WorldWideScience

Sample records for active site insights

  1. Widely available active sites on Ni2P for electrochemical hydrogen evolution - insights from first principles calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Stern, Lucas-Alexandre; Feng, Ligang;

    2015-01-01

    We present insights into the mechanism and the active site for hydrogen evolution on nickel phosphide (Ni2P). Ni2P was recently discovered to be a very active non-precious hydrogen evolution catalyst. Current literature attributes the activity of Ni2P to a particular site on the (0001) facet. In ...

  2. Insights into the conformation of aminofluorene-deoxyguanine adduct in a DNA polymerase active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Vaidyanathan G; Liang, Fengting; Beard, William A; Shock, David D; Wilson, Samuel H; Cho, Bongsup P

    2013-08-09

    The active site conformation of the mutagenic fluoroaminofluorene-deoxyguanine adduct (dG-FAF, N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-7-fluoro-2-aminofluorene) has been investigated in the presence of Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I (Kfexo(-)) and DNA polymerase β (pol β) using (19)F NMR, insertion assay, and surface plasmon resonance. In a single nucleotide gap, the dG-FAF adduct adopts both a major-groove- oriented and base-displaced stacked conformation, and this heterogeneity is retained upon binding pol β. The addition of a non-hydrolysable 2'-deoxycytosine-5'-[(α,β)-methyleno]triphosphate (dCMPcPP) nucleotide analog to the binary complex results in an increase of the major groove conformation of the adduct at the expense of the stacked conformation. Similar results were obtained with the addition of an incorrect dAMPcPP analog but with formation of the minor groove binding conformer. In contrast, dG-FAF adduct at the replication fork for the Kfexo(-) complex adopts a mix of the major and minor groove conformers with minimal effect upon the addition of non-hydrolysable nucleotides. For pol β, the insertion of dCTP was preferred opposite the dG-FAF adduct in a single nucleotide gap assay consistent with (19)F NMR data. Surface plasmon resonance binding kinetics revealed that pol β binds tightly with DNA in the presence of correct dCTP, but the adduct weakens binding with no nucleotide specificity. These results provide molecular insights into the DNA binding characteristics of FAF in the active site of DNA polymerases and the role of DNA structure and sequence on its coding potential.

  3. Mechanochemical coupling in the myosin motor domain. I. Insights from equilibrium active-site simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Yu

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the major structural transitions in molecular motors are often argued to couple to the binding of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP, the recovery stroke in the conventional myosin has been shown to be dependent on the hydrolysis of ATP. To obtain a clearer mechanistic picture for such "mechanochemical coupling" in myosin, equilibrium active-site simulations with explicit solvent have been carried out to probe the behavior of the motor domain as functions of the nucleotide chemical state and conformation of the converter/relay helix. In conjunction with previous studies of ATP hydrolysis with different active-site conformations and normal mode analysis of structural flexibility, the results help establish an energetics-based framework for understanding the mechanochemical coupling. It is proposed that the activation of hydrolysis does not require the rotation of the lever arm per se, but the two processes are tightly coordinated because both strongly couple to the open/close transition of the active site. The underlying picture involves shifts in the dominant population of different structural motifs as a consequence of changes elsewhere in the motor domain. The contribution of this work and the accompanying paper [] is to propose the actual mechanism behind these "population shifts" and residues that play important roles in the process. It is suggested that structural flexibilities at both the small and large scales inherent to the motor domain make it possible to implement tight couplings between different structural motifs while maintaining small free-energy drops for processes that occur in the detached states, which is likely a feature shared among many molecular motors. The significantly different flexibility of the active site in different X-ray structures with variable level arm orientations supports the notation that external force sensed by the lever arm may transmit into the active site and influence the chemical steps (nucleotide

  4. Structural insight into the active site of a Bombyx mori unclassified glutathione transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are major detoxification enzymes that play central roles in the defense against various environmental toxicants as well as oxidative stress. Here, we identify amino acid residues of an unclassified GST from Bombyx mori, bmGSTu-interacting glutathione (GSH). Site-directed mutagenesis of bmGSTu mutants indicated that amino acid residues Asp103, Ser162, and Ser166 contribute to catalytic activity.

  5. [Enhancing glutamate decarboxylase activity by site-directed mutagenesis: an insight from Ramachandran plot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Piyu; Huang, Jun; Hu, Sheng; Zhao, Weirui; Lü, Changjiang; Yu, Kai; Lei, Yinlin; Wang, Jinbo; Mei, Lehe

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can catalyze the decarboxylation of glutamate into γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) and is the only enzyme of GABA biosynthesis. Improving GAD activity and thermostability will be helpful for the highly efficient biosynthesis of GABA. According to the Ramachandran plot information of GAD 1407 three-dimensional structure from Lactobacillus brevis CGMCC No. 1306, we identified the unstable site K413 as the mutation target, constructed the mutant GAD by site-directed mutagenesis and measured the thermostability and activity of the wide type and mutant GAD. Mutant K413A led to a remarkably slower inactivation rate, and its half-life at 50 °C reached 105 min which was 2.1-fold higher than the wild type GAD1407. Moreover, mutant K413I exhibited 1.6-fold higher activity in comparison with the wide type GAD1407, although it had little improvement in thermostability of GAD. Ramachandran plot can be considered as a potential approach to increase GAD thermostability and activity.

  6. Spectroscopic insights into the nature of active sites in iron–nitrogen–carbon electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction in acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Qingying; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Tylus, Urszula; Strickland, Kara; Li, Jingkun; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Anibal, Jacob; Gumeci, Cenk; Barton, Scott Calabrese; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frederic; Halevi, Barr; Mukerjee, Sanjeev (NEU); (UNM); (CNRS-UMR); (General Motors); (Pajarito); (MSU)

    2016-11-01

    Developing efficient and inexpensive catalysts for the sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) constitutes one of the grand challenges in the fabrication of commercially viable fuel cell devices and metal–air batteries for future energy applications. Despite recent achievements in designing advanced Pt-based and Pt-free catalysts, current progress primarily involves an empirical approach of trial-and-error combination of precursors and synthesis conditions, which limits further progress. Rational design of catalyst materials requires proper understanding of the mechanistic origin of the ORR and the underlying surface properties under operating conditions that govern catalytic activity. Herein, several different groups of iron-based catalysts synthesized via different methods and/or precursors were systematically studied by combining multiple spectroscopic techniques under ex situ and in situ conditions in an effort to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the synthesis-products correlations, nature of active sites, and the reaction mechanisms. These catalysts include original macrocycles, macrocycle-pyrolyzed catalysts, and Fe-N–C catalysts synthesized from individual Fe, N, and C precursors including polymer-based catalysts, metal organic framework (MOF)-based catalysts, and sacrificial support method (SSM)-based catalysts. The latter group of catalysts is most promising as not only they exhibit exceptional ORR activity and/or durability, but also the final products are controllable. We show that the high activity observed for most pyrolyzed Fe-based catalysts can mainly be attributed to a single active site: non-planar Fe–N4 moiety embedded in distorted carbon matrix characterized by a high potential for the Fe2+/3+ redox transition in acidic electrolyte/environment. The high intrinsic ORR activity, or turnover frequency (TOF), of this site is shown to be accounted for by redox catalysis mechanism that highlights the dominant role

  7. Structural Insights into the Protease-like Antigen Plasmodium falciparum SERA5 and Its Noncanonical Active-Site Serine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodder, Anthony N.; Malby, Robyn L.; Clarke, Oliver B.; Fairlie, W. Douglas; Colman, Peter M.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Smith, Brian J.; (WEHIMR); (Melbourne)

    2009-08-28

    The sera genes of the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium encode a family of unique proteins that are maximally expressed at the time of egress of parasites from infected red blood cells. These multi-domain proteins are unique, containing a central papain-like cysteine-protease fragment enclosed between the disulfide-linked N- and C-terminal domains. However, the central fragment of several members of this family, including serine repeat antigen 5 (SERA5), contains a serine (S596) in place of the active-site cysteine. Here we report the crystal structure of the central protease-like domain of Plasmodium falciparum SERA5, revealing a number of anomalies in addition to the putative nucleophilic serine: (1) the structure of the putative active site is not conducive to binding substrate in the canonical cysteine-protease manner; (2) the side chain of D594 restricts access of substrate to the putative active site; and (3) the S{sub 2} specificity pocket is occupied by the side chain of Y735, reducing this site to a small depression on the protein surface. Attempts to determine the structure in complex with known inhibitors were not successful. Thus, despite having revealed its structure, the function of the catalytic domain of SERA5 remains an enigma.

  8. Direct atomic-level insight into the active sites of a high-performance PGM-free ORR catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hoon T.; Cullen, David A.; Higgins, Drew; Sneed, Brian T.; Holby, Edward F.; More, Karren L.; Zelenay, Piotr

    2017-08-01

    Platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) metal-nitrogen-carbon catalysts have emerged as a promising alternative to their costly platinum (Pt)-based counterparts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) but still face some major challenges, including (i) the identification of the most relevant catalytic site for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and (ii) demonstration of competitive PEFC performance under automotive-application conditions in the hydrogen (H2)-air fuel cell. Herein, we demonstrate H2-air performance gains achieved with an iron-nitrogen-carbon catalyst synthesized with two nitrogen precursors that developed hierarchical porosity. Current densities recorded in the kinetic region of cathode operation, at fuel cell voltages greater than ~0.75 V, were the same as those obtained with a Pt cathode at a loading of 0.1 milligram of Pt per centimeter squared. The proposed catalytic active site, carbon-embedded nitrogen-coordinated iron (FeN4), was directly visualized with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, and the contributions of these active sites associated with specific lattice-level carbon structures were explored computationally.

  9. Plasmodium falciparum Plasmepsin V (PfPMV): Insights into recombinant expression, substrate specificity and active site structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonyalai, Nonlawat; Sittikul, Pichamon; Yuvaniyama, Jirundon

    2015-05-01

    Plasmepsin V from Plasmodium falciparum (PfPMV) is responsible for the cleavage of the Plasmodium export element (PEXEL) motif at the N-terminus of several hundreds of the exported proteins. PfPMV is necessary for parasite viability and has become a novel promising target for antimalarial therapy. The first recombinant expression of soluble, active PfPMV as thioredoxin fusion proteins is reported herein. Two truncated forms of PfPMV were fused to thioredoxin (Trx) to generate Trx-PfPMVp37 and Trx-PfPMVm84. The fusion proteins were successfully purified using Ni(2+) affinity chromatography in combination with ATP treatment to eliminate Escherichia coli HSP60 contaminant. Trx-PfPMVm84 could hydrolyze the PEXEL-containing peptides more efficiently than Trx-PfPMVp37. Interestingly, both Trx-PfPMVs preferred to cleave PfEMP2 peptide over HRPII peptide. The replacement of Ser with Val or Glu at P1' position created a substrate with 75% reduction in the enzyme activity, whereas the substitution of Ile with Lys or Glu at P2 position reduced the cleavage efficiency by 30%. The activity of Trx-PfPMVm84 was inhibited by PMSF and nelfinavir but not by pepstatin A. After the removal of Trx domain, activities of both enzymes toward PfEMP2 and HRPII peptides were fitted to the Michaelis-Menten model to determine kinetic parameters. The Km values toward both peptides were apparently much lower than the previously reported data although with similar kcat values. Along with an improved PfPMV preparation protocol, these findings have provided insights into its substrate specificity at P2 and P1' positions as well as interactions among the enzyme, substrates, and inhibitors.

  10. Computational insights into active site shaping for substrate specificity and reaction regioselectivity in the EXTL2 retaining glycosyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Fernanda; Lluch, José M; Masgrau, Laura

    2017-09-14

    Glycosyltransferases are enzymes that catalyze a monosaccharide transfer reaction from a donor to an acceptor substrate with the synthesis of a new glycosidic bond. They are highly substrate specific and regioselective, even though the acceptor substrate often presents multiple reactive groups. Currently, many efforts are dedicated to the development of biocatalysts for glycan synthesis and, therefore, a better understanding of how natural enzymes achieve this goal can be of valuable help. To gain a deeper insight into the catalytic strategies used by retaining glycosyltransferases, the wild type EXTL2 (CAZy family GT64) and four mutant forms (at positions 293 and 246) were studied using QM(DFT)/MM calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. Existing hypotheses on the roles of Arg293, an enigmatic residue in the CAZy family GT64 that seemed to contradict a mechanism through an oxocarbenium intermediate, and of Asp246 have been tested. We also provide a molecular interpretation for the results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments. Moreover, we have investigated why an Asp, and not a Glu like in the family GT6, is found on the β-face of the transferred GlcNAc. It is predicted that an Asp246Glu mutant of EXTL2 would be unable to catalyze the α-1,4 transfer. The results herein presented clarify the roles that Arg293, Asp246 and Leu213 have at different stages of the catalytic process (for binding but also for efficient chemical reaction). Altogether, we provide a molecular view that connects the identity and conformation of these residues to the substrate specificity and regioselectivity of the enzyme, illustrating a delicate interplay between all these aspects.

  11. Site-directed mutagenesis of the toxin from the Chinese scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch (BmKAS): insight into sites related to analgesic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Song, Yong-Bo; Ma, Lin; Liu, Yan-Feng; Li, Guo-Dong; Wu, Chun-Fu; Zhang, Jing-Hai

    2010-10-01

    This study utilized the E. coli expression system to investigate the role of amino acid residues in toxin from the Chinese scorpion--Buthus martensii Karsch (BmKAS). To evaluate the extent to which residues of the toxin core contribute to its analgesic activity, ten mutants of BmKAS were obtained by PCR. Using site-directed mutagenesis, all of these residues were substituted with different amino acids. This study represents a thorough mapping and elucidation of the epitopes that form the molecular basis of the toxin's analgesic activity. Our results showed large mutant-dependent differences that emphasize the important roles of the studied residues.

  12. Homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation of N-myristoyltransferase from protozoan parasites: active site characterization and insights into rational inhibitor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Chunquan; Ji, Haitao; Miao, Zhenyuan; Che, Xiaoyin; Yao, Jianzhong; Wang, Wenya; Dong, Guoqiang; Guo, Wei; Lü, Jiaguo; Zhang, Wannian

    2009-06-01

    Myristoyl-CoA:protein N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) is a cytosolic monomeric enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of the myristoyl group from myristoyl-CoA to the N-terminal glycine of a number of eukaryotic cellular and viral proteins. Recent experimental data suggest NMT from parasites could be a promising new target for the design of novel antiparasitic agents with new mode of action. However, the active site topology and inhibitor specificity of these enzymes remain unclear. In this study, three-dimensional models of NMT from Plasmodium falciparum (PfNMT), Leishmania major (LmNMT) and Trypanosoma brucei (TbNMT) were constructed on the basis of the crystal structures of fungal NMTs using homology modeling method. The models were further refined by energy minimization and molecular dynamics simulations. The active sites of PfNMT, LmNMT and TbNMT were characterized by multiple copy simultaneous search (MCSS). MCSS functional maps reveal that PfNMT, LmNMT and TbNMT share a similar active site topology, which is defined by two hydrophobic pockets, a hydrogen-bonding (HB) pocket, a negatively-charged HB pocket and a positively-charged HB pocket. Flexible docking approaches were then employed to dock known inhibitors into the active site of PfNMT. The binding mode, structure-activity relationships and selectivity of inhibitors were investigated in detail. From the results of molecular modeling, the active site architecture and certain key residues responsible for inhibitor binding were identified, which provided insights for the design of novel inhibitors of parasitic NMTs.

  13. Mechanistic insights into ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase catalysis involving the conserved glutamate in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumit, Verónica I; Essigke, Timm; Cortez, Néstor; Ullmann, G Matthias

    2010-04-02

    Plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases (FNRs) are flavoenzymes harboring one molecule of noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide that catalyze reversible reactions between obligatory one-electron carriers and obligatory two-electron carriers. A glutamate next to the C-terminus is strictly conserved in FNR and has been proposed to function as proton donor/acceptor during catalysis. However, experimental studies of this proposed function led to contradicting conclusions about the role of this glutamate in the catalytic mechanism. In the present work, we study the titration behavior of the glutamate in the active site of FNR using theoretical methods. Protonation probabilities for maize FNR were computed for the reaction intermediates of the catalytic cycle by Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations and Metropolis Monte Carlo titration. The titration behavior of the highly conserved glutamate was found to vary depending on the bound substrates NADP(H) and ferredoxin and also on the redox states of these substrates and the flavin adenine dinucleotide. Our results support the involvement of the glutamate in the FNR catalytic mechanism not only as a proton donor but also as a key residue for stabilizing and destabilizing reaction intermediates. On the basis of our findings, we propose a model rationalizing the function of the glutamate in the reaction cycle, which allows reinterpretation of previous experimental results. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Connecting Active-Site Loop Conformations and Catalysis in Triosephosphate Isomerase: Insights from a Rare Variation at Residue 96 in the Plasmodial Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareek, Vidhi; Samanta, Moumita; Joshi, Niranjan V; Balaram, Hemalatha; Murthy, Mathur R N; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2016-04-01

    Despite extensive research into triosephosphate isomerases (TIMs), there exists a gap in understanding of the remarkable conjunction between catalytic loop-6 (residues 166-176) movement and the conformational flip of Glu165 (catalytic base) upon substrate binding that primes the active site for efficient catalysis. The overwhelming occurrence of serine at position 96 (98% of the 6277 unique TIM sequences), spatially proximal to E165 and the loop-6 residues, raises questions about its role in catalysis. Notably, Plasmodium falciparum TIM has an extremely rare residue--phenylalanine--at this position whereas, curiously, the mutant F96S was catalytically defective. We have obtained insights into the influence of residue 96 on the loop-6 conformational flip and E165 positioning by combining kinetic and structural studies on the PfTIM F96 mutants F96Y, F96A, F96S/S73A, and F96S/L167V with sequence conservation analysis and comparative analysis of the available apo and holo structures of the enzyme from diverse organisms.

  15. An insight into the effects of B-site transition metals on the activity, activation effect and stability of perovskite oxygen electrodes for solid oxide electrolysis cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Jiaxin; Yang, Shengbing; Zhong, Shaohua; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Fan, Chou; Chen, Xinbing; Liu, Yihui

    2017-09-01

    Here, effects of B-site transition metals (TMs) in the (La0.6Sr0.4)XO3-δ (X = Mn, Fe, Co) perovskite structure on the activity and stability of the oxygen electrodes during high temperature electrolysis are discussed to provide a deep understanding of the phenomena observed for different oxygen electrodes under anodic polarizations. Performance and stability of the electrodes vary significantly at 800 °C as the TMs changed from Mn to Fe and Co, which is attributed to the different ionic conductivities and surface chemistry of the materials that have a strong dependence on the valence state and electronic structure of TMs. Under an anodic current passage of 200 mA cm-2 at 800 °C, electrode polarization resistance (RE) and overpotential (η) of the (La0.6Sr0.4)MnO3-δ (LSM) electrode decrease significantly by 1.75 Ω cm2 and 101 mV during the 1200 min test, compared with the constant values of RE and η for the (La0.6Sr0.4)FeO3-δ (LSF) and (La0.6Sr0.4)CoO3-δ (LSC) electrodes, an indication of the influence of B-site TMs on the electrode performance and stability. Most serious degradation is observed at the (La0.6Sr0.4)MnO3-δ electrode due to the electrode detachment arising from the accelerated SrO surface segregation and related disintegration of LSM particles near the electrode/electrolyte interface.

  16. Domain movements of the enhancer-dependent sigma factor drive DNA delivery into the RNA polymerase active site: insights from single molecule studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amit; Leach, Robert N; Gell, Christopher; Zhang, Nan; Burrows, Patricia C; Shepherd, Dale A; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh; Smith, David Alastair; Zhang, Xiaodong; Buck, Martin; Stockley, Peter G; Tuma, Roman

    2014-04-01

    Recognition of bacterial promoters is regulated by two distinct classes of sequence-specific sigma factors, σ(70) or σ(54), that differ both in their primary sequence and in the requirement of the latter for activation via enhancer-bound upstream activators. The σ(54) version controls gene expression in response to stress, often mediating pathogenicity. Its activator proteins are members of the AAA+ superfamily and use adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis to remodel initially auto-inhibited holoenzyme promoter complexes. We have mapped this remodeling using single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. Initial remodeling is nucleotide-independent and driven by binding both ssDNA during promoter melting and activator. However, DNA loading into the RNA polymerase active site depends on co-operative ATP hydrolysis by the activator. Although the coupled promoter recognition and melting steps may be conserved between σ(70) and σ(54), the domain movements of the latter have evolved to require an activator ATPase.

  17. Structure and function relationship of toxin from Chinese scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch (BmKAGAP): gaining insight into related sites of analgesic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Guo, Gui-Li; Ma, Lin; Hu, Nan; Song, Yong-Bo; Liu, Yan-Feng; Wu, Chun-Fu; Zhang, Jing-Hai

    2010-06-01

    In this study, an effective Escherichia coli expression system was used to study the role of residues in the antitumor-analgesic peptide from Chinese scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch (BmKAGAP). To evaluate the extent to which residues of the toxin core contribute to its analgesic activity, nine mutants of BmKAGAP were obtained by PCR. Using site-directed mutagenesis, all of these residues were individually substituted by one amino acid. These were then subjected to a circular dichroism analysis, and an analgesic activity assay in mice. This study represents a thorough mapping and elucidation of the epitopes that underlie the molecular basis of the analgesic activity. The three-dimensional structure of BmKAGAP was established by homology modeling. Our results revealed large mutant-dependent differences that indicated important roles for the studied residues. With our ongoing efforts for establishing the structure and analgesic activity relationship of BmKAGAP, we have succeeded in pinpointing which residues are important for the analgesic activity.

  18. An active site mutant of Escherichia coli cyclopropane fatty acid synthase forms new non-natural fatty acids providing insights on the mechanism of the enzymatic reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E, Guangqi; Drujon, Thierry; Correia, Isabelle; Ploux, Olivier; Guianvarc'h, Dominique

    2013-12-01

    We have produced and purified an active site mutant of the Escherichia coli cyclopropane fatty acid synthase (CFAS) by replacing the strictly conserved G236 within cyclopropane synthases, by a glutamate residue, which corresponds to E146 of the homologous mycolic acid methyltransferase, Hma, producing hydroxymethyl mycolic acids. The G236E CFAS mutant had less than 1% of the in vitro activity of the wild type enzyme. We expressed the G236E CFAS mutant in an E. coli (DE3) strain in which the chromosomal cfa gene had been deleted. After extraction of phospholipids and conversion into the corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), we observed the formation of cyclopropanated FAMEs suggesting that the mutant retained some of the normal activity in vivo. However, we also observed the formation of new C17 methyl-branched unsaturated FAMEs whose structures were determined using GC/MS and NMR analyses. The double bond was located at different positions 8, 9 or 10, and the methyl group at position 10 or 9. Thus, this new FAMEs are likely arising from a 16:1 acyl chain of a phospholipid that had been transformed by the G236E CFAS mutant in vivo. The reaction catalyzed by this G236E CFAS mutant thus starts by the methylation of the unsaturated acyl chain at position 10 or 9 yielding a carbocation at position 9 or 10 respectively. It follows then two competing steps, a normal cyclopropanation or hydride shift/elimination events giving different combinations of alkenes. This study not only provides further evidence that cyclopropane synthases (CSs) form a carbocationic intermediate but also opens the way to CSs engineering for the synthesis of non-natural fatty acids.

  19. Theoretic Insight into CO2 Reduction at Active Sites of Molybdenum and Tungsten Enzymes: a {\\pi} Interaction between CO2 and Tungsten Bis-Dithiolene Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Active sites of molybdenum and tungsten enzymes, particularly mononuclear tungsten formate dehydrogenase (FDH) have been theoretically investigated towards their interaction with CO2. Obvious {\\pi} interaction has been found between the 2e reduced metallodithiole moiety and the molecular CO2. This weak {\\pi} bonding is predicated both at gas phase, noted as -6.0 kcal/mol and aqueous solvation level, -3.6 kcal/mol. Such interaction is not only limited to CO2, but also to the CO2 reduced product, i.e. formate, in the form of anion- {\\pi} interaction, noted as -6.8 kcal/mol and -4.1 kcal/mol respectively in gas and aqueous solvation model. The Bailar twisted angles from 60o to 0o, governing structure preference of tungsten dithiolene from octahedron to triangle prism in their restricted structures, has been explored to evaluate such {\\pi} in-terrelations with CO2 and formate. An octahedral structure with 3 kcal/mol energy lower is preferred over the triangle prismatic when such interactions are concerned.

  20. Fungal endophytes of Alpinia officinarum rhizomes: insights on diversity and variation across growth years, growth sites, and the inner active chemical concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubin, Li; Juan, Huang; RenChao, Zhou; ShiRu, Xu; YuanXiao, Jin

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) technique, combined with the use of a clone library, was applied to assess the baseline diversity of fungal endophyte communities associated with rhizomes of Alpinia officinarum Hance, a medicinal plant with a long history of use. A total of 46 distinct T-RFLP fragment peaks were detected using HhaI or MspI mono-digestion-targeted, amplified fungal rDNA ITS sequences from A. officinarum rhizomes. Cloning and sequencing of representative sequences resulted in the detection of members of 10 fungal genera: Pestalotiopsis, Sebacina, Penicillium, Marasmius, Fusarium, Exserohilum, Mycoleptodiscus, Colletotrichum, Meyerozyma, and Scopulariopsis. The T-RFLP profiles revealed an influence of growth year of the host plant on fungal endophyte communities in rhizomes of this plant species; whereas, the geographic location where A. officinarum was grown contributed to only limited variation in the fungal endophyte communities of the host tissue. Furthermore, non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis across all of the rhizome samples showed that the fungal endophyte community assemblages in the rhizome samples could be grouped according to the presence of two types of active indicator chemicals: total volatile oils and galangin. Our present results, for the first time, address a diverse fungal endophyte community is able to internally colonize the rhizome tissue of A. officinarum. The diversity of the fungal endophytes found in the A. officinarum rhizome appeared to be closely correlated with the accumulation of active chemicals in the host plant tissue. The present study also provides the first systematic overview of the fungal endophyte communities in plant rhizome tissue using a culture-independent method.

  1. Inhibition of CK2 Activity by TCDD via Binding to ATP-competitive Binding Site of Catalytic Subunit:Insight from Computational Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xian-jin; CANNISTRARO Salvatore; BIZZARRI Anna-rita; ZENG Yi; CHEN Wei-zu; WANG Cun-xin

    2013-01-01

    Alternative mechanisms of toxic effects induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin(TCDD),instead of the binding to aryl hydrocarbon receptor(AhR),have been taken into consideration.It has been recently shown that TCDD reduces rapidly the activity of CK2(casein kinase Ⅱ) both in vivo and in vitro.It is found that TCDD has high molecular similarities to the known inhibitors of CK2 catalytic subunit(CK2α).This suggests that TCDD could also be an ATP-competitive inhibitor of CK2α.In this work,docking TCDD to CK2 was carried out based on the two structures of CK2α from maize and human,respectively.The binding free energies of the predicted CK2α-TCDD complexes estimated by the molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area(MM/PBSA) method are from -85.1 kJ/mol to-114.3 kJ/mol for maize and are from-96.1 kJ/mol to-118.2 kJ/mol for human,which are comparable to those estimated for the known inhibitor and also ATP with CK2α.The energetic analysis also reveals that the van der Waals interaction is the dominant contribution to the binding free energy.These results are also useful for designing new drugs for a target of overexpressing CK2 in cancers.

  2. New insight into the dynamic properties and the active site architecture of H-Ras p21 revealed by X-ray crystallography at very high resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klink Björn U

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In kinetic crystallography, the usually static method of X-ray diffraction is expanded to allow time-resolved analysis of conformational rearrangements in protein structures. To achieve this, reactions have to be triggered within the protein crystals of interest, and optical spectroscopy can be used to monitor the reaction state. For this approach, a modified form of H-Ras p21 was designed which allows reaction initiation and fluorescence readout of the initiated GTPase reaction within the crystalline state. Rearrangements within the crystallized protein due to the progressing reaction and associated heterogeneity in the protein conformations have to be considered in the subsequent refinement processes. Results X-ray diffraction experiments on H-Ras p21 in different states along the reaction pathway provide detailed information about the kinetics and mechanism of the GTPase reaction. In addition, a very high data quality of up to 1.0 Å resolution allowed distinguishing two discrete subconformations of H-Ras p21, expanding the knowledge about the intrinsic flexibility of Ras-like proteins, which is important for their function. In a complex of H-Ras•GppNHp (guanosine-5'-(β,γ-imido-triphosphate, a second Mg2+ ion was found to be coordinated to the γ-phosphate group of GppNHp, which positions the hydrolytically active water molecule very close to the attacked γ-phosphorous atom. Conclusion For the structural analysis of very high-resolution data we have used a new 'two-chain-isotropic-refinement' strategy. This refinement provides an alternative and easy to interpret strategy to reflect the conformational variability within crystal structures of biological macromolecules. The presented fluorescent form of H-Ras p21 will be advantageous for fluorescence studies on H-Ras p21 in which the use of fluorescent nucleotides is not feasible.

  3. Selection of the InSight Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M.; Kipp, D.; Warner, N.; Daubar, I. J.; Fergason, R.; Kirk, R. L.; Beyer, R.; Huertas, A.; Piqueux, S.; Putzig, N. E.; Campbell, B. A.; Morgan, G. A.; Charalambous, C.; Pike, W. T.; Gwinner, K.; Calef, F.; Kass, D.; Mischna, M.; Ashley, J.; Bloom, C.; Wigton, N.; Hare, T.; Schwartz, C.; Gengl, H.; Redmond, L.; Trautman, M.; Sweeney, J.; Grima, C.; Smith, I. B.; Sklyanskiy, E.; Lisano, M.; Benardini, J.; Smrekar, S.; Lognonné, P.; Banerdt, W. B.

    2016-12-01

    The selection of the Discovery Program InSight landing site took over four years from initial identification of possible areas that met engineering constraints, to downselection via targeted data from orbiters (especially Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Context Camera (CTX) and High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images), to selection and certification via sophisticated entry, descent and landing (EDL) simulations. Constraints on elevation ( {≤}{-}2.5 km for sufficient atmosphere to slow the lander), latitude (initially 15°S-5°N and later 3°N-5°N for solar power and thermal management of the spacecraft), ellipse size (130 km by 27 km from ballistic entry and descent), and a load bearing surface without thick deposits of dust, severely limited acceptable areas to western Elysium Planitia. Within this area, 16 prospective ellipses were identified, which lie ˜600 km north of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover. Mapping of terrains in rapidly acquired CTX images identified especially benign smooth terrain and led to the downselection to four northern ellipses. Acquisition of nearly continuous HiRISE, additional Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), and High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) images, along with radar data confirmed that ellipse E9 met all landing site constraints: with slopes objectives did not directly influence landing site selection.

  4. Selection of the InSight landing site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M.; Kipp, D.; Warner, N.; Daubar, Ingrid J.; Fergason, Robin L.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Beyer, R.; Huertas, A.; Piqueux, Sylvain; Putzig, N.E.; Campbell, B.A.; Morgan, G. A.; Charalambous, C.; Pike, W. T.; Gwinner, K.; Calef, F.; Kass, D.; Mischna, M A; Ashley, J.; Bloom, C.; Wigton, N.; Hare, T.; Schwartz, C.; Gengl, H.; Redmond, L.; Trautman, M.; Sweeney, J.; Grima, C.; Smith, I. B.; Sklyanskiy, E.; Lisano, M.; Benardini, J.; Smrekar, S.E.; Lognonne, P.; Banerdt, W. B.

    2017-01-01

    The selection of the Discovery Program InSight landing site took over four years from initial identification of possible areas that met engineering constraints, to downselection via targeted data from orbiters (especially Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Context Camera (CTX) and High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images), to selection and certification via sophisticated entry, descent and landing (EDL) simulations. Constraints on elevation (≤−2.5 km">≤−2.5 km≤−2.5 km for sufficient atmosphere to slow the lander), latitude (initially 15°S–5°N and later 3°N–5°N for solar power and thermal management of the spacecraft), ellipse size (130 km by 27 km from ballistic entry and descent), and a load bearing surface without thick deposits of dust, severely limited acceptable areas to western Elysium Planitia. Within this area, 16 prospective ellipses were identified, which lie ∼600 km north of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover. Mapping of terrains in rapidly acquired CTX images identified especially benign smooth terrain and led to the downselection to four northern ellipses. Acquisition of nearly continuous HiRISE, additional Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), and High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) images, along with radar data confirmed that ellipse E9 met all landing site constraints: with slopes <15° at 84 m and 2 m length scales for radar tracking and touchdown stability, low rock abundance (<10 %) to avoid impact and spacecraft tip over, instrument deployment constraints, which included identical slope and rock abundance constraints, a radar reflective and load bearing surface, and a fragmented regolith ∼5 m thick for full penetration of the heat flow probe. Unlike other Mars landers, science objectives did not directly influence landing site selection.

  5. 77 FR 14832 - Plumchoice, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Balance Staffing, Insight Global Staffing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... Staffing, Insight Global Staffing, and Technisource, Scarborough, ME; Amended Certification Regarding..., Inc., including on-site leased workers from Balance Staffing, Insight Global Staffing, and... from Balance Staffing, Insight Global Staffing, and Technisource, Scarborough, Maine, who...

  6. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of a Copper-Binding Mutant of the Organomercurial Lyase MerB: Insight into the Key Role of the Active Site Aspartic Acid in Hg-Carbon Bond Cleavage and Metal Binding Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahba, Haytham M; Lecoq, Lauriane; Stevenson, Michael; Mansour, Ahmed; Cappadocia, Laurent; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Sygusch, Jurgen; Wilcox, Dean E; Omichinski, James G

    2016-02-23

    In bacterial resistance to mercury, the organomercurial lyase (MerB) plays a key role in the detoxification pathway through its ability to cleave Hg-carbon bonds. Two cysteines (C96 and C159; Escherichia coli MerB numbering) and an aspartic acid (D99) have been identified as the key catalytic residues, and these three residues are conserved in all but four known MerB variants, where the aspartic acid is replaced with a serine. To understand the role of the active site serine, we characterized the structure and metal binding properties of an E. coli MerB mutant with a serine substituted for D99 (MerB D99S) as well as one of the native MerB variants containing a serine residue in the active site (Bacillus megaterium MerB2). Surprisingly, the MerB D99S protein copurified with a bound metal that was determined to be Cu(II) from UV-vis absorption, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron paramagnetic resonance studies. X-ray structural studies revealed that the Cu(II) is bound to the active site cysteine residues of MerB D99S, but that it is displaced following the addition of either an organomercurial substrate or an ionic mercury product. In contrast, the B. megaterium MerB2 protein does not copurify with copper, but the structure of the B. megaterium MerB2-Hg complex is highly similar to the structure of the MerB D99S-Hg complexes. These results demonstrate that the active site aspartic acid is crucial for both the enzymatic activity and metal binding specificity of MerB proteins and suggest a possible functional relationship between MerB and its only known structural homologue, the copper-binding protein NosL.

  7. A Carbon Flux Super Site. New Insights and Innovative Atmosphere-Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Measurements and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclerc, Monique Y. [The University of Georgia Research Foundation, Athens, GA (United States)

    2014-11-17

    This final report presents the main activities and results of the project “A Carbon Flux Super Site: New Insights and Innovative Atmosphere-Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Measurements and Modeling” from 10/1/2006 to 9/30/2014. It describes the new AmeriFlux tower site (Aiken) at Savanna River Site (SC) and instrumentation, long term eddy-covariance, sodar, microbarograph, soil and other measurements at the site, and intensive field campaigns of tracer experiment at the Carbon Flux Super Site, SC, in 2009 and at ARM-CF site, Lamont, OK, and experiments in Plains, GA. The main results on tracer experiment and modeling, on low-level jet characteristics and their impact on fluxes, on gravity waves and their influence on eddy fluxes, and other results are briefly described in the report.

  8. Neural activity when people solve verbal problems with insight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Jung-Beeman

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available People sometimes solve problems with a unique process called insight, accompanied by an "Aha!" experience. It has long been unclear whether different cognitive and neural processes lead to insight versus noninsight solutions, or if solutions differ only in subsequent subjective feeling. Recent behavioral studies indicate distinct patterns of performance and suggest differential hemispheric involvement for insight and noninsight solutions. Subjects solved verbal problems, and after each correct solution indicated whether they solved with or without insight. We observed two objective neural correlates of insight. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (Experiment 1 revealed increased activity in the right hemisphere anterior superior temporal gyrus for insight relative to noninsight solutions. The same region was active during initial solving efforts. Scalp electroencephalogram recordings (Experiment 2 revealed a sudden burst of high-frequency (gamma-band neural activity in the same area beginning 0.3 s prior to insight solutions. This right anterior temporal area is associated with making connections across distantly related information during comprehension. Although all problem solving relies on a largely shared cortical network, the sudden flash of insight occurs when solvers engage distinct neural and cognitive processes that allow them to see connections that previously eluded them.

  9. Insight into Nek2A activity regulation and its pharmacological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ambuj Kumar

    2012-11-28

    Nov 28, 2012 ... 3. Nek2A activity regulation and associated pathological outcomes . .... vide a detailed insight into how they coordinate the cell cycle .... the adenine subpocket creating steric hindrance in the plane of ... Three dimensional.

  10. Active Site Engineering in Electrocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdaguer Casadevall, Arnau; Stephens, Ifan; Chorkendorff, Ib

    on nanostructured electrodes.• Oxygen reduction to water has been carried out on Pt-rare earth alloys, which outperformed the activity of Pt by as much as a factor of five while showing promising stability. The increase in activity can be attributed to compressive strain of the Pt overlayer formed under reaction...... vacuum, as well as theory calculations. The thesis falls in three different parts: firstly, study of model systems for oxygen reduction to water; secondly, oxygen reduction to hydrogen peroxide on both model systems and commercially relevant nanoparticles and thirdly CO2 and CO electroreduction studies...

  11. Meter-Scale Slopes of Candidate InSight Landing Sites from Point Photoclinometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Ross A.

    2016-09-01

    Photoclinometry was used to analyze the small-scale roughness of areas within the proposed Mars InSight landing ellipse. The landing ellipse presented in this study is in Elysium Planitia. This study was able to constrain surface slopes on length scales comparable to the HiRISE image resolution (0.25 meters/pixel and coarser). The InSight mission has various engineering constraints that each candidate landing ellipse must satisfy. These constraints indicate that the statistical value of the slopes at one, two, and five meter baselines are an important criterion. This technique estimates surface slopes across large swaths of each image, and builds up slope statistics for the images in the landing ellipse. The slopes I derived for the InSight landing site ellipse in this study are within the small-scale roughness constraints put forth by the InSight project. These results have provided input into the landing hazard assessment process.

  12. Mechanistic insights into heterogeneous methane activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Allegra A; Aljama, Hassan; Kakekhani, Arvin; Yoo, Jong Suk; Kulkarni, Ambarish; Tsai, Charlie; Garcia-Melchor, Max; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Nørskov, Jens K

    2017-02-01

    While natural gas is an abundant chemical fuel, its low volumetric energy density has prompted a search for catalysts able to transform methane into more useful chemicals. This search has often been aided through the use of transition state (TS) scaling relationships, which estimate methane activation TS energies as a linear function of a more easily calculated descriptor, such as final state energy, thus avoiding tedious TS energy calculations. It has been shown that methane can be activated via a radical or surface-stabilized pathway, both of which possess a unique TS scaling relationship. Herein, we present a simple model to aid in the prediction of methane activation barriers on heterogeneous catalysts. Analogous to the universal radical TS scaling relationship introduced in a previous publication, we show that a universal TS scaling relationship that transcends catalysts classes also seems to exist for surface-stabilized methane activation if the relevant final state energy is used. We demonstrate that this scaling relationship holds for several reducible and irreducible oxides, promoted metals, and sulfides. By combining the universal scaling relationships for both radical and surface-stabilized methane activation pathways, we show that catalyst reactivity must be considered in addition to catalyst geometry to obtain an accurate estimation for the TS energy. This model can yield fast and accurate predictions of methane activation barriers on a wide range of catalysts, thus accelerating the discovery of more active catalysts for methane conversion.

  13. Insights into Mechanism of Glucokinase Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shenping; Ammirati, Mark J.; Song, Xi; Knafels, John D.; Zhang, Jeff; Greasley, Samantha E.; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A.; Qiu, Xiayang

    2012-01-01

    Human glucokinase (GK) is a principal regulating sensor of plasma glucose levels. Mutations that inactivate GK are linked to diabetes, and mutations that activate it are associated with hypoglycemia. Unique kinetic properties equip GK for its regulatory role: although it has weak basal affinity for glucose, positive cooperativity in its binding of glucose causes a rapid increase in catalytic activity when plasma glucose concentrations rise above euglycemic levels. In clinical trials, small molecule GK activators (GKAs) have been efficacious in lowering plasma glucose and enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, but they carry a risk of overly activating GK and causing hypoglycemia. The theoretical models proposed to date attribute the positive cooperativity of GK to the existence of distinct protein conformations that interconvert slowly and exhibit different affinities for glucose. Here we report the respective crystal structures of the catalytic complex of GK and of a GK-glucose complex in a wide open conformation. To assess conformations of GK in solution, we also carried out small angle x-ray scattering experiments. The results showed that glucose dose-dependently converts GK from an apo conformation to an active open conformation. Compared with wild type GK, activating mutants required notably lower concentrations of glucose to be converted to the active open conformation. GKAs decreased the level of glucose required for GK activation, and different compounds demonstrated distinct activation profiles. These results lead us to propose a modified mnemonic model to explain cooperativity in GK. Our findings may offer new approaches for designing GKAs with reduced hypoglycemic risk. PMID:22298776

  14. Ternary complex structures of human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase bound with a novel inhibitor and secondary ligands provide insights into the molecular details of the enzyme’s active site closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Jaeok

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPPS controls intracellular levels of farnesyl pyrophosphate, which is essential for various biological processes. Bisphosphonate inhibitors of human FPPS are valuable therapeutics for the treatment of bone-resorption disorders and have also demonstrated efficacy in multiple tumor types. Inhibition of human FPPS by bisphosphonates in vivo is thought to involve closing of the enzyme’s C-terminal tail induced by the binding of the second substrate isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP. This conformational change, which occurs through a yet unclear mechanism, seals off the enzyme’s active site from the solvent environment and is essential for catalysis. The crystal structure of human FPPS in complex with a novel bisphosphonate YS0470 and in the absence of a second substrate showed partial ordering of the tail in the closed conformation. Results We have determined crystal structures of human FPPS in ternary complex with YS0470 and the secondary ligands inorganic phosphate (Pi, inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi, and IPP. Binding of PPi or IPP to the enzyme-inhibitor complex, but not that of Pi, resulted in full ordering of the C-terminal tail, which is most notably characterized by the anchoring of the R351 side chain to the main frame of the enzyme. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments demonstrated that PPi binds more tightly to the enzyme-inhibitor complex than IPP, and differential scanning fluorometry experiments confirmed that Pi binding does not induce the tail ordering. Structure analysis identified a cascade of conformational changes required for the C-terminal tail rigidification involving Y349, F238, and Q242. The residues K57 and N59 upon PPi/IPP binding undergo subtler conformational changes, which may initiate this cascade. Conclusions In human FPPS, Y349 functions as a safety switch that prevents any futile C-terminal closure and is locked in the “off” position in the

  15. Forecasting the solar activity cycle: new insights

    CERN Document Server

    Nandy, Dibyendu

    2013-01-01

    Having advanced knowledge of solar activity is important because the Sun's magnetic output governs space weather and impacts technologies reliant on space. However, the irregular nature of the solar cycle makes solar activity predictions a challenging task. This is best achieved through appropriately constrained solar dynamo simulations and as such the first step towards predictions is to understand the underlying physics of the solar dynamo mechanism. In Babcock-Leighton type dynamo models, the poloidal field is generated near the solar surface whereas the toroidal field is generated in the solar interior. Therefore a finite time is necessary for the coupling of the spatially segregated source layers of the dynamo. This time delay introduces a memory in the dynamo mechanism which allows forecasting of future solar activity. Here we discuss how this forecasting ability of the solar cycle is affected by downward turbulent pumping of magnetic flux. With significant turbulent pumping the memory of the dynamo is ...

  16. Efficient oxygen electrocatalysis on special active sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halck, Niels Bendtsen

    throughout this thesis to understand these local structure effects and their influence on surface reactions. The concept of these special active sites is used to explain how oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts can have activities beyond the limits of what was previously thought possible. The concept...

  17. Active zone stability: insights from fly neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The presynaptic active zone is a dynamic structure that orchestrates regulated release of neurotransmitters. Developmental and aging processes, and changes in neuronal network activity can all modulate the number, size and composition of active zone and thereby synaptic efficacy. However, very little is known about the mechanism that controls the structural stability of active zone. By studying a model synapse, the Drosophila neuromuscular junction, our recent work shed light on how two scaffolding proteins at the active zone regulate active zone stability by promoting a localized dephosphorylation event at the nerve terminal. Here we discuss the major insights from our findings and their implications for future research.

  18. Structural insight to mutation effects uncover a common allosteric site in class C GPCRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Boesgaard, Michael W; Munk, Christian;

    2017-01-01

    . Combining pharmacological site-directed mutagenesis data with the recent class C GPCR experimental structures will provide a foundation for rational design of new therapeutics. RESULTS: We uncover one common site for both positive and negative modulators with different amino acid layouts that can......MOTIVATION: Class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate important physiological functions and allosteric modulators binding to the transmembrane domain constitute an attractive and, due to a lack of structural insight, a virtually unexplored potential for therapeutics and the food industry...

  19. Promoter proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia Kjølhede; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site...... RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels.......Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site......, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites...

  20. Dust devil track survey at Elysium Planitia, Mars: Implications for the InSight landing sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Dennis; Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2016-03-01

    The InSight (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) robotic lander is scheduled to land in Elysium Planitia on Mars in September 2016. InSight will perform the first comprehensive surface-based geophysical investigation including seismic measurements. Knowledge about encounter rates of dust devils with the InSight lander are important for two main reasons: (1) dust devils will affect the scientific measurements, i.e., wind-induced seismic noise, and (2) the power-supply of the InSight lander and instruments is provided by solar arrays and previous landers and rovers on Mars were affected by a steady decline in electrical power output due to atmospheric dust deposition on the solar panels. Long term science operations were only made possible by dust clearing events of the solar arrays caused by wind gusts and dust devils. In this study we analyzed dust devil tracks (DDTs) at the final InSight landing site region in Elysium Planitia. Formation of DDTs is caused by the removal of a layer of dust by passing dust devils, hence in principle the same process as clearing of dust from solar panels. We mapped the number, size (width and length), and orientation of DDTs in repeat observations using High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images covering the exact same surface area acquired within a relatively short time span (solar panel clearing recurrence interval estimate of ∼11 Mars years using the mean annual DDT formation rate, and the mean DDT width and length from all measured DDTs. Due to several uncertainties this solar panel clearing recurrence interval for the InSight landing should be seen as an upper limit estimate.

  1. Methane to acetic acid over Cu-exchanged zeolites: mechanistic insights from a site-specific carbonylation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narsimhan, Karthik; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Mathies, Guinevere; Gunther, William R; Griffin, Robert G; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-02-11

    The selective low temperature oxidation of methane is an attractive yet challenging pathway to convert abundant natural gas into value added chemicals. Copper-exchanged ZSM-5 and mordenite (MOR) zeolites have received attention due to their ability to oxidize methane into methanol using molecular oxygen. In this work, the conversion of methane into acetic acid is demonstrated using Cu-MOR by coupling oxidation with carbonylation reactions. The carbonylation reaction, known to occur predominantly in the 8-membered ring (8MR) pockets of MOR, is used as a site-specific probe to gain insight into important mechanistic differences existing between Cu-MOR and Cu-ZSM-5 during methane oxidation. For the tandem reaction sequence, Cu-MOR generated drastically higher amounts of acetic acid when compared to Cu-ZSM-5 (22 vs 4 μmol/g). Preferential titration with sodium showed a direct correlation between the number of acid sites in the 8MR pockets in MOR and acetic acid yield, indicating that methoxy species present in the MOR side pockets undergo carbonylation. Coupled spectroscopic and reactivity measurements were used to identify the genesis of the oxidation sites and to validate the migration of methoxy species from the oxidation site to the carbonylation site. Our results indicate that the Cu(II)-O-Cu(II) sites previously associated with methane oxidation in both Cu-MOR and Cu-ZSM-5 are oxidation active but carbonylation inactive. In turn, combined UV-vis and EPR spectroscopic studies showed that a novel Cu(2+) site is formed at Cu/Al <0.2 in MOR. These sites oxidize methane and promote the migration of the product to a Brønsted acid site in the 8MR to undergo carbonylation.

  2. Direct instrumental identification of catalytically active surface sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfisterer, Jonas H. K.; Liang, Yunchang; Schneider, Oliver; Bandarenka, Aliaksandr S.

    2017-09-01

    The activity of heterogeneous catalysts—which are involved in some 80 per cent of processes in the chemical and energy industries—is determined by the electronic structure of specific surface sites that offer optimal binding of reaction intermediates. Directly identifying and monitoring these sites during a reaction should therefore provide insight that might aid the targeted development of heterogeneous catalysts and electrocatalysts (those that participate in electrochemical reactions) for practical applications. The invention of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) and the electrochemical STM promised to deliver such imaging capabilities, and both have indeed contributed greatly to our atomistic understanding of heterogeneous catalysis. But although the STM has been used to probe and initiate surface reactions, and has even enabled local measurements of reactivity in some systems, it is not generally thought to be suited to the direct identification of catalytically active surface sites under reaction conditions. Here we demonstrate, however, that common STMs can readily map the catalytic activity of surfaces with high spatial resolution: we show that by monitoring relative changes in the tunnelling current noise, active sites can be distinguished in an almost quantitative fashion according to their ability to catalyse the hydrogen-evolution reaction or the oxygen-reduction reaction. These data allow us to evaluate directly the importance and relative contribution to overall catalyst activity of different defects and sites at the boundaries between two materials. With its ability to deliver such information and its ready applicability to different systems, we anticipate that our method will aid the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts.

  3. A Flexible Binding Site Architecture Provides New Insights into CcpA Global Regulation in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Catabolite control protein A (CcpA is the master regulator in Gram-positive bacteria that mediates carbon catabolite repression (CCR and carbon catabolite activation (CCA, two fundamental regulatory mechanisms that enable competitive advantages in carbon catabolism. It is generally regarded that CcpA exerts its regulatory role by binding to a typical 14- to 16-nucleotide (nt consensus site that is called a catabolite response element (cre within the target regions. However, here we report a previously unknown noncanonical flexible architecture of the CcpA-binding site in solventogenic clostridia, providing new mechanistic insights into catabolite regulation. This novel CcpA-binding site, named crevar, has a unique architecture that consists of two inverted repeats and an intervening spacer, all of which are variable in nucleotide composition and length, except for a 6-bp core palindromic sequence (TGTAAA/TTTACA. It was found that the length of the intervening spacer of crevar can affect CcpA binding affinity, and moreover, the core palindromic sequence of crevar is the key structure for regulation. Such a variable architecture of crevar shows potential importance for CcpA’s diverse and fine regulation. A total of 103 potential crevar sites were discovered in solventogenic Clostridium acetobutylicum, of which 42 sites were picked out for electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs, and 30 sites were confirmed to be bound by CcpA. These 30 crevar sites are associated with 27 genes involved in many important pathways. Also of significance, the crevar sites are found to be widespread and function in a great number of taxonomically different Gram-positive bacteria, including pathogens, suggesting their global role in Gram-positive bacteria.

  4. [Mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lifeng; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2012-04-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent for inhibiting arginine-auxotrophic tumors (such as melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas) in phase III clinical trials. In this work, we studied the molecular mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutation sites, A128, H404 and 1410, were introduced into wild-type ADI gene by QuikChange site-directed mutagenesis method, and four ADI mutants M1 (A128T), M2 (H404R), M3 (I410L), and M4 (A128T, H404R) were obtained. The ADI mutants were individually expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the enzymatic properties of the purified mutant proteins were determined. The results show that both A128T and H404R had enhanced optimum pH, higher activity and stability of ADI under physiological condition (pH 7.4), as well as reduced K(m) value. This study provides an insight into the molecular mechanism of the ADI activity, and also the experimental evidence for the rational protein evolution in the future.

  5. Active zone stability:insights from fly neuromuscular junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolin Tian; Chunlai Wu

    2015-01-01

    The presynaptic active zone is a dynamic structure that orchestrates regulated release of neurotrans-mitters. Developmental and aging processes, and changes in neuronal network activity can all modulate the number, size and composition of active zone and thereby synaptic efifcacy. However, very little is known about the mechanism that controls the structural stability of active zone. By study-ing a model synapse, theDrosophila neuromuscular junction, our recent work shed light on how two scaffolding proteins at the active zone regulate active zone stability by promoting a localized dephos-phorylation event at the nerve terminal. Here we discuss the major insights from our ifndings and their implications for future research.

  6. Analysis of Local Slopes at the InSight Landing Site on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergason, R. L.; Kirk, R. L.; Cushing, G.; Galuszka, D. M.; Golombek, M. P.; Hare, T. M.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Kipp, D. M.; Redding, B. L.

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the topography of the surface within the InSight candidate landing ellipses, we generated Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) at lander scales and those appropriate for entry, descent, and landing simulations, along with orthoimages of both images in each stereopair, and adirectional slope images. These products were used to assess the distribution of slopes for each candidate ellipse and terrain type in the landing site region, paying particular attention to how these slopes impact InSight landing and engineering safety, and results are reported here. Overall, this region has extremely low slopes at 1-meter baseline scales and meets the safety constraints of the InSight lander. The majority of the landing ellipse has a mean slope at 1-meter baselines of 3.2°. In addition, a mosaic of HRSC, CTX, and HiRISE DTMs within the final landing ellipse (ellipse 9) was generated to support entry, descent, and landing simulations and evaluations. Several methods were tested to generate this mosaic and the NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline program dem_mosaic produced the best results. For the HRSC-CTX-HiRISE DTM mosaic, more than 99 % of the mosaic has slopes less than 15°, and the introduction of artificially high slopes along image seams was minimized.

  7. Analysis of local slopes at the InSight landing site on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergason, Robin L.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Cushing, Glen; Galuszka, Donna M.; Golombek, Matthew P.; Hare, Trent M.; Howington-Kraus, Elpitha; Kipp, Devin M; Redding, Bonnie L.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the topography of the surface within the InSight candidate landing ellipses, we generated Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) at lander scales and those appropriate for entry, descent, and landing simulations, along with orthoimages of both images in each stereopair, and adirectional slope images. These products were used to assess the distribution of slopes for each candidate ellipse and terrain type in the landing site region, paying particular attention to how these slopes impact InSight landing and engineering safety, and results are reported here. Overall, this region has extremely low slopes at 1-meter baseline scales and meets the safety constraints of the InSight lander. The majority of the landing ellipse has a mean slope at 1-meter baselines of 3.2°. In addition, a mosaic of HRSC, CTX, and HiRISE DTMs within the final landing ellipse (ellipse 9) was generated to support entry, descent, and landing simulations and evaluations. Several methods were tested to generate this mosaic and the NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline program dem_mosaic produced the best results. For the HRSC-CTX-HiRISE DTM mosaic, more than 99 % of the mosaic has slopes less than 15°, and the introduction of artificially high slopes along image seams was minimized.

  8. Building structure-activity insights through patent mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Meihua; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Guzman-Perez, Angel; Filipski, Kevin J

    2012-11-01

    One gap in current patent-mining practice is the lack of tools to build SAR knowledge. Here, we report a novel technique that enabled us to derive useful SAR information from the exemplified structures of a series of patents. In our approach, exemplified chemical structures were extracted from patent documents. They were grouped into structural series based on similarity and binding mode, after which the R-group table was generated. By analyzing R-group usages over time, we were able to build insights into SAR of a structural series, even though the biological activities were not available.

  9. Elucidation of the bicarbonate binding site and insights into the carboxylation mechanism of (N(5))-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthase (PurK) from Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuntland, Micheal L; Santarsiero, Bernard D; Johnson, Michael E; Fung, Leslie W M

    2014-11-01

    Structures of (N(5))-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthase (PurK) from Bacillus anthracis with various combinations of ATP, ADP, Mg(2+), bicarbonate and aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) in the active site are presented. The binding site of bicarbonate has only been speculated upon previously, but is shown here for the first time. The binding involves interactions with the conserved residues Arg272, His274 and Lys348. These structures provide insights into each ligand in the active site and allow a possible mechanism to be proposed for the reaction that converts bicarbonate and AIR, in the presence of ATP, to produce (N(5))-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide. The formation of a carboxyphosphate intermediate through ATP phosphoryl transfer is proposed, followed by carboxylation of AIR to give the product, facilitated by a cluster of conserved residues and an active-site water network.

  10. Radar interferometry offers new insights into threats to the Angkor site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fulong; Guo, Huadong; Ma, Peifeng; Lin, Hui; Wang, Cheng; Ishwaran, Natarajan; Hang, Peou

    2017-01-01

    The conservation of World Heritage is critical to the cultural and social sustainability of regions and nations. Risk monitoring and preventive diagnosis of threats to heritage sites in any given ecosystem are a complex and challenging task. Taking advantage of the performance of Earth Observation technologies, we measured the impacts of hitherto imperceptible and poorly understood factors of groundwater and temperature variations on the monuments in the Angkor World Heritage site (400 km2). We developed a two-scale synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) approach. We describe spatial-temporal displacements (at millimeter-level accuracy), as measured by high-resolution TerraSAR/TanDEM-X satellite images, to provide a new solution to resolve the current controversy surrounding the potential structural collapse of monuments in Angkor. Multidisciplinary analysis in conjunction with a deterioration kinetics model offers new insights into the causes that trigger the potential decline of Angkor monuments. Our results show that pumping groundwater for residential and touristic establishments did not threaten the sustainability of monuments during 2011 to 2013; however, seasonal variations of the groundwater table and the thermodynamics of stone materials are factors that could trigger and/or aggravate the deterioration of monuments. These factors amplify known impacts of chemical weathering and biological alteration of temple materials. The InSAR solution reported in this study could have implications for monitoring and sustainable conservation of monuments in World Heritage sites elsewhere. PMID:28275729

  11. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth.

  12. Genetic insight of the H5N1 hemagglutinin cleavage site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The cleavability of the hemagglutinin (HA) plays a major role in virulence of avian influenza viruses. Detailed analyses of the cleavage sequences and their evolution would give insights into the high pathogenicity of the H5N1 virus. HA segments were visually identifiable in the cellular automata (CA) image, and a feature gene segment (FGS) was only found in H5N1 rather than any other subtype. This FGS is a 30-bp gene segment mainly consisting of 'A' and 'G'. When translated into amino acids the FGS converted into a sequence of mainly basic amino acids with positive charges. This feature amino acid segment (FAAS) was located in the cleavage site loop of HA which was potentially cleavable by various proteases. The 3D structure of H5N1 HA was reconstructed using homology modelling. It was found that the cleavage site loop was well exposed to potential proteases. The molecular surfaces were reconstructed to study how mutation and deletion of some amino acids in the FAAS affected the charge distribution. It was found that some mutations had severely changed the landscape of the charge distribution. Statistical analyses of FAAS were made with respect to when and where the H5N1 viruses were found. In 2005, there were less un-mutated FAAS than the other years according to temporal evolution, and more mutated FAAS appeared in China than other regions according to geographic distribution. These results are helpful for exploring the evolution of virus high pathogenicity.

  13. Computational predictions provide insights into the biology of TAL effector target sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Jan; Wolf, Annett; Reschke, Maik; Bonas, Ulla; Posch, Stefan; Boch, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors are injected into host plant cells by Xanthomonas bacteria to function as transcriptional activators for the benefit of the pathogen. The DNA binding domain of TAL effectors is composed of conserved amino acid repeat structures containing repeat-variable diresidues (RVDs) that determine DNA binding specificity. In this paper, we present TALgetter, a new approach for predicting TAL effector target sites based on a statistical model. In contrast to previous approaches, the parameters of TALgetter are estimated from training data computationally. We demonstrate that TALgetter successfully predicts known TAL effector target sites and often yields a greater number of predictions that are consistent with up-regulation in gene expression microarrays than an existing approach, Target Finder of the TALE-NT suite. We study the binding specificities estimated by TALgetter and approve that different RVDs are differently important for transcriptional activation. In subsequent studies, the predictions of TALgetter indicate a previously unreported positional preference of TAL effector target sites relative to the transcription start site. In addition, several TAL effectors are predicted to bind to the TATA-box, which might constitute one general mode of transcriptional activation by TAL effectors. Scrutinizing the predicted target sites of TALgetter, we propose several novel TAL effector virulence targets in rice and sweet orange. TAL-mediated induction of the candidates is supported by gene expression microarrays. Validity of these targets is also supported by functional analogy to known TAL effector targets, by an over-representation of TAL effector targets with similar function, or by a biological function related to pathogen infection. Hence, these predicted TAL effector virulence targets are promising candidates for studying the virulence function of TAL effectors. TALgetter is implemented as part of the open-source Java library

  14. Computational predictions provide insights into the biology of TAL effector target sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Grau

    Full Text Available Transcription activator-like (TAL effectors are injected into host plant cells by Xanthomonas bacteria to function as transcriptional activators for the benefit of the pathogen. The DNA binding domain of TAL effectors is composed of conserved amino acid repeat structures containing repeat-variable diresidues (RVDs that determine DNA binding specificity. In this paper, we present TALgetter, a new approach for predicting TAL effector target sites based on a statistical model. In contrast to previous approaches, the parameters of TALgetter are estimated from training data computationally. We demonstrate that TALgetter successfully predicts known TAL effector target sites and often yields a greater number of predictions that are consistent with up-regulation in gene expression microarrays than an existing approach, Target Finder of the TALE-NT suite. We study the binding specificities estimated by TALgetter and approve that different RVDs are differently important for transcriptional activation. In subsequent studies, the predictions of TALgetter indicate a previously unreported positional preference of TAL effector target sites relative to the transcription start site. In addition, several TAL effectors are predicted to bind to the TATA-box, which might constitute one general mode of transcriptional activation by TAL effectors. Scrutinizing the predicted target sites of TALgetter, we propose several novel TAL effector virulence targets in rice and sweet orange. TAL-mediated induction of the candidates is supported by gene expression microarrays. Validity of these targets is also supported by functional analogy to known TAL effector targets, by an over-representation of TAL effector targets with similar function, or by a biological function related to pathogen infection. Hence, these predicted TAL effector virulence targets are promising candidates for studying the virulence function of TAL effectors. TALgetter is implemented as part of the open

  15. Shale gas impacts on groundwater resources: insights from monitoring a fracking site in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montcoudiol, Nelly; Isherwood, Catherine; Gunning, Andrew; Kelly, Thomas; Younger, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Exploitation of shale gas by hydraulic fracturing (fracking) is highly controversial and concerns have been raised regarding induced risks from this technique. The SHEER project, an EU Horizon 2020-funded project, is looking into developing best practice to understand, prevent and mitigate the potential short- and long-term environmental impacts and risks from shale gas exploration and exploitation. Three major potential impacts were identified: groundwater contamination, air pollution and induced seismicity. This presentation will deal with the hydrogeological aspect. As part of the SHEER project, four monitoring wells were installed at a shale gas exploration site in Northern Poland. They intercept the main drinking water aquifer located in Quaternary sediments. Baseline monitoring was carried out from mid-December 2015 to beginning of June 2016. Fracking operations occurred in two horizontal wells, in two stages, in June and July 2016. The monitoring has continued after fracking was completed, with site visits every 4-6 weeks. Collected data include measurements of groundwater level, conductivity and temperature at 15-minute intervals, frequent sampling for laboratory analyses and field measurements of groundwater physico-chemical parameters. Groundwater samples are analysed for a range of constituents including dissolved gases and isotopes. The presentation will focus on the interpretation of baseline monitoring data. The insights gained into the behaviour of the Quaternary aquifer will allow a greater perspective to be place on the initial project understanding draw from previous studies. Short-term impacts will also be discussed in comparison with the baseline monitoring results. The presentation will conclude with discussion of challenges regarding monitoring of shale gas fracking sites.

  16. Oxygen Activation at the Active Site of a Fungal Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, William B; Agarwal, Pratul K; Meilleur, Flora

    2017-01-16

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases have attracted vast attention owing to their abilities to disrupt glycosidic bonds via oxidation instead of hydrolysis and to enhance enzymatic digestion of recalcitrant substrates including chitin and cellulose. We have determined high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of an enzyme from Neurospora crassa in the resting state and of a copper(II) dioxo intermediate complex formed in the absence of substrate. X-ray crystal structures also revealed "pre-bound" molecular oxygen adjacent to the active site. An examination of protonation states enabled by neutron crystallography and density functional theory calculations identified a role for a conserved histidine in promoting oxygen activation. These results provide a new structural description of oxygen activation by substrate free lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases and provide insights that can be extended to reactivity in the enzyme-substrate complex. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Eutrophication increases methane emission to the atmosphere in tropical lagoons: insights from two Ivory Coast sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    José-mathieu Koné, Yéfanlan; Vieira Borges, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    Eutrophication increases methane emission to the atmosphere in tropical lagoons: insights from two Ivory Coast sites. Y J M Koné (1) & A.V. Borges (2) (1) Centre de recherches océanologiques (CRO) d'Abidjan, (Ivory Coast) (2) University of Liège, Chemical Oceanography Unit, Liège, Belgium (Belgium) Eutrophication is a worldwide environmental problem and a definitive solution is far from being achieved, despite the large number of studies documenting its causes. In small aquatic ecosystems, excessive growth of macrophytes is a well known undesirable consequence of eutrophication. When these plants die and sink to the bottom the decomposing biomass depletes oxygen content in the water column thus leading to anoxia promoting methane (CH4) production. Here, we reported the CH4 data obtained during six campaigns covering the annual cycle in two small lagoons of Ivory Coast (Ono, Kodjoboué) that are contrasted in the degree of eutrophication and the corresponding coverage of macrophytes (e.g. Echinochloa pyramidalis, Eichhornia crassipes, Hydrilla verticillata). Our data showed a high spatio-temporal variability of CH4 within the lagoons and between the two systems, with CH4 concentrations in surface waters ranging between 80 to 74,604 nmol L-1. The highest CH4 concentration values were observed in the eutrophic Ono lagoon that is covered by 80% of macrophytes, suggesting that lagoons dominated by macrophytes are significant sources of CH4 toward the atmosphere.

  18. Clostripain: Characterization of the active site

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kembhavi, Ashu A; Buttle, David J; Rauber, Peter; Barrett, Alan J

    1991-01-01

    ... + for stability and activity. Mg 2+ and Sr 2+ were ineffective. Rapid inactivation by diethylpyrocarbonate, reversed by hydroxylamine, indicated that histidine is essential for catalytic activity...

  19. Crystallographic B factor of critical residues at enzyme active site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海龙; 宋时英; 林政炯

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-seven sets of crystallographic enzyme data were selected from Protein Data Bank (PDB, 1995). The average temperature factors (B) of the critical residues at the active site and the whole molecule of those enzymes were calculated respectively. The statistical results showed that the critical residues at the active site of most of the enzymes had lower B factors than did the whole molecules, indicating that in the crystalline state the critical residues at the active site of the natural enzymes possess more stable conformation than do the whole molecules. The flexibility of the active site during the unfolding by denaturing was also discussed.

  20. Active site conformational dynamics in human uridine phosphorylase 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarmo P Roosild

    Full Text Available Uridine phosphorylase (UPP is a central enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzing the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose-1-phosphate. Human UPP activity has been a focus of cancer research due to its role in activating fluoropyrimidine nucleoside chemotherapeutic agents such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU and capecitabine. Additionally, specific molecular inhibitors of this enzyme have been found to raise endogenous uridine concentrations, which can produce a cytoprotective effect on normal tissues exposed to these drugs. Here we report the structure of hUPP1 bound to 5-FU at 2.3 A resolution. Analysis of this structure reveals new insights as to the conformational motions the enzyme undergoes in the course of substrate binding and catalysis. The dimeric enzyme is capable of a large hinge motion between its two domains, facilitating ligand exchange and explaining observed cooperativity between the two active sites in binding phosphate-bearing substrates. Further, a loop toward the back end of the uracil binding pocket is shown to flexibly adjust to the varying chemistry of different compounds through an "induced-fit" association mechanism that was not observed in earlier hUPP1 structures. The details surrounding these dynamic aspects of hUPP1 structure and function provide unexplored avenues to develop novel inhibitors of this protein with improved specificity and increased affinity. Given the recent emergence of new roles for uridine as a neuron protective compound in ischemia and degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, inhibitors of hUPP1 with greater efficacy, which are able to boost cellular uridine levels without adverse side-effects, may have a wide range of therapeutic applications.

  1. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  2. Low Mitochondrial DNA Diversity in an Ancient Population from China: Insight into Social Organization at the Fujia Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yu; Li, Chunxiang; Luan, Fengshi; Li, Zhenguang; Li, Hongjie; Cui, Yinqiu; Zhou, Hui; Malhi, Ripan S

    2015-01-01

    To gain insight into the social organization of a population associated with the Dawenkou period, we performed ancient DNA analysis of 18 individuals from human remains from the Fujia site in Shandong Province, China. Directly radiocarbon dated to 4800-4500 cal BP, the Fujia site is assumed to be associated with a transitional phase from matrilineal clans to patrilineal monogamous families. Our results reveal a low mitochondrial DNA diversity from the site and population. Combined with Y chromosome data, the pattern observed at the Fujia site is most consistent with a matrilineal community. The patterns also suggest that the bond of marriage was de-emphasized compared with the bonds of descent at Fujia.

  3. Predicting active site residue annotations in the Pfam database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn Robert D

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 5% of Pfam families are enzymatic, but only a small fraction of the sequences within these families ( Description We have created a large database of predicted active site residues. On comparing our active site predictions to those found in UniProtKB, Catalytic Site Atlas, PROSITE and MEROPS we find that we make many novel predictions. On investigating the small subset of predictions made by these databases that are not predicted by us, we found these sequences did not meet our strict criteria for prediction. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of our methodology and estimate that only 3% of our predicted sequences are false positives. Conclusion We have predicted 606110 active site residues, of which 94% are not found in UniProtKB, and have increased the active site annotations in Pfam by more than 200 fold. Although implemented for Pfam, the tool we have developed for transferring the data can be applied to any alignment with associated experimental active site data and is available for download. Our active site predictions are re-calculated at each Pfam release to ensure they are comprehensive and up to date. They provide one of the largest available databases of active site annotation.

  4. Diffusional correlations among multiple active sites in a single enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-04-07

    Simulations of the enzymatic dynamics of a model enzyme containing multiple substrate binding sites indicate the existence of diffusional correlations in the chemical reactivity of the active sites. A coarse-grain, particle-based, mesoscopic description of the system, comprising the enzyme, the substrate, the product and solvent, is constructed to study these effects. The reactive and non-reactive dynamics is followed using a hybrid scheme that combines molecular dynamics for the enzyme, substrate and product molecules with multiparticle collision dynamics for the solvent. It is found that the reactivity of an individual active site in the multiple-active-site enzyme is reduced substantially, and this effect is analyzed and attributed to diffusive competition for the substrate among the different active sites in the enzyme.

  5. Perspective: On the active site model in computational catalyst screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Karsten; Plaisance, Craig P.; Oberhofer, Harald; Andersen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    First-principles screening approaches exploiting energy trends in surface adsorption represent an unparalleled success story in recent computational catalysis research. Here we argue that our still limited understanding of the structure of active sites is one of the major bottlenecks towards an ever extended and reliable use of such computational screening for catalyst discovery. For low-index transition metal surfaces, the prevalently chosen high-symmetry (terrace and step) sites offered by the nominal bulk-truncated crystal lattice might be justified. For more complex surfaces and composite catalyst materials, computational screening studies will need to actively embrace a considerable uncertainty with respect to what truly are the active sites. By systematically exploring the space of possible active site motifs, such studies might eventually contribute towards a targeted design of optimized sites in future catalysts.

  6. Probability of solar panel clearing events at the Insight landing sites (Mars) from a dust devil track survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, D.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2015-10-01

    The InSight robotic lander is scheduled to land on Mars in September 2016. InSight was designed to perform the first comprehensive surface-based geophysical investigation of Mars [1]. Passage of vortices may have a number of influences on the geophysical measurements to be made by InSight. Seismic data could be influenced by dust devils and vortices via several mechanisms such as loading of the elastic ground by a surface pressure field which causes a local tilt [e.g. 2]. In addition, the power supply of the InSight instruments is provided by solar arrays. Solar-powered missions on Mars like the Sojourner rover in 1997 were affected by a decline in electrical power output by 0.2-0.3 %per day caused by steadily dust deposition on its horizontal solar panel [3]. The solar-powered Mars Exploration Rovers (MERs) Spirit and Opportunity experienced similar dust deposition rates [4] which led to steady power decrease over time endangering longer rover operation times. The much longer operation times of the rovers were made possible by unanticipated 'dust clearing events' of the solar arrays by wind gust or dust devils [5]. Recent studies imply that dust devils are primarily responsible for those recurrent 'dust clearing events' [6]. In this study we investigate the potential frequency of intense dust devil occurrences at the InSight landing site regions, which are able to remove dust from its solar panels. We analyzed newly formed dust devil tracks within a given time span using multi-temporal HiRISE image data covering the same surface area. Based on these measurements we will give encounter rate predictions of intense (high tangential speed and high pressure drop) dust devils with the InSight lander.

  7. The Surface Groups and Active Site of Fibrous Mineral Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Fa-qin; WAN Pu; FENG Qi-ming; SONG Gong-bao; PENG Tong-jiang; LI Ping; LI Guo-wu

    2004-01-01

    The exposed and transformed groups of fibrous brucite,wollastonite,chrysotile asbestos,sepiolite,palygorskite,clinoptilolite,crocidolite and diatomaceous earth mineral materials are analyzed by IR spectra after acid and alikali etching,strong mechanical and polarity molecular interaction.The results show the active sites concentrate on the ends in stick mineral materials and on the defect or hole edge in pipe mineral materials.The inside active site of mineral materials plays a main role in small molecular substance.The shape of minerals influence their distribution and density of active site.The strong mechanical impulsion and weak chemical force change the active site feature of minerals,the powder process enables minerals exposed more surface group and more combined types.The surface processing with the small polarity molecular or the brand of middle molecular may produce ionation and new coordinate bond,and change the active properties and level of original mineral materials.

  8. Design Insights and Inspiration from the Tate: What Museum Web Sites Can Offer Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley-Huff, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    There are many similarities between museums and academic libraries as public service institutions. This article is an examination of museum Web site practices and concepts that might also be transferable to academic library Web sites. It explores the digital manifestations of design and information presentation, user engagement, interactivity, and…

  9. Sites of regulated phosphorylation that control K-Cl cotransporter activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Jesse; Maksimova, Yelena D; Tanis, Jessica E; Stone, Kathryn L; Hodson, Caleb A; Zhang, Junhui; Risinger, Mary; Pan, Weijun; Wu, Dianqing; Colangelo, Christopher M; Forbush, Biff; Joiner, Clinton H; Gulcicek, Erol E; Gallagher, Patrick G; Lifton, Richard P

    2009-08-07

    Modulation of intracellular chloride concentration ([Cl(-)](i)) plays a fundamental role in cell volume regulation and neuronal response to GABA. Cl(-) exit via K-Cl cotransporters (KCCs) is a major determinant of [Cl(-)](I); however, mechanisms governing KCC activities are poorly understood. We identified two sites in KCC3 that are rapidly dephosphorylated in hypotonic conditions in cultured cells and human red blood cells in parallel with increased transport activity. Alanine substitutions at these sites result in constitutively active cotransport. These sites are highly phosphorylated in plasma membrane KCC3 in isotonic conditions, suggesting that dephosphorylation increases KCC3's intrinsic transport activity. Reduction of WNK1 expression via RNA interference reduces phosphorylation at these sites. Homologous sites are phosphorylated in all human KCCs. KCC2 is partially phosphorylated in neonatal mouse brain and dephosphorylated in parallel with KCC2 activation. These findings provide insight into regulation of [Cl(-)](i) and have implications for control of cell volume and neuronal function.

  10. Resolving the Structure of Active Sites on Platinum Catalytic Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Lan Yun; Barnard, Amanda S.; Gontard, Lionel Cervera

    2010-01-01

    Accurate understanding of the structure of active sites is fundamentally important in predicting catalytic properties of heterogeneous nanocatalysts. We present an accurate determination of both experimental and theoretical atomic structures of surface monatomic steps on industrial platinum nanop...

  11. Physical activity and cancer risk: dose-response and cancer, all sites and site-specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thune, I; Furberg, A S

    2001-06-01

    The association between physical activity and overall and site-specific cancer risk is elaborated in relation to whether any observed dose-response association between physical activity and cancer can be interpreted in terms of how much physical activity (type, intensity, duration, frequency) is needed to influence site- and gender-specific cancer risk. Observational studies were reviewed that have examined the independent effect of the volume of occupational physical activity (OPA) and/or leisure time physical activity (LPA) on overall and site-specific cancer risk. The evidence of cohort and case-control studies suggests that both leisure time and occupational physical activity protect against overall cancer risk, with a graded dose-response association suggested in both sexes. Confounding effects such as diet, body weight, and parity are often included as a covariate in the analyses, with little influence on the observed associations. A crude graded inverse dose-response association was observed between physical activity and colon cancer in 48 studies including 40,674 colon/colorectal cancer cases for both sexes. A dose-response effect of physical activity on colon cancer risk was especially observed, when participation in activities of at least moderate activity (>4.5 MET) and demonstrated by activities expressed as MET-hours per week. An observed inverse association with a dose-response relationship between physical activity and breast cancer was also identified in the majority of the 41 studies including 108,031 breast cancer cases. The dose-response relationship was in particular observed in case-control studies and supported by observations in cohort studies when participation in activities of at least moderate activity (>4.5 MET) and demonstrated by activities expressed by MET-hours per week. This association between physical activity and breast cancer risk is possibly dependent on age at exposure, age at diagnosis, menopausal status and other effect

  12. Landscapes, depositional environments and human occupation at Middle Paleolithic open-air sites in the southern Levant, with new insights from Nesher Ramla, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidner, Yossi; Frumkin, Amos; Friesem, David; Tsatskin, Alexander; Shahack-Gross, Ruth

    2016-04-01

    Middle Paleolithic human occupation in the Levant (250-50 ka ago) has been recorded in roofed (cave and rockshelter) and open-air sites. Research at these different types of sites yielded different perspectives on the Middle Paleolithic human behavior and evolution. Until recently, open-air Middle Paleolithic sites in the Levant were found in three major sedimentary environments: fluvial, lake-margin and spring. Here we describe a unique depositional environment and formation processes at the recently discovered open-air site of Nesher Ramla (Israel) and discuss their contribution to understanding site formation processes in open-air sites in the Levant. The site is 8-m-thick Middle Paleolithic sequence (OSL dated to 170-80 ka) that is located in a karst sinkhole formed by gravitational deformation and sagging into underground voids. The sedimentary sequence was shaped by gravitational collapse, cyclic colluviation of soil and gravel into the depression, waterlogging, in situ pedogenesis and human occupation. Original bedding and combustion features are well-preserved in the Lower archaeological sequence, a rare occurrence in comparison to other open-air archaeological sites. This phenomenon coincides with episodes of fast sedimentation/burial, which also allowed better preservation of microscopic remains such as ash. The Upper archaeological sequence does not exhibit bedding or preservation of ash, despite presence of heat-affected lithic artifacts, which makes it similar to other open-air sites in the Levant. We suggest that rate of burial is the major factor that caused the difference between the Upper and Lower sequences. The differences in the burial rate may be connected to environmental and vegetation changes at the end of MIS 6. We also identified an interplay between sediment in-wash and density of human activity remains, i.e. during episodes of low natural sediment input the density of artifacts is higher relative to episodes with high rate of sediment in

  13. Insights to repository performance through study of a nuclear test site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D K; Kersting, A B; Thompson, J L; Finnegan, D L

    2000-07-12

    Underground nuclear test sites offer an unprecedented opportunity to evaluate processes relevant to high-level waste repository performance in the absence of engineered barriers. Radionuclide migration programs at the Nevada Test Site represent a twenty-five year systematic investigation of the diverse radiologic source terms residual from weapons testing and the evolution of the hydrologic source term which comprises those radionuclides dissolved in or otherwise available for transport by groundwater. The Nevada Test Site shares actinide source terms, correlative geology, an identical tectonic setting, similar climate, and a thick unsaturated zone with the adjacent proposed Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository and provides a natural laboratory to assess long-term radionuclide transport in the near field. Analog studies may ultimately help validate predictions of radionuclide transport from the Yucca Mountain repository.

  14. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide.

  15. Kv3 channel assembly, trafficking and activity are regulated by zinc through different binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuanzheng; Barry, Joshua; Gu, Chen

    2013-05-15

    Zinc, a divalent heavy metal ion and an essential mineral for life, regulates synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability via ion channels. However, its binding sites and regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we report that Kv3 channel assembly, localization and activity are regulated by zinc through different binding sites. Local perfusion of zinc reversibly reduced spiking frequency of cultured neurons most likely by suppressing Kv3 channels. Indeed, zinc inhibited Kv3.1 channel activity and slowed activation kinetics, independent of its site in the N-terminal T1 domain. Biochemical assays surprisingly identified a novel zinc-binding site in the Kv3.1 C-terminus, critical for channel activity and axonal targeting, but not for the zinc inhibition. Finally, mutagenesis revealed an important role of the junction between the first transmembrane (TM) segment and the first extracellular loop in sensing zinc. Its mutant enabled fast spiking with relative resistance to the zinc inhibition. Therefore, our studies provide novel mechanistic insights into the multifaceted regulation of Kv3 channel activity and localization by divalent heavy metal ions.

  16. The interactive authority of brand web sites: a new tool provides new insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorveld, H.; Neijens, P.; Smit, E.

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to develop a new coding instrument to examine the interactivity of the Web sites of brands. A new instrument contains 47 interactive functions and is directly linked to theory on interactivity. To test the applicability of the instrument, the study investigates the interactivity of 6

  17. Authigenic Carbonate Formation on the Peru Margin; New Insights from IODP Site 1230

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullajintakam, S.; Naehr, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid seepage of reduced organic compounds such as methane impacts the geology and biology of the seabed by inducing complex, microbially mediated biogeochemical processes. Authigenic carbonates serve as one of the few permanent records of these of dynamic biogeochemical interactions that involve methanogenesis, methanotrophy, sulfate reduction and carbonate precipitation. Meister et al. (2007) investigated deep-sea dolomite formation at Sites 1227-1229 on the Peru margin, where dolomite precipitation occurs in association with organic carbon-rich continental margin sediments. Geochemical and petrographic studies indicated episodic dolomite precipitation at a dynamic sulfate methane transition zone (SMTZ). Variations in δ13C values of these dolomites between +15‰ and -15‰ were attributed to non-steady state conditions as a result of the upward and downward migration of the SMTZ. Our study aims to better understand the biogeochemical processes associated with authigenic carbonate precipitation in this dynamic deep-sea setting. We focused our efforts on IODP Site 1230, which is a gas-hydrate-bearing site that shows sulphate consumption within the uppermost 10 m below the seafloor as well as high methane production. Using a multi proxy approach, we combined X-ray diffraction, stable isotope geochemistry, and trace metal analysis of authigenic carbonates to elucidate conditions for authigenic carbonate formation. Results from Site 1230 are compared to Sites 1227 and 1229, which lacks gas hydrates and is characterized by high pore water sulfate and low methane concentrations. This study contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of authigenic carbonate formation and associated biogeochemical processes in continental margin sediments. Meister, P., Mckenzie, J. A., Vasconcelos, C., Bernasconi, S., Frank, M., Gutjhar, M. and SCHRAG, D. P. (2007), Dolomite formation in the dynamic deep biosphere: results from the Peru Margin. Sedimentology, 54: 1007-1032.

  18. Human Glycinamide Ribonucleotide Transformylase: Active Site Mutants as Mechanistic Probes†

    OpenAIRE

    Manieri, Wanda; Moore, Molly E.; Soellner, Matthew B.; Tsang, Pearl; Caperelli, Carol A.

    2007-01-01

    Human glycinamide ribonucleotide transformylase (GART) (EC2.1.2.2) is a validated target for cancer chemotherapy, but mechanistic studies of this therapeutically important enzyme are limited. Site-directed mutagenesis, initial velocity studies, pH-rate studies, and substrate binding studies have been employed to probe the role of the strictly conserved active site residues, N106, H108, D144, and the semi-conserved K170 in substrate binding and catalysis. Only two conservative substitutions, N...

  19. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  20. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  1. De novo active sites for resurrected Precambrian enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Valeria A.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Candel, Adela M.; Krüger, Dennis M.; Pantoja-Uceda, David; Ortega-Muñoz, Mariano; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco; Gaucher, Eric A.; Kamerlin, Shina C. L.; Bruix, Marta; Gavira, Jose A.; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2017-07-01

    Protein engineering studies often suggest the emergence of completely new enzyme functionalities to be highly improbable. However, enzymes likely catalysed many different reactions already in the last universal common ancestor. Mechanisms for the emergence of completely new active sites must therefore either plausibly exist or at least have existed at the primordial protein stage. Here, we use resurrected Precambrian proteins as scaffolds for protein engineering and demonstrate that a new active site can be generated through a single hydrophobic-to-ionizable amino acid replacement that generates a partially buried group with perturbed physico-chemical properties. We provide experimental and computational evidence that conformational flexibility can assist the emergence and subsequent evolution of new active sites by improving substrate and transition-state binding, through the sampling of many potentially productive conformations. Our results suggest a mechanism for the emergence of primordial enzymes and highlight the potential of ancestral reconstruction as a tool for protein engineering.

  2. Insights into correlation between satellite infrared information and fault activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Tectonic activities are accompanied with material movement and energy transfer, which definitely change the state of thermal radiation on the ground. Thus it is possible to infer present-day tectonic activities based on variations of the thermal radiation state on the ground. The received satellite infrared information is, however, likely influenced by many kinds of factors. Therefore, the first problem that needs to be solved is to extract information on tectonic activities and eliminate effects of external (non-tectonic) factors. In this study, we firstly make a review of the current studies on this subject, and then present the technical approach and our research goal.Using the data of 20 years from the infrared band of the satellite of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the method we have developed, we investigate fault activities in western China. The results show that the areas with high residual values of land surface brightness temperature (LSBT), which is presumably related to faultings in space, accord usually with the locations of followed major earthquakes. The times of their value growing are also roughly consistent with the beginning of active periods of earthquakes.The low frequency component fields of the LSBT, acquired from wavelet analysis, exhibit well the spatial distributions of active faults.The "heat penetrability index" (HPI) related with enhancement of subsurface thermal information has been expressed well for the backgrounds of accelerated tectonic motions, and some correlations exist between HPI and the local faulting and seismicity. This study provides a new approach to study temporal-spatial evolution of recent activities of faults and their interactions.

  3. Oxygen reduction and evolution at single-metal active sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calle-Vallejo, F.; Martínez, J.I.; García Lastra, Juan Maria

    2013-01-01

    of functionalized graphitic materials and gas-phase porphyrins with late transition metals. We find that both kinds of materials follow approximately the same activity trends, and active sites with transition metals from groups 7 to 9 may be good ORR and OER electrocatalysts. However, spin analyses show more...... overpotentials and is made of precious materials. A possible solution is the use of non-noble electrocatalysts with single-metal active sites. Here, on the basis of DFT calculations of adsorbed intermediates and a thermodynamic analysis, we compare the oxygen reduction (ORR) and evolution (OER) activities...... flexibility in the possible oxidation states of the metal atoms in solid electrocatalysts, while in porphyrins they must be +2. These observations reveal that the catalytic activity of these materials is mainly due to nearest-neighbor interactions. Based on this, we propose that this class of electrocatalysts...

  4. Interferon Gamma Release Assays in active Tuberculosis: new medical insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Pierdomenico

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Since first presentation, Interferon γ Release Assays (IGRAs have had basic and wide application to LTBI, in accordance with international consensus and CDC recommendations, leaving their use in active TB to the field of study and research.We reviewed the results of 633 patients investigated from 2004 to 2008 targeting active TB, with the objective to highlight immunological data supporting test performances.We evaluated Quantiferon TB Gold (1st generation IGRA kit in association to Culture (MGIT 960 and Lowenstein Jensen and PCR (Probetec-ET having the positivity of culture plus clinical diagnosis as the standard true value to compare. QTB Gold was studied in 69 TB positive patients (42 pulmonary and 27 extra-pulmonary, with Sensitivity, Specificity, PPV and NPV average to 61.8%, 94.5%, 54.3% and 95.9% respectively, after indeterminate results discharging. Significant statistical differences didn’t emerge between pulmonary and extra-pulmonary infections (CI 95%.The overall indeterminate ratio arose up to 20.3% in patients with active TB vs 2.7% of global population (p<0.001. In 22% of patients with active pulmonary disease, IGRA conversed to positivity after 15 days in replicated tests, in spite of current treatment. 4 patients, with pulmonary TB and Quantiferon persistent negativities, underwent 18 months follow-up as not respondent although SIRE phenotypic susceptibilities and enough DOT compliance. Molecular DST documented hetero resistance for rpoB (MUT 1, MUT 3 plus wild lines and katG (MUT 1 plus wild in association to lack of inhA wild lines (Genotype MTBDR plus, Hain Lifescience. These reports suggest a mutational relationship between Rv3874 – 3875 cassette, encoding ESAT-6 / CFP-10, and rpoB, katG, inhA genes plausibly implying weak or absent selective clonal Th 1 activation to IGRA antigens. Our data seem to point out: 1 positive results are able to match true active TB in less than 50% of patients; 2 negative results could leave

  5. Cellular automaton rules conserving the number of active sites

    CERN Document Server

    Boccara, N; Boccara, Nino; Fuks, Henryk

    1997-01-01

    This paper shows how to determine all the unidimensional two-state cellular automaton rules of a given number of inputs which conserve the number of active sites. These rules have to satisfy a necessary and sufficient condition. If the active sites are viewed as cells occupied by identical particles, these cellular automaton rules represent evolution operators of systems of identical interacting particles whose total number is conserved. Some of these rules, which allow motion in both directions, mimic ensembles of one-dimensional pseudo-random walkers. The corresponding stochastic processes are, however, not Gaussian.

  6. Targeting Bax interaction sites reveals that only homo-oligomerization sites are essential for its activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, R; Tong, J-S; Li, H; Yue, B; Zou, F; Yu, J; Zhang, L

    2013-01-01

    Bax is a proapoptotic Bcl-2 family member that has a central role in the initiation of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. However, the mechanism of Bax activation during apoptosis remains unsettled. It is believed that the activation of Bax is mediated by either dissociation from prosurvival Bcl-2 family members, or direct association with BH3-only members. Several interaction sites on Bax that mediate its interactions with other Bcl-2 family members, as well as its proapoptotic activity, have been identified in previous studies by other groups. To rigorously investigate the functional role of these interaction sites, we knocked in their respective mutants using HCT116 colon cancer cells, in which apoptosis induced by several stimuli is strictly Bax-dependent. Bax-mediated apoptosis was intact upon knock-in (KI) of K21E and D33A, which were shown to block the interaction of Bax with BH3-only activators. Apoptosis was partially reduced by KI of D68R, which impairs the interaction of Bax with prosurvival members, and S184V, a constitutively mitochondria-targeting mutant. In contrast, apoptosis was largely suppressed by KI of L70A/D71A, which blocks homo-oligomerization of Bax and its binding to prosurvival Bcl-2 family proteins. Collectively, our results suggest that the activation of endogenous Bax in HCT116 cells is dependent on its homo-oligomerization sites, but not those previously shown to interact with BH3-only activators or prosurvival proteins only. We therefore postulate that critical interaction sites yet to be identified, or mechanisms other than protein-protein interactions, need to be pursued to delineate the mechanism of Bax activation during apoptosis. PMID:23392123

  7. The coproporphyrin ferrochelatase of Staphylococcus aureus : mechanistic insights into a regulatory iron binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Charlie; Reid, J D; Shepherd, Mark

    2017-09-01

    The majority of characterised ferrochelatase enzymes catalyse the final step of classical haem synthesis, inserting ferrous iron into protoporphyrin IX. However, for the recently-discovered coproporphyrin-dependent pathway, ferrochelatase catalyses the penultimate reaction where ferrous iron is inserted into coproporphyrin III. Ferrochelatase enzymes from the bacterial phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria have previously been shown to insert iron into coproporphyrin, and those from Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus are known to be inhibited by elevated iron concentrations. The work herein reports a Km (coproporphyrin III) for S. aureus ferrochelatase of 1.5 µM and it is shown that elevating the iron concentration increases the Km for coproporphyrin III, providing a potential explanation for the observed iron-mediated substrate inhibition. Together, structural modelling, site-directed mutagenesis, and kinetic analyses confirm residue Glu271 as being essential for the binding of iron to the inhibitory regulatory site on S. aureus ferrochelatase, providing a molecular explanation for the observed substrate inhibition patterns. This work therefore has implications for how haem biosynthesis in S. aureus is regulated by iron availability. ©2017 The Author(s).

  8. Insights into Animal and Plant Lectins with Antimicrobial Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Oliveira Dias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lectins are multivalent proteins with the ability to recognize and bind diverse carbohydrate structures. The glyco -binding and diverse molecular structures observed in these protein classes make them a large and heterogeneous group with a wide range of biological activities in microorganisms, animals and plants. Lectins from plants and animals are commonly used in direct defense against pathogens and in immune regulation. This review focuses on sources of animal and plant lectins, describing their functional classification and tridimensional structures, relating these properties with biotechnological purposes, including antimicrobial activities. In summary, this work focuses on structural-functional elucidation of diverse lectin groups, shedding some light on host-pathogen interactions; it also examines their emergence as biotechnological tools through gene manipulation and development of new drugs.

  9. Polymorphisms in miRNA binding site: new insight into small cell lung cancer susceptibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-yu LIU; Jun CHEN

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause in cancer-related deaths with less than 15% five-year survival worldwide.Small cell lung cancer (SCLC),which accounts for about 15%-18% of lung cancer,carries the worst prognosis within the lung cancer patients.SCLC differs from other lung cancers,so called non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs),in the specifically clinical and biologic characteristics.It exhibits aggressive behavior,with rapid growth,early spread to distant sites.Although exquisite sensitive to chemotherapy and radiation,SCLC recurs rapidly with only 5% of patients surviving five years and frequent association with distinct paraneoplastic syndromes[1].

  10. Active site modeling in copper azurin molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizzuti, B; Swart, M; Sportelli, L; Guzzi, R

    2004-01-01

    Active site modeling in molecular dynamics simulations is investigated for the reduced state of copper azurin. Five simulation runs (5 ns each) were performed at room temperature to study the consequences of a mixed electrostatic/constrained modeling for the coordination between the metal and the po

  11. The nature of the active site in heterogeneous metal catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Bligaard, Thomas; Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk

    2008-01-01

    This tutorial review, of relevance for the surface science and heterogeneous catalysis communities, provides a molecular-level discussion of the nature of the active sites in metal catalysis. Fundamental concepts such as "Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi relations'' and "volcano curves'' are introduced...

  12. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  13. Functional and catalytic active sites prediction and docking analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioinformatics

    2015-07-01

    Jul 1, 2015 ... industrially important azo dyes such as the molecular weight, molecular ... et al., 2010). The software possesses structure-based method to predict active sites in proteins based on a Difference of Gaussian (DoG) approach ...

  14. Metaproteomics provides functional insight into activated sludge wastewater treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Wilmes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Through identification of highly expressed proteins from a mixed culture activated sludge system this study provides functional evidence of microbial transformations important for enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor was successfully operated for different levels of EBPR, removing around 25, 40 and 55 mg/l P. The microbial communities were dominated by the uncultured polyphosphate-accumulating organism "Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis". When EBPR failed, the sludge was dominated by tetrad-forming alpha-Proteobacteria. Representative and reproducible 2D gel protein separations were obtained for all sludge samples. 638 protein spots were matched across gels generated from the phosphate removing sludges. 111 of these were excised and 46 proteins were identified using recently available sludge metagenomic sequences. Many of these closely match proteins from "Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis" and could be directly linked to the EBPR process. They included enzymes involved in energy generation, polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, glycogen synthesis, glyoxylate/TCA cycle, fatty acid beta oxidation, fatty acid synthesis and phosphate transport. Several proteins involved in cellular stress response were detected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Importantly, this study provides direct evidence linking the metabolic activities of "Accumulibacter" to the chemical transformations observed in EBPR. Finally, the results are discussed in relation to current EBPR metabolic models.

  15. Metaproteomics Provides Functional Insight into Activated Sludge Wastewater Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmes, Paul; Wexler, Margaret; Bond, Philip L.

    2008-01-01

    Background Through identification of highly expressed proteins from a mixed culture activated sludge system this study provides functional evidence of microbial transformations important for enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). Methodology/Principal Findings A laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor was successfully operated for different levels of EBPR, removing around 25, 40 and 55 mg/l P. The microbial communities were dominated by the uncultured polyphosphate-accumulating organism “Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis”. When EBPR failed, the sludge was dominated by tetrad-forming α-Proteobacteria. Representative and reproducible 2D gel protein separations were obtained for all sludge samples. 638 protein spots were matched across gels generated from the phosphate removing sludges. 111 of these were excised and 46 proteins were identified using recently available sludge metagenomic sequences. Many of these closely match proteins from “Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis” and could be directly linked to the EBPR process. They included enzymes involved in energy generation, polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, glycogen synthesis, glyoxylate/TCA cycle, fatty acid β oxidation, fatty acid synthesis and phosphate transport. Several proteins involved in cellular stress response were detected. Conclusions/Significance Importantly, this study provides direct evidence linking the metabolic activities of “Accumulibacter” to the chemical transformations observed in EBPR. Finally, the results are discussed in relation to current EBPR metabolic models. PMID:18392150

  16. Physical activity, stress reduction, and mood: insight into immunological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Mark; Endrighi, Romano; Poole, Lydia

    2012-01-01

    Psychosocial factors, such as chronic mental stress and mood, are recognized as an important predictor of longevity and wellbeing. In particular, depression is independently associated with cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, and is often comorbid with chronic diseases that can worsen their associated health outcomes. Regular exercise is thought to be associated with stress reduction and better mood, which may partly mediate associations between depression, stress, and health outcomes. The underlying mechanisms for the positive effects of exercise on wellbeing remain poorly understood. In this overview we examine epidemiological evidence for an association between physical activity and mental health. We then describe the exercise withdrawal paradigm as an experimental protocol to study mechanisms linking exercise, mood, and stress. In particular we will discuss the potential role of the inflammatory response as a central mechanism.

  17. Modulation of RNase E activity by alternative RNA binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daeyoung Kim

    Full Text Available Endoribonuclease E (RNase E affects the composition and balance of the RNA population in Escherichia coli via degradation and processing of RNAs. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effects of an RNA binding site between amino acid residues 25 and 36 (24LYDLDIESPGHEQK37 of RNase E. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the N-terminal catalytic domain of RNase E (N-Rne that was UV crosslinked with a 5'-32P-end-labeled, 13-nt oligoribonucleotide (p-BR13 containing the RNase E cleavage site of RNA I revealed that two amino acid residues, Y25 and Q36, were bound to the cytosine and adenine of BR13, respectively. Based on these results, the Y25A N-Rne mutant was constructed, and was found to be hypoactive in comparison to wild-type and hyperactive Q36R mutant proteins. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that Y25A and Q36R mutations abolished the RNA binding to the uncompetitive inhibition site of RNase E. The Y25A mutation increased the RNA binding to the multimer formation interface between amino acid residues 427 and 433 (427LIEEEALK433, whereas the Q36R mutation enhanced the RNA binding to the catalytic site of the enzyme (65HGFLPL*K71. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the stable RNA-protein complex formation was positively correlated with the extent of RNA binding to the catalytic site and ribonucleolytic activity of the N-Rne proteins. These mutations exerted similar effects on the ribonucleolytic activity of the full-length RNase E in vivo. Our findings indicate that RNase E has two alternative RNA binding sites for modulating RNA binding to the catalytic site and the formation of a functional catalytic unit.

  18. Role of active site rigidity in activity: MD simulation and fluorescence study on a lipase mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Zahid Kamal

    Full Text Available Relationship between stability and activity of enzymes is maintained by underlying conformational flexibility. In thermophilic enzymes, a decrease in flexibility causes low enzyme activity while in less stable proteins such as mesophiles and psychrophiles, an increase in flexibility is associated with enhanced enzyme activity. Recently, we identified a mutant of a lipase whose stability and activity were enhanced simultaneously. In this work, we probed the conformational dynamics of the mutant and the wild type lipase, particularly flexibility of their active site using molecular dynamic simulations and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. In contrast to the earlier observations, our data show that active site of the mutant is more rigid than wild type enzyme. Further investigation suggests that this lipase needs minimal reorganization/flexibility of active site residues during its catalytic cycle. Molecular dynamic simulations suggest that catalytically competent active site geometry of the mutant is relatively more preserved than wild type lipase, which might have led to its higher enzyme activity. Our study implies that widely accepted positive correlation between conformation flexibility and enzyme activity need not be stringent and draws attention to the possibility that high enzyme activity can still be accomplished in a rigid active site and stable protein structures. This finding has a significant implication towards better understanding of involvement of dynamic motions in enzyme catalysis and enzyme engineering through mutations in active site.

  19. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  20. Kinematics Card Sort Activity: Insight into Students' Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryhill, Erin; Herrington, Deborah; Oliver, Keith

    2016-12-01

    Kinematics is a topic students are unknowingly aware of well before entering the physics classroom. Students observe motion on a daily basis. They are constantly interpreting and making sense of their observations, unintentionally building their own understanding of kinematics before receiving any formal instruction. Unfortunately, when students take their prior conceptions to understand a new situation, they often do so in a way that inaccurately connects their learning. We were motivated to identify strategies to help our students make accurate connections to their prior knowledge and understand kinematics at a deeper level. To do this, we integrated a formative assessment card sort into a kinematic graphing unit within an introductory high school physics course. Throughout the activities, we required students to document and reflect upon their thinking. This allowed their learning to build upon their own previously held conceptual understanding, which provided an avenue for cognitive growth. By taking a more direct approach to eliciting student reasoning, we hoped to improve student learning and guide our assessment of their learning.

  1. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-06

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions.

  2. The democratization of gene editing: Insights from site-specific cleavage and double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasin, Maria; Haber, James E

    2016-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are dangerous lesions that if not properly repaired can lead to genomic change or cell death. Organisms have developed several pathways and have many factors devoted to repairing DSBs, which broadly occurs by homologous recombination, which relies on an identical or homologous sequence to template repair, or nonhomologous end-joining. Much of our understanding of these repair mechanisms has come from the study of induced DNA cleavage by site-specific endonucleases. In addition to their biological role, these cellular pathways can be co-opted for gene editing to study gene function or for gene therapy or other applications. While the first gene editing experiments were done more than 20 years ago, the recent discovery of RNA-guided endonucleases has simplified approaches developed over the years to make gene editing an approach that is available to the entire biomedical research community. Here, we review DSB repair mechanisms and site-specific cleavage systems that have provided insight into these mechanisms and led to the current gene editing revolution.

  3. Multiphase flow above explosion sites in debris-filled volcanic vents: Insights from analogue experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Pierre-Simon; White, James D. L.; Zimanowski, Bernd; Büttner, Ralf

    2008-11-01

    Discrete explosive bursts are known from many volcanic eruptions. In maar-diatreme eruptions, they have occurred in debris-filled volcanic vents when magma interacted with groundwater, implying that material mobilized by such explosions passed through the overlying and enclosing debris to reach the surface. Although other studies have addressed the form and characteristics of craters formed by discrete explosions in unconsolidated material, no details are available regarding the structure of the disturbed debris between the explosion site and the surface. Field studies of diatreme deposits reveal cross-cutting, steep-sided zones of non-bedded volcaniclastic material that have been inferred to result from sedimentation of material transported by "debris jets" driven by explosions. In order to determine the general processes and deposit geometry resulting from discrete, explosive injections of entrained particles through a particulate host, we ran a series of analogue experiments. Specific volumes of compressed (0.5-2.5 MPa) air were released in bursts that drove gas-particle dispersions through a granular host. The air expanded into and entrained coloured particles in a small crucible before moving upward into the host (white particles). Each burst drove into the host an expanding cavity containing air and coloured particles. Total duration of each run, recorded with high-speed video, was approximately 0.5-1 s. The coloured beads sedimented into the transient cavity. This same behaviour was observed even in runs where there was no breaching of the surface, and no coloured beads ejected. A steep-sided body of coloured beads was left that is similar to the cross-cutting pipes observed in deposits filling real volcanic vents, in which cavity collapse can result not only from gas escape through a granular host as in the experiments, but also through condensation of water vapour. A key conclusion from these experiments is that the geometry of cross-cutting volcaniclastic

  4. Studies on the biotin-binding site of avidin. Tryptophan residues involved in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, G; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1988-01-01

    Egg-white avidin was modified with the tryptophan-specific reagent 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl bromide. The complete loss of biotin-binding activity was achieved upon modification of an average of one tryptophan residue per avidin subunit. The identity of the modified residues was determined by isolating the relevant tryptic and chymotryptic peptides from CNBr-cleaved avidin fragments. The results demonstrate that Trp-70 and Trp-110 are modified in approximately equivalent proportions. It is believed that these residues are located in the active site of avidin and take part in the binding of biotin. PMID:3355517

  5. Studies on the biotin-binding site of avidin. Tryptophan residues involved in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, G; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1988-02-15

    Egg-white avidin was modified with the tryptophan-specific reagent 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl bromide. The complete loss of biotin-binding activity was achieved upon modification of an average of one tryptophan residue per avidin subunit. The identity of the modified residues was determined by isolating the relevant tryptic and chymotryptic peptides from CNBr-cleaved avidin fragments. The results demonstrate that Trp-70 and Trp-110 are modified in approximately equivalent proportions. It is believed that these residues are located in the active site of avidin and take part in the binding of biotin.

  6. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  7. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V., E-mail: chern@ns.kinetics.nsc.ru [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Institutskaya 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Physics Department, Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Polshchitsin, Alexey A. [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Institutskaya 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); JSC “VECTOR-BEST”, PO BOX 492, Novosibirsk 630117 (Russian Federation); Yakovleva, Galina E. [JSC “VECTOR-BEST”, PO BOX 492, Novosibirsk 630117 (Russian Federation); Maltsev, Valeri P. [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Institutskaya 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Physics Department, Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Department of Preventive Medicine, Novosibirsk State Medical University, Krasny Prospect 52, 630091 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  8. HDAC Inhibitors without an Active Site Zn2+-Binding Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vickers, Chris J.; Olsen, Christian Adam; Leman, Luke J.

    2012-01-01

    Natural and synthetic histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors generally derive their strong binding affinity and high potency from a key functional group that binds to the Zn2+ ion within the enzyme active site. However, this feature is also thought to carry the potential liability of undesirable off......-target interactions with other metalloenzymes. As a step toward mitigating this issue, here, we describe the design, synthesis, and structure−activity characterizations of cyclic α3β-tetrapeptide HDAC inhibitors that lack the presumed indispensable Zn2+-binding group. The lead compounds (e.g., 15 and 26) display good...

  9. Seismic activity parameters of the Finnish potential repository sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saari, J. [Fortum Engineering Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    2000-10-01

    Posiva Oy has started a project for estimating the possible earthquake induced rock movements on the deposition holes containing canisters of spent nuclear fuel. These estimates will be made for the four investigation sites, Romuvaara, Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Haestholmen. This study deals with the current and future seismicity associated with the above mentioned sites. Seismic belts that participate the seismic behaviour of the studied sites have been identified and the magnitude-frequency distributions of these belts have been estimated. The seismic activity parameters of the sites have been deduced from the characteristics of the seismic belts in order to forecast the seismicity during the next 100,000 years. The report discusses the possible earthquakes induced by future glaciation. The seismic interpretation seems to indicate that the previous postglacial faults in Finnish Lapland have been generated in compressional environment. The orientation of the rather uniform compression has been NW-SE, which coincide with the current stress field. It seems that, although the impact of postglacial crustal rebound must have been significant, the impact of plate tectonics has been dominant. A major assumption of this study has been that future seismicity will generally resemble the current seismicity. However, when the postglacial seismicity is concerned, the magnitude-frequency distribution is likely different and the expected maximum magnitude will be higher. Maximum magnitudes of future postglacial earthquakes have been approximated by strain release examinations. Seismicity has been examined within the framework of the lineament maps, in order to associate the future significant earthquakes with active fault zones in the vicinity of the potential repository sites. (orig.)

  10. Insight into the Strong Antioxidant Activity of Deinoxanthin, a Unique Carotenoid in Deinococcus Radiodurans

    OpenAIRE

    Hong-Fang Ji

    2010-01-01

    Deinoxanthin (DX) is a unique carotenoid synthesized by Deinococcus radiodurans, one of the most radioresistant organisms known. In comparison with other carotenoids, DX was proven to exhibit significantly stronger reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging activity, which plays an important role in the radioresistance of D. radiodurans. In this work, to gain deeper insights into the strong antioxidant activity of DX, the parameters characterizing ROS-scavenging potential were calculated by mea...

  11. In Situ Probing of the Active Site Geometry of Ultrathin Nanowires for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiqing; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M; Crooks, Richard M; Adzic, Radoslav R; Liu, Ping; Wong, Stanislaus S

    2015-10-07

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (∼2 nm) core-shell Pt∼Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shown to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu∼Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Hence, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.

  12. Active serine involved in the stabilization of the active site loop in the Humicola lanuginosa lipase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.j.; Svendsen, A.; Langberg, H.;

    1998-01-01

    reveal that the hinges of the active site lid are more flexible in the wild-type Hll than in S146A. In contrast, larger fluctuations are observed in the middle region of the active site loop in S 146A than in Hll. These findings reveal that the single mutation (S146A) of the active site serine leads......We have investigated the binding properties of and dynamics in Humicola lanuginosa lipase (HII) and the inactive mutant S146A (active Ser146 substituted with Ala) using fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations, respectively. Hll and S146A show significantly different binding......, whereas only small changes are observed for I-Ill suggesting that the active site Lid in the latter opens more easily and hence more lipase molecules are bound to the liposomes. These observations are in agreement with molecular dynamics simulations and subsequent essential dynamics analyses. The results...

  13. Compensatory signals associated with the activation of human GC 5' splice sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralovicova, Jana; Hwang, Gyulin; Asplund, A Charlotta; Churbanov, Alexander; Smith, C I Edvard; Vorechovsky, Igor

    2011-09-01

    GC 5' splice sites (5'ss) are present in ∼1% of human introns, but factors promoting their efficient selection are poorly understood. Here, we describe a case of X-linked agammaglobulinemia resulting from a GC 5'ss activated by a mutation in BTK intron 3. This GC 5'ss was intrinsically weak, yet it was selected in >90% primary transcripts in the presence of a strong and intact natural GT counterpart. We show that efficient selection of this GC 5'ss required a high density of GAA/CAA-containing splicing enhancers in the exonized segment and was promoted by SR proteins 9G8, Tra2β and SC35. The GC 5'ss was efficiently inhibited by splice-switching oligonucleotides targeting either the GC 5'ss itself or the enhancer. Comprehensive analysis of natural GC-AG introns and previously reported pathogenic GC 5'ss showed that their efficient activation was facilitated by higher densities of splicing enhancers and lower densities of silencers than their GT 5'ss equivalents. Removal of the GC-AG introns was promoted to a minor extent by the splice-site strength of adjacent exons and inhibited by flanking Alu repeats, with the first downstream Alus located on average at a longer distance from the GC 5'ss than other transposable elements. These results provide new insights into the splicing code that governs selection of noncanonical splice sites.

  14. An active site homology model of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase from Petroselinum crispum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röther, Dagmar; Poppe, László; Morlock, Gaby; Viergutz, Sandra; Rétey, János

    2002-06-01

    The plant enzyme phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5) shows homology to histidine ammonia-lyase (HAL) whose structure has been solved by X-ray crystallography. Based on amino-acid sequence alignment of the two enzymes, mutagenesis was performed on amino-acid residues that were identical or similar to the active site residues in HAL to gain insight into the importance of this residues in PAL for substrate binding or catalysis. We mutated the following amino-acid residues: S203, R354, Y110, Y351, N260, Q348, F400, Q488 and L138. Determination of the kinetic constants of the overexpressed and purified enzymes revealed that mutagenesis led in each case to diminished activity. Mutants S203A, R354A and Y351F showed a decrease in kcat by factors of 435, 130 and 235, respectively. Mutants F400A, Q488A and L138H showed a 345-, 615- and 14-fold lower kcat, respectively. The greatest loss of activity occurred in the PAL mutants N260A, Q348A and Y110F, which were 2700, 2370 and 75 000 times less active than wild-type PAL. To elucidate the possible function of the mutated amino-acid residues in PAL we built a homology model of PAL based on structural data of HAL and mutagenesis experiments with PAL. The homology model of PAL showed that the active site of PAL resembles the active site of HAL. This allowed us to propose possible roles for the corresponding residues in PAL catalysis.

  15. Overview of the activities carried out at the FEBEX site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missana, T.; Buil, B.; Garralon, A.; Gomez, P. [CIEMAT, Dept. de Medioambien te, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Perez-Estaun, A.; Carbonell, R. [Inst. Jaume Almera, CSIC (Spain); Suso, J.; Carretero, G.; Bueno, J.; Martinez, L. [AITEMIN (Spain) ; Hernan, P. [ENRESA (Spain)

    2007-06-15

    One of the main aim of WP 4.1 and 4.2 is to study solute migration mechanisms in crystalline host-rock in realistic conditions. Many organisations are participating in a joint study that is being performed in the FEBEX gallery (NAGRA's Grimsel Test Site, GTS, Switzerland). The FEBEX experiment reproduces at a real scale a high-level waste repository in granite and was installed more than 9 years ago. At moment, it represents the most realistic environment where the processes affecting radionuclide migration from the bentonite to granite can be studied. This paper summarises the main activities carried out at the FEBEX site during the second year of the project.

  16. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  17. Random and Site-Specific Mutagenesis of the Helicobacter pylori Ferric Uptake Regulator Provides Insight into Fur Structure-Function Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreath, Jeremy J.; Pich, Oscar Q.; Benoit, Stéphane L.; Besold, Angelique N.; Cha, Jeong-Heon; Maier, Robert J.; Michel, Sarah L.J.; Maynard, Ernest L.; Merrell, D. Scott

    2013-01-01

    Summary The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) of Helicobacter pylori is a global regulator that is important for colonization and survival within the gastric mucosa. H. pylori Fur is unique in its ability to activate and repress gene expression in both the iron-bound (Fe-Fur) and apo forms (apo-Fur). In the current study we combined random and site-specific mutagenesis to identify amino acid residues important for both Fe-Fur and apo-Fur function. We identified 25 mutations that affected Fe-Fur repression and 23 mutations that affected apo-Fur repression, as determined by transcriptional analyses of the Fe-Fur target gene amiE, and the apo-Fur target gene, pfr. In addition, eight of these mutations also significantly affected levels of Fur in the cell. Based on regulatory phenotypes, we selected several representative mutations to characterize further. Of those selected, we purified the wildtype (HpFurWT) and three mutant Fur proteins (HpFurE5A, HpFurA92T, and HpFurH134Y), which represent mutations in the N-terminal extension, the regulatory metal binding site (S2) and the structural metal binding site (S3), respectively. Purified proteins were evaluated for secondary structure by circular dichroism spectroscopy, iron-binding by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, oligomerization in iron-substituted and apo conditions by in vitro cross-linking assays, and DNA binding to Fe-Fur and apo-Fur target sequences by fluorescence anisotropy. The results showed that the N-terminal, S2, and S3 regions play distinct roles in terms of Fur structure-function relationships. Overall, these studies provide novel information regarding the role of these residues in Fur function, and provide mechanistic insight into how H. pylori Fur regulates gene expression in both the iron-bound and apo forms of the protein. PMID:23710935

  18. Probing the electrostatics of active site microenvironments along the catalytic cycle for Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C Tony; Layfield, Joshua P; Stewart, Robert J; French, Jarrod B; Hanoian, Philip; Asbury, John B; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Benkovic, Stephen J

    2014-07-23

    Electrostatic interactions play an important role in enzyme catalysis by guiding ligand binding and facilitating chemical reactions. These electrostatic interactions are modulated by conformational changes occurring over the catalytic cycle. Herein, the changes in active site electrostatic microenvironments are examined for all enzyme complexes along the catalytic cycle of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) by incorporation of thiocyanate probes at two site-specific locations in the active site. The electrostatics and degree of hydration of the microenvironments surrounding the probes are investigated with spectroscopic techniques and mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. Changes in the electrostatic microenvironments along the catalytic environment lead to different nitrile (CN) vibrational stretching frequencies and (13)C NMR chemical shifts. These environmental changes arise from protein conformational rearrangements during catalysis. The QM/MM calculations reproduce the experimentally measured vibrational frequency shifts of the thiocyanate probes across the catalyzed hydride transfer step, which spans the closed and occluded conformations of the enzyme. Analysis of the molecular dynamics trajectories provides insight into the conformational changes occurring between these two states and the resulting changes in classical electrostatics and specific hydrogen-bonding interactions. The electric fields along the CN axes of the probes are decomposed into contributions from specific residues, ligands, and solvent molecules that make up the microenvironments around the probes. Moreover, calculation of the electric field along the hydride donor-acceptor axis, along with decomposition of this field into specific contributions, indicates that the cofactor and substrate, as well as the enzyme, impose a substantial electric field that facilitates hydride transfer. Overall, experimental and theoretical data provide evidence for

  19. SITE-DIRECTED MUTAGENESIS OF PROPOSED ACTIVE-SITE RESIDUES OF PENICILLIN-BINDING PROTEIN-5 FROM ESCHERICHIA-COLI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLINDEN, MPG; DEHAAN, L; DIDEBERG, O; KECK, W

    1994-01-01

    Alignment of the amino acid sequence of penicillin-binding protein 5 (PBP5) with the sequences of other members of the family of active-site-serine penicillin-interacting enzymes predicted the residues playing a role in the catalytic mechanism of PBP5. Apart from the active-site (Ser(44)), Lys(47),

  20. Identification of residues involved in nucleotidyltransferase activity of JHP933 from helicobacter pyloriby site-directed mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Xianren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a well-known bacterial pathogen involved in the development of peptic ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma and other forms of gastric cancer. Evidence has suggested that certain strain-specific genes in the plasticity region may play key roles in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases. Therefore there is considerable interest in the strain-specific genes located in the plasticity regions of H. pylori. JHP933 is encoded by the gene in the plasticity region of H. pylori strain J99. Recently, the crystal structure of JHP933 has confirmed it as a nucleotidyltransferase (NTase superfamily protein and a putative active site has been proposed. However, no evidence from direct functional assay has been presented to confirm the active site and little is known about the functional mechanism of JHP933. Here, through superimposition with Cid1/NTP complex structures, we modelled the complex structures of JHP933 with different NTPs. Based on the models and using rational site-directed mutagenesis combined with enzymatic activity assays, we confirm the active site and identify several residues important for the nucleotidyl transferring function of JHP933. Furthermore, mutations of these active site residues result in the abolishment of the nucleotidyltransferase activity of JHP933. This work provides preliminary insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the pathophysiological role in H. pylori infection of JHP933 as a novel NTase superfamily protein.

  1. 77 FR 39508 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... characterization activities (geophysical, geotechnical, archaeological, and biological surveys needed to develop..., site characterization, and site assessment in and around the Call Area (76 FR 51391). The Call Area...

  2. Study the active site of flavonoid applying radiation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Jilan; Sun Gang; Zhang Fugen; He Yongke; Li Jiuqiang [Department of Technical Physics, Peking Univ., Beijing (China)

    2000-03-01

    Flavonoid are a large and important class of naturally occurring, low molecular weight benzo-{gamma}-pyrone derivatives which are reported to have a myriad of biological activities, but the study on the active sites of flavonoids is still ambiguous. In this paper, rutin, quercetin and baicalin have been selected as model compounds. It is well known that rutin is used in inhibiting arteriosclerosis and baicalin is antibacterial and antiviral. They have similar basic structure, but their medicinal properties are so different, why? As most flavonoids contain carbonyl group, which can capture electron effectively, we predict that flavonoids can capture electron to form radical anion. The formation of anion radical may have influence on the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The difference in the ability of forming anion radical may cause the difference in their medicinal effects. (author)

  3. Probing the putative active site of YjdL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Johanne Mørch; Ismat, Fouzia; Szakonyi, Gerda;

    2012-01-01

    YjdL from E. coli is an unusual proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter (POT). Unlike prototypical POTs, dipeptides are preferred over tripeptides, in particular dipeptides with a positively charged C-terminal residue. To further understand this difference in peptide specificity, the sequences...... of YjdL and YdgR, a prototypical E. coli POT, were compared in light of the crystal structure of a POT from Shewanella oneidensis. Several residues found in the putative active site were mutated and the activities of the mutated variants were assessed in terms of substrate uptake assays, and changes...... pocket that opens towards the extracellular space. The C-terminal side chain faces in the opposite direction into a sub pocket that faces the cytoplasm. These data indicated a stabilizing effect on a bulky N-terminal residue by an Ala281Phe variant and on the dipeptide backbone by Trp278...

  4. Molybdenum and tungsten oxygen transferases--and functional diversity within a common active site motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushie, M Jake; Cotelesage, Julien J; George, Graham N

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum and tungsten are the only second and third-row transition elements with a known function in living organisms. The molybdenum and tungsten enzymes show common structural features, with the metal being bound by a pyranopterin-dithiolene cofactor called molybdopterin. They catalyze a variety of oxygen transferase reactions coupled with two-electron redox chemistry in which the metal cycles between the +6 and +4 oxidation states usually with water, either product or substrate, providing the oxygen. The functional roles filled by the molybdenum and tungsten enzymes are diverse; for example, they play essential roles in microbial respiration, in the uptake of nitrogen in green plants, and in human health. Together, the enzymes form a superfamily which is among the most prevalent known, being found in all kingdoms of life. This review discusses what is known of the active site structures and the mechanisms, together with some recent insights into the evolution of these important enzyme systems.

  5. Insights into the Binding Sites of Organometallic Ruthenium Anticancer Compounds on Peptides Using Ultra-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Rebecca H.; Habtemariam, Abraha; Lopez-Clavijo, Andrea F.; Barrow, Mark P.; Sadler, Peter J.; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2014-04-01

    The binding sites of two ruthenium(II) organometallic complexes of the form [(η6-arene)Ru( N, N)Cl]+, where arene/ N, N = biphenyl (bip)/bipyridine (bipy) for complex AH076, and biphenyl (bip)/ o-phenylenediamine ( o-pda) for complex AH078, on the peptides angiotensin and bombesin have been investigated using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry. Fragmentation was performed using collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), with, in some cases, additional data being provided by electron capture dissociation (ECD). The primary binding sites were identified as methionine and histidine, with further coordination to phenylalanine, potentially through a π-stacking interaction, which has been observed here for the first time. This initial peptide study was expanded to investigate protein binding through reaction with insulin, on which the binding sites proposed are histidine, glutamic acid, and tyrosine. Further reaction of the ruthenium complexes with the oxidized B chain of insulin, in which two cysteine residues are oxidized to cysteine sulfonic acid (Cys-SO3H), and glutathione, which had been oxidized with hydrogen peroxide to convert the cysteine to cysteine sulfonic acid, provided further support for histidine and glutamic acid binding, respectively.

  6. Eel calcitonin binding site distribution and antinociceptive activity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidobono, F.; Netti, C.; Sibilia, V.; Villa, I.; Zamboni, A.; Pecile, A.

    1986-03-01

    The distribution of binding site for (/sup 125/I)-eel-calcitonin (ECT) to rat central nervous system, studied by an autoradiographic technique, showed concentrations of binding in the diencephalon, the brain stem and the spinal cord. Large accumulations of grains were seen in the hypothalamus, the amygdala, in the fasciculus medialis prosencephali, in the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, in the ventrolateral part of the periventricular gray matter, in the lemniscus medialis and in the raphe nuclei. The density of grains in the reticular formation and in the nucleus tractus spinalis nervi trigemini was more moderate. In the spinal cord, grains were scattered throughout the dorsal horns. Binding of the ligand was displaced equally by cold ECT and by salmon CT(sCT), indicating that both peptides bind to the same receptors. Human CT was much weaker than sCT in displacing (/sup 125/I)-ECT binding. The administration of ECT into the brain ventricles of rats dose-dependently induced a significant and long-lasting enhancement of hot-plate latencies comparable with that obtained with sCT. The antinociceptive activity induced by ECT is compatible with the topographical distribution of binding sites for the peptide and is a further indication that fish CTs are active in the mammalian brain.

  7. Site characterization and related activities at the potential high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gertz, C.P.; Nelson, R.M. Jr.; Blanchard, M.B. [Department of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Cloke, P.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) involves a complex set of activities and issues. These include the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), site characterization surface-based testing, performance assessment, public outreach and information services, conceptual design of a potential repository, compliance with regulations, environmental issues, transportation of nuclear wastes, and systems engineering. Integration among the scientific and technical activities requires constant attention to keep work focused on determining the suitability of the site and on avoiding irretrievable loss of data. All activities must be conducted with due regard to quality assurance and safety and health. This paper provides a brief summary of the status of these activities as of December, 1993.

  8. Identification and characterization of columbid annexin Icp37. Insights into the evolution of annexin I phosphorylation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigler, H T; Mangili, J A; Gao, Y; Jones, J; Horseman, N D

    1992-09-25

    Annexin I (AnxI) contains phosphorylation sites in its "hinge region" that have been implicated in the regulation of cell growth and/or differentiation. A pigeon (Columba livia) isoform of this protein, annexin Icp35 (cp35), has a very similar amino acid sequence overall but an unrelated sequence that lacks phosphorylation sites in the hinge region. We now report the identification and characterization of annexin Icp37 (cp37) from pigeon. Genomic cloning and Southern blot analysis demonstrated that cp37 and cp35 were encoded by separated genes. Prolactin induced the expression of cp35 mRNA but not cp37. The amino acid sequence of cp37 was deduced from a cDNA clone and found to share 93 and 75% sequence identity with cp35 and human AnxI, respectively. The amino acid sequence of cp37 bore similarities to both AnxI and cp35 in the critical hinge region. Like AnxI, cp37 contained consensus phosphorylation sites in its amino acid sequence and was phosphorylated on tyrosine by the EGF receptor/kinase and on serine by protein kinase C in vitro. Despite the functional similarities between cp37 and AnxI, the nucleotide sequence that encoded the hinge region of cp37 was very similar to the analogous region of cp35, but different from that of AnxI. We propose that certain features shared by cp37 and AnxI are the products of convergent evolution. The fact that evolution independently selected for two annexin I-like genes (cp37 and anxI) encoding analogous phosphorylation sites is strong evidence that phosphorylation is important for the regulation of the biological activity of these proteins.

  9. NMR crystallography of enzyme active sites: probing chemically detailed, three-dimensional structure in tryptophan synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Leonard J; Dunn, Michael F

    2013-09-17

    NMR crystallography--the synergistic combination of X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry--offers unprecedented insight into three-dimensional, chemically detailed structure. Initially, researchers used NMR crystallography to refine diffraction data from organic and inorganic solids. Now we are applying this technique to explore active sites in biomolecules, where it reveals chemically rich detail concerning the interactions between enzyme site residues and the reacting substrate. Researchers cannot achieve this level of detail from X-ray, NMR,or computational methodologies in isolation. For example, typical X-ray crystal structures (1.5-2.5 Å resolution) of enzyme-bound intermediates identify possible hydrogen-bonding interactions between site residues and substrate but do not directly identify the protonation states. Solid-state NMR can provide chemical shifts for selected atoms of enzyme-substrate complexes, but without a larger structural framework in which to interpret them only empirical correlations with local chemical structure are possible. Ab initio calculations and molecular mechanics can build models for enzymatic processes, but they rely on researcher-specified chemical details. Together, however, X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry can provide consistent and testable models for structure and function of enzyme active sites: X-ray crystallography provides a coarse framework upon which scientists can develop models of the active site using computational chemistry; they can then distinguish these models by comparing calculated NMR chemical shifts with the results of solid-state NMR spectroscopy experiments. Conceptually, each technique is a puzzle piece offering a generous view of the big picture. Only when correctly pieced together, however, can they reveal the big picture at the highest possible resolution. In this Account, we detail our first steps in the development of

  10. The conversion of nickel-bound CO into an acetyl thioester: organometallic chemistry relevant to the acetyl coenzyme A synthase active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Bettina; Limberg, Christian; Herwig, Christian; Mebs, Stefan

    2011-12-23

    When three become one: Within one nickel-based model system, the three reactants CO, MeI, and PhSH have been assembled to yield an acetyl thioester. The reactivity is of relevance for the functioning of the acetyl coenzyme A synthase active site and provides insights into possible binding sequences.

  11. Caught in the act: the crystal structure of cleaved cathepsin L bound to the active site of Cathepsin L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnowski, Piotr; Turk, Dušan

    2016-04-01

    Cathepsin L is a ubiquitously expressed papain-like cysteine protease involved in the endosomal degradation of proteins and has numerous roles in physiological and pathological processes, such as arthritis, osteoporosis, and cancer. Insight into the specificity of cathepsin L is important for elucidating its physiological roles and drug discovery. To study interactions with synthetic ligands, we prepared a presumably inactive mutant and crystallized it. Unexpectedly, the crystal structure determined at 1.4 Å revealed that the cathepsin L molecule is cleaved, with the cleaved region trapped in the active site cleft of the neighboring molecule. Hence, the catalytic mutant demonstrated low levels of catalytic activity.

  12. Differential active site loop conformations mediate promiscuous activities in the lactonase SsoPox.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Hiblot

    Full Text Available Enzymes are proficient catalysts that enable fast rates of Michaelis-complex formation, the chemical step and products release. These different steps may require different conformational states of the active site that have distinct binding properties. Moreover, the conformational flexibility of the active site mediates alternative, promiscuous functions. Here we focused on the lactonase SsoPox from Sulfolobus solfataricus. SsoPox is a native lactonase endowed with promiscuous phosphotriesterase activity. We identified a position in the active site loop (W263 that governs its flexibility, and thereby affects the substrate specificity of the enzyme. We isolated two different sets of substitutions at position 263 that induce two distinct conformational sampling of the active loop and characterized the structural and kinetic effects of these substitutions. These sets of mutations selectively and distinctly mediate the improvement of the promiscuous phosphotriesterase and oxo-lactonase activities of SsoPox by increasing active-site loop flexibility. These observations corroborate the idea that conformational diversity governs enzymatic promiscuity and is a key feature of protein evolvability.

  13. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert (UMASS, MED)

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  14. Prediction of P53 mutants (multiple sites transcriptional activity based on structural (2D&3D properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Geetha Ramani

    Full Text Available Prediction of secondary site mutations that reinstate mutated p53 to normalcy has been the focus of intense research in the recent past owing to the fact that p53 mutants have been implicated in more than half of all human cancers and restoration of p53 causes tumor regression. However laboratory investigations are more often laborious and resource intensive but computational techniques could well surmount these drawbacks. In view of this, we formulated a novel approach utilizing computational techniques to predict the transcriptional activity of multiple site (one-site to five-site p53 mutants. The optimal MCC obtained by the proposed approach on prediction of one-site, two-site, three-site, four-site and five-site mutants were 0.775,0.341,0.784,0.916 and 0.655 respectively, the highest reported thus far in literature. We have also demonstrated that 2D and 3D features generate higher prediction accuracy of p53 activity and our findings revealed the optimal results for prediction of p53 status, reported till date. We believe detection of the secondary site mutations that suppress tumor growth may facilitate better understanding of the relationship between p53 structure and function and further knowledge on the molecular mechanisms and biological activity of p53, a targeted source for cancer therapy. We expect that our prediction methods and reported results may provide useful insights on p53 functional mechanisms and generate more avenues for utilizing computational techniques in biological data analysis.

  15. Active site loop conformation regulates promiscuous activity in a lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a "hot spot" in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity.

  16. Active site loop conformation regulates promiscuous activity in a lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    Full Text Available Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a "hot spot" in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity.

  17. In Silico Docking, Molecular Dynamics and Binding Energy Insights into the Bolinaquinone-Clathrin Terminal Domain Binding Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed K. Abdel-Hamid

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME is a process that regulates selective internalization of important cellular cargo using clathrin-coated vesicles. Perturbation of this process has been linked to many diseases including cancer and neurodegenerative conditions. Chemical proteomics identified the marine metabolite, 2-hydroxy-5-methoxy-3-(((1S,4aS,8aS-1,4a,5-trimethyl-1,2,3,4,4a,7,8,8a-octahydronaphthalen-2-ylmethylcyclohexa- 2,5-diene-1,4-dione (bolinaquinone as a clathrin inhibitor. While being an attractive medicinal chemistry target, the lack of data about bolinaquinone’s mode of binding to the clathrin enzyme represents a major limitation for its structural optimization. We have used a molecular modeling approach to rationalize the observed activity of bolinaquinone and to predict its mode of binding with the clathrin terminal domain (CTD. The applied protocol started by global rigid-protein docking followed by flexible docking, molecular dynamics and linear interaction energy calculations. The results revealed the potential of bolinaquinone to interact with various pockets within the CTD, including the clathrin-box binding site. The results also highlight the importance of electrostatic contacts over van der Waals interactions for proper binding between bolinaquinone and its possible binding sites. This study provides a novel model that has the potential to allow rapid elaboration of bolinaquinone analogues as a new class of clathrin inhibitors.

  18. Allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a using Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside and its combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Nidhi; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; P T V, Lakshmi; Arunachalam, Annamalai

    2016-08-01

    Recent crystallographic study revealed the involvement of allosteric site in active site inhibition of penicillin binding protein (PBP2a), where one molecule of Ceftaroline (Cef) binds to the allosteric site of PBP2a and paved way for the other molecule (Cef) to bind at the active site. Though Cef has the potency to inhibit the PBP2a, its adverse side effects are of major concern. Previous studies have reported the antibacterial property of Quercetin derivatives, a group of natural compounds. Hence, the present study aims to evaluate the effect of Quercetin 3-o-rutinoside (Rut) in allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a. The molecular docking studies between allosteric site and ligands (Rut, Que, and Cef) revealed a better binding efficiency (G-score) of Rut (-7.790318) and Cef (-6.194946) with respect to Que (-5.079284). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies showed significant changes at the active site in the presence of ligands (Rut and Cef) at allosteric site. Four different combinations of Rut and Cef were docked and their G-scores ranged between -6.320 and -8.623. MD studies revealed the stability of the key residue (Ser403) with Rut being at both sites, compared to other complexes. Morphological analysis through electron microscopy confirmed that combination of Rut and Cefixime was able to disturb the bacterial cell membrane in a similar fashion to that of Rut and Cefixime alone. The results of this study indicate that the affinity of Rut at both sites were equally good, with further validations Rut could be considered as an alternative for inhibiting MRSA growth.

  19. Insight into the mechanism of polyphenols on the activity of HMGR by molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Barira; Sharma, Charu; Adem, Abdu; Aburawi, Elhadi; Ojha, Shreesh

    2015-01-01

    Statins are hypolipidemic drugs that are effective in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia by attenuating cholesterol synthesis in the liver via competitive inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase. Recently, dietary changes associated with drug therapy have garnered attention as novel drugs to mitigate or ameliorate hypercholesterolemia. The present study was undertaken to observe different dietary polyphenols that can bind to the active site of HMGR and inhibit it. Results from the 12 dietary polyphenols tested reveal that polyphenols can bind to HMGR and block the binding of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)). We observed that the rigidity of phenolic rings prevents the polyphenols from docking to the enzyme activity site. The presence of an ester linkage between the phenolic rings in (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and the alkyl chain in curcumin allows them to orient in the active site of the HMGR and bind to the catalytic residues. EGCG and curcumin showed binding to the active site residues with a low GRID score, which may be a potential inhibitor of HMGR. Kaempferol showed binding to HMG-CoA, but with low binding affinity. These observations provide a rationale for the consistent hypolipidemic effect of EGCG and curcumin, which has been previously reported in several epidemiological and animal studies. Therefore, this study substantiates the mechanism of polyphenols on the activity of HMGR by molecular docking and provides the impetus for drug design involving further structure-function relationship studies.

  20. Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites - WASTE_SOLID_ACTIVE_PERMITTED_IDEM_IN: Active Permitted Solid Waste Sites in Indiana (Indiana Department of Environmental Management, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — WASTE_SOLID_ACTIVE_PERMITTED_IDEM_IN is a point shapefile that contains active permitted solid waste site locations in Indiana, provided by personnel of Indiana...

  1. Insight into the strong antioxidant activity of deinoxanthin, a unique carotenoid in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hong-Fang

    2010-11-10

    Deinoxanthin (DX) is a unique carotenoid synthesized by Deinococcus radiodurans, one of the most radioresistant organisms known. In comparison with other carotenoids, DX was proven to exhibit significantly stronger reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging activity, which plays an important role in the radioresistance of D. radiodurans. In this work, to gain deeper insights into the strong antioxidant activity of DX, the parameters characterizing ROS-scavenging potential were calculated by means of quantum chemical calculations. It was found that DX possesses lower lowest triplet excitation energy for its unique structure than other carotenoids, such as β-carotene and zeaxanthin, which endows DX strong potential in the energy transfer-based ROS-scavenging process. Moreover, the H-atom donating potential of DX is similar to zeaxanthin according to the theoretical homolytic O-H bond dissociation enthalpy. Thus, the large number of conjugated double bonds should be crucial for its strong antioxidant activity.

  2. Insight into the Strong Antioxidant Activity of Deinoxanthin, a Unique Carotenoid in Deinococcus Radiodurans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Fang Ji

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Deinoxanthin (DX is a unique carotenoid synthesized by Deinococcus radiodurans, one of the most radioresistant organisms known. In comparison with other carotenoids, DX was proven to exhibit significantly stronger reactive oxygen species (ROS-scavenging activity, which plays an important role in the radioresistance of D. radiodurans. In this work, to gain deeper insights into the strong antioxidant activity of DX, the parameters characterizing ROS-scavenging potential were calculated by means of quantum chemical calculations. It was found that DX possesses lower lowest triplet excitation energy for its unique structure than other carotenoids, such as β-carotene and zeaxanthin, which endows DX strong potential in the energy transfer-based ROS‑scavenging process. Moreover, the H-atom donating potential of DX is similar to zeaxanthin according to the theoretical homolytic O-H bond dissociation enthalpy. Thus, the large number of conjugated double bonds should be crucial for its strong antioxidant activity.

  3. Active site - a site of binding of affinity inhibitors in baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svyato, I.E.; Sklyankina, V.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-03-20

    The interaction of the enzyme-substrate complex with methyl phosphate, O-phosphoethanolamine, O-phosphopropanolamine, N-acetylphosphoserine, and phosphoglyolic acid, as well as pyrophosphatase, modified by monoesters of phosphoric acid, with pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate, was investigated. It was shown that the enzyme containing the substrate in the active site does not react with monophosphates, but modified pyrophosphatase entirely retains the ability to bind polyanions to the regulatory site. It is concluded that the inactivation of baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase by monoesters of phosphoric acid, which are affinity inhibitors of it, is the result of modification of the active site of the enzyme.

  4. Structure-guided inhibitor design for human FAAH by interspecies active site conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mileni, Mauro; Johnson, Douglas S.; Wang, Zhigang; Everdeen, Daniel S.; Liimatta, Marya; Pabst, Brandon; Bhattacharya, Keshab; Nugent, Richard A.; Kamtekar, Satwik; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Ahn, Kay; Stevens, Raymond C. (Scripps); (Pfizer)

    2008-11-24

    The integral membrane enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) hydrolyzes the endocannabinoid anandamide and related amidated signaling lipids. Genetic or pharmacological inactivation of FAAH produces analgesic, anxiolytic, and antiinflammatory phenotypes but not the undesirable side effects of direct cannabinoid receptor agonists, indicating that FAAH may be a promising therapeutic target. Structure-based inhibitor design has, however, been hampered by difficulties in expressing the human FAAH enzyme. Here, we address this problem by interconverting the active sites of rat and human FAAH using site-directed mutagenesis. The resulting humanized rat (h/r) FAAH protein exhibits the inhibitor sensitivity profiles of human FAAH but maintains the high-expression yield of the rat enzyme. We report a 2.75-{angstrom} crystal structure of h/rFAAH complexed with an inhibitor, N-phenyl-4-(quinolin-3-ylmethyl)piperidine-1-carboxamide (PF-750), that shows strong preference for human FAAH. This structure offers compelling insights to explain the species selectivity of FAAH inhibitors, which should guide future drug design programs.

  5. The promise and peril of intensive-site-based ecological research: insights from the Hubbard Brook ecosystem study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy J. Fahey; Pamela H. Templer; Bruce T. Anderson; John J. Battles; John L. Campbell; Charles T. Driscoll; Anthony R. Fusco; Mark B. Green; Karim-Aly S. Kassam; Nicholas L. Rodenhouse; Lindsey Rustad; Paul G. Schaberg; Matthew A. Vadeboncoeur

    2015-01-01

    Ecological research is increasingly concentrated at particular locations or sites. This trend reflects a variety of advantages of intensive, site-based research, but also raises important questions about the nature of such spatially delimited research: how well does site based research represent broader areas, and does it constrain scientific discovery? We provide an...

  6. Calculation of vibrational shifts of nitrile probes in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase upon ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layfield, Joshua P; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2013-01-16

    The vibrational Stark effect provides insight into the roles of hydrogen bonding, electrostatics, and conformational motions in enzyme catalysis. In a recent application of this approach to the enzyme ketosteroid isomerase (KSI), thiocyanate probes were introduced in site-specific positions throughout the active site. This paper implements a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach for calculating the vibrational shifts of nitrile (CN) probes in proteins. This methodology is shown to reproduce the experimentally measured vibrational shifts upon binding of the intermediate analogue equilinen to KSI for two different nitrile probe positions. Analysis of the molecular dynamics simulations provides atomistic insight into the roles that key residues play in determining the electrostatic environment and hydrogen-bonding interactions experienced by the nitrile probe. For the M116C-CN probe, equilinen binding reorients an active-site water molecule that is directly hydrogen-bonded to the nitrile probe, resulting in a more linear C≡N--H angle and increasing the CN frequency upon binding. For the F86C-CN probe, equilinen binding orients the Asp103 residue, decreasing the hydrogen-bonding distance between the Asp103 backbone and the nitrile probe and slightly increasing the CN frequency. This QM/MM methodology is applicable to a wide range of biological systems and has the potential to assist in the elucidation of the fundamental principles underlying enzyme catalysis.

  7. Molecular dynamics studies unravel role of conserved residues responsible for movement of ions into active site of DHBPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Ranajit Nivrutti; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Singh, Balvinder

    2017-01-01

    3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase (DHBPS) catalyzes the conversion of D-ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru5P) to L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate in the presence of Mg2+. Although crystal structures of DHBPS in complex with Ru5P and non-catalytic metal ions have been reported, structure with Ru5P along with Mg2+ is still elusive. Therefore, mechanistic role played by Mg2+ in the structure of DHBPS is poorly understood. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations of DHBPS-Ru5P complex along with Mg2+ have shown entry of Mg2+ from bulk solvent into active site. Presence of Mg2+ in active site has constrained conformations of Ru5P and has reduced flexibility of loop-2. Formation of hydrogen bonds among Thr-108 and residues - Gly-109, Val-110, Ser-111, and Asp-114 are found to be critical for entry of Mg2+ into active site. Subsequent in silico mutations of residues, Thr-108 and Asp-114 have substantiated the importance of these interactions. Loop-4 of one monomer is being proposed to act as a “lid” covering the active site of other monomer. Further, the conserved nature of residues taking part in the transfer of Mg2+ suggests the same mechanism being present in DHBPS of other microorganisms. Thus, this study provides insights into the functioning of DHBPS that can be used for the designing of inhibitors.

  8. Structural and mechanistic insights into Helicobacter pylori NikR activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlawane, C.; Dian, C.; Muller, C.; Round, A.; Fauquant, C.; Schauer, K.; de Reuse, H.; Terradot, L.; Michaud-Soret, I.

    2010-01-01

    NikR is a transcriptional metalloregulator central in the mandatory response to acidity of Helicobacter pylori that controls the expression of numerous genes by binding to specific promoter regions. NikR/DNA interactions were proposed to rely on protein activation by Ni(II) binding to high-affinity (HA) and possibly secondary external (X) sites. We describe a biochemical characterization of HpNikR mutants that shows that the HA sites are essential but not sufficient for DNA binding, while the secondary external (X) sites and residues from the HpNikR dimer–dimer interface are important for DNA binding. We show that a second metal is necessary for HpNikR/DNA binding, but only to some promoters. Small-angle X-ray scattering shows that HpNikR adopts a defined conformation in solution, resembling the cis-conformation and suggests that nickel does not trigger large conformational changes in HpNikR. The crystal structures of selected mutants identify the effects of each mutation on HpNikR structure. This study unravels key structural features from which we derive a model for HpNikR activation where: (i) HA sites and an hydrogen bond network are required for DNA binding and (ii) metallation of a unique secondary external site (X) modulates HpNikR DNA binding to low-affinity promoters by disruption of a salt bridge. PMID:20089510

  9. Active versus passive radon monitoring at the Yucca Mountain site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, M.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Federal Regulations have mandated that a baseline assessment for the Yucca Mountain Site be performed. This includes the detection and monitoring of specific radionuclides present at the site. These radionuclides include radon 222, a decay progeny of naturally occurring uranium. Two radon monitoring systems are utilized at the Yucca Mountain site to detect ambient levels of radon. The first is a passive time integrated system, and the second is a continuous radon monitoring (CRM) system.

  10. New insights into the structural bases of activation of Cys-loop receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzat, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors of the Cys-loop superfamily mediate rapid synaptic transmission throughout the nervous system, and include receptors activated by ACh, GABA, glycine and serotonin. They are involved in physiological processes, including learning and memory, and in neurological disorders, and they are targets for clinically relevant drugs. Cys-loop receptors assemble either from five copies of one type of subunit, giving rise to homomeric receptors, or from several types of subunits, giving rise to heteromeric receptors. Homomeric receptors are invaluable models for probing fundamental relationships between structure and function. Receptors contain a large extracellular domain that carries the binding sites and a transmembrane region that forms the ion pore. How the structural changes elicited by agonist binding are propagated through a distance of 50Å to the ion channel gate is central to understanding receptor function. Depending on the receptor subtype, occupancy of either two, as in the prototype muscle nicotinic receptor, or three binding sites, as in homomeric receptors, is required for full activation. The conformational changes initiated at the binding sites are propagated to the gate through the interface between the extracellular and transmembrane domains. This region forms a network that relays structural changes from the binding site towards the pore, and also contributes to open channel lifetime and rate of desensitization. Thus, this coupling region controls the beginning and duration of a synaptic response. Here we review recent advances in the molecular mechanism by which Cys-loop receptors are activated with particular emphasis on homomeric receptors.

  11. Rayleigh Wave Ellipticity Modeling and Inversion for Shallow Structure at the Proposed InSight Landing Site in Elysium Planitia, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapmeyer-Endrun, Brigitte; Golombek, Matthew P.; Ohrnberger, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    The SEIS (Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure) instrument onboard the InSight mission will be the first seismometer directly deployed on the surface of Mars. From studies on the Earth and the Moon, it is well known that site amplification in low-velocity sediments on top of more competent rocks has a strong influence on seismic signals, but can also be used to constrain the subsurface structure. Here we simulate ambient vibration wavefields in a model of the shallow sub-surface at the InSight landing site in Elysium Planitia and demonstrate how the high-frequency Rayleigh wave ellipticity can be extracted from these data and inverted for shallow structure. We find that, depending on model parameters, higher mode ellipticity information can be extracted from single-station data, which significantly reduces uncertainties in inversion. Though the data are most sensitive to properties of the upper-most layer and show a strong trade-off between layer depth and velocity, it is possible to estimate the velocity and thickness of the sub-regolith layer by using reasonable constraints on regolith properties. Model parameters are best constrained if either higher mode data can be used or additional constraints on regolith properties from seismic analysis of the hammer strokes of InSight's heat flow probe HP3 are available. In addition, the Rayleigh wave ellipticity can distinguish between models with a constant regolith velocity and models with a velocity increase in the regolith, information which is difficult to obtain otherwise.

  12. Structural insights into the dehydroascorbate reductase activity of human omega-class glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huina; Brock, Joseph; Liu, Dan; Board, Philip G; Oakley, Aaron J

    2012-07-13

    The reduction of dehydroascorbate (DHA) to ascorbic acid (AA) is a vital cellular function. The omega-class glutathione transferases (GSTs) catalyze several reductive reactions in cellular biochemistry, including DHA reduction. In humans, two isozymes (GSTO1-1 and GSTO2-2) with significant DHA reductase (DHAR) activity are found, sharing 64% sequence identity. While the activity of GSTO2-2 is higher, it is significantly more unstable in vitro. We report the first crystal structures of human GSTO2-2, stabilized through site-directed mutagenesis and determined at 1.9 Å resolution in the presence and absence of glutathione (GSH). The structure of a human GSTO1-1 has been determined at 1.7 Å resolution in complex with the reaction product AA, which unexpectedly binds in the G-site, where the glutamyl moiety of GSH binds. The structure suggests a similar mode of ascorbate binding in GSTO2-2. This is the first time that a non-GSH-based reaction product has been observed in the G-site of any GST. AA stacks against a conserved aromatic residue, F34 (equivalent to Y34 in GSTO2-2). Mutation of Y34 to alanine in GSTO2-2 eliminates DHAR activity. From these structures and other biochemical data, we propose a mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis of DHAR activity.

  13. Insight into the mechanism of polyphenols on the activity of HMGR by molecular docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam B

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Barira Islam,1,* Charu Sharma,2,* Abdu Adem,3 Elhadi Aburawi,1 Shreesh Ojha3 1Department of Paediatrics, 2Department of Internal Medicine, 3Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Statins are hypolipidemic drugs that are effective in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia by attenuating cholesterol synthesis in the liver via competitive inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase. Recently, dietary changes associated with drug therapy have garnered attention as novel drugs to mitigate or ameliorate hypercholesterolemia. The present study was undertaken to observe different dietary polyphenols that can bind to the active site of HMGR and inhibit it. Results from the 12 dietary polyphenols tested reveal that polyphenols can bind to HMGR and block the binding of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+. We observed that the rigidity of phenolic rings prevents the polyphenols from docking to the enzyme activity site. The presence of an ester linkage between the phenolic rings in (–-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG and the alkyl chain in curcumin allows them to orient in the active site of the HMGR and bind to the catalytic residues. EGCG and curcumin showed binding to the active site residues with a low GRID score, which may be a potential inhibitor of HMGR. Kaempferol showed binding to HMG-CoA, but with low binding affinity. These observations provide a rationale for the consistent hypolipidemic effect of EGCG and curcumin, which has been previously reported in several epidemiological and animal studies. Therefore, this study substantiates the mechanism of polyphenols on the activity of HMGR by molecular docking and provides the impetus for drug design involving further structure–function relationship studies. Keywords: polyphenols

  14. An insight into the removal of fluoroquinolones in activated sludge process: Sorption and biodegradation characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Qiang, Zhimin; Li, Yangang; Ben, Weiwei

    2017-06-01

    The detailed sorption steps and biodegradation characteristics of fluoroquinolones (FQs) including ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, lomefloxacin, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin were investigated through batch experiments. The results indicate that FQs at a total concentration of 500μg/L caused little inhibition of sludge bioactivity. Sorption was the primary removal pathway of FQs in the activated sludge process, followed by biodegradation, while hydrolysis and volatilization were negligible. FQ sorption on activated sludge was a reversible process governed by surface reaction. Henry and Freundlich models could describe the FQ sorption isotherms well in the concentration range of 100-300μg/L. Thermodynamic parameters revealed that FQ sorption on activated sludge is spontaneous, exothermic, and enthalpy-driven. Hydrophobicity-independent mechanisms determined the FQ sorption affinity with activated sludge. The zwitterion of FQs had the strongest sorption affinity, followed by cation and anion, and aerobic condition facilitated FQ sorption. FQs were slowly biodegradable, with long half-lives (>100hr). FQ biodegradation was enhanced with increasing temperature and under aerobic condition, and thus was possibly achieved through co-metabolism during nitrification. This study provides an insight into the removal kinetics and mechanism of FQs in the activated sludge process, but also helps assess the environmental risks of FQs resulting from sludge disposal. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Physical activity counseling in primary care: Insights from public health and behavioral economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuval, Kerem; Leonard, Tammy; Drope, Jeffrey; Katz, David L; Patel, Alpa V; Maitin-Shepard, Melissa; Amir, On; Grinstein, Amir

    2017-05-06

    Physical inactivity has reached epidemic proportions in modern society. Abundant evidence points to a causal link between physical inactivity and increased risk for numerous noncommunicable diseases, such as some types of cancer and heart disease, as well as premature mortality. Yet, despite this overwhelming evidence, many individuals do not meet the recommended amount of physical activity required to achieve maximum health benefits. Because primary care physicians' advice is highly regarded, clinicians have the unique opportunity to play an important role in enabling patients to modify their behavior at the point of care with the goal of guiding patients to adopt and maintain an active lifestyle. In the current study, the authors evaluate pertinent literature from the fields of medicine/public health and economics/psychology to suggest a comprehensive approach to physical activity counseling at the primary care level. They first examine the public health approach to physical activity counseling, and then proceed to offer insights from behavioral economics, an emerging field that combines principles from psychology and economics. The application of key behavioral economics tools (eg, precommitment contracts, framing) to physical activity counseling in primary care is elaborated. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:233-244. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  16. Kinetic Isotope Effects for Alkaline Phosphatase Reactions: Implications for the Role of Active Site Metal Ions in Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalatan, Jesse G.; Catrina, Irina; Mitchell, Rebecca; Grzyska, Piotr K.; O’Brien, Patrick J.; Herschlag, Daniel; Hengge, Alvan C.

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer reactions have frequently been suggested to proceed through transition states that are altered from their solution counterparts, with the alterations presumably arising from interactions with active site functional groups. In particular, the phosphate monoester hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) has been the subject of intensive scrutiny. Recent linear free energy relationship (LFER) studies suggest that AP catalyzes phosphate monoester hydrolysis through a loose transition state, similar to that in solution. To gain further insight into the nature of the transition state and active site interactions, we have determined kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for AP-catalyzed hydrolysis reactions with several phosphate monoester substrates. The LFER and KIE data together provide a consistent picture for the nature of the transition state for AP-catalyzed phosphate monoester hydrolysis and support previous models suggesting that the enzymatic transition state is similar to that in solution. Moreover, the KIE data provides unique information regarding specific interactions between the transition state and the active site Zn2+ ions. These results provide strong support for a model in which electrostatic interactions between the bimetallo Zn2+ site and a nonbridging phosphate ester oxygen atom make a significant contribution to the large rate enhancement observed for AP-catalyzed phosphate monoester hydrolysis. PMID:17630738

  17. Kinetic isotope effects for alkaline phosphatase reactions: implications for the role of active-site metal ions in catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalatan, Jesse G; Catrina, Irina; Mitchell, Rebecca; Grzyska, Piotr K; O'brien, Patrick J; Herschlag, Daniel; Hengge, Alvan C

    2007-08-08

    Enzyme-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer reactions have frequently been suggested to proceed through transition states that are altered from their solution counterparts, with the alterations presumably arising from interactions with active-site functional groups. In particular, the phosphate monoester hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) has been the subject of intensive scrutiny. Recent linear free energy relationship (LFER) studies suggest that AP catalyzes phosphate monoester hydrolysis through a loose transition state, similar to that in solution. To gain further insight into the nature of the transition state and active-site interactions, we have determined kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for AP-catalyzed hydrolysis reactions with several phosphate monoester substrates. The LFER and KIE data together provide a consistent picture for the nature of the transition state for AP-catalyzed phosphate monoester hydrolysis and support previous models suggesting that the enzymatic transition state is similar to that in solution. Moreover, the KIE data provides unique information regarding specific interactions between the transition state and the active-site Zn2+ ions. These results provide strong support for a model in which electrostatic interactions between the bimetallo Zn2+ site and a nonbridging phosphate ester oxygen atom make a significant contribution to the large rate enhancement observed for AP-catalyzed phosphate monoester hydrolysis.

  18. Quantum mechanics study of the hydroxyethylamines-BACE-1 active site interaction energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueto-Tettay, Carlos; Drosos, Juan Carlos; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo

    2011-06-01

    The identification of BACE-1, a key enzyme in the production of Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, generated by the proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein, was a major advance in the field of Alzheimer's disease as this pathology is characterized by the presence of extracellular senile plaques, mainly comprised of Aβ peptides. Hydroxyethylamines have demonstrated a remarkable potential, like candidate drugs, for this disease using BACE-1 as target. Density Functional Theory calculations were employed to estimate interaction energies for the complexes formed between the hydroxyethylamine derivated inhibitors and 24 residues in the BACE-1 active site. The collected data offered not only a general but a particular quantitative description that gives a deep insight of the interactions in the active site, showing at the same time how ligand structural variations affect them. Polar interactions are the major energetic contributors for complex stabilization and those ones with charged aspartate residues are highlighted, as they contribute over 90% of the total attractive interaction energy. Ligand-ARG296 residue interaction reports the most repulsive value and decreasing of the magnitude of this repulsion can be a key feature for the design of novel and more potent BACE-1 inhibitors. Also it was explained why sultam derivated BACE-1 inhibitors are better ones than lactam based. Hydrophobic interactions concentrated at S1 zone and other relevant repulsions and attractions were also evaluated. The comparison of two different theory levels (X3LYP and M062X) allowed to confirm the relevance of the detected interactions as each theory level has its own strength to depict the forces involved, as is the case of M062X which is better describing the hydrophobic interactions. Those facts were also evaluated and confirmed by comparing the quantitative trend, of selected ligand-residue interactions, with MP2 theory level as reference standard method for electrostatic plus

  19. Origin of magnetic highs at ultramafic hosted hydrothermal systems: Insights from the Yokoniwa site of Central Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Masakazu; Okino, Kyoko; Sato, Taichi; Sato, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution vector magnetic measurements were performed on an inactive ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal vent field, called Yokoniwa Hydrothermal Field (YHF), using a deep-sea manned submersible Shinkai6500 and an autonomous underwater vehicle r2D4. The YHF has developed at a non-transform offset massif of the Central Indian Ridge. Dead chimneys were widely observed around the YHF along with a very weak venting of low-temperature fluids so that hydrothermal activity of the YHF was almost finished. The distribution of crustal magnetization from the magnetic anomaly revealed that the YHF is associated with enhanced magnetization, as seen at the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow and Ashadze-1 hydrothermal sites of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The results of rock magnetic analysis on seafloor rock samples (including basalt, dolerite, gabbro, serpentinized peridotite, and hydrothermal sulfide) showed that only highly serpentinized peridotite carries high magnetic susceptibility and that the natural remanent magnetization intensity can explain the high magnetization of Yokoniwa. These observations reflect abundant and strongly magnetized magnetite grains within the highly serpentinized peridotite. Comparisons with the Rainbow and Ashadze-1 suggest that in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems, strongly magnetized magnetite and pyrrhotite form during the progression of hydrothermal alteration of peridotite. After the completion of serpentinization and production of hydrogen, pyrrhotites convert into pyrite or nonmagnetic iron sulfides, which considerably reduces their levels of magnetization. Our results revealed origins of the magnetic high and the development of subsurface chemical processes in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems. Furthermore, the results highlight the use of near-seafloor magnetic field measurements as a powerful tool for detecting and characterizing seafloor hydrothermal systems.

  20. Structural insights into ligand-induced activation of the insulin receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, C.; Lawrence, M.; Streltsov, V.; Garrett, T.; McKern, N.; Lou, M.-Z.; Lovrecz, G.; Adams, T. (CSIRO); (WEHIMR)

    2008-04-29

    The current model for insulin binding to the insulin receptor proposes that there are two binding sites, referred to as sites 1 and 2, on each monomer in the receptor homodimer and two binding surfaces on insulin, one involving residues predominantly from the dimerization face of insulin (the classical binding surface) and the other residues from the hexamerization face. High-affinity binding involves one insulin molecule using its two surfaces to make bridging contacts with site 1 from one receptor monomer and site 2 from the other. Whilst the receptor dimer has two identical site 1-site 2 pairs, insulin molecules cannot bridge both pairs simultaneously. Our structures of the insulin receptor (IR) ectodomain dimer and the L1-CR-L2 fragments of IR and insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) explain many of the features of ligand-receptor binding and allow the two binding sites on the receptor to be described. The IR dimer has an unexpected folded-over conformation which places the C-terminal surface of the first fibronectin-III domain in close juxtaposition to the known L1 domain ligand-binding surface suggesting that the C-terminal surface of FnIII-1 is the second binding site involved in high-affinity binding. This is very different from previous models based on three-dimensional reconstruction from scanning transmission electron micrographs. Our single-molecule images indicate that IGF-1R has a morphology similar to that of IR. In addition, the structures of the first three domains (L1-CR-L2) of the IR and IGF-1R show that there are major differences in the two regions governing ligand specificity. The implications of these findings for ligand-induced receptor activation will be discussed. This review summarizes the key findings regarding the discovery and characterization of the insulin receptor, the identification and arrangement of its structural domains in the sequence and the key features associated with ligand binding. The remainder of the review

  1. The nature of inherent bactericidal activity: insights from the nanotopology of three species of dragonfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainwaring, David E.; Nguyen, Song Ha; Webb, Hayden; Jakubov, Timur; Tobin, Mark; Lamb, Robert N.; Wu, Alex H.-F.; Marchant, Richard; Crawford, Russell J.; Ivanova, Elena P.

    2016-03-01

    While insect wings are widely recognised as multi-functional, recent work showed that this extends to extensive bactericidal activity brought about by cell deformation and lysis on the wing nanotopology. We now quantitatively show that subtle changes to this topography result in substantial changes in bactericidal activity that are able to span an order of magnitude. Notably, the chemical composition of the lipid nanopillars was seen by XPS and synchrotron FTIR microspectroscopy to be similar across these activity differences. Modelling the interaction between bacterial cells and the wing surface lipids of 3 species of dragonflies, that inhabit similar environments, but with distinctly different behavioural repertoires, provided the relationship between surface structure and antibacterial functionality. In doing so, these principal behavioural patterns correlated with the demands for antimicrobial efficiency dictated by differences in their foraging strategies. This work now reveals a new feature in the design elegance of natural multi-functional surfaces as well providing insights into the bactericidal mechanism underlying inherently antimicrobial materials, while suggesting that nanotopology is related to the evolutionary development of a species through the demands of its behavioural repertoire. The underlying relationship between the processes of wetting, adhesion and capillarity of the lipid nanopillars and bactericidal efficiency suggests new prospects for purely mechano-responsive antibacterial surfaces.While insect wings are widely recognised as multi-functional, recent work showed that this extends to extensive bactericidal activity brought about by cell deformation and lysis on the wing nanotopology. We now quantitatively show that subtle changes to this topography result in substantial changes in bactericidal activity that are able to span an order of magnitude. Notably, the chemical composition of the lipid nanopillars was seen by XPS and synchrotron

  2. Monoclonal antibody against the active site of caeruloplasmin and the ELISA system detecting active caeruloplasmin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyamuta, S; Ito, K

    1994-04-01

    Serum caeruloplasmin deficiency is a characteristic biochemical abnormality found in patients with Wilson's disease, but the mechanism of this disease is unknown. Although the phenylenediamine oxidase activity of serum caeruloplasmin is markedly low in patients with Wilson's disease, mRNA of caeruloplasmin exists to some extent. To investigate the deficiency of caeruloplasmin oxidase activity in Wilson's disease, we generated 14 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and selected ID1, which had the strongest reactivity, and ID2, which had neutralizing ability. We also established a system to measure active caeruloplasmin specifically using these MAbs. These MAbs and the system will be useful tools in analyzing the active site of caeruloplasmin in patients with Wilson's disease.

  3. Structural insights into the anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) activity of ceftobiprole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovering, Andrew L; Gretes, Michael C; Safadi, Susan S; Danel, Franck; de Castro, Liza; Page, Malcolm G P; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2012-09-14

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an antibiotic-resistant strain of S. aureus afflicting hospitals and communities worldwide. Of greatest concern is its development of resistance to current last-line-of-defense antibiotics; new therapeutics are urgently needed to combat this pathogen. Ceftobiprole is a recently developed, latest generation cephalosporin and has been the first to show activity against MRSA by inhibiting essential peptidoglycan transpeptidases, including the β-lactam resistance determinant PBP2a, from MRSA. Here we present the structure of the complex of ceftobiprole bound to PBP2a. This structure provides the first look at the molecular details of an effective β-lactam-resistant PBP interaction, leading to new insights into the mechanism of ceftobiprole efficacy against MRSA.

  4. Insights and models from medical anthropology for understanding the healing activity of the Historical Jesus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Pilch

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay sketches a basic introdution to medical anthropology as a key to understanding and interpreting  the healing activity of the historical Jesus described in the gospels. It presents select literature, leading experts, fundamental concepts, and insights and models of special value to biblical specialists. Only a cross-cultural discipline like medical anthropology allows the investigator to  interpret texts and events from other cultures with respect for their distinctive cultural contexts in order to draw more appropriate conclusions and applications in other cultures. Applications to biblical texts are not included in this essay but may be found in other articles published by the author and listed in the bibliography.

  5. Insights on the evolution of prolyl 3-hydroxylation sites from comparative analysis of chicken and Xenopus fibrillar collagens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Hudson

    Full Text Available Recessive mutations that prevent 3-hydroxyproline formation in type I collagen have been shown to cause forms of osteogenesis imperfecta. In mammals, all A-clade collagen chains with a GPP sequence at the A1 site (P986, except α1(III, have 3Hyp at residue P986. Available avian, amphibian and reptilian type III collagen sequences from the genomic database (Ensembl all differ in sequence motif from mammals at the A1 site. This suggests a potential evolutionary distinction in prolyl 3-hydroxylation between mammals and earlier vertebrates. Using peptide mass spectrometry, we confirmed that this 3Hyp site is fully occupied in α1(III from an amphibian, Xenopus laevis, as it is in chicken. A thorough characterization of all predicted 3Hyp sites in collagen types I, II, III and V from chicken and xenopus revealed further differences in the pattern of occupancy of the A3 site (P707. In mammals only α2(I and α2(V chains had any 3Hyp at the A3 site, whereas in chicken all α-chains except α1(III had A3 at least partially 3-hydroxylated. The A3 site was also partially 3-hydroxylated in xenopus α1(I. Minor differences in covalent cross-linking between chicken, xenopus and mammal type I and III collagens were also found as a potential index of evolving functional differences. The function of 3Hyp is still unknown but observed differences in site occupancy during vertebrate evolution are likely to give important clues.

  6. Molecular modeling and competition binding study of Br-noscapine and colchicine provides insight into noscapinoid-tubulin binding site

    OpenAIRE

    Naik, Pradeep K.; Santoshi, Seneha; Rai, Ankit; Joshi, Harish C.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously discovered the tubulin-binding anti-cancer properties of noscapine and its derivatives (noscapinoids). Here, we present three lines of evidence that noscapinoids bind at or near the well studied colchicine binding site of tubulin: 1) In silico molecular docking studies of Br-noscapine and noscapine yield highest docking score with the well characterised colchicine-binding site from the co-crystal structure; 2) the molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area (MM-GB/SA)...

  7. KatB, a cyanobacterial Mn-catalase with unique active site configuration: Implications for enzyme function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihani, Subhash C; Chakravarty, Dhiman; Ballal, Anand

    2016-04-01

    Manganese catalases (Mn-catalases), a class of H2O2 detoxifying proteins, are structurally and mechanistically distinct from the commonly occurring catalases, which contain heme. Active site of Mn-catalases can serve as template for the synthesis of catalase mimetics for therapeutic intervention in oxidative stress related disorders. However, unlike the heme catalases, structural aspects of Mn-catalases remain inadequately explored. The genome of the ancient cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC7120, shows the presence of two Mn-catalases, KatA and KatB. Here, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of KatB. The KatB protein (with a C-terminal his-tag) was over-expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. On the addition of Mn(2+) to the E. coli growth medium, a substantial increase in production of the soluble KatB protein was observed. The purified KatB protein was an efficient catalase, which was relatively insensitive to inhibition by azide. Crystal structure of KatB showed a hexameric assembly with four-helix bundle fold, characteristic of the Ferritin-like superfamily. With canonical Glu4His2 coordination geometry and two terminal water ligands, the KatB active site was distinctly different from that of other Mn-catalases. Interestingly, the KatB active site closely resembled the active sites of ruberythrin/bacterioferritin, bi-iron members of the Ferritin-like superfamily. The KatB crystal structure provided fundamental insights into the evolutionary relationship within the Ferritin-like superfamily and further showed that Mn-catalases can be sub-divided into two groups, each with a distinct active site configuration.

  8. Molecular modelling and competition binding study of Br-noscapine and colchicine provide insight into noscapinoid-tubulin binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Pradeep K; Santoshi, Seneha; Rai, Ankit; Joshi, Harish C

    2011-06-01

    We have previously discovered the tubulin-binding anti-cancer properties of noscapine and its derivatives (noscapinoids). Here, we present three lines of evidence that noscapinoids bind at or near the well studied colchicine binding site of tubulin: (1) in silico molecular docking studies of Br-noscapine and noscapine yield highest docking score with the well characterised colchicine-binding site from the co-crystal structure; (2) the molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area (MM-GB/SA) scoring results ΔΔG(bind-cald) for both noscapine and Br-noscapine (3.915 and 3.025 kcal/mol) are in reasonably good agreement with our experimentally determined binding affinity (ΔΔG(bind-Expt) of 3.570 and 2.988 kcal/mol, derived from K(d) values); and (3) Br-noscapine competes with colchicine binding to tubulin. The simplest interpretation of these collective data is that Br-noscapine binds tubulin at a site overlapping with, or very close to colchicine-binding site of tubulin. Although we cannot rule out a formal possibility that Br-noscapine might bind to a site distinct and distant from the colchicine-binding site that might negatively influence the colchicine binding to tubulin.

  9. Novel mechanisms for superoxide-scavenging activity of human manganese superoxide dismutase determined by the K68 key acetylation site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiaqi; Cheng, Kuoyuan; Zhang, Bo; Xu, Huan; Cao, Yuanzhao; Guo, Fei; Feng, Xudong; Xia, Qing

    2015-08-01

    Superoxide is the primary reactive oxygen species generated in the mitochondria. Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) is the major enzymatic superoxide scavenger present in the mitochondrial matrix and one of the most crucial reactive oxygen species-scavenging enzymes in the cell. SOD2 is activated by sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) through NAD(+)-dependent deacetylation. However, the exact acetylation sites of SOD2 are ambiguous and the mechanisms underlying the deacetylation-mediated SOD2 activation largely remain unknown. We are the first to characterize SOD2 mutants of the acetylation sites by investigating the relative enzymatic activity, structures, and electrostatic potential of SOD2 in this study. These SOD2 mutations affected the superoxide-scavenging activity in vitro and in HEK293T cells. The lysine 68 (K68) site is the most important acetylation site contributing to SOD2 activation and plays a role in cell survival after paraquat treatment. The molecular basis underlying the regulation of SOD2 activity by K68 was investigated in detail. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that K68 mutations induced a conformational shift of residues located in the active center of SOD2 and altered the charge distribution on the SOD2 surface. Thus, the entry of the superoxide anion into the coordinated core of SOD2 was inhibited. Our results provide a novel mechanistic insight, whereby SOD2 acetylation affects the structure and charge distribution of SOD2, its tetramerization, and p53-SOD2 interactions of SOD2 in the mitochondria, which may play a role in nuclear-mitochondrial communication during aging.

  10. Human population and activities in Forsmark. Site description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miliander, Sofia; Punakivi, Mari; Kylaekorpi, Lasse; Rydgren, Bernt [SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) is in the process of selecting a safe and environmentally acceptable location for a deep repository of radioactive waste. Two alternative locations are under investigation. These are Forsmark, Oesthammars kommun (kommun = municipality) and Simpevarp/Laxemar, Oskarshamns kommun. SKB has expressed the importance of describing the humans and their activities in these areas and therefore has this synthesis concerning the human population in Forsmark been produced.The description is a statistical synthesis, mainly based upon statistical data from SCB (Statistics Sweden) that has been collected, processed and analysed. The statistical data has not been verified through site inspections and interviews. When using statistical data, it is advisable to note that the data becomes more unreliable if the areas are small, with small populations.The data in this description is essential for future evaluations of the impact on the environment and its human population (Environmental Impact Assessments). The data is also important when modelling the potential flows of radio nuclides and calculating the risk of exposure in future safety assessments.The actual area for the study is in this report called 'the Forsmark area', an area of 19.5 km{sup 2} near Forsmark nuclear power plant. The land use in the Forsmark area differs notably from the land use in Uppsala laen (laen = county). Only 0.04% of the total area is developed (built-up) compared to 4.9% in Uppsala laen and only 4% is agricultural land compared to 25% in the county. Furthermore, there are far more forest, wetlands and water areas in the Forsmark area. The forest area represents as much as 72.5% of the total area.The Forsmark area is uninhabited, and its surroundings are very sparsely populated. In 2002, the population density in Forsmark was 1.8 inhabitants per square kilometre, which was 24 times lower than in Uppsala laen. The population density in the

  11. Synthesis and characterization of 18F-labeled active site inhibited factor VII (ASIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlandsson, Maria; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen; Jeppesen, Troels Elmer

    2015-01-01

    Activated factor VII blocked in the active site with Phe-Phe-Arg-chloromethyl ketone (active site inhibited factor VII (ASIS)) is a 50-kDa protein that binds with high affinity to its receptor, tissue factor (TF). TF is a transmembrane glycoprotein that plays an important role in, for example, th...

  12. Insights into structure and activity of natural compound inhibitors of pneumolysin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongen; Zhao, Xiaoran; Deng, Xuming; Wang, Jianfeng; Song, Meng; Niu, Xiaodi; Peng, Liping

    2017-01-01

    Pneumolysin is the one of the major virulence factor of the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. In previous report, it is shown that β-sitosterol, a natural compound without antimicrobial activity, is a potent antagonist of pneumolysin. Here, two new pneumolysin natural compound inhibitors, with differential activity, were discovered via haemolysis assay. To explore the key factor of the conformation for the inhibition activity, the interactions between five natural compound inhibitors with differential activity and pneumolysin were reported using molecular modelling, the potential of mean force profiles. Interestingly, it is found that incorporation of the single bond (C22-C23-C24-C25) to replace the double bond (hydrocarbon sidechain) improved the anti-haemolytic activity. In view of the molecular modelling, binding of the five inhibitors to the conserved loop region (Val372, Leu460, and Tyr461) of the cholesterol binding sites led to stable complex systems, which was consistent with the result of β-sitosterol. Owing to the single bond (C22-C23-C24-C25), campesterol and brassicasterol could form strong interactions with Val372 and show higher anti-haemolytic activity, which indicated that the single bond (C22-C23-C24-C25) in inhibitors was required for the anti-haemolytic activity. Overall, the current molecular modelling work provides a starting point for the development of rational design and higher activity pneumolysin inhibitors. PMID:28165051

  13. The nature of inherent bactericidal activity: insights from the nanotopology of three species of dragonfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainwaring, David E; Nguyen, Song Ha; Webb, Hayden; Jakubov, Timur; Tobin, Mark; Lamb, Robert N; Wu, Alex H-F; Marchant, Richard; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2016-03-28

    While insect wings are widely recognised as multi-functional, recent work showed that this extends to extensive bactericidal activity brought about by cell deformation and lysis on the wing nanotopology. We now quantitatively show that subtle changes to this topography result in substantial changes in bactericidal activity that are able to span an order of magnitude. Notably, the chemical composition of the lipid nanopillars was seen by XPS and synchrotron FTIR microspectroscopy to be similar across these activity differences. Modelling the interaction between bacterial cells and the wing surface lipids of 3 species of dragonflies, that inhabit similar environments, but with distinctly different behavioural repertoires, provided the relationship between surface structure and antibacterial functionality. In doing so, these principal behavioural patterns correlated with the demands for antimicrobial efficiency dictated by differences in their foraging strategies. This work now reveals a new feature in the design elegance of natural multi-functional surfaces as well providing insights into the bactericidal mechanism underlying inherently antimicrobial materials, while suggesting that nanotopology is related to the evolutionary development of a species through the demands of its behavioural repertoire. The underlying relationship between the processes of wetting, adhesion and capillarity of the lipid nanopillars and bactericidal efficiency suggests new prospects for purely mechano-responsive antibacterial surfaces.

  14. Structure of a diguanylate cyclase from Thermotoga maritima: insights into activation, feedback inhibition and thermostability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline Deepthi

    Full Text Available Large-scale production of bis-3'-5'-cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP would facilitate biological studies of numerous bacterial signaling pathways and phenotypes controlled by this second messenger molecule, such as virulence and biofilm formation. C-di-GMP constitutes also a potentially interesting molecule as a vaccine adjuvant. Even though chemical synthesis of c-di-GMP can be done, the yields are incompatible with mass-production. tDGC, a stand-alone diguanylate cyclase (DGC or GGDEF domain from Thermotoga maritima, enables the robust enzymatic production of large quantities of c-di-GMP. To understand the structural correlates of tDGC thermostability, its catalytic mechanism and feedback inhibition, we determined structures of an active-like dimeric conformation with both active (A sites facing each other and of an inactive dimeric conformation, locked by c-di-GMP bound at the inhibitory (I site. We also report the structure of a single mutant of tDGC, with the R158A mutation at the I-site, abolishing product inhibition and unproductive dimerization. A comparison with structurally characterized DGC homologues from mesophiles reveals the presence of a higher number of salt bridges in the hyperthermophile enzyme tDGC. Denaturation experiments of mutants disrupting in turn each of the salt bridges unique to tDGC identified three salt-bridges critical to confer thermostability.

  15. Hemispheric Symmetries of Plio-Pleistocene Surface Ocean Conditions: Insights from Southern Hemisphere ODP Sites 1125 and 1088

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, K. T.; Peterson, L.; Kelly, C.; Miller, H.; Seidenstein, J.

    2013-12-01

    For decades, most studies of Plio-Pleistocene climate and of the transition from the warmth of the Pliocene to the colder and more variable conditions of the Pleistocene have focused solely on northern hemisphere climate processes and responses. Here, we explore the southern hemisphere response to this major climate transition by documenting ocean surface conditions at Ocean Drilling Program Sites 1125 (42οS, 178οW, 1360m) and 1088 (40οS, 15οE, 2082m) through the Plio-Pleistocene. Secular trends in alkenone-derived sea surface temperature (SST) records indicate that these mid-latitude southern hemisphere sites cooled ~3-4οC over the past 3 Myrs, a magnitude comparable to sites located at similar latitudes in both the North Atlantic and North Pacific. This observation suggests that contraction of the low latitude warm pool was hemispherically symmetric. Our highly resolved (3 kyr resolution) Site 1125 SST record bears considerable structural similarity to SST records from nearby site 1123 (42οS,171οW) as well as sites 846 (3οS, 91οW) in the eastern equatorial Pacific and U1313 (41οN, 33οW) in the North Atlantic. Most of these SST records are dominated by 100k power and contain strong secondary 41k peaks throughout the past 3 million years. North Atlantic site U1313 is the exception, mirroring the shift in dominant periodicity from 41k to 100k associated with the mid-Pleistocene transition, that has long been observed in benthic oxygen isotope records. Finally, in southern hemisphere SST records as well as at site U1313 from the north Atlantic we observe weak precessional power that is not evident in benthic oxygen isotope record. These results suggest a fairly hemispherically-coordinated response of ocean surface temperature to changing global climate conditions during the Plio-Pleistocene in terms of both secular trends and dominant orbital frequencies.

  16. Studies on the biotin-binding site of avidin. Lysine residues involved in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, G; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1987-01-01

    Egg-white avidin was treated with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Modification of an average of one lysine residue per avidin subunit caused the complete loss of biotin binding. Tryptic peptides obtained from the 2,4-dinitrophenylated avidin were fractionated by reversed-phase h.p.l.c. Three peptides contained the 2,4-dinitrophenyl group. Amino acid analysis revealed that lysine residues 45, 94 and 111 are modified and probably comprise part of the biotin-binding site. PMID:3109401

  17. Studies on the biotin-binding site of avidin. Lysine residues involved in the active site.

    OpenAIRE

    Gitlin, G; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1987-01-01

    Egg-white avidin was treated with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Modification of an average of one lysine residue per avidin subunit caused the complete loss of biotin binding. Tryptic peptides obtained from the 2,4-dinitrophenylated avidin were fractionated by reversed-phase h.p.l.c. Three peptides contained the 2,4-dinitrophenyl group. Amino acid analysis revealed that lysine residues 45, 94 and 111 are modified and probably comprise part of the biotin-binding site.

  18. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  19. Spectroscopic study on the active site of a SiO2 supported niobia catalyst used for the gas-phase Beckmann rearrangement of cyclohexanone oxime to ε-caprolactam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maronna, M M; Kruissink, E C; Parton, R F; Soulimani, F; Weckhuysen, B M; Hoelderich, W F

    2016-01-01

    NbOx/SiO2 with a very high catalytic activity for the gas-phase Beckmann rearrangement of cyclohexanone oxime to ε-caprolactam, was investigated by different spectroscopic methods in order to obtain new insights in the formation and nature of the active sites. FT-IR spectroscopy in combination with

  20. 78 FR 33908 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... renewable energy leases and subsequent site characterization activities (geophysical, geotechnical, archaeological, and biological surveys needed to develop specific project proposals on those leases) in an... from leasing, site characterization, and site assessment in and around the Call Area (76 FR 51391)....

  1. SET7/9 Catalytic Mutants Reveal the Role of Active Site Water Molecules in Lysine Multiple Methylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Rizzo, Paul A.; Couture, Jean-François; Dirk, Lynnette M.A.; Strunk, Bethany S.; Roiko, Marijo S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Houtz, Robert L.; Trievel, Raymond C. (Michigan); (NWU); (Kentucky)

    2010-11-15

    SET domain lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) methylate specific lysine residues in histone and non-histone substrates. These enzymes also display product specificity by catalyzing distinct degrees of methylation of the lysine {epsilon}-amino group. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this specificity, we have characterized the Y245A and Y305F mutants of the human KMT SET7/9 (also known as KMT7) that alter its product specificity from a monomethyltransferase to a di- and a trimethyltransferase, respectively. Crystal structures of these mutants in complex with peptides bearing unmodified, mono-, di-, and trimethylated lysines illustrate the roles of active site water molecules in aligning the lysine {epsilon}-amino group for methyl transfer with S-adenosylmethionine. Displacement or dissociation of these solvent molecules enlarges the diameter of the active site, accommodating the increasing size of the methylated {epsilon}-amino group during successive methyl transfer reactions. Together, these results furnish new insights into the roles of active site water molecules in modulating lysine multiple methylation by SET domain KMTs and provide the first molecular snapshots of the mono-, di-, and trimethyl transfer reactions catalyzed by these enzymes.

  2. Photocatalytic Properties of TiO2: Evidence of the Key Role of Surface Active Sites in Water Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Tadeusz; Li, Wenxian; Nowotny, Janusz; Atanacio, Armand J; Davis, Joel

    2015-09-10

    Photocatalytic activity of oxide semiconductors is commonly considered in terms of the effect of the band gap on the light-induced performance. The present work considers a combined effect of several key performance-related properties (KPPs) on photocatalytic activity of TiO2 (rutile), including the chemical potential of electrons (Fermi level), the concentration of surface active sites, and charge transport, in addition to the band gap. The KPPs have been modified using defect engineering. This approach led to imposition of different defect disorders and the associated KPPs, which are defect-related. This work shows, for the first time, a competitive influence of different KPPs on photocatalytic activity that was tested using oxidation of methylene blue (MB). It is shown that the increase of oxygen activity in the TiO2 lattice from 10(-12) Pa to 10(5) Pa results in (i) increase in the band gap from 2.42 to 2.91 eV (direct transitions) or 2.88 to 3 eV (indirect transitions), (ii) increase in the population of surface active sites, (iii) decrease of the Fermi level, and (iv) decrease of the charge transport. It is shown that the observed changes in the photocatalytic activity are determined by two dominant KPPs: the concentration of active surface sites and the Fermi level, while the band gap and charge transport have a minor effect on the photocatalytic performance. The effect of the defect-related properties on photoreactivity of TiO2 with water is considered in terms of a theoretical model offering molecular-level insight into the process.

  3. Are nest sites actively chosen? Testing a common assumption for three non-resource limited birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, A. E.; Elliot, S. L.; Hart, A. G.

    2009-09-01

    Many widely-accepted ecological concepts are simplified assumptions about complex situations that remain largely untested. One example is the assumption that nest-building species choose nest sites actively when they are not resource limited. This assumption has seen little direct empirical testing: most studies on nest-site selection simply assume that sites are chosen actively (and seek explanations for such behaviour) without considering that sites may be selected randomly. We used 15 years of data from a nestbox scheme in the UK to test the assumption of active nest-site choice in three cavity-nesting bird species that differ in breeding and migratory strategy: blue tit ( Cyanistes caeruleus), great tit ( Parus major) and pied flycatcher ( Ficedula hypoleuca). Nest-site selection was non-random (implying active nest-site choice) for blue and great tits, but not for pied flycatchers. We also considered the relative importance of year-specific and site-specific factors in determining occupation of nest sites. Site-specific factors were more important than year-specific factors for the tit species, while the reverse was true for pied flycatchers. Our results show that nest-site selection, in birds at least, is not always the result of active choice, such that choice should not be assumed automatically in studies of nesting behaviour. We use this example to highlight the need to test key ecological assumptions empirically, and the importance of doing so across taxa rather than for single "model" species.

  4. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  5. Human population and activities at Simpevarp. Site description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miliander, Sofia; Punakivi, Mari; Kylaekorpi, Lasse; Rydgren, Bernt [SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) is in the process of selecting a safe and environmentally acceptable location for a deep repository of radioactive waste. Two alternative locations are under investigation. These are Forsmark, Oesthammars kommun (kommun = municipality) and Simpevarp/Laxemar, Oskarshamns kommun. SKB has expressed the importance of describing the humans and their activities in these areas and therefore has this synthesis concerning the human population in Forsmark been produced. The description is a statistical synthesis, mainly based upon statistical data from SCB (Statistics Sweden) that has been collected, processed and analysed. The statistical data has not been verified through site inspections and interviews. When using statistical data, it is advisable to note that the data becomes more unreliable if the areas are small, with small populations. The data in this description is essential for future evaluations of the impact on the environment and its human population (environmental impacts assessments). The data is also important when modelling the potential flows of radio nuclides and calculating the risk of exposure in future safety assessments. The actual area for the study is in this report called 'the Simpevarp area', an area of 127.0 km{sup 2} near Oskarshamn nuclear power plant. The land use in Simpevarp area differs notably from the land use in Kalmar laen. The forest area is far more dominating in Simpevarp area than in Kalmar laen and it represents as much as 89% compared to 63% of the total area. Only 4.4% of the area is arable land compared to 11.6% in Kalmar laen and only 0.3% is of other type (wetlands, bare rock, quarries, pites etc) compared to 15.6% in the county. The main observation is that Simpevarp area is a sparsely populated area located in a relatively lightly populated county. In 2002, the population density was 7.4 inhabitants/km{sup 2}, three times lower than in Kalmar laen. The

  6. Human population and activities at Simpevarp. Site description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miliander, Sofia; Punakivi, Mari; Kylaekorpi, Lasse; Rydgren, Bernt [SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) is in the process of selecting a safe and environmentally acceptable location for a deep repository of radioactive waste. Two alternative locations are under investigation. These are Forsmark, Oesthammars kommun (kommun = municipality) and Simpevarp/Laxemar, Oskarshamns kommun. SKB has expressed the importance of describing the humans and their activities in these areas and therefore has this synthesis concerning the human population in Forsmark been produced. The description is a statistical synthesis, mainly based upon statistical data from SCB (Statistics Sweden) that has been collected, processed and analysed. The statistical data has not been verified through site inspections and interviews. When using statistical data, it is advisable to note that the data becomes more unreliable if the areas are small, with small populations. The data in this description is essential for future evaluations of the impact on the environment and its human population (environmental impacts assessments). The data is also important when modelling the potential flows of radio nuclides and calculating the risk of exposure in future safety assessments. The actual area for the study is in this report called 'the Simpevarp area', an area of 127.0 km{sup 2} near Oskarshamn nuclear power plant. The land use in Simpevarp area differs notably from the land use in Kalmar laen. The forest area is far more dominating in Simpevarp area than in Kalmar laen and it represents as much as 89% compared to 63% of the total area. Only 4.4% of the area is arable land compared to 11.6% in Kalmar laen and only 0.3% is of other type (wetlands, bare rock, quarries, pites etc) compared to 15.6% in the county. The main observation is that Simpevarp area is a sparsely populated area located in a relatively lightly populated county. In 2002, the population density was 7.4 inhabitants/km{sup 2}, three times lower than in Kalmar laen. The

  7. Structural insight into activity enhancement and inhibition of H64A carbonic anhydrase II by imidazoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Aggarwal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human carbonic anhydrases (CAs are zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the hydration and dehydration of CO2 and HCO3−, respectively. The reaction follows a ping-pong mechanism, in which the rate-limiting step is the transfer of a proton from the zinc-bound solvent (OH−/H2O in/out of the active site via His64, which is widely believed to be the proton-shuttling residue. The decreased catalytic activity (∼20-fold lower with respect to the wild type of a variant of CA II in which His64 is replaced with Ala (H64A CA II can be enhanced by exogenous proton donors/acceptors, usually derivatives of imidazoles and pyridines, to almost the wild-type level. X-ray crystal structures of H64A CA II in complex with four imidazole derivatives (imidazole, 1-methylimidazole, 2-methylimidazole and 4-methylimidazole have been determined and reveal multiple binding sites. Two of these imidazole binding sites have been identified that mimic the positions of the `in' and `out' rotamers of His64 in wild-type CA II, while another directly inhibits catalysis by displacing the zinc-bound solvent. The data presented here not only corroborate the importance of the imidazole side chain of His64 in proton transfer during CA catalysis, but also provide a complete structural understanding of the mechanism by which imidazoles enhance (and inhibit when used at higher concentrations the activity of H64A CA II.

  8. Structural insights into Cydia pomonella pheromone binding protein 2 mediated prediction of potentially active semiochemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen; Liu, Jiyuan; Zhang, Yalin

    2016-03-01

    Given the advantages of behavioral disruption application in pest control and the damage of Cydia pomonella, due progresses have not been made in searching active semiochemicals for codling moth. In this research, 31 candidate semiochemicals were ranked for their binding potential to Cydia pomonella pheromone binding protein 2 (CpomPBP2) by simulated docking, and this sorted result was confirmed by competitive binding assay. This high predicting accuracy of virtual screening led to the construction of a rapid and viable method for semiochemicals searching. By reference to binding mode analyses, hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interaction were suggested to be two key factors in determining ligand affinity, so is the length of molecule chain. So it is concluded that semiochemicals of appropriate chain length with hydroxyl group or carbonyl group at one head tended to be favored by CpomPBP2. Residues involved in binding with each ligand were pointed out as well, which were verified by computational alanine scanning mutagenesis. Progress made in the present study helps establish an efficient method for predicting potentially active compounds and prepares for the application of high-throughput virtual screening in searching semiochemicals by taking insights into binding mode analyses.

  9. B-H bond activation using an electrophilic metal complex: insights into the reaction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul; Jagirdar, Balaji R

    2013-01-07

    A highly electrophilic ruthenium center in the [RuCl(dppe)(2)][OTf] complex brings about the activation of the B-H bond in ammonia borane (H(3)N·BH(3), AB) and dimethylamine borane (Me(2)HN·BH(3), DMAB). At room temperature, the reaction between [RuCl(dppe)(2)][OTf] and AB or DMAB results in trans-[RuH(η(2)-H(2))(dppe)(2)][OTf], trans-[RuCl(η(2)-H(2))(dppe)(2)][OTf], and trans-[RuH(Cl)(dppe)(2)], as noted in the NMR spectra. Mixing the ruthenium complex and AB or DMAB at low temperature (198/193 K) followed by NMR spectral measurements as the reaction mixture was warmed up to room temperature allowed the observation of various species formed enroute to the final products that were obtained at room temperature. On the basis of the variable-temperature multinuclear NMR spectroscopic studies of these two reactions, the mechanistic insights for B-H bond activation were obtained. In both cases, the reaction proceeds via an η(1)-B-H moiety bound to the metal center. The detailed mechanistic pathways of these two reactions as studied by NMR spectroscopy are described.

  10. Comparative Characterization of CTX-M-64 and CTX-M-14 Provides Insights into the Structure and Catalytic Activity of the CTX-M Class of Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dandan; Chiou, Jiachi; Zeng, Zhenling; Chan, Edward Wai-Chi; Liu, Jian-Hua; Chen, Sheng

    2016-10-01

    Clinical isolates producing hybrid CTX-M β-lactamases, presumably due to recombination between the blaCTX-M-15 and blaCTX-M-14 elements, have emerged in recent years. Among the hybrid enzymes, CTX-M-64 and CTX-M-14 display the most significant difference in catalytic activity. This study aims to investigate the mechanisms underlying such differential enzymatic activities in order to provide insight into the structure/function relationship of this class of enzymes. Sequence alignment analysis showed that the major differences between the amino acid composition of CTX-M-64 and CTX-M-14 lie at both the N and C termini of the enzymes. Single or multiple amino acid substitutions introduced into CTX-M-64 and CTX-M-14 were found to produce only minor effects on hydrolytic functions; such a finding is consistent with the notion that the discrepancy between the functional activities of the two enzymes is not the result of only a few amino acid changes but is attributable to interactions between a unique set of amino acid residues in each enzyme. This theory is supported by the results of the thermal stability assay, which confirmed that CTX-M-64 is significantly more stable than CTX-M-14. Our data confirmed that, in addition to the important residues located in the active site, residues distal to the active site also contribute to the catalytic activity of the enzyme through stabilizing its structural integrity.

  11. Histopathological and molecular insights into the ovicidal activities of two entomopathogenic fungi against two-spotted spider mite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Shi, Wei-Bing; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2014-03-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi can infect and kill spider mite eggs but their ovicidal activities are poorly understood. Here we gain histopathogenical and molecular insights into the ovicidal activities of Beauveria bassiana and Isaria fumosorosea against the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae. Scanning electronic microscopy indicated successful adhesion and germination of fungal conidia on egg shell at 24h post-spray (HPS). Germ tubes of both fungi could penetrate into egg shell with penetration pegs at 48 HPS. Interestingly, the germ tubes of B. bassiana may elongate on egg surface to locate appropriate sites for penetration, acting as 'searching' hyphae. Aside from the normal penetration, the germ tubes of I. fumosorosea can be completely or partially embedded into egg shell for a distance of extension, forming shell humps. Light microscopy of ultrathin sections of infected eggs showed shrunken (affected) or disrupted embryos at 48-96 HPS despite little effect on egg cleavage at 24 HPS. However, distinguishable hyphal cells were hardly found inside the embryos lacking oxygen although fungal outgrowths were abundant on unhatched (killed) eggs. In PCR with specific probes, the 18S rDNA signals of B. bassiana (412 bp) and I. fumosorosea (454 bp) in the DNA extracts from surface-cleaned mite eggs increased at 0-96 HPS, confirming fungal colonization in the infected eggs. We consider that the colonization on shell surface and underside could rely upon extending hyphae for uptake of egg nutrition, resulting in embryo disruption. Our observations add knowledge to microbial control of spider mites.

  12. Enzyme-ligand interactions that drive active site rearrangements in the Helicobacter pylori 5´-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronning, Donald R; Iacopelli, Natalie M; Mishra, Vidhi [Toledo

    2012-03-15

    The bacterial enzyme 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) plays a central role in three essential metabolic pathways in bacteria: methionine salvage, purine salvage, and polyamine biosynthesis. Recently, its role in the pathway that leads to the production of autoinducer II, an important component in quorum-sensing, has garnered much interest. Because of this variety of roles, MTAN is an attractive target for developing new classes of inhibitors that influence bacterial virulence and biofilm formation. To gain insight toward the development of new classes of MTAN inhibitors, the interactions between the Helicobacter pylori-encoded MTAN and its substrates and substrate analogs were probed using X-ray crystallography. The structures of MTAN, an MTAN-Formycin A complex, and an adenine bound form were solved by molecular replacement and refined to 1.7, 1.8, and 1.6 Å, respectively. The ribose-binding site in the MTAN and MTAN-adenine cocrystal structures contain a tris[hydroxymethyl]aminomethane molecule that stabilizes the closed form of the enzyme and displaces a nucleophilic water molecule necessary for catalysis. This research gives insight to the interactions between MTAN and bound ligands that promote closing of the enzyme active site and highlights the potential for designing new classes of MTAN inhibitors using a link/grow or ligand assembly development strategy based on the described H. pylori MTAN crystal structures.

  13. Insights into Ocean Acidification During the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum from Boron Isotopes at Southern Ocean Site 738

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebius, I.; Hoenisch, B.; Friedrich, O.

    2015-12-01

    The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) is a ~650-kyr interval of global warming, with a brief ~50 ky long peak warming interval, and an abrupt termination. Deep sea and surface ocean temperature evolution across this interval are fairly well constrained, but thus far we have little understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the gradual warming and rapid recovery. Carbonate mass accumulation rates suggest a shoaling of the carbonate compensation depth, and studies on alkenones indicate increasing atmospheric CO2 levels during the MECO. This suggests an increase in surface ocean CO2, and consequently ocean acidification. However, the severity and timing of the proposed ocean acidification with respect to the onset, peak warming and the termination are currently not well resolved. The boron isotopic composition (δ11B) recorded in planktic foraminifer shells offers an opportunity to infer oceanic pH across this interval. We are working on a boron isotope reconstruction from Southern Ocean IODP site 738 and South Atlantic IODP site 1263, covering 42.0 to 38.5 Ma. These sites are characterized by good carbonate preservation and well-defined age models have been established. Additionally, ecology, nutrient content and bottom-water oxygenation have been shown to change significantly across the event towards a more eutrophic, periodically oxygen-depleted environment supporting different biological communities. We selected the planktic foraminifera species Acarinina spinuloinflata for this study because it is symbiont-bearing, suggesting a near-surface habitat and little vertical migration in the water column, and because of its abundance in the samples. δ11B data will be translated to surface ocean pH and atmospheric pCO2 will be approximated to refine knowledge about the carbon cycle during this time. Parallel analysis of two core sites will help to evaluate the tenacity of the data.

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi: insights into naphthoquinone effects on growth and proteinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourguignon, Saulo C; Cavalcanti, Danielle F B; de Souza, Alessandra M T; Castro, Helena C; Rodrigues, Carlos R; Albuquerque, Magaly G; Santos, Dilvani O; da Silva, Gabriel Gomes; da Silva, Fernando C; Ferreira, Vitor F; de Pinho, Rosa T; Alves, Carlos R

    2011-01-01

    In this study we compared the effects of naphthoquinones (α-lapachone, β-lapachone, nor-β-lapachone and Epoxy-α-lap) on growth of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes forms, and on viability of VERO cells. In addition we also experimentally analyzed the most active compounds inhibitory profile against T. cruzi serine- and cysteine-proteinases activity and theoretically evaluated them against cruzain, the major T. cruzi cysteine proteinase by using a molecular docking approach. Our results confirmed β-lapachone and Epoxy-α-lap with a high trypanocidal activity in contrast to α-lapachone and nor-β-lapachone whereas Epoxy-α-lap presented the safest toxicity profile against VERO cells. Interestingly the evaluation of the active compounds effects against T. cruzi cysteine- and serine-proteinases activities revealed different targets for these molecules. β-Lapachone is able to inhibit the cysteine-proteinase activity of T. cruzi proteic whole extract and of cruzain, similar to E-64, a classical cysteine-proteinase inhibitor. Differently, Epoxy-α-lap inhibited the T. cruzi serine-proteinase activity, similar to PMSF, a classical serine-proteinase inhibitor. In agreement to these biological profiles in the enzymatic assays, our theoretical analysis showed that E-64 and β-lapachone interact with the cruzain specific S2 pocket and active site whereas Epoxy-α-lap showed no important interactions. Overall, our results infer that β-lapachone and Epoxy-α-lap compounds may inhibit T. cruzi epimastigotes growth by affecting T. cruzi different proteinases. Thus the present data shows the potential of these compounds as prototype of protease inhibitors on drug design studies for developing new antichagasic compounds.

  15. Size Dependence of Atomically Precise Gold Nanoclusters in Chemoselective Hydrogenation and Active Site Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gao [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU); Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Kumar, Santosh [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU); Chen, Yuxiang [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU); Jin, Rongchao [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU)

    2014-01-01

    We here investigate the catalytic properties of water-soluble Aun(SG)m nanocluster catalysts (H-SG = glutathione) of different sizes, including Au15(SG)13, Au18(SG)14, Au25(SG)18, Au38(SG)24, and captopril-capped Au25(Capt)18 nanoclusters. These Aun(SR)m nanoclusters (-SR represents thiolate generally) are used as homogeneous catalysts (i.e., without supports) in the chemoselective hydrogenation of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde (4-NO2PhCHO) to 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol (4-NO2PhCH2OH) in water with H2 gas (20 bar) as the hydrogen source. These nanocluster catalysts, except Au18(SG)14, remain intact after the catalytic reaction, evidenced by UV-vis spectra which are characteristic of each sized nanoclusters and thus serve as spectroscopic fingerprints . We observe a drastic size-dependence and steric effect of protecting ligands on the gold nanocluster catalysts in the hydrogenation reaction. Density functional theory (DFT) modeling of the 4-nitrobenzaldehyde adsorption shows that both the CHO and NO2 groups are in close interact with the S-Au-S staples on the gold nanocluster surface; the adsorption of the 4-nitrobenzaldehyde molecule on the four different sized Aun(SR)m nanoclusters are moderately strong and similar in strength. The DFT results suggest that the catalytic activity of the Aun(SR)m nanoclusters is primarily determined by the surface area of the Au nanocluster, consistent with the observed trend of the conversion of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde versus the cluster size. Overall, this work offers the molecular insight into the hydrogenation of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and the catalytically active site structure on gold nanocluster catalysts.

  16. 76 FR 24871 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... from eligible active uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of...). Title X requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs...

  17. 76 FR 30696 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... eligible active uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of the Energy... requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs of...

  18. Identification of Active Edge Sites for Electrochemical H2 Evolution from MoS2 Nanocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaramillo, Thomas; Jørgensen, Kristina Pilt; Bonde, Jacob;

    2007-01-01

    The identification of the active sites in heterogeneous catalysis requires a combination of surface sensitive methods and reactivity studies. We determined the active site for hydrogen evolution, a reaction catalyzed by precious metals, on nanoparticulate molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) by atomically...

  19. New Insights into the Active Tectonics of Eastern Indonesia from GPS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilo, S.; Koulali Idrissi, A.; McClusky, S.; Meilano, I.; Cummins, P. R.; Tregoning, P.; Syafii, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Indonesian archipelago encompasses a wide range of tectonic environments, including island arc volcanism, subduction zones, and arc-continent collision. Many of the details of this tectonic activity are still poorly understood, especially where the Australian continent collides with Indonesia, separating the Sunda Arc in west from that at the Banda Arc in the east. While it seems clear that the Australian plate is subducted under both the Sunda and Banda Arcs, it is not clear what happens along the 1000 km -long stretch in between. The question of just where the plate motion is accommodated is of major importance to assessments of earthquake and tsunami hazard in the region. To help resolve these questions the Geospatial Information Agency of Indonesia has collaborated with the Australian National University and the Bandung Institute of Technology in a GPS campaign spanning much of eastern Indonesia, from Lombok in the west to Alor in the east. We have combined these data with those from previous campaigns, resulting in over 27 campaign and 18 continuous GPS sites being used in the analysis. The improvement in site density allowed us to develop of a more complete description of tectonic activity in this region than has been obtained in previous studies. Our preliminary results suggests that there is a relatively simple transition from subduction at the Java Trench off east Java, to a partitioned convergence along both the Timor Trough and the Flores Thrust in the Nusa Tenggara region.

  20. Modelling active sites for the Beckmann rearrangement reaction in boron-containing zeolites and their interaction with probe molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezcano-González, Inés; Vidal-Moya, Alejandro; Boronat, Mercedes; Blasco, Teresa; Corma, Avelino

    2010-06-28

    Theoretical calculations and in situ solid state NMR spectroscopy have been combined to get insight on the nature of the active sites for the Beckmann rearrangement reaction in borosilicate zeolites. The interaction of a B site in zeolite Beta with a series of probe molecules (ammonia, pyridine, acetone and water) has been modelled and the (15)N and (11)B NMR isotropic chemical shift of the resulting complexes calculated and compared with experimental in situ NMR results. This approach has allowed validation of the methodology to model the adsorption on a zeolite boron site of molecules of varying basicity which are either protonated or non-protonated. The limitation is that theoretical calculations overestimate the effect of molecular adsorption through hydrogen bonds on the calculated isotropic (11)B NMR chemical shift.Theoretical and experimental results on the adsorption of acetophenone and cyclohexanone oximes on zeolite B-Beta indicate that Brønsted acid sites protonate the oximes, changing the boron coordination from trigonal to tetrahedral. Comparison of theoretical and experimental (15)N NMR chemical shifts of the adsorbed amides (acetanilide and epsilon-caprolactam) indicates that they are non-protonated, and the (11)B NMR spectra show that, as expected, boron remains in trigonal coordination with an isotropic delta(11)B(exp) which differs from the calculated value delta(11)B(calc).

  1. Effects of Alien Plants on Ecosystem Structure and Functioning and Implications for Restoration: Insights from Three Degraded Sites in South African Fynbos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Mirijam; Richardson, David M.; Privett, Sean D. J.

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the type and extent of degradation at three sites on the Agulhas Plain, South Africa: an old field dominated by the alien grass Pennisetum clandestinum Pers . (kikuyu), an abandoned Eucalyptus plantation, and a natural fynbos community invaded by nitrogen fixing—Australian Acacia species. These forms of degradation are representative of many areas in the region. By identifying the nature and degree of ecosystem degradation we aimed to determine appropriate strategies for restoration in this biodiversity hotspot. Vegetation surveys were conducted at degraded sites and carefully selected reference sites. Soil-stored propagule seed banks and macro- and micro-soil nutrients were determined. Species richness, diversity and native cover under Eucalyptus were extremely low compared to the reference site and alterations of the soil nutrients were the most severe. The cover of indigenous species under Acacia did not differ significantly from that in reference sites, but species richness was lower under Acacia and soils were considerably enriched. Native species richness was much lower in the kikuyu site, but soil nutrient status was similar to the reference site. Removal of the alien species alone may be sufficient to re-initiate ecosystem recovery at the kikuyu site, whereas active restoration is required to restore functioning ecosystems dominated by native species in the Acacia thicket and the Eucalyptus plantation. To restore native plant communities we suggest burning, mulching with sawdust and sowing of native species.

  2. Active Tectonic Research for Seismic Safety Evaluation of Long-Line Engineering Sites in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran Yongkang; Chen Lichun

    2005-01-01

    Long-line engineering sites usually have to pass through active tectonics, so the research of active tectonics is of great importance to seismic safety evaluation of this sort of site. In the paper, basing on the summarization and analysis of the requirements for seismic safety evaluation of long-line engineering site and the status quo of active tectonics research, we propose the focal points of active tectonics research for seismic safety evaluation of long-line engineering sites, including the research contents, technical targets and routes, and the submission of the achievements, etc. Finally, we make a preliminary analysis and discussion about the problems existing in the present-day active tectonics research for seismic safety evaluation of long-line engineering sites.

  3. Studies on the biotin-binding site of avidin. Tryptophan residues involved in the active site.

    OpenAIRE

    Gitlin, G; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1988-01-01

    Egg-white avidin was modified with the tryptophan-specific reagent 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl bromide. The complete loss of biotin-binding activity was achieved upon modification of an average of one tryptophan residue per avidin subunit. The identity of the modified residues was determined by isolating the relevant tryptic and chymotryptic peptides from CNBr-cleaved avidin fragments. The results demonstrate that Trp-70 and Trp-110 are modified in approximately equivalent proportions. It is beli...

  4. Blogs and Social Network Sites as Activity Systems: Exploring Adult Informal Learning Process through Activity Theory Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Gyeong Mi; Lee, Romee

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses an Activity Theory framework to explore adult user activities and informal learning processes as reflected in their blogs and social network sites (SNS). Using the assumption that a web-based space is an activity system in which learning occurs, typical features of the components were investigated and each activity system then…

  5. Structural and dynamic insights into the energetics of activation loop rearrangement in FGFR1 kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tobias; Vajpai, Navratna; Phillips, Jonathan J; Davies, Gareth; Holdgate, Geoffrey A; Phillips, Chris; Tucker, Julie A; Norman, Richard A; Scott, Andrew D; Higazi, Daniel R; Lowe, David; Thompson, Gary S; Breeze, Alexander L

    2015-07-23

    Protein tyrosine kinases differ widely in their propensity to undergo rearrangements of the N-terminal Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG) motif of the activation loop, with some, including FGFR1 kinase, appearing refractory to this so-called 'DFG flip'. Recent inhibitor-bound structures have unexpectedly revealed FGFR1 for the first time in a 'DFG-out' state. Here we use conformationally selective inhibitors as chemical probes for interrogation of the structural and dynamic features that appear to govern the DFG flip in FGFR1. Our detailed structural and biophysical insights identify contributions from altered dynamics in distal elements, including the αH helix, towards the outstanding stability of the DFG-out complex with the inhibitor ponatinib. We conclude that the αC-β4 loop and 'molecular brake' regions together impose a high energy barrier for this conformational rearrangement, and that this may have significance for maintaining autoinhibition in the non-phosphorylated basal state of FGFR1.

  6. Structural and dynamic insights into the energetics of activation loop rearrangement in FGFR1 kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tobias; Vajpai, Navratna; Phillips, Jonathan J.; Davies, Gareth; Holdgate, Geoffrey A.; Phillips, Chris; Tucker, Julie A.; Norman, Richard A.; Scott, Andrew D.; Higazi, Daniel R.; Lowe, David; Thompson, Gary S.; Breeze, Alexander L.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases differ widely in their propensity to undergo rearrangements of the N-terminal Asp–Phe–Gly (DFG) motif of the activation loop, with some, including FGFR1 kinase, appearing refractory to this so-called ‘DFG flip'. Recent inhibitor-bound structures have unexpectedly revealed FGFR1 for the first time in a ‘DFG-out' state. Here we use conformationally selective inhibitors as chemical probes for interrogation of the structural and dynamic features that appear to govern the DFG flip in FGFR1. Our detailed structural and biophysical insights identify contributions from altered dynamics in distal elements, including the αH helix, towards the outstanding stability of the DFG-out complex with the inhibitor ponatinib. We conclude that the αC-β4 loop and ‘molecular brake' regions together impose a high energy barrier for this conformational rearrangement, and that this may have significance for maintaining autoinhibition in the non-phosphorylated basal state of FGFR1. PMID:26203596

  7. 'Maximising shareholder value': a detailed insight into the corporate political activity of the Australian food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mialon, Melissa; Swinburn, Boyd; Allender, Steven; Sacks, Gary

    2017-04-01

    To gain deeper insight into the corporate political activity (CPA) of the Australian food industry from a public health perspective. Fifteen interviews with a purposive sample of current and former policy makers, public health advocates and academics who have closely interacted with food industry representatives or observed food industry behaviours. All participants reported having directly experienced the CPA of the food industry during their careers, with the 'information and messaging' and 'constituency building' strategies most prominent. Participants expressed concern that food industry CPA strategies resulted in weakened policy responses to addressing diet-related disease. This study provides direct evidence of food industry practices that have the potential to shape public health-related policies and programs in Australia in ways that favour business interests at the expense of population health. Implications for public health: This evidence can inform policy makers and public health advocates and be used to adopt measures to ensure that public interests are put at the forefront as part of the policy development and implementation process. © 2017 The Authors.

  8. Mutation of yeast Eug1p CXXS active sites to CXXC results in a dramatic increase in protein disulphide isomerase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, P; Winther, Jakob R.

    2001-01-01

    Protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) is an essential protein which is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum of eukaryotic cells. It catalyses the formation and isomerization of disulphide bonds during the folding of secretory proteins. PDI is composed of domains with structural homology...... to thioredoxin and with CXXC catalytic motifs. EUG1 encodes a yeast protein, Eug1p, that is highly homologous to PDI. However, Eug1p contains CXXS motifs instead of CXXC. In the current model for PDI function both cysteines in this motif are required for PDI-catalysed oxidase activity. To gain more insight...... into the biochemical properties of this unusual variant of PDI we have purified and characterized the protein. We have furthermore generated a number of mutant forms of Eug1p in which either or both of the active sites have been mutated to a CXXC sequence. To determine the catalytic capacity of the wild...

  9. XPD Helicase Structures and Activities: Insights into the Cancer and Aging Phenotypes from XPD Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tainer, John; Fan, Li; Fuss, Jill O.; Cheng, Quen J.; Arvai, Andrew S.; Hammel, Michal; Roberts, Victoria A.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Tainer, John A.

    2008-06-02

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  10. XPD Helicase Structures And Activities: Insights Into the Cancer And Aging Phenotypes From XPD Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, L.; Fuss, J.O.; Cheng, Q.J.; Arvai, A.S.; Hammel, M.; Roberts, V.A.; Cooper, P.K.; Tainer, J.A.

    2009-05-18

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  11. The role of multiple hydrogen-bonding groups in specific alcohol binding sites in proteins: insights from structural studies of LUSH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thode, Anna B; Kruse, Schoen W; Nix, Jay C; Jones, David N M

    2008-03-07

    It is now generally accepted that many of the physiological effects of alcohol consumption are a direct result of binding to specific sites in neuronal proteins such as ion channels or other components of neuronal signaling cascades. Binding to these targets generally occurs in water-filled pockets and leads to alterations in protein structure and dynamics. However, the precise interactions required to confer alcohol sensitivity to a particular protein remain undefined. Using information from the previously solved crystal structures of the Drosophila melanogaster protein LUSH in complexes with short-chain alcohols, we have designed and tested the effects of specific amino acid substitutions on alcohol binding. The effects of these substitutions, specifically S52A, T57S, and T57A, were examined using a combination of molecular dynamics, X-ray crystallography, fluorescence spectroscopy, and thermal unfolding. These studies reveal that the binding of ethanol is highly sensitive to small changes in the composition of the alcohol binding site. We find that T57 is the most critical residue for binding alcohols; the T57A substitution completely abolishes binding, while the T57S substitution differentially affects ethanol binding compared to longer-chain alcohols. The additional requirement for a potential hydrogen-bond acceptor at position 52 suggests that both the presence of multiple hydrogen-bonding groups and the identity of the hydrogen-bonding residues are critical for defining an ethanol binding site. These results provide new insights into the detailed chemistry of alcohol's interactions with proteins.

  12. Role of active site conformational changes in photocycle activation of the AppA BLUF photoreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Puja; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2017-02-14

    Blue light using flavin adenine dinucleotide (BLUF) proteins are essential for the light regulation of a variety of physiologically important processes and serve as a prototype for photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET). Free-energy simulations elucidate the active site conformations in the AppA (activation of photopigment and puc expression) BLUF domain before and following photoexcitation. The free-energy profile for interconversion between conformations with either Trp104 or Met106 closer to the flavin, denoted Trpin/Metout and Trpout/Metin, reveals that both conformations are sampled on the ground state, with the former thermodynamically favorable by ∼3 kcal/mol. These results are consistent with the experimental observation of both conformations. To analyze the proton relay from Tyr21 to the flavin via Gln63, the free-energy profiles for Gln63 rotation were calculated on the ground state, the locally excited state of the flavin, and the charge-transfer state associated with electron transfer from Tyr21 to the flavin. For the Trpin/Metout conformation, the hydrogen-bonding pattern conducive to the proton relay is not thermodynamically favorable on the ground state but becomes more favorable, corresponding to approximately half of the configurations sampled, on the locally excited state. The calculated energy gaps between the locally excited and charge-transfer states suggest that electron transfer from Tyr21 to the flavin is more facile for configurations conducive to proton transfer. When the active site conformation is not conducive to PCET from Tyr21, Trp104 can directly compete with Tyr21 for electron transfer to the flavin through a nonproductive pathway, impeding the signaling efficiency.

  13. Assessment of activation products in the Savannah River Site environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.

    1996-07-01

    This document assesses the impact of radioactive activation products released from SRS facilities since the first reactor became operational late in 1953. The isotopes reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS: {sup 32}P, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 60}C, and {sup 65}Zn. Release pathways, emission control features, and annual releases to the aqueous and atmospheric environments are discussed. No single incident has resulted in a major acute release of activation products to the environment. The releases were the result of normal operations of the reactors and separations facilities. Releases declined over the years as better controls were established and production was reduced. The overall radiological impact of SRS activation product atmospheric releases from 1954 through 1994 on the offsite maximally exposed individual can be characterized by a total dose of 0.76 mrem. During the same period, such an individual received a total dose of 14,400 mrem from non-SRS sources of ionizing radiation present in the environment. SRS activation product aqueous releases between 1954 and 1994 resulted in a total dose of 54 mrem to the offsite maximally exposed individual. The impact of SRS activation product releases on offsite populations also has been evaluated.

  14. Characterization of an Active Thermal Erosion Site, Caribou Creek, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busey, R.; Bolton, W. R.; Cherry, J. E.; Hinzman, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this project is to estimate volume loss of soil over time from this site, provide parameterizations on erodibility of ice rich permafrost and serve as a baseline for future landscape evolution simulations. Located in the zone of discontinuous permafrost, the interior region of Alaska (USA) is home to a large quantity of warm, unstable permafrost that is both high in ice content and has soil temperatures near the freezing point. Much of this permafrost maintains a frozen state despite the general warming air temperature trend in the region due to the presence of a thick insulating organic mat and a dense root network in the upper sub-surface of the soil column. At a rapidly evolving thermo-erosion site, located within the Caribou-Poker Creeks Research Watershed (part of the Bonanza Creek LTER) near Chatanika, Alaska (N65.140, W147.570), the protective organic layer and associated plants were disturbed by an adjacent traditional use trail and the shifting of a groundwater spring. These triggers have led to rapid geomorphological change on the landscape as the soil thaws and sediment is transported into the creek at the valley bottom. Since 2006 (approximately the time of initiation), the thermal erosion has grown to 170 meters length, 3 meters max depth, and 15 meters maximum width. This research combines several data sets: DGPS survey, imagery from an extremely low altitude pole-based remote sensing (3 to 5 meters above ground level), and imagery from an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) at about 60m altitude.

  15. Volatile anesthetics inhibit the activity of calmodulin by interacting with its hydrophobic site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Miao-miao; XIA Hui-min; LIU Jiao; XU You-nian; XIN Nai-xin; ZHANG Shi-hai

    2012-01-01

    Background Volatile anesthetics (VAs) may affect varied and complex physiology processes by manipulating Ca2+-calmodulin (CaM).However,the detailed mechanism about the action of VAs on CaM has not been elucidated.This study was undertaken to examine the effects of VAs on the conformational change,hydrophobic site,and downstream signaling pathway of CaM,to explore the possible mechanism of anesthetic action of VAs.Methods Real-time second-harmonic generation (SHG) was performed to monitor the conformational change of CaM in the presence of VAs, each plus 100 μmol/L Ca2+. A hydrophobic fluorescence indicator,8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate (ANS),was utilized to define whether the VAs would interact with CaM at the hydrophobic site or not.High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was carried out to analyze the activity of CaM-dependent phosphodiesterase (PDE1) in the presence of VAs.The VAs studied were ether,enflurane,isoflurane,and sevoflurane,with their aqueous concentrations 7.6,9.5,11.4 mmol/L; 0.42,0.52,0.62 mmol/L; 0.25,0.31,0.37 mmol/L and 0.47,0.59,0.71 mmol/L respectively,each were equivalent to their 0.8,1.0 and 1.2 concentration for 50% of maximal effect (EC50) for general anesthesia.Results The second-harmonic radiation of CaM in the presence of Ca2+ was largely inhibited by the VAs.The fluorescence intensity of ANS,generated by binding of Ca2+ to CaM,was reversed by the VAs.HPLC results also showed that AMP,the product of the hydrolysis of cAMP by CaM-dependent PDE1,was reduced by the VAs.Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that the above VAs interact with the hydrophobic core of Ca2+-CaM and the interaction results in the inhibition of the conformational change and activity of CaM.This in vitro study may provide us insight into the possible mechanism of anesthetic action of VAs in vivo.

  16. Site directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues at the active site of mouse aldehyde oxidase AOX1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Schumann

    Full Text Available Mouse aldehyde oxidase (mAOX1 forms a homodimer and belongs to the xanthine oxidase family of molybdoenzymes which are characterized by an essential equatorial sulfur ligand coordinated to the molybdenum atom. In general, mammalian AOs are characterized by broad substrate specificity and an yet obscure physiological function. To define the physiological substrates and the enzymatic characteristics of mAOX1, we established a system for the heterologous expression of the enzyme in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein showed spectral features and a range of substrate specificity similar to the native protein purified from mouse liver. The EPR data of recombinant mAOX1 were similar to those of AO from rabbit liver, but differed from the homologous xanthine oxidoreductase enzymes. Site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids Val806, Met884 and Glu1265 at the active site resulted in a drastic decrease in the oxidation of aldehydes with no increase in the oxidation of purine substrates. The double mutant V806E/M884R and the single mutant E1265Q were catalytically inactive enzymes regardless of the aldehyde or purine substrates tested. Our results show that only Glu1265 is essential for the catalytic activity by initiating the base-catalyzed mechanism of substrate oxidation. In addition, it is concluded that the substrate specificity of molybdo-flavoenzymes is more complex and not only defined by the three characterized amino acids in the active site.

  17. An Investigation of the Mechanical Properties of Some Martian Regolith Simulants with Respect to the Surface Properties at the InSight Mission Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delage, Pierre; Karakostas, Foivos; Dhemaied, Amine; Belmokhtar, Malik; Lognonné, Philippe; Golombek, Matt; De Laure, Emmanuel; Hurst, Ken; Dupla, Jean-Claude; Keddar, Sharon; Cui, Yu Jun; Banerdt, Bruce

    2017-02-01

    In support of the InSight mission in which two instruments (the SEIS seismometer and the HP3 heat flow probe) will interact directly with the regolith on the surface of Mars, a series of mechanical tests were conducted on three different regolith simulants to better understand the observations of the physical and mechanical parameters that will be derived from InSight. The mechanical data obtained were also compared to data on terrestrial sands. The density of the regolith strongly influences its mechanical properties, as determined from the data on terrestrial sands. The elastoplastic compression volume changes were investigated through oedometer tests that also provided estimates of possible changes in density with depth. The results of direct shear tests provided values of friction angles that were compared with that of a terrestrial sand, and an extrapolation to lower density provided a friction angle compatible with that estimated from previous observations on the surface of Mars. The importance of the contracting/dilating shear volume changes of sands on the dynamic penetration of the mole was determined, with penetration facilitated by the ˜1.3 Mg/m3 density estimated at the landing site. Seismic velocities, measured by means of piezoelectric bender elements in triaxial specimens submitted to various isotropic confining stresses, show the importance of the confining stress, with lesser influence of density changes under compression. A power law relation of velocity as a function of confining stress with an exponent of 0.3 was identified from the tests, allowing an estimate of the surface seismic velocity of 150 m/s. The effect on the seismic velocity of a 10% proportion of rock in the regolith was also studied. These data will be compared with in situ data measured by InSight after landing.

  18. Active site densities, oxygen activation and adsorbed reactive oxygen in alcohol activation on npAu catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lu-Cun [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Harvard University; Cambridge, USA; Friend, C. M. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Harvard University; Cambridge, USA; School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; Harvard University; Fushimi, Rebecca [Parks College of Engineering, Aviation and Technology; Saint Louis University; Saint Louis, USA; The Langmuir Research Institute; Saint Louis; Madix, Robert J. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; Harvard University; Cambridge, USA

    2016-01-01

    The activation of molecular O2as well as the reactivity of adsorbed oxygen species is of central importance in aerobic selective oxidation chemistry on Au-based catalysts. Herein, we address the issue of O2activation on unsupported nanoporous gold (npAu) catalysts by applying a transient pressure technique, a temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor, to measure the saturation coverage of atomic oxygen, its collisional dissociation probability, the activation barrier for O2dissociation, and the facility with which adsorbed O species activate methanol, the initial step in the catalytic cycle of esterification. The results from these experiments indicate that molecular O2dissociation is associated with surface silver, that the density of reactive sites is quite low, that adsorbed oxygen atoms do not spill over from the sites of activation onto the surrounding surface, and that methanol reacts quite facilely with the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In addition, the O species from O2dissociation exhibits reactivity for the selective oxidation of methanol but not for CO. The TAP experiments also revealed that the surface of the npAu catalyst is saturated with adsorbed O under steady state reaction conditions, at least for the pulse reaction.

  19. Structural insights into omega-class glutathione transferases: a snapshot of enzyme reduction and identification of a non-catalytic ligandin site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Brock

    Full Text Available Glutathione transferases (GSTs are dimeric enzymes containing one active-site per monomer. The omega-class GSTs (hGSTO1-1 and hGSTO2-2 in humans are homodimeric and carry out a range of reactions including the glutathione-dependant reduction of a range of compounds and the reduction of S-(phenacylglutathiones to acetophenones. Both types of reaction result in the formation of a mixed-disulfide of the enzyme with glutathione through the catalytic cysteine (C32. Recycling of the enzyme utilizes a second glutathione molecule and results in oxidized glutathione (GSSG release. The crystal structure of an active-site mutant (C32A of the hGSTO1-1 isozyme in complex with GSSG provides a snapshot of the enzyme in the process of regeneration. GSSG occupies both the G (GSH-binding and H (hydrophobic-binding sites and causes re-arrangement of some H-site residues. In the same structure we demonstrate the existence of a novel "ligandin" binding site deep within in the dimer interface of this enzyme, containing S-(4-nitrophenacylglutathione, an isozyme-specific substrate for hGSTO1-1. The ligandin site, conserved in Omega class GSTs from a range of species, is hydrophobic in nature and may represent the binding location for tocopherol esters that are uncompetitive hGSTO1-1 inhibitors.

  20. Structural insights into omega-class glutathione transferases: a snapshot of enzyme reduction and identification of a non-catalytic ligandin site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Joseph; Board, Philip G; Oakley, Aaron J

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are dimeric enzymes containing one active-site per monomer. The omega-class GSTs (hGSTO1-1 and hGSTO2-2 in humans) are homodimeric and carry out a range of reactions including the glutathione-dependant reduction of a range of compounds and the reduction of S-(phenacyl)glutathiones to acetophenones. Both types of reaction result in the formation of a mixed-disulfide of the enzyme with glutathione through the catalytic cysteine (C32). Recycling of the enzyme utilizes a second glutathione molecule and results in oxidized glutathione (GSSG) release. The crystal structure of an active-site mutant (C32A) of the hGSTO1-1 isozyme in complex with GSSG provides a snapshot of the enzyme in the process of regeneration. GSSG occupies both the G (GSH-binding) and H (hydrophobic-binding) sites and causes re-arrangement of some H-site residues. In the same structure we demonstrate the existence of a novel "ligandin" binding site deep within in the dimer interface of this enzyme, containing S-(4-nitrophenacyl)glutathione, an isozyme-specific substrate for hGSTO1-1. The ligandin site, conserved in Omega class GSTs from a range of species, is hydrophobic in nature and may represent the binding location for tocopherol esters that are uncompetitive hGSTO1-1 inhibitors.

  1. The landscape degradation in the mining sites with suspended activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca IONCE

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The extracting industry, through its extraction activities, of shipping the ores, of breaking the ores, of preparing the practical substances, of stowing the useless rock, of transporting the practical substances, etc. might modify the area’s relief and the quality of ground, of thesurface waters and of the air. Suceava County has an old tradition of mining, where the results of this activity are visible, especially the visual point of view, and where not taking certain measures of ecological remediation will emphasize the disappointing image of the landscape within the areas of mining activity performing.The predominant mountainous landscape, in which mining activities have been held, is being affected also by the abandoned industrial and administrative buildings, in an advanced degradation state.The hydrographic system, very rich in mining areas, has its water quality affected by the acid rock drainage- phenomenon which appeared in many mining waste deposits.

  2. Location and activity specific site-management for military locations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maring, L.; Hulst, M. van; Meuken, D.

    2009-01-01

    pace is limited in the Netherlands and military activities, that may cause nuisance or environmental hazards, should therefore be considered and evaluated during the use of military locations. The last few years TNO and Deltares have worked on a research program on environmental effects due to milit

  3. Genome-wide mapping of transcription start sites yields novel insights into the primary transcriptome of Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arrigo, Isotta; Bojanovic, Klara; Yang, Xiaochen

    2016-01-01

    was examined using an in vivo assay with GFP-fusion vectors and shown to function via a translational repression mechanism. Furthermore, 56 novel intergenic small RNAs and 8 putative actuaton transcripts were detected, as well as 8 novel open reading frames (ORFs). This study illustrates how global mapping...... elements of P. putida strain KT2440. A total of 7937 putative transcription start sites (TSSs) were identified, where over two-thirds were located either on the opposite strand or internal to annotated genes. For TSSs associated with mRNAs, sequence analysis revealed a clear Shine–Dalgarno sequence...... but a lack of conserved overrepresented promoter motifs. These TSSs defined approximately 50 leaderless transcripts and an abundance of mRNAs with long leader regions of which 18 contain RNA regulatory elements from the Rfam database. The thiamine pyrophosphate riboswitch upstream of the thiC gene...

  4. Insight into the neuroendocrine site and cellular mechanism by which cortisol suppresses pituitary responsiveness to gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Kellie M; Davis, Tracy L; Doro, Lisa C; Nett, Terry M; Oakley, Amy E; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Rispoli, Louisa A; Wagenmaker, Elizabeth R; Karsch, Fred J

    2008-02-01

    Stress-like elevations in plasma glucocorticoids rapidly inhibit pulsatile LH secretion in ovariectomized sheep by reducing pituitary responsiveness to GnRH. This effect can be blocked by a nonspecific antagonist of the type II glucocorticoid receptor (GR) RU486. A series of experiments was conducted to strengthen the evidence for a mediatory role of the type II GR and to investigate the neuroendocrine site and cellular mechanism underlying this inhibitory effect of cortisol. First, we demonstrated that a specific agonist of the type II GR, dexamethasone, mimics the suppressive action of cortisol on pituitary responsiveness to GnRH pulses in ovariectomized ewes. This effect, which became evident within 30 min, documents mediation via the type II GR. We next determined that exposure of cultured ovine pituitary cells to cortisol reduced the LH response to pulse-like delivery of GnRH by 50% within 30 min, indicating a pituitary site of action. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that suppression of pituitary responsiveness to GnRH in ovariectomized ewes is due to reduced tissue concentrations of GnRH receptor. Although cortisol blunted the amplitude of GnRH-induced LH pulses within 1-2 h, the amount of GnRH receptor mRNA or protein was not affected over this time frame. Collectively, these observations provide evidence that cortisol acts via the type II GR within the pituitary gland to elicit a rapid decrease in responsiveness to GnRH, independent of changes in expression of the GnRH receptor.

  5. Encroachment of Human Activity on Sea Turtle Nesting Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziskin, D.; Aubrecht, C.; Elvidge, C.; Tuttle, B.; Baugh, K.; Ghosh, T.

    2008-12-01

    The encroachment of anthropogenic lighting on sea turtle nesting sites poses a serious threat to the survival of these animals [Nicholas, 2001]. This danger is quantified by combining two established data sets. The first is the Nighttime Lights data produced by the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center [Elvidge et al., 1997]. The second is the Marine Turtle Database produced by the World Conservation Monitoring Centre (WCMC). The technique used to quantify the threat of encroachment is an adaptation of the method described in Aubrecht et al. [2008], which analyzes the stress on coral reef systems by proximity to nighttime lights near the shore. Nighttime lights near beaches have both a direct impact on turtle reproductive success since they disorient hatchlings when they mistake land-based lights for the sky-lit surf [Lorne and Salmon, 2007] and the lights are also a proxy for other anthropogenic threats. The identification of turtle nesting sites with high rates of encroachment will hopefully steer conservation efforts to mitigate their effects [Witherington, 1999]. Aubrecht, C, CD Elvidge, T Longcore, C Rich, J Safran, A Strong, M Eakin, KE Baugh, BT Tuttle, AT Howard, EH Erwin, 2008, A global inventory of coral reef stressors based on satellite observed nighttime lights, Geocarto International, London, England: Taylor and Francis. In press. Elvidge, CD, KE Baugh, EA Kihn, HW Kroehl, ER Davis, 1997, Mapping City Lights with Nighttime Data from the DMSP Operational Linescan System, Photogrammatic Engineering and Remote Sensing, 63:6, pp. 727-734. Lorne, JK, M Salmon, 2007, Effects of exposure to artificial lighting on orientation of hatchling sea turtles on the beach and in the ocean, Endangered Species Research, Vol. 3: 23-30. Nicholas, M, 2001, Light Pollution and Marine Turtle Hatchlings: The Straw that Breaks the Camel's Back?, George Wright Forum, 18:4, p77-82. Witherington, BE, 1999, Reducing Threats To Nesting Habitat, Research and Management Techniques for

  6. Lipolytic activity from bacteria prospected in polluted portuary sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Levy Fonseca

    2014-06-01

    This study demonstrates that these TBT resistant isolates have, at the same time, the capacity to produce enzymes with a large biotechnological potential but, nevertheless, their relationship is not well understood, representing a novel approach. It is expected for these organisms to produce highly biotechnological relevant biocatalysts, due to their severe adaptations (Suehiro et al., 2007. The fully characterization of these lipases, mostly for F3 with elevated lipolytic activity exhibited, presents also a future challenge.

  7. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  8. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  9. Cooperative activation of cardiac transcription through myocardin bridging of paired MEF2 sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Courtney M. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Hu, Jianxin [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Thomas, Reuben [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Gladstone Inst.; Gainous, T. Blair [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Celona, Barbara [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Sinha, Tanvi [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Dickel, Diane E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Genomics Division; Heidt, Analeah B. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Xu, Shan-Mei [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Bruneau, Benoit G. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Gladstone Inst.; Pollard, Katherine S. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Gladstone Inst.; Pennacchio, Len A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Genomics Division; Black, Brian L. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of

    2017-03-28

    Enhancers frequently contain multiple binding sites for the same transcription factor. These homotypic binding sites often exhibit synergy, whereby the transcriptional output from two or more binding sites is greater than the sum of the contributions of the individual binding sites alone. Although this phenomenon is frequently observed, the mechanistic basis for homotypic binding site synergy is poorly understood. Here in this paper, we identify a bona fide cardiac-specific Prkaa2 enhancer that is synergistically activated by homotypic MEF2 binding sites. We show that two MEF2 sites in the enhancer function cooperatively due to bridging of the MEF2C-bound sites by the SAP domain-containing co-activator protein myocardin, and we show that paired sites buffer the enhancer from integration site-dependent effects on transcription in vivo. Paired MEF2 sites are prevalent in cardiac enhancers, suggesting that this might be a common mechanism underlying synergy in the control of cardiac gene expression in vivo.

  10. Active Site Metal Occupancy and Cyclic Di-GMP Phosphodiesterase Activity of Thermotoga maritima HD-GYP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Kyle D; Kurtz, Donald M

    2016-02-16

    HD-GYPs make up a subclass of the metal-dependent HD phosphohydrolase superfamily and catalyze conversion of cyclic di(3',5')-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) to 5'-phosphoguanylyl-(3'→5')-guanosine (pGpG) and GMP. Until now, the only reported crystal structure of an HD-GYP that also exhibits c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity contains a His/carboxylate ligated triiron active site. However, other structural and phylogenetic correlations indicate that some HD-GYPs contain dimetal active sites. Here we provide evidence that an HD-GYP c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase, TM0186, from Thermotoga maritima can accommodate both di- and trimetal active sites. We show that an as-isolated iron-containing TM0186 has an oxo/carboxylato-bridged diferric site, and that the reduced (diferrous) form is necessary and sufficient to catalyze conversion of c-di-GMP to pGpG, but that conversion of pGpG to GMP requires more than two metals per active site. Similar c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activities were obtained with divalent iron or manganese. On the basis of activity correlations with several putative metal ligand residue variants and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that TM0186 can accommodate both di- and trimetal active sites. Our results also suggest that a Glu residue conserved in a subset of HD-GYPs is required for formation of the trimetal site and can also serve as a labile ligand to the dimetal site. Given the anaerobic growth requirement of T. maritima, we suggest that this HD-GYP can function in vivo with either divalent iron or manganese occupying di- and trimetal sites.

  11. Vegetation-derived insights on the mobilization and potential transport of radionuclides from the Nopal I natural analog site, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie, B.W.; Pickett, D.A.; Pearcy, E.C.

    1999-07-01

    The Nopal I uranium (U) deposit, Pena Blanca, Mexico is a source term and contaminant transport natural analog to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In an attempt to characterize the mobilization and potential transport of radionuclides in the unsaturated zone at the Nopal I deposit, vegetation growing on ore piles was analyzed for {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 232}Th decay-series isotopes. Specimens of Phacelia robusta growing on high-grade piles of U ore were collected and analyzed by alpha autoradiography, and by alpha and gamma spectrometry. Activities for U, thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) isotopes (Bq/kg dried plant) were 300, 1,000, and 7,000 for {sup 238}U, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 226}Ra, respectively. The {sup 226}Ra activities in these specimens are among the highest ever measured for plants; furthermore, the plant-to-soil {sup 226}Ra concentration ratio is higher than expected. These results demonstrate the large mobility and bio-availability of Ra in the Nopal I environment, and support previous indications of recent loss of {sup 226}Ra from the ore body. Comparison between the activities of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th decay-chain Th isotopes in the plants and in the ore substrate indicate that relative mobilization into pore solutions of {sup 228}Th > {sup 230}Th > {sup 232}Th, in a ratio of about 50--25:4:1, respectively. The similarity of the plant's {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratio ({approximately}1.2) to that of a caliche deposit that formed adjacent to the Nopal ore body around 54 ka suggests the {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratio of U released from the ore is approximately 1.2. The U and {sup 226}Ra isotope activities of the plants and ore substrate, and solubility considerations, are used to assess a source term model of the potential Yucca Mountain repository. These results suggest the use of a natural analog source term model in performance assessments may be non-conservative.

  12. Binding site asymmetry in human transthyretin: insights from a joint neutron and X-ray crystallographic analysis using perdeuterated protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melina Haupt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Human transthyretin has an intrinsic tendency to form amyloid fibrils and is heavily implicated in senile systemic amyloidosis. Here, detailed neutron structural studies of perdeuterated transthyretin are described. The analyses, which fully exploit the enhanced visibility of isotopically replaced hydrogen atoms, yield new information on the stability of the protein and the possible mechanisms of amyloid formation. Residue Ser117 may play a pivotal role in that a single water molecule is closely associated with the γ-hydrogen atoms in one of the binding pockets, and could be important in determining which of the two sites is available to the substrate. The hydrogen-bond network at the monomer–monomer interface is more extensive than that at the dimer–dimer interface. Additionally, the edge strands of the primary dimer are seen to be favourable for continuation of the β-sheet and the formation of an extended cross-β structure through sequential dimer couplings. It is argued that the precursor to fibril formation is the dimeric form of the protein.

  13. Active site proton delivery and the lyase activity of human CYP17A1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khatri, Yogan; Gregory, Michael C.; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G., E-mail: s-sligar@illinois.edu

    2014-01-03

    equivalents and protons are funneled into non-productive pathways. This is similar to previous work with other P450 catalyzed hydroxylation. However, catalysis of carbon–carbon bond scission by the T306A mutant was largely unimpeded by disruption of the CYP17A1 acid-alcohol pair. The unique response of CYP17A1 lyase activity to mutation of Thr306 is consistent with a reactive intermediate formed independently of proton delivery in the active site, and supports involvement of a nucleophilic peroxo-anion rather than the traditional Compound I in catalysis.

  14. Insight into temperature dependence of GTPase activity in human guanylate binding protein-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Rani

    Full Text Available Interferon-γ induced human guanylate binding protein-1(hGBP1 belongs to a family of dynamin related large GTPases. Unlike all other GTPases, hGBP1 hydrolyzes GTP to a mixture of GDP and GMP with GMP being the major product at 37°C but GDP became significant when the hydrolysis reaction was carried out at 15°C. The hydrolysis reaction in hGBP1 is believed to involve with a number of catalytic steps. To investigate the effect of temperature in the product formation and on the different catalytic complexes of hGBP1, we carried out temperature dependent GTPase assays, mutational analysis, chemical and thermal denaturation studies. The Arrhenius plot for both GDP and GMP interestingly showed nonlinear behaviour, suggesting that the product formation from the GTP-bound enzyme complex is associated with at least more than one step. The negative activation energy for GDP formation and GTPase assay with external GDP together indicate that GDP formation occurs through the reversible dissociation of GDP-bound enzyme dimer to monomer, which further reversibly dissociates to give the product. Denaturation studies of different catalytic complexes show that unlike other complexes the free energy of GDP-bound hGBP1 decreases significantly at lower temperature. GDP formation is found to be dependent on the free energy of the GDP-bound enzyme complex. The decrease in the free energy of this complex at low temperature compared to at high is the reason for higher GDP formation at low temperature. Thermal denaturation studies also suggest that the difference in the free energy of the GTP-bound enzyme dimer compared to its monomer plays a crucial role in the product formation; higher stability favours GMP but lower favours GDP. Thus, this study provides the first thermodynamic insight into the effect of temperature in the product formation of hGBP1.

  15. Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2): comparative modeling of the active site, specificity requirements, and chloride dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Jodie L; Jackson, Richard M; Acharya, K Ravi; Sturrock, Edward D; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J

    2003-11-18

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a homologue of ACE, represents a new and potentially important target in cardio-renal disease. A model of the active site of ACE2, based on the crystal structure of testicular ACE, has been developed and indicates that the catalytic mechanism of ACE2 resembles that of ACE. Structural differences exist between the active site of ACE (dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase) and ACE2 (carboxypeptidase) that are responsible for the differences in specificity. The main differences occur in the ligand-binding pockets, particularly at the S2' subsite and in the binding of the peptide carboxy-terminus. The model explains why the classical ACE inhibitor lisinopril is unable to bind to ACE2. On the basis of the ability of ACE2 to cleave a variety of biologically active peptides, a consensus sequence of Pro-X-Pro-hydrophobic/basic for the protease specificity of ACE2 has been defined that is supported by the ACE2 model. The dipeptide, Pro-Phe, completely inhibits ACE2 activity at 180 microM with angiotensin II as the substrate. As with ACE, the chloride dependence of ACE2 is substrate-specific such that the hydrolysis of angiotensin I and the synthetic peptide substrate, Mca-APK(Dnp), are activated in the presence of chloride ions, whereas the cleavage of angiotensin II is inhibited. The ACE2 model is also suggestive of a possible mechanism for chloride activation. The structural insights provided by these analyses for the differences in inhibition pattern and substrate specificity among ACE and its homologue ACE2 and for the chloride dependence of ACE/ACE2 activity are valuable in understanding the function and regulation of ACE2.

  16. Molecular docking simulations provide insights in the substrate binding sites and possible substrates of the ABCC6 transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jakir Hosen

    Full Text Available The human ATP-binding cassette family C member 6 (ABCC6 gene encodes an ABC transporter protein (ABCC6, primarily expressed in liver and kidney. Mutations in the ABCC6 gene cause pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE, an autosomal recessive connective tissue disease characterized by ectopic mineralization of the elastic fibers. The pathophysiology underlying PXE is incompletely understood, which can at least partly be explained by the undetermined nature of the ABCC6 substrates as well as the unknown substrate recognition and binding sites. Several compounds, including anionic glutathione conjugates (N-ethylmaleimide; NEM-GS and leukotriene C4 (LTC4 were shown to be modestly transported in vitro; conversely, vitamin K3 (VK3 was demonstrated not to be transported by ABCC6. To predict the possible substrate binding pockets of the ABCC6 transporter, we generated a 3D homology model of ABCC6 in both open and closed conformation, qualified for molecular docking and virtual screening approaches. By docking 10 reported in vitro substrates in our ABCC6 3D homology models, we were able to predict the substrate binding residues of ABCC6. Further, virtual screening of 4651 metabolites from the Human Serum Metabolome Database against our open conformation model disclosed possible substrates for ABCC6, which are mostly lipid and biliary secretion compounds, some of which are found to be involved in mineralization. Docking of these possible substrates in the closed conformation model also showed high affinity. Virtual screening expands this possibility to explore more compounds that can interact with ABCC6, and may aid in understanding the mechanisms leading to PXE.

  17. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical...... for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon...... sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites...

  18. Dynamics of an Active-Site Flap Contributes to Catalysis in a JAMM Family Metallo Deubiquitinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Amy N; Shrestha, Rashmi K; Ronau, Judith A; Babar, Aditya; Sheedlo, Michael J; Fuchs, Julian E; Paul, Lake N; Das, Chittaranjan

    2015-10-06

    The endosome-associated deubiquitinase (DUB) AMSH is a member of the JAMM family of zinc-dependent metallo isopeptidases with high selectivity for Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains, which play a key role in endosomal-lysosomal sorting of activated cell surface receptors. The catalytic domain of the enzyme features a flexible flap near the active site that opens and closes during its catalytic cycle. Structural analysis of its homologues, AMSH-LP (AMSH-like protein) and the fission yeast counterpart, Sst2, suggests that a conserved Phe residue in the flap may be critical for substrate binding and/or catalysis. To gain insight into the contribution of this flap in substrate recognition and catalysis, we generated mutants of Sst2 and characterized them using a combination of enzyme kinetics, X-ray crystallography, molecular dynamics simulations, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Our analysis shows that the Phe residue in the flap contributes key interactions during the rate-limiting step but not to substrate binding, since mutants of Phe403 exhibit a defect only in kcat but not in KM. Moreover, ITC studies show Phe403 mutants have similar KD for ubiquitin compared to the wild-type enzyme. The X-ray structures of both Phe403Ala and the Phe403Trp, in both the free and ubiquitin bound form, reveal no appreciable structural change that might impair substrate or alter product binding. We observed that the side chain of the Trp residue is oriented identically with respect to the isopeptide moiety of the substrate as the Phe residue in the wild-type enzyme, so the loss of activity seen in this mutant cannot be explained by the absence of a group with the ability to provide van der Waals interactions that facilitate the hyrdolysis of the Lys63-linked diubiquitin. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the flap in the Trp mutant is quite flexible, allowing almost free rotation of the indole side chain. Therefore, it is possible that these different dynamic

  19. Structural insights into a novel interkingdom signaling circuit by cartography of the ligand-binding sites of the homologous quorum sensing LuxR-family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covaceuszach, Sonia; Degrassi, Giuliano; Venturi, Vittorio; Lamba, Doriano

    2013-10-15

    Recent studies have identified a novel interkingdom signaling circuit, via plant signaling molecules, and a bacterial sub-family of LuxR proteins, bridging eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Indeed pivotal plant-bacteria interactions are regulated by the so called Plant Associated Bacteria (PAB) LuxR solo regulators that, although closely related to the quorum sensing (QS) LuxR family, do not bind or respond to canonical quorum sensing N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), but only to specific host plant signal molecules. The large body of structural data available for several members of the QS LuxR family complexed with different classes of ligands (AHLs and other compounds), has been exploited to dissect the cartography of their regulatory domains through structure-based multiple sequence alignments, structural superimposition and a comparative analysis of the contact residues involved in ligand binding. In the absence of experimentally determined structures of members of the PAB LuxR solos subfamily, an homology model of its prototype OryR is presented, aiming to elucidate the architecture of its ligand-binding site. The obtained model, in combination with the cartography of the regulatory domains of the homologous QS LuxRs, provides novel insights into the 3D structure of its ligand-binding site and unveils the probable molecular determinants responsible for differences in selectivity towards specific host plant signal molecules, rather than to canonical QS compounds.

  20. Recommended survey designs for occupancy modelling using motion-activated cameras: insights from empirical wildlife data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Graeme; Lewis, Jesse S; Gerber, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    Motion-activated cameras are a versatile tool that wildlife biologists can use for sampling wild animal populations to estimate species occurrence. Occupancy modelling provides a flexible framework for the analysis of these data; explicitly recognizing that given a species occupies an area the probability of detecting it is often less than one. Despite the number of studies using camera data in an occupancy framework, there is only limited guidance from the scientific literature about survey design trade-offs when using motion-activated cameras. A fuller understanding of these trade-offs will allow researchers to maximise available resources and determine whether the objectives of a monitoring program or research study are achievable. We use an empirical dataset collected from 40 cameras deployed across 160 km(2) of the Western Slope of Colorado, USA to explore how survey effort (number of cameras deployed and the length of sampling period) affects the accuracy and precision (i.e., error) of the occupancy estimate for ten mammal and three virtual species. We do this using a simulation approach where species occupancy and detection parameters were informed by empirical data from motion-activated cameras. A total of 54 survey designs were considered by varying combinations of sites (10-120 cameras) and occasions (20-120 survey days). Our findings demonstrate that increasing total sampling effort generally decreases error associated with the occupancy estimate, but changing the number of sites or sampling duration can have very different results, depending on whether a species is spatially common or rare (occupancy = ψ) and easy or hard to detect when available (detection probability = p). For rare species with a low probability of detection (i.e., raccoon and spotted skunk) the required survey effort includes maximizing the number of sites and the number of survey days, often to a level that may be logistically unrealistic for many studies. For common species with

  1. Insights on organic aerosol aging and the influence of coal combustion at a regional receptor site of central eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. W. Hu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the aging and processing of organic aerosols (OA, an intensive field campaign (Campaign of Air Pollution at Typical Coastal Areas IN Eastern China, CAPTAIN was conducted March–April at a receptor site (a Changdao island in central eastern China. Multiple fast aerosol and gas measurement instruments were used during the campaign, including a high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS that was applied to measure mass concentrations and non-refractory chemical components of submicron particles (PM1nr. The average mass concentration of PM1(PM1nr+black carbon was 47 ± 36 μg m−3 during the campaign and showed distinct variation, depending on back trajectories and their overlap with source regions. Organic aerosol (OA is the largest component of PM1 (30%, followed by nitrate (28%, sulfate (19%, ammonium (15%, black carbon (6%, and chloride (3%. Four OA components were resolved by positive matrix factorization (PMF of the high-resolution spectra, including low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA, semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA, hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA and a coal combustion OA (CCOA. The mass spectrum of CCOA had high abundance of fragments from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs (m/z 128, 152, 178, etc.. The average atomic ratio of oxygen to carbon in OA (O / C at Changdao was 0.59, which is comparable to other field studies reported at locations downwind of large pollution sources, indicating the oxidized nature of most OA during the campaign. The evolution of OA elemental composition in the van Krevelen diagram (H / C vs. O / C showed a slope of −0.63; however, the OA influenced by coal combustion exhibits a completely different evolution that appears dominated by physical mixing. The aging of organic aerosols vs. photochemical age was investigated. It was shown that OA / ΔCO, as well as LV-OOA / ΔCO and SV-OOA / ΔCO, positively correlated with photochemical age. LV

  2. Structure and nuclearity of active sites in Fe-zeolites: comparison with iron sites in enzymes and homogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecchina, Adriano; Rivallan, Mickaël; Berlier, Gloria; Lamberti, Carlo; Ricchiardi, Gabriele

    2007-07-21

    Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite zeolites efficiently catalyse several oxidation reactions which find close analogues in the oxidation reactions catalyzed by homogeneous and enzymatic compounds. The iron centres are highly dispersed in the crystalline matrix and on highly diluted samples, mononuclear and dinuclear structures are expected to become predominant. The crystalline and robust character of the MFI framework has allowed to hypothesize that the catalytic sites are located in well defined crystallographic positions. For this reason these catalysts have been considered as the closest and best defined heterogeneous counterparts of heme and non heme iron complexes and of Fenton type Fe(2+) homogeneous counterparts. On this basis, an analogy with the methane monooxygenase has been advanced several times. In this review we have examined the abundant literature on the subject and summarized the most widely accepted views on the structure, nuclearity and catalytic activity of the iron species. By comparing the results obtained with the various characterization techniques, we conclude that Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite are not the ideal samples conceived before and that many types of species are present, some active and some other silent from adsorptive and catalytic point of view. The relative concentration of these species changes with thermal treatments, preparation procedures and loading. Only at lowest loadings the catalytically active species become the dominant fraction of the iron species. On the basis of the spectroscopic titration of the active sites by using NO as a probe, we conclude that the active species on very diluted samples are isolated and highly coordinatively unsaturated Fe(2+) grafted to the crystalline matrix. Indication of the constant presence of a smaller fraction of Fe(2+) presumably located on small clusters is also obtained. The nitrosyl species formed upon dosing NO from the gas phase on activated Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite, have been analyzed

  3. 77 FR 3460 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of the acceptance of... (DOE) acceptance of claims in FY 2012 from eligible active uranium and thorium processing site... uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs of decontamination, decommissioning, reclamation,...

  4. 75 FR 71677 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of the Energy Policy Act of... requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs of...

  5. The balance of flexibility and rigidity in the active site residues of hen egg white lysozyme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Jian-Xun; Jiang Fan

    2011-01-01

    The crystallographic temperature factors (B factor) of individual atoms contain important information about the thermal motion of the atoms in a macromolecule. Previously the theory of flexibility of active site has been established based on the observation that the enzyme activity is sensitive to low concentration denaturing agents. It has been found that the loss of enzyme activity occurs well before the disruption of the three-dimensional structural scaffold of the enzyme. To test the theory of conformational flexibility of enzyme active site, crystal structures were perturbed by soaking in low concentration guanidine hydrochloride solutions. It was found that many lysozyme crystals tested could still diffract until the concentration of guanidine hydrochloride reached 3 M. It was also found that the B factors averaged over individually collected data sets were more accurate. Thus it suggested that accurate measurement of crystal temperature factors could be achieved for medium-high or even medium resolution crystals by averaging over multiple data sets. Furthermore, we found that the correctly predicted active sites included not only the more flexible residues, but also some more rigid residues. Both the flexible and the rigid residues in the active site played an important role in forming the active site residue network, covering the majority of the substrate binding residues. Therefore, this experimental prediction method may be useful for characterizing the binding site and the function of a protein, such as drug targeting.

  6. Active site dynamics of toluene hydroxylation by cytochrome P-450

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanzlik, R.P.; Kahhiing John Ling (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (United States))

    1990-06-22

    Rat liver cytochrome P-450 hydroxylates toluene to benzyl alcohol plus o-, m-, and p-cresol. Deuterated toluenes were incubated under saturating conditions with liver microsomes from phenobarbital-pretreated rats, and product yields and ratios were measured. Stepwise deuteration of the methyl leads to stepwise decreases in the alcohol/cresol ratio without changing the cresol isomer ratios. Extensive deuterium retention in the benzyl alcohols from PhCH{sub 2}D and PhCHD{sub 2} suggests there is a large intrinsic isotope effect for benzylic hydroxylation. After replacement of the third benzylic H by D, the drop in the alcohol/cresol ratio was particularly acute, suggsting that metabolic switching from D to H within the methyl group was easier than switching from the methyl to the ring. Comparison of the alcohol/cresol ratio for PhCH{sub 3} vs PhCD{sub 3} indicated a net isotope effect of 6.9 for benzylic hydroxylation. From product yield data for PhCH{sub 3} and PhCD{sub 3}, {sup D}V for benzyl alcohol formation is only 1.92, whereas {sup D}V for total product formation is 0.67 (i.e., inverse). From competitive incubations of PhCH{sub 3}/PhCD{sub 3} mixtures {sup D}(V/K) isotope effects on benzyl alcohol formation and total product formation (3.6 and 1.23, respectively) are greatly reduced, implying strong commitment to catalysis. In contrast, {sup D}(V/K) for the alcohol/cresol ratio is 6.3, indicating that the majority of the intrinsic isotope effect is expressed through metabolic switching. Overall, these data are consistent with reversible formation of a complex between toluene and the active oxygen form of cytochrome P-450, which rearranges internally and reacts to form products faster than it dissociates back to release substrate.

  7. 1993 annual report of hazardous waste activities for the Oak Ridge K-25 site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This report is a detailed listing of all of the Hazardous Waste activities occurring at Martin Marietta`s K-25 site. Contained herein are hazardous waste notification forms, waste stream reports, generator fee forms and various TSDR reports.

  8. 1993 annual report of hazardous waste activities for the Oak Ridge K-25 site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This report is a detailed listing of all of the Hazardous Waste activities occurring at Martin Marietta`s K-25 site. Contained herein are hazardous waste notification forms, waste stream reports, generator fee forms and various TSDR reports.

  9. Insights into seasonal active layer dynamics by monitoring relative velocity changes using ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S. R.; Knox, H. A.; Cole, C. J.; Abbott, R. E.; Screaton, E.

    2016-12-01

    Seasonal freeze and thaw of the active layer above permafrost results in dramatic changes in seismic velocity. We used daily cross correlations of ambient seismic noise recorded at Poker Flat Research Range in central Alaska to create a nearly continuous 2-year record of relative velocity changes. This analysis required that we modify the Moving Window Cross-spectral Analysis technique used in the Python package MSNoise to reduce the occurrence of cycle skipping. Results show relative velocity variations follow a seasonal pattern, where velocities decrease in late spring through the summer months and increase through the fall and winter months. This timing is consistent with active layer freeze and thaw in this region. These results were compared to a suite of ground- and satellite-based measurements to identify relationships. A decrease in relative velocities in late spring closely follows the timing of snow melt recorded in nearby ground temperatures and snow-depth logs. This transition also aligns with a decrease in the Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI) derived from multi-temporal Landsat 8 satellite imagery collected over the study site. A gradual increase in relative velocity through the fall months occurs when temperatures below ground surface remain near zero. We suggest this is due to latent heat feedbacks that keep temperatures constant while active layer velocities increase from continued ice formation. This highlights the value in velocity variations for capturing details on the freezing process. In addition, spatial variations in the magnitude of velocity changes are consistent with thaw probe surveys. Exploring relationships with remote sensing may allow indirect measurements of thaw over larger areas and further surface wave analysis may allow for thickness evolution measurements. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for

  10. The thermal stability of the framework, hydroxyl groups, and active sites of faujasites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishin, I.V.; Kalinin, V.P.; Nissenbaum, V.D. [Zelinskii Institute of Organic Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation); Beyer, H.K. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Karge, H.G. [Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Soceity, Berlin (Germany)

    1994-07-01

    The effect of the framework composition on the crystallinity and {open_quotes}density{close_quotes} of hydroxyl groups and the concentration of active sites is reported for hydrogen forms of Y zeolites preheated at 400 - 1000{degrees}C. The increase in the Si/Al ratios results in improved resistance of the framework atoms and hydroxyl groups to high temperatures and in enhanced thermal stability of the sites that are active in the cracking of isooctane and disproportionation of ethylbenzene.

  11. XAFS Study of the Photo-Active Site of Mo/MCM-41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Daisuke; Ichikuni, Nobuyuki; Shimazu, Shogo

    2007-02-01

    An Mo/MCM-41 catalyst was prepared and used for study of propene and 1-butene photo-metathesis reactions. XAFS analysis revealed that hydrogen reduction leads to a decreased role for the Mo=O site. The Mo-O site plays an important role for the olefin photo-metathesis reaction on the H2 reduced Mo/MCM-41. From EXAFS analysis, the active site of photo-metathesis reaction is the Mo=O part for oxidized Mo/MCM-41, whereas it is the Mo-O site for reduced Mo/MCM-41.

  12. Digestive enzyme activities in the guts of bonnethead sharks (Sphyrna tiburo) provide insight into their digestive strategy and evidence for microbial digestion in their hindguts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Parth; Papastamatiou, Yannis P; German, Donovan P

    2015-11-01

    Few investigations have studied digestive enzyme activities in the alimentary tracts of sharks to gain insight into how these organisms digest their meals. In this study, we examined the activity levels of proteases, carbohydrases, and lipase in the pancreas, and along the anterior intestine, spiral intestine, and colon of the bonnethead shark, Sphyrna tiburo. We then interpreted our data in the context of a rate-yield continuum to discern this shark's digestive strategy. Our data show anticipated decreasing patterns in the activities of pancreatic enzymes moving posteriorly along the gut, but also show mid spiral intestine peaks in aminopeptidase and lipase activities, which support the spiral intestine as the main site of absorption in bonnetheads. Interestingly, we observed spikes in the activity levels of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and β-glucosidase in the bonnethead colon, and these chitin- and cellulose-degrading enzymes, respectively, are likely of microbial origin in this distal gut region. Taken in the context of intake and relatively long transit times of food through the gut, the colonic spikes in N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and β-glucosidase activities suggest that bonnetheads take a yield-maximizing strategy to the digestive process, with some reliance on microbial digestion in their hindguts. This is one of the first studies to examine digestive enzyme activities along the gut of any shark, and importantly, the data match with previous observations that sharks take an extended time to digest their meals (consistent with a yield-maximizing digestive strategy) and that the spiral intestine is the primary site of absorption in sharks.

  13. 'Unconventional' coordination chemistry by metal chelating fragments in a metalloprotein active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David P; Blachly, Patrick G; Marts, Amy R; Woodruff, Tessa M; de Oliveira, César A F; McCammon, J Andrew; Tierney, David L; Cohen, Seth M

    2014-04-01

    The binding of three closely related chelators: 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-thione (allothiomaltol, ATM), 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-thione (thiomaltol, TM), and 3-hydroxy-4H-pyran-4-thione (thiopyromeconic acid, TPMA) to the active site of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) has been investigated. Two of these ligands display a monodentate mode of coordination to the active site Zn(2+) ion in hCAII that is not recapitulated in model complexes of the enzyme active site. This unprecedented binding mode in the hCAII-thiomaltol complex has been characterized by both X-ray crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy. In addition, the steric restrictions of the active site force the ligands into a 'flattened' mode of coordination compared with inorganic model complexes. This change in geometry has been shown by density functional computations to significantly decrease the strength of the metal-ligand binding. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the mode of binding by small metal-binding groups can be significantly influenced by the protein active site. Diminishing the strength of the metal-ligand bond results in unconventional modes of metal coordination not found in typical coordination compounds or even carefully engineered active site models, and understanding these effects is critical to the rational design of inhibitors that target clinically relevant metalloproteins.

  14. Poisoning Experiments Aimed at Discriminating Active and Less-Active Sites of Silica-Supported Tantalum Hydride for Alkane Metathesis

    KAUST Repository

    Saggio, Guillaume

    2010-10-04

    Only 50% of the silica-supported tantalum hydride sites are active in the metathesis of propane. Indeed, more than 45% of the tantalum hydride can be eliminated by a selective oxygen poisoning of inactive sites with no significant decrease in the global turnover. Conversely, cyclopentane induces no such selective poisoning. Hence, the active tantalum hydride sites that show greater resistance to oxygen poisoning correspond to the νTa-H bands of higher wavenumbers, particularly that at 1860cm-1. These active tantalum hydride sites should correspond to tris- or monohydride species relatively far from silica surface oxygen atoms. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Concept for calculating dose rates from activated groundwater at accelerator sites

    CERN Document Server

    Prolingheuer, N; Vanderborght, J; Schlögl, B; Nabbi, R; Moormann, R

    Licensing of particle accelerators requires the proof that the groundwater outside of the site will not be significantly contaminated by activation products formed below accelerator and target. In order to reduce the effort for this proof, a site independent simplified but conservative method is under development. The conventional approach for calculation of activation of soil and groundwater is shortly described on example of a site close to Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany. Additionally an updated overview of a data library for partition coefficients for relevant nuclides transported in the aquifer at the site is presented. The approximate model for transport of nuclides with ground water including exemplary results on nuclide concentrations outside of the site boundary and of resulting effective doses is described. Further applications and developments are finally outlined.

  16. Mixing active-site components: a recipe for the unique enzymatic activity of a telomere resolvase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankhead, Troy; Chaconas, George

    2004-09-21

    The ResT protein, a telomere resolvase from Borrelia burgdorferi, processes replication intermediates into linear replicons with hairpin ends by using a catalytic mechanism similar to that for tyrosine recombinases and type IB topoisomerases. We have identified in ResT a hairpin binding region typically found in cut-and-paste transposases. We show that substitution of residues within this region results in a decreased ability of these mutants to catalyze telomere resolution. However, the mutants are capable of resolving heteroduplex DNA substrates designed to allow spontaneous destabilization and prehairpin formation. These findings support the existence of a hairpin binding region in ResT, the only known occurrence outside a transposase. The combination of transposase-like and tyrosine-recombinase-like domains found in ResT indicates the use of a composite active site and helps explain the unique breakage-and-reunion reaction observed with this protein. Comparison of the ResT sequence with other known telomere resolvases suggests that a hairpin binding motif is a common feature in this class of enzyme; the sequence motif also appears in the RAG recombinases. Finally, our data support a mechanism of action whereby ResT induces prehairpin formation before the DNA cleavage step.

  17. Black and Brown Bear Activity at Selected Coastal Sites in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska: A Preliminary Assessment Using Noninvasive Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Steve; Smith, Tom; Lewis, Tania

    2009-01-01

    A number of efforts in recent years have sought to predict bear activity in various habitats to minimize human disturbance and bear/human conflicts. Alaskan coastal areas provide important foraging areas for bears (Ursus americanus and U. arctos), particularly following den emergence when there may be no snow-free foraging alternatives. Additionally, coastal areas provide important food items for bears throughout the year. Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (GLBA) in southeastern Alaska has extensive coastal habitats, and the National Park Service (NPS) has been long interested in learning more about the use of these coastal habitats by bears because these same habitats receive extensive human use by park visitors, especially kayaking recreationists. This study provides insight regarding the nature and intensity of bear activity at selected coastal sites within GLBA. We achieved a clearer understanding of bear/habitat relationships within GLBA by analyzing bear activity data collected with remote cameras, bear sign mapping, scat collections, and genetic analysis of bear hair. Although we could not quantify actual levels of bear activity at study sites, agreement among measures of activity (for example, sign counts, DNA analysis, and video record) lends support to our qualitative site assessments. This work suggests that habitat evaluation, bear sign mapping, and periodic scat counts can provide a useful index of bear activity for sites of interest.

  18. Metaproteomics of our microbiome - Developing insight in function and activity in man and model systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolmeder, C.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    We are all colonized by a large microbiome, a complex set of microbes that have intimate associations with us. Culture-based approaches have provided insights in the complexity of the microbial communities living on surfaces inside and outside the body. However, the application of high-throughput se

  19. Correlated structural kinetics and retarded solvent dynamics at the metalloprotease active site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, Moran; Born, Benjamin; Heyden, Matthias; Tworowski, Dmitry; Fields, Gregg B.; Sagi, Irit; Havenith, Martina

    2011-09-18

    Solvent dynamics can play a major role in enzyme activity, but obtaining an accurate, quantitative picture of solvent activity during catalysis is quite challenging. Here, we combine terahertz spectroscopy and X-ray absorption analyses to measure changes in the coupled water-protein motions during peptide hydrolysis by a zinc-dependent human metalloprotease. These changes were tightly correlated with rearrangements at the active site during the formation of productive enzyme-substrate intermediates and were different from those in an enzyme–inhibitor complex. Molecular dynamics simulations showed a steep gradient of fast-to-slow coupled protein-water motions around the protein, active site and substrate. Our results show that water retardation occurs before formation of the functional Michaelis complex. We propose that the observed gradient of coupled protein-water motions may assist enzyme-substrate interactions through water-polarizing mechanisms that are remotely mediated by the catalytic metal ion and the enzyme active site.

  20. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  1. The linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA selectively activates PKC-epsilon, possibly binding to the phosphatidylserine binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Yaguchi, Takahiro; Hi, Rika; Mukasa, Takeshi; Fujikawa, Hirokazu; Nagata, Tetsu; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2006-06-01

    This study examined the effect of 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA), a newly synthesized linoleic acid derivative with cyclopropane rings instead of cis-double bonds, on protein kinase C (PKC) activity. In the in situ PKC assay with reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, DCP-LA significantly activated PKC in PC-12 cells in a concentration-dependent (10 nM-100 microM) manner, with the maximal effect at 100 nM, and the DCP-LA effect was blocked by GF109203X, a PKC inhibitor, or a selective inhibitor peptide of the novel PKC isozyme PKC-epsilon. Furthermore, DCP-LA activated PKC in HEK-293 cells that was inhibited by the small, interfering RNA against PKC-epsilon. In the cell-free PKC assay, of the nine isozymes examined here, DCP-LA most strongly activated PKC-epsilon, with >7-fold potency over other PKC isozymes, in the absence of dioleoyl-phosphatidylserine and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol; instead, the DCP-LA action was inhibited by dioleoyl-phosphatidylserine. DCP-LA also activated PKC-gamma, a conventional PKC, but to a much lesser extent compared with that for PKC-epsilon, by a mechanism distinct from PKC-epsilon activation. Thus, DCP-LA serves as a selective activator of PKC-epsilon, possibly by binding to the phosphatidylserine binding site on PKC-epsilon. These results may provide fresh insight into lipid signaling in PKC activation.

  2. Comparison of templates for homology model of ρ1 GABAC receptors: More insights to the orthosteric binding site's structure and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naffaa, Moawiah M; Chebib, Mary; Hibbs, David E; Hanrahan, Jane R

    2015-11-01

    Five sets of ρ1 GABAC homology models were generated based on X-ray crystal structures of the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP), the ion channel from Caenorhabditis elegans (GLIC), the ion channel from Erwinia chrysanthemi (ELIC), the homomeric GABAA β3 ion channel, and the homomeric α-subunit of glutamate-gated homopentameric chloride channel (GluCl). The GluCl based model was found to the represent the structure of ρ1 GABAC receptors. The GABA pose docked in the selected best model was confirmed by QM-polarized ligand docking and induced fit docking protocol, and used to study molecular interactions in the ρ1 GABA binding site. The potential interactions of identified residues are discussed. This study identified several residues with potential ligand interactions located on loops F and G with their side chain oriented toward the binding site such as Ser215 and Gln83. The partial agonists muscimol and imidazole-4-acetic acid (I4AA) were docked into the binding site of the most reliable 'GABA bound' homology model. The potency and efficacy of these partial agonists in activating recombinant ρ1 receptors were correlated with their docking results. The model predicts that muscimol resembles GABA in the docking pose with similar interactions. However, I4AA has a very different docking pose to GABA and was predicted by the model to form π-π stacking with aromatic residues in the orthosteric binding site. A set of TPMPA bound ρ1 homology models based on the GluClα 'apo state' template was built in order to study a competitive antagonist in the ρ1 orthosteric binding site. The results demonstrated the ability of our model to explain most experimental findings and predict potential roles of residues within the orthosteric binding site. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Activity after Site-Directed Mutagenesis of CD59 on Complement-Mediated Cytolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinhong Zhu; Meihua Gao; Shurong Ren; Qiubo Wang; Cunzhi Lin

    2008-01-01

    CD59 may inhibit the cytolytic activity of complement by binding to C8/C9 and protect host cell membranes against homologous membrane attack complex (MAC). However, CD59 is widely overexpressed on tumor cells,which has been implicated in tumorigenesis. The active site of CD59 relative to MAC is still confused. As reported the MAC binding site is located in the vicinity of a hydrophobic groove on the membrane distal face of the protein centered around residue W40. Here two site-directed mutagenesis were performed by overlapping extension PCR to delete residue W40 site (Mutant 1, M1) or to change C39W40K41 to W39W40W41 (Mutant 2, M2). Then we constructed mutant CD59 eukaryotic expression system and investigated their biological function on CHO cells compared with wild-type CD59. Stable populations of CHO cells expressing recombinant proteins were screened by immunotechnique. After 30 passages culturing, proteins could be tested. Dye release assays suggest that M1CD59 loses the activity against complement, while M2CD59 increases the anti-complement activity slightly.Results indicate that W40 of human CD59 is important to its activity, and prohibition of this site may be a potential way to increase complement activity and to treat tumors.

  4. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parashar, Abhinav [Center for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, 632014 India (India); Venkatachalam, Avanthika [REDOx Lab, PSG Institute of Advanced Studies, Avinashi Road, Peelamedu, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, 641004 (India); Gideon, Daniel Andrew [Center for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, 632014 India (India); Manoj, Kelath Murali, E-mail: satyamjayatu@yahoo.com [REDOx Lab, PSG Institute of Advanced Studies, Avinashi Road, Peelamedu, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, 641004 (India)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Cyanide (CN) is a well-studied toxic principle, known to inhibit heme-enzymes. • Inhibition is supposed to result from CN binding at the active site as a ligand. • Diverse heme enzymes’ CN inhibition profiles challenge prevailing mechanism. • Poor binding efficiency of CN at low enzyme concentrations and ligand pressures. • CN-based diffusible radicals cause ‘non-productive electron transfers’ (inhibition). - Abstract: The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins’ active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  5. Structural Insights into the Activation and Inhibition of Histo-Aspartic Protease from Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaumik, Prasenjit; Xiao, Huogen; Hidaka, Koushi; Gustchina, Alla; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Yada, Rickey Y.; Wlodawer, Alexander (Guelph); (Kyoto); (NCI)

    2012-09-17

    Histo-aspartic protease (HAP) from Plasmodium falciparum is a promising target for the development of novel antimalarial drugs. The sequence of HAP is highly similar to those of pepsin-like aspartic proteases, but one of the two catalytic aspartates, Asp32, is replaced with histidine. Crystal structures of the truncated zymogen of HAP and of the complex of the mature enzyme with inhibitor KNI-10395 have been determined at 2.1 and 2.5 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. As in other proplasmepsins, the propeptide of the zymogen interacts with the C-terminal domain of the enzyme, forcing the N- and C-terminal domains apart, thereby separating His32 and Asp215 and preventing formation of the mature active site. In the inhibitor complex, the enzyme forms a tight domain-swapped dimer, not previously seen in any aspartic proteases. The inhibitor is found in an unprecedented conformation resembling the letter U, stabilized by two intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Surprisingly, the location and conformation of the inhibitor are similar to those of the fragment of helix 2 comprising residues 34p-38p in the prosegments of the zymogens of gastric aspartic proteases; a corresponding helix assumes a vastly different orientation in proplasmepsins. Each inhibitor molecule is in contact with two molecules of HAP, interacting with the carboxylate group of the catalytic Asp215 of one HAP protomer through a water molecule, while also making a direct hydrogen bond to Glu278A' of the other protomer. A comparison of the shifts in the positions of the catalytic residues in the inhibitor complex presented here with those published previously gives further hints regarding the enzymatic mechanism of HAP.

  6. Conformational Change in the Active Site of Streptococcal Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase Through Site-Directed Mutagenesis at Asp-115.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, Yusuke; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (UGL) degrades unsaturated disaccharides generated from mammalian extracellular matrices, glycosaminoglycans, by polysaccharide lyases. Two Asp residues, Asp-115 and Asp-175 of Streptococcus agalactiae UGL (SagUGL), are completely conserved in other bacterial UGLs, one of which (Asp-175 of SagUGL) acts as a general acid and base catalyst. The other Asp (Asp-115 of SagUGL) also affects the enzyme activity, although its role in the enzyme reaction has not been well understood. Here, we show substitution of Asp-115 in SagUGL with Asn caused a conformational change in the active site. Tertiary structures of SagUGL mutants D115N and D115N/K370S with negligible enzyme activity were determined at 2.00 and 1.79 Å resolution, respectively, by X-ray crystallography. The side chain of Asn-115 is drastically shifted in both mutants owing to the interaction with several residues, including Asp-175, by formation of hydrogen bonds. This interaction between Asn-115 and Asp-175 probably prevents the mutants from triggering the enzyme reaction using Asp-175 as an acid catalyst.

  7. Serine-202 is the putative precursor of the active site dehydroalanine of phenylalanine ammonia lyase. Site-directed mutagenesis studies on the enzyme from parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, B; Rétey, J

    1994-08-01

    To investigate the possible role of serine as a precursor of dehydroalanine at the active site of phenylalanine ammonia lyase, two serines, conserved in all known PAL and histidase sequences, were changed to alanine by site-directed mutagenesis. The resulting mutant genes were subcloned into the expression vector pT7.7 and the gene products were assayed for PAL activity. Mutant PALMutS209A showed the same catalytic property as wild-type PAL, whereas mutant PALMutS202A was devoid of catalytic activity, indicating that serine-202 is the most likely precursor of the active site dehydroalanine.

  8. Structures of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain Complexed with Small-Molecule Inhibitors Highlight Active-Site Flexibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvaggi,N.; Boldt, G.; Hixon, M.; Kennedy, J.; Tzipori, S.; Janda, K.; Allen, K.

    2007-01-01

    The potential for the use of Clostridial neurotoxins as bioweapons makes the development of small-molecule inhibitors of these deadly toxins a top priority. Recently, screening of a random hydroxamate library identified a small-molecule inhibitor of C. botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain (BoNT/A-LC), 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate, a derivative of which has been shown to have in vivo efficacy in mice and no toxicity. We describe the X-ray crystal structures of BoNT/A-LC in complexes with two potent small-molecule inhibitors. The structures of the enzyme with 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate or 2,4-dichlorocinnamic hydroxamate bound are compared to the structure of the enzyme complexed with L-arginine hydroxamate, an inhibitor with modest affinity. Taken together, this suite of structures provides surprising insights into the BoNT/A-LC active site, including unexpected conformational flexibility at the S1' site that changes the electrostatic environment of the binding pocket. Information gained from these structures will inform the design and optimization of more effective small-molecule inhibitors of BoNT/A-LC.

  9. Structural Snapshots of an Engineered Cystathionine-γ-lyase Reveal the Critical Role of Electrostatic Interactions in the Active Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Wupeng; Stone, Everett; Zhang, Yan Jessie

    2017-02-01

    Enzyme therapeutics that can degrade l-methionine (l-Met) are of great interest as numerous malignancies are exquisitely sensitive to l-Met depletion. To exhaust the pool of methionine in human serum, we previously engineered an l-Met-degrading enzyme based on the human cystathionine-γ-lyase scaffold (hCGL-NLV) to circumvent immunogenicity and stability issues observed in the preclinical application of bacterially derived methionine-γ-lyases. To gain further insights into the structure–activity relationships governing the chemistry of the hCGL-NLV lead molecule, we undertook a biophysical characterization campaign that captured crystal structures (2.2 Å) of hCGL-NLV with distinct reaction intermediates, including internal aldimine, substrate-bound, gem-diamine, and external aldimine forms. Curiously, an alternate form of hCGL-NLV that crystallized under higher-salt conditions revealed a locally unfolded active site, correlating with inhibition of activity as a function of ionic strength. Subsequent mutational and kinetic experiments pinpointed that a salt bridge between the phosphate of the essential cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and residue R62 plays an important role in catalyzing β- and γ-eliminations. Our study suggests that solvent ions such as NaCl disrupt electrostatic interactions between R62 and PLP, decreasing catalytic efficiency.

  10. Dynamic Contacts of U2, RES, Cwc25, Prp8 and Prp45 Proteins with the Pre-mRNA Branch-Site and 3' Splice Site during Catalytic Activation and Step 1 Catalysis in Yeast Spliceosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelius Schneider

    Full Text Available Little is known about contacts in the spliceosome between proteins and intron nucleotides surrounding the pre-mRNA branch-site and their dynamics during splicing. We investigated protein-pre-mRNA interactions by UV-induced crosslinking of purified yeast B(act spliceosomes formed on site-specifically labeled pre-mRNA, and analyzed their changes after conversion to catalytically-activated B* and step 1 C complexes, using a purified splicing system. Contacts between nucleotides upstream and downstream of the branch-site and the U2 SF3a/b proteins Prp9, Prp11, Hsh49, Cus1 and Hsh155 were detected, demonstrating that these interactions are evolutionarily conserved. The RES proteins Pml1 and Bud13 were shown to contact the intron downstream of the branch-site. A comparison of the B(act crosslinking pattern versus that of B* and C complexes revealed that U2 and RES protein interactions with the intron are dynamic. Upon step 1 catalysis, Cwc25 contacts with the branch-site region, and enhanced crosslinks of Prp8 and Prp45 with nucleotides surrounding the branch-site were observed. Cwc25's step 1 promoting activity was not dependent on its interaction with pre-mRNA, indicating it acts via protein-protein interactions. These studies provide important insights into the spliceosome's protein-pre-mRNA network and reveal novel RNP remodeling events during the catalytic activation of the spliceosome and step 1 of splicing.

  11. Dynamic Contacts of U2, RES, Cwc25, Prp8 and Prp45 Proteins with the Pre-mRNA Branch-Site and 3' Splice Site during Catalytic Activation and Step 1 Catalysis in Yeast Spliceosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Cornelius; Agafonov, Dmitry E; Schmitzová, Jana; Hartmuth, Klaus; Fabrizio, Patrizia; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about contacts in the spliceosome between proteins and intron nucleotides surrounding the pre-mRNA branch-site and their dynamics during splicing. We investigated protein-pre-mRNA interactions by UV-induced crosslinking of purified yeast B(act) spliceosomes formed on site-specifically labeled pre-mRNA, and analyzed their changes after conversion to catalytically-activated B* and step 1 C complexes, using a purified splicing system. Contacts between nucleotides upstream and downstream of the branch-site and the U2 SF3a/b proteins Prp9, Prp11, Hsh49, Cus1 and Hsh155 were detected, demonstrating that these interactions are evolutionarily conserved. The RES proteins Pml1 and Bud13 were shown to contact the intron downstream of the branch-site. A comparison of the B(act) crosslinking pattern versus that of B* and C complexes revealed that U2 and RES protein interactions with the intron are dynamic. Upon step 1 catalysis, Cwc25 contacts with the branch-site region, and enhanced crosslinks of Prp8 and Prp45 with nucleotides surrounding the branch-site were observed. Cwc25's step 1 promoting activity was not dependent on its interaction with pre-mRNA, indicating it acts via protein-protein interactions. These studies provide important insights into the spliceosome's protein-pre-mRNA network and reveal novel RNP remodeling events during the catalytic activation of the spliceosome and step 1 of splicing.

  12. Crystal structure of an avian influenza polymerase PA[subscript N] reveals an endonuclease active site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Puwei; Bartlam, Mark; Lou, Zhiyong; Chen, Shoudeng; Zhou, Jie; He, Xiaojing; Lv, Zongyang; Ge, Ruowen; Li, Xuemei; Deng, Tao; Fodor, Ervin; Rao, Zihe; Liu, Yingfang; (NU Sinapore); (Nankai); (Oxford); (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (Tsinghua)

    2009-11-10

    The heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase, containing the PA, PB1 and PB2 proteins, catalyses viral RNA replication and transcription in the nucleus of infected cells. PB1 holds the polymerase active site and reportedly harbours endonuclease activity, whereas PB2 is responsible for cap binding. The PA amino terminus is understood to be the major functional part of the PA protein and has been implicated in several roles, including endonuclease and protease activities as well as viral RNA/complementary RNA promoter binding. Here we report the 2.2 angstrom (A) crystal structure of the N-terminal 197 residues of PA, termed PA(N), from an avian influenza H5N1 virus. The PA(N) structure has an alpha/beta architecture and reveals a bound magnesium ion coordinated by a motif similar to the (P)DX(N)(D/E)XK motif characteristic of many endonucleases. Structural comparisons and mutagenesis analysis of the motif identified in PA(N) provide further evidence that PA(N) holds an endonuclease active site. Furthermore, functional analysis with in vivo ribonucleoprotein reconstitution and direct in vitro endonuclease assays strongly suggest that PA(N) holds the endonuclease active site and has critical roles in endonuclease activity of the influenza virus polymerase, rather than PB1. The high conservation of this endonuclease active site among influenza strains indicates that PA(N) is an important target for the design of new anti-influenza therapeutics.

  13. Substrate Shuttling Between Active Sites of Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase in Not Required to Generate Coproporphyrinogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.; Warby, C; Whitby, F; Kushner, J; Hill, C

    2009-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D; EC 4.1.1.37), the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is required for the production of heme, vitamin B12, siroheme, and chlorophyll precursors. URO-D catalyzes the sequential decarboxylation of four acetate side chains in the pyrrole groups of uroporphyrinogen to produce coproporphyrinogen. URO-D is a stable homodimer, with the active-site clefts of the two subunits adjacent to each other. It has been hypothesized that the two catalytic centers interact functionally, perhaps by shuttling of reaction intermediates between subunits. We tested this hypothesis by construction of a single-chain protein (single-chain URO-D) in which the two subunits were connected by a flexible linker. The crystal structure of this protein was shown to be superimposable with wild-type activity and to have comparable catalytic activity. Mutations that impaired one or the other of the two active sites of single-chain URO-D resulted in approximately half of wild-type activity. The distributions of reaction intermediates were the same for mutant and wild-type sequences and were unaltered in a competition experiment using I and III isomer substrates. These observations indicate that communication between active sites is not required for enzyme function and suggest that the dimeric structure of URO-D is required to achieve conformational stability and to create a large active-site cleft.

  14. Residents’ Environmental Conservation Behaviors at Tourist Sites: Broadening the Norm Activation Framework by Adopting Environment Attachment

    OpenAIRE

    Yuling Zhang; Jie Zhang; Yuyao Ye; Qitao Wu; Lixia Jin; Hongou Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the factors that affect residents’ environmental conservation behaviors help in managing the environment of tourist sites. This research provides an integrative understanding of how residents near tourist sites form their environmental conservation behaviors by merging the norm-activation model and cognitive-affective model into one theoretical framework. Results of the structural analysis from a sample of 642 residents showed that this study’s proposed composite model includes ...

  15. Modified Active Site Coordination in a Clinical Mutant of Sulfite Oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doonan, C.J.; Wilson, H.L.; Rajagopalan, K.V.; Garrett, R.M.; Bennett, B.; Prince, R.C.; George, G.N.

    2009-06-02

    The molybdenum site of the Arginine 160 {yields} Glutamine clinical mutant of the physiologically vital enzyme sulfite oxidase has been investigated by a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. We conclude that the mutant enzyme has a six-coordinate pseudo-octahedral active site with coordination of Glutamine O{sup {epsilon}} to molybdenum. This contrasts with the wild-type enzyme which is five-coordinate with approximately square-based pyramidal geometry. This difference in the structure of the molybdenum site explains many of the properties of the mutant enzyme which have previously been reported.

  16. New insights into prevention of disability by physical activity and exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tak, E.; Dronkers, J.; Koeneman, M.; Hopman-Rock, M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract for the International Society for Aging and Physical activity's 8th World Congress on Aging and Physical Activity: A celebration of Diversity and Inclusion in Active Ageing, August 13-17 2012.

  17. New insights into prevention of disability by physical activity and exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tak, E.; Dronkers, J.; Koeneman, M.; Hopman-Rock, M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract for the International Society for Aging and Physical activity's 8th World Congress on Aging and Physical Activity: A celebration of Diversity and Inclusion in Active Ageing, August 13-17 2012.

  18. Solvent Tuning of Electrochemical Potentials in the Active Sites of HiPIP Versus Ferredoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, A.; Francis, E.J.; Adams, M.W.W.; Babini, E.; Takahashi, Y.; Fukuyama, K.; Hodgson, K.O.; Hedman, B.; Solomon, E.I.; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept. /Georgia U. /Bologna U. /Osaka U. /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-29

    A persistent puzzle in the field of biological electron transfer is the conserved iron-sulfur cluster motif in both high potential iron-sulfur protein (HiPIP) and ferredoxin (Fd) active sites. Despite this structural similarity, HiPIPs react oxidatively at physiological potentials, whereas Fds are reduced. Sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy uncovers the substantial influence of hydration on this variation in reactivity. Fe-S covalency is much lower in natively hydrated Fd active sites than in HiPIPs but increases upon water removal; similarly, HiPIP covalency decreases when unfolding exposes an otherwise hydrophobically shielded active site to water. Studies on model compounds and accompanying density functional theory calculations support a correlation of Fe-S covalency with ease of oxidation and therefore suggest that hydration accounts for most of the difference between Fd and HiPIP reduction potentials.

  19. Evolution of anatase surface active sites probed by in situ sum-frequency phonon spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yue; Chen, Shiyou; Li, Yadong; Gao, Yi; Yang, Deheng; Shen, Yuen Ron; Liu, Wei-Tao

    2016-09-01

    Surface active sites of crystals often govern their relevant surface chemistry, yet to monitor them in situ in real atmosphere remains a challenge. Using surface-specific sum-frequency spectroscopy, we identified the surface phonon mode associated with the active sites of undercoordinated titanium ions and conjoint oxygen vacancies, and used it to monitor them on anatase (TiO2) (101) under ambient conditions. In conjunction with theory, we determined related surface structure around the active sites and tracked the evolution of oxygen vacancies under ultraviolet irradiation. We further found that unlike in vacuum, the surface oxygen vacancies, which dominate the surface reactivity, are strongly regulated by ambient gas molecules, including methanol and water, as well as weakly associated species, such as nitrogen and hydrogen. The result revealed a rich interplay between prevailing ambient species and surface reactivity, which can be omnipresent in environmental and catalytic applications of titanium dioxides.

  20. Quantum delocalization of protons in the hydrogen bond network of an enzyme active site

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lu; Boxer, Steven G; Markland, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes utilize protein architectures to create highly specialized structural motifs that can greatly enhance the rates of complex chemical transformations. Here we use experiments, combined with ab initio simulations that exactly include nuclear quantum effects, to show that a triad of strongly hydrogen bonded tyrosine residues within the active site of the enzyme ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) facilitates quantum proton delocalization. This delocalization dramatically stabilizes the deprotonation of an active site tyrosine residue, resulting in a very large isotope effect on its acidity. When an intermediate analog is docked, it is incorporated into the hydrogen bond network, giving rise to extended quantum proton delocalization in the active site. These results shed light on the role of nuclear quantum effects in the hydrogen bond network that stabilizes the reactive intermediate of KSI, and the behavior of protons in biological systems containing strong hydrogen bonds.

  1. Improving the neutral phytase activity from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Wang, Zupeng; Yan, Xiuhua

    2015-03-01

    Neutral phytase is used as a feed additive for degradation of anti-nutritional phytate in aquatic feed industry. Site-directed mutagenesis of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 phytase was performed with an aim to increase its activity. Mutation residues were chosen based on multiple sequence alignments and structure analysis of neutral phytsaes from different microorganisms. The mutation sites on surface (D148E, S197E and N156E) and around the active site (D52E) of phytase were selected. Analysis of the phytase variants showed that the specific activities of mutants D148E and S197E remarkably increased by about 35 and 13% over a temperature range of 40-75 °C at pH 7.0, respectively. The k cat of mutants D148E and S197E were 1.50 and 1.25 times than that of the wild-type phytase, respectively. Both D148E and S197E showed much higher thermostability than that of the wild-type phytase. However, mutants N156E and D52E led to significant loss of specific activity of the enzyme. Structural analysis revealed that these mutations may affect conformation of the active site of phytase. The present mutant phytases D148E and S197E with increased activities and thermostabilities have application potential as additives in aquaculture feed.

  2. Stringency of the 2-His-1-Asp active-site motif in prolyl 4-hydroxylase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L Gorres

    Full Text Available The non-heme iron(II dioxygenase family of enzymes contain a common 2-His-1-carboxylate iron-binding motif. These enzymes catalyze a wide variety of oxidative reactions, such as the hydroxylation of aliphatic C-H bonds. Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H is an alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent iron(II dioxygenase that catalyzes the post-translational hydroxylation of proline residues in protocollagen strands, stabilizing the ensuing triple helix. Human P4H residues His412, Asp414, and His483 have been identified as an iron-coordinating 2-His-1-carboxylate motif. Enzymes that catalyze oxidative halogenation do so by a mechanism similar to that of P4H. These halogenases retain the active-site histidine residues, but the carboxylate ligand is replaced with a halide ion. We replaced Asp414 of P4H with alanine (to mimic the active site of a halogenase and with glycine. These substitutions do not, however, convert P4H into a halogenase. Moreover, the hydroxylase activity of D414A P4H cannot be rescued with small molecules. In addition, rearranging the two His and one Asp residues in the active site eliminates hydroxylase activity. Our results demonstrate a high stringency for the iron-binding residues in the P4H active site. We conclude that P4H, which catalyzes an especially demanding chemical transformation, is recalcitrant to change.

  3. Insight into mechanisms of 3′-5′ exonuclease activity and removal of bulky 8,5′-cyclopurine adducts by apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Vigouroux, Armelle; Aikeshev, Bulat; Brooks, Philip J.; Saparbaev, Murat K.; Morera, Solange; Ishchenko, Alexander A.

    2013-01-01

    8,5′-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (cdA) and 8,5′-cyclo-2'-deoxyguanosine generated in DNA by both endogenous oxidative stress and ionizing radiation are helix-distorting lesions and strong blocks for DNA replication and transcription. In duplex DNA, these lesions are repaired in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. However, lesions at DNA strand breaks are most likely poor substrates for NER. Here we report that the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases—Escherichia coli Xth and human APE1—can remove 5′S cdA (S-cdA) at 3′ termini of duplex DNA. In contrast, E. coli Nfo and yeast Apn1 are unable to carry out this reaction. None of these enzymes can remove S-cdA adduct located at 1 or more nt away from the 3′ end. To understand the structural basis of 3′ repair activity, we determined a high-resolution crystal structure of E. coli Nfo-H69A mutant bound to a duplex DNA containing an α-anomeric 2′-deoxyadenosine:T base pair. Surprisingly, the structure reveals a bound nucleotide incision repair (NIR) product with an abortive 3′-terminal dC close to the scissile position in the enzyme active site, providing insight into the mechanism for Nfo-catalyzed 3′→5′ exonuclease function and its inhibition by 3′-terminal S-cdA residue. This structure was used as a template to model 3′-terminal residues in the APE1 active site and to explain biochemical data on APE1-catalyzed 3′ repair activities. We propose that Xth and APE1 may act as a complementary repair pathway to NER to remove S-cdA adducts from 3′ DNA termini in E. coli and human cells, respectively. PMID:23898172

  4. Insight into mechanisms of 3'-5' exonuclease activity and removal of bulky 8,5'-cyclopurine adducts by apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Vigouroux, Armelle; Aikeshev, Bulat; Brooks, Philip J; Saparbaev, Murat K; Morera, Solange; Ishchenko, Alexander A

    2013-08-13

    8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (cdA) and 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyguanosine generated in DNA by both endogenous oxidative stress and ionizing radiation are helix-distorting lesions and strong blocks for DNA replication and transcription. In duplex DNA, these lesions are repaired in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. However, lesions at DNA strand breaks are most likely poor substrates for NER. Here we report that the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases--Escherichia coli Xth and human APE1--can remove 5'S cdA (S-cdA) at 3' termini of duplex DNA. In contrast, E. coli Nfo and yeast Apn1 are unable to carry out this reaction. None of these enzymes can remove S-cdA adduct located at 1 or more nt away from the 3' end. To understand the structural basis of 3' repair activity, we determined a high-resolution crystal structure of E. coli Nfo-H69A mutant bound to a duplex DNA containing an α-anomeric 2'-deoxyadenosine:T base pair. Surprisingly, the structure reveals a bound nucleotide incision repair (NIR) product with an abortive 3'-terminal dC close to the scissile position in the enzyme active site, providing insight into the mechanism for Nfo-catalyzed 3'→5' exonuclease function and its inhibition by 3'-terminal S-cdA residue. This structure was used as a template to model 3'-terminal residues in the APE1 active site and to explain biochemical data on APE1-catalyzed 3' repair activities. We propose that Xth and APE1 may act as a complementary repair pathway to NER to remove S-cdA adducts from 3' DNA termini in E. coli and human cells, respectively.

  5. Fragment-based identification of determinants of conformational and spectroscopic change at the ricin active site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares Alexei S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ricin is a potent toxin and known bioterrorism threat with no available antidote. The ricin A-chain (RTA acts enzymatically to cleave a specific adenine base from ribosomal RNA, thereby blocking translation. To understand better the relationship between ligand binding and RTA active site conformational change, we used a fragment-based approach to find a minimal set of bonding interactions able to induce rearrangements in critical side-chain positions. Results We found that the smallest ligand stabilizing an open conformer of the RTA active site pocket was an amide group, bound weakly by only a few hydrogen bonds to the protein. Complexes with small amide-containing molecules also revealed a switch in geometry from a parallel towards a splayed arrangement of an arginine-tryptophan cation-pi interaction that was associated with an increase and red-shift in tryptophan fluorescence upon ligand binding. Using the observed fluorescence signal, we determined the thermodynamic changes of adenine binding to the RTA active site, as well as the site-specific binding of urea. Urea binding had a favorable enthalpy change and unfavorable entropy change, with a ΔH of -13 ± 2 kJ/mol and a ΔS of -0.04 ± 0.01 kJ/(K*mol. The side-chain position of residue Tyr80 in a complex with adenine was found not to involve as large an overlap of rings with the purine as previously considered, suggesting a smaller role for aromatic stacking at the RTA active site. Conclusion We found that amide ligands can bind weakly but specifically to the ricin active site, producing significant shifts in positions of the critical active site residues Arg180 and Tyr80. These results indicate that fragment-based drug discovery methods are capable of identifying minimal bonding determinants of active-site side-chain rearrangements and the mechanistic origins of spectroscopic shifts. Our results suggest that tryptophan fluorescence provides a sensitive probe for the

  6. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzner, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  7. Deletion of loop fragment adjacent to active site diminishes the stability and activity of exo-inulinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjomand, Maryam Rezaei; Habibi-Rezaei, Mehran; Ahmadian, Gholamreza; Hassanzadeh, Malihe; Karkhane, Ali Asghar; Asadifar, Mandana; Amanlou, Massoud

    2016-11-01

    Inulinases are classified as hydrolases and widely used in the food and medical industries. Here, we report the deletion of a six-membered adjacent active site loop fragment ((74)YGSDVT(79) sequence) from third Ω-loop of the exo-inulinase containing aspartate residue from Aspergillus niger to study its structural and functional importance. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to create the mutant of the exo-inulinase (Δ6SL). To investigate the stability of the region spanning this loop, MD simulations were performed 80ns for 20-85 residues. Molecular docking was performed to compare the interactions in the active sites of enzymes with fructose as a ligand. Accordingly, the functional thermostability of the exo-inulinase was significantly decreased upon loop fragment deletion. Evaluation of the kinetics parameters (Vmax, Km, kcat and, kcat/Km) and activation energy (Ea) of the catalysis of enzymes indicated the importance of the deleted sequence on the catalytic performance of the enzyme. In conclusion, six-membered adjacent active site loop fragment not only plays a crucial role in the stability of the enzyme, but also it involves in the enzyme catalysis through lowering the activation energy of the catalysis and effective improving the catalytic performance. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. SABER: a computational method for identifying active sites for new reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R; Houk, K N

    2012-05-01

    A software suite, SABER (Selection of Active/Binding sites for Enzyme Redesign), has been developed for the analysis of atomic geometries in protein structures, using a geometric hashing algorithm (Barker and Thornton, Bioinformatics 2003;19:1644-1649). SABER is used to explore the Protein Data Bank (PDB) to locate proteins with a specific 3D arrangement of catalytic groups to identify active sites that might be redesigned to catalyze new reactions. As a proof-of-principle test, SABER was used to identify enzymes that have the same catalytic group arrangement present in o-succinyl benzoate synthase (OSBS). Among the highest-scoring scaffolds identified by the SABER search for enzymes with the same catalytic group arrangement as OSBS were L-Ala D/L-Glu epimerase (AEE) and muconate lactonizing enzyme II (MLE), both of which have been redesigned to become effective OSBS catalysts, demonstrated by experiments. Next, we used SABER to search for naturally existing active sites in the PDB with catalytic groups similar to those present in the designed Kemp elimination enzyme KE07. From over 2000 geometric matches to the KE07 active site, SABER identified 23 matches that corresponded to residues from known active sites. The best of these matches, with a 0.28 Å catalytic atom RMSD to KE07, was then redesigned to be compatible with the Kemp elimination using RosettaDesign. We also used SABER to search for potential Kemp eliminases using a theozyme predicted to provide a greater rate acceleration than the active site of KE07, and used Rosetta to create a design based on the proteins identified.

  9. The active site of low-temperature methane hydroxylation in iron-containing zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Benjamin E. R.; Vanelderen, Pieter; Bols, Max L.; Hallaert, Simon D.; Böttger, Lars H.; Ungur, Liviu; Pierloot, Kristine; Schoonheydt, Robert A.; Sels, Bert F.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2016-08-01

    An efficient catalytic process for converting methane into methanol could have far-reaching economic implications. Iron-containing zeolites (microporous aluminosilicate minerals) are noteworthy in this regard, having an outstanding ability to hydroxylate methane rapidly at room temperature to form methanol. Reactivity occurs at an extra-lattice active site called α-Fe(II), which is activated by nitrous oxide to form the reactive intermediate α-O; however, despite nearly three decades of research, the nature of the active site and the factors determining its exceptional reactivity are unclear. The main difficulty is that the reactive species—α-Fe(II) and α-O—are challenging to probe spectroscopically: data from bulk techniques such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility are complicated by contributions from inactive ‘spectator’ iron. Here we show that a site-selective spectroscopic method regularly used in bioinorganic chemistry can overcome this problem. Magnetic circular dichroism reveals α-Fe(II) to be a mononuclear, high-spin, square planar Fe(II) site, while the reactive intermediate, α-O, is a mononuclear, high-spin Fe(IV)=O species, whose exceptional reactivity derives from a constrained coordination geometry enforced by the zeolite lattice. These findings illustrate the value of our approach to exploring active sites in heterogeneous systems. The results also suggest that using matrix constraints to activate metal sites for function—producing what is known in the context of metalloenzymes as an ‘entatic’ state—might be a useful way to tune the activity of heterogeneous catalysts.

  10. Mild activation of CeO2-supported gold nanoclusters and insight into the catalytic behavior in CO oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weili; Ge, Qingjie; Ma, Xiangang; Chen, Yuxiang; Zhu, Manzhou; Xu, Hengyong; Jin, Rongchao

    2016-01-28

    We report a new activation method and insight into the catalytic behavior of a CeO2-supported, atomically precise Au144(SR)60 nanocluster catalyst (where thiolate -SR = -SCH2CH2Ph) for CO oxidation. An important finding is that the activation of the catalyst is closely related to the production of active oxygen species on CeO2, rather than ligand removal of the Au144(SR)60 clusters. A mild O2 pretreatment (at 80 °C) can activate the catalyst, and the addition of reductive gases (CO or H2) can enhance the activation effects of O2 pretreatment via a redox cycle in which CO could reduce the surface of CeO2 to produce oxygen vacancies-which then adsorb and activate O2 to produce more active oxygen species. The CO/O2 pulse experiments confirm that CO is adsorbed on the cluster catalyst even with ligands on, and active oxygen species present on the surface of the pretreated catalyst reacts with CO pulses to generate CO2. The Au144(SR)60/CeO2 exhibits high CO oxidation activity at 80 °C without the removal of thiolate ligands. The surface lattice-oxygen of the support CeO2 possibly participates in the oxidation of CO over the Au144(SR)60/CeO2 catalyst.

  11. Divergence in Enzymatic Activities in the Soybean GST Supergene Family Provides New Insight into the Evolutionary Dynamics of Whole-Genome Duplicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-Jing; Tang, Zhen-Xin; Han, Xue-Min; Yang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Fu-Min; Yang, Hai-Ling; Liu, Yan-Jing; Zeng, Qing-Yin

    2015-11-01

    Whole-genome duplication (WGD), or polyploidy, is a major force in plant genome evolution. A duplicate of all genes is present in the genome immediately following a WGD event. However, the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for the loss of, or retention and subsequent functional divergence of polyploidy-derived duplicates remain largely unknown. In this study we reconstructed the evolutionary history of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene family from the soybean genome, and identified 72 GST duplicated gene pairs formed by a recent Glycine-specific WGD event occurring approximately 13 Ma. We found that 72% of duplicated GST gene pairs experienced gene losses or pseudogenization, whereas 28% of GST gene pairs have been retained in the soybean genome. The GST pseudogenes were under relaxed selective constraints, whereas functional GSTs were subject to strong purifying selection. Plant GST genes play important roles in stress tolerance and detoxification metabolism. By examining the gene expression responses to abiotic stresses and enzymatic properties of the ancestral and current proteins, we found that polyploidy-derived GST duplicates show the divergence in enzymatic activities. Through site-directed mutagenesis of ancestral proteins, this study revealed that nonsynonymous substitutions of key amino acid sites play an important role in the divergence of enzymatic functions of polyploidy-derived GST duplicates. These findings provide new insights into the evolutionary and functional dynamics of polyploidy-derived duplicate genes.

  12. New active site oriented glyoxyl-agarose derivatives of Escherichia coli penicillin G acylase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terreni Marco

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immobilized Penicillin G Acylase (PGA derivatives are biocatalysts that are industrially used for the hydrolysis of Penicillin G by fermentation and for the kinetically controlled synthesis of semi-synthetic β-lactam antibiotics. One of the most used supports for immobilization is glyoxyl-activated agarose, which binds the protein by reacting through its superficial Lys residues. Since in E. coli PGA Lys are also present near the active site, an immobilization that occurs through these residues may negatively affect the performance of the biocatalyst due to the difficult diffusion of the substrate into the active site. A preferential orientation of the enzyme with the active site far from the support surface would be desirable to avoid this problem. Results Here we report how it is possible to induce a preferential orientation of the protein during the binding process on aldehyde activated supports. A superficial region of PGA, which is located on the opposite side of the active site, is enriched in its Lys content. The binding of the enzyme onto the support is consequently forced through the Lys rich region, thus leaving the active site fully accessible to the substrate. Different mutants with an increasing number of Lys have been designed and, when active, immobilized onto glyoxyl agarose. The synthetic performances of these new catalysts were compared with those of the immobilized wild-type (wt PGA. Our results show that, while the synthetic performance of the wt PGA sensitively decreases after immobilization, the Lys enriched mutants have similar performances to the free enzyme even after immobilization. We also report the observations made with other mutants which were unable to undergo a successful maturation process for the production of active enzymes or which resulted toxic for the host cell. Conclusion The desired orientation of immobilized PGA with the active site freely accessible can be obtained by increasing

  13. Insights into the pathogenic character of a common NUBPL branch-site mutation associated with mitochondrial disease and complex I deficiency using a yeast model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz M. Wydro

    2013-09-01

    Complex I deficiencies are the most common causes of mitochondrial disorders. They can result from mutations not only in the structural subunits but also in a growing number of known assembly factors. A branch-site mutation in the human gene encoding assembly factor NUBPL has recently been associated with mitochondrial encephalopathy and complex I deficiency in seven independent cases. Moreover, the mutation is present in 1.2% of European haplotypes. To investigate its pathogenicity, we have reconstructed the altered C-terminus that results from the branch-site mutation and frameshift in the homologous Ind1 protein in the respiratory yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. We demonstrate that the altered sequence did not affect IND1 mRNA stability, yet it led to a decrease in Ind1 protein level. The instability of mutant Ind1 resulted in a strong decrease in complex I activity and caused slow growth, resembling the phenotype of the deletion strain of IND1. The presented data confirms the deleterious impact of the altered C-terminus resulting from the branch-site mutation. Furthermore, our approach demonstrates the great potential of Y. lipolytica as a model to investigate complex I deficiencies, especially in cases with genetic complexity.

  14. Maintenance and decline of physical activity during adolescence: insights from a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filion Annie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Better knowledge on why some individuals succeed in maintaining participation in physical activity throughout adolescence is needed to guide the development of effective interventions to increase and then maintain physical activity levels. Despite allowing an in-depth understanding, qualitative designs have infrequently been used to study physical activity maintenance. We explored factors contributing to the maintenance and the decline of physical activity during adolescence. Methods Questionnaires were administered to 515 grade 10-12 students. The Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents was used to determine physical activity level at the end of adolescence. An adapted version of this questionnaire was used to estimate physical activity in early adolescence. Among both genders, we identified participants who maintained a high level of physical activity since grade 7 and some whose activity level declined. For each category, groups of 10 students were randomly selected to take part in focus group discussions. Results Seven focus groups with 5 to 8 participants in each were held. Both maintainers and decliners associated physical activity with positive health outcomes. Maintenance of physical activity was associated with supportive social environments and heightened feelings of competence and attractiveness. A decline in physical activity was associated with negative social validation, poor social support and barriers related to access. Conclusions Although maintainers and decliners associate physical activity with similar themes, the experiences of both groups differ substantially with regards to those themes. Taking both perspectives in consideration could help improve interventions to increase and maintain physical activity levels of adolescents.

  15. The role of hydrophobic active-site residues in substrate specificity and acyl transfer activity of penicillin acylase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkema, WBL; Dijkhuis, AJ; de Vries, E; Janssen, DB

    2002-01-01

    Penicillin acylase of Escherichia colt catalyses the hydrolysis and synthesis of beta-lactam antibiotics. To study the role of hydrophobic residues in these reactions, we have mutated three active-site phenylalanines. Mutation of alphaF146, betaF24 and betaF57 to Tyr, Trp, Ala or Leu yielded mutants

  16. Active catalytic sites in the ammoxidation of propane and propene over V-Sb-O catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, S.A.; Zanthoff, H.W. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Chemie

    1998-12-31

    The ammoxidation of propane over VSb{sub y}O{sub x} catalysts (y=1, 2, 5) was investigated with respect to the role of different oxygen species in the selective and non selective reaction steps using transient experiments in the Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP) reactor. Only lattice oxygen is involved in the oxidation reactions. Using isotopic labelled oxygen it is shown that two different active sites exist on the surface. On site A, which can be reoxidized faster by gas phase oxygen compared to site B, mainly CO is formed. On site B CO{sub 2} and acrolein as well as NO and N{sub 2}O in the presence of ammonia in the feed gas are formed and reoxidation mainly occurs with bulk lattice oxygen. (orig.)

  17. Active site diversification of P450cam with indole generates catalysts for benzylic oxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Paul P; Eichler, Anja; Herter, Susanne; Kranz, David C; Turner, Nicholas J; Flitsch, Sabine L

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are useful biocatalysts for C-H activation, and there is a need to expand the range of these enzymes beyond what is naturally available. A panel of 93 variants of active self-sufficient P450cam[Tyr96Phe]-RhFRed fusion enzymes with a broad diversity in active site amino acids was developed by screening a large mutant library of 16,500 clones using a simple, highly sensitive colony-based colorimetric screen against indole. These mutants showed distinct fingerprints of activity not only when screened in oxidations of substituted indoles but also for unrelated oxidations such as benzylic hydroxylations.

  18. Active site diversification of P450cam with indole generates catalysts for benzylic oxidation reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul P. Kelly

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are useful biocatalysts for C–H activation, and there is a need to expand the range of these enzymes beyond what is naturally available. A panel of 93 variants of active self-sufficient P450cam[Tyr96Phe]-RhFRed fusion enzymes with a broad diversity in active site amino acids was developed by screening a large mutant library of 16,500 clones using a simple, highly sensitive colony-based colorimetric screen against indole. These mutants showed distinct fingerprints of activity not only when screened in oxidations of substituted indoles but also for unrelated oxidations such as benzylic hydroxylations.

  19. POISONING OF ACTIVE SITES ON ZIEGLER-NATTA CATALYST FOR PROPYLENE POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kitti Tangjituabun; Sang Yull Kim; Yuichi Hiraoka; Toshiaki Taniike; Minoru Terano; Bunjerd Jongsomjit; Piyasan Praserthdam

    2008-01-01

    The effects of poisoning materials on catalytic activity and isospecificity of the supported Ziegler-Natta catalyst were investigated.A minor amount of simple structure of Lewis base,i.e.,methanol,acetone,ethyl acetate,was introduced into the catalyst slurry for partial poisoning catalytic active centers.It was found that the variations in deactivation power were in the order of methanol>acetone>ethyl acetate.The kinetic investigation via stopped-flow polymerization showed that poisoning compounds caused a decrease in activity through the reduction of the number of active sites whereas no effect on the degree of isotacticity was observed.

  20. Autocatalytic activation of the furin zymogen requires removal of the emerging enzyme's N-terminus from the active site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Gawlik

    Full Text Available Before furin can act on protein substrates, it must go through an ordered process of activation. Similar to many other proteinases, furin is synthesized as a zymogen (profurin which becomes active only after the autocatalytic removal of its auto-inhibitory prodomain. We hypothesized that to activate profurin its prodomain had to be removed and, in addition, the emerging enzyme's N-terminus had to be ejected from the catalytic cleft.We constructed and analyzed the profurin mutants in which the egress of the emerging enzyme's N-terminus from the catalytic cleft was restricted. Mutants were autocatalytically processed at only the primary cleavage site Arg-Thr-Lys-Arg(107 downward arrowAsp(108, but not at both the primary and the secondary (Arg-Gly-Val-Thr-Lys-Arg(75 downward arrowSer(76 cleavage sites, yielding, as a result, the full-length prodomain and mature furins commencing from the N-terminal Asp108. These correctly processed furin mutants, however, remained self-inhibited by the constrained N-terminal sequence which continuously occupied the S' sub-sites of the catalytic cleft and interfered with the functional activity. Further, using the in vitro cleavage of the purified prodomain and the analyses of colon carcinoma LoVo cells with the reconstituted expression of the wild-type and mutant furins, we demonstrated that a three-step autocatalytic processing including the cleavage of the prodomain at the previously unidentified Arg-Leu-Gln-Arg(89 downward arrowGlu(90 site, is required for the efficient activation of furin.Collectively, our results show the restrictive role of the enzyme's N-terminal region in the autocatalytic activation mechanisms. In a conceptual form, our data apply not only to profurin alone but also to a range of self-activated proteinases.

  1. In Silico Structure Prediction of Human Fatty Acid Synthase-Dehydratase: A Plausible Model for Understanding Active Site Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Arun; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Samdani, A; Sangeetha, Manoharan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Deepa, Perinkulam Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN, UniProt ID: P49327) is a multienzyme dimer complex that plays a critical role in lipogenesis. Consequently, this lipogenic enzyme has gained tremendous biomedical importance. The role of FASN and its inhibition is being extensively researched in several clinical conditions, such as cancers, obesity, and diabetes. X-ray crystallographic structures of some of its domains, such as β-ketoacyl synthase, acetyl transacylase, malonyl transacylase, enoyl reductase, β-ketoacyl reductase, and thioesterase, (TE) are already reported. Here, we have attempted an in silico elucidation of the uncrystallized dehydratase (DH) catalytic domain of human FASN. This theoretical model for DH domain was predicted using comparative modeling methods. Different stand-alone tools and servers were used to validate and check the reliability of the predicted models, which suggested it to be a highly plausible model. The stereochemical analysis showed 92.0% residues in favorable region of Ramachandran plot. The initial physiological substrate β-hydroxybutyryl group was docked into active site of DH domain using Glide. The molecular dynamics simulations carried out for 20 ns in apo and holo states indicated the stability and accuracy of the predicted structure in solvated condition. The predicted model provided useful biochemical insights into the substrate-active site binding mechanisms. This model was then used for identifying potential FASN inhibitors using high-throughput virtual screening of the National Cancer Institute database of chemical ligands. The inhibitory efficacy of the top hit ligands was validated by performing molecular dynamics simulation for 20 ns, where in the ligand NSC71039 exhibited good enzyme inhibition characteristics and exhibited dose-dependent anticancer cytotoxicity in retinoblastoma cancer cells in vitro.

  2. Study on the active sites of Cu-ZSM-5 in trichloroethylene catalytic combustion with air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Hua Xu; Chuan Qi Liu; Yan Zhong; Xiu Zhou Yang; Jian Ying Liu; Ying Chun Yang; Zhi Xiang Ye

    2008-01-01

    The catalytic activity of Cu-ZSM-5 in trichloroethylene (TCE) combustion increases with the increasing skeletal Cu amount and however decreases with the increase of surface amorphous CuO,which is detected by infrared spectroscopy (IR) and diffuse reflectance ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (DRS-UV-vis),therefore the skeletal Cu species are concluded to be the active sites for the TCE combustion.

  3. Thiolactomycin inhibits D-aspartate oxidase: a novel approach to probing the active site environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katane, Masumi; Saitoh, Yasuaki; Hanai, Toshihiko; Sekine, Masae; Furuchi, Takemitsu; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Nakagome, Izumi; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Hirono, Shuichi; Homma, Hiroshi

    2010-10-01

    D-Aspartate oxidase (DDO) and D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) are flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-containing flavoproteins that catalyze the oxidative deamination of D-amino acids. While several functionally and structurally important amino acid residues have been identified in the DAO protein, little is known about the structure-function relationships of DDO. In the search for a potent DDO inhibitor as a novel tool for investigating its structure-function relationships, a large number of biologically active compounds of microbial origin were screened for their ability to inhibit the enzymatic activity of mouse DDO. We discovered several compounds that inhibited the activity of mouse DDO, and one of the compounds identified, thiolactomycin (TLM), was then characterized and evaluated as a novel DDO inhibitor. TLM reversibly inhibited the activity of mouse DDO with a mixed type of inhibition more efficiently than meso-tartrate and malonate, known competitive inhibitors of mammalian DDOs. The selectivity of TLM was investigated using various DDOs and DAOs, and it was found that TLM inhibits not only DDO, but also DAO. Further experiments with apoenzymes of DDO and DAO revealed that TLM is most likely to inhibit the activities of DDO and DAO by competition with both the substrate and the coenzyme, FAD. Structural models of mouse DDO/TLM complexes supported this finding. The binding mode of TLM to DDO was validated further by site-directed mutagenesis of an active site residue, Arg-237. Collectively, our findings show that TLM is a novel, active site-directed DDO inhibitor that will be useful for elucidating the molecular details of the active site environment of DDO. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Screening Approach to the Activation of Soil and Contamination of Groundwater at Linear Proton Accelerator Sites

    CERN Document Server

    Otto, Thomas

    The activation of soil and the contamination of groundwater at proton accelerator sites with the radionuclides 3H and 22Na are estimated with a Monte-Carlo calculation and a conservative soil- and ground water model. The obtained radionuclide concentrations show that the underground environment of future accelerators must be adequately protected against a migration of activation products. This study is of particular importance for the proton driver accelerator in the planned EURISOL facility.

  5. Active layer dynamics in three sites with contrasted topography in the Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Marc; Ruiz-Fernández, Jesús; Vieira, Gonçalo

    2015-04-01

    Topography exerts a key role on permafrost distribution in areas where mean annual temperatures are slightly negative. This is the case of low-altitude environments in Maritime Antarctica, namely in the South Shetland Islands, where permafrost is marginal to discontinuous until elevations of 20-40 m asl turning to continuous at higher areas. Consequently, the active layer dynamics is also strongly conditioned by the geomorphological setting. In January 2014 we installed three sites for monitoring the active layer dynamics across the Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands) in different geomorphological environments at elevations between 60 and 100 m. The purpose was to examine the role of the topography and microclimatic conditions on the active layer dynamics. At each site a set of loggers was set up to monitor: air temperatures, snow thickness, ground temperatures until 80 cm together with the coupling atmosphere-ground temperatures. During the first year of monitoring the mean annual air temperatures show similar values in the three sites, in all cases slightly below freezing. The snowy conditions during this year in this archipelago have resulted in a late melting of snow, which has also conditioned the duration of frozen conditions in the uppermost soil layers. Topography has a strong influence on snow cover duration, which in turn affects frozen ground conditions. The Domo site is located in a higher position with respect to the central plateau of Byers; here, the wind is stronger and snow cover thinner, which has conditioned a longer thawing season than in the other two sites (Cerro Negro, Escondido). These two sites are located in topographically protected areas favouring snow accumulation. The longer persistence of snow conditions a longer duration of negative temperatures in the active layer of the permafrost. This research was financially supported by the HOLOANTAR project (Portuguese Science Foundation) and the AXA Research Fund.

  6. Spectroscopic studies on the active site of hydroperoxide lyase : the influence of detergents on its conformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Noordermeer, M.A.; Veldink, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    Expression of high quantities of alfalfa hydroperoxide lyase in Escherichia coli made it possible to study its active site and structure in more detail. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra showed that hydroperoxide lyase consists for about 75% of alpha-helices. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spec

  7. Creation of a putative third metal binding site in type II dihydroorotases significantly enhances enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yen-Hua; Huang, Cheng-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Dihydroorotase (DHOase) is the third enzyme in the de novo biosynthesis pathway of pyrimidine nucleotides. DHOase is divided into two types (I and II). Type II DHOase generally contains a binuclear metal center in its active site. Recently, the crystal structure of DHOase domain in human CAD protein (huDHOase) has revealed three metal ions in the protein's active site. However, whether type II DHOase can have the critical third metal ion, as observed in huDHOase, remains unknown. In the present study, the putative third metal binding site in type II enzymes, such as the prokaryotic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 DHOase (StDHOase) and the eukaryotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae DHOase (ScDHOase), was created and identified. StDHOase T198E and ScDHOase T208E mutants had higher activities compared with their wild-type enzymes. The need for a higher DHOase stability and activity may drive creation of the third metal ion binding site in huDHOase, which can be achieved by mutating a highly conserved position T in type II dihydroorotases to E, similar to that in huDHOase.

  8. 78 FR 8190 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic... Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment (EA) for Commercial Wind Leasing and...

  9. 77 FR 74218 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic... suitable for wind energy leasing on the OCS, known as Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) and to obtain public and... these areas to achieve an efficient and responsible renewable energy leasing process. More...

  10. Aberration-corrected imaging of active sites on industrial catalyst nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel Cervera; Chang, L-Y; Hetherington, CJD

    2007-01-01

    Picture perfect: Information about the local topologies of active sites on commercial nanoparticles can be gained with atomic resolution through spherical-aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A powder of Pt nanoparticles on carbon black was examined with two advanced TEM t...

  11. Active-site residues of procarboxypeptidase Y are accessible to chemical modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, S O; Winther, Jakob R.

    1994-01-01

    The accessibility of the active-site cleft of procarboxypeptidase Y from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been studied by chemical modifications of two specific amino-acid residues. Previous studies have shown that these residues, Cys-341 and Met-398 in the mature enzyme, are located in the S1 and S'1...

  12. Aberration-corrected imaging of active sites on industrial catalyst nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel Cervera; Chang, L-Y; Hetherington, CJD;

    2007-01-01

    Picture perfect: Information about the local topologies of active sites on commercial nanoparticles can be gained with atomic resolution through spherical-aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A powder of Pt nanoparticles on carbon black was examined with two advanced TEM t...

  13. Artificial Metalloenzymes for Asymmetric Catalysis by Creation of Novel Active Sites in Protein and DNA Scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drienovska, Ivana; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Artificial metalloenzymes have emerged as a promising new approach to asymmetric catalysis. In our group, we are exploring novel artificial metalloenzyme designs involving creation of a new active site in a protein or DNA scaffold that does not have an existing binding pocket. In this review, we giv

  14. Molecular Interactions Between the Active Sites of RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp with its Receptor (Integrine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jauregui

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available A study of the molecular interactions between the active sites of RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp with it Receptor using simultaions is reported. Our calculations indicate that the guanidine-carboxylate complex is energetically favourd with respect to the guanidine-methyl tetrazole complex.

  15. Domestic activities at the Linear Pottery site of Elsloo (Netherlands) : a look from under the microscoop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijn, van A.L.; Mazzucco, N.; Hamon, C.; Allard, P.; Ilett, M.

    2013-01-01

    Use-wear analysis of a sample of flint tools from the site of Elsloo, situated in the Graetheide cluster (NL), has shed light on the domestic activities carried out within the settlement. It was shown that hide processing predominates. The extent and character of the wear on the hide working impleme

  16. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 nitrogenase active site to increase photobiological hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masukawa, Hajime; Inoue, Kazuhito; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Wolk, C Peter; Hausinger, Robert P

    2010-10-01

    Cyanobacteria use sunlight and water to produce hydrogen gas (H₂), which is potentially useful as a clean and renewable biofuel. Photobiological H₂ arises primarily as an inevitable by-product of N₂ fixation by nitrogenase, an oxygen-labile enzyme typically containing an iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) active site. In Anabaena sp. strain 7120, the enzyme is localized to the microaerobic environment of heterocysts, a highly differentiated subset of the filamentous cells. In an effort to increase H₂ production by this strain, six nitrogenase amino acid residues predicted to reside within 5 Å of the FeMo-co were mutated in an attempt to direct electron flow selectively toward proton reduction in the presence of N₂. Most of the 49 variants examined were deficient in N₂-fixing growth and exhibited decreases in their in vivo rates of acetylene reduction. Of greater interest, several variants examined under an N₂ atmosphere significantly increased their in vivo rates of H₂ production, approximating rates equivalent to those under an Ar atmosphere, and accumulated high levels of H₂ compared to the reference strains. These results demonstrate the feasibility of engineering cyanobacterial strains for enhanced photobiological production of H₂ in an aerobic, nitrogen-containing environment.

  17. Microstructural analysis and calcite piezometry on hydrothermal veins: Insights into the deformation history of the Cocos Plate at Site U1414 (IODP Expedition 344)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstätter, Jennifer; Kurz, Walter; Rogowitz, Anna

    2017-08-01

    In this study we present microstructural data from hydrothermal veins in the sedimentary cover and the igneous basement recovered from Hole U1414A, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 344 (Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project), to constrain deformation mechanism operating in the subducting Cocos Plate. Cathodoluminescence studies, mechanical e-twin piezometry and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of carbonate veins were used to give insights into the deformation conditions and to help to understand the tectonic deformation history of the Cocos Plate offshore Costa Rica. Analyses of microstructures in the sedimentary rocks and in the basalt of the igneous basement reveal brittle deformation, as well as crystal-plastic deformation of the host rock and the vein material. Cathodoluminescence images showed that in the basalt fluid flow and related precipitation occurred over several episodes. The differential stresses, obtained from two different piezometers using the same parameter (twin density), indicate various mean differential stresses of 49 ± 11 and 69 ± 30 MPa and EBSD mapping of calcite veins reveals low-angle subgrain boundaries. Deformation temperatures are restricted to the range from 170°C to 220°C, due to the characteristics of the existing twins and the lack of high-temperature intracrystalline deformation mechanisms (>220°C). The obtained results suggest that deformation occurred over a period associated with changes of ambient temperatures, occurrence of fluids and hydrofracturing, induced differential stresses due to the bending of the plate at the trench, and related seismic activity.

  18. Explicit treatment of active-site waters enhances quantum mechanical/implicit solvent scoring: Inhibition of CDK2 by new pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylsová, Michaela; Carbain, Benoit; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Musilová, Lenka; Haldar, Susanta; Köprülüoğlu, Cemal; Ajani, Haresh; Brahmkshatriya, Pathik S; Jorda, Radek; Kryštof, Vladimír; Hobza, Pavel; Echalier, Aude; Paruch, Kamil; Lepšík, Martin

    2017-01-27

    We present comprehensive testing of solvent representation in quantum mechanics (QM)-based scoring of protein-ligand affinities. To this aim, we prepared 21 new inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) with the pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine core, whose activities spanned three orders of magnitude. The crystal structure of a potent inhibitor bound to the active CDK2/cyclin A complex revealed that the biphenyl substituent at position 5 of the pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine scaffold was located in a previously unexplored pocket and that six water molecules resided in the active site. Using molecular dynamics, protein-ligand interactions and active-site water H-bond networks as well as thermodynamics were probed. Thereafter, all the inhibitors were scored by the QM approach utilizing the COSMO implicit solvent model. Such a standard treatment failed to produce a correlation with the experiment (R(2) = 0.49). However, the addition of the active-site waters resulted in significant improvement (R(2) = 0.68). The activities of the compounds could thus be interpreted by taking into account their specific noncovalent interactions with CDK2 and the active-site waters. In summary, using a combination of several experimental and theoretical approaches we demonstrate that the inclusion of explicit solvent effects enhance QM/COSMO scoring to produce a reliable structure-activity relationship with physical insights. More generally, this approach is envisioned to contribute to increased accuracy of the computational design of novel inhibitors.

  19. A facile reflux procedure to increase active surface sites form highly active and durable supported palladium@platinum bimetallic nanodendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Li, Yingjun; Liu, Baocang; Xu, Guangran; Zhang, Geng; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    A series of well-dispersed bimetallic Pd@Pt nanodendrites uniformly supported on XC-72 carbon black are fabricated by using different capping agents. These capping agents are essential for the branched morphology control. However, the surfactant adsorbed on the nanodendrites surface blocks the access of reactant molecules to the active surface sites, and the catalytic activities of these bimetallic nanodendrites are significantly restricted. Herein, a facile reflux procedure to effectively remove the capping agent molecules without significantly affecting their sizes is reported for activating supported nanocatalysts. More significantly, the structure and morphology of the nanodendrites can also be retained, enhancing the numbers of active surface sites, catalytic activity and stability toward methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation reactions. The as-obtained hot water reflux-treated Pd@Pt/C catalyst manifests superior catalytic activity and stability both in terms of surface and mass specific activities, as compared to the untreated catalysts and the commercial Pt/C and Pd/C catalysts. We anticipate that this effective and facile removal method has more general applicability to highly active nanocatalysts prepared with various surfactants, and should lead to improvements in environmental protection and energy production.

  20. Site energies of active and inactive pheophytins in the reaction center of Photosystem II from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, K; Neupane, B; Zazubovich, V; Sayre, R T; Picorel, R; Seibert, M; Jankowiak, R

    2012-03-29

    It is widely accepted that the primary electron acceptor in various Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) preparations is pheophytin a (Pheo a) within the D1 protein (Pheo(D1)), while Pheo(D2) (within the D2 protein) is photochemically inactive. The Pheo site energies, however, have remained elusive, due to inherent spectral congestion. While most researchers over the past two decades placed the Q(y)-states of Pheo(D1) and Pheo(D2) bands near 678-684 and 668-672 nm, respectively, recent modeling [Raszewski et al. Biophys. J. 2005, 88, 986 - 998; Cox et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 12364 - 12374] of the electronic structure of the PSII RC reversed the assignment of the active and inactive Pheos, suggesting that the mean site energy of Pheo(D1) is near 672 nm, whereas Pheo(D2) (~677.5 nm) and Chl(D1) (~680 nm) have the lowest energies (i.e., the Pheo(D2)-dominated exciton is the lowest excited state). In contrast, chemical pigment exchange experiments on isolated RCs suggested that both pheophytins have their Q(y) absorption maxima at 676-680 nm [Germano et al. Biochemistry 2001, 40, 11472 - 11482; Germano et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 86, 1664 - 1672]. To provide more insight into the site energies of both Pheo(D1) and Pheo(D2) (including the corresponding Q(x) transitions, which are often claimed to be degenerate at 543 nm) and to attest that the above two assignments are most likely incorrect, we studied a large number of isolated RC preparations from spinach and wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (at different levels of intactness) as well as the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (D2-L209H), in which the active branch Pheo(D1) is genetically replaced with chlorophyll a (Chl a). We show that the Q(x)-/Q(y)-region site energies of Pheo(D1) and Pheo(D2) are ~545/680 nm and ~541.5/670 nm, respectively, in good agreement with our previous assignment [Jankowiak et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2002, 106, 8803 - 8814]. The latter values should be used to model excitonic

  1. Site Energies of Active and Inactive Pheophytins in the Reaction Center of Photosystem II from Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, K.; Neupane, B.; Zazubovich, V.; Sayre, R. T.; Picorel, R.; Seibert, M.; Jankowiak, R.

    2012-03-29

    It is widely accepted that the primary electron acceptor in various Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) preparations is pheophytin {alpha} (Pheo {alpha}) within the D1 protein (Pheo{sub D1}), while Pheo{sub D2} (within the D2 protein) is photochemically inactive. The Pheo site energies, however, have remained elusive, due to inherent spectral congestion. While most researchers over the past two decades placed the Q{sub y}-states of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} bands near 678-684 and 668-672 nm, respectively, recent modeling [Raszewski et al. Biophys. J. 2005, 88, 986-998; Cox et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 12364-12374] of the electronic structure of the PSII RC reversed the assignment of the active and inactive Pheos, suggesting that the mean site energy of Pheo{sub D1} is near 672 nm, whereas Pheo{sub D2} ({approx}677.5 nm) and Chl{sub D1} ({approx}680 nm) have the lowest energies (i.e., the Pheo{sub D2}-dominated exciton is the lowest excited state). In contrast, chemical pigment exchange experiments on isolated RCs suggested that both pheophytins have their Q{sub y} absorption maxima at 676-680 nm [Germano et al. Biochemistry 2001, 40, 11472-11482; Germano et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 86, 1664-1672]. To provide more insight into the site energies of both Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} (including the corresponding Q{sub x} transitions, which are often claimed to be degenerate at 543 nm) and to attest that the above two assignments are most likely incorrect, we studied a large number of isolated RC preparations from spinach and wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (at different levels of intactness) as well as the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (D2-L209H), in which the active branch Pheo{sub D1} is genetically replaced with chlorophyll {alpha} (Chl {alpha}). We show that the Q{sub x}-/Q{sub y}-region site energies of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} are {approx}545/680 nm and {approx}541.5/670 nm, respectively, in good agreement with our previous assignment

  2. Site-specific profiles of estrogenic activity in agricultural areas of California's inland waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavado, Ramon; Loyo-Rosales, Jorge E; Floyd, Emily; Kolodziej, Edward P; Snyder, Shane A; Sedlak, David L; Schlenk, Daniel

    2009-12-15

    To evaluate the occurrence and sources of compounds capable of feminizing fish in agriculturally impacted waterways of the Central Valley of California, water samples were extracted and subjected to chemical analyses as well as in vitro and in vivo measurements of vitellogenin in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Among the 16 sites sampled, 6 locations frequently exhibited elevated concentrations of estrogenic substances with 17beta-estradiol equivalents up to 242 ng/L in vitro and 12 microg/kg in vivo. The patterns of activity varied among sites, with two sites showing elevated activity only in vitro, two showing elevated activity only in vivo, and two showing elevated activity in both assays. Sequential elution of solid-phase extraction (SPE) disks followed by bioassay-guided fractionation was used to characterize water samples from the two locations where activity was observed in both bioassays. The highest estrogenic activity was observed in the most nonpolar fractions (80-100% methanol eluent) from the Napa River, while most of the activity in the Sacramento River Delta eluted in the 60% methanol eluent. Quantitative analyses of SPE extracts and additional HPLC fractionation of the SPE extracts by GC-MS/MS and LC-MS/MS indicated concentrations of steroid hormones, alkylphenol polyethoxylates, and herbicides that were at least 1-3 orders of magnitude below bioassay 17beta-estradiol equivalent calculations. Given the different patterns of activity and chemical properties of the estrogenic compounds, it appears that estrogenic activity in these agriculturally impacted surface waters is attributable to multiple compounds. Further investigation is needed to identify the compounds causing the estrogenic activity and to determine the potential impacts of these compounds on feral fish.

  3. Nest predation increases with parental activity: separating nest site and parental activity effects.

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, T E; Scott, J; Menge, C

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators h...

  4. The role of the catalysts with highly dispersed and isolated active sites in the selective oxidation of light hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hongxuan; ZHAO Zhen

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes the role of catalysts with highly dispersed and isolated active sites (active sites: supported atoms f≤0.5 % ) in the selective oxidation of light hydrocarbons, such as methane, ethane and propane, into oxygenatesand the epoxidation of olefins. The plausible structures of the highly dispersed and isolated active species, as well as their effects on the catalytic performances are discussed. The special physico-chemical properties and the functional mechanism of the catalysts with highly dispersed and isolated active sites, as well as the preparation, characterization of the catalysts with highly dispersed and isolated active sites and their applications in other types of reactions of lower hydrocarbons are summarized.

  5. Asymmetry of the Active Site Loop Conformation between Subunits of Glutamate-1-semialdehyde Aminomutase in Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Campanini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminomutase (GSAM is a dimeric, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP- dependent enzyme catalysing in plants and some bacteria the isomerization of L-glutamate-1-semialdehyde to 5-aminolevulinate, a common precursor of chlorophyll, haem, coenzyme B12, and other tetrapyrrolic compounds. During the catalytic cycle, the coenzyme undergoes conversion from pyridoxamine 5′-phosphate (PMP to PLP. The entrance of the catalytic site is protected by a loop that is believed to switch from an open to a closed conformation during catalysis. Crystallographic studies indicated that the structure of the mobile loop is related to the form of the cofactor bound to the active site, allowing for asymmetry within the dimer. Since no information on structural and functional asymmetry of the enzyme in solution is available in the literature, we investigated the active site accessibility by determining the cofactor fluorescence quenching of PMP- and PLP-GSAM forms. PLP-GSAM is partially quenched by potassium iodide, suggesting that at least one catalytic site is accessible to the anionic quencher and therefore confirming the asymmetry observed in the crystal structure. Iodide induces release of the cofactor from PMP-GSAM, apparently from only one catalytic site, therefore suggesting an asymmetry also in this form of the enzyme in solution, in contrast with the crystallographic data.

  6. New insights into the activation mechanism of store-operated calcium channels:roles of STIM and Orai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-wei GUO; Lan HUANG

    2008-01-01

    The activation of Ca2+ entry through store-operated channels by agonists that deplete Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)is a ubiquitous signaling mechanism,the molecular basis of which has remained elusive for the past two decades.Store-operated Ca2+-release-activated Ca2+(CRAC)channels constitute the sole pathway for Ca2+ entry following antigen-receptor engagement.In a set of breakthrough studies over the past two years,stromal interaction molecule l(STIM1,tbe ER Ca2+ sensor) and Orail(a pore-forming subunit of the CRAC channel)have been identified.Here we review these recent studies and the insights they provide into the mechanism of store-operated Ca2+ channels(SOCCs).

  7. 2-(pyrazin-2-yloxy)acetohydrazide analogs QSAR Study: An insight into the structural basis of antimycobacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Revathi A; Gupta, Arun K; Soni, Love K; Kaskhedikar, Satish Gopalrao

    2010-11-01

    Quantitative structure activity relationship analysis based on classical Hansch approach was adopted on reported novel series of 2-(pyrazin-2-yloxy)acetohydrazide analogs. Various types of descriptors like topological, spatial, thermodynamic, and electronic were used to derive a quantitative relationship between the antitubercular activity and structural properties. The consensus scoring function showed a significant statistics of training and test set. Coefficient of determination (r²) of consensus model and predictive squared correlation coefficient (r²(pred)) were found to be 0.889 and 0.782, respectively. The model is not only able to predict the activity of test compounds but also explained the important structural features of the molecules in a quantitative manner. The study revealed that antimycobacterium activity is predominantly explained by the molecular connectivity indices of length 6, hydrogen donor feature of the analogs, and shape factors of the substituent. The comparative investigation of antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella typhi provided structural insights on how modulation of the molecular connectivity indices, energy of lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, accessible surface area, and moment of inertia of the analogs could be usefully made to optimize the antibacterial activity.

  8. Number of active transcription factor binding sites is essential for the Hes7 oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Angelis Martin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is commonly accepted that embryonic segmentation of vertebrates is regulated by a segmentation clock, which is induced by the cycling genes Hes1 and Hes7. Their products form dimers that bind to the regulatory regions and thereby repress the transcription of their own encoding genes. An increase of the half-life of Hes7 protein causes irregular somite formation. This was shown in recent experiments by Hirata et al. In the same work, numerical simulations from a delay differential equations model, originally invented by Lewis, gave additional support. For a longer half-life of the Hes7 protein, these simulations exhibited strongly damped oscillations with, after few periods, severely attenuated the amplitudes. In these simulations, the Hill coefficient, a crucial model parameter, was set to 2 indicating that Hes7 has only one binding site in its promoter. On the other hand, Bessho et al. established three regulatory elements in the promoter region. Results We show that – with the same half life – the delay system is highly sensitive to changes in the Hill coefficient. A small increase changes the qualitative behaviour of the solutions drastically. There is sustained oscillation and hence the model can no longer explain the disruption of the segmentation clock. On the other hand, the Hill coefficient is correlated with the number of active binding sites, and with the way in which dimers bind to them. In this paper, we adopt response functions in order to estimate Hill coefficients for a variable number of active binding sites. It turns out that three active transcription factor binding sites increase the Hill coefficient by at least 20% as compared to one single active site. Conclusion Our findings lead to the following crucial dichotomy: either Hirata's model is correct for the Hes7 oscillator, in which case at most two binding sites are active in its promoter region; or at least three binding sites are active, in which

  9. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Afsar U; Williams, Bryan R G; Hannigan, Gregory E

    2015-11-11

    Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding.

  10. The Crystal Structure of Yeast Protein Disulfide Isomerase Suggests Cooperativity Between Its Active Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian,G.; Xiang, S.; Noiva, R.; Lennarz, W.; Schindelin, H.

    2006-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase plays a key role in catalyzing the folding of secretory proteins. It features two catalytically inactive thioredoxin domains inserted between two catalytically active thioredoxin domains and an acidic C-terminal tail. The crystal structure of yeast PDI reveals that the four thioredoxin domains are arranged in the shape of a twisted 'U' with the active sites facing each other across the long sides of the 'U.' The inside surface of the 'U' is enriched in hydrophobic residues, thereby facilitating interactions with misfolded proteins. The domain arrangement, active site location, and surface features strikingly resemble the Escherichia coli DsbC and DsbG protein disulfide isomerases. Biochemical studies demonstrate that all domains of PDI, including the C-terminal tail, are required for full catalytic activity. The structure defines a framework for rationalizing the differences between the two active sites and their respective roles in catalyzing the formation and rearrangement of disulfide bonds.

  11. Interaction of aspartic acid-104 and proline-287 with the active site of m-calpain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, J S; Elce, J S

    1996-01-01

    In an ongoing study of the mechanisms of calpain catalysis and Ca(2+)-induced activation, the effects of Asp-104-->Ser and Pro-287-->Ser large subunit mutations on m-calpain activity, the pH-activity profile, Ca(2+)-sensitivity, and autolysis were measured. The importance of these positions was suggested by sequence comparisons between the calpain and papain families of cysteine proteinases. Asp-104 is adjacent to the active-site Cys-105, and Pro-287 is adjacent to the active-site Asn-286 and probably to the active-site His-262; both Asp-104 and Pro-287 are absolutely conserved in the known calpains, but are replaced by highly conserved serine residues in the papains. The single mutants had approx. 10-15% of wild-type activity, due mainly to a decrease in kcat, since Km was only slightly increased. The Pro-287-->Ser mutation appeared to cause a local perturbation of the catalytic Cys-105/His-262 catalytic ion pair, reducing its efficiency without major effect on the conformation and stability of the enzyme. The Asp-104-->Ser mutation caused a marked narrowing of the pH-activity curve, a 9-fold increase in Ca2+ requirement, and an acceleration of autolysis, when compared with the wild-type enzyme. The results indicated that Asp-104 alters the nature of its interaction with the catalytic ion pair during Ca(2+)-induced conformational change in calpain. This interaction may be direct or indirect, but is important in activation of the enzyme. PMID:8912692

  12. Molecular modeling of sialyloligosaccharide fragments into the active site of influenza virus N9 neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veluraja, K; Suresh, M X; Christlet, T H; Rafi, Z A

    2001-08-01

    Molecular modeling studies have been carried out to investigate the interactions between substrate sialyloligosaccharide (SOS) fragments bearing different glycosidic linkages and influenza virus N9 neuraminidase, a surface glycoprotein of influenza virus subtype N9. The studies revealed that the allowed orientation for sialic acid (SA) is less than 1% in the Eulerian space at the active site. The active site of this enzyme has enough space to accommodate various SOS fragments, NeuNAcalpha(2-3)Gal, NeuNAcalpha(2-6)Gal, NeuNAcalpha(2-8)NeuNAc and NeuNAcalpha(2-9)NeuNAc, but on specific conformations. In the bound conformation, among these substrates there exists a conformational similarity leading to a structural similarity, which may be an essential requirement for the cleavage activity of the neuraminidases irrespective of the type of glycosidic linkage.

  13. Selective targeting of the conserved active site cysteine of Mycobacterium tuberculosis methionine aminopeptidase with electrophilic reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddi, Ravikumar; Arya, Tarun; Kishor, Chandan; Gumpena, Rajesh; Ganji, Roopa J; Bhukya, Supriya; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs) cleave initiator methionine from ~ 70% of the newly synthesized proteins in every living cell, and specific inhibition or knockdown of this function is detrimental. MetAPs are metalloenzymes, and are broadly classified into two subtypes, type I and type II. Bacteria contain only type I MetAPs, and the active site of these enzymes contains a conserved cysteine. By contrast, in type II enzymes the analogous position is occupied by a conserved glycine. Here, we report the reactivity of the active site cysteine in a type I MetAP, MetAP1c, of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtMetAP1c) towards highly selective cysteine-specific reagents. The authenticity of selective modification of Cys105 of MtMetAP1c was established by using site-directed mutagenesis and crystal structure determination of covalent and noncovalent complexes. On the basis of these observations, we propose that metal ions in the active site assist in the covalent modification of Cys105 by orienting the reagents appropriately for a successful reaction. These studies establish, for the first time, that the conserved cysteine of type I MetAPs can be targeted for selective inhibition, and we believe that this chemistry can be exploited for further drug discovery efforts regarding microbial MetAPs.

  14. Structural insights into the histidine trimethylation activity of EgtD from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae-Hee; Cha, Hyung Jin; Ha, Sung-Chul; Rojviriya, Catleya; Kim, Yeon-Gil

    2014-10-03

    EgtD is an S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-dependent histidine N,N,N-methyltransferase that catalyzes the formation of hercynine from histidine in the ergothioneine biosynthetic process of Mycobacterium smegmatis. Ergothioneine is a secreted antioxidant that protects mycobacterium from oxidative stress. Here, we present three crystal structures of EgtD in the apo form, the histidine-bound form, and the S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (SAH)/histidine-bound form. The study revealed that EgtD consists of two distinct domains: a typical methyltransferase domain and a unique substrate binding domain. The histidine binding pocket of the substrate binding domain primarily recognizes the imidazole ring and carboxylate group of histidine rather than the amino group, explaining the high selectivity for histidine and/or (mono-, di-) methylated histidine as substrates. In addition, SAM binding to the MTase domain induced a conformational change in EgtD to facilitate the methyl transfer reaction. The structural analysis provides insights into the putative catalytic mechanism of EgtD in a processive trimethylation reaction.

  15. Radiological audit of remedial action activities at the processing site, transfer site, and Cheney disposal site Grand Junction, Colorado: Audit date, August 9--11, 1993. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) performed a radiological audit of the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), MK-Ferguson and CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., at the processing site, transfer site, and Cheney disposal site in Grand Junction, Colorado. Jim Hylko and Bill James of the TAC conducted this audit August 9 through 11, 1993. Bob Cornish and Frank Bosiljevec represented the US Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents one programmatic finding, eleven site-specific observations, one good practice, and four programmatic observations.

  16. Superior Temporal Activation as a Function of Linguistic Knowledge: Insights from Deaf Native Signers Who Speechread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capek, Cheryl M.; Woll, Bencie; MacSweeney, Mairead; Waters, Dafydd; McGuire, Philip K.; David, Anthony S.; Brammer, Michael J.; Campbell, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Studies of spoken and signed language processing reliably show involvement of the posterior superior temporal cortex. This region is also reliably activated by observation of meaningless oral and manual actions. In this study we directly compared the extent to which activation in posterior superior temporal cortex is modulated by linguistic…

  17. Intermetallic Alloys as CO Electroreduction Catalysts-Role of Isolated Active Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamad, Mohammadreza; Tripkovic, Vladimir; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2014-01-01

    binary bulk alloys forming from these elements have been investigated using density functional theory calculations. The electronic and geometric properties of the catalyst surface can be tuned by varying the size of the active centers and the elements forming them. We have identified six different...... potentially selective intermetallic surfaces on which CO can be reduced to methanol at potentials comparable to or even slightly positive than those for CO/CO2 reduction to methane on Cu. Common features shared by most of the selective alloys are single TM sites. The role of single sites is to block parasitic...

  18. Technical basis for classification of low-activity waste fraction from Hanford site tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, C.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-17

    The overall objective of this report is to provide a technical basis to support a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission determination to classify the low-activity waste from the Hanford Site single-shell and double-shell tanks as `incidental` wastes after removal of additional radionuclides and immobilization.The proposed processing method, in addition to the previous radionuclide removal efforts, will remove the largest practical amount of total site radioactivity, attributable to high-level wastes, for disposal in a deep geologic repository. The remainder of the waste would be considered `incidental` waste and could be disposed onsite.

  19. Technical basis for classification of low-activity waste fraction from Hanford site tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, C.A.

    1996-09-20

    The overall objective of this report is to provide a technical basis to support a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission determination to classify the low-activity waste from the Hanford Site single-shell and double-shell tanks as `incidental` wastes after removal of additional radionuclides and immobilization.The proposed processing method, in addition to the previous radionuclide removal efforts, will remove the largest practical amount of total site radioactivity, attributable to high-level waste, for disposal is a deep geologic repository. The remainder of the waste would be considered `incidental` waste and could be disposed onsite.

  20. Defining the origins of electron transfer at screen-printed graphene-like and graphite electrodes: MoO2 nanowire fabrication on edge plane sites reveals electrochemical insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley-Neale, Samuel J; Brownson, Dale A C; Banks, Craig E

    2016-08-18

    Molybdenum (di)oxide (MoO2) nanowires are fabricated onto graphene-like and graphite screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) for the first time, revealing crucial insights into the electrochemical properties of carbon/graphitic based materials. Distinctive patterns observed in the electrochemical process of nanowire decoration show that electron transfer occurs predominantly on edge plane sites when utilising SPEs fabricated/comprised of graphitic materials. Nanowire fabrication along the edge plane sites (and on edge plane like-sites/defects) of graphene/graphite is confirmed with Cyclic Voltammetry, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Raman Spectroscopy. Comparison of the heterogeneous electron transfer (HET) rate constants (k°) at unmodified and nanowire coated SPEs show a reduction in the electrochemical reactivity of SPEs when the edge plane sites are effectively blocked/coated with MoO2. Throughout the process, the basal plane sites of the graphene/graphite electrodes remain relatively uncovered; except when the available edge plane sites have been utilised, in which case MoO2 deposition grows from the edge sites covering the entire surface of the electrode. This work clearly illustrates the distinct electron transfer properties of edge and basal plane sites on graphitic materials, indicating favourable electrochemical reactivity at the edge planes in contrast to limited reactivity at the basal plane sites. In addition to providing fundamental insights into the electron transfer properties of graphite and graphene-like SPEs, the reported simple, scalable, and cost effective formation of unique and intriguing MoO2 nanowires realised herein is of significant interest for use in both academic and commercial applications.

  1. Communication: Active space decomposition with multiple sites: Density matrix renormalization group algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Shane M.; Shiozaki, Toru [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2014-12-07

    We extend the active space decomposition method, recently developed by us, to more than two active sites using the density matrix renormalization group algorithm. The fragment wave functions are described by complete or restricted active-space wave functions. Numerical results are shown on a benzene pentamer and a perylene diimide trimer. It is found that the truncation errors in our method decrease almost exponentially with respect to the number of renormalization states M, allowing for numerically exact calculations (to a few μE{sub h} or less) with M = 128 in both cases. This rapid convergence is because the renormalization steps are used only for the interfragment electron correlation.

  2. Active space decomposition with multiple sites: Density matrix renormalization group algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Shane M

    2014-01-01

    We extend the active space decomposition method, recently developed by us, to more than two active sites using the density matrix renormalization group algorithm. The fragment wave functions are described by complete or restricted active-space wave functions. Numerical results are shown on a benzene pentamer and a perylene diimide trimer. It is found that the truncation errors in our method decrease almost exponentially with respect to the number of renormalization states M, allowing for numerically exact calculations (to a few {\\mu}Eh or less) with M = 128 in both cases, which is in contrast to conventional ab initio density matrix renormalization group.

  3. Communication: Active space decomposition with multiple sites: density matrix renormalization group algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Shane M; Shiozaki, Toru

    2014-12-07

    We extend the active space decomposition method, recently developed by us, to more than two active sites using the density matrix renormalization group algorithm. The fragment wave functions are described by complete or restricted active-space wave functions. Numerical results are shown on a benzene pentamer and a perylene diimide trimer. It is found that the truncation errors in our method decrease almost exponentially with respect to the number of renormalization states M, allowing for numerically exact calculations (to a few μE(h) or less) with M = 128 in both cases. This rapid convergence is because the renormalization steps are used only for the interfragment electron correlation.

  4. Controlling activation site density by low-energy far-field stimulation in cardiac tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörning, Marcel; Takagi, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-06-01

    Tachycardia and fibrillation are potentially fatal arrhythmias associated with the formation of rotating spiral waves in the heart. Presently, the termination of these types of arrhythmia is achieved by use of antitachycardia pacing or cardioversion. However, these techniques have serious drawbacks, in that they either have limited application or produce undesirable side effects. Low-energy far-field stimulation has recently been proposed as a superior therapy. This proposed therapeutic method would exploit the phenomenon in which the application of low-energy far-field shocks induces a large number of activation sites (“virtual electrodes”) in tissue. It has been found that the formation of such sites can lead to the termination of undesired states in the heart and the restoration of normal beating. In this study we investigate a particular aspect of this method. Here we seek to determine how the activation site density depends on the applied electric field through in vitro experiments carried out on neonatal rat cardiac tissue cultures. The results indicate that the activation site density increases exponentially as a function of the intracellular conductivity and the level of cell isotropy. Additionally, we report numerical results obtained from bidomain simulations of the Beeler-Reuter model that are quantitatively consistent with our experimental results. Also, we derive an intuitive analytical framework that describes the activation site density and provides useful information for determining the ratio of longitudinal to transverse conductivity in a cardiac tissue culture. The results obtained here should be useful in the development of an actual therapeutic method based on low-energy far-field pacing. In addition, they provide a deeper understanding of the intrinsic properties of cardiac cells.

  5. Human 15-LOX-1 active site mutations alter inhibitor binding and decrease potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michelle; van Hoorebeke, Christopher; Horn, Thomas; Deschamps, Joshua; Freedman, J Cody; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Jacobson, Matthew P; Holman, Theodore

    2016-11-01

    Human 15-lipoxygenase-1 (h15-LOX-1 or h12/15-LOX) reacts with polyunsaturated fatty acids and produces bioactive lipid derivatives that are implicated in many important human diseases. One such disease is stroke, which is the fifth leading cause of death and the first leading cause of disability in America. The discovery of h15-LOX-1 inhibitors could potentially lead to novel therapeutics in the treatment of stroke, however, little is known about the inhibitor/active site interaction. This study utilizes site-directed mutagenesis, guided in part by molecular modeling, to gain a better structural understanding of inhibitor interactions within the active site. We have generated eight mutants (R402L, R404L, F414I, F414W, E356Q, Q547L, L407A, I417A) of h15-LOX-1 to determine whether these active site residues interact with two h15-LOX-1 inhibitors, ML351 and an ML094 derivative, compound 18. IC50 values and steady-state inhibition kinetics were determined for the eight mutants, with four of the mutants affecting inhibitor potency relative to wild type h15-LOX-1 (F414I, F414W, E356Q and L407A). The data indicate that ML351 and compound 18, bind in a similar manner in the active site to an aromatic pocket close to F414 but have subtle differences in their specific binding modes. This information establishes the binding mode for ML094 and ML351 and will be leveraged to develop next-generation inhibitors.

  6. Mechanistic insights into caspase-9 activation by the structure of the apoptosome holoenzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yini; Zhou, Mengying; Hu, Qi; Bai, Xiao-chen; Huang, Weiyun; Shi, Yigong

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian intrinsic apoptosis requires activation of the initiator caspase-9, which then cleaves and activates the effector caspases to execute cell killing. The heptameric Apaf-1 apoptosome is indispensable for caspase-9 activation by together forming a holoenzyme. The molecular mechanism of caspase-9 activation remains largely enigmatic. Here, we report the cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of an apoptotic holoenzyme and structure-guided biochemical analyses. The caspase recruitment domains (CARDs) of Apaf-1 and caspase-9 assemble in two different ways: a 4:4 complex docks onto the central hub of the apoptosome, and a 2:1 complex binds the periphery of the central hub. The interface between the CARD complex and the central hub is required for caspase-9 activation within the holoenzyme. Unexpectedly, the CARD of free caspase-9 strongly inhibits its proteolytic activity. These structural and biochemical findings demonstrate that the apoptosome activates caspase-9 at least in part through sequestration of the inhibitory CARD domain. PMID:28143931

  7. New insights into the antioxidant activity and components in crude oat oil and soybean oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Qiu, Shuang; Gan, Jing; Li, Zaigui; Nirasawa, Satoru; Yin, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Developing new antioxidants and using natural examples is of current interest. This study evaluated the antioxidant activities and the ability to inhibit soybean oil oxidation of oat oil obtained with different solvents. Oat oil extract obtained by ethanol extraction gave the highest antioxidant activity with a DPPH radical (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) scavenging activity of 88.2 % and a reducing power (A 700) of 0.83. Oat oil extracted by ethanol contained the highest polyphenol and α-tocopherol content. Significant correlation was observed between the total polyphenol contents, individual phenolic acid, α-tocopherol, and DPPH radical scavenging activity. Soybean oil with 2 % added oat oil showed low malondialdehyde content (8.35 mmol mL(-1)), suggesting that the added oat oil inhibited oxidation. Oat oil showed good antioxidant activity, especially when extracted with ethanol which could also retard the oxidation of soybean oil . DPPH radical scavenging activity was the best method to evaluate the antioxidant activity and components of oat oil.

  8. Insights into mechanism of glucokinase activation: observation of multiple distinct protein conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shenping; Ammirati, Mark J; Song, Xi; Knafels, John D; Zhang, Jeff; Greasley, Samantha E; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Qiu, Xiayang

    2012-04-20

    Human glucokinase (GK) is a principal regulating sensor of plasma glucose levels. Mutations that inactivate GK are linked to diabetes, and mutations that activate it are associated with hypoglycemia. Unique kinetic properties equip GK for its regulatory role: although it has weak basal affinity for glucose, positive cooperativity in its binding of glucose causes a rapid increase in catalytic activity when plasma glucose concentrations rise above euglycemic levels. In clinical trials, small molecule GK activators (GKAs) have been efficacious in lowering plasma glucose and enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, but they carry a risk of overly activating GK and causing hypoglycemia. The theoretical models proposed to date attribute the positive cooperativity of GK to the existence of distinct protein conformations that interconvert slowly and exhibit different affinities for glucose. Here we report the respective crystal structures of the catalytic complex of GK and of a GK-glucose complex in a wide open conformation. To assess conformations of GK in solution, we also carried out small angle x-ray scattering experiments. The results showed that glucose dose-dependently converts GK from an apo conformation to an active open conformation. Compared with wild type GK, activating mutants required notably lower concentrations of glucose to be converted to the active open conformation. GKAs decreased the level of glucose required for GK activation, and different compounds demonstrated distinct activation profiles. These results lead us to propose a modified mnemonic model to explain cooperativity in GK. Our findings may offer new approaches for designing GKAs with reduced hypoglycemic risk.

  9. Invited award contribution for ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry. Geometric and electronic structure contributions to function in bioinorganic chemistry: active sites in non-heme iron enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, E I

    2001-07-16

    Spectroscopy has played a major role in the definition of structure/function correlations in bioinorganic chemistry. The importance of spectroscopy combined with electronic structure calculations is clearly demonstrated by the non-heme iron enzymes. Many members of this large class of enzymes activate dioxygen using a ferrous active site that has generally been difficult to study with most spectroscopic methods. A new spectroscopic methodology has been developed utilizing variable temperature, variable field magnetic circular dichroism, which enables one to obtain detailed insight into the geometric and electronic structure of the non-heme ferrous active site and probe its reaction mechanism on a molecular level. This spectroscopic methodology is presented and applied to a number of key mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes leading to a general mechanistic strategy for O2 activation. These studies are then extended to consider the new features present in the binuclear non-heme iron enzymes and applied to understand (1) the mechanism of the two electron/coupled proton transfer to dioxygen binding to a single iron center in hemerythrin and (2) structure/function correlations over the oxygen-activating enzymes stearoyl-ACP Delta9-desaturase, ribonucleotide reductase, and methane monooxygenase. Electronic structure/reactivity correlations for O2 activation by non-heme relative to heme iron enzymes will also be developed.

  10. [NiFe] dithiolene diphosphine complex for hydrogen gas activation: a Theoretic Insight

    CERN Document Server

    GuYan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    A diphosphino-nickel-iron dithiolene complex, [Ni(bdt)(dppf)] (bdt = 1,2-benzenedithiolate, dppf = 1,1-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene), has been recently found to be reasonably active on proton reduction to dihydrogen (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015, 137, 1109). Interestingly, this exceptional complex was found to be also reactive towards dihydrogen activation as indicated by the electrochemical investigation. However, a pure nickel dithiolene diphosphine theoretical mode, excluding the contributions from iron moiety, was applied to attribute the experimental catalytic observation. We have re-visited the theoretical approach in details for this [NiFe] catalyst and compared it with the non-active nickel dithiolene diphosphine complexes. We found that both nickel and iron moieties in this newly developed complex were imperative for the observed catalytic per-formance, particularly towards the activation of dihydrogen.

  11. Multiple nucleophilic elbows leading to multiple active sites in a single module esterase from Sorangium cellulosum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udatha, D.B.R.K. Gupta; Madsen, Karina Marie; Panagiotou, Gianni;

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic residues in carbohydrate esterase enzyme families constitute a highly conserved triad: serine, histidine and aspartic acid. This catalytic triad is generally located in a very sharp turn of the protein backbone structure, called the nucleophilic elbow and identified by the consensus...... sequence GXSXG. An esterase from Sorangium cellulosum Soce56 that contains five nucleophilic elbows was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and the function of each nucleophilic elbowed site was characterized. In order to elucidate the function of each nucleophilic elbow, site directed mutagenesis...... was used to generate variants with deactivated nucleophilic elbows and the functional promiscuity was analyzed. In silico analysis together with enzymological characterization interestingly showed that each nucleophilic elbow formed a local active site with varied substrate specificities and affinities...

  12. Novel active comb-shaped dry electrode for EEG measurement in hairy site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Wu, Chung-Yu; Wong, Alice May-Kuen; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is an important biopotential, and has been widely applied in clinical applications. The conventional EEG electrode with conductive gels is usually used for measuring EEG. However, the use of conductive gel also encounters with the issue of drying and hardening. Recently, many dry EEG electrodes based on different conductive materials and techniques were proposed to solve the previous issue. However, measuring EEG in the hairy site is still a difficult challenge. In this study, a novel active comb-shaped dry electrode was proposed to measure EEG in hairy site. Different form other comb-shaped or spike-shaped dry electrodes, it can provide more excellent performance of avoiding the signal attenuation, phase distortion, and the reduction of common mode rejection ratio. Even under walking motion, it can effectively acquire EEG in hairy site. Finally, the experiments for alpha rhythm and steady-state visually evoked potential were also tested to validate the proposed electrode.

  13. [NiFe] dithiolene diphosphine complex for hydrogen gas activation: a Theoretic Insight

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A diphosphino-nickel-iron dithiolene complex, [Ni(bdt)(dppf)] (bdt = 1,2-benzenedithiolate, dppf = 1,1-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene), has been recently found to be reasonably active on proton reduction to dihydrogen (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015, 137, 1109). Interestingly, this exceptional complex was found to be also reactive towards dihydrogen activation as indicated by the electrochemical investigation. However, a pure nickel dithiolene diphosphine theoretical mode, excluding the contribution...

  14. Direct Activation of ENaC by Angiotensin II: Recent Advances and New Insights

    OpenAIRE

    Zaika, Oleg; Mamenko, Mykola; Staruschenko, Alexander; Pochynyuk, Oleh

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the principal effector of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). It initiates myriad processes in multiple organs integrated to increase circulating volume and elevate systemic blood pressure. In the kidney, Ang II stimulates renal tubular water and salt reabsorption causing antinatriuresis and antidiuresis. Activation of RAAS is known to enhance activity of the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron. In addition to its w...

  15. Appraisal of active tectonics in Hindu Kush: Insights from DEM derived geomorphic indices and drainage analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Amer Mahmood

    2012-07-01

    The results obtained from these indices were combined to yield an index of relative active tectonics (IRAT using GIS. The average of the seven measured geomorphic indices was used to evaluate the distribution of relative tectonic activity in the study area. We defined four classes to define the degree of relative tectonic activity: class 1__very high (1.0 ≤ IRAT < 1.3; class 2__high (1.3 ≥ IRAT < 1.5; class 3—moderate (1.5 ≥ IRAT < 1.8; and class 4—low (1.8 ≥ IRAT. In view of the results, we conclude that this combined approach allows the identification of the highly deformed areas related to active tectonics. Landsat imagery and field observations also evidence the presence of active tectonics based on the deflected streams, deformed landforms, active mountain fronts and triangular facets. The indicative values of IRAT are consistent with the areas of known relative uplift rates, landforms and geology.

  16. Human glutaminyl cyclase and bacterial zinc aminopeptidase share a common fold and active site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misquitta Stephanie A

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutaminyl cyclase (QC forms the pyroglutamyl residue at the amino terminus of numerous secretory peptides and proteins. We previously proposed the mammalian QC has some features in common with zinc aminopeptidases. We now have generated a structural model for human QC based on the aminopeptidase fold (pdb code 1AMP and mutated the apparent active site residues to assess their role in QC catalysis. Results The structural model proposed here for human QC, deposited in the protein databank as 1MOI, is supported by a variety of fold prediction programs, by the circular dichroism spectrum, and by the presence of the disulfide. Mutagenesis of the six active site residues present in both 1AMP and QC reveal essential roles for the two histidines (140 and 330, QC numbering and the two glutamates (201 and 202, while the two aspartates (159 and 248 appear to play no catalytic role. ICP-MS analysis shows less than stoichiometric zinc (0.3:1 in the purified enzyme. Conclusions We conclude that human pituitary glutaminyl cyclase and bacterial zinc aminopeptidase share a common fold and active site residues. In contrast to the aminopeptidase, however, QC does not appear to require zinc for enzymatic activity.

  17. Synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups on the hydrolysis of cellulose over activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Guo Shiou; Sievers, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    The chemical oxidation of activated carbon by H2 O2 and H2 SO4 is investigated, structural and chemical modifications are characterized, and the materials are used as catalysts for the hydrolysis of cellulose. Treatment with H2 O2 enlarges the pore size and imparts functional groups such as phenols, lactones, and carboxylic acids. H2 SO4 treatment targets the edges of carbon sheets primarily, and this effect is more pronounced with a higher temperature. Adsorption isotherms demonstrate that the adsorption of oligomers on functionalized carbon is dominated by van der Waals forces. The materials treated chemically are active for the hydrolysis of cellulose despite the relative weakness of most of their acid sites. It is proposed that a synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups enhances the activity by inducing a conformational change in the glucan chains if they are adsorbed at defect sites. This activates the glycosidic bonds for hydrolysis by in-plane functional groups. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Progress report on decommissioning activities at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), is located about 18 miles northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. Between 1953 and 1989, the facility, then called the Feed Material Production Center or FMPC, produced uranium metal products used in the eventual production of weapons grade material for use by other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. In 1989, FMPC`s production was suspended by the federal government in order to focus resources on environmental restoration versus defense production. In 1992, Fluor Daniel Fernald assumed responsibility for managing all cleanup activities at the FEMP under contract to the DOE. In 1990, as part of the remediation effort, the site was divided into five operable units based on physical proximity of contaminated areas, similar amounts of types of contamination, or the potential for a similar technology to be used in cleanup activities. This report continues the outline of the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities at the FEMP site Operable Unit 3 (OU3) and provides an update on the status of the decommissioning activities. OU3, the Facilities Closure and Demolition Project, involves the remediation of more than 200 uranium processing facilities. The mission of the project is to remove nuclear materials stored in these buildings, then perform the clean out of the buildings and equipment, and decontaminate and dismantle the facilities.

  19. Active site dynamics in NADH oxidase from Thermus thermophilus studied by NMR spin relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletti, Teresa; Farber, Patrick J; Mittermaier, Anthony

    2011-09-01

    We have characterized the backbone dynamics of NADH oxidase from Thermus thermophilus (NOX) using a recently-developed suite of NMR experiments designed to isolate exchange broadening, together with (15)N R (1), R (1ρ ), and {(1)H}-(15)N steady-state NOE relaxation measurements performed at 11.7 and 18.8 T. NOX is a 54 kDa homodimeric enzyme that belongs to a family of structurally homologous flavin reductases and nitroreductases with many potential biotechnology applications. Prior studies have suggested that flexibility is involved in the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. The active site residue W47 was previously identified as being particularly important, as its level of solvent exposure correlates with enzyme activity, and it was observed to undergo "gating" motions in computer simulations. The NMR data are consistent with these findings. Signals from W47 are dynamically broadened beyond detection and several other residues in the active site have significant R ( ex ) contributions to transverse relaxation rates. In addition, the backbone of S193, whose side chain hydroxyl proton hydrogen bonds directly with the FMN cofactor, exhibits extensive mobility on the ns-ps timescale. We hypothesize that these motions may facilitate structural rearrangements of the active site that allow NOX to accept both FMN and FAD as cofactors.

  20. A NMR and MD study of the active site of factor Xa by selective inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, B. T.; Fraternali, F.; Do, Q. T.; Atkinson, R. A.; Palmas, P.; Sklenar, V.; Wildgoose, P.; Strop, P.; Saudek, V.

    1998-02-01

    The structure of two selective inhibitors obtained by the screening of a vast combinatorial library, Ac-Tyr-Ile-Arg-Ile-NH2 and Ac-(4-amino-Phe)-(Cyc.-Gly)-NH2, in the active site of the blood clotting enzyme factor Xa was determined using transferred NOE NMR and simulated annealing (SA) under NMR constraints. The refined structures of the inhibitors were docked in the active site and SA was performed inside the enzyme which has been kept as a rigid charged template. The final structures were optimised by molecular dynamics simulation of the complexes in water. The inhibitors assume a compact, very well defined conformation embedded in the binding site without blocking the catalysis. The model allows to explain the mode of action, affinity and specificity. L'étude structurale d'inhibiteurs du facteur Xa, une enzyme de coagulation, obtenus par chimie combinatoire : Ac-Tyr-Ile-Arg-Ile-NH2, Ac-(4-amino-Phe)-(Cyc.-Gly)-NH2, a été réalisée par RMN NOE de transfert et modélisation moléculaire. Les structures ont été calculées sous contraintes RMN : géométrie de distance, recuit simulé et minimisation, affinées par une recherche conformationnelle et recuit de l'inhibiteur placé dans le site actif et optimisées par simulation de dynamique moléculaire du complexe dans l'eau. L'inhibiteur présente une structure compacte positionnée dans le site d'interaction hors d'accès du site catalytique. Ce modèle permet d'expliquer le mode d'action, l'affinité et la spécificité des peptides.

  1. Structural insights for activation of retinal guanylate cyclase by GCAP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunghyuk Lim

    Full Text Available Guanylyl cyclase activating protein 1 (GCAP1, a member of the neuronal calcium sensor (NCS subclass of the calmodulin superfamily, confers Ca(2+-sensitive activation of retinal guanylyl cyclase 1 (RetGC1 upon light activation of photoreceptor cells. Here we present NMR assignments and functional analysis to probe Ca(2+-dependent structural changes in GCAP1 that control activation of RetGC. NMR assignments were obtained for both the Ca(2+-saturated inhibitory state of GCAP1 versus a GCAP1 mutant (D144N/D148G, called EF4mut, which lacks Ca(2+ binding in EF-hand 4 and models the Ca(2+-free/Mg(2+-bound activator state of GCAP1. NMR chemical shifts of backbone resonances for Ca(2+-saturated wild type GCAP1 are overall similar to those of EF4mut, suggesting a similar main chain structure for assigned residues in both the Ca(2+-free activator and Ca(2+-bound inhibitor states. This contrasts with large Ca(2+-induced chemical shift differences and hence dramatic structural changes seen for other NCS proteins including recoverin and NCS-1. The largest chemical shift differences between GCAP1 and EF4mut are seen for residues in EF4 (S141, K142, V145, N146, G147, G149, E150, L153, E154, M157, E158, Q161, L166, but mutagenesis of EF4 residues (F140A, K142D, L153R, L166R had little effect on RetGC1 activation. A few GCAP1 residues in EF-hand 1 (K23, T27, G32 also show large chemical shift differences, and two of the mutations (K23D and G32N each decrease the activation of RetGC, consistent with a functional conformational change in EF1. GCAP1 residues at the domain interface (V77, A78, L82 have NMR resonances that are exchange broadened, suggesting these residues may be conformationally dynamic, consistent with previous studies showing these residues are in a region essential for activating RetGC1.

  2. New Insights into the Antibacterial Activity of Hydroxycoumarins against Ralstonia solanacearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Yang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Coumarins are important plant-derived natural products with wide-ranging bioactivities and extensive applications. In this study, we evaluated for the first time the antibacterial activity and mechanisms of action of coumarins against the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum, and investigated the effect of functional group substitution. We first tested the antibacterial activity of 18 plant-derived coumarins with different substitution patterns, and found that daphnetin, esculetin, xanthotol, and umbelliferone significantly inhibited the growth of R. solanacearum. Daphnetin showed the strongest antibacterial activity, followed by esculetin and umbelliferone, with MICs of 64, 192, and 256 mg/L, respectively, better than the archetypal coumarin with 384 mg/L. We further demonstrated that the hydroxylation of coumarins at the C-6, C-7 or C-8 position significantly enhanced the antibacterial activity against R. solanacearum. Transmission electron microscope (TEM and fluorescence microscopy images showed that hydroxycoumarins may interact with the pathogen by mechanically destroying the cell membrane and inhibiting biofilm formation. The antibiofilm effect of hydroxycoumarins may relate to the repression of flagellar genes fliA and flhC. These physiological changes in R. solanacearum caused by hydroxycoumarins can provide information for integral pathogen control. The present findings demonstrated that hydroxycoumarins have superior antibacterial activity against the phytopathogen R. solanacearum, and thus have the potential to be applied for controlling plant bacterial wilt.

  3. Insights from an observational assessment of park-based physical activity in Nanchang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Tu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Internationally, parks have been shown to be an important community asset for physical activity (PA, but little is known about the relationship between park usage and physical activity in China. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between park user characteristics and PA in Nanchang, China. In June 2014, 75,678 people were observed in eight parks over 12 days using SOPARC, a validated systematic observation tool. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between PA and park user characteristics. Most park users were older adults (53.5% or adults (34.6%. Overall, 55% of park users engaged in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA. Fewer women were observed in parks than men, but were 66% more likely to be engaged in MVPA than men. Park users were more likely to be observed in MVPA between 6–9 am and when the temperature was below 30 °C. Chinese park users were more active (55% than US studies in Tampa (30%, Chicago (49%, and Los Angeles (34%. More research is necessary to identify features of parks that are associated with greater PA so that effective interventions can be developed to promote active park use in Chinese citizens.

  4. Molecular Imaging Provides Novel Insights on Estrogen Receptor Activity in Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Stell

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptors have long been known to be expressed in several brain areas in addition to those directly involved in the control of reproductive functions. Investigations in humans and in animal models suggest a strong influence of estrogens on limbic and motor functions, yet the complexity and heterogeneity of neural tissue have limited our approaches to the full understanding of estrogen activity in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to examine the transcriptional activity of estrogen receptors in the brain of male and female mice. Exploiting the ERE-Luc reporter mouse, we set up a novel, bioluminescence-based technique to study brain estrogen receptor transcriptional activity. Here we show, for the first time, that estrogen receptors are similarly active in male and female brains and that the estrous cycle affects estrogen receptor activity in regions of the central nervous system not known to be associated with reproductive functions. Because of its reproducibility and sensitivity, this novel bioluminescence application stands as a candidate as an innovative methodology for the study and development of drugs targeting brain estrogen receptors.

  5. Soil pollution with trace elements at selected sites in Romania studied by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantelica, A. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Magurele, Ilfov County (Romania); Carmo Freitas, M. do [Technological and Nuclear Institute (ITN), Sacavem (Portugal); Ene, A. [Dunarea de Jos Univ. of Galati (Romania). Dept. of Chemistry, Physics and Environment; Steinnes, E. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Dept. of Chemistry

    2013-03-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to determine concentrations of 42 elements in samples of surface soil collected at seven sites polluted from various anthropogenic activities and a control site in a relatively clean area. Elements studied were Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Gd, Hf, Hg, K, La, Lu, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nd, Ni, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, Ti, U, V, W, Yb, Zn, and Zr. The results are compared with data for trace elements atmospheric deposition in lichen transplants from the same sites. The most severe soil contamination was observed at Copsa Mica from non-ferrous metallurgy. Appreciable soil contamination was also indicated at Baia Mare (non-ferrous mining and metallurgy), Deva (coal-fired power plant, cement and building materials industry), Galati (ferrous metallurgy), Magurele and Afumati (general urban pollution), and Oradea (chemical and light industries). In most cases excessive levels of toxic metals in soils matched correspondingly high values in lichen transplants. Compared to Romanian norms, legal upper limits were exceeded for Zn and Cd at Copsa Mica. Also, As and Sb occurred in excessive levels at given sites. (orig.)

  6. Assessment of Tritium Activity in Groundwater at the Nuclear Objects Sites in Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vigilija Cidzikienė

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of nuclear objects sites in Lithuania, including groundwater characterization, took place in the last few years. Tritium activity in groundwater is a very useful tool for determining how groundwater systems function. Natural and artificial tritium was measured in 8 wells in different layers (from 1.5 to 15 meters depth. The results were compared with other regions of Lithuania also. The evaluated tritium activities varied from 1.8 to 6.4 Bq/L at nuclear objects sites in Lithuania and they are coming to background level (1.83 Bq/L and other places in Lithuania. The data show, that groundwater at the nuclear power objects sites is not contaminated with artificial tritium. In this work, the vertical tritium transfer from soil water to the groundwater well at nuclear objects site was estimated. The data show that the main factor for vertical tritium transfer to the well depends on the depth of wells.

  7. Irreversible Oxidation of the Active-site Cysteine of Peroxiredoxin to Cysteine Sulfonic Acid for Enhanced Molecular Chaperone Activity*

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The thiol (–SH) of the active cysteine residue in peroxiredoxin (Prx) is known to be reversibly hyperoxidized to cysteine sulfinic acid (–SO2H), which can be reduced back to thiol by sulfiredoxin/sestrin. However, hyperoxidized Prx of an irreversible nature has not been reported yet. Using an antibody developed against the sulfonylated (–SO3H) yeast Prx (Tsa1p) active-site peptide (AFTFVCPTEI), we observed an increase in the immunoblot intensity in proportion to the ...

  8. Structural insight into the recognition of complement C3 activation products by integrin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajic, Goran

    2015-01-01

    associated with microbes and apoptotic or necrotic cells. Complement not only protects against pathogens but also maintains body homeostasis. Activation of complement leads to cleavage of the complement proteins C4, C3 and C5, and their fragments have effector functions through binding to pathogen surfaces...... fragment C3a called anaphylatoxin. Complement leads to opsonization as the proteolytic fragment C3b becomes covalently linked to the activator surface through a reactive thioester. Self-surfaces are protected by complement regulators, whereas complement activation vividly amplifies on pathogens...... and their clearance by dendritic cells is mediated by αMβ2. The central molecule in my project, αMβ2 integrin, recognizes many diverse ligands including iC3b, but the molecular basis for such recognition was lacking. During my PhD I have obtained a major breakthrough in the dissection of iC3b interaction with αMβ2. I...

  9. Pyrimethamine Derivatives: Insight into Binding Mechanism and Improved Enhancement of Mutant β-N-acetylhexosaminidase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropak, Michael B; Zhang, Jianmin; Yonekawa, Sayuri; Rigat, Brigitte A; Aulakh, Virender S; Smith, Matthew R; Hwang, Hee-Jong; Ciufolini, Marco A; Mahuran, Don J

    2015-06-11

    In order to identify structural features of pyrimethamine (5-(4-chlorophenyl)-6-ethylpyrimidine-2,4-diamine) that contribute to its inhibitory activity (IC50 value) and chaperoning efficacy toward β-N-acetylhexosaminidase, derivatives of the compound were synthesized that differ at the positions bearing the amino, ethyl, and chloro groups. Whereas the amino groups proved to be critical to its inhibitory activity, a variety of substitutions at the chloro position only increased its IC50 by 2-3-fold. Replacing the ethyl group at the 6-position with butyl or methyl groups increased IC50 more than 10-fold. Surprisingly, despite its higher IC50, a derivative lacking the chlorine atom in the para-position was found to enhance enzyme activity in live patient cells a further 25% at concentrations >100 μM, while showing less toxicity. These findings demonstrate the importance of the phenyl group in modulating the chaperoning efficacy and toxicity profile of the derivatives.

  10. Recent insights into the biological activities and drug delivery systems of tanshinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuee; Zhang, Wenji; Chen, Zirong; Shi, Zhi; He, Chengwei; Chen, Meiwan

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinones, the major lipid-soluble pharmacological constituents of the Chinese medicinal herb Tanshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza), have attracted growing scientific attention because of the prospective biomedical applications of these compounds. Numerous pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardio-cerebrovascular protection activities, are exhibited by the three primary bioactive constituents among the tanshinones, ie, tanshinone I (TNI), tanshinone IIA (TNIIA), and cryptotanshinone (CPT). However, due to their poor solubility and low dissolution rate, the clinical applications of TNI, TNIIA, and CPT are limited. To solve these problems, many studies have focused on loading tanshinones into liposomes, nanoparticles, microemulsions, cyclodextrin inclusions, solid dispersions, and so on. In this review, we aim to offer an updated summary of the biological activities and drug delivery systems of tanshinones to provide a reference for these constituents in clinical applications.

  11. An insight into synthetic Schiff bases revealing antiproliferative activities in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztanke, Krzysztof; Maziarka, Agata; Osinka, Anna; Sztanke, Małgorzata

    2013-07-01

    Schiff bases or azomethines are among the most important groups of biomolecules. These compounds have been found to reveal both remarkable biological activities and a variety of valuable practical applications. An interest in the exploration of novel series of synthetic Schiff bases has undoubtedly been growing due to their proven utility as attractive lead structures for the design of novel cytotoxic and cytostatic agents with a mechanism of action that sometimes differs from that of clinically authorized anticancer agents. Therefore, in the present paper we have focussed our attention on the collected synthetic simple Schiff bases of aldimine- and ketimine-types revealing anticancer activities in vitro, that have been described in the scientific literature during the last decade, and on structural variations whose affect the antiproliferative activity in sets of the designed molecules.

  12. New insight into the biological treatment by activated sludge: the role of adsorption process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaochun; Li, Xinrun; Zhang, Qingrui; Peng, Qiuming; Zhang, Wen; Gao, Faming

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of adsorption on the biological treatment process of wastewater. In the absence of substrate in the water, activated sludge developed well in the first hour, indicating that the growth of microorganism was not directly related to substrate concentration and the dissolved organic matter in the water assays were performed, no organic matter was detected out, revealing that there was no desorption in the activated sludge adsorption process. Activated sludge batch growth experiments in the presence of different adsorption capacities indicated that specific growth rate increased as specific adsorption capacity increased. The experiment on the relationship of adsorption capacity and substrate concentration or sludge concentration was also carried out. Specific adsorption capacity increased as sludge load increased, presenting linear correlation. The experiment results showed that adsorption should be taken into account in the study of the biological treatment process of wastewater.

  13. New insights into co-digestion of activated sludge and food waste: Biogas versus biofertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingqun; Yin, Yao; Liu, Yu

    2017-10-01

    This study explored two holistic approaches for co-digestion of activated sludge and food waste. In Approach 1, mixed activated sludge and food waste were first hydrolyzed with fungal mash, and produced hydrolysate without separation was directly subject to anaerobic digestion. In Approach 2, solid generated after hydrolysis of food waste by fungal mash was directly converted to biofertilizer, while separated liquid with high soluble COD concentration was further co-digested with activated sludge for biomethane production. Although the potential energy produced from Approach 1 was about 1.8-time higher than that from Approach 2, the total economic revenue generated from Approach 2 was about 1.9-fold of that from Approach 1 due to high market value of biofertilizer. It is expected that this study may lead to a paradigm shift in biosolid management towards environmental and economic sustainability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Metabolic activation of pyrrolizidine alkaloids: insights into the structural and enzymatic basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jianqing; Yang, Mengbi; Fu, Peter; Ye, Yang; Lin, Ge

    2014-06-16

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are natural toxins widely distributed in plants. The toxic potencies of different PAs vary significantly. PAs are mono- or diesters of necine acids with a necine base. On the basis of the necine bases, PAs are classified into three types: retronecine-type, otonecine-type, and platynecine-type. Hepatotoxic PAs contain an unsaturated necine base. PAs exert hepatotoxicity through metabolic activation by hepatic cytochromes P450s (CYPs) to generate reactive intermediates which form pyrrole-protein adducts. These adducts provide a mechanism-based biomarker to assess PA toxicity. In the present study, metabolic activation of 12 PAs from three structural types was investigated first in mice to demonstrate significant variations in hepatic metabolic activation of different PAs. Subsequently, the structural and enzymatic factors affecting metabolic activation of these PAs were further investigated by using human liver microsomes and recombinant human CYPs. Pyrrole-protein adducts were detected in the liver and blood of mice and the in vitro systems treated with toxic retronecine-type and otonecine-type PAs having unsaturated necine bases but not with a platynecine-type PA containing a saturated necine base. Retronecine-type PAs produced more pyrrole-protein adducts than otonecine-type PAs with similar necine acids, demonstrating that the structure of necine base affected PA toxic potency. Among retronecine-type PAs, open-ring diesters generated the highest amount of pyrrole-protein adducts, followed by macrocyclic diesters, while monoesters produced the least. Only CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 activated otonecine-type PAs, while all 10 CYPs studied showed the ability to activate retronecine-type PAs. Moreover, the contribution of major CYPs involved also varied significantly among retronecine-type PAs. In conclusion, our findings provide a scientific basis for predicting the toxicities of individual PAs in biological systems based on PA structural

  15. A structural insight into lead neurotoxicity and calmodulin activation by heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursula, Petri; Majava, Viivi

    2007-01-01

    Calmodulin is a calcium sensor that is also capable of binding and being activated by other metal ions. Of specific interest in this respect is lead, which is known to be neurotoxic and to have a very high affinity towards calmodulin. Crystal structures of human calmodulin complexed with lead and barium ions have been solved. The results will help in understanding the activation mechanisms of calmodulin by different heavy metals and will provide a detailed view of a putative target for lead neurotoxicity in humans. PMID:17671360

  16. Linde FUSRAP Site Remediation: Engineering Challenges and Solutions of Remedial Activities on an Active Industrial Facility - 13506

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beres, Christopher M.; Fort, E. Joseph [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States); Boyle, James D. [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Linde FUSRAP Site (Linde) is located in Tonawanda, New York at a major research and development facility for Praxair, Inc. (Praxair). Successful remediation activities at Linde combines meeting cleanup objectives of radiological contamination while minimizing impacts to Praxair business operations. The unique use of Praxair's property coupled with an array of active and abandoned utilities poses many engineering and operational challenges; each of which has been overcome during the remedial action at Linde. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) and CABRERA SERVICES, INC. (CABRERA) have successfully faced engineering challenges such as relocation of an aboveground structure, structural protection of an active water line, and installation of active mechanical, electrical, and communication utilities to perform remediation. As remediation nears completion, continued success of engineering challenges is critical as remaining activities exist in the vicinity of infrastructure essential to business operations; an electrical substation and duct bank providing power throughout the Praxair facility. Emphasis on engineering and operations through final remediation and into site restoration will allow for the safe and successful completion of the project. (authors)

  17. Synthesis of supported bimetallic nanoparticles with controlled size and composition distributions for active site elucidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakim, Sikander H.; Sener, Canan; Alba Rubio, Ana C.; Gostanian, Thomas M.; O' neill, Brandon J; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Dumesic, James A

    2015-08-01

    Elucidation of active sites in supported bimetallic catalysts is complicated by the high level of dispersity in the nanoparticle size and composition that is inherent in conventional methods of catalyst preparation. We present a synthesis strategy that leads to highly dispersed, bimetallic nanoparticles with uniform particle size and composition by means of controlled surface reactions. We demonstrate the synthesis of three systems, RhMo, PtMo, and RhRe, consisting of a highly reducible metal with an oxophilic promoter. These catalysts are characterized by FTIR, CO chemisorption, STEM/EDS, TPR, and XAS analysis. The catalytic properties of these bimetallic nanoparticles were probed for the selective CO hydrogenolysis of (hydroxymethyl)tetrahydropyran to produce 1,6 hexanediol. Based on the characterization results and reactivity trends, the active sites in the hydrogenolysis reaction are identified to be small ensembles of the more noble metal (Rh, Pt) adjacent to highly reduced moieties of the more oxophilic metal (Mo, Re).

  18. Visualization of the Differential Transition State Stabilization within the Active Site Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Leszczynski

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Increasing interest in the enzymatic reaction mechanisms and in the nature of catalytic effects in enzymes causes the need of appropriate visualization methods. A new interactive method to investigate catalytic effects using differential transition state stabilization approach (DTSS [1, 2] is presented. The catalytic properties of the active site of cytidine deaminase (E.C. 3.5.4.5 is visualized in the form of differential electrostatic properties. The visualization was implemented using scripting interface of VMD [3]. Cumulative Atomic Multipole Moments (CAMM [4,5,6] were utilized for efficient yet accurate evaluation of the electrostatic properties. The implementation is efficient enough for interactive presentation of catalytic effects in the active site of the enzyme due to transition state or substrate movement. This system of visualization of DTTS approach can be potentially used to validate hypotheses regarding the catalytic mechanism or to study binding properties of transition state analogues.

  19. Dynamics of water molecules in the active-site cavity of human cytochromes P450

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydberg, Patrik; Rod, Thomas Holm; Olsen, Lars;

    2007-01-01

    have quite big cavities, with 41 water molecules on average in 2C8 and 54-58 in 2C9 and 3A4, giving a water volume of 1500-2100 A3. The two crystal structures of 2C9 differ quite appreciably, whereas those of 3A4 are quite similar. The active-site cavity is connected to the surroundings by three to six......We have studied the dynamics of water molecules in six crystal structures of four human cytochromes P450, 2A6, 2C8, 2C9, and 3A4, with molecular dynamics simulations. In the crystal structures, only a few water molecules are seen and the reported sizes of the active-site cavity vary a lot...

  20. Extreme electric fields power catalysis in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Stephen D; Bagchi, Sayan; Boxer, Steven G

    2014-12-19

    Enzymes use protein architecture to impose specific electrostatic fields onto their bound substrates, but the magnitude and catalytic effect of these electric fields have proven difficult to quantify with standard experimental approaches. Using vibrational Stark effect spectroscopy, we found that the active site of the enzyme ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) exerts an extremely large electric field onto the C=O chemical bond that undergoes a charge rearrangement in KSI's rate-determining step. Moreover, we found that the magnitude of the electric field exerted by the active site strongly correlates with the enzyme's catalytic rate enhancement, enabling us to quantify the fraction of the catalytic effect that is electrostatic in origin. The measurements described here may help explain the role of electrostatics in many other enzymes and biomolecular systems.

  1. Twinning in fcc lattice creates low-coordinated catalytically active sites in porous gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajčí, Marian; Kameoka, Satoshi; Tsai, An-Pang

    2016-08-28

    We describe a new mechanism for creation of catalytically active sites in porous gold. Samples of porous gold prepared by de-alloying Al2Au exhibit a clear correlation between the catalytic reactivity towards CO oxidation and structural defects in the fcc lattice of Au. We have found that on the stepped {211} surfaces quite common twin boundary defects in the bulk structure of porous gold can form long close-packed rows of atoms with the coordination number CN = 6. DFT calculations confirm that on these low-coordinated Au sites dioxygen chemisorbs and CO oxidation can proceed via the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with the activation energy of 37 kJ/mol or via the CO-OO intermediate with the energy barrier of 19 kJ/mol. The existence of the twins in porous gold is stabilized by the surface energy.

  2. Dynamics and Mechanism of Efficient DNA Repair Reviewed by Active-Site Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chuang; Liu, Zheyun; Li, Jiang; Guo, Xunmin; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2010-06-01

    Photolyases repair the UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in damage DNA via a photoreaction which includes a series of light-driven electron transfers between the two-electron-reduced flavin cofactor FADH^- and the dimer. We report here our systematic studies of the repair dynamics in E. coli photolyase with mutation of several active-site residues. With femtosecond resolution, we observed the significant change in the forward electron transfer from the excited FADH^- to the dimer and the back electron transfer from the repaired thymines by mutation of E274A, R226A, R342A, N378S and N378C. We also found that the mutation of E274A accelerates the bond-breaking of the thymine dimer. The dynamics changes are consistent with the quantum yield study of these mutants. These results suggest that the active-site residues play a significant role, structurally and chemically, in the DNA repair photocycle.

  3. 78 FR 21352 - Update on Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... on Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY... reimbursement for cleanup work performed by licensees at eligible uranium and thorium processing sites in... licensees of eligible uranium and thorium processing sites. If licensees submit claims in FY 2013,...

  4. Human cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) contains two classes of binding sites for S-adenosylmethionine (SAM): complex regulation of CBS activity and stability by SAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pey, Angel L; Majtan, Tomas; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M; Kraus, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    CBS (cystathionine β-synthase) is a multidomain tetrameric enzyme essential in the regulation of homocysteine metabolism, whose activity is enhanced by the allosteric regulator SAM (S-adenosylmethionine). Missense mutations in CBS are the major cause of inherited HCU (homocystinuria). In the present study we apply a novel approach based on a combination of calorimetric methods, functional assays and kinetic modelling to provide structural and energetic insight into the effects of SAM on the stability and activity of WT (wild-type) CBS and seven HCU-causing mutants. We found two sets of SAM-binding sites in the C-terminal regulatory domain with different structural and energetic features: a high affinity set of two sites, probably involved in kinetic stabilization of the regulatory domain, and a low affinity set of four sites, which are involved in the enzyme activation. We show that the regulatory domain displays a low kinetic stability in WT CBS, which is further decreased in many HCU-causing mutants. We propose that the SAM-induced stabilization may play a key role in modulating steady-state levels of WT and mutant CBS in vivo. Our strategy may be valuable for understanding ligand effects on proteins with a complex architecture and their role in human genetic diseases and for the development of novel pharmacological strategies.

  5. Structure of the cathelicidin motif of protegrin-3 precursor: structural insights into the activation mechanism of an antimicrobial protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jean-Frédéric; Hoh, François; Strub, Marie-Paule; Aumelas, André; Dumas, Christian

    2002-10-01

    Cathelicidins are a family of antimicrobial proteins isolated from leucocytes and epithelia cells that contribute to the innate host defense mechanisms in mammalians. Located in the C-terminal part of the holoprotein, the cathelicidin-derived antimicrobial peptide is liberated by a specific protease cleavage. Here, we report the X-ray structure of the cathelicidin motif of protegrin-3 solved by MAD phasing using the selenocysteine-labeled protein. Its overall structure represents a fold homologous to the cystatin family and adopts two native states, a monomer, and a domain-swapped dimer. This crystal structure is the first example of a structural characterization of the highly conserved cathelicidin motif and thus provides insights into the possible mechanism of activation of the antimicrobial protegrin peptide.

  6. Immunoglobulin free light chains: new insights in mast cell activation and immunology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thio, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, several studies are described that elaborate on the biological properties of immunoglobulin free light chains (Ig-fLC) related to the activation of mast cells and effects on other cells. Mast cell degranulation through Ig-fLC requires two events. At first, mast cell-bound Ig-fLCs sho

  7. New insight into the solution structures of wheat gluten proteins from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, E.W.; Kasarda, D.D.; Hecht, L.

    2003-01-01

    Vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of the wheat proteins a-gliadin (A-gliadin), omega-liadin, and a 30 kDa peptide called T-A-1 from the high molecular weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) Dx5 were measured to obtain new information about their solution structures. The spectral data sho...

  8. New insight into the solution structures of wheat gluten proteins from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, E.W.; Kasarda, D.D.; Hecht, L.

    2003-01-01

    Vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of the wheat proteins a-gliadin (A-gliadin), omega-liadin, and a 30 kDa peptide called T-A-1 from the high molecular weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) Dx5 were measured to obtain new information about their solution structures. The spectral data sho...

  9. Marketing Activities to Support ‘Moderately Novel’ Product Innovation: Insights from the Chemical Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, A.A.J.; Vissers, G.A.N.; Dankbaar, B.

    2015-01-01

    Scholars often follow a contingency approach to study which marketing activities are suitable for a particular type of product innovation project, thereby making a distinction between incremental and radical innovation only. ‘Moderately novel’ projects, which have intermediate levels of newness, hav

  10. Structure of phosphorylated UBL domain and insights into PINK1-orchestrated parkin activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Jacob D; Dunkerley, Karen M; Mercier, Pascal; Shaw, Gary S

    2017-01-10

    Mutations in PARK2 and PARK6 genes are responsible for the majority of hereditary Parkinson's disease cases. These genes encode the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin and the protein kinase PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1), respectively. Together, parkin and PINK1 regulate the mitophagy pathway, which recycles damaged mitochondria following oxidative stress. Native parkin is inactive and exists in an autoinhibited state mediated by its ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain. PINK1 phosphorylation of serine 65 in parkin's UBL and serine 65 of ubiquitin fully activate ubiquitin ligase activity; however, a structural rationale for these observations is not clear. Here, we report the structure of the phosphorylated UBL domain from parkin. We find that destabilization of the UBL results from rearrangements to hydrophobic core packing that modify its structure. Altered surface electrostatics from the phosphoserine group disrupt its intramolecular association, resulting in poorer autoinhibition in phosphorylated parkin. Further, we show that phosphorylation of both the UBL domain and ubiquitin are required to activate parkin by releasing the UBL domain, forming an extended structure needed to facilitate E2-ubiquitin binding. Together, the results underscore the importance of parkin activation by the PINK1 phosphorylation signal and provide a structural picture of the unraveling of parkin's ubiquitin ligase potential.

  11. Moving Souls: History Offers Insights into Physical Activity that Go beyond Fitness and Fun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydnor, Synthia

    2005-01-01

    This article looks at four theoretical themes that scholars insist on when studying history. The themes--social memory, liminality, community, and critique--may be useful in stimulating the direction, planning, and practice of physical activity in young adults. These particular themes were chosen because they seem to match some of the…

  12. Functional insights into modulation of BKCa channel activity to alter myometrial contractility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón A Lorca

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The large-conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ channel (BKCa is an important regulator of membrane excitability in a wide variety of cells and tissues. In myometrial smooth muscle, activation of BKCa plays essential roles in buffering contractility to maintain uterine quiescence during pregnancy and in the transition to a more contractile state at the onset of labor. Multiple mechanisms of modulation have been described to alter BKCa channel activity, expression, and cellular localization. In the myometrium, BKCa is regulated by alternative splicing, protein targeting to the plasma membrane, compartmentation in membrane microdomains, and posttranslational modifications. In addition, interaction with auxiliary proteins (i.e., β1- and β2-subunits, association with G-protein coupled receptor signaling pathways, such as those activated by adrenergic and oxytocin receptors, and hormonal regulation provide further mechanisms of variable modulation of BKCa channel function in myometrial smooth muscle. Here, we provide an overview of these mechanisms of BKCa channel modulation and provide a context for them in relation to myometrial function.

  13. Factor B structure provides insights into activation of the central protease of the complement system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milder, F.J.; Gomes, L.; Schouten, A.; Janssen, B.J.C.; Huizinga, E.G.; Romijn, R.A.; Hemrika, W.; Roos, A; Daha, M.R.; Gros, P.

    2007-01-01

    Factor B is the central protease of the complement system of immune defense. Here, we present the crystal structure of human factor B at 2.3-A° resolution, which reveals how the five-domain proenzyme is kept securely inactive. The canonical activation helix of the Von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domai

  14. Insights into cholinesterase inhibitory and antioxidant activities of five Juniperus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Nilufer; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Ergun, Fatma

    2011-09-01

    In vitro acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory and antioxidant activities of the aqueous and ethanol extracts of the leaves, ripe fruits, and unripe fruits of Juniperus communis ssp. nana, Juniperus oxycedrus ssp. oxycedrus, Juniperus sabina, Juniperus foetidissima, and Juniperus excelsa were investigated in the present study. Cholinesterase inhibition of the extracts was screened using ELISA microplate reader. Antioxidant activity of the extracts was tested by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide radical scavenging, ferrous ion-chelating, and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Total phenol and flavonoid contents of the extracts were determined spectrophotometrically. The extracts had low or no inhibition towards AChE, whereas the leaf aqueous extract of J. foetidissima showed the highest BChE inhibition (93.94 ± 0.01%). The leaf extracts usually exerted higher antioxidant activity. We herein describe the first study on anticholinesterase and antioxidant activity by the methods of ferrous ion-chelating, superoxide radical scavenging, and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays of the mentioned Juniperus species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Interaction of mining activities and aquatic environment: A review from Greek mine sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileiou, Eleni; Kallioras, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In Greece a significant amount of mineral and ore deposits have been recorded accompanied by large industrial interest and a long mining history. Today many active and/or abandoned mine sites are scattered within the country; while mining activities take place in different sites for exploiting various deposits (clay, limestone, slate, gypsum, kaolin, mixed sulphide ores (lead, zinc, olivine, pozzolan, quartz lignite, nickel, magnesite, aluminum, bauxite, gold, marbles etc). The most prominent recent ones are: (i) the lignite exploitation that is extended in the area of Ptolemais (Western Macedonia) and Megalopolis (Central Peloponnese); and (ii) the major bauxite deposits located in central Greece within the Parnassos-Ghiona geotectonic zone and on Euboea Island. In the latter area, significant ores of magnesite were exploited and mixed sulphide ores. Centuries of intensive mining exploitation and metallurgical treatment of lead-silver deposits in Greece, have also resulted in significant abandoned sites, such as the one in Lavrion. Mining activities in Lavrio, were initiated in ancient times and continued until the 1980s, resulting in the production of significant waste stockpiles deposited in the area, crucial for the local water resources. Ιn many mining sites, environmental pressures are also recorded after the mine closure to the aquatic environment, as the surface waters flow through waste dump areas and contaminated soils. This paper aims to the geospatial visualization of the mining activities in Greece, in connection to their negative (surface- and/or ground-water pollution; overpumping due to extensive dewatering practices) or positive (enhanced groundwater recharge; pit lakes, improvement of water budget in the catchment scale) impacts on local water resources.

  16. Variation of (222)Rn activity concentration in soil gas at a site in Sapporo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyoshi, Ryoko; Kinoshita, Moriyoshi; Sawamura, Sadashi

    2005-09-01

    Several factors controlling the soil radon level in the present site were found to be changing air-filled porosity caused by fluctuations in moisture content, differences between the atmospheric and soil temperatures as well as volumetric (226)Ra content of the soil. The radon activity increased significantly in early October, especially at point 1, possibly as a result of a magnitude 8.0 earthquake which occurred on September 26, 2003, with epicenter located offshore near Tokachi, Hokkaido.

  17. Identification of the provenience of Majolica from sites in the Caribbean using neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olin, J.S.; Sayre, E.V.

    1975-01-01

    Tin-enamelled earthenware pottery from five early Spanish Colonial sites in the Dominican Republic and Venezuela were sampled and analyzed by neutron activation analysis in an attempt to determine whether these sherds had a common source. The tentative conclusion was that although several sources were indicated for the specimens analyzed the overall similarity in composition indicated that these sources were probably closely related. (JSR)

  18. Global Indicators Analysis and Consultancy Experience Insights into Correlation between Entrepreneurial Activities and Business Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovan Krivokapić

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many researches and practical experiences clearly indicate the existence of a strong relationship between entrepreneurial activities and the business environment in which these activities are initiated. Although this topic has been quite ignored until the late twentieth century, a lot of studies and consulting practice have contributed to the fact that there are now a number of theories concerning mentioned correlation. These theories aim to offer a model that would provide better utilization of the possibilities from the business environment which could be very important for the development from both macroeconomic and microeconomic aspects. An increasing number of articles on this topic says enough about its importance, and numerous researches by many reputable globally recognized institutions go in favor of this claim. There are many indicators that observe the economic situation in a country or a region from different aspects, so the analyses of these indicators make it possible to determine the specific relationships between entrepreneurial activities and the local and the global business environment. Given the complexity of these relations, the impact cannot be observed partially, without taking into consideration other important factors, but more detailed analyses, however, result in some useful conclusions, which in the proper context can have a positive impact on many economic factors. It is very important to emphasize the fact that the correlation between the business environment and entrepreneurial activities is bidirectional, since this influence is mutual, so that changes in one of these factors can and usually cause some modifications in the other. Frequent series of such iterations actually lead to changes in the business environment, while entrepreneurial activity changes its shape and affects the economy of a country or a region, which is of particular importance for its competitiveness in the era of globalization.

  19. Insights into the phosphatase and the synthase activities of human bisphosphoglycerate mutase: a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2014-03-07

    Bisphosphoglycerate mutase (BPGM) is a multi-activity enzyme. Its main function is to synthesize the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, the allosteric effector of hemoglobin. This enzyme can also catalyze the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate to the 3-phosphoglycerate. In this study, the reaction mechanisms of both the phosphatase and the synthase activities of human bisphosphoglycerate mutase were theoretically calculated by using the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method based on the metadynamics and umbrella sampling simulations. The simulation results not only show the free energy curve of the phosphatase and the synthase reactions, but also reveal the important role of some residues in the active site. Additionally, the energy barriers of the two reactions indicate that the activity of the synthase in human bisphosphoglycerate mutase is much higher than that of the phosphatase. The estimated reaction barriers are consistent with the experimental data. Therefore, our work can give important information to understand the catalytic mechanism of the bisphosphoglycerate mutase family.

  20. Discovery and characterization of non-ATP site inhibitors of the mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comess, Kenneth M; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R; Gum, Rebecca J; Borhani, David W; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E; Haasch, Deanna L; Smith, Harriet T; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L; Cloutier, Timothy E; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J; Calderwood, David J; Hajduk, Philip J

    2011-03-18

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38α (involved in the formation of TNFα and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional (1)H/(13)C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38α both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in similar fashion to Jnk-1 si

  1. Discovery and Characterization of Non-ATP Site Inhibitors of the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comess, Kenneth M.; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R.; Gum, Rebecca J.; Borhani, David W.; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R.; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E.; Haasch, Deanna L.; Smith, Harriet T.; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L.; Cloutier, Timothy E.; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I.; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J.; Calderwood, David J.; Hajduk, Philip J. (Abbott)

    2012-03-02

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38{alpha} (involved in the formation of TNF{alpha} and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38{alpha} both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in

  2. Myelin 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase: active-site ligand binding and molecular conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Myllykoski

    Full Text Available The 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase is a highly abundant membrane-associated enzyme in the myelin sheath of the vertebrate nervous system. CNPase is a member of the 2H phosphoesterase family and catalyzes the formation of 2'-nucleotide products from 2',3'-cyclic substrates; however, its physiological substrate and function remain unknown. It is likely that CNPase participates in RNA metabolism in the myelinating cell. We solved crystal structures of the phosphodiesterase domain of mouse CNPase, showing the binding mode of nucleotide ligands in the active site. The binding mode of the product 2'-AMP provides a detailed view of the reaction mechanism. Comparisons of CNPase crystal structures highlight flexible loops, which could play roles in substrate recognition; large differences in the active-site vicinity are observed when comparing more distant members of the 2H family. We also studied the full-length CNPase, showing its N-terminal domain is involved in RNA binding and dimerization. Our results provide a detailed picture of the CNPase active site during its catalytic cycle, and suggest a specific function for the previously uncharacterized N-terminal domain.

  3. Photoreduction of the Active Site of the Metalloprotein Putidaredoxin By Synchrotron Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbett, M.C.; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept.; Latimer, M.J.; Poulos, T.L.; Sevrioukova, I.F.; Hodgson, K.O.; /SLAC, SSRL /UC, Irvine /Stanford U., Chem. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL; Hedman, B.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-10-10

    X-ray damage to protein crystals is often assessed on the basis of the degradation of diffraction intensity, yet this measure is not sensitive to the rapid changes that occur at photosensitive groups such as the active sites of metalloproteins. Here, X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to study the X-ray dose-dependent photoreduction of crystals of the [Fe2S2]-containing metalloprotein putidaredoxin. A dramatic decrease in the rate of photoreduction is observed in crystals cryocooled with liquid helium at 40 K compared with those cooled with liquid nitrogen at 110 K. Whereas structural changes consistent with cluster reduction occur in the active site of the crystal measured at 110 K, no such changes occur in the crystal measured at 40 K, even after an eightfold increase in dose. When the structural results from extended X-ray absorption fine-structure measurements are compared with those obtained by crystallography on this and similar proteins, it is apparent that X-ray-induced photoreduction has had an impact on the crystallographic data and subsequent structure solutions. These results strongly indicate the importance of using liquid-helium-based cooling for metalloprotein crystallography in order to avoid the subtle yet important changes that can take place at the metalloprotein active sites when liquid-nitrogen-based cooling is used. The study also illustrates the need for direct measurement of the redox states of the metals, through X-ray absorption spectroscopy, simultaneously with the crystallographic measurements.

  4. Photoreduction of the active site of the metalloprotein putidaredoxin by synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Mary C; Latimer, Matthew J; Poulos, Thomas L; Sevrioukova, Irina F; Hodgson, Keith O; Hedman, Britt

    2007-09-01

    X-ray damage to protein crystals is often assessed on the basis of the degradation of diffraction intensity, yet this measure is not sensitive to the rapid changes that occur at photosensitive groups such as the active sites of metalloproteins. Here, X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to study the X-ray dose-dependent photoreduction of crystals of the [Fe(2)S(2)]-containing metalloprotein putidaredoxin. A dramatic decrease in the rate of photoreduction is observed in crystals cryocooled with liquid helium at 40 K compared with those cooled with liquid nitrogen at 110 K. Whereas structural changes consistent with cluster reduction occur in the active site of the crystal measured at 110 K, no such changes occur in the crystal measured at 40 K, even after an eightfold increase in dose. When the structural results from extended X-ray absorption fine-structure measurements are compared with those obtained by crystallography on this and similar proteins, it is apparent that X-ray-induced photoreduction has had an impact on the crystallographic data and subsequent structure solutions. These results strongly indicate the importance of using liquid-helium-based cooling for metalloprotein crystallography in order to avoid the subtle yet important changes that can take place at the metalloprotein active sites when liquid-nitrogen-based cooling is used. The study also illustrates the need for direct measurement of the redox states of the metals, through X-ray absorption spectroscopy, simultaneously with the crystallographic measurements.

  5. Thermal regime of active layer at two lithologically contrasting sites on James Ross Island, Antarctic Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrbáček, Filip; Nývlt, Daniel; Láska, Kamil

    2016-04-01

    Antarctic Peninsula region (AP) represents one of the most rapidly warming parts of our planet in the last 50 years. Despite increasing research activities along both western and eastern sides of AP in last decades, there is still a lot of gaps in our knowledge relating to permafrost, active layer and its thermal and physical properties. This study brings new results of active layer monitoring on James Ross Island, which is the largest island in northern AP. Its northern part, Ulu Peninsula, is the largest ice-free area (more than 200 km2) in the region. Due its large area, we focused this study on sites located in different lithologies, which would affect local thermal regime of active layer. Study site (1) at Abernethy Flats area (41 m a.s.l.) lies ~7 km from northern coast. Lithologically is formed by disintegrated Cretaceous calcareous sandstones and siltstones of the Santa Marta Formation. Study site (2) is located at the northern slopes of Berry Hill (56 m a.s.l.), about 0.4 km from northern coastline. Lithology is composed of muddy to intermediate diamictites, tuffaceous siltstones to fine grained sandstones of the Mendel Formation. Data of air temperature at 2 meters above ground and the active layer temperatures at 75 cm deep profiles were obtained from both sites in period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2014. Small differences were found when comparing mean air temperatures and active temperatures at 5 and 75 cm depth in the period 2012-2014. While the mean air temperatures varied between -7.7 °C and -7.0 °C, the mean ground temperatures fluctuated between -6.6 °C and -6.1 °C at 5 cm and -6.9 °C and -6.0 °C at 75 cm at Abernethy Flats and Berry Hill slopes respectively. Even though ground temperature differences along the profiles weren't pronounced during thawing seasons, the maximum active layer thickness was significantly larger at Berry Hill slopes (80 to 82 cm) than at Abernethy Flats (52 to 64 cm). We assume this differences are affected by

  6. Alkynol natural products target ALDH2 in cancer cells by irreversible binding to the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydenreuter, Wolfgang; Kunold, Elena; Sieber, Stephan A

    2015-11-11

    Falcarinol and stipudiol are natural products with potent anti-cancer activity found in several vegetables. Here, we use a chemical proteomic strategy to identify ALDH2 as a molecular target of falcarinol in cancer cells and confirm enzyme inhibition via covalent alkylation of the active site. Furthermore, the synthesis of stipudiol led to the observation that ALDH2 exhibits preference for alkynol-based binders. Inhibition of ALDH2 impairs detoxification of reactive aldehydes and limits oxidative stress response, two crucial pathways for cellular viability.

  7. A novel mutation in the β-spectrin gene causes the activation of a cryptic 5'-splice site and the creation of a de novo 3'-splice site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Pilar Carrasco; Rosales, José Miguel Lezana; Milla, Carmen Palma; Montiel, Javier López; Siles, Juan López

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of genes involved in hereditary spherocytosis, by next-generation sequencing in two patients with clinical diagnosis of the disease, showed the presence of the c.1795+1G>A mutation in the SPTB gene. cDNA amplification then revealed the occurrence of a consequent aberrant mRNA isoform produced from the activation of a cryptic 5'-splice site and the creation of a newly 3'-splice site. The mechanisms by which these two splice sites are used as a result of the same mutation should be analyzed in depth in further studies.

  8. Nonlinear optical studies and structure-activity relationship of chalcone derivatives with in silico insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Swayamsiddha; Adithya, K. S.; Shankar, Pruthvik; Jagadeesh Babu, N.; Srivastava, Sailesh; Nageswara Rao, G.

    2017-07-01

    Nine chalcones were prepared via Claisen-Schmidt condensation, and characterized by UV-vis, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectrometry. One of the representative member 4-NDM-TC has been studied via single crystal XRD and the TGA/DTA technique. SHG efficiency and NLO susceptibilities of the chalcones have been evaluated by the Kurtz and Perry method and Degenerate Four Wave Mixing techniques respectively. 3-Cl-4‧-HC was noted to possess SHG efficiency 1.37 times that of urea while 4-NDM-TC returned the highest third order NLO susceptibilities with respect to CS2. In silico studies help evaluate various physical parameters, in correlating the observed activities. In conclusion, the structure-activity relationship was derived based on the in silico and experimental results for the third order NLO susceptibilities.

  9. Streaming potential modeling in fractured rock: Insights into the identification of hydraulically active fractures

    CERN Document Server

    Roubinet, D; Jougnot, D; Irving, J

    2016-01-01

    Numerous field experiments suggest that the self-potential (SP) geophysical method may allow for the detection of hydraulically active fractures and provide information about fracture properties. However, a lack of suitable numerical tools for modeling streaming potentials in fractured media prevents quantitative interpretation and limits our understanding of how the SP method can be used in this regard. To address this issue, we present a highly efficient two-dimensional discrete-dual-porosity approach for solving the fluid flow and associated self-potential problems in fractured rock. Our approach is specifically designed for complex fracture networks that cannot be investigated using standard numerical methods. We then simulate SP signals associated with pumping conditions for a number of examples to show that (i) accounting for matrix fluid flow is essential for accurate SP modeling and (ii) the sensitivity of SP to hydraulically active fractures is intimately linked with fracture-matrix fluid interaction...

  10. Activities of Amphioxus GH-Like Protein in Osmoregulation: Insight into Origin of Vertebrate GH Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengyang; Jiang, Chengyan

    2017-01-01

    GH is known to play an important role in both growth promotion and osmoregulation in vertebrates. We have shown that amphioxus possesses a single GH-like hormone (GHl) gene encoding a functional protein capable of promoting growth. However, if GHl can mediate osmoregulation remains open. Here, we demonstrated clearly that GHl increased not only the survival rate of amphioxus but also the muscle moisture under high salinity. Moreover, GHl induced the expression of both the ion transporter Na+-K+-ATPase (NKA) and Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC) in the gill as well as the mediator of GH action IGFl in the hepatic caecum, indicating that GHl fulfills this osmoregulatory activity through the same mechanisms of vertebrate GH. These results together suggest that the osmoregulatory activities of GH had emerged in the basal chordate amphioxus. We also proposed a new model depicting the origin of pituitary hormone family in vertebrates.

  11. Activities of Amphioxus GH-Like Protein in Osmoregulation: Insight into Origin of Vertebrate GH Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengyang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available GH is known to play an important role in both growth promotion and osmoregulation in vertebrates. We have shown that amphioxus possesses a single GH-like hormone (GHl gene encoding a functional protein capable of promoting growth. However, if GHl can mediate osmoregulation remains open. Here, we demonstrated clearly that GHl increased not only the survival rate of amphioxus but also the muscle moisture under high salinity. Moreover, GHl induced the expression of both the ion transporter Na+-K+-ATPase (NKA and Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC in the gill as well as the mediator of GH action IGFl in the hepatic caecum, indicating that GHl fulfills this osmoregulatory activity through the same mechanisms of vertebrate GH. These results together suggest that the osmoregulatory activities of GH had emerged in the basal chordate amphioxus. We also proposed a new model depicting the origin of pituitary hormone family in vertebrates.

  12. Insights on the Spectral Signatures of Stellar Activity and Planets from PCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Allen B.; Cisewski, Jessi; Dumusque, Xavier; Fischer, Debra A.; Ford, Eric B.

    2017-09-01

    Photospheric velocities and stellar activity features such as spots and faculae produce measurable radial velocity signals that currently obscure the detection of sub-meter-per-second planetary signals. However, photospheric velocities are imprinted differently in a high-resolution spectrum than are Keplerian Doppler shifts. Photospheric activity produces subtle differences in the shapes of absorption lines due to differences in how temperature or pressure affects the atomic transitions. In contrast, Keplerian Doppler shifts affect every spectral line in the same way. With a high enough signal-to-noise (S/N) and resolution, statistical techniques can exploit differences in spectra to disentangle the photospheric velocities and detect lower-amplitude exoplanet signals. We use simulated disk-integrated time-series spectra and principal component analysis (PCA) to show that photospheric signals introduce spectral line variability that is distinct from that of Doppler shifts. We quantify the impact of instrumental resolution and S/N for this work.

  13. Non-linear rheology of active particle suspensions: Insights from an analytical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Hess, Siegfried; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2010-01-01

    We consider active suspensions in the isotropic phase subjected to a shear flow. Using a set of extended hydrodynamic equations we derive a variety of {\\em analytical} expressions for rheological quantities such as shear viscosity and normal stress differences. In agreement to full-blown numerical calculations and experiments we find a shear thickening or -thinning behaviour depending on whether the particles are contractile or extensile. Moreover, our analytical approach predicts that the no...

  14. Alternative Woods for Aging Distillates -An Insight into Their Phenolic Profiles and Antioxidant Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez,Roberto; Suárez, Belén; Diñeiro, Yolanda; Valle, Paula; Picinelli, A.M. (Anna)

    2012-01-01

    Work has commenced on the study and characterization of wood native species (oak, chestnut, cherry, alder, ash, and beech), employed to a minor extent in enology, for their application in the elaboration of distillates. To this end, furanic and low molecular weight phenol compounds, total phenolic content, and antioxidant activity in alcoholic extracts by maceration of wood chips at 2 toasting levels were studied. Significant differences between samples, technologically relevant, were due bot...

  15. Recent insights into the biological activities and drug delivery systems of tanshinones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Y

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Yuee Cai,1,* Wenji Zhang,2,* Zirong Chen,3 Zhi Shi,1,2 Chengwei He,1 Meiwan Chen1 1State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Macau, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Cell Biology & Institute of Biomedicine, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Bioengineering Medicine, College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Shands Cancer Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Tanshinones, the major lipid-soluble pharmacological constituents of the Chinese medicinal herb Tanshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza, have attracted growing scientific attention because of the prospective biomedical applications of these compounds. Numerous pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardio-cerebrovascular protection activities, are exhibited by the three primary bioactive constituents among the tanshinones, ie, tanshinone I (TNI, tanshinone IIA (TNIIA, and cryptotanshinone (CPT. However, due to their poor solubility and low dissolution rate, the clinical applications of TNI, TNIIA, and CPT are limited. To solve these problems, many studies have focused on loading tanshinones into liposomes, nanoparticles, microemulsions, cyclodextrin inclusions, solid dispersions, and so on. In this review, we aim to offer an updated summary of the biological activities and drug delivery systems of tanshinones to provide a reference for these constituents in clinical applications. Keywords: tanshinones, biological activities, drug delivery systems, bioavailability, solubility

  16. Simultaneous Activation of Multiple Memory Systems during Learning: Insights from Electrophysiology and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    following OFC damage. In addiction , OFC activation is seen in response to drug stimuli that elicit craving , perhaps consistent with its hypothesized role in...34 and has been extensively studied in the context of drug addiction and more recently in behavioral studies investigating its role in goal-directed...encoding expected reward. For reviews on the role of the OFC in addiction , see Everitt et al. (2007). For reviews regarding the OFC in normal

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES IN DEXTRANSUCRASE FROM Weissella cibaria JAG8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingirikari Jagan Mohan Rao

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dextransucrase isolated from Weissella cibaria JAG8 was subjected to chemical modification by bifunctional inhibitor o-phthalaldehyde to know the involvement of lysine and cysteine residues in its activity. The enzyme lost 97% of its activity in presence of 10 mM o-phthalaldehyde. The enzyme inhibitor complex gave absorbance maxima at 334 nm and fluorescence emission maxima at 418 nm, which confirmed the isoindole derivative formation. Sucrose protected the enzyme against o-phthalaldehyde inactivation. Denaturation with urea decreased the fluorescence emission showing that the native form of enzyme is essential for isoindole formation. Dextransucrase pre-treated with pyridoxal-5’-phosphate followed by o-phthalaldehyde treatment showed an increase in fluorescence intensity at 418 nm after dialysis, when compared with fluorescence intensity before dialysis, indicated that both the inhibitors bind to same lysine residues present at (or near the active site of enzyme. The results showed that both lysine and cysteine are the key amino acid residues which are present at the active site and are essential for dextransucrase activity.

  18. Baroreflex Activation Therapy in Congestive Heart Failure: Novel Findings and Future Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Guido; Brambilla, GianMaria; Pizzalla, Daniela Prata; Seravalle, Gino

    2016-08-01

    Congestive heart failure is characterized by hemodynamic and non-hemodynamic abnormalities, the latter including an activation of the sympathetic influences to the heart and peripheral circulation coupled with an impairment of baroreceptor control of autonomic function. Evidence has been provided that both these alterations are hallmark features of the disease with a specific relevance for the disease progression as well as for the development of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. In addition, a number of studies have documented in heart failure the adverse prognostic role of the sympathetic and baroreflex alterations, which both are regarded as major independent determinants of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This represents the pathophysiological and clinical background for the use of carotid baroreceptor activation therapy in the treatment of congestive heart failure. Promising data collected in experimental animal models of heart failure have supported the recent performance of pilot small-scale clinical studies, aimed at providing initial information in this area. The results of these studies demonstrated the clinical safety and efficacy of the intervention which has been tested in large-scale clinical studies. The present paper will critically review the background and main results of the published studies designed at defining the clinical impact of baroreflex activation therapy in congestive heart failure patients. Emphasis will be given to the strengths and limitations of such studies, which represent the background for the ongoing clinical trials testing the long-term effects of the device in heart failure patients.

  19. Cloud droplet activation mechanisms of amino acid aerosol particles: insight from molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric amino acids constitute a large fraction of water-soluble organic nitrogen compounds in aerosol particles, and have been confirmed as effective cloud condensation nuclei (CCN materials in laboratory experiments. We present a molecular dynamics (MD study of six amino acids with different structures and chemical properties that are relevant to the remote marine atmospheric aerosol–cloud system, with the aim of investigating the detailed mechanism of their induced changes in surface activity and surface tension, which are important properties for cloud drop activation. Distributions and orientations of the amino acid molecules are studied; these l-amino acids are serine (SER, glycine (GLY, alanine (ALA, valine (VAL, methionine (MET and phenylalanine (PHE and are categorised as hydrophilic and amphiphilic according to their affinities to water. The results suggest that the presence of surface-concentrated amphiphilic amino acid molecules give rise to enhanced Lennard–Jones repulsion, which in turn results in decreased surface tension of a planar interface and an increased surface tension of the spherical interface of droplets with diameters below 10 nm. The observed surface tension perturbation for the different amino acids under study not only serves as benchmark for future studies of more complex systems, but also shows that amphiphilic amino acids are surface active. The MD simulations used in this study reproduce experimental results of surface tension measurements for planar interfaces and the method is therefore applicable for spherical interfaces of nano-size for which experimental measurements are not possible to conduct.

  20. Three-dimensional representations of salt-dome margins at four active strategic petroleum reserve sites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Stein, Joshua S.

    2003-01-01

    Existing paper-based site characterization models of salt domes at the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been converted to digital format and visualized using modern computer software. The four sites are the Bayou Choctaw dome in Iberville Parish, Louisiana; the Big Hill dome in Jefferson County, Texas; the Bryan Mound dome in Brazoria County, Texas; and the West Hackberry dome in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. A new modeling algorithm has been developed to overcome limitations of many standard geological modeling software packages in order to deal with structurally overhanging salt margins that are typical of many salt domes. This algorithm, and the implementing computer program, make use of the existing interpretive modeling conducted manually using professional geological judgement and presented in two dimensions in the original site characterization reports as structure contour maps on the top of salt. The algorithm makes use of concepts of finite-element meshes of general engineering usage. Although the specific implementation of the algorithm described in this report and the resulting output files are tailored to the modeling and visualization software used to construct the figures contained herein, the algorithm itself is generic and other implementations and output formats are possible. The graphical visualizations of the salt domes at the four Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites are believed to be major improvements over the previously available two-dimensional representations of the domes via conventional geologic drawings (cross sections and contour maps). Additionally, the numerical mesh files produced by this modeling activity are available for import into and display by other software routines. The mesh data are not explicitly tabulated in this report; however an electronic version in simple ASCII format is included on a PC-based compact disk.

  1. Influence of active sites organisation on calcium carbonate formation at model biomolecular interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacke, S.; Möbius, D.; Lieu, V.-T.

    2005-06-01

    In an approach to understand the influence of structural parameters of interfaces on calcification in biomineralisation, the distribution and conformation of head groups as active sites in an inert matrix were varied using two-component phospholipid model monolayers. Dimyristoylphosphatidic acid (DMPA) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholin (DPPC), respectively, were the active components, and methyl octadecanoate (MOD) was used as inactive matrix. Surface pressure-area isotherms provide evidence for a different distribution of the active components in the matrix. Formation of solid calcium carbonate with two-component monolayers on subphases containing aqueous CaCO 3 was observed in situ by Brewster angle microscopy, where CaCO 3 domains appear bright. Striking differences in kinetics and extent of CaCO 3 formation are observed between monolayers containing dimyristoylphosphatidic acid and those containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholin. The presence of κ-carrageenan in the subphase as a further active component resulted in partial inhibition of CaCO 3 formation.

  2. Comparing single-site with multisite rTMS for the treatment of chronic tinnitus – clinical effects and neuroscientific insights: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Several years ago, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the auditory cortex has been introduced as a treatment approach for chronic tinnitus. Even if this treatment is beneficial for a subgroup of patients, the overall effects are limited. This limitation may be due to the fact that the auditory cortex is only one of several brain areas involved in tinnitus. Whereas auditory areas are considered to code for tinnitus loudness, conscious perception of and attention allocation to tinnitus is supposed to be reflected by network activity involving frontal and parietal cortical areas. The aim of the present study is to influence this frontoparietal network more efficiently by perturbing the most important nodes with rTMS. Methods/design This is a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study. Patients receive rTMS treatment on 10 consecutive working days using either the multisite rTMS protocol (left dorsolateral prefrontal, 1,000 stimuli, 20 Hz; left temporoparietal, 1,000 stimuli, 1 Hz; right temporoparietal stimulation, 1,000 stimuli, 1 Hz) or a single-site protocol (unilateral stimulation of the temporoparietal cortex, 3,000 stimuli, 1 Hz). Individuals aged 18 to 70 years with chronic tinnitus ≥6-month duration and a Tinnitus Handicap Inventory score ≥38 are recruited for the study. A total of 50 patients are needed to detect a clinical relevant change of tinnitus severity (α = 0.05; 1 – β = 0.80). Primary outcome measures are the change in the Tinnitus Questionnaire score from baseline to the end of treatment as well as the number of treatment responders as defined by a reduction in the Tinnitus Questionnaire score of ≥5 points. Furthermore, changes in brain structure and activity are assessed using (functional) magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography in the resting state. Those measurements are also performed in 25 healthy control subjects. Discussion This study is designed to reveal whether network

  3. Structural insights into Ca(2+)-activated long-range allosteric channel gating of RyR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Risheng; Wang, Xue; Zhang, Yan; Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Xinrui; Jing, Shan; Liu, Congcong; Li, Shuang; Wang, Guangyu; Xu, Yaofang; Zhu, Sujie; Williams, Alan J; Sun, Fei; Yin, Chang-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a class of giant ion channels with molecular mass over 2.2 mega-Daltons. These channels mediate calcium signaling in a variety of cells. Since more than 80% of the RyR protein is folded into the cytoplasmic assembly and the remaining residues form the transmembrane domain, it has been hypothesized that the activation and regulation of RyR channels occur through an as yet uncharacterized long-range allosteric mechanism. Here we report the characterization of a Ca(2+)-activated open-state RyR1 structure by cryo-electron microscopy. The structure has an overall resolution of 4.9 Å and a resolution of 4.2 Å for the core region. In comparison with the previously determined apo/closed-state structure, we observed long-range allosteric gating of the channel upon Ca(2+) activation. In-depth structural analyses elucidated a novel channel-gating mechanism and a novel ion selectivity mechanism of RyR1. Our work not only provides structural insights into the molecular mechanisms of channel gating and regulation of RyRs, but also sheds light on structural basis for channel-gating and ion selectivity mechanisms for the six-transmembrane-helix cation channel family.

  4. New insights into the aquatic photochemistry of fluoroquinolone antibiotics: Direct photodegradation, hydroxyl-radical oxidation, and antibacterial activity changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Linke; Na, Guangshui; Zhang, Siyu; Li, Kai; Zhang, Peng; Ren, Honglei; Yao, Ziwei

    2015-09-15

    The ubiquity and photoreactivity of fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) in surface waters urge new insights into their aqueous photochemical behavior. This study concerns the photochemistry of 6 FQs: ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, levofloxacin, sarafloxacin, difloxacin and enrofloxacin. Methods were developed to calculate their solar direct photodegradation half-lives (td,E) and hydroxyl-radical oxidation half-lives (tOH,E) in sunlit surface waters. The td,E values range from 0.56 min to 28.8 min at 45° N latitude, whereas tOH,E ranges from 3.24h to 33.6h, suggesting that most FQs tend to undergo fast direct photolysis rather than hydroxyl-radical oxidation in surface waters. However, a case study for levofloxacin and sarafloxacin indicated that the hydroxyl-radical oxidation induced risky photochlorination and resulted in multi-degradation pathways, such as piperazinyl hydroxylation and clearage. Changes in the antibacterial activity of FQs caused by photodegradation in various waters were further examined using Escherichia coli, and it was found that the activity evolution depended on primary photodegradation pathways and products. Primary intermediates with intact FQ nuclei retained significant antibacterial activity. These results are important for assessing the fate and risk of FQs in surface waters. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Role of Arginine-304 in the Diphosphate-Triggered Active Site Closure Mechanism of Trichodiene Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedula,L.; Cane, D.; Christianson, D.

    2005-01-01

    The X-ray crystal structures of R304K trichodiene synthase and its complexes with inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) and aza analogues of the bisabolyl carbocation intermediate are reported. The R304K substitution does not cause large changes in the overall structure in comparison with the wild-type enzyme. The complexes with (R)- and (S)-azabisabolenes and PPi bind three Mg2+ ions, and each undergoes a diphosphate-triggered conformational change that caps the active site cavity. This conformational change is only slightly attenuated compared to that of the wild-type enzyme complexed with Mg{sup 2+}{sub 3-}PP{sub i}, in which R304 donates hydrogen bonds to PP{sub i} and D101. In R304K trichodiene synthase, K304 does not engage in any hydrogen bond interactions in the unliganded state and it donates a hydrogen bond to only PP{sub i} in the complex with (R)-azabisabolene; K304 makes no hydrogen bond contacts in its complex with PP{sub i} and (S)-azabisabolene. Thus, although the R304-D101 hydrogen bond interaction stabilizes diphosphate-triggered active site closure, it is not required for Mg{sup 2+}{sub 3-}PP{sub i} binding. Nevertheless, since R304K trichodiene synthase generates aberrant cyclic terpenoids with a 5000-fold reduction in kcat/KM, it is clear that a properly formed R304-D101 hydrogen bond is required in the enzyme-substrate complex to stabilize the proper active site contour, which in turn facilitates cyclization of farnesyl diphosphate for the exclusive formation of trichodiene. Structural analysis of the R304K mutant and comparison with the monoterpene cyclase (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase suggest that the significant loss in activity results from compromised activation of the PP{sub i} leaving group.

  6. Implementation of Low Carbon Construction Activities in Order to Optimize Water Consumption on the Construction Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Esmaeilifar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The number of law carbon construction project had increased tremendously across Malaysia over the recent years. In fact, there is no doubt on the necessity of development law carbon construction and benefits that have for the society, specifically for the construction companies. In order to make significant inroads into the low carbon construction practices, the industry needs to improve its energy usage and natural resources consumed in all its construction site activities. This study attempts to evaluate the sources of CO2 emission regarding water usage during construction project; secondly, to identify effective optimization method with regard to water usage in construction activities; and finally, to provide a plan of actions to minimize CO2 emissions during construction activities. SPSS version 20 was used to analyse the collected data. 385 questionnaires were distributed to the construction companies in Malaysia. The findings revealed that, despite the importance of low carbon construction, not many companies are serious enough to cut down their natural resource consumption. The particular phenomena, myriad of contractors and construction firms in Malaysia have not yet paid attention binding themselves to carbon construction and green building's constitution in general by contrast to common construction activity. The location of the site for water is the main way for the law carbon construction and has been highlighted as the main reason of ignorance of the current situation within the construction sector. Indeed, introducing optimization methods is vital for contractors and supervisors of the sites to be motivated regarding inequality on usage of water during construction project, which lead to carbon dioxide creation. In addition to optimization water consumption, monitoring the usage of water during construction activity can play as a main role.

  7. Structural evolution of luciferase activity in Zophobas mealworm AMP/CoA-ligase (protoluciferase) through site-directed mutagenesis of the luciferin binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, R A; Barbosa, J A; Ohmiya, Y; Viviani, V R

    2011-07-01

    The structural origin and evolution of bioluminescent activity of beetle luciferases from AMP/CoA ligases remains a mystery. Previously we cloned the luciferase-like enzyme from Zophobas morio mealworm, a reasonable protoluciferase model that could shine light on this mystery. Kinetic characterization and studies with D- and L-luciferin and their adenylates showed that stereoselectivity constitutes a critical feature for the origin of luciferase activity in AMP/CoA ligases. Comparison of the primary structures and modeling studies of this protoluciferase and the three main families of beetle luciferases showed that the carboxylic acid substrate binding site of this enzyme is smaller and more hydrophobic than the luciferin binding site of beetle luciferases, showing several substitutions of otherwise conserved residues. Thus, here we performed a site-directed mutagenesis survey of the carboxylic binding site motifs of the protoluciferase by replacing their residues by the respective conserved ones found in beetle luciferases in order to identify the structural determinants of luciferase/oxygenase activity. Although most of the substitutions had negative impact on the luminescence activity of the protoluciferase, only the substitution I327T improved the luminescence activity, resulting in a broad and 15 nm blue-shifted luminescence spectrum. Such substitution indicates the importance of the loop motif 322YGMSEI327 (341YGLTETT347 in Photinus pyralis luciferase) for luciferase activity, and indicates a possible route for the evolution of bioluminescence function of beetle luciferases.

  8. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Gallagher; S Kim; H Robinson; P Reddy

    2011-12-31

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV) - two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  9. Dynamics of the active site architecture in plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases catalytic complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Azqueta, Ana; Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L; López-Rivero, Arleth; Tondo, María Laura; Orellano, Elena G; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A; Medina, Milagros

    2014-10-01

    Kinetic isotope effects in reactions involving hydride transfer and their temperature dependence are powerful tools to explore dynamics of enzyme catalytic sites. In plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases the FAD cofactor exchanges a hydride with the NADP(H) coenzyme. Rates for these processes are considerably faster for the plastidic members (FNR) of the family than for those belonging to the bacterial class (FPR). Hydride transfer (HT) and deuteride transfer (DT) rates for the NADP(+) coenzyme reduction of four plant-type FNRs (two representatives of the plastidic type FNRs and the other two from the bacterial class), and their temperature dependences are here examined applying a full tunnelling model with coupled environmental fluctuations. Parameters for the two plastidic FNRs confirm a tunnelling reaction with active dynamics contributions, but isotope effects on Arrhenius factors indicate a larger contribution for donor-acceptor distance (DAD) dynamics in the Pisum sativum FNR reaction than in the Anabaena FNR reaction. On the other hand, parameters for bacterial FPRs are consistent with passive environmental reorganisation movements dominating the HT coordinate and no contribution of DAD sampling or gating fluctuations. This indicates that active sites of FPRs are more organised and rigid than those of FNRs. These differences must be due to adaptation of the active sites and catalytic mechanisms to fulfil their particular metabolic roles, establishing a compromise between protein flexibility and functional optimisation. Analysis of site-directed mutants in plastidic enzymes additionally indicates the requirement of a minimal optimal architecture in the catalytic complex to provide a favourable gating contribution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, D.T.; Robinson, H.; Kim, S.-K.; Reddy, P. T.

    2011-01-21

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV)-two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  11. New Insights on the Mechanism of the K+-Independent Activity of Crenarchaeota Pyruvate Kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Vega-Ruíz, Gustavo; Domínguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Guerrero-Mendiola, Carlos; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Hernández-Alcántara, Gloria; García-Trejo, José J.; Ramírez-Silva, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    Eukarya pyruvate kinases have glutamate at position 117 (numbered according to the rabbit muscle enzyme), whereas in Bacteria have either glutamate or lysine and in Archaea have other residues. Glutamate at this position makes pyruvate kinases K+-dependent, whereas lysine confers K+-independence because the positively charged residue substitutes for the monovalent cation charge. Interestingly, pyruvate kinases from two characterized Crenarchaeota exhibit K+-independent activity, despite having serine at the equivalent position. To better understand pyruvate kinase catalytic activity in the absence of K+ or an internal positive charge, the Thermofilum pendens pyruvate kinase (valine at the equivalent position) was characterized. The enzyme activity was K+-independent. The kinetic mechanism was random order with a rapid equilibrium, which is equal to the mechanism of the rabbit muscle enzyme in the presence of K+ or the mutant E117K in the absence of K+. Thus, the substrate binding order of the T. pendens enzyme was independent despite lacking an internal positive charge. Thermal stability studies of this enzyme showed two calorimetric transitions, one attributable to the A and C domains (Tm of 99.2°C), and the other (Tm of 105.2°C) associated with the B domain. In contrast, the rabbit muscle enzyme exhibits a single calorimetric transition (Tm of 65.2°C). The calorimetric and kinetic data indicate that the B domain of this hyperthermophilic enzyme is more stable than the rest of the protein with a conformation that induces the catalytic readiness of the enzyme. B domain interactions of pyruvate kinases that have been determined in Pyrobaculum aerophilum and modeled in T. pendens were compared with those of the rabbit muscle enzyme. The results show that intra- and interdomain interactions of the Crenarchaeota enzymes may account for their higher B domain stability. Thus the structural arrangement of the T. pendens pyruvate kinase could allow charge

  12. Addressing complex healthcare problems in diverse settings: insights from activity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Gail; Entwistle, Vikki A; Beech, Nic

    2012-02-01

    In the U.K., approaches to policy implementation, service improvement and quality assurance treat policy, management and clinical care as separate, hierarchical domains. They are often based on the central knowledge transfer (KT) theory idea that best practice solutions to complex problems can be identified and 'rolled out' across organisations. When the designated 'best practice' is not implemented, this is interpreted as local--particularly management--failure. Remedial actions include reiterating policy aims and tightening performance management of solution implementation, frequently to no avail. We propose activity theory (AT) as an alternative approach to identifying and understanding the challenges of addressing complex healthcare problems across diverse settings. AT challenges the KT conceptual separations between levels of policy, management and clinical care. It does not regard knowledge and practice as separable, and does not understand them in the commodified way that has typified some versions of KT theory. Instead, AT focuses on "objects of activity" which can be contested. It sees new practice as emerging from contradiction and understands knowledge and practice as fundamentally entwined, not separate. From an AT perspective, there can be no single best practice. The contributions of AT are that it enables us to understand the dynamics of knowledge-practice in activities rather than between levels. It shows how efforts to reduce variation from best practice may paradoxically remove a key source of practice improvement. After explaining the principles of AT we illustrate its explanatory potential through an ethnographic study of primary healthcare teams responding to a policy aim of reducing inappropriate hospital admissions of older people by the 'best practice' of rapid response teams.

  13. A proteomic insight into the effects of the immunomodulatory hydroxynaphthoquinone lapachol on activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Renato A S; Correia-Oliveira, Janaina; Tang, Li-Jun; Garcia, Rodolfo C

    2012-09-01

    We report the effect of an immunomodulatory and anti-mycobacterial naphthoquinone, lapachol, on the bi-dimensional patterns of protein expression of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-agonised and IFN-γ-treated THP-1 macrophages. This non-hypothesis driven proteomic analysis intends to shed light on the cellular functions lapachol may be affecting. Proteins of both cytosol and membrane fractions were analysed. After quantification of the protein spots, the protein levels corresponding to macrophages activated in the absence or presence of lapachol were compared. A number of proteins were identified, the levels of which were appreciably and significantly increased or decreased as a result of the action of lapachol on the activated macrophages: cofilin-1, fascin, plastin-2, glucose-6-P-dehydrogenase, adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1, pyruvate kinase, sentrin-specific protease 6, cathepsin B, cathepsin D, cytosolic aminopeptidase, proteasome β type-4 protease, tryptophan-tRNA ligase, DnaJ homolog and protein disulphide isomerase. Altogether, the comparative analysis performed indicates that lapachol could be hypothetically causing an impairment of cell migration and/or phagocytic capacity, an increase in NADPH availability, a decrease in pyruvate concentration, protection from proteosomal protein degradation, a decrease in lysosomal protein degradation, an impairment of cytosolic peptide generation, and an interference with NOS2 activation and grp78 function. The present proteomic results suggest issues that should be experimentally addressed ex- and in-vivo, to establish more accurately the potential of lapachol as an anti-infective drug. This study also constitutes a model for the pre-in-vivo evaluation of drug actions.

  14. Modulation of NCC activity by low and high K+ intake: insights into the signaling pathways involved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Bueno, María; Cervantes-Perez, Luz Graciela; Rojas-Vega, Lorena; Arroyo-Garza, Isidora; Vázquez, Norma; Moreno, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of Na+-Cl− cotransporter (NCC) activity is essential to adjust K+ excretion in the face of changes in dietary K+ intake. We used previously characterized genetic mouse models to assess the role of Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) and with-no-lysine kinase (WNK)4 in the modulation of NCC by K+ diets. SPAK knockin and WNK4 knockout mice were placed on normal-, low-, or high-K+-citrate diets for 4 days. The low-K+ diet decreased and high-K+ diet increased plasma aldosterone levels, but both diets were associated with increased phosphorylation of NCC (phospho-NCC, Thr44/Thr48/Thr53) and phosphorylation of SPAK/oxidative stress responsive kinase 1 (phospho-SPAK/OSR1, Ser383/Ser325). The effect of the low-K+ diet on SPAK phosphorylation persisted in WNK4 knockout and SPAK knockin mice, whereas the effects of ANG II on NCC and SPAK were lost in both mouse colonies. This suggests that for NCC activation by ANG II, integrity of the WNK4/SPAK pathway is required, whereas for the low-K+ diet, SPAK phosphorylation occurred despite the absence of WNK4, suggesting the involvement of another WNK (WNK1 or WNK3). Additionally, because NCC activation also occurred in SPAK knockin mice, it is possible that loss of SPAK was compensated by OSR1. The positive effect of the high-K+ diet was observed when the accompanying anion was citrate, whereas the high-KCl diet reduced NCC phosphorylation. However, the effect of the high-K+-citrate diet was aldosterone dependent, and neither metabolic alkalosis induced by bicarbonate, nor citrate administration in the absence of K+ increased NCC phosphorylation, suggesting that it was not due to citrate-induced metabolic alkalosis. Thus, the accompanying anion might modulate the NCC response to the high-K+ diet. PMID:24761002

  15. Modulation of NCC activity by low and high K(+) intake: insights into the signaling pathways involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Bueno, María; Cervantes-Perez, Luz Graciela; Rojas-Vega, Lorena; Arroyo-Garza, Isidora; Vázquez, Norma; Moreno, Erika; Gamba, Gerardo

    2014-06-15

    Modulation of Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) activity is essential to adjust K(+) excretion in the face of changes in dietary K(+) intake. We used previously characterized genetic mouse models to assess the role of Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) and with-no-lysine kinase (WNK)4 in the modulation of NCC by K(+) diets. SPAK knockin and WNK4 knockout mice were placed on normal-, low-, or high-K(+)-citrate diets for 4 days. The low-K(+) diet decreased and high-K(+) diet increased plasma aldosterone levels, but both diets were associated with increased phosphorylation of NCC (phospho-NCC, Thr(44)/Thr(48)/Thr(53)) and phosphorylation of SPAK/oxidative stress responsive kinase 1 (phospho-SPAK/OSR1, Ser(383)/Ser(325)). The effect of the low-K(+) diet on SPAK phosphorylation persisted in WNK4 knockout and SPAK knockin mice, whereas the effects of ANG II on NCC and SPAK were lost in both mouse colonies. This suggests that for NCC activation by ANG II, integrity of the WNK4/SPAK pathway is required, whereas for the low-K(+) diet, SPAK phosphorylation occurred despite the absence of WNK4, suggesting the involvement of another WNK (WNK1 or WNK3). Additionally, because NCC activation also occurred in SPAK knockin mice, it is possible that loss of SPAK was compensated by OSR1. The positive effect of the high-K(+) diet was observed when the accompanying anion was citrate, whereas the high-KCl diet reduced NCC phosphorylation. However, the effect of the high-K(+)-citrate diet was aldosterone dependent, and neither metabolic alkalosis induced by bicarbonate, nor citrate administration in the absence of K(+) increased NCC phosphorylation, suggesting that it was not due to citrate-induced metabolic alkalosis. Thus, the accompanying anion might modulate the NCC response to the high-K(+) diet. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  16. New insights into [FeFe] hydrogenase activation and maturase function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon M Kuchenreuther

    Full Text Available [FeFe] hydrogenases catalyze H(2 production using the H-cluster, an iron-sulfur cofactor that contains carbon monoxide (CO, cyanide (CN(-, and a dithiolate bridging ligand. The HydE, HydF, and HydG maturases assist in assembling the H-cluster and maturing hydrogenases into their catalytically active form. Characterization of these maturases and in vitro hydrogenase activation methods have helped elucidate steps in the H-cluster biosynthetic pathway such as the HydG-catalyzed generation of the CO and CN(- ligands from free tyrosine. We have refined our cell-free approach for H-cluster synthesis and hydrogenase maturation by using separately expressed and purified HydE, HydF, and HydG. In this report, we illustrate how substrates and protein constituents influence hydrogenase activation, and for the first time, we show that each maturase can function catalytically during the maturation process. With precise control over the biomolecular components, we also provide evidence for H-cluster synthesis in the absence of either HydE or HydF, and we further show that hydrogenase activation can occur without exogenous tyrosine. Given these findings, we suggest a new reaction sequence for the [FeFe] hydrogenase maturation pathway. In our model, HydG independently synthesizes an iron-based compound with CO and CN(- ligands that is a precursor to the H-cluster [2Fe](H subunit, and which we have termed HydG-co. We further propose that HydF is a transferase that stabilizes HydG-co and also shuttles the complete [2Fe](H subcluster to the hydrogenase, a translocation process that may be catalyzed by HydE. In summary, this report describes the first example of reconstructing the [FeFe] hydrogenase maturation pathway using purified maturases and subsequently utilizing this in vitro system to better understand the roles of HydE, HydF, and HydG.

  17. Nonlinear rheology of active particle suspensions: insights from an analytical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Hess, Siegfried; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2011-01-01

    We consider active suspensions in the isotropic phase subjected to a shear flow. Using a set of extended hydrodynamic equations we derive a variety of analytical expressions for rheological quantities such as shear viscosity and normal stress differences. In agreement to full-blown numerical calculations and experiments we find a shear-thickening or -thinning behavior depending on whether the particles are contractile or extensile. Moreover, our analytical approach predicts that the normal stress differences can change their sign in contrast to passive suspensions.

  18. Structural and dynamic insights into the energetics of activation loop rearrangement in FGFR1 kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, T.; Vajpai, N; Phillips, JJ; Davies, G; Holdgate, GA; Phillips, C.; Tucker, JA; Norman, RA; Scott, AD; Higazi, DR; Lowe, D; Thompson, GS; Breeze, A

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases differ widely in their propensity to undergo rearrangements of the N-terminal Asp–Phe–Gly (DFG) motif of the activation loop, with some, including FGFR1 kinase, appearing refractory to this so-called ‘DFG flip'. Recent inhibitor-bound structures have unexpectedly revealed FGFR1 for the first time in a ‘DFG-out' state. Here we use conformationally selective inhibitors as chemical probes for interrogation of the structural and dynamic features that appear to govern the ...

  19. Active Reward Processing during Human Sleep: Insights from Sleep-Related Eating Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perogamvros, Lampros; Baud, Patrick; Hasler, Roland; Cloninger, Claude Robert; Schwartz, Sophie; Perrig, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present two carefully documented cases of patients with sleep-related eating disorder (SRED), a parasomnia which is characterized by involuntary compulsive eating during the night and whose pathophysiology is not known. Using video-polysomnography, a dream diary and psychometric examination, we found that both patients present elevated novelty seeking and increased reward sensitivity. In light of new evidence on the mesolimbic dopaminergic implication in compulsive eating disorders, our findings suggest a role of an active reward system during sleep in the manifestation of SRED.

  20. Active reward processing during human sleep: insights from sleep-related eating disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lampros ePerogamvros

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present two carefully documented cases of patients with sleep-related eating disorder (SRED, a parasomnia which is characterized by involuntary compulsive eating during the night and whose pathophysiology is not known. Using video-polysomnography and psychometric examination, we found that both patients present elevated novelty seeking and increased reward sensitivity on reward-related questionnaires. In light of new evidence on the mesolimbic dopaminergic implication in compulsive eating disorders, our findings suggest a role of an active reward system during sleep in the manifestation of SRED.

  1. Characterization of the interactions between the active site of a protein tyrosine kinase and a divalent metal activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayrapetov Marina K

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein tyrosine kinases are important enzymes for cell signalling and key targets for anticancer drug discovery. The catalytic mechanisms of protein tyrosine kinase-catalysed phosphorylation are not fully understood. Protein tyrosine kinase Csk requires two Mg2+ cations for activity: one (M1 binds to ATP, and the other (M2 acts as an essential activator. Results Experiments in this communication characterize the interaction between M2 and Csk. Csk activity is sensitive to pH in the range of 6 to 7. Kinetic characterization indicates that the sensitivity is not due to altered substrate binding, but caused by the sensitivity of M2 binding to pH. Several residues in the active site with potential of binding M2 are mutated and the effect on metal activation studied. An active mutant of Asn319 is generated, and this mutation does not alter the metal binding characteristics. Mutations of Glu236 or Asp332 abolish the kinase activity, precluding a positive or negative conclusion on their role in M2 coordination. Finally, the ability of divalent metal cations to activate Csk correlates to a combination of ionic radius and the coordination number. Conclusion These studies demonstrate that M2 binding to Csk is sensitive to pH, which is mainly responsible for Csk activity change in the acidic arm of the pH response curve. They also demonstrate critical differences in the metal activator coordination sphere in protein tyrosine kinase Csk and a protein Ser/Thr kinase, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. They shed light on the physical interactions between a protein tyrosine kinase and a divalent metal activator.

  2. Covalent binding of the organophosphorus agent FP-biotin to tyrosine in eight proteins that have no active site serine

    OpenAIRE

    Grigoryan, Hasmik; Li, Bin; Anderson, Erica K.; Xue, Weihua; Nachon, Florian; Lockridge, Oksana; Schopfer, Lawrence M.

    2009-01-01

    Organophosphorus esters (OP) are known to bind covalently to the active site serine of enzymes in the serine hydrolase family. It was a surprise to find that proteins with no active site serine are also covalently modified by OP. The binding site in albumin, transferrin, and tubulin was identified as tyrosine. The goal of the present work was to determine whether binding to tyrosine is a general phenomenon. Fourteen proteins were treated with a biotin-tagged organophosphorus agent called FP-b...

  3. Functional properties of the two redox-active sites in yeast protein disulphide isomerase in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westphal, V; Darby, N J; Winther, Jakob R.

    1999-01-01

    to that of human PDI, both in rearrangement and oxidation reactions. However, while the a domain active site of the human enzyme is more active than the a'-site, the reverse is the case for yPDI. This prompted us to set up an assay to investigate whether the situation would be different with a native yeast...

  4. Insights into the emission reductions of multiple unintentional persistent organic pollutants from industrial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guorui; Zheng, Minghui; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Jin, Rong; Zhao, Yuyang; Zhan, Jiayu

    2016-02-01

    Industrial activities result in unintentional production of multiple types of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) at various concentrations. Because of the potential adverse effect of these POPs on the environment, biota and human health, methods for controlling emission of POPs are required. Development and application of techniques for controlling emissions of POPs can be a technical and economic burden for the industry involved. Therefore, from the point of view of cost-benefit analysis, reducing emissions of multiple pollutants at the same time is optimal for sustainable industrial development. Although techniques have been developed for reducing the emissions of individual POPs, such as dioxins, further work is required on multi-POP control emissions from industrial activities. This paper discusses three important aspects that need to be taken to achieve multi-POP control. These aspects include the establishment of a comprehensive system for evaluating the risk from emissions of multiple POPs, determination of indicators for total emissions of multiple POPs, and the preparation and application of functional materials to inhibit formation of multiple POPs. These discussion might be helpful for the future research on the multi-POP control in industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural insights into human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta (PPAR-delta selective ligand binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda A H Batista

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs δ, α and γ are closely related transcription factors that exert distinct effects on fatty acid and glucose metabolism, cardiac disease, inflammatory response and other processes. Several groups developed PPAR subtype specific modulators to trigger desirable effects of particular PPARs without harmful side effects associated with activation of other subtypes. Presently, however, many compounds that bind to one of the PPARs cross-react with others and rational strategies to obtain highly selective PPAR modulators are far from clear. GW0742 is a synthetic ligand that binds PPARδ more than 300-fold more tightly than PPARα or PPARγ but the structural basis of PPARδ:GW0742 interactions and reasons for strong selectivity are not clear. Here we report the crystal structure of the PPARδ:GW0742 complex. Comparisons of the PPARδ:GW0742 complex with published structures of PPARs in complex with α and γ selective agonists and pan agonists suggests that two residues (Val312 and Ile328 in the buried hormone binding pocket play special roles in PPARδ selective binding and experimental and computational analysis of effects of mutations in these residues confirms this and suggests that bulky substituents that line the PPARα and γ ligand binding pockets as structural barriers for GW0742 binding. This analysis suggests general strategies for selective PPARδ ligand design.

  6. Antioxidant activity of ferulic acid alkyl esters in a heterophasic system: a mechanistic insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmi, Cecilia; Centini, Marisanna; Granata, Paola; Sega, Alessandro; Buonocore, Anna; Bernini, Andrea; Facino, Roberto Maffei

    2004-10-20

    The antioxidant activity of some esters of ferulic acid with the linear fatty alcohols C7, C8 (branched and linear), C9, C11, C12, C13, C15, C16, and C18 has been studied in homogeneous and heterogeneous phases. Whereas in homogeneous phase all of the alkyl ferulates possessed similar radical-scavenging abilities, in rat liver microsomes they showed striking differences, the more effective being C12 (7) (IC50 = 11.03 M), linear C8 (3) (IC50 = 12.40 microM), C13 (8) (IC50 = 18.60 microM), and C9 (5) (IC50 = 19.74 microM), followed by C7 (2), C15 (9), C11 (6), branched C8 (4), C16 (10), and C18 (11) (ferulic acid was the less active, IC50 = 243.84 microM). All of the molecules showed similar partition coefficients in an octanol-buffer system. Three-dimensional studies (NMR in solution, modeling in vacuo) indicate that this behavior might be due to a different anchorage of the molecules with the ester side chain to the microsomal phospholipid bilayer and to a consequent different orientation/positioning of the scavenging phenoxy group outside the membrane surface against the flux of oxy radicals.

  7. An Insight into the Anticancer Activities of Ru(II-Based Metallocompounds Using Docking Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Ajibade

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Unlike organic molecules, reports on docking of metal complexes are very few; mainly due to the inadequacy of force fields in docking packages to appropriately characterize the metal atoms that consequentially hinder the rational design of metal-based drug complexes. In this study we have made used Molegro and Autodock to predict the anticancer activities of selected Ru(II complexes against twelve anticancer targets. We observed that introducing the quantum calculated atomic charges of the optimized geometries significantly improved the docking predictions of these anticancer metallocompounds. Despite several limitations in the docking of metal-based complexes, we obtained results that are highly correlated with the available experimental results. Most of our newly proposed metallocompounds are found theoretically to be better anticancer metallocompounds than all the experimentally proposed RAPTA complexes. An interesting features of a strong interactions of new modeled of metallocompounds against the two base edges of DNA strands suggest similar mechanisms of anticancer activities similar to that of cisplatin. There is possibility of covalent bonding between the metal center of the metallocompounds and the residues of the receptors DNA-1, DNA-2, HDAC7, HIS and RNR. However, the general results suggest the possibility of metals positioning the coordinated ligands in the right position for optimal receptor interactions and synergistic effects, rather than forming covalent bonds.

  8. Insights on the Phytochemical Profile (Cyclopeptides and Biological Activities of Calotropis procera Latex Organic Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Lustosa Jucá

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calotropis procera is a medicinal plant whose pharmacological properties are associated with its latex. Here, the Calotropis procera latex fractions were investigated in an attempt to trace its phytochemical profile and measure its anti-inflammatory and toxicity activity. The crude latex was partitioned, yielding five fractions (49.4% hexane, 5.2% dichloromethane, 2.0% ethyl acetate, 2.1% n-butanol, and 41.1% aqueous. Phytochemical screening and spectroscopy analysis revealed that dichloromethane is the most chemically diverse fraction. Triterpenes were detected in both the hexane and dichloromethane fractions, while flavonoids were detected in the dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fractions. These fractions were cytotoxic to cancer cell lines (LD50 0.05 to 3.9 μg/mL and lethal to brine shrimp (LD50 10.9 to 65.7 μg/mL. Reduced neutrophil migration in rats was observed in carrageenan-induced peritonitis for the dichloromethane (67%, ethyl acetate (56%, and aqueous (72% fractions. A positive reaction with tolidine and ninhydrin suggested that cyclopeptides are in the ethyl acetate fraction. It is therefore concluded that Calotropis procera latex dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fractions exhibit both in vitro and in vivo activities as well as anti-inflammatory properties. Cyclopeptide detection is especially interesting because previous attempts to investigate these low-molecular cyclic amino acid sequences in C. procera have failed.

  9. Some Insights to the Reuse of Dredged Marine Soils by Admixing with Activated Steel Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee-Ming Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regular dredging is necessary for the development of coastal regions and the maintenance of shipping channels. The dredging process dislodges sediments from the seabed, and the removed materials, termed dredged marine soils, are generally considered a geowaste for dumping. However, disposal of the dredged soils offshores can lead to severe and irreversible impact on the marine ecosystem, while disposal on land often incurs exorbitant costs with no guarantee of zero-contamination. It is therefore desirable to reuse the material, and one option is solidification with another industrial waste, that is, steel slag. This paper describes the exploratory work of admixing dredged marine soil with activated steel slag for improvement of the mechanical properties. An optimum activation concentration of NaOH was introduced to the soil-slag mixture for uniform blending. Specimens were prepared at different mix ratios then left to cure for up to 4 weeks. The unconfined compressive strength test was conducted to monitor the changes in strength at predetermined intervals. It was found that the strength does not necessarily increase with higher steel slag content, indicating an optimum slag content required for the maximum solidification effect to take place. Also, regardless of the slag content, longer curing time produces greater strength gain. In conclusion, steel slag addition to dredged sediments can effectively strengthen the originally weak soil structure by both the “cementation” and “filler” effects, though the combined effects were not distinguished in the present study.

  10. Insights into the antioxidant activity of some flavones on silver nanoparticles using the chemiluminescence method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voicescu, Mariana, E-mail: voicescu@icf.ro [Romanian Academy, Institute of Physical Chemistry “Ilie Murgulescu”, Splaiul Independentei 202, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Nistor, Cristina L. [Polymer Department, National R and D Institute for Chemistry and Petrochemistry ICECHIM, Splaiul Independentei 202, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Meghea, Aurelia [University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Polizu 1, 78126 Bucharest (Romania)

    2015-01-15

    The work aims to simulate in vitro the effects caused by oxidation of five hydroxyflavones (HF) (some typical models of flavonols), (3-HF, 6-HF, 7-HF, 3,6-diHF and 3,7-diHF) on silver nanoparticles (SNPs) using the chemiluminescent system luminol–hydrogen peroxide, in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. The contribution of bovine and human serum albumins to the antioxidant activity of the mentioned flavones, and the effect on the SNPs support, in the chemiluminescent system luminol–hydrogen peroxide, has been also investigated. The results are discussed with relevance to the oxidative stress process. - Highlights: • The effects caused by oxidation of five hydroxiflavones (HF) (3-HF, 6-HF, 7-HF, 3,6-diHF and 3,7-diHF) on silver nanoparticles (SNPs) using the chemiluminescent (CL) system luminol–hydrogen peroxide, in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. • The contribution of bovine and human serum albumins to the antioxidant activity of the mentioned flavones, and the effect on the SNPs support, in the CL system luminol–hydrogen peroxide, are discussed. • The results have relevance to the oxidative stress process.

  11. Antioxidative activity of high-density lipoprotein (HDL): Mechanistic insights into potential clinical benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brites, Fernando; Martin, Maximiliano; Guillas, Isabelle; Kontush, Anatol

    2017-12-01

    Uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles by macrophages represents a key step in the development of atherosclerotic plaques, leading to the foam cell formation. Chemical modification of LDL is however necessary to induce this process. Proatherogenic LDL modifications include aggregation, enzymatic digestion and oxidation. LDL oxidation by one-electron (free radicals) and two-electron oxidants dramatically increases LDL affinity to macrophage scavenger receptors, leading to rapid LDL uptake and fatty streak formation. Circulating high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles, primarily small, dense, protein-rich HDL3, provide potent protection of LDL from oxidative damage by free radicals, resulting in the inhibition of the generation of pro-inflammatory oxidized lipids. HDL-mediated inactivation of lipid hydroperoxides involves their initial transfer from LDL to HDL and subsequent reduction to inactive hydroxides by redox-active Met residues of apolipoprotein A-I. Several HDL-associated enzymes are present at elevated concentrations in HDL3 relative to large, light HDL2 and can be involved in the inactivation of short-chain oxidized phospholipids. Therefore, HDL represents a multimolecular complex capable of acquiring and inactivating proatherogenic lipids. Antioxidative function of HDL can be impaired in several metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Structural and compositional anomalies in the HDL proteome and lipidome underlie such functional deficiency. Concomitant normalization of the metabolism, circulating levels, composition and biological activities of HDL particles, primarily those of small, dense HDL3, can constitute future therapeutic target.

  12. A Near-Atomic Structure of the Dark Apoptosome Provides Insight into Assembly and Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tat Cheung; Akey, Ildikó V; Yuan, Shujun; Yu, Zhiheng; Ludtke, Steven J; Akey, Christopher W

    2017-01-03

    In Drosophila, the Apaf-1-related killer (Dark) forms an apoptosome that activates procaspases. To investigate function, we have determined a near-atomic structure of Dark double rings using cryo-electron microscopy. We then built a nearly complete model of the apoptosome that includes 7- and 8-blade β-propellers. We find that the preference for dATP during Dark assembly may be governed by Ser325, which is in close proximity to the 2' carbon of the deoxyribose ring. Interestingly, β-propellers in V-shaped domains of the Dark apoptosome are more widely separated, relative to these features in the Apaf-1 apoptosome. This wider spacing may be responsible for the lack of cytochrome c binding to β-propellers in the Dark apoptosome. Our structure also highlights the roles of two loss-of-function mutations that may block Dark assembly. Finally, the improved model provides a framework to understand apical procaspase activation in the intrinsic cell death pathway.

  13. Translational Insights Into Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors in Experimental Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Szatmary, Peter; Wan, Meihua; Bharucha, Shameena; Awais, Muhammad; Tang, Wenfu; Criddle, David N; Xia, Qing; Sutton, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disorder of the exocrine pancreas frequently associated with metabolic causes, contributing factors, or consequences, including hypertriglyceridemia, obesity, and disorders of intermediary metabolism, respectively. To date, there is no specific therapy for this disease. Future optimal therapy should correct both inflammatory and metabolic components of the disease. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are lipid-sensing nuclear receptors that control inflammatory and metabolic pathways via ligand-dependent and ligand-independent mechanisms. There are 3 known subtypes, PPAR-α, PPAR-β/δ, and PPAR-γ, which are differentially expressed in various tissues. The PPARs interact closely with other transcription factors such as nuclear factor κB and signal tranducers and activators of transcription that have pivotal roles in the pathobiology of AP. In this comprehensive review, we summarize the role of PPARs in AP, highlighting important in vitro and in vivo experimental findings. Finally, we propose future research directions as well as potential translational use of PPAR agonists in the treatment of AP.

  14. CO-dynamics in the active site of cytochrome c oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviov, Maksym; Meuwly, Markus

    2014-04-01

    The transfer of CO from heme a3 to the CuB site in Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) after photolysis is studied using molecular dynamics simulations using an explicitly reactive, parametrized potential energy surface based on density functional theory calculations. After photodissociation from the heme-Fe, the CO ligand rebinds to the CuB site on the sub-picosecond time scale. Depending on the simulation protocol the characteristic time ranges from 260 fs to 380 fs which compares with an estimated 450 fs from experiment based on the analysis of the spectral changes as a function of time delay after the photodissociating pulse. Following photoexcitation ≈90% of the ligands are found to rebind to either the CuB (major component, 85%) or the heme-Fe (minor component, 2%) whereas about 10% remain in an unbound state. The infrared spectra of unbound CO in the active site is broad and featureless and no appreciable shift relative to gas-phase CO is found, which is in contrast to the situation in myoglobin. These observations explain why experimentally, unbound CO in the binuclear site of CcO has not been found as yet.

  15. Active-site properties of Phrixotrix railroad worm green and red bioluminescence-eliciting luciferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviani, V R; Arnoldi, F G C; Venkatesh, B; Neto, A J S; Ogawa, F G T; Oehlmeyer, A T L; Ohmiya, Y

    2006-10-01

    The luciferases of the railroad worm Phrixotrix (Coleoptera: Phengodidae) are the only beetle luciferases that naturally produce true red bioluminescence. Previously, we cloned the green- (PxGR) and red-emitting (PxRE) luciferases of railroad worms Phrixotrix viviani and P. hirtus[OLE1]. These luciferases were expressed and purified, and their active-site properties were determined. The red-emitting PxRE luciferase displays flash-like kinetics, whereas PxGR luciferase displays slow-type kinetics. The substrate affinities and catalytic efficiency of PxRE luciferase are also higher than those of PxGR luciferase. Fluorescence studies with 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid and 6-p-toluidino-2-naphthalene sulfonic acid showed that the PxRE luciferase luciferin-binding site is more polar than that of PxGR luciferase, and it is sensitive to guanidine. Mutagenesis and modelling studies suggest that several invariant residues in the putative luciferin-binding site of PxRE luciferase cannot interact with excited oxyluciferin. These results suggest that one portion of the luciferin-binding site of the red-emitting luciferase is tighter than that of PxGR luciferase, whereas the other portion could be more open and polar.

  16. Some insights about the activity of the Ceboruco Volcano (Nayarit, Mexico) from recent seismic low-frequency activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Uribe, María Carolina; Núñez-Cornú, Francisco Javier; Nava Pichardo, Fidencio Alejandro; Suárez-Plascencia, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    The Ceboruco stratovolcano (2,280 m.a.s.l.) is located in Nayarit, Mexico, at the western end of the Mexican volcanic belt, near several population centers and by the side of a strategic highway. During the last 1,000 years it has had, on the average, one eruption every 125 years. It last eruptive activity began in 1870, and during the following 5 years it presented superficial activity including vapor emissions, ash falls, and rhyodacitic lava flows along the southeast side. A data set consisting of 139 low-frequency volcanic-type earthquakes, recorded from March 2003 to July 2008 at the CEBN triaxial short period digital station on the southwestern side of the volcano, was classified according to waveform and spectral characteristics into four families: short duration, extended coda, bobbin, and modulated amplitude. Approximate hypocentral locations indicate that there is no particular location for events of any family, but rather that all events occur at different points within the volcano. The presence of ongoing volcanic-earthquake activity together with the ongoing vapor emissions indicate that the Ceboruco volcano continues to be active, and the higher occurrence rates of short-duration events, as compared with those for the other families, could indicate an increase in the stress in the volcanic edifice. This apparent stress increase, together with the fact that the last eruption occurred 143 years ago, tell us that the Ceboruco may be approaching a critical state, and may represent a hazard to the surrounding communities and economic activities.

  17. Single-site substitutions improve cold activity and increase thermostability of the dehairing alkaline protease (DHAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong-Yan; Wu, Li-Ying; Liu, Gang; Feng, Hong

    2016-12-01

    To engineer dehairing alkaline protease (DHAP) variants to improve cold activity and increase thermostability so these variants are suitable for the leather processing industry. Based on previous studies with bacterial alkaline proteases, double-site mutations (W106K/V149I and W106K/M124L) were introduced into the DHAP from Bacillus pumilus. Compared with the wild-type DHAP hydrolytic activity, the double-site variant W106K/V149I showed an increase in specific hydrolytic activity at 15 °C by 2.3-fold toward casein in terms of hydrolytic rate and 2.7-fold toward the synthetic peptide AAPF-pN by means of kcat/Km value. The thermostability of the variant (W106K/V149I) was improved with the half-life at 60 and 70 °C increased by 2.7- and 5.0-fold, respectively, when compared with the thermostability of the wild-type DHAP. Conclusively, an increase in the cold activity and thermostability of a bacterial alkaline protease was achieved by protein engineering.

  18. Effect of particle surface area on ice active site densities retrieved from droplet freezing spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beydoun, Hassan; Polen, Michael; Sullivan, Ryan C.

    2016-10-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation remains one of the outstanding problems in cloud physics and atmospheric science. Experimental challenges in properly simulating particle-induced freezing processes under atmospherically relevant conditions have largely contributed to the absence of a well-established parameterization of immersion freezing properties. Here, we formulate an ice active, surface-site-based stochastic model of heterogeneous freezing with the unique feature of invoking a continuum assumption on the ice nucleating activity (contact angle) of an aerosol particle's surface that requires no assumptions about the size or number of active sites. The result is a particle-specific property g that defines a distribution of local ice nucleation rates. Upon integration, this yields a full freezing probability function for an ice nucleating particle. Current cold plate droplet freezing measurements provide a valuable and inexpensive resource for studying the freezing properties of many atmospheric aerosol systems. We apply our g framework to explain the observed dependence of the freezing temperature of droplets in a cold plate on the concentration of the particle species investigated. Normalizing to the total particle mass or surface area present to derive the commonly used ice nuclei active surface (INAS) density (ns) often cannot account for the effects of particle concentration, yet concentration is typically varied to span a wider measurable freezing temperature range. A method based on determining what is denoted an ice nucleating species' specific critical surface area is presented and explains the concentration dependence as a result of increasing the variability in ice nucleating active sites between droplets. By applying this method to experimental droplet freezing data from four different systems, we demonstrate its ability to interpret immersion freezing temperature spectra of droplets containing variable particle concentrations. It is shown that general

  19. Mechanistic insights on immunosenescence and chronic immune activation in HIV-tuberculosis co-infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Esaki M; Velu, Vijayakumar; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Larsson, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Immunosenescence is marked by accelerated degradation of host immune responses leading to the onset of opportunistic infections, where senescent T cells show remarkably higher ontogenic defects as compared to healthy T cells. The mechanistic association between T-cell immunosenescence and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression, and functional T-cell responses in HIV-tuberculosis (HIV-TB) co-infection remains to be elaborately discussed. Here, we discussed the association of immunosenescence and chronic immune activation in HIV-TB co-infection and reviewed the role played by mediators of immune deterioration in HIV-TB co-infection necessitating the importance of designing therapeutic strategies against HIV disease progression and pathogenesis. PMID:25674514

  20. Immunity activation in brain cells in epilepsy: mechanistic insights and pathological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravizza, Teresa; Kostoula, Chrysaugi; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2013-12-01

    The search of targets for developing novel drugs that can control seizures resistant to available treatments in children and adults represents a great challenge for basic science. In the past decade, emerging evidence pointed out to the crucial role played by glia, the innate immunity brain-resident cells, in the generation of hyperexcitable neuronal networks underlying seizures. Molecular and pharmacological studies targeting glia, and the inflammatory mediators released by these cells in experimental models of epilepsy, highlighted novel targets for drug intervention aimed at interfering with the disease mechanisms, therefore providing putative disease-modifying treatments. This article will focus on the role of immunity activation in the brain and the concomitant release by glia of inflammatory molecules with neuromodulatory properties, in the pathogenesis of epileptic seizures, cell loss, and comorbidities.

  1. Nature of Copper Active Sites in CuZSM-5: Theory and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Kozyra

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We report here a concise resume reporting the way of constructing the model of an active site composed of transition metal cation exchanged in zeolites. The main goal was to devise the model of CuZSM-5 capable of describing geometrical and electronic properties of metal sites and adsorption complexes with small molecules. The models were built up starting from simple ring structures encountered in ZSM-5 framework to fused rings’ model selected as the representative of α position for hosting the exchanged cation. Geometrical and electronic properties of the basal model, composed of the extended framework cluster with Cu+ or Cu2+ cation, and adsorption complexes with diatomic molecules were extracted from DFT calculations. The stress was put here on direct confirmation of structural changes on copper reduction/oxidation and adsorption. Electron donor/acceptor properties of the sites combined with electronic properties of adsorbed molecules led to the proposal for the mechanism of NO activation by Cu+ZSM-5: transfer of electrons from copper d orbitals to antibonding states of NO should cause large weakening of the bond, which was evidenced also by IR measurements.

  2. Stress-induced enhancement of leukocyte trafficking into sites of surgery or immune activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Kavitha; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.

    2005-04-01

    Effective immunoprotection requires rapid recruitment of leukocytes into sites of surgery, wounding, infection, or vaccination. In contrast to immunosuppressive chronic stressors, short-term acute stressors have immunoenhancing effects. Here, we quantify leukocyte infiltration within a surgical sponge to elucidate the kinetics, magnitude, subpopulation, and chemoattractant specificity of an acute stress-induced increase in leukocyte trafficking to a site of immune activation. Mice acutely stressed before sponge implantation showed 200-300% higher neutrophil, macrophage, natural killer cell, and T cell infiltration than did nonstressed animals. We also quantified the effects of acute stress on lymphotactin- (LTN; a predominantly lymphocyte-specific chemokine), and TNF-- (a proinflammatory cytokine) stimulated leukocyte infiltration. An additional stress-induced increase in infiltration was observed for neutrophils, in response to TNF-, macrophages, in response to TNF- and LTN, and natural killer cells and T cells in response to LTN. These results show that acute stress initially increases trafficking of all major leukocyte subpopulations to a site of immune activation. Tissue damage-, antigen-, or pathogen-driven chemoattractants subsequently determine which subpopulations are recruited more vigorously. Such stress-induced increases in leukocyte trafficking may enhance immunoprotection during surgery, vaccination, or infection, but may also exacerbate immunopathology during inflammatory (cardiovascular disease or gingivitis) or autoimmune (psoriasis, arthritis, or multiple sclerosis) diseases. chemokine | psychophysiological stress | surgical sponge | wound healing | lymphotactin

  3. The Mechanism by which 146-N-Glycan Affects the Active Site of Neuraminidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pi Liu

    Full Text Available One of the most conserved glycosylation sites of neuraminidase (NA is 146-N-glycan. This site is adjacent to the 150-cavity of NA, which is found within the active site and thought to be a target for rational drug development against the antiviral resistance of influenza. Here, through a total of 2.4 μs molecular dynamics (MD simulations, we demonstrated that 146-N-glycan can stabilize the conformation of the 150-loop that controls the volume of the 150-cavity. Moreover, with 146-N-glycan, our simulation result was more consistent with crystal structures of NAs than simulations conducted without glycans. Cluster analysis of the MD trajectories showed that 146-N-glycan adopted three distinct conformations: monomer-bridged, dimer-bridged and standing. Of these conformations, the dimer-bridged 146-N-glycan was the most stable one and contributed to stabilization of the 150-loop conformation. Furthermore, our simulation revealed that various standing conformations of 146-N-glycan could block the entrance of the binding pocket. This result was consistent with experimental data and explained the relatively low activity of inhibitors with flexible substituents toward the 150-cavity. Together, our results lead us to hypothesize that rigid and hydrophobic substituents could serve as better inhibitors targeting the 150-cavity.

  4. Complement receptor 2-mediated targeting of complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongbin; He, Chun; Knaak, Christian; Guthridge, Joel M; Holers, V Michael; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    In a strategy to specifically target complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation and disease, recombinant fusion proteins consisting of a complement inhibitor linked to a C3 binding region of complement receptor (CR) 2 were prepared and characterized. Natural ligands for CR2 are C3 breakdown products deposited at sites of complement activation. Fusion proteins were prepared consisting of a human CR2 fragment linked to either the N terminus or C terminus of soluble forms of the membrane complement inhibitors decay accelerating factor (DAF) or CD59. The targeted complement inhibitors bound to C3-opsonized cells, and all were significantly more effective (up to 20-fold) than corresponding untargeted inhibitors at protecting target cells from complement. CR2 fusion proteins also inhibited CR3-dependent adhesion of U937 cells to C3 opsonized erythrocytes, indicating a second potential anti-inflammatory mechanism of CR2 fusion proteins, since CR3 is involved in endothelial adhesion and diapedesis of leukocytes at inflammatory sites. Finally, the in vivo validity of the targeting strategy was confirmed by the demonstration that CR2-DAF, but not soluble DAF, targets to the kidney in mouse models of lupus nephritis that are associated with renal complement deposition.

  5. Human glucocerebrosidase: heterologous expression of active site mutants in murine null cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrega, S; Durand, P; Codogno, P; Bauvy, C; Delomenie, C; Henrissat, B; Martin, B M; McKinney, C; Ginns, E I; Mornon, J P; Lehn, P

    2000-11-01

    Using bioinformatics methods, we have previously identified Glu235 and Glu340 as the putative acid/base catalyst and nucleophile, respectively, in the active site of human glucocerebrosidase. Thus, we undertook site-directed mutagenesis studies to obtain experimental evidence supporting these predictions. Recombinant retroviruses were used to express wild-type and E235A and E340A mutant proteins in glucocerebrosidase-deficient murine cells. In contrast to wild-type enzyme, the mutants were found to be catalytically inactive. We also report the results of various studies (Western blotting, glycosylation analysis, subcellular fractionation, and confocal microscopy) indicating that the wild-type and mutant enzymes are identically processed and sorted to the lysosomes. Thus, enzymatic inactivity of the mutant proteins is not the result of incorrect folding/processing. These findings indicate that Glu235 plays a key role in the catalytic machinery of human glucocerebrosidase and may indeed be the acid/base catalyst. As concerns Glu340, the results both support our computer-based predictions and confirm, at the biological level, previous identification of Glu340 as the nucleophile by use of active site labeling techniques. Finally, our findings may help to better understand the molecular basis of Gaucher disease, the human lysosomal disease resulting from deficiency in glucocerebrosidase.

  6. Insights on glucocorticoid receptor activity modulation through the binding of rigid steroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego M Presman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The glucocorticoid receptor (GR is a transcription factor that regulates gene expression in a ligand-dependent fashion. This modular protein is one of the major pharmacological targets due to its involvement in both cause and treatment of many human diseases. Intense efforts have been made to get information about the molecular basis of GR activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, the behavior of four GR-ligand complexes with different glucocorticoid and antiglucocorticoid properties were evaluated. The ability of GR-ligand complexes to oligomerize in vivo was analyzed by performing the novel Number and Brightness assay. Results showed that most of GR molecules form homodimers inside the nucleus upon ligand binding. Additionally, in vitro GR-DNA binding analyses suggest that ligand structure modulates GR-DNA interaction dynamics rather than the receptor's ability to bind DNA. On the other hand, by coimmunoprecipitation studies we evaluated the in vivo interaction between the transcriptional intermediary factor 2 (TIF2 coactivator and different GR-ligand complexes. No correlation was found between GR intranuclear distribution, cofactor recruitment and the homodimerization process. Finally, Molecular determinants that support the observed experimental GR LBD-ligand/TIF2 interaction were found by Molecular Dynamics simulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data presented here sustain the idea that in vivo GR homodimerization inside the nucleus can be achieved in a DNA-independent fashion, without ruling out a dependent pathway as well. Moreover, since at least one GR-ligand complex is able to induce homodimer formation while preventing TIF2 coactivator interaction, results suggest that these two events might be independent from each other. Finally, 21-hydroxy-6,19-epoxyprogesterone arises as a selective glucocorticoid with potential pharmacological interest. Taking into account that GR homodimerization and cofactor recruitment are

  7. Activation energy spectra: insights into transport limitations of organic semiconductors and photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Ziqi; Nardes, Alexandre M.; Van de Lagemaat, Jao; Gregg, Brian A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    2012-03-07

    Some mechanisms of charge transport in organic semiconductors and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells can be distinguished by their predicted change in activation energy for the current, E{sub a}, versus applied field, F. E{sub a} versus F is measured first in pure films of commercially available regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and in the same P3HT treated to reduce its charged defect density. The former shows a Poole-Frenkel (PF)-like decrease in E{sub a} at low F, which then plateaus at higher F. The low defect material does not exhibit PF behavior and E{sub a} remains approximately constant. Upon addition of [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), however, both materials show a large increase in E{sub a} and exhibit PF-like behavior over the entire field range. These results are explained with a previously proposed model of transport that considers both the localized random disorder in the energy levels and the long-range electrostatic fluctuations resulting from charged defects. Activation energy spectra in working OPV cells show that the current is injection-limited over most of the voltage range but becomes transport-limited, with a large peak in E{sub a}, near the open circuit photovoltage. This causes a decrease in fill factor, which may be a general limitation in such solar cells. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Deprotonation states of the two active site water molecules regulate the binding of protein phosphatase 5 with its substrate: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingyun; Yan, Feng

    2017-07-20

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5), mainly localized in human brain, can dephosphorylate tau protein whose high level of phosphorylation is related to Alzheimer's disease. Similar to other protein phosphatases, PP5 has a conserved motif in the catalytic domain that contains two binding sites for manganese (Mn(2+) ) ions. Structural data indicate that two active site water molecules, one bridging the two Mn(2+) ions and the other terminally coordinated with one of the Mn(2+) ions (Mn1), are involved in catalysis. Recently, a density functional theory study revealed that the two water molecules can be both deprotonated to keep a neutral active site for catalysis. The theoretical study gives us an insight into the catalytic mechanism of PP5, but the knowledge of how the deprotonation states of the two water molecules affect the binding of PP5 with its substrate is still lacking. To approach this problem, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to model the four possible deprotonation states. Through structural, dynamical and energetic analyses, the results demonstrate that the deprotonation states of the two water molecules affect the structure of the active site including the distance between the two Mn(2+) ions and their coordination, impact the interaction energy of residues R275, R400 and H304 which directly interact with the substrate phosphoserine, and mediate the dynamics of helix αJ which is involved in regulation of the enzyme's activity. Furthermore, the deprotonation state that is preferable for PP5 binding of its substrate has been identified. These findings could provide new design strategy for PP5 inhibitor. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  9. Benzodiazepines: rat pinealocyte binding sites and augmentation of norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew, E.; Parfitt, A.G.; Sugden, D.; Engelhardt, D.L.; Zimmerman, E.A.; Klein, D.C.

    1984-02-01

    Studies of (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding to intact rat pineal cells were carried out in tissue culture preparations. The binding was saturable, reversible and proportional to the number of cells used. Scatchard analysis resulted in a linear plot (Kd . 23 nM, maximum binding sites (Bmax) . 1.56 pmol/mg of protein for cells in monolayer culture; Kd . 7 nM, Bmax . 1.3 pmol/mg of protein for cells in suspension culture). Inhibition constants (Ki) for clonazepam (500 nM), flunitrazepam (38 nM) and Ro-5-4864 (5 nM) indicated that the binding sites were probably of the ''peripheral'' type. In addition, the effects of diazepam on norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity were studied in organ culture and dissociated cell culture. Diazepam (10-50 microM) both prolonged and increased the magnitude of the norepinephrine-induced increase in NAT activity but did not affect the initial rate of rise of enzyme activity. The effect was dose-dependent and was also seen with clonazepam, flunitrazepam and Ro-5-4864, but not with Ro-15-1788. Diazepam, by itself, at these concentrations, had no effect on NAT, but enzyme activity was increased by higher concentrations (0.1-1 mM). Although a relationship between the (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding sites described here and the effect of benzodiazepines on NAT cannot be established from these studies, the data suggest that the benzodiazepines may alter melatonin levels through their action on NAT.

  10. Insights into the evolution of tectonically-active glaciated mountain ranges from digital elevation model analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, S. H.; Whipple, K. X.

    2003-12-01

    Glaciers have played an important role in the development of most active mountain ranges around the world during the Quaternary, but the interaction between glacial erosion (as modulated by climate change) and tectonic processes is poorly understood. The so-called glacial buzzsaw hypothesis (Brozovic et al., 1997) proposes that glaciers can incise as rapidly as the most rapid rock uplift rates, such that glaciated landscapes experiencing different rock uplift rates but the same snowline elevation will look essentially the same, with mean elevations close to the snowline. Digital elevation model-based analyses of the glaciated landscapes of the Nanga Parbat region, Pakistan, and the Southern Alps, New Zealand, lend some support to this hypothesis, but also reveal considerably more variety to the landscapes of glaciated, tectonically-active mountain ranges. Larger glaciers in the Nanga Parbat region maintain a low downvalley gradient and valley floor elevations close to the snowline, even in the face of extremely rapid rock uplift. However, smaller glaciers steepen in response to rapid uplift, similar to the response of rivers. A strong correlation between the height of hillslopes rising from the cirque floors and rock uplift rates implies that erosion processes on hillslopes cannot initially keep up with more rapid glacial incision rates. It is these staggering hillslopes that permit mountain peaks to rise above 8000m. The glacial buzzsaw hypothesis does not describe the evolution of the Southern Alps as well, because here mean elevations rise in areas of more rapid rock uplift. The buzzsaw hypothesis may work well in the Nanga Parbat region because the zone of rapid rock uplift is structurally confined to a narrow region. Alternatively, the Southern Alps may not have been rising sufficiently rapidly or sufficiently long for the glacial buzzsaw to be imposed outside the most rapidly uplifting region, around Mount Cook. The challenge now is to understand in detail

  11. Mechanical Control of ATP Synthase Function: Activation Energy Difference between Tight and Loose Binding Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás

    2010-01-26

    Despite exhaustive chemical and crystal structure studies, the mechanistic details of how FoF1-ATP synthase can convert mechanical energy to chemical, producing ATP, are still not fully understood. On the basis of quantum mechanical calculations using a recent highresolution X-ray structure, we conclude that formation of the P-O bond may be achieved through a transition state (TS) with a planar PO3 - ion. Surprisingly, there is a more than 40 kJ/mol difference between barrier heights of the loose and tight binding sites of the enzyme. This indicates that even a relatively small change in active site conformation, induced by the γ-subunit rotation, may effectively block the back reaction in βTP and, thus, promote ATP. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  12. The crystal structure of Pseudomonas putida azoreductase - the active site revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Ana Maria D; Mendes, Sónia; de Sanctis, Daniele; Martins, Lígia O; Bento, Isabel

    2013-12-01

    The enzymatic degradation of azo dyes begins with the reduction of the azo bond. In this article, we report the crystal structures of the native azoreductase from Pseudomonas putida MET94 (PpAzoR) (1.60 Å), of PpAzoR in complex with anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (1.50 Å), and of PpAzoR in complex with Reactive Black 5 dye (1.90 Å). These structures reveal the residues and subtle changes that accompany substrate binding and release. Such changes highlight the fine control of access to the catalytic site that is required by the ping-pong mechanism, and in turn the specificity offered by the enzyme towards different substrates. The topology surrounding the active site shows novel features of substrate recognition and binding that help to explain and differentiate the substrate specificity observed among different bacterial azoreductases.

  13. Dipolar Relaxation Dynamics at the Active Site of an ATPase Regulated by Membrane Lateral Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischermeier, Elisabeth; Pospíšil, Petr; Sayed, Ahmed; Hof, Martin; Solioz, Marc; Fahmy, Karim

    2017-01-24

    The active transport of ions across biological membranes requires their hydration shell to interact with the interior of membrane proteins. However, the influence of the external lipid phase on internal dielectric dynamics is hard to access by experiment. Using the octahelical transmembrane architecture of the copper-transporting P1B -type ATPase from Legionella pneumophila as a model structure, we have established the site-specific labeling of internal cysteines with a polarity-sensitive fluorophore. This enabled dipolar relaxation studies in a solubilized form of the protein and in its lipid-embedded state in nanodiscs. Time-dependent fluorescence shifts revealed the site-specific hydration and dipole mobility around the conserved ion-binding motif. The spatial distribution of both features is shaped significantly and independently of each other by membrane lateral pressure. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. New insights into the anti-obesity activity of xanthones from Garcinia mangostana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian-Yu; Wang, Yi-Tao; Lin, Li-Gen

    2015-02-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions worldwide. This condition, and its related diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, have become major public health challenges. Fruits are important dietary components, and bioactive constituents from fruits are considered to be a promising source for developing effective and safe anti-obesity drugs. Garcinia mangostana Linn. (Clusiaceae) is a tropical evergreen tree, and its fruit, mangosteen, is called 'Queen of Fruit'. The pericarp of G. mangostana has been used for centuries in Southeast Asia as a medicinal agent for treatment of various diseases. Products derived from mangosteen are widely consumed to ameliorate metabolic dysfunction and resultant metabolic syndrome. However, the chemical principles and mechanisms underlying these effects are unclear. This review summarizes the recent chemical and pharmacological studies related to G. mangostana, including weight reduction, anti-adipogenesis, anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation activity. The aim of this review is to shed light on the role of G. mangostana and its constituents in preventing and treating obesity, which should encourage more interest in the development of relevant therapeutic methods.

  15. New insights into dietary supplements used in sport: active substances, pharmacological and side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koncic, Marijana Zovko; Tomczyk, Michal

    2013-08-01

    As a society we are increasingly concerned about our physical appearance. For example, as much as 24% of people in developed countries admittedly exercise to improve their performance. Professional sportsmen and amateurs alike are in a constant search for new means that will enable them better sport results in shorter time. Among those means, a prominent place belongs to dietary supplements. However, the producers often advertise products whose use in sports is neither scientifically founded nor safe. This brings on an irrational use of herbal supplements which sometimes leads to unwanted side effects, but is more often of little use. Thus, the aim of this review will be to systematically evaluate some of the herbal supplements that are used as adaptogenic and ergogenic aids in sport. The review will include available data on Rhodiola rosea, Withania somnifera, Schisandra chinensis, Tribulus terrestris, Vitis vinifera, Citrus aurantium, and others. Their effects, active ingredients as well as possible adverse effects will be discussed with special focus on clinical studies.

  16. New Insights on Late-A and Early-F Star Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire Ferrero, R.; Catalano, S.; Marilli, E.; Gouttebroze, P.; Talavera, A.; Bruhweiler, F.

    The onset of chromospheric activity in late-A and early-F stars is here discussed. The detection of Ly- emission core in several A and F atars with the IUE satellite, gives evidence for the presence of chromospheric layers in these stars up to B - V = 0m.19 (Marilli et al., 1996). Semiempirical chromospheric models for Altair allowed us (Freire Ferrero et al., 1995) to explain the observed emission profiles taking into account normal H I interstellar (IS) absorption. However, due to the very high rotational velocity, we analysed alternative hypotheses to explain the observed emissions: (1) circumstellar or shell matter; (2) co-rotating expanding optically thin wind. We ruled out these hypotheses because their effects are negligible and as a consequence, this result reinforces the chromospheric origin of the observed Ly- core in Altair. The stars of our sample, having observed Ly- profilies similar to Altair's and similar stellar and IS properties, should reproduce similar chromospheric behaviour. Here we discuss several important questions that are raised by these results.

  17. Ordering Dynamics in Neuron Activity Pattern Model: An Insight to Brain Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundh, Jasleen; Singh, Awaneesh; Singh, R K Brojen

    2015-01-01

    We study the domain ordering kinetics in d = 2 ferromagnets which corresponds to populated neuron activities with both long-ranged interactions, V(r) ∼ r-n and short-ranged interactions. We present the results from comprehensive Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for the nonconserved Ising model with n ≥ 2, interaction range considering near and far neighbors. Our model results could represent the long-ranged neuron kinetics (n ≤ 4) in consistent with the same dynamical behaviour of short-ranged case (n ≥ 4) at far below and near criticality. We found that emergence of fast and slow kinetics of long and short ranged case could imitate the formation of connections among near and distant neurons. The calculated characteristic length scale in long-ranged interaction is found to be n independent (L(t) ∼ t1/(n-2)), whereas short-ranged interaction follows L(t) ∼ t1/2 law and approximately preserve universality in domain kinetics. Further, we did the comparative study of phase ordering near the critical temperature which follows different behaviours of domain ordering near and far critical temperature but follows universal scaling law.

  18. Insights into the electrochemical activity of nanosized {alpha}-LiFeO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, J.; Santos-Pena, J.; Trocoli, R. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica e Ingenieria Quimica, Edificio Marie Curie, Campus de Rabanales, Universidad de Cordoba, Cordoba 14071 (Spain); Franger, S. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de l' Etat Solide, ICMMO, Universite Paris XI, Orsay 91405 (France); Rodriguez-Castellon, E. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Campus de Teatinos, Universidad de Malaga, Malaga 29071 (Spain)

    2008-09-20

    In recent work [J. Morales, J. Santos-Pena, Electrochem. Commun. 9 (2007) 2116], we prepared nanosized {alpha}-LiFeO{sub 2} with increased electrochemical activity in lithium cells relative to various lithium ferrite polymorphs. In this work, we studied the previous electrodes in different charge states in order to obtain a more accurate picture of the phenomena occurring during cycling. Exsitu X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements confirmed the oxidation/reduction of iron atoms during the charge/discharge process. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results suggested that the electrolyte is not oxidised during the first charge, but rather than a solid electrolyte interface is formed after one cycle. Also, thermal tests revealed that Fe(IV) present in the electrodes reacted with the electrolyte to form oxidised carbon species. Finally, {alpha}-LiFeO{sub 2} was tested as a positive electrode material in a lithium battery under different regimes. Stabilised capacities up to 150 mAh g{sup -1} were obtained under a C/4 regime. This lithium ferrite is therefore an attractive alternative to LiCoO{sub 2}. (author)

  19. Sources and atmospheric processes impacting oxalate at a suburban coastal site in Hong Kong: Insights inferred from 1 year hourly measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yang; Huang, Xiaohui Hilda; Bian, Qijing; Griffith, Stephen M.; Louie, Peter K. K.; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2015-09-01

    Oxalic acid is one of the most abundant dicarboxylic acids in the atmosphere, receiving a great deal of attention due to its potential influence on cloud condensation nucleus activities. In this work, we report 10 months of hourly oxalate measurements in particulate matter of less than 2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) by a Monitor for Aerosols and Gases in ambient Air at a suburban coastal site in Hong Kong from April 2012 to February 2013. A total of more than 6000 sets of oxalate and inorganic ion data were obtained. The mean (±SD) oxalate concentration was 0.34 (±0.18) µg m-3, accounting for 2.8% of the total ion mass and 1.5% of the PM2.5 mass. Seasonal variation showed higher concentrations in fall and winter (0.54 and 0.36 µg m-3, respectively) and lower concentrations in spring and summer (~0.26 µg m-3). Different from the inorganic ions, a shallow dip in the oxalate concentration consistently occurred in the morning after sunrise (around 9:00 A.M.) throughout all seasons. Our analysis suggests that this was likely due to photolysis of oxalate-Fe (III) complex under sunlight. In summer, a small daytime peak was discernable for oxalate and nitrate. This characteristic, together with a more evident diurnal variation of O3, indicates comparatively more active photochemical oxidation in summer than other seasons. High correlations were observed between oxalate and non-sea-salt SO42- (NSS) (R2 = 0.63) and Ox (O3 + NO2) (R2 = 0.48), indicating significant commonality in their secondary formation. Positive matrix factorization analysis of oxalate and other real-time gas and particle-phase component data estimates that secondary formation processes, including secondary gas or aqueous oxidation processes (49%), oxidation processes of biomass burning emissions (37%), accounted for the majority of PM2.5 oxalate. A backward trajectories cluster analysis found that higher oxalate/NSS ratios were associated with low pollution samples under the influence of

  20. Evaluating the online activity of users of the e-Bug web site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quincey, Ed; Kostkova, Patty; Jawaheer, Gawesh; Farrell, David; McNulty, Cliodna A M; Weinberg, Julius

    2011-06-01

    Web server log analysis is being increasingly used to evaluate the user behaviour on healthcare resource web sites due to the detailed record of activity that they contain. This study aimed to use this information to evaluate the e-Bug web site, a healthcare resource that provides a range of educational resources about microbes, hand and respiratory hygiene, and antibiotics. This evaluation was conducted by analysing the web server logs of the e-Bug web site for the period January 2008 to November 2009, using a proprietary application named Sawmill. The e-Bug web site has had >900,000 page views generated from >88,000 users, with an increase in May 2009 during the swine flu epidemic and a further increase in September 2009 following the official launch of e-Bug. The majority of visitors were from the UK, but visits were recorded from 190 different countries. Word(®) document resources were downloaded >169,000 times, with the most popular being a swine flu factsheet. PowerPoint(®) document resources were downloaded >36,000 times, with the most popular relating to the 'chain of infection'. The majority of visitor referrals originated from search engines, with the most popular referral keywords being variations on the e-Bug name. The most common non-search engine referrals were from other healthcare resources and agencies. Use of the site has increased markedly since the official launch of e-Bug, with average page views of >200,000 per month, from a range of countries, illustrating the international demand for a teaching resource for microbes, hygiene and antibiotics.

  1. Exploring the active site structure of photoreceptor proteins by Raman optical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Masashi

    2015-03-01

    Understanding protein function at the atomic level is a major challenge in a field of biophysics and requires the combined efforts of structural and functional methods. We use photoreceptor proteins as a model system to understand in atomic detail how a chromophore and a protein interact to sense light and send a biological signal. A potential technique for investigating molecular structures is Raman optical activity (ROA), which is a spectroscopic method with a high sensitivity to the structural details of chiral molecules. However, its application to photoreceptor proteins has not been reported. Thus we have constructed ROA spectrometer using near-infrared (NIR) laser excitation at 785 nm. The NIR excitation enables us to measure ROA spectra for a variety of biological samples, including photoreceptor proteins, without fluorescence from the samples. In the present study, we have applied the NIR-ROA to bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and photoactive yellow protein (PYP). BR is a light-driven proton pump and contains a protonated Schiff base of retinal as a chromophore. PYP is a blue light receptor, and this protein has the 4-hydroxycinnamyl chromophore, which is covalently linked to Cys69 through a thiolester bond. We have successfully obtained the ROA spectra of the chromophore within a protein environment. Furthermore, calculations of the ROA spectra utilizing density functional theory provide detailed structural information, such as data on out-of-plane distortions of the chromophore. The structural information obtained from the ROA spectra includes the positions of hydrogen atoms, which are usually not detected in the crystal structures of biological samples.

  2. Commentary on the Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun: Insight Relative to Coronal Holes, Sunspots, and Solar Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available While mankind will always remain unable to sample the interior of the Sun, the presence of sunspots and coronal holes can provide clues as to its subsurface structure. Insight relative to the solar body can also be gained by recognizing that the Sun must exist in the condensed state and support a discrete lattice structure, as required for the production of its continuous spectrum. In this regard, the layered liquid metallic hydrogen lattice advanced as a condensed model of the Sun (Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen: A Building Block for the Liquid Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2011, v. 3, 60–74; Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen II: A Critical Assessment of Current and Primordial Helium Levels in Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2013, v. 2, 35–47; Robitaille J.C. and Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen III. Intercalation and Lattice Exclusion Versus Gravitational Settling and Their Consequences Relative to Internal Structure, Surface Activity, and Solar Winds in the Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2013, v. 2, in press provides the ability to add structure to the solar interior. This constitutes a significant advantage over the gaseous solar models. In fact, a layered liquid metallic hydrogen lattice and the associated intercalation of non-hydrogen elements can help to account for the position of sunspots and coronal holes. At the same time, this model provid