary conditions including fibroding alveolitis, pulmonary actinomycosis, active pulmonary sarcoidosis, pulmonary interstitial fibrosis in progressive systemic sclerosis and active osteomyelitis. In a recent report conducted by Cetin Oncel, Tc-99m MIBI imaging is an effective method in the detection and follow-up of pulmonary tuberculosis. We have also experienced Tc-99m-MIBI uptake in active pulmonary tuberculosis incidentally found in a patient with suspected proliferative villonodular synovitis of the left ankle.

  12. Defining the research agenda to reduce the joint burden of disease from diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harries, Anthony D; Murray, Megan B; Jeon, Christie Y

    2010-01-01

    diseases, to address research gaps and to develop a research agenda. Ten key research questions were identified, of which 4 were selected as high priority: (i) whether, when and how to screen for TB in patients with diabetes mellitus and vice versa; (ii) the impact of diabetes mellitus and non......The steadily growing epidemic of diabetes mellitus poses a threat for global tuberculosis (TB) control. Previous studies have identified an important association between diabetes mellitus and TB. However, these studies have limitations: very few were carried out in low-income countries, with none...... and monitoring tests, including measurements of blood glucose and glycated haemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) for patients with diabetes mellitus. Implementation of this research agenda will benefit the control of both diseases....

  13. Detection of Tuberculosis Infection Hotspots Using Activity Spaces Based Spatial Approach in an Urban Tokyo, from 2003 to 2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyohiko Izumi

    Full Text Available Identifying ongoing tuberculosis infection sites is crucial for breaking chains of transmission in tuberculosis-prevalent urban areas. Previous studies have pointed out that detection of local accumulation of tuberculosis patients based on their residential addresses may be limited by a lack of matching between residences and tuberculosis infection sites. This study aimed to identify possible tuberculosis hotspots using TB genotype clustering statuses and a concept of "activity space", a place where patients spend most of their waking hours. We further compared the spatial distribution by different residential statuses and describe urban environmental features of the detected hotspots.Culture-positive tuberculosis patients notified to Shinjuku city from 2003 to 2011 were enrolled in this case-based cross-sectional study, and their demographic and clinical information, TB genotype clustering statuses, and activity space were collected. Spatial statistics (Global Moran's I and Getis-Ord Gi* statistics identified significant hotspots in 152 census tracts, and urban environmental features and tuberculosis patients' characteristics in these hotspots were assessed.Of the enrolled 643 culture-positive tuberculosis patients, 416 (64.2% were general inhabitants, 42 (6.5% were foreign-born people, and 184 were homeless people (28.6%. The percentage of overall genotype clustering was 43.7%. Genotype-clustered general inhabitants and homeless people formed significant hotspots around a major railway station, whereas the non-clustered general inhabitants formed no hotspots. This suggested the detected hotspots of activity spaces may reflect ongoing tuberculosis transmission sites and were characterized by smaller residential floor size and a higher proportion of non-working households.Activity space-based spatial analysis suggested possible TB transmission sites around the major railway station and it can assist in further comprehension of TB transmission

  14. Detection of Tuberculosis Infection Hotspots Using Activity Spaces Based Spatial Approach in an Urban Tokyo, from 2003 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kiyohiko; Ohkado, Akihiro; Uchimura, Kazuhiro; Murase, Yoshiro; Tatsumi, Yuriko; Kayebeta, Aya; Watanabe, Yu; Ishikawa, Nobukatsu

    2015-01-01

    Identifying ongoing tuberculosis infection sites is crucial for breaking chains of transmission in tuberculosis-prevalent urban areas. Previous studies have pointed out that detection of local accumulation of tuberculosis patients based on their residential addresses may be limited by a lack of matching between residences and tuberculosis infection sites. This study aimed to identify possible tuberculosis hotspots using TB genotype clustering statuses and a concept of "activity space", a place where patients spend most of their waking hours. We further compared the spatial distribution by different residential statuses and describe urban environmental features of the detected hotspots. Culture-positive tuberculosis patients notified to Shinjuku city from 2003 to 2011 were enrolled in this case-based cross-sectional study, and their demographic and clinical information, TB genotype clustering statuses, and activity space were collected. Spatial statistics (Global Moran's I and Getis-Ord Gi* statistics) identified significant hotspots in 152 census tracts, and urban environmental features and tuberculosis patients' characteristics in these hotspots were assessed. Of the enrolled 643 culture-positive tuberculosis patients, 416 (64.2%) were general inhabitants, 42 (6.5%) were foreign-born people, and 184 were homeless people (28.6%). The percentage of overall genotype clustering was 43.7%. Genotype-clustered general inhabitants and homeless people formed significant hotspots around a major railway station, whereas the non-clustered general inhabitants formed no hotspots. This suggested the detected hotspots of activity spaces may reflect ongoing tuberculosis transmission sites and were characterized by smaller residential floor size and a higher proportion of non-working households. Activity space-based spatial analysis suggested possible TB transmission sites around the major railway station and it can assist in further comprehension of TB transmission dynamics in an

  15. Target prioritization and strategy selection for active case-finding of pulmonary tuberculosis: a tool to support country-level project planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikiori, Nobuyuki; Van Weezenbeek, Catharina

    2013-02-02

    Despite the progress made in the past decade, tuberculosis (TB) control still faces significant challenges. In many countries with declining TB incidence, the disease tends to concentrate in vulnerable populations that often have limited access to health care. In light of the limitations of the current case-finding approach and the global urgency to improve case detection, active case-finding (ACF) has been suggested as an important complementary strategy to accelerate tuberculosis control especially among high-risk populations. The present exercise aims to develop a model that can be used for county-level project planning. A simple deterministic model was developed to calculate the number of estimated TB cases diagnosed and the associated costs of diagnosis. The model was designed to compare cost-effectiveness parameters, such as the cost per case detected, for different diagnostic algorithms when they are applied to different risk populations. The model was transformed into a web-based tool that can support national TB programmes and civil society partners in designing ACF activities. According to the model output, tuberculosis active case-finding can be a costly endeavor, depending on the target population and the diagnostic strategy. The analysis suggests the following: (1) Active case-finding activities are cost-effective only if the tuberculosis prevalence among the target population is high. (2) Extensive diagnostic methods (e.g. X-ray screening for the entire group, use of sputum culture or molecular diagnostics) can be applied only to very high-risk groups such as TB contacts, prisoners or people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. (3) Basic diagnostic approaches such as TB symptom screening are always applicable although the diagnostic yield is very limited. The cost-effectiveness parameter was sensitive to local diagnostic costs and the tuberculosis prevalence of target populations. The prioritization of appropriate target

  16. Whole Genome Sequencing Shows a Low Proportion of Tuberculosis Disease Is Attributable to Known Close Contacts in Rural Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith R Glynn

    Full Text Available The proportion of tuberculosis attributable to transmission from close contacts is not well known. Comparison of the genome of strains from index patients and prior contacts allows transmission to be confirmed or excluded.In Karonga District, Malawi, all tuberculosis patients are asked about prior contact with others with tuberculosis. All available strains from culture-positive patients were sequenced. Up to 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms between index patients and their prior contacts were allowed for confirmation, and ≥ 100 for exclusion. The population attributable fraction was estimated from the proportion of confirmed transmissions and the proportion of patients with contacts.From 1997-2010 there were 1907 new culture-confirmed tuberculosis patients, of whom 32% reported at least one family contact and an additional 11% had at least one other contact; 60% of contacts had smear-positive disease. Among case-contact pairs with sequences available, transmission was confirmed from 38% (62/163 smear-positive prior contacts and 0/17 smear-negative prior contacts. Confirmed transmission was more common in those related to the prior contact (42.4%, 56/132 than in non-relatives (19.4%, 6/31, p = 0.02, and in those with more intense contact, to younger index cases, and in more recent years. The proportion of tuberculosis attributable to known contacts was estimated to be 9.4% overall.In this population known contacts only explained a small proportion of tuberculosis cases. Even those with a prior family contact with smear positive tuberculosis were more likely to have acquired their infection elsewhere.

  17. Development and evaluation of a new chest radiograph reading and recording system for epidemiological surveys of tuberculosis and lung disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Boon, S.; Bateman, E. D.; Enarson, D. A.; Borgdorff, M. W.; Verver, S.; Lombard, C. J.; Irusen, E.; Beyers, N.; White, N. W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The development and evaluation of a new chest radiograph reading and recording system (CRRS) for community surveys of tuberculosis (TB) and lung disease. DESIGN: An experienced pulmonologist read 2608 chest X-rays (CXRs) performed as part of a TB prevalence survey using the newly

  18. Local Inflammation, Dissemination and Coalescence of Lesions Are Key for the Progression toward Active Tuberculosis: The Bubble Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats, Clara; Vilaplana, Cristina; Valls, Joaquim; Marzo, Elena; Cardona, Pere-Joan; López, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of a tuberculosis (TB) infection toward active disease is driven by a combination of factors mostly related to the host response. The equilibrium between control of the bacillary load and the pathology generated is crucial as regards preventing the growth and proliferation of TB lesions. In addition, some experimental evidence suggests an important role of both local endogenous reinfection and the coalescence of neighboring lesions. Herein we propose a mathematical model that captures the essence of these factors by defining three hypotheses: (i) lesions grow logistically due to the inflammatory reaction; (ii) new lesions can appear as a result of extracellular bacilli or infected macrophages that escape from older lesions; and (iii) lesions can merge when they are close enough. This model was implemented in Matlab to simulate the dynamics of several lesions in a 3D space. It was also fitted to available microscopy data from infected C3HeB/FeJ mice, an animal model of active TB that reacts against Mycobacterium tuberculosis with an exaggerated inflammatory response. The results of the simulations show the dynamics observed experimentally, namely an initial increase in the number of lesions followed by fluctuations, and an exponential increase in the mean area of the lesions. In addition, further analysis of experimental and simulation results show a strong coincidence of the area distributions of lesions at day 21, thereby highlighting the consistency of the model. Three simulation series removing each one of the hypothesis corroborate their essential role in the dynamics observed. These results demonstrate that three local factors, namely an exaggerated inflammatory response, an endogenous reinfection, and a coalescence of lesions, are needed in order to progress toward active TB. The failure of one of these factors stops induction of the disease. This mathematical model may be used as a basis for developing strategies to stop the progression of

  19. Local inflammation, dissemination and coalescence of lesions are key for the progression towards active tuberculosis: the bubble model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara ePrats

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of a tuberculosis (TB infection towards active disease is driven by a combination of factors mostly related to the host response. The equilibrium between control of the bacillary load and the pathology generated is crucial as regards preventing the growth and proliferation of TB lesions. In addition, some experimental evidence suggests an important role of both local endogenous reinfection and the coalescence of neighboring lesions.Herein we propose a mathematical model that captures the essence of these factors by defining three hypotheses: (i lesions grow logistically due to the inflammatory reaction; (ii new lesions can appear as a result of extracellular bacilli or infected macrophages that escape from older lesions; and (iii lesions can merge when they are close enough. This model was implemented in Matlab to simulate the dynamics of several lesions in a 3D space. It was also fitted to available microscopy data from infected C3HeB/FeJ mice, an animal model of active TB that reacts against Mycobacterium tuberculosis with an exaggerated inflammatory response.The results of the simulations show the dynamics observed experimentally, namely an initial increase in the number of lesions followed by oscillations, and an exponential increase in the mean area of the lesions. In addition, further analysis of experimental and simulation results show a strong coincidence of the area distributions of lesions at day 21, thereby highlighting the consistency of the model. Three simulation series removing each one of the hypothesis corroborate their essential role in the dynamics observed.These results demonstrate that three local factors, namely an exaggerated inflammatory response, an endogenous reinfection and a coalescence of lesions, are needed in order to progress towards active TB. The failure of one of these factors stops induction of the disease. This mathematical model may be used as a basis for developing strategies to stop the

  20. Feasibility and yield of screening for non-communicable diseases among treated tuberculosis patients in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, A L; Marais, B J; Mitnick, C D; Garden, F L; Lecca, L; Contreras, C; Yauri, Y; Garcia, F; Marks, G B

    2018-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) poses a major challenge to low- and middle-income countries. Patients' engagement with health services for anti-tuberculosis treatment provides an opportunity for screening for NCDs and for linkage to care. We explored the feasibility and yield of screening for NCDs in patients treated for tuberculosis (TB) in Lima, Peru, as part of a study focused on chronic respiratory sequelae. A representative sample of community controls was recruited from the same geographical area. Screening entailed taking a medical history and performing ambulatory blood pressure measurement and urinalysis. A total of 177 participants with previous TB (33 with multidrug-resistant TB) and 161 community controls were evaluated. There was an almost four-fold increased prevalence of self-reported diabetes mellitus (DM) in the TB group (adjusted prevalence ratio 3.66, 95%CI 1.68-8.01). Among those without self-reported DM, 3.3% had glycosuria, with a number needed to screen (NNS) of 31. The NNS to find one (new) case of hypertension or proteinuria in the TB group was respectively 24 and 5. Patient-centred care that includes pragmatic NCD screening is feasible in TB patients, and the treatment period provides a good opportunity to link patients to ongoing care.

  1. Activation of MMPs in Macrophages by Mycobacterium tuberculosis via the miR-223-BMAL1 Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jun; Wang, Yongli; Zhang, Zhimin; Qiu, Weiqiang

    2017-12-01

    An interaction between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and macrophages constitutes an essential step in tuberculosis development, as macrophages exert both positive and negative effects on M. tuberculosis-triggered organ lesions. In this study, we focused on the regulation of the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which is responsible for lung matrix degradation and bacteria dissection, in macrophages following M. tuberculosis infection. Female BALB/c mice were intravenously injected with the M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv at 0 h zeitgeber time (ZT0) or 12 h zeitgeber time (ZT12). The expression and activity of MMP-1, -2, -3, and -9 in lungs and spleens were then evaluated. In vitro, peritoneal macrophages were harvested at ZT0 or at ZT12 and infected with 10 MOI M. tuberculosis. The expression of MMPs, microRNA-223 and BMAL1 was analyzed by qRT-PCR and/or Western blot. The binding of BMAL1 3'-UTR by miR-223 was confirmed by luciferase activity assay. Additionally, wild-type BMAL1 or NLS mut BMAL1 plasmids were transfected to evaluate the effect of BMAL1 on MMPs. The results showed a differential expression of MMPs in mice tissues infected at different times. M. tuberculosis infection caused enhanced MMP-1, -9, and miR-223 expression, with inhibited BMAL1 expression. MiR-223 modulated BMAL1 expression via the direct binding of BMAL1 3'-UTR. Furthermore, wild-type BMAL1 other than NLS mut BMAL1 attenuated MMPs expression in M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages. Overall, this study demonstrated a potential involvement of circadian rhythm in MMP activation by M. tuberculosis in macrophages. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 4804-4812, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Oral vaccination with heat inactivated Mycobacterium bovis activates the complement system to protect against tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Beltrán-Beck

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a pandemic affecting billions of people worldwide, thus stressing the need for new vaccines. Defining the correlates of vaccine protection is essential to achieve this goal. In this study, we used the wild boar model for mycobacterial infection and TB to characterize the protective mechanisms elicited by a new heat inactivated Mycobacterium bovis vaccine (IV. Oral vaccination with the IV resulted in significantly lower culture and lesion scores, particularly in the thorax, suggesting that the IV might provide a novel vaccine for TB control with special impact on the prevention of pulmonary disease, which is one of the limitations of current vaccines. Oral vaccination with the IV induced an adaptive antibody response and activation of the innate immune response including the complement component C3 and inflammasome. Mycobacterial DNA/RNA was not involved in inflammasome activation but increased C3 production by a still unknown mechanism. The results also suggested a protective mechanism mediated by the activation of IFN-γ producing CD8+ T cells by MHC I antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs in response to vaccination with the IV, without a clear role for Th1 CD4+ T cells. These results support a role for DCs in triggering the immune response to the IV through a mechanism similar to the phagocyte response to PAMPs with a central role for C3 in protection against mycobacterial infection. Higher C3 levels may allow increased opsonophagocytosis and effective bacterial clearance, while interfering with CR3-mediated opsonic and nonopsonic phagocytosis of mycobacteria, a process that could be enhanced by specific antibodies against mycobacterial proteins induced by vaccination with the IV. These results suggest that the IV acts through novel mechanisms to protect against TB in wild boar.

  3. Plasma Indoleamine 2, 3-Dioxygenase, a Biomarker for Tuberculosis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu-Gyamfi, Clement G; Snyman, Tracy; Hoffmann, Christopher J; Martinson, Neil A; Chaisson, Richard E; George, Jaya A; Suchard, Melinda S

    2017-10-15

    There is no biomarker for diagnosing active tuberculosis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an immunoregulatory enzyme that breaks down tryptophan (Trp) to metabolites known as kynurenines (Kyns). We investigated whether IDO activity, as measured by the ratio of Kyn to Trp, could be used to diagnose or predict active tuberculosis disease in HIV-infected adults. Kyn and Trp concentrations were measured using ultraperformance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry in plasma samples from 32 HIV-infected patients in whom active tuberculosis developed and who were followed up prospectively. We compared to 70 HIV-infected control subjects from the same cohort in whom tuberculosis did not develop, matched by age, sex, and CD4 cell count, and 37 unmatched HIV-infected patients with a diagnosis of pneumonia. Clinical parameters, including body mass index, CD4 cell count, HIV load, and C-reactive protein levels were analyzed. At the time of tuberculosis diagnosis, IDO activity was significantly higher in patients with tuberculosis than in controls (P tuberculosis diagnosis, IDO activity was significantly higher in all patients who later developed tuberculosis (P tuberculosis treatment, IDO activity in patients with tuberculosis declined to levels similar to those in controls. IDO activity was 4-fold higher in patients with tuberculosis than in those with pneumonia, and could be used to distinguish them. With a receiver operating characteristic curve, IDO activity had a sensitivity of 97%, a specificity of 99%, and positive and negative predictive values of 89% and 100% for detecting active tuberculosis disease. Plasma IDO activity is suitable as a biomarker of active tuberculosis in HIV-positive patients. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  4. Deregulated microRNAs in CD4+ T cells from individuals with latent tuberculosis versus active tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yurong; Yi, Zhengjun; Li, Jianhua; Li, Ruifang

    2014-03-01

    The mechanisms of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection remain elusive. Roles of microRNA (miRNA) have been highlighted in pathogen-host interactions recently. To identify miRNAs involved in the immune response to TB, expression profiles of miRNAs in CD4(+) T cells from patients with latent TB, active TB and healthy controls were investigated by microarray assay and validated by RT-qPCR. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis were used to analyse the significant functions and involvement in signalling pathways of the differentially expressed miRNAs. To identify potential target genes for miR-29, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) mRNA expression was measured by RT-qPCR. Our results showed that 27 miRNAs were deregulated among the three groups. RT-qPCR results were generally consistent with the microarray data. We observed an inverse correlation between miR-29 level and IFN-γ mRNA expression in CD4(+) T cells. GO and KEGG pathway analysis showed that the possible target genes of deregulated miRNAs were significantly enriched in mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway, focal adhesion and extracellular matrix receptor interaction, which might be involved in the transition from latent to active TB. In all, for the first time, our study revealed that some miRNAs in CD4(+) T cells were altered in latent and active TB. Function and pathway analysis highlighted the possible involvement of miRNA-deregulated mRNAs in TB. The study might help to improve understanding of the relationship between miRNAs in CD4(+) T cells and TB, and laid an important foundation for further identification of the underlying mechanisms of latent TB infection and its reactivation. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  5. DNA repair systems and the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: varying activities at different stages of infection

    OpenAIRE

    Gorna, AE; Bowater, RP; Dziadek, J

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacteria, including most of all MTB (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), cause pathogenic infections in humans and, during the infectious process, are exposed to a range of environmental insults, including the host's immune response. From the moment MTB is exhaled by infected individuals, through an active and latent phase in the body of the new host, until the time they reach the reactivation stage, MTB is exposed to many types of DNA-damaging agents. Like all cellular organisms, MTB has effici...

  6. Diterpenes Synthesized from the Natural Serrulatane Leubethanol and Their in Vitro Activities against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Escarcena

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Seventeen new derivatives of the natural diterpene leubethanol, including some potential pro-drugs, with changes in the functionality of the aliphatic chain or modifications of aromatic ring and the phenolic group, were synthesized and tested in vitro by the MABA technique for their activity against the H37Rv strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Some compounds showed antimycobacterial selectivity indices higher than leubethanol.

  7. Tuberculosis Facts - TB and HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB and HIV/AIDS What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  8. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in patients with anterior tuberculosis compared to tobacco related COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiedem, Elise; Ikomey, George Mondinde; Nkenfou, Céline; Walter, Pefura-Yone Eric; Mesembe, Martha; Chegou, Novel Njweipi; Jacobs, Graeme Brendon; Okomo Assoumou, Marie Claire

    2018-03-27

    The inflammatory profile of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) related to tobacco is known in certain studies while that of the post tuberculosis form is not yet known. This study aimed to evaluate the levels of neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes cells in sputum of COPD patients with history of smoking or anterior tuberculosis. Enumeration of cells in samples was analyzed using standard microscopy. We enrolled 92 participants, 46 (50%) were COPD subjects comprising 22 (47.83%) smokers and 24 (52.17%) with anterior tuberculosis while 46 (50%) healthy persons constituted the control group. The levels of neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes were statistically higher in COPD patients compared to the control group with p-values of 0.0001 respectively. Neutrophils levels were higher in COPD patients with history of tobacco than in COPD patients with anterior tuberculosis with a mean rate of 4.72 × 10 6 /ml and 2.48 × 10 6 /ml respectively (p = 0.04). The monocytes and lymphocytes levels were not statistically different between the two sub-groups of COPD patients with p-value of 0.052 and 0.91 respectively. Neutrophils are the only inflammatory cells that were significantly higher in COPD patients with history of smoking as compared to COPD patients with anterior tuberculosis.

  9. Influence of diabetes mellitus and risk factors in activating latent tuberculosis infection: a case for targeted screening in malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarna Nantha, Y

    2012-10-01

    A review of the epidemiology of tuberculosis, its contributing risk factors (excluding HIV) and the role of screening latent tuberculosis infection in Malaysia was done. Despite the global and domestic decrease in prevalence rates of tuberculosis in the past decade, there is an alarming increase in the trend of non communicable diseases in the country. High prevalence rates of major risk factors leading to reactivation of tuberculosis were seen within the population, with diabetes mellitus being in the forefront. The rising numbers in the ageing population of Malaysia poses a further threat of re-emergence of tuberculosis in the years to come. Economically, screening of diabetic patients with comorbidities for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) using two major techniques, namely tuberculin sensitivity (TST) and Interferon gamma release assay tests (IGRA) could be a viable option. The role of future research in the detection of LTBI in the Malaysian setting might be necessary to gauge the disease reservoir before implementing prophylactic measures for high risk groups involved.

  10. Urease Activity Represents an Alternative Pathway for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Nitrogen Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wenwei; Mathys, Vanessa; Ang, Emily Lei Yin; Koh, Vanessa Hui Qi; Martínez Gómez, Julia María; Ang, Michelle Lay Teng; Zainul Rahim, Siti Zarina; Tan, Mai Ping; Pethe, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Urease represents a critical virulence factor for some bacterial species through its alkalizing effect, which helps neutralize the acidic microenvironment of the pathogen. In addition, urease serves as a nitrogen source provider for bacterial growth. Pathogenic mycobacteria express a functional urease, but its role during infection has yet to be characterized. In this study, we constructed a urease-deficient Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain and confirmed the alkalizing effect of the urease activity within the mycobacterium-containing vacuole in resting macrophages but not in the more acidic phagolysosomal compartment of activated macrophages. However, the urease-mediated alkalizing effect did not confer any growth advantage on M. tuberculosis in macrophages, as evidenced by comparable growth profiles for the mutant, wild-type (WT), and complemented strains. In contrast, the urease-deficient mutant exhibited impaired in vitro growth compared to the WT and complemented strains when urea was the sole source of nitrogen. Substantial amounts of ammonia were produced by the WT and complemented strains, but not with the urease-deficient mutant, which represents the actual nitrogen source for mycobacterial growth. However, the urease-deficient mutant displayed parental colonization profiles in the lungs, spleen, and liver in mice. Together, our data demonstrate a role for the urease activity in M. tuberculosis nitrogen metabolism that could be crucial for the pathogen's survival in nutrient-limited microenvironments where urea is the sole nitrogen source. Our work supports the notion that M. tuberculosis virulence correlates with its unique metabolic versatility and ability to utilize virtually any carbon and nitrogen sources available in its environment. PMID:22645285

  11. Digital clubbing in tuberculosis – relationship to HIV infection, extent of disease and hypoalbuminemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smieja Marek

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Digital clubbing is a sign of chest disease known since the time of Hippocrates. Its association with tuberculosis (TB has not been well studied, particularly in Africa where TB is common. The prevalence of clubbing in patients with pulmonary TB and its association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV, severity of disease, and nutritional status was assessed. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among patients with smear-positive TB recruited consecutively from the medical and TB wards and outpatient clinics at a public hospital in Uganda. The presence of clubbing was assessed by clinical signs and measurement of the ratio of the distal and inter-phalangeal diameters (DPD/IPD of both index fingers. Clubbing was defined as a ratio > 1.0. Chest radiograph, serum albumin and HIV testing were done. Results Two hundred patients (82% HIV-infected participated; 34% had clubbing by clinical criteria whilst 30% had clubbing based on DPD/IPD ratio. Smear grade, extensive or cavitary disease, early versus late HIV disease, and hypoalbuminemia were not associated with clubbing. Clubbing was more common among patients with a lower Karnofsky performance scale score or with prior TB. Conclusion Clubbing occurs in up to one-third of Ugandan patients with pulmonary TB. Clubbing was not associated with stage of HIV infection, extensive disease or hypoalbuminemia.

  12. Prospective evaluation of a whole-blood test using Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigens ESAT-6 and CFP-10 for diagnosis of active tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Munk, Martin E; Andersen, Ase B

    2005-01-01

    A new immunodiagnostic test based on the Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigens CFP-10/ESAT-6(QFT-RD1) has been launched as an aid in the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI). The aim of this study was to evaluate this test for the diagnosis of active TB. Eighty-two patients...... with suspicion of TB and 39 healthy BCG-vaccinated persons were enrolled. Forty-eight had active TB, 25 did not, and 9 were excluded. Sensitivity and specificity of the test for active TB were evaluated in a prospective blinded manner in patients suspected of TB. The sensitivity of the QFT-RD1 was 85% (40......% (5/12) by culture (P test, sensitivity increased to 96% (CI, 90 to 102). Ten of 25 (40%) non-TB patients were QFT-RD1 positive, resulting...

  13. Serological diagnosis for active tuberculosis in Malaysian population: Comparison of four protein candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Suraiya

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To asses the ability of 4 types of Mtb proteins-ESAT6, SCWP, MAN and Ag85 to serve as indicator for active tuberculosis among Malaysian population. Methods: Sera from 90 individuals, 60 from confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 30 healthy PPD negative individuals were tested for presence of anti-IgG and anti IgA by ELISA assay. Result: Mean concentration of IgG and IgA were higher in patients compared to healthy Positivity of the ELISA test were calculated, taking the cut off value at mean +2 SD of healthy sera. The sensitivity of the ELISA IgA assay for ESAT 6, SCWP, MAN and Ag85 were 81.1%, 83.3%, 11.7% and 53.3% respectively. The sensitivity of the ELISA IgG asay for ESAT 6, SCWP, MAN and Ag85 were 71.0%, 71.0%, 71.0% and 21.0% respectively. Conclusion: Detectionof IgA against SCWP promised a good indicator for active tuberculosis infection among Malaysian.

  14. Listeria-vectored vaccine expressing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 30 kDa major secretory protein via the constitutively active prfA* regulon boosts BCG efficacy against tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qingmei; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Masleša-Galić, Saša; Horwitz, Marcus A

    2017-06-19

    A potent vaccine against tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest diseases, is needed to enhance the immunity of people worldwide, most of whom have been vaccinated with the partially effective BCG vaccine. Here we investigate novel live attenuated recombinant Listeria monocytogenes (rLm) vaccines expressing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) 30 kDa major secretory protein (r30/Ag85B) (rLm30) as heterologous booster vaccines in animals primed with BCG. Using three attenuated Lm vectors, rLm Δ actA (LmI), rLm Δ actA Δ inlB (LmII), and rLm Δ actA Δ inlB prfA * (LmIII), we constructed five rLm30 vaccine candidates expressing the r30 linked in-frame to the Lm Listeriolycin O signal sequence and driven by the hly promoter (h30) or linked in-frame to the ActA N-terminus and driven by the actA promoter (a30). All five rLm30 vaccines secreted r30 in broth and macrophages; while rLm expressing r30 via a constitutively active prfA * regulon (rLmIII/a30) expressed the greatest amount of r30 in broth culture, all five rLm vaccines expressed equivalent amounts of r30 in infected macrophages. In comparative studies, boosting BCG-immunized mice with rLmIII/a30 induced the strongest antigen-specific T-cell responses, including splenic and lung polyfunctional CD4+ T-cells expressing the three cytokines of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-2 (IL-2) ( P vaccines were generally more potent booster vaccines than r30 in adjuvant and a recombinant adenovirus vaccine expressing r30. In a setting in which BCG alone was highly immunoprotective, boosting mice with rLmIII/a30, the most potent of the vaccines, significantly enhanced protection against aerosolized Mtb ( P <0.01). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Involvement of CD244 in regulating CD4+ T cell immunity in patients with active tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingfen Yang

    Full Text Available CD244 (2B4 is a member of the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM family of immune cell receptors and it plays an important role in modulating NK cell and CD8(+ T cell immunity. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of CD244/2B4 on CD4(+ T cells from active TB patients and latent infection individuals. Active TB patients had significantly elevated CD244/2B4 expression on M. tuberculosis antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells compared with latent infection individuals. The frequencies of CD244/2B4-expressing antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells were significantly higher in retreatment active TB patients than in new active TB patients. Compared with CD244/2B4-dull and -middle CD4(+ T cells, CD244/2B4-bright CD4(+ T cell subset had significantly reduced expression of IFN-γ, suggesting that CD244/2B4 expression may modulate IFN-γ production in M. tuberculosis antigen-responsive CD4(+ T cells. Activation of CD244/2B4 signaling by cross-linking led to significantly decreased production of IFN-γ. Blockage of CD244/2B4 signaling pathway of T cells from patients with active TB resulted in significantly increased production of IFN-γ, compared with isotype antibody control. In conclusion, CD244/2B4 signaling pathway has an inhibitory role on M. tuberculosis antigen-specific CD4(+ T cell function.

  16. Assessment of an ELISA for serodiagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis in a Cuban population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Ayala

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the serodiagnostic potential of the five recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens CFP-10 (Rv3874, ESAT-6 (Rv3875, APA (Rv1860, PstS-1 (Rv0934, Ag85A (Rv3804c and their combination in a Cuban population with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: The serodiagnostic potential of the recombinant antigens rESAT-6, rCFP-10, rAPA, rPstS-1 produced in Escherichia coli, rAg85A produced in Streptomyces lividans and the combination of the five proteins was evaluated by an indirect ELISA. Humoral immune response was analysed in a group of 140 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (smear-, Mantoux- and culture-positive and in a control group consisting of 34 bacillus CalmetteGuerin vaccinated, Mantoux-negative, healthy subjects. Results: With the exception of CFP-10, the use of the separate recombinant antigens or the antigenic cocktail in ELISA-based serodiagnosis resulted in a significant difference in the mean optical densitiy values between sera of patients and healthy subjects. The highest sensitivity of the assay using single antigens, being 58.57%, was achieved with rPstS-1 compared to 27.14% with rCFP-10, 31.65% with Ag85A, 42.86% with rAPA and 44.29% with rESAT-6. Single antigen ELISAs provided high specificity values ranging from 94.12% to 97.06%. A cocktail of the aforementioned antigens increased the sensitivity to 87.14% and the specificity to 97.06%. Conclusions: An ELISA using a multi-antigen mix containing recombinant immuno-dominant antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, namely, rCFP-10, rESAT-6, rAPA, rPstS-1 and rAg85, increases the sensitivity and specificity compared with that using the single antigens and shows potential as a complementary tool for the diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis in Cuba.

  17. Prevalence and Impact of Diabetes Mellitus Among Patients with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Hye; Lee, Jung Mo; Kang, Young Ae; Leem, Ah Young; Kim, Eun Young; Jung, Ji Ye; Park, Moo Suk; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Se Kyu; Chang, Joon; Kim, Song Yee

    2017-04-01

    South Korea has an increasing prevalence of diabetes and a relatively high burden of tuberculosis. We aimed to determine the prevalence of diabetes in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and examine the effect of diabetes on tuberculosis treatment outcomes. Data from patients ≥30 years diagnosed with and treated for PTB between January 2010 and December 2012 at Severance Hospital, a 2000-bed tertiary referral hospital in Seoul, South Korea, were analyzed and compared with data from a contemporaneous general population sample extracted from KNHANES V. Diabetes prevalence was 24.2% (252/1044) among patients with PTB and 11.6% (1700/14,655) among controls. Diabetes [odds ratios (OR) 2.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.56-4.21, P Diabetes was the only factor associated with unsuccessful treatment outcomes (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.03-2.70, P = 0.039). The prevalence of diabetes was markedly higher in patients with PTB than in a sample of the general South Korean population. Diabetes may delay sputum conversion and adversely affect treatment outcomes; detection and management of diabetes in patients with PTB is crucial.

  18. Efflux pumps of Mycobacterium tuberculosis play a significant role in antituberculosis activity of potential drug candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balganesh, Meenakshi; Dinesh, Neela; Sharma, Sreevalli; Kuruppath, Sanjana; Nair, Anju V; Sharma, Umender

    2012-05-01

    Active efflux of drugs mediated by efflux pumps that confer drug resistance is one of the mechanisms developed by bacteria to counter the adverse effects of antibiotics and chemicals. To understand these efflux mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we generated knockout (KO) mutants of four efflux pumps of the pathogen belonging to different classes. We measured the MICs and kill values of two different compound classes on the wild type (WT) and the efflux pump (EP) KO mutants in the presence and absence of the efflux inhibitors verapamil and l-phenylalanyl-l-arginyl-β-naphthylamide (PAβN). Among the pumps studied, the efflux pumps belonging to the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) class, encoded by Rv1218c, and the SMR (small multidrug resistance) class, encoded by Rv3065, appear to play important roles in mediating the efflux of different chemical classes and antibiotics. Efflux pumps encoded by Rv0849 and Rv1258c also mediate the efflux of these compounds, but to a lesser extent. Increased killing is observed in WT M. tuberculosis cells by these compounds in the presence of either verapamil or PAβN. The efflux pump KO mutants were more susceptible to these compounds in the presence of efflux inhibitors. We have shown that these four efflux pumps of M. tuberculosis play a vital role in mediating efflux of different chemical scaffolds. Inhibitors of one or several of these efflux pumps could have a significant impact in the treatment of tuberculosis. The identification and characterization of Rv0849, a new efflux pump belonging to the MFS (major facilitator superfamily) class, are reported.

  19. Pulmonary tuberculosis with neuromyelitis optica: an uncommon association of a common disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqi, S.A.; Hashmi, M.; Azmat, Z.; Mustafa, S.; Siddiqui, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic tuberculosis has been reported with varying neurological manifestations like meningitis, tuberculomas, myositis and neuropathy. Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a well known neurological entity which has been described in association with several systemic disorders like systemic lupus erythematosis, diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. insecticides etc. However, only a few cases of NMO have been reported in association with Here, we report a case of pulmonary tuberculosis in association with NMO to highlight the under-reported association of NMO with pulmonary tuberculosis presenting in a peculiar anatomical fashion i.e. longitudinal myelitis with predominant posterior column involvement. (author)

  20. [Cost-benefit analysis of the active screening of pulmonary tuberculosis in a recluse population entering prison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, V; Domínguez, A; Alcaide, J

    1997-01-01

    In spanish prisons, tuberculosis is a serious problem of public health and health authorities don't take it seriously. To prove the efficiency of pulmonary tuberculosis case-finding on arrival at prison in order to get location resources in this activity. Cost-benefit analysis of a case-finding program compared with to wait for diagnostic to illness. The sensitivity of test was fixed in 80% and the specificity in 99.99%. The cost was based on market prices. Sensitivity analysis was done in every variables as well as tridimensional analysis in those one of more influence. The case-finding was efficient on prevalences of tuberculosis over 5 per mil. Its efficiency was hardly affected by discount social rates or the sensitivity of diagnostic tests. The prevalence of illness, the cost of diagnostic activities as well as the success of treatment and the specificity of diagnostic tests used had as influence on the efficiency model. The tridimensional analysis proved that the case-finding of pulmonary tuberculosis has efficiency on low prevalences (1 per thousand), provided the number of people cured is a 5% higher than the alternative one and the costs of case-finding less than 1,000 pesetas per subject. The case-finding pulmonary tuberculosis on arrival at prisons is of high efficiency. In a cost-opportunity situation (location of available resources, penitentiary and extrapenitentiary) the program is very efficacious taking into account the fact of higher prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis in this people.

  1. Systematic Survey of Serine Hydrolase Activity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Defines Changes Associated with Persistence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Corrie; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Frando, Andrew; Sadler, Natalie C.; Brown, Robert W.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.; Grundner, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    The transition between replication and non-replication underlies much of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) pathogenicity, as non- or slowly replicating Mtb are responsible for persistence and poor treatment outcomes. Therapeutic targeting of non-replicating, persistent populations is a priority for tuberculosis treatment, but only few drug targets in non-replicating Mtb are currently known. Here, we directly measure the activity of the highly diverse and druggable serine hydrolases (SHs) during active replication and non-replication by activity-based proteomics. We predict serine hydrolase activity for 78 proteins, including 27 proteins with previously unknown function, and identify 37 SHs that remain active even in the absence of replication, providing a set of candidate persistence targets. Non-replication was associated with large shifts in the activity of the majority of SHs. These activity changes were largely independent of SH abundance, indicating extensive post-translational regulation. By probing a large cross-section of druggable Mtb enzyme space during replication and non-replication, we identify new SHs and suggest new persistence targets.

  2. The potential role of vitamin D for prevention and treatment of tuberculosis and infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catia Dini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Vitamin D deficiency (VDD is a common condition among several populations in the world. VDD is associated with higher incidence of immune system disorders and faster progression of some infectious diseases. Vitamin D is known to be of physiological importance, it is considered an essential micronutrient for the bone health and plays a beneficial role in the prevention and/or treatment of a number of chronic diseases. Vitamin D has a complex action on the immune system. RESULTS: Evidence that vitamin D protects against tuberculosis has been supported by in vitro, epidemiological and some preliminary clinical studies. Vitamin D has a potential effect on HIV (human immunodeficiency virus and plays a crucial role in the defence against respiratory infections. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D supplementation could be a low-cost, practical method to protect groups of people with high incidence of those diseases. Public health education should stress the need for adequate dietary intake of vitamin D in those vulnerable groups.

  3. Global, regional, and national incidence and mortality for HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria during 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J.L. Murray (Christopher); K.F. Ortblad (Katrina F); C. Guinovart (Caterina); S.S. Lim (Stephen); T.M. Wolock (Timothy M); D.A. Roberts (D Allen); E.A. Dansereau (Emily A); N. Graetz (Nicholas); R.M. Barber (Ryan); J.C. Brown (Jonathan C); H. Wang (Haidong); H.C. Duber (Herbert C); M. Naghavi (Morteza); D. Dicker (Daniel); L. Dandona (Lalit); J.A. Salomon (Joshua); K.R. Heuton (Kyle R); K. Foreman (Kyle); D.E. Phillips (David E); T.D. Fleming (Thomas D); A.D. Flaxman (Abraham D); B.K. Phillips (Bryan K); E.M. Johnson (Elizabeth); M.S. Coggeshall (Megan S); F. Abd-Allah (Foad); S.F. Abera (Semaw Ferede); J.P. Abraham (Jerry); I. Abubakar (Ibrahim); L.J. Abu-Raddad (Laith J); N.M. Abu-Rmeileh (Niveen Me); T. Achoki (Tom); A. Adeyemo (Adebowale); A.K. Adou (Arsène Kouablan); J.C. Adsuar (José C); E.E. Agardh (Emilie Elisabet); D. Akena (Dickens); M.J. Al Kahbouri (Mazin J); D. Alasfoor (Deena); M.I. Albittar (Mohammed I); G. Alcalá-Cerra (Gabriel); M.A. Alegretti (Miguel Angel); G. Alemu (Getnet ); R. Alfonso-Cristancho (Rafael); S. Alhabib (Samia); R. Ali (Raghib); F. Alla (Francois); P.J. Allen (Peter); U. Alsharif (Ubai); E. Alvarez (Elena); N. Alvis-Guzman (Nelson); A.A. Amankwaa (Adansi A); A.T. Amare (Azmeraw T); H. Amini (Hassan); K.A. Ammar; B.O. Anderson (Benjamin); C.A.T. Antonio (Carl Abelardo T); P. Anwari (Palwasha); J. Ärnlöv (Johan); V.S.A. Arsenijevic (Valentina S Arsic); A. Artaman (Ali); R.J. Asghar (Rana J); R. Assadi (Reza); L.S. Atkins (Lydia S); A.F. Badawi (Alaa); A. Banerjee (Amitava); S. Basu (Saonli); J. Beardsley (Justin); T. Bekele (Tolesa); M.L. Bell (Michelle Lee); E. Bernabe (Eduardo); T.J. Beyene (Tariku Jibat); N. Bhala (Neeraj); P.L. Bhalla (Pankaj); Z.A. Bhutta (Zulfiqar A); A.B. Abdulhak (Aref Bin); A. Binagwaho (Agnes); J.D. Blore (Jed D); D. Bose (Dipan); M. Brainin (Michael); N. Breitborde (Nicholas); C.A. Castañeda-Orjuela (Carlos A); F. Catalá-López (Ferrán); D. Chadha; J.-C. Chang (Jung-Chen); Y.T. Chiang; T.-W. Chuang (Ting-Wu); M. Colomar (Mercedes); L.T. Cooper Jr. (Leslie Trumbull); C. Cooper (Charles); K.J. Courville (Karen J); M.R. Cowie (Martin R.); M. Criqui (Michael); R. Dandona (Rakhi); A. Dayama (Anand); D. de Leo (Diego); F. Degenhardt; B. Del Pozo-Cruz (Borja); K. Deribe (Kebede); D.C. Des Jarlais (Don C); M. Dessalegn (Muluken); S.D. Dharmaratne (Samath D); U. Dilmen (Uǧur); E.L. Ding (Eric); J.M. Driscoll; Z. Durrani; R.G. Ellenbogen (Richard G); S. Ermakov (Sergey); A. Esteghamati (Alireza); E.J.A. Faraon (Emerito Jose A); F. Farzadfar (Farshad); S.-M. Fereshtehnejad (Seyed-Mohammad); D.O. Fijabi (Daniel Obadare); M.H. Forouzanfar (Mohammad H); U. Fra.Paleo (Urbano); L. Gaffikin (Lynne); A. Gamkrelidze (Amiran); F.G. Gankpé (Fortuné Gbètoho); J.M. Geleijnse (Marianne); B.D. Gessner (Bradford D); K.B. Gibney (Katherine B); I.A.M. Ginawi (Ibrahim Abdelmageem Mohamed); E.L. Glaser (Elizabeth L); P. Gona (Philimon); A. Goto (Akimoto); H.N. Gouda (Hebe N); H.C. Gugnani (Harish Chander); R. Gupta (Rajeev); R. Gupta (Rajeev); N. Hafezi-Nejad (Nima); R.R. Hamadeh (Randah Ribhi); M. Hammami (Mouhanad); G.J. Hankey (Graeme); H.L. Harb (Hilda L); J.M. Haro (Josep Maria); R. Havmoeller (Rasmus); S.I. Hay (Simon I); M.T. Hedayati (Mohammad T); I.B.H. Pi (Ileana B Heredia); H.W. Hoek (Hans); J.C. Hornberger (John C); H.D. Hosgood (H Dean); P.J. Hotez (Peter); D.G. Hoy (Damian G); J. Huang (Jian); K.M. Iburg (Kim M); B.T. Idrisov (Bulat T); K. Innos (Kaire); K.H. Jacobsen (Kathryn H); P. Jeemon (Panniyammakal); P.N. Jensen (Paul N); V. Jha (Vivekanand); G. Jiang (Guohong); J.B. Jonas; K. Juel (Knud); H. Kan (Haidong); I. Kankindi (Ida); V. Karam (Vincent); F. Karch (Francois); C.K. Karema (Corine Kakizi); A. Kaul (Anil); N. Kawakami (Norito); D.S. Kazi (Dhruv S); A.H. Kemp (Andrew H); A.P. Kengne (Andre Pascal); A. Keren (Andre); M. Kereselidze (Maia); Y.S. Khader (Yousef Saleh); S.E.A.H. Khalifa (Shams Eldin Ali Hassan); E.A. Khan (Ejaz Ahmed); Y.-H. Khang (Young-Ho); I. Khonelidze (Irma); Y. Kinfu (Yohannes); J.M. Kinge (Jonas M); L. Knibbs (Luke); Y. Kokubo (Yoshihiro); S. Kosen (Soewarta); B.K. Defo (Barthelemy Kuate); V.S. Kulkarni (Veena S); C. Kulkarni (Chanda); K. Kumar (Kuldeep); R.B. Kumar (Ravi B); G.A. Kumar (G Anil); G.F. Kwan (Gene F); T. Lai (Taavi); A.L. Balaji (Arjun Lakshmana); H. Lam (Hilton); Q. Lan (Qing); V.C. Lansingh (Van C); H.J. Larson (Heidi J); A. Larsson (Anders); J.-T. Lee (Jong-Tae); P.N. Leigh (Nigel); M. Leinsalu (Mall); R. Leung (Ricky); Y. Li (Yichong); Y. Li (Yongmei); G.M.F. de Lima (Graça Maria Ferreira); H.-H. Lin (Hsien-Ho); S.E. Lipshultz (Steven); S. Liu (Simin); Y. Liu (Yang); B.K. Lloyd (Belinda K); P.A. Lotufo (Paulo A); V.M.P. Machado (Vasco Manuel Pedro); J.H. Maclachlan (Jennifer H); C. Magis-Rodriguez (Carlos); M. Majdan (Marek); C.C. Mapoma (Christopher Chabila); W. Marcenes (Wagner); M.B. Marzan (Melvin Barrientos); J.R. Masci (Joseph R); R. Mashal; A.J. Mason-Jones (Amanda J); B.M. Mayosi (Bongani); T.T. Mazorodze (Tasara T); M.J. Mckay (Michael); M.J. Meaney; M.M. Mehndiratta (Man Mohan); F. Mejia-Rodriguez (Fabiola); Y.A. Melaku (Yohannes Adama); Z.A. Memish (Ziad); W. Mendoza (Walter); T.R. Miller (Ted R); E.J. Mills (Edward J); K.A. Mohammad (Karzan Abdulmuhsin); A.H. Mokdad (Ali H); G.L. Mola (Glen Liddell); L. Monasta (Lorenzo); M. Montico (Marcella); A.R. Moore (Ami R); R. Mori (Riccardo); W.N. Moturi (Wilkister Nyaora); M. Mukaigawara (Mitsuru); A.C. Murthy (Adeline C.); A. Naheed (Aliya); K.S. Naidoo (Kovin S); L. Naldi; M. Nangia (Monika); K.M.V. Narayan (Venkat); J.H.E. Nash (John); C. Nejjari (Chakib); R.D. Nelson (Robert); S.P. Neupane (Sudan Prasad); C. Newton (Cameron); M. Ng (Marie); M.I. Nisar (Muhammad Imran); S. Nolte (Sandra); O.F. Norheim (Ole F); V. Nowaseb (Vincent); L. Nyakarahuka (Luke); I.-H. Oh (In-Hwan); T. Ohkubo (Takayoshi); B.O. Olusanya (Bolajoko O); S.B. Omer (Saad B); J.N. Opio (John Nelson); O.E. Orisakwe (Orish Ebere); N.G. Pandian (Natesa); C. Papachristou; M.S. Caicedo (Marco); J. Patten; V.K. Paul (Vinod K); B.I. Pavlin (Boris Igor); N. Pearce (Neil); D.M. Pereira (David M); Z. Pervaiz (Zahid); K. Pesudovs (Konrad); M. Petzold (Max); F. Pourmalek (Farshad); D. Qato (Dima); A.D. Quezada (Amado D); D.A. Quistberg (D Alex); A. Rafay (Anwar); K. Rahimi (Kazem); V. Rahimi-Movaghar (Vafa); S.U. Rahman (Sajjad Ur); M. Raju (Murugesan); S.M. Rana (Saleem M); H. Razavi (Homie); R.Q. Reilly (Robert Quentin); G. Remuzzi (Giuseppe); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); L. Ronfani (Luca); N. van Roy (Nadine); M.L. Sabin (Miriam Lewis); M.Y. Saeedi (Mohammad Yahya); M.A. Sahraian (Mohammad Ali); G.M.J. Samonte (Genesis May J); M.S. Sawhney (Monika); I.J.C. Schneider (Ione J C); D.C. Schwebel (David C); S. Seedat (Soraya); S.G. Sepanlou (Sadaf G); E.E. Servan-Mori (Edson E); S. Sheikhbahaei (Sara); K. Shibuya (Kenji); H.H. Shin (Hwashin Hyun); I. Shiue (Ivy); R. Shivakoti (Rupak); I.D. Sigfusdottir (Inga Dora); D.H. Silberberg (Donald H); A.P. Silva (Andrea P); J. Simard (Jacques); J.A. Singh (Jasvinder); V. Skirbekk (Vegard); K. Sliwa (Karen); S. Soneji (Samir); S.S. Soshnikov (Sergey S); C.T. Sreeramareddy (Chandrashekhar T); V.K. Stathopoulou (Vasiliki Kalliopi); K. Stroumpoulis (Konstantinos); S. Swaminathan; B.C. Sykes (Bryan); K.M. Tabb (Karen M); R.T. Talongwa (Roberto Tchio); E.Y. Tenkorang (Eric Yeboah); A.S. Terkawi (Abdullah Sulieman); A.J. Thomson (Alan J); A.L. Thorne-Lyman (Andrew L); J.A. Towbin (Jeffrey A); J. Traebert (Jefferson); B.X. Tran (Bach X); Z.T. Dimbuene (Zacharie Tsala); M. Tsilimbaris (Miltiadis); U.S. Uchendu (Uche S); K.N. Ukwaja (Kingsley N); S.R. Vallely (Stephen); T.J. Vasankari (Tommi J); N. Venketasubramanian (Narayanaswamy); F.S. Violante (Francesco S); V.V. Vlassov (Vasiliy Victorovich); P. Waller (Patrick); M.T. Wallin (Mitchell T); L. Wang (Linhong); S.X. Wang; Y. Wang (Yanping); S. Weichenthal (Scott); E. Weiderpass (Elisabete); R.G. Weintraub (Robert G); R. Westerman (Ronny); R.G. White (Richard); J.D. Wilkinson (James D); T.N. Williams (Thomas Neil); S.M. Woldeyohannes (Solomon Meseret); J.B. Wong (John); G. Xu (Gelin); Y.C. Yang (Yang C); K.-I. Yano; P. Yip (Paul); N. Yonemoto (Naohiro); S.-J. Yoon (Seok-Jun); M. Younis (Mustafa); C. Yu (Chuanhua); K.Y. Jin (Kim Yun); M. El Sayed Zaki (Maysaa); Y. Zhao (Yong); Y. Zheng (Yuhui); K. Balakrishnan (Kalpana); M. Zhou (Ming); J. Zhu (Jun); X.N. Zou (Xiao Nong); A.D. Lopez (Alan D); T. Vos (Theo)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Background: The Millennium Declaration in 2000 brought special global attention to HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria through the formulation of Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 6. The Global Burden of Disease 2013 study provides a consistent and comprehensive approach

  4. Preliminary study on fractions' activities of red betel vine (Piper crocatum Ruiz & Pav) leaves ethanol extract toward Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmawaty, Farida Juliantina; Julianto, Tatang Shabur; Tamhid, Hady Anshory

    2018-04-01

    This research aims to identify the antimycobacterial activity of fraction of red betel vine leaves ethanol extract (methanol fraction, ethyl acetate, and chloroform) toward M. tuberculosis. Red betel vine leaves ethanol extract was made with maceration method using ethanol solvent 70%. Resulted extract was then fractionated using Liquid Vacuum Chromatography (LVC) with methanol, ethyl acetate, and chloroform solvent. Each fractionation was exposed to M. tuberculosis with serial dilution method. Controls of fraction, media, bacteria, and isoniazid as standard drug were included in this research. The group of compound from the most active fraction was then identified. The research found that the best fraction for antimycobacterial activity toward M. tuberculosisis chloroform fraction. The compound group of chloroform fraction was then identified. The fraction contains flavonoid, tannin, alkaloid, and terpenoid. The fraction of methanol, ethyl acetate, and chloroform from red betel vine leaves has antimycobacterial activity toward M. tuberculosis. Chloroform fraction has the best antimycobacterial activity and it contains flavonoid, tannin, alkaloid, and terpenoid.

  5. Anti-tuberculosis activity of -lactam antibiotics: prospects for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review is prepared to show results on the anti-TB activity of -lactam antibiotics. -Lactams are among the oldest drugs with little or no side effects. Both in vitro studies and clinical data indicate that -lactams have a promising activity for use in the management of MDR-TB. More studies are required to define the interaction ...

  6. Drivers of Tuberculosis Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathema, Barun; Andrews, Jason R; Cohen, Ted; Borgdorff, Martien W; Behr, Marcel; Glynn, Judith R; Rustomjee, Roxana; Silk, Benjamin J; Wood, Robin

    2017-11-03

    Measuring tuberculosis transmission is exceedingly difficult, given the remarkable variability in the timing of clinical disease after Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection; incident disease can result from either a recent (ie, weeks to months) or a remote (ie, several years to decades) infection event. Although we cannot identify with certainty the timing and location of tuberculosis transmission for individuals, approaches for estimating the individual probability of recent transmission and for estimating the fraction of tuberculosis cases due to recent transmission in populations have been developed. Data used to estimate the probable burden of recent transmission include tuberculosis case notifications in young children and trends in tuberculin skin test and interferon γ-release assays. More recently, M. tuberculosis whole-genome sequencing has been used to estimate population levels of recent transmission, identify the distribution of specific strains within communities, and decipher chains of transmission among culture-positive tuberculosis cases. The factors that drive the transmission of tuberculosis in communities depend on the burden of prevalent tuberculosis; the ways in which individuals live, work, and interact (eg, congregate settings); and the capacity of healthcare and public health systems to identify and effectively treat individuals with infectious forms of tuberculosis. Here we provide an overview of these factors, describe tools for measurement of ongoing transmission, and highlight knowledge gaps that must be addressed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  7. Total hip replacement infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complicated by Addison disease and psoas muscle abscess: a case report

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    De Nardo Pasquale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Prosthetic joint infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis is occasionally encountered in clinical practice. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a prosthetic joint infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis complicated by psoas abscesses and secondary Addison disease. Case presentation A 67-year-old immunocompetent Caucasian woman underwent total left hip arthroplasty because of osteoarthritis. After 18 months, she underwent arthroplasty revision for a possible prosthetic infection. Periprosthetic tissue specimens for bacteria were negative, and empirical antibiotic therapy was unsuccessful. She was then admitted to our department because of complications arising 22 months after arthroplasty. A physical examination revealed a sinus tract overlying her left hip and skin and mucosal pigmentation. Her levels of C-reactive protein, basal cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and sodium were out of normal range. Results of the tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON-TB Gold test were positive. Computed tomography revealed a periprosthetic abscess and the inclusion of the left psoas muscle. Results of microbiological tests were negative, but polymerase chain reaction of a specimen taken from the hip fistula was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our patient's condition was diagnosed as prosthetic joint infection and muscle psoas abscess due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and secondary Addison disease. She underwent standard treatment with rifampicin, ethambutol, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide associated with hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone. At 15 months from the beginning of therapy, she was in good clinical condition and free of symptoms. Conclusions Prosthetic joint infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is uncommon. A differential diagnosis of tuberculosis should be considered when dealing with prosthetic joint infection, especially when repeated smears and histology examination from infected

  8. Identification and Characterization of Lipase Activity and Immunogenicity of LipL from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Jun Cao

    Full Text Available Lipids and lipid-metabolizing esterases/lipases are highly important for the mycobacterial life cycle and, possibly, for mycobacterial virulence. In this study, we expressed 10 members of the Lip family of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Among the 10 proteins, LipL displayed a significantly high enzymatic activity for the hydrolysis of long-chain lipids. The optimal temperature for the lipase activity of LipL was demonstrated to be 37°C, and the optimal pH was 8.0. The lipase active center was not the conserved motif G-x-S-x-G, but rather the S-x-x-K and GGG motifs, and the key catalytic amino acid residues were identified as G50, S88, and K91, as demonstrated through site-directed mutagenesis experiments. A three-dimensional modeling structure of LipL was constructed, which showed that the GGG motif was located in the surface of a pocket structure. Furthermore, the subcellular localization of LipL was demonstrated to be on the mycobacterial surface by Western blot analysis. Our results revealed that the LipL protein could induce a strong humoral immune response in humans and activate a CD8+ T cell-mediated response in mice. Overall, our study identified and characterized a novel lipase denoted LipL from M. tuberculosis, and demonstrated that LipL functions as an immunogen that activates both humoral and cell-mediated responses.

  9. Perinatal tuberculosis: a diagnostic challenge

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    Edna Lúcia S. de Souza

    Full Text Available Despite the high prevalence of tuberculosis in adults and children, the congenital and perinatal forms of tuberculosis are rare. In Brazil, there has been only one published case of congenital tuberculosis and two cases of the perinatal form of this disease. We report a case of perinatal tuberculosis presenting with pneumonia. Alcohol-acid-resistant bacilli were found in the gastric lavage. Diagnosis of this disease presentation requires a high index of suspicion.

  10. Tuberculosis active case finding in Cambodia: a pragmatic, cost-effectiveness comparison of three implementation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Richard; Khim, Keovathanak; Boudarene, Lydia; Yoong, Joanne; Phalla, Chea; Saint, Saly; Koeut, Pichenda; Mao, Tan Eang; Coker, Richard; Khan, Mishal Sameer

    2017-08-22

    Globally, almost 40% of tuberculosis (TB) patients remain undiagnosed, and those that are diagnosed often experience prolonged delays before initiating correct treatment, leading to ongoing transmission. While there is a push for active case finding (ACF) to improve early detection and treatment of TB, there is extremely limited evidence about the relative cost-effectiveness of different ACF implementation models. Cambodia presents a unique opportunity for addressing this gap in evidence as ACF has been implemented using different models, but no comparisons have been conducted. The objective of our study is to contribute to knowledge and methodology on comparing cost-effectiveness of alternative ACF implementation models from the health service perspective, using programmatic data, in order to inform national policy and practice. We retrospectively compared three distinct ACF implementation models - door to door symptom screening in urban slums, checking contacts of TB patients, and door to door symptom screening focusing on rural populations aged above 55 - in terms of the number of new bacteriologically-positive pulmonary TB cases diagnosed and the cost of implementation assuming activities are conducted by the national TB program of Cambodia. We calculated the cost per additional case detected using the alternative ACF models. Our analysis, which is the first of its kind for TB, revealed that the ACF model based on door to door screening in poor urban areas of Phnom Penh was the most cost-effective (249 USD per case detected, 737 cases diagnosed), followed by the model based on testing contacts of TB patients (308 USD per case detected, 807 cases diagnosed), and symptomatic screening of older rural populations (316 USD per case detected, 397 cases diagnosed). Our study provides new evidence on the relative effectiveness and economics of three implementation models for enhanced TB case finding, in line with calls for data from 'routine conditions' to be included

  11. Serial interferon-gamma release assays during treatment of active tuberculosis in young adults

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    Lee Choon-Taek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of interferon-γ release assay (IGRA in monitoring responses to anti-tuberculosis (TB treatment is not clear. We evaluated the results of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-tube (QFT-GIT assay over time during the anti-TB treatment of adults with no underlying disease. Methods We enrolled soldiers who were newly diagnosed with active TB and admitted to the central referral military hospital in South Korea between May 1, 2008 and September 30, 2009. For each participant, we preformed QFT-GIT assay before treatment (baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 months after initiating anti-TB medication. Results Of 67 eligible patients, 59 (88.1% completed the study protocol. All participants were males who were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-negative and had no chronic diseases. Their median age was 21 years (range, 20-48. Initially, 57 (96.6% patients had positive QFT-GIT results, and 53 (89.8%, 42 (71.2%, and 39 (66.1% had positive QFT-GIT results at 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively. The IFN-γ level at baseline was 5.31 ± 5.34 IU/ml, and the levels at 1, 3, and 6 months were 3.95 ± 4.30, 1.82 ± 2.14, and 1.50 ± 2.12 IU/ml, respectively. All patients had clinical and radiologic improvements after treatment and were cured. A lower IFN-γ level, C-reactive protein ≥ 3 mg/dl, and the presence of fever (≥ 38.3°C at diagnosis were associated with negative reversion of the QFT-GIT assay. Conclusion Although the IFN-γ level measured by QFT-GIT assay decreased after successful anti-TB treatment in most participants, less than half of them exhibited QFT-GIT reversion. Thus, the reversion to negativity of the QFT-GIT assay may not be a good surrogate for treatment response in otherwise healthy young patients with TB.

  12. Childhood tuberculosis and malnutrition.

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    Jaganath, Devan; Mupere, Ezekiel

    2012-12-15

    Despite the burden of both malnutrition and tuberculosis in children worldwide, there are few studies on the mechanisms that underlie this relationship. From available research, it appears that malnutrition is a predictor of tuberculosis disease and is associated with worse outcomes. This is supported through several lines of evidence, including the role of vitamin D receptor genotypes, malnutrition's effects on immune development, respiratory infections among malnourished children, and limited work specifically on pediatric tuberculosis and malnutrition. Nutritional supplementation has yet to suggest significant benefits on the course of tuberculosis in children. There is a critical need for research on childhood tuberculosis, specifically on how nutritional status affects the risk and progression of tuberculosis and whether nutritional supplementation improves clinical outcomes or prevents disease.

  13. Tea Drinking and Its Association with Active Tuberculosis Incidence among Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults: The Singapore Chinese Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Avril Zixin; Pan, An; Chee, Cynthia Bin Eng; Wang, Yee-Tang; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2017-05-25

    Experimental studies showed that tea polyphenols may inhibit growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis . However, no prospective epidemiologic study has investigated tea drinking and the risk of active tuberculosis. We investigated this association in the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective population-based cohort of 63,257 Chinese aged 45-74 years recruited between 1993 and 1998 in Singapore. Information on habitual drinking of tea (including black and green tea) and coffee was collected via structured questionnaires. Incident cases of active tuberculosis were identified via linkage with the nationwide tuberculosis registry up to 31 December 2014. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the relation of tea and coffee consumption with tuberculosis risk. Over a mean 16.8 years of follow-up, we identified 1249 incident cases of active tuberculosis. Drinking either black or green tea was associated with a dose-dependent reduction in tuberculosis risk. Compared to non-drinkers, the hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval (CI)) was 1.01 (0.85-1.21) in monthly tea drinkers, 0.84 (0.73-0.98) in weekly drinkers, and 0.82 (0.71-0.96) in daily drinkers ( p for trend = 0.003). Coffee or caffeine intake was not significantly associated with tuberculosis risk. In conclusion, regular tea drinking was associated with a reduced risk of active tuberculosis.

  14. The role of the time-kill kinetics assay as part of a preclinical modeling framework for assessing the activity of anti-tuberculosis drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bax, Hannelore I; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A J M; de Vogel, Corné P; van der Meijden, Aart; Verbon, Annelies; de Steenwinkel, Jurriaan E M

    2017-07-01

    Novel treatment strategies for tuberculosis are urgently needed. Many different preclinical models assessing anti-tuberculosis drug activity are available, but it is yet unclear which combination of models is most predictive of clinical treatment efficacy. The aim of this study was to determine the role of our in vitro time kill-kinetics assay as an asset to a predictive preclinical modeling framework assessing anti-tuberculosis drug activity. The concentration- and time-dependent mycobacterial killing capacities of six anti-tuberculosis drugs were determined during exposure as single drugs or in dual, triple and quadruple combinations towards a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype strain and drug resistance was assessed. Streptomycin, rifampicin and isoniazid were most active against fast-growing M. tuberculosis. Isoniazid with rifampicin or high dose ethambutol were the only synergistic drug combinations. The addition of rifampicin or streptomycin to isoniazid prevented isoniazid resistance. In vitro ranking showed agreement with early bactericidal activity in tuberculosis patients for some but not all anti-tuberculosis drugs. The time-kill kinetics assay provides important information on the mycobacterial killing dynamics of anti-tuberculosis drugs during the early phase of drug exposure. As such, this assay is a valuable component of the preclinical modeling framework. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Being active when you have heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease - activity; CAD - activity; Coronary artery disease - activity; Angina - activity ... Getting regular exercise when you have heart disease is ... It may also help you be more active without chest pain or other ...

  16. Comparison of sensitivity of quantiferon-tb gold test and tuberculin skin test in active pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, K.F.; Ambreen, A.; Butt, T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the sensitivity of tuberculin skin test (TST) and quantiFERON-TB gold test (QFT-G) in active pulmonary tuberculosis. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pulmonology, Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi, from July 2011 to January 2012. Methodology: QuantiFERON-TB gold test (QFT-G) was evaluated and compared it with tuberculin skin test (TST) in 50 cases of active pulmonary tuberculosis, in whom tuberculous infection was suspected on clinical, radiological and microbiological grounds. Sensitivity was determined against positive growth for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Results: Out of 50 cases, 43 were females and 7 were males. The mean age was 41.84 A+- 19.03 years. Sensitivity of QFT-G was 80% while that of TST was 28%. Conclusion: QFT-G has much higher sensitivity than TST for active pulmonary tuberculosis. It is unaffected by prior BCG administration and prior exposure to atypical mycobacteria. A positive QFT-G result can be an adjunct to diagnosis in patients having clinical and radiological data compatible with pulmonary tuberculosis. (author)

  17. A novel clinical sign in intraocular tuberculosis: Active chorioretinitis within chorioretinal atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Avinash Pathengay; Bhavik Panchal; Himadri Choudhury; Soumyava Basu; Nidhi Relhan; Harry W. Flynn, Jr.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report a novel clinical sign in patients with intraocular tuberculosis. The current study is an observational consecutive case series of patients diagnosed with intraocular tuberculosis managed at a tertiary eye care centre from June 1, 2012 to December 31, 2015. Observations: The diagnosis of intraocular tuberculosis was made in 6 patients based on ocular features suggestive of tuberculosis along with a positive tuberculin skin testing and chest X-ray consistent with tuberculo...

  18. Respiratory symptoms and active tuberculosis in a prison in Southern Brazil: associated epidemiologic variables

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    Jeane Zanini Rocha

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: This study is justified by the high TB prevalence in prisons, which constitutes a public health problem and aims to estimate the prevalence of active tuberculosis (TB and determine the variables associated with respiratory symptoms in a prison in Brazil. Methods: This is a descriptive study of 262 inmates divided into respiratory symptomatic and asymptomatic groups. Samples were evaluated by microscopy following the cultivation of the sputum from symptomatic individuals. Associated epidemiological variables were also evaluated. Results: Among the 262 inmates included, 178 (68% were considered symptomatic, and of these, 25 (14% were diagnosed with active TB. The contribution of culturing in the detection of TB cases was 48%. The prevalence of active TB was 9,542/100.000. Low educational level, use of drugs and alcohol, prison recidivism, and previous TB and HIV-positive status were associated with the presence of respiratory symptoms. Being male, single, black, a prison recidivist, an alcoholic and HIV-seropositive was associated with the development of TB. The rate of TB/HIV co infection was 60%. The outcome was death in 12% of patients. Drug therapy interruption was reported by 96% of patients. Conclusions: The studied population showed a high prevalence of TB and TB/HIV co-infection. In addition, the rates of drug therapy interruption and mortality were alarmingly elevated. KEYWORDS: Epidemiology. Tuberculosis. Coinfections. HIV infection. Prisons.

  19. Pictorial essay: Orbital tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narula, Mahender K; Chaudhary, Vikas; Baruah, Dhiraj; Kathuria, Manoj; Anand, Rama

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the orbit is rare, even in places where tuberculosis is endemic. The disease may involve soft tissue, the lacrimal gland, or the periosteum or bones of the orbital wall. Intracranial extension, in the form of extradural abscess, and infratemporal fossa extension has been described. This pictorial essay illustrates the imaging findings of nine histopathologically confirmed cases of orbital tuberculosis. All these patients responded to antituberculous treatment

  20. Tuberculosis and nutrition

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    Gupta Krishna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition and tuberculosis are both problems of considerable magnitude in most of the underdeveloped regions of the world. These two problems tend to interact with each other. Tuberculosis mortality rates in different economic groups in a community tend to vary inversely with their economic levels. Similarly, nutritional status is significantly lower in patients with active tuberculosis compared with healthy controls. Malnutrition can lead to secondary immunodeficiency that increases the host′s susceptibility to infection. In patients with tuberculosis, it leads to reduction in appetite, nutrient malabsorption, micronutrient malabsorption, and altered metabolism leading to wasting. Both, protein-energy malnutrition and micronutrients deficiencies increase the risk of tuberculosis. It has been found that malnourished tuberculosis patients have delayed recovery and higher mortality rates than well-nourished patients. Nutritional status of patients improves during tuberculosis chemotherapy. High prevalence of human immunodeficiency (HIV infection in the underdeveloped countries further aggravates the problem of malnutrition and tuberculosis. Effect of malnutrition on childhood tuberculosis and tuberculin skin test are other important considerations. Nutritional supplementation may represent a novel approach for fast recovery in tuberculosis patients. In addition, raising nutritional status of population may prove to be an effective measure to control tuberculosis in underdeveloped areas of world.

  1. Air pollution and tuberculosis disease mortality: a quantitative analysis (a viewpoint)

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    Koshal, R K; Koshal, M

    1976-01-01

    This paper establishes a quantitative relationship between tuberculosis mortality rates and the levels of air pollution and other socio-economic variables by using a macro-model. With the help of regression analysis, it is observed that a hundred percent increase in the air pollution would imply an increase in the mortality rate by about 45--79 percent. An average improvement of 50 percent in the quality of air would reduce the tuberculosis mortality rate by 22.5--39.5 percent. This would imply a social saving of about $139 to $234 million per year in terms of tuberculosis only.

  2. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

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    Pereira, Jose M. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: jmpjesus@yahoo.com; Madureira, Antonio J. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Vieira, Alberto [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Ramos, Isabel [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)

    2005-08-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis.

  3. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Jose M.; Madureira, Antonio J.; Vieira, Alberto; Ramos, Isabel

    2005-01-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis

  4. Prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection among health care workers in a hospital for pulmonary diseases

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    Diel Roland

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the prevalence of latent tuberculosis infections (LTBI in health care workers (HCW in low-incidence countries especially in hospitals for pulmonary diseases. With Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA, a new method for diagnosis of LTBI is available which is more specific than the tuberculin skin test (TST. Objectives The study was designed to estimate prevalence of LTBI among 270 HCW in a Hospital of Pulmonary Diseases routinely screened for TB. Methods LTBI was assessed by the QuantiFERON-Gold In Tube (QFT-IT. Information on gender, age, workplace, job title, BCG vaccination and history of both TB and TST were collected using a standardised questionnaire. Adjusted odds ratios for potential risk factors for LTBI were calculated. Results The prevalence of LTBI was 7.2%. In HCW younger than 30 years LTBI prevalence was 3.5% and in those older than 50 years 22%. Physicians and nurses showed a higher prevalence rate than other professions (10.8% to 4.5%. The putative risk factors for LTBI were age (>50 year OR 9.3, 95%CI 2.5–33.7, working as physicians/nurses (OR 3. 95%CI 1.2–10.4 and no previous TST in medical history (OR 4.4, 95%CI 1.01–18.9 when compared to those with a negative TST. Conclusion Prevalence of LTBI assessed by QFT-IT is low, this indicates a low infection risk even in hospitals for pulmonary diseases. No statement can be made regarding the occupational risk as compared to the general population because there are no LTBI prevalence data from Germany available. The higher LTBI prevalence rate in older HCWs might be due to the cohort effect or the longer time at risk.

  5. HIV-1 Infection Is Associated with Depletion and Functional Impairment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific CD4 T Cells in Individuals with Latent Tuberculosis Infection.

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    Day, Cheryl L; Abrahams, Deborah A; Harris, Levelle D; van Rooyen, Michele; Stone, Lynnett; de Kock, Marwou; Hanekom, Willem A

    2017-09-15

    Coinfection with HIV is the single greatest risk factor for reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and progression to active tuberculosis disease. HIV-associated dysregulation of adaptive immunity by depletion of CD4 Th cells most likely contributes to loss of immune control of LTBI in HIV-infected individuals, although the precise mechanisms whereby HIV infection impedes successful T cell-mediated control of M. tuberculosis have not been well defined. To further delineate mechanisms whereby HIV impairs protective immunity to M. tuberculosis , we evaluated the frequency, phenotype, and functional capacity of M. tuberculosis -specific CD4 T cells in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected adults with LTBI. HIV infection was associated with a lower total frequency of cytokine-producing M. tuberculosis -specific CD4 T cells, and preferential depletion of a discrete subset of M. tuberculosis -specific IFN-γ + IL-2 - TNF-α + CD4 T cells. M. tuberculosis -specific CD4 T cells in HIV-infected individuals expressed significantly higher levels of Ki67, compared with HIV-uninfected individuals, thus indicating recent activation and turnover of these cells in vivo. The ex vivo proliferative capacity of M. tuberculosis -specific CD4 T cells was markedly impaired in HIV-infected individuals, compared with HIV-uninfected individuals. Moreover, HIV infection was associated with increased M. tuberculosis Ag-induced CD4 T cell death ex vivo, indicating a possible mechanism contributing to impaired proliferative capacity of M. tuberculosis -specific CD4 T cells in HIV-infected individuals. These data provide new insights into the parameters of M. tuberculosis -specific CD4 T cell immunity that are impaired in HIV-infected individuals with LTBI, which may contribute to their increased risk of developing active tuberculosis disease. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Active tuberculosis patients have high levels of IgA anti-alpha-crystallin and isocitrate lyase proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera-Paulín, M; García-Morales, L; Ruíz-Sánchez, B P; Caamal-Ley, Á D; Hernández-Solis, A; Ramírez-Casanova, E; Cicero-Sabido, R; Espitia, C; Helguera-Repetto, C; González-Y-Merchand, J A; Flores-Mejía, R; Estrada-Parra, S; Estrada-García, I; Chacón-Salinas, R; Wong-Baeza, I; Serafín-López, J

    2016-12-01

    Mexico City, Mexico. To identify proteins synthetised by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in hypoxic culture, which resemble more closely a granuloma environment than aerobic culture, and to determine if they are recognised by antibodies from patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Soluble extracts from M. tuberculosis H37Rv cultured under aerobic or hypoxic conditions were analysed using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and proteins over-expressed under hypoxia were identified by mass spectrometry. The presence of immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgA and IgM antibodies against these proteins was determined in the serum of 42 patients with active PTB and 42 healthy controls. We selected three M. tuberculosis H37Rv proteins (alpha-crystallin protein [Acr, Rv2031c], universal stress protein Rv2623 and isocitrate lyase [ICL, RV0467]) that were over-expressed under hypoxia. Titres of anti-Acr and anti-ICL IgA antibodies were higher in patients than in healthy controls, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.71 for anti-ICL IgA antibodies. ICL could be used in combination with other M. tuberculosis antigens to improve the sensitivity and specificity of current serological TB diagnostic methods.

  7. Evaluation of Active Case Finding (ACF of Tuberculosis in Slums Population in North of Iran

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    Reza Hoseinpoor

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background At present of the limitation of the current case finding strategies and the global urgency to improve tuberculosis (TB case finding, a renewed interest in active case finding (ACF has risen. World Health Organization (WHO calls for research on TB screening among low-income countries because of the limitation of the passive case finding strategies. We aimed to evaluated Active Case Finding strategy for TB among the slums population in North of Iran (Gorgan city and comprise this procedure to Passive Case Finding. Materials and Methods We conducted a house-to-house survey from April 2016 to July 2016 by trained health volunteers for TB in ten urban slums of Gorgan. Individuals with TB symptoms were identified through targeted screening using a standardized questionnaire and investigated further for TB. Descriptive analyses were performed using Stata-12. Results During study period, of 22,741 individuals screened for TB, 112 (0.49% were identified as TB suspects; 95 suspects were evaluated for TB. TB was diagnosed in four individuals, representing 4.2% of those evaluated for TB as suspected cases. The incidence rate of tuberculosis was 17.5 in 100.000 people in slums population of Gorgan. Of the four detected cases, three individuals had pulmonary TB that among them two cases had new smear-positive TB. Conclusion ACF could supplement current strategies to yield additional TB cases, lead to early diagnosis and better treatment.

  8. High utility of active tuberculosis case finding in an Ethiopian prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merid, Y; Woldeamanuel, Y; Abebe, M; Datiko, D G; Hailu, T; Habtamu, G; Assefa, G; Kempker, R R; Blumberg, H M; Aseffa, A

    2018-05-01

    Hawassa Prison, Southern Region of Ethiopia. To determine the burden of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) using active case finding among prisoners. In this cross-sectional study, prisoners were screened for TB using a symptom screen. Those with cough of 2 weeks had spot and morning sputum samples collected for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear microscopy and molecular diagnostic testing (Xpert® MTB/RIF). Among 2068 prisoners, 372 (18%) had a positive cough screen. The median age of these 372 persons was 23 years, 97% were male and 63% were from urban areas. Among those with a positive symptom screen, 8 (2%) were AFB sputum smear-positive and 31 (8%) were Xpert-positive. The point prevalence of pulmonary TB at the prison was 1748 per 100 000 persons. In multivariate analysis, persons with cough >4 weeks were more likely to have TB (OR 3.34, 95%CI 1.54-7.23). A high prevalence of TB was detected among inmates at a large Ethiopian prison. Active case finding using a cough symptom screen in combination with Xpert had high utility, and has the potential to interrupt transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in correctional facilities in low- and middle-income, high-burden countries.

  9. Systematic Expression Profiling Analysis Identifies Specific MicroRNA-Gene Interactions that May Differentiate between Active and Latent Tuberculosis Infection

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    Lawrence Shih-Hsin Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is the second most common cause of death from infectious diseases. About 90% of those infected are asymptomatic—the so-called latent TB infections (LTBI, with a 10% lifetime chance of progressing to active TB. To further understand the molecular pathogenesis of TB, several molecular studies have attempted to compare the expression profiles between healthy controls and active TB or LTBI patients. However, the results vary due to diverse genetic backgrounds and study designs and the inherent complexity of the disease process. Thus, developing a sensitive and efficient method for the detection of LTBI is both crucial and challenging. For the present study, we performed a systematic analysis of the gene and microRNA profiles of healthy individuals versus those affected with TB or LTBI. Combined with a series of in silico analysis utilizing publicly available microRNA knowledge bases and published literature data, we have uncovered several microRNA-gene interactions that specifically target both the blood and lungs. Some of these molecular interactions are novel and may serve as potential biomarkers of TB and LTBI, facilitating the development for a more sensitive, efficient, and cost-effective diagnostic assay for TB and LTBI for the Taiwanese population.

  10. Systematic expression profiling analysis identifies specific microRNA-gene interactions that may differentiate between active and latent tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin; Lee, Shih-Wei; Huang, Kai-Yao; Lee, Tzong-Yi; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Weng, Julia Tzu-Ya

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the second most common cause of death from infectious diseases. About 90% of those infected are asymptomatic--the so-called latent TB infections (LTBI), with a 10% lifetime chance of progressing to active TB. To further understand the molecular pathogenesis of TB, several molecular studies have attempted to compare the expression profiles between healthy controls and active TB or LTBI patients. However, the results vary due to diverse genetic backgrounds and study designs and the inherent complexity of the disease process. Thus, developing a sensitive and efficient method for the detection of LTBI is both crucial and challenging. For the present study, we performed a systematic analysis of the gene and microRNA profiles of healthy individuals versus those affected with TB or LTBI. Combined with a series of in silico analysis utilizing publicly available microRNA knowledge bases and published literature data, we have uncovered several microRNA-gene interactions that specifically target both the blood and lungs. Some of these molecular interactions are novel and may serve as potential biomarkers of TB and LTBI, facilitating the development for a more sensitive, efficient, and cost-effective diagnostic assay for TB and LTBI for the Taiwanese population.

  11. Virulence factors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrellad, Marina A.; Klepp, Laura I.; Gioffré, Andrea; Sabio y García, Julia; Morbidoni, Hector R.; Santangelo, María de la Paz; Cataldi, Angel A.; Bigi, Fabiana

    2013-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) consists of closely related species that cause tuberculosis in both humans and animals. This illness, still today, remains to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The mycobacteria enter the host by air, and, once in the lungs, are phagocytated by macrophages. This may lead to the rapid elimination of the bacillus or to the triggering of an active tuberculosis infection. A large number of different virulence factors have evolved in MTBC members as a response to the host immune reaction. The aim of this review is to describe the bacterial genes/proteins that are essential for the virulence of MTBC species, and that have been demonstrated in an in vivo model of infection. Knowledge of MTBC virulence factors is essential for the development of new vaccines and drugs to help manage the disease toward an increasingly more tuberculosis-free world. PMID:23076359

  12. [Tuberculosis and malaria global prophylaxis in the light of decisions of the Big Eight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, G G

    2008-01-01

    At the present time about two million people, one third of the Earth's population, are carriers of tuberculosis agent. Though tuberculosis is curable disease, it continues to take away lives of about 4400 persons; most of them are young and are in the most productive age. The most active incidence rate of tuberculosis occurs in the countries of Africa to the south of Sahara (29% of all cases of tuberculosis per head); half of new cases of tuberculosis fall on Asian countries: Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, Philippines. The governments of Big Eight maintain activities that have stabilized morbidity of tuberculosis on a world scale. Over 11 years (1995 - 2006) World Health Organization (WHO) implemented the DOTS strategy (Directly Observed Treatment with Short course of chemotherapy) in 183 countries and tested it on 26 millions patients with tuberculosis. Global data acquisition in 2005 found out morbidity of tuberculosis in 59% (the aim is 70%) and successful cure in 84% cases (the aim is 85 %). In 2006 WHO started realization of the Global Plan "Stop tuberculosis" (2006 - 2012). At the present time Global Fund use about 17% its resources to finance programs against tuberculosis. These funds help to reveal 5 millions extra cases of tuberculosis and cure 3 millions patients in the network of DOTS.

  13. Inflammasome genetics contributes to the development and control of active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza de Lima, D; Ogusku, M M; Sadahiro, A; Pontillo, A

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a major public health problem. An estimated one-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) but remains asymptomatic (latent TB) and only 5% to 10% of these latent individuals will develop active pulmonary TB. Factors affecting the balance between latent and active TB are mostly unknown, even if host genome has been shown to contribute to the outcome of Mtb response. Acute inflammation and Th1 response are important in the early clearance of the bacteria as it was emphasized by the association between immune genes (i.e.: HLA, IFNG, TNF, NRPAM1, IL10) variants and the development of active pulmonary TB. Recently, the role of the inflammasome in experimental TB has been demonstrated, however, to our knowledge, no data still exist about the contribution of inflammasome genetics to Mtb susceptibility and/or to the development of active TB. For this reason, selected polymorphisms in inflammasome genes were analysed in a case/control cohort of individuals with active pulmonary TB from an endemic area of Brazil Amazon. Our data evidence the novel association between polymorphisms in NLRP3-inflammasome encoding genes and active pulmonary TB, and replicated the association between P2X7 and TB observed in other populations. These results emphasize the role of NLRP3-inflammasome also in human TB, and contribute to our knowledge about pathways involved in the development of active TB, even if deeper investigation are needed to fully elucidate the role of the complex in Mtb infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhl, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Dissemination of the tubercle bacillus is of three types: bronchogenic, hematogenous, and lymphangitic. Bronchogenic dissemination occurs when exudate from a cavity or small area of caseation drains into a bronchus and is aspirated into previously uninfected areas either on the same or on the opposite side. This type of spreading occurs frequently after bleeding and when there is a cavity emptying into a bronchus. Hematogenous dissemination leads to miliary tuberculosis and to extrapulmonary lesions throughout the body. Acute massive hematogenous spread causes miliary tuberculosis, while chronic spread in smaller amounts usually results in the chronic extrapulmonary foci. Lymphangitic dissemination is common in primary infection. It is responsible for involvement with subsequent enlargement of hilar and mediastinal nodes that is often seen in children and in young black adults. The reaction to M. tuberculosis depends on the presence or absence of immunity to tuberculoprotein. In individuals having no tissue hypersensitivity or immunity, primary tuberculosis results. In those with immunity produced by previous infection or BCG vaccination, the reactivation (reinfection) disease may develop

  15. Completeness of tuberculosis reporting forms in five Brazilian capitals with a high incidence of the disease *

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Normeide Pedreira; Lírio, Monique; Passos, Louran Andrade Reis; Dias, Juarez Pereira; Kritski, Afrânio Lineu; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Grassi, Maria Fernanda Rios

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the completeness of tuberculosis reporting forms in the greater metropolitan areas of five Brazilian capitals where the incidence of tuberculosis was high in 2010-Salvador, Rio de Janeiro, Cuiabá, Porto Alegre, and Belém-using tabulations obtained from the Sistema Nacional de Informação de Agravos de Notificação (National Case Registry Database). The degree of completeness was highest in Porto Alegre and Cuiabá, whereas it was lowest in Rio de Janeiro, where there are more reported cases of tuberculosis than in any other Brazilian capital. A low degree of completeness of these forms can affect the quality of the Brazilian National Tuberculosis Control Program, which will have negative consequences for health care and decision-making processes. PMID:23670508

  16. Accurate Diagnosis of Pediatric Active Tuberculosis and Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Revue de Médecine et de Pharmacie. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 1 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Tuberculosis of the cervical spine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis of the cervical spine is rare, comprising 3 -. 5% of cases of tuberculosis of the spine. Eight patients with tuberculosis of the cervicaJ spine seen during 1989 -. 1992 were reviewed. They all presented with neck pain. The 4 children presented with a kyphotic deformity. In all the children the disease was extensive, ...

  18. Primary pulmonary tuberculosis in infancy: A resurgent disease in the urban United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amodio, J.; Abramson, S.; Berdon, W.

    1986-01-01

    Primary pulmonary tuberculosis in infancy still exists in the urban United States, reflecting new immigrations from less developed areas. The clinical diagnosis may be difficult and routine chest radiographs may be confusing. We found magnification high KV filtered radiography to be very useful in delineating the primary complex and its effect on the tracheobronchial tree. Twelve infants and small children with primary pulmonary tuberculosis were seen in the years 1978-1984. (orig.)

  19. Tuberculose ativa entre profissionais de saúde em Portugal Active tuberculosis among health care workers in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Castela Torres da Costa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a incidência de tuberculose (TB ativa em uma coorte de profissionais de saúde (PS. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo dos casos de TB ativa identificados entre 2005 e 2010 no rastreio de medicina do trabalho efetuado em 6.112 PS. Casos de TB ativa foram definidos como aqueles com identificação de Mycobacterium tuberculosis por microscopia direta ou cultura; aqueles com sintomas ou sinais clínicos de TB e granuloma necrotizante, detectado por histologia; e aqueles com achados radiológicos consistentes com TB ativa. RESULTADOS: Dos 6.112 PS avaliados, houve 62 casos de TB ativa (TB pulmonar, em 43; TB pleural, em 15; TB ganglionar, em 2; TB do pericárdio, em 1; TB cutânea, em 1. Sete PS estavam assintomáticos no momento do diagnóstico. Dos 62 casos de TB ativa, a doença ocorreu nos primeiros 10 anos de exposição ocupacional em 48 e nos primeiros 5 anos em 36. A maioria dos casos verificou-se em médicos e enfermeiros (22 e 21, respectivamente. CONCLUSÕES: O impacto da TB em PS em Portugal é elevado. Os médicos e enfermeiros são os PS com o maior risco de desenvolver TB ativa. Tal como relatado em estudos prévios, parece haver um risco mais elevado de desenvolver essa doença nos primeiros anos de exposição. Em países de elevada incidência, o rastreio de TB nos PS é importante no controle da transmissão dessa doença.OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of active tuberculosis (TB in a cohort of health care workers (HCWs. METHODS: Descriptive study of active TB cases identified in an occupational health screening of 6,112 HCWs between 2005 and 2010. Cases of active TB were defined as those in which Mycobacterium tuberculosis was identified by direct microscopy or culture; those in which there were symptoms or clinical signs of TB and necrotizing granuloma, as detected by histology; and those in which the radiological findings were consistent with active TB. RESULTS: Among the 6,112 HCWs evaluated, we identified

  20. [Control of tuberculosis as seen "in the field": popular perceptions of the disease and access to care in Conakry, Guinea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, A B; Diallo, M; Jaffré, Y

    2004-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a public health priority especially in developing countries. A variety of control programs have been implemented. The purpose of this survey was to study the perceptions and practices of the victims of this disease "in the field". The findings of this survey carried out in a cohort of 65 patients and their families in Conakry, Guinea underline the importance of popular perceptions of the disease in care-seeking behavior. This survey also shows that health care workers share the same perceptions as the general population, which constitutes a major impediment for screening and treatment.

  1. A Survey of Texas HIV, Sexually Transmitted Disease, Tuberculosis, and Viral Hepatitis Providers' Billing and Reimbursement Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Matthew B; Atwood, Robin; Greenberg, Jennifer B; Ray, Tara; Harris, Karol Kaye

    2015-11-01

    The Affordable Care Act presents financial challenges and opportunities for publicly funded service providers. We assessed billing practices and anticipated barriers to third-party billing among organizations in Texas that provide publicly funded HIV, sexually transmitted diseases, tuberculosis, and viral hepatitis services. One third to one half of the organizations did not bill for medical services. The most common barrier to third-party billing was lack of staff knowledge about billing and coding. Future research must evaluate options for organizations and communities to maintain access to infectious disease services for vulnerable populations.

  2. A Survey of Texas HIV, Sexually Transmitted Disease, Tuberculosis, and Viral Hepatitis Providers’ Billing and Reimbursement Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Robin; Greenberg, Jennifer B.; Ray, Tara; Harris, Karol Kaye

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act presents financial challenges and opportunities for publicly funded service providers. We assessed billing practices and anticipated barriers to third-party billing among organizations in Texas that provide publicly funded HIV, sexually transmitted diseases, tuberculosis, and viral hepatitis services. One third to one half of the organizations did not bill for medical services. The most common barrier to third-party billing was lack of staff knowledge about billing and coding. Future research must evaluate options for organizations and communities to maintain access to infectious disease services for vulnerable populations. PMID:26447911

  3. Spinal tuberculosis, natural history of disease, classifications and principles of management with historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kush

    2016-08-01

    To describe the natural history spinal tuberculosis, classifications and principles of management based upon the grading of the neurological deficit. Review of literature was conducted with the aim to provide the clinico-radiological correlation of the natural history of spinal tuberculosis in different stages. Management strategy is developed based upon the severity of the neurological deficit. A five stage natural history of spinal tuberculosis is described. Stage of neurological involvement is further divided into 4 grades, predominantly on the basis of progressively increasing motor deficits as negligible, mild, moderate and severe with sensory and autonomic dysfunctions. Suitable principles of management with role of rest, braces, chemotherapy and surgery are discussed. Neurological deficit grading based management is developed. Grade 1 and 2, conservative treatment, grade 3, gray zone and grade 4, operative treatment is emphasized. The five stages of natural history of tuberculosis of spine have been developed from the clinician's point of view. Management of tuberculosis of spine, in general, it is no different than management of soft tissue tuberculosis, in HIV negative or positive patients. Role of surgery is very limited. Management of tubercular paraplegia, based upon the grading of paraplegia is simple, logical, efficient and easy to understand and remember by any orthopedic surgeon.

  4. Primary isolated hepatic tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, A.S.F.; Qureshi, I.H.; Saba, K.; Bukhari, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Isolated hepatic tuberculosis without pulmonary or bowel involvement is a diagnostic challenge and can cause considerable morbidity. A young lady from Lahore presented with fever, pain in right hypochondria, nausea and weight loss. CT scan of abdomen showed multiple small hypodense non-enhancing lesions and a heterogeneous texture of liver. Biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic tuberculosis. It was concluded a case of isolated hepatic tuberculosis without evidence of other primary sites involvement. It is important to consider tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis when suspecting lymphoproliferative or metastatic diseases in a patient with vague symptoms and abnormal hepatic texture on CT. (author)

  5. Tuberculosis non-communicable disease comorbidity and multimorbidity in public primary care patients in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl

    2018-04-11

     Little is known about the prevalence of non-communicable disease (NCD) multimorbidity among tuberculosis (TB) patients in Africa.Aim and setting: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of NCD multimorbidity, its pattern and impact on adverse health outcomes among patients with TB in public primary care in three selected districts of South Africa.  In a cross-sectional survey, new TB and TB retreatment patients were interviewed, and medical records assessed in consecutive sampling within 1 month of anti-TB treatment. The sample included 4207 (54.5% men and 45.5% women) TB patients from 42 primary care clinics in three districts. Multimorbidity was measured as the simultaneous presence of two or more of 10 chronic conditions, including myocardial infarction or angina pectoris, arthritis, asthma, chronic lung disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, malignant neoplasms, tobacco and alcohol-use disorder.  The prevalence of comorbidity (with one NCD) was 26.9% and multimorbidity (with two or more NCDs) was 25.3%. We identified three patterns of multimorbidity: (1) cardio-metabolic disorders; (2) respiratory disorders, arthritis and cancer; and (3) substance-use disorders. The likelihood of multimorbidity was higher in older age, among men, and was lower in those with higher education and socio-economic status. The prevalence of physical health decreased, and common mental disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder increased with an increase in the number of chronic conditions.  High NCD comorbidity and multimorbidity were found among TB patients predicted by socio-economic disparity.

  6. Pleural tuberculosis in a patient with untreated type 1 Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulgar, Ozgecan; Eskazan, Ahmet Emre; Ersen, Ezel; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Turna, Akif; Oz, Buge; Tuzuner, Nukhet

    2016-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive glycolipid storage disorder, due to deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, leading to accumulation of the substrate glucocerebroside in the cells of the macrophage-monocyte system. Patients with GD have alteration in their immune system and impaired microbicidal capacity of mononuclear phagocytes. It has also been demonstrated that monocyte dysfunction may correlate with the plasma glucocerebrosidase concentrations. Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem in developing countries. Pleural TB is one of the most common forms of extra-pulmonary TB. Since immune system can be impaired due to the deficiency of glucocerebrosidase in various ways, TB can be observed in patients with GD especially when left untreated. Cytopenia(s) is also general finding in untreated Gaucher patients, and they may be observed most frequently due to the infiltration of the bone marrow with Gaucher cells together with the additional factor of splenomegaly. We herein present a case of an adult patient with heterozygous untreated GD1, who developed pleural TB complicated by ipsilateral pulmonary fibrosis. Before his admission to our clinic, pleurectomy operation was performed and 4-drug combination anti-TB therapy was initiated including isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and pyrazinamide. Fever complaint was disappeared with anti-TB treatment but he also had fatigue and pain. After initiation of enzyme replacement therapy in addition to anti-TB treatment, clinical and hematological improvement was observed. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of GD1 with pleural TB. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The diagnostic value of polymerase chain reaction for Mycobacterium tuberculosis to distinguish intestinal tuberculosis from crohn's disease: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ting; Fei, Baoying; Zhang, Yu; He, Xujun

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and Crohn's disease (CD) are important differential diagnoses that can be difficult to distinguish. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is an efficient and promising tool. This meta-analysis was performed to systematically and objectively assess the potential diagnostic accuracy and clinical value of PCR for MTB in distinguishing ITB from CD. We searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Science Direct, and the Cochrane Library for eligible studies, and nine articles with 12 groups of data were identified. The included studies were subjected to quality assessment using the revised Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) tool. The summary estimates were as follows: sensitivity 0.47 (95% CI: 0.42-0.51); specificity 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93-0.97); the positive likelihood ratio (PLR) 10.68 (95% CI: 6.98-16.35); the negative likelihood ratio (NLR) 0.49 (95% CI: 0.33-0.71); and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) 21.92 (95% CI: 13.17-36.48). The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.9311, with a Q* value of 0.8664. Heterogeneity was found in the NLR. The heterogeneity of the studies was evaluated by meta-regression analysis and subgroup analysis. The current evidence suggests that PCR for MTB is a promising and highly specific diagnostic method to distinguish ITB from CD. However, physicians should also keep in mind that negative results cannot exclude ITB for its low sensitivity. Additional prospective studies are needed to further evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of PCR.

  8. Vitamin D status did not related to calcium status in active tuberculosis patients in North Sumatera, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keumala Sari, Dina; Khairina Arrasyid, Nurfida

    2018-03-01

    Background: Tuberculosis is one of the highest mortality caused in a tropical country with abundant sunlight such Indonesia. Vitamin D and calcium plays important roles in tuberculosis pathogenesis. Objective:We sought to determine whether there is an association between vitamin D status and calcium status in tuberculosis patients. Design: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 32 man and women aged 18-60 years with active tuberculosis in North Sumatera, Indonesia. Parameters were 25(OH)D and calcium serum level, body mass index, fat mass, and others lifestyles factors also assessed. The association was analysis using chi-square or fischer test. Results: the mean of study subjects age were 37.2±14.9 years old and BMI were 20.8±4.4 kg/m2 There were 81.2% subjects categorized into vitamin D deficiency-insufficiency and 18.8% categorized into vitamin D sufficiency. There were 29% subjects categorized into normal calcium level, and 3% were hypocalcemia. Based on food recall analysis, there were found lower vitamin D and calcium intake. There is no association between vitamin D and calcium classification. Conclusions: based on this result, although there is no association between vitamin D and calcium, but there could be altered by lower food intake and tuberculosis progression.

  9. "Impact of and response to increased tuberculosis prevalence among Syrian refugees compared with Jordanian tuberculosis prevalence: case study of a tuberculosis public health strategy".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, Susan T; Abaza, Hiba; Clarke, Kevin R; Burton, Ann; Sabrah, Nadia A; Rumman, Khaled A; Odeh, Nedal; Naoum, Marwan

    2015-01-01

    By the summer of 2014, the Syrian crisis resulted in a regional humanitarian emergency with 2.9 million refugees, including 608,000 in Jordan. These refugees access United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)-sponsored clinics or Jordan Ministry of Health clinics, including tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment. Tuberculosis care in Syria has deteriorated with destroyed health infrastructure and drug supply chain. Syrian refugees may have undiagnosed tuberculosis; therefore, the UNHCR, the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the National Tuberculosis Program (NTP), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed the Public Health Strategy for Tuberculosis among Syrian Refugees in Jordan. This case study presents that strategy, its impact, and recommendations for other neighboring countries. UNHCR determined that World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for implementing a tuberculosis program in an emergency were met for the Syrian refugees in Jordan. Jordan NTP assessed their tuberculosis program and found that access to Syrian refugees was the one component of their program missing. Therefore, a strategy for tuberculosis control among Syrian refugees was developed. Since that development through work with IOM, UNHCR, and NTP, tuberculosis case detection among Syrian refugees is almost 40 % greater (74 cases/12 months or 1.01/100,000 monthly through June 2014 vs. 56 cases/16 months or 0.73/100,000 monthly through June 2013) using estimated population figures; more than two fold the 2012 Jordan tuberculosis incidence. Additionally, the WHO objective of curing ≥85 % of newly identified infectious tuberculosis cases was met among Syrian refugees. Tuberculosis (TB) rates among displaced persons are high, but increased detection is possible. High TB rates were found among Syrian refugees through active screening and will probably persist as the Syrian crisis continues. Active screening can detect tuberculosis early and reduce risk

  10. Sputum Microscopy With Fluorescein Diacetate Predicts Tuberculosis Infectiousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sumona; Sherman, Jonathan M; Tovar, Marco A; Bravard, Marjory A; Valencia, Teresa; Montoya, Rosario; Quino, Willi; D'Arcy, Nikki; Ramos, Eric S; Gilman, Robert H; Evans, Carlton A

    2017-09-01

    Sputum from patients with tuberculosis contains subpopulations of metabolically active and inactive Mycobacterium tuberculosis with unknown implications for infectiousness. We assessed sputum microscopy with fluorescein diacetate (FDA, evaluating M. tuberculosis metabolic activity) for predicting infectiousness. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was quantified in pretreatment sputum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis using FDA microscopy, culture, and acid-fast microscopy. These 35 patients' 209 household contacts were followed with prevalence surveys for tuberculosis disease for 6 years. FDA microscopy was positive for a median of 119 (interquartile range [IQR], 47-386) bacteria/µL sputum, which was 5.1% (IQR, 2.4%-11%) the concentration of acid-fast microscopy-positive bacteria (2069 [IQR, 1358-3734] bacteria/μL). Tuberculosis was diagnosed during follow-up in 6.4% (13/209) of contacts. For patients with lower than median concentration of FDA microscopy-positive M. tuberculosis, 10% of their contacts developed tuberculosis. This was significantly more than 2.7% of the contacts of patients with higher than median FDA microscopy results (crude hazard ratio [HR], 3.8; P = .03). This association maintained statistical significance after adjusting for disease severity, chemoprophylaxis, drug resistance, and social determinants (adjusted HR, 3.9; P = .02). Mycobacterium tuberculosis that was FDA microscopy negative was paradoxically associated with greater infectiousness. FDA microscopy-negative bacteria in these pretreatment samples may be a nonstaining, slowly metabolizing phenotype better adapted to airborne transmission. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  11. Gastrointestinal Tuberculosis: Still a challenge for radiologists and Gastroenterologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamadnejad, M.; Malekzadeh, R.; Soroush, Z.; Sedighi, N.

    2003-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major health problem in Iran. All parts of the gastrointestinal tract can be affected by Tuberculosis. Therefore, it should be included in the differential diagnoses of almost and tuberculosis diseases, and physicians should be aware of the imaging characteristics of tuberculosis in the tuberculosis tract. This is a report of 4 patients with different types of tuberculosis involvement by tuberculosis, along with its clinical pictures and imaging characteristics

  12. Evaluation of anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of Campomanesia adamantium (Myrtaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Rogério Pavan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of Campomanesia adamantium fruits extracts were evaluated. Six compounds, identified as flavanones and chalcones were quantified by HPLC-DAD-UV. Promising antitubercular activity was observed with ethyl acetate extract (MIC 62.5 µg/mL and their fractions (MIC values ranging from 39 to above 250 µg/mL. The better MIC result of 39 µg/mL was associated with two fractions that contain bigger amounts of 5,7-dihydroxy-6, 8-di-C-methylflavanone and 2',4'-dihydroxy-3',5'-dimethyl-6'-methoxychalcone. These compounds exhibited MICs >250 and 62.5 µg/mL, respectively, while their mixtures showed values ranging from 62.5 to 7.8 µg/mL, demonstrating a synergism between them.

  13. Evaluation of anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of Campomanesia adamantium (Myrtaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavan, Fernando Rogerio; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura

    2009-01-01

    The anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of Campomanesia adamantium fruits extracts were evaluated. Six compounds, identified as flavanones and chalcones were quantified by HPLC-DAD-UV. Promising antitubercular activity was observed with ethyl acetate extract (MIC 62.5 μg/mL) and their fractions (MIC values ranging from 39 to above 250 μg/mL). The better MIC result of 39 μg/mL was associated with two fractions that contain bigger amounts of 5,7-dihydroxy-6, 8-di-C-methylflavanone and 2',4'-dihydroxy-3',5'-dimethyl-6'-methoxychalcone. These compounds exhibited MICs >250 and 62.5 μg/mL, respectively, while their mixtures showed values ranging from 62.5 to 7.8 μg/mL, demonstrating a synergism between them. (author)

  14. Heterogeneous disease progression and treatment response in a C3HeB/FeJ mouse model of tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Lanoix

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mice are the most commonly used species for non-clinical evaluations of drug efficacy against tuberculosis (TB. Unlike commonly used strains, C3HeB/FeJ mice develop caseous necrosis in the lung, which might alter the representation of drug efficacy in a way that is more like human TB. Because the development of such pathology requires time, we investigated the effect of infection incubation period on the activity of six drugs in C3HeB/FeJ and BALB/c mice. Mice were aerosol infected and held for 6, 10 or 14 weeks before receiving therapy with rifampin (RIF, rifapentine (RPT, pyrazinamide (PZA, linezolid (LZD, sutezolid (PNU or metronidazole (MTZ for 4-8 weeks. Outcomes included pathological assessments, pH measurements of liquefied caseum and assessment of colony-forming unit (CFU counts from lung cultures. Remarkable heterogeneity in the timing and extent of disease progression was observed in C3HeB/FeJ mice, largely independent of incubation period. Likewise, drug efficacy in C3HeB/FeJ mice was not affected by incubation period. However, for PZA, LZD and PNU, dichotomous treatment effects correlating with the presence or absence of large caseous lesions were observed. In the case of PZA, its poor activity in the subset of C3HeB/FeJ mice with large caseous lesions might be explained by the pH of 7.36±0.09 measured in liquefied caseum. This study highlights the potential value of C3HeB/FeJ mice for non-clinical efficacy testing, especially for investigating the interaction of lesion pathology and drug effect. Careful use of this model could enhance the bridging of non-clinical results with clinical outcomes.

  15. Chest radiography and thoracic computed tomography findings in children who have family members with active pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzum, Kazim; Karahan, Okkes I.; Dogan, Sukru; Coskun, Abdulhakim; Topcu, Faik

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The chest radiography and TCT findings in children who had contacted with adult family members with active pulmonary tuberculosis were compared. The contributions of thoracic computed tomography to the diagnosis of tuberculosis were investigated. Methods and material: The children who were 0-16 years old (n=173) and children of families with an adult member which was diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis were evaluated. The children were considered in two groups based on the absence (n=125) or presence (n=48) of complaints and/or ambiguous symptoms such as lack of appetite, mild cough, sweating, history of lung infection, low body weight and those with suspicious chest radiography findings (12 cases) were included in this study. Asymptomatic patients (n=125) did not undergo TCT. Patients who had positive PPD skin tests only received isoniazid. If the TCT demonstrated enlarged lymph nodes or parenchymal lesions, minimally active pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed and antituberculous treatment was given. Results and discussions: TCT revealed lymph node enlargement or parenchymal lesions in 39 children (81.2%). Of the 12 children whose CXRs revealed suspicious lymph node enlargement and/or infiltration, five had normal findings in TCT whereas the initial findings were confirmed in the remaining seven. These data suggest that there is a correlation between the presence of ambiguous symptoms in exposed children and TCT findings; chest radiography and TCT findings do not yield parallel findings. All the patients who received anti-TB treatment were resolved in the control examinations. Conclusion: In this study there is a correlation between presence of ambiguous symptoms and TCT findings, but the chest radiography and TCT findings do not yield harmony in exposed children with ambiguous symptoms (suspicious tuberculosis cases). These observations should be considered in children with symptoms similar to those of exposed children, but with no definite history of

  16. Mycobactericidal activity of sutezolid (PNU-100480 in sputum (EBA and blood (WBA of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S Wallis

    Full Text Available Sutezolid (PNU-100480 is a linezolid analog with superior bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the hollow fiber, whole blood and mouse models. Like linezolid, it is unaffected by mutations conferring resistance to standard TB drugs. This study of sutezolid is its first in tuberculosis patients.Sputum smear positive tuberculosis patients were randomly assigned to sutezolid 600 mg BID (N = 25 or 1200 mg QD (N = 25, or standard 4-drug therapy (N = 9 for the first 14 days of treatment. Effects on mycobacterial burden in sputum (early bactericidal activity or EBA were monitored as colony counts on agar and time to positivity in automated liquid culture. Bactericidal activity was also measured in ex vivo whole blood cultures (whole blood bactericidal activity or WBA inoculated with M. tuberculosis H37Rv.All patients completed assigned treatments and began subsequent standard TB treatment according to protocol. The 90% confidence intervals (CI for bactericidal activity in sputum over the 14 day interval excluded zero for all treatments and both monitoring methods, as did those for cumulative WBA. There were no treatment-related serious adverse events, premature discontinuations, or dose reductions due to laboratory abnormalities. There was no effect on the QT interval. Seven sutezolid-treated patients (14% had transient, asymptomatic ALT elevations to 173±34 U/L on day 14 that subsequently normalized promptly; none met Hy's criteria for serious liver injury.The mycobactericidal activity of sutezolid 600 mg BID or 1200 mg QD was readily detected in sputum and blood. Both schedules were generally safe and well tolerated. Further studies of sutezolid in tuberculosis treatment are warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01225640.

  17. Pulmonary tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    TB; Tuberculosis - pulmonary; Mycobacterium - pulmonary ... Pulmonary TB is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M tuberculosis) . TB is contagious. This means the bacteria is easily spread from an infected person ...

  18. Tuberculosis (TB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Tuberculosis Go to Information for Researchers ► Credit: NIAID Scanning ... are drug resistant. Why Is the Study of Tuberculosis a Priority for NIAID? Tuberculosis is one of ...

  19. Utility of CT in the evaluation of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients without Aids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.S.; Hwang, J.W.; Chung, M.P.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. To assess the utility of CT in the evaluation of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients without AIDS. Patients and methods. Thin-section CT scans for suspicion of pulmonary tuberculosis were obtained from 226 patients. A total of 38 patients were excluded; the reasons were unavailability of final results (n=18), patient unavailability for follow-up (n=13), and coexistence of tuberculosis and aspergilloma (n=7). The results from 188 patients were used for this study. After assessing the patterns of parenchymal lesion, involved segments, and presence of cavity, bronchiectases, and bronchogenic spread of the lesion with CT, tentative diagnosis and disease activity were recorded. Results. With CT, 133 of 146 patients (91%) with tuberculosis were correctly diagnosed as having pulmonary tuberculosis whereas 32 of 42 patients (76%) without tuberculosis were correctly excluded. CT diagnosis of lung cancer (n=8), bacterial pneumonia (n=2), pulmonary metastasis (n=1), chronic hypersensitivity pneumonia (n=1) and diffuse pan-bronchiolitis (n=1) turned out to be tuberculosis. Conversely CT diagnoses of tuberculosis appeared pathologically as lung cancer (n=5), bacterial pneumonia 71/89, 80%) and inactive state (51/57, 89%) of disease respectively could be correctly differentiated by CT. Conclusion. CT can be helpful in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in most cases. On the basis of CT findings, distinction of active from inactive disease can be made in most cases. (authors)

  20. Identification of biomarkers for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease in BCG-vaccinated young children in Southern India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhanasekaran, S; Jenum, S; Stavrum, R

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric tuberculosis (TB) often goes undiagnosed because of the lack of reliable diagnostic methods. With the aim of assessing biomarker(s) that can aid in the diagnosis of TB infection and disease, we investigated 746 Indian children with suspected TB. Whole-blood mRNA from 210 children...... or equal to0.05) was downregulated in TB disease compared with uninfected controls, while transcription of RAB33A was downregulated in TB disease compared with both latent TB (Pcontrols (P....05) was upregulated in latent TB compared with that in controls. Using the Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (lasso) model, RAB33A alone discriminated between TB disease and latent TB (area under the curve (AUC) 77.5%), whereas a combination of RAB33A, CXCL10, SEC14L1, FOXP3 and TNFRSF1A was effective...

  1. Isolated Optic Disc Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Ahmad M.; Tabbara, Khalid F.; Tabbarah, Zuhair

    2015-01-01

    We present a healthy male subject who developed progressive visual loss in the left eye initially diagnosed as optic neuritis. Upon suspicion of infectious etiology, testing was positive for tuberculosis. There were no signs or symptoms of active systemic tuberculosis infection. The patient responded swiftly to antimycobacterial therapy with return of vision and resolution of disc swelling. Positive purified protein derivative skin test, negative chest radiograph, negative systemic workup, negative workup for other causes of unilateral optic neuritis and quick response to mycobacterial therapy reaffirm the entity of isolated optic disc tuberculosis similar to isolated choroidal tuberculosis without systemic manifestation. PMID:26483675

  2. Isolated Optic Disc Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Mansour

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a healthy male subject who developed progressive visual loss in the left eye initially diagnosed as optic neuritis. Upon suspicion of infectious etiology, testing was positive for tuberculosis. There were no signs or symptoms of active systemic tuberculosis infection. The patient responded swiftly to antimycobacterial therapy with return of vision and resolution of disc swelling. Positive purified protein derivative skin test, negative chest radiograph, negative systemic workup, negative workup for other causes of unilateral optic neuritis and quick response to mycobacterial therapy reaffirm the entity of isolated optic disc tuberculosis similar to isolated choroidal tuberculosis without systemic manifestation.

  3. Plant natural products research in tuberculosis drug discovery and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant natural products research in tuberculosis drug discovery and development: A situation report ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... tuberculosis (XDR-TB), call for the development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs to combat this disease.

  4. Two enzymes with redundant fructose bisphosphatase activity sustain gluconeogenesis and virulence in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy, Uday; Marrero, Joeli; Calhoun, Susannah; Eoh, Hyungjin; de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro Sorio; Rhee, Kyu; Ehrt, Sabine

    2015-08-10

    The human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) likely utilizes host fatty acids as a carbon source during infection. Gluconeogenesis is essential for the conversion of fatty acids into biomass. A rate-limiting step in gluconeogenesis is the conversion of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate to fructose 6-phosphate by a fructose bisphosphatase (FBPase). The Mtb genome contains only one annotated FBPase gene, glpX. Here we show that, unexpectedly, an Mtb mutant lacking GLPX grows on gluconeogenic carbon sources and has detectable FBPase activity. We demonstrate that the Mtb genome encodes an alternative FBPase (GPM2, Rv3214) that can maintain gluconeogenesis in the absence of GLPX. Consequently, deletion of both GLPX and GPM2 is required for disruption of gluconeogenesis and attenuation of Mtb in a mouse model of infection. Our work affirms a role for gluconeogenesis in Mtb virulence and reveals previously unidentified metabolic redundancy at the FBPase-catalysed reaction step of the pathway.

  5. Global, regional, and national incidence and mortality for HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria during 1990-2013 : a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murray, Christopher J. L.; Ortblad, Katrina F.; Guinovart, Caterina; Lim, Stephen S.; Wolock, Timothy M.; Roberts, D. Allen; Dansereau, Emily A.; Graetz, Nicholas; Barber, Ryan M.; Brown, Jonathan C.; Wang, Haidong; Duber, Herbert C.; Naghavi, Mohsen; Dicker, Daniel; Dandona, Lalit; Salomon, Joshua A.; Heuton, Kyle R.; Foreman, Kyle; Phillips, David E.; Fleming, Thomas D.; Flaxman, Abraham D.; Phillips, Bryan K.; Johnson, Elizabeth K.; Coggeshall, Megan S.; Abd-Allah, Foad; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Abraham, Jerry P.; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen Me; Achoki, Tom; Adeyemo, Austine Olufemi; Adou, Arsene Kouablan; Adsuar, Jose C.; Agardh, Emilie Elisabet; Akena, Dickens; Al Kahbouri, Mazin J.; Alasfoor, Deena; Albittar, Mohammed I.; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Angel Alegretti, Miguel; Alemu, Zewdie Aderaw; Alfonso-Cristancho, Rafael; Alhabib, Samia; Ali, Raghib; Alla, Francois; Allen, Peter J.; Alsharif, Ubai; Alvarez, Elena; Alvis-Guzman, Nelson; Amankwaa, Adansi A.; Amare, Azmeraw T.; Amini, Hassan; Ammar, Walid; Anderson, Benjamin O.; Antonio, Carl Abelardo T.; Anwari, Palwasha; Arnlov, Johan; Arsenijevic, Valentina S. Arsic; Artaman, Ali; Asghar, Rana J.; Assadi, Reza; Atkins, Lydia S.; Badawi, Alaa; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Banerjee, Amitava; Basu, Sanjay; Beardsley, Justin; Bekele, Tolesa; Bell, Michelle L.; Bernabe, Eduardo; Beyene, Tariku Jibat; Bhala, Neeraj; Bhalla, Ashish; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Bin Abdulhak, Aref; Binagwaho, Agnes; Blore, Jed D.; Basara, Berrak Bora; Bose, Dipan; Brainin, Michael; Breitborde, Nicholas; Castaneda-Orjuela, Carlos A.; Catala-Lopez, Ferran; Chadha, Vineet K.; Chang, Jung-Chen; Chiang, Peggy Pei-Chia; Chuang, Ting-Wu; Colomar, Mercedes; Cooper, Leslie Trumbull; Cooper, Cyrus; Courville, Karen J.; Cowie, Benjamin C.; Criqui, Michael H.; Dandona, Rakhi; Dayama, Anand; De Leo, Diego; Degenhardt, Louisa; Del Pozo-Cruz, Borja; Deribe, Kebede; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Dessalegn, Muluken; Dharmaratne, Samath D.; Dilmen, Ugur; Ding, Eric L.; Driscoll, Tim R.; Durrani, Adnan M.; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Ermakov, Sergey Petrovich; Esteghamati, Alireza; Faraon, Emerito Jose A.; Farzadfar, Farshad; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Fijabi, Daniel Obadare; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H.; Paleo, Urbano Fra; Gaffikin, Lynne; Gamkrelidze, Amiran; Gankpe, Fortune Gbetoho; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Gessner, Bradford D.; Gibney, Katherine B.; Ginawi, Ibrahim Abdelmageem Mohamed; Glaser, Elizabeth L.; Gona, Philimon; Goto, Atsushi; Gouda, Hebe N.; Gugnani, Harish Chander; Gupta, Rajeev; Gupta, Rahul; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Hamadeh, Randah Ribhi; Hammami, Mouhanad; Hankey, Graeme J.; Harb, Hilda L.; Maria Haro, Josep; Havmoeller, Rasmus; Hay, Simon I.; Hedayati, Mohammad T.; Heredia Pi, Ileana B.; Hoek, Hans W.; Hornberger, John C.; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hotez, Peter J.; Hoy, Damian G.; Huang, John J.; Iburg, Kim M.; Idrisov, Bulat T.; Innos, Kaire; Jacobsen, Kathryn H.; Jeemon, Panniyammakal; Jensen, Paul N.; Jha, Vivekanand; Jiang, Guohong; Jonas, Jost B.; Juel, Knud; Kan, Haidong; Kankindi, Ida; Karam, Nadim E.; Karch, Andre; Karema, Corine Kakizi; Kaul, Anil; Kawakami, Norito; Kazi, Dhruv S.; Kemp, Andrew H.; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Keren, Andre; Kereselidze, Maia; Khader, Yousef Saleh; Khalifa, Shams Eldin Ali Hassan; Khan, Ejaz Ahmed; Khang, Young-Ho; Khonelidze, Irma; Kinfu, Yohannes; Kinge, Jonas M.; Knibbs, Luke; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Kosen, S.; Defo, Barthelemy Kuate; Kulkarni, Veena S.; Kulkarni, Chanda; Kumar, Kaushalendra; Kumar, Ravi B.; Kumar, G. Anil; Kwan, Gene F.; Lai, Taavi; Balaji, Arjun Lakshmana; Lam, Hilton; Lan, Qing; Lansingh, Van C.; Larson, Heidi J.; Larsson, Anders; Lee, Jong-Tae; Leigh, James; Leinsalu, Mall; Leung, Ricky; Li, Yichong; Li, Yongmei; Ferreira De Lima, Graca Maria; Lin, Hsien-Ho; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Liu, Shiwei; Liu, Yang; Lloyd, Belinda K.; Lotufo, Paulo A.; Pedro Machado, Vasco Manuel; Maclachlan, Jennifer H.; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Majdan, Marek; Mapoma, Christopher Chabila; Marcenes, Wagner; Barrieotos Marzan, Melvin; Masci, Joseph R.; Mashal, Mohammad Taufiq; Mason-Jones, Amanda J.; Mayosi, Bongani M.; Mazorodze, Tasara T.; Mckay, Abigail Cecilia; Meaney, Peter A.; Mehndiratta, Man Mohan; Mejia-Rodriguez, Fabiola; Melaku, Yohannes Adama; Memish, Ziad A.; Mendoza, Walter; Miller, Ted R.; Mills, Edward J.; Mohammad, Karzan Abdulmuhsin; Mokdad, Ali H.; Mola, Glen Liddell; Monasta, Lorenzo; Montico, Marcella; Moore, Ami R.; Mori, Rintaro; Moturi, Wilkister Nyaora; Mukaigawara, Mitsuru; Murthy, Kinnari S.; Naheed, Aliya; Naidoo, Kovin S.; Naldi, Luigi; Nangia, Vinay; Narayan, K. M. Venkat; Nash, Denis; Nejjari, Chakib; Nelson, Robert G.; Neupane, Sudan Prasad; Newton, Charles R.; Ng, Marie; Nisar, Muhammad Imran; Nolte, Sandra; Norheim, Ole F.; Nowaseb, Vincent; Nyakarahuka, Luke; Oh, In-Hwan; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Olusanya, Bolajoko O.; Omer, Saad B.; Opio, John Nelson; Orisakwe, Orish Ebere; Pandian, Jeyaraj D.; Papachristou, Christina; Paternina Caicedo, Angel J.; Patten, Scott B.; Paul, Vinod K.; Pavlin, Boris Igor; Pearce, Neil; Pereira, David M.; Pervaiz, Aslam; Pesudovs, Konrad; Petzold, Max; Pourmalek, Farshad; Qato, Dima; Quezada, Amado D.; Quistberg, D. Alex; Rafay, Anwar; Rahimi, Kazem; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Rahman, Sajjad Ur; Raju, Murugesan; Rana, Saleem M.; Razavi, Homie; Reilly, Robert Quentin; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Ronfani, Luca; Roy, Nobhojit; Sabin, Nsanzimana; Saeedi, Mohammad Yahya; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Samonte, Genesis May J.; Sawhney, Monika; Schneider, Ione J. C.; Schwebel, David C.; Seedat, Soraya; Sepanlou, Sadaf G.; Servan-Mori, Edson E.; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Shibuya, Kenji; Shin, Hwashin Hyun; Shiue, Ivy; Shivakoti, Rupak; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Silberberg, Donald H.; Silva, Andrea P.; Simard, Edgar P.; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Skirbekk, Vegard; Sliwa, Karen; Soneji, Samir; Soshnikov, Sergey S.; Sreeramareddy, Chandrashekhar T.; Stathopoulou, Vasiliki Kalliopi; Stroumpoulis, Konstantinos; Swaminathan, Soumya; Sykes, Bryan L.; Tabb, Karen M.; Talongwa, Roberto Tchio; Tenkorang, Eric Yeboah; Terkawi, Abdullah Sulieman; Thomson, Alan J.; Thorne-Lyman, Andrew L.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Traebert, Jefferson; Tran, Bach X.; Dimbuene, Zacharie Tsala; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis; Uchendu, Uche S.; Ukwaja, Kingsley N.; Uzun, Selen Begum; Vallely, Andrew J.; Vasankari, Tommi J.; Venketasubramanian, N.; Violante, Francesco S.; Vlassov, Vasiliy Victorovich; Vollset, Stein Emil; Waller, Stephen; Wallin, Mitchell T.; Wang, Linhong; Wang, XiaoRong; Wang, Yanping; Weichenthal, Scott; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weintraub, Robert G.; Westerman, Ronny; White, Richard A.; Wilkinson, James D.; Williams, Thomas Neil; Woldeyohannes, Solomon Meseret; Wong, John Q.; Xu, Gelin; Yang, Yong C.; Yano, Yuichiro; Yentur, Gokalp Kadri; Yip, Paul; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Younis, Mustafa; Yu, Chuanhua; Jin, Kim Yun; Zaki, Maysaa El Sayed; Zhao, Yong; Zheng, Yingfeng; Zhou, Maigeng; Zhu, Jun; Zou, Xiao Nong; Lopez, Alan D.; Vos, Theo

    2014-01-01

    Background The Millennium Declaration in 2000 brought special global attention to HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria through the formulation of Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 6. The Global Burden of Disease 2013 study provides a consistent and comprehensive approach to disease estimation for between

  6. Immunity against HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis during Co-Infections with Neglected Infectious Diseases: Recommendations for the European Union Research Priorities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boraschi, D.; Alemayehu, M.A.; Aseffa, A.; Chiodi, F.; Chisi, J.; Prete, G. Del; Doherty, T.M.; Elhassan, I.; Engers, H.; Gyan, B; Harandi, A.M.; Kariuki, T.; Kironde, F.; Kouriba, B.; Langhorne, J.; Laskay, T.; Medaglini, D.; Olesen, O.; Onyebujoh, P.; Palma, C.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Sibanda, E.; Steinhoff, U.; Tagliabue, A.; Thiel, A.; Vahedi, M.; Troye-Blomberg, M.

    2008-01-01

    Author SummaryInfectious diseases remain a major health and socioeconomic problem in many low-income countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. For many years, the three most devastating diseases, HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis (TB) have received most of the world's attention. However, in

  7. Tuberculosis among Children in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis among Alaskan children under 15 was more than twice the national rate, with Alaska Native children showing a much higher incidence. Children with household exposure to adults with active tuberculosis had a high risk of infection. About 22 percent of pediatric tuberculosis cases were identified through school…

  8. The geographic epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis disease in Baltimore, 1971-1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obasanjo, Olugbenga Olufemi

    Given the reemergence of Tuberculosis (TB) in the United States (U.S.) in the 1980s and 1990s, several strategies have emerged to combat the disease. A successful tool has been Directly Observed Therapy (DOT). Chaulk, et al. showed that DOT was responsible for the maintaining the decline in TB rates in Baltimore through the corresponding period of an upswing in rates nationally. In this study, we measure the impact of DOT on the geographic pattern of TB in Baltimore. We used Geographical Information System (GIS) methods to compare the geographic patterns of TB in Baltimore before and after the introduction of DOT in the city. We identified both predictors of TB, and differences in geographic units in Baltimore over time. We measured the impact of the introduction of DOT and Rifampin on various treatment outcomes for TB at about the same time. Despite the drop in numbers of TB cases, the spatial distribution of cases generally remained unchanged until 1995. This was confirmed by the fact that similar predictors were identified in all of the years that were analyzed. However, higher proportions of TB cases were found among blacks and females in more recent years. Death rates have increased significantly while corresponding relapse rates and the mean length of therapy have declined significantly. Rifampin was associated with a longer length of therapy before DOT, but with a shorter duration of therapy following the introduction of DOT. In all of the years analyzed, losses to follow-up (LTFU) do not differ from those completing therapy and are not spatially clustered relative to those completing therapy. DOT has been effective in reducing the numbers of TB cases in Baltimore city-wide without an emphasis on so-called "high-risk" patients for LTFU. Thus, any declines in TB case rates are not due to a decline in a particular group or geographic sector of the city. Universal DOT is effective and does not cause a geographic clustering of difficult-to-reach patients. This

  9. A preliminary investigation of tuberculosis and other diseases in African buffalo (Syncerus caffer in Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kalema-Zikusoka

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A survey to determine the prevalence of bovine tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis and certain other infectious diseases was conducted on 42 free-ranging African buffaloes, (Syncerus caffer from May to June 1997 in the Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda. Using the gamma interferon test, exposure to M. bovis was detected in 21.6 % of the buffaloes. One dead buffalo and an emaciated warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus that was euthanased, were necropsied; both had miliary granulomas from which M. bovis was isolated. None of the buffaloes sampled in Sector A of the park, which has no cattle interface, tested positive for bovine tuberculosis (BTB exposure. The prevalence and distribution of BTB does not appear to have changed significantly since the 1960s, but this may be due to fluxes in the buffalo population. Serological testing for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD demonstrated positive exposure of 57.1% of the buffaloes sampled, with types A, O and SAT 1-3, which is the first known report of FMD antibodies to A and O types in free ranging African buffaloes. Foot-and-mouth disease virus types SAT 1 and SAT 3 were isolated from buffalo probang samples. Two percent of the buffaloes had been exposed to brucellosis. None of the buffaloes tested had antibodies to rinderpest, leptospirosis or Q fever.

  10. Design, syntheses, and anti-tuberculosis activities of conjugates of piperazino-1,3-benzothiazin-4-ones (pBTZs) with 2,7-dimethylimidazo [1,2-a]pyridine-3-carboxylic acids and 7-phenylacetyl cephalosporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Mark W; Tiwari, Rohit; Miller, Patricia A; Cho, Sanghyun; Franzblau, Scott G; Miller, Marvin J

    2016-04-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the most threatening diseases in the world and the need for development of new therapies is dire. Herein we describe the rationale for the design and subsequent syntheses and studies of conjugates between pBTZ and both the imidazopyridine and cephalosporin scaffolds. Overall some compounds exhibited notable anti-TB activity in the range of 2-0.2 μM in the Microplate Alamar Blue (MABA) Assay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Type I interferons in tuberculosis: Foe and occasionally friend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-Teixeira, Lúcia; Mayer-Barber, Katrin; Sher, Alan; O'Garra, Anne

    2018-05-07

    Tuberculosis remains one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide, and, despite its clinical significance, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of pathogenic and protective mechanisms triggered by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Type I interferons (IFN) regulate a broad family of genes that either stimulate or inhibit immune function, having both host-protective and detrimental effects, and exhibit well-characterized antiviral activity. Transcriptional studies have uncovered a potential deleterious role for type I IFN in active tuberculosis. Since then, additional studies in human tuberculosis and experimental mouse models of M. tuberculosis infection support the concept that type I IFN promotes both bacterial expansion and disease pathogenesis. More recently, studies in a different setting have suggested a putative protective role for type I IFN. In this study, we discuss the mechanistic and contextual factors that determine the detrimental versus beneficial outcomes of type I IFN induction during M. tuberculosis infection, from human disease to experimental mouse models of tuberculosis. © 2018 Moreira-Teixeira et al.

  12. Activity of Medicinal Plant Extracts on Multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under Reduced Oxygen Conditions Using Intracellular and Axenic Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purva D. Bhatter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Test the activity of selected medicinal plant extracts on multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under reduced oxygen concentration which represents nonreplicating conditions. Material and Methods. Acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of the plants Acorus calamus L. (rhizome, Ocimum sanctum L. (leaf, Piper nigrum L. (seed, and Pueraria tuberosa DC. (tuber were tested on Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv intracellularly using an epithelial cell (A549 infection model. The extracts found to be active intracellularly were further studied axenically under reducing oxygen concentrations. Results and Conclusions. Intracellular multiplication was inhibited ≥60% by five of the twelve extracts. Amongst these 5 extracts, in axenic culture, P. nigrum (acetone was active under aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic conditions indicating presence of multiple components acting at different levels and P. tuberosa (aqueous showed bactericidal activity under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions implying the influence of anaerobiosis on its efficacy. P. nigrum (aqueous and A. calamus (aqueous and ethanol extracts were not active under axenic conditions but only inhibited intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, suggesting activation of host defense mechanisms to mediate bacterial killing rather than direct bactericidal activity.

  13. Altered protein and iron levels of patients with active tuberculosis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Backgound: Tuberculosis as a state of chronic inflammation impacts on haematologic functions of the body. Objectives: This study aimed at assessing iron parameters and serum protein levels of ninety tuberculosis patients aged fifteen to sixty years, enrolled from Dr Lawrence Henshaw Memorial Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria.

  14. Mycobacteria-specific cytokine responses as correlates of treatment response in active and latent tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Vanessa; Tebruegge, Marc; Zufferey, Christel; Germano, Susie; Forbes, Ben; Cosentino, Lucy; McBryde, Emma; Eisen, Damon; Robins-Browne, Roy; Street, Alan; Denholm, Justin; Curtis, Nigel

    2017-08-01

    A biomarker indicating successful tuberculosis (TB) therapy would assist in determining appropriate length of treatment. This study aimed to determine changes in mycobacteria-specific antigen-induced cytokine biomarkers in patients receiving therapy for latent or active TB, to identify biomarkers potentially correlating with treatment success. A total of 33 adults with active TB and 36 with latent TB were followed longitudinally over therapy. Whole blood stimulation assays using mycobacteria-specific antigens (CFP-10, ESAT-6, PPD) were done on samples obtained at 0, 1, 3, 6 and 9 months. Cytokine responses (IFN-γ, IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IP-10, MIP-1β, and TNF-α) in supernatants were measured by Luminex xMAP immunoassay. In active TB cases, median IL-1ra (with CFP-10 and with PPD stimulation), IP-10 (CFP-10, ESAT-6), MIP-1β (ESAT-6, PPD), and TNF-α (ESAT-6) responses declined significantly over the course of therapy. In latent TB cases, median IL-1ra (CFP-10, ESAT-6, PPD), IL-2 (CFP-10, ESAT-6), and IP-10 (CFP-10, ESAT-6) responses declined significantly. Mycobacteria-specific cytokine responses change significantly over the course of therapy, and their kinetics in active TB differ from those observed in latent TB. In particular, mycobacteria-specific IL-1ra responses are potential correlates of successful therapy in both active and latent TB. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Chronic respiratory disease in adults treated for tuberculosis in Khartoum, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, R K; Mortimer, K; Bjune, G; El Sony, A I

    2016-09-01

    Background: Chronic respiratory disease (CRD) causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Although the global CRD epidemic collides with the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic in many low- and middle-income country settings, the risk of TB-associated CRD is not well described in countries with a high burden of TB. Methods: We recruited 136 patients with a history of sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB (PTB) from the TB clinic at Omdurman Teaching Hospital in Khartoum, Sudan, and 136 age- and sex-matched community controls, between 28 July 2013 and 30 December 2013. Data were collected using standardised questionnaires and spirometry was performed before and after bronchodilator. Results: The mean age of the subjects with previous PTB and controls was respectively 44.0 years (SD 8.5) and 44.5 years (SD 8.6), with 27.2% females in both groups. Chronic respiratory symptoms such as chronic cough (OR 6.67, 95%CI 2.98-14.90, P de tuberculose (TB) dans de nombreux pays à revenu faible ou moyen, le risque de MRC associée à la TB n'est pas bien décrit dans les pays durement frappés par la TB. Méthodes : Nous avons recruté 136 patients ayant des antécédents de tuberculose pulmonaire (TBP) à frottis positif dans le service de pneumologie du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Omdurman à Khartoum, Soudan, et 136 témoins de la communauté, appariés sur l'âge et le sexe, entre le 28 juillet 2013 et le 30 décembre 2013. Les données ont été recueillies grâce à des questionnaires standardisés ainsi qu'à une spirométrie avant et après bronchodilatateur. Résultats : L'âge moyen des cas et des témoins a été de 44,0 ans (DS 8,5) et 44,5 ans (DS 8,61), respectivement, avec 27,2% de femmes dans les deux groupes. Des symptômes respiratoires chroniques comme une toux chronique (OR 6,67 ; IC95% 2,98-14,90 ; P de TBP après ajustement sur les facteurs de confusion potentiels. Conclusion : Les caractéristiques cliniques des MRC sont fortement associées à des ant

  16. IP-10 and MIG are compartmentalized at the site of disease during pleural and meningeal tuberculosis and are decreased after antituberculosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qianting; Cai, Yi; Zhao, Wei; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Mingxia; Luo, Kai; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Haiying; Zhou, Boping; Kornfeld, Hardy; Chen, Xinchun

    2014-12-01

    The diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) disease remains a challenge, especially in high-burden settings. Cytokines and chemokines are important in the pathogenesis of TB. Here we investigate the usefulness of circulating and compartmentalized cytokines/chemokines for diagnosis of TB. The levels of multiple cytokines/chemokines in plasma, pleural fluid (PF), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were determined by Luminex liquid array-based multiplexed immunoassays. Three of 26 cytokines/chemokines in plasma were significantly different between TB and latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Among them, IP-10 and MIG had the highest diagnostic values, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC AUC) of 0.92 for IP-10 and 0.86 for MIG for distinguishing TB from LTBI. However, IP-10 and MIG levels in plasma were not different between TB and non-TB lung disease. In contrast, compartmentalized IP-10 and MIG in the PF and CSF showed promising diagnostic values in discriminating TB and non-TB pleural effusion (AUC = 0.87 for IP-10 and 0.93 for MIG), as well as TB meningitis and non-TB meningitis (AUC = 0.9 for IP-10 and 0.95 for MIG). A longitudinal study showed that the plasma levels of IP-10, MIG, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) decreased, while the levels of MCP-1/CCL2 and eotaxin-1/CCL11 increased, after successful treatment of TB. Our findings provide a practical methodology for discriminating active TB from LTBI by sequential IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs) and plasma IP-10 testing, while increased IP-10 and MIG at the site of infection (PF or CSF) can be used as a marker for distinguishing pleural effusion and meningitis caused by TB from those of non-TB origins. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Limited impact of tuberculosis control in Hong Kong: attributable to high risks of reactivation disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vynnycky, E.; Borgdorff, M. W.; Leung, C. C.; Tam, C. M.; Fine, P. E. M.

    2008-01-01

    Over 50% of the global burden of tuberculosis occurs in South East Asia and the Western Pacific. Since 1950, notification rates in high-income countries in these settings have declined slowly and have remained over ten-fold greater than those in Western populations. The reasons for the slow decline

  18. Identification of biomarkers for tuberculosis disease using a novel dual-color RT-MLPA assay.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, S.A.; Goeman, J.J.; Sutherland, J.S.; Opmeer, L.; Boer, K.G. de; Jacobsen, M.; Kaufmann, S.H.; Finos, L.; Magis-Escurra Ibanez, C.; Ota, M.O.; Ottenhoff, T.H.; Haks, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Owing to our lack of understanding of the factors that constitute protective immunity during natural infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), there is an urgent need to identify host biomarkers that predict long-term outcome of infection in the absence of therapy. Moreover, the

  19. Sutherlandia frutescens (Fabaceae extracts used for treating tuberculosis do not have high activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itumeleng H. Mabusa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sutherlandia frutescens (L R. Br. contains several essential, bioactive compounds with clinically proven pharmacological activities. Sutherlandia is prescribed for people with tuberculosis but it is still not known what compounds in this plant act against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its mode of action. This study is aimed at determining if S. frutescens extracts contain antimycobacterial compounds. Aerial parts of S. frutescens were dried, ground and extracted with ethanol, dichloromethane: methanol 1:1 (v/v and water. The chemical profiling was done using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS and thin layer chromatography (TLC. TLC plates were developed in butanol:acetic acid:water (BAW to the ratio of 21:6:3; chloroform:methanol:water:formic acid (CMWF1 [60:15:2:1] and (CMWF2 [21:9:1:0.3]. Qualitative antioxidant activity was done, using 2.2-diphenylpacryl-1-hydrazyl (DPPH. Antimycobacterial activity of the plant extracts was evaluated, using micro-dilution and bioautographic methods against Mycobacterium smegmatis. Low antimycobacterial activity against M. smegmatis was observed on the bioautograms. The ethanol extracts contained more compounds compared to water extracts on HPLC-MS chromatographic profiles. The average Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC values for all the extracts were 0.61 mg/mL units and the DCM:MeOH (1:1 extract had the lowest MIC value of 0.28 mg/mL. The results showed that the plant could be further explored for possible antimycobacterial agents. Low activity was observed, possibly due to low replication of bacilli and non-replicating organisms. The study provides preliminary scientific validation of the traditional medicinal use of this plant. Further studies are required to identify the bioactive compounds in the DCM:MeOH 1:1 extract which showed significant antimycobacterial activities.   Research correlation: This article is the original version, of which an Afrikaans

  20. Demographic predictors of active tuberculosis in people migrating to British Columbia, Canada: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald, Lisa A; Campbell, Jonathon R; Balshaw, Robert F; Romanowski, Kamila; Roth, David Z; Marra, Fawziah; Cook, Victoria J; Johnston, James C

    2018-02-26

    Canadian tuberculosis (TB) guidelines recommend targeting postlanding screening for and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in people migrating to Canada who are at increased risk for TB reactivation. Our objectives were to calculate robust longitudinal estimates of TB incidence in a cohort of people migrating to British Columbia, Canada, over a 29-year period, and to identify groups at highest risk of developing TB based on demographic characteristics at time of landing. We included all individuals ( n = 1 080 908) who became permanent residents of Canada between Jan. 1, 1985, and Dec. 31, 2012, and were resident in BC at any time between 1985 and 2013. Multiple administrative databases were linked to the provincial TB registry. We used recursive partitioning models to identify populations with high TB yield. Active TB was diagnosed in 2814 individuals (incidence rate 24.2/100 000 person-years). Demographic factors (live-in caregiver, family, refugee immigration classes; higher TB incidence in country of birth; and older age) were strong predictors of TB incidence in BC, with elevated rates continuing many years after entry into the cohort. Recursive partitioning identified refugees 18-64 years of age from countries with a TB incidence greater than 224/100 000 population as a high-yield group, with 1% developing TB within the first 10 years. These findings support recommendations in Canadian guidelines to target postlanding screening for and treatment of LTBI in adult refugees from high-incidence countries. Because high-yield populations can be identified at entry via demographic data, screening at this point may be practical and high-impact, particularly if the LTBI care cascade can be optimized. © 2018 Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  1. Investigation of the proinflammatory activity of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in lung cancer and inflammatory diseases of respiratory organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Makarova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The proinflammatory activity of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF was investigated using the biological test system (donor blood in 71 patients with lung cancer and inflammatory disease of respiratory organs (lung abscess, infiltrative tuberculosis, tuberculoma, fibrocavernous tuberculosis. The supernatant of BALF was purified by filtration through millipores and added to blood, and a nitroblue tetrazolium recovery test (HBT was carried out. Hank’s balanced salt solution was used in the control. The proinflammatory effect of BALF was defined as a diformazan-positive neutrophil count ratio in the experimental and control samples (stimulation index. The inflammatory process developing in lung cancer was active, as suggested by the accumulation of neutrophils in the lung and by the high proinflammatory activity of BALF, which were comparable with the similar indicators in lung abscess and fibrocavernous tuberculosis.

  2. Prevalence of latent and active tuberculosis among dairy farm workers exposed to cattle infected by Mycobacterium bovis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Torres-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human tuberculosis caused by M. bovis is a zoonosis presently considered sporadic in developed countries, but remains a poorly studied problem in low and middle resource countries. The disease in humans is mainly attributed to unpasteurized dairy products consumption. However, transmission due to exposure of humans to infected animals has been also recognized. The prevalence of tuberculosis infection and associated risk factors have been insufficiently characterized among dairy farm workers (DFW exposed in settings with poor control of bovine tuberculosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Tuberculin skin test (TST and Interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA were administered to 311 dairy farm and abattoir workers and their household contacts linked to a dairy production and livestock facility in Mexico. Sputa of individuals with respiratory symptoms and samples from routine cattle necropsies were cultured for M. bovis and resulting spoligotypes were compared. The overall prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI was 76.2% (95% CI, 71.4-80.9% by TST and 58.5% (95% CI, 53.0-64.0% by IGRA. Occupational exposure was associated to TST (OR 2.72; 95% CI, 1.31-5.64 and IGRA (OR 2.38; 95% CI, 1.31-4.30 adjusting for relevant variables. Two subjects were diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis, both caused by M. bovis. In one case, the spoligotype was identical to a strain isolated from bovines. CONCLUSIONS: We documented a high prevalence of latent and pulmonary TB among workers exposed to cattle infected with M. bovis, and increased risk among those occupationally exposed in non-ventilated spaces. Interspecies transmission is frequent and represents an occupational hazard in this setting.

  3. In Vitro Activity of Copper(II Complexes, Loaded or Unloaded into a Nanostructured Lipid System, against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia B. da Silva

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is an infectious disease caused mainly by the bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, presenting 9.5 million new cases and 1.5 million deaths in 2014. The aim of this study was to evaluate a nanostructured lipid system (NLS composed of 10% phase oil (cholesterol, 10% surfactant (soy phosphatidylcholine, sodium oleate, and Eumulgin® HRE 40 ([castor oil polyoxyl-40-hydrogenated] in a proportion of 3:6:8, and an 80% aqueous phase (phosphate buffer pH = 7.4 as a tactic to enhance the in vitro anti-Mtb activity of the copper(II complexes [CuCl2(INH2]·H2O (1, [Cu(NCS2(INH2]·5H2O (2 and [Cu(NCO2(INH2]·4H2O (3. The Cu(II complex-loaded NLS displayed sizes ranging from 169.5 ± 0.7095 to 211.1 ± 0.8963 nm, polydispersity index (PDI varying from 0.135 ± 0.0130 to 0.236 ± 0.00100, and zeta potential ranging from −0.00690 ± 0.0896 to −8.43 ± 1.63 mV. Rheological analysis showed that the formulations behave as non-Newtonian fluids of the pseudoplastic and viscoelastic type. Antimycobacterial activities of the free complexes and NLS-loaded complexes against Mtb H37Rv ATCC 27294 were evaluated by the REMA methodology, and the selectivity index (SI was calculated using the cytotoxicity index (IC50 against Vero (ATCC® CCL-81, J774A.1 (ATCC® TIB-67, and MRC-5 (ATCC® CCL-171 cell lines. The data suggest that the incorporation of the complexes into NLS improved the inhibitory action against Mtb by 52-, 27-, and 4.7-fold and the SI values by 173-, 43-, and 7-fold for the compounds 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The incorporation of the complexes 1, 2 and 3 into the NLS also resulted in a significant decrease of toxicity towards an alternative model (Artemia salina L.. These findings suggest that the NLS may be considered as a platform for incorporation of metallic complexes aimed at the treatment of TB.

  4. Activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis with concomitant induction of cellular immune responses by a tetraaza-macrocycle with acetate pendant arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, S; Ordway, D; Arroz, M J; Costa, J; Delgado, R

    2001-01-01

    The novel tetraaza-macrocyclic compound 3,7,11-tris(carboxymethyl)-3,7,11,17-tetraaza-bicyclo[11.3.1]heptadeca-1(17),13,15-triene, abbreviated as ac3py14, was investigated for its activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and for induction of protective cellular immune responses. Perspective results show that ac3py14 and its Fe3+ 1:1 complex, [Fe(ac3py14)], inhibited radiometric growth of several strains of M. tuberculosis. Inhibition with 25 microg/mL varied from 99% for H37Rv to 80% and above for multiple drug-resistant clinical isolates. The capacity of ac3py14 to elicit a beneficial immune response without cellular apoptosis was assessed and compared to the effects of virulent M. tuberculosis. The present study produces evidence that after stimulation with ac3py14 there was significant production of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), whereas the production of interleukin-5 (IL-5) remained low, and there was development of a memory population (CD45RO). The level of binding of Annexin V, a marker of apoptosis, was not sufficient to result in toxic effects toward alphabeta and gammadelta T cells and CD14+ macrophages. This preliminary study is the first report of a compound that simultaneously exerts an inhibitory effect against M. tuberculosis and induces factors associated with protective immune responses.

  5. T-cell recognition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate fractions in tuberculosis patients and their household contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demissie, A; Ravn, P; Olobo, J

    1999-01-01

    We examined the immune responses of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and their healthy household contacts to short-term culture filtrate (ST-CF) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis or molecular mass fractions derived from it. Our goal was to identify fractions strongly recognized......, to secreted mycobacterial antigens is suggestive of an early stage of infection by M. tuberculosis, which could in time result in overt disease or containment of the infection. This possibility is currently being investigated by follow-up studies of the household contacts....

  6. Prevalence, risk factors and social context of active pulmonary tuberculosis among prison inmates in Tajikistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Winetsky

    Full Text Available SETTING: Tuberculosis (TB is highly prevalent in prisons of the former Soviet Union. OBJECTIVE: To understand the behavioral, demographic and biological factors placing inmates in Tajikistan at risk for active TB. DESIGN: We administered a behavioral and demographic survey to 1317 inmates in two prison facilities in Sughd province, Tajikistan along with radiographic screening for pulmonary TB. Suspected cases were confirmed bacteriologically. Inmates undergoing TB treatment were also surveyed. In-depth interviews were conducted with former prisoners to elicit relevant social and behavioral characteristics. RESULTS: We identified 59 cases of active pulmonary TB (prevalence 4.5%. Factors independently associated with increased prevalence of active TB were: HIV-infection by self-report (PR 7.88; 95%CI 3.40-18.28, history of previous TB (PR 10.21; 95%CI 6.27-16.63 and infrequent supplemental nutrition beyond scheduled meals (PR 3.00; 95%CI 1.67-5.62. Access to supplemental nutrition was associated with frequency of visits from friends and family and ability to rely on other inmates for help. CONCLUSION: In prison facilities of Tajikistan, HIV-infection, injection drug use and low access to supplemental nutrition were associated with prevalent cases of active pulmonary TB. Policies that reduce HIV transmission among injection drug users and improve the nutritional status of socially isolated inmates may alleviate the TB burden in Tajikistan's prisons.

  7. Urgent Living-Donor Liver Transplantation in a Patient With Concurrent Active Tuberculosis: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, B-H; Park, J-I; Lee, S-G

    2018-04-01

    Although active tuberculosis (TB) is considered a contraindication for liver transplantation (LT), this is the only treatment in patients with liver failure and concurrent active TB. We report a case with successful urgent living-donor LT for irreversible liver failure in the presence of active TB. A 48-year-old man, with a history of decompensated alcoholic liver cirrhosis, was presented with stupor. At admission, his consciousness had deteriorated to semi-coma, and his renal function also rapidly deteriorated to hepatorenal syndrome. A preoperative computed tomography scan of the chest revealed several small cavitary lesions in both upper lobes, and acid-fast bacillus stain from his sputum was graded 2+. Adenosine deaminase levels from ascites were elevated, suggesting TB peritonitis. A first-line anti-TB drug regimen was started immediately (rifampin, isoniazid, levofloxacin, and amikacin). An urgent living-donor LT was performed 2 days later. After LT, the regimen was changed to second-line anti-TB drugs (amikacin, levofloxacin, cycloserine, and pyridoxine). The sputum acid-fast bacillus stain tested negative on postoperative day 10. His liver function remained well preserved, even after the reversion to first-line anti-TB treatment. The patient recovered without any anti-TB medication-related complications and was discharged. LT can be prudently performed as a life-saving option, particularly for patients with liver failure and concurrent active TB. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnosis of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: is the demise of the Mantoux test imminent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothel, James S; Andersen, Peter

    2005-12-01

    Tuberculosis is responsible for more then 2 million deaths worldwide each year and vies with HIV as the world's most fatal infectious disease. In many developing countries, attempts to control the spread of infection rely solely on identification and treatment of those with active disease, ignoring subclinical infection. However, in developed countries, large efforts are also expended to identify and give prophylactic drugs to people with latent tuberculosis infection. Until recently, the 100-year-old tuberculin skin test (Mantoux) has been the only available diagnostic test for latent tuberculosis infection, despite its many well-known limitations. Advances in scientific knowledge have led to the development of tests for tuberculosis that measure the production of interferon-gamma by T-cells stimulated in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigens. These interferon-gamma tests are highly specific and unaffected by prior Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination or immune reactivity to most atypical mycobacteria. They are more sensitive than the tuberculin skin test in detecting people with active tuberculosis, and their results correlate more closely with M. tuberculosis exposure risk factors than the tuberculin skin test in people likely to have latent tuberculosis infection. Science has caught up with one of the oldest diagnostic tests still in use worldwide, and the adoption of new, tuberculosis-specific interferon-gamma-based tests should move us one step closer to better control of this insidious pathogen.

  9. Miliary tuberculosis with no pulmonary involvement in myelodysplastic syndromes: a curable, yet rarely diagnosed, disease: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krambovitis Elias

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although tuberculosis is not uncommon among patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, only a few reports of such patients suffering from miliary tuberculosis (MT exist. MT often presents as a fever of unknown origin and it is a curable disease, yet fatal if left untreated. Case presentation We report a case of MT with no clinical or laboratory indications of pulmonary involvement in a patient with MDS, and review the relevant literature. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from the liquid culture of a bone marrow aspirate. Conclusion Even if the initial diagnostic investigation for a fever of obscure etiology is negative, MT should not be excluded from the differential diagnosis list. Since it is a curable disease, persistent and vigorous diagnostic efforts are warranted. In suspected cases, mycobacterial blood cultures should be collected as soon as possible after hospital admission and early bone marrow aspirate with mycobacterial cultures is advocated.

  10. BCG protects toddlers during a tuberculosis outbreak.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gaensbauer, J T

    2009-05-01

    In 2007, an outbreak of tuberculosis occurred in a toddler population attending two child care centres in Cork, Ireland. Of 268 children exposed, 18 were eventually diagnosed with active tuberculosis. We present the initial clinical and radiographic characteristics of the active disease group. Mantoux testing was positive in only 66% of cases. All cases were either pulmonary or involved hilar adenopathy on chest radiograph; there were no cases of disseminated disease or meningitis. 24% of the exposed children had been previously vaccinated with BCG, and no case of active disease was found in this group (p = 0.016), suggesting a profound protective effect of BCG in this population. Our experience provides evidence supporting a protective effect of BCG against pulmonary disease in young children.

  11. COAGULATION ACTIVITY IN LIVER DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sheikh Sajjadieh Mohammad Reza

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with advanced hepatic failure may present with the entire spectrum of coagulation factor deficiencies. This study was designed to determine laboratory abnormalities in coagulation in chronic liver disease and the association of these abnormalities with the extent of chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Coagulation markers were assayed in 60 participants: 20 patients with chronic hepatitis, 20 patients with cirrhosis, and 20 healthy individuals (control. Plasma levels of anti-thrombin III were determined by a chromogenic substrate method, and plasma concentrations of fibrinogen were analyzed by the Rutberg method. Commercially available assays were used for laboratory coagulation tests. The levels of coagualation activity markers in patients with chronic liver disease were significantly different in comparison to those in healthy participants. These results indicate the utility of measuring markers for coagulation activity in determining which cirrhosis patients are more susceptible to disseminated intravascular coagulation.

  12. Active tuberculosis is associated with worse clinical outcomes in HIV-infected African patients on antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham M Siika

    Full Text Available This cohort study utilized data from a large HIV treatment program in western Kenya to describe the impact of active tuberculosis (TB on clinical outcomes among African patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART.We included all patients initiating ART between March 2004 and November 2007. Clinical (signs and symptoms, radiological (chest radiographs and laboratory (mycobacterial smears, culture and tissue histology criteria were used to record the diagnosis of TB disease in the program's electronic medical record system.We assessed the impact of TB disease on mortality, loss to follow-up (LTFU and incident AIDS-defining events (ADEs through Cox models and CD4 cell and weight response to ART by non-linear mixed models.We studied 21,242 patients initiating ART-5,186 (24% with TB; 62% female; median age 37 years. There were proportionately more men in the active TB (46% than in the non-TB (35% group. Adjusting for baseline HIV-disease severity, TB patients were more likely to die (hazard ratio--HR = 1.32, 95% CI 1.18-1.47 or have incident ADEs (HR = 1.31, 95% CI: 1.19-1.45. They had lower median CD4 cell counts (77 versus 109, weight (52.5 versus 55.0 kg and higher ADE risk at baseline (CD4-adjusted odds ratio = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.31-1.85. ART adherence was similarly good in both groups. Adjusting for gender and baseline CD4 cell count, TB patients experienced virtually identical rise in CD4 counts after ART initiation as those without. However, the overall CD4 count at one year was lower among patients with TB (251 versus 269 cells/µl.Clinically detected TB disease is associated with greater mortality and morbidity despite salutary response to ART. Data suggest that identifying HIV patients co-infected with TB earlier in the HIV-disease trajectory may not fully address TB-related morbidity and mortality.

  13. Antigen induced production of υ-interferon ex vivo, in the peripheral blood of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. M. Zagdyn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is one of the most significant problems in the Russian Health Care. Russia remains on the list of the 22 countries with a high TB incidence and on the third place in the world with a high prevalence of Drug Resistant TB [1]. It is urgently needed to develop new TB diagnostic methods as well as effective measures of the specific TB prevention, including a development of the novel vaccines, so we have to know better about the most immunogenic antigens of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. We studied the Interferon-Q production in the whole blood after stimulating immune response with different proteins of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis in patients with active TB. The study results permitted us to evaluate the immunogenicity of the previously known proteins (Ag85a и ESAT-6 in comparison to the recently identified ones (Rv2957, Rv2958c и Rv0447, analyzing simultaneously their relation to tuberculin, as well as to antigens of the different viruses (Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr Virus, Influenza Virus. Protein Rv2958c, unlike protein ESAT-6, showed the high immunogenicity in comparison to tuberculin. The expressed immunogenicity of protein Rv2958c might be indicated a possible greatest specificity of immune response to this antigen in TB patients. Meanwhile, bacillary tuberculosis was strongly associated with low immune response to this protein. Also we were found statistical differences in immune responses of patients to the different Mycobacterium Tuberculosis antigens depending on the drug sensitivity. In addition it was interesting to know about a significantly low immune response of patients with Drug Resistant TB to protein pp65 CMV.

  14. [Epidemiology of bacillary pulmonary tuberculosis according to HIV status of patients followed in the department of infectious diseases Conakry (Guinea)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traoré, F A; Sako, F B; Sylla, D; Bangoura, M; Kpamy, D O; Traoré, M; Doumbouya, M; Sangare, I

    2014-12-01

    Despite many efforts of prevention and the availability of free treatment, TB/HIV co-infection is still rampant in Guinea. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis according to HIV status among patients hospitalized in the infectious diseases department of Conakry University Hospital. This was a descriptive and analytical retrospective study of patient records admitted for pulmonary tuberculosis from January 2003 to December 2012. During this period, 1953 cases of tuberculosis were collected of which 346 (17.7%) were smear positive. There was a marked male predominance (59.7%). The average age was 38 ± 11 years. The majority of patients originated from the suburbs of Conakry and its surrounding prefectures (76.7%). People without profession were most represented (40.7%). A level of primary education was the most frequently reported (39.7%). Out of 325 patients tested for HIV, the serology was positive in 185 patients (56.9%). A contact with a TB patient was reported in 21.4% of HIV negative patients, and in 6.5% of the HIV-positive group (p = 0.0006). There was no difference between the two groups regarding clinical signs and symptoms. The mean CD4 count was comparable in both groups (p = 0.05). Lethality was higher among co-infected patients (30.4% against 15.56%; p = 0.00037). Strengthening the prevention of TB among PLWHA by the administration of isoniazide seems necessary and warrants further study on this subject in Guinea.

  15. INCIDENCE AND CLINICAL FEATURES OF TUBERCULOSIS IN HIV-INFECTED CHILDREN IN THE SVERDLOVSK REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Eismont

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the structure of HIV-infected children who was ill with tuberculosis in the Sverdlovsk Region in 2004-2012. The incidence of tuberculosis in children aged 0 to 14 years in the Sverdlovsk Region showed a 79.4% increase in the above period due to the introduction of Russian innovative technologies for the diagnosis of this disease in children. At the same time there was a rise in both the number of HIV-infected children aged 0 to 14 years and the proportion of same-age children with late-stage HIV infection. Simultaneously, the incidence of tuberculosis in the non-HIV-infected children aged 0 to 14 years was 55.2-193.2 times lower than that in the HIV-infected children. In 2004-2014, the Sverdlovsk Region notified fewer new cases of tuberculosis among the children without HIV infection than among those with its late stages. Non-HIV-infected children of both sexes were also ill with tuberculosis less frequently than HIV-infected boys and girls. HIV-infected children 1-3 and 7-14 years of age proved to be most vulnerable to tuberculosis. Among those who fell ill with tuberculosis, there was a preponderance of patients with late-stage HIV infection; moreover, the majority (79.6% received highly active antiretroviral therapy. 63.3% of the cases were in contact with a tuberculosis patient, only every five patients had chemoprophylaxis for this disease. High-quality vaccination against tuberculosis prevented complications and bacterial excretion in children with comorbidity. Out of the clinical forms of tuberculosis in children with HIV infection, there was a predominance of primary tuberculous complex and intrathoracic lymph node tuberculosis. The latter was less common in children without HIV infection than in those with this disease; the same was true of bacterial excretion in respiratory tuberculosis.

  16. Spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, R N; Ben Husien, M

    2018-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains endemic in many parts of the developing world and is increasingly seen in the developed world due to migration. A total of 1.3 million people die annually from the disease. Spinal TB is the most common musculoskeletal manifestation, affecting about 1 to 2% of all cases of TB. The coexistence of HIV, which is endemic in some regions, adds to the burden and the complexity of management. This review discusses the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, impact of HIV and both the medical and surgical options in the management of spinal TB. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:425-31.

  17. CDC WONDER: Online Tuberculosis Information System (OTIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Online Tuberculosis Information System (OTIS) on CDC WONDER contains information on verified tuberculosis (TB) cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control...

  18. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  19. Immune responses to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigen ESAT-6 signal subclinical infection among contacts of tuberculosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doherty, T Mark; Demissie, Abebech; Olobo, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Diagnosis of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is considered essential for tuberculosis control but is hampered by the lack of specific reagents. We report that strong recognition of tuberculosis complex-specific antigen ESAT-6 by healthy household contacts of tuberculosis patients...... correlates with the subsequent development of active tuberculosis during a 2-year follow-up period....

  20. Tuberculosis DALY-Gap: Spatial and Quantitative Comparison of Disease Burden Across Urban Slum and Non-slum Census Tracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Mariel A; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia; Sales, Carolina Maia Martins; Gomes, Teresa; Snyder, Robert E; Daumas, Regina Paiva; Riley, Lee W

    2015-08-01

    To quantitatively assess disease burden due to tuberculosis between populations residing in and outside of urban informal settlements in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, we compared disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), or "DALY-gap." Using the 2010 Brazilian census definition of informal settlements as aglomerados subnormais (AGSN), we allocated tuberculosis (TB) DALYs to AGSN vs non-AGSN census tracts based on geocoded addresses of TB cases reported to the Brazilian Information System for Notifiable Diseases in 2005 and 2010. DALYs were calculated based on the 2010 Global Burden of Disease methodology. DALY-gap was calculated as the difference between age-adjusted DALYs/100,000 population between AGSN and non-AGSN. Total TB DALY in Rio in 2010 was 16,731 (266 DALYs/100,000). DALYs were higher in AGSN census tracts (306 vs 236 DALYs/100,000), yielding a DALY-gap of 70 DALYs/100,000. Attributable DALY fraction for living in an AGSN was 25.4%. DALY-gap was highest for males 40-59 years of age (501 DALYs/100,000) and in census tracts with <60% electricity (12,327 DALYs/100,000). DALY-gap comparison revealed spatial and quantitative differences in TB burden between slum vs non-slum census tracts that were not apparent using traditional measures of incidence and mortality. This metric could be applied to compare TB burden or burden for other diseases in mega-cities with large informal settlements for more targeted resource allocation and evaluation of intervention programs.

  1. Ibuprofen therapy resulted in significantly decreased tissue bacillary loads and increased survival in a new murine experimental model of active tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaplana, Cristina; Marzo, Elena; Tapia, Gustavo; Diaz, Jorge; Garcia, Vanesa; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2013-07-15

    C3HeB/FeJ mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis were used in an experimental animal model mimicking active tuberculosis in humans to evaluate the effect of antiinflammatory agents. No other treatment but ibuprofen was given, and it was administered when the animals' health started to deteriorate. Animals treated with ibuprofen had statistically significant decreases in the size and number of lung lesions, decreases in the bacillary load, and improvements in survival, compared with findings for untreated animals. Because antiinflammatory agents are already on the market, further clinical trials should be done to evaluate this effect in humans as soon as possible, to determine their suitability as coadjuvant tuberculosis treatment.

  2. Radiographic differentiation of atypical tuberculosis from mycobacterium tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarver, R.D.; Pearcy, E.A.; Conces, D.J. Jr.; Mathur, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    The chest radiographs of 95 patients with the new diagnosis of atypical turberculosis were reviewed to determine if any significant differences between atypical tuberculosis and that caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis could be discerned. Findings included upper lobe involvement in B4 of the 95 patients and cavities in 76, with nearly equal groups having no, moderate, or extensive surrounding alveolar disease. Nodules were common; in six patients a nodule was the sole manifestation of disease. Adenopathy was seen in 12 of the 95 patients, atlectasis in 45, pleural thickening in 90, and effusions in three. These radiographic findings did not allow the radiographic differentiation of atypical tuberculosis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

  3. Tomographic Aspects of Advanced Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Evaluation of Sequelae following Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Barcelos Capone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate tomographic changes in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB, degree of agreement among three radiologists regarding tomographic diagnoses, and sequelae following treatment. Methods. Cross-sectional and descriptive study of 74 TB patients confirmed by sputum culture and chest computed tomography before (CT1 and 6 months after (CT2 drug therapy. Results were performed by three radiologists blinded to clinical and laboratory results. Results. Main findings in CT1 included nodules indicating the presence of a tree-in-bud pattern in 93% of cases, ill-defined nodules in 84% of cases, consolidation in 77% of cases, architectural distortion in 71% of cases, cavitary lesions in 62% of cases, and ground glass opacities in 37% of cases. Airway involvement, characterized by increased thickness and dilatation of the bronchial walls, occurred in 93% of cases. Pleural involvement occurred in 54%. There was an agreement on active TB among the three radiologists in 85% of cases. The results in CT2 indicated the presence of architectural distortion in 91% of cases and cylindrical bronchiectasis in 86%. Conclusions. The study established a tomographic pattern for diagnosis of active TB characterized by the presence of airway nodules, consolidation, architectural distortion, and cavitary lesions, and an almost complete degree of agreement (Kappa was observed among the radiologists (0.85. CT after treatment assists in defining the cure.

  4. Endometrial Tuberculosis i ninfertility: Report of 2 cases and a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis is a chronic granulomatous disease affecting human and many other mammals. Most human diseases are caused by M.tuberculosis but some are due to M.bovis.(1). Tuberculosis of the tubes and endometrium is intimately bound to the problem of sterility. Despite the decline in frequency of genital tuberculosis ...

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Transfer RNA Induces IL-12p70 via Synergistic Activation of Pattern Recognition Receptors within a Cell Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Caroline; Krutzik, Stephan; Schenk, Mirjam; Scumpia, Philip O; Lu, Jing; Pang, Yan Ling Joy; Russell, Brandon S; Lim, Kok Seong; Shell, Scarlet; Prestwich, Erin; Su, Dan; Elashoff, David; Hershberg, Robert M; Bloom, Barry R; Belisle, John T; Fortune, Sarah; Dedon, Peter C; Pellegrini, Matteo; Modlin, Robert L

    2018-05-01

    Upon recognition of a microbial pathogen, the innate and adaptive immune systems are linked to generate a cell-mediated immune response against the foreign invader. The culture filtrate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains ligands, such as M. tuberculosis tRNA, that activate the innate immune response and secreted Ags recognized by T cells to drive adaptive immune responses. In this study, bioinformatics analysis of gene-expression profiles derived from human PBMCs treated with distinct microbial ligands identified a mycobacterial tRNA-induced innate immune network resulting in the robust production of IL-12p70, a cytokine required to instruct an adaptive Th1 response for host defense against intracellular bacteria. As validated by functional studies, this pathway contained a feed-forward loop, whereby the early production of IL-18, type I IFNs, and IL-12p70 primed NK cells to respond to IL-18 and produce IFN-γ, enhancing further production of IL-12p70. Mechanistically, tRNA activates TLR3 and TLR8, and this synergistic induction of IL-12p70 was recapitulated by the addition of a specific TLR8 agonist with a TLR3 ligand to PBMCs. These data indicate that M. tuberculosis tRNA activates a gene network involving the integration of multiple innate signals, including types I and II IFNs, as well as distinct cell types to induce IL-12p70. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Active pulmonary tuberculosis case detection and treatment among floating population in China: an effective pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinxu; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Shiwen; Wang, Jia; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Li, Weibin; Yao, Hongyan; Wang, Lixia

    2010-12-01

    China has more and more floating population because of reform and opening-up. As one of the high burden countries in tuberculosis (TB) control in the world, China has to face more challenges about the TB case detection and treatment among floating population in China. Aim to evaluate the effect of case detection and treatment of the Floating Population TB Control Pilot Project from Global Fund Round Five (GFR5) TB Control Program in China. During October 2006 to September 2008, the pilot project was implemented gradually in 60 counties in Tianjin, Shanghai, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Fujian, Shandong and Guangdong. All quarterly reports of the pilot project were collected, and these materials were summarized and analyzed. In seven coastal provinces, 19,584 active pulmonary TB (PTB) cases were registered among floating population in 2 years. Among the active PTB cases, 87.2% were 15-45 years old, and 62.8% were male. In second year, 15,629 active PTB cases were registered, and the overall registration rate was 68 per 100,000 people. DOT treatments were provided for 18,125 active PTB cases in 2 years, and overall DOT treatment rate was 92.6%. There were 3,955 active PTB cases registered in first year, and the overall cure rate was 86.0%. Through the implementation of the pilot project, the TB case detection and treatment among floating population have been enhanced in pilot areas of China. The useful experience and results from the pilot project have been being gradually generalized nationally.

  7. Intestinal/Peritoneal Tuberculosis in Children: An Analysis of Autopsy Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Ridaura-Sanz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection by Mycobacterium bovis is not infrequently identified in Mexico. Its relation to nonpasteurized milk products ingestion is well recognized with primary infection usually in the intestinal tract. The term “abdominal tuberculosis” includes peritoneal as well as primary and secondary intestinal tuberculosis. The clinical differentiation of these conditions is difficult. In this work, we reviewed the clinical and pathological features of 24 cases of children dying with tuberculosis in whom autopsy revealed abdominal disease in a referral hospital in Mexico City. We identified 8 cases of primary intestinal tuberculosis, with documentation of M. bovis in 6 of them, and 9 cases of secondary intestinal tuberculosis (primary pulmonary disease, all negative to M. bovis. Seven patients had peritoneal tuberculosis without intestinal lesions and with active pulmonary disease in 4 of them, and of the remaining three, two had mesenteric lymph node involvement suggesting healed intestinal disease. In this approach to abdominal tuberculosis, postmortem analysis was able to differentiate primary from secondary intestinal tuberculosis and to define the nature of peritoneal involvement. This discrimination gives rise to different diagnostic approaches and epidemiological and preventive actions, particularly in countries where tuberculosis is endemic and infection by M. bovis continues to be identified.

  8. Impact of infectious disease epidemics on tuberculosis diagnostic, management, and prevention services: experiences and lessons from the 2014–2015 Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Ansumana

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO Global Tuberculosis Report 2015 states that 28% of the world's 9.6 million new tuberculosis (TB cases are in the WHO Africa Region. The Mano River Union (MRU countries of West Africa–Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia–have made incremental sustained investments into TB control programmes over the past two decades. The devastating Ebola virus disease (EVD outbreak of 2014–2015 in West Africa impacted significantly on all sectors of the healthcare systems in the MRU countries, including the TB prevention and control programmes. The EVD outbreak also had an adverse impact on the healthcare workforce and healthcare service delivery. At the height of the EVD outbreak, numerous staff members in all MRU countries contracted EBV at the Ebola treatment units and died. Many healthcare workers were also infected in healthcare facilities that were not Ebola treatment units but were national hospitals and peripheral health units that were unprepared for receiving patients with EVD. In all three MRU countries, the disruption to TB services due to the EVD epidemic will no doubt have increased Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission, TB morbidity and mortality, and decreased patient adherence to TB treatment, and the likely impact will not be known for several years to come. In this viewpoint, the impact that the EVD outbreak had on TB diagnostic, management, and prevention services is described. Vaccination against TB with BCG in children under 5 years of age was affected adversely by the EVD epidemic. The EVD outbreak was a result of global failure and represents yet another ‘wake-up call’ to the international community, and particularly to African governments, to reach a consensus on new ways of thinking at the national, regional, and global levels for building healthcare systems that can sustain their function during outbreaks. This is necessary so that other disease control programmes (like those for TB, malaria

  9. Approaching a diagnostic point-of-care test for pediatric tuberculosis through evaluation of immune biomarkers across the clinical disease spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenum, Synne; Dhanasekaran, S; Lodha, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) calls for an accurate, rapid, and simple point-of-care (POC) test for the diagnosis of pediatric tuberculosis (TB) in order to make progress "Towards Zero Deaths". Whereas the sensitivity of a POC test based on detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB...... (CD14, FCGR1A, FPR1, MMP9, RAB24, SEC14L1, and TIMP2) or "downstream" towards a decreased likelihood of TB disease (BLR1, CD3E, CD8A, IL7R, and TGFBR2), suggesting a correlation with MTB-related pathology and high relevance to a future POC test for pediatric TB. A biomarker signature consisting of BPI...

  10. Absceso y tuberculosis pulmonar

    OpenAIRE

    Hercelles García, Oswaldo

    2014-01-01

    Si la tuberculosis pulmonar es conocida desde los tiempos más remotos y el absceso del pulmón es considerado, desde el siglo XIX, como una entidad patológica perfectamente definida, es evidente que la asociación absceso y tuberculosis pulmonar no tiene su verdadera expresión de estudio, sino en los últimos años. If pulmonary tuberculosis has been known since ancient times and lung abscess is considered, since the nineteenth century as a well-defined disease entity, it is clear that the abs...

  11. Activity of moxifloxacin and linezolid against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in combination with potentiator drugs verapamil, timcodar, colistin and SQ109.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Knegt, Gerjo J; van der Meijden, Aart; de Vogel, Corné P; Aarnoutse, Rob E; de Steenwinkel, Jurriaan E M

    2017-03-01

    Current treatment for tuberculosis (TB) is complicated by the emergence of multidrug resistant TB (MDR-TB). As a result, there is an urgent need for new powerful anti-TB regimens and novel strategies. In this study, we aimed to potentiate a moxifloxacin + linezolid backbone as treatment for MDR-TB with the efflux pump inhibitors verapamil and timcodar as well as with drugs that act on mycobacterial cell wall stability such as colistin and SQ109. Using a time-kill kinetics assay, the activities of moxifloxacin, linezolid, verapamil, timcodar, colistin and SQ109 as single drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis were evaluated. In addition, the activity of the moxifloxacin + linezolid backbone in combination with one of the potentiator drugs was assessed. As little as 0.125 mg/L moxifloxacin achieved 99% killing of M. tuberculosis after 6 days of exposure. Linezolid showed moderate killing but 99% killing was not achieved. Verapamil, timcodar and colistin only resulted in killing with the highest concentrations tested but 99% killing was not achieved. SQ109 resulted in complete elimination after 1 day of exposure to 256 mg/L and in 99% elimination after 6 days of exposure to 1 mg/L. Furthermore, colistin added to the moxifloxacin + linezolid backbone resulted in increased elimination, whereas verapamil, timcodar and SQ109 showed no added value to the backbone. This finding that colistin potentiates the activity of the moxifloxacin + linezolid backbone against M. tuberculosis suggests its potential role in further studies on the applicability of a moxifloxacin + linezolid treatment of MDR-TB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  12. Extrapulmonary involvement in pediatric tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika; Andres, Mariaem M; Tatco, Vincent R; Lim, Cielo Consuelo Q; Concepcion, Nathan David P

    2017-09-01

    Tuberculosis in childhood is clinically challenging, but it is a preventable and treatable disease. Risk factors depend on age and immunity status. The most common form of pediatric tuberculosis is pulmonary disease, which comprises more than half of the cases. Other forms make up the extrapulmonary tuberculosis that involves infection of the lymph nodes, central nervous system, gastrointestinal system, hepatobiliary tree, and renal and musculoskeletal systems. Knowledge of the imaging characteristics of pediatric tuberculosis provides clues to diagnosis. This article aims to review the imaging characteristics of common sites for extrapulmonary tuberculous involvement in children.

  13. Evaluation of clinical characteristics and prognosis of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis depending on the underlying lung diseases: Emphysema vs prior tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Kazuya; Ohshima, Nobuharu; Suzuki, Junko; Kawashima, Masahiro; Okuda, Kenichi; Sato, Ryota; Suzukawa, Maho; Nagai, Hideaki; Matsui, Hirotoshi; Ohta, Ken

    2015-11-01

    There have been scarce data evaluating the differences of clinical characteristics and prognosis of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) depending on underlying pulmonary diseases. We tried to clarify them in CPA patients who had pulmonary emphysema or previous pulmonary tuberculosis. We reviewed and evaluated CPA patients diagnosed between 2007 and 2013 with pulmonary emphysema (PE group; n = 29), with previous pulmonary tuberculosis (PT group; n = 47) and with combination of these 2 underlying conditions (CTE group; n = 24). In CT findings, fungus balls were rare in PE group (7% in PE group and 36% in PT group; p = 0.006). Compared with PT group, PE group patients exhibited more frequent preceding antibiotics administration (45% vs 11%; p = 0.002) and fever (52% vs 17%; p = 0.002), less frequent hemosputum (24% vs 57%; p = 0.008), and more frequent consolidations in imaging (79% vs 38%; p = 0.001) and respiratory failure (34% vs 13%; p = 0.020), possibly suggesting more acute clinical manifestations of CPA in emphysematous patients. Trend of the differences between PT and PE group was not changed when patients with fungal balls were excluded. Multivariate Cox regression analysis of risks for all-cause mortality revealed age (HR, 1.079; p = 0.002) and emphysema (HR, 2.45; p = 0.040) as risk factors. Assessment of underlying lung diseases is needed when we estimate prognosis and consider treatment of CPA patients. Particularly, emphysematous patients can be presented as refractory pneumonia and show poor prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tuberculosis abdominal Abdominal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    T. Rubio; M. T. Gaztelu; A. Calvo; M. Repiso; H. Sarasíbar; F. Jiménez Bermejo; A. Martínez Echeverría

    2005-01-01

    La tuberculosis abdominal cursa con un cuadro inespecífico, con difícil diagnóstico diferencial respecto a otras entidades de similar semiología. Presentamos el caso de un varón que ingresa por presentar dolor abdominal, pérdida progresiva y notoria de peso corporal y fiebre de dos meses de evolución. El cultivo de la biopsia de colon mostró presencia de bacilo de Koch.Abdominal tuberculosis develops according to a non-specific clinical picture, with a difficult differential diagnosis with re...

  15. Exploration of Serum Proteomic Profiling and Diagnostic Model That Differentiate Crohn's Disease and Intestinal Tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenming Zhang

    Full Text Available To explore the diagnostic models of Crohn's disease (CD, Intestinal tuberculosis (ITB and the differential diagnostic model between CD and ITB by analyzing serum proteome profiles.Serum proteome profiles from 30 CD patients, 21 ITB patients and 30 healthy controls (HCs were analyzed by using weak cationic magnetic beads combined with MALDI-TOF-MS technique to detect the differentially expressed proteins of serum samples. Three groups were made and compared accordingly: group of CD patients and HCs, group of ITB patients and HCs, group of CD patients and ITB patients. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to screen the ten most differentiated protein peaks (P < 0.05. Genetic algorithm combining with support vector machine (SVM was utilized to establish the optimal diagnostic models for CD, ITB and the optimal differential diagnostic model between CD and ITB. The predictive effects of these models were evaluated by Leave one out (LOO cross validation method.There were 236 protein peaks differently expressed between group of CD patients and HCs, 305 protein peaks differently expressed between group of ITB patients and HCs, 332 protein peaks differently expressed between group of CD patients and ITB patients. Ten most differentially expressed peaks were screened out between three groups respectively (P < 0.05 to establish diagnostic models and differential diagnostic model. A diagnostic model comprising of four protein peaks (M/Z 4964, 3029, 2833, 2900 can well distinguish CD patients and HCs, with a specificity and sensitivity of 96.7% and 96.7% respectively. A diagnostic model comprising four protein peaks (M/Z 3030, 2105, 2545, 4210 can well distinguish ITB patients and HCs, with a specificity and sensitivity of 93.3% and 95.2% respectively. A differential diagnostic model comprising three potential biomarkers protein peaks (M/Z 4267, 4223, 1541 can well distinguish CD patients and ITB patients, with a specificity and sensitivity of 76.2% and 80

  16. Adrenal insufficiency secondary to tuberculosis: the value of telemedicine in the remote diagnosis of Addison's disease in Ebeye, Republic of the Marshall Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Lisabeth A; Ruess, Lynne; Jack, Tom; Person, Donald A

    2009-01-01

    A young Marshallese woman presented with the insidious development of fever, cough, fatigue, profound weakness, massive weight loss, cachexia, alopecia, amenorrhea, and periumbilical hyperpigmentation. Limited laboratory studies revealed anemia, leukocytosis, and hyponatremia. Imaging studies, as well as digital photographs, transmitted over the Internet, using the secure Pacific Island Health Care Project (PIHCP), store-and-forward telemedicine system, suggested the diagnosis of disseminated tuberculosis, and antimycobacterial antibiotics were begun. Sputum cultures eventually grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Based on the constellation of clinical signs and symptoms, the transmitted images, and limited laboratory data, adrenal tuberculosis (Addison's disease) with adrenal insufficiency was diagnosed and corticosteroids were initiated. The patient responded dramatically This case underscores the utility of telemedicine in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with unusual conditions, rarely seen today in the United States, from remote sites in the Developing World.

  17. Phosphodiesterase-4 inhibition combined with isoniazid treatment of rabbits with pulmonary tuberculosis reduces macrophage activation and lung pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbian, Selvakumar; Tsenova, Liana; O'Brien, Paul; Yang, Guibin; Koo, Mi-Sun; Peixoto, Blas; Fallows, Dorothy; Zeldis, Jerome B; Muller, George; Kaplan, Gilla

    2011-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Even after successful microbiological cure of TB, many patients are left with residual pulmonary damage that can lead to chronic respiratory impairment and greater risk of additional TB episodes due to reinfection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Elevated levels of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α and several other markers of inflammation, together with expression of matrix metalloproteinases, have been associated with increased risk of pulmonary fibrosis, tissue damage, and poor treatment outcomes in TB patients. In this study, we used a rabbit model of pulmonary TB to evaluate the impact of adjunctive immune modulation, using a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor that dampens the innate immune response, on the outcome of treatment with the antibiotic isoniazid. Our data show that cotreatment of M. tuberculosis infected rabbits with the phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor CC-3052 plus isoniazid significantly reduced the extent of immune pathogenesis, compared with antibiotic alone, as determined by histologic analysis of infected tissues and the expression of genes involved in inflammation, fibrosis, and wound healing in the lungs. Combined treatment with an antibiotic and CC-3052 not only lessened disease but also improved bacterial clearance from the lungs. These findings support the potential for adjunctive immune modulation to improve the treatment of pulmonary TB and reduce the risk of chronic respiratory impairment. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Enzymatic activities and DNA substrate specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA helicase XPB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasingham, Seetha V; Zegeye, Ephrem Debebe; Homberset, Håvard; Rossi, Marie L; Laerdahl, Jon K; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Tønjum, Tone

    2012-01-01

    XPB, also known as ERCC3 and RAD25, is a 3' → 5' DNA repair helicase belonging to the superfamily 2 of helicases. XPB is an essential core subunit of the eukaryotic basal transcription factor complex TFIIH. It has two well-established functions: in the context of damaged DNA, XPB facilitates nucleotide excision repair by unwinding double stranded DNA (dsDNA) surrounding a DNA lesion; while in the context of actively transcribing genes, XPB facilitates initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription at gene promoters. Human and other eukaryotic XPB homologs are relatively well characterized compared to conserved homologs found in mycobacteria and archaea. However, more insight into the function of bacterial helicases is central to understanding the mechanism of DNA metabolism and pathogenesis in general. Here, we characterized Mycobacterium tuberculosis XPB (Mtb XPB), a 3'→5' DNA helicase with DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed DNA unwinding in the presence of significant excess of enzyme. The unwinding activity was fueled by ATP or dATP in the presence of Mg(2+)/Mn(2+). Consistent with the 3'→5' polarity of this bacterial XPB helicase, the enzyme required a DNA substrate with a 3' overhang of 15 nucleotides or more. Although Mtb XPB efficiently unwound DNA model substrates with a 3' DNA tail, it was not active on substrates containing a 3' RNA tail. We also found that Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed ATP-independent annealing of complementary DNA strands. These observations significantly enhance our understanding of the biological roles of Mtb XPB.

  19. Enzymatic activities and DNA substrate specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA helicase XPB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seetha V Balasingham

    Full Text Available XPB, also known as ERCC3 and RAD25, is a 3' → 5' DNA repair helicase belonging to the superfamily 2 of helicases. XPB is an essential core subunit of the eukaryotic basal transcription factor complex TFIIH. It has two well-established functions: in the context of damaged DNA, XPB facilitates nucleotide excision repair by unwinding double stranded DNA (dsDNA surrounding a DNA lesion; while in the context of actively transcribing genes, XPB facilitates initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription at gene promoters. Human and other eukaryotic XPB homologs are relatively well characterized compared to conserved homologs found in mycobacteria and archaea. However, more insight into the function of bacterial helicases is central to understanding the mechanism of DNA metabolism and pathogenesis in general. Here, we characterized Mycobacterium tuberculosis XPB (Mtb XPB, a 3'→5' DNA helicase with DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed DNA unwinding in the presence of significant excess of enzyme. The unwinding activity was fueled by ATP or dATP in the presence of Mg(2+/Mn(2+. Consistent with the 3'→5' polarity of this bacterial XPB helicase, the enzyme required a DNA substrate with a 3' overhang of 15 nucleotides or more. Although Mtb XPB efficiently unwound DNA model substrates with a 3' DNA tail, it was not active on substrates containing a 3' RNA tail. We also found that Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed ATP-independent annealing of complementary DNA strands. These observations significantly enhance our understanding of the biological roles of Mtb XPB.

  20. Tuberculosis and systemic lupus erythematosus: a case-control study in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-González, Pedro; Romero-Díaz, Juanita; Cervera-Hernández, Miguel Enrique; Ocampo-Torres, Mario; Chaires-Garza, Luis Gerardo; Lastiri-González, Ernesto Alejandro; Atisha-Fregoso, Yemil; Bobadilla-Del-Valle, Miriam; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo; Sifuentes-Osornio, José

    2018-04-20

    To determine, among systemic lupus erythematosus patients, factors associated with active tuberculosis. We performed a case-control study, in a tertiary-care center in Mexico City. We defined cases as systemic lupus erythematosus patients with active tuberculosis and matched them 1:1 with systemic lupus erythematosus patients without tuberculosis (controls) by age, date of systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosis, and disease duration. We analyzed clinical variables, lupus disease activity (SLEDAI-2K), and accumulated damage (SLICC/ARC-DI). We performed a nonconditional logistic regression to determine factors associated with tuberculosis. We identified 72 tuberculosis cases among systemic lupus erythematosus patients, 58% were culture confirmed. Thirty-three percent (24/72) were pulmonary only, 47.2% (34/72) extrapulmonary only, and 19.4% both. After adjustment for age, gender, and socioeconomic status, SLEDAI-2K and SLICC/ARC-DI, a 1-year cumulative dose of prednisone ≥ 3 g (odds ratios (OR), 18.85; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 6.91-51.45) was associated with tuberculosis, and the antimalarial treatment was protective (OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.04-0.36). Among systemic lupus erythematosus patients, cumulative dose of prednisone is associated with tuberculosis. Further research is required to elucidate the protective effect of antimalarial drugs for tuberculosis. Preventive strategies must be implemented in patients at risk.

  1. Drug therapy in spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, S; Khandelwal, Gaurav

    2013-06-01

    Although the discovery of effective anti-tuberculosis drugs has made uncomplicated spinal tuberculosis a medical disease, the advent of multi-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the co-infection of HIV with tuberculosis have led to a resurgence of the disease recently. The principles of drug treatment of spinal tuberculosis are derived from our experience in treating pulmonary tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis is classified to be a severe form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and hence is included in Category I of the WHO classification. The tuberculosis bacilli isolated from patients are of four different types with different growth kinetics and metabolic characteristics. Hence multiple drugs, which act on the different groups of the mycobacteria, are included in each anti-tuberculosis drug regimen. Prolonged and uninterrupted chemotherapy (which may be 'short course' and 'intermittent' but preferably 'directly observed') is effective in controlling the infection. Spinal Multi-drug-resistant TB and spinal TB in HIV-positive patients present unique problems in management and have much poorer prognosis. Failure of chemotherapy and emergence of drug resistance are frequent due to the failure of compliance hence all efforts must be made to improve patient compliance to the prescribed drug regimen.

  2. DNA repair systems and the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: varying activities at different stages of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorna, Alina E; Bowater, Richard P; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2010-05-25

    Mycobacteria, including most of all MTB (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), cause pathogenic infections in humans and, during the infectious process, are exposed to a range of environmental insults, including the host's immune response. From the moment MTB is exhaled by infected individuals, through an active and latent phase in the body of the new host, until the time they reach the reactivation stage, MTB is exposed to many types of DNA-damaging agents. Like all cellular organisms, MTB has efficient DNA repair systems, and these are believed to play essential roles in mycobacterial pathogenesis. As different stages of infection have great variation in the conditions in which mycobacteria reside, it is possible that different repair systems are essential for progression to specific phases of infection. MTB possesses homologues of DNA repair systems that are found widely in other species of bacteria, such as nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair and repair by homologous recombination. MTB also possesses a system for non-homologous end-joining of DNA breaks, which appears to be widespread in prokaryotes, although its presence is sporadic within different species within a genus. However, MTB does not possess homologues of the typical mismatch repair system that is found in most bacteria. Recent studies have demonstrated that DNA repair genes are expressed differentially at each stage of infection. In the present review, we focus on different DNA repair systems from mycobacteria and identify questions that remain in our understanding of how these systems have an impact upon the infection processes of these important pathogens.

  3. Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor Levels in Tuberculosis Patients at High Risk for Multidrug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Yudani Mardining Raras

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR has been shown to be a strong prognostic biomarker for tuberculosis (TB. In the present study, the profiles of plasma suPAR levels in pulmonary TB patients at high risk for multidrug resistance were analyzed and compared with those in multidrug resistant (MDR-TB patients. Forty patients were prospectively included, consisting of 10 MDR-TB patients and 30 TB patients at high risk for MDR, underwent clinical assesment. Plasma suPAR levels were measured using ELISA (SUPARnostic, Denmark and bacterial cultures were performed in addition to drug susceptibility tests. All patients of suspected MDR-TB group demonstrated significantly higher suPAR levels compared with the healthy TB-negative group (1.79 ng/mL. Among the three groups at high risk for MDR-TB, only the relapse group (7.87 ng/mL demonstrated suPAR levels comparable with those of MDR-TB patients (7.67 ng/mL. suPAR levels in the two-month negative acid-fast bacilli conversion group (9.29 ng/mL were higher than positive control, whereas levels in the group consisting of therapy failure patients (5.32 ng/mL were lower. Our results strongly suggest that suPAR levels enable rapid screening of suspected MDR-TB patients, but cannot differentiate between groups.

  4. Enhancing the role of private practitioners in tuberculosis prevention and care activities in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanu Anand

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available India accounts for the highest number of incident tuberculosis (TB cases globally. Hence, to impact the TB incidence world over, there is an urgent need to address and accelerate TB control activities in the country. Nearly, half of the TB patients first seek TB care in private sector. However, the participation of private practitioners (PPs has been patchy in TB prevention and care and distrust exists between public and private sector. PPs usually have varied diagnostic and treatment practices that are inadequate and amplify the risk of drug resistance. Hence, their regulation and involvement as key stakeholders are important in TB prevention and care in India if we are to achieve TB control at global level. However, there remain certain barriers and gaps, which are preventing their upscaling. The current paper aims to discuss the status of private sector involvement in TB prevention and care in India. The paper also discusses the strategies and initiatives taken by the government in this regard as evidence shows that the involvement of private sector in co-opting directly observed treatment short-course (DOTS helps to enhance case finding and treatment outcomes; it improves the accessibility of quality TB care with greater geographic coverage. Besides public-private mix, DOTS has been found more cost-effective and reduces financial burden of patients. The paper also offers to present some more solutions both at policy and program level for upscaling the engagement of PPs in the national TB control program.

  5. Imaging of pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyck, P.; De Schepper, A.M.; Vanhoenacker, F.M.; Van den Brande, P.

    2003-01-01

    Tuberculosis, more than any other infectious disease, has always been a challenge, since it has been responsible for a great amount of morbidity and mortality in humans. After a steady decline in the number of new cases during the twentieth century, due to improved social and environmental conditions, early diagnosis, and the development of antituberculous medication, a stagnation and even an increase in the number of new cases was noted in the mid-1980s. The epidemiological alteration is multifactorial: global increase in developing countries; minority groups (HIV and other immunocompromised patients); and elderly patients due to an altered immune status. Other factors that may be responsible are a delayed diagnosis, especially in elderly patients, incomplete or inadequate therapy, and the emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The course of the disease and its corresponding clinicoradiological pattern depends on the interaction between the organism and the host response. Classically, pulmonary tuberculosis has been classified in primary tuberculosis, which occurred previously in children, and postprimary tuberculosis, occurring in adult patients. In industrialized countries, however, there seems to be a shift of primary tuberculosis towards adults. Furthermore, due to an altered immunological response in certain groups, such as immunocompromised and elderly patients, an atypical radioclinical pattern may occur. The changing landscape, in which tuberculosis occurs, as well as the global resurgence, and the changed spectrum of the clinical and radiological presentation, justify a renewed interest of radiologists for the imaging features of pulmonary tuberculosis. This article deals with the usual imaging features of pulmonary tuberculosis as well as the atypical patterns encountered in immunodepressed and elderly patients. (orig.)

  6. HMGB1/RAGE Signaling and Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Responses in Non-HIV Adults with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Lui

    Full Text Available We aimed to study the pathogenic roles of High-Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1 / Receptor-for-Advanced-Glycation-End-products (RAGE signaling and pro-inflammatory cytokines in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB.A prospective study was conducted among non-HIV adults newly-diagnosed with active PTB at two acute-care hospitals (n = 80; age-and-sex matched asymptomatic individuals (tested for latent TB were used for comparison (n = 45. Plasma concentrations of 8 cytokines/chemokines, HMGB1, soluble-RAGE, and transmembrane-RAGE expressed on monocytes/dendritic cells, were measured. Gene expression (mRNA of HMGB1, RAGE, and inflammasome-NALP3 was quantified. Patients' PBMCs were stimulated with recombinant-HMGB1 and MTB-antigen (lipoarabinomannan for cytokine induction ex vivo.In active PTB, plasma IL-8/CXCL8 [median(IQR, 6.0(3.6-15.1 vs 3.6(3.6-3.6 pg/ml, P<0.001] and IL-6 were elevated, which significantly correlated with mycobacterial load, extent of lung consolidation (rs +0.509, P<0.001, severity-score (rs +0.317, P = 0.004, and fever and hospitalization durations (rs +0.407, P<0.001. IL-18 and sTNFR1 also increased. Plasma IL-8/CXCL8 (adjusted OR 1.12, 95%CI 1.02-1.23 per unit increase, P = 0.021 and HMGB1 (adjusted OR 1.42 per unit increase, 95%CI 1.08-1.87, P = 0.012 concentrations were independent predictors for respiratory failure, as well as for ICU admission/death. Gene expression of HMGB1, RAGE, and inflammasome-NALP3 were upregulated (1.2-2.8 fold. Transmembrane-RAGE was increased, whereas the decoy soluble-RAGE was significantly depleted. RAGE and HMGB1 gene expressions positively correlated with cytokine levels (IL-8/CXCL8, IL-6, sTNFR1 and clinico-/radiographical severity (e.g. extent of consolidation rs +0.240, P = 0.034. Ex vivo, recombinant-HMGB1 potentiated cytokine release (e.g. TNF-α when combined with lipoarabinomannan.In patients with active PTB, HMGB1/RAGE signaling and pro-inflammatory cytokines may play important

  7. Nanoparticles as Antituberculosis Drugs Carriers: Effect on Activity Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimova, Y.V.; Gelperina, S.I.; Peloquin, C.A.; Heifets, L.B.

    2000-01-01

    This is the first report evaluating the nanoparticle delivery system for three antituberculosis drugs: isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin. The typical particle size is 250 nm. We studied accumulation of these drugs in human monocytes as well as their antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis residing in human monocyte-derived macrophages. Nanoparticle encapsulation increased the intracellular accumulation (cell-association) of all three tested drugs, but it enhanced the antimicrobial activity of isoniazid and streptomycin only. On the other hand, the activity of encapsulated rifampin against intracellular bacteria was not higher than that of the free drug

  8. Addressing poverty through disease control programmes: examples from Tuberculosis control in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamineni, Vishnu Vardhan; Wilson, Nevin; Das, Anand; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Chadha, Sarabjit; Sachdeva, Kuldeep Singh; Chauhan, Lakbir Singh

    2012-03-26

    Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem in India with the country accounting for one-fifth or 21% of all tuberculosis cases reported globally. The purpose of the study was to obtain an understanding on pro-poor initiatives within the framework of tuberculosis control programme in India and to identify mechanisms to improve the uptake and access to TB services among the poor. A national level workshop was held with participation from all relevant stakeholder groups. This study conducted during the stakeholder workshop adopted participatory research methods. The data was elicited through consultative and collegiate processes. The research study also factored information from primary and secondary sources that included literature review examining poverty headcount ratios and below poverty line population in the country; and quasi-profiling assessments to identify poor, backward and tribal districts as defined by the TB programme in India. Results revealed that current pro-poor initiatives in TB control included collaboration with private providers and engaging community to improve access among the poor to TB diagnostic and treatment services. The participants identified gaps in existing pro-poor strategies that related to implementation of advocacy, communication and social mobilisation; decentralisation of DOT; and incentives for the poor through the available schemes for public-private partnerships and provided key recommendations for action. Synergies between TB control programme and centrally sponsored social welfare schemes and state specific social welfare programmes aimed at benefitting the poor were unclear. Further in-depth analysis and systems/policy/operations research exploring pro-poor initiatives, in particular examining service delivery synergies between existing poverty alleviation schemes and TB control programme is essential. The understanding, reflection and knowledge of the key stakeholders during this participatory workshop provides

  9. A Functional Role for Antibodies in Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lenette L; Chung, Amy W; Rosebrock, Tracy R; Ghebremichael, Musie; Yu, Wen Han; Grace, Patricia S; Schoen, Matthew K; Tafesse, Fikadu; Martin, Constance; Leung, Vivian; Mahan, Alison E; Sips, Magdalena; Kumar, Manu P; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Robinson, Hannah; Tkachenko, Elizabeth; Draghi, Monia; Freedberg, Katherine J; Streeck, Hendrik; Suscovich, Todd J; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Restrepo, Blanca I; Day, Cheryl; Fortune, Sarah M; Alter, Galit

    2016-10-06

    While a third of the world carries the burden of tuberculosis, disease control has been hindered by a lack of tools, including a rapid, point-of-care diagnostic and a protective vaccine. In many infectious diseases, antibodies (Abs) are powerful biomarkers and important immune mediators. However, in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, a discriminatory or protective role for humoral immunity remains unclear. Using an unbiased antibody profiling approach, we show that individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (Ltb) and active tuberculosis disease (Atb) have distinct Mtb-specific humoral responses, such that Ltb infection is associated with unique Ab Fc functional profiles, selective binding to FcγRIII, and distinct Ab glycosylation patterns. Moreover, compared to Abs from Atb, Abs from Ltb drove enhanced phagolysosomal maturation, inflammasome activation, and, most importantly, macrophage killing of intracellular Mtb. Combined, these data point to a potential role for Fc-mediated Ab effector functions, tuned via differential glycosylation, in Mtb control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Profile of glycated-hemoglobin, antioxidant vitamin and cytokine levels in pulmonary tuberculosis patients: A cross sectional study at Pulmonary Diseases Center Semarang City, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praba Ginandjar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uncontrolled blood glucose, which marked by high level of HbA1c, increases risk of pulmonary TB because of cellular immunity dysfunction. This study aimed to analyze profile of glycated hemoglobin, antioxidant vitamins status and cytokines levels in active pulmonary TB patients. Methods: This was a cross sectional study, conducted at Pulmonary Diseases Center Semarang City, Indonesia. Study subject consisted of 62 pulmonary TB patients, diagnosed with positive acid fast bacilli and chest X-ray. ELISA was used to measure IFN-γ and IL-12. Status of antioxidant vitamins was determined by concentration of vitamin A and E using HPLC. Blood glucose control was determined by HbA1c concentration (HbA1c ≥7% is considered as uncontrolled. Results: A significant difference of age between pulmonary tuberculosis patients with normal and uncontrolled blood glucose (p = 0.000 was showed, while all other characteristics (sex, education, occupation did not differ with p = 0.050, 0.280, 0.380 respectively. Mean HbA1c was 7.25 ± 2.70%. Prevalence of uncontrolled glucose among pulmonary TB patients was 29%. Levels of IFN-γ and IL-12 did not differ according to HbA1c concentration (p = 0.159 and p = 0.965 respectively. Pulmonary tuberculosis patients with uncontrolled blood glucose has higher vitamin E (p = 0.006, while vitamin A did not differ significantly (p = 0.478. Conclusions: This study supports the importance of performing diabetes screening among pulmonary TB patients. Further study needs to be done to determine the feasibility of TB-DM co-management. Keywords: HbA1c, Pulmonary tuberculosis, Vitamin A, Vitamin E

  11. The effects of socioeconomic status, clinical factors, and genetic ancestry on pulmonary tuberculosis disease in northeastern Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie N Young

    Full Text Available Diverse socioeconomic and clinical factors influence susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB disease in Mexico. The role of genetic factors, particularly those that differ between the parental groups that admixed in Mexico, is unclear. The objectives of this study are to identify the socioeconomic and clinical predictors of the transition from latent TB infection (LTBI to pulmonary TB disease in an urban population in northeastern Mexico, and to examine whether genetic ancestry plays an independent role in this transition. We recruited 97 pulmonary TB disease patients and 97 LTBI individuals from a public hospital in Monterrey, Nuevo León. Socioeconomic and clinical variables were collected from interviews and medical records, and genetic ancestry was estimated for a subset of 142 study participants from 291,917 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. We examined crude associations between the variables and TB disease status. Significant predictors from crude association tests were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. We also compared genetic ancestry between LTBI individuals and TB disease patients at 1,314 SNPs in 273 genes from the TB biosystem in the NCBI BioSystems database. In crude association tests, 12 socioeconomic and clinical variables were associated with TB disease. Multivariable logistic regression analyses indicated that marital status, diabetes, and smoking were independently associated with TB status. Genetic ancestry was not associated with TB disease in either crude or multivariable analyses. Separate analyses showed that LTBI individuals recruited from hospital staff had significantly higher European genetic ancestry than LTBI individuals recruited from the clinics and waiting rooms. Genetic ancestry differed between individuals with LTBI and TB disease at SNPs located in two genes in the TB biosystem. These results indicate that Monterrey may be structured with respect to genetic ancestry, and that genetic

  12. The effects of socioeconomic status, clinical factors, and genetic ancestry on pulmonary tuberculosis disease in northeastern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Bonnie N; Rendón, Adrian; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian; Baker, Jack; Healy, Meghan; Gross, Jessica M; Long, Jeffrey; Burgos, Marcos; Hunley, Keith L

    2014-01-01

    Diverse socioeconomic and clinical factors influence susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) disease in Mexico. The role of genetic factors, particularly those that differ between the parental groups that admixed in Mexico, is unclear. The objectives of this study are to identify the socioeconomic and clinical predictors of the transition from latent TB infection (LTBI) to pulmonary TB disease in an urban population in northeastern Mexico, and to examine whether genetic ancestry plays an independent role in this transition. We recruited 97 pulmonary TB disease patients and 97 LTBI individuals from a public hospital in Monterrey, Nuevo León. Socioeconomic and clinical variables were collected from interviews and medical records, and genetic ancestry was estimated for a subset of 142 study participants from 291,917 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We examined crude associations between the variables and TB disease status. Significant predictors from crude association tests were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. We also compared genetic ancestry between LTBI individuals and TB disease patients at 1,314 SNPs in 273 genes from the TB biosystem in the NCBI BioSystems database. In crude association tests, 12 socioeconomic and clinical variables were associated with TB disease. Multivariable logistic regression analyses indicated that marital status, diabetes, and smoking were independently associated with TB status. Genetic ancestry was not associated with TB disease in either crude or multivariable analyses. Separate analyses showed that LTBI individuals recruited from hospital staff had significantly higher European genetic ancestry than LTBI individuals recruited from the clinics and waiting rooms. Genetic ancestry differed between individuals with LTBI and TB disease at SNPs located in two genes in the TB biosystem. These results indicate that Monterrey may be structured with respect to genetic ancestry, and that genetic differences in TB

  13. Tuberculosis Fluoroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follow-up though Dec 31, 2002 has been completed for a study of site-specific cancer mortality among tuberculosis patients treated with artificial lung collapse therapy in Massachusetts tuberculosis sanatoria (1930-1950).

  14. Survey on medicinal plants traditionally used in Senegal for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and assessment of their antimycobacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diop, ElHadji Assane; Queiroz, Emerson Ferreira; Kicka, Sébastien; Rudaz, Serge; Diop, Tahir; Soldati, Thierry; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2018-04-24

    In West Africa, populations are used to taking traditional medicine as a first aid against common health problems. In this aspect, many plants are claimed to be effective in the treatment of Tuberculosis (TB), which according to the World Health Organization (WHO) remains one of the world's deadliest communicable diseases. The main aim of this study was to identify plants used to treat TB-symptoms by the population of Senegal and to evaluate their possible concomitant use with clinically approved TB-drugs. This approach allowed the selection of plants effectively used in traditional medicine. In order to verify if the usage of some of these plants can be rationalized, the activity of their traditional preparations was assessed with both an intracellular and extracellular antimycobacterial host-pathogen assays. An ethnopharmacological survey conducted on 117 TB-patients and 30 healers in Senegal from March to May 2014. The questionnaires were focused on the use of medicinal plants to treat common TB -symptoms (cough longer than 2 weeks, fever, night sweats, weight loss and bloody sputum). Local plant names, utilized organs (herbal drugs) and traditional formulations of the plants were recorded. Extracts were prepared by mimicking the traditional decoction in boiling water and screened for their antimycobacterial activity using Mycobacterium marinum, as a validated TB surrogate, and an Acanthamoeba castellanii - M. marinum whole-cell based host-pathogen assay, to detect anti-infective activities. By the end of the survey, nearly 30 plants were cited and the 12 most cited herbal drugs were collected and their usage documented by extensive literature search. Extracts of the chosen herbs were screened with the described assays; with a main focus on traditional formulas (mainly herbal decoctions). Two of the water extracts from Combretum aculeatum and Guiera senegalensis showed significant antimycobacterial activities when compared to the positive control drug (rifampin

  15. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody is not useful to differentiate between Crohn′s disease and intestinal tuberculosis in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghoshal U

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Clinical, endoscopic, radiological and histological parameters of intestinal tuberculosis (IT and Crohn′s disease (CD are so similar that differentiation between these two diseases, which require different treatment, is difficult. Anti- Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody (ASCA, which is often present in the sera of patients with CD, may be potentially useful to differentiate CD from IT. Aim : To evaluate the role of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test for ASCA in serum in differentiating CD from intestinal tuberculosis. Settings and Design : Prospective case-control study. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients with IT, 16 CD, 36 UC diagnosed using standard parameters and 12 controls (11 healthy subjects and one with colonic carcinoma were tested for IgG ASCA in serum. Statistical Analysis Used : Categorical variables were analyzed using Chi-square test with Yates′ correction, as applicable. Continuous variables were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test. Results : Eight of 16 (50% patients with IT, 10 of 16 with CD (62%, nine of 35 with UC (26% and one of 12 controls tested positive for ASCA in serum. Though the frequency of ASCA in serum was comparable among patients with IT and CD (8/16 vs. 10/16, P = ns, IT and UC (8/16 vs. 9/35, P =ns, CD and UC (10/16 vs. 9/35, P =ns, its frequency in CD or IT but not in UC was higher than healthy controls ( P < 0.01. Conclusions : Serum ASCA is unlikely to be useful to differentiate between CD and IT in India.

  16. Immunodiagnosis of tuberculosis: new questions, new tools conference 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennaro Maria L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis exists as a spectrum of conditions ranging from asymptomatic infection to active disease. Novel, accurate tuberculosis immunodiagnostics have been introduced over the last decade, but it remains challenging to timely diagnose active disease and to accurately distinguish asymptomatic M. tuberculosis infection from immune memory resulting from a prior infection eradicated by the host response. The conference titled Immunodiagnosis of Tuberculosis: New Questions, New Tools, which was held on September 21-23, 2008 in Virginia Beach, Virginia, United States, brought together basic scientists and clinical experts to discuss recent progress in tuberculosis research and diagnosis. Global analyses of M. tuberculosis biology and the host immune response, with emphasis on systems approaches to the study of host-pathogen interactions, were presented. Moreover, conference participants discussed new tests in the pipeline and reviewed new technologies leading to novel assay formats. The discussion included technologies ranging from simple, inexpensive point-of-care tests to automated molecular platforms for detection of multiple infections based on the “lab on a chip” concept. It was also recognized that the utility of any new diagnostic relies on laboratory capacity, accessibility, costs, and test deployment. The conference included lessons from the field. For example, the application of existing technologies to neglected areas, such as diagnosis in children and HIV+ populations, was discussed.

  17. Radiology in silico-tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, H.

    1981-01-01

    In spite of a decreasing number of new cases of silico-tuberculosis even today there still remains a serious complication of silicosis. The job of radiology is to recognise the disease, evaluate the course of the disease during therapy and classify the disease for compensation purposes. Due to the pathogenetic and pathomorphologic similarities of silicosis and tuberculosis, it is often difficult and sometimes even impossible to recognise the presence of tuberculosis in cases of silicoses or to identify and isolate the TB component in silico-tuberculosis. Careful consideration of all radiological and clinical parameters improves the accuracy of diagnosis. Since the radiographic examination provides the only method of evaluating the morphologic state of the disease, radiology will keep its central position in the diagnosis of silico-tuberculosis. (orig.) [de

  18. Changing patterns in pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tytle, T.L.; Johnson, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    The authors reviewed the initial chest roentgenograms of 182 consecutive adult patients with proven active tuberculosis. Less than 50% of all cases were known or suspected at the time of initial presentation. There is a low degree of correlation between radiologically discernible active pulmonary tuberculosis and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. A high percentage of cases represent uncommon pulmonary locations. The frequency of occurrence of four common pulmonary patterns is presented. 21 references, 4 figures, 5 tables

  19. Computed tomography of active pulmonary tuberculosis with nonvisualized cavitary lesion on plain chest film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Woo Hyun; Cho, Seoung Hwan; Lee, Jun Bae; Kim, Byung Soo

    1989-01-01

    The detection of cavity in pulmonary tuberculosis has important roles in its diagnosis, therapy planning and follow-up of healing process, and also means at least moderate advanced tuberculosis. The plain chest film has some limitation of detection of cavity in pulmonary tuberculosis owing to several factors. CT is superior to plain chest film and conventional tomography, in detection of cavitary lesion. Authors retrospectively analyzed CT findings of 20 cases of minimal pulmonary tuberculosis, of which the plain chest films showed no cavitary lesion from Sept. 1986 to July 1988 in Pusan National University Hospital. All cases were proven by culture or AFB test of sputum and clinical evidence. The results were as follows: 1. Sex distribution showed 10 cases (50%) in male, 10 case (50%) in female and the highest incidence in the second decade (40%). 2. All 20 cases showed no cavity on the plain chest films, but all cases showed variable sized cavities on CT. 3. The size of cavities ranged from 4 mm to 30 mm, averaged as 9.9 mm, the thickness of cavitary wall from 3 mm to 8 mm, averaged as 5.8 mm. 4. It is concluded that cavitary lesions which are not visualized on the plain chest films can be demonstrated by CT scan in minimal pulmonary tuberculosis

  20. The diet, physical activity and accommodation of patients with quiescent pulmonary tuberculosis in a poor South Indian community. A four-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, C V; Rajendran, K; Mohan, K; Fox, W; Radhakrishna, S

    1966-01-01

    A previous report from the Tuberculosis Chemotherapy Centre, Madras, has shown that, if standard chemotherapy is given for one year, the response of patients treated at home in very poor environmental circumstances is nearly as good as that of those treated in sanatorium under much more favourable conditions. This paper reports on a four-year follow-up of all the patients whose disease was bacteriologically quiescent at the end of the year's treatment. During this period, all the patients were managed on a domiciliary basis; about a quarter of them received chemotherapy with isoniazid alone for two years, another quarter received the drug for one year and the rest received no specific chemotherapy. Despite adverse environmental factors (poor diet; long hours of work often involving strenuous physical activity; overcrowded living conditions; and, for the sanatorium patients, the stresses of returning suddenly to the unfavourable home environment), the great majority of patients in both series maintained quiescent disease throughout the follow-up period. Furthermore, the few patients whose disease relapsed bacteriologically were at no special dietary disadvantage in comparison with those who maintained quiescent disease throughout, nor did they show any appreciable differences in occupation, physical activity or living accommodation. These findings, together with the earlier ones, indicate that, despite adverse environmental circumstances, standard chemotherapy for an adequate period of time is sufficient in the great majority of patients for the attainment of bacteriological quiescence and its maintenance thereafter.

  1. Congenital tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2012-06-20

    Jun 20, 2012 ... Key words: Congenital tuberculo- sis, case report, miliary tuberculosis. Introduction. Congenital tuberculosis defines tuberculosis in infants of .... tary TB and otitis media, resulting in seizures, deafness, and death. It is therefore not surprising that the index case who presented at twelve weeks of age, had ...

  2. Bovine tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) in animals and humans may result from exposure to bacilli within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (i.e., M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum, M. pinnipedii, M. microti, M. caprae, or M. canetti) . Mycobacterium bovis is the species most often isolated from tuberculous cat...

  3. Ocular tuberculosis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakarchi FI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Faiz I Shakarchi1,21Ibn Al-Haetham Teaching Eye Hospital, 2Department of Opthalmology, Medical College, Al-Mustansiriya University, Baghdad, IraqAbstract: The World Health Organization currently estimates that nearly two billion people, or one-third of the world’s population, are infected by tuberculosis, and that roughly 10% of the infected people are symptomatic. Tuberculosis affects the lungs in 80% of patients, while in the remaining 20% the disease may affect other organs, including the eye. Uveitis can be seen concurrently with tuberculosis, but a direct association is difficult to prove. Ocular tuberculosis is usually not associated with clinical evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis, as up to 60% of extrapulmonary tuberculosis patients may not have pulmonary disease. The diagnosis of tuberculous uveitis is often problematic and in nearly all reported cases, the diagnosis was only presumptive. Tuberculous uveitis is a great mimicker of various uveitis entities and it can be considered in the differential diagnosis of any type of intraocular inflammation. It is still unknown if ocular manifestations result from a direct mycobacterium infection or hypersensitivity reaction and this is reflected on the management of tuberculous uveitis. Prevalence of tuberculosis as an etiology of uveitis may reach up to 10% in endemic areas. Tuberculous uveitis is a vision-threatening disease that inevitably leads to blindness if not properly diagnosed and treated. The aim of this review is to illustrate the various clinical features and management of presumed tuberculous uveitis. The current review focuses on the diagnostic criteria, significance of tuberculin skin test, and use of systemic corticosteroids in the management of tuberculous uveitis as recommended in recent publications.Keywords: tuberculosis, uveitis, choroiditis, tuberculin skin test

  4. IL-10 dependent suppression of type 1, type 2 and type 17 cytokines in active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathella Pavan Kumar

    Full Text Available Although Type 1 cytokine responses are considered protective in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB, their role as well as those of Type 2, 17 and immunoregulatory cytokines in tuberculous lymphadenitis (TBL and latent tuberculosis (LTB have not been well studied.To identify cytokine responses associated with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB, TB lymphadenitits and latent TB, we examined mycobacterial antigen-specific immune responses of PTB, TBL and LTB individuals. More specifically, we examined ESAT-6 and CFP-10 induced Type 1, Type 2 and Type 17 cytokine production and their regulation using multiplex ELISA.PTB individuals exhibited a significantly lower baseline as well as antigen-specific production of Type 1 (IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2; Type 2 (IL-4 and Type 17 (IL-17A and IL-17F cytokines in comparison to both TBL and LTB individuals. TBL individuals exhibited significantly lower antigen-specific IFNγ responses alone in comparison to LTB individuals. Although, IL-10 levels were not significantly higher, neutralization of IL-10 during antigen stimulation resulted in significantly enhanced production of IFNγ, IL-4 and IL-17A in PTB individuals, indicating that IL-10 mediates (at least partially the suppression of cytokine responses in PTB.Pulmonary TB is characterized by an IL-10 dependent antigen-specific suppression of Type 1, Type 2 and Type 17 cytokines, reflecting an important association of these cytokines in the pathogenesis of active TB.

  5. Biosynthesis of ilamycins featuring unusual building blocks and engineered production of enhanced anti-tuberculosis agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junying; Huang, Hongbo; Xie, Yunchang; Liu, Zhiyong; Zhao, Jin; Zhang, Chunyan; Jia, Yanxi; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Tianyu; Ju, Jianhua

    2017-08-30

    Tuberculosis remains one of the world's deadliest communicable diseases, novel anti-tuberculosis agents are urgently needed due to severe drug resistance and the co-epidemic of tuberculosis/human immunodeficiency virus. Here, we show the isolation of six anti-mycobacterial ilamycin congeners (1-6) bearing rare L-3-nitro-tyrosine and L-2-amino-4-hexenoic acid structural units from the deep sea-derived Streptomyces atratus SCSIO ZH16. The biosynthesis of the rare L-3-nitrotyrosine and L-2-amino-4-hexenoic acid units as well as three pre-tailoring and two post-tailoring steps are probed in the ilamycin biosynthetic machinery through a series of gene inactivation, precursor chemical complementation, isotope-labeled precursor feeding experiments, as well as structural elucidation of three intermediates (6-8) from the respective mutants. Most impressively, ilamycins E 1 /E 2 , which are produced in high titers by a genetically engineered mutant strain, show very potent anti-tuberculosis activity with an minimum inhibitory concentration value ≈9.8 nM to Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv constituting extremely potent and exciting anti-tuberculosis drug leads.Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the world's deadliest communicable diseases, novel anti-TB agents are urgently needed due to severe drug resistance and the co-epidemic of TB/HIV. Here, the authors show that anti-mycobacterial ilamycin congeners bearing unusual structural units possess extremely potent anti-tuberculosis activities.

  6. Validation of a model for predicting smear-positive active pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with initial acid-fast bacilli smear-negative sputum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Jun-Jun [Department of Chest Medicine, Section of Thoracic Imaging, Ditmanson Medical Foundation Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi City (China); Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan (China); Meiho University, Pingtung (China); Pingtung Christian Hospital, Pingtung (China); Heng Chun Christian Hospital, Pingtung (China)

    2018-01-15

    The objective of this study was to develop a predictive model for final smear-positive (SP) active pulmonary tuberculosis (aPTB) in patients with initial negative acid fast bacilli (AFB) sputum smears (iSN-SP-aPTB) based on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Eighty (126, 21) patients of iSN-SP-aPTB and 402 (459, 876) patients of non-initial positive acid fast bacilli (non-iSP) pulmonary disease without iSN-SP-aPTB were included in a derivation (validation, prospective) cohort. HRCT characteristics were analysed, and multivariable regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to develop a score predictive of iSN-SP-aPTB. The derivation cohort showed clusters of nodules/mass of the right upper lobe or left upper lobe were independent predictors of iSN-SP-aPTB, while bronchiectasis in the right middle lobe or left lingual lobe were negatively associated with iSN-SP-aPTB. A predictive score for iSN-SP-aPTB based on these findings was tested in the validation and prospective cohorts. With an ideal cut-off score = 1, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the prediction model were 87.5% (90%, 90.5%), 99% (97.1%, 98.4%), 94.6% (81.3%, 57.5%), and 97.6% (97%, 99.8%) in the derivation (validation, prospective) cohorts, respectively. The model may help identify iSN-SP-aPTB among patients with non-iSP pulmonary diseases. circle Smear-positive active pulmonary tuberculosis that is initial smear-negative (iSN-SP-aPTB) is infectious. (orig.)

  7. A Rare Case of Pott's Disease (Spinal Tuberculosis) Mimicking Metastatic Disease in the Southern Region of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osmanagic, Azra; Emamifar, Amir; Christian Bang, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    leukocytosis and increased C-reactive protein. Initial spinal x-ray was performed and revealed osteolytic changes in the vertebral body of T11 and T12. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine illustrated spondylitis of T10, T11, and T12, with multiple paravertebral and epidural abscesses, which...... was suggestive of PD. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the patient's gastric fluid was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT). Based on MRI and PCR findings, standard treatment for TB was initiated. Results of the spine biopsy and culture showed colonies of MT and confirmed the diagnosis afterwards. Due...

  8. Tuberculosis/HIV co-infection in Brazilian state capitals: comments from the data of the Information System of Notifiable Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder Oliveira e Silva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the frequency of requests for serological testing for HIV infection in patients with Tuberculosis and the prevalence of such co-infection in Brazilian state capitals and in the Federal District (DF, between 2004 and 2006. Methods: It was a retrospective epidemiological survey based in the data of Brazil’s Information System of Notifiable Diseases (SINAN. The data were collected in August, 2008. In the studied period, there were notified in SINAN, 35,639 cases of Tuberculosis in 2004, 37,520 in 2005 and 34,439 in 2006, in all the 26 state capitals and the DF. The percentage of patients with known serological status and the percentage of patients with positive testing for HIV infection within the patients with Tuberculosis varied widely among the capitals and among the time periods assessed. Results: The municipalities of Rio Branco and Macapá (North region showed the worse coverage of serological testing for HIV infection, with a frequency of not screening above 86.5% in the three years of the study. The best HIV screening coverage occurred in Campo Grande (Center-West region and Curitiba (South region, with frequencies of not testing fewer than 20.5%. The frequency of Tuberculosis/HIV co-infection varied from 64.5% in Florianópolis (South region, in 2004 to 0% in Rio Branco (North region, in 2006. Conclusion: In the study, the regional disparities for HIV serological testing in patients with Tuberculosis were observed. In order to achieve the goals for HIV screening in all patients with Tuberculosis there shall be necessary some operational adjustments and a greater commitment in the implantation of public policies directed for these populations.

  9. Disease, predation and demography: Assessing the impacts of bovine tuberculosis on African buffalo by monitoring at individual and population levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, P.C.; Heisey, D.M.; Bowers, J.A.; Hay, C.T.; Wolhuter, J.; Buss, P.; Hofmeyr, M.; Michel, A.L.; Bengis, Roy G.; Bird, T.L.F.; du Toit, Johan T.; Getz, W.M.

    2009-01-01

    1. Understanding the effects of disease is critical to determining appropriate management responses, but estimating those effects in wildlife species is challenging. We used bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in the African buffalo Syncerus caffer population of Kruger National Park, South Africa, as a case study to highlight the issues associated with estimating chronic disease effects in a long-lived host. 2. We used known and radiocollared buffalo, aerial census data, and a natural gradient in pathogen prevalence to investigate if: (i) at the individual level, BTB infection reduces reproduction; (ii) BTB infection increases vulnerability to predation; and (iii) at the population level, increased BTB prevalence causes reduced population growth. 3. There was only a marginal reduction in calving success associated with BTB infection, as indexed by the probability of sighting a known adult female with or without a calf (P = 0??065). 4. Since 1991, BTB prevalence increased from 27 to 45% in the southern region and from 4 to 28% in the central region of Kruger National Park. The prevalence in the northern regions was only 1??5% in 1998. Buffalo population growth rates, however, were neither statistically different among regions nor declining over time. 5. Lions Panthera leo did not appear to preferentially kill test-positive buffalo. The best (Akaike's Information Criterion corrected for small sample size) AICc model with BTB as a covariate [exp(??) = 0??49; 95% CI = (0??24-1??02)] suggested that the mortality hazard for positive individuals was no greater than for test-negative individuals. 6. Synthesis and applications. Test accuracy, time-varying disease status, and movement among populations are some of the issues that make the detection of chronic disease impacts challenging. For these reasons, the demographic impacts of bovine tuberculosis in the Kruger National Park remain undetectable despite 6 years of study on known individuals and 40 years of population counts

  10. Current use and acceptability of novel diagnostic tests for active tuberculosis: a worldwide survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Amicosante

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the current use and potential acceptance (by tuberculosis experts worldwide of novel rapid tests for the diagnosis of tuberculosis that are in line with World Health Organization target product profiles. Methods: A multilingual survey was disseminated online between July and November of 2016. Results: A total of 723 individuals from 114 countries responded to the survey. Smear microscopy was the most commonly used rapid tuberculosis test (available to 90.9% of the respondents, followed by molecular assays (available to 70.7%. Only a small proportion of the respondents in middle- and low-income countries had access to interferon-gamma-release assays. Serological and lateral flow immunoassays were used by more than a quarter (25.4% of the respondents. Among the respondents who had access to molecular tests, 46.7% were using the Xpert assay overall, that proportion being higher in lower middle-income countries (55.6% and low-income countries (76.6%. The data also suggest that there was some alignment of pricing for molecular assays. Respondents stated they would accept novel rapid tuberculosis tests if available, including molecular assays (acceptable to 86.0% or biomarker-based serological assays (acceptable to 81.7%. Simple biomarker-based assays were more commonly deemed acceptable in middle- and low-income countries. Conclusions: Second-generation molecular assays have become more widely available in high- and low-resource settings. However, the development of novel rapid tuberculosis tests continues to be considered important by tuberculosis experts. Our data also underscore the need for additional training and education of end users.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis monoarthritis in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg Alan M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A child with isolated Mycobacterium tuberculosis monoarthritis, with features initially suggesting oligoarthritis subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, is presented. This patient illustrates the need to consider the possibility of tuberculosis as the cause of oligoarthritis in high-risk pediatric populations even in the absence of a tuberculosis contact history and without evidence of overt pulmonary disease.

  12. Tuberculosis Facts - You Can Prevent TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts You Can Prevent TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination TB Facts: You Can Prevent TB What ...

  13. Tuberculosis Facts - TB Can Be Treated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB Can Be Treated What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Page 1 of 2 TB Facts: TB ...

  14. 9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The... pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep, goats, and equines. (a) Carcasses condemned. The entire...

  15. PRIMARY CONJUNCTIVAL TUBERCULOSIS – A RARE CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Dinesh R, Sulegaon Ritesh V, Chulki Shashidhar F

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is an endemic disease in India. Primary conjunctival tuberculosis is an uncommon condition and with better treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis it is now becoming extremely rare. Primary conjunctival Tuberculosis can present as unilateral conjunctivitis, hence laterality, chronicity and non-resolution of symptoms on treatment are indications for biopsy. In our patient conjunctival Tuberculosis was diagnosed on histopathology, which resulted in early implementation of antikochs’ treatment and complete resolution of the disease condition.

  16. Pulmonary granulomatous diseases and pulmonary manifestations of systemic granulomatous disease. Including tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteriosis; Pulmonale granulomatoese Erkrankungen und pulmonale Manifestationen systemischer Granulomatosen. Inklusive Tuberkulose und nichttuberkuloese Mykobakteriosen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piel, S. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Zentrum fuer interstitielle und seltene Lungenerkrankungen, Pneumologie und Beatmungsmedizin, Thoraxklinik, Heidelberg (Germany); Kreuter, M.; Herth, F. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Zentrum fuer interstitielle und seltene Lungenerkrankungen, Pneumologie und Beatmungsmedizin, Thoraxklinik, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Translational Lung Research Center (TLRC), Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, H.U. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Translational Lung Research Center (TLRC), Heidelberg (Germany); Heussel, C.P. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie mit Nuklearmedizin, Thoraxklinik, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Translational Lung Research Center (TLRC), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Granulomas as signs of specific inflammation of the lungs are found in various diseases with pulmonary manifestations and represent an important imaging finding. The standard imaging modality for the work-up of granulomatous diseases of the lungs is most often thin-slice computed tomography (CT). There are a few instances, e. g. tuberculosis, sarcoidosis and silicosis, where a chest radiograph still plays an important role. Further radiological modalities are usually not needed in the routine work-up of granulomatous diseases of the chest. In special cases magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT scans play an important role, e. g. detecting cardiac sarcoidosis by cardiac MRI or choline C-11 PET-CT in diagnosing lung carcinoma in scar tissue after tuberculosis. The accuracy of thin-slice CT is very high for granulomatous diseases. In cases of chronic disease and fibrotic interstitial lung disease it is important to perform thin-slice CT in order to diagnose a specific disease pattern. Thin-slice CT is also highly sensitive in detecting disease complications and comorbidities, such as malignancies. Given these indications thin-slice CT is generally accepted in the routine daily practice. A thin-slice CT and an interdisciplinary discussion are recommended in many cases with a suspected diagnosis of pulmonary granulomatous disease due to clinical or radiographic findings. (orig.) [German] Granulome als Zeichen der spezifischen Entzuendung im Lungengewebe treten bei zahlreichen Erkrankungen mit pulmonaler Manifestation auf und stellen einen wichtigen Befund in der Bildgebung dar. Das radiologische Standardverfahren bei pulmonalen Granulomatosen ist meistens die Duennschichtcomputertomographie, in wenigen Faellen, wie z. B. bei Tuberkulose, Sarkoidose und Silikose, spielt die Roentgenthoraxuebersicht immer noch eine wichtige Rolle. Bei der Standardabklaerung der meisten Granulomatosen ist die Hinzunahme weiterer Verfahren nicht

  17. Tuberculosis of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baharoon Salim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis of the breast is an uncommon disease even in countries where the incidence of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis is high. Clinical presentation is usually of a solitary, ill-defined, unilateral hard lump situated in the upper outer quadrant of the breast. This disease can present a diagnostic problem on radiological and microbiological investigations, and thus a high index of suspicion is needed. Incorporating a highly sensitive technique like polymerase chain reaction (PCR may be helpful in establishing the usefulness of such technology and can aid in conforming the diagnosis early. The disease is curable with antitubercular drugs, and surgery is rarely required

  18. Vaccination against tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Carlos; Aguilo, Nacho; Gonzalo-Asensio, Jesús

    2018-04-04

    BCG (Bacille Calmette-Guérin) vaccination is included in the immunization schedule for tuberculosis endemic countries with a global coverage at birth close to 90% worldwide. BCG was attenuated from Mycobacterium bovis almost a century ago, and provides a strong protection against disseminated forms of the disease, though very limited against pulmonary forms of tuberculosis, responsible for transmission. Novel prophylactic tuberculosis vaccines are in clinical development either to replace BCG or to improve its protection against respiratory forms of the disease. There are limitations understanding the immunological responses involved and the precise type of long-lived immunity that new vaccines need to induce. MTBVAC is the first and only tuberculosis vaccine candidate based on live-attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical evaluation. MTBVAC clinical development plans to target tuberculosis prevention in newborns, as a BCG replacement strategy, and as secondary objective to be tested in adolescents and adults previous vaccinated with BCG. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  19. The tuberculosis hospital in Hohenkrug, Stettin. Department of Genitourinary Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajaczkowski, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    Towards the end of the 19th century, Europe turned particular attention to the problem of tuberculosis, at that time the most serious social disease. In the majority of cases, pulmonary tuberculosis had a fatal outcome owing to the lack of effective drugs and methods of treatment. Due to poor sanitary conditions, particularly as regards dwellings, pulmonary tuberculosis was able to spread rapidly. Hospital departments were reluctant to admit patients suffering from tuberculosis. It was only after the discoveries of Robert Koch (bacillus tubercle in 1882) that the cause of the disease became understood and methods of treatment began to be developed. A modern sanatorium and hospital with 270 beds was erected in Hohenkrug (today Szczecin-Zdunowo) between 1915 and 1930. Patients could now be treated with modern methods, surgically in most cases. After the Second World War, pulmonary tuberculosis was still an enormous epidemiologic problem. In 1949, the Polish authorities opened a 400-bed sanatoriumin Zdunowo. The methods of treatment were not much different from pre-war practice and it was only the routine introduction of antituberculotic drugs during the fifties of the past century that brought about a radical change in the fight against tuberculosis. The growing numbers of patients with tuberculosis of the genitourinary system led to the opening in 1958 of a 40-bed specialist ward at the Tuberculosis Sanatorium in Zdunowo. It should be emphasized that the Department of Genitourinary Tuberculosis in Szczecin-Zdunowo was a historical necessity and a salvation for thousands of patients from Northern Poland. The Department totally fulfilled its social duties thanks to the commitment of many outstanding persons dedicated to helping the patients. This unit was finally closed in 1987 because the demand for surgical treatment of tuberculosis was declining concurrently with the advent of new and potent antituberculotics and falling number of new cases of genitourinary

  20. Colorectal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagi, B.; Kochhar, R.; Bhasin, D.K.; Singh, K.

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the incidence of colorectal tuberculosis in our series and to study its radiological spectrum. A total of 684 cases of proven gastrointestinal tuberculosis with positive barium contrast findings seen over a period of more than one decade were evaluated. The study did not include cases where colon was involved in direct contiguity with ileo-caecal tuberculosis. Seventy-four patients (10.8%) had colorectal tuberculosis. Commonest site involved was transverse colon, closely followed by rectum and ascending colon. Radiological findings observed were in the form of strictures (54%), colitis (39%) and polypoid lesions (7%). Complications noted were in the form of perforations and fistulae in 18.9% of cases. Colorectal tuberculosis is a very common site for gastrointestinal tuberculosis. Typical findings of colorectal tuberculosis are strictures, signs of colitis and polypoid lesions. Common complications are perforation and fistulae. (orig.)

  1. Impacts of neglected tropical disease on incidence and progression of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria: scientific links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.G. Simon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neglected tropical diseases (NTDs are the most common infections of humans in Sub-Saharan Africa. Virtually all of the population living below the World Bank poverty figure is affected by one or more NTDs. New evidence indicates a high degree of geographic overlap between the highest-prevalence NTDs (soil-transmitted helminths, schistosomiasis, onchocerciasis, lymphatic filariasis, and trachoma and malaria and HIV, exhibiting a high degree of co-infection. Recent research suggests that NTDs can affect HIV and AIDS, tuberculosis (TB, and malaria disease progression. A combination of immunological, epidemiological, and clinical factors can contribute to these interactions and add to a worsening prognosis for people affected by HIV/AIDS, TB, and malaria. Together these results point to the impacts of the highest-prevalence NTDs on the health outcomes of malaria, HIV/AIDS, and TB and present new opportunities to design innovative public health interventions and strategies for these ‘big three’ diseases. This analysis describes the current findings of research and what research is still needed to strengthen the knowledge base of the impacts NTDs have on the big three.

  2. U.S. College and University Student Health Screening Requirements for Tuberculosis and Vaccine-Preventable Diseases, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, A.; Bell, T; Cohen, NJ.; Buckley, K.; Leino, V.; Even, S.; Beavers, S.; Brown, C.; Marano, N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Colleges are at risk for communicable disease outbreaks because of the high degree of person-to-person interactions and relatively crowded dormitory settings. This report describes the U.S. college student health screening requirements among U.S. resident and international students for tuberculosis (TB) and vaccine-preventable diseases (VPD) as it relates to the American College Health Association (ACHA) Guidelines. Methods/Participants In April 2012, U.S. college health administrators (N=2858) were sent online surveys to assess their respective school’s TB screening and immunization requirements. Results Surveys were completed by 308 (11%) schools. Most schools were aware of the ACHA immunization (78%) and TB screening (76%) guidelines. Schools reported having policies related to immunization screening (80.4%), immunization compliance (93%), TB screening (55%), and TB compliance (87%). Conclusion Most colleges were following ACHA guidelines. However, there are opportunities for improvement to fully utilize the recommendations and prevent outbreaks of communicable diseases among students in colleges. PMID:26730492

  3. Preventing the Establishment of a Wildlife Disease Reservoir: A Case Study of Bovine Tuberculosis in Wild Deer in Minnesota, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Carstensen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine tuberculosis (bTB has been found in 12 cattle operations and 27 free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus in northwestern Minnesota, following the state's most recent outbreak of the disease in 2005 in the northwest part of the state. Both deer and cattle have the same strain of bTB. The Minnesota Board of Animal Health has been leading efforts to eradicate the disease in Minnesota's cattle, which have included the depopulation of all infected herds, a cattle buy-out program, and mandatory fencing of stored feeds. The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources began surveillance efforts in free-ranging white-tailed deer in fall 2005. All bTB-infected deer have been found within a 16 km2 area in direct association with infected cattle farms. Aggressive efforts to reduce deer densities through liberalized hunting and sharpshooting have resulted in a 55% decline in deer densities. Also, recreational feeding of wild deer has been banned. Disease prevalence in deer has decreased from 1.2% in 2005 to an undetectable level in 2010.

  4. Flourensia cernua: Hexane Extracts a Very Active Mycobactericidal Fraction from an Inactive Leaf Decoction against Pansensitive and Panresistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria María Molina-Salinas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of decoction in extracting mycobactericidal compounds from Flourensia cernua (Hojasé leaves and fractionation with solvents having ascending polarity was compared with that of (i ethanol extraction by still maceration, extraction with a Soxhlet device, shake-assisted maceration, or ultrasound-assisted maceration, followed by fractionation with n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol; (ii sequential extraction with n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol, by still maceration, using a Soxhlet device, shake-assisted maceration, or ultrasound-assisted maceration. The in vitro mycobactericidal activity of each preparation was measured against drug-sensitive (SMtb and drug-resistant (RMtb Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. The results of which were expressed as absolute mycobactericidal activity (AMA. These data were normalized to the ΣAMA of the decoction fraction set. Although decoction was inactive, the anti-RMtb normalized ΣAMA (NAMA of its fractions was comparable with the anti-RMtb NAMA of the still maceration extracts and significantly higher than the anti-SMtb and anti-RMtb NAMAs of every other ethanol extract and serial extract and fraction. Hexane extracted, from decoction, material having 55.17% and 92.62% of antituberculosis activity against SMtb and RMtb, respectively. Although the mycobactericidal activity of decoction is undetectable; its efficacy in extracting F. cernua active metabolites against M. tuberculosis is substantially greater than almost all pharmacognostic methods.

  5. Tuberculin-Specific T Cells Are Reduced in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis Compared to LTBI or Status Post BCG Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streitz, Mathias; Fuhrmann, Stephan; Powell, Fiona; Quassem, Ali; Nomura, Laurel; Maecker, Holden; Martus, Peter; Volk, Hans-Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Functional characteristics of tuberculosis (TB)–specific CD4 T cells were studied in clinically active pulmonary TB (n = 21) and high TB exposure including LTBI (n = 17). Following tuberculin stimulation, activated CD4 T cells were identified by flow-cytometry (CD154 up-regulation, degranulation, interferon γ [IFN-γ], tumor necrosis factor α [TNF-α], and interleukin 2 [IL-2\\ production). Interestingly, CD154 up-regulation accounted for ∼80% of activated CD4 T cells in the active TB group but just 40% in the controls, whereas IFN-γ accounted for only ∼50% of activated cells in each group. The frequencies of CD4 T cells displaying at least 1 activation marker discriminated better between the groups than those displaying degranulation or IFN-γ production alone. PMID:21186260

  6. Determinants of tuberculosis transmission and treatment abandonment in Fortaleza, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harling, Guy; Lima Neto, Antonio S; Sousa, Geziel S; Machado, Marcia M T; Castro, Marcia C

    2017-05-25

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a public health problem, despite recent achievements in reducing incidence and mortality rates. In Brazil, these achievements were above the worldwide average, but marked by large regional heterogeneities. In Fortaleza (5th largest city in Brazil), the tuberculosis cure rate has been declining and treatment abandonment has been increasing in the past decade, despite a reduction in incidence and an increase in directly observed therapy (DOT). These trends put efforts to eliminate tuberculosis at risk. We therefore sought to determine social and programmatic determinants of tuberculosis incidence and treatment abandonment in Fortaleza. We analyzed sociodemographic and clinical data for all new tuberculosis cases notified in the Notifiable Diseases Information System (SINAN) from Fortaleza between 2007 and 2014. We calculated incidence rates for 117 neighborhoods in Fortaleza, assessed their spatial clustering, and used spatial regression models to quantify associations between neighborhood-level covariates and incidence rates. We used hierarchical logistic regression models to evaluate how individual- and neighborhood-level covariates predicted tuberculosis treatment abandonment. There were 12,338 new cases reported during the study period. Case rates across neighborhoods were significantly positively clustered in two low-income areas close to the city center. In an adjusted model, tuberculosis rates were significantly higher in neighborhoods with lower literacy, higher sewerage access and homicide rates, and a greater proportion of self-reported black residents. Treatment was abandoned in 1901 cases (15.4%), a rate that rose by 71% between 2007 and 2014. Abandonment was significantly associated with many individual sociodemographic and clinical factors. Notably, being recommended for DOT was protective for those who completed DOT, but associated with abandonment for those who did not. Low socioeconomic status areas have higher tuberculosis

  7. Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Training Home Conditions Tuberculosis (TB) Tuberculosis: Treatment Tuberculosis: Treatment Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... or bones is treated longer. NEXT: Preventive Treatment Tuberculosis: Diagnosis Tuberculosis: History Clinical Trials For more than ...

  8. Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer: Student Awareness Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, James H., Comp.

    Awareness activities pertaining to cancer and cardiovascular disease are presented as a supplement for high school science classes. The exercises can be used to enrich units of study dealing with the circulatory system, the cell, or human diseases. Eight activities deal with the following topics: (1) cardiovascular disease risk factors; (2)…

  9. The curative activity of thioridazine on mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Marta; Viveiros, Miguel; Kristiansen, Jette E

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of thioridazine (TZ) at different dose levels on mice that had been infected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with a high dose of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis ATCC H37Rv strain. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Groups of five female BALB/C mice were...

  10. risk factors of active tuberculosis in people living with hiv/aids in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abrham

    2011-07-02

    Jul 2, 2011 ... R, Lisse I, Samb B et al: Tuberculosis in. Bissau: incidence and risk factors in an urban community in sub-Saharan Africa. Int J. Epidemiol 2004;33(1):163-172. 10. MOH: TB, leprosy and TB/HIV prevention and control program manual. Addis Ababa,. Ethiopia. 2008. 11. Fugnudo Mbeki AG, Kuwala Lube: ...

  11. Structure/activity of Pt{sup II}/N,N-disubstituted-N'-acylthiourea complexes: Anti-tumor and anti-mycobacterium tuberculosis activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plutín, Ana M.; Alvarez, Anislay; Mocelo, Raúl; Ramos, Raúl; Sánchez, Osmar C. [Laboratorio de Síntesis Orgánica, Facultad de Química, Universidad de La Habana (Cuba); Castellano, Euardo E. [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Silva, Monize M. da; Villarreal, Wilmer; Colina-Vegas, Legna; Batista, Alzir A. [Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil); Pavan, Fernando R., E-mail: anap@fq.uh.cu, E-mail: daab@ufscar.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas

    2018-05-01

    The syntheses, characterization, cytotoxicity against tumor cells and anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity assays of Pt{sup II}/PPh{sub 3}/N,N-disubstituted-N'-acylthioureas complexes with general formulae [Pt(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}(L)]PF{sub 6}, PPh{sub 3} = triphenylphosphine; L = N,N-disubstituted-N'-acylthiourea, are here reported. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, infrared (IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) ({sup 1} H, {sup 13}C{1 H} and {sup 31}P{"1 H}) spectroscopy. The {sup 31}P{"1 H} NMR data are consistent with the presence of two PPh{sup 3} ligands cis to each other position, and one N,N-disubstituted-N'-acylthiourea coordinated to the metal through O and S, in a chelate form. The structures of the complexes were determined by X-ray crystallography, forming distorted square-planar structures. The complexes were tested in human cell lines carcinomas and also screened with respect to their anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity (H37RvATCC 27294). It was found that complexes with N,N-disubstituted-N'-acylthiourea containing open and small chains as R2 groups show higher cytotoxic and higher anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity than those containing rings in this position. (author)

  12. Identification, activity and disulfide connectivity of C-di-GMP regulating proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajal Gupta

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available C-di-GMP, a bacterial second messenger plays a key role in survival and adaptation of bacteria under different environmental conditions. The level of c-di-GMP is regulated by two opposing activities, namely diguanylate cyclase (DGC and phosphodiesterase (PDE-A exhibited by GGDEF and EAL domain, respectively in the same protein. Previously, we reported a bifunctional GGDEF-EAL domain protein, MSDGC-1 from Mycobacterium smegmatis showing both these activities (Kumar and Chatterji, 2008. In this current report, we have identified and characterized the homologous protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Rv 1354c named as MtbDGC. MtbDGC is also a bifunctional protein, which can synthesize and degrade c-di-GMP in vitro. Further we expressed Mtbdgc in M. smegmatis and it was able to complement the MSDGC-1 knock out strain by restoring the long term survival of M. smegmatis. Another protein Rv 1357c, named as MtbPDE, is an EAL domain protein and degrades c-di-GMP to pGpG in vitro. Rv1354c and 1357c have seven cysteine amino acids in their sequence, distributed along the full length of the protein. Disulfide bonds play an important role in stabilizing protein structure and regulating protein function. By proteolytic digestion and mass spectrometric analysis of MtbDGC, connectivity between cysteine pairs Cys94-Cys584, Cys2-Cys479 and Cys429-Cys614 was determined, whereas the third cysteine (Cys406 from N terminal was found to be free in MtbDGC protein, which was further confirmed by alkylation with iodoacetamide labeling. Bioinformatics modeling investigations also supported the pattern of disulfide connectivity obtained by Mass spectrometric analysis. Cys406 was mutated to serine by site directed mutagenesis and the mutant MtbC406S was not found to be active and was not able to synthesize or degrade c-di-GMP. The disulfide connectivity established here would help further in understanding the structure - function relationship in MtbDGC.

  13. Responsiveness of Endoscopic Indices of Disease Activity for Crohn's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khanna, Reena; Zou, Guangyong; Stitt, Larry; Feagan, Brian G.; Sandborn, William J.; Rutgeerts, Paul; McDonald, John W. D.; Dubcenco, Elena; Fogel, Ronald; Panaccione, Remo; Jairath, Vipul; Nelson, Sigrid; Shackelton, Lisa M.; Huang, Bidan; Zhou, Qian; Robinson, Anne M.; Levesque, Barrett G.; D'Haens, Geert

    2017-01-01

    The Crohn's Disease Endoscopic Index of Severity (CDEIS) and the Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease (SES-CD) are commonly used to assess Crohn's disease (CD) activity; however neither instrument is fully validated. We evaluated the responsiveness to change of the SES-CD and CDEIS using data

  14. Tuberculosis in ancient times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Cilliers

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In spite of an array of effective antibiotics, tuberculosis is still very common in developing countries where overcrowding, malnutrition and poor hygienic conditions prevail. Over the past 30 years associated HIV infection has worsened the situation by increasing the infection rate and mortality of tuberculosis. Of those diseases caused by a single organism only HIV causes more deaths internationally than tuberculosis. The tubercle bacillus probably first infected man in Neolithic times, and then via infected cattle, but the causative Mycobacteriacea have been in existence for 300 million years. Droplet infection is the most common way of acquiring tuberculosis, although ingestion (e.g. of infected cows’ milk may occur. Tuberculosis probably originated in Africa. The earliest path gnomonic evidence of human tuberculosis in man was found in osteo-archaeological findings of bone tuberculosis (Pott’s disease of the spine in the skeleton of anEgyptian priest from the 21st Dynasty (approximately 1 000 BC. Suggestive but not conclusiveevidence of tuberculotic lesions had been found in even earlier skeletons from Egypt and Europe. Medical hieroglyphics from ancient Egypt are silent on the disease, which could be tuberculosis,as do early Indian and Chinese writings. The Old Testament refers to the disease schachapeth, translated as phthisis in the Greek Septuagint. Although the Bible is not specific about this condition, tuberculosis is still called schachapeth in modern Hebrew. In pre-Hippocratic Greece Homer did not mention phthisis, a word meaning non-specific wasting of the body. However. Alexander of Tralles (6th century BC seemed to narrow the concept down to a specific disease, and in the Hippocratic Corpus (5th-4th centuries BC phthisis can be recognised as tuberculosis. It was predominantly a respiratory disease commonly seen and considered to be caused by an imbalance of bodily humours. It was commonest in autumn, winter and spring

  15. Preclinical Testing of the Nitroimidazopyran PA-824 for Activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a Series of In Vitro and In Vivo Models

    OpenAIRE

    Lenaerts, Anne J.; Gruppo, Veronica; Marietta, Karen S.; Johnson, Christine M.; Driscoll, Diane K.; Tompkins, Nicholas M.; Rose, Jerry D.; Reynolds, Robert C.; Orme, Ian M.

    2005-01-01

    This study extends earlier reports regarding the in vitro and in vivo efficacies of the nitroimidazopyran PA-824 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PA-824 was tested in vitro against a broad panel of multidrug-resistant clinical isolates and was found to be highly active against all isolates (MIC < 1 μg/ml). The activity of PA-824 against M. tuberculosis was also assessed grown under conditions of oxygen depletion. PA-824 showed significant activity at 2, 10, and 50 μg/ml, similar to that of...

  16. Citoquinas en tuberculosis Cytokines in tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime I. Rodríguez

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available La tuberculosis continúa siendo un modelo inmunológico para estudiar las infecciones intracelulares. Entenderlos complejos mecanismos de interacción de la micobacteria con el sistema inmune del hospedero permitirá un manejo más racional de los fenómenos clínicos que se presentan en la enfermedad. Las citoquinas desempeñan un papel fundamental tanto en el desarrollo de los mecanismos de inmunidad protectora como en el daño tisular presente en esta enfermedad. La estimulación in vitro de linfocitos de sujetos sanos tuberculino positivos con antígenos específicos induce preferencial mente un patrón de citoquinas tipo I (1'IL-2, 1'IFN-y, ~IL-4, ~IL-5, mientras que en la mayoría de los pacientes no se presenta este patrón. Las citoquinas tipo I conducen a la activación de los macrófagos que a su vez inhiben la replicación de las micobacterias. En el ratón, los macrófagos activados inhiben la micobacteria por medio del óxido nítrico; en los humanos la producción de óxido nítrico por los macrófagos no está plenamente demostrada. Recientemente se ha demostrado que la infección con M. tuberculosis puede inducir apoptosis en los macrófagos infectados. La apoptosis depende de la producción del Factor de Necrosis Tumoral a y de óxido nítrico. Paradójicamente, ellipoarabinomanán manosilado (ManLAM presente en la pared de las micobacterias inhibe la apoptosis. Estos hallazgos muestran un nuevo fenómeno en la interacción micobacteriamacrófago el cual debe estar finamente regulado tanto en el microorganismo como en el hospedero. Tuberculosis continues to be a model to study the immunological aspects of intracellular infections. A better understanding of the mycobacteria.host interaction would allow a more rational approach to the clinical problems of this disease. Cytokines playa key role in the development of protective immunity as well as in the tissue injury that occurs during the disease. In vitro stimulation with

  17. Identification of probable early-onset biomarkers for tuberculosis disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayne S Sutherland

    Full Text Available Determining what constitutes protective immunity to TB is critical for the development of improved diagnostics and vaccines. The comparison of the immune system between contacts of TB patients, who later develop TB disease (progressors, versus contacts who remain healthy (non-progressors, allows for identification of predictive markers of TB disease. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of the immune system of progressors and non-progressors using a well-characterised TB case-contact (TBCC platform in The Gambia, West Africa. 22 progressors and 31 non-progressors were analysed at recruitment, 3 months and 18 months (time to progression: median[IQR] of 507[187-714] days. Immunophenotyping of PBMC, plasma cytokine levels and RT-MLPA analysis of whole blood-derived RNA was performed to capture key immune system parameters. At recruitment, progressors had lower PBMC proportions of CD4+ T cells, NKT cells and B cells relative to non-progressors. Analysis of the plasma showed higher levels of IL-18 in progressors compared to non-progressors and analysis of the RNA showed significantly lower gene expression of Bcl2 but higher CCR7 in progressors compared to non-progressors. This study shows several markers that may predict the onset of active TB at a very early stage after infection. Once these markers have been validated in larger studies, they provide avenues to prospectively identify people at risk of developing TB, a key issue in the testing of new TB vaccines.

  18. Strong In Vitro Activities of Two New Rifabutin Analogs against Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Ana-Belén; Palacios, Juan J.; Ruiz, María-Jesús; Barluenga, José; Aznar, Fernando; Cabal, María-Paz; García, José María; Díaz, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    Two new rifabutin analogs, RFA-1 and RFA-2, show high in vitro antimycobacterial activities against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. MIC values of RFA-1 and RFA-2 were ≤0.02 μg/ml against rifamycin-susceptible strains and 0.5 μg/ml against a wide selection of multidrug-resistant strains, compared to ≥50 μg/ml for rifampin and 10 μg/ml for rifabutin. Molecular dynamic studies indicate that the compounds may exert tighter binding to mutants of RNA polymerase that have adapted to the rifamycins. PMID:20855731

  19. Role of bronchoscopy in evaluation of cases with sputum smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis, interstitial lung disease and lung malignancy: A retrospective study of 712 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj; Gupta, Nitesh

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of flexible bronchoscope has revolutionized the field of pulmonary medicine and is a standard instrument used for diagnostic purpose. A retrospective analysis of the clinico-radiological profile, indication, biopsy procedure and complications, for patients undergoing bronchoscopy at one of the respiratory unit at a tertiary care center in India. Retrospective analysis of 712 bronchoscopies was done in regard to demographic profile, clinical and radiological presentation and diagnostic indication. The results were analyzed on basis of bronchoscopy inspection and histopathological specimen obtained from transbronchial (TBLB), endobronchial biopsy (EBLB) and cytology specimen by transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA). Furthermore, diagnostic yield of each biopsy procedure and their combination was evaluated. Of 712 patients undergoing bronchoscopy, the pathological diagnosis was achieved in 384 (53.93%). Of 384 diagnosed cases, the clinic-radio-pathological diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in 88 (22.19%), interstitial lung disease (ILDs) in 226 (58.85%), and lung cancer in 70 (18.22%) cases. Of 116 sputum smear negative tuberculosis patients, 88 (75.86%) were diagnosed to be pulmonary tuberculosis; the contribution of BAL being 71.59%. Of 226 ILDs, sarcoidosis was most common 148/226 (65.48%). Among 70 lung cancer diagnosed cases, squamous cell carcinoma was most common (54.28%). The results from current study reemphasizes on the diagnostic utility as well as safety of the bronchoscopy procedure. Copyright © 2015 Tuberculosis Association of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [A comparison of chest radiographs between patients with pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection and those with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in the initial stage of disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Eri; Senoo, Mami; Nagayama, Naohiro; Masuda, Kimihiko; Matsui, Hirotoshi; Tamura, Atsuhisa; Nagai, Hideaki; Akagawa, Shinobu; Toyoda, Emiko; Oota, Ken

    2013-08-01

    To elucidate the differences in affected lung segments between patients with pulmonary M. kansasii infection and those with M. tuberculosis infection in the initial stage of disease, we examined chest radiography images and CT scans. The initial stage of disease was defined as the period when less than one-sixth of the total lung area was affected by the infection, as visualized on chest radiography and CT. One hundred eighty-four patients were diagnosed with M.kansasii infection between 1996 and 2010 and 835 patients, with M.tuberculosis infection between 2008 and 2009 at our hospital. The diagnosis was made on the basis of the results of sputum culture and/or bronchial washing. After excluding the patients with underlying lung diseases such as chronic pulmonary emphysema, interstitial pneumonia, and old pulmonary tuberculosis as well as those in advanced stages, 24 patients with M. kansasii infection and 62 patients with M. tuberculosis infection were included in this study. The affected segments of the lungs and the rates of cavity development were determined by using CT scans. In patients with M.kansasii, 17 had an infected right lung, while 7 had an infected left lung. Additionally, in patients with M.tuberculosis, 58 had an infected right lung, 3 had an infected left lung, and 1 had a bilateral infection. In patients infected with M. kansasii, the upper lobes were affected in 22 cases and the lower lobes in 3 cases. In patients infected with M. tuberculosis, the upper, middle, and lower lobes and the lingular segment were affected in 41, 8, 24, and 1 cases, respectively. Upper lobe lesions were seen more frequently in patients with M. kansasii infection than in those with M. tuberculosis infection (p formation was identified more frequently in patients infected with M. kansasii (91.7%) than in those infected with M. tuberculosis (32.3%) (p < 0.001). Cavitary lesions were more frequently localized to the apical, posterior, and apico-posterior regions (S1, S2

  1. Global, regional, and national incidence and mortality for HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria during 1990—2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    J L Murray, Christopher; F Ortblad, Katrina; Guinovart, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    Background The Millennium Declaration in 2000 brought special global attention to HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria through the formulation of Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 6. The Global Burden of Disease 2013 study provides a consistent and comprehensive approach to disease estimation for between...... with and without antiretroviral therapy (ART). For concentrated epidemics, we calibrated Spectrum models to fit vital registration data corrected for misclassification of HIV deaths. In generalised epidemics, we minimised a loss function to select epidemic curves most consistent with prevalence data...... and demographic data for all-cause mortality. We analysed counterfactual scenarios for HIV to assess years of life saved through prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and ART. For tuberculosis, we analysed vital registration and verbal autopsy data to estimate mortality using cause of death ensemble...

  2. Modeling of novel diagnostic strategies for active tuberculosis - a systematic review: current practices and recommendations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Zwerling

    Full Text Available The field of diagnostics for active tuberculosis (TB is rapidly developing. TB diagnostic modeling can help to inform policy makers and support complicated decisions on diagnostic strategy, with important budgetary implications. Demand for TB diagnostic modeling is likely to increase, and an evaluation of current practice is important. We aimed to systematically review all studies employing mathematical modeling to evaluate cost-effectiveness or epidemiological impact of novel diagnostic strategies for active TB.Pubmed, personal libraries and reference lists were searched to identify eligible papers. We extracted data on a wide variety of model structure, parameter choices, sensitivity analyses and study conclusions, which were discussed during a meeting of content experts.From 5619 records a total of 36 papers were included in the analysis. Sixteen papers included population impact/transmission modeling, 5 were health systems models, and 24 included estimates of cost-effectiveness. Transmission and health systems models included specific structure to explore the importance of the diagnostic pathway (n = 4, key determinants of diagnostic delay (n = 5, operational context (n = 5, and the pre-diagnostic infectious period (n = 1. The majority of models implemented sensitivity analysis, although only 18 studies described multi-way sensitivity analysis of more than 2 parameters simultaneously. Among the models used to make cost-effectiveness estimates, most frequent diagnostic assays studied included Xpert MTB/RIF (n = 7, and alternative nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs (n = 4. Most (n = 16 of the cost-effectiveness models compared new assays to an existing baseline and generated an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER.Although models have addressed a small number of important issues, many decisions regarding implementation of TB diagnostics are being made without the full benefits of insight from mathematical

  3. Lung scintigraphy with Tc-99m-MIBI in diagnosis of active tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raziei, G.; Fotouhi, F.; Masjedi, M.R.; Neshandar, E.

    2002-01-01

    Tuberculosis is highly contagious infection and one of the most important health problems in the world today, particularly in our country. Routine diagnostic procedures are sometimes unable to differentiated active from inactive cases particularly in elderly. Children, immunomedics patients, Chronic cases with recurrent actuate infection and in the patients unable to provide sputum for microbiological studies. Several radiopharmaceuticals have been used in the evaluation of active pulmonary TB. In this study Tc 99 m-MIBI lung scan was performed using a single head ADAC gamma camera. 62 patients including 34 APTB 915 male and 19 female) and 28 IPTB 99 male and 19 female) underwent six minutes anterior and posterior chest images 20 and minutes after injection of 10 mCi (370 MBq) of Tc 99 m-MIBI. Visual grading was generated by comparing uptake of lesion with neck soft tissue (sternoleidomastoid muscle) and myocardium. For semiquantitative analysis, regions of interest were draw over the lesion (L), non lesion (NL) and neck soft tissue (SCM) and mean count value of ROIs as well as L/NL, L/SCM values were obtained. Results: From 34 patients with APTB, 4 PTS had normal lung uptake (11.7%), 14 PTs+(41, 2%), 14 PTs++41.2%) and 2 PTS +++ (5.9%), therefore 30 PTs of APTB were positive in scintigraphy (88.2%). From 28 patients with IPTB 21 PTs had normal lung uptake (75%), 6 PTs+ (21.4%) and one PT ++ (3.5%). In the semi quantitative study L/NL ratio is calculated for + about 1.35 +/-0.15 and below from this range is considered with normal limit. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV were 88.2% 75%, 82.2%, 81.1% and 84% respectively. From 100 CXR lesion in APTB, 60 had compatible positive scan and from 86 CXR lesions in IPTB 9 had compatible positive scan, where as incompatible positive findings were 12 and 2 respectively. This study indicates Tc 99 m - MIBI lung scan can be used as a reliable complementary study in diagnosis of APTB and differentiating from

  4. [Managment of tuberculosis in an University of Campania].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccello, R; Monaco, M G L; Feola, D; Garzillo, E M; Muoio, M; Sannolo, N; Lamberti, M

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TBC) is an infectious disease with the highest mortality and morbidity by single pathogen, affecting about one third of worldwide population. Although Mantoux test is the most used, IGRA (Interferon-gamma Release Assays) tests seem to give good results for presumptive diagnosis of active or latent tuberculosis. From June 2011 to June 2012 we made about 1,000 visits for TBC prevention among the exposed to biological risks of our University. The management of suspected latent or active