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Sample records for active noise control

  1. Active noise control primer

    CERN Document Server

    Snyder, Scott D

    2000-01-01

    Active noise control - the reduction of noise by generating an acoustic signal that actively interferes with the noise - has become an active area of basic research and engineering applications. The aim of this book is to present all of the basic knowledge one needs for assessing how useful active noise control will be for a given problem and then to provide some guidance for designing, setting up, and tuning an active noise-control system. Written for students who have no prior knowledge of acoustics, signal processing, or noise control but who do have a reasonable grasp of basic physics and mathematics, the book is short and descriptive. It leaves for more advanced texts or research monographs all mathematical details and proofs concerning vibrations, signal processing and the like. The book can thus be used in independent study, in a classroom with laboratories, or in conjunction with a kit for experiment or demonstration. Topics covered include: basic acoustics; human perception and sound; sound intensity...

  2. Active Noise Control for Dishwasher noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nokhaeng; Park, Youngjin

    2016-09-01

    The dishwasher is a useful home appliance and continually used for automatically washing dishes. It's commonly placed in the kitchen with built-in style for practicality and better use of space. In this environment, people are easily exposed to dishwasher noise, so it is an important issue for the consumers, especially for the people living in open and narrow space. Recently, the sound power levels of the noise are about 40 - 50 dBA. It could be achieved by removal of noise sources and passive means of insulating acoustical path. For more reduction, such a quiet mode with the lower speed of cycle has been introduced, but this deteriorates the washing capacity. Under this background, we propose active noise control for dishwasher noise. It is observed that the noise is propagating mainly from the lower part of the front side. Control speakers are placed in the part for the collocation. Observation part of estimating sound field distribution and control part of generating the anti-noise are designed for active noise control. Simulation result shows proposed active noise control scheme could have a potential application for dishwasher noise reduction.

  3. Active control of the noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez V, Luis Alfonso; Lopez Q, Jose German

    2001-01-01

    The problems of acoustic noise are more and more preponderant in the measure in that the amount of equipment and industrial machinery is increased such as fans, transformers, compressors etc. the use of devices passive mechanics for the reduction of the noise is effective and very appreciated because its effects embrace a wide range of acoustic frequency. However, to low frequencies, such devices become too big and expensive besides that present a tendency to do not effective. The control of active noise, CAN, using the electronic generation anti-noise, constitutes an interesting solution to the problem because their operation principle allows achieving an appreciable reduction of the noise by means of the use of compact devices. The traditional techniques for the control of acoustic noise like barriers and silenced to attenuate it, are classified as passive and their works has been accepted as norm as for the treatment of problems of noise it refers. Such techniques are considered in general very effective in the attenuation of noise of wide band. However, for low frequency, the required passive structures are too big and expensive; also, their effectiveness diminishes flagrantly, that which makes them impractical in many applications. The active suppression is profiled like a practical alternative for the reduction of acoustic noise. The idea in the active treatment of the noise it contemplates the use of a device electro-acoustic, like a speaker for example that it cancels to the noise by the generation of sounds of Same width and of contrary phase (anti-noise). The cancellation phenomenon is carried out when the ant-noise combines acoustically with the noise, what is in the cancellation of both sounds. The effectiveness of the cancellation of the primary source of noise depends on the precision with which the width and the phase of the generated ant-noise are controlled. The active control of noise, ANC (activates noise control), it is being investigated for

  4. Active noise control in a duct to cancel broadband noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Chun; Chang, Cheng-Yuan; Kuo, Sen M.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents cancelling duct noises by using the active noise control (ANC) techniques. We use the single channel feed forward algorithm with feedback neutralization to realize ANC. Several kinds of ducts noises including tonal noises, sweep tonal signals, and white noise had investigated. Experimental results show that the proposed ANC system can cancel these noises in a PVC duct very well. The noise reduction of white noise can be up to 20 dB.

  5. Development of Active Noise Control System for Quieting Transformer Noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bok Kyu; Song, Seik Young; Choi, Huo Yul [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Dae Hea; Lee, Hyuk Jae [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The passive noise control technique made use of sound-absorbing or soundproofing materials, so it required a large area and high cost for installation and had a drawback of poor performance at low frequency. Compared to this, the Active Noise Control attenuates noise sound pressure by using secondary source which has same performance ay low-frequency. Furthermore, it is able to save space and expenses. - research on adaptive algorithms - evaluation of global attenuation of the control - computer simulation - real-time Active Noise Control System Hardware Implementation - ANC system setting in the noisy area.

  6. Active Control Of Structure-Borne Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, S. J.

    1994-11-01

    The successful practical application of active noise control requires an understanding of both its acoustic limitations and the limitations of the electrical control strategy used. This paper is concerned with the active control of sound in enclosures. First, a review is presented of the fundamental physical limitations of using loudspeakers to achieve either global or local control. Both approaches are seen to have a high frequency limit, due to either the acoustic modal overlap, or the spatial correlation function of the pressure field. These physical performance limits could, in principle, be achieved with either a feedback or a feedforward control strategy. These strategies are reviewed and the use of adaptive digital filters is discussed for both approaches. The application of adaptive feedforward control in the control of engine and road noise in cars is described. Finally, an indirect approach to the active control of sound is discussed, in which the vibration is suppressed in the structural paths connecting the source of vibration to the enclosure. Two specific examples of this strategy are described, using an active automotive engine mount and the incorporation of actuators into helicopter struts to control gear-meshing tones. In both cases good passive design can minimize the complexity of the active controller.

  7. Active noise control technique and its application on ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Kean

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid development during past three decades, Active Noise Control(ANC has become a highly complementary noise control approach in comparison with traditional approaches, and has formed a complete system including basic theory, investigation approach, key techniques and system implementation. Meanwhile, substantial progress has been achieved in such fields as the practical application, industrialization development and commercial popularization of ANC, and this developed technique provides a practical and feasible choice for the active control of ship noise. In this review paper, its sound field analysis, system setup and key techniques are summarized, typical examples of ANC-based engineering applications including control of cabin noise and duct noise are briefly described, and a variety of forefronts and problems associated with the applications of ANC in ship noise control, such as active sound absorption, active sound insulation and smart acoustic structure, are subsequently discussed.

  8. Active Noise Control Experiments using Sound Energy Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Uli

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the latest results concerning the active noise control approach using net flow of acoustic energy. The test set-up consists of two loudspeakers simulating the engine noise and two smaller loudspeakers which belong to the active noise system. The system is completed by two acceleration sensors and one microphone per loudspeaker. The microphones are located in the near sound field of the loudspeakers. The control algorithm including the update equation of the feed-forward controller is introduced. Numerical simulations are performed with a comparison to a state of the art method minimising the radiated sound power. The proposed approach is experimentally validated.

  9. Active noise control in fuselage design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krakers, L.A.; Tooren, M.J.L. van; Beukers, A.; Berkhof, A.P.; Goeje, M.P. de

    2003-01-01

    To achieve comfortable noise levels inside the passenger cabin, sound damping measures have to be taken to improve the sound insulation properties of the bare airframe. Usually the sound insulation requirements of a passenger cabin are met after the mechanical design of the fuselage structure is

  10. Development of a Voice Activity Controlled Noise Canceller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid Noor, Ali O.; Samad, Salina Abdul; Hussain, Aini

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a variable threshold voice activity detector (VAD) is developed to control the operation of a two-sensor adaptive noise canceller (ANC). The VAD prohibits the reference input of the ANC from containing some strength of actual speech signal during adaptation periods. The novelty of this approach resides in using the residual output from the noise canceller to control the decisions made by the VAD. Thresholds of full-band energy and zero-crossing features are adjusted according to the residual output of the adaptive filter. Performance evaluation of the proposed approach is quoted in terms of signal to noise ratio improvements as well mean square error (MSE) convergence of the ANC. The new approach showed an improved noise cancellation performance when tested under several types of environmental noise. Furthermore, the computational power of the adaptive process is reduced since the output of the adaptive filter is efficiently calculated only during non-speech periods. PMID:22778667

  11. Development of a Voice Activity Controlled Noise Canceller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aini Hussain

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a variable threshold voice activity detector (VAD is developed to control the operation of a two-sensor adaptive noise canceller (ANC. The VAD prohibits the reference input of the ANC from containing some strength of actual speech signal during adaptation periods. The novelty of this approach resides in using the residual output from the noise canceller to control the decisions made by the VAD. Thresholds of full-band energy and zero-crossing features are adjusted according to the residual output of the adaptive filter. Performance evaluation of the proposed approach is quoted in terms of signal to noise ratio improvements as well mean square error (MSE convergence of the ANC. The new approach showed an improved noise cancellation performance when tested under several types of environmental noise. Furthermore, the computational power of the adaptive process is reduced since the output of the adaptive filter is efficiently calculated only during non-speech periods.

  12. Quelling Cabin Noise in Turboprop Aircraft via Active Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, Rex K.; Laba, Keith E.; Padula, Sharon L.

    1997-01-01

    Cabin noise in turboprop aircraft causes passenger discomfort, airframe fatigue, and employee scheduling constraints due to OSHA standards for exposure to high levels of noise. The noise levels in the cabins of turboprop aircraft are typically 10 to 30 decibels louder than commercial jet noise levels. However. unlike jet noise the turboprop noise spectrum is dominated by a few low frequency tones. Active structural acoustic control is a method in which the control inputs (used to reduce interior noise) are applied directly to a vibrating structural acoustic system. The control concept modeled in this work is the application of in-plane force inputs to piezoceramic patches bonded to the wall of a vibrating cylinder. The goal is to determine the force inputs and locations for the piezoceramic actuators so that: (1) the interior noise is effectively damped; (2) the level of vibration of the cylinder shell is not increased; and (3) the power requirements needed to drive the actuators are not excessive. Computational experiments for data taken from a computer generated model and from a laboratory test article at NASA Langley Research Center are provided.

  13. Reduction of external noise of mobile energy facilities by using active noise control system in muffler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivaev, O. I.; Kuznetsov, A. N.; Larionov, A. N.; Beliansky, R. G.

    2018-03-01

    The paper describes a method for the reducing emission of low-frequency noise of modern automotive vehicles into the environment. The importance of reducing the external noise of modern mobile energy facilities made in Russia is substantiated. Standard methods for controlling external noise in technology are of low efficiency when low-frequency sound waves are reduced. In this case, it is in the low-frequency zone of the sound range that the main power of the noise emitted by the machinery lies. The most effective way to reduce such sound waves is to use active noise control systems. A design of a muffler using a similar system is presented. This muffler allowed one to reduce the emission of increased noise levels into the environment by 7-11 dB and to increase acoustic comfort at the operator's workplace by 3-5 dB.

  14. Applications of adaptive filters in active noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Paul

    The active reduction of acoustic noise is achieved by the addition of a cancelling acoustic signal to the unwanted sound. Successful definition of the cancelling signal amounts to a system identification problem. Recent advances in adaptive signal processing have allowed this problem to be tackled using adaptive filters, which offer significant advantages over conventional solutions. The extension of adaptive noise cancelling techniques, which were developed in the electrical signal conditioning context, to the control of acoustic systems is studied. An analysis is presented of the behavior of the Widrow-Hoff LMS adaptive noise canceller with a linear filter in its control loop. The active control of plane waves propagating axially in a hardwalled duct is used as a motivating model problem. The model problem also motivates the study of the effects of feedback around an LMS adaptive filter. An alternative stochastic gradient algorithm for controlling adaptive filters in the presence of feedback is presented.

  15. First Test of Fan Active Noise Control (ANC) Completed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    With the advent of ultrahigh-bypass engines, the space available for passive acoustic treatment is becoming more limited, whereas noise regulations are becoming more stringent. Active noise control (ANC) holds promise as a solution to this problem. It uses secondary (added) noise sources to reduce or eliminate the offending noise radiation. The first active noise control test on the low-speed fan test bed was a General Electric Company system designed to control either the exhaust or inlet fan tone. This system consists of a "ring source," an induct array of error microphones, and a control computer. Fan tone noise propagates in a duct in the form of spinning waves. These waves are detected by the microphone array, and the computer identifies their spinning structure. The computer then controls the "ring source" to generate waves that have the same spinning structure and amplitude, but 180 out of phase with the fan noise. This computer generated tone cancels the fan tone before it radiates from the duct and is heard in the far field. The "ring source" used in these tests is a cylindrical array of 16 flat-plate acoustic radiators that are driven by thin piezoceramic sheets bonded to their back surfaces. The resulting source can produce spinning waves up to mode 7 at levels high enough to cancel the fan tone. The control software is flexible enough to work on spinning mode orders from -6 to 6. In this test, the fan was configured to produce a tone of order 6. The complete modal (spinning and radial) structure of the tones was measured with two builtin sets of rotating microphone rakes. These rakes provide a measurement of the system performance independent from the control system error microphones. In addition, the far-field noise was measured with a semicircular array of 28 microphones. This test represents the first in a series of tests that demonstrate different active noise control concepts, each on a progressively more complicated modal structure. The tests are

  16. Digitally controlled active noise reduction with integrated speech communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneken, H.J.M.; Verhave, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Active noise reduction is a successful addition to passive ear-defenders for improvement of the sound attenuation at low frequencies. Design and assessment methods are discussed, focused on subjective and objective attenuation measurements, stability, and high noise level applications. Active noise

  17. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 3; Active Fan Noise Cancellation in the NASA Lewis Active Noise Control Fan Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, Frederic G.; Hu, Ziqiang; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Active Noise Cancellation (ANC) System designed by General Electric and tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center's (LERC) 48 inch Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF). The goal of this study is to assess the feasibility of using wall mounted secondary acoustic sources and sensors within the duct of a high bypass turbofan aircraft engine for global active noise cancellation of fan tones. The GE ANC system is based on a modal control approach. A known acoustic mode propagating in the fan duct is canceled using an array of flush-mounted compact sound sources. The canceling modal signal is generated by a modal controller. Inputs to the controller are signals from a shaft encoder and from a microphone array which senses the residual acoustic mode in the duct. The key results are that the (6,0) was completely eliminated at the 920 Hz design frequency and substantially reduced elsewhere. The total tone power was reduced 6.8 dB (out of a possible 9.8 dB). Farfield reductions of 15 dB (SPL) were obtained. The (4,0) and (4,1) modes were reduced simultaneously yielding a 15 dB PWL decrease. The results indicate that global attenuation of PWL at the target frequency was obtained in the aft quadrant using an ANC actuator and sensor system totally contained within the duct. The quality of the results depended on precise mode generation. High spillover into spurious modes generated by the ANC actuator array caused less than optimum levels of PWL reduction. The variation in spillover is believed to be due to calibration procedure, but must be confirmed in subsequent tests.

  18. Cancelation and its simulation using Matlab according to active noise control case study of automotive noise silencer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfisyahrin; Isranuri, I.

    2018-02-01

    Active Noise Control is a technique to overcome noisy with noise or sound countered with sound in scientific terminology i.e signal countered with signals. This technique can be used to dampen relevant noise in accordance with the wishes of the engineering task and reducing automotive muffler noise to a minimum. Objective of this study is to develop a Active Noise Control which should cancel the noise of automotive Exhaust (Silencer) through Signal Processing Simulation methods. Noise generator of Active Noise Control is to make the opponent signal amplitude and frequency of the automotive noise. The steps are: Firstly, the noise of automotive silencer was measured to characterize the automotive noise that its amplitude and frequency which intended to be expressed. The opposed sound which having similar character with the signal source should be generated by signal function. A comparison between the data which has been completed with simulation calculations Fourier transform field data is data that has been captured on the muffler (noise silencer) Toyota Kijang Capsule assembly 2009. MATLAB is used to simulate how the signal processing noise generated by exhaust (silencer) using FFT. This opponent is inverted phase signal from the signal source 180° conducted by Instruments of Signal Noise Generators. The process of noise cancelation examined through simulation using computer software simulation. The result is obtained that attenuation of sound (noise cancellation) has a difference of 33.7%. This value is obtained from the comparison of the value of the signal source and the signal value of the opponent. So it can be concluded that the noisy signal can be attenuated by 33.7%.

  19. Foundations of Active Control - Active Noise Reduction Helmets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmkjær, Torsten Haaber Leth

    2008-01-01

    rate is increased which in turn most likely also will lead to an increased ANR bandwidth. The hybrid system is also constituted from a continuous-time feedback system (FBS) and a discrete-time FBS. The continuous-time FBS is primarily responsible for additional broadband noise reduction, whereas...... the discrete-time FBS primarily is responsible for the attenuation of periodic signals. Owing to the requirement on causal operation of a physical AC system time delays will also to a large extent determine the achievable performance in FFS design and in particular in FBS design. A quantity referred...... on a head and torso simulator (HATS), is exposed to diffuse sound field illumination. By applying the JCRSA method the spatially-weighted-averaged acquisition lead times provided by the reference sensors relative to the performance sensors are estimated to be as much as 800-900μs. The thesis also includes...

  20. Active structural acoustic control of helicopter interior multifrequency noise using input-output-based hybrid control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xunjun; Lu, Yang; Wang, Fengjiao

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents the recent advances in reduction of multifrequency noise inside helicopter cabin using an active structural acoustic control system, which is based on active gearbox struts technical approach. To attenuate the multifrequency gearbox vibrations and resulting noise, a new scheme of discrete model predictive sliding mode control has been proposed based on controlled auto-regressive moving average model. Its implementation only needs input/output data, hence a broader frequency range of controlled system is modelled and the burden on the state observer design is released. Furthermore, a new iteration form of the algorithm is designed, improving the developing efficiency and run speed. To verify the algorithm's effectiveness and self-adaptability, experiments of real-time active control are performed on a newly developed helicopter model system. The helicopter model can generate gear meshing vibration/noise similar to a real helicopter with specially designed gearbox and active struts. The algorithm's control abilities are sufficiently checked by single-input single-output and multiple-input multiple-output experiments via different feedback strategies progressively: (1) control gear meshing noise through attenuating vibrations at the key points on the transmission path, (2) directly control the gear meshing noise in the cabin using the actuators. Results confirm that the active control system is practical for cancelling multifrequency helicopter interior noise, which also weakens the frequency-modulation of the tones. For many cases, the attenuations of the measured noise exceed the level of 15 dB, with maximum reduction reaching 31 dB. Also, the control process is demonstrated to be smoother and faster.

  1. Control strategies for active noise barriers using near-field error sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    In this paper active noise control strategies for noise barriers are presented which are based on the use of sensors near the noise barrier. Virtual error signals are derived from these near-field sensor signals such that reductions of the far-field sound pressure are obtained with the active

  2. A Lightweight Loudspeaker for Aircraft Communications and Active Noise Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnaka, Glenn E.; Kleinle, Mark; Tsangaris, Parry; Oslac, Michael J.; Moskow, Harry J.

    1992-01-01

    A series of new, lightweight loudspeakers for use on commercial aircraft has been developed. The loudspeakers use NdFeB magnets and aluminum alloy frames to reduce the weight. The NdFeB magnet is virtually encapsulated by steel in the new speaker designs. Active noise reduction using internal loudspeakers was demonstrated to be effective in 1983. A weight, space, and cost efficient method for creating the active sound attenuating fields is to use the existing cabin loudspeakers for both communication and sound attenuation. This will require some additional loudspeaker design considerations.

  3. Parallel feedback active noise control of MRI acoustic noise with signal decomposition using hybrid RLS-NLMS adaptive algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Anshuman; Krishna Vemuri, Sri Hari; Panahi, Issa

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a cost-effective adaptive feedback Active Noise Control (FANC) method for controlling functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) acoustic noise by decomposing it into dominant periodic components and residual random components. Periodicity of fMRI acoustic noise is exploited by using linear prediction (LP) filtering to achieve signal decomposition. A hybrid combination of adaptive filters-Recursive Least Squares (RLS) and Normalized Least Mean Squares (NLMS) are then used to effectively control each component separately. Performance of the proposed FANC system is analyzed and Noise attenuation levels (NAL) up to 32.27 dB obtained by simulation are presented which confirm the effectiveness of the proposed FANC method.

  4. Active control of noise radiation from vibrating structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørkholt, Jakob

    developed, based on the theory of radiation filters for estimating the sound radiation from multimodal vibrations. This model has then been used in simulations of optimal feedback control, with special emphasis of the stability margins of the optimal control scheme. Two different methods of designing...... optimal and robust discrete-time feedback controllers for active vibration control of multimodal structures have been compared. They have been showed to yield controllers with identical frequency response characteristics, even though they employ completely different methods of numerical solutions...... and result in different representations of the controllers. The Internal Model Control structure combined with optimal filtering is suggested as an alternative to state space optimal control techniques for designing robust optimal controllers for audio frequency vibration control of resonant structures....

  5. Integration of Bass Enhancement and Active Noise Control System in Automobile Cabin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advancement of digital signal processing technologies, consumers are more concerned with the quality of multimedia entertainment in automobiles. In order to meet this demand, an audio enhancement system is needed to improve bass reproduction and cancel engine noise in the cabins. This paper presents an integrated active noise control system that is based on frequency-sampling filters to track and extract the bass information from the audio signal, and a multifrequency active noise equalizer to tune the low-frequency engine harmonics to enhance the bass reproduction. In the noise cancellation mode, a maximum of 3 dB bass enhancement can be achieved with significant noise suppression, while higher bass enhancement can be achieved in the bass enhance mode. The results show that the proposed system is effective for solving both the bass audio reproduction and the noise control problems in automobile cabins.

  6. Smart Materials and Active Noise and Vibration Control in Vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doppenberg, E.J.J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.; van Overbeek, M.; Gissinger, G.L.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results for the reduction of sound radiated from a structure using different control methodologies, and discusses two approaches for active structural acoustic control: the acoustic approach or the vibro-acoustic approach. Integrated actuators in structure material are

  7. Effects of Noise and Time Delay Upon Active Control of Combustion Instabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zinn, Ben

    2001-01-01

    To improve the performance of practical active control system (ACS) for unstable combustors, the effects of system noise and ACS time delay upon combustion instabilities and the ACS performance were studied...

  8. Multichannel active control of random noise in a small reverberant room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Søren; Elliott, Stephen J.

    1993-01-01

    An algorithm for multichannel adaptive IIR (infinite impulse response) filtering is presented and applied to the active control of broadband random noise in a small reverberant room. Assuming complete knowledge of the primary noise, the theoretically optimal reductions of acoustic energy are init...... with the primary noise field generated by a panel excited by a loudspeaker in an adjoining room. These results show that far better performances are provided by IIR and FIR filters when the primary source has a lightly damped dynamic behavior which the active controller must model...

  9. Controlled Noise Seismology

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2015-08-19

    We use controlled noise seismology (CNS) to generate surface waves, where we continuously record seismic data while generating artificial noise along the profile line. To generate the CNS data we drove a vehicle around the geophone line and continuously recorded the generated noise. The recorded data set is then correlated over different time windows and the correlograms are stacked together to generate the surface waves. The virtual shot gathers reveal surface waves with moveout velocities that closely approximate those from active source shot gathers.

  10. Controlled Noise Seismology

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.; AlTheyab, Abdullah; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2015-01-01

    We use controlled noise seismology (CNS) to generate surface waves, where we continuously record seismic data while generating artificial noise along the profile line. To generate the CNS data we drove a vehicle around the geophone line and continuously recorded the generated noise. The recorded data set is then correlated over different time windows and the correlograms are stacked together to generate the surface waves. The virtual shot gathers reveal surface waves with moveout velocities that closely approximate those from active source shot gathers.

  11. Toward Active Control of Noise from Hot Supersonic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    et al. (2011a), the Mach number chosen for this study is not typical of commercial or military aircraft engines, and bears little relevance to most...CHRISTOPHER K. W., VISWANATHAN, K., AHUJA, K. K. & PANDA , J. 2008 The sources of jet noise: experimental evidence. J. Fluid Mech. 615, 253-292. TANNA, H. K

  12. Comparison between hybrid feedforward-feedback, feedforward, and feedback structures for active noise control of fMRI noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Rajiv M; Panahi, Issa M S

    2008-01-01

    The performance of FIR feedforward, IIR feedforward, FIR feedback, hybrid FIR feedforward--FIR feedback, and hybrid IIR feedforward - FIR feedback structures for active noise control (ANC) are compared for an fMRI noise application. The filtered-input normalized least squares (FxNLMS) algorithm is used to update the coefficients of the adaptive filters in all these structures. Realistic primary and secondary paths of an fMRI bore are used by estimating them on a half cylindrical acrylic bore of 0.76 m (D)x1.52 m (L). Detailed results of the performance of the ANC system are presented in the paper for each of these structures. We find that the IIR feedforward structure produces most of the performance improvement in the hybrid IIR feedforward - FIR feedback structure and adding the feedback structure becomes almost redundant in the case of fMRI noise.

  13. Effects of secondary loudspeaker properties on broadband feedforward active duct noise control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yum-Ji; Huang, Lixi; Lam, James

    2013-07-01

    Dependence of the performance of feedforward active duct noise control on secondary loudspeaker parameters is investigated. Noise reduction performance can be improved if the force factor of the secondary loudspeaker is higher. For example, broadband noise reduction improvement up to 1.6 dB is predicted by increasing the force factor by 50%. In addition, a secondary loudspeaker with a larger force factor was found to have quicker convergence in the adaptive algorithm in experiment. In simulations, noise reduction is improved in using an adaptive algorithm by using a secondary loudspeaker with a heavier moving mass. It is predicted that an extra broadband noise reduction of more than 7 dB can be gained using an adaptive filter if the force factor, moving mass and coil inductance of a commercially available loudspeaker are doubled. Methods to increase the force factor beyond those of commercially available loudspeakers are proposed.

  14. MD 2485: Active halo control using narrowband and colored noise excitations

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Morales, Hector; Kotzian, Gerd; Maclean, Ewen Hamish; Redaelli, Stefano; Valuch, Daniel; Wagner, Joschka; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    This MD note summarizes the actions carried out during the MD 2485 on Active halo control using narrowband and colored noise excitations. The goal of the MD was to repeat some promising cases already tested in the past and introduce a new excitation type based on applying a colored noise. Although we were able to repeat some cases using a narrowband excitation, due to a problem with the waveform generator, the colored noise excitation could not be accomplished as expected. In any case, we provide some results that may be useful for future MDs.

  15. Application of the remote microphone method to active noise control in a mobile phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheer, Jordan; Elliott, Stephen J; Oh, Eunmi; Jeong, Jonghoon

    2018-04-01

    Mobile phones are used in a variety of situations where environmental noise may interfere with the ability of the near-end user to communicate with the far-end user. To overcome this problem, it might be possible to use active noise control technology to reduce the noise experienced by the near-end user. This paper initially demonstrates that when an active noise control system is used in a practical mobile phone configuration to minimise the noise measured by an error microphone mounted on the mobile phone, the attenuation achieved at the user's ear depends strongly on the position of the source generating the acoustic interference. To help overcome this problem, a remote microphone processing strategy is investigated that estimates the pressure at the user's ear from the pressure measured by the microphone on the mobile phone. Through an experimental implementation, it is demonstrated that this arrangement achieves a significant improvement in the attenuation measured at the ear of the user, compared to the standard active control strategy. The robustness of the active control system to changes in both the interfering sound field and the position of the mobile device relative to the ear of the user is also investigated experimentally.

  16. Active control of aircraft engine inlet noise using compact sound sources and distributed error sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdisso, Ricardo (Inventor); Fuller, Chris R. (Inventor); O'Brien, Walter F. (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Dungan, Mary E. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active noise control system using a compact sound source is effective to reduce aircraft engine duct noise. The fan noise from a turbofan engine is controlled using an adaptive filtered-x LMS algorithm. Single multi channel control systems are used to control the fan blade passage frequency (BPF) tone and the BPF tone and the first harmonic of the BPF tone for a plane wave excitation. A multi channel control system is used to control any spinning mode. The multi channel control system to control both fan tones and a high pressure compressor BPF tone simultaneously. In order to make active control of turbofan inlet noise a viable technology, a compact sound source is employed to generate the control field. This control field sound source consists of an array of identical thin, cylindrically curved panels with an inner radius of curvature corresponding to that of the engine inlet. These panels are flush mounted inside the inlet duct and sealed on all edges to prevent leakage around the panel and to minimize the aerodynamic losses created by the addition of the panels. Each panel is driven by one or more piezoelectric force transducers mounted on the surface of the panel. The response of the panel to excitation is maximized when it is driven at its resonance; therefore, the panel is designed such that its fundamental frequency is near the tone to be canceled, typically 2000-4000 Hz.

  17. Anticipated Effectiveness of Active Noise Control in Propeller Aircraft Interiors as Determined by Sound Quality Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Clemans A.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    2004-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted, using sound quality engineering practices, to determine the subjective effectiveness of hypothetical active noise control systems in a range of propeller aircraft. The two tests differed by the type of judgments made by the subjects: pair comparisons in the first test and numerical category scaling in the second. Although the results of the two tests were in general agreement that the hypothetical active control measures improved the interior noise environments, the pair comparison method appears to be more sensitive to subtle changes in the characteristics of the sounds which are related to passenger preference.

  18. Active Noise Control Using Modified FsLMS and Hybrid PSOFF Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Walia

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Active noise control is an efficient technique for noise cancellation of the system, which has been defined in this paper with the aid of Modified Filtered-s Least Mean Square (MFsLMS algorithm. The Hybrid Particle Swarm Optimization and Firefly (HPSOFF algorithm are used to identify the stability factor of the MFsLMS algorithm. The computational difficulty of the modified algorithm is reduced when compared with the original Filtered-s Least Mean Square (FsLMS algorithm. The noise sources are removed from the signal and it is compared with the existing FsLMS algorithm. The performance of the system is established with the normalized mean square error for two different types of noises. The proposed method has also been compared with the existing algorithms for the same purposes.

  19. Analysis and Optimal Condition of the Rear-Sound-Aided Control Source in Active Noise Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Kreuter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An active noise control scenario of simple ducts is considered. The previously suggested technique of using an single loudspeaker and its rear sound to cancel the upstream sound is further examined and compared to the bidirectional solution in order to give theoretical proof of its advantage. Firstly, a model with a new approach for taking damping effects into account is derived based on the electrical transmission line theory. By comparison with the old model, the new approach is validated, and occurring differences are discussed. Moreover, a numerical application with the consideration of damping is implemented for confirmation. The influence of the rear sound strength on the feedback-path system is investigated, and the optimal condition is determined. Finally, it is proven that the proposed source has an advantage of an extended phase lag and a time delay in the feedback-path system by both frequency-response analysis and numerical calculation of the time response.

  20. A numerically stable, finite memory, fast array recursive least squares algorithm for broadband active noise control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ophem, S.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2016-01-01

    For broadband active noise control applications with a rapidly changing primary path, it is desirable to find algorithms with a rapid convergence, a fast tracking performance, and a low computational cost. Recently, a promising algorithm has been presented, called the fast-array Kalman filter, which

  1. A numerically stable, finite memory, fast array recursive least squares filter for broadband active noise control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ophem, S. van; Berkhoff, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary For broadband active noise control applications with a rapidly changing primary path, it is desirable to find algorithms with a rapid convergence, a fast tracking performance, and a low computational cost. Recently, a promising algorithm has been presented, called the fast-array Kalman

  2. Active Control of Inlet Noise on the JT15D Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jerome P.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Chris R.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the key results obtained by the Vibration and Acoustics Laboratories at Virginia Tech over the year from November 1997 to December 1998 on the Active Noise Control of Turbofan Engines research project funded by NASA Langley Research Center. The concept of implementing active noise control techniques with fuselage-mounted error sensors is investigated both analytically and experimentally. The analytical part of the project involves the continued development of an advanced modeling technique to provide prediction and design guidelines for application of active noise control techniques to large, realistic high bypass engines of the type on which active control methods are expected to be applied. Results from the advanced analytical model are presented that show the effectiveness of the control strategies, and the analytical results presented for fuselage error sensors show good agreement with the experimentally observed results and provide additional insight into the control phenomena. Additional analytical results are presented for active noise control used in conjunction with a wavenumber sensing technique. The experimental work is carried out on a running JT15D turbofan jet engine in a test stand at Virginia Tech. The control strategy used in these tests was the feedforward Filtered-X LMS algorithm. The control inputs were supplied by single and multiple circumferential arrays of acoustic sources equipped with neodymium iron cobalt magnets mounted upstream of the fan. The reference signal was obtained from an inlet mounted eddy current probe. The error signals were obtained from a number of pressure transducers flush-mounted in a simulated fuselage section mounted in the engine test cell. The active control methods are investigated when implemented with the control sources embedded within the acoustically absorptive material on a passively-lined inlet. The experimental results show that the combination of active control techniques with fuselage

  3. Noise Reduction Efforts for Special Operations C-130 Aircraft Using Active Synchrophaser Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hammond, Daryl; McKinley, Richard; Hale, Bill

    1998-01-01

    .... A more complicated approach uses an active noise cancellation (ANC) system, which offers improved performance that can augment passive methods to significantly reduce both internal and external aircraft noise...

  4. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 6; Theoretical Analysis for Coupling of Active Noise Control Actuator Ring Sources to an Annular Duct with Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an analytical model for the coupling of active noise control (ANC) piston-type actuators that are mounted flush to the inner and outer walls of an annular duct to the modes in the duct generated by the actuator motion. The analysis will be used to couple the ANC actuators to the modal analysis propagation computer program for the annular duct, to predict the effects of active suppression of fan-generated engine noise sources. This combined program will then be available to assist in the design or evaluation of ANC systems in fan engine annular exhaust ducts. An analysis has been developed to predict the modes generated in an annular duct due to the coupling of flush-mounted ring actuators on the inner and outer walls of the duct. The analysis has been combined with a previous analysis for the coupling of modes to a cylindrical duct in a FORTRAN computer program to perform the computations. The method includes the effects of uniform mean flow in the duct. The program can be used for design or evaluation purposes for active noise control hardware for turbofan engines. Predictions for some sample cases modeled after the geometry of the NASA Lewis ANC Fan indicate very efficient coupling in both the inlet and exhaust ducts for the m = 6 spinning mode at frequencies where only a single radial mode is cut-on. Radial mode content in higher order cut-off modes at the source plane and the required actuator displacement amplitude to achieve 110 dB SPL levels in the desired mode were predicted. Equivalent cases with and without flow were examined for the cylindrical and annular geometry, and little difference was found for a duct flow Mach number of 0.1. The actuator ring coupling program will be adapted as a subroutine to the cylindrical duct modal analysis and the exhaust duct modal analysis. This will allow the fan source to be defined in terms of characteristic modes at the fan source plane and predict the propagation to the

  5. Active3 noise reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzfuss, J.

    1996-01-01

    Noise reduction is a problem being encountered in a variety of applications, such as environmental noise cancellation, signal recovery and separation. Passive noise reduction is done with the help of absorbers. Active noise reduction includes the transmission of phase inverted signals for the cancellation. This paper is about a threefold active approach to noise reduction. It includes the separation of a combined source, which consists of both a noise and a signal part. With the help of interaction with the source by scanning it and recording its response, modeling as a nonlinear dynamical system is achieved. The analysis includes phase space analysis and global radial basis functions as tools for the prediction used in a subsequent cancellation procedure. Examples are given which include noise reduction of speech. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  6. Active control of time-varying broadband noise and vibrations using a sliding-window Kalman filter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ophem, S.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.; Sas, P.; Moens, D.; Denayer, H.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a multiple-input/multiple-output Kalman filter technique was presented to control time-varying broadband noise and vibrations. By describing the feed-forward broadband active noise control problem in terms of a state estimation problem it was possible to achieve a faster rate of

  7. A rapid prototyping system for broadband multichannel active noise and vibration control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselink, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years the need for active and passive noise reduction methods has increased. This is due to an increase in the ambient noise caused by industrialization and the extended use of power tools. The effects of noise on a person can be quite severe and can cause illness and in severe cased lead

  8. Active Vibration Control for Helicopter Interior Noise Reduction Using Power Minimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, J.; Chevva, K.; Sun, F.; Blanc, A.; Kim, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work performed by United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) for NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) under Contract NNL11AA06C. The objective of this program is to develop technology to reduce helicopter interior noise resulting from multiple gear meshing frequencies. A novel active vibration control approach called Minimum Actuation Power (MAP) is developed. MAP is an optimal control strategy that minimizes the total input power into a structure by monitoring and varying the input power of controlling sources. MAP control was implemented without explicit knowledge of the phasing and magnitude of the excitation sources by driving the real part of the input power from the controlling sources to zero. It is shown that this occurs when the total mechanical input power from the excitation and controlling sources is a minimum. MAP theory is developed for multiple excitation sources with arbitrary relative phasing for single or multiple discrete frequencies and controlled by a single or multiple controlling sources. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of MAP for structural vibration reduction of a realistic rotorcraft interior structure. MAP control resulted in significant average global vibration reduction of a single frequency and multiple frequency excitations with one controlling actuator. Simulations also demonstrate the potential effectiveness of the observed vibration reductions on interior radiated noise.

  9. Active control of multi-modal propagation of tonal noise in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Søren

    1996-01-01

    The active control of tonal noise propagating in ducts at frequencies where many modes are able to propagate is considered. The final objective of the work reported is to cancel the prominent 450-500 Hz blade passing frequency of the rotary suction fans found in chimney stacks of power stations...... laboratory. The study of the full control system, which comprises thirty secondary sources and thirty-two error sensors, has revealed a number of new results, in particular with respect to the positioning of the sources and sensors along the length of the duct. Eventually, a reduction of the radiated power...

  10. Structural sensing of interior sound for active control of noise in structural-acoustic cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagha, Ashok K; Modak, S V

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a method for structural sensing of acoustic potential energy for active control of noise in a structural-acoustic cavity. The sensing strategy aims at global control and works with a fewer number of sensors. It is based on the established concept of radiation modes and hence does not add too many states to the order of the system. Acoustic potential energy is sensed using a combination of a Kalman filter and a frequency weighting filter with the structural response measurements as the inputs. The use of Kalman filter also makes the system robust against measurement noise. The formulation of the strategy is presented using finite element models of the system including that of sensors and actuators so that it can be easily applied to practical systems. The sensing strategy is numerically evaluated in the framework of Linear Quadratic Gaussian based feedback control of interior noise in a rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate with single and multiple pairs of piezoelectric sensor-actuator patches when broadband disturbances act on the plate. The performance is compared with an "acoustic filter" that models the complete transfer function from the structure to the acoustic domain. The sensing performance is also compared with a direct estimation strategy.

  11. Induced Noise Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maidanik, G

    2002-01-01

    The induced noise control parameter is defined in terms of the ratio of the stored energy in a master dynamic system, when it is coupled to an adjunct dynamic system, to that stored energy when the coupling is absent...

  12. Active Structural Acoustic Control of Interior Noise on a Raytheon 1900D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Dan; Cabell, Ran; Sullivan, Brenda; Cline, John

    2000-01-01

    An active structural acoustic control system has been demonstrated on a Raytheon Aircraft Company 1900D turboprop airliner. Both single frequency and multi-frequency control of the blade passage frequency and its harmonics was accomplished. The control algorithm was a variant of the popular filtered-x LMS implemented in the principal component domain. The control system consisted of 21 inertial actuators and 32 microphones. The actuators were mounted to the aircraft's ring frames. The microphones were distributed uniformly throughout the interior at head height, both seated and standing. Actuator locations were selected using a combinatorial search optimization algorithm. The control system achieved a 14 dB noise reduction of the blade passage frequency during single frequency tests. Multi-frequency control of the first 1st, 2nd and 3rd harmonics resulted in 10.2 dB, 3.3 dB and 1.6 dB noise reductions respectively. These results fall short of the predictions which were produced by the optimization algorithm (13.5 dB, 8.6 dB and 6.3 dB). The optimization was based on actuator transfer functions taken on the ground and it is postulated that cabin pressurization at flight altitude was a factor in this discrepancy.

  13. Detection of active noise control on the standard motorcycle exhaust Supra X 125 D using PVC pipe technique form Y

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isranuri, I.; Alfisyahrin; Nasution, A. R.

    2018-02-01

    This detection aims to obtain noise reduction on the supra X 125D motorcycle exhaust by using the Active Noise Control Method. The technique is done using a Y-shaped PVC pipe to be bolted on the exhaust, which then branch Y PVC is placed loudspeaker with impermeable conditions. The function of this loudspeaker is as a secondary noise to counter the primary noise of the sound of exhaust motorcycle Supra X 125D. The sound generator in this study is the ISD 4004 module, which serves to generate noise to counter the source noise. How this ISD 4004 module works is by recording source noise then recording the source noise and then reversed the phase 180° by phase reversing circuit. So that, the noise generated by the sound generator will hit the source noise and encounter or such as addition of two different phase of sound will result in noise reduction when detected at the end of the Y-shaped PVC pipe. Inverted phase reversed using feed-back resistor 1 kΩ and 2 kΩ input resistors, 16V capacitor 2500μf and as amplifier using ICL 7660 and TL 702 CP. Test results on the highest 1000 rpm rotation engine speed on the Z axis of 2 dB, and at the highest 2000 rpm rotation engine speed also occurs on the Z axis of 1.5 dB.

  14. Structural Acoustic Characteristics of Aircraft and Active Control of Interior Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1998-01-01

    The reduction of aircraft cabin sound levels to acceptable values still remains a topic of much research. The use of conventional passive approaches has been extensively studied and implemented. However performance limits of these techniques have been reached. In this project, new techniques for understanding the structural acoustic behavior of aircraft fuselages and the use of this knowledge in developing advanced new control approaches are investigated. A central feature of the project is the Aircraft Fuselage Test Facility at Va Tech which is based around a full scale Cessna Citation III fuselage. The work is divided into two main parts; the first part investigates the use of an inverse technique for identifying dominant fuselage vibrations. The second part studies the development and implementation of active and active-passive techniques for controlling aircraft interior noise.

  15. Filtered-X Affine Projection Algorithms for Active Noise Control Using Volterra Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sicuranza Giovanni L

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the use of adaptive Volterra filters, implemented in the form of multichannel filter banks, as nonlinear active noise controllers. In particular, we discuss the derivation of filtered-X affine projection algorithms for homogeneous quadratic filters. According to the multichannel approach, it is then easy to pass from these algorithms to those of a generic Volterra filter. It is shown in the paper that the AP technique offers better convergence and tracking capabilities than the classical LMS and NLMS algorithms usually applied in nonlinear active noise controllers, with a limited complexity increase. This paper extends in two ways the content of a previous contribution published in Proc. IEEE-EURASIP Workshop on Nonlinear Signal and Image Processing (NSIP '03, Grado, Italy, June 2003. First of all, a general adaptation algorithm valid for any order of affine projections is presented. Secondly, a more complete set of experiments is reported. In particular, the effects of using multichannel filter banks with a reduced number of channels are investigated and relevant results are shown.

  16. Skeletonized inversion of surface wave: Active source versus controlled noise comparison

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing; Hanafy, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a skeletonized inversion method that inverts the S-wave velocity distribution from surface-wave dispersion curves. Instead of attempting to fit every wiggle in the surface waves with predicted data, it only inverts the picked dispersion curve, thereby mitigating the problem of getting stuck in a local minimum. We have applied this method to a synthetic model and seismic field data from Qademah fault, located at the western side of Saudi Arabia. For comparison, we have performed dispersion analysis for an active and controlled noise source seismic data that had some receivers in common with the passive array. The active and passive data show good agreement in the dispersive characteristics. Our results demonstrated that skeletonized inversion can obtain reliable 1D and 2D S-wave velocity models for our geologic setting. A limitation is that we need to build layered initial model to calculate the Jacobian matrix, which is time consuming.

  17. Skeletonized inversion of surface wave: Active source versus controlled noise comparison

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2016-07-14

    We have developed a skeletonized inversion method that inverts the S-wave velocity distribution from surface-wave dispersion curves. Instead of attempting to fit every wiggle in the surface waves with predicted data, it only inverts the picked dispersion curve, thereby mitigating the problem of getting stuck in a local minimum. We have applied this method to a synthetic model and seismic field data from Qademah fault, located at the western side of Saudi Arabia. For comparison, we have performed dispersion analysis for an active and controlled noise source seismic data that had some receivers in common with the passive array. The active and passive data show good agreement in the dispersive characteristics. Our results demonstrated that skeletonized inversion can obtain reliable 1D and 2D S-wave velocity models for our geologic setting. A limitation is that we need to build layered initial model to calculate the Jacobian matrix, which is time consuming.

  18. Vehicle engine sound design based on an active noise control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M. [Siemens VDO Automotive, Auburn Hills, MI (United States)

    2002-07-01

    A study has been carried out to identify the types of vehicle engine sounds that drivers prefer while driving at different locations and under different driving conditions. An active noise control system controlled the sound at the air intake orifice of a vehicle engine's first sixteen orders and half orders. The active noise control system was used to change the engine sound to quiet, harmonic, high harmonic, spectral shaped and growl. Videos were made of the roads traversed, binaural recording of vehicle interior sounds, and vibrations of the vehicle floor pan. Jury tapes were made up for day driving, nighttime driving and driving in the rain during the day for each of the sites. Jurors used paired comparisons to evaluate the vehicle interior sounds while sitting in a vehicle simulator developed by Siemens VDO that replicated videos of the road traversed, binaural recording of the vehicle interior sounds and vibrations of the floor pan and seat. (orig.) [German] Im Rahmen einer Studie wurden Typen von Motorgeraeuschen identifiziert, die von Fahrern unter verschiedenen Fahrbedingungen als angenehm empfunden werden. Ein System zur aktiven Geraeuschbeeinflussung am Ansauglufteinlass im Bereich des Luftfilters modifizierte den Klang des Motors bis zur 16,5ten Motorordnung, und zwar durch Bedaempfung, Verstaerkung und Filterung der Signalfrequenzen. Waehrend der Fahrt wurden Videoaufnahmen der befahrenen Strassen, Stereoaufnahmen der Fahrzeuginnengeraeusche und Aufnahmen der Vibrationsamplituden des Fahrzeugbodens erstellt; dies bei Tag- und Nachtfahrten und bei Tagfahrten im Regen. Zur Beurteilung der aufgezeichneten Geraeusche durch Versuchspersonen wurde ein Fahrzeug-Laborsimulator mit Fahrersitz, Bildschirm, Lautsprecher und mechanischer Erregung der Bodenplatte aufgebaut, um die aufgenommenen Signale moeglichst wirklichkeitsgetreu wiederzugeben. (orig.)

  19. Controlling kilometre-scale interferometric detectors for gravitational wave astronomy: Active phase noise cancellation using EOMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaud, N.; Balembois, L.; Bizouard, M.A.; Brisson, V.; Casanueva, J.; Cavalier, F.; Davier, M.; Frey, V.; Hello, P.; Huet, D.; Leroy, N.; Loriette, V.; Maksimovic, I.; Robinet, F.

    2017-01-01

    The second generation of Gravitational waves detectors are kilometric Michelson interferometers with additional recycling Fabry–Perot cavities on the arms and ​the addition of two more recycling cavities to enhance their sensitivity, with the particularity that all the mirrors are suspended. In order to control them a new technique, based on the use of auxiliary lasers, has been developed to bring the interferometer to its working point, with all the cavities on their resonance, in an adiabatic way. The implementation of this technique in Advanced Virgo is under preparation and the propagation of a stable laser through a 3-km optical fibre is one of the most problematic issues. A new technique of active phase noise cancellation based on the use of Electro Optical Modulators has been developed, and a first prototype has been successfully tested.

  20. Controlling kilometre-scale interferometric detectors for gravitational wave astronomy: Active phase noise cancellation using EOMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaud, N.; Balembois, L.; Bizouard, M.A.; Brisson, V. [LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, Univ. Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); Casanueva, J., E-mail: casanuev@lal.in2p3.fr [LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, Univ. Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); Cavalier, F.; Davier, M.; Frey, V.; Hello, P.; Huet, D.; Leroy, N. [LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, Univ. Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); Loriette, V.; Maksimovic, I. [ESPCI, CNRS, F-75005 Paris (France); Robinet, F. [LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, Univ. Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France)

    2017-02-11

    The second generation of Gravitational waves detectors are kilometric Michelson interferometers with additional recycling Fabry–Perot cavities on the arms and ​the addition of two more recycling cavities to enhance their sensitivity, with the particularity that all the mirrors are suspended. In order to control them a new technique, based on the use of auxiliary lasers, has been developed to bring the interferometer to its working point, with all the cavities on their resonance, in an adiabatic way. The implementation of this technique in Advanced Virgo is under preparation and the propagation of a stable laser through a 3-km optical fibre is one of the most problematic issues. A new technique of active phase noise cancellation based on the use of Electro Optical Modulators has been developed, and a first prototype has been successfully tested.

  1. Controlling kilometre-scale interferometric detectors for gravitational wave astronomy: Active phase noise cancellation using EOMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, N.; Balembois, L.; Bizouard, M. A.; Brisson, V.; Casanueva, J.; Cavalier, F.; Davier, M.; Frey, V.; Hello, P.; Huet, D.; Leroy, N.; Loriette, V.; Maksimovic, I.; Robinet, F.

    2017-02-01

    The second generation of Gravitational waves detectors are kilometric Michelson interferometers with additional recycling Fabry-Perot cavities on the arms and ​the addition of two more recycling cavities to enhance their sensitivity, with the particularity that all the mirrors are suspended. In order to control them a new technique, based on the use of auxiliary lasers, has been developed to bring the interferometer to its working point, with all the cavities on their resonance, in an adiabatic way. The implementation of this technique in Advanced Virgo is under preparation and the propagation of a stable laser through a 3-km optical fibre is one of the most problematic issues. A new technique of active phase noise cancellation based on the use of Electro Optical Modulators has been developed, and a first prototype has been successfully tested.

  2. Low noise control valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    Noise is one of the problems associated with the use of any type of control valve in systems involving the flow of fluids. The advent of OSHA standards has prompted control valve manufacturers to design valves with special trim to lower the sound pressure level to meet these standards. However, these levels are in some cases too high, particularly when a valve must be located in or near an area where people are working at tasks requiring a high degree of concentration. Such locations are found around and near research devices and in laboratory-office areas. This paper describes a type of fluid control device presently being used at PPL as a bypass control valve in deionized water systems and designed to reduce sound pressure levels considerably below OSHA standards. Details of the design and construction of this constant pressure drop variable flow control valve are contained in the text and are shown in photographs and drawings. Test data taken are included

  3. Real-time Kalman filter implementation for active feedforward control of time-varying broadband noise and vibrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ophem, S. van; Berkhoff, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    Tracking behavior and the rate of convergence are critical properties in active noise control applications with time-varying disturbance spectra. As compared to the standard filtered-reference Least Mean Square (LMS) algorithm, improved convergence can be obtained with schemes based on

  4. Root locus analysis and design of the adaptation process in active noise control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei Ardekani, Iman; Abdulla, Waleed H

    2012-10-01

    This paper applies root locus theory to develop a graphical tool for the analysis and design of adaptive active noise control systems. It is shown that the poles of the adaptation process performed in these systems move on typical trajectories in the z-plane as the adaptation step-size varies. Based on this finding, the dominant root of the adaptation process and its trajectory can be determined. The first contribution of this paper is formulating parameters of the adaptation process root locus. The next contribution is introducing a mechanism for modifying the trajectory of the dominant root in the root locus. This mechanism creates a single open loop zero in the original root locus. It is shown that appropriate localization of this zero can cause the dominant root of the locus to be pushed toward the origin, and thereby the adaptation process becomes faster. The validity of the theoretical findings is confirmed in an experimental setup which is implemented using real-time multi-threading and multi-core processing techniques.

  5. Handbook for industrial noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The basic principles of sound, measuring techniques, and instrumentation associated with general purpose noise control are discussed. Means for identifying and characterizing a noise problem so that subsequent work may provide the most efficient and cost effective solution are outlined. A methodology for choosing appropriate noise control materials and the proper implementation of control procedures is detailed. The most significant NASA sponsored contributions to the state of the art development of optimum noise control technologies are described including cases in which aeroacoustics and related research have shed some light on ways of reducing noise generation at its source.

  6. A Model Predictive Algorithm for Active Control of Nonlinear Noise Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Zhi Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an improved nonlinear Active Noise Control (ANC system is achieved by introducing an appropriate secondary source. For ANC system to be successfully implemented, the nonlinearity of the primary path and time delay of the secondary path must be overcome. A nonlinear Model Predictive Control (MPC strategy is introduced to deal with the time delay in the secondary path and the nonlinearity in the primary path of the ANC system. An overall online modeling technique is utilized for online secondary path and primary path estimation. The secondary path is estimated using an adaptive FIR filter, and the primary path is estimated using a Neural Network (NN. The two models are connected in parallel with the two paths. In this system, the mutual disturbances between the operation of the nonlinear ANC controller and modeling of the secondary can be greatly reduced. The coefficients of the adaptive FIR filter and weight vector of NN are adjusted online. Computer simulations are carried out to compare the proposed nonlinear MPC method with the nonlinear Filter-x Least Mean Square (FXLMS algorithm. The results showed that the convergence speed of the proposed nonlinear MPC algorithm is faster than that of nonlinear FXLMS algorithm. For testing the robust performance of the proposed nonlinear ANC system, the sudden changes in the secondary path and primary path of the ANC system are considered. Results indicated that the proposed nonlinear ANC system can rapidly track the sudden changes in the acoustic paths of the nonlinear ANC system, and ensure the adaptive algorithm stable when the nonlinear ANC system is time variable.

  7. Panel Resonance Control and Cavity Control in Double-Panel Structures for Active Noise Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation of panel resonance control and cavity control in a double-panel structure is presented in this paper. The double-panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its low

  8. Active control of noise amplification in the flow over a square leading-edge flat plate utilizing DBD plasma actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadong, HUANG; Benmou, ZHOU

    2018-05-01

    Perturbation is generally considered as the flow noise, and its energy can gain transient growth in the separation bubble. The amplified perturbations may cause unstable Kelvin–Helmohltz vortices which induce the three-dimensional transition. Active control of noise amplification via dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator in the flow over a square leading-edge flat plate is numerically studied. The actuator is installed near the plate leading-edge where the separation bubble is formed. The maximum energy amplification of perturbations is positively correlated with the separation bubble scale which decreases with the increasing control parameters. As the magnitude of noise amplification is reduced, the laminar-turbulent transition is successfully suppressed.

  9. Poultry Plant Noise Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    A demonstration conducted last winter at the Tip Top Poultry Plant intended to show poultry plant managers from all over the U.S. potential solutions to the problem of plant noise. Plastic covers used over sound absorbing materials need to meet cleanability requirements, high- pressure water cleaning and other harsh maintenance procedures peculiar to the poultry processing industry. For the demonstration, Fiber Flex, Inc. manufactured and donated 750 noise panels; Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation donated the fiberglas cores; and the cover material was purchased from Howe and Bainbridge. The Engineering Experiment Station (EES) conducted before and after noise surveys and is evaluating the effect of noise reduction on turnover and productivity in the demonstration plant. EES plans to conduct a noise abatement workshop and update a handbook to help poultry processors with noise problems. EES study and demonstration may be applicable to other food processing plants where similar sanitary constraints exist.

  10. Adjusting phenotypes by noise control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung H Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetically identical cells can show phenotypic variability. This is often caused by stochastic events that originate from randomness in biochemical processes involving in gene expression and other extrinsic cellular processes. From an engineering perspective, there have been efforts focused on theory and experiments to control noise levels by perturbing and replacing gene network components. However, systematic methods for noise control are lacking mainly due to the intractable mathematical structure of noise propagation through reaction networks. Here, we provide a numerical analysis method by quantifying the parametric sensitivity of noise characteristics at the level of the linear noise approximation. Our analysis is readily applicable to various types of noise control and to different types of system; for example, we can orthogonally control the mean and noise levels and can control system dynamics such as noisy oscillations. As an illustration we applied our method to HIV and yeast gene expression systems and metabolic networks. The oscillatory signal control was applied to p53 oscillations from DNA damage. Furthermore, we showed that the efficiency of orthogonal control can be enhanced by applying extrinsic noise and feedback. Our noise control analysis can be applied to any stochastic model belonging to continuous time Markovian systems such as biological and chemical reaction systems, and even computer and social networks. We anticipate the proposed analysis to be a useful tool for designing and controlling synthetic gene networks.

  11. Active Control of Fan Noise-Feasibility Study. Volume 2: Canceling Noise Source-Design of an Acoustic Plate Radiator Using Piezoceramic Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, F. G.; Rajiyah, H.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility of using acoustic plate radiators powered by piezoceramic thin sheets as canceling sources for active control of aircraft engine fan noise is demonstrated. Analytical and numerical models of actuated beams and plates are developed and validated. An optimization study is performed to identify the optimum combination of design parameters that maximizes the plate volume velocity for a given resonance frequency. Fifteen plates with various plate and actuator sizes, thicknesses, and bonding layers were fabricated and tested using results from the optimization study. A maximum equivalent piston displacement of 0.39 mm was achieved with the optimized plate samples tested with only one actuator powered, corresponding to a plate deflection at the center of over 1 millimeter. This is very close to the deflection required for a full size engine application and represents a 160-fold improvement over previous work. Experimental results further show that performance is limited by the critical stress of the piezoceramic actuator and bonding layer rather than by the maximum moment available from the actuator. Design enhancements are described in detail that will lead to a flight-worthy acoustic plate radiator by minimizing actuator tensile stresses and reducing nonlinear effects. Finally, several adaptive tuning methods designed to increase the bandwidth of acoustic plate radiators are analyzed including passive, active, and semi-active approaches. The back chamber pressurization and volume variation methods are investigated experimentally and shown to be simple and effective ways to obtain substantial control over the resonance frequency of a plate radiator. This study shows that piezoceramic-based plate radiators can be a viable acoustic source for active control of aircraft engine fan noise.

  12. Re-Active Passive devices for control of noise transmission through a panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneal, James P.; Giovanardi, Marco; Fuller, Chris R.; Palumbo, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Re-Active Passive devices have been developed to control low-frequency (transmission through a panel. These devices use a combination of active, re-active, and passive technologies packaged into a single unit to control a broad frequency range utilizing the strength of each technology over its best suited frequency range. The Re-Active Passive device uses passive constrained layer damping to cover relatively high-frequency range (>150 Hz), reactive distributed vibration absorber to cover the medium-frequency range (50-200 Hz), and active control for controlling low frequencies (transmission through a panel mounted in the Transmission Loss Test Facility at Virginia Tech. Experimental results are presented for the bare panel, and combinations of passive treatment, reactive treatment, and active control. Results indicate that three Re-Active Passive devices were able to increase the overall broadband (15-1000 Hz) transmission loss by 9.4 dB. These three devices added a total of 285 g to the panel mass of 6.0 kg, or approximately 5%, not including control electronics.

  13. Noise Reduction Efforts for Special Operations C-130 Aircraft Using Active Synchrophaser Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hammond, Daryl; McKinley, Richard; Hale, Bill

    1998-01-01

    Aircraft noise often inhibits mission effectiveness. As a result, flight crews, ground maintenance personnel, and passengers suffer degraded voice communication, impaired performance, increased fatigue, and hearing loss...

  14. Virtual sensors for active noise control in acoustic-structural coupled enclosures using structural sensing: robust virtual sensor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Dunant; Cheng, Li; Su, Zhongqing

    2011-03-01

    The work was aimed to develop a robust virtual sensing design methodology for sensing and active control applications of vibro-acoustic systems. The proposed virtual sensor was designed to estimate a broadband acoustic interior sound pressure using structural sensors, with robustness against certain dynamic uncertainties occurring in an acoustic-structural coupled enclosure. A convex combination of Kalman sub-filters was used during the design, accommodating different sets of perturbed dynamic model of the vibro-acoustic enclosure. A minimax optimization problem was set up to determine an optimal convex combination of Kalman sub-filters, ensuring an optimal worst-case virtual sensing performance. The virtual sensing and active noise control performance was numerically investigated on a rectangular panel-cavity system. It was demonstrated that the proposed virtual sensor could accurately estimate the interior sound pressure, particularly the one dominated by cavity-controlled modes, by using a structural sensor. With such a virtual sensing technique, effective active noise control performance was also obtained even for the worst-case dynamics. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  15. Re-active Passive (RAP) Devices for Control of Noise Transmission through a Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneal, James P.; Giovanardi, Marco; Fuller, Chris R.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    Re-Active Passive (RAP) devices have been developed to control low frequency (transmission through a panel. These devices use a combination of active, re-active, and passive technologies packaged into a single unit to control a broad frequency range utilizing the strength of each technology over its best suited frequency range. The RAP device uses passive constrained layer damping to cover the relatively high frequency range (>200 Hz), reactive distributed vibration absorber) to cover the medium frequency range (75 to 250 Hz), and active control for controlling low frequencies (transmission through a panel mounted in a transmission loss test facility. Experimental results are presented for the bare panel, and combinations of passive treatment, reactive treatment, and active control. Results indicate that three RAP devices were able to increase the overall broadband (15-1000 Hz) transmission loss by 9.4 dB. These three devices added a total of 285 grams to the panel mass of 6.0 kg, or approximately 5%, not including control electronics.

  16. Active Control of Low-Speed Fan Tonal Noise Using Actuators Mounted in Stator Vanes: Part III Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Remington, Paul J.; Walker, Bruce E.

    2003-01-01

    A test program to demonstrate simplification of Active Noise Control (ANC) systems relative to standard techniques was performed on the NASA Glenn Active Noise Control Fan from May through September 2001. The target mode was the m = 2 circumferential mode generated by the rotor-stator interaction at 2BPF. Seven radials (combined inlet and exhaust) were present at this condition. Several different error-sensing strategies were implemented. Integration of the error-sensors with passive treatment was investigated. These were: (i) an in-duct linear axial array, (ii) an induct steering array, (iii) a pylon-mounted array, and (iv) a near-field boom array. The effect of incorporating passive treatment was investigated as well as reducing the actuator count. These simplified systems were compared to a fully ANC specified system. Modal data acquired using the Rotating Rake are presented for a range of corrected fan rpm. Simplified control has been demonstrated to be possible but requires a well-known and dominant mode signature. The documented results here in are part III of a three-part series of reports with the same base title. Part I and II document the control system and error-sensing design and implementation.

  17. Reduction of broadband noise in vehicles by means of active feedforward control

    OpenAIRE

    Misol, Malte; Haase, Thomas; Monner, Hans Peter

    2015-01-01

    Broadband noise in a vehicle’s interior is an important issue because of its negative impact on the passengersʼ comfort and wellbeing. The perception of this broadband noise can increase due to the use of new, less noisy drive concepts and the accompanying loss of masking noise compo-nents. This contribution focuses on the reduction of the transmission of external broadband distur-bances through lightweight panel structures (e.g. a car’s roof liner or an aircraft sidewall panel) by means of a...

  18. Active structural acoustic control of noise transmission through double panel systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneal, James P.; Fuller, Chris R.

    1995-04-01

    A preliminary parametric study of active control of sound transmission through double panel systems has been experimentally performed. The technique used is the active structural acoustic control (ASAC) approach where control inputs, in the form of piezoelectric actuators, were applied to the structure while the radiated pressure field was minimized. Results indicate the application of control inputs to the radiating panel resulted in greater transmission loss due to its direct effect on the nature of the structural-acoustic coupling between the radiating panel and the receiving chamber. Increased control performance was seen in a double panel system consisting of a stiffer radiating panel with a lower modal density. As expected, more effective control of a radiating panel excited on-resonance is achieved over one excited off-resonance. In general, the results validate the ASAC approach for double panel systems and demonstrate that it is possible to take advantage of double panel behavior to enhance control performance, although it is clear that further research must be done to understand the physics involved.

  19. First investigation on the applicability of an active noise control system on a tracked tractor without cab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Pochi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In last years, several research teams pointed their attention on the application of active noise control systems (ANC inside the cabs of agricultural tractor, with the purpose of reducing the driver exposition to noise, that is only partially controlled by the frame of the cab. This paper reports the results of a first experience that aimed at verifying the applicability of an ANC on a medium-high power, tracked tractor without cab. The tested tractor was a Fiat Allis 150 A, equipped with rear power take off, used in the execution of deep primary tillage in compact soils. It is a tracked tractor without cab, with maximum power of 108.8 kW at 1840 min–1 of the engine. The ANC consists of a control unit box based on a digital signal processor (DPS, two microphones, two speakers and a power amplifier. The instrumentation used in noise data collecting and processing consisted of a multichannel signal analyzer (Sinus - Soundbook, a ½” microphone capsule and an acoustic calibrator, both Bruel & Kjaer. The study aimed at evaluating the behaviour of the ANC by means of tests carried out under repeatable conditions, characterized by pre-defined engine speed values. Three replications have been made for each engine speed. The sampling time was 30 s. Two series of tests were performed in order to compare the results observed with the ANC on and off. The engine speed adopted in the study ranged from 600 min– 1, up to 2000 min–1 (maximum speed with steps of 100 min–1. The ANC proved to be effective in the interval of speed between 1400 and 1700 min–1, where the samplings have been intensified, adopting steps of 50 min–1. In such an interval, the attenuation observed with the ANC system on appeared evident both as weighed A sound pressure level (from 1.29 up to 2.46 dB(A and linear (from 4.54 up to 8.53 dB. The best performance has been observed at the engine speed of 1550 min–1, with attenuations, respectively of 2.46 dB(A and 7.67 d

  20. Part II - Effects of Cross-Sectional Partitioning on Active Noise Control in Round Ducts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Slagley, Jeremy M; Guffey, Steven E

    2006-01-01

    .... Higher order mode waves are much more difficult to control Basic acoustic principles dictate that the cut-on frequency at which higher order modes will first begin to eclipse simple plane waves...

  1. An Autonomous Sensor System Architecture for Active Flow and Noise Control Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M, Jr.; Culliton, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Multi-channel sensor fusion represents a powerful technique to simply and efficiently extract information from complex phenomena. While the technique has traditionally been used for military target tracking and situational awareness, a study has been successfully completed that demonstrates that sensor fusion can be applied equally well to aerodynamic applications. A prototype autonomous hardware processor was successfully designed and used to detect in real-time the two-dimensional flow reattachment location generated by a simple separated-flow wind tunnel model. The success of this demonstration illustrates the feasibility of using autonomous sensor processing architectures to enhance flow control feedback signal generation.

  2. Controlled exposure to diesel exhaust and traffic noise - Effects on oxidative stress and activation in mononuclear blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Jette Gjerke; Møller, Peter; Jantzen, Kim

    2015-01-01

    exhaust (DE) at 276μg/m(3) from a passenger car or filtered air, with co-exposure to traffic noise at 48 or 75dB(A). Gene expression markers of inflammation, (interleukin-8 and tumor necrosis factor), oxidative stress (heme oxygenase (decycling-1)) and DNA repair (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1)) were...... molecules in leukocyte subtypes. CONCLUSION: 3-h exposure to DE caused no genotoxicity, oxidative stress or inflammation in PBMCs, whereas exposure to noise might cause oxidatively damaged DNA.......Particulate air pollution increases risk of cancer and cardiopulmonary disease, partly through oxidative stress. Traffic-related noise increases risk of cardiovascular disease and may cause oxidative stress. In this controlled random sequence study, 18 healthy subjects were exposed for 3h to diesel...

  3. Fuselage panel noise attenuation by piezoelectric switching control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makihara, Kanjuro; Onoda, Junjiro; Minesugi, Kenji; Miyakawa, Takeya

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a problem that we encountered in our noise attenuation project and our solution for it. We intend to attenuate low-frequency noise that transmits through aircraft fuselage panels. Our method of noise attenuation is implemented with a piezoelectric semi-active system having a selective switch instead of an active energy-supply system. The semi-active controller is based on the predicted sound pressure distribution obtained from acoustic emission analysis. Experiments and numerical simulations demonstrate that the semi-active method attenuates acoustic levels of not only the simple monochromatic noise but also of broadband noise. We reveal that tuning the electrical parameters in the circuit is the key to effective noise attenuation, to overcome the acoustic excitation problem due to sharp switching actions, as well as to control chattering problems. The results obtained from this investigation provide meaningful insights into designing noise attenuation systems for comfortable aircraft cabin environments

  4. Genetic noise control via protein oligomerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghim, C; Almaas, E

    2008-06-12

    Gene expression in a cell entails random reaction events occurring over disparate time scales. Thus, molecular noise that often results in phenotypic and population-dynamic consequences sets a fundamental limit to biochemical signaling. While there have been numerous studies correlating the architecture of cellular reaction networks with noise tolerance, only a limited effort has been made to understand the dynamical role of protein-protein associations. We have developed a fully stochastic model for the positive feedback control of a single gene, as well as a pair of genes (toggle switch), integrating quantitative results from previous in vivo and in vitro studies. In particular, we explicitly account for the fast protein binding-unbinding kinetics, RNA polymerases, and the promoter/operator sequences of DNA. We find that the overall noise-level is reduced and the frequency content of the noise is dramatically shifted to the physiologically irrelevant high-frequency regime in the presence of protein dimerization. This is independent of the choice of monomer or dimer as transcription factor and persists throughout the multiple model topologies considered. For the toggle switch, we additionally find that the presence of a protein dimer, either homodimer or heterodimer, may significantly reduce its intrinsic switching rate. Hence, the dimer promotes the robust function of bistable switches by preventing the uninduced (induced) state from randomly being induced (uninduced). The specific binding between regulatory proteins provides a buffer that may prevent the propagation of fluctuations in genetic activity. The capacity of the buffer is a non-monotonic function of association-dissociation rates. Since the protein oligomerization per se does not require extra protein components to be expressed, it provides a basis for the rapid control of intrinsic or extrinsic noise. The stabilization of phenotypically important toggle switches, and nested positive feedback loops in

  5. A Noise-Insensitive Semi-Active Air Suspension for Heavy-Duty Vehicles with an Integrated Fuzzy-Wheelbase Preview Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengchao Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Semi-active air suspension is increasingly used on heavy-duty vehicles due to its capabilities of consuming less power and low cost and providing better ride quality. In this study, a new low cost but effective approach, fuzzy-wheelbase preview controller with wavelet denoising filter (FPW, is developed for semi-active air suspension system. A semi-active suspension system with a rolling lobe air spring is firstly modeled and a novel front axle vertical acceleration-based road prediction model is constructed. By adopting a sensor on the front axle, the road prediction model can predict more reliable road information for the rear wheel. After filtering useless signal noise, the proposed FPW can generate a noise-insensitive control damping force. Simulation results show that the ride quality, the road holding, the handling capability, the road friendliness, and the comprehensive performance of the semi-active air suspension with FPW outperform those with the traditional active suspension with PID-wheelbase preview controller (APP. It can also be seen that, with the addition of the wavelet filter, the impact of sensor noise on the suspension performance can be minimized.

  6. Virtual sensors for active noise control in acoustic-structural coupled enclosures using structural sensing: part II--Optimization of structural sensor placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Dunant; Cheng, Li; Su, Zhongqing

    2011-04-01

    The work proposed an optimization approach for structural sensor placement to improve the performance of vibro-acoustic virtual sensor for active noise control applications. The vibro-acoustic virtual sensor was designed to estimate the interior sound pressure of an acoustic-structural coupled enclosure using structural sensors. A spectral-spatial performance metric was proposed, which was used to quantify the averaged structural sensor output energy of a vibro-acoustic system excited by a spatially varying point source. It was shown that (i) the overall virtual sensing error energy was contributed additively by the modal virtual sensing error and the measurement noise energy; (ii) each of the modal virtual sensing error system was contributed by both the modal observability levels for the structural sensing and the target acoustic virtual sensing; and further (iii) the strength of each modal observability level was influenced by the modal coupling and resonance frequencies of the associated uncoupled structural/cavity modes. An optimal design of structural sensor placement was proposed to achieve sufficiently high modal observability levels for certain important panel- and cavity-controlled modes. Numerical analysis on a panel-cavity system demonstrated the importance of structural sensor placement on virtual sensing and active noise control performance, particularly for cavity-controlled modes.

  7. Helicopter internal noise control: Three case histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, B. D.; Cox, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    Case histories are described in which measurable improvements in the cabin noise environments of the Bell 214B, 206B, and 222 were realized. These case histories trace the noise control efforts followed in each vehicle. Among the design approaches considered, the addition of a fluid pulsation damper in a hydraulic system and the installation of elastomeric engine mounts are highlighted. It is concluded that substantial weight savings result when the major interior noise sources are controlled by design, both in altering the noise producing mechanism and interrupting the sound transmission paths.

  8. Genetic noise control via protein oligomerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almaas Eivind

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression in a cell entails random reaction events occurring over disparate time scales. Thus, molecular noise that often results in phenotypic and population-dynamic consequences sets a fundamental limit to biochemical signaling. While there have been numerous studies correlating the architecture of cellular reaction networks with noise tolerance, only a limited effort has been made to understand the dynamic role of protein-protein interactions. Results We have developed a fully stochastic model for the positive feedback control of a single gene, as well as a pair of genes (toggle switch, integrating quantitative results from previous in vivo and in vitro studies. In particular, we explicitly account for the fast binding-unbinding kinetics among proteins, RNA polymerases, and the promoter/operator sequences of DNA. We find that the overall noise-level is reduced and the frequency content of the noise is dramatically shifted to the physiologically irrelevant high-frequency regime in the presence of protein dimerization. This is independent of the choice of monomer or dimer as transcription factor and persists throughout the multiple model topologies considered. For the toggle switch, we additionally find that the presence of a protein dimer, either homodimer or heterodimer, may significantly reduce its random switching rate. Hence, the dimer promotes the robust function of bistable switches by preventing the uninduced (induced state from randomly being induced (uninduced. Conclusion The specific binding between regulatory proteins provides a buffer that may prevent the propagation of fluctuations in genetic activity. The capacity of the buffer is a non-monotonic function of association-dissociation rates. Since the protein oligomerization per se does not require extra protein components to be expressed, it provides a basis for the rapid control of intrinsic or extrinsic noise. The stabilization of regulatory circuits

  9. Active microphonic noise cancellation in radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    A new adaptive filtering technique to reduce microphonic noise in radiation detectors is presented. The technique is based on system identification that actively cancels the microphonic noise. A sensor is used to measures mechanical disturbances that cause vibration on the detector assembly, and the digital adaptive filtering estimates the impact of these disturbances on the microphonic noise. The noise then can be subtracted from the actual detector measurement. In this paper the technique is presented and simulations are used to support this approach. -- Highlights: •A sensor is used to measures mechanical disturbances that cause vibration on the detector assembly. •Digital adaptive filtering estimates the impact of these disturbances on the microphonic noise. •The noise is then subtracted from the actual detector measurement. •We use simulations to demonstrate the performance of this approach. •After cancellation, we recover most of the original energy resolution

  10. Adaptive Active Noise Suppression Using Multiple Model Switching Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanzhen Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Active noise suppression for applications where the system response varies with time is a difficult problem. The computation burden for the existing control algorithms with online identification is heavy and easy to cause control system instability. A new active noise control algorithm is proposed in this paper by employing multiple model switching strategy for secondary path varying. The computation is significantly reduced. Firstly, a noise control system modeling method is proposed for duct-like applications. Then a multiple model adaptive control algorithm is proposed with a new multiple model switching strategy based on filter-u least mean square (FULMS algorithm. Finally, the proposed algorithm was implemented on Texas Instruments digital signal processor (DSP TMS320F28335 and real time experiments were done to test the proposed algorithm and FULMS algorithm with online identification. Experimental verification tests show that the proposed algorithm is effective with good noise suppression performance.

  11. A generalized leaky FxLMS algorithm for tuning the waterbed effect of feedback active noise control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lifu; Qiu, Xiaojun; Guo, Yecai

    2018-06-01

    To tune the noise amplification in the feedback system caused by the waterbed effect effectively, an adaptive algorithm is proposed in this paper by replacing the scalar leaky factor of the leaky FxLMS algorithm with a real symmetric Toeplitz matrix. The elements in the matrix are calculated explicitly according to the noise amplification constraints, which are defined based on a simple but efficient method. Simulations in an ANC headphone application demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can adjust the frequency band of noise amplification more effectively than the FxLMS algorithm and the leaky FxLMS algorithm.

  12. Traffic noise control of a city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.; Khan, J.A.; Lakhani, A.H.; Hyder, F.G.; Shamsuddin, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Long exposure to noise due to traffic affects our health and comfort. A noise level up to 45 dB is acceptable for the buildings in the city. A traffic noise study was conducted in Karachi at places of high traffic flow. The noise level was between 75-85 dB. Residential and commercial buildings had sound level up to 79 dB. Reducing vehicle noise by using proper muffler and acoustic treatment should first control traffic noise. Then noise can be reduced by 10-15 dB by constructing barriers of wood or concrete along roadside. Barrier height for sound attenuation can be found from Fresnel Number. The barrier reduces noise better if width at the top is increased and an inward bend of 60 degree is placed at the top. Where feasible a 4-5 meter high concrete barrier is recommended otherwise the nearby buildings from the road should be insulated and acoustically treated. (author)

  13. An analytical and experimental investigation of active structural acoustic control of noise transmission through double panel systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneal, James P.; Fuller, Chris R.

    2004-05-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation of active control of sound transmission through double panel systems has been performed. The technique used was active structural acoustic control (ASAC) where the control inputs, in the form of piezoelectric actuators, were applied to the structure while the radiating pressure field was minimized. Results verify earlier experimental investigations and indicate the application of control inputs to the radiating panel of the double panel system resulted in greater transmission loss (TL) due to its direct effect on the nature of the structural-acoustic (or radiation) coupling between the radiating panel and the receiving acoustic space. Increased control performance was seen in a double panel system consisting of a stiffer radiating panel due to its lower modal density and also as a result of better impedance matching between the piezoelectric actuator and the radiating plate. In general the results validate the ASAC approach for double panel systems, demonstrating that it is possible to take advantage of double panel system passive behavior to enhance control performance, and provide design guidelines.

  14. A Tunable Low Noise Active Bandpass Filter Using a Noise Canceling Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Soltani, N.

    2016-01-01

    A monolithic tunable low noise active bandpass filter is presented in this study. Biasing voltages can control the center frequency and quality factor. By keeping the gain constant, the center frequency shift is 300 MHz. The quality factor can range from 90 to 290 at the center frequency. By using a noise cancelling circuit, noise is kept lower than 2.8 dB. The proposed filter is designed using MMIC technology with a center frequency of 2.4 GHz and a power consumption of 180 mW. ED02AH techno...

  15. A Tunable Low Noise Active Bandpass Filter Using a Noise Canceling Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Soltani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A monolithic tunable low noise active bandpass filter is presented in this study. Biasing voltages can control the center frequency and quality factor. By keeping the gain constant, the center frequency shift is 300 MHz. The quality factor can range from 90 to 290 at the center frequency. By using a noise cancelling circuit, noise is kept lower than 2.8 dB. The proposed filter is designed using MMIC technology with a center frequency of 2.4 GHz and a power consumption of 180 mW. ED02AH technology is used to simulate the circuit elements.

  16. Active noise cancellation in hearing devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed is a hearing device system comprising at least one hearing aid circuitry and at least one active noise cancellation unit, the at least one hearing aid circuitry comprises at least one input transducer adapted to convert a first audio signal to an electric audio signal; a signal processor...... connected to the at least one input transducer and adapted to process said electric audio signal by at least partially correcting for a hearing loss of a user; an output transducer adapted to generate from at least said processed electric audio signal a sound pressure in an ear canal of the user, whereby...... the generated sound pressure is at least partially corrected for the hearing loss of the user; ; the at least one active noise cancellation unit being adapted to provide an active noise cancellation signal adapted to perform active noise cancellation of an acoustical signal entering the ear canal in addition...

  17. Retrofitting reciprocating compressors for noise control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, L.; Qualfe, R.

    1992-01-01

    The Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board recently enacted their noise control directive ID 88-1. The effects of this regulation on the operation of an oil and gas facility are discussed, and a specific case history is presented to provide a disciplined strategy for noise attenuation retrofits. An investigation was carried out into sound sources at a reciprocating compressor gas plant, revealing several sound sources: engine exhaust stacks, engine exhaust silencer shells, direct-drive fan cooler inlets, direct drive fan cooler outlets, aerial cooler inlets and aerial cooler outlets. Details are presented of the investigative techniques and order-ranking of sources by decibel level. When controlling engine exhaust noise, silencers or mufflers are the preferred treatment. Choice of type (reactive or absorptive) and specification of acoustical performance of a silencer are discussed. The gas plant achieved noise reductions of 6-13 dB, measured at affected residences, through the use of engine exhaust silencers. 4 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Noise control of radiological monitoring equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubick, R.D.; Stevens, W.W.; Burke, L.L.

    1998-01-01

    Although vacuum pumps on continuous air monitors (CAMs) do not produce noise levels above regulatory limits, engineering controls were used to establish a safer work environment. Operations performed in areas where CAMs are located are highly specialized and require precision work when handling nuclear materials, heavy metals, and inert gases. Traditional methods for controlling noise such as enclosing or isolating the source and the use of personal protection equipment were evaluated. An innovative solution was found by retrofitting CAMs with air powered multistage ejectors pumps. By allowing the air to expand in several chambers to create a vacuum, one can eliminate the noise hazard altogether. In facilities with adequate pressurized air, use of these improved ejector pumps may be a cost-effective replacement for noisy vacuum pumps. A workplace designed or engineered with noise levels as low as possible or as close to background adds to increased concentration, attention to detail, and increased production

  19. Measurement and control of occupational noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elammari, Muftah Faraj

    2007-01-01

    High level of environmental and occupational noise remain a problem all over the world. As problems and complaints increased dramatically by the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries focusing on the problem was intensified. In this thesis occupational noise levels at different places were measured and compared with the international permissible levels using the integrating sound level meter (Quest 2800). The calibration of the instrument was carried out before and after each measurement using the acoustic calibrator (Quest CA-12B calibrator). The method which was followed was measuring the sound pressure level of the different noise sources over a broad frequency band covering the audible frequency range using the (octave band filter, model OB-100), disregrading variation with time. Since the human ear is most sensitive in the 2-5 khz range of frequencies and least sensitive at extremely high and low frequencies the instrument was adjusted on the A weighting net work which varies with frequencies in a very similar way as that of the human ear. From the obtained results, some noise levels which were recorded were within the permissible levels i.e. below 90 dba and some noise levels were higher than the permissible limit as in janzour textile factory (95 dba), The welding workshop (120 dba), Benghazi Macaroni factory (100 dba), and near the air blowers at Zletin cement factory, Benghazi cement factory (97-10-dba) in these cases suggestions were made to minimize the problem. Concerning the noise control, four methods of noise control were tested, these methods were: reducing noise by sound absorbing material at Sirt local broadcasting radio, reducing noise by keeping a distance from the noise source, at the Boilers hall at REWDC, reducing noise by enclosures, at the compressors room at Zletin cement factory, and finally reducing noise by performing regular maintenance at Garabolli photo development centre. The percentage of noise reduction was 21%, 12

  20. Noise reduction in optically controlled quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijun; Slattery, Oliver; Tang, Xiao

    2018-05-01

    Quantum memory is an essential tool for quantum communications systems and quantum computers. An important category of quantum memory, called optically controlled quantum memory, uses a strong classical beam to control the storage and re-emission of a single-photon signal through an atomic ensemble. In this type of memory, the residual light from the strong classical control beam can cause severe noise and degrade the system performance significantly. Efficiently suppressing this noise is a requirement for the successful implementation of optically controlled quantum memories. In this paper, we briefly introduce the latest and most common approaches to quantum memory and review the various noise-reduction techniques used in implementing them.

  1. Evaluation of the Performance of Feedforward and Recurrent Neural Networks in Active Cancellation of Sound Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrshad Salmasi; Homayoun Mahdavi-Nasab

    2012-01-01

    Active noise control is based on the destructive interference between the primary noise and generated noise from the secondary source. An antinoise of equal amplitude and opposite phase is generated and combined with the primary noise. In this paper, performance of the neural networks is evaluated in active cancellation of sound noise. For this reason, feedforward and recurrent neural networks are designed and trained. After training, performance of the feedforwrad and recurrent networks in n...

  2. Optimization of actuator arrays for aircraft interior noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, R. H.; Lester, H. C.; Mathur, G. P.; Tran, B. N.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical procedure for grouping actuators in order to reduce the number of degrees of freedom in an active noise control system is evaluated using experimental data. Piezoceramic actuators for reducing aircraft interior noise are arranged into groups using a nonlinear optimization routine and clustering algorithm. An actuator group is created when two or more actuators are driven with the same control input. This procedure is suitable for active control applications where actuators are already mounted on a structure. The feasibility of this technique is demonstrated using measured data from the aft cabin of a Douglas DC-9 fuselage. The measured data include transfer functions between 34 piezoceramic actuators and 29 interior microphones and microphone responses due to the primary noise produced by external speakers. Control inputs for the grouped actuators were calculated so that a cost function, defined as a quadratic pressure term and a penalty term, was a minimum. The measured transfer functions and microphone responses are checked by comparing calculated noise reductions with measured noise reductions for four frequencies. The grouping procedure is then used to determine actuator groups that improve overall interior noise reductions by 5.3 to 15 dB, compared to the baseline experimental configuration.

  3. Noise-control needs in the developing energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keast, D.N.

    1978-03-01

    The noise characteristics of existing energy conversion technologies, e.g., from obtaining and processing fossil fuels to power plants operations, and of developing energy technologies (wind, geothermal sources, solar energy or fusion systems) are discussed in terms of the effects of noise on humans, animals, structures, and equipment and methods for noise control. Regulations for noise control are described. Recommendations are made for further research on noise control and noise effects. (LCL)

  4. The Traffic Noise Index: A Method of Controlling Noise Nuisance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, F. J.; Scholes, W. E.

    This building research survey is an analysis of the social nuisance caused by urban motor ways and their noise. The Traffic Noise Index is used to indicate traffic noises and their effects on architectural designs and planning, while suggesting the need for more and better window insulation and acoustical barriers. Overall concern is for--(1)…

  5. NOISE CONTROL OF VEHICLE DRIVE SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Gabbert

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overall simulation approach to control the noise emission of car engines at a very early stage of the design process where no real prototypes are available. The suggested approach combines different physical models and couples different software tools such as multi-body analysis, fluid dynamics, structural mechanics, magneto-electrodynamics, thermodynamics, acoustics and control as well. The general overall simulation methodology is presented first. Then, this methodology is applied to a combustion engine in order to improve its acoustical behavior by passive means, such as changing the stiffness and the use of damping materials to build acoustic and thermal encapsulations. The active control by applying piezoelectric patch actuators at the oil sump as the noisiest part of the engine is discussed as well. The sound emission is evaluated by hearing tests and a mathematical prediction model of the human perception. Finally, it is shown that the presented approach can be extended to electric engines, which is demonstrated at a newly developed electric wheel hub motor.

  6. Active control of flow noise sources in turbulent boundary layer on a flat-plate using piezoelectric bimorph film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Woo Seog; Lee, Seung Bae; Shin, Dong Shin; Na, Yang

    2006-01-01

    The piezoelectric bimorph film, which, as an actuator, can generate more effective displacement than the usual PVDF film, is used to control the turbulent boundary-layer flow. The change of wall pressures inside the turbulent boundary layer is observed by using the multi-channel microphone array flush-mounted on the surface when actuation at the non-dimensional frequency f b + =0.008 and 0.028 is applied to the turbulent boundary layer. The wall pressure characteristics by the actuation to produce local displacement are more dominantly influenced by the size of the actuator module than the actuation frequency. The movement of large-scale turbulent structures to the upper layer is found to be the main mechanism of the reduction in the wall-pressure energy spectrum when the 700ν/u τ -long bimorph film is periodically actuated at the non-dimensional frequency f b + =0.008 and 0.028. The bimorph actuator is triggered with the time delay for the active forcing at a single frequency when a 1/8' pressure-type, pin-holed microphone sensor detects the large-amplitude pressure event by the turbulent spot. The wall-pressure energy in the late-transitional boundary layer is partially reduced near the convection wavenumber by the open-loop control based on the large amplitude event

  7. On spatial spillover in feedforward and feedback noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Antai; Bernstein, Dennis

    2017-03-01

    Active feedback noise control for rejecting broadband disturbances must contend with the Bode integral constraint, which implies that suppression over some frequency range gives rise to amplification over another range at the performance microphone. This is called spectral spillover. The present paper deals with spatial spillover, which refers to the amplification of noise at locations where no microphone is located. A spatial spillover function is defined, which is valid for both feedforward and feedback control with scalar and vector control inputs. This function is numerically analyzed and measured experimentally. Obstructions are introduced in the acoustic space to investigate their effect on spatial spillover.

  8. Noise Pollution Control System in the Hospital Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa Gallo, LM; Olivera, JM

    2016-04-01

    Problems related to environmental noise are not a new subject, but they became a major issue to solve because of the increasing, in complexity and intensity, of human activities due technological advances. Numerous international studies had dealt with the exposure of critical patients to noisy environment such as the Neonatal Intensive Care Units; their results show that there are difficulties in the organization in the developing brain, it can damage the delicate auditory structures and can cause biorhythm disorders, specially in preterm infants. The objective of this paper is to present the development and implementation of a control system that includes technical-management-training aspects to regulate the levels of specific noise sources in the neonatal hospitalization environment. For this purpose, there were applied different tools like: observations, surveys, procedures, an electronic control device and a training program for a Neonatal Service Unit. As a result, all noise sources were identified -some of them are eliminable-; all the service stable staff categories participated voluntarily; environmental noise measurements yielded values between 62.5 and 64.6 dBA and maximum were between 86.1 and 89.7 dBA; it was designed and installed a noise control device and the staff is being trained in noise reduction best practices.

  9. Noise Pollution Control System in the Hospital Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa Gallo, LM; Olivera, JM

    2016-01-01

    Problems related to environmental noise are not a new subject, but they became a major issue to solve because of the increasing, in complexity and intensity, of human activities due technological advances. Numerous international studies had dealt with the exposure of critical patients to noisy environment such as the Neonatal Intensive Care Units; their results show that there are difficulties in the organization in the developing brain, it can damage the delicate auditory structures and can cause biorhythm disorders, specially in preterm infants. The objective of this paper is to present the development and implementation of a control system that includes technical-management-training aspects to regulate the levels of specific noise sources in the neonatal hospitalization environment. For this purpose, there were applied different tools like: observations, surveys, procedures, an electronic control device and a training program for a Neonatal Service Unit. As a result, all noise sources were identified -some of them are eliminable-; all the service stable staff categories participated voluntarily; environmental noise measurements yielded values between 62.5 and 64.6 dBA and maximum were between 86.1 and 89.7 dBA; it was designed and installed a noise control device and the staff is being trained in noise reduction best practices. (paper)

  10. Structural Acoustic Prediction and Interior Noise Control Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, G. P.; Chin, C. L.; Simpson, M. A.; Lee, J. T.; Palumbo, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report documents the results of Task 14, "Structural Acoustic Prediction and Interior Noise Control Technology". The task was to evaluate the performance of tuned foam elements (termed Smart Foam) both analytically and experimentally. Results taken from a three-dimensional finite element model of an active, tuned foam element are presented. Measurements of sound absorption and sound transmission loss were taken using the model. These results agree well with published data. Experimental performance data were taken in Boeing's Interior Noise Test Facility where 12 smart foam elements were applied to a 757 sidewall. Several configurations were tested. Noise reductions of 5-10 dB were achieved over the 200-800 Hz bandwidth of the controller. Accelerometers mounted on the panel provided a good reference for the controller. Configurations with far-field error microphones outperformed near-field cases.

  11. Vibration noise control in laser satellite communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksonov, Avigdor; Shlomi, Arnon; Kopeika, Norman S.

    2001-08-01

    Laser satellite communication has become especially attractive in recent years. Because the laser beam width is narrow than in the RF or microwave range, the transmitted optical power may be significantly reduced. This leads to development of miniature communication systems with extremely low power consumption. On the other hand, the laser communication channel is very sensitive to vibrations of the optical platform. These vibrations cause angular noise in laser beam pointing, comparable to the laser beam width. As result, as significant portion of the optical power between transmitter and receiver is lost and the bit error rate is increased. Consequently, vibration noise control is a critical problem in laser satellite communication. The direction of the laser beam is corrected with a fast steering mirror (FSM). In this paper are presented two approaches for the FSM control. One is the feedback control that uses an LQG algorithm. The second is the direct feed- forward control when vibration noise is measured by three orthogonal accelerometers and drives directly the F SM. The performances of each approach are evaluated using MATLAB simulations.

  12. Research on the application of active sound barriers for the transformer noise abatement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sound barriers are a type of measure most commonly used in the noise abatement of transformers. In the noise abatement project of substations, the design of sound barriers is restrained by the portal frames which are used to hold up outgoing lines from the main transformers, which impacts the noise reduction effect. If active sound barriers are utilized in these places, the noise diffraction of sound barriers can be effectively reduced. At a 110kV Substation, an experiment using a 15-channel active sound barrier has been carried out. The result of the experiment shows that the mean noise reduction value (MNRV of the noise measuring points at the substation boundary are 1.5 dB (A. The effect of the active noise control system is impacted by the layout of the active noise control system, the acoustic environment on site and the spectral characteristic of the target area.

  13. Modeling of a fluid-loaded smart shell structure for active noise and vibration control using a coupled finite element–boundary element approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringwelski, S; Gabbert, U

    2010-01-01

    A recently developed approach for the simulation and design of a fluid-loaded lightweight structure with surface-mounted piezoelectric actuators and sensors capable of actively reducing the sound radiation and the vibration is presented. The objective of this paper is to describe the theoretical background of the approach in which the FEM is applied to model the actively controlled shell structure. The FEM is also employed to model finite fluid domains around the shell structure as well as fluid domains that are partially or totally bounded by the structure. Boundary elements are used to characterize the unbounded acoustic pressure fields. The approach presented is based on the coupling of piezoelectric and acoustic finite elements with boundary elements. A coupled finite element–boundary element model is derived by introducing coupling conditions at the fluid–fluid and fluid–structure interfaces. Because of the possibility of using piezoelectric patches as actuators and sensors, feedback control algorithms can be implemented directly into the multi-coupled structural–acoustic approach to provide a closed-loop model for the design of active noise and vibration control. In order to demonstrate the applicability of the approach developed, a number of test simulations are carried out and the results are compared with experimental data. As a test case, a box-shaped shell structure with surface-mounted piezoelectric actuators and four sensors and an open rearward end is considered. A comparison between the measured values and those predicted by the coupled finite element–boundary element model shows a good agreement

  14. Filter apparatus for actively reducing noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.; Nijsse, G.

    2010-01-01

    A filter apparatus for reducing noise from a primary noise source, comprising a secondary source signal connector for generating secondary noise to reduce said primary noise and a sensor connector for connecting to a sensor for measuring said primary and secondary noise as an error signal. A first

  15. A filter apparatus for actively reducing noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.; Nijsse, G.

    2006-01-01

    A filter apparatus for reducing noise from a primary noise source, comprising a secondary source signal connector for generating secondary noise to reduce said primary noise and a sensor connector for connecting to a sensor for measuring said primary and secondary noise as an error signal. A first

  16. Proceedings of the 1986 international conference on noise control engineering. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotz, R.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on noise pollution. Topics include: noise sources, noise of chain conveyors in mining, control of noise sources in power plants, noise control elements, vibration, a method of noise control in a nuclear power plant, biological effects of noise, statistical audio dosimetry, and power house noise control

  17. Evaluation of the Performance of Feedforward and Recurrent Neural Networks in Active Cancellation of Sound Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrshad Salmasi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Active noise control is based on the destructive interference between the primary noise and generated noise from the secondary source. An antinoise of equal amplitude and opposite phase is generated and combined with the primary noise. In this paper, performance of the neural networks is evaluated in active cancellation of sound noise. For this reason, feedforward and recurrent neural networks are designed and trained. After training, performance of the feedforwrad and recurrent networks in noise attenuation are compared. We use Elman network as a recurrent neural network. For simulations, noise signals from a SPIB database are used. In order to compare the networks appropriately, equal number of layers and neurons are considered for the networks. Moreover, training and test samples are similar. Simulation results show that feedforward and recurrent neural networks present good performance in noise cancellation. As it is seen, the ability of recurrent neural network in noise attenuation is better than feedforward network.

  18. Evaluation of piezoceramic actuators for control of aircraft interior noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silcox, Richard J.; Lefebvre, Sylvie; Metcalf, Vern L.; Beyer, Todd B.; Fuller, Chris R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an experiment to evaluate piezoceramic actuators as the control actuator for active control of interior noise in a large-scale fuselage model are presented. Control was demonstrated for tonal excitation using a time domain least mean squares algorithm. A maximum of four actuator channels and six error signals were used. The actuators were employed for control of noise at frequencies where interior cavity modes were the dominant response and for driven acoustic responses where a structure resonance was dominant. Global reductions of 9 to 12 dB were obtained for the cases examined. The most effective configuration of skin-mounted actuators was found to be a pure in-plane forcing function as opposed to a bending excitation. The frame-mounted actuators were found to be equally effective as the skin-mounted actuators. However, both configurations resulted in local regions of unacceptably high vibration response in the structure.

  19. Supersonic impinging jet noise reduction using a hybrid control technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Alex; Kumar, Rajan

    2015-07-01

    Control of the highly resonant flowfield associated with supersonic impinging jet has been experimentally investigated. Measurements were made in the supersonic impinging jet facility at the Florida State University for a Mach 1.5 ideally expanded jet. Measurements included unsteady pressures on a surface plate near the nozzle exit, acoustics in the nearfield and beneath the impingement plane, and velocity field using particle image velocimetry. Both passive control using porous surface and active control with high momentum microjet injection are effective in reducing nearfield noise and flow unsteadiness over a range of geometrical parameters; however, the type of noise reduction achieved by the two techniques is different. The passive control reduces broadband noise whereas microjet injection attenuates high amplitude impinging tones. The hybrid control, a combination of two control methods, reduces both broadband and high amplitude impinging tones and surprisingly its effectiveness is more that the additive effect of the two control techniques. The flow field measurements show that with hybrid control the impinging jet is stabilized and the turbulence quantities such as streamwise turbulence intensity, transverse turbulence intensity and turbulent shear stress are significantly reduced.

  20. Wave field synthesis, adaptive wave field synthesis and ambisonics using decentralized transformed control: Potential applications to sound field reproduction and active noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Berry, Alain; Woszczyk, Wieslaw

    2005-09-01

    Sound field reproduction finds applications in listening to prerecorded music or in synthesizing virtual acoustics. The objective is to recreate a sound field in a listening environment. Wave field synthesis (WFS) is a known open-loop technology which assumes that the reproduction environment is anechoic. Classical WFS, therefore, does not perform well in a real reproduction space such as room. Previous work has suggested that it is physically possible to reproduce a progressive wave field in-room situation using active control approaches. In this paper, a formulation of adaptive wave field synthesis (AWFS) introduces practical possibilities for an adaptive sound field reproduction combining WFS and active control (with WFS departure penalization) with a limited number of error sensors. AWFS includes WFS and closed-loop ``Ambisonics'' as limiting cases. This leads to the modification of the multichannel filtered-reference least-mean-square (FXLMS) and the filtered-error LMS (FELMS) adaptive algorithms for AWFS. Decentralization of AWFS for sound field reproduction is introduced on the basis of sources' and sensors' radiation modes. Such decoupling may lead to decentralized control of source strength distributions and may reduce computational burden of the FXLMS and the FELMS algorithms used for AWFS. [Work funded by NSERC, NATEQ, Université de Sherbrooke and VRQ.] Ultrasound/Bioresponse to

  1. Effects of noise exposure on catalase activity of growing lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Kashif Nawaz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress due to noise was estimated at cell level using model of growing lymphocytes. Lymphocytes were isolated and cultured using conventional methodology. Cell culture of each group was exposed to sound of frequency 1 KHz during incubation. Three groups were defined on the basis of exposure of sound with specific range of intensity and duration of exposure. Group A and Group B were exposed to sound with intensity 110 dBA for four hours per day and for eight hours per day respectively. Control group was exposed to sound less than 85 dBA. Viable cell count was performed using trypan blue. Catalase activity of each group was estimated using ELISA kit.Viable cell count of Group A and Group B was almost same but significantly less than that of control group. Catalase activity of lymphocytes in Group B was significantly low as compared to Group A and controls (p=0.003,p< 0.05. There was no significant difference between catalase activity of Group A and control group.Exposure of sound with frequency 1 KHz and intensity 110 dBA for 4 hours and eight hours per day may induce oxidative stress in growing lymphocytes causing the difference in viable cell count. However the catalase activity depends on duration of exposure. In case of noise exposure of 8 hours per day, it declines significantly as compared to noise exposure of 4 hours per day.

  2. Noise control in aeroacoustics; Proceedings of the 1993 National Conference on Noise Control Engineering, NOISE-CON 93, Williamsburg, VA, May 2-5, 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Harvey H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    In the conference over 100 papers were presented in eight sessions: (1) Emission: Noise Sources; (2) Physical Phenomena; (3) Noise ControlElements; (4) Vibration and Shock: Generation, Transmission, Isolation, and Reduction; (5) Immission: Physical Aspects of Environmental Noise; (6) Immission: Effects of Noise; (7) Analysis; and (8) Requirements. In addition, the distinguished lecture series included presentations on the High Speed Civil Transport and on research from the United Kingdom on aircraft noise effects.

  3. Active compressor engine silencer reduces exhaust noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denenberg, J.N.; Miller, S.K.; Jay, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    An active industrial silencer on a compressor engine at a Tenneco Gas station has reduced low-frequency 'rumbling' noise by 8 dB during trials while lowering backpressure about 90$. This 8 dB reduction of the piston firing frequency corresponds to a more than 80% decrease in emitted acoustic power. The silencing unit, installed on one of six engines at the station near Eden, N.Y., continues in operation. Based on the results, the manufacturer is identifying additional compressor sites for further tests. This paper reviews this project

  4. The Feasibility of Noise Control in a Soft Drink Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouladi Dehaghi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background “Noise” can be defined as any unwanted sound. Soft drink plants, which produce the raw materials used in most carbonated beverage factories, are sources of noise. Objectives This study investigated the noise pollution present in a soft drink CO2 gas injection plant, in order to present noise control measures. Materials and Methods The instructions specified by the canadian center for occupational health and safety (CCOHS were followed during the noise study, and a sound level meter, CEL.450 calibrated with CEL-110.2 based on ISO-9612 methods, was used to record the sound pressure level (SPL at each grid point. SPL was determined in weighting scales A and C. and a noise survey map of equivalent SPLs was drawn for each part. Each part of the floor area of the soft drink factory where SPL exceeded 85 dBA was identified from the noise survey map to determine the causes of high levels of noise. In order to reduce noise level in each part, the absorption coefficient, transmission loss, and noise reduction rate were calculated in the proposed control area. Results According to the study results, noise levels in a CO2 plant’s house and control room ranged from 88 to 102 dB and 79 to 82 dB (A, respectively. In order to reduce the amount of emitted noise in the CO2 plant house and control room, a noise control plan was implemented in each part of the facility; it was met with effective results. Conclusions The findings of this investigation have clearly revealed that plant workers are at risk of developing noise-induced hearing loss. However, after the implementation of a noise control plan in each part of the facility, the noise dose received by workers has significantly decreased. The need to implement a noise conservation program was established.

  5. Traffic noise and vehicle movement at a controlled intersection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Traffic noise at an intersection controlled by traffic lights shows noise level variations due to the alternating green and red lights for the different trafficstreams. Noise peaks caused by automobiles pulling up or passing by at highspeed may be quite annoying for people living near the

  6. Engineering to Control Noise, Loading, and Optimal Operating Points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell R. Swartz

    2000-01-01

    Successful engineering of low-energy nuclear systems requires control of noise, loading, and optimum operating point (OOP) manifolds. The latter result from the biphasic system response of low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR)/cold fusion systems, and their ash production rate, to input electrical power. Knowledge of the optimal operating point manifold can improve the reproducibility and efficacy of these systems in several ways. Improved control of noise, loading, and peak production rates is available through the study, and use, of OOP manifolds. Engineering of systems toward the OOP-manifold drive-point peak may, with inclusion of geometric factors, permit more accurate uniform determinations of the calibrated activity of these materials/systems

  7. Compressor noise control begins with design--Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the typical methods used by oil and gas pipeline companies to reduce the noise level associated with their pump and compressor stations. The common method is for the design engineer to specify an acceptable noise level at a specified distance. Unfortunately, the results by this method are rarely acceptable because vendors have not considered the effects of sound propagation outside the station, the owners have not considered the cumulative effect of various machinery, and there is little methodology available to distinguish the individual components which might be contributing the acoustically unacceptable noise levels in a multi-component system. This article stresses balanced noise control designs using noise control engineering

  8. Noise exposure immediately activates cochlear mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar N Alagramam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is a major public health issue worldwide. Uncovering the early molecular events associated with NIHL would reveal mechanisms leading to the hearing loss. Our aim is to investigate the immediate molecular responses after different levels of noise exposure and identify the common and distinct pathways that mediate NIHL. Previous work showed mice exposed to 116 decibels sound pressure level (dB SPL broadband noise for 1 h had greater threshold shifts than the mice exposed to 110 dB SPL broadband noise, hence we used these two noise levels in this study. Groups of 4-8-week-old CBA/CaJ mice were exposed to no noise (control or to broadband noise for 1 h, followed by transcriptome analysis of total cochlear RNA isolated immediately after noise exposure. Previously identified and novel genes were found in all data sets. Following exposure to noise at 116 dB SPL, the earliest responses included up-regulation of 243 genes and down-regulation of 61 genes, while a similar exposure at 110 dB SPL up-regulated 155 genes and down-regulated 221 genes. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling was the major pathway in both levels of noise exposure. Nevertheless, both qualitative and quantitative differences were noticed in some MAPK signaling genes, after exposure to different noise levels. Cacna1b , Cacna1g , and Pla2g6 , related to calcium signaling were down-regulated after 110 dB SPL exposure, while the fold increase in the expression of Fos was relatively lower than what was observed after 116 dB SPL exposure. These subtle variations provide insight on the factors that may contribute to the differences in NIHL despite the activation of a common pathway.

  9. Study on Noise Prediction Model and Control Schemes for Substation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Liu, Songtao

    2014-01-01

    With the government's emphasis on environmental issues of power transmission and transformation project, noise pollution has become a prominent problem now. The noise from the working transformer, reactor, and other electrical equipment in the substation will bring negative effect to the ambient environment. This paper focuses on using acoustic software for the simulation and calculation method to control substation noise. According to the characteristics of the substation noise and the techniques of noise reduction, a substation's acoustic field model was established with the SoundPLAN software to predict the scope of substation noise. On this basis, 4 reasonable noise control schemes were advanced to provide some helpful references for noise control during the new substation's design and construction process. And the feasibility and application effect of these control schemes can be verified by using the method of simulation modeling. The simulation results show that the substation always has the problem of excessive noise at boundary under the conventional measures. The excess noise can be efficiently reduced by taking the corresponding noise reduction methods. PMID:24672356

  10. A Calculation of hydrodynamic noise of control valve on instrumentation and control system using smart plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demon Handoyo; Djoko H Nugroho

    2012-01-01

    It has been calculated characteristics of the control valve Instrumentation and Control Systems using Smart Plant software. This calculation is done in order to control the valve that will be installed as part of the instrumentation and control systems to provide the performance according to the design. The characteristics that have been calculated are Reynolds number factors which are related to the flow regime in the valve. Critical pressure factor, Valve Hydrodynamic cavitation and noise index. In this paper the discussion will be limited to matters relating to Hydrodynamic noise generation process using model of the instrumentation and control system in the plant design in yellow cake PIPKPP activities in 2012. The results of the calculation of the noise on the valves design are in the range between 9.58~70.1 dBA. (author)

  11. Quality control in digital mammography: the noise components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyton, Fernando; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro; Duran, Maria Paz; Dantas, Marcelino; Ubeda, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    To measure the linearity of the detector and determine the noise components (quantum, electronic and structural noise) that contributed to losing image quality and to determine the signal noise ratio (SNR) and contrast noise ratio (CNR). This paper describes the results of the implementation of a protocol for quality control in digital mammography performed in two direct digital mammography equipment (Hologic, Selenia) in Santiago of Chile. Shows the results of linearity and noise analysis of the images which establishes the main cause of noise in the image of the mammogram to ensure the quality and optimize procedures. The study evaluated two digital mammography's Selenia, Hologic (DR) from Santiago, Chile. We conducted the assessment of linearity of the detector, the signal noise ratio, contrast noise ratio and was determined the contribution of different noise components (quantum, electronics and structural noise). Used different thicknesses used in clinical practice according to the protocol for quality control in digital mammography of Spanish society of medical physics and NHSBSP Equipment Report 0604 Version 3. The Selenia mammography software was used for the analysis of images and Unfors Xi detector for measuring doses. The mammography detector has a linear performance, the CNR and SNR did not comply with the Protocol for the thicknesses of 60 and 70 mm. The main contribution of the noise corresponds to the quantum noise, therefore it is necessary to adjust and optimize the mammography system. (author)

  12. Quality control in digital mammography: the noise components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyton, Fernando [Universidade de Tarapaca, Arica (Chile). Centro de Estudios en Ciencias Radiologicas; Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nogueira, Maria do Socorro, E-mail: mnogue@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Duran, Maria Paz [Clinica Alemana, Santiago (Chile). Dept. de Radiologia; Dantas, Marcelino, E-mail: marcelino@inb.gov.b [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerios; Ubeda, Carlos, E-mail: cubeda@uta.c [Universidade de Tarapaca, Arica (Chile). Fac. de Ciencias de la Salud

    2011-07-01

    To measure the linearity of the detector and determine the noise components (quantum, electronic and structural noise) that contributed to losing image quality and to determine the signal noise ratio (SNR) and contrast noise ratio (CNR). This paper describes the results of the implementation of a protocol for quality control in digital mammography performed in two direct digital mammography equipment (Hologic, Selenia) in Santiago of Chile. Shows the results of linearity and noise analysis of the images which establishes the main cause of noise in the image of the mammogram to ensure the quality and optimize procedures. The study evaluated two digital mammography's Selenia, Hologic (DR) from Santiago, Chile. We conducted the assessment of linearity of the detector, the signal noise ratio, contrast noise ratio and was determined the contribution of different noise components (quantum, electronics and structural noise). Used different thicknesses used in clinical practice according to the protocol for quality control in digital mammography of Spanish society of medical physics and NHSBSP Equipment Report 0604 Version 3. The Selenia mammography software was used for the analysis of images and Unfors Xi detector for measuring doses. The mammography detector has a linear performance, the CNR and SNR did not comply with the Protocol for the thicknesses of 60 and 70 mm. The main contribution of the noise corresponds to the quantum noise, therefore it is necessary to adjust and optimize the mammography system. (author)

  13. Model tracking dual stochastic controller design under irregular internal noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Bok; Heo, Hoon; Cho, Yun Hyun; Ji, Tae Young

    2006-01-01

    Although many methods about the control of irregular external noise have been introduced and implemented, it is still necessary to design a controller that will be more effective and efficient methods to exclude for various noises. Accumulation of errors due to model tracking, internal noises (thermal noise, shot noise and l/f noise) that come from elements such as resistor, diode and transistor etc. in the circuit system and numerical errors due to digital process often destabilize the system and reduce the system performance. New stochastic controller is adopted to remove those noises using conventional controller simultaneously. Design method of a model tracking dual controller is proposed to improve the stability of system while removing external and internal noises. In the study, design process of the model tracking dual stochastic controller is introduced that improves system performance and guarantees robustness under irregular internal noises which can be created internally. The model tracking dual stochastic controller utilizing F-P-K stochastic control technique developed earlier is implemented to reveal its performance via simulation

  14. Flow and Noise Control: Review and Assessment of Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Joslin, Ronald D.

    2002-01-01

    Technologies for developing radically new aerovehicles that would combine quantum leaps in cost, safety, and performance benefits with environmental friendliness have appeared on the horizon. This report provides both an assessment of the current state-of-the-art in flow and noise control and a vision for the potential gains to be made, in terms of performance benefit for civil and military aircraft and a unique potential for noise reduction, via future advances in flow and noise technologies. This report outlines specific areas of research that will enable the breakthroughs necessary to bring this vision to reality. Recent developments in many topics within flow and noise control are reviewed. The flow control overview provides succinct summaries of various approaches for drag reduction and improved maneuvering. Both exterior and interior noise problems are examined, including dominant noise sources, physics of noise generation and propagation, and both established and proposed concepts for noise reduction. Synergy between flow and noise control is a focus and, more broadly, the need to pursue research in a more concurrent approach involving multiple disciplines. Also discussed are emerging technologies such as nanotechnology that may have a significant impact on the progress of flow and noise control.

  15. Noise: how can the nuisance be controlled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollerhead, J B

    1973-09-01

    Aircraft noise is a major nuisance in residential communities around airports. If the air transport industries are to meet the ever increasing demand for air travel, determined efforts are required now to reduce the burden of noise upon these communities. Significant engine noise reductions have already been achieved in the latest generation of wide-bodied aircraft, and further reductions are being forecast by the engine manufacturers. Regardless of whether there are justifiable grounds for this optimism there are alternative steps to be taken. But the problem is basically an economic rather than a technological one - how much does noise reduction cost and how much can we afford to pay? The various costs of aircraft noise, both monetary and social, are discussed in relation to its effects upon people. Although an economic analysis of the problem is feasible, it is doubtful whether our understanding of the relationships between physical noise levels and human reaction is yet adequate for such purposes. Planning methods for estimating the extent of community noise nuisance are presented, and it is shown that consideration should be given to outlying regions exposed to relatively little aircraft noise.

  16. Control source development for reduction of noise transmitted through a double panel structure

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, J.

    2014-01-01

    A double panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in between, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace, automotive industries, and buildings due to its low sound transmission at high frequencies, low heat transmission, and low weight. Nevertheless, the resonance of the cavity and the poor sound transmission loss at low frequencies limit the double panel’s noise control performance. Applying active structural acoustic control to the panels or active noise control ...

  17. Noise pollution resources compendium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Abstracts of reports concerning noise pollution are presented. The abstracts are grouped in the following areas of activity: (1) sources of noise, (2) noise detection and measurement, (3) noise abatement and control, (4) physical effects of noise and (5) social effects of noise.

  18. Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise Control, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA need for quiet on-orbit crew quarters (CQ), Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a new Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise...

  19. Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address NASA needs for quiet crew volumes in a space habitat, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a new Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise...

  20. Wavelet Adaptive Algorithm and Its Application to MRE Noise Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yulin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To address the limitation of conventional adaptive algorithm used for active noise control (ANC system, this paper proposed and studied two adaptive algorithms based on Wavelet. The twos are applied to a noise control system including magnetorheological elastomers (MRE, which is a smart viscoelastic material characterized by a complex modulus dependent on vibration frequency and controllable by external magnetic fields. Simulation results reveal that the Decomposition LMS algorithm (D-LMS and Decomposition and Reconstruction LMS algorithm (DR-LMS based on Wavelet can significantly improve the noise reduction performance of MRE control system compared with traditional LMS algorithm.

  1. Hybrid Feedforward-Feedback Noise Control Using Virtual Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Jacob; Fuller, Chris; Schiller, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Several approaches to active noise control using virtual sensors are evaluated for eventual use in an active headrest. Specifically, adaptive feedforward, feedback, and hybrid control structures are compared. Each controller incorporates the traditional filtered-x least mean squares algorithm. The feedback controller is arranged in an internal model configuration to draw comparisons with standard feedforward control theory results. Simulation and experimental results are presented that illustrate each controllers ability to minimize the pressure at both physical and virtual microphone locations. The remote microphone technique is used to obtain pressure estimates at the virtual locations. It is shown that a hybrid controller offers performance benefits over the traditional feedforward and feedback controllers. Stability issues associated with feedback and hybrid controllers are also addressed. Experimental results show that 15-20 dB reduction in broadband disturbances can be achieved by minimizing the measured pressure, whereas 10-15 dB reduction is obtained when minimizing the estimated pressure at a virtual location.

  2. An improved affine projection algorithm for active noise cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Congyan; Wang, Mingjiang; Han, Yufei; Sun, Yunzhuo

    2017-08-01

    Affine projection algorithm is a signal reuse algorithm, and it has a good convergence rate compared to other traditional adaptive filtering algorithm. There are two factors that affect the performance of the algorithm, which are step factor and the projection length. In the paper, we propose a new variable step size affine projection algorithm (VSS-APA). It dynamically changes the step size according to certain rules, so that it can get smaller steady-state error and faster convergence speed. Simulation results can prove that its performance is superior to the traditional affine projection algorithm and in the active noise control (ANC) applications, the new algorithm can get very good results.

  3. Application of an active device for helicopter noise reduction in JAXA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shigeru; Kobiki, Noboru; Tanabe, Yasutada

    2010-01-01

    Important issues in noise problems for current helicopters are described. An active tab (AT) was developed as a new active device for noise/vibration reduction under research cooperation between Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and Kawada Industries, Inc. The wind tunnel test was conducted in order to investigate the effectiveness of the AT on the aeroacoustic characteristics of a helicopter. From the wind tunnel test, the capability of reducing blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise by an AT was verified. A new control law using instantaneous pressure change on a blade during BVI phenomena was introduced and applied to the wind tunnel testing. This new control law shows reasonable controllability for helicopter noise reduction. Furthermore, in order to analyze noise characteristics, the advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code named JAXA o v3d was developed in JAXA and extended to include CFD-CSD (computational structure dynamics) coupling by using the beam theory for blade deformation. (invited paper)

  4. Quieting: A Practical Guide to Noise Control. NBS Handbook 119.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendt, Raymond D.; And Others

    This guide describes the ways in which sounds are generated, travel, and affect the listener's hearing and well-being. Recommendations are given for controlling noise at the source and along its path of travel, and for protecting the listener. Remedies are given for noise commonly encountered in homes, work environments, schools, while traveling,…

  5. Noise Controlled Synchronization in Potassium Coupled Neural Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D. E.; Ryazanova, L. S.; Zhirin, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    The paper applies biologically plausible models to investigate how noise input to small ensembles of neurons, coupled via the extracellular potassium concentration, can influence their firing patterns. Using the noise intensity and the volume of the extracellular space as control parameters, we......-temporal oscillations in neuronal ensembles....

  6. The noise control prioritizing index in a tire manufacturing company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rostam Golmohammadi

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion; the results of the present study indicated that using an index resulted from a combination of various parameters affecting the noise pollution, we would be able to prioritize units for implementing noise pollution control confidently. The results of the present study are applicable to all similar industrial settings.

  7. Barkhausen noise sensor with direct field control

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stupakov, Oleksandr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2013), s. 209-212 ISSN 1546-198X R&D Projects: GA ČR GP102/09/P108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : Barkhausen noise * field measurement * magnetic non-destructive testing Subject RIV: JB - Sensor s, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 0.558, year: 2013

  8. AIR DISTRIBUTION NOISE CONTROL IN CRITICAL AUDITORIUMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HOOVER, R.M.

    THE ACHIEVEMENT OF EXTREMELY LOW AIR-CONDITIONING NOISE LEVELS REQUIRED FOR MODERN AUDITORIUMS ARE THE RESULT OF CAREFUL PLANNING AND THOROUGH DETAILING. PROBLEMS FACED AND TECHNIQUES USED IN ARRIVING AT LEVELS AS LOW AS NC-15 FOR A SINGLE SYSTEM SERVING A HALL ARE DESCRIBED. SIX CASE HISTORIES ARE EXAMINED AND THE FOLLOWING OBSERVATIONS ARE…

  9. Noise, Worker Perception, and Worker Concentration in Timber Harvesting Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efi Yuliati Yovi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Timber harvesting activities are unquestionably related with high risk of work accidents and health disorders.Such activities were not only burdened the workers with heavy physical workloads due to uneasy workingenvironment, and massive work materials and tools, but also physiopsychologically burdened workers as theywere imposed with both mechanical and acoustic vibrations (noise produced by the chainsaw. However,  it is acommon practice that most of the workers still ignored the importance of the use of noise reduction devices suchas earmuff or ear plug.  This study was aimed to reveal the factual effects of noise on work concentration of theworkers to provide a scientific basis in supporting efforts in improving workers’ attitude.  The results confirmedthat chainsaw might produce noise during operation.  Noise intensities received by both right and left ears werenot significantly different, indicating that left-handed and normal workers received similar degree of noise inboth side of ears. Further, results also showed that there was a significant difference on the perception and workconcentration of chainsaw operators versus sedentary people to the noise.  These findings proved that hearingability of chainsaw operators had declined due to frequent noise exposure.Keywords: timber harvesting, physio-psychological disorder, noise, chainsaw

  10. Contralateral white noise selectively changes left human auditory cortex activity in a lexical decision task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behne, Nicole; Wendt, Beate; Scheich, Henning; Brechmann, André

    2006-04-01

    In a previous study, we hypothesized that the approach of presenting information-bearing stimuli to one ear and noise to the other ear may be a general strategy to determine hemispheric specialization in auditory cortex (AC). In that study, we confirmed the dominant role of the right AC in directional categorization of frequency modulations by showing that fMRI activation of right but not left AC was sharply emphasized when masking noise was presented to the contralateral ear. Here, we tested this hypothesis using a lexical decision task supposed to be mainly processed in the left hemisphere. Subjects had to distinguish between pseudowords and natural words presented monaurally to the left or right ear either with or without white noise to the other ear. According to our hypothesis, we expected a strong effect of contralateral noise on fMRI activity in left AC. For the control conditions without noise, we found that activation in both auditory cortices was stronger on contralateral than on ipsilateral word stimulation consistent with a more influential contralateral than ipsilateral auditory pathway. Additional presentation of contralateral noise did not significantly change activation in right AC, whereas it led to a significant increase of activation in left AC compared with the condition without noise. This is consistent with a left hemispheric specialization for lexical decisions. Thus our results support the hypothesis that activation by ipsilateral information-bearing stimuli is upregulated mainly in the hemisphere specialized for a given task when noise is presented to the more influential contralateral ear.

  11. Open noise barriers based on sonic crystals. Advances in noise control in transport infraestructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peiro Torres, M.P.; Redondo Pastor, J.; Bravo Plana-Sala, J.M.; Sanchez Perez, J.V.

    2016-07-01

    Noise control is an environmental problem of first magnitude nowadays. In this work, we present a new concept of acoustic screen designed to control the specific noise generated by transport infrastructures, based on new materials called sonic crystals. These materials are formed by arrangements of acoustic scatterers in air, and provide a new and different mechanism in the fight against noise from those of the classical screens. This mechanism is usually called multiple scattering and is due to their structuring in addition to their physical properties. Due to the separation between scatterers, these barriers are transparent to air and water allowing a reduction on their foundations. Tests carried out in a wind tunnel show a reduction of 42% in the overturning momentum compared to classical barriers. The acoustical performance of these barriers is shown in this work, explaining the new characteristics provided in the control of noise. Finally, an example of these barriers is presented and classified according to acoustic standardization tests. The acoustic barrier reported in this work provides a high technological solution in the field of noise control. (Author)

  12. Compressor noise control begins with design--Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, L.

    1993-01-01

    Reduction of noise pollution at gas compressor stations associated with natural gas pipelines and distribution systems, has long been a complex problem. Specified noise levels of individual components tell nothing of the overall system when it is installed and placed in a site-specific setting. Further, testing for compliance performance guarantees is virtually impossible to conduct at a distant location because one cannot distinguish among various contributing noise sources. This paper develops a plan for calculating an estimate of sound generation from a compressor station and the methods for controlling and measuring sounds of individual components. It also classifies the types of noise and gives various methods of dealing with each noise type

  13. Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  14. Legal and planning framework for the control of noise emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinick, M.

    1992-01-01

    An examination is offered of the statutory basis for the control of noise emissions. Principal pieces of legislation and some advisory notes have been produced within appendices. The paper briefly examines the controls in other EC countries before discussing the way in which planning controls relate to the jurisdiction of the court. (author)

  15. Studying the Noise Control Engineering Protocols in Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Golshah

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Today, sound is one of the detrimental factors in the workplace and its harmful impact has been so important that scientists have named it “Noise Pollutions”. Hearing is one of the five senses of human being which is also a medium for communicating with other s and enjoying the pleasant feeling of listening to a piece of music. In spite of this, changes in the intensity and frequency of sound can make it annoying. Using Sound Level Meter to measure the dB of noise in the workplace and noise control principles will be discussed here.

  16. High-powered CO2 -lasers and noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkasalo, Antero; Kuronen, Juhani

    High-power CO2 -lasers are being more and more widely used for welding, drilling and cutting in machine shops. In the near future, different kinds of surface treatments will also become routine practice with laser units. The industries benefitting most from high power lasers will be: the automotive industry, shipbuilding, the offshore industry, the aerospace industry, the nuclear and the chemical processing industries. Metal processing lasers are interesting from the point of view of noise control because the working tool is a laser beam. It is reasonable to suppose that the use of such laser beams will lead to lower noise levels than those connected with traditional metal processing methods and equipment. In the following presentation, the noise levels and possible noise-control problems attached to the use of high-powered CO2 -lasers are studied.

  17. The influence of noise and vibration upon creatine kinase activity in blood serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonderko, G; Gabryel, A; Jonderko, K; Konca, A; Marcisz, C; Olak, Z; Szramek-Urbaniak, A

    1982-02-01

    The investigations comprised part of the workers employed in a factory of prefabricated concrete elements. The creatine kinase (CK) activity was determined before and after a day's work in the following groups of workers: These exposed to noise and vibration exceeding the allowed norm; those exposed to noise, performing the same hard physical work as group I and exposed to vibration not exceeding 79dB in particular octave bands, and those practising physical work a group I and II but in environment free from noise and vibration, and a control group of persons not exposed to any of the tested factors (vibration, noise, work). The obtained results indicate that the determination of the CK activity may serve as a test of exposure to vibration and noise.

  18. Updating working memory in aircraft noise and speech noise causes different fMRI activations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saetrevik, Bjørn; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2015-02-01

    The present study used fMRI/BOLD neuroimaging to investigate how visual-verbal working memory is updated when exposed to three different background-noise conditions: speech noise, aircraft noise and silence. The number-updating task that was used can distinguish between "substitution processes," which involve adding new items to the working memory representation and suppressing old items, and "exclusion processes," which involve rejecting new items and maintaining an intact memory set. The current findings supported the findings of a previous study by showing that substitution activated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the posterior medial frontal cortex and the parietal lobes, whereas exclusion activated the anterior medial frontal cortex. Moreover, the prefrontal cortex was activated more by substitution processes when exposed to background speech than when exposed to aircraft noise. These results indicate that (a) the prefrontal cortex plays a special role when task-irrelevant materials should be denied access to working memory and (b) that, when compensating for different types of noise, either different cognitive mechanisms are involved or those cognitive mechanisms that are involved are involved to different degrees. © 2014 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology published by Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Tunable Interior Rotorcraft Noise Control, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CRG has recently developed a new class of shape memory polymers (SMP) that are electrically activated, as opposed to the more mature thermally activated SMPs....

  20. Aircraft Interior Noise Control Using Distributed Piezoelectric Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian Q.

    1996-01-01

    Developing a control system that can reduce the noise and structural vibration at the same time is an important task. This talk presents one possible technical approach for accomplishing this task. The target application of the research is for aircraft interior noise control. The emphasis of the present approach is not on control strategies, but rather on the design of actuators for the control system. In the talk, a theory of distributed piezoelectric actuators is introduced. A uniform cylindrical shell is taken as a simplified model of fuselage structures to illustrate the effectiveness of the design theory. The actuators developed are such that they can reduce the tonal structural vibration and interior noise in a wide range of frequencies. Extensive computer simulations have been done to study various aspects of the design theory. Experiments have also been conducted and the test results strongly support the theoretical development.

  1. Control of noise - systems for compact HVAC units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    systems affect the performance of implementations. The source pressure and the impedance of a centrifugal fan were measured, and a number of configurations for noise control were investigated. The performance of a simple analogue feedback control was tested in a physical prototype. An adaptive digital...

  2. White noise improves learning by modulating activity in dopaminergic midbrain regions and right superior temporal sulcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Vanessa H; Bauch, Eva M; Bunzeck, Nico

    2014-07-01

    In neural systems, information processing can be facilitated by adding an optimal level of white noise. Although this phenomenon, the so-called stochastic resonance, has traditionally been linked with perception, recent evidence indicates that white noise may also exert positive effects on cognitive functions, such as learning and memory. The underlying neural mechanisms, however, remain unclear. Here, on the basis of recent theories, we tested the hypothesis that auditory white noise, when presented during the encoding of scene images, enhances subsequent recognition memory performance and modulates activity within the dopaminergic midbrain (i.e., substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area, SN/VTA). Indeed, in a behavioral experiment, we can show in healthy humans that auditory white noise-but not control sounds, such as a sinus tone-slightly improves recognition memory. In an fMRI experiment, white noise selectively enhances stimulus-driven phasic activity in the SN/VTA and auditory cortex. Moreover, it induces stronger connectivity between SN/VTA and right STS, which, in addition, exhibited a positive correlation with subsequent memory improvement by white noise. Our results suggest that the beneficial effects of auditory white noise on learning depend on dopaminergic neuromodulation and enhanced connectivity between midbrain regions and the STS-a key player in attention modulation. Moreover, they indicate that white noise could be particularly useful to facilitate learning in conditions where changes of the mesolimbic system are causally related to memory deficits including healthy and pathological aging.

  3. Phase transitions in distributed control systems with multiplicative noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Nicolas; Bamieh, Bassam; Mitra, Partha; Sire, Clément

    2018-01-01

    Contemporary technological challenges often involve many degrees of freedom in a distributed or networked setting. Three aspects are notable: the variables are usually associated with the nodes of a graph with limited communication resources, hindering centralized control; the communication is subject to noise; and the number of variables can be very large. These three aspects make tools and techniques from statistical physics particularly suitable for the performance analysis of such networked systems in the limit of many variables (analogous to the thermodynamic limit in statistical physics). Perhaps not surprisingly, phase-transition like phenomena appear in these systems, where a sharp change in performance can be observed with a smooth parameter variation, with the change becoming discontinuous or singular in the limit of infinite system size. In this paper, we analyze the so called network consensus problem, prototypical of the above considerations, that has previously been analyzed mostly in the context of additive noise. We show that qualitatively new phase-transition like phenomena appear for this problem in the presence of multiplicative noise. Depending on dimensions, and on the presence or absence of a conservation law, the system performance shows a discontinuous change at a threshold value of the multiplicative noise strength. In the absence of the conservation law, and for graph spectral dimension less than two, the multiplicative noise threshold (the stability margin of the control problem) is zero. This is reminiscent of the absence of robust controllers for certain classes of centralized control problems. Although our study involves a ‘toy’ model, we believe that the qualitative features are generic, with implications for the robust stability of distributed control systems, as well as the effect of roundoff errors and communication noise on distributed algorithms.

  4. Reduction of noise in the neonatal intensive care unit using sound-activated noise meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Aubertin, C; Barrowman, N; Moreau, K; Dunn, S; Harrold, J

    2014-11-01

    To determine if sound-activated noise meters providing direct audit and visual feedback can reduce sound levels in a level 3 neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Sound levels (in dB) were compared between a 2-month period with noise meters present but without visual signal fluctuation and a subsequent 2 months with the noise meters providing direct audit and visual feedback. There was a significant increase in the percentage of time the sound level in the NICU was below 50 dB across all patient care areas (9.9%, 8.9% and 7.3%). This improvement was not observed in the desk area where there are no admitted patients. There was no change in the percentage of time the NICU was below 45 or 55 dB. Sound-activated noise meters seem effective in reducing sound levels in patient care areas. Conversations may have moved to non-patient care areas preventing a similar change there. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Anthropogenic noise alters bat activity levels and echolocation calls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie P. Bunkley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative impacts from anthropogenic noise are well documented for many wildlife taxa. Investigations of the effects of noise on bats however, have not been conducted outside of the laboratory. Bats that hunt arthropods rely on auditory information to forage. Part of this acoustic information can fall within the spectrum of anthropogenic noise, which can potentially interfere with signal reception and processing. Compressor stations associated with natural gas extraction produce broadband noise 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. With over half a million producing gas wells in the U.S. this infrastructure is a major source of noise pollution across the landscape. We conducted a ‘natural experiment’ in the second largest gas extraction field in the U.S. to investigate the potential effects of gas compressor station noise on the activity levels of the local bat assemblage. We used acoustic monitoring to compare the activity level (number of minutes in a night with a bat call of the bat assemblage at sites with compressor stations to sites lacking this infrastructure. We found that activity levels for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis were 40% lower at loud compressor sites compared to quieter well pads, whereas the activity levels of four other species (Myotis californicus, M. cillolabrum, M. lucifugus, Parastrellus hesperus were not affected by noise. Furthermore, our results reveal that the assemblage of bat species emitting low frequency (35 kHz echolocation did not exhibit altered activity levels in noise. Lower activity levels of Brazilian free-tailed bats at loud sites indicate a potential reduction in habitat for this species. Additionally, a comparison of echolocation search calls produced by free-tailed bats at sites with and without compressor stations reveal that this species modifies its echolocation search calls in noise—producing longer calls with a narrower bandwidth. Call alterations might affect prey

  6. Coupled dynamic systems and Le Chatelier's principle in noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidanik, G.; Becker, K. J.

    2004-05-01

    Investigation of coupling an externally driven dynamic system-a master dynamic system-to a passive one-an adjunct dynamic system-reveals that the response of the adjunct dynamic system affects the precoupled response of the master dynamic system. The responses, in the two dynamic systems when coupled, are estimated by the stored energies (Es) and (E0), respectively. Since the adjunct dynamic system, prior to coupling, was with zero (0) stored energy, E0s=0, the precoupled stored energy (E00) in the master dynamic system is expected to be reduced to (E0) when coupling is instituted; i.e., one expects E0noise control of the master dynamic system would result from the coupling. It is argued that the change in the disposition of the stored energies as just described may not be the only change. The coupling may influence the external input power into the master dynamic system which may interfere with the expected noise control. Indeed, the coupling may influence the external input power such that the expected beneficial noise control may not materialize. Examples of these kinds of noise control reversals are cited.

  7. Noise and Sound Control in Open Plan Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Ben

    This annotated bibliography includes summaries of 19 articles and reports dealing with noise control and acoustical design in school buildings. A brief introduction discusses the need for careful attention to acoustics in any school construction or remodeling project, with particular emphasis on the need for special acoustical measures in an open…

  8. Adaptive Feed-Forward Control of Low Frequency Interior Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Kletschkowski, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This book presents a mechatronic approach to Active Noise Control (ANC). It describes the required elements of system theory, engineering acoustics, electroacoustics and adaptive signal processing in a comprehensive, consistent and systematic manner using a unified notation. Furthermore, it includes a design methodology for ANC-systems, explains its application and describes tools to be used for ANC-system design. From the research point of view, the book presents new approaches to sound source localization in weakly damped interiors. One is based on the inverse finite element method, the other is based on a sound intensity probe with an active free field. Furthermore, a prototype of an ANC-system able to reach the physical limits of local (feed-forward) ANC is described. This is one example for applied research in ANC-system design. Other examples are given for (i) local ANC in a semi-enclosed subspace of an aircraft cargo hold and (ii) for the combination of audio entertainment with ANC.

  9. Influence of noise and vibration upon creatine kinase activity in blood serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonderko, G; Gabryel, A; Jonderko, K; Konca, A; Marcisz, C; Olak, Z; Szramek-Urbaniak, A

    1982-02-01

    The investigations comprised part of the workers employed in a factory of prefabricated concrete elements. The creatine kinase (CK) activity was determined before and after a day's work in the following groups of workers: I - exposed to noise and vibration exceeding the allowed norm, II - exposed to noise, performing the same hard physical work as group I and exposed to vibration not exceeding 79 dB in particular octave bands, III - practising physical work as group I and II but in environment free from noise and vibration, and a control group of persons not exposed to any of the tested factors. The obtained results indicate that the determination of the CK activity may serve as a test of exposure to vibration and noise.

  10. [Protective effect of indirect activator of calcium pump on noise-induced hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Yu, Ning; Han, Dongyi; Yang, Weiyan; Li, Xingqi

    2002-12-01

    To investigate the possible protective effect of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC) and indirect activator of Ca2+ pump, on noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Twenty guinea pigs were divided randomly into two groups, and then perfused with artificial perilymph solutions in one group and with artificial perilymph solutions containing 3 mumol/L PMA in the other one, respectively. All animals were exposed with 100 dB SPL white noise for 2 hours. Cochlear microphonics (CM) and compound action potential (CAP) were recorded from the round window (RW) before noise exposure and 2 hours after noise exposure. There was no significant difference in CAP threshold and CM amplitude between two groups before noise exposure. A significant difference was observed in CAP threshold and CM amplitude between two groups after noise exposure. The amplitude of CM decreased and the threshold of CAP increased in both group after noise exposure, but in the PMA group the decrease of the amplitude of CM was higher while the increase of threshold of CAP lower than that in control (P < 0.05). PMA might have partly protective effect on NIHL. These findings indirectly proved that intracellular Ca2+ overload might involve in the mechanism of NIHL.

  11. Automotive engine air intake system with variable noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moenssen, David J.; Hellie, Mark D.; Koston, John D.; Shaw, Christopher E.

    2005-09-01

    Engine air intake systems are routinely tasked with delivering a specific target sound which involves meeting an overall noise level and, in many cases, desired frequency content over the entire engine speed range. In order to meet these targets, it is generally necessary to incorporate one or more reactive tuning devices, such as Helmholtz resonators, into the intake system. Traditional devices provide deep attenuation at their designed frequency, but they also introduce undesirable sideband resonances at a higher and a lower frequency. Even after the addition of several devices, it may still not be possible to match the desired intake noise targets due to their deep attenuation and sideband amplification. The subject of this work is to introduce an electronically controlled variable noise control (VNC) device for engine air intake systems which is capable of adjusting the air intake system's frequency response as commanded by the engine operating conditions. The VNC device permits the desired amount of attenuation of peaks in the air intake noise without introducing undesirable sideband resonances. In addition, because the tuning is controlled electronically, the VNC device can deliver a target-specific response using the same hardware across multiple vehicle programs.

  12. Cortical activity patterns predict robust speech discrimination ability in noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetake, Jai A.; Wolf, Jordan T.; Cheung, Ryan J.; Engineer, Crystal T.; Ram, Satyananda K.; Kilgard, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    The neural mechanisms that support speech discrimination in noisy conditions are poorly understood. In quiet conditions, spike timing information appears to be used in the discrimination of speech sounds. In this study, we evaluated the hypothesis that spike timing is also used to distinguish between speech sounds in noisy conditions that significantly degrade neural responses to speech sounds. We tested speech sound discrimination in rats and recorded primary auditory cortex (A1) responses to speech sounds in background noise of different intensities and spectral compositions. Our behavioral results indicate that rats, like humans, are able to accurately discriminate consonant sounds even in the presence of background noise that is as loud as the speech signal. Our neural recordings confirm that speech sounds evoke degraded but detectable responses in noise. Finally, we developed a novel neural classifier that mimics behavioral discrimination. The classifier discriminates between speech sounds by comparing the A1 spatiotemporal activity patterns evoked on single trials with the average spatiotemporal patterns evoked by known sounds. Unlike classifiers in most previous studies, this classifier is not provided with the stimulus onset time. Neural activity analyzed with the use of relative spike timing was well correlated with behavioral speech discrimination in quiet and in noise. Spike timing information integrated over longer intervals was required to accurately predict rat behavioral speech discrimination in noisy conditions. The similarity of neural and behavioral discrimination of speech in noise suggests that humans and rats may employ similar brain mechanisms to solve this problem. PMID:22098331

  13. Analytical investigation of adaptive control of radiated inlet noise from turbofan engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risi, John D.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.

    1994-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed to predict the resulting far field radiation from a turbofan engine inlet. A feedforward control algorithm was simulated to predict the controlled far field radiation from the destructive combination of fan noise and secondary control sources. Numerical results were developed for two system configurations, with the resulting controlled far field radiation patterns showing varying degrees of attenuation and spillover. With one axial station of twelve control sources and error sensors with equal relative angular positions, nearly global attenuation is achieved. Shifting the angular position of one error sensor resulted in an increase of spillover to the extreme sidelines. The complex control inputs for each configuration was investigated to identify the structure of the wave pattern created by the control sources, giving an indication of performance of the system configuration. It is deduced that the locations of the error sensors and the control source configuration are equally critical to the operation of the active noise control system.

  14. Wideband CMOS low noise amplifier including an active balun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaakmeer, S.C.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Leenaerts, D.M.W.; Nauta, Bram

    2007-01-01

    An inductorless LNA with active balun is proposed for multi-standard radio applications between 100MHz and 6GHz [1]. It exploits a combination of a common-gate (CG) stage and an common-source (CS) stage with replica biasing to maximize balanced operation, while simultaneously canceling the noise and

  15. Analysis of Noise Mechanisms in Cell-Size Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Saurabh; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar Augusto; Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Singh, Abhyudai

    2017-06-06

    At the single-cell level, noise arises from multiple sources, such as inherent stochasticity of biomolecular processes, random partitioning of resources at division, and fluctuations in cellular growth rates. How these diverse noise mechanisms combine to drive variations in cell size within an isoclonal population is not well understood. Here, we investigate the contributions of different noise sources in well-known paradigms of cell-size control, such as adder (division occurs after adding a fixed size from birth), sizer (division occurs after reaching a size threshold), and timer (division occurs after a fixed time from birth). Analysis reveals that variation in cell size is most sensitive to errors in partitioning of volume among daughter cells, and not surprisingly, this process is well regulated among microbes. Moreover, depending on the dominant noise mechanism, different size-control strategies (or a combination of them) provide efficient buffering of size variations. We further explore mixer models of size control, where a timer phase precedes/follows an adder, as has been proposed in Caulobacter crescentus. Although mixing a timer and an adder can sometimes attenuate size variations, it invariably leads to higher-order moments growing unboundedly over time. This results in a power-law distribution for the cell size, with an exponent that depends inversely on the noise in the timer phase. Consistent with theory, we find evidence of power-law statistics in the tail of C. crescentus cell-size distribution, although there is a discrepancy between the observed power-law exponent and that predicted from the noise parameters. The discrepancy, however, is removed after data reveal that the size added by individual newborns in the adder phase itself exhibits power-law statistics. Taken together, this study provides key insights into the role of noise mechanisms in size homeostasis, and suggests an inextricable link between timer-based models of size control and

  16. BVI induced vibration and noise alleviation by active and passive approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li

    This dissertation describes the development of a comprehensive aeroelastic/aeroacoustic simulation capability for the modeling of vibration and noise in rotorcraft induced by blade-vortex interaction (BVI). Subsequently this capability is applied to study vibration and noise reduction, using active and passive control approaches. The active approach employed is the actively controlled partial span trailing edge flaps (ACF), implemented in single and dual, servo and plain flap configurations. The passive approach is based on varying the sweep and anhedral on the tip of the rotor. Two different modern helicopters are chosen as the baseline for the implementation of ACF approach, one resembling a four-bladed MBB BO-105 hingeless rotor and the other similar to a five-bladed MD-900 bearingless rotor. The structural model is based on a finite element approach capable of simulating composite helicopter blades with swept tips, and representing multiple load paths at the blade root which is a characteristic of bearingless rotors. An unsteady compressible aerodynamic model based on a rational function approximation (RFA) approach is combined with a free wake analysis which has been enhanced by improving the wake analysis resolution and modeling a dual vortex structure. These enhancements are important for capturing BVI effects. A method for predicting compressible unsteady blade surface pressure distribution on rotor blades has been developed, which is required by the acoustic analysis. A modified version of helicopter noise code WOPWOP with provisions for blade flexibility has been combined with the aeroelastic analysis to predict the BVI noise. Several variants of the higher harmonic control (HHC) algorithm have been applied for the active noise control, as well as the simultaneous vibration and noise control. Active control of BVI noise is accomplished using feedback from an onboard microphone. The simulation has been extensively validated against experimental data and

  17. NOISE CONTROL IN GAS STATIONS – CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Eduardo Amaral Herzer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The high noise level in urban has changed, in the last decades, in some way of pollution that has worried the health agents. The value registered accused levels of so high discomfort that the urban sound pollution passed to be considered as a kind of pollution that hit the outnumbered people. There are efficient measures in its control, but still there are few companies that adopt measure control and auditive conservation program. This way, the objective of the work was to evaluate the noise level in which the employees and users of the gas station are daily exposed. The survey of quantitative datum was done measuring the noise level right in the emission source and making arithmetic means with the gotten sample. The average obtained revealed that the working environment isn’t appropriate, that means the noise can affect straight to communication and working production. With the prevention objective or stabilizing the auditive lost in witch the workers and the frequenters are submitted to the referred place were proposed measures to the implantation of a Auditive Conservation Program (ACP.

  18. Assuring robustness to noise in optimal quantum control experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartelt, A.F.; Roth, M.; Mehendale, M.; Rabitz, H.

    2005-01-01

    Closed-loop optimal quantum control experiments operate in the inherent presence of laser noise. In many applications, attaining high quality results [i.e., a high signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio for the optimized objective] is as important as producing a high control yield. Enhancement of the S/N ratio will typically be in competition with the mean signal, however, the latter competition can be balanced by biasing the optimization experiments towards higher mean yields while retaining a good S/N ratio. Other strategies can also direct the optimization to reduce the standard deviation of the statistical signal distribution. The ability to enhance the S/N ratio through an optimized choice of the control is demonstrated for two condensed phase model systems: second harmonic generation in a nonlinear optical crystal and stimulated emission pumping in a dye solution

  19. Synchronization of coupled active rotators by common noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmatova, Anastasiya V.; Goldobin, Denis S.; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2017-12-01

    We study the effect of common noise on coupled active rotators. While such a noise always facilitates synchrony, coupling may be attractive (synchronizing) or repulsive (desynchronizing). We develop an analytical approach based on a transformation to approximate angle-action variables and averaging over fast rotations. For identical rotators, we describe a transition from full to partial synchrony at a critical value of repulsive coupling. For nonidentical rotators, the most nontrivial effect occurs at moderate repulsive coupling, where a juxtaposition of phase locking with frequency repulsion (anti-entrainment) is observed. We show that the frequency repulsion obeys a nontrivial power law.

  20. The influence of parametric and external noise in act-and-wait control with delayed feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaxing; Kuske, Rachel

    2017-11-01

    We apply several novel semi-analytic approaches for characterizing and calculating the effects of noise in a system with act-and-wait control. For concrete illustration, we apply these to a canonical balance model for an inverted pendulum to study the combined effect of delay and noise within the act-and-wait setting. While the act-and-wait control facilitates strong stabilization through deadbeat control, a comparison of different models with continuous vs. discrete updating of the control strategy in the active period illustrates how delays combined with the imprecise application of the control can seriously degrade the performance. We give several novel analyses of a generalized act-and-wait control strategy, allowing flexibility in the updating of the control strategy, in order to understand the sensitivities to delays and random fluctuations. In both the deterministic and stochastic settings, we give analytical and semi-analytical results that characterize and quantify the dynamics of the system. These results include the size and shape of stability regions, densities for the critical eigenvalues that capture the rate of reaching the desired stable equilibrium, and amplification factors for sustained fluctuations in the context of external noise. They also provide the dependence of these quantities on the length of the delay and the active period. In particular, we see that the combined influence of delay, parametric error, or external noise and on-off control can qualitatively change the dynamics, thus reducing the robustness of the control strategy. We also capture the dependence on how frequently the control is updated, allowing an interpolation between continuous and frequent updating. In addition to providing insights for these specific models, the methods we propose are generalizable to other settings with noise, delay, and on-off control, where analytical techniques are otherwise severely scarce.

  1. BARRIER DESIGN STRATEGIES TO CONTROL NOISE INGRESS INTO DOMESTIC BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina E. Mediastika

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise source for buildings adjacent to streets is traffic-generated predominantly. Where people are mostly spend their time indoors, it is important for buildings to have screening or blocking to control noise intrusion into living spaces. But this blocking should also permit airflow. This is important for middle to low-cost domestic buildings, which do not employ conditioned ventilation. A common feature of Indonesian buildings, fence, is studied to perform noise barrier. The fence -a barrier to be- should obey three factors: position, dimension, and material. All these three factors were studied to seek compromised design for acoustic performance and natural ventilation purpose. Domestic building situated in the urban area of Yogyakarta was studying to see the most possible design of the barrier to be. There are two calculation methods employed to investigate the proposed design. The study shows that it is possible to gain minimum of 10 dB noise reduction by placing windows within the shadow effect of approximately 1.5 height fence-barrier.

  2. Noise influence on spike activation in a Hindmarsh–Rose small-world neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhe, Sun; Micheletto, Ruggero

    2016-01-01

    We studied the role of noise in neural networks, especially focusing on its relation to the propagation of spike activity in a small sized system. We set up a source of information using a single neuron that is constantly spiking. This element called initiator x o feeds spikes to the rest of the network that is initially quiescent and subsequently reacts with vigorous spiking after a transitional period of time. We found that noise quickly suppresses the initiator’s influence and favors spontaneous spike activity and, using a decibel representation of noise intensity, we established a linear relationship between noise amplitude and the interval from the initiator’s first spike and the rest of the network activation. We studied the same process with networks of different sizes (number of neurons) and found that the initiator x o has a measurable influence on small networks, but as the network grows in size, spontaneous spiking emerges disrupting its effects on networks of more than about N = 100 neurons. This suggests that the mechanism of internal noise generation allows information transmission within a small neural neighborhood, but decays for bigger network domains. We also analyzed the Fourier spectrum of the whole network membrane potential and verified that noise provokes the reduction of main θ and α peaks before transitioning into chaotic spiking. However, network size does not reproduce a similar phenomena; instead we recorded a reduction in peaks’ amplitude, a better sharpness and definition of Fourier peaks, but not the evident degeneration to chaos observed with increasing external noise. This work aims to contribute to the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of propagation of spontaneous spiking in neural networks and gives a quantitative assessment of how noise can be used to control and modulate this phenomenon in Hindmarsh−Rose (H−R) neural networks. (paper)

  3. Noise influence on spike activation in a Hindmarsh-Rose small-world neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhe, Sun; Micheletto, Ruggero

    2016-07-01

    We studied the role of noise in neural networks, especially focusing on its relation to the propagation of spike activity in a small sized system. We set up a source of information using a single neuron that is constantly spiking. This element called initiator x o feeds spikes to the rest of the network that is initially quiescent and subsequently reacts with vigorous spiking after a transitional period of time. We found that noise quickly suppresses the initiator’s influence and favors spontaneous spike activity and, using a decibel representation of noise intensity, we established a linear relationship between noise amplitude and the interval from the initiator’s first spike and the rest of the network activation. We studied the same process with networks of different sizes (number of neurons) and found that the initiator x o has a measurable influence on small networks, but as the network grows in size, spontaneous spiking emerges disrupting its effects on networks of more than about N = 100 neurons. This suggests that the mechanism of internal noise generation allows information transmission within a small neural neighborhood, but decays for bigger network domains. We also analyzed the Fourier spectrum of the whole network membrane potential and verified that noise provokes the reduction of main θ and α peaks before transitioning into chaotic spiking. However, network size does not reproduce a similar phenomena; instead we recorded a reduction in peaks’ amplitude, a better sharpness and definition of Fourier peaks, but not the evident degeneration to chaos observed with increasing external noise. This work aims to contribute to the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of propagation of spontaneous spiking in neural networks and gives a quantitative assessment of how noise can be used to control and modulate this phenomenon in Hindmarsh-Rose (H-R) neural networks.

  4. Advance Noise Control Fan II: Test Rig Fan Risk Management Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, John

    2013-01-01

    Since 1995 the Advanced Noise Control Fan (ANCF) has significantly contributed to the advancement of the understanding of the physics of fan tonal noise generation. The 9'x15' WT has successfully tested multiple high speed fan designs over the last several decades. This advanced several tone noise reduction concepts to higher TRL and the validation of fan tone noise prediction codes.

  5. Macroscopic tunneling, decoherence and noise-induced activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardo, Fernando C; Monteoliva, Diana; Villar, Paula I [Departamento de Fisica Juan Jose Giambiagi, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UBA, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-05-15

    We study the effects of the environment at zero temperature on tunneling in an open system described by a static double-well potential. We show that the evolution of the system in an initial Schroedinger cat state, can be summarized in terms of three main physical phenomena, namely decoherence, quantum tunneling and noise-induced activation. Using large-scale numerical simulations, we obtain a detailed picture of the main stages of the evolution and of the relevant dynamical processes.

  6. Danish activities concerning noise in the environment (A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Fritz

    1982-01-01

    the country in international collaboration. It is claimed that noise abatement will be diffuse and weak, if it is not based on a national strategy. The discussion of noise in the environment covers: external industrial noise, road traffic noise, and air traffic noise. The principles on which the maximum...

  7. Application of Circulation Control Technology to Airframe Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Sankar, L. N.; Englar, R. J.; Munro, Scott E.; Li, Yi; Gaeta, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    This report is a summary of the work performed by Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) under NASA Langley Grant NAG-1-2146, which was awarded as a part of NASA's Breakthrough Innovative Technologies (BIT) initiative. This was a three-year program, with a one-year no-cost extension. Each year's study has been an integrated effort consisting of computational fluid dynamics, experimental aerodynamics, and detailed noise and flow measurements. Year I effort examined the feasibility of reducing airframe noise by replacing the conventional wing systems with a Circulation Control Wing (CCW), where steady blowing was used through the trailing edge of the wing over a Coanda surface. It was shown that the wing lift increases with CCW blowing and indeed for the same lift, a CCW wing was shown to produce less noise. Year 2 effort dealt with a similar study on the role of pulsed blowing on airframe noise. The main objective of this portion of the study was to assess whether pulse blowing from the trailing edge of a CCW resulted in more, less, or the same amount of radiated noise to the farfield. Results show that a reduction in farfield noise of up to 5 dB is measured when pulse flow is compared with steady flow for an equivalent lift configuration. This reduction is in the spectral region associated with the trailing edge jet noise. This result is due to the unique advantage that pulsed flow has over steady flow. For a range of frequencies, more lift is experienced with the same mass flow as the steady case. Thus, for an equivalent lift and slot height, the pulsed system can operate at lower jet velocities, and hence lower jet noise. The computational analysis showed that for a given time-averaged mass flow rate, pulsed jets give a higher value of C(sub l) and a higher L/D than equivalent steady jets. This benefit is attributable to higher instantaneous jet velocities, and higher instantaneous C(sub mu) values for the pulsed jet. Pulsed jet benefits increase at higher

  8. Macrophage recruitment, but not interleukin 1 beta activation, enhances noise-induced hearing damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Yu; Fujimoto, Chisato; Kashio, Akinori; Kondo, Kenji; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2017-11-18

    It has been suggested that macrophages or inflammatory monocytes participate in the pathology of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), but it is unclear how extensively these cells contribute to the development of temporary and/or permanent NIHL. To address this question, we used clodronate liposomes to deplete macrophages and monocytes. After clodronate liposome injection, mice were exposed to 4-kHz octave band noise at 121 dB for 4 h. Compared to vehicle-injected controls, clodronate-treated mice exhibited significantly reduced permanent threshold shifts at 4 and 8 kHz and significantly smaller outer hair cell losses in the lower-apical cochlear turn. Following noise exposure, the stria vascularis had significantly more cells expressing the macrophage-specific protein F4/80, and this effect was significantly suppressed by clodronate treatment. These F4/80-positive cells expressed interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), which noise exposure activated. However, IL-1β deficient mice did not exhibit significant resistance to intense noise when compared to wild-type mice. These findings suggest that macrophages that enter the cochlea after noise exposure are involved in NIHL, whereas IL-1β inhibition does not reverse this cochlear damage. Therefore, macrophages may be a promising therapeutic target in human sensorineural hearing losses such as NIHL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Active noise cancellation of low frequency noise propagating in a duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Forouharmajd

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: With regard to the wide range of frequencies of different noise sources, having optimized circumstances in the duct, microphone location on the duct body or even the distance of the speakers may be important in signal processing, noise sampling and anti noise production.

  10. Control of noise and structural vibration a MATLAB-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Qibo

    2013-01-01

    Control of Noise and Structural Vibration presents a MATLAB®-based approach to solving the problems of undesirable noise generation and transmission by structures and of undesirable vibration within structures in response to environmental or operational forces. The fundamentals of acoustics, vibration and coupling between vibrating structures and the sound fields they generate are introduced including a discussion of the finite element method for vibration analysis. Following this, the treatment of sound and vibration control begins, illustrated by example systems such as beams, plates and double plate structures. Sensor and actuator placement is explained as is the idea of modal sensor–actuators. The design of appropriate feedback systems includes consideration of basic stability criteria and robust active structural acoustic control. Single and multi-mode positive position feedback (PPF) control systems are also described in the context of loudspeaker–duct model with non-collocated loudspeaker–microp...

  11. Linear signal noise summer accurately determines and controls S/N ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundry, J. L.

    1966-01-01

    Linear signal noise summer precisely controls the relative power levels of signal and noise, and mixes them linearly in accurately known ratios. The S/N ratio accuracy and stability are greatly improved by this technique and are attained simultaneously.

  12. Comparison of various decentralised structural and cavity feedback control strategies for transmitted noise reduction through a double panel structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jen-Hsuan; Berkhoff, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    This paper compares various decentralised control strategies, including structural and acoustic actuator-sensor configuration designs, to reduce noise transmission through a double panel structure. The comparison is based on identical control stability indexes. The double panel structure consists of two panels with air in between and offers the advantages of low sound transmission at high frequencies, low heat transmission, and low weight. The double panel structure is widely used, such as in the aerospace and automotive industries. Nevertheless, the resonance of the cavity and the poor sound transmission loss at low frequencies limit the double panel's noise control performance. Applying active structural acoustic control to the panels or active noise control to the cavity has been discussed in many papers. In this paper, the resonances of the panels and the cavity are considered simultaneously to further reduce the transmitted noise through an existing double panel structure. A structural-acoustic coupled model is developed to investigate and compare various structural control and cavity control methods. Numerical analysis and real-time control results show that structural control should be applied to both panels. Three types of cavity control sources are presented and compared. The results indicate that the largest noise reduction is obtained with cavity control by loudspeakers modified to operate as incident pressure sources.

  13. Air traffic controllers' long-term speech-in-noise training effects: A control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaballos, Maria T P; Plasencia, Daniel P; González, María L Z; de Miguel, Angel R; Macías, Ángel R

    2016-01-01

    Speech perception in noise relies on the capacity of the auditory system to process complex sounds using sensory and cognitive skills. The possibility that these can be trained during adulthood is of special interest in auditory disorders, where speech in noise perception becomes compromised. Air traffic controllers (ATC) are constantly exposed to radio communication, a situation that seems to produce auditory learning. The objective of this study has been to quantify this effect. 19 ATC and 19 normal hearing individuals underwent a speech in noise test with three signal to noise ratios: 5, 0 and -5 dB. Noise and speech were presented through two different loudspeakers in azimuth position. Speech tokes were presented at 65 dB SPL, while white noise files were at 60, 65 and 70 dB respectively. Air traffic controllers outperform the control group in all conditions [P<0.05 in ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U tests]. Group differences were largest in the most difficult condition, SNR=-5 dB. However, no correlation between experience and performance were found for any of the conditions tested. The reason might be that ceiling performance is achieved much faster than the minimum experience time recorded, 5 years, although intrinsic cognitive abilities cannot be disregarded. ATC demonstrated enhanced ability to hear speech in challenging listening environments. This study provides evidence that long-term auditory training is indeed useful in achieving better speech-in-noise understanding even in adverse conditions, although good cognitive qualities are likely to be a basic requirement for this training to be effective. Our results show that ATC outperform the control group in all conditions. Thus, this study provides evidence that long-term auditory training is indeed useful in achieving better speech-in-noise understanding even in adverse conditions.

  14. Type of activity and order of experimental conditions affect noise annoyance by identifiable and unidentifiable transportation noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kim; Bronkhorst, Adelbert W; Meeter, Martijn

    2018-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that identifiability of sound sources influence noise annoyance levels. The aim of the present experiment was to additionally study the effects of actively performing a task versus a less active pastime on noise annoyance. This was done by asking participants to perform a task (task condition) or read a magazine of their choice (no-task condition), while listening to identifiable and unidentifiable samples of transportation noise at varying sound exposure levels (55-85 ASEL). Annoyance was higher for identifiable samples (recordings) than for unidentifiable transformed samples (with equal spectral energy and envelope). Although there was no main effect of activity type on noise annoyance, for the transformed samples, an interaction was found between activity type and sound exposure levels: annoyance started lower in the no-task condition, but rose more steeply with ascending exposure levels than was the case during task performance (large effect). When assessing order effects, it was found that annoyance was higher when the task condition came first, especially for lower sound exposure levels (large effects). It is therefore concluded that the type of activity and the condition order do influence noise annoyance but in interaction with exposure levels, the type of noise and habituation.

  15. Applications of aero-acoustic analysis to wind turbine noise control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowson, M.V.

    1992-01-01

    Wind turbine noise generation mechanisms are essentially equivalent to the aero-acoustic mechanisms of other rotors, which have been studied in depth for many years. Basic sources for the wind turbine noise radiation process are defined, and their significance assessed. From the analysis, areas of potential improvement in wind turbine noise prediction are defined. Suggestions are made for approaches to wind turbine noise control which separate the noise problems at cut-in from those at rated power. Some of these offer the possibility of noise reduction without unfavourable effects on performance. (author)

  16. Applications of aero-acoustic analysis to wind turbine noise control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowson, M.

    1993-01-01

    Wind turbine noise generation mechanisms are essentially equivalent to the aero-acoustic mechanisms of other rotors, which have been studied in depth for many years. Basic sources for the wind turbine noise radiation process are defined, and their significance assessed. From the analysis, areas of potential improvement in wind turbine noise prediction are defined. Suggestions are made for approaches to wind turbine noise control which separate the noise problems at cut-in from those at rated power. Some of these offer the possibility of noise reduction without unfavourable effects on performance. (author)

  17. Multiobjective Output Feedback Control of a Class of Stochastic Hybrid Systems with State-Dependent Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Aberkane

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with dynamic output feedback control of continuous-time active fault tolerant control systems with Markovian parameters (AFTCSMP and state-dependent noise. The main contribution is to formulate conditions for multiperformance design, related to this class of stochastic hybrid systems, that take into account the problematic resulting from the fact that the controller only depends on the fault detection and isolation (FDI process. The specifications and objectives under consideration include stochastic stability, ℋ2 and ℋ∞ (or more generally, stochastic integral quadratic constraints performances. Results are formulated as matrix inequalities. The theoretical results are illustrated using a classical example from literature.

  18. Noise Reduction in Double‿Panel Structures by Cavity and Panel Resonance Control

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the cavity and the panel resonance control in a double‿panel structure. The double‿panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its light weight and effective transmission‿loss at high frequency. However, the resonance of the cavity and the poor transmission‿loss at low frequency limit its noise control performance. Applying active control forces on the panels or utili...

  19. Noise promotes independent control of gamma oscillations and grid firing within recurrent attractor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanka, Lukas; van Rossum, Mark CW; Nolan, Matthew F

    2015-01-01

    Neural computations underlying cognitive functions require calibration of the strength of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic connections and are associated with modulation of gamma frequency oscillations in network activity. However, principles relating gamma oscillations, synaptic strength and circuit computations are unclear. We address this in attractor network models that account for grid firing and theta-nested gamma oscillations in the medial entorhinal cortex. We show that moderate intrinsic noise massively increases the range of synaptic strengths supporting gamma oscillations and grid computation. With moderate noise, variation in excitatory or inhibitory synaptic strength tunes the amplitude and frequency of gamma activity without disrupting grid firing. This beneficial role for noise results from disruption of epileptic-like network states. Thus, moderate noise promotes independent control of multiplexed firing rate- and gamma-based computational mechanisms. Our results have implications for tuning of normal circuit function and for disorders associated with changes in gamma oscillations and synaptic strength. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06444.001 PMID:26146940

  20. CONTROLLING RISK DUE TO NOISE ON FERRY BOAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Nikolic

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Environmental and occupational noise is common nuisance that affects the health of employees. Performed health checks of employees engaged by Company “Pomorski Saobraćaj” showed that 5% of examined sailors had hearing loss. The results were a trigger for starting experiment on noise risk assessment with objective to discover possibilities of noise pollution presence, precise significant noise sources and describe solutions for eliminating negative effects. Several measurements on five positions were performed on ferry boat “KAMENARI”, according to EC Physical Agents Directive and Merchant Shipping and Fishing Vessels Regulations 2007. Noise on selected positions exceeded the limit for about 1-5dB. Noise exposure level was 84.5dB. Diesel engine, exhaust system and structural noise were main sources of excessive noise. Experiment shows noise presence as nuisance that affects sailors. Noise presents a serious threat for sailor’s health. It interferes with crew communication and jeopardizes navigation safety. Technical measures, crew health checks and noise monitoring could prevent all negative effects.

  1. Optimizing noise control strategy in a forging workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Hamideh; Ramazanifar, Ehsan; Bagherzadeh, Jalal

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a computer program based on a genetic algorithm is developed to find an economic solution for noise control in a forging workshop. Initially, input data, including characteristics of sound sources, human exposure, abatement techniques, and production plans are inserted into the model. Using sound pressure levels at working locations, the operators who are at higher risk are identified and picked out for the next step. The program is devised in MATLAB such that the parameters can be easily defined and changed for comparison. The final results are structured into 4 sections that specify an appropriate abatement method for each operator and machine, minimum allowance time for high-risk operators, required damping material for enclosures, and minimum total cost of these treatments. The validity of input data in addition to proper settings in the optimization model ensures the final solution is practical and economically reasonable.

  2. Subjective annoyance caused by indoor low-level and low frequency noise and control method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DI Guo-qing; ZHANG Bang-jun; SHANG Qi

    2005-01-01

    The influence of low-level noise has not been widely noticed. This paper discovered that low-level and low frequency noise(Aweighted equivalent level Leq < 45 dB) causes higher probability of subjective annoyance. The fuzzy mathematic principle was applied to deal with the threshold level of subjective annoyance from noise in this study; there is preferable relationship between the indoor noise and noise annoyance at low frequency noise level. Study indicated at the same centered noise level, the change of annoyance probability is mainly caused by the change of the frequency spectrum characteristic of the indoor noise. Under low noise level environment, without change of the medium-low frequency noise, the slight increase of medium-high frequency noise level with the help of noise sheltering effect can significantly reduce the noise annoyance. This discovery brings a new resolution on how to improve the environmental quality of working or living places. A noise control model is given in this study according to the acoustic analysis.

  3. Noise-Induced Transition in a Voltage-Controlled Oscillator Neuron Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Huizhang; Liu Xuemei; Li Zhibing; Ai Baoquan; Liu Lianggang

    2008-01-01

    In the presence of Gaussian white noise, we study the properties of voltage-controlled oscillator neuron model and discuss the effects of the additive and multiplicative noise. It is found that the additive noise can accelerate and counterwork the firing of neuron, which depends on the value of central frequency of neuron itself, while multiplicative noise can induce the continuous change or mutation of membrane potential

  4. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  5. Controlling noise-induced behavior of excitable networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patidar, S; Pototsky, A; Janson, N B

    2009-01-01

    The paper demonstrates the possibility to control the collective behavior of a large network of excitable stochastic units, in which oscillations are induced merely by external random input. Each network element is represented by the FitzHugh-Nagumo system under the influence of noise, and the elements are coupled through the mean field. As known previously, the collective behavior of units in such a network can range from synchronous to non-synchronous spiking with a variety of states in between. We apply the Pyragas delayed feedback to the mean field of the network and demonstrate that this technique is capable of suppressing or weakening the collective synchrony, or of inducing the synchrony where it was absent. On the plane of control parameters we indicate the areas where suppression of synchrony is achieved. To explain the numerical observations on a qualitative level, we use the semi-analytic approach based on the cumulant expansion of the distribution density within Gaussian approximation. We perform bifurcation analysis of the obtained cumulant equations with delay and demonstrate that the regions of stability of its steady state have qualitatively the same structure as the regions of synchrony suppression of the original stochastic equations. We also demonstrate the delay-induced multistability in the stochastic network. These results are relevant to the control of unwanted behavior in neural networks.

  6. Low-noise encoding of active touch by layer 4 in the somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hires, Samuel Andrew; Gutnisky, Diego A; Yu, Jianing; O'Connor, Daniel H; Svoboda, Karel

    2015-08-06

    Cortical spike trains often appear noisy, with the timing and number of spikes varying across repetitions of stimuli. Spiking variability can arise from internal (behavioral state, unreliable neurons, or chaotic dynamics in neural circuits) and external (uncontrolled behavior or sensory stimuli) sources. The amount of irreducible internal noise in spike trains, an important constraint on models of cortical networks, has been difficult to estimate, since behavior and brain state must be precisely controlled or tracked. We recorded from excitatory barrel cortex neurons in layer 4 during active behavior, where mice control tactile input through learned whisker movements. Touch was the dominant sensorimotor feature, with >70% spikes occurring in millisecond timescale epochs after touch onset. The variance of touch responses was smaller than expected from Poisson processes, often reaching the theoretical minimum. Layer 4 spike trains thus reflect the millisecond-timescale structure of tactile input with little noise.

  7. Noise focusing and the emergence of coherent activity in neuronal cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, Javier G.; Soriano, Jordi; Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Teller, Sara; Casademunt, Jaume

    2013-09-01

    At early stages of development, neuronal cultures in vitro spontaneously reach a coherent state of collective firing in a pattern of nearly periodic global bursts. Although understanding the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks is of chief importance in neuroscience, the origin and nature of that pulsation has remained elusive. By combining high-resolution calcium imaging with modelling in silico, we show that this behaviour is controlled by the propagation of waves that nucleate randomly in a set of points that is specific to each culture and is selected by a non-trivial interplay between dynamics and topology. The phenomenon is explained by the noise focusing effect--a strong spatio-temporal localization of the noise dynamics that originates in the complex structure of avalanches of spontaneous activity. Results are relevant to neuronal tissues and to complex networks with integrate-and-fire dynamics and metric correlations, for instance, in rumour spreading on social networks.

  8. 'NASA Invention of the Year' Controls Noise and Vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Developed at NASA's Langley Research Center, the Macro-Fiber Composite (MFC) is designed to control vibration, noise, and deflections in composite structural beams and panels. Smart Material Corporation specializes in the development of piezocomposite components, and licensed the MFC technology from Langley in 2002. To date, Smart Material Corporation has sold MFCs to over 120 customers, including such industry giants as Volkswagen, Toyota, Honda, BMW, General Electric, and the tennis company, HEAD. The company estimates that its customers have filed at least 100 patents for their various unique uses of the technology. In addition, the company's product portfolio has grown to include piezoceramic fibers and fiber composites, piezoceramic actuators and sensors, and test equipment for these products. It also offers a compact, lightweight power system for MFC testing and validation. Consumer applications already on the market include piezoelectric systems as part of audio speakers, phonograph cartridges and microphones, and recreational products requiring vibration control, such as skis, snowboards, baseball bats, hockey sticks, and tennis racquets.

  9. The effect of human activity noise on the acoustic quality in open plan office

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlbæk, Tania Stenholt; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    A disadvantage of open plan offices is the noise annoyance. Noise problems in open plan offices have been dealt with in several studies, and standards have been set up. Still, what has not been taken into account is the effect of human activity noise on acoustic conditions. In this study......, measurements of the general office noise levels and the room acoustic conditions according to ISO 3382-3 have been carried out in five open plan offices. Probability density functions of the sound pressure level have been obtained, and the human activity noise has been identified. Results showed a decrease...... in STI-values including the human activity noise compared to STI-values including only technical background noise as the standard recommends. Furthermore, at 500 Hz a regression analysis showed that the density of people in an room, absorption area, reverberation time as well as the ISO 3382-3 parameter...

  10. Anthropogenic noise alters bat activity levels and echolocation calls

    OpenAIRE

    Bunkley, Jessie P.; McClure, Christopher J.W.; Kleist, Nathan J.; Francis, Clinton D.; Barber, Jesse R.

    2015-01-01

    Negative impacts from anthropogenic noise are well documented for many wildlife taxa. Investigations of the effects of noise on bats however, have not been conducted outside of the laboratory. Bats that hunt arthropods rely on auditory information to forage. Part of this acoustic information can fall within the spectrum of anthropogenic noise, which can potentially interfere with signal reception and processing. Compressor stations associated with natural gas extraction produce broadband nois...

  11. An intervention for noise control of blast furnace in steel industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmohammadi, Rostam; Giahi, Omid; Aliabadi, Mohsen; Darvishi, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Noise pollution is currently a major health risk factor for workers in industries. The aim of this study was to investigate noise pollution and implement a control intervention plan for blast furnace in a steel industry. The measurement of sound pressure level (SPL) along with frequency analysis was done with the sound-level-meter Cell-450. Personal noise exposure was performed using dosimeter TES-1345 calibrated with CEL-282. Before planning noise controls, acoustic insulation properties of the furnace control unit and workers' rest room were assessed. Control room and workers' rest room were redesigned in order to improve acoustical condition. The SPL before intervention around the Blast Furnace was 90.3 dB (L) and its dominant frequency was 4000 Hz. Besides, noise transmission loss of the control and rest rooms were 10.3 dB and 4.2 dB, respectively. After intervention, noise reduction rates in the control and rest rooms were 27.4 dB and 27.7 dB, respectively. The workers' noise dose before and after the intervention was 240% and less than 100%, respectively. Improvement the workroom acoustic conditions through noise insulation can be considered effective method for preventing workers exposure to harmful noise.

  12. Inertia Wheel on Low-Noise Active Magnetic Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabelli, S.; Genta, G.; Silvagni, M.; Tonoli, A.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are particularly suited for space applications for a number of reasons: - they are ideally suited for vacuum applications; - the lack of lubrication and wear enhances the reliability and guaranties a long maintenance-free operation - the low drag torque decreases power consumption and reduces the torque exerted on the stator of the machine. - the possibility of insulating actively the spacecraft from the excitation due to unbalance of the rotating system In the case of reaction wheels, a well designed magnetic suspension allows high speed operation with a very low power consumption and vibration level. Conversely, microgravity (and possibly vacuum) operation is an advantage for magnetic bearings. The absence of static forces allows to operate with low current levels, thus reducing electrical noise and allowing to reach even lower vibration levels than in Earth applications of magnetic bearings. Active magnetic bearings (AMB) allow to adapt the working characteristics of the system to the operating needs: it is possible to use the actuators to lock the system during launch (absence of grabbers) and to stiffen the suspension when the spacecraft is accelerated (impulsive phases), while working in conditions optimised for microgravity when this is needed. Magnetic suspension systems designed for microgravity environment cannot be correctly tested on the ground. Testing in ground conditions results in the need of grossly overdesigning the levitation device; furthermore, in some cases ground testing is completely impossible, if not by introducing devices which compensate for the Earth gravitational field. If the compensation for the gravitational force is supplied by the same actuators used for microgravity operation, the actuators and the power amplifiers must be overdesigned and in some cases the suspension can be altogether impossible. They work in conditions which are much different from nominal ones and, above all, it is impossible to reach the

  13. Developing noise control strategies for entire railway networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertli, Jakob

    2006-06-01

    The EU Environmental Noise Directive (2002/49) requires member states to deliver noise maps to the commission by 2007 and action plans by 2008 both for agglomerations as well as for major roads, railways and airports. Noise mitigation projects resulting from action plans are usually very expensive and therefore may threaten the economic viability of the railways in the current harsh competitive transport market, thus hindering sustainable transport policies. It is therefore of vital interest that the action plans and the resulting projects are designed in the most cost-effective way possible. The EU and Union of Railways (UIC) sponsored project Strategies and Tools to Assess and Implement noise Reducing measures for Railway Systems (STAIRRS) recognized this need and developed a tool, with which such optimal solutions can be obtained for entire railway networks. Since data collection is the most expensive part of the analysis, noise mapping data is ideally collected in such a way that it can be used for the calculation of the different scenarios, from which the most cost-effective action plans are chosen. The paper shows how the STAIRRS tool is used for this purpose and how cost-effectiveness considerations have led to optimal railway noise mitigation strategies in Switzerland and have given a basis for noise related decision making in Luxembourg.

  14. Advanced Noise Control Fan: A 20-Year Retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutliff, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The ANCF test bed is used for evaluating fan noise reduction concepts, developing noise measurement technologies, and providing a database for Aero-acoustic code development. Rig Capabilities: 4 foot 16 bladed rotor @ 2500 rpm, Auxiliary air delivery system (3 lbm/sec @ 6/12 psi), Variable configuration (rotor pitch angle, stator count/position, duct length), synthetic acoustic noise generation (tone/broadband). Measurement Capabilities: 112 channels dynamic data system, Unique rotating rake mode measuremen, Farfield (variable radius), Duct wall microphones, Stator vane microphones, Two component CTA w/ traversing, ESP for static pressures.

  15. Automatic exposure control systems designed to maintain constant image noise: effects on computed tomography dose and noise relative to clinically accepted technique charts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazza, Christopher P; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James M; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2015-01-01

    To compare computed tomography dose and noise arising from use of an automatic exposure control (AEC) system designed to maintain constant image noise as patient size varies with clinically accepted technique charts and AEC systems designed to vary image noise. A model was developed to describe tube current modulation as a function of patient thickness. Relative dose and noise values were calculated as patient width varied for AEC settings designed to yield constant or variable noise levels and were compared to empirically derived values used by our clinical practice. Phantom experiments were performed in which tube current was measured as a function of thickness using a constant-noise-based AEC system and the results were compared with clinical technique charts. For 12-, 20-, 28-, 44-, and 50-cm patient widths, the requirement of constant noise across patient size yielded relative doses of 5%, 14%, 38%, 260%, and 549% and relative noises of 435%, 267%, 163%, 61%, and 42%, respectively, as compared with our clinically used technique chart settings at each respective width. Experimental measurements showed that a constant noise-based AEC system yielded 175% relative noise for a 30-cm phantom and 206% relative dose for a 40-cm phantom compared with our clinical technique chart. Automatic exposure control systems that prescribe constant noise as patient size varies can yield excessive noise in small patients and excessive dose in obese patients compared with clinically accepted technique charts. Use of noise-level technique charts and tube current limits can mitigate these effects.

  16. A Novel Recurrent Neural Network for Manipulator Control With Improved Noise Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Wang, Huanqing; Rafique, Muhammad Usman

    2017-04-12

    In this paper, we propose a novel recurrent neural network to resolve the redundancy of manipulators for efficient kinematic control in the presence of noises in a polynomial type. Leveraging the high-order derivative properties of polynomial noises, a deliberately devised neural network is proposed to eliminate the impact of noises and recover the accurate tracking of desired trajectories in workspace. Rigorous analysis shows that the proposed neural law stabilizes the system dynamics and the position tracking error converges to zero in the presence of noises. Extensive simulations verify the theoretical results. Numerical comparisons show that existing dual neural solutions lose stability when exposed to large constant noises or time-varying noises. In contrast, the proposed approach works well and has a low tracking error comparable to noise-free situations.

  17. Long-term exposure to noise impairs cortical sound processing and attention control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujala, Teija; Shtyrov, Yury; Winkler, Istvan; Saher, Marieke; Tervaniemi, Mari; Sallinen, Mikael; Teder-Sälejärvi, Wolfgang; Alho, Kimmo; Reinikainen, Kalevi; Näätänen, Risto

    2004-11-01

    Long-term exposure to noise impairs human health, causing pathological changes in the inner ear as well as other anatomical and physiological deficits. Numerous individuals are daily exposed to excessive noise. However, there is a lack of systematic research on the effects of noise on cortical function. Here we report data showing that long-term exposure to noise has a persistent effect on central auditory processing and leads to concurrent behavioral deficits. We found that speech-sound discrimination was impaired in noise-exposed individuals, as indicated by behavioral responses and the mismatch negativity brain response. Furthermore, irrelevant sounds increased the distractibility of the noise-exposed subjects, which was shown by increased interference in task performance and aberrant brain responses. These results demonstrate that long-term exposure to noise has long-lasting detrimental effects on central auditory processing and attention control.

  18. Effects of repeated exposure to white noise on central cholinergic activity in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, H

    1988-03-01

    Acute (45 min) exposure to noise has been shown to decrease sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake activity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat. In the present experiment, the effects of repeated noise exposure on choline uptake in these two brain regions were studied. Rats were exposed to 100-dB white noise in ten 45-min sessions. Tolerance developed to the effects of noise on choline uptake. In addition, the effects were found to be classically conditionable to cues in the exposure environment. These data may have important implications in understanding the health hazard of noise exposure in both the public and occupational environments.

  19. FIACH: A biophysical model for automatic retrospective noise control in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Tim M; Weiss-Croft, Louise J; Centeno, Maria; Shamshiri, Elhum A; Perani, Suejen; Baldeweg, Torsten; Clark, Christopher A; Carmichael, David W

    2016-01-01

    Different noise sources in fMRI acquisition can lead to spurious false positives and reduced sensitivity. We have developed a biophysically-based model (named FIACH: Functional Image Artefact Correction Heuristic) which extends current retrospective noise control methods in fMRI. FIACH can be applied to both General Linear Model (GLM) and resting state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) studies. FIACH is a two-step procedure involving the identification and correction of non-physiological large amplitude temporal signal changes and spatial regions of high temporal instability. We have demonstrated its efficacy in a sample of 42 healthy children while performing language tasks that include overt speech with known activations. We demonstrate large improvements in sensitivity when FIACH is compared with current methods of retrospective correction. FIACH reduces the confounding effects of noise and increases the study's power by explaining significant variance that is not contained within the commonly used motion parameters. The method is particularly useful in detecting activations in inferior temporal regions which have proven problematic for fMRI. We have shown greater reproducibility and robustness of fMRI responses using FIACH in the context of task induced motion. In a clinical setting this will translate to increasing the reliability and sensitivity of fMRI used for the identification of language lateralisation and eloquent cortex. FIACH can benefit studies of cognitive development in young children, patient populations and older adults. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Residential traffic noise exposure and vestibular schwannoma - a Danish case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roswall, Nina; Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Schüz, Joachim; Johansen, Christoffer; Jensen, Steen Solvang; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Sørensen, Mette

    2017-10-01

    Few risk factors for sporadic vestibular schwannoma (VS) are known. Several studies have proposed an increased risk with occupational noise exposure, whereas no studies have investigated residential traffic noise exposure as a risk factor. The present study investigated if residential traffic noise was associated with vestibular schwannoma in a large, population-based Danish case-control study. We identified 1454 VS cases, age above 30 years at diagnosis, between 1990 and 2007. For each case, we selected two random population controls, matched on sex and year of birth. Road and railway traffic noise at the residence was calculated for all present and historical addresses between 1987 and index date. Associations between traffic noise and risk for VS were estimated using conditional logistic regression, adjusted for education, disposable personal income, cohabitation status, railway noise exposure, municipal population density, and municipal income. A two-year time-weighted mean road traffic noise exposure was associated with an adjusted odds ratio of 0.92 (0.82-1.03) for developing VS, per 10 dB increment. There was no clear trend in categorical analyses. Similarly, linear and categorical analyses of residential railway noise did not suggest an association. We found no interaction with demographics, year of diagnosis, individual and municipal socioeconomic variables, and railway noise exposure. The results did not differ by tumor side, spread or size. The present study does not suggest an association between residential traffic noise and VS.

  1. Cingulo-opercular activity affects incidental memory encoding for speech in noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaden, Kenneth I; Teubner-Rhodes, Susan; Ahlstrom, Jayne B; Dubno, Judy R; Eckert, Mark A

    2017-08-15

    Correctly understood speech in difficult listening conditions is often difficult to remember. A long-standing hypothesis for this observation is that the engagement of cognitive resources to aid speech understanding can limit resources available for memory encoding. This hypothesis is consistent with evidence that speech presented in difficult conditions typically elicits greater activity throughout cingulo-opercular regions of frontal cortex that are proposed to optimize task performance through adaptive control of behavior and tonic attention. However, successful memory encoding of items for delayed recognition memory tasks is consistently associated with increased cingulo-opercular activity when perceptual difficulty is minimized. The current study used a delayed recognition memory task to test competing predictions that memory encoding for words is enhanced or limited by the engagement of cingulo-opercular activity during challenging listening conditions. An fMRI experiment was conducted with twenty healthy adult participants who performed a word identification in noise task that was immediately followed by a delayed recognition memory task. Consistent with previous findings, word identification trials in the poorer signal-to-noise ratio condition were associated with increased cingulo-opercular activity and poorer recognition memory scores on average. However, cingulo-opercular activity decreased for correctly identified words in noise that were not recognized in the delayed memory test. These results suggest that memory encoding in difficult listening conditions is poorer when elevated cingulo-opercular activity is not sustained. Although increased attention to speech when presented in difficult conditions may detract from more active forms of memory maintenance (e.g., sub-vocal rehearsal), we conclude that task performance monitoring and/or elevated tonic attention supports incidental memory encoding in challenging listening conditions. Copyright © 2017

  2. Quantum control with noisy fields: computational complexity versus sensitivity to noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallush, S; Khasin, M; Kosloff, R

    2014-01-01

    A closed quantum system is defined as completely controllable if an arbitrary unitary transformation can be executed using the available controls. In practice, control fields are a source of unavoidable noise, which has to be suppressed to retain controllability. Can one design control fields such that the effect of noise is negligible on the time-scale of the transformation? This question is intimately related to the fundamental problem of a connection between the computational complexity of the control problem and the sensitivity of the controlled system to noise. The present study considers a paradigm of control, where the Lie-algebraic structure of the control Hamiltonian is fixed, while the size of the system increases with the dimension of the Hilbert space representation of the algebra. We find two types of control tasks, easy and hard. Easy tasks are characterized by a small variance of the evolving state with respect to the operators of the control operators. They are relatively immune to noise and the control field is easy to find. Hard tasks have a large variance, are sensitive to noise and the control field is hard to find. The influence of noise increases with the size of the system, which is measured by the scaling factor N of the largest weight of the representation. For fixed time and control field the ability to control degrades as O(N) for easy tasks and as O(N 2 ) for hard tasks. As a consequence, even in the most favorable estimate, for large quantum systems, generic noise in the controls dominates for a typical class of target transformations, i.e. complete controllability is destroyed by noise. (paper)

  3. Effect of Unpleasant Loud Noise on Hippocampal Activities during Picture Encoding: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Fujita, Masafumi; Watanabe, Kazuko; Niwa, Masami; Takahashi, Toru; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Ido, Yasushi; Tomida, Mihoko; Onozuka, Minoru

    2006-01-01

    The functional link between the amygdala and hippocampus in humans has not been well documented. We examined the effect of unpleasant loud noise on hippocampal and amygdaloid activities during picture encoding by means of fMRI, and on the correct response in humans. The noise reduced activity in the hippocampus during picture encoding, decreased…

  4. The impact of traffic noise on mental performance considering complexity of activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Alimohammadi

    2015-12-01

      Conclusion: One of the most significant findings emerged from this study is that traffic noise seems to have no effect on the mentioned variables under simple activity condition. However, traffic noise has devastating effects on median reaction time, number of appeared stimuli and reactions under complex activity condition.

  5. Assessment and control design for steam vent noise in an oil refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monazzam, Mohammad Reza; Golmohammadi, Rostam; Nourollahi, Maryam; Momen Bellah Fard, Samaneh

    2011-06-13

    Noise is one of the most important harmful agents in work environment. Noise pollution in oil refinery industries is related to workers' health. This study aimed to determine the overall noise pollution of an oil refinery operation and its frequency analysis to determine the control plan for a vent noise in these industries. This experimental study performed in control unit of Tehran Oil Refinery in 2008. To determine the noise distributions, environmental noise measurements were carried out by lattice method according to basic information and technical process. The sound pressure level and frequency distribution was measured for each study sources subject separately was performed individually. According to the vent's specification, the measured steam noise characteristics reviewed and compared to the theoretical results of steam noise estimation. Eventually, a double expansion muffler was designed. Data analysis and graphical design were carried out using Excel software. The results of environmental noise measurements indicated that the level of sound pressure was above the national permitted level (85 dB (A)). The Mean level of sound pressure of the studied steam jet was 90.3 dB (L). The results of noise frequency analysis for the steam vents showed that the dominant frequency was 4000 Hz. To obtain 17 dB noise reductions, a double chamber aluminum muffler with 500 mm length and 200 mm diameter consisting pipe drilled was designed. The characteristics of steam vent noise were separated from other sources, a double expansion muffler was designed using a new method based on the level of steam noise, and principle sound frequency, a double expansion muffler was designed.

  6. Noise control, sound, and the vehicle design process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donavan, Paul

    2005-09-01

    For many products, noise and sound are viewed as necessary evils that need to be dealt with in order to bring the product successfully to market. They are generally not product ``exciters'' although some vehicle manufacturers do tune and advertise specific sounds to enhance the perception of their products. In this paper, influencing the design process for the ``evils,'' such as wind noise and road noise, are considered in more detail. There are three ingredients to successfully dealing with the evils in the design process. The first of these is knowing how excesses in noise effects the end customer in a tangible manner and how that effects customer satisfaction and ultimately sells. The second is having and delivering the knowledge of what is required of the design to achieve a satisfactory or even better level of noise performance. The third ingredient is having the commitment of the designers to incorporate the knowledge into their part, subsystem or system. In this paper, the elements of each of these ingredients are discussed in some detail and the attributes of a successful design process are enumerated.

  7. Advanced Trailing Edge Blowing Concepts for Fan Noise Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezar RIZEA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study documents trailing edge blowing research performed to reduce rotor / stator interaction noise in turbofan engines. The existing technique of filling every velocity deficit requires a large amount of air and is therefore impractical. The purpose of this research is to investigate new blowing configurations in order to achieve noise reduction with lesser amounts of air. Using the new configurations air is not injected into every fan blade, but is instead varied circumferentially. For example, blowing air may be applied to alternating fan blades. This type of blowing configuration both reduces the amount of air used and changes the spectral shape of the tonal interaction noise. The original tones at the blade passing frequency and its harmonics are reduced and new tones are introduced between them. This change in the tonal spectral shape increases the performance of acoustic liners used in conjunction with trailing edge blowing.

  8. Extraction of Overt Verbal Response from the Acoustic Noise in a Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scan by Use of Segmented Active Noise Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwan-Jin; Prasad, Parikshit; Qin, Yulin; Anderson, John R.

    2013-01-01

    A method to extract the subject's overt verbal response from the obscuring acoustic noise in an fMRI scan is developed by applying active noise cancellation with a conventional MRI microphone. Since the EPI scanning and its accompanying acoustic noise in fMRI are repetitive, the acoustic noise in one time segment was used as a reference noise in suppressing the acoustic noise in subsequent segments. However, the acoustic noise from the scanner was affected by the subject's movements, so the reference noise was adaptively adjusted as the scanner's acoustic properties varied in time. This method was successfully applied to a cognitive fMRI experiment with overt verbal responses. PMID:15723385

  9. Increase of Investment Appeal of Projects for Noise Control Measures in Urban Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmakov, A. V.; Ignatyeva, V. O.

    2017-11-01

    The authors analyzed the contemporary noise pollution level in the large cities of the Russian Federation. The article identifies the factors causing the reduction of acoustically comfortable urban territories. It states the task for the increase of investment appeal of the projects aimed at noise control measures adoption.

  10. Low noise signal-to-noise ratio enhancing readout circuit for current-mediated active pixel sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottaviani, Tony; Karim, Karim S.; Nathan, Arokia; Rowlands, John A.

    2006-01-01

    Diagnostic digital fluoroscopic applications continuously expose patients to low doses of x-ray radiation, posing a challenge to both the digital imaging pixel and readout electronics when amplifying small signal x-ray inputs. Traditional switch-based amorphous silicon imaging solutions, for instance, have produced poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) at low exposure levels owing to noise sources from the pixel readout circuitry. Current-mediated amorphous silicon pixels are an improvement over conventional pixel amplifiers with an enhanced SNR across the same low-exposure range, but whose output also becomes nonlinear with increasing dosage. A low-noise SNR enhancing readout circuit has been developed that enhances the charge gain of the current-mediated active pixel sensor (C-APS). The solution takes advantage of the current-mediated approach, primarily integrating the signal input at the desired frequency necessary for large-area imaging, while adding minimal noise to the signal readout. Experimental data indicates that the readout circuit can detect pixel outputs over a large bandwidth suitable for real-time digital diagnostic x-ray fluoroscopy. Results from hardware testing indicate that the minimum achievable C-APS output current that can be discerned at the digital fluoroscopic output from the enhanced SNR readout circuit is 0.341 nA. The results serve to highlight the applicability of amorphous silicon current-mediated pixel amplifiers for large-area flat panel x-ray imagers

  11. Contemporary theories of 1/f noise in motor control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diniz, A.; Wijnants, M.L.; Torre, K.; Barreiros, J.; Crato, N.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Hasselman, F.W.; Cox, R.F.A.; Orden, G.C. van; Delignieres, D.

    2011-01-01

    1/f noise has been discovered in a number of time series collected in psychological and behavioral experiments. This ubiquitous phenomenon has been ignored for a long time and classical models were not designed for accounting for these long-range correlations. The aim of this paper is to present and

  12. Simulation on a car interior aerodynamic noise control based on statistical energy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Wang, Dengfeng; Ma, Zhengdong

    2012-09-01

    How to simulate interior aerodynamic noise accurately is an important question of a car interior noise reduction. The unsteady aerodynamic pressure on body surfaces is proved to be the key effect factor of car interior aerodynamic noise control in high frequency on high speed. In this paper, a detail statistical energy analysis (SEA) model is built. And the vibra-acoustic power inputs are loaded on the model for the valid result of car interior noise analysis. The model is the solid foundation for further optimization on car interior noise control. After the most sensitive subsystems for the power contribution to car interior noise are pointed by SEA comprehensive analysis, the sound pressure level of car interior aerodynamic noise can be reduced by improving their sound and damping characteristics. The further vehicle testing results show that it is available to improve the interior acoustic performance by using detailed SEA model, which comprised by more than 80 subsystems, with the unsteady aerodynamic pressure calculation on body surfaces and the materials improvement of sound/damping properties. It is able to acquire more than 2 dB reduction on the central frequency in the spectrum over 800 Hz. The proposed optimization method can be looked as a reference of car interior aerodynamic noise control by the detail SEA model integrated unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and sensitivity analysis of acoustic contribution.

  13. Quantum dynamics manipulation using optimal control theory in the presence of laser field noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Praveen; Malinovskaya, Svetlana A.

    2010-08-01

    We discuss recent advances in optimal control theory (OCT) related to the investigation of the impact of control field noise on controllability of quantum dynamics. Two numerical methods, the gradient method and the iteration method, are paid particular attention. We analyze the problem of designing noisy control fields to maximize the vibrational transition probability in diatomic quantum systems, e.g. the HF and OH molecules. White noise is used as an additive random variable in the amplitude of the control field. It is demonstrated that the convergence is faster in the presence of noise and population transfer is increased by 0.04% for small values of noise compared to the field amplitude.

  14. The Effect of Background Noise on the Word Activation Process in Nonnative Spoken-Word Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharenborg, Odette; Coumans, Juul M. J.; van Hout, Roeland

    2018-01-01

    This article investigates 2 questions: (1) does the presence of background noise lead to a differential increase in the number of simultaneously activated candidate words in native and nonnative listening? And (2) do individual differences in listeners' cognitive and linguistic abilities explain the differential effect of background noise on…

  15. Noise Parameters of CW Radar Sensors Used in Active Defense Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Jenik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Active defense represents an innovative way of protecting military vehicles. It is based on the employment of a set of radar sensors which detect an approaching threat missile and activate a suitable counter-measure. Since the radar sensors are supposed to detect flying missiles very fast and, at the same time, distinguish them from stationary or slow-moving objects, CW Doppler radar sensors can be employed with a benefit. The submitted article deals with a complex noise analysis of this type of sensors. The analysis considers the noise of linear and quasi-linear RF components, phase-noise of the local oscillator as well as the noise of low-frequency circuits. Since the incidence of the phase-noise depends strongly upon the time delay between the reference and the cross-talked signals, a new method of measuring noise parameters utilizing a reflecting wall has been developed and verified. The achieved results confirm potentially high influence of the phase-noise on the noise parameters of the mentioned type of radar sensors. Obtained results can be used for the analysis of noise parameters of the similar but even more complex sensors.

  16. A noise-reduction program in a pediatric operation theatre is associated with surgeon's benefits and a reduced rate of complications: a prospective controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Carsten R; Neis, Jan Philipp; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Grote, Gudela; Ure, Benno M

    2014-05-01

    We assessed the impact of a noise-reduction program in a pediatric operating theatre. Adverse effects from noise pollution in theatres have been demonstrated. In 156 operations spatially resolved, sound levels were measured before and after a noise-reduction program on the basis of education, rules, and technical devices (Sound Ear). Surgical complications were recorded. The surgeon's biometric (saliva cortisol, electrodermal activity) and behavioral stress responses (questionnaires) were measured and correlated with mission protocols and individual noise sensitivity. Median noise levels in the control group versus the interventional group were reduced by -3 ± 3 dB(A) (63 vs 59 dB(A), P 0.05). Spontaneous noise during pediatric operations attains the magnitude of a lawn mower and peaks resemble a passing truck. The sound intensity could be reduced by 50% by specific measures. This reduction was associated with a significantly lowered number of postoperative complications. The surgeon's benefits are idiosyncratic with "responders" experiencing marked improvements.

  17. Visual signal detection in structured backgrounds. II. Effects of contrast gain control, background variations, and white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, M. P.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of visual detection of a signal superimposed on one of two identical backgrounds show performance degradation when the background has high contrast and is similar in spatial frequency and/or orientation to the signal. To account for this finding, models include a contrast gain control mechanism that pools activity across spatial frequency, orientation and space to inhibit (divisively) the response of the receptor sensitive to the signal. In tasks in which the observer has to detect a known signal added to one of M different backgrounds grounds due to added visual noise, the main sources of degradation are the stochastic noise in the image and the suboptimal visual processing. We investigate how these two sources of degradation (contrast gain control and variations in the background) interact in a task in which the signal is embedded in one of M locations in a complex spatially varying background (structured background). We use backgrounds extracted from patient digital medical images. To isolate effects of the fixed deterministic background (the contrast gain control) from the effects of the background variations, we conduct detection experiments with three different background conditions: (1) uniform background, (2) a repeated sample of structured background, and (3) different samples of structured background. Results show that human visual detection degrades from the uniform background condition to the repeated background condition and degrades even further in the different backgrounds condition. These results suggest that both the contrast gain control mechanism and the background random variations degrade human performance in detection of a signal in a complex, spatially varying background. A filter model and added white noise are used to generate estimates of sampling efficiencies, an equivalent internal noise, an equivalent contrast-gain-control-induced noise, and an equivalent noise due to the variations in the structured background.

  18. In-Service Performance and Costs of Methods to Control Urban Rail System Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    This study evaluates the acoustic and economic effectiveness of five methods of controlling wheel/rail noise and vibration on urban rail transit systems, namely: rail grinding, wheel truing, resilient wheels, ring-damped wheels, and welded vs. jointe...

  19. Possibilities to employ noise analysis techniques in controlling nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso Pallares, C.; Iglesias Ferrer, R.; Sarabia Molina, I.

    1998-01-01

    This work shows basic requirements the authors think must be complied with by monitoring systems for operational surveillance based on noise analysis techniques that in turn can be employed in the regulatory control

  20. Environmental noise levels affect the activity budget of the Florida manatee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L.; Donaghay, Percy L.; Miller, James H.; Tyack, Peter L.

    2005-09-01

    Manatees inhabit coastal bays, lagoons, and estuaries because they are dependent on the aquatic vegetation that grows in shallow waters. Food requirements force manatees to occupy the same areas in which human activities are the greatest. Noise produced from human activities has the potential to affect these animals by eliciting responses ranging from mild behavioral changes to extreme aversion. This study quantifies the behavioral responses of manatees to both changing levels of ambient noise and transient noise sources. Results indicate that elevated environmental noise levels do affect the overall activity budget of this species. The proportion of time manatees spend feeding, milling, and traveling in critical habitats changed as a function of noise level. More time was spent in the directed, goal-oriented behaviors of feeding and traveling, while less time was spent milling when noise levels were highest. The animals also responded to the transient noise of approaching vessels with changes in behavioral state and movements out of the geographical area. This suggests that manatees detect and respond to changes in environmental noise levels. Whether these changes legally constitute harassment and produce biologically significant effects need to be addressed with hypothesis-driven experiments and long-term monitoring. [For Animal Bioacoustics Best Student Paper Award.

  1. Noise filtering algorithm for the MFTF-B computer based control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minor, E.G.

    1983-01-01

    An algorithm to reduce the message traffic in the MFTF-B computer based control system is described. The algorithm filters analog inputs to the control system. Its purpose is to distinguish between changes in the inputs due to noise and changes due to significant variations in the quantity being monitored. Noise is rejected while significant changes are reported to the control system data base, thus keeping the data base updated with a minimum number of messages. The algorithm is memory efficient, requiring only four bytes of storage per analog channel, and computationally simple, requiring only subtraction and comparison. Quantitative analysis of the algorithm is presented for the case of additive Gaussian noise. It is shown that the algorithm is stable and tends toward the mean value of the monitored variable over a wide variety of additive noise distributions

  2. Two-antenna GNSS Aided-INS Alignment Using Adaptive Control of Filter Noise Covariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAO Yushi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper developed a theory of INS fine alignment in order to restrain the divergence of yaw angle,two antennas GNSS aided-INS integrated alignment algorithm was utilized.An attitude error measurement equation was conducted based on the relationship between baseline vectors calculated by two sensors and attitude error.The algorithm was executed by EKF using adaptive control of filter noise covariance.The experimental results showed that stability of the integrated system was improved under the system noise covariance adaptive control mechanism;The measurement noise covariance adaptive control mechanism can reduce the influence of measurement noise and improve the alignment absolute accuracy;Further improvement was achieved under the condition of minim bias of baseline length.The accuracy of roll and pitch was 0.02°,the accuracy of yaw was 0.04°.

  3. Noise-sustained and controlled synchronization of stirred excitable media by external forcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Changsong; Kurths, Juergen

    2005-01-01

    Most of the previous studies on constructive effects of noise in spatially extended systems have focused on static media, e.g., of the reaction-diffusion type. Because many active chemical or biological processes occur in a fluid environment with mixing, we investigate here the interplay among noise, excitability, mixing and external forcing in excitable media advected by a chaotic flow, in a two-dimensional FitzHugh-Nagumo model described by a set of reaction-advection-diffusion equations. In the absence of external forcing, noise may generate sustained coherent oscillations of the media in a range of noise intensities and stirring rates. We find that these noise-sustained oscillations can be synchronized by external periodic signals much smaller than the threshold. Analysis of the locking regions in the parameter space of the signal period, stirring rate and noise intensity reveals that the mechanism underlying the synchronization behaviour is a matching between the time scales of the forcing signal and the noise-sustained oscillations. The results demonstrate that, in the presence of a suitable level of noise, the stirred excitable media act as self-sustained oscillatory systems and become much easier to be entrained by weak external forcing. Our results may be verified in experiments and are useful to understand the synchronization of population dynamics of oceanic ecological systems by annual cycles

  4. Noise-sustained and controlled synchronization of stirred excitable media by external forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Changsong; Kurths, Juergen [Institute of Physics, University of Potsdam, PF 601553, 14415 Potsdam (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Most of the previous studies on constructive effects of noise in spatially extended systems have focused on static media, e.g., of the reaction-diffusion type. Because many active chemical or biological processes occur in a fluid environment with mixing, we investigate here the interplay among noise, excitability, mixing and external forcing in excitable media advected by a chaotic flow, in a two-dimensional FitzHugh-Nagumo model described by a set of reaction-advection-diffusion equations. In the absence of external forcing, noise may generate sustained coherent oscillations of the media in a range of noise intensities and stirring rates. We find that these noise-sustained oscillations can be synchronized by external periodic signals much smaller than the threshold. Analysis of the locking regions in the parameter space of the signal period, stirring rate and noise intensity reveals that the mechanism underlying the synchronization behaviour is a matching between the time scales of the forcing signal and the noise-sustained oscillations. The results demonstrate that, in the presence of a suitable level of noise, the stirred excitable media act as self-sustained oscillatory systems and become much easier to be entrained by weak external forcing. Our results may be verified in experiments and are useful to understand the synchronization of population dynamics of oceanic ecological systems by annual cycles.

  5. Reactive control of subsonic axial fan noise in a duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Choy, Y S; Huang, L; Cheng, L

    2014-10-01

    Suppressing the ducted fan noise at low frequencies without varying the flow capacity is still a technical challenge. This study examines a conceived device consisting of two tensioned membranes backed with cavities housing the axial fan for suppression of the sound radiation from the axial fan directly. The noise suppression is achieved by destructive interference between the sound fields from the axial fan of a dipole nature and sound radiation from the membrane via vibroacoustics coupling. A two-dimensional model with the flow effect is presented which allows the performance of the device to be explored analytically. The air flow influences the symmetrical behavior and excites the odd in vacuo mode response of the membrane due to kinematic coupling. Such an asymmetrical effect can be compromised with off-center alignment of the axial fan. Tension plays an important role to sustain the performance to revoke the deformation of the membrane during the axial fan operation. With the design of four appropriately tensioned membranes covered by a cylindrical cavity, the first and second blade passage frequencies of the axial fan can be reduced by at least 20 dB. The satisfactory agreement between experiment and theory demonstrates that its feasibility is practical.

  6. Sensor locations and noise reduction in high-purity batch distillation control loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oisiovici R.M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the sensor locations on the composition control of high-purity batch distillation columns has been investigated. Using concepts of the nonlinear control theory, an input-output linearizing controller was implemented to keep the distillate composition constant at a desired value by varying the reflux ratio. An Extended Kalman Filter was developed to estimate the compositions required in the control algorithm using temperature measurements. In the presence of measurement noise, the control performance depended greatly on the sensor locations. Placing the sensors further from the top stages reduced the detrimental effects of noise but increased the inference error. To achieve accurate composition control, both noise reduction and composition estimate accuracy should be considered in the selection of the sensor locations.

  7. Fault-tolerant controlled quantum secure direct communication over a collective quantum noise channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chun-Wei; Hwang, Tzonelih; Tsai, Chia-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This work proposes controlled quantum secure direct communication (CQSDC) over an ideal channel. Based on the proposed CQSDC, two fault-tolerant CQSDC protocols that are robust under two kinds of collective noises, collective-dephasing noise and collective-rotation noise, respectively, are constructed. Due to the use of quantum entanglement of the Bell state (or logical Bell state) as well as dense coding, the proposed protocols provide easier implementation as well as better qubit efficiency than other CQSDC protocols. Furthermore, the proposed protocols are also free from correlation-elicitation attack and other well-known attacks. (paper)

  8. Lévy noise improves the electrical activity in a neuron under electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Xu, Yong; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    As the fluctuations of the internal bioelectricity of nervous system is various and complex, the external electromagnetic radiation induced by magnet flux on membrane can be described by the non-Gaussian type distribution of Lévy noise. Thus, the electrical activities in an improved Hindmarsh-Rose model excited by the external electromagnetic radiation of Lévy noise are investigated and some interesting modes of the electrical activities are exhibited. The external electromagnetic radiation of Lévy noise leads to the mode transition of the electrical activities and spatial phase, such as from the rest state to the firing state, from the spiking state to the spiking state with more spikes, and from the spiking state to the bursting state. Then the time points of the firing state versus Lévy noise intensity are depicted. The increasing of Lévy noise intensity heightens the neuron firing. Also the stationary probability distribution functions of the membrane potential of the neuron induced by the external electromagnetic radiation of Lévy noise with different intensity, stability index and skewness papremeters are analyzed. Moreover, through the positive largest Lyapunov exponent, the parameter regions of chaotic electrical mode of the neuron induced by the external electromagnetic radiation of Lévy noise distribution are detected.

  9. Lévy noise improves the electrical activity in a neuron under electromagnetic radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wu

    Full Text Available As the fluctuations of the internal bioelectricity of nervous system is various and complex, the external electromagnetic radiation induced by magnet flux on membrane can be described by the non-Gaussian type distribution of Lévy noise. Thus, the electrical activities in an improved Hindmarsh-Rose model excited by the external electromagnetic radiation of Lévy noise are investigated and some interesting modes of the electrical activities are exhibited. The external electromagnetic radiation of Lévy noise leads to the mode transition of the electrical activities and spatial phase, such as from the rest state to the firing state, from the spiking state to the spiking state with more spikes, and from the spiking state to the bursting state. Then the time points of the firing state versus Lévy noise intensity are depicted. The increasing of Lévy noise intensity heightens the neuron firing. Also the stationary probability distribution functions of the membrane potential of the neuron induced by the external electromagnetic radiation of Lévy noise with different intensity, stability index and skewness papremeters are analyzed. Moreover, through the positive largest Lyapunov exponent, the parameter regions of chaotic electrical mode of the neuron induced by the external electromagnetic radiation of Lévy noise distribution are detected.

  10. Multi-Resonant-Activation for a System Only Driven by Multi-State Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jinghui

    2010-01-01

    We consider the escape of the particles over fluctuating potential barrier for a system only driven by a multi-state noise. It is shown that, the noise can make the particles escape over the fluctuating potential barrier in some circumstances; but in other circumstances, it can not. If the noise can make the particle escape over the fluctuating potential barrier, the mean first passage time (MFPT) can display the phenomenon of multi-resonant-activation. For this phenomenon, there are two kinds of resonant activation to appear. One is resonant activation for the MFPTs as the function of the flipping rates of the fluctuating potential barrier; the other is that for the MFPTs as the functions of the transition rates of the multi-state noise. (general)

  11. Signal-Noise Ratio Control Subsystem of Digital Equipment for Transmission of "Strela" Relay Protection Commands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Zabenkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous measurement function of relative noise and interference level in the information transmission channel is considered as an important one for controlling parameters of high-frequency signal. The present paper simulates an algorithm for measuring signal-noise ratio in the transmission channel of high-voltage lines which is used in the digital equipment for transmission of relay protection and emergency automation commands of "Strela" complex.

  12. Air Traffic Controllers’ Long-Term Speech-in-Noise Training Effects: A Control Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaballos, María T.P.; Plasencia, Daniel P.; González, María L.Z.; de Miguel, Angel R.; Macías, Ángel R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Speech perception in noise relies on the capacity of the auditory system to process complex sounds using sensory and cognitive skills. The possibility that these can be trained during adulthood is of special interest in auditory disorders, where speech in noise perception becomes compromised. Air traffic controllers (ATC) are constantly exposed to radio communication, a situation that seems to produce auditory learning. The objective of this study has been to quantify this effect. Subjects and Methods: 19 ATC and 19 normal hearing individuals underwent a speech in noise test with three signal to noise ratios: 5, 0 and −5 dB. Noise and speech were presented through two different loudspeakers in azimuth position. Speech tokes were presented at 65 dB SPL, while white noise files were at 60, 65 and 70 dB respectively. Results: Air traffic controllers outperform the control group in all conditions [P<0.05 in ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U tests]. Group differences were largest in the most difficult condition, SNR=−5 dB. However, no correlation between experience and performance were found for any of the conditions tested. The reason might be that ceiling performance is achieved much faster than the minimum experience time recorded, 5 years, although intrinsic cognitive abilities cannot be disregarded. Discussion: ATC demonstrated enhanced ability to hear speech in challenging listening environments. This study provides evidence that long-term auditory training is indeed useful in achieving better speech-in-noise understanding even in adverse conditions, although good cognitive qualities are likely to be a basic requirement for this training to be effective. Conclusion: Our results show that ATC outperform the control group in all conditions. Thus, this study provides evidence that long-term auditory training is indeed useful in achieving better speech-in-noise understanding even in adverse conditions. PMID:27991470

  13. Effectiveness evaluation of existing noise controls in a deep shaft underground mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Eric A; Reed, Rustin J; Turner, Dylan; Littau, Sally R; Lee, Vivien; Hu, Chengcheng

    2015-01-01

    Noise exposures and hearing loss in the mining industry continue to be a major problem, despite advances in noise control technologies. This study evaluated the effectiveness of engineering, administrative, and personal noise controls using both traditional and in-ear dosimetry by job task, work shift, and five types of earplug. The noise exposures of 22 miners performing deep shaft-sinking tasks were evaluated during 56 rotating shifts in an underground mine. Miners were earplug-insertion trained, earplug fit-tested, and monitored utilizing traditional and in-ear dosimetry. The mean TWA8 noise exposure via traditional dosimetry was 90.1 ± 8.2 dBA, while the mean in-ear TWA8 was 79.6 ± 13.8 dBA. The latter was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) personal exposure limit (PEL) of 90 dBA. Dosimetry mean TWA8 noise exposures for bench blowing (103.5 ± 0.9 dBA), jumbo drill operation (103.0 ± 0.8 dBA), and mucking tasks (99.6 ± 4.7 dBA) were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than other tasks. For bench blowing, cable pulling, grinding, and jumbo drill operation tasks, the mean in-ear TWA8 was greater than 85 dBA. Those working swing shift had a significantly higher (p < 0.001) mean TWA8 noise exposure (95.4 ± 7.3 dBA) than those working day shift. For percent difference between traditional vs. in-ear dosimetry, there was no significant difference among types of earplug used. Reflective of occupational hearing loss rate trends across the mining industry, this study found that, despite existing engineering and administrative controls, noise exposure levels exceeded regulatory limits, while the addition of personal hearing protection limited excessive exposures.

  14. An alternative method for noise analysis using pixel variance as part of quality control procedures on digital mammography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouwman, R; Broeders, M; Van Engen, R; Young, K; Lazzari, B; Ravaglia, V

    2009-01-01

    According to the European Guidelines for quality assured breast cancer screening and diagnosis, noise analysis is one of the measurements that needs to be performed as part of quality control procedures on digital mammography systems. However, the method recommended in the European Guidelines does not discriminate sufficiently between systems with and without additional noise besides quantum noise. This paper attempts to give an alternative and relatively simple method for noise analysis which can divide noise into electronic noise, structured noise and quantum noise. Quantum noise needs to be the dominant noise source in clinical images for optimal performance of a digital mammography system, and therefore the amount of electronic and structured noise should be minimal. For several digital mammography systems, the noise was separated into components based on the measured pixel value, standard deviation (SD) of the image and the detector entrance dose. The results showed that differences between systems exist. Our findings confirm that the proposed method is able to discriminate systems based on their noise performance and is able to detect possible quality problems. Therefore, we suggest to replace the current method for noise analysis as described in the European Guidelines by the alternative method described in this paper.

  15. ON THE APPLICATION OF PARTIAL BARRIERS FOR SPINNING MACHINE NOISE CONTROL: A THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Monazzam, A. Nezafat

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Noise is one of the most serious challenges in modern community. In some specific industries, according to the nature of process, this challenge is more threatening. This paper describes a means of noise control for spinning machine based on experimental measurements. Also advantages and disadvantages of the control procedure are added. Different factors which may affect the performance of the barrier in this situation are also mentioned. To provide a good estimation of the control measure, a theoretical formula is also described and it is compared with the field data. Good agreement between the results of filed measurements and theoretical presented model was achieved. No obvious noise reduction was seen by partial indoor barriers in low absorbent enclosed spaces, since the reflection from multiple hard surfaces is the main dominated factor in the tested environment. At the end, the situation of the environment and standards, which are necessary in attaining the ideal results, are explained.

  16. Entropy as a measure of the noise extent in a two-level quantum feedback controlled system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Tao-Bo; Fang Mao-Fa; Hu Yao-Hua

    2007-01-01

    By introducing the von Neumann entropy as a measure of the extent of noise, this paper discusses the entropy evolution in a two-level quantum feedback controlled system. The results show that the feedback control can induce the reduction of the degree of noise, and different control schemes exhibit different noise controlling ability, the extent of the reduction also related with the position of the target state on the Bloch sphere. It is shown that the evolution of entropy can provide a real time noise observation and a systematic guideline to make reasonable choice of control strategy.

  17. Theoretical investigation of the neutron noise diagnostics of two-dimensional control rod vibrations in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazsit, I.; Analytis, G.T.

    1980-01-01

    In order to develop a method for monitoring control rod vibrations by neutron noise measurements, the noise induced by two-dimensional vibrations of control elements is investigated. The two-dimensional Green's function relating the small stochastic cross-section fluctuations to the neutron noise is determined for a rectangular slab reactor in the modified one-group theory, and subsequently, the neutron response to two-dimensional vibrating noise sources is investigated. Two possible diagnostical applications are considered: (a) the reconstruction of the mechanical trajectory of the vibrating element by neutron noise measurements, and (b) the possibility of locating the vibrating element in the core. (author)

  18. Estimation and Control for Linear Systems with Additive Cauchy Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    man & Hall, New York, 1994. [11] J. L. Speyer and W. H. Chung, Stochastic Processes, Estimation, and Control, SIAM, 2008. [12] Nassim N. Taleb ...Gaussian control algorithms. 18 4 References [1] N. N. Taleb . The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable...the multivariable system. The estimator was then evaluated numerically for a third-order example. REFERENCES [1] N. N. Taleb , The Black Swan: The

  19. A feedback control strategy for the airfoil system under non-Gaussian colored noise excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yong, E-mail: hy@njust.edu.cn, E-mail: taogang@njust.edu.cn; Tao, Gang, E-mail: hy@njust.edu.cn, E-mail: taogang@njust.edu.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, 200 XiaoLingwei Street, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2014-09-01

    The stability of a binary airfoil with feedback control under stochastic disturbances, a non-Gaussian colored noise, is studied in this paper. First, based on some approximated theories and methods the non-Gaussian colored noise is simplified to an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Furthermore, via the stochastic averaging method and the logarithmic polar transformation, one dimensional diffusion process can be obtained. At last by applying the boundary conditions, the largest Lyapunov exponent which can determine the almost-sure stability of the system and the effective region of control parameters is calculated.

  20. A feedback control strategy for the airfoil system under non-Gaussian colored noise excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Tao, Gang

    2014-09-01

    The stability of a binary airfoil with feedback control under stochastic disturbances, a non-Gaussian colored noise, is studied in this paper. First, based on some approximated theories and methods the non-Gaussian colored noise is simplified to an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Furthermore, via the stochastic averaging method and the logarithmic polar transformation, one dimensional diffusion process can be obtained. At last by applying the boundary conditions, the largest Lyapunov exponent which can determine the almost-sure stability of the system and the effective region of control parameters is calculated.

  1. Comparison between swinging and playing of white noise among colicky babies: A paired randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezici, Emel; Yigit, Deniz

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of swinging and playing of white noise on the crying and sleeping durations of colicky babies. Infantile colic (IC) is one of the most common reasons for doctor visits among babies younger than 3 months. One of five babies older than 3 months also experiences IC. IC, unlike gastrointestinal problems, is regarded as an individual differentiation and maturation of the central nervous system. Providing a warm bath, breastfeeding, swinging and playing of white noise are nonpharmacological methods. The efficiency of these methods has been proven by various studies independently of one another. The study is a prospective, multicentre, paired randomised controlled trial. The study was conducted between April-December 2016. The study sample consisted of 40 1-month-old babies with gas pains who passed a hearing screening and their mothers. The total daily crying and sleeping durations of the babies were determined without any intervention on the first week. On the second week, 20 randomly selected babies (first group) were swung each time they cried, and on the third week, they were made to listen to white noise. The other 20 babies (second group) were made to listen to white noise on the second week and were swung on the third week. Swinging and playing of white noise were performed until the babies stopped crying. After every intervention, the total crying and sleeping durations of the babies were evaluated using a "Colicky Baby's Diary." Playing of white noise significantly decreased the daily crying durations (p white noise was found to be a more effective nonpharmacological method on crying and sleeping durations of colicky babies than swinging. Playing of white noise may be helpful for parents and healthcare personnel in reducing the gas pains of babies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Scanning probe microscope simulator for the assessment of noise in scanning probe microscopy controllers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wutscher, T.; Niebauer, J.; Giessibl, F. J.

    2013-01-01

    We present an electronic circuit that allows to calibrate and troubleshoot scanning probe microscopy (SPM) controllers with respect to their noise performance. The control signal in an SPM is typically highly nonlinear—the tunneling current in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) varies exponentially with distance. The exponential current-versus-voltage characteristics of diodes allow to model the current dependence in STM. Additional inputs allow to simulate the effects of external perturbations and the reactions of the control electronics. We characterized the noise performance of the feedback controller using the apparent topography roughness of recorded images. For a comparison of different STM controllers, an optimal gain parameter was determined by exploring settling times through a rectangular perturbation signal. We used the circuit to directly compare the performance of two types of SPM controllers used in our laboratory

  3. Room acoustic analysis of blower unit and noise control plan in the typical steel industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the steel industry,air blowers used to supply compressed air are considered as sources of annoying noise. This study aims to acoustics analysis of theairblower workroomand sound source characteristics in order to present noise controlmeasuresinthe steel industry. .Material and Method: Measurement of noiselevel and its frequency analysis was performed usingsound levelmetermodelof CASELLA-Cell.450. Distribution of noise level in the investigated workroom in form of noise map was provided using Surfer software. In addition, acoustic analysis of workroom and control room was performed in view point of soundabsorption andinsulation. Redesignofdoor and window of controlroom and installation of soundabsorbing materialson theceiling of the workroom were proposed and the efficiency of these interventionswasestimated. .Result: The totalsound pressurelevelin the blower workroom was 95.4 dB(L and the dominant frequency was 2000Hz. Sound pressure level inside the room control was 80.1dB(A. The average absorption coefficient and reverberation time in the blower workroom was estimated equal to 0.082 Sab.m2 and 3.9 seconds respectively. These value in control room was 0.04 Sab.m2 and 3/4 seconds respectively. In control room, sound transmission loss between the two parts of the wall dividing was 13.7 dB(A. The average of noise dose in blower operators was 230%. With the installation of sound absorber on ceiling of workroom, average of absorption coefficient can increase to 0.33 Sab.m2 and sound transmission loss of the new designed door and window was estimated equal to 20dB. . Conclusion: The main cause of noise leakage in the control room was insufficient insulation properties of door and windows. By replacing the door and window and installation of sound absorbing on ceiling of workroom, the noise dose can reduce to 49.6%. New Improved door and window of control room can reduce noise dose to 69.65% solely.

  4. Reward Pays the Cost of Noise Reduction in Motor and Cognitive Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Sanjay G; Chong, Trevor T-J; Apps, Matthew A J; Batla, Amit; Stamelou, Maria; Jarman, Paul R; Bhatia, Kailash P; Husain, Masud

    2015-06-29

    Speed-accuracy trade-off is an intensively studied law governing almost all behavioral tasks across species. Here we show that motivation by reward breaks this law, by simultaneously invigorating movement and improving response precision. We devised a model to explain this paradoxical effect of reward by considering a new factor: the cost of control. Exerting control to improve response precision might itself come at a cost--a cost to attenuate a proportion of intrinsic neural noise. Applying a noise-reduction cost to optimal motor control predicted that reward can increase both velocity and accuracy. Similarly, application to decision-making predicted that reward reduces reaction times and errors in cognitive control. We used a novel saccadic distraction task to quantify the speed and accuracy of both movements and decisions under varying reward. Both faster speeds and smaller errors were observed with higher incentives, with the results best fitted by a model including a precision cost. Recent theories consider dopamine to be a key neuromodulator in mediating motivational effects of reward. We therefore examined how Parkinson's disease (PD), a condition associated with dopamine depletion, alters the effects of reward. Individuals with PD showed reduced reward sensitivity in their speed and accuracy, consistent in our model with higher noise-control costs. Including a cost of control over noise explains how reward may allow apparent performance limits to be surpassed. On this view, the pattern of reduced reward sensitivity in PD patients can specifically be accounted for by a higher cost for controlling noise. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Active vibration control by robust control techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohar, F.A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper studies active vibration control of multi-degree-of-freedom system. The control techniques considered are LTR, H/sup 2/ and H/sup infinite/. The results show that LTR controls the vibration but its respective settling time is higher than that of the other techniques. The control performance of H/sup infinite/ control is similar to that of H/sup 2/ control in the case of it weighting functions. However, H/sup infinite/ control is superior to H/sup 2/ control with respect to robustness, steady state error and settling time. (author)

  6. Blade-Mounted Flap Control for BVI Noise Reduction Proof-of-Concept Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Seth; Hassan, Ahmed; Straub, Friedrich; Tadghighi, Hormoz

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a wind tunnel test of the McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems (MDHS) Active Flap Model Rotor at the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The test demonstrated that BVI noise reductions and vibration reductions were possible with the use of an active flap. Aerodynamic results supported the acoustic data trends, showing a reduction in the strength of the tip vortex with the deflection of the flap. Acoustic results showed that the flap deployment, depending on the peak deflection angle and azimuthal shift in its deployment schedule, can produce BVI noise reductions as much as 6 dB on the advancing and retreating sides. The noise reduction was accompanied by an increase in low frequency harmonic noise and high frequency broadband noise. A brief assessment of the effect of the flap on vibration showed that significant reductions were possible. The greatest vibration reductions (as much as 76%) were found in the four per rev pitching moment at the hub. Performance improvement cam results were inconclusive, as the improvements were predicted to be smaller than the resolution of the rotor balance.

  7. Reduced In-Plane, Low Frequency Helicopter Noise of an Active Flap Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Ben W.; Janakiram, Ram D.; Barbely, Natasha L.; Solis, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Results from a recent joint DARPA/Boeing/NASA/Army wind tunnel test demonstrated the ability to reduce in-plane, low frequency noise of the full-scale Boeing-SMART rotor using active flaps. Test data reported in this paper illustrated that acoustic energy in the first six blade-passing harmonics could be reduced by up to 6 decibels at a moderate airspeed, level flight condition corresponding to advance ratio of 0.30. Reduced noise levels were attributed to selective active flap schedules that modified in-plane blade airloads on the advancing side of the rotor, in a manner, which generated counteracting acoustic pulses that partially offset the negative pressure peaks associated with in-plane, steady thickness noise. These favorable reduced-noise operating states are a strong function of the active flap actuation amplitude, frequency and phase. The associated noise reductions resulted in reduced aural detection distance by up to 18%, but incurred significant vibratory load penalties due to increased hub shear forces. Small reductions in rotor lift-to-drag ratios, of no more than 3%, were also measured

  8. Odeon, a design tool for auditorium acoustics, noise control and loudspeaker systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Lynge

    2001-01-01

    The ODEON software was originally developed for prediction of auditorium acoustics. However current editions of the software are not limited to these fields, but also allow prediction in rooms such as churches and mosques, interior noise control, design of room acoustics and sound distribution...

  9. dc SQUID electronics based on adaptive noise cancellation and a high open-loop gain controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppae, H.

    1992-01-01

    A low-noise SQUID readout electronics with a high slew rate and an automatic gain control feature has been developed. Flux noise levels of 5x10 -7 Φ 0 /√Hz at 1 kHz and 2x10 -6 Φ 0 /√Hz at 1 Hz have been measured with this readout scheme. The system tolerates sinusoidal disturbances having amplitudes up to 140 Φ 0 at 1 kHz without loosing lock. The electronics utilizes a cooled GaAs FET to control the cancellation of the voltage noise of the room temperature amplifier, a PI 3/2 controller to provide a high open-loop gain at low frequencies, and a square-wave flux and offset voltage modulation to enable automatic control of the noise reduction. The cutoff frequency of the flux-locked-loop is 300 kHz and the feedback gain is more than 130 dB at 10 Hz. (orig.)

  10. Stabilization of Barkhausen noise readings by controlling a surface field waveform

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stupakov, Oleksandr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2014), s. 1-8 ISSN 0957-0233 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-18993S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic Barkhausen noise * surface field measurement * digital feedback control * non-destructive testing Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.433, year: 2014

  11. Noise-induced hearing loss induces loudness intolerance in a rat Active Sound Avoidance Paradigm (ASAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Senthilvelan; Spoth, Jaclyn; Radziwon, Kelly; Auerbach, Benjamin D; Salvi, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Hyperacusis is a loudness hypersensitivity disorder in which moderate-intensity sounds are perceived as extremely loud, aversive and/or painful. To assess the aversive nature of sounds, we developed an Active Sound Avoidance Paradigm (ASAP) in which rats altered their place preference in a Light/Dark shuttle box in response to sound. When no sound (NS) was present, rats spent more than 95% of the time in the Dark Box versus the transparent Light Box. However, when a 60 or 90 dB SPL noise (2-20 kHz, 2-8 kHz, or 16-20 kHz bandwidth) was presented in the Dark Box, the rats'' preference for the Dark Box significantly decreased. Percent time in the dark decreased as sound intensity in the Dark Box increased from 60 dB to 90 dB SPL. Interestingly, the magnitude of the decrease was not a monotonic function of intensity for the 16-20 kHz noise and not related to the bandwidth of the 2-20 kHz and 2-8 kHz noise bands, suggesting that sound avoidance is not solely dependent on loudness but the aversive quality of the noise as well. Afterwards, we exposed the rats for 28 days to a 16-20 kHz noise at 102 dB SPL; this exposure produced a 30-40 dB permanent threshold shift at 16 and 32 kHz. Following the noise exposure, the rats were then retested on the ASAP paradigm. High-frequency hearing loss did not alter Dark Box preference in the no-sound condition. However, when the 2-20 kHz or 2-8 kHz noise was presented at 60 or 90 dB SPL, the rats avoided the Dark Box significantly more than they did before the exposure, indicating these two noise bands with energy below the region of hearing loss were perceived as more aversive. In contrast, when the 16-20 kHz noise was presented at 60 or 90 dB SPL, the rats remained in the Dark Box presumably because the high-frequency hearing loss made 16-20 kHz noise less audible and less aversive. These results indicate that when rats develop a high-frequency hearing loss, they become less tolerant of low frequency noise, i

  12. Wind Turbine Rotors with Active Vibration Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Martin Nymann

    that the basic modes of a wind turbine blade can be effectively addressed by an in-blade ‘active strut’ actuator mechanism. The importance of accounting for background mode flexibility is demonstrated. Also, it is shown that it is generally possible to address multiple beam modes with multiple controllers, given...... in the targeted modes and the observed spill-over to other modes is very limited and generally stabilizing. It is shown that physical controller positioning for reduced background noise is important to the calibration. By simulation of the rotor response to both simple initial conditions and a stochastic wind......This thesis presents a framework for structural modeling, analysis and active vibration damping of rotating wind turbine blades and rotors. A structural rotor model is developed in terms of finite beam elements in a rotating frame of reference. The element comprises a representation of general...

  13. Low-noise humidity controller for imaging water mediated processes in atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaponenko, I., E-mail: iaroslav.gaponenko@unige.ch; Gamperle, L.; Herberg, K.; Muller, S. C.; Paruch, P. [DQMP, University of Geneva, 24 Quai E. Ansermet, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

    2016-06-15

    We demonstrate the construction of a novel low-noise continuous flow humidity controller and its integration with a commercial variable-temperature atomic force microscope fluid cell, allowing precise control of humidity and temperature at the sample during nanoscale measurements. Based on wet and dry gas mixing, the design allows a high mechanical stability to be achieved by means of an ultrasonic atomiser for the generation of water-saturated gas, improving upon previous bubbler-based architectures. Water content in the flow is measured both at the inflow and outflow of the fluid cell, enabling the monitoring of water condensation and icing, and allowing controlled variation of the sample temperature independently of the humidity. To benchmark the performance of the controller, the results of detailed noise studies and time-based imaging of the formation of ice layers on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite are shown.

  14. Low-noise humidity controller for imaging water mediated processes in atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaponenko, I.; Gamperle, L.; Herberg, K.; Muller, S. C.; Paruch, P.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the construction of a novel low-noise continuous flow humidity controller and its integration with a commercial variable-temperature atomic force microscope fluid cell, allowing precise control of humidity and temperature at the sample during nanoscale measurements. Based on wet and dry gas mixing, the design allows a high mechanical stability to be achieved by means of an ultrasonic atomiser for the generation of water-saturated gas, improving upon previous bubbler-based architectures. Water content in the flow is measured both at the inflow and outflow of the fluid cell, enabling the monitoring of water condensation and icing, and allowing controlled variation of the sample temperature independently of the humidity. To benchmark the performance of the controller, the results of detailed noise studies and time-based imaging of the formation of ice layers on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite are shown.

  15. Low-noise humidity controller for imaging water mediated processes in atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponenko, I.; Gamperle, L.; Herberg, K.; Muller, S. C.; Paruch, P.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the construction of a novel low-noise continuous flow humidity controller and its integration with a commercial variable-temperature atomic force microscope fluid cell, allowing precise control of humidity and temperature at the sample during nanoscale measurements. Based on wet and dry gas mixing, the design allows a high mechanical stability to be achieved by means of an ultrasonic atomiser for the generation of water-saturated gas, improving upon previous bubbler-based architectures. Water content in the flow is measured both at the inflow and outflow of the fluid cell, enabling the monitoring of water condensation and icing, and allowing controlled variation of the sample temperature independently of the humidity. To benchmark the performance of the controller, the results of detailed noise studies and time-based imaging of the formation of ice layers on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite are shown.

  16. A decision-support tool for the control of urban noise pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriano, Marcia Thais; de Souza, Léa Cristina Lucas; da Silva, Antonio Nelson Rodrigues

    2015-07-01

    Improving the quality of life is increasingly seen as an important urban planning goal. In order to reach it, various tools are being developed to mitigate the negative impacts of human activities on society. This paper develops a methodology for quantifying the population's exposure to noise, by proposing a classification of urban blocks. Taking into account the vehicular flow and traffic composition of the surroundings of urban blocks, we generated a noise map by applying a computational simulation. The urban blocks were classified according to their noise range and then the population was estimated for each urban block, by a process which was based on the census tract and the constructed area of the blocks. The acoustical classes of urban blocks and the number of inhabitants per block were compared, so that the population exposed to noise levels above 65 dB(A) could be estimated, which is the highest limit established by legislation. As a result, we developed a map of the study area, so that urban blocks that should be priority targets for noise mitigation actions can be quickly identified.

  17. Acoustical Engineering Controls and Estimated Return on Investment for DoD Selected High Noise Sources: A Roadmap for Future Noise Control in Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-25

    20K $4.4B $8.8B Active Noise Cancellation 7 dB $30K $60K $13.2B $26.4B Tire Tread Re-design 5 dB $0.8K $2K $0.3B $0.8B Distributed TVA’s 5 dB $10K...lbs Distributed vibration absorbers $10,000 to $20,000 4 inches tall 1000 lbs Tire Tread $200-500 Minimal impact Minimal impact Hydraulic Mounts...of vibration and changing the shape and thickness of covers can reduce vibration levels and reduce radiation efficiency. Other than separating

  18. Engineering the Flow of Liquid Two-Phase Systems by Passive Noise Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zeyi; Kong, Tiantian; Zhou, Chunmei; Wang, Liqiu

    2018-02-01

    We investigate a passive noise-control approach to engineering the two-phase flow in a microfluidic coflow system. The presence or absence of the jet breakup is studied for two immiscible oil phases, in a straight microchannel (referred to as the J device in the main text), an expansion microchannel (the W device) and a microchannel with the expansion-contraction geometry (the S device), respectively. We show that the jet breaks into droplets, in the jetting regime and the dripping regime (also referred to as the widening-jetting regime) for the straight channel and expansion channel, respectively, while a stable long jet does not break for the expansion-contraction geometry. As the inner phase passes the expansion-contraction functional unit, the random noise on the interface is significantly reduced and the hydrodynamic instability is suppressed, for a range of experimental parameters including flow rates, device geometry, liquid viscosity, and interfacial tension. We further present scale-up devices with multiple noise-control units and achieve decimeter-long yet stable jets. Our simple, effective, and robust noise-control approach can benefit microfluidic applications such as microfiber fabrication, interface chemical reaction, and on-chip distance transportation.

  19. AN ADAPTIVE OPTIMAL KALMAN FILTER FOR STOCHASTIC VIBRATION CONTROL SYSTEM WITH UNKNOWN NOISE VARIANCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shu; Zhuo Jiashou; Ren Qingwen

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, an optimal criterion is presented for adaptive Kalman filter in a control sys tem with unknown variances of stochastic vibration by constructing a function of noise variances and minimizing the function. We solve the model and measure variances by using DFP optimal method to guarantee the results of Kalman filter to be optimized. Finally, the control of vibration can be implemented by LQG method.

  20. Cyclic pitch for the control of wind turbine noise amplitude modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Fischer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Using experimental data acquired during a wind turbine measurement campaign, it is shown that amplitude modulation of aerodynamic noise can be generated by the rotating blades in conjunction with the atmospheric wind shear. As an attempt to alleviate this phenomenon, a control strategy is designed...... if such a strategy is to be implemented on an actual wind turbine, though at the expense of an increased wear and tear of the pitch control system....

  1. Localized, Non-Harmonic Active Flap Motions for Low Frequency In-Plane Rotor Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; LeMasurier, Philip; Lorber, Peter; Andrews, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A first-of-its-kind demonstration of the use of localized, non-harmonic active flap motions, for suppressing low frequency, in-plane rotor noise, is reported in this paper. Operational feasibility is verified via testing of the full-scale AATD/Sikorsky/UTRC active flap demonstration rotor in the NFAC's 40- by 80-Foot anechoic wind tunnel. Effectiveness of using localized, non-harmonic active flap motions are compared to conventional four-per-rev harmonic flap motions, and also active flap motions derived from closed-loop acoustics implementations. All three approaches resulted in approximately the same noise reductions over an in-plane three-by-three microphone array installed forward and near in-plane of the rotor in the nearfield. It is also reported that using an active flap in this localized, non-harmonic manner, resulted in no more that 2% rotor performance penalty, but had the tendency to incur higher hub vibration levels.

  2. General and efficient method for calculating modulation ressponses and noise spectra of active semiconductor waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaaberg, Søren; Öhman, Filip; Mørk, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    We present a theoretical method for obtaining small-signal responses in a spatially resolved active semiconductor waveguide including finite end-facet reflectivities and amplified spontaneous emission. RF-modulation responses and output noise spectra of an SOA are shown....

  3. Carbon Nanotube Thin Films for Active Noise Cancellation, Solar Energy Harvesting, and Energy Storage in Building Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shan

    This research explores the application of carbon nanotube (CNT) films for active noise cancellation, solar energy harvesting and energy storage in building windows. The CNT-based components developed herein can be integrated into a solar-powered active noise control system for a building window. First, the use of a transparent acoustic transducer as both an invisible speaker for auxiliary audio playback and for active noise cancellation is accomplished in this work. Several challenges related to active noise cancellation in the window are addressed. These include secondary path estimation and directional cancellation of noise so as to preserve auxiliary audio and internal sounds while preventing transmission of external noise into the building. Solar energy can be harvested at a low rate of power over long durations while acoustic sound cancellation requires short durations of high power. A supercapacitor based energy storage system is therefore considered for the window. Using CNTs as electrode materials, two generations of flexible, thin, and fully solid-state supercapacitors are developed that can be integrated into the window frame. Both generations consist of carbon nanotube films coated on supporting substrates as electrodes and a solid-state polymer gel layer for the electrolyte. The first generation is a single-cell parallel-plate supercapacitor with a working voltage of 3 Volts. Its energy density is competitive with commercially available supercapacitors (which use liquid electrolyte). For many applications that will require higher working voltage, the second-generation multi-cell supercapacitor is developed. A six-cell device with a working voltage as high as 12 Volts is demonstrated here. Unlike the first generation's 3D structure, the second generation has a novel planar (2D) architecture, which makes it easy to integrate multiple cells into a thin and flexible supercapacitor. The multi-cell planar supercapacitor has energy density exceeding that of

  4. A bulk-controlled ring-VCO with 1/f-noise reduction for frequency ΔΣ modulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuan Vu, CAO; Wisland, Dag T.; Lande, Tor Sverre

    The paper introduces a bulk-controlled ring-VCO with a tail transistor utilizing flicker-noise (1/f-noise) reduction techniques for a frequency-based DeltaSigma modulator (FDSM). This VCO converts an analog input voltage to phase information under various bias conditions ranging from sub-threshol......The paper introduces a bulk-controlled ring-VCO with a tail transistor utilizing flicker-noise (1/f-noise) reduction techniques for a frequency-based DeltaSigma modulator (FDSM). This VCO converts an analog input voltage to phase information under various bias conditions ranging from sub...

  5. Active self-testing noise measurement sensors for large-scale environmental sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Federico; Cuong, Nguyen The; Reinoso, Felipe; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2013-12-13

    Large-scale noise pollution sensor networks consist of hundreds of spatially distributed microphones that measure environmental noise. These networks provide historical and real-time environmental data to citizens and decision makers and are therefore a key technology to steer environmental policy. However, the high cost of certified environmental microphone sensors render large-scale environmental networks prohibitively expensive. Several environmental network projects have started using off-the-shelf low-cost microphone sensors to reduce their costs, but these sensors have higher failure rates and produce lower quality data. To offset this disadvantage, we developed a low-cost noise sensor that actively checks its condition and indirectly the integrity of the data it produces. The main design concept is to embed a 13 mm speaker in the noise sensor casing and, by regularly scheduling a frequency sweep, estimate the evolution of the microphone's frequency response over time. This paper presents our noise sensor's hardware and software design together with the results of a test deployment in a large-scale environmental network in Belgium. Our middle-range-value sensor (around €50) effectively detected all experienced malfunctions, in laboratory tests and outdoor deployments, with a few false positives. Future improvements could further lower the cost of our sensor below €10.

  6. Background MR gradient noise and non-auditory BOLD activations: a data-driven perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Sven; Homola, György A; Scheffler, Klaus; Beckmann, Christian F; Bartsch, Andreas J

    2009-07-28

    The effect of echoplanar imaging (EPI) acoustic background noise on blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) activations was investigated. Two EPI pulse sequences were compared: (i) conventional EPI with a pulsating sound component of typically 8-10 Hz, which is a potent physiological stimulus, and (ii) the more recently developed continuous-sound EPI, which is perceived as less distractive despite equivalent peak sound pressure levels. Sixteen healthy subjects performed an established demanding visual n-back working memory task. Using an exploratory data analysis technique (tensorial probabilistic independent component analysis; tensor-PICA), we studied the inter-session/within-subject response variability introduced by continuous-sound versus conventional EPI acoustic background noise in addition to temporal and spatial signal characteristics. The analysis revealed a task-related component associated with the established higher-level working memory and motor feedback response network, which exhibited a significant 19% increase in its average effect size for the continuous-sound as opposed to conventional EPI. Stimulus-related lower-level activations, such as primary visual areas, were not modified. EPI acoustic background noise influences much more than the auditory system per se. This analysis provides additional evidence for an enhancement of task-related, extra-auditory BOLD activations by continuous-sound EPI due to less distractive acoustic background gradient noise.

  7. Resonant activation in 2D and 3D systems driven by multi-variate Lévy noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczepaniec, Krzysztof; Dybiec, Bartłomiej

    2014-01-01

    Resonant activation is one of the classical effects demonstrating the constructive role of noise. In resonant activation, the cooperative action of a barrier modulation process and noise lead to the optimal escape kinetics as measured by the mean first passage time. Resonant activation has been observed in versatile systems for various types of barrier modulation process and noise type. Here, we show that resonant activation is also observed in 2D and 3D systems driven by bi-variate and tri-variate α-stable noise. The strength of resonant activation is sensitive to the exact value of the noise parameters. In particular, the decrease in the stability index α results in the disappearance of the resonant activation. (paper)

  8. Applied acoustics concepts, absorbers, and silencers for acoustical comfort and noise control alternative solutions, innovative tools, practical examples

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Helmut V

    2013-01-01

    The author gives a comprehensive overview of materials and components for noise control and acoustical comfort. Sound absorbers must meet acoustical and architectural requirements, which fibrous or porous material alone can meet. Basics and applications are demonstrated, with representative examples for spatial acoustics, free-field test facilities and canal linings. Acoustic engineers and construction professionals will find some new basic concepts and tools for developments in order to improve acoustical comfort. Interference absorbers, active resonators and micro-perforated absorbers of different materials and designs complete the list of applications.

  9. Sound Control in the Physic Lab in the Polyacryl Company and Studying the Noise Reduction by Means of Different Absorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harandi

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Studying noise effect at the workplace has more various aspects than other factors. So it is not surprising that its adverse impact on the physical and mental state of the society has been detected to some extent. There is a significant correlation between the hearing loss and the noise pollution of the workplaces. The most important ways to lessen and control the impact of noise are: substituting the noisy equipments with ones that produce less noise, correcting noise sources and isolating the sound source. In the current study we tried to control the noise level by using various sound absorbents and measured sound level by using these different substances. The results of these measurements have reported in the current article in details.

  10. Comparison of various decentralised structural and cavity feedback control strategies for transmitted noise reduction through a double panel structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    This paper compares various decentralised control strategies, including structural and acoustic actuator–sensor configuration designs, to reduce noise transmission through a double panel structure. The comparison is based on identical control stability indexes. The double panel structure consists of

  11. Comparison of various decentralised structural and cavity feedback control strategies for transmitted noise reduction through a double panel structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.H.; Berkhoff, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares various decentralised control strategies, including structural and acoustic actuator-sensor configuration designs, to reduce noise transmission through a double panel structure. The comparison is based on identical control stability indexes. The double panel structure consists of

  12. Active control of convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bau, H.H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  13. Noise-Induced Loss of Hair Cells and Cochlear Synaptopathy Are Mediated by the Activation of AMPK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kayla; Yuan, Hu; Wang, Xianren

    2016-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major unresolved public health problem. Here, we investigate pathomechanisms of sensory hair cell death and suggest a novel target for protective intervention. Cellular survival depends upon maintenance of energy homeostasis, largely by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In response to a noise exposure in CBA/J mice, the levels of phosphorylated AMPKα increased in hair cells in a noise intensity-dependent manner. Inhibition of AMPK via siRNA or the pharmacological inhibitor compound C attenuated noise-induced loss of outer hair cells (OHCs) and synaptic ribbons, and preserved auditory function. Additionally, noise exposure increased the activity of the upstream AMPK kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) in cochlear tissues. The inhibition of LKB1 by siRNA attenuated the noise-increased phosphorylation of AMPKα in OHCs, reduced the loss of inner hair cell synaptic ribbons and OHCs, and protected against NIHL. These results indicate that noise exposure induces hair cell death and synaptopathy by activating AMPK via LKB1-mediated pathways. Targeting these pathways may provide a novel route to prevent NIHL. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our results demonstrate for the first time that the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) α in sensory hair cells is noise intensity dependent and contributes to noise-induced hearing loss by mediating the loss of inner hair cell synaptic ribbons and outer hair cells. Noise induces the phosphorylation of AMPKα1 by liver kinase B1 (LKB1), triggered by changes in intracellular ATP levels. The inhibition of AMPK activation by silencing AMPK or LKB1, or with the pharmacological inhibitor compound C, reduced outer hair cell and synaptic ribbon loss as well as noise-induced hearing loss. This study provides new insights into mechanisms of noise-induced hearing loss and suggests novel interventions for the prevention of the loss of sensory hair cells and cochlear synaptopathy. PMID:27413159

  14. Passive noise control by enhancing aeroacoustic interference due to structural discontinuities in close proximity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, R. C. K.; So, R. M. C.; Tang, S. K.; Wang, X. Q.

    2011-07-01

    In-duct devices are commonly installed in flow ducts for various flow management purposes. The structural construction of these devices indispensably creates disruption to smooth flow through duct passages so they exist as structural discontinuities in duct flow. The presence of these discontinuities provides additional possibility of noise generation. In real practice, in-duct devices do not exist alone in any duct system. Even though each in-duct device would generate its own noise, it might be possible that these devices could be properly arranged so as to strengthen the interference between individual noise; thus giving rise to an overall reduction of noise radiation in the in-duct far field. This concept of passive noise control is investigated by considering different configurations of two structural discontinuities of simple form (i.e., a cavity) in tandem in an unconfined flow and in opposing setting within a flow duct. It is known that noise generated by a cavity in unconfined domain (unconfined cavity) is strongly dependent on flow-resonant behavior within the cavity so the interference it produces is merely aeroacoustic. The objective of the present study is to verify the concept of passive noise reduction through enhancement of aeroacoustic interference due to two cavities by considering laminar flow only. A two-dimensional approach is adopted for the direct aeroacoustic calculations using a direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique. The position and geometries of the cavities and the Mach number are varied; the resultant aeroacoustic behavior and acoustic power are calculated. The numerical results are compared with a single cavity case to highlight the effect of introducing additional cavities to the aeroacoustic problem. Resonant flow oscillations occur when two unconfined cavities are very close and the associated acoustic field is very intense with no noise reduction possible. However, for duct aeroacoustics, it is found that a 7.9 db reduction

  15. Aircraft noise effects on sleep: a systematic comparison of EEG awakenings and automatically detected cardiac activations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basner, Mathias; Müller, Uwe; Elmenhorst, Eva-Maria; Kluge, Götz; Griefahn, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Polysomnography is the gold standard for investigating noise effects on sleep, but data collection and analysis are sumptuous and expensive. We recently developed an algorithm for the automatic identification of cardiac activations associated with cortical arousals, which uses heart rate information derived from a single electrocardiogram (ECG) channel. We hypothesized that cardiac activations can be used as estimates for EEG awakenings. Polysomnographic EEG awakenings and automatically detected cardiac activations were systematically compared using laboratory data of 112 subjects (47 male, mean ± SD age 37.9 ± 13 years), 985 nights and 23 855 aircraft noise events (ANEs). The probability of automatically detected cardiac activations increased monotonically with increasing maximum sound pressure levels of ANEs, exceeding the probability of EEG awakenings by up to 18.1%. If spontaneous reactions were taken into account, exposure–response curves were practically identical for EEG awakenings and cardiac activations. Automatically detected cardiac activations may be used as estimates for EEG awakenings. More investigations are needed to further validate the ECG algorithm in the field and to investigate inter-individual differences in its ability to predict EEG awakenings. This inexpensive, objective and non-invasive method facilitates large-scale field studies on the effects of traffic noise on sleep

  16. A low noise remotely controllable wireless telemetry system for single-unit recording in rats navigating in a vertical maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yung; Wu, Jin-Shang; Hyland, Brian; Lu, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Jia Jin Jason

    2008-08-01

    The use of cables for recording neural activity limits the scope of behavioral tests used in conscious free-moving animals. Particularly, cable attachments make it impossible to record in three-dimensional (3D) mazes where levels are vertically stacked or in enclosed spaces. Such environments are of particular interest in investigations of hippocampal place cells, in which neural activity is correlated with spatial position in the environment. We developed a flexible miniaturized Bluetooth-based wireless data acquisition system. The wireless module included an 8-channel analogue front end, digital controller, and Bluetooth transceiver mounted on a backpack. Our bidirectional wireless design allowed all data channels to be previewed at 1 kHz sample rate, and one channel, selected by remote control, to be sampled at 10 kHz. Extracellular recordings of neuronal activity are highly susceptible to ambient electrical noise due to the high electrode impedance. Through careful design of appropriate shielding and hardware configuration to avoid ground loops, mains power and Bluetooth hopping frequency noise were reduced sufficiently to yield signal quality comparable to those recorded by wired systems. With this system we were able to obtain single-unit recordings of hippocampal place cells in rats running an enclosed vertical maze, over a range of 5 m.

  17. Web-based Traffic Noise Control Support System for Sustainable Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lisa; Dai, Liming; Li, Anson

    Traffic noise is considered as one of the major pollutions that will affect our communities in the future. This paper presents a framework of web-based traffic noise control support system (WTNCSS) for a sustainable transportation. WTNCSS is to provide the decision makers, engineers and publics a platform to efficiently access the information, and effectively making decisions related to traffic control. The system is based on a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) which takes the advantages of the convenience of World Wide Web system with the data format of XML. The whole system is divided into different modules such as the prediction module, ontology-based expert module and dynamic online survey module. Each module of the system provides a distinct information service to the decision support center through the HTTP protocol.

  18. A separation theorem for the stochastic sampled-data LQG problem. [control of continuous linear plant disturbed by white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halyo, N.; Caglayan, A. K.

    1976-01-01

    This paper considers the control of a continuous linear plant disturbed by white plant noise when the control is constrained to be a piecewise constant function of time; i.e. a stochastic sampled-data system. The cost function is the integral of quadratic error terms in the state and control, thus penalizing errors at every instant of time while the plant noise disturbs the system continuously. The problem is solved by reducing the constrained continuous problem to an unconstrained discrete one. It is shown that the separation principle for estimation and control still holds for this problem when the plant disturbance and measurement noise are Gaussian.

  19. Studies on neutron noise diagnostics of control rod vibrations by neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roston, G.; Kozma, R.; Kitamura, M.; Garis, N.S.; Pazsit, I.

    1996-01-01

    This work is focussed on the study of a neutron noise based technique for the diagnostics of reactor core internal, in particular, excessively vibrating control rods. The use of a combination of physical models and neural networks offers an alternative way of performing the inversion procedure. The application of a neural network technique to determine the rod position from the detector spectra is much faster, more effective and simpler to use than the conventional method. (author). 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  20. Adaptive control of dynamical synchronization on evolving networks with noise disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wu-Jie; Zhou, Jian-Fang; Sendiña-Nadal, Irene; Boccaletti, Stefano; Wang, Zhen

    2018-02-01

    In real-world networked systems, the underlying structure is often affected by external and internal unforeseen factors, making its evolution typically inaccessible. An adaptive strategy was introduced for maintaining synchronization on unpredictably evolving networks [Sorrentino and Ott, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 114101 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.114101], which yet does not consider the noise disturbances widely existing in networks' environments. We provide here strategies to control dynamical synchronization on slowly and unpredictably evolving networks subjected to noise disturbances which are observed at the node and at the communication channel level. With our strategy, the nodes' coupling strength is adaptively adjusted with the aim of controlling synchronization, and according only to their received signal and noise disturbances. We first provide a theoretical analysis of the control scheme by introducing an error potential function to seek for the minimization of the synchronization error. Then, we show numerical experiments which verify our theoretical results. In particular, it is found that our adaptive strategy is effective even for the case in which the dynamics of the uncontrolled network would be explosive (i.e., the states of all the nodes would diverge to infinity).

  1. Comparison of Auditory Brainstem Response in Noise Induced Tinnitus and Non-Tinnitus Control Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassem Mohammadkhani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Tinnitus is an unpleasant sound which can cause some behavioral disorders. According to evidence the origin of tinnitus is not only in peripheral but also in central auditory system. So evaluation of central auditory system function is necessary. In this study Auditory brainstem responses (ABR were compared in noise induced tinnitus and non-tinnitus control subjects.Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, descriptive and analytic study is conducted in 60 cases in two groups including of 30 noise induced tinnitus and 30 non-tinnitus control subjects. ABRs were recorded ipsilateraly and contralateraly and their latencies and amplitudes were analyzed.Results: Mean interpeak latencies of III-V (p= 0.022, I-V (p=0.033 in ipsilatral electrode array and mean absolute latencies of IV (p=0.015 and V (p=0.048 in contralatral electrode array were significantly increased in noise induced tinnitus group relative to control group. Conclusion: It can be concluded from that there are some decrease in neural transmission time in brainstem and there are some sign of involvement of medial nuclei in olivery complex in addition to lateral lemniscus.

  2. Noise-induced hearing loss and associated factors among vector control workers in a Malaysian state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masilamani, Retneswari; Rasib, Abdul; Darus, Azlan; Ting, Anselm Su

    2014-11-01

    This study aims to determine the prevalence and associated factors of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) among vector control workers in the state of Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia. This was an analytical cross-sectional study conducted on 181 vector control workers who were working in district health offices in a state in Malaysia. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire and audiometry. Prevalence of NIHL was 26% among this group of workers. NIHL was significantly associated with the age-group of 40 years and older, length of service of 10 or more years, current occupational noise exposure, listening to loud music, history of firearms use, and history of mumps/measles infection. Following logistic regression, age of more than 40 years and noise exposure in current occupation were associated with NIHL with an odds ratio of 3.45 (95% confidence interval = 1.68-7.07) and 6.87 (95% confidence interval = 1.54-30.69), respectively, among this group of vector control workers. © 2012 APJPH.

  3. Intrinsic Noise Profoundly Alters the Dynamics and Steady State of Morphogen-Controlled Bistable Genetic Switches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Perez-Carrasco

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available During tissue development, patterns of gene expression determine the spatial arrangement of cell types. In many cases, gradients of secreted signalling molecules-morphogens-guide this process by controlling downstream transcriptional networks. A mechanism commonly used in these networks to convert the continuous information provided by the gradient into discrete transitions between adjacent cell types is the genetic toggle switch, composed of cross-repressing transcriptional determinants. Previous analyses have emphasised the steady state output of these mechanisms. Here, we explore the dynamics of the toggle switch and use exact numerical simulations of the kinetic reactions, the corresponding Chemical Langevin Equation, and Minimum Action Path theory to establish a framework for studying the effect of gene expression noise on patterning time and boundary position. This provides insight into the time scale, gene expression trajectories and directionality of stochastic switching events between cell states. Taking gene expression noise into account predicts that the final boundary position of a morphogen-induced toggle switch, although robust to changes in the details of the noise, is distinct from that of the deterministic system. Moreover, the dramatic increase in patterning time close to the boundary predicted from the deterministic case is substantially reduced. The resulting stochastic switching introduces differences in patterning time along the morphogen gradient that result in a patterning wave propagating away from the morphogen source with a velocity determined by the intrinsic noise. The wave sharpens and slows as it advances and may never reach steady state in a biologically relevant time. This could explain experimentally observed dynamics of pattern formation. Together the analysis reveals the importance of dynamical transients for understanding morphogen-driven transcriptional networks and indicates that gene expression noise can

  4. Intrinsic Noise Profoundly Alters the Dynamics and Steady State of Morphogen-Controlled Bistable Genetic Switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    During tissue development, patterns of gene expression determine the spatial arrangement of cell types. In many cases, gradients of secreted signalling molecules—morphogens—guide this process by controlling downstream transcriptional networks. A mechanism commonly used in these networks to convert the continuous information provided by the gradient into discrete transitions between adjacent cell types is the genetic toggle switch, composed of cross-repressing transcriptional determinants. Previous analyses have emphasised the steady state output of these mechanisms. Here, we explore the dynamics of the toggle switch and use exact numerical simulations of the kinetic reactions, the corresponding Chemical Langevin Equation, and Minimum Action Path theory to establish a framework for studying the effect of gene expression noise on patterning time and boundary position. This provides insight into the time scale, gene expression trajectories and directionality of stochastic switching events between cell states. Taking gene expression noise into account predicts that the final boundary position of a morphogen-induced toggle switch, although robust to changes in the details of the noise, is distinct from that of the deterministic system. Moreover, the dramatic increase in patterning time close to the boundary predicted from the deterministic case is substantially reduced. The resulting stochastic switching introduces differences in patterning time along the morphogen gradient that result in a patterning wave propagating away from the morphogen source with a velocity determined by the intrinsic noise. The wave sharpens and slows as it advances and may never reach steady state in a biologically relevant time. This could explain experimentally observed dynamics of pattern formation. Together the analysis reveals the importance of dynamical transients for understanding morphogen-driven transcriptional networks and indicates that gene expression noise can qualitatively

  5. Active Control of Suspension Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper some recent research on active control of very long suspension bridges, is presented. The presentation is based on research work at Aalborg University, Denmark. The active control system is based on movable flaps attached to the bridge girder. Wind load on bridges with or without...... flaps attached to the girder is briefly presented. A simple active control system is discussed. Results from wind tunnel experiments with a bridge section show that flaps can be used effectively to control bridge girder vibrations. Flutter conditions for suspension bridges with and without flaps...

  6. Design of CMOS Tunable Image-Rejection Low-Noise Amplifier with Active Inductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ler Chun Lee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A fully integrated CMOS tunable image-rejection low-noise amplifier (IRLNA has been designed using Silterra's industry standard 0.18 μm RF CMOS process. The notch filter is designed using an active inductor. Measurement results show that the notch filter designed using active inductor contributes additional 1.19 dB to the noise figure of the low-noise amplifier (LNA. A better result is possible if the active inductor is optimized. Since active inductors require less die area, the die area occupied by the IRLNA is not significantly different from a conventional LNA, which was designed for comparison. The proposed IRLNA exhibits S21 of 11.8 dB, S11 of −17.8 dB, S22 of −10.7 dB, and input 1 dB compression point of −12 dBm at 3 GHz

  7. Predicting the Inflow Distortion Tone Noise of the NASA Glenn Advanced Noise Control Fan with a Combined Quadrupole-Dipole Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, L. Danielle

    2012-01-01

    A combined quadrupole-dipole model of fan inflow distortion tone noise has been extended to calculate tone sound power levels generated by obstructions arranged in circumferentially asymmetric locations upstream of a rotor. Trends in calculated sound power level agreed well with measurements from tests conducted in 2007 in the NASA Glenn Advanced Noise Control Fan. Calculated values of sound power levels radiated upstream were demonstrated to be sensitive to the accuracy of the modeled wakes from the cylindrical rods that were placed upstream of the fan to distort the inflow. Results indicate a continued need to obtain accurate aerodynamic predictions and measurements at the fan inlet plane as engineers work towards developing fan inflow distortion tone noise prediction tools.

  8. Extremal dynamics: A unifying physical explanation of fractals, 1/f noise, and activated processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, S.L.; Miller, W.M.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The properties of physical systems whose observable properties depend upon random exceedances of critical parameters are quantitatively examined. Using extreme value theory, the dynamical behavior of this broad class of systems is derived. This class of systems can exhibit two characteristic signatures: generalized activation when far from equilibrium and noise with a characteristic power spectrum (including 1/f ) when in quasiequilibrium. Fractal structures can also arise from these systems. It is thus demonstrated that generalized activation, noise, and fractals, in some cases, are simply different manifestations of a single common dynamical principle, which is termed ''extremal dynamics.'' Examples of physical processes governed by extremal dynamics are discussed, including data loss of nonvolatile memories and dielectric breakdown

  9. Annoyance and activity disturbance induced by high-speed railway and conventional railway noise: a contrastive case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Guo-Qing; Lin, Qi-Li; Li, Zheng-Guang; Kang, Jian

    2014-03-07

    High-speed railway (HR, Electrified railway with service speed above 200 km/h.) noise and conventional railway (CR, Electrified railway with service speed under 200 km/h.) noise are different in both time and frequency domain. There is an urgent need to study the influence of HR noise and consequently, develop appropriate noise evaluation index and limits for the total railway noise including HR and CR noise. Based on binaural recording of HR and CR noises in a approximate semi-free field, noise annoyance and activity disturbance induced by maximal train pass-by events in China were investigated through laboratory subjective evaluation. 80 students within recruited 102 students, 40 males and 40 females, 23.9 ± 2.1 years old, were finally selected as the subjects. After receiving noise stimulus via headphone of a binaural audio playback system, subjects were asked to express the annoyance or activity disturbance due to railway noise at a 0-100 numerical scale. The results show that with the same annoyance rating (A) or activity disturbance rating (D), the A-weighted equivalent sound pressure level (LAeq) of CR noise is approximately 7 dB higher than that of HR noise. Linear regression analysis between some acoustical parameters and A (or D) suggests that the coefficient of determination (R2) is higher with the instantaneous fast A-weighted sound pressure level (LAFmax) than that with LAeq. A combined acoustical parameter, LHC = 1.74LAFmax + 0.008LAFmax(Lp-LAeq), where Lp is the sound pressure level, was derived consequently, which could better evaluate the total railway noise, including HR and CR noise. More importantly, with a given LHC, the noise annoyance of HR and CR noise is the same. Among various acoustical parameters including LHC and LAeq, A and D have the highest correlation with LHC. LHC has been proved to be an appropriate index to evaluate the total railway noise, including both HR and CR. However, it should be pointed out that this study provides

  10. Cross-Cutting Activities 2016 on Wind Turbine Noise, Summary Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Fischer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this report is to summarize activities that took place in year 2016 as part of the Cross-Cutting Activity on Wind Turbine Noise, self-financed by DTU Wind Energy. A short description of the background behind this project (in particular Cross-Cutting Activities conducted in year 2015......), the main objectives of the various studies and scientific achievements are reported in the introduction. Then, each Work Packages constituting this project are described in more details in the following sections....

  11. Activation barrier scaling and crossover for noise-induced switching in micromechanical parametric oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, H B; Stambaugh, C

    2007-08-10

    We explore fluctuation-induced switching in parametrically driven micromechanical torsional oscillators. The oscillators possess one, two, or three stable attractors depending on the modulation frequency. Noise induces transitions between the coexisting attractors. Near the bifurcation points, the activation barriers are found to have a power law dependence on frequency detuning with critical exponents that are in agreement with predicted universal scaling relationships. At large detuning, we observe a crossover to a different power law dependence with an exponent that is device specific.

  12. Kalman filter based fault diagnosis of networked control system with white noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanwei WANG; Ying ZHENG

    2005-01-01

    The networked control system NCS is regarded as a sampled control system with output time-variant delay.White noise is considered in the model construction of NCS.By using the Kalman filter theory to compute the filter parameters,a Kalman filter is constructed for this NCS.By comparing the output of the filter and the practical system,a residual is generated to diagnose the sensor faults and the actuator faults.Finally,an example is given to show the feasibility of the approach.

  13. Task-specific noise exposure during manual concrete surface grinding in enclosed areas-influence of operation variables and dust control methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar-Khanzadeh, Farhang; Ames, April L; Milz, Sheryl A; Akbar-Khanzadeh, Mahboubeh

    2013-01-01

    Noise exposure is a distinct hazard during hand-held concrete grinding activities, and its assessment is challenging because of the many variables involved. Noise dosimeters were used to examine the extent of personal noise exposure while concrete grinding was performed with a variety of grinder sizes, types, accessories, and available dust control methods. Noise monitoring was conducted in an enclosed area covering 52 task-specific grinding sessions lasting from 6 to 72 minutes. Noise levels, either in minute average noise level (Lavg, dBA) or in minute peak (dBC), during concrete grinding were significantly (P grinding cup wheel (blade) sizes of 4-inch (100 mm), 5-inch (125 mm) and 6-inch (150 mm), and surface orientation (horizontal, inclined). Overall, minute Lavg during grinding was 97.0 ± 3.3 (mean ± SD), ranging from 87.9 to 113. The levels of minute Lavg during uncontrolled grinding (98.9 ± 5.2) or wet-grinding (98.5 ± 2.7) were significantly higher than those during local exhaust ventilation (LEV) grinding (96.2 ± 2.8). A 6-inch grinding cup wheel generated significantly higher noise levels (98.7 ± 2.8) than 5-inch (96.3 ± 3.2) or 4-inch (95.3 ± 3.5) cup wheels. The minute peak noise levels (dBC) during grinding was 113 ± 5.2 ranging from 104 to 153. The minute peak noise levels during uncontrolled grinding (119 ± 10.2) were significantly higher than those during wet-grinding (115 ± 4.5) and LEV-grinding (112 ± 3.4). A 6-inch grinding cup wheel generated significantly higher minute peak noise levels (115 ± 5.3) than 5-inch (112 ± 4.5) or 4-inch (111 ± 5.4) cup wheels. Assuming an 8-hour work shift, the results indicated that noise exposure levels during concrete grinding in enclosed areas exceeded the recommended permissible exposure limits and workers should be protected by engineering control methods, safe work practices, and/or personal protective devices.

  14. Response of Electrical Activity in an Improved Neuron Model under Electromagnetic Radiation and Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Feibiao; Liu, Shenquan

    2017-01-01

    Electrical activities are ubiquitous neuronal bioelectric phenomena, which have many different modes to encode the expression of biological information, and constitute the whole process of signal propagation between neurons. Therefore, we focus on the electrical activities of neurons, which is also causing widespread concern among neuroscientists. In this paper, we mainly investigate the electrical activities of the Morris-Lecar (M-L) model with electromagnetic radiation or Gaussian white noise, which can restore the authenticity of neurons in realistic neural network. First, we explore dynamical response of the whole system with electromagnetic induction (EMI) and Gaussian white noise. We find that there are slight differences in the discharge behaviors via comparing the response of original system with that of improved system, and electromagnetic induction can transform bursting or spiking state to quiescent state and vice versa. Furthermore, we research bursting transition mode and the corresponding periodic solution mechanism for the isolated neuron model with electromagnetic induction by using one-parameter and bi-parameters bifurcation analysis. Finally, we analyze the effects of Gaussian white noise on the original system and coupled system, which is conducive to understand the actual discharge properties of realistic neurons.

  15. Response of Electrical Activity in an Improved Neuron Model under Electromagnetic Radiation and Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feibiao Zhan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Electrical activities are ubiquitous neuronal bioelectric phenomena, which have many different modes to encode the expression of biological information, and constitute the whole process of signal propagation between neurons. Therefore, we focus on the electrical activities of neurons, which is also causing widespread concern among neuroscientists. In this paper, we mainly investigate the electrical activities of the Morris-Lecar (M-L model with electromagnetic radiation or Gaussian white noise, which can restore the authenticity of neurons in realistic neural network. First, we explore dynamical response of the whole system with electromagnetic induction (EMI and Gaussian white noise. We find that there are slight differences in the discharge behaviors via comparing the response of original system with that of improved system, and electromagnetic induction can transform bursting or spiking state to quiescent state and vice versa. Furthermore, we research bursting transition mode and the corresponding periodic solution mechanism for the isolated neuron model with electromagnetic induction by using one-parameter and bi-parameters bifurcation analysis. Finally, we analyze the effects of Gaussian white noise on the original system and coupled system, which is conducive to understand the actual discharge properties of realistic neurons.

  16. Reduction of interior sound fields in flexible cylinders by active vibration control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms of interior sound reduction through active control of a thin flexible shell's vibrational response are presently evaluated in view of an analytical model. The noise source is a single exterior acoustic monopole. The active control model is evaluated for harmonic excitation; the results obtained indicate spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 20 dB over the source plane, for acoustic resonant conditions inside the cavity.

  17. Noise Response Data Reveal Novel Controllability Gramian for Nonlinear Network Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashima, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Control of nonlinear large-scale dynamical networks, e.g., collective behavior of agents interacting via a scale-free connection topology, is a central problem in many scientific and engineering fields. For the linear version of this problem, the so-called controllability Gramian has played an important role to quantify how effectively the dynamical states are reachable by a suitable driving input. In this paper, we first extend the notion of the controllability Gramian to nonlinear dynamics in terms of the Gibbs distribution. Next, we show that, when the networks are open to environmental noise, the newly defined Gramian is equal to the covariance matrix associated with randomly excited, but uncontrolled, dynamical state trajectories. This fact theoretically justifies a simple Monte Carlo simulation that can extract effectively controllable subdynamics in nonlinear complex networks. In addition, the result provides a novel insight into the relationship between controllability and statistical mechanics. PMID:27264780

  18. Toward Active Control of Noise from Hot Supersonic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-21

    Mechanisms AGARD - CP -131, 1974, pp. 13.1-13.12. [23] Goldstein, M.E., "On identifying the true sources of aerodynamic sound," Journal of Fluid Mechanics Vol...either constant or begins to decay. For the resampled data (1/8 inch microphones resampled at 100 kHz), the change in 7( 73 ) follows the originally...supersonic jet and their acoustic radiation," Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 69, No.l, 1975, pp. 73 95. [5] Tain, C. K. W., "Mach wave radiation from high

  19. Dependence of regular background noise of VLF radiation and thunder-storm activity on solar wind proton density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolev, A.V.; Kozlov, V.I.

    1997-01-01

    Correlation of the intensity of slowly changing regular background noise within 9.7 kHz frequency in Yakutsk (L = 3) and of the solar wind density protons was determined. This result explains the reverse dependence of the intensity of the regular background noise on the solar activity, 27-day frequency, increase before and following geomagnetic storms, absence of relation with K p index of geomagnetic activity. Conclusion is made that growth of density of the solar wind protons results in increase of the regular background noise and thunderstorm activity

  20. Experimental and Computational Instrumentation for Rotorcraft Noise and Vibration Control Research at the Penn State Rotorcraft Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Edward

    2001-01-01

    A team of faculty at the Penn State Rotorcraft Center of Excellence has integrated five new facilities into a broad range of research and educational programs focused on rotorcraft noise and vibration control...

  1. Reduction of the radiating sound of a submerged finite cylindrical shell structure by active vibration control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-02-06

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water.

  2. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Bok Choi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water.

  3. Low-noise cable for diagnostics, control and instrumentation of the ASDEX tokamak fusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gernhardt, J.

    1988-11-01

    ASDEX (Axially Symmetric Divertor EXperiment) is a large tokamak (R=1.65 m; a=0.4 m) with an air transformer. The relatively large stray field, Bz=10 mT=(100 G); for ρ=5 m, Bz=40 mT=(400 G); for ρ=3 m, BΦ=0.3 T=(3 kG); for ρ=3m, compared with that of an iron transformer, and the cable length 1≤30 m from the experiment to the control room, make mainly the magnetically induced and capacitively coupled noise signal in the cable relatively high. As a result of neutral injection (> 4 MW; 40 kV) and lower hybrid ion cyclotron and Alfven wave heating strong E-fields are produced and noise is coupled into the cables. These magnetic and electric field gradients during the plasma shot vary with time and location. This report tries to show how these noise signals can be reduced without reducing the broadcast frequency of the signal. The Electro Magnetic Compatibility and Interference (EMC, EMI) are discussed. The cost of diagnostic cable, connectors and cable ducts without mounting is approximately DM 700,000.--. (orig.)

  4. Modeling of Broadband Liners Applied to the Advanced Noise Control Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Jones, Michael G.; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    The broadband component of fan noise has grown in relevance with an increase in bypass ratio and incorporation of advanced fan designs. Therefore, while the attenuation of fan tones remains a major factor in engine nacelle acoustic liner design, the simultaneous reduction of broadband fan noise levels has received increased interest. As such, a previous investigation focused on improvements to an established broadband acoustic liner optimization process using the Advanced Noise Control Fan (ANCF) rig as a demonstrator. Constant-depth, double-degree of freedom and variable-depth, multi-degree of freedom liner designs were carried through design, fabrication, and testing. This paper addresses a number of areas for further research identified in the initial assessment of the ANCF study. Specifically, incident source specification and uncertainty in some aspects of the predicted liner impedances are addressed. This information is incorporated in updated predictions of the liner performance and comparisons with measurement are greatly improved. Results illustrate the value of the design process in concurrently evaluating the relative costs/benefits of various liner designs. This study also provides further confidence in the integrated use of duct acoustic propagation/radiation and liner modeling tools in the design and evaluation of novel broadband liner concepts for complex engine configurations.

  5. Improved Broadband Liner Optimization Applied to the Advanced Noise Control Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Jones, Michael G.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Ayle, Earl; Ichihashi, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    The broadband component of fan noise has grown in relevance with the utilization of increased bypass ratio and advanced fan designs. Thus, while the attenuation of fan tones remains paramount, the ability to simultaneously reduce broadband fan noise levels has become more desirable. This paper describes improvements to a previously established broadband acoustic liner optimization process using the Advanced Noise Control Fan rig as a demonstrator. Specifically, in-duct attenuation predictions with a statistical source model are used to obtain optimum impedance spectra over the conditions of interest. The predicted optimum impedance information is then used with acoustic liner modeling tools to design liners aimed at producing impedance spectra that most closely match the predicted optimum values. Design selection is based on an acceptance criterion that provides the ability to apply increased weighting to specific frequencies and/or operating conditions. Constant-depth, double-degree of freedom and variable-depth, multi-degree of freedom designs are carried through design, fabrication, and testing to validate the efficacy of the design process. Results illustrate the value of the design process in concurrently evaluating the relative costs/benefits of these liner designs. This study also provides an application for demonstrating the integrated use of duct acoustic propagation/radiation and liner modeling tools in the design and evaluation of novel broadband liner concepts for complex engine configurations.

  6. Simulation and stability analysis of supersonic impinging jet noise with microjet control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Nathaniel; Nichols, Joseph W.

    2014-11-01

    A model for an ideally expanded 1.5 Mach turbulent jet impinging on a flat plate using unstructured high-fidelity large eddy simulations (LES) and hydrodynamic stability analysis is presented. Note the LES configuration conforms exactly to experiments performed at the STOVL supersonic jet facility of the Florida Center for Advanced Aero-Propulsion allowing validation against experimental measurements. The LES are repeated for different nozzle-wall separation distances as well as with and without the addition of sixteen microjets positioned uniformly around the nozzle lip. For some nozzle-wall distances, but not all, the microjets result in substantial noise reduction. Observations of substantial noise reduction are associated with a relative absence of large-scale coherent vortices in the jet shear layer. To better understand and predict the effectiveness of microjet noise control, the application of global stability analysis about LES mean fields is used to extract axisymmetric and helical instability modes connected to the complex interplay between the coherent vortices, shocks, and acoustic feedback. We gratefully acknowledge computational resources provided by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility.

  7. Proximal versus distal control of two-joint planar reaching movements in the presence of neuromuscular noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung P; Dingwell, Jonathan B

    2012-06-01

    Determining how the human nervous system contends with neuro-motor noise is vital to understanding how humans achieve accurate goal-directed movements. Experimentally, people learning skilled tasks tend to reduce variability in distal joint movements more than in proximal joint movements. This suggests that they might be imposing greater control over distal joints than proximal joints. However, the reasons for this remain unclear, largely because it is not experimentally possible to directly manipulate either the noise or the control at each joint independently. Therefore, this study used a 2 degree-of-freedom torque driven arm model to determine how different combinations of noise and/or control independently applied at each joint affected the reaching accuracy and the total work required to make the movement. Signal-dependent noise was simultaneously and independently added to the shoulder and elbow torques to induce endpoint errors during planar reaching. Feedback control was then applied, independently and jointly, at each joint to reduce endpoint error due to the added neuromuscular noise. Movement direction and the inertia distribution along the arm were varied to quantify how these biomechanical variations affected the system performance. Endpoint error and total net work were computed as dependent measures. When each joint was independently subjected to noise in the absence of control, endpoint errors were more sensitive to distal (elbow) noise than to proximal (shoulder) noise for nearly all combinations of reaching direction and inertia ratio. The effects of distal noise on endpoint errors were more pronounced when inertia was distributed more toward the forearm. In contrast, the total net work decreased as mass was shifted to the upper arm for reaching movements in all directions. When noise was present at both joints and joint control was implemented, controlling the distal joint alone reduced endpoint errors more than controlling the proximal joint

  8. Car audio using DSP for active sound control. DSP ni yoru active seigyo wo mochiita audio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, K.; Asano, S.; Furukawa, N. (Mitsubishi Motor Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-06-01

    In the automobile cabin, there are some unique problems which spoil the quality of sound reproduction from audio equipment, such as the narrow space and/or the background noise. The audio signal processing by using DSP (digital signal processor) makes enable a solution to these problems. A car audio with a high amenity has been successfully made by the active sound control using DSP. The DSP consists of an adder, coefficient multiplier, delay unit, and connections. For the actual processing by DSP, are used functions, such as sound field correction, response and processing of noises during driving, surround reproduction, graphic equalizer processing, etc. High effectiveness of the method was confirmed through the actual driving evaluation test. The present paper describes the actual method of sound control technology using DSP. Especially, the dynamic processing of the noise during driving is discussed in detail. 1 ref., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Electrical Maxwell demon and Szilard engine utilizing Johnson noise, measurement, logic and control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laszlo Bela Kish

    Full Text Available We introduce a purely electrical version of Maxwell's demon which does not involve mechanically moving parts such as trapdoors, etc. It consists of a capacitor, resistors, amplifiers, logic circuitry and electronically controlled switches and uses thermal noise in resistors (Johnson noise to pump heat. The only types of energy of importance in this demon are electrical energy and heat. We also demonstrate an entirely electrical version of Szilard's engine, i.e., an information-controlled device that can produce work by employing thermal fluctuations. The only moving part is a piston that executes work, and the engine has purely electronic controls and it is free of the major weakness of the original Szilard engine in not requiring removal and repositioning the piston at the end of the cycle. For both devices, the energy dissipation in the memory and other binary informatics components are insignificant compared to the exponentially large energy dissipation in the analog part responsible for creating new information by measurement and decision. This result contradicts the view that the energy dissipation in the memory during erasure is the most essential dissipation process in a demon. Nevertheless the dissipation in the memory and information processing parts is sufficient to secure the Second Law of Thermodynamics.

  10. Electrical Maxwell demon and Szilard engine utilizing Johnson noise, measurement, logic and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Laszlo Bela; Granqvist, Claes-Göran

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a purely electrical version of Maxwell's demon which does not involve mechanically moving parts such as trapdoors, etc. It consists of a capacitor, resistors, amplifiers, logic circuitry and electronically controlled switches and uses thermal noise in resistors (Johnson noise) to pump heat. The only types of energy of importance in this demon are electrical energy and heat. We also demonstrate an entirely electrical version of Szilard's engine, i.e., an information-controlled device that can produce work by employing thermal fluctuations. The only moving part is a piston that executes work, and the engine has purely electronic controls and it is free of the major weakness of the original Szilard engine in not requiring removal and repositioning the piston at the end of the cycle. For both devices, the energy dissipation in the memory and other binary informatics components are insignificant compared to the exponentially large energy dissipation in the analog part responsible for creating new information by measurement and decision. This result contradicts the view that the energy dissipation in the memory during erasure is the most essential dissipation process in a demon. Nevertheless the dissipation in the memory and information processing parts is sufficient to secure the Second Law of Thermodynamics.

  11. Electrical Maxwell Demon and Szilard Engine Utilizing Johnson Noise, Measurement, Logic and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Laszlo Bela; Granqvist, Claes-Göran

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a purely electrical version of Maxwell's demon which does not involve mechanically moving parts such as trapdoors, etc. It consists of a capacitor, resistors, amplifiers, logic circuitry and electronically controlled switches and uses thermal noise in resistors (Johnson noise) to pump heat. The only types of energy of importance in this demon are electrical energy and heat. We also demonstrate an entirely electrical version of Szilard's engine, i.e., an information-controlled device that can produce work by employing thermal fluctuations. The only moving part is a piston that executes work, and the engine has purely electronic controls and it is free of the major weakness of the original Szilard engine in not requiring removal and repositioning the piston at the end of the cycle. For both devices, the energy dissipation in the memory and other binary informatics components are insignificant compared to the exponentially large energy dissipation in the analog part responsible for creating new information by measurement and decision. This result contradicts the view that the energy dissipation in the memory during erasure is the most essential dissipation process in a demon. Nevertheless the dissipation in the memory and information processing parts is sufficient to secure the Second Law of Thermodynamics. PMID:23077525

  12. Subtractive, divisive and non-monotonic gain control in feedforward nets linearized by noise and delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejias, Jorge F; Payeur, Alexandre; Selin, Erik; Maler, Leonard; Longtin, André

    2014-01-01

    The control of input-to-output mappings, or gain control, is one of the main strategies used by neural networks for the processing and gating of information. Using a spiking neural network model, we studied the gain control induced by a form of inhibitory feedforward circuitry-also known as "open-loop feedback"-, which has been experimentally observed in a cerebellum-like structure in weakly electric fish. We found, both analytically and numerically, that this network displays three different regimes of gain control: subtractive, divisive, and non-monotonic. Subtractive gain control was obtained when noise is very low in the network. Also, it was possible to change from divisive to non-monotonic gain control by simply modulating the strength of the feedforward inhibition, which may be achieved via long-term synaptic plasticity. The particular case of divisive gain control has been previously observed in vivo in weakly electric fish. These gain control regimes were robust to the presence of temporal delays in the inhibitory feedforward pathway, which were found to linearize the input-to-output mappings (or f-I curves) via a novel variability-increasing mechanism. Our findings highlight the feedforward-induced gain control analyzed here as a highly versatile mechanism of information gating in the brain.

  13. Subtractive, divisive and non-monotonic gain control in feedforward nets linearized by noise and delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge F Mejias

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The control of input-to-output mappings, or gain control, is one of the main strategies used by neural networks for the processing and gating of information. Using a spiking neural network model, we studied the gain control induced by a form of inhibitory feedforward circuitry — also known as ’open-loop feedback’ —, which has been experimentally observed in a cerebellum-like structure in weakly electric fish. We found, both analytically and numerically, that this network displays three different regimes of gain control: subtractive, divisive, and non-monotonic. Subtractive gain control was obtained when noise is very low in the network. Also, it was possible to change from divisive to non-monotonic gain control by simply modulating the strength of the feedforward inhibition, which may be achieved via long-term synaptic plasticity. The particular case of divisive gain control has been previously observed in vivo in weakly electric fish. These gain control regimes were robust to the presence of temporal delays in the inhibitory feedforward pathway, which were found to linearize the input-to-output mappings (or f-I curves via a novel variability-increasing mechanism. Our findings highlight the feedforward-induced gain control analyzed here as a highly versatile mechanism of information gating in the brain.

  14. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  15. Spherical loudspeaker array for local active control of sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafaely, Boaz

    2009-05-01

    Active control of sound has been employed to reduce noise levels around listeners' head using destructive interference from noise-canceling sound sources. Recently, spherical loudspeaker arrays have been studied as multiple-channel sound sources, capable of generating sound fields with high complexity. In this paper, the potential use of a spherical loudspeaker array for local active control of sound is investigated. A theoretical analysis of the primary and secondary sound fields around a spherical sound source reveals that the natural quiet zones for the spherical source have a shell-shape. Using numerical optimization, quiet zones with other shapes are designed, showing potential for quiet zones with extents that are significantly larger than the well-known limit of a tenth of a wavelength for monopole sources. The paper presents several simulation examples showing quiet zones in various configurations.

  16. Panels Manufactured from Vegetable Fibers: An Alternative Approach for Controlling Noises in Indoor Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo Pacheco Bastos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise control devices such as panels and barriers, when of high efficiency, generally are of difficult acquisition due to high costs turning in many cases their use impracticable, mainly for limited budget small-sized companies. There is a huge requirement for new acoustic materials that have satisfactory performance, not only under acoustic aspect but also other relevant ones and are of low cost. Vegetable fibers are an alternative solution when used as panels since they promise satisfactory acoustic absorption, according to previous researches, exist in abundance, and derive from renewable sources. This paper, therefore, reports on the development of panels made from vegetable fibers (coconut, palm, sisal, and açaí, assesses their applicability by various experimental (flammability, odor, fungal growth, and ageing tests, and characterize them acoustically in terms of their sound absorption coefficients on a scale model reverberant chamber. Acoustic results point out that the aforementioned fiber panels play pretty well the role of a noise control device since they have compatible, and in some cases, higher performance when compared to commercially available conventional materials.

  17. Noise-Induced Loss of Hair Cells and Cochlear Synaptopathy Are Mediated by the Activation of AMPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kayla; Yuan, Hu; Wang, Xianren; Sha, Su-Hua

    2016-07-13

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major unresolved public health problem. Here, we investigate pathomechanisms of sensory hair cell death and suggest a novel target for protective intervention. Cellular survival depends upon maintenance of energy homeostasis, largely by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In response to a noise exposure in CBA/J mice, the levels of phosphorylated AMPKα increased in hair cells in a noise intensity-dependent manner. Inhibition of AMPK via siRNA or the pharmacological inhibitor compound C attenuated noise-induced loss of outer hair cells (OHCs) and synaptic ribbons, and preserved auditory function. Additionally, noise exposure increased the activity of the upstream AMPK kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) in cochlear tissues. The inhibition of LKB1 by siRNA attenuated the noise-increased phosphorylation of AMPKα in OHCs, reduced the loss of inner hair cell synaptic ribbons and OHCs, and protected against NIHL. These results indicate that noise exposure induces hair cell death and synaptopathy by activating AMPK via LKB1-mediated pathways. Targeting these pathways may provide a novel route to prevent NIHL. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) α in sensory hair cells is noise intensity dependent and contributes to noise-induced hearing loss by mediating the loss of inner hair cell synaptic ribbons and outer hair cells. Noise induces the phosphorylation of AMPKα1 by liver kinase B1 (LKB1), triggered by changes in intracellular ATP levels. The inhibition of AMPK activation by silencing AMPK or LKB1, or with the pharmacological inhibitor compound C, reduced outer hair cell and synaptic ribbon loss as well as noise-induced hearing loss. This study provides new insights into mechanisms of noise-induced hearing loss and suggests novel interventions for the prevention of the loss of sensory hair cells and cochlear synaptopathy. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/367497-14$15.00/0.

  18. Noise-induced effects on multicellular biopacemaker spontaneous activity: Differences between weak and strong pacemaker cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghighi, Alireza; Comtois, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Self-organization of spontaneous activity of a network of active elements is important to the general theory of reaction-diffusion systems as well as for pacemaking activity to initiate beating of the heart. Monolayer cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, consisting of resting and pacemaker cells, exhibit spontaneous activation of their electrical activity. Similarly, one proposed approach to the development of biopacemakers as an alternative to electronic pacemakers for cardiac therapy is based on heterogeneous cardiac cells with resting and spontaneously beating phenotypes. However, the combined effect of pacemaker characteristics, density, and spatial distribution of the pacemaker cells on spontaneous activity is unknown. Using a simple stochastic pattern formation algorithm, we previously showed a clear nonlinear dependency of spontaneous activity (occurrence and amplitude of spontaneous period) on the spatial patterns of pacemaker cells. In this study, we show that this behavior is dependent on the pacemaker cell characteristics, with weaker pacemaker cells requiring higher density and larger clusters to sustain multicellular activity. These multicellular structures also demonstrated an increased sensitivity to voltage noise that favored spontaneous activity at lower density while increasing temporal variation in the period of activity. This information will help researchers overcome the current limitations of biopacemakers.

  19. Evaluating the B-cell density with various activation functions using White Noise Path Integral Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aban, C. J. G.; Bacolod, R. O.; Confesor, M. N. P.

    2015-06-01

    A The White Noise Path Integral Approach is used in evaluating the B-cell density or the number of B-cell per unit volume for a basic type of immune system response based on the modeling done by Perelson and Wiegel. From the scaling principles of Perelson [1], the B- cell density is obtained where antigens and antibodies mutates and activation function f(|S-SA|) is defined describing the interaction between a specific antigen and a B-cell. If the activation function f(|S-SA|) is held constant, the major form of the B-cell density evaluated using white noise analysis is similar to the form of the B-cell density obtained by Perelson and Wiegel using a differential approach.A piecewise linear functionis also used to describe the activation f(|S-SA|). If f(|S-SA|) is zero, the density decreases exponentially. If f(|S-SA|) = S-SA-SB, the B- cell density increases exponentially until it reaches a certain maximum value. For f(|S-SA|) = 2SA-SB-S, the behavior of B-cell density is oscillating and remains to be in small values.

  20. Self-organized critical noise amplification in human closed loop control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Patzelt

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available When humans perform closed loop control tasks like in upright standing or while balancing a stick, their behavior exhibits non-Gaussian fluctuations with long-tailed distributions. The origin of these fluctuations is not known. Here, we investigate if they are caused by selforganized critical noise amplification which emerges in control systems when an unstable dynamics becomes stabilized by an adaptive controller that has finite memory. Starting from this theory, we formulate a realistic model of adaptive closed loop control by including constraints on memory and delays. To test this model, we performed psychophysical experiments where humans balanced an unstable target on a screen. It turned out that the model reproduces the long tails of the distributions together with other characteristic features of the human control dynamics. Fine-tuning the model to match the experimental dynamics identifies parameters characterizing a subject’s control system which can be independently tested. Our results suggest that the nervous system involved in closed loop motor control nearly optimally estimates system parameters on-line from very short epochs of past observations.

  1. Noise suppression by noise

    OpenAIRE

    Vilar, J. M. G. (José M. G.), 1972-; Rubí Capaceti, José Miguel

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed the interplay between an externally added noise and the intrinsic noise of systems that relax fast towards a stationary state, and found that increasing the intensity of the external noise can reduce the total noise of the system. We have established a general criterion for the appearance of this phenomenon and discussed two examples in detail.

  2. An adaptive noise cancelling system used for beam control at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himel, T.; Allison, S.; Grossberg, P.; Hendrickson, L.; Sass, R.; Shoaee, H.

    1993-06-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider now has a total of twenty-four beam-steering feedback loops used to keep the electron and positron beams on their desired trajectories. Seven of these loops measure and control the same beam as it proceeds down the linac through the arcs to the final focus. Ideally by each loop should correct only for disturbances that occur between it and the immediate upstream loop. In fact, in the original system each loop corrected for all upstream disturbances. This resulted in undesirable over-correction and ringing. We added MIMO (Multiple Input Multiple Output) adaptive noise cancellers to separate the signal we wish to correct from disturbances further upstream. This adaptive control improved performance in the 1992 run

  3. Designing and Manufacturing a Noise Controlling Silencer for the Cooling Tower Pump of Sarcheshmeh Copper Power Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Zare

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background One of the most common harmful factors in the workplace is noise. Noise control is a factor beneficial for health and safety in the workplace. Objectives The current study aimed to design and manufacture a silencer for the cooling tower pump of Sarcheshmeh Copper power station in order to control noise. Methods In this study, sound pressure level was measured by the use of a sound level meter (B & K 2260. Measurement was carried out in the light of ISO 1996 standard. After studying technical and acoustic features of the noise source, a dispersive-absorptive silencer was designed to control noise pollution generated by the cooling tower pump of the thermal station. After analyzing the frequencies of sound pressure level and using available data, a cylindrical silencer (with a diameter of 1.5 m and height of 3 m was designed and manufactured. The internal part of the silencer was filled with different columns of absorbent material covered with punched metal. Therefore, the silencer consisted of (1 acoustic diffuser, (2 acoustic chamber, and (3 acoustic channels. Results Measurements showed that, at a distance of 1 m from the source, sound pressure level reduced from 127 dBA before installing the silencer to 79 dBA after the installation, resulting in a reduction of 48 dBA. Conclusions Using a silencer with absorbent material (glass wool is very effective in reducing the noise generated by the pump.

  4. Active control: Wind turbine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindner, H.

    1999-01-01

    This report is a part of the reporting of the work done in the project 'Active Control of Wind Turbines'. This project aim is to develop a simulation model for design of control systems for turbines with pitch control and to use that model to designcontrollers. This report describes the model...... validation as well as parameter estimation. The model includes a simple model of the structure of the turbine including tower and flapwise blade bending,a detailed model of the gear box and induction generator, a linearized aerodynamic model including modelling of induction lag and actuator and sensor models...

  5. Active control: Wind turbine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindner, Henrik

    1999-07-01

    This report is a part of the reporting of the work done in the project `Active Control of Wind Turbines`. This project aim is to develop a simulation model for design of control systems for turbines with pitch control and to use that model to design controllers. This report describes the model developed for controller design and analysis. Emphasis has been put on establishment of simple models describing the dynamic behavior of the wind turbine in adequate details for controller design. This has been done with extensive use of measurements as the basis for selection of model complexity and model validation as well as parameter estimation. The model includes a simple model of the structure of the turbine including tower and flapwise blade bending, a detailed model of the gear box and induction generator, a linearized aerodynamic model including modelling of induction lag and actuator and sensor models. The models are all formulated as linear differential equations. The models are validated through comparisons with measurements performed on a Vestas WD 34 400 kW wind turbine. It is shown from a control point of view simple linear models can be used to describe the dynamic behavior of a pitch controlled wind turbine. The model and the measurements corresponds well in the relevant frequency range. The developed model is therefore applicable for controller design. (au) EFP-91. 18 ills., 22 refs.

  6. The Effect of Exposure to High Noise Levels on the Performance and Rate of Error in Manual Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajenasiri, Farahnaz; Zamanian, Alireza; Zamanian, Zahra

    2016-03-01

    Sound is among the significant environmental factors for people's health, and it has an important role in both physical and psychological injuries, and it also affects individuals' performance and productivity. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of exposure to high noise levels on the performance and rate of error in manual activities. This was an interventional study conducted on 50 students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (25 males and 25 females) in which each person was considered as its own control to assess the effect of noise on her or his performance at the sound levels of 70, 90, and 110 dB by using two factors of physical features and the creation of different conditions of sound source as well as applying the Two-Arm coordination Test. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Repeated measurements were used to compare the length of performance as well as the errors measured in the test. Based on the results, we found a direct and significant association between the levels of sound and the length of performance. Moreover, the participant's performance was significantly different for different sound levels (at 110 dB as opposed to 70 and 90 dB, p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). This study found that a sound level of 110 dB had an important effect on the individuals' performances, i.e., the performances were decreased.

  7. Controlled longitudinal emittance blow-up using band-limited phase noise in CERN PSB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartullo, D.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Timko, H.

    2017-07-01

    Controlled longitudinal emittance blow-up (from 1 eVs to 1.4 eVs) for LHC beams in the CERN PS Booster is currently achievied using sinusoidal phase modulation of a dedicated high-harmonic RF system. In 2021, after the LHC injectors upgrade, 3 eVs should be extracted to the PS. Even if the current method may satisfy the new requirements, it relies on low-power level RF improvements. In this paper another method of blow-up was considered, that is the injection of band-limited phase noise in the main RF system (h=1), never tried in PSB but already used in CERN SPS and LHC, under different conditions (longer cycles). This technique, which lowers the peak line density and therefore the impact of intensity effects in the PSB and the PS, can also be complementary to the present method. The longitudinal space charge, dominant in the PSB, causes significant synchrotron frequency shifts with intensity, and its effect should be taken into account. Another complication arises from the interaction of the phase loop with the injected noise, since both act on the RF phase. All these elements were studied in simulations of the PSB cycle with the BLonD code, and the required blow-up was achieved.

  8. Does exposure to noise from human activities compromise sensory information from cephalopod statocysts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Marta; Lenoir, Marc; Durfort, Mercè; López-Bejar, Manel; Lombarte, Antoni; van der Schaar, Mike; André, Michel

    2013-10-01

    Many anthropogenic noise sources are nowadays contributing to the general noise budget of the oceans. The extent to which sound in the sea impacts and affects marine life is a topic of considerable current interest both to the scientific community and to the general public. Cepaholopods potentially represent a group of species whose ecology may be influenced by artificial noise that would have a direct consequence on the functionality and sensitivity of their sensory organs, the statocysts. These are responsible for their equilibrium and movements in the water column. Controlled Exposure Experiments, including the use of a 50-400Hz sweep (RL=157±5dB re 1μPa with peak levels up to SPL=175dB re 1μPa) revealed lesions in the statocysts of four cephalopod species of the Mediterranean Sea, when exposed to low frequency sounds: (n=76) of Sepia officinalis, (n=4) Octopus vulgaris, (n=5) Loligo vulgaris and (n=2) Illex condietii. The analysis was performed through scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopical techniques of the whole inner structure of the cephalopods' statocyst, especially on the macula and crista. All exposed individuals presented the same lesions and the same incremental effects over time, consistent with a massive acoustic trauma observed in other species that have been exposed to much higher intensities of sound: Immediately after exposure, the damage was observed in the macula statica princeps (msp) and in the crista sensory epithelium. Kinocilia on hair cells were either missing or were bent or flaccid. A number of hair cells showed protruding apical poles and ruptured lateral plasma membranes, most probably resulting from the extrusion of cytoplasmic material. Hair cells were also partially ejected from the sensory epithelium, and spherical holes corresponding to missing hair cells were visible in the epithelium. The cytoplasmic content of the damaged hair cells showed obvious changes, including the presence of numerous vacuoles

  9. Noise and noise disturbances from wind power plants - Tests with interactive control of sound parameters for more comfortable and less perceptible sounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson-Waye, K.; Oehrstroem, E.; Bjoerkman, M.; Agge, A.

    2001-12-01

    In experimental pilot studies, a methodology has been worked out for interactively varying sound parameters in wind power plants. In the tests, 24 persons varied the center frequency of different band-widths, the frequency of a sinus-tone and the amplitude-modulation of a sinus-tone in order to create as comfortable a sound as possible. The variations build on the noise from the two wind turbines Bonus and Wind World. The variations were performed with a constant dba level. The results showed that the majority preferred a low-frequency tone (94 Hz and 115 Hz for Wind World and Bonus, respectively). The mean of the most comfortable amplitude-modulation varied between 18 and 22 Hz, depending on the ground frequency. The mean of the center-frequency for the different band-widths varied from 785 to 1104 Hz. In order to study the influence of the wind velocity on the acoustic character of the noise, a long-time measurement program has been performed. A remotely controlled system has been developed, where wind velocity, wind direction, temperature and humidity are registered simultaneously with the noise. Long-time registrations have been performed for four different wing turbines

  10. Statistical process control: separating signal from noise in emergency department operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Laura; Barrueto, Fermin

    2015-05-01

    Statistical process control (SPC) is a visually appealing and statistically rigorous methodology very suitable to the analysis of emergency department (ED) operations. We demonstrate that the control chart is the primary tool of SPC; it is constructed by plotting data measuring the key quality indicators of operational processes in rationally ordered subgroups such as units of time. Control limits are calculated using formulas reflecting the variation in the data points from one another and from the mean. SPC allows managers to determine whether operational processes are controlled and predictable. We review why the moving range chart is most appropriate for use in the complex ED milieu, how to apply SPC to ED operations, and how to determine when performance improvement is needed. SPC is an excellent tool for operational analysis and quality improvement for these reasons: 1) control charts make large data sets intuitively coherent by integrating statistical and visual descriptions; 2) SPC provides analysis of process stability and capability rather than simple comparison with a benchmark; 3) SPC allows distinction between special cause variation (signal), indicating an unstable process requiring action, and common cause variation (noise), reflecting a stable process; and 4) SPC keeps the focus of quality improvement on process rather than individual performance. Because data have no meaning apart from their context, and every process generates information that can be used to improve it, we contend that SPC should be seriously considered for driving quality improvement in emergency medicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effective equilibrium states in mixtures of active particles driven by colored noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, René; Brader, J. M.; Sharma, A.; Marconi, U. Marini Bettolo

    2018-01-01

    We consider the steady-state behavior of pairs of active particles having different persistence times and diffusivities. To this purpose we employ the active Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model, where the particles are driven by colored noises with exponential correlation functions whose intensities and correlation times vary from species to species. By extending Fox's theory to many components, we derive by functional calculus an approximate Fokker-Planck equation for the configurational distribution function of the system. After illustrating the predicted distribution in the solvable case of two particles interacting via a harmonic potential, we consider systems of particles repelling through inverse power-law potentials. We compare the analytic predictions to computer simulations for such soft-repulsive interactions in one dimension and show that at linear order in the persistence times the theory is satisfactory. This work provides the toolbox to qualitatively describe many-body phenomena, such as demixing and depletion, by means of effective pair potentials.

  12. Cavity Control and Panel Control Strategies in Double-Panel Structures for Transmitted Noise Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Kalverboer, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2012-01-01

    Investigation and comparisons of the cavity control and the panel control in a double-panel structure are presented in this paper. The double-panel structure, which comprises two panels with air in the gap, provides the advantages of low sound-transmission at high frequency, low heat-transmission

  13. Fully probabilistic control for stochastic nonlinear control systems with input dependent noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzallah, Randa

    2015-03-01

    Robust controllers for nonlinear stochastic systems with functional uncertainties can be consistently designed using probabilistic control methods. In this paper a generalised probabilistic controller design for the minimisation of the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the actual joint probability density function (pdf) of the closed loop control system, and an ideal joint pdf is presented emphasising how the uncertainty can be systematically incorporated in the absence of reliable systems models. To achieve this objective all probabilistic models of the system are estimated from process data using mixture density networks (MDNs) where all the parameters of the estimated pdfs are taken to be state and control input dependent. Based on this dependency of the density parameters on the input values, explicit formulations to the construction of optimal generalised probabilistic controllers are obtained through the techniques of dynamic programming and adaptive critic methods. Using the proposed generalised probabilistic controller, the conditional joint pdfs can be made to follow the ideal ones. A simulation example is used to demonstrate the implementation of the algorithm and encouraging results are obtained. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Increasing LIGO sensitivity by feedforward subtraction of auxiliary length control noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadors, Grant David; Riles, Keith; Kawabe, Keita

    2014-01-01

    LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, has been designed and constructed to measure gravitational wave strain via differential arm length. The LIGO 4 km Michelson arms with Fabry–Perot cavities have auxiliary length control servos for suppressing Michelson motion of the beam-splitter and arm cavity input mirrors, which degrades interferometer sensitivity. We demonstrate how a post facto pipeline improves a data sample from LIGO Science Run 6 with feedforward subtraction. Dividing data into 1024 s windows, we numerically fit filter functions representing the frequency-domain transfer functions from Michelson length channels into the gravitational-wave strain data channel for each window, then subtract the filtered Michelson channel noise (witness) from the strain channel (target). In this paper we describe the algorithm, assess achievable improvements in sensitivity to astrophysical sources, and consider relevance to future interferometry. (paper)

  15. Graph theory applied to noise and vibration control in statistical energy analysis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasch, Oriol; Cortés, Lluís

    2009-06-01

    A fundamental aspect of noise and vibration control in statistical energy analysis (SEA) models consists in first identifying and then reducing the energy flow paths between subsystems. In this work, it is proposed to make use of some results from graph theory to address both issues. On the one hand, linear and path algebras applied to adjacency matrices of SEA graphs are used to determine the existence of any order paths between subsystems, counting and labeling them, finding extremal paths, or determining the power flow contributions from groups of paths. On the other hand, a strategy is presented that makes use of graph cut algorithms to reduce the energy flow from a source subsystem to a receiver one, modifying as few internal and coupling loss factors as possible.

  16. On the neutron noise diagnostics of pressurized water reactor control rod vibrations II. Stochastic vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazsit, I.; Glockler, O.

    1984-01-01

    In an earlier publication, using the theory of neutron fluctuations induced by a vibrating control rod, a complete formal solution of rod vibration diagnostics based on neutron noise measurements was given in terms of Fourier-transformed neutron detector time signals. The suggested procedure was checked in numerical simulation tests where only periodic vibrations could be considered. The procedure and its numerical testing are elaborated for stochastic two-dimensional vibrations. A simple stochastic theory of two-dimensional flow-induced vibrations is given; then the diagnostic method is formulated in the stochastic case, that is, in terms of neutron detector auto- and crosspower spectra. A previously suggested approximate rod localization technique is also formulated in the stochastic case. Applicability of the methods is then investigated in numerical simulation tests, using the proposed model of stochastic two-dimensional vibrations when generating neutron detector spectra that simulate measured data

  17. Experimental investigation of flow-induced control-element movements by noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunwald, G.; Liewers, P.; Schumann, P.; Weiss, F.P.

    1978-01-01

    The possibility has been reported of separating a single noise component due to flow-induced vibrations of a certain control element from a complex neutron signal which also contained contributions of many other control elements vibrating similarly. One of the basic assumptions for the different methods applied was that the body sound signal originating from touch events with the channel wall is closely correlated with the control-element movement. Some discrepancies between the results of the different methods showed that this assumption may not be entirely fulfilled. This paper investigates this correlation more accurately by measurements of an air flow model of the control-element channel. The pendulum movement of the element, and the body-sound signal due to the touch events with the channel wall, were measured at different flow-rates. The result is that the correlation is not an ideal one. For a constant flow-rate the touch events happen mainly within a small angle region, which means that the touch event marks a certain phase of the movement period and is therefore correlated with the movement. The dispersion of the touch events' angle distribution explains the small discrepancy between the so-called modified averaging method, which uses the sound signal to trigger the averaging procedure, and the partial spectral density method. But not all discrepancies can be explained by these results; they await further investigation. (author)

  18. Novel Active Combustion Control Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspermeyer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This project presents an innovative solution for active combustion control. Relative to the state of the art, this concept provides frequency modulation (greater than 1,000 Hz) in combination with high-amplitude modulation (in excess of 30 percent flow) and can be adapted to a large range of fuel injector sizes. Existing valves often have low flow modulation strength. To achieve higher flow modulation requires excessively large valves or too much electrical power to be practical. This active combustion control valve (ACCV) has high-frequency and -amplitude modulation, consumes low electrical power, is closely coupled with the fuel injector for modulation strength, and is practical in size and weight. By mitigating combustion instabilities at higher frequencies than have been previously achieved (approximately 1,000 Hz), this new technology enables gas turbines to run at operating points that produce lower emissions and higher performance.

  19. Optogenetic control of epileptiform activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Jan; Sørensen, Andreas T; Deisseroth, Karl

    2009-01-01

    such an optogenetic approach using the light-driven halorhodopsin chloride pump from Natronomonas pharaonis (NpHR), modified for mammalian CNS expression to hyperpolarize central neurons, may inhibit excessive hyperexcitability and epileptiform activity. We show that a lentiviral vector containing the NpHR gene under...... that the optogenetic approach may prove useful for controlling epileptiform activity and opens a future perspective to develop it into a strategy to treat epilepsy.......The optogenetic approach to gain control over neuronal excitability both in vitro and in vivo has emerged as a fascinating scientific tool to explore neuronal networks, but it also opens possibilities for developing novel treatment strategies for neurologic conditions. We have explored whether...

  20. Noise activated bistable sensor based on chaotic system with output defined by temporal coding and firing rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneta, Wojciech; Gomes, Iacyel

    2017-11-01

    Traditional bistable sensors use external bias signal to drive its response between states and their detection strategy is based on the output power spectral density or the residence time difference (RTD) in two sensor states. Recently, the noise activated nonlinear dynamic sensors driven only by noise based on RTD technique have been proposed. Here, we present experimental results of dc voltage measurements by noise-driven bistable sensor based on electronic Chua's circuit operating in a chaotic regime where two single scroll attractors coexist. The output of the sensor is quantified by the proportion of the time the sensor stays in one state to the total observation time and by the spike-count rate with spikes defined by crossings between attractors. The relationship between the stimuli and particular observable for different noise intensities is obtained, the usefulness of each coding scheme is discussed, and the optimal noise intensity for detection is indicated. It is shown that the obtained relationship is the same for any observation time when population coding is used. The optimal time window for both detection and the number of units in population coding is found. Our results may be useful for analyses and understanding of the neural activity and in designing bistable storage elements at length scales where thermal fluctuations drastically increase and the effect of noise must be taken into consideration.

  1. Design Method of Active Disturbance Rejection Variable Structure Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-jie Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on lines cluster approaching theory and inspired by the traditional exponent reaching law method, a new control method, lines cluster approaching mode control (LCAMC method, is designed to improve the parameter simplicity and structure optimization of the control system. The design guidelines and mathematical proofs are also given. To further improve the tracking performance and the inhibition of the white noise, connect the active disturbance rejection control (ADRC method with the LCAMC method and create the extended state observer based lines cluster approaching mode control (ESO-LCAMC method. Taking traditional servo control system as example, two control schemes are constructed and two kinds of comparison are carried out. Computer simulation results show that LCAMC method, having better tracking performance than the traditional sliding mode control (SMC system, makes the servo system track command signal quickly and accurately in spite of the persistent equivalent disturbances and ESO-LCAMC method further reduces the tracking error and filters the white noise added on the system states. Simulation results verify the robust property and comprehensive performance of control schemes.

  2. [Changes of neurotransmitter, lipid peroxide and their metabolic related enzyme activities in the brain of rats exposed to noise and vitamin E].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, N

    1984-09-01

    Effects of noise on locomotor activities were analysed in rat. In addition, changes in lipid peroxide (LPX), their metabolic related enzyme activities, and neurotransmitter in the rat brain due to noise exposure and the effects of vitamin E on the rats were studied. The results obtained were as follows: After white noise exposure of 95 dB (A), the locomotor activities of rat increased. But 3 weeks after noise exposure, the activities began to decrease. LPX and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities in hypothalamus and cortex increased at the 14th day after noise exposure or at the 21st day after noise exposure. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities increased in hippocampus at the 4th day after noise exposure, and decreased in midbrain and thalamus at the 14th day and the 21th day after noise exposure. Norepinephrine (NE) increased in hypothalamus at the 1st day, the 2nd day and the 7th day after noise exposure, and increased in striatum at the 7th day after noise exposure, in cortex at the 4th day and the 7th day after exposure. At the 14th day after noise exposure, NE decreased in cerebellum, in medulla and pons, in midbrain and thalamus, and in cortex. In cortex NE also decreased at the 21st day after noise exposure. Serotonin increased in hypothalamus and in midbrain and thalamus at the 1st and 4th day after noise exposure, and increased in striatum at the 7th day after noise exposure. Decrease in serotonin was observed in cerebellum at the 14th day after noise exposure. Vitamin E decreased LPX in rat brain and the liver.

  3. Controlling Decoherence in Superconducting Qubits: Phenomenological Model and Microscopic Origin of 1/f Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-28

    quasiparticle poisoning which include a completely novel physical origin of these noises. We also proposed a model for excess low frequency flux noise which...and quasiparticle poisoning which include a completely novel physical origin of these noises. We also proposed a model for excess low frequency flux...metallic nanomechanical resonators, Phys. Rev. B 81, 184112 (2010). 3) L. Faoro, A. Kitaev and L. B. Ioffe, Quasiparticle poisoning and Josephson current

  4. Life Cycle Cost Evaluation of Noise and Vibration Control Methods at Urban Railway Turnouts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Tavares de Freitas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A focus of the railway industry over the past decades has been to research, find and develop methods to mitigate noise and vibration resulting from wheel/rail contact along track infrastructure. This resulted in a wide range of abatement measures that are available for today’s engineers. The suitability of each method must be analysed through budget and timeframe limitations, which includes building, maintenance and inspection costs and time allocation, while also aiming at delivering other benefits, such as environmental impact and durability of infrastructure. There are several situations that need noise and vibration mitigation methods, but each design allocates different priorities on a case-by-case basis. Traditionally, the disturbance caused by railways to the community are generated by wheel/rail contact sound radiation that is expressed in different ways, depending on the movement of the rolling stock and track alignment, such as rolling noise, impact noise and curve noise. More specifically, in special trackworks such as turnouts (or called “switches and crossings”, there are two types of noise that can often be observed: impact noise and screeching noise. With respect to the screeching (or flanging, its mitigation methods are usually associated with curve lubrications. In contrast, the impact noise emerges from the sound made by the rolling stock moving through joints and discontinuities (i.e., gaps, resulting in various noise abatement features to minimise such noise impact. Life cycle analysis is therefore vital for cost efficiency benchmarking of the mitigation methods. The evaluation is based on available data from open literature and the total costs were estimated from valid industry reports to maintain coherency. A 50-year period for a life cycle analysis is chosen for this study. As for the general parameters, an area with a high density of people is considered to estimate the values for a community with very strict limits

  5. Effective equilibrium states in the colored-noise model for active matter I. Pairwise forces in the Fox and unified colored noise approximations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, René; Maggi, C.; Sharma, A.; Scacchi, A.; Brader, J. M.; Marini Bettolo Marconi, U.

    2017-11-01

    The equations of motion of active systems can be modeled in terms of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes (OUPs) with appropriate correlators. For further theoretical studies, these should be approximated to yield a Markovian picture for the dynamics and a simplified steady-state condition. We perform a comparative study of the unified colored noise approximation (UCNA) and the approximation scheme by Fox recently employed within this context. We review the approximations necessary to define effective interaction potentials in the low-density limit and study the conditions for which these represent the behavior observed in two-body simulations for the OUPs model and active Brownian particles. The demonstrated limitations of the theory for potentials with a negative slope or curvature can be qualitatively corrected by a new empirical modification. In general, we find that in the presence of translational white noise the Fox approach is more accurate. Finally, we examine an alternative way to define a force-balance condition in the limit of small activity.

  6. An Overview of Recent Automotive Applications of Active Vibration Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kowalczyk, K; Svaricek, F; Bohn, C; Karkosch, H

    2004-01-01

    .... Continental has developed and implemented prototypes of active mounting systems on various test vehicles and demonstrated that significant reductions in noise and vibration levels are achievable...

  7. On the neutron noise diagnostics of pressurized water reactor control rod vibrations. 1. periodic vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazsit, I.; Glockler, O.

    1983-01-01

    Based on the theory of neutron noise arising from the vibration of a localized absorber, the possibility of rod vibration diagnostics is investigated. It is found that noise source characteristics, namely rod position and vibration trajectory and spectra, can be unfolded from measured neutron noise signals. For the localization process, the first and more difficult part of the diagnostics, a procedure is suggested whose novelty is that it is applicable in case of arbitrary vibration trajectories. Applicability of the method is investigated in numerical experiments where effects of background noise are also accounted for

  8. Use of active noise cancellation devices in caregivers in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, S; Weigle, C G; Cheng, E Y; Toohill, R; Berens, R J

    2000-04-01

    Recent development of noise cancellation devices may offer relief from noise in the intensive care unit environment. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of noise cancellation devices on subjective hearing assessment by caregivers in the intensive care units. Randomized, double-blind. Adult medical intensive care unit and pediatric intensive care unit of a teaching hospital. Caregivers of patients, including nurses, parents, respiratory therapists, and nursing assistants from a medical intensive care unit and pediatric intensive care, were enrolled in the study. Each participant was asked to wear the headphones, functional or nonfunctional noise cancellation devices, for a minimum of 30 mins. Subjective ambient noise level was assessed on a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) before and during headphone use by each participant. Headphone comfort and the preference of the caregiver to wear the headphone were also evaluated on a 10-point VAS. Simultaneously, objective measurement of noise was done with a sound level meter using the decibel-A scale and at each of nine octave bands at each bedspace. The functional headphones significantly reduced the subjective assessment of noise by 2 (out of 10) VAS points (p noise profiles, based on decibel-A and octave band assessments. Noise cancellation devices improve subjective assessment of noise in caretakers. The benefit of these devices on hearing loss needs further evaluation in caregivers and critically ill patients.

  9. Potential-based methodology for active sound control in three dimensional settings

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, H.; Utyuzhnikov, S V; Lam, Y.W.; Kelly, L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends a potential-based approach to active noise shielding with preservation of wanted sound in three-dimensional settings. The approach, which was described in a previous publication [Lim et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 129(2), 717–725 (2011)], provides several significant advantages over conventional noise control methods. Most significantly, the methodology does not require any information including the characterization of sources, impedance boundary conditions and surrounding med...

  10. The impact of twenty years of noise research on nuclear power plant design, instrumentation and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1975-01-01

    Early investigations demonstrated that time constants and the dynamic characteristics of low energy nuclear systems could be elegantly determined by correlation of spectral analysis of fluctuating signals from ion chambers and proportional counters. Analyses of the time series information and the multi-filtering operations in the frequency domain were time consuming and tedious projects due to the lack of suitable data processing equipment. During the last decade, the significant advances were the recognition of the advantages of the two-channel cross-correlation technique and the realisation that the dynamic behaviour of nuclear power plant at power could be monitored and studied in depth by the cross-correlation of mechanical, thermal and hydrodynamic signals with neutronic information. The former concept led to the development of theoretical models for spatial and energy-dependent noise fields within a nuclear system. The latter opened a floodgate of potential advances in nuclear power plant design optimization, control and safety instrumentation, and control and safety diagnostic systems. (U.K.)

  11. Effects of Long-Term Speech-in-Noise Training in Air Traffic Controllers and High Frequency Suppression. A Control Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Zaballos, María Teresa; Ramos de Miguel, Ángel; Pérez Plasencia, Daniel; Zaballos González, María Luisa; Ramos Macías, Ángel

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate 1) if air traffic controllers (ATC) perform better than non-air traffic controllers in an open-set speech-in-noise test because of their experience with radio communications, and 2) if high-frequency information (>8000 Hz) substantially improves speech-in-noise perception across populations. The control group comprised 28 normal-hearing subjects, and the target group comprised 48 ATCs aged between 19 and 55 years who were native Spanish speakers. The hearing -in-noise abilities of the two groups were characterized under two signal conditions: 1) speech tokens and white noise sampled at 44.1 kHz (unfiltered condition) and 2) speech tokens plus white noise, each passed through a 4th order Butterworth filter with 70 and 8000 Hz low and high cutoffs (filtered condition). These tests were performed at signal-to-noise ratios of +5, 0, and -5-dB SNR. The ATCs outperformed the control group in all conditions. The differences were statistically significant in all cases, and the largest difference was observed under the most difficult conditions (-5 dB SNR). Overall, scores were higher when high-frequency components were not suppressed for both groups, although statistically significant differences were not observed for the control group at 0 dB SNR. The results indicate that ATCs are more capable of identifying speech in noise. This may be due to the effect of their training. On the other hand, performance seems to decrease when the high frequency components of speech are removed, regardless of training.

  12. Residential traffic noise exposure and vestibular schwannoma - a Danish case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roswall, Nina; Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Cayé-Thomasen, Per

    2017-01-01

    of birth. Road and railway traffic noise at the residence was calculated for all present and historical addresses between 1987 and index date. Associations between traffic noise and risk for VS were estimated using conditional logistic regression, adjusted for education, disposable personal income...

  13. Updating working memory in aircraft noise and speech causes different fMRI activations

    OpenAIRE

    Sætrevik, Bjørn; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    The present study used fMRI/BOLD neuroimaging to investigate how visual-verbal working memory is updated when exposed to three different background-noise conditions: speech noise, aircraft noise and silence. The number-updating task that was used can distinguish between ?substitution processes,? which involve adding new items to the working memory representation and suppressing old items, and ?exclusion processes,? which involve rejecting new items and maintaining an intact memory set. The cu...

  14. An alternative method for noise analysis using pixel variance as part of quality control procedures on digital mammography systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, R.; Young, K.; Lazzari, B.; Ravaglia, V.; Broeders, M.J.M.; Engen, R. van

    2009-01-01

    According to the European Guidelines for quality assured breast cancer screening and diagnosis, noise analysis is one of the measurements that needs to be performed as part of quality control procedures on digital mammography systems. However, the method recommended in the European Guidelines does

  15. In-Service Performance and Costs of Methods to Control Urban Rail System Noise : Second Test Series Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    The goal of the project is to provide sufficient information to allow a transit system with given track and car conditions and budgetary constraints to determine the mix of available noise control methods which will result in the greatest overall ben...

  16. Effects of scanner acoustic noise on intrinsic brain activity during auditory stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakunina, Natalia; Kang, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Tae Su; Min, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Sam Soo; Nam, Eui-Cheol

    2015-10-01

    Although the effects of scanner background noise (SBN) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been extensively investigated for the brain regions involved in auditory processing, its impact on other types of intrinsic brain activity has largely been neglected. The present study evaluated the influence of SBN on a number of intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) during auditory stimulation by comparing the results obtained using sparse temporal acquisition (STA) with those using continuous acquisition (CA). Fourteen healthy subjects were presented with classical music pieces in a block paradigm during two sessions of STA and CA. A volume-matched CA dataset (CAm) was generated by subsampling the CA dataset to temporally match it with the STA data. Independent component analysis was performed on the concatenated STA-CAm datasets, and voxel data, time courses, power spectra, and functional connectivity were compared. The ICA revealed 19 ICNs; the auditory, default mode, salience, and frontoparietal networks showed greater activity in the STA. The spectral peaks in 17 networks corresponded to the stimulation cycles in the STA, while only five networks displayed this correspondence in the CA. The dorsal default mode and salience networks exhibited stronger correlations with the stimulus waveform in the STA. SBN appeared to influence not only the areas of auditory response but also the majority of other ICNs, including attention and sensory networks. Therefore, SBN should be regarded as a serious nuisance factor during fMRI studies investigating intrinsic brain activity under external stimulation or task loads.

  17. Effects of scanner acoustic noise on intrinsic brain activity during auditory stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakunina, Natalia [Kangwon National University, Institute of Medical Science, School of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kangwon National University Hospital, Neuroscience Research Institute, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Eun Kyoung [Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Su [Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kangwon National University, School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Min, Ji-Hoon [University of Michigan, Department of Biopsychology, Cognition, and Neuroscience, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kim, Sam Soo [Kangwon National University Hospital, Neuroscience Research Institute, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kangwon National University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Eui-Cheol [Kangwon National University Hospital, Neuroscience Research Institute, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kangwon National University, School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Although the effects of scanner background noise (SBN) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been extensively investigated for the brain regions involved in auditory processing, its impact on other types of intrinsic brain activity has largely been neglected. The present study evaluated the influence of SBN on a number of intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) during auditory stimulation by comparing the results obtained using sparse temporal acquisition (STA) with those using continuous acquisition (CA). Fourteen healthy subjects were presented with classical music pieces in a block paradigm during two sessions of STA and CA. A volume-matched CA dataset (CAm) was generated by subsampling the CA dataset to temporally match it with the STA data. Independent component analysis was performed on the concatenated STA-CAm datasets, and voxel data, time courses, power spectra, and functional connectivity were compared. The ICA revealed 19 ICNs; the auditory, default mode, salience, and frontoparietal networks showed greater activity in the STA. The spectral peaks in 17 networks corresponded to the stimulation cycles in the STA, while only five networks displayed this correspondence in the CA. The dorsal default mode and salience networks exhibited stronger correlations with the stimulus waveform in the STA. SBN appeared to influence not only the areas of auditory response but also the majority of other ICNs, including attention and sensory networks. Therefore, SBN should be regarded as a serious nuisance factor during fMRI studies investigating intrinsic brain activity under external stimulation or task loads. (orig.)

  18. Effects of scanner acoustic noise on intrinsic brain activity during auditory stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakunina, Natalia; Kang, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Tae Su; Min, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Sam Soo; Nam, Eui-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Although the effects of scanner background noise (SBN) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been extensively investigated for the brain regions involved in auditory processing, its impact on other types of intrinsic brain activity has largely been neglected. The present study evaluated the influence of SBN on a number of intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) during auditory stimulation by comparing the results obtained using sparse temporal acquisition (STA) with those using continuous acquisition (CA). Fourteen healthy subjects were presented with classical music pieces in a block paradigm during two sessions of STA and CA. A volume-matched CA dataset (CAm) was generated by subsampling the CA dataset to temporally match it with the STA data. Independent component analysis was performed on the concatenated STA-CAm datasets, and voxel data, time courses, power spectra, and functional connectivity were compared. The ICA revealed 19 ICNs; the auditory, default mode, salience, and frontoparietal networks showed greater activity in the STA. The spectral peaks in 17 networks corresponded to the stimulation cycles in the STA, while only five networks displayed this correspondence in the CA. The dorsal default mode and salience networks exhibited stronger correlations with the stimulus waveform in the STA. SBN appeared to influence not only the areas of auditory response but also the majority of other ICNs, including attention and sensory networks. Therefore, SBN should be regarded as a serious nuisance factor during fMRI studies investigating intrinsic brain activity under external stimulation or task loads. (orig.)

  19. Experimental Investigations of Noise Control in Planetary Gear Set by Phasing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Gawande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Now a days reduction of gear noise and resulting vibrations has received much attention of the researchers. The internal excitation caused by the variation in tooth mesh stiffness is a key factor in causing vibration. Therefore to reduce gear noise and vibrations several techniques have been proposed in recent years. In this research the experimental work is carried out to study the effect of planet phasing on noise and subsequent resulting vibrations of Nylon-6 planetary gear drive. For this purpose experimental set-up was built and trials were conducted for two different arrangements (i.e., with phasing and without phasing and it is observed that the noise level and resulting vibrations were reduced by planet phasing arrangement. So from the experimental results it is observed that by applying the meshing phase difference one can reduce planetary gear set noise and vibrations.

  20. STUDY ON NOISE LEVEL GENERATED BY HUMAN ACTIVITIES IN SIBIU CITY, ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina STANCA-MOISE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I have proposed an analysis and monitoring of the noise sources in the open spaces of air traffic, rail and car in Sibiu. From centralizing data obtained from the analysis of the measurements performed with equipment noise levels, we concluded that the noise and vibration produced by means of Transportation (air, road, rail can affect human health if they exceed limits. Noise is present and part of our lives and always a source of pollution as any of modern man is not conscious.

  1. Noise analysis of a novel hybrid active-passive pixel sensor for medical X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safavian, N.; Izadi, M.H.; Sultana, A.; Wu, D.; Karim, K.S.; Nathan, A.; Rowlands, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Passive pixel sensor (PPS) is one of the most widely used architectures in large area amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat panel imagers. It consists of a detector and a thin film transistor (TFT) acting as a readout switch. While the PPS is advantageous in terms of providing a simple and small architecture suitable for high-resolution imaging, it directly exposes the signal to the noise of data line and external readout electronics, causing significant increase in the minimum readable sensor input signal. In this work we present the operation and noise performance of a hybrid 3-TFT current programmed, current output active pixel sensor (APS) suitable for real-time X-ray imaging. The pixel circuit extends the application of a-Si TFT from conventional switching element to on-pixel amplifier for enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and higher imager dynamic range. The capability of operation in both passive and active modes as well as being able to compensate for inherent instabilities of the TFTs makes the architecture a good candidate for X-ray imaging modalities with a wide range of incoming X-ray intensities. Measurement and theoretical calculations reveal a value for input refferd noise below the 1000 electron noise limit for real-time fluoroscopy. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Analytical study of interior noise control by fuselage design techniques on high-speed, propeller-driven aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, J. D.; Balena, F. J.; Koval, L. R.

    1980-01-01

    The acoustical treatment mass penalties required to achieve an interior noise level of 80 dBA for high speed, fuel efficient propfan-powered aircraft are determined. The prediction method used is based on theory developed for the outer shell dynamics, and a modified approach for add-on noise control element performance. The present synthesis of these methods is supported by experimental data. Three different sized aircraft are studied, including a widebody, a narrowbody and a business sized aircraft. Noise control penalties are calculated for each aircraft for two kinds of noise control designs: add-on designs, where the outer wall structure cannot be changed, and advanced designs where the outer wall stiffness level and the materials usage can be altered. For the add-on designs, the mass penalties range from 1.7 to 2.4 percent of the takeoff gross weight (TOGW) of the various aircraft, similar to preliminary estimates. Results for advanced designs show significant reductions of the mass penalties. For the advanced aluminum designs the penalties are 1.5% of TOGW, and for an all composite aircraft the penalties range from 0.74 to 1.4% of TOGW.

  3. Sounds and Noises. A Position Paper on Noise Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Thomas L.

    This position paper focuses on noise pollution and the problems and solutions associated with this form of pollution. The paper is divided into the following five sections: Noise and the Ear, Noise Measurement, III Effects of Noise, Acoustics and Action, and Programs and Activities. The first section identifies noise and sound, the beginnings of…

  4. Numerical Study of Controlling Jet Flow and Noise using Pores on Nozzle Inner Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Shi, Zhixiao; Lai, Huanxin

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of controlling the subsonic jet flow and its noise using pores of blind holes added on the nozzle inner wall is explored numerically. These pores are intended to introduce disturbances to the shear layer so as to change the flow mixing. This passive strategy has not been attempted so far. A convergent nozzle with a cylindrical extension is selected as the baseline case. Three nozzles with pores on the inner wall are set up. Validations of the numerical settings are carried out, then the compressible turbulent jets at the exit Mach number M j = 0.6 in the four nozzles are calculated by large eddy simulations (LES), while the radiated sounds are predicted by the FW-H acoustic analogy. The results show that the blind holes have produced some effects on weakening the turbulence intensity in the shear layer. Comparison reveals that both temporal and spatial correlations of the turbulent fluctuations in the modified cases are suppressed to some extent. Meanwhile, the porous nozzles are shown to suppress the pairing of vortices and enhance the flow mixing, and therefore, the development of shear layer and the fragmentation of large scale vortices are accelerated.

  5. Dynamics and Synchronization of Noise Perturbed Ensembles of Periodically Activated neuron Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belykh, V. N.; Pankratova, Evgeniya; Mosekilde, Erik

    2008-01-01

    The role of noise for a single neuron and for an ensemble of mutually coupled neurons is investigated. For a single element we show that an increase in noise intensity in the regime of irregular. ring enhances the coherence of the neuronal response. For this regime of spiking a study...... based on the connection graph stability method and through numerical simulation....

  6. Active control of sound transmission through a double panel partition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sas, P.; Bao, C.; Augusztinovicz, F.; Desmet, W.

    1995-03-01

    The feasibility of improving the insertion loss of lightweight double panel partitions by using small loudspeakers as active noise control sources inside the air gap between both panels of the partition is investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally in this paper. A theoretical analysis of the mechanisms of the fluid-structure interaction of double panel structures is presented in order to gain insight into the physical phenomena underlying the behaviour of a coupled vibro-acoustic system controlled by active methods. The analysis, based on modal coupling theory, enables one to derive some qualitative predictions concerning the potentials and limitations of the proposed approach. The theoretical analysis is valid only for geometrically simple structures. For more complex geometries, numerical simulations are required. Therefore the potential use of active noise control inside double panel structures has been analyzed by using coupled finite element and boundary element methods. To verify the conclusions drawn from the theoretical analysis and the numerical calculation and, above all, to demonstrate the potential of the proposed approach, experiments have been conducted with a laboratory set-up. The performance of the proposed approach was evaluated in terms of relative insertion loss measurements. It is shown that a considerable improvement of the insertion loss has been achieved around the lightly damped resonances of the system for the frequency range investigated (60-220 Hz).

  7. Resonant Activation in a Stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley Model: Interplay between noise and suprathreshold driving effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pankratova, Evgeniya; Polovinkin, A.V.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The paper considers an excitable Hodgkin-Huxley system subjected to a strong periodic forcing in the presence of random noise. The influence of the forcing frequency on the response of the system is examined in the realm of suprathreshold amplitudes. Our results confirm that the presence of noise...... a minimum as functions of the forcing frequency. The destructive influence of noise on the interspike interval can also be reduced. With driving signals in a certain frequency range, the system can show stable periodic spiking even for relatively large noise intensities. Outside this frequency range, noise...... of similar intensity destroys the regularity of the spike trains by suppressing the generation of some of the spikes....

  8. METHODS OF PROVIDING NOISE IMMUNITY IN AUTOMOBILE ANTI-THEFT SYSTEM CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frolov, V.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In modern ani-theft systems they use frequency and phase modulation. Since the width of the signal is limited, it is possible to intercept the signal and then switch off the alarm at the right time.To ensure the noise immunity and secrecy manufacturers use more sophisticated codes using the methods of cryptography. Significant increase in noise immunity in modern ani-theft systems is possible using broadband signals.

  9. Adaptive Multiscale Noise Control Enhanced Stochastic Resonance Method Based on Modified EEMD with Its Application in Bearing Fault Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimeng Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of mechanical equipment becomes increasingly complex, and tough environments under which it works often make bearings and gears subject to failure. However, effective extraction of useful feature information submerged in strong noise that is indicative of structural defects has remained a major challenge. Therefore, an adaptive multiscale noise control enhanced stochastic resonance (SR method based on modified ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD for mechanical fault diagnosis is proposed in the paper. According to the oscillation characteristics of signal itself, the algorithm of modified EEMD can adaptively decompose the fault signals into different scales and it reduces the decomposition levels to improve calculation efficiency of the proposed method. Through filter processing with the constructed filters, the orthogonality of adjacent intrinsic mode functions (IMFs can be improved, which is conducive to enhancing the extraction of weak features from strong noise. The constructed signal obtained by using IMFs is inputted into the SR system, and the noise control parameter of different scales is optimized and selected with the help of the genetic algorithm, thus achieving the enhancement extraction of weak features. Finally, simulation experiments and engineering application of bearing fault diagnosis demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed method.

  10. Time-lapse imaging of fault properties at seismogenic depth using repeating earthquakes, active sources and seismic ambient noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xin

    2009-12-01

    The time-varying stress field of fault systems at seismogenic depths plays the mort important role in controlling the sequencing and nucleation of seismic events. Using seismic observations from repeating earthquakes, controlled active sources and seismic ambient noise, five studies at four different fault systems across North America, Central Japan, North and mid-West China are presented to describe our efforts to measure such time dependent structural properties. Repeating and similar earthquakes are hunted and analyzed to study the post-seismic fault relaxation at the aftershock zone of the 1984 M 6.8 western Nagano and the 1976 M 7.8 Tangshan earthquakes. The lack of observed repeating earthquakes at western Nagano is attributed to the absence of a well developed weak fault zone, suggesting that the fault damage zone has been almost completely healed. In contrast, the high percentage of similar and repeating events found at Tangshan suggest the existence of mature fault zones characterized by stable creep under steady tectonic loading. At the Parkfield region of the San Andreas Fault, repeating earthquake clusters and chemical explosions are used to construct a scatterer migration image based on the observation of systematic temporal variations in the seismic waveforms across the occurrence time of the 2004 M 6 Parkfield earthquake. Coseismic fluid charge or discharge in fractures caused by the Parkfield earthquake is used to explain the observed seismic scattering properties change at depth. In the same region, a controlled source cross-well experiment conducted at SAFOD pilot and main holes documents two large excursions in the travel time required for a shear wave to travel through the rock along a fixed pathway shortly before two rupture events, suggesting that they may be related to pre-rupture stress induced changes in crack properties. At central China, a tomographic inversion based on the theory of seismic ambient noise and coda wave interferometry

  11. Lévy stable noise-induced transitions: stochastic resonance, resonant activation and dynamic hysteresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybiec, Bartłomiej; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2009-01-01

    A standard approach to analysis of noise-induced effects in stochastic dynamics assumes a Gaussian character of the noise term describing interaction of the analyzed system with its complex surroundings. An additional assumption about the existence of timescale separation between the dynamics of the measured observable and the typical timescale of the noise allows external fluctuations to be modeled as temporally uncorrelated and therefore white. However, in many natural phenomena the assumptions concerning the above mentioned properties of 'Gaussianity' and 'whiteness' of the noise can be violated. In this context, in contrast to the spatiotemporal coupling characterizing general forms of non-Markovian or semi-Markovian Lévy walks, so called Lévy flights correspond to the class of Markov processes which can still be interpreted as white, but distributed according to a more general, infinitely divisible, stable and non-Gaussian law. Lévy noise-driven non-equilibrium systems are known to manifest interesting physical properties and have been addressed in various scenarios of physical transport exhibiting a superdiffusive behavior. Here we present a brief overview of our recent investigations aimed at understanding features of stochastic dynamics under the influence of Lévy white noise perturbations. We find that the archetypal phenomena of noise-induced ordering are robust and can be detected also in systems driven by memoryless, non-Gaussian, heavy-tailed fluctuations with infinite variance

  12. Data-driven adaptive fractional order PI control for PMSM servo system with measurement noise and data dropouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuanlong; Tang, Xiaoqi; Song, Bao; Zhou, Xiangdong; Guo, Yixuan

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, data-driven adaptive fractional order proportional integral (AFOPI) control is presented for permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) servo system perturbed by measurement noise and data dropouts. The proposed method directly exploits the closed-loop process data for the AFOPI controller design under unknown noise distribution and data missing probability. Firstly, the proposed method constructs the AFOPI controller tuning problem as a parameter identification problem using the modified l p norm virtual reference feedback tuning (VRFT). Then, iteratively reweighted least squares is integrated into the l p norm VRFT to give a consistent compensation solution for the AFOPI controller. The measurement noise and data dropouts are estimated and eliminated by feedback compensation periodically, so that the AFOPI controller is updated online to accommodate the time-varying operating conditions. Moreover, the convergence and stability are guaranteed by mathematical analysis. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated both on simulations and experiments implemented on a practical PMSM servo system. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Noise Parameters of CW Radar Sensors Used in Active Defense Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeník, V.; Hudec, P.; Pánek, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 2 (2012), s. 632-639 ISSN 1210-2512 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : radar * phase noise Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.687, year: 2012

  14. Resistive wall mode active control physics design for KSTAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bialek, J. M.; Berkery, J. W.; Bak, J. G.; Lee, S. G.; Oh, Y. K.

    2014-01-01

    As KSTAR H-mode operation approaches the region where the resistive wall mode (RWM) can be unstable, an important issue for future long pulse, high beta plasma operation is to evaluate RWM active feedback control performance using a planned active/passive RWM stabilization system on the device. In particular, an optimal design of feedback sensors allows mode stabilization up to the highest achievable β N close to the ideal with-wall limit, β N wall , with reduced control power requirements. The computed ideal n = 1 mode structure from the DCON code has been input to the VALEN-3D code to calculate the projected performance of an active RWM control system in the KSTAR three-dimensional conducting structure device geometry. Control performance with the midplane locked mode detection sensors, off-midplane saddle loops, and magnetic pickup coils is examined. The midplane sensors measuring the radial component of the mode perturbation is found to be strongly affected by the wall eddy current. The off-axis saddle loops with proper compensation of the prompt applied field are computed to provide stabilization at β N up to 86% of β N wall but the low RWM amplitude computed in the off-axis regions near the sensors can produce a low signal-to-noise ratio. The required control power and bandwidth are also estimated with varied noise levels in the feedback sensors. Further improvements have been explored by examining a new RWM sensor design motivated by the off-midplane poloidal magnetic field sensors in NSTX. The new sensors mounted off of the copper passive stabilizer plates near the device midplane show a clear advantage in control performance corresponding to achieving 99% of β N wall without the need of compensation of the prompt field. The result shows a significant improvement of RWM feedback stabilization using the new sensor set which motivates a future feedback sensor upgrade

  15. Flow Field Simulation and Noise Control of a Twin-Screw Engine-Driven Supercharger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advantages of good low-speed torque capability and excellent instant response performance, twin-screw superchargers have great potential in the automobile market, but the noise of these superchargers is the main factor that discourages their use. Therefore, it is important to study their noise mechanism and methods of reducing it. This study included a transient numerical simulation of a twin-screw supercharger flow field with computational fluid dynamics software and an analysis of the pressure field of the running rotor. The results showed that overcompression was significant in the compression end stage of the supercharger, resulting in a surge in airflow to a supersonic speed and the production of shock waves that resulted in loud noise. On the basis of these findings, optimization of the supercharger is proposed, including expansion of the supercharger exhaust orifice and creation of a slot along the direction of the rotor spiral normal line at the exhaust port, so as to reduce the compression end pressure, improve the exhaust flow channel, and weaken the source of the noise. Experimental results showed that the noise level value of the improved twin-screw supercharger was significantly lower at the same speed than the original model, with an average decrease of about 5 dB (A.

  16. Ion pump as molecular ratchet and effects of noise: electric activation of cation pumping by Na,K-ATPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsong, T. Y.; Xie, T. D.

    2002-08-01

    Na,K-ATPase is a universal ion pump of the biological cell. Under physiological conditions, it uses the γ-phosphorus bond energy of ATP during hydrolysis to pump 2 K+ inward and 3 Na+ outward; both being uphill transports. The experiment presented here demonstrates that the protein transporter can also use electric energy to fuel its pump activity. A theory of electroconformational coupling (TEC) is described and an experiment performed to verify several predictions of the model. Analysis based on the TEC model suggests that Na,K-ATPase is a Brownian ratchet. The enzyme harvests energy from the applied field by means of the field-induced conformational oscillation or fluctuation. However, high efficiency of energy transduction can only be achieved with an electric field of certain intensities, frequencies and waveforms. This property of the enzyme allows us to define an electric signal and differentiate it from electric noise on the basis of the analysis by the TEC model. Data show that electric noise alone does not induce pump activity. However, an appropriate power level of noise imposed on a signal can enhance the pump efficiency. The effect of noise on the signal transduction of Na,K-ATPase is reminiscent of the stochastic resonance phenomenon reported in other biological systems [3, 35]. The TEC model embodies many common features of enzymes and biological motors. It is potentially energy-efficient, much more so than models based on the ion-rectification mechanism.

  17. Design of a 1 _s real-time low-noise data acquisition for power converters control loop

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)712364; Arpaia, Pasquale; Cerqueira Bastos, Miguel; Martino, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The proof of principle of a real-time data acquisition system to be integrated into a digital control loop for controlling the power converters of the Compact LInear Collider is presented. The system is based on an ultra low noise analogue front-end with 1:1 ppm RMS noise (referred to input), and about 1 _s of real-time delay. After the analogue conditioning, a fully-differential analogue-todigital converter is foreseen. The requirements of this system, directly derived from the accelerator performance, are discussed and translated into design specification. The results obtained by means of Pspice simulations are reported in order to prove that the design is feasible with the proposed architecture. Finally, the results of the experimental validation of the prototype, currently under design, will be included in the final paper.

  18. Low frequency noise as a control test for spacial solar panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsal, B.; Alabedra, R.; Ruas, R.

    1986-07-01

    The present study of low frequency noise in a forward-biased dark solar cell, in order to develop an NDE test method for solar panels, notes that a single cell with a given defect is thus detectable under dark conditions. The test subject was a space solar panel consisting of five cells in parallel and five in series; these cells are of the n(+)-p monocrystalline Si junction type. It is demonstrated that the noise associated with the defective cell is 10-15 times higher than that of a good cell. Replacement of a good cell by a defective one leads to a 30-percent increase in the noise level of the panel as a whole.

  19. A Mode Propagation Database Suitable for Code Validation Utilizing the NASA Glenn Advanced Noise Control Fan and Artificial Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center's Advanced Noise Control Fan (ANCF) was developed in the early 1990s to provide a convenient test bed to measure and understand fan-generated acoustics, duct propagation, and radiation to the farfield. A series of tests were performed primarily for the use of code validation and tool validation. Rotating Rake mode measurements were acquired for parametric sets of: (i) mode blockage, (ii) liner insertion loss, (iii) short ducts, and (iv) mode reflection.

  20. Control of an experiment to measure acoustic noise in the space shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Charles B.

    1989-06-01

    The potential use of a general-purpose controller to measure acoustic vibration autonomously in the Space Shuttle Cargo Bay during launch is described. The experimental package will be housed in a Shuttle Get Away Special (GAS) canister. The control functions were implemented with software written largely in the C programming language. An IBM MS DOS computer and C cross-compiler were used to generate Z-80 assembly language code, assemble and link this code, and then transfer it to EPROM for use in the experiment's controller. The software is written in a modular fashion to permit adapting it easily to other applications. The software combines the experimental control functions with a menu-driven, diagnostic subsystem to ensure that the software will operate in practice as it does in theory and under test. The experiment uses many peripheral devices controlled by the software described here. These devices include: (1) a solid-state data recorder; (2) a bubble memory storage module; (3) a real-time clock; (4) an RS-232C serial interface; (5) a power control subsystem; (6) a matched filter subsystem to detect activation of the Space Shuttle's auxillary power units five minutes prior to launch; (7) a launch detection subsystem based on vibrational and barometric sensors; (8) analog-to-digital converters; and (9) a heater subsystem. The matched filter design is discussed in detail and the results of a computer simulation of the performance of its most critical sub-circuit are presented.

  1. Feedforward and Feedback Control in Apraxia of Speech: Effects of Noise Masking on Vowel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Edwin; Mailend, Marja-Liisa; Guenther, Frank H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to test two hypotheses about apraxia of speech (AOS) derived from the Directions Into Velocities of Articulators (DIVA) model (Guenther et al., 2006): the feedforward system deficit hypothesis and the feedback system deficit hypothesis. Method: The authors used noise masking to minimize auditory feedback during…

  2. No control, no drive: How noise may undermine conservation behavior in a commons dilemma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brucks, W.; van Lange, P.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Sometimes people may no longer engage in conservational behavior (e.g., to reduce emissions) because their attempts to do so have been thwarted by "negative noise ", or external forces that may cause otherwise cooperative intentions to translate into non-cooperative action (e.g., strikes prevented

  3. Active control versus recursive backstepping control of a chaotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper active controllers and recursive backstepping controllers are designed for a third order chaotic system. The performances of these controllers in the control of the dynamics of the chaotic system are investigated numerically and are found to be effective. Comparison of their transient performances show that the ...

  4. Influence of leisure-time noise on outer hair cell activity in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosanowski, Frank; Eysholdt, Ulrich; Hoppe, Ulrich

    2006-10-01

    Noise exceeding a certain level can damage outer hair cells and thus cause hearing loss. In the past, noise-induced hearing loss was mainly caused by occupational noise. Leisure-time noise may be a promoting factor, particularly in young adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) can be used to evaluate outer hair cell damage in young adults with no history of hearing complaints. The data obtained from the measurement of TEOAE were correlated with the participants' listening habits and exposure to leisure-time noise. Eighty-eight young adults (47 women, 41 men; age 22.9+/-2.9 years) were examined. TEOAE were measured using standard ILO 88 equipment. All participants had normal hearing (hearing thresholds better than 20 dB HL; frequency range 0.125-10 kHz). None of the participants suffered from permanent tinnitus. All participants answered a questionnaire concerning their listening habits. On average, the participants frequented a discotheque 1.4 times a month; 25% had never visited a discotheque, 35% visited once a month and 32% twice or three times a month. Sixteen per cent reported transient tinnitus after every visit to a discotheque and 58% after nearly every visit. Eight per cent suffered from transient hearing loss after every visit to a disco and 37% after nearly every visit. Three per cent (4%) reported tinnitus (nearly) every morning after visiting a discotheque. The TEOAE level was above 6 dB in all participants [9.2+/-3.6 dB (mean +/- SD)] and reproducibility was above 60% (90+/-9%). All values matched pass criteria for normal TEOAE under clinical conditions. However, TEOAE levels and reproducibility decreased significantly with an increased number of visits to discotheques. Outer hair cell damage could be measured using TEOAE in individuals exposed to leisure-time noise, although these individuals exhibited no measurable puretone hearing loss.

  5. Analytical analyses of active control of sound transmission through soft-core sandwich structures and double panel partitions

    OpenAIRE

    Sahu, Kiran Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Active structural acoustic control (ASAC) is a form of active noise control which focuses on the control of structural vibrations in a manner that minimizes acoustic radiation from a structure. The greatest difficulty ASAC suffers from is in finding an "optimal" error quantity, which can be easily implemented in a control algorithm. Volume velocity control (VVC) metric which is generally used in ASAC typically requires either a large number of sensors distributed across the entire structure, ...

  6. Developing Internal Controls through Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, F. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Life events can include the Tuesday afternoon cooking class with the group worker or the Saturday afternoon football game, but in the sense that Fritz Redl thought of them, these activities are only threads in a fabric of living that includes all the elements of daily life: playing, working, school-based learning, learning through activities,…

  7. A Review on Natural Ventilation-enabling Façade Noise Control Devices for Congested High-Rise Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Keung Tang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the current status of the research and development of natural ventilation-enabling noise control devices for use on the façades of high-rise residential buildings in congested cities. These devices are important for a sustainable urbanized city, as they are supposed to offer good acoustical protection to citizens, allowing for an acceptable level of natural ventilation inside residential units; energy for mechanical ventilation can then be saved. From the information presented in the existing literature, it is concluded that protrusive devices, such as lintels and balconies, are not effective noise screening devices, even if they are installed with sound absorbers and/or reflectors, under the effect of city reverberation. On the contrary, plenum windows and similar structures, which are plenum structures with a staggered air inlet and outlet, are interesting alternatives that are worth rigorous considerations.

  8. Evaluating the Acoustic Benefits of Over-the-Rotor Acoustic Treatments Installed on the Advanced Noise Control Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazella, Matthew R.; Takakura, Tamuto; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Bozak, Richard F.; Tester, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, over-the-rotor acoustic treatments have been evaluated by NASA with varying success. Recently, NASA has been developing the next generation of over-the-rotor acoustic treatments for fan noise reduction. The NASA Glenn Research Centers Advanced Noise Control Fan was used as a Low Technology Readiness Level test bed. A rapid prototyped in-duct array consisting of 50 microphones was employed, and used to correlate the in-duct analysis to the far-field acoustic levels and to validate an existing beam-former method. The goal of this testing was to improve the Technology Readiness Level of various over-the-rotor acoustic treatments by advancing the understanding of the physical mechanisms and projecting the far-field acoustic benefit.

  9. Noise-induced hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola Sliwinska-Kowalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL still remains a problem in developed countries, despite reduced occupational noise exposure, strict standards for hearing protection and extensive public health awareness campaigns. Therefore NIHL continues to be the focus of noise research activities. This paper summarizes progress achieved recently in our knowledge of NIHL. It includes papers published between the years 2008-2011 (in English, which were identified by a literature search of accessible medical and other relevant databases. A substantial part of this research has been concerned with the risk of NIHL in the entertainment sector, particularly in professional, orchestral musicians. There are also constant concerns regarding noise exposure and hearing risk in "hard to control" occupations, such as farming and construction work. Although occupational noise has decreased since the early 1980s, the number of young people subject to social noise exposure has tripled. If the exposure limits from the Noise at Work Regulations are applied, discotheque music, rock concerts, as well as music from personal music players are associated with the risk of hearing loss in teenagers and young adults. Several recent research studies have increased the understanding of the pathomechanisms of acoustic trauma, the genetics of NIHL, as well as possible dietary and pharmacologic otoprotection in acoustic trauma. The results of these studies are very promising and offer grounds to expect that targeted therapies might help prevent the loss of sensory hair cells and protect the hearing of noise-exposed individuals. These studies emphasize the need to launch an improved noise exposure policy for hearing protection along with developing more efficient norms of NIHL risk assessment.

  10. Active control of turbulent boundary layer sound transmission into a vehicle interior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caiazzo, A; Alujević, N; Pluymers, B; Desmet, W

    2016-01-01

    In high speed automotive, aerospace, and railway transportation, the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) is one of the most important sources of interior noise. The stochastic pressure distribution associated with the turbulence is able to excite significantly structural vibration of vehicle exterior panels. They radiate sound into the vehicle through the interior panels. Therefore, the air flow noise becomes very influential when it comes to the noise vibration and harshness assessment of a vehicle, in particular at low frequencies. Normally, passive solutions, such as sound absorbing materials, are used for reducing the TBL-induced noise transmission into a vehicle interior, which generally improve the structure sound isolation performance. These can achieve excellent isolation performance at higher frequencies, but are unable to deal with the low-frequency interior noise components. In this paper, active control of TBL noise transmission through an acoustically coupled double panel system into a rectangular cavity is examined theoretically. The Corcos model of the TBL pressure distribution is used to model the disturbance. The disturbance is rejected by an active vibration isolation unit reacting between the exterior and the interior panels. Significant reductions of the low-frequency vibrations of the interior panel and the sound pressure in the cavity are observed. (paper)

  11. Mapping nanoscale effects of localized noise-source activities on photoconductive charge transports in polymer-blend films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Shashank; Cho, Duckhyung; Cho, Dong-Guk; Yang, Myungjae; Hong, Seunghun

    2018-05-01

    We develolped a method to directly image the nanoscale effects of localized noise-source activities on photoconducting charge transports in domain structures of phase-separated polymer-blend films of Poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) and Poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorene-alt-benzothiadiazole). For the imaging, current and noise maps of the polymer-blend were recorded using a conducting nanoprobe in contact with the surface, enabling the conductivity (σ) and noise-source density (N T) mappings under an external stimulus. The blend-films exhibited the phase-separation between the constituent polymers at domains level. Within a domain, high σ (low N T) and low σ (high N T) regions were observed, which could be associated with the ordered and disordered regions of a domain. In the N T maps, we observed that noise-sources strongly affected the conduction mechanism, resulting in a scaling behavior of σ ∝ {{N}{{T}}}-0.5 in both ordered and disordered regions. When a blend film was under an influence of an external stimulus such as a high bias or an illumination, an increase in the σ was observed, but that also resulted in increases in the N T as a trade-off. Interestingly, the Δσ versus ΔN T plot exhibited an unusual scaling behavior of Δσ ∝ {{Δ }}{{N}{{T}}}0.5, which is attributed to the de-trapping of carriers from deep traps by the external stimuli. In addition, we found that an external stimulus increased the conductivity at the interfaces without significantly increasing their N T, which can be the origin of the superior performances of polymer-blend based devices. These results provide valuable insight about the effects of noise-sources on nanoscale optoelectronic properties in polymer-blend films, which can be an important guideline for improving devices based on polymer-blend.

  12. Vibration control of active structures an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Preumont, Andre

    2002-01-01

    This text is an introduction to the dynamics of active structures and to the feedback control of lightly damped flexible structures. The emphasis is placed on basic issues and simple control strategies that work.

  13. The differences in brain activity between narrow band noise and pure tone tinnitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Vanneste

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tinnitus is an auditory sensation characterized by the perception of sound or noise in the absence of any external sound source. Based on neurobiological research, it is generally accepted that most forms of tinnitus are attributable to maladaptive plasticity due to damage to auditory system. Changes have been observed in auditory structures such as the inferior colliculus, the thalamus and the auditory cortex as well as in non-auditory brain areas. However, the observed changes show great variability, hence lacking a conclusive picture. One of the reasons might be the selection of inhomogeneous groups in data analysis. METHODOLOGY: The aim of the present study was to delineate the differences between the neural networks involved in narrow band noise and pure tone tinnitus conducting LORETA based source analysis of resting state EEG. CONCLUSIONS: Results demonstrated that narrow band noise tinnitus patients differ from pure tone tinnitus patients in the lateral frontopolar (BA 10, PCC and the parahippocampal area for delta, beta and gamma frequency bands, respectively. The parahippocampal-PCC current density differences might be load dependent, as noise-like tinnitus constitutes multiple frequencies in contrast to pure tone tinnitus. The lateral frontopolar differences might be related to pitch specific memory retrieval.

  14. A flicker noise/IM3 cancellation technique for active mixer using negative impedance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, W.; Annema, Anne J.; Wienk, Gerhardus J.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2013-01-01

    Abstract—This paper presents an approach to simultaneously cancel flicker noise and IM3 in Gilbert-type mixers, utilizing negative impedances. For proof of concept, two prototype double-balanced mixers in 0.16- m CMOS are fabricated. The first demonstration mixer chip was optimized for full IM3

  15. Optimizing an Actuator Array for the Control of Multi-Frequency Noise in Aircraft Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, D. L.; Padula, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    Techniques developed for selecting an optimized actuator array for interior noise reduction at a single frequency are extended to the multi-frequency case. Transfer functions for 64 actuators were obtained at 5 frequencies from ground testing the rear section of a fully trimmed DC-9 fuselage. A single loudspeaker facing the left side of the aircraft was the primary source. A combinatorial search procedure (tabu search) was employed to find optimum actuator subsets of from 2 to 16 actuators. Noise reduction predictions derived from the transfer functions were used as a basis for evaluating actuator subsets during optimization. Results indicate that it is necessary to constrain actuator forces during optimization. Unconstrained optimizations selected actuators which require unrealistically large forces. Two methods of constraint are evaluated. It is shown that a fast, but approximate, method yields results equivalent to an accurate, but computationally expensive, method.

  16. Aeroacoustics of Flight Vehicles: Theory and Practice. Volume 2. Noise Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    noisiness, Localization and Precedence The ability to determine the location of sound sources is one of the major benefits of having a binaural hearing... binaural hearing is commonly called the Haas. or precedence, effect (ref. 16). This refers to the ability to hear as a single acoustic event the...propellers are operated at slightly different rpm values, beating interference between the two sources occurs, and the noise level in the cabin rises and

  17. Optimized control of X-ray exposure and image noise using a particular multislice CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shuji; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Koyama, Yoshihiro; Nagasawa, Hirofumi

    2008-01-01

    Patient dose reduction in computed tomography (CT) always results in a trade off between radiation exposure and image quality. There are few reports that estimate the relationship between image quality and X-ray exposure in CT examinations as one optimal index. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal parameter settings enabling a low radiation exposure without compromising image quality using a particular 4-row multislice CT (MSCT) scanner (Aquilion VZ 4-slice CT scanner, Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Otawara, Tochigi, Japan). Normalized dose divided by image noise for helical pitches (nDNR: normalized dose to noise ratio) were calculated in consideration of beam collimation and tube current-time product. Optimal tube current-time product was calculated using the nDNR for the helical pitches based on user-defined standards of quality of the CT image. As a result, the nDNR proved to be well-supported to decrease the patient exposure in various exposure conditions of MSCT scans; however, the dose and image noise did not show a linear relation to the helical pitch. In conclusion, nDNR can be applied to patient dose reduction while keeping an acceptable image quality using a particular 4-row MSCT scanner. (author)

  18. Pioneer Venus Star Sensor. [active despin control application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutshall, R. L.; Thomas, G.

    1979-01-01

    The design predictions and orbital performance verification of the solid state star scanner used in the Onboard Attitude Control of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter and Multiprobe are presented. The star sensor extended the scanner use to active despin control, and it differs from previous sensors in solid state detection, redundant electronics for reliability, larger field of view, and large dynamic spin range. The star scanner hardware and design performance based on the ability to predict all noise sources, signal magnitudes, and expected detection probability are discussed. In-flight data collected to verify sensor ground calibration are tabulated and plotted in predicted accuracy curves. It is concluded that the Pioneer Venus Star Sensor has demonstrated predictable star calibration in the range of .1 magnitude uncertainties and usable star catalogs of 100 stars with very high probabilities of detection, which were much better than expected and well within the mission requirements.

  19. A low-power and low-phase-noise LC digitally controlled oscillator featuring a novel capacitor bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Huanhuan; Li Zhiqiang; Chen Pufeng; Wu Rufei; Zhang Haiying, E-mail: thuan8@126.com [Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2010-12-15

    A monolithic low-power and low-phase-noise digitally controlled oscillator (DCO) based on a symmetric spiral inductor with center-tap and novel capacitor bank was implemented in a 0.18 {mu}m CMOS process with six metal layers. A third new way to change capacitance is proposed and implemented in this work. Results show that the phase noise at 1 MHz offset frequency is below -122.5 dBc/Hz while drawing a current of only 4.8 mA from a 1.8 V supply. Also, the DCO can work at low supply voltage conditions with a 1.6 V power supply and 4.1 mA supply current for the DCO's core circuit, achieving a phase-noise of -21.5 dBc/Hz at offset of 1 MHz. It demonstrates that the supply pushing of DCO is less than 10 MHz/V. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  20. Dynamic Control of Synchronous Activity in Networks of Spiking Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Hutt

    Full Text Available Oscillatory brain activity is believed to play a central role in neural coding. Accumulating evidence shows that features of these oscillations are highly dynamic: power, frequency and phase fluctuate alongside changes in behavior and task demands. The role and mechanism supporting this variability is however poorly understood. We here analyze a network of recurrently connected spiking neurons with time delay displaying stable synchronous dynamics. Using mean-field and stability analyses, we investigate the influence of dynamic inputs on the frequency of firing rate oscillations. We show that afferent noise, mimicking inputs to the neurons, causes smoothing of the system's response function, displacing equilibria and altering the stability of oscillatory states. Our analysis further shows that these noise-induced changes cause a shift of the peak frequency of synchronous oscillations that scales with input intensity, leading the network towards critical states. We lastly discuss the extension of these principles to periodic stimulation, in which externally applied driving signals can trigger analogous phenomena. Our results reveal one possible mechanism involved in shaping oscillatory activity in the brain and associated control principles.

  1. Dynamic Control of Synchronous Activity in Networks of Spiking Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutt, Axel; Mierau, Andreas; Lefebvre, Jérémie

    Oscillatory brain activity is believed to play a central role in neural coding. Accumulating evidence shows that features of these oscillations are highly dynamic: power, frequency and phase fluctuate alongside changes in behavior and task demands. The role and mechanism supporting this variability is however poorly understood. We here analyze a network of recurrently connected spiking neurons with time delay displaying stable synchronous dynamics. Using mean-field and stability analyses, we investigate the influence of dynamic inputs on the frequency of firing rate oscillations. We show that afferent noise, mimicking inputs to the neurons, causes smoothing of the system's response function, displacing equilibria and altering the stability of oscillatory states. Our analysis further shows that these noise-induced changes cause a shift of the peak frequency of synchronous oscillations that scales with input intensity, leading the network towards critical states. We lastly discuss the extension of these principles to periodic stimulation, in which externally applied driving signals can trigger analogous phenomena. Our results reveal one possible mechanism involved in shaping oscillatory activity in the brain and associated control principles.

  2. Base neutron noise in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaly, G.; Albrecht, R.W.; Dailey, D.J.; Fry, D.N.

    1981-01-01

    Considerable activity has been devoted in recent years to the use of neutron noise for investigation of problems in pressurized-water reactors (PWRs). The investigators have found that neutron noise provides an effective way to monitor reactor internal vibrations such as vertical and lateral core motion; core support barrel and thermal shield shell modes, bending modes of fuel assemblies, and control rod vibrations. However, noise analysts have also concluded that diagnosis of a problem is easier if baseline data for normal plant operation is available. Therefore, the authors have obtained ex-core neutron noise signatures from eight PWRs to determine the similarity of signatures between plants and to build a base of data to determine the sources of neutron noise and thus the potential diagnostic information contained in the data. It is concluded that: (1) ex-core neutron noise contains information about the vibration of components in the pressure vessel; (2) baseline signature acquisition can aid understanding of plant specific vibration frequencies and provide a bases for diagnosis of future problems if they occur; and (3) abnormal core support barrel vibration can most likely be detected over and above the plant-to-plant signature variation observed thus far

  3. The Physical Microbe; An introduction to noise, control, and communication in the prokaryotic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Stephen J.

    2017-10-01

    Physical biology is a fusion of biology and physics. This book narrows down the scope of physical biology by focusing on the microbial cell; exploring the physical phenomena of noise, feedback, and variability that arise in the cellular information-processing circuits used by bacteria. It looks at the microbe from a physics perspective, asking how the cell optimizes its function to live within the constraints of physics. It introduces a physical and information-based (as opposed to microbiological) perspective on communication and signalling between microbes.

  4. Relationship of Industrial Noise to Hearing Acuity in a Controlled Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-01-01

    heel tacker and fiber nailer. The fiber nailer produces seat lasting, toe lasting, tacking and tack pulling , a very sharp impact. lImpa’t-type noises are...criteria are friom person toi liers-in Another possible goali for criteria int ended to leti ne a hia za rdous sit uato or, (con- is that expiosure to...mniewliere in biet weeln. Tile oet ave, ba nd with the in axi nttitn l ottdtnes~s is 2,400- dte j ii k m ot trivial. b eca use design goalIs fori

  5. The need to revitalize our national noise policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, William W.; Beranek, Leo L.

    2002-05-01

    At the present time, our Nation does not have a national noise policy. The Congress attempted to define one with the passage of the Noise Control Act of 1972 as follows: The Congress declares that it is the policy of the United States to promote an environment for all Americans free from noise that jeopardizes their health and welfare. The Act assigned to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the role of leading Federal agency with the task of coordinating the programs of all Federal agencies relating to noise research and noise control. Ten years later (1982), all funds for noise control were withdrawn from the EPA, and today the Nation is without an effective, overall noise policy. Residual responsibility for the control of environmental and occupational noise currently rests with a dozen agencies of the Federal government, as well as State, municipal, and local authorities. But the activities of these organizations are largely uncoordinated, and the enforcement of existing noise control regulations is at best sporadic, and in some cases nonexistent. To assure our quality of life and to minimize the economic impact of potential trade barriers, a study team is recommending that a national noise policy be developed and then implemented in the immediate future.

  6. Prevalence of active trachoma two years after control activities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of TF/TI showed significant reduction (p-value <0.001) in all five districts and overall in the two regions. Conclusion: Trachoma control activities over a two-year period in two regions in Ghana had led to significant reduction in the prevalence of active disease. Integrated surveillance and active monitoring will ...

  7. Noise level and MPEG-2 encoder statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungwoo

    1997-01-01

    Most software in the movie and broadcasting industries are still in analog film or tape format, which typically contains random noise that originated from film, CCD camera, and tape recording. The performance of the MPEG-2 encoder may be significantly degraded by the noise. It is also affected by the scene type that includes spatial and temporal activity. The statistical property of noise originating from camera and tape player is analyzed and the models for the two types of noise are developed. The relationship between the noise, the scene type, and encoder statistics of a number of MPEG-2 parameters such as motion vector magnitude, prediction error, and quant scale are discussed. This analysis is intended to be a tool for designing robust MPEG encoding algorithms such as preprocessing and rate control.

  8. Thermal stress mitigation by Active Thermal Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soldati, Alessandro; Dossena, Fabrizio; Pietrini, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    This work proposes an Active Thermal Control (ATC) of power switches. Leveraging on the fact that thermal stress has wide impact on the system reliability, controlling thermal transients is supposed to lengthen the lifetime of electronic conversion systems. Indeed in some environments...... results of control schemes are presented, together with evaluation of the proposed loss models. Experimental proof of the ability of the proposed control to reduce thermal swing and related stress on the device is presented, too....

  9. Activities of the control services; Activites des services du controle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes the control activities of the technical service of electric power and big dams: annual examinations, administrative instructions (draining, floods, granting renewal), decennial examinations etc. (J.S.)

  10. General Method for Calculating the Response and Noise Spectra of Active Fabry-Perot Semiconductor Waveguides With External Optical Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaaberg, Søren; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    We present a theoretical method for calculating small-signal modulation responses and noise spectra of active Fabry-Perot semiconductor waveguides with external light injection. Small-signal responses due to either a modulation of the pump current or due to an optical amplitude or phase modulatio...... amplifiers and an injection-locked laser. We also demonstrate the applicability of the method to analyze slow and fast light effects in semiconductor waveguides. Finite reflectivities of the facets are found to influence the phase changes of the injected microwave-modulated light....

  11. Numerical investigation of two control rod models for vibration noise in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazsit, I.; Garis, N.S.

    1995-01-01

    In two previous publications it was investigated how the spatial structure of neutron noise, induced by the vibration of localized absorbers, depends on (a) the strength of the rod (i.e. an investigation of the applicability of the weak absorber approximation), and (b) the way the vibrating absorbers are modelled. A quantitative analysis of both items was performed in 1-D. In 2-D, however, only analytical formulae were given. The purpose of this paper is to present a quantitative analysis of the above two problems in 2-D. The results show that the domain of applicability of the weak absorber approximation is smaller in 2-D than in the 1-D case. On the other hand, the choice of the rod model plays a much less significant role in 2-D. (author)

  12. Noise control of subsonic cavity flows using plasma actuated receptive channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Arnob Das; Roy, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a passive receptive rectangular channel at the trailing edge of an open rectangular cavity to reduce the acoustic tones generated due to coherent shear layer impingement. The channel is numerically tested at Mach 0.3 using an unsteady three-dimensional large eddy simulation. Results show reduction in pressure fluctuations in the cavity due to which sound pressure levels are suppressed. Two linear dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators are placed inside the channel to enhance the flow through it. Specifically, acoustic suppression of 7 dB was obtained for Mach 0.3 flow with the plasma actuated channel. Also, the drag coefficient for the cavity reduced by over three folds for the channel and over eight folds for the plasma actuated channel. Such a channel can be useful in noise and drag reduction for various applications, including weapons bay, landing gear and branched piping systems. (fast track communication)

  13. A business case evaluation of workplace engineering noise control: a net-cost model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Supriya; Low, Colleen; Barry, Michael

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a convenient tool for companies to determine the costs and benefits of alternative interventions to prevent noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Contextualized for Singapore and in collaboration with Singapore's Ministry of Manpower, the Net-Cost model evaluates costs of intervention for equipment and labor, avoided costs of productivity losses and medical care, and productivity gains from the employer's economic perspective. To pilot this approach, four case studies are presented, with varying degrees of economic benefits to the employer, including one in which multifactor productivity is the main driver. Although compliance agencies may not require economic analysis of NIHL, given scarce resources in a market-driven economy, this tool enables stakeholders to understand and compare the costs and benefits of NIHL interventions comprehensively and helps in determining risk management strategies.

  14. Noise and Fano-Factor Control in AC-Driven Aharonov-Casher Ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zein W. A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The spin dependent current and Fano factor of Aharonov-Casher semiconducting ring is investigated under the effect of microwave, infrared, ultraviolet radiation and magnetic field. Both the average current and the transport noise (Fano factor characteristics are expressed in terms of the tunneling probability for the respective scattering channels. For spin transport induced by microwave and infrared radiation, a random oscillatory behavior of the Fano factor is observed. These oscillations are due to constructive and destructive spin interference effects. While for the case of ultraviolet radiation, the Fano factor becomes constant. This is due to that the oscillations has been washed out by phase averaging (i.e. ensemble dephasing over the spin transport channels. The present investigation is very important for quantum computing and information processing.

  15. Noise and Fano-factor Control in AC-Driven Aharonov-Casher Ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips A. H.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The spin dependent current and Fano factor of Aharonov-Casher semiconducting ring is investigated under the effect of microwave, infrared, ultraviolet radiation and magnetic field. Both the average current and the transport noise (Fano factor characteristics are expressed in terms of the tunneling probability for the respective scattering channels. For spin transport induced by microwave and infrared radiation, a random oscillatory behavior of the Fano factor is observed. These oscillations are due to constructive and destructive spin interference effects. While for the case of ultraviolet radiation, the Fano factor becomes constant. This is due to that the oscillations has been washed out by phase averaging (i.e. ensemble dephasing over the spin transport channels. The present investigation is very important for quantum computing and information processing.

  16. Noise and vibration levels in artificial polar bear dens as related to selected petroleum exploration and developmental activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, A.S.; Lentfer, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    Petroleum exploration and development are occurring in various locations in the Arctic, where there are important denning sites for polar bears. Petroleum activities usually coincide with winter denning activities by bears, who may abandon dens if subject to prolonged annoyance. A study was carried out to measure noise and vibration levels in artificial polar bear dens at Prudhoe's Bar, Alaska, resulting from seismic testing, drilling and transport. A microphone and an accelerometer were frozen to the floor of the dens, with leads passed through a consolidated snow filled entrance to a truck, tent or helicopter. Tests were carried out on land, sea ice, and next to a drilling tower on an artificial island, which was also used to measure noise levels resulting from a helicopter taking off. It was concluded that the dry and wind-beaten arctic snow muffles both sound and vibration extremely well, and it is unlikely that polar bears in their dens will be disturbed by the type of petroleum-related activities measured, provided they do not take place within 100 m of the dens. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  17. DSP Control of Line Hybrid Active Filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dan, Stan George; Benjamin, Doniga Daniel; Magureanu, R.

    2005-01-01

    Active Power Filters have been intensively explored in the past decade. Hybrid active filters inherit the efficiency of passive filters and the improved performance of active filters, and thus constitute a viable improved approach for harmonic compensation. In this paper a parallel hybrid filter...... is studied for current harmonic compensation. The hybrid filter is formed by a single tuned Le filter and a small-rated power active filter, which are directly connected in series without any matching transformer. Thus the required rating of the active filter is much smaller than a conventional standalone...... active filter. Simulation and experimental results obtained in laboratory confirmed the validity and effectiveness of the control....

  18. Manually controlled neutron-activation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, R.A.; Carothers, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    A manually controlled neutron activation system, the Manual Reactor Activation System, was designed and built and has been operating at one of the Savannah River Plant's production reactors. With this system, samples can be irradiated for up to 24 hours and pneumatically transferred to a shielded repository for decay until their activity is low enough for them to be handled at a radiobench. The Manual Reactor Activation System was built to provide neutron activation of solid waste forms for the Alternative Waste Forms Leach Testing Program. Neutron activation of the bulk sample prior to leaching permits sensitive multielement radiometric analyses of the leachates

  19. Spontaneous brain activity as a source of ideal 1/f noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegrini, Paolo; Menicucci, Danilo; Bedini, Remo; Fronzoni, Leone; Gemignani, Angelo; Grigolini, Paolo; West, Bruce J.; Paradisi, Paolo

    2009-12-01

    We study the electroencephalogram (EEG) of 30 closed-eye awake subjects with a technique of analysis recently proposed to detect punctual events signaling rapid transitions between different metastable states. After single-EEG-channel event detection, we study global properties of events simultaneously occurring among two or more electrodes termed coincidences. We convert the coincidences into a diffusion process with three distinct rules that can yield the same μ only in the case where the coincidences are driven by a renewal process. We establish that the time interval between two consecutive renewal events driving the coincidences has a waiting-time distribution with inverse power-law index μ≈2 corresponding to ideal 1/f noise. We argue that this discovery, shared by all subjects of our study, supports the conviction that 1/f noise is an optimal communication channel for complex networks as in art or language and may therefore be the channel through which the brain influences complex processes and is influenced by them.

  20. The Effects of White Noise on Agitated Behaviors, Mental Status, and Activities of Daily Living in Older Adults With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Wei; Weng, Shu-Chuan; Wu, Hua-Shan; Tsai, Lu-Jen; Lin, Ya-Ling; Yeh, Shu-Hui

    2018-02-01

    The aging of society is a global trend, and care of older adults with dementia is an urgent challenge. As dementia progresses, patients exhibit negative emotions, memory disorders, sleep disorders, and agitated behavior. Agitated behavior is one of the most difficult problems for family caregivers and healthcare providers to handle when caring for older adults with dementia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of white noise in improving agitated behavior, mental status, and activities of daily living in older adults with dementia. An experimental research design was used to study elderly participants two times (pretest and posttest). Six dementia care centers in central and southern Taiwan were targeted to recruit participants. There were 63 participants: 28 were in the experimental group, and 35 were in the comparison group. Experimental group participants received 20 minutes of white noise consisting of ocean, rain, wind, and running water sounds between 4 and 5 P.M. daily over a period of 4 weeks. The comparison group received routine care. Questionnaires were completed, and observations of agitated behaviors were collected before and after the intervention. Agitated behavior in the experimental group improved significantly between pretest and posttest. Furthermore, posttest scores on the Mini-Mental Status Examination and Barthel Index were slightly better for this group than at pretest. However, the experimental group registered no significant difference in mental status or activities of daily living at posttest. For the comparison group, agitated behavior was unchanged between pretest and posttest. The results of this study support white noise as a simple, convenient, and noninvasive intervention that improves agitated behavior in older adults with dementia. These results may provide a reference for related healthcare providers, educators, and administrators who care for older adults with dementia.

  1. Safety and efficacy of ebselen for the prevention of noise-induced hearing loss: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Jonathan; Lobarinas, Edward; Spankovich, Christopher; Griffiths, Scott K; Antonelli, Patrick J; Lynch, Eric D; Le Prell, Colleen G

    2017-09-02

    Noise-induced hearing loss is a leading cause of occupational and recreational injury and disease, and a major determinant of age-related hearing loss. No therapeutic agent has been approved for the prevention or treatment of this disorder. In animal models, glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1) activity is reduced after acute noise exposure. Ebselen, a novel GPx1 mimic, has been shown to reduce both temporary and permanent noise-induced hearing loss in preclinical studies. We assessed the safety and efficacy of ebselen for the prevention of noise-induced hearing loss in young adults in a phase 2 clinical trial. In this single-centre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial, healthy adults aged 18-31 years were randomly assigned (1:1:1:1) at the University of Florida (Gainsville, FL, USA) to receive ebselen 200 mg, 400 mg, or 600 mg, or placebo orally twice daily for 4 days, beginning 2 days before a calibrated sound challenge (4 h of pre-recorded music delivered by insert earphones). Randomisation was done with an allocation sequence generated by an independent third party. The primary outcome was mean temporary threshold shift (TTS) at 4 kHz measured 15 min after the calibrated sound challenge by pure tone audiometry; a reduction of 50% in an ebselen dose group compared with the placebo group was judged to be clinically relevant. All participants who received the calibrated sound challenge and at least one dose of study drug were included in the efficacy analysis. All randomly assigned patients were included in the safety analysis. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01444846. Between Jan 11, 2013, and March 24, 2014, 83 participants were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive ebselen 200 mg (n=22), 400 mg (n=20), or 600 mg (n=21), or placebo (n=20). Two participants in the 200 mg ebselen group were discontinued from the study before the calibrated sound challenge because they no longer met the inclusion criteria; these

  2. Effects of industrial noise on wildlife : issues and challenges in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, D.; Lapka, S. [Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    The effects of noise from industrial activities on wildlife was examined with particular reference to the potential impacts of noise on caribou and grizzly bears from the Mackenzie Gas pipeline project. In Alberta, environmental noise requirements for oil and gas production facilities are outlined in the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) Noise Control Directive 038. The requirements provide protection for human receptors, but not for wildlife. In order to ensure accurate assessments of the effects that industrial noise is having on wildlife, appropriate study methods must be developed to identify, quantify, and assess wildlife responses to noise. Without this knowledge, noise level thresholds for wildlife species cannot be established. A literature review was presented to demonstrate the range of published information on noise effects on wildlife and to highlight information that is relevant for the development of noise criteria for wildlife. It was concluded that wildlife noise thresholds are unknown, evidence for habituation to industrial facilities is limited, and long-term effects are generally unknown. Preliminary studies do not show any clear indication that observed reactions of wild animals are in response to noise. As such, development of regulatory criteria for wildlife noise control is not recommended at this time. The EUB will continue to keep up to date in wildlife related noise issues and will maintain the existing philosophy to limit noise to 5dB above ambient and to control dBA levels at 1500 m from facility fence lines. 57 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J. (University of California, Davis, CA)

    2008-07-01

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  4. Psychometric properties of the Bulgarian translation of noise sensitivity scale short form (NSS-SF): implementation in the field of noise control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhambov, Angel M; Dimitrova, Donka D

    2014-01-01

    The Noise Sensitivity Scale Short Form (NSS-SF), developed in English as a more practical form of the classical Weinstein NSS, has not to date been validated in other cultures, and its validity and reliability have not yet been confirmed. This study aimed to validate NSS-SF in Bulgarian and to demonstrate its applicability. The study comprised test-retest (n = 115) and a field-testing (n = 71) of the newly validated scale. Its construct validity was examined with confirmatory factor analysis, and very good model-fit was observed. Temporal stability was assessed in a test-retest (r = 0.990), convergent validity was examined with single-item susceptibility to the noise scale (r = 0.906) and discriminant validity was confirmed with single-item noise annoyance scale (r = 0.718). The lowest observed McDonald's omega across the studies was 0.923. The cross-cultural validation of NSS-SF was successful but it proved to be somewhat problematic with respect to its annoyance-based items.

  5. Low-Noise Active Decoupling Circuit and its Application to 13C Cryogenic RF Coils at 3T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, Juan Diego; Søvsø Szocska Hansen, Esben; Laustsen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the loss contributions in a small, 50-mm-diameter receive-only coil for carbon-13 (13C) magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T for 3 different circuits, which, including active decoupling, are compared in terms of their Q-factors and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The results show that a circ......We analyze the loss contributions in a small, 50-mm-diameter receive-only coil for carbon-13 (13C) magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T for 3 different circuits, which, including active decoupling, are compared in terms of their Q-factors and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The results show...... that a circuit using unsegmented tuning and split matching capacitors can provide 20% SNR enhancement at room temperature compared with that using more traditional designs. The performance of the proposed circuit was also measured when cryogenically cooled to 105 K, and an additional 1.6-fold SNR enhancement...... was achieved on a phantom. The enhanced circuit performance is based on the low capacitance needed to match to 50 when coil losses are low, which significantly reduces the proportion of the current flowing through the matching network and therefore minimizes this loss contribution. This effect makes...

  6. Modeling and control of active twist aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Nicholas Bryan

    The Wright Brothers marked the beginning of powered flight in 1903 using an active twist mechanism as their means of controlling roll. As time passed due to advances in other technologies that transformed aviation the active twist mechanism was no longer used. With the recent advances in material science and manufacturability, the possibility of the practical use of active twist technologies has emerged. In this dissertation, the advantages and disadvantages of active twist techniques are investigated through the development of an aeroelastic modeling method intended for informing the designs of such technologies and wind tunnel testing to confirm the capabilities of the active twist technologies and validate the model. Control principles for the enabling structural technologies are also proposed while the potential gains of dynamic, active twist are analyzed.

  7. Active and passive vibration control of structures

    CERN Document Server

    Spelsberg-Korspeter, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    Active and Passive Vibration Control of Structures form an issue of very actual interest in many different fields of engineering, for example in the automotive and aerospace industry, in precision engineering (e.g. in large telescopes), and also in civil engineering. The papers in this volume bring together engineers of different background, and it fill gaps between structural mechanics, vibrations and modern control theory.  Also links between the different applications in structural control are shown.

  8. Viability Analysis of Waste Tires as Material for Rail Vibration and Noise Control in Modern Tram Track Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiyou Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research study focused on the effect of using damping chamber elements made from waste tires on railway noise reduction. First, the energy absorption characteristics of damping chamber elements with various gradation combinations and compaction indices were measured in the laboratory using compression testing. The laboratory compression results demonstrated that the optimal gradation combination of damping chamber elements is as follows: the content of fine rubber particles is 10%, the content of coarse granules is 90%, and the optimal compaction index is 0.98. Next, the findings from the laboratory compression-test studies were used to produce damping chamber elements that were applied to a full-scale modern track model in the laboratory. The measurements of the dynamic properties indicated that the damping chamber elements could significantly reduce the vibration levels of the rail head. Finally, the damping chamber elements, which had been proven effective through laboratory dynamic tests, were widely applied to test rail sections in the field. The field tests demonstrated that damping chamber elements can significantly increase the track vibration decay rate in the frequency range of 200–10000 Hz. Therefore, damping chamber elements made from waste tires are able to control rail vibration and noise in modern tram track systems.

  9. Classical noise, quantum noise and secure communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannous, C; Langlois, J

    2016-01-01

    Secure communication based on message encryption might be performed by combining the message with controlled noise (called pseudo-noise) as performed in spread-spectrum communication used presently in Wi-Fi and smartphone telecommunication systems. Quantum communication based on entanglement is another route for securing communications as demonstrated by several important experiments described in this work. The central role played by the photon in unifying the description of classical and quantum noise as major ingredients of secure communication systems is highlighted and described on the basis of the classical and quantum fluctuation dissipation theorems. (review)

  10. Noise upon the Sinusoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

    2005-01-01

    Sinusoids are used for making harmonic and other sounds. In order to having life in the sounds and adding a wide variety of noises, irregularities are inserted in the frequency and amplitudes. A simple and intuitive noise model is presented, consisting of a low-pass filtered noise, and having...... control for strength and bandwidth. The noise is added on the frequency and amplitudes of the sinusoids, and the resulting irregularity’s (jitter and shimmer) bandwidth is derived. This, together with an overview of investigation methods of the jitter and shimmer results in an analysis of the necessary...

  11. Control of nucleus accumbens activity with neurofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Stephanie M; Trujillo, Andrew J; Glover, Gary H; Knutson, Brian

    2014-08-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) plays critical roles in healthy motivation and learning, as well as in psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). Thus, techniques that confer control of NAcc activity might inspire new therapeutic interventions. By providing second-to-second temporal resolution of activity in small subcortical regions, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can resolve online changes in NAcc activity, which can then be presented as "neurofeedback." In an fMRI-based neurofeedback experiment designed to elicit NAcc activity, we found that subjects could increase their own NAcc activity, and that display of neurofeedback significantly enhanced their ability to do so. Subjects were not as capable of decreasing their NAcc activity, however, and enhanced control did not persist after subsequent removal of neurofeedback. Further analyses suggested that individuals who recruited positive aroused affect were better able to increase NAcc activity in response to neurofeedback, and that NAcc neurofeedback also elicited functionally correlated activity in the medial prefrontal cortex. Together, these findings suggest that humans can modulate their own NAcc activity and that fMRI-based neurofeedback may augment their efforts. The observed association between positive arousal and effective NAcc control further supports an anticipatory affect account of NAcc function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Active fault diagnosis by controller modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Two active fault diagnosis methods for additive or parametric faults are proposed. Both methods are based on controller reconfiguration rather than on requiring an exogenous excitation signal, as it is otherwise common in active fault diagnosis. For the first method, it is assumed that the system...... considered is controlled by an observer-based controller. The method is then based on a number of alternate observers, each designed to be sensitive to one or more additive faults. Periodically, the observer part of the controller is changed into the sequence of fault sensitive observers. This is done...... in a way that guarantees the continuity of transition and global stability using a recent result on observer parameterization. An illustrative example inspired by a field study of a drag racing vehicle is given. For the second method, an active fault diagnosis method for parametric faults is proposed...

  13. Noise Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Regulated by EPA EPA or a designated Federal agency regulates noise sources, such as rail and motor carriers, low noise emission products, construction equipment, transport equipment, trucks, motorcycles, and the labeling of hearing ...

  14. THE CONTROL AND EVALUATION OF PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Sabou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focused on importance and benefits of control and evaluation of marketing activities. The control of efficiency review the assessment of the resources for marketing activity, checking also the efficiency of the human resources, advertising, promotion activities and distribution activities. In the analyse of human resources the most important ratio are: the average of costumers visits on a day, the number of custom order received from 100 visits, the number of new customers from a period, the number of lost customers from a period, the marketing human expenditures from all the sales.The strategic control is made to check if the objectives and the company strategy are adapted to the marketing environment.

  15. Reduction of phase-induced intensity noise in a fiber-based coherent Doppler lidar using polarization control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Pedersen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Optimization of signal-to-noise ratio is an important aspect in the design of optical heterodyne detection systems such as a coherent Doppler lidar (CDL). In a CDL, optimal performance is achieved when the noise in the detector signal is dominated by local oscillator shot-noise. Most modern CDL...... systems are built using rugged and cost-efficient fiber optic components. Unfortunately, leakage signals such as residual reflections inherent within fiber components (e.g. circulator) can introduce phaseinduced intensity noise (PIIN) to the Doppler spectrum in a CDL. Such excess noise may be a few orders...

  16. Noise Pollution--What can be Done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Edgar A. G.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the ratio of energy dissipated as sound to the mechanical output of devices. Considers noise levels, ranges vs. peaks, noise indexes, and health hazards. Indicates some problems vs. solutions in the technology of noise control. (GH)

  17. Noise Pollution, Teachers' Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Patrick A.; Lavaroni, Charles W.

    One of three in a series about pollution, this teacher's guide for a unit on noise pollution is designed for use in junior high school grades. It offers suggestions for extending the information and activities contained in the textual material for students. Chapter 1 discusses the problem of noise pollution and involves students in processes of…

  18. Seguridad industrial y minera: Aspectos estratégicos para el control pasivo de ruido. // Industrial and mining security: estrategics aspects for the passive control of noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Felipe Sexto

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo presenta una serie de aspectos medulares a tener en cuenta para atenuar el efecto de la contaminación sonora enambientes industriales. Propone un perfil de enfrentamiento que, en su conjunto, se ha dado en llamar Control Pasivo deRuido (CPR. Entre los elementos que se analizan están los descriptores de ruido necesarios, la determinación de lostiempos de exposición límites, el aislamiento de las vibraciones, el programa de control, la utilidad de las pantallas yencapsulamientos acústicos, , entre otros aspectos. Se exponen, con especial énfasis, los criterios para la selección efectivade los dispositivos para la protección auditiva. Además, se plantea un enfoque que vincula la estrategia de Control Pasivode Ruido como parte de una concepción más amplia que es considerada en la consecuente aplicación de una política demantenimiento eficaz. Tal relación constituye el punto de partida para asegurar la salud del personal, el buenfuncionamiento de los equipos, la seguridad operacional, y con ello, la disminución del alcance nefasto de la contaminaciónacústica en ambientes industriales.Palabras claves: Ruido, contaminación, mantenimiento, seguridad, salud, control pasivo._____________________________________________________________________AbstractThe work presents a series of important aspects to keep in mind in order to attenuate the effect of the sound contaminationin industrial environment. A confrontation profile is provided, which has been called Passive Control of Noise (CPR.Among the analyzed elements are: the determination of time exhibition limits, the vibration isolation, the utility of screensand acoustic capsule, the control program, and other aspects. With special emphasis are exposed the approaches for theeffective selection of the devices for auditive protection. An aproach is stated that links the strategy of Passive NoiseControl as part of a wider conception that is considered in the consequent application

  19. A Low-Power Wireless Image Sensor Node with Noise-Robust Moving Object Detection and a Region-of-Interest Based Rate Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    from both environment and hardware further reduces the transmission energy with negligible computation and memory overhead. The rate controller...detection, Region-of-interest, Rate control Introduction In wireless image sensor nodes for moving object surveillance, energy efficiency can be...noise, reliable moving object detection is required to avoid unnecessary transmission of background scenes [1]. Transmission energy can be further

  20. Community noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragdon, C. R.

    Airport and community land use planning as they relate to airport noise reduction are discussed. Legislation, community relations, and the physiological effect of airport noise are considered. Noise at the Logan, Los Angeles, and Minneapolis/St. Paul airports is discussed.

  1. Active Structural Acoustic Control in an Original A400M Aircraft Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehne, C; Sachau, D; Renger, K

    2016-01-01

    Low frequency noise has always been a challenge in propeller driven aircraft. At low frequencies passive noise treatments are not as efficient as active noise reduction systems. The Helmut-Schmidt-University has built up a full-scale test rig with an original A400M aircraft structure. This provides a good opportunity to develop and test active noise reduction systems in a realistic environment. The currently installed system consists of mechanical actuators and acoustical sensors. The actuators are called TVAs (Tuneable Vibration Absorber) and contain two spring-mass systems whose natural frequencies are adjusted to the BPFs (Blade Passage Frequency) of the propellers. The TVAs are mounted to the frames and the force direction is normal to the skin. The sensors are condenser microphones which are attached to the primary structure of the airframe. The TVAs are equipped with signal processing devices. These components carry out Fourier transforms and signal amplification for the sensor data and actuator signals. The communication between the TVAs and the central control unit is implemented by the CAN Bus protocol and mainly consists of complex coefficients for the sensor and actuator data. This paper describes the basic structure of the system, the hardware set-up and function tests of the controller. (paper)

  2. Active Structural Acoustic Control in an Original A400M Aircraft Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, C.; Sachau, D.; Renger, K.

    2016-09-01

    Low frequency noise has always been a challenge in propeller driven aircraft. At low frequencies passive noise treatments are not as efficient as active noise reduction systems. The Helmut-Schmidt-University has built up a full-scale test rig with an original A400M aircraft structure. This provides a good opportunity to develop and test active noise reduction systems in a realistic environment. The currently installed system consists of mechanical actuators and acoustical sensors. The actuators are called TVAs (Tuneable Vibration Absorber) and contain two spring-mass systems whose natural frequencies are adjusted to the BPFs (Blade Passage Frequency) of the propellers. The TVAs are mounted to the frames and the force direction is normal to the skin. The sensors are condenser microphones which are attached to the primary structure of the airframe. The TVAs are equipped with signal processing devices. These components carry out Fourier transforms and signal amplification for the sensor data and actuator signals. The communication between the TVAs and the central control unit is implemented by the CAN Bus protocol and mainly consists of complex coefficients for the sensor and actuator data. This paper describes the basic structure of the system, the hardware set-up and function tests of the controller.

  3. Model dynamic behaviour analysis with chaotic noise using fuzzy logic based control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Glauco Antonio Santos da

    2002-01-01

    This work presents an application of fuzzy control on dynamical system models. It has been observed that fuzzy controllers maybe used as a good alternative to the classical PI controller, once it incorporates human line behavior. Three implication relationships were used for the fussy controllers, namely, Mamdani Min, Larsen and Takagi-Sugeno. Performance comparisons were made aiming at achieving the best performance for each model used. The PI controller was used as a minimum standard, once it has been present in the industry for many years, giving acceptable performances and some degree of reliability . Two kinds of perturbations were introduced in the models to test the controllers: a ramp and chaotic perturbations. The first one is a monotonic, standard increase of an input parameter. The second one presents non-periodicity and irregularity in such a way to be quite rough to the controllers. The chaotic signal, as an analysis tool to dynamical systems, is an interesting contribution of this work. As a general conclusion it can be said the best performance, in this work, was achieved by the Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy controller. (author)

  4. Adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators for active structural acoustic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vipperman, Jeffrey Stuart

    1997-09-01

    A new transducer technology with application to active control systems, modal analysis, and autonomous system health monitoring, is brought to fruition in this work. It has the advantages of being lightweight, potentially cost-effective, self-tuning, has negligible dynamics, and most importantly (from a robustness perspective), it provides a colocated sensor/actuator pair. The transducer consists of a piezoceramic element which serves as both an actuator and a sensor and will be referred to in this work as a sensoriactuator. Simple, adaptive signal processing in conjunction with a voltage controlled amplifier, reference capacitor, and a common-mode rejection circuit extract the mechanical response from the total response of the piezoelectric sensoriactuator for sensing. The digital portion of the adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuator merely serves to tune the circuit, avoiding the potentially destabilizing effects of introducing a digital delay in the signal path, when used for feedback control applications. Adaptive compensation of the sensoriactuator is necessary since the signal to noise ratio is typically greater than 40 dB, making it prohibitive to tune the circuit manually. In addition, the constitutive properties of piezoceramics vary with time and environment, necessitating that the circuit be periodically re-tuned. The analog portion of the hardware is based upon op-amp circuits and an AD632 analog multiplier chip, which serves as both a voltage controlled amplifier (VCA) and a common mode rejection (CMR) circuit. A single coefficient least-mean square (LMS) adaptive filter continuously adjusts the gain of the VCA circuit as necessary. Nonideal behavior of piezoceramics is discussed along with methods to counter the consequential deterioration in circuit performance. A multiple input multiple output (MIMO) implementation of the adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuator is developed using orthogonal white noise training signals for each sensoriactuator. Two

  5. Adaptive Piezoelectric Absorber for Active Vibration Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Herold

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Passive vibration control solutions are often limited to working reliably at one design point. Especially applied to lightweight structures, which tend to have unwanted vibration, active vibration control approaches can outperform passive solutions. To generate dynamic forces in a narrow frequency band, passive single-degree-of-freedom oscillators are frequently used as vibration absorbers and neutralizers. In order to respond to changes in system properties and/or the frequency of excitation forces, in this work, adaptive vibration compensation by a tunable piezoelectric vibration absorber is investigated. A special design containing piezoelectric stack actuators is used to cover a large tuning range for the natural frequency of the adaptive vibration absorber, while also the utilization as an active dynamic inertial mass actuator for active control concepts is possible, which can help to implement a broadband vibration control system. An analytical model is set up to derive general design rules for the system. An absorber prototype is set up and validated experimentally for both use cases of an adaptive vibration absorber and inertial mass actuator. Finally, the adaptive vibration control system is installed and tested with a basic truss structure in the laboratory, using both the possibility to adjust the properties of the absorber and active control.

  6. Active Vibration Control of Hydrodynamic Journal Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tůma, J.; Šimek, J.; Škuta, J.; Los, J.; Zavadil, J.

    Rotor instability is one of the most serious problems of high-speed rotors supported by sliding bearings. With constantly increasing parameters, new machines problems with rotor instability are encountered more and more often. Even though there are many solutions based on passive improvement of the bearing geometry to enlarge the operational speed range of the journal bearing, the paper deals with a working prototype of a system for the active vibration control of journal bearings with the use of piezoactuators. The actively controlled journal bearing consists of a movable bushing, which is actuated by two piezoactuators. It is assumed that the journal vibration is measured by a pair of proximity probes. Force produced by piezoactuators and acting at the bushing is controlled according to error signals derived from the proximity probe output signals. The active vibration control was tested with the use of a test rig, which consists of a rotor supported by two controllable journal bearings and driven by an inductive motor up to 23,000 rpm. As it was proved by experiments the active vibration control extends considerably the range of the rotor operational speed.

  7. Bootstrap Signal-to-Noise Confidence Intervals: An Objective Method for Subject Exclusion and Quality Control in ERP Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Nathan A.; Gannon, Matthew A.; Long, Stephanie M.; Young, Madeleine E.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of event-related potential (ERP) data includes several steps to ensure that ERPs meet an appropriate level of signal quality. One such step, subject exclusion, rejects subject data if ERP waveforms fail to meet an appropriate level of signal quality. Subject exclusion is an important quality control step in the ERP analysis pipeline as it ensures that statistical inference is based only upon those subjects exhibiting clear evoked brain responses. This critical quality control step is most often performed simply through visual inspection of subject-level ERPs by investigators. Such an approach is qualitative, subjective, and susceptible to investigator bias, as there are no standards as to what constitutes an ERP of sufficient signal quality. Here, we describe a standardized and objective method for quantifying waveform quality in individual subjects and establishing criteria for subject exclusion. The approach uses bootstrap resampling of ERP waveforms (from a pool of all available trials) to compute a signal-to-noise ratio confidence interval (SNR-CI) for individual subject waveforms. The lower bound of this SNR-CI (SNRLB) yields an effective and objective measure of signal quality as it ensures that ERP waveforms statistically exceed a desired signal-to-noise criterion. SNRLB provides a quantifiable metric of individual subject ERP quality and eliminates the need for subjective evaluation of waveform quality by the investigator. We detail the SNR-CI methodology, establish the efficacy of employing this approach with Monte Carlo simulations, and demonstrate its utility in practice when applied to ERP datasets. PMID:26903849

  8. Novel active signal compression in low-noise analog readout at future X-ray FEL facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manghisoni, M.; Comotti, D.; Gaioni, L.; Lodola, L.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.

    2015-04-01

    This work presents the design of a low-noise front-end implementing a novel active signal compression technique. This feature can be exploited in the design of analog readout channels for application to the next generation free electron laser (FEL) experiments. The readout architecture includes the low-noise charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) with dynamic signal compression, a time variant shaper used to process the signal at the preamplifier output and a 10-bit successive approximation register (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The channel will be operated in such a way to cope with the high frame rate (exceeding 1 MHz) foreseen for future XFEL machines. The choice of a 65 nm CMOS technology has been made in order to include all the building blocks in the target pixel pitch of 100 μm. This work has been carried out in the frame of the PixFEL Project funded by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Italy.

  9. On the Use of Sensor Fusion to Reduce the Impact of Rotational and Additive Noise in Human Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Rojas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of fusion mechanisms is to increase the individual reliability of the systems through the use of the collectivity knowledge. Moreover, fusion models are also intended to guarantee a certain level of robustness. This is particularly required for problems such as human activity recognition where runtime changes in the sensor setup seriously disturb the reliability of the initial deployed systems. For commonly used recognition systems based on inertial sensors, these changes are primarily characterized as sensor rotations, displacements or faults related to the batteries or calibration. In this work we show the robustness capabilities of a sensor-weighted fusion model when dealing with such disturbances under different circumstances. Using the proposed method, up to 60% outperformance is obtained when a minority of the sensors are artificially rotated or degraded, independent of the level of disturbance (noise imposed. These robustness capabilities also apply for any number of sensors affected by a low to moderate noise level. The presented fusion mechanism compensates the poor performance that otherwise would be obtained when just a single sensor is considered.

  10. Subtractive, divisive and non-monotonic gain control in feedforward nets linearized by noise and delays

    OpenAIRE

    Mejias, Jorge F.; Payeur, Alexandre; Selin, Erik; Maler, Leonard; Longtin, André

    2014-01-01

    The control of input-to-output mappings, or gain control, is one of the main strategies used by neural networks for the processing and gating of information. Using a spiking neural network model, we studied the gain control induced by a form of inhibitory feedforward circuitry—also known as “open-loop feedback”—, which has been experimentally observed in a cerebellum-like structure in weakly electric fish. We found, both analytically and numerically, that this network displays three different...

  11. THE NOISE IMMUNITY OF THE DIGITAL DEMODULATOR MFM-AM SIGNAL USED IN DATA COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS OF AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL WITH AUTOMATIC DEPENDENT SURVEILLANCE AGAINST A NON-GAUSSIAN NOISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Senyavskiy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the robustness of the digital demodulator of the signal with the lowest frequency shift keying at a subcarrier frequency with respect to non-Gaussian interference type of atmospheric, industrial noise and interfering frequency -and phase-shift keyed signals. This type of demodulator is used for the transmission of navigation data in the systems of air traffic control with automatic dependent surveillance.

  12. Noise, buildings and people

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croome, D J

    1977-01-01

    This book covers the physics of acoustics necessary to understand the analytical aspects of acoustical design and noise control in buildings. The major part is devoted to the problems of noise and man, and other chapters cover features of noise control in and around buildings. In an introduction, building environmental engineering is dealth with in general terms of architecture, creativity, systms design, etc. Aspects of the acoustical environment, noise sources in buildings, control of airborne and structure-borne noise and acoustical design techniques are covered in Part II. Items include: comfort, physiological response to noise and vibrations, noise criteria, human performance, speech communication, landscaped offices, sound generation by air-conditioning and heating equipment, building structure and noise attenuation, acoustical design. Part III gives some fundamentals of acoustics; mechanical vibration, wave motion, propagation of sound, structure-borne sound, behavior of sound in rooms, transmission of sound through structure. References include lists of British standards and booklets on health and safety at work.

  13. Reduction of environmental MHz noise for SQUID application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araya, T. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)]. E-mail: araya@sup.ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kitamura, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Kamishiro, M. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Sakuta, K. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Itozaki, H. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)]. E-mail: itozaki@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-10-01

    It is important to remove large environmental noise in measurement using SQUIDs without magnetic shielding. Active noise control (ANC) is an effective method to remove the environmental noise. The environmental noise has been reduced by the ANC system in the radio frequency region around MHz. The anti-phase waves of the environmental noise should be generated by this system. The ANC system including the phase and amplitude control circuit was developed to make the anti-phase waves in the MHz region. In this paper, sinusoidal waves with a MHz frequency were used as the environmental noise. When a coil antenna was used for a receiver antenna, this ANC system suppressed these sinusoidal waves to the white noise level about 40 dB. When we used a SQUID as a receiver antenna, we also cancelled sinusoidal waves to the white noise level by this system. This shows that the ANC system is useful to reduce an environmental noise when this ANC system is developed to cancel multi-frequency noise.

  14. Reduction of environmental MHz noise for SQUID application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, T.; Kitamura, Y.; Kamishiro, M.; Sakuta, K.; Itozaki, H.

    2006-01-01

    It is important to remove large environmental noise in measurement using SQUIDs without magnetic shielding. Active noise control (ANC) is an effective method to remove the environmental noise. The environmental noise has been reduced by the ANC system in the radio frequency region around MHz. The anti-phase waves of the environmental noise should be generated by this system. The ANC system including the phase and amplitude control circuit was developed to make the anti-phase waves in the MHz region. In this paper, sinusoidal waves with a MHz frequency were used as the environmental noise. When a coil antenna was used for a receiver antenna, this ANC system suppressed these sinusoidal waves to the white noise level about 40 dB. When we used a SQUID as a receiver antenna, we also cancelled sinusoidal waves to the white noise level by this system. This shows that the ANC system is useful to reduce an environmental noise when this ANC system is developed to cancel multi-frequency noise

  15. Orthonormal filters for identification in active control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Many active noise and vibration control systems require models of the control paths. When the controlled system changes slightly over time, adaptive digital filters for the identification of the models are useful. This paper aims at the investigation of a special class of adaptive digital filters: orthonormal filter banks possess the robust and simple adaptation of the widely applied finite impulse response (FIR) filters, but at a lower model order, which is important when considering implementation on embedded systems. However, the filter banks require prior knowledge about the resonance frequencies and damping of the structure. This knowledge can be supposed to be of limited precision, since in many practical systems, uncertainties in the structural parameters exist. In this work, a procedure using a number of training systems to find the fixed parameters for the filter banks is applied. The effect of uncertainties in the prior knowledge on the model error is examined both with a basic example and in an experiment. Furthermore, the possibilities to compensate for the imprecise prior knowledge by a higher filter order are investigated. Also comparisons with FIR filters are implemented in order to assess the possible advantages of the orthonormal filter banks. Numerical and experimental investigations show that significantly lower computational effort can be reached by the filter banks under certain conditions. (paper)

  16. Chapter 13 - Active Rectifiers and Their Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davari, Pooya; Zare, Firuz; Abdelhakim, Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    This chapter investigates the control design of active rectifiers and their applications in power electronics-based power system. The harmonic emission and measures are firstly addressed as a basis of evaluating the active rectifier's effectiveness. Furthermore, the importance of new coming...... standards is highlighted. Application-oriented design of active rectifiers as a main reason behind evolvement of different topologies is discussed. Then, the main principle in designing different control schemes in single-phase and three-phase rectifiers is investigated, analyzed, and experimentally...... verified. The influence of nonideal operating conditions with possible solutions is addressed. Finally, future prospective of active rectifiers as a one of the key enabler of carbon-free power system is summarized....

  17. Jacket Substructure Fatigue Mitigation through Active Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanis, Tomas; Natarajan, Anand

    2014-01-01

    to the fatigue design loads on the braces of the jacket. Since large wind turbines of 10MW rating have low rotor speeds (p), the modal frequencies of the sub structures approach 3p at low wind speeds, which leads to a modal coupling and resonance. Therefore an active control system is developed which provides...... sufficient structural damping and consequently a fatigue reduction at the substructure. The resulting reduction in fatigue design loads on the jacket structure based on the active control system is presented....

  18. Where's the Noise? Key Features of Spontaneous Activity and Neural Variability Arise through Learning in a Deterministic Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Hartmann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Even in the absence of sensory stimulation the brain is spontaneously active. This background "noise" seems to be the dominant cause of the notoriously high trial-to-trial variability of neural recordings. Recent experimental observations have extended our knowledge of trial-to-trial variability and spontaneous activity in several directions: 1. Trial-to-trial variability systematically decreases following the onset of a sensory stimulus or the start of a motor act. 2. Spontaneous activity states in sensory cortex outline the region of evoked sensory responses. 3. Across development, spontaneous activity aligns itself with typical evoked activity patterns. 4. The spontaneous brain activity prior to the presentation of an ambiguous stimulus predicts how the stimulus will be interpreted. At present it is unclear how these observations relate to each other and how they arise in cortical circuits. Here we demonstrate that all of these phenomena can be accounted for by a deterministic self-organizing recurrent neural network model (SORN, which learns a predictive model of its sensory environment. The SORN comprises recurrently coupled populations of excitatory and inhibitory threshold units and learns via a combination of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP and homeostatic plasticity mechanisms. Similar to balanced network architectures, units in the network show irregular activity and variable responses to inputs. Additionally, however, the SORN exhibits sequence learning abilities matching recent findings from visual cortex and the network's spontaneous activity reproduces the experimental findings mentioned above. Intriguingly, the network's behaviour is reminiscent of sampling-based probabilistic inference, suggesting that correlates of sampling-based inference can develop from the interaction of STDP and homeostasis in deterministic networks. We conclude that key observations on spontaneous brain activity and the variability of neural

  19. Active versus passive screening for entrance control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, N.J.

    1976-01-01

    The benefits of different entrance control actions are quantitatively assessed by defining a relative improvement index for the screening activity. Three classes of entrance control measures are investigated: the use of a purely active screening measure (such as a portal monitor), the use of a purely passive screening measure (such as personality typing), and the combined use of active and passive measures. Active entrance control measures have been studied previously [McCormick and Erdmann, Nucl. Mat. Manag. 4, (1975)] where it was determined that the relative improvement index is approximately related to the nondetection probability factor r for the protective system by (1-r + r ln r). It is shown here that the relative improvement index for a purely passive screening system also can be approximately expressed in a convenient manner. Because the probability is very small that a sabotage or diversion action would be attempted, the result for passive screening, multiplied by r, may be combined with the factor (1-r + r ln r) to give the relative improvement index for a combined, active-and-passive entrance control system. Results from simple example calculations indicate that passive screening of nuclear plant personnel or applicants for such positions is orders-of-magnitude less effective than portal monitors or reasonable improvements in them. 5 tables

  20. Active disturbance rejection controller for chemical reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both, Roxana; Dulf, Eva H.; Muresan, Cristina I.

    2015-01-01

    In the petrochemical industry, the synthesis of 2 ethyl-hexanol-oxo-alcohols (plasticizers alcohol) is of high importance, being achieved through hydrogenation of 2 ethyl-hexenal inside catalytic trickle bed three-phase reactors. For this type of processes the use of advanced control strategies is suitable due to their nonlinear behavior and extreme sensitivity to load changes and other disturbances. Due to the complexity of the mathematical model an approach was to use a simple linear model of the process in combination with an advanced control algorithm which takes into account the model uncertainties, the disturbances and command signal limitations like robust control. However the resulting controller is complex, involving cost effective hardware. This paper proposes a simple integer-order control scheme using a linear model of the process, based on active disturbance rejection method. By treating the model dynamics as a common disturbance and actively rejecting it, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) can achieve the desired response. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method

  1. Active disturbance rejection controller for chemical reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Both, Roxana; Dulf, Eva H.; Muresan, Cristina I., E-mail: roxana.both@aut.utcluj.ro [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-03-10

    In the petrochemical industry, the synthesis of 2 ethyl-hexanol-oxo-alcohols (plasticizers alcohol) is of high importance, being achieved through hydrogenation of 2 ethyl-hexenal inside catalytic trickle bed three-phase reactors. For this type of processes the use of advanced control strategies is suitable due to their nonlinear behavior and extreme sensitivity to load changes and other disturbances. Due to the complexity of the mathematical model an approach was to use a simple linear model of the process in combination with an advanced control algorithm which takes into account the model uncertainties, the disturbances and command signal limitations like robust control. However the resulting controller is complex, involving cost effective hardware. This paper proposes a simple integer-order control scheme using a linear model of the process, based on active disturbance rejection method. By treating the model dynamics as a common disturbance and actively rejecting it, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) can achieve the desired response. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Genetic Variation in POU4F3 and GRHL2 Associated with Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Chinese Population: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangrong Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is an important occupational disease worldwide resulting from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to examine whether genetic variations in POU4F3 and GRHL2 may influence susceptibility to NIHL in the Chinese population. A matched case-control study was carried out among 293 hearing loss individuals and 293 normal hearing workers drawn from a population of 3790 noise-exposed workers. Ten single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in POU4F3 and GRHL2 were selected and genotyped. Logistic regression was performed to analyze the main effects of SNPs and the interactions between noise exposure and SNPs. Moreover, the interactions between predictor haplotypes and noise exposure were also analyzed. Analysis revealed that the CC genotype of rs1981361 in the GRHL2 gene was associated with a higher risk of NIHL (adjusted OR = 1.59; 95% CI: 1.08–2.32, p = 0.018. Additionally, the GG genotype of rs3735715 in the GRHL2 gene was also a risk genotype (adjusted OR = 1.48; 95% CI: 1.01–2.19, p = 0.046. Significant interactions were found between rs3735715, rs1981361 (GRHL2, rs1368402 as well as rs891969 (POU4F3 and noise exposure in the high-level exposure groups. Furthermore, the protective haplotype CA in the POU4F3 gene and the risk haplotype GCCG in the GRHL2 gene were identified combined with noise exposure. These results indicated that GRHL2 might be an NIHL susceptibility gene, but the effect of POU4F3 on NIHL could only be detected when taking noise exposure into account, and their effects were enhanced by higher levels of noise exposure. However, the differences were not significant after the Bonferroni correction was applied. These results should be seen as suggestive.

  3. Comparisons between various cavity and panel noise reduction control in double-panel structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.H.; Kalverboer, J.; Berkhoff, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents comparisons between various panel and cavity resonance control methods to reduce the transmitted sound in a double-panel structure. The double-panel, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, has the advantages of low weight and effective transmission-loss at high

  4. Noise Reduction in Double‿Panel Structures by Cavity and Panel Resonance Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the cavity and the panel resonance control in a double‿panel structure. The double‿panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its light weight and effective

  5. Noise reduction in double-panel structures by cavity and panel resonance control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.-H.; Berkhoff, A.P

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the cavity and the panel resonance control in a double‐panel structure. The double‐panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its light weight and effective

  6. Acoustic ambient noise recorder

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saran, A.K.; Navelkar, G.S.; Almeida, A.M.; More, S.R.; Chodankar, P.V.; Murty, C.S.

    with a robust outfit that can withstand high pressures and chemically corrosion resistant materials. Keeping these considerations in view, a CMOS micro-controller-based marine acoustic ambient noise recorder has been developed with a real time clock...

  7. Design and implementation of multichannel global active structural acoustic control for a device casing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Krzysztof; Wrona, Stanislaw; Pawelczyk, Marek

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents the idea and discussion on implementation of multichannel global active noise control systems. As a test plant an active casing is used. It has been developed by the authors to reduce device noise directly at the source by controlling vibration of its casing. To provide global acoustic effect in the whole environment, where the device operates, it requires a number of secondary sources and sensors for each casing wall, thus making the whole active control structure complicated, i.e. with a large number of interacting channels. The paper discloses all details concerning hardware setup and efficient implementation of control algorithms for the multichannel case. A new formulation is presented to introduce the distributed version of the Switched-error Filtered-reference Least Mean Squares (FXLMS) algorithm together with adaptation rate enhancement. The convergence rate of the proposed algorithm is compared with original Multiple-error FXLMS. A number of hints followed from many years of authors' experience on microprocessor control systems design and signal processing algorithms optimization are presented. They can be used for various active control and signal processing applications, both for academic research and commercialization.

  8. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1995-07-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with a piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changes suddenly. the experimental results were compared to the predictions from the mathematical model. The model was successful in predicting the trends in leakage rate that occurred as the balance ratio and sealed pressure changed

  9. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  10. Practical ranges of loudness levels of various types of environmental noise, including traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.; Janssen, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    In environmental noise control one commonly employs the A-weighted sound level as an approximate measure of the effect of noise on people. A measure that is more closely related to direct human perception of noise is the loudness level. At constant A-weighted sound level, the loudness level of a

  11. Arbitrary quantum control of qubits in the presence of universal noise

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Green, TJ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available treatment of decoherence: the error vector and control matrix . . . . 7 2.4. Magnus expansion of the error vector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3. Operational fidelity 9 3.1. Moving to the Fourier domain... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 5.4. The full filter functions: dynamical decoupling+DCG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 6. Limits of approximation 19 6.1. Convergence of the Magnus expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 6.2. Numerical simulations and the first...

  12. Physical hazards (noise, heat, vibration, illumination) - control at work place, methods and strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, M.; Srivastava, P.; Ganesh, G.

    2016-01-01

    The industrial work is getting modernized more day by day leading to more physical hazard. It is forcing the line management stressed upon in relation to the work place physical hazard. In order to keep the work place free from physical hazard it is required to use proper tool like work place assessment, measuring the parameters and analyze the end result which force us to take proper control measures to check and eliminate the physical hazard. (author)

  13. Soundscape elaboration from anthrophonic adaptation of community noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teddy Badai Samodra, FX

    2018-03-01

    Under the situation of an urban environment, noise has been a critical issue in affecting the indoor environment. A reliable approach is required for evaluation of the community noise as one factor of anthrophonic in the urban environment. This research investigates the level of noise exposure from different community noise sources and elaborates the advantage of the noise disadvantages for soundscape innovation. Integrated building element design as a protector for noise control and speech intelligibility compliance using field experiment and MATLAB programming and modeling are also carried out. Meanwhile, for simulation analysis and building acoustic optimization, Sound Reduction-Speech Intelligibility and Reverberation Time are the main parameters for identifying tropical building model as case study object. The results show that the noise control should consider its integration with the other critical issue, thermal control, in an urban environment. The 1.1 second of reverberation time for speech activities and noise reduction more than 28.66 dBA for critical frequency (20 Hz), the speech intelligibility index could be reached more than fair assessment, 0.45. Furthermore, the environmental psychology adaptation result “Close The Opening” as the best method in high noise condition and personal adjustment as the easiest and the most adaptable way.

  14. Quality control of the activity meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Marlon da Silva Brandão; Sá, Lídia Vasconcelos de

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To carry out a comparative analysis of national and international standards regarding the quality control of the activity meter used in Nuclear Medicine Services in Brazil. Material and methods: Quality control protocols from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) were pointed out and compared with requirements from both regulatory Brazilian agencies, National Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) and National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). Results: The daily routine tests recommended by the regulatory agencies do not have significant differences; in contrast the tests with higher periodicities like (accuracy, linearity and precision) have differences discrepant. Conclusion: In view of the comparative analysis carried out, it is suggested that the national recommendations for the quality control tests of the activity meter should be checked and evaluated, with emphasis on the semiannual and annual periodicity tests. (author)

  15. Improving Accuracy of Processing Through Active Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Barbashov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An important task of modern mathematical statistics with its methods based on the theory of probability is a scientific estimate of measurement results. There are certain costs under control, and under ineffective control when a customer has got defective products these costs are significantly higher because of parts recall.When machining the parts, under the influence of errors a range scatter of part dimensions is offset towards the tolerance limit. To improve a processing accuracy and avoid defective products involves reducing components of error in machining, i.e. to improve the accuracy of machine and tool, tool life, rigidity of the system, accuracy of the adjustment. In a given time it is also necessary to adapt machine.To improve an accuracy and a machining rate there, currently  become extensively popular various the in-process gaging devices and controlled machining that uses adaptive control systems for the process monitoring. Improving the accuracy in this case is compensation of a majority of technological errors. The in-cycle measuring sensors (sensors of active control allow processing accuracy improvement by one or two quality and provide a capability for simultaneous operation of several machines.Efficient use of in-cycle measuring sensors requires development of methods to control the accuracy through providing the appropriate adjustments. Methods based on the moving average, appear to be the most promising for accuracy control since they include data on the change in some last measured values of the parameter under control.

  16. Inhibitory noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Destexhe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical neurons in vivo may operate in high-conductance states, in which the major part of the neuron's input conductance is due to synaptic activity, sometimes several-fold larger than the resting conductance. We examine here the contribution of inhibition in such high-conductance states. At the level of the absolute conductance values, several studies have shown that cortical neurons in vivo are characterized by strong inhibitory conductances. However, conductances are balanced and spiking activity is mostly determined by fluctuations, but not much is known about excitatory and inhibitory contributions to these fluctuations. Models and dynamic-clamp experiments show that, during high-conductance states, spikes are mainly determined by fluctuations of inhibition, or by inhibitory noise. This stands in contrast to low-conductance states, in which excitatory conductances determine spiking activity. To determine these contributions from experimental data, maximum likelihood methods can be designed and applied to intracellular recordings in vivo. Such methods indicate that action potentials are indeed mostly correlated with inhibitory fluctuations in awake animals. These results argue for a determinant role for inhibitory fluctuations in evoking spikes, and do not support feed-forward modes of processing, for which opposite patterns are predicted.

  17. Cooperative wireless network control based health and activity monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, R; Ganesh, A Balaji; Girish, Siva V

    2016-10-01

    A real-time cooperative communication based wireless network is presented for monitoring health and activity of an end-user in their environment. The cooperative communication offers better energy consumption and also an opportunity to aware the current location of a user non-intrusively. The link between mobile sensor node and relay node is dynamically established by using Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) and Link Quality Indicator (LQI) based on adaptive relay selection scheme. The study proposes a Linear Acceleration based Transmission Power Decision Control (LA-TPDC) algorithm to further enhance the energy efficiency of cooperative communication. Further, the occurrences of false alarms are carefully prevented by introducing three stages of sequential warning system. The real-time experiments are carried-out by using the nodes, namely mobile sensor node, relay nodes and a destination node which are indigenously developed by using a CC430 microcontroller integrated with an in-built transceiver at 868 MHz. The wireless node performance characteristics, such as energy consumption, Signal-Noise ratio (SNR), Bit Error Rate (BER), Packet Delivery Ratio (PDR) and transmission offset are evaluated for all the participated nodes. The experimental results observed that the proposed linear acceleration based transmission power decision control algorithm almost doubles the battery life time than energy efficient conventional cooperative communication.

  18. Relating Eye Activity Measures to Human Controller Remnant Characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popovici, A; Zaal, P.M.T.; Pool, D.M.; Mulder, M.; Sawaragi, T

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to partially explain the characteristics of the human perceptual remnant, following Levison’s representation of the remnant as an equivalent observation noise. Eye activity parameters are recorded using an eye tracker in two compensatory tracking tasks in which the visual

  19. Coherent active polarization control without loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yuqian; Hay, Darrick; Shi, Zhimin

    2017-11-01

    We propose a lossless active polarization control mechanism utilizing an anisotropic dielectric medium with two coherent inputs. Using scattering matrix analysis, we derive analytically the required optical properties of the anisotropic medium that can behave as a switchable polarizing beam splitter. We also show that such a designed anisotropic medium can produce linearly polarized light at any azimuthal direction through coherent control of two inputs with a specific polarization state. Furthermore, we present a straightforward design-on-demand procedure of a subwavelength-thick metastructure that can possess the desired optical anisotropy at a flexible working wavelength. Our lossless coherent polarization control technique may lead to fast, broadband and integrated polarization control elements for applications in imaging, spectroscopy, and telecommunication.

  20. Coherent active polarization control without loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqian Ye

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a lossless active polarization control mechanism utilizing an anisotropic dielectric medium with two coherent inputs. Using scattering matrix analysis, we derive analytically the required optical properties of the anisotropic medium that can behave as a switchable polarizing beam splitter. We also show that such a designed anisotropic medium can produce linearly polarized light at any azimuthal direction through coherent control of two inputs with a specific polarization state. Furthermore, we present a straightforward design-on-demand procedure of a subwavelength-thick metastructure that can possess the desired optical anisotropy at a flexible working wavelength. Our lossless coherent polarization control technique may lead to fast, broadband and integrated polarization control elements for applications in imaging, spectroscopy, and telecommunication.