WorldWideScience

Sample records for active cmos microarray

  1. CMOS Imaging of Temperature Effects on Pin-Printed Xerogel Sensor Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei Yao; Ka Yi Yung; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P; Bright, Frank V

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of temperature on the operation and performance of a xerogel-based sensor microarrays coupled to a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imager integrated circuit (IC) that images the photoluminescence response from the sensor microarray. The CMOS imager uses a 32 × 32 (1024 elements) array of active pixel sensors and each pixel includes a high-gain phototransistor to convert the detected optical signals into electrical currents. A correlated double sampling circuit and pixel address/digital control/signal integration circuit are also implemented on-chip. The CMOS imager data are read out as a serial coded signal. The sensor system uses a light-emitting diode to excite target analyte responsive organometallic luminophores doped within discrete xerogel-based sensor elements. As a proto type, we developed a 3 × 3 (9 elements) array of oxygen (O2) sensors. Each group of three sensor elements in the array (arranged in a column) is designed to provide a different and specific sensitivity to the target gaseous O2 concentration. This property of multiple sensitivities is achieved by using a mix of two O2 sensitive luminophores in each pin-printed xerogel sensor element. The CMOS imager is designed to be low noise and consumes a static power of 320.4 μW and an average dynamic power of 624.6 μW when operating at 100-Hz sampling frequency and 1.8-V dc power supply. PMID:23851206

  2. Characterization of active CMOS sensors for capacitively coupled pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirono, Toko; Gonella, Laura; Janssen, Jens; Hemperek, Tomasz; Huegging, Fabian; Krueger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert [Institute of Physics, University of Bonn (Germany); Peric, Ivan [Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Active CMOS pixel sensor is one of the most attractive candidates for detectors of upcoming particle physics experiments. In contrast to conventional sensors of hybrid detectors, signal processing circuit can be integrated in the active CMOS sensor. The characterization and optimization of the pixel circuit are indispensable to obtain a good performance from the sensors. The prototype chips of the active CMOS sensor were fabricated in the AMS 180nm and L-Foundry 150 nm CMOS processes, respectively a high voltage and high resistivity technology. Both chips have a charge sensitive amplifier and a comparator in each pixel. The chips are designed to be glued to the FEI4 pixel readout chip. The signals from 3 pixels of the prototype chips are capacitively coupled to the FEI4 input pads. We have performed lab tests and test beams to characterize the prototypes. In this presentation, the measurement results of the active CMOS prototype sensors are shown.

  3. CMOS Imaging of Pin-Printed Xerogel-Based Luminescent Sensor Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lei; Yung, Ka Yi; Khan, Rifat; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P; Bright, Frank V

    2010-12-01

    We present the design and implementation of a luminescence-based miniaturized multisensor system using pin-printed xerogel materials which act as host media for chemical recognition elements. We developed a CMOS imager integrated circuit (IC) to image the luminescence response of the xerogel-based sensor array. The imager IC uses a 26 × 20 (520 elements) array of active pixel sensors and each active pixel includes a high-gain phototransistor to convert the detected optical signals into electrical currents. The imager includes a correlated double sampling circuit and pixel address/digital control circuit; the image data is read-out as coded serial signal. The sensor system uses a light-emitting diode (LED) to excite the target analyte responsive luminophores doped within discrete xerogel-based sensor elements. As a prototype, we developed a 4 × 4 (16 elements) array of oxygen (O2) sensors. Each group of 4 sensor elements in the array (arranged in a row) is designed to provide a different and specific sensitivity to the target gaseous O2 concentration. This property of multiple sensitivities is achieved by using a strategic mix of two oxygen sensitive luminophores ([Ru(dpp)3](2+) and ([Ru(bpy)3](2+)) in each pin-printed xerogel sensor element. The CMOS imager consumes an average power of 8 mW operating at 1 kHz sampling frequency driven at 5 V. The developed prototype system demonstrates a low cost and miniaturized luminescence multisensor system. PMID:24489484

  4. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): developments and future outlook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Turchetta; A. Fant; P. Gasiorek; C. Esbrand; J.A. Griffiths; M.G. Metaxas; G.J. Royle; R. Speller; C. Venanzi; P.F. van der Stelt; H.G.C. Verheij; G. Li; S. Theodoridis; H. Georgiou; D. Cavouras; G. Hall; M. Noy; J. Jones; J. Leaver; D. Machin; S. Greenwood; M. Khaleeq; H. Schulerud; J.M. Østby; F. Triantis; A. Asimidis; D. Bolanakis; N. Manthos; R. Longo; A. Bergamaschi

    2007-01-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end app

  5. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): developments and future outlook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Turchetta; A. Fant; P. Gasiorek; C. Esbrand; J.A. Griffiths; M.G. Metaxas; G.J. Royle; R. Speller; C. Venanzi; P.F. van der Stelt; H.G.C. Verheij; G. Li; S. Theodoridis; H. Georgiou; D. Cavouras; G. Hall; M. Noy; J. Jones; J. Leaver; D. Machin; S. Greenwood; M. Khaleeq; H. Schulerud; J.M. Østby; F. Triantis; A. Asimidis; D. Bolanakis; N. Manthos; R. Longo; A. Bergamaschi

    2006-01-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end app

  6. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) for future vertex detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the development of CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) for future vertex detectors. MAPS are developed in a standard CMOS technology. In the imaging field, where the technology found its first applications, they are also known as CMOS Image Sensors. The use of MAPS as a detector for particle physics was first proposed at the end of 1999. Since then, their good performance in terms of spatial resolution, efficiency, radiation hardness have been demonstrated and work is now well under way to deliver the first MAPS-based vertex detectors

  7. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) for future vertex detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Turchetta, R

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) for future vertex detectors. MAPS are developed in a standard CMOS technology. In the imaging field, where the technology found its first applications, they are also known as CMOS Image Sensors. The use of MAPS as a detector for particle physics was first proposed at the end of 1999. Since then, their good performance in terms of spatial resolution, efficiency, radiation hardness have been demonstrated and work is now well under way to deliver the first MAPS-based vertex detectors.

  8. A Single-Transistor Active Pixel CMOS Image Sensor Architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guo-An; ZHANG Dong-Wei; HE Jin; SU Yan-Mei; WANG Cheng; CHEN Qin; LIANG Hai-Lang; YE Yun

    2012-01-01

    A single-transistor CMOS active pixel image sensor (1T CMOS APS) architecture is proposed,By switching the photosensing pinned diode,resetting and selecting can be achieved by diode pull-up and capacitive coupling pull-down of the source follower. Thus,the reset and selected transistors can be removed. In addition,the reset and selected signal lines can be shared to reduce the metal signal line,leading to a very high fill factor.The pixel design and operation principles are discussed in detail.The functionality of the proposed 1 T CMOS APS architecture has been experimentally verified using a fabricated chip in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS AMIS technology.

  9. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): Developments and future outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchetta, R. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)], E-mail: r.turchetta@rl.ac.uk; Fant, A.; Gasiorek, P. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Esbrand, C.; Griffiths, J.A.; Metaxas, M.G.; Royle, G.J.; Speller, R.; Venanzi, C. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London (United Kingdom); Stelt, P.F. van der; Verheij, H.; Li, G. [Academic Centre for Dentistry, Vrije Universiteit and University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Theodoridis, S.; Georgiou, H. [Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, University of Athens (Greece); Cavouras, D. [Medical Image and Signal Processing Laboratory, Department of Medical Instrument Technology, Technological Education Institution of Athens (Greece); Hall, G.; Noy, M.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Machin, D. [High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)] (and others)

    2007-12-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end applications, for example web-cams, and is slowly pervading the high-end applications, for example in prosumer digital cameras. Higher specifications are required for scientific applications: very low noise, high speed, high dynamic range, large format and radiation hardness are some of these requirements. This paper will present a brief overview of the CMOS Image Sensor technology and of the requirements for scientific applications. As an example, a sensor for X-ray imaging will be presented. This sensor was developed within a European FP6 Consortium, intelligent imaging sensors (I-ImaS)

  10. New Active Digital Pixel Circuit for CMOS Image Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new active digital pixel circuit for CMOS image sensor is designed consisting of four components: a photo-transducer, a preamplifier, a sample & hold (S & H) circuit and an A/D converter with an inverter. It is optimized by simulation and adjustment based on 2μm standard CMOS process. Each circuit of the components is designed with specific parameters. The simulation results of the whole pixel circuits show that the circuit has such advantages as low distortion, low power consumption, and improvement of the output performances by using an inverter.

  11. E-Beam Effects on CMOS Active Pixel Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different CMOS active pixel structures manufactured in a deep submicron process have been evaluated with electron beam. The devices were exposed to 1 MeV electron beam up to 5kGy. Dark current increased after E-beam irradiation differently at each pixel structure. Dark current change is dependent on CMOS pixel structures. CMOS image sensors are now good candidates in demanding applications such as medical image sensor, particle detection and space remote sensing. In these situations, CISs are exposed to high doses of radiation. In fact radiation is known to generate trapped charge in CMOS oxides. It can lead to threshold voltage shifts and current leakages in MOSFETs and dark current increase in photodiodes. We studied ionizing effects in three types of CMOS APSs fabricated by 0.25 CMOS process. The devices were irradiated by a Co60 source up to 50kGy. All irradiation took place at room temperature. The dark current in the three different pixels exhibits increase with electron beam exposure. From the above figure, the change of dark current is dependent on the pixel structure. Double junction structure has shown relatively small increase of dark current after electron beam irradiation. The dark current in the three different pixels exhibits increase with electron beam exposure. The contribution of the total ionizing dose to the dark current increase is small here, since the devices were left unbiased during the electron beam irradiation. Radiation hardness in dependent on the pixel structures. Pixel2 is relatively vulnerable to radiation exposure. Pixel3 has radiation hardened structure

  12. Monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) in a VLSI CMOS technology

    CERN Document Server

    Turchetta, R; Manolopoulos, S; Tyndel, M; Allport, P P; Bates, R; O'Shea, V; Hall, G; Raymond, M

    2003-01-01

    Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) designed in a standard VLSI CMOS technology have recently been proposed as a compact pixel detector for the detection of high-energy charged particle in vertex/tracking applications. MAPS, also named CMOS sensors, are already extensively used in visible light applications. With respect to other competing imaging technologies, CMOS sensors have several potential advantages in terms of low cost, low power, lower noise at higher speed, random access of pixels which allows windowing of region of interest, ability to integrate several functions on the same chip. This brings altogether to the concept of 'camera-on-a-chip'. In this paper, we review the use of CMOS sensors for particle physics and we analyse their performances in term of the efficiency (fill factor), signal generation, noise, readout speed and sensor area. In most of high-energy physics applications, data reduction is needed in the sensor at an early stage of the data processing before transfer of the data to ta...

  13. A 128 x 128 CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensor for Highly Integrated Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, Sunetra K.; Kemeny, Sabrina E.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    A new CMOS-based image sensor that is intrinsically compatible with on-chip CMOS circuitry is reported. The new CMOS active pixel image sensor achieves low noise, high sensitivity, X-Y addressability, and has simple timing requirements. The image sensor was fabricated using a 2 micrometer p-well CMOS process, and consists of a 128 x 128 array of 40 micrometer x 40 micrometer pixels. The CMOS image sensor technology enables highly integrated smart image sensors, and makes the design, incorporation and fabrication of such sensors widely accessible to the integrated circuit community.

  14. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, M.; Anaxagoras, T; Konstantinidis, AC; Zheng, Y.; Speller, RD; Evans, PM; Allinson, NM; Wells, K

    2014-01-01

    Recently CMOS Active Pixels Sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous Silicon and Selenium Flat Panel Imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non...

  15. A charge pump for driving CMOS active pixel reset

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jiang-tao; LI Bin-qiao; YAO Su-ying; SUN Zhong-yan

    2009-01-01

    To overcome the limitation of low image signal swing range and long reset time in four transistor CMOS active pixel image sensor, a charge pump circuit is presented to improve the pixel reset performance. The charge pump circuit consists of two stage switch capacitor serial voltage doubler. Cross-coupled MOSFET switch structure with well close and open perfor-mance is used in the second stage of the charge pump. The pixel reset transistor with gate voltage driven by output of the pump works in linear region, which can accelerate reset process and complete reset is achieved. The simulation results show that output of the charge pump is enhanced from 1.2 to 4.2 V with voltage tipple lower than 6 inV. The pixel reset time is reduced to 1.14 ns in dark. Image smear due to non-completely reset is eliminated and the image signal swing range is enlarged. The charge pump is successfully embedded in a CMOS image sensor chip with 0.3 ~ 106 pixeis.

  16. Monte Carlo Study of the Dosimetry of Small-Photon Beams Using CMOS Active Pixel Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez Spang, F.

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is an increasingly common treatment modality that uses very small photon fields. This technique imposes high dosimetric standards and complexities that remain unsolved. In this work the dosimetric performance of CMOS active pixel sensors is presented for the measurement of small-photons beams. A novel CMOS active pixel sensor called Vanilla developed for scientific applications was used. The detector is an array of 520 × 520 pixels on a 25 μm pitch which allows up to...

  17. Microarray of programmable electrochemically active elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    S. McCaskill, John; Maeke, Thomas; Straczek, Lukas;

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes possible applications of a two dimensional array of programmable electrochemically active elements to Alife. The array has been developed as part of the MICREA-gents project, and after several design phases, is now a mature enough device for general use beyond the project. Here...

  18. The Dexela 2923 CMOS X-ray detector: A flat panel detector based on CMOS active pixel sensors for medical imaging applications

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinidis, A. C.; Szafraniec, M. B.; Speller, R.D.; Olivo, A.

    2012-01-01

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) active pixel sensors (APS) have been introduced recently in many scientific applications. This work reports on the performance (in terms of signal and noise transfer) of an X-ray detector that uses a novel CMOS APS which was developed for medical X-ray imaging applications. For a full evaluation of the detector's performance, electro-optical and X-ray characterizations were carried out. The former included measuring read noise, full well capacit...

  19. Development of radiation hard CMOS active pixel sensors for HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernegger, Heinz

    2016-07-01

    New pixel detectors, based on commercial high voltage and/or high resistivity full CMOS processes, hold promise as next-generation active pixel sensors for inner and intermediate layers of the upgraded ATLAS tracker. The use of commercial CMOS processes allow cost-effective detector construction and simpler hybridisation techniques. The paper gives an overview of the results obtained on AMS-produced CMOS sensors coupled to the ATLAS Pixel FE-I4 readout chips. The SOI (silicon-on-insulator) produced sensors by XFAB hold great promise as radiation hard SOI-CMOS sensors due to their combination of partially depleted SOI transistors reducing back-gate effects. The test results include pre-/post-irradiation comparison, measurements of charge collection regions as well as test beam results.

  20. Electronic dosimetry and neutron metrology by CMOS active pixel sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims at demonstrating the possibility to use active pixel sensors as operational neutron dosemeters. To do so, the sensor that has been used has to be γ-transparent and to be able to detect neutrons on a wide energy range with a high detection efficiency. The response of the device, made of the CMOS sensor MIMOSA-5 and a converter in front of the sensor (polyethylene for fast neutron detection and 10B for thermal neutron detection), has been compared with Monte Carlo simulations carried out with MCNPX and GEANT4. These codes have been before-hand validated to check they can be used properly for our application. Experiments to characterize the sensor have been performed at IPHC and at IRSN/LMDN (Cadarache). The results of the sensor irradiation to photon sources and mixed field (241AmBe source) show the γ-transparency of the sensor by applying an appropriate threshold on the deposited energy (around 100 keV). The associated detection efficiency is satisfactory with a value of 10-3, in good agreement with MCNPX and GEANT4. Other features of the device have been tested with the same source, like the angular response. The last part of this work deals with the detection of thermal neutrons (eV-neutrons). Assays have been done in Cadarache (IRSN) with a 252Cf source moderated with heavy water (with and without cadmium shell). Results asserted a very high detection efficiency (up to 6*10-3 for a pure 10B converter) in good agreement with GEANT4. (author)

  1. Phenotype microarray profiling of the antibacterial activity of red cabbage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafidh RR

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Functional food can be a potent source of wide array of biocomonents with antimicrobial activity. We investigated the antibacterial activity of red cabbage (RC extract on Gram negative and positive ATCC strains. Most intersting, we, for the first time, explored and analysed the complete phenotypic profile of RC-treated bacteria using Omnilog Phenotype Microarray. Results: This study revealed that the phenotype microarray (PM screen was a valuable tool in the search for compounds and their antibacterial mechanisms that can inhibit bacterial growth by affecting certain metabolic pathways. It was shown that RC exerted remarkable antibacterial effect on S. aureus and E. coli bacteria, and PM showed a wide range phenotypic profile of the exerted RC antibacterial activity. RC targeted the peptide, carbon, nutriontional assembly, and sulfur metbolic pathways altogether. The peptidoglycan synthesis pathway was inferred to be targeted by RC extract at a metabolic point different from other available cell wall-targeting drugs; these could be hot targets for the discovery of new therapy for many problematic microbes.Conclusions: Taken together, the phenotype microarray for functional food and medicinal plants can be a very useful tool for profiling their antimicrobial activity. Moreover, extracts of functional food can exert antibacterial activity by hitting a wide range of metabolic pathways, at the same time leading to very difficult condition for bacteria to rapidly develop resistance. Therefore, using functional foods or medicinal plants as such, or as extracts, can be superior on mono-targeting antibiotics if the optimal concentrations and conditions of these functional foods were sought.

  2. Determination of strongly overlapping signaling activity from microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidaut Ghislain

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As numerous diseases involve errors in signal transduction, modern therapeutics often target proteins involved in cellular signaling. Interpretation of the activity of signaling pathways during disease development or therapeutic intervention would assist in drug development, design of therapy, and target identification. Microarrays provide a global measure of cellular response, however linking these responses to signaling pathways requires an analytic approach tuned to the underlying biology. An ongoing issue in pattern recognition in microarrays has been how to determine the number of patterns (or clusters to use for data interpretation, and this is a critical issue as measures of statistical significance in gene ontology or pathways rely on proper separation of genes into groups. Results Here we introduce a method relying on gene annotation coupled to decompositional analysis of global gene expression data that allows us to estimate specific activity on strongly coupled signaling pathways and, in some cases, activity of specific signaling proteins. We demonstrate the technique using the Rosetta yeast deletion mutant data set, decompositional analysis by Bayesian Decomposition, and annotation analysis using ClutrFree. We determined from measurements of gene persistence in patterns across multiple potential dimensionalities that 15 basis vectors provides the correct dimensionality for interpreting the data. Using gene ontology and data on gene regulation in the Saccharomyces Genome Database, we identified the transcriptional signatures of several cellular processes in yeast, including cell wall creation, ribosomal disruption, chemical blocking of protein synthesis, and, criticially, individual signatures of the strongly coupled mating and filamentation pathways. Conclusion This works demonstrates that microarray data can provide downstream indicators of pathway activity either through use of gene ontology or transcription

  3. Low Power Camera-on-a-Chip Using CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    A second generation image sensor technology has been developed at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a result of the continuing need to miniaturize space science imaging instruments. Implemented using standard CMOS, the active pixel sensor (APS) technology permits the integration of the detector array with on-chip timing, control and signal chain electronics, including analog-to-digital conversion.

  4. Radiation Tolerance of CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors with Self-Biased Pixels

    CERN Document Server

    Deveaux, M; Besson, A; Claus, G; Colledani, C; Dorokhov, M; Dritsa, C; Dulinski, W; Fröhlich, I; Goffe, M; Grandjean, D; Heini, S; Himmi, A; Hu, C; Jaaskelainen, K; Müntz, C; Shabetai, A; Stroth, J; Szelezniak, M; Valin, I; Winter, M

    2009-01-01

    CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) are proposed as a technology for various vertex detectors in nuclear and particle physics. We discuss the mechanisms of ionizing radiation damage on MAPS hosting the the dead time free, so-called self bias pixel. Moreover, we discuss radiation hardened sensor designs which allow operating detectors after exposing them to irradiation doses above 1 Mrad

  5. CMOS active pixel sensor for fault tolerance and background illumination subtraction

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Yu Hin (Desmond)

    2005-01-01

    As the CMOS active pixel sensor evolves, its weaknesses are being overcome and its strengths start to surpass that of the charge-coupled device. This thesis discusses two novel APS designs. The first novel APS design was a Fault Tolerance Active Pixel Sensor (FTAPS) to increase a pixel's tolerance to defects. By dividing a regular APS pixel into two halves, the reliability of the pixel is increased, resulting in higher fabrication yield, longer pixel life time, and reduction in cost. Photodio...

  6. Analysis of noise characteristics for the active pixels in CMOS image sensors for X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Soo; Cho, Gyuseong; Bae, Jun-Hyung

    2006-09-01

    CMOS image sensors have poorer performance compared to conventional charge coupled devices (CCDs). Since CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) in general have higher temporal noise, higher dark current, smaller full well charge capacitance, and lower spectral response, they cannot provide the same wide dynamic range and superior signal to noise ratio as CCDs. In view of electronic noise, the main source for the CMOS APS is the pixel, along with other signal processing blocks such as row and column decoder, analog signal processor (ASP), analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and timing and control logic circuitry. Therefore, it is important and necessary to characterize noise of the active pixels in CMOS APSs, and we performed experimental measurements and comparisons with theoretical estimations. To derive noise source of the pixels, we designed and fabricated four types of CMOS active pixels, and each pixel is composed of a photodiode and three MOS transistors. The size of these pixels is 100 μm×100 μm. The test chip was fabricated using ETRI 0.8 μm (2P/2M) standard CMOS process. It was found that the dominant noise in CMOS active pixels is shot noise during integration under normal operating conditions. And, it was also seen that epitaxial type pixels have similar noise level compared to non-epitaxial type, and the noise of diffusion type pixel is larger than for a well type pixel on the same substrate type.

  7. Analysis of noise characteristics for the active pixels in CMOS image sensors for X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CMOS image sensors have poorer performance compared to conventional charge coupled devices (CCDs). Since CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) in general have higher temporal noise, higher dark current, smaller full well charge capacitance, and lower spectral response, they cannot provide the same wide dynamic range and superior signal to noise ratio as CCDs. In view of electronic noise, the main source for the CMOS APS is the pixel, along with other signal processing blocks such as row and column decoder, analog signal processor (ASP), analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and timing and control logic circuitry. Therefore, it is important and necessary to characterize noise of the active pixels in CMOS APSs, and we performed experimental measurements and comparisons with theoretical estimations. To derive noise source of the pixels, we designed and fabricated four types of CMOS active pixels, and each pixel is composed of a photodiode and three MOS transistors. The size of these pixels is 100 μmx100 μm. The test chip was fabricated using ETRI 0.8 μm (2P/2M) standard CMOS process. It was found that the dominant noise in CMOS active pixels is shot noise during integration under normal operating conditions. And, it was also seen that epitaxial type pixels have similar noise level compared to non-epitaxial type, and the noise of diffusion type pixel is larger than for a well type pixel on the same substrate type

  8. Prototype Active Silicon Sensor in 150 nm HR-CMOS Technology for ATLAS Inner Detector Upgrade

    OpenAIRE

    Rymaszewski, Piotr; Barbero, Marlon; Breugnon, Patrick; Godiot, Stépahnie; Gonella, Laura; Hemperek, Tomasz; Hirono, Toko; Hügging, Fabian; Krüger, Hans; Liu, Jian; Pangaud, Patrick; Peric, Ivan; Rozanov, Alexandre; Wang, Anqing; Wermes, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The LHC Phase-II upgrade will lead to a significant increase in luminosity, which in turn will bring new challenges for the operation of inner tracking detectors. A possible solution is to use active silicon sensors, taking advantage of commercial CMOS technologies. Currently ATLAS R&D programme is qualifying a few commercial technologies in terms of suitability for this task. In this paper a prototype designed in one of them (LFoundry 150 nm process) will be discussed. The chip architecture ...

  9. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, M; Anaxagoras, T; Konstantinidis, A C; Zheng, Y; Speller, R D; Evans, P M; Allinson, N M; Wells, K

    2014-07-01

    Recently CMOS active pixels sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous silicon and selenium flat panel imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However, despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non-uniformity of stitched sensors can arise from a number of factors related to the manufacturing process, including variation of amplification, variation between readout components, wafer defects and process variations across the wafer due to manufacturing processes. This paper reports on an investigation into the spatial non-uniformity and regional variations of a wafer scale stitched CMOS APS. For the first time a per-pixel analysis of the electro-optical performance of a wafer CMOS APS is presented, to address inhomogeneity issues arising from the stitching techniques used to manufacture wafer scale sensors. A complete model of the signal generation in the pixel array has been provided and proved capable of accounting for noise and gain variations across the pixel array. This novel analysis leads to readout noise and conversion gain being evaluated at pixel level, stitching block level and in regions of interest, resulting in a coefficient of variation ⩽1.9%. The uniformity of the image quality performance has been further investigated in a typical x-ray application, i.e. mammography, showing a uniformity in terms of CNR among the highest when compared with mammography detectors commonly used in clinical practice. Finally, in order to compare the detection capability of this novel APS with the technology currently used (i.e. FPIs), theoretical evaluation of the detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at zero-frequency has been performed, resulting in a higher DQE for this

  10. CMOS Active Pixel Sensors as energy-range detectors for proton Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the first proof of concept in the early 70s, a number of technologies has been proposed to perform proton CT (pCT), as a means of mapping tissue stopping power for accurate treatment planning in proton therapy. Previous prototypes of energy-range detectors for pCT have been mainly based on the use of scintillator-based calorimeters, to measure proton residual energy after passing through the patient. However, such an approach is limited by the need for only a single proton passing through the energy-range detector in a read-out cycle. A novel approach to this problem could be the use of pixelated detectors, where the independent read-out of each pixel allows to measure simultaneously the residual energy of a number of protons in the same read-out cycle, facilitating a faster and more efficient pCT scan. This paper investigates the suitability of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) to track individual protons as they go through a number of CMOS layers, forming an energy-range telescope. Measurements performed at the iThemba Laboratories will be presented and analysed in terms of correlation, to confirm capability of proton tracking for CMOS APSs

  11. CMOS Active Pixel Sensors as energy-range detectors for proton Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, M.; Anaxagoras, T.; Evans, P. M.; Green, S.; Manolopoulos, S.; Nieto-Camero, J.; Parker, D. J.; Poludniowski, G.; Price, T.; Waltham, C.; Allinson, N. M.

    2015-06-01

    Since the first proof of concept in the early 70s, a number of technologies has been proposed to perform proton CT (pCT), as a means of mapping tissue stopping power for accurate treatment planning in proton therapy. Previous prototypes of energy-range detectors for pCT have been mainly based on the use of scintillator-based calorimeters, to measure proton residual energy after passing through the patient. However, such an approach is limited by the need for only a single proton passing through the energy-range detector in a read-out cycle. A novel approach to this problem could be the use of pixelated detectors, where the independent read-out of each pixel allows to measure simultaneously the residual energy of a number of protons in the same read-out cycle, facilitating a faster and more efficient pCT scan. This paper investigates the suitability of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) to track individual protons as they go through a number of CMOS layers, forming an energy-range telescope. Measurements performed at the iThemba Laboratories will be presented and analysed in terms of correlation, to confirm capability of proton tracking for CMOS APSs.

  12. CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Star Tracker with Regional Electronic Shutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Pain, Bedabrata; Staller, Craig; Clark, Christopher; Fossum, Eric

    1996-01-01

    The guidance system in a spacecraft determines spacecraft attitude by matching an observed star field to a star catalog....An APS(active pixel sensor)-based system can reduce mass and power consumption and radiation effects compared to a CCD(charge-coupled device)-based system...This paper reports an APS (active pixel sensor) with locally variable times, achieved through individual pixel reset (IPR).

  13. Charged Particle Detection using a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Matis, H. S.; Bieser, F.; Kleinfelder, S.; Rai, G.; Retiere, F.; H.G. Ritter; Singh, K.; Wurzel, S. E.; Wieman, H.; Yamamoto, E.

    2002-01-01

    Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology has shown promise for next-generation vertex detectors. This paper discusses the design and testing of two generations of APS chips. Both are arrays of 128 by 128 pixels, each 20 by 20 micro-m. Each array is divided into sub-arrays in which different sensor structures (4 in the first version and 16 in the second) and/or readout circuits are employed. Measurements of several of these structures under Fe55 exposure are reported. The sensors have also been ir...

  14. Application-specific architectures of CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelezniak, Michal; Besson, Auguste; Claus, Gilles; Colledani, Claude; Degerli, Yavuz; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Deveaux, Michael; Dorokhov, Andrei; Dulinski, Wojciech; Fourches, Nicolas; Goffe, Mathieu; Grandjean, Damien; Guilloux, Fabrice; Heini, Sebastien; Himmi, Abdelkader; Hu, Christine; Jaaskelainen, Kimmo; Li, Yan; Lutz, Pierre; Orsini, Fabienne; Pellicioli, Michel; Shabetai, Alexandre; Valin, Isabelle; Winter, Marc

    2006-11-01

    Several development directions intended to adapt and optimize monolithic active pixel sensors for specific applications are presented in this work. The first example, compatible with the STAR microvertex upgrade, is based on a simple two-transistor pixel circuitry. It is suited for a long integration time, room-temperature operation and minimum power dissipation. In another approach for this application, a specific readout method is proposed, allowing optimization of the integration time independently of the full frame-readout time. The circuit consists of an in-pixel front-end voltage amplifier, with a gain on the order of five, followed by two analog memory cells. The extended version of this scheme, based on the implementation of more memory cells per pixel, is the solution considered for the outer layers of a microvertex detector at the international linear collider. For the two innermost layers, a circuit allowing fast frame scans together with on-line, on-chip data sparsification is proposed. The first results of this prototype demonstrate that the fixed pattern dispersion is reduced below a noise level of 15 e -, allowing the use of a single comparator or a low-resolution ADC per pixel column. A common element for most of the mentioned readout schemes is a low-noise, low power consumption, layout efficient in-pixel amplifier. A review of possible solutions for this element together with some experimental results is presented.

  15. A CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for Charged Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matis, Howard S.; Bieser, Fred; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Rai, Gulshan; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans George; Singh, Kunal; Wurzel, Samuel E.; Wieman, Howard; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2002-12-02

    Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology has shown promise for next-generation vertex detectors. This paper discusses the design and testing of two generations of APS chips. Both are arrays of 128 by 128 pixels, each 20 by 20 {micro}m. Each array is divided into sub-arrays in which different sensor structures (4 in the first version and 16 in the second) and/or readout circuits are employed. Measurements of several of these structures under Fe{sup 55} exposure are reported. The sensors have also been irradiated by 55 MeV protons to test for radiation damage. The radiation increased the noise and reduced the signal. The noise can be explained by shot noise from the increased leakage current and the reduction in signal is due to charge being trapped in the epi layer. Nevertheless, the radiation effect is small for the expected exposures at RHIC and RHIC II. Finally, we describe our concept for mechanically supporting a thin silicon wafer in an actual detector.

  16. Radiation hardness of a large area CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, M; Diaz, O; Wells, K.; Anaxagoras, T; Allinson, NM

    2012-01-01

    A wafer scale CMOS Active Pixel Sensor has been designed employing design techniques of transistor enclosed geometry and P+ doped guard rings to offer ionizing radiation tolerance. The detector was irradiated with 160 kVp X-rays up to a total dose of 94 kGy(Si) and remained functional. The radiation damage produced in the device has been studied, resulting in a dark current density increase per decade of 96±5 pA/cm/decade and a damage threshold of 204 Gy(Si). The damage produced in the detect...

  17. Prototype Active Silicon Sensor in 150 nm HR-CMOS technology for ATLAS Inner Detector Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymaszewski, P.; Barbero, M.; Breugnon, P.; Godiot, S.; Gonella, L.; Hemperek, T.; Hirono, T.; Hügging, F.; Krüger, H.; Liu, J.; Pangaud, P.; Peric, I.; Rozanov, A.; Wang, A.; Wermes, N.

    2016-02-01

    The LHC Phase-II upgrade will lead to a significant increase in luminosity, which in turn will bring new challenges for the operation of inner tracking detectors. A possible solution is to use active silicon sensors, taking advantage of commercial CMOS technologies. Currently ATLAS R&D programme is qualifying a few commercial technologies in terms of suitability for this task. In this paper a prototype designed in one of them (LFoundry 150 nm process) will be discussed. The chip architecture will be described, including different pixel types incorporated into the design, followed by simulation and measurement results.

  18. Characterisation of a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for use in the TEAM Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Battaglia, Marco; Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Doering, Dionisio; Duden, Thomas; Krieger, Brad; Giubilato, Piero; Gnani, Dario; Radmilovic, Velimir

    2010-01-01

    A 1M- and a 4M-pixel monolithic CMOS active pixel sensor with 9.5x9.5 micron^2 pixels have been developed for direct imaging in transmission electron microscopy as part of the TEAM project. We present the design and a full characterisation of the detector. Data collected with electron beams at various energies of interest in electron microscopy are used to determine the detector response. Data are compared to predictions of simulation. The line spread function measured with 80 keV and 300 keV...

  19. Prototype Active Silicon Sensor in 150 nm HR-CMOS Technology for ATLAS Inner Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Rymaszewski, Piotr; Breugnon, Patrick; Godiot, Stépahnie; Gonella, Laura; Hemperek, Tomasz; Hirono, Toko; Hügging, Fabian; Krüger, Hans; Liu, Jian; Pangaud, Patrick; Peric, Ivan; Rozanov, Alexandre; Wang, Anqing; Wermes, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The LHC Phase-II upgrade will lead to a significant increase in luminosity, which in turn will bring new challenges for the operation of inner tracking detectors. A possible solution is to use active silicon sensors, taking advantage of commercial CMOS technologies. Currently ATLAS R&D programme is qualifying a few commercial technologies in terms of suitability for this task. In this paper a prototype designed in one of them (LFoundry 150 nm process) will be discussed. The chip architecture will be described, including different pixel types incorporated into the design, followed by simulation and measurement results.

  20. Design of CMOS Tunable Image-Rejection Low-Noise Amplifier with Active Inductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ler Chun Lee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A fully integrated CMOS tunable image-rejection low-noise amplifier (IRLNA has been designed using Silterra's industry standard 0.18 μm RF CMOS process. The notch filter is designed using an active inductor. Measurement results show that the notch filter designed using active inductor contributes additional 1.19 dB to the noise figure of the low-noise amplifier (LNA. A better result is possible if the active inductor is optimized. Since active inductors require less die area, the die area occupied by the IRLNA is not significantly different from a conventional LNA, which was designed for comparison. The proposed IRLNA exhibits S21 of 11.8 dB, S11 of −17.8 dB, S22 of −10.7 dB, and input 1 dB compression point of −12 dBm at 3 GHz

  1. Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS) implemented in LF-150 nm CMOS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishishita, T.; Hemperek, T.; Krüger, H.; Wermes, N.

    2015-03-01

    We present the recent development of Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS), implemented with an LFoundry (LF) 150 nm CMOS process. MAPS detectors based on an epi-layer have been matured in recent years and have attractive features in terms of reducing material budget and handling cost compared to conventional hybrid pixel detectors. However, the obtained signal is relatively small (~1000 e-) due to the thin epi-layer, and charge collection time is relatively slow, e.g., in the order of 100 ns, because charges are mainly collected by diffusion. Modern commercial CMOS technology, however, offers advanced process options to overcome such difficulties and enable truly monolithic devices as an alternative to hybrid pixel sensors and charge coupled devices. Unlike in the case of the standard MAPS technologies with epi-layers, the LF process provides a high-resistivity substrate that enables large signal and fast charge collection by drift in a ~50 μm thick depleted layer. Since this process also enables the use of deep n- and p-wells to isolate the collection electrode from the thin active device layer, PMOS and NMOS transistors are available for the readout electronics in each pixel cell. In order to evaluate the sensor and transistor characteristics, several collection electrodes variants and readout architectures have been implemented. In this report, we focus on its design aspect of the LF-DMAPS prototype chip.

  2. Photon small-field measurements with a CMOS active pixel sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Spang, F.; Rosenberg, I.; Hedin, E.; Royle, G.

    2015-06-01

    In this work the dosimetric performance of CMOS active pixel sensors for the measurement of small photon beams is presented. The detector used consisted of an array of 520  × 520 pixels on a 25 µm pitch. Dosimetric parameters measured with this sensor were compared with data collected with an ionization chamber, a film detector and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. The sensor performance for beam profiles measurements was evaluated for field sizes of 0.5  × 0.5 cm2. The high spatial resolution achieved with this sensor allowed the accurate measurement of profiles, beam penumbrae and field size under lateral electronic disequilibrium. Field size and penumbrae agreed within 5.4% and 2.2% respectively with film measurements. Agreements with ionization chambers better than 1.0% were obtained when measuring tissue-phantom ratios. Output factor measurements were in good agreement with ionization chamber and Monte Carlo simulation. The data obtained from this imaging sensor can be easily analyzed to extract dosimetric information. The results presented in this work are promising for the development and implementation of CMOS active pixel sensors for dosimetry applications.

  3. Photon small-field measurements with a CMOS active pixel sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the dosimetric performance of CMOS active pixel sensors for the measurement of small photon beams is presented. The detector used consisted of an array of 520  × 520 pixels on a 25 µm pitch. Dosimetric parameters measured with this sensor were compared with data collected with an ionization chamber, a film detector and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. The sensor performance for beam profiles measurements was evaluated for field sizes of 0.5  × 0.5 cm2. The high spatial resolution achieved with this sensor allowed the accurate measurement of profiles, beam penumbrae and field size under lateral electronic disequilibrium. Field size and penumbrae agreed within 5.4% and 2.2% respectively with film measurements. Agreements with ionization chambers better than 1.0% were obtained when measuring tissue-phantom ratios. Output factor measurements were in good agreement with ionization chamber and Monte Carlo simulation. The data obtained from this imaging sensor can be easily analyzed to extract dosimetric information. The results presented in this work are promising for the development and implementation of CMOS active pixel sensors for dosimetry applications. (paper)

  4. Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS) implemented in LF-150 nm CMOS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the recent development of Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS), implemented with an LFoundry (LF) 150 nm CMOS process. MAPS detectors based on an epi-layer have been matured in recent years and have attractive features in terms of reducing material budget and handling cost compared to conventional hybrid pixel detectors. However, the obtained signal is relatively small (∼1000 e−) due to the thin epi-layer, and charge collection time is relatively slow, e.g., in the order of 100 ns, because charges are mainly collected by diffusion. Modern commercial CMOS technology, however, offers advanced process options to overcome such difficulties and enable truly monolithic devices as an alternative to hybrid pixel sensors and charge coupled devices. Unlike in the case of the standard MAPS technologies with epi-layers, the LF process provides a high-resistivity substrate that enables large signal and fast charge collection by drift in a ∼50 μm thick depleted layer. Since this process also enables the use of deep n- and p-wells to isolate the collection electrode from the thin active device layer, PMOS and NMOS transistors are available for the readout electronics in each pixel cell. In order to evaluate the sensor and transistor characteristics, several collection electrodes variants and readout architectures have been implemented. In this report, we focus on its design aspect of the LF-DMAPS prototype chip

  5. Full colour RGB OLEDs on CMOS for active-matrix OLED microdisplays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreye, D.; Toerker, M.; Vogel, U.; Amelung, J.

    2006-08-01

    Microdisplays are used in various optical devices such as headsets, viewfinders and helmet-mounted displays. The use of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) in a microdisplay on silicone substrate provides the opportunity of lower power consumption and higher optical performance compared to other near-to-eye display technologies. Highly efficient, low-voltage, top emitting OLEDs are well suitable for the integration into a CMOSprocess. By reducing the operating voltage for the OLEDs below 5V, the costs for the CMOS process can be reduced significantly, because a standard process without high-voltage option can be used. Various OLED stacks on silicone substrate are presented, suitable for full colour (RGB) applications. Red and green emitting phosphorescent OLEDs and blue emitting fluorescent OLEDs all with doped charge transport layers were prepared on a two metal layer CMOS test substrate without active transistor area. Afterwards, the different test displays were measured and compared with respect to their performance (current, luminance, voltage, luminance dependence on viewing angle, optical outcoupling etc.)

  6. On drift fields in CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors with point-like collection diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Deveaux, M; Dorokhov, A; Doering, D; Heymes, J; Kachel, M; Koziel, M; Linnik, B; Müntz, C; Stroth, J

    2016-01-01

    CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for charged particle tracking are considered as technology for numerous experiments in heavy ion and particle physics. To match the requirements for those applications in terms of tolerance to non-ionizing radiation, it is being tried to deplete the sensitive volume of the, traditionally non-depleted, silicon sensors. We study the feasibility of this approach for the common case that the collection diodes of the pixel are small as compared to the pixel pitch. An analytic equation predicting the thickness of the depletion depth and the capacity of this point-like junction is introduced. We find that the predictions of this equations differs qualitatively from the usual results for flat PN junctions and that $dC/dU$-measurements are not suited to measure the depletion depth of diodes with point-like geometry. The predictions of the equation is compared with measurements on the depletion depth of CMOS sensors, which were carried out with a novel measurement protocol. It is fo...

  7. Characterisation of regional variations in a stitched CMOS active pixel sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stitched, large area, complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS), active pixel sensors (APS) show promises for X-ray imaging applications. In this paper we present an investigation of the effects of stitching on uniformity of sensor response for an experimental APS. The sensor, known as LAS (large area sensor), was made by reticular stitching onto a single silicon wafer of a 5x5 array of regions consisting of 270x270 pixels with 40 μm pixel pitch, to yield 1350x1350 pixels and an imaging area of 54x54 mm. Data acquired from two different sensors of the same type were filtered to remove spiking pixels and electromagnetic interference (EMI). The non-linear compensation (NLC) technique for CMOS sensor analysis was used to determine the variation in gain, read noise, full well capacity and dynamic range between stitched regions. Variations across stitched regions were analysed using profiles, analysis of pixel variations at stitch boundaries and using a measurement of non-uniformity within a stitched region. The results showed that non-uniformity variations were present, which increased with signal (1.5-3.5% at dark signal, rising to 3-8%). However, these were found to be smaller than variations caused by differences in readout electronics, particularly at low signal levels. The results suggest these variations should be correctable using standard calibration methods.

  8. Towards monolithically integrated CMOS cameras for active imaging with 600 GHz radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boppel, Sebastian; Lisauskas, Alvydas; Krozer, Viktor; Roskos, Hartmut G.

    2012-02-01

    We explore terahertz imaging with CMOS field-effect transistors exploiting their plasmonic detection capability and the advantages of CMOS technology for the fabrication of THz cameras with respect to process stability, array uniformity, ease of integration of additional functionality, scalability and cost-effectiveness. A 100×100-pixel camera with an active area of 20×20 mm² is physically simulated by scanning single detectors and groups of a few detectors in the image plane. Using detectors with a noise-equivalent power of 43 pW/√Hz, a distributed illumination of 432 μW at 591.4 GHz, and an integration time of 20 ms (for a possible frame rate of 17 fps), this virtual camera allows to obtain images with a dynamic range of at least 20 dB and a resolution approaching the diffraction limit. Imaging examples acquired in direct and heterodyne detection mode, and in transmission and reflection geometry, show the potential for real-time operation. It is demonstrated that heterodyning (i) improves the dynamic range substantially even if the radiation from the local oscillator is distributed over the camera area, and (ii) allows sensitive determination of object-induced phase changes, which promises the realization of coherent imaging systems.

  9. A CMOS Energy Harvesting and Imaging (EHI) Active Pixel Sensor (APS) Imager for Retinal Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, S U

    2011-12-01

    A CMOS image sensor capable of imaging and energy harvesting on same focal plane is presented for retinal prosthesis. The energy harvesting and imaging (EHI) active pixel sensor (APS) imager was designed, fabricated, and tested in a standard 0.5 μm CMOS process. It has 54 × 50 array of 21 × 21 μm(2) EHI pixels, 10-bit supply boosted (SB) SAR ADC, and charge pump circuits consuming only 14.25 μW from 1.2 V and running at 7.4 frames per second. The supply boosting technique (SBT) is used in an analog signal chain of the EHI imager. Harvested solar energy on focal plane is stored on an off-chip capacitor with the help of a charge pump circuit with better than 70% efficiency. Energy harvesting efficiency of the EHI pixel was measured at different light levels. It was 9.4% while producing 0.41 V open circuit voltage. The EHI imager delivers 3.35 μW of power was delivered to a resistive load at maximum power point operation. The measured pixel array figure of merit (FoM) was 1.32 pW/frame/pixel while imager figure of merit (iFoM) including whole chip power consumption was 696 fJ/pixel/code for the EHI imager. PMID:23852551

  10. Development and application of the active surveillance of pathogens microarray to monitor bacterial gene flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinds Jason

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human and animal health is constantly under threat by emerging pathogens that have recently acquired genetic determinants that enhance their survival, transmissibility and virulence. We describe the construction and development of an Active Surveillance of Pathogens (ASP oligonucleotide microarray, designed to 'actively survey' the genome of a given bacterial pathogen for virulence-associated genes. Results The microarray consists of 4958 reporters from 151 bacterial species and include genes for the identification of individual bacterial species as well as mobile genetic elements (transposons, plasmid and phage, virulence genes and antibiotic resistance genes. The ASP microarray was validated with nineteen bacterial pathogens species, including Francisella tularensis, Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The ASP microarray identified these bacteria, and provided information on potential antibiotic resistance (eg sufamethoxazole resistance and sulfonamide resistance and virulence determinants including genes likely to be acquired by horizontal gene transfer (e.g. an alpha-haemolysin. Conclusion The ASP microarray has potential in the clinic as a diagnostic tool, as a research tool for both known and emerging pathogens, and as an early warning system for pathogenic bacteria that have been recently modified either naturally or deliberately.

  11. A Real-time Auto-detection Method for Random Telegraph Signal (RTS) Noise Detection in CMOS Active pixel sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CMOS Active pixel sensors (CMOS APS) are attractive for use in the innermost layers of charged particle trackers, due to their good tradeoffs among the key performances. However, CMOS APS can be greatly influenced by random telegraph signal (RTS) noise, which can cause particle tracking or energy calculation failures. In-depth research of pixels' RTS behavior stimulates the interest of the methods for RTS noise detection, reconstruction and parameters extraction. In this paper, a real-time auto-detection method is proposed, using real-time Gaussian noise standard deviation as the detection threshold. Experimental results show that, compared with current methods using signal standard deviation as the thresholds, the proposed method is more sensitive in multi-level RTS detection and more effective in the case of RTS noise degradation

  12. A SiGe BiCMOS double-balanced mixer with active balun for X-band Doppler radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Rasmus S.; Johansen, Tom K.; Tamborg, Kjeld M.;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present an X-band doublebalanced mixer in SiGe BiCMOS technology. The mixer core consists of a LO Matched quad diode ring using diode-connected Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors (HBTs). The mixer is integrated with a low-noise, high-linearity active balun on the RF port...

  13. A Wide Tuning-Range CMOS VCO with a Tunable Active Inductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-Ling Kao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a wide tuning-range VCO using tunable active inductor (TAI topology and cross-coupled pair configuration for radio frequency operation. The TAI used two feedback loops to form a cascode circuit to obtain more degrees of freedom for inductance value. The TAI-VCO was fabricated using a 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The coarse frequency tuning is achieved by TAIs while the fine tuning is controlled by varactors. The fabricated circuit provides an output frequency range from 0.6 to 7.2 GHz (169%. The measured phase noise is from −110.38 to −86.01 dBc/Hz at a 1 MHz offset and output power is from −11.11 to −3.89 dBm within the entire frequency range under a 1.8 V power supply.

  14. A 512x512 CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor with integrated ADCs for space science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last few years, CMOS sensors have become widely used for consumer applications, but little has been done for scientific instruments. In this paper we present the design and experimental characterisation of a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) intended for a space science application. The sensor incorporates a 525x525 array of pixels on a 25 μm pitch. Each pixel contains a detector together with three transistors that are used for pixel reset, pixel selection and charge-to-voltage conversion. The detector consists of four n-well/p-substrate diodes combining optimum charge collection and low noise performance. The array readout is column-parallel with adjustable gain column amplifiers and a 10-bit single slope ADC. Data conversion takes place simultaneously for all the 525 pixels in one row. The ADC slope can be adjusted in order to give the best dynamic range for a given brightness of a scene. The digitised data are output on a 10-bit bus at 3 MHz. An on-chip state machine generates all of the control signals needed for the readout. All of the bias currents and voltages are generated on chip by a DAC that is programmable through an I2C compatible interface. The sensor was designed and fabricated on a standard 0.5 μm CMOS technology. The overall die size is 16.7 mmx19.9 mm including the associated readout electronics and bond pads. Preliminary test results show that the full-scale design works well, meeting the Star Tracker requirements with less than 1-bit noise, good linearity and good optical performance

  15. A 512×512 CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor with integrated ADCs for space science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prydderch, M. L.; Waltham, N. J.; Turchetta, R.; French, M. J.; Holt, R.; Marshall, A.; Burt, D.; Bell, R.; Pool, P.; Eyles, C.; Mapson-Menard, H.

    2003-10-01

    In the last few years, CMOS sensors have become widely used for consumer applications, but little has been done for scientific instruments. In this paper we present the design and experimental characterisation of a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) intended for a space science application. The sensor incorporates a 525×525 array of pixels on a 25 μm pitch. Each pixel contains a detector together with three transistors that are used for pixel reset, pixel selection and charge-to-voltage conversion. The detector consists of four n-well/p-substrate diodes combining optimum charge collection and low noise performance. The array readout is column-parallel with adjustable gain column amplifiers and a 10-bit single slope ADC. Data conversion takes place simultaneously for all the 525 pixels in one row. The ADC slope can be adjusted in order to give the best dynamic range for a given brightness of a scene. The digitised data are output on a 10-bit bus at 3 MHz. An on-chip state machine generates all of the control signals needed for the readout. All of the bias currents and voltages are generated on chip by a DAC that is programmable through an I 2C compatible interface. The sensor was designed and fabricated on a standard 0.5 μm CMOS technology. The overall die size is 16.7 mm×19.9 mm including the associated readout electronics and bond pads. Preliminary test results show that the full-scale design works well, meeting the Star Tracker requirements with less than 1-bit noise, good linearity and good optical performance.

  16. Active pixel sensors in AMS H18/H35 HV-CMOS technology for the ATLAS HL-LHC upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Branislav

    2016-09-01

    Deep sub micron HV-CMOS processes offer the opportunity for sensors built by industry standard techniques while being HV tolerant, making them good candidates for drift-based, fast collecting, thus radiation-hard pixel detectors. For the upgrade of the ATLAS Pixel Detector towards the HL-LHC requirements, active pixel sensors in HV-CMOS technology were investigated. These implement signal processing electronics in deep n-wells, which also act as collecting electrodes. The deep n-wells allow for bias voltages up to 150 V leading to a depletion depth of several 10 μm. Prototype sensors in the AMS H18 180 nm and H35 350 nm HV-CMOS processes were thoroughly tested in lab measurements as well as in testbeam experiments. Irradiations with X-rays and protons revealed a tolerance to ionizing doses of 1 Grad while Edge-TCT studies assessed the effects of radiation on the charge collection. The sensors showed high detection efficiencies after neutron irradiation to 1015neq cm-2 in testbeam experiments. A full reticle size demonstrator chip, implemented in the H35 process is being submitted to prove the large scale feasibility of the HV-CMOS concept.

  17. Physical characterization and performance comparison of active- and passive-pixel CMOS detectors for mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbakri, I A; McIntosh, B J; Rickey, D W

    2009-03-21

    We investigated the physical characteristics of two complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) mammography detectors. The detectors featured 14-bit image acquisition, 50 microm detector element (del) size and an active area of 5 cm x 5 cm. One detector was a passive-pixel sensor (PPS) with signal amplification performed by an array of amplifiers connected to dels via data lines. The other detector was an active-pixel sensor (APS) with signal amplification performed at each del. Passive-pixel designs have higher read noise due to data line capacitance, and the APS represents an attempt to improve the noise performance of this technology. We evaluated the detectors' resolution by measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) using a tilted edge. We measured the noise power spectra (NPS) and detective quantum efficiencies (DQE) using mammographic beam conditions specified by the IEC 62220-1-2 standard. Our measurements showed the APS to have much higher gain, slightly higher MTF, and higher NPS. The MTF of both sensors approached 10% near the Nyquist limit. DQE values near dc frequency were in the range of 55-67%, with the APS sensor DQE lower than the PPS DQE for all frequencies. Our results show that lower read noise specifications in this case do not translate into gains in the imaging performance of the sensor. We postulate that the lower fill factor of the APS is a possible cause for this result. PMID:19242050

  18. Characterization of Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel detectors implemented with a high-resistive CMOS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishishita, T.; Hemperek, T.; Rymaszewski, P.; Hirono, T.; Krüger, H.; Wermes, N.

    2016-07-01

    We present the recent development of DMAPS (Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor), implemented with a Toshiba 130 nm CMOS process. Unlike in the case of standard MAPS technologies which are based on an epi-layer, this process provides a high-resistive substrate that enables larger signal and faster charge collection by drift in a 50 - 300 μm thick depleted layer. Since this process also enables the use of deep n-wells to isolate the collection electrodes from the thin active device layer, NMOS and PMOS transistors are available for the readout electronics in each pixel cell. In order to characterize the technology, we implemented a simple three transistor readout with a variety of pixel pitches and input FET sizes. This layout variety gives us a clue on sensor characteristics for future optimization, such as the input detector capacitance or leakage current. In the initial measurement, the radiation spectra were obtained from 55Fe with an energy resolution of 770 eV (FWHM) and 90Sr with the MVP of 4165 e-.

  19. Nano CMOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malay Ranjan Tripathy

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS has become major challenge to scaling and integration. However, innovation in transistor structures and integration of novel materials are needed to sustain this performance trend. CMOS variability in the scaling technology becoming very important concern because of limitation of process control over statistical variability related to the fundamental discreteness of charge and matter. Different aspects responsible for device variability are discussed in this article. The challenges and opportunities of nano CMOS technology are outlined here.

  20. Next-Generation Active-Pixel Sensor Devices With CMOS-avalanche photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern high-energy physics experiments that explore the fundamental properties of matter rely on large, sophisticated instruments for tracking particle decay events with large detector arrays. The performance of these instruments is limited by the available detector technology. Future progress depends on breakthroughs in the sensitivity, speed and signal-to-noise performance of the detectors. Phase I research successfully developed and tested many different pixel designs. Several different pixel and circuit applications were designed based on previously manufactured chips, but with the vertex detector application in mind. We have characterized the noise performance and sensitivity of CMOS APD pixels using several different types of radiation and selected the best designs. Phase II will were are concerned with transforming our test structures into fully functional detector elements with the appropriate processing and readout electronics integrated with large arrays of pixels. We investigated methods to increase the active area and reduce the noise while implementing an event-driven readout scheme to drastically increase the readout speed and simplify the data stream

  1. Radiation-hard active CMOS pixel sensors for HL-LHC detector upgrades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, Malte

    2015-02-01

    The luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be increased during the Long Shutdown of 2022 and 2023 (LS3) in order to increase the sensitivity of its experiments. A completely new inner detector for the ATLAS experiment needs to be developed to withstand the extremely harsh environment of the upgraded, so-called High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). High radiation hardness as well as granularity is mandatory to cope with the requirements in terms of radiation damage as well as particle occupancy. A new silicon detector concept that uses commercial high voltage and/or high resistivity full complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processes as active sensor for pixel and/or strip layers has risen high attention, because it potentially provides high radiation hardness and granularity and at the same time reduced price due to the commercial processing and possibly relaxed requirements for the hybridization technique. Results on the first prototypes characterized in a variety of laboratory as well as test beam environments are presented.

  2. Characterisation of a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for use in the TEAM Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, Marco; Denes, Peter; Doering, Dionisio; Duden, Thomas; Krieger, Brad; Giubilato, Piero; Gnani, Dario; Radmilovic, Velimir

    2010-01-01

    A 1M- and a 4M-pixel monolithic CMOS active pixel sensor with 9.5x9.5 micron^2 pixels have been developed for direct imaging in transmission electron microscopy as part of the TEAM project. We present the design and a full characterisation of the detector. Data collected with electron beams at various energies of interest in electron microscopy are used to determine the detector response. Data are compared to predictions of simulation. The line spread function measured with 80 keV and 300 keV electrons is (12.1+/-0.7) micron and (7.4+/-0.6) micron, respectively, in good agreement with our simulation. We measure the detection quantum efficiency to be 0.78+/-0.04 at 80 keV and 0.74+/-0.03 at 300 keV. Using a new imaging technique, based on single electron reconstruction, the line spread function for 80 keV and 300 keV electrons becomes (6.7+/-0.3) micron and (2.4+/-0.2) micron, respectively. The radiation tolerance of the pixels has been tested up to 5 Mrad and the detector is still functional with a decrease o...

  3. Characterisation of a CMOS active pixel sensor for use in the TEAM microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Marco; Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Doering, Dionisio; Duden, Thomas; Krieger, Brad; Giubilato, Piero; Gnani, Dario; Radmilovic, Velimir

    2010-10-01

    A 1M- and a 4M-pixel monolithic CMOS active pixel sensor with 9.5×9.5 μm2 pixels have been developed for direct imaging in transmission electron microscopy as part of the TEAM project. We present the design and a full characterisation of the detector. Data collected with electron beams at various energies of interest in electron microscopy are used to determine the detector response. Data are compared to predictions of simulation. The line spread function measured with 80 and 300 keV electrons is (12.1±0.7) and (7.4±0.6) μm, respectively, in good agreement with our simulation. We measure the detection quantum efficiency to be 0.78±0.04 at 80 keV and 0.74±0.03 at 300 keV. Using a new imaging technique, based on single electron reconstruction, the line spread function for 80 and 300 keV electrons becomes (6.7±0.3) and (2.4±0.2) μm, respectively. The radiation tolerance of the pixels has been tested up to 5 Mrad and the detector is still functional with a decrease of dynamic range by ≃30%, corresponding to a reduction in full-well depth from ˜39 to ˜27 primary 300 keV electrons, due to leakage current increase, but identical line spread function performance.

  4. Characterisation of a CMOS active pixel sensor for use in the TEAM microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, Marco, E-mail: MBattaglia@lbl.go [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Doering, Dionisio; Duden, Thomas; Krieger, Brad [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Giubilato, Piero [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi, Padova I-35131 (Italy); Gnani, Dario; Radmilovic, Velimir [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-10-21

    A 1M- and a 4M-pixel monolithic CMOS active pixel sensor with 9.5x9.5{mu}m{sup 2} pixels have been developed for direct imaging in transmission electron microscopy as part of the TEAM project. We present the design and a full characterisation of the detector. Data collected with electron beams at various energies of interest in electron microscopy are used to determine the detector response. Data are compared to predictions of simulation. The line spread function measured with 80 and 300 keV electrons is (12.1{+-}0.7) and (7.4{+-}0.6){mu}m, respectively, in good agreement with our simulation. We measure the detection quantum efficiency to be 0.78{+-}0.04 at 80 keV and 0.74{+-}0.03 at 300 keV. Using a new imaging technique, based on single electron reconstruction, the line spread function for 80 and 300 keV electrons becomes (6.7{+-}0.3) and (2.4{+-}0.2){mu}m, respectively. The radiation tolerance of the pixels has been tested up to 5 Mrad and the detector is still functional with a decrease of dynamic range by {approx_equal}30%, corresponding to a reduction in full-well depth from {approx}39 to {approx}27 primary 300 keV electrons, due to leakage current increase, but identical line spread function performance.

  5. Effect and suppression of parasitic surface damage in neutron irradiated CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Deveaux, M; Scharrer, P; Stroth, J

    2016-01-01

    CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) were chosen as sensor technology for the vertex detectors of STAR, CBM and the upgraded ALICE-ITS. They also constitute a valuable option for tracking devices at future e+e- colliders. Those applications require a substantial tolerance to both, ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. To allow for a focused optimization of the radiation tolerance, prototypes are tested by irradiating the devices either with purely ionizing radiation (e.g. soft X-rays) or the most pure sources of non-ionizing radiation available (e.g. reactor neutrons). In the second case, it is typically assumed that the impact of the parasitic $\\gamma$-rays found in the neutron beams is negligible. We checked this assumption by irradiating MAPS with $\\gamma$-rays and comparing the radiation damage generated with the one in neutron irradiated sensors. We conclude that the parasitic radiation doses may cause non-negligible radiation damage. Based on the results we propose a procedure to recognize and to ...

  6. Integrated Circuit of CMOS DC-DC Buck Converter with Differential Active Inductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoutar Elbakkar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new design of DC-DC buck converter (BC, which the spiral inductor is replaced by a differential gyrator with capacitor load (gyrator-C implemented in 0.18um CMOS process. The gyrator-C transforms the capacitor load (which is the parasitic capacitor of MOSFETS to differential active inductor DAI. The low-Q value of DAI at switching frequency of converter (few hundred kHz is boosted by adding a negative impedance converter (NIC. The transistor parameters of DAI and NIC can be properly chosen to achieve the desirable value of equivalent inductance L (few tens H, and the maximum-Q value at the switching frequency, and thus the efficiency of converter is improved. Experimental results show that the converter supplied with an input voltage of 1V, provides an output voltage of 0.74V and output ripple voltage of 10mV at 155 kHz and Q-value is maximum (#8776;4226 at this frequency.

  7. Biomarker genes used to predict AhR activity; accession numbers of microarray datasets used in the study

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Biomarker genes used to predict AhR activity; accession numbers of microarray datasets used in the study This dataset is associated with the following publication:...

  8. Measurements on HV-CMOS active sensors after irradiation to HL-LHC fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, B.

    2015-04-01

    During the long shutdown (LS) 3 beginning 2022 the LHC will be upgraded for higher luminosities pushing the limits especially for the inner tracking detectors of the LHC experiments. In order to cope with the increased particle rate and radiation levels the ATLAS Inner Detector will be completely replaced by a purely silicon based one. Novel sensors based on HV-CMOS processes prove to be good candidates in terms of spatial resolution and radiation hardness. In this paper measurements conducted on prototypes built in the AMS H18 HV-CMOS process and irradiated to fluences of up to 2·1016 neq cm-2 are presented.

  9. Active Pixel Sensors in ams H18/H35 HV-CMOS Technology for the ATLAS HL-LHC Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Ristic, Branislav

    2016-01-01

    Deep sub micron HV-CMOS processes offer the opportunity for sensors built by industry standard techniques while being HV tolerant, making them good candidates for drift-based, fast collecting, thus radiation-hard pixel detectors. For the upgrade of the ATLAS Pixel Detector towards the HL-LHC requirements, active pixel sensors in HV-CMOS technology were investigated. These implement amplifier and discriminator stages directly in insulating deep n-wells, which also act as collecting electrodes. The deep n-wells allow for bias voltages up to 150V leading to a depletion depth of several 10um. Prototype sensors in the ams H18 180nm and H35 350nm HV-CMOS processes have been manufactured, acting as a potential drop-in replacement for the current ATLAS Pixel sensors, thus leaving higher level processing such as trigger handling to dedicated read-out chips. Sensors were thoroughly tested in lab measurements as well as in testbeam experiments. Irradiation with X-rays and protons revealed a tolerance to ionizing doses o...

  10. Large area CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis: Analysis, modeling, and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy, E-mail: kanicki@eecs.umich.edu [Solid-State Electronics Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Konstantinidis, Anastasios C. [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and Diagnostic Radiology and Radiation Protection, Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Patel, Tushita [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Large area x-ray imagers based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology have been proposed for various medical imaging applications including digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). The low electronic noise (50–300 e{sup −}) of CMOS APS x-ray imagers provides a possible route to shrink the pixel pitch to smaller than 75 μm for microcalcification detection and possible reduction of the DBT mean glandular dose (MGD). Methods: In this study, imaging performance of a large area (29 × 23 cm{sup 2}) CMOS APS x-ray imager [Dexela 2923 MAM (PerkinElmer, London)] with a pixel pitch of 75 μm was characterized and modeled. The authors developed a cascaded system model for CMOS APS x-ray imagers using both a broadband x-ray radiation and monochromatic synchrotron radiation. The experimental data including modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were theoretically described using the proposed cascaded system model with satisfactory consistency to experimental results. Both high full well and low full well (LFW) modes of the Dexela 2923 MAM CMOS APS x-ray imager were characterized and modeled. The cascaded system analysis results were further used to extract the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for microcalcifications with sizes of 165–400 μm at various MGDs. The impact of electronic noise on CNR was also evaluated. Results: The LFW mode shows better DQE at low air kerma (K{sub a} < 10 μGy) and should be used for DBT. At current DBT applications, air kerma (K{sub a} ∼ 10 μGy, broadband radiation of 28 kVp), DQE of more than 0.7 and ∼0.3 was achieved using the LFW mode at spatial frequency of 0.5 line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm) and Nyquist frequency ∼6.7 lp/mm, respectively. It is shown that microcalcifications of 165–400 μm in size can be resolved using a MGD range of 0.3–1 mGy, respectively. In comparison to a General Electric GEN2 prototype DBT system (at

  11. A high frequency active voltage doubler in standard CMOS using offset-controlled comparators for inductive power transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung-Min; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a fully integrated active voltage doubler in CMOS technology using offset-controlled high speed comparators for extending the range of inductive power transmission to implantable microelectronic devices (IMD) and radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. This active voltage doubler provides considerably higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) and lower dropout voltage compared to its passive counterpart and requires lower input voltage than active rectifiers, leading to reliable and efficient operation with weakly coupled inductive links. The offset-controlled functions in the comparators compensate for turn-on and turn-off delays to not only maximize the forward charging current to the load but also minimize the back current, optimizing PCE in the high frequency (HF) band. We fabricated the active voltage doubler in a 0.5-μm 3M2P std . CMOS process, occupying 0.144 mm(2) of chip area. With 1.46 V peak AC input at 13.56 MHz, the active voltage doubler provides 2.4 V DC output across a 1 kΩ load, achieving the highest PCE = 79% ever reported at this frequency. In addition, the built-in start-up circuit ensures a reliable operation at lower voltages. PMID:23853321

  12. A 90 nm CMOS, 6 μW Power-Proportional Acoustic Sensing Frontend for Voice Activity Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Badami, Komail; Lauwereins, Steven; Meert, Wannes; Verhelst, Marian

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a sub-6 µW acoustic front-end for speech/non-speech classification in a voice activity detection (VAD) in 90 nm CMOS. Power consumption of the VAD system is minimized by architectural design around a new Power-Proportional sensing paradigm and the use of machine-learning assisted moderate-precision analog analytics for classification. Power-Proportional sensing allows for hierarchical and context-aware scaling of the frontend’s power consumption depending on the complexity ...

  13. Measurements on HV-CMOS Active Sensors After Irradiation to HL-LHC fluences

    CERN Document Server

    Ristic, B

    2015-01-01

    During the long shutdown (LS) 3 beginning 2022 the LHC will be upgraded for higher luminosities pushing the limits especially for the inner tracking detectors of the LHC experiments. In order to cope with the increased particle rate and radiation levels the ATLAS Inner Detector will be completely replaced by a purely silicon based one. Novel sensors based on HV-CMOS processes prove to be good candidates in terms of spatial resolution and radiation hardness. In this paper measurements conducted on prototypes built in the AMS H18 HV-CMOS process and irradiated to fluences of up to $2\\cdot10^{16}\\,\\text{n}_\\text{eq}\\text{cm}^{-2}$ are presented.

  14. Performance of a Fast Binary Readout CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Chip Designed for Charged Particle Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Degerli, Y.; Besancon, M.; Besson, A.; Claus, G; Deptuch, G; Dulinski, W.; Fourches, N.; Goffe, M.; Himmi, A.; Li, Y.; Li, Y.; Lutz, P.; Orsini, F.; Szelezniak, M.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the performance of the MIMOSA8 (HiMAPS1) chip. The chip is a 128$, times ,$32 pixels array where 24 columns have discriminated binary outputs and eight columns analog test outputs. Offset correction techniques are used extensively in this chip to overcome process related mismatches. The array is divided in four blocks of pixels with different conversion factors and is controlled by a serially programmable sequencer. MIMOSA8 is a representative of the CMOS sensors development opti...

  15. Development of a Standardised Readout System for Active Pixel Sensors in HV/HR-CMOS Technologies for ATLAS Inner Detector Upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LHC Phase-II Upgrade results in new challenges for tracking detectors for example in terms of cost effectiveness, resolution and radiation hardness. Active Pixel Sensors in HV/HR-CMOS technologies show promising results coping with these challenges. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of hybrid modules with active CMOS sensors and readout chips for the future ATLAS Inner Tracker, ATLAS R and D activities have started. After introducing the basic concepts and the demonstrator program, the development of an ATLAS compatible readout system will be presented as well as tuning procedures and measurements with demonstrator modules to test the readout system

  16. Development of CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for the ALICE-ITS Outer Barrel and for the CBM-MVD

    CERN Document Server

    Deveaux, Michael

    2015-01-01

    After more than a decade of R&D;, CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS or CPS) have proven to offer concrete answers to the demanding requirements of subatomic physics experi- ments. Their main advantages result from their low material budget, their very high granularity and their integrated signal processing circuitry, which allows coping with high particle rates. Moreover, they offer a valuable radiation tolerance and may be produced at low cost. Sensors of the MIMOSA series have offered an opportunity for nuclear and particle physics exper- iments to address with improved sensitivity physics studies requiring an accurate reconstruction of short living and soft particles. One of their major applications is the STAR-PXL detector, which is the first vertex detector based on MAPS. While this experiment is successfully taking data since two years, it was found that the 0.35 m CMOS technology used for this purpose is not suited for upcoming applications like the CBM micro-vertex detector (MVD) and the ...

  17. Integrated X-ray and charged particle active pixel CMOS sensor arrays using an epitaxial silicon sensitive region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinfelder, Stuart; Bichsel, Hans; Bieser, Fred; Matis, Howard S.; Rai, Gulshan; Retiere, Fabrice; Weiman, Howard; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2002-07-01

    Integrated CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (APS) arrays have been fabricated and tested using X-ray and electron sources. The 128 by 128 pixel arrays, designed in a standard 0.25 micron process, use a {approx}10 micron epitaxial silicon layer as a deep detection region. The epitaxial layer has a much greater thickness than the surface features used by standard CMOS APS, leading to stronger signals and potentially better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). On the other hand, minority carriers confined within the epitaxial region may diffuse to neighboring pixels, blur images and reduce peak signal intensity. But for low-rate, sparse-event images, centroid analysis of this diffusion may be used to increase position resolution. Careful trade-offs involving pixel size and sense-node area verses capacitance must be made to optimize overall performance. The prototype sensor arrays, therefore, include a range of different pixel designs, including different APS circuits and a range of different epitaxial layer contact structures. The fabricated arrays were tested with 1.5 GeV electrons and Fe-55 X-ray sources, yielding a measured noise of 13 electrons RMS and an SNR for single Fe-55 X-rays of greater than 38.

  18. Investigation of Toshiba 130nm CMOS process as a possible candidate for active silicon sensors in HEP and X-ray experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yunan; Hemperek, Tomasz; Kishishita, Testsuichi; Krueger, Hans; Rymaszewski, Piotr; Wermes, Norbert [University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Peric, Ivan [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Following the advances of commercial semiconductor manufacturing technologies there has recently been an increased interest within experimental physics community in applying CMOS manufacturing processes to developing active silicon sensors. Possibility of applying high voltage bias combined with high resistivity substrate allows for better depletion of sensor and therefore quicker and more efficient charge collection. One of processes that accommodates those features is Toshiba 130 nm CMOS technology (CMOS3E). Within our group a test chip was designed to examine the suitability of this technology for physics experiment (both for HEP and X-ray imaging). Design consisted of 4 pixel matrices with total of 12 different pixel flavors allowing for evaluation of various pixel geometries and architectures in terms of depletion depth, noise performance, charge collection efficiency, etc. During this talk initial outcome of this evaluation is presented, starting with brief introduction to technology itself, followed by results of TCAD simulations, description of final design and first measurements results.

  19. Microfluidic DNA microarrays in PMMA chips: streamlined fabrication via simultaneous DNA immobilization and bonding activation by brief UV exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabourin, David; Petersen, J; Snakenborg, Detlef;

    2010-01-01

    This report presents and describes a simple and scalable method for producing functional DNA microarrays within enclosed polymeric, PMMA, microfluidic devices. Brief (30 s) exposure to UV simultaneously immobilized poly(T)poly(C)-tagged DNA probes to the surface of unmodified PMMA and activated t...

  20. A new versatile microarray-based method for high throughput screening of carbohydrate-active enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Pedersen, Henriette L; Schückel, Julia; Arnal, Grégory; Dumon, Claire; Amby, Daniel B; Monrad, Rune Nygaard; Westereng, Bjørge; Willats, William G T

    2015-04-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes have multiple biological roles and industrial applications. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing together with associated bioinformatics tools have identified vast numbers of putative carbohydrate-degrading and -modifying enzymes including glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. However, there is a paucity of methods for rapidly screening the activities of these enzymes. By combining the multiplexing capacity of carbohydrate microarrays with the specificity of molecular probes, we have developed a sensitive, high throughput, and versatile semiquantitative enzyme screening technique that requires low amounts of enzyme and substrate. The method can be used to assess the activities of single enzymes, enzyme mixtures, and crude culture broths against single substrates, substrate mixtures, and biomass samples. Moreover, we show that the technique can be used to analyze both endo-acting and exo-acting glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. We demonstrate the potential of the technique by identifying the substrate specificities of purified uncharacterized enzymes and by screening enzyme activities from fungal culture broths.

  1. A data parallel digitizer for a time-based simulation of CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors with FairRoot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitzmann, P.; Amar-Youcef, S.; Doering, D.; Deveaux, M.; Fröhlich, I.; Koziel, M.; Krebs, E.; Linnik, B.; Michel, J.; Milanovic, B.; Müntz, C.; Li, Q.; Stroth, J.; Tischler, T.

    2014-06-01

    CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) demonstrated excellent performances in the field of charged particle tracking. They feature an excellent single point resolution of few μm, a light material budget of 0.05% Xo in combination with a good radiation tolerance and time resolution. This makes the sensors a valuable technology for micro vertex detectors (MVD) of various experiments in heavy ion and particle physics like STAR and CBM. State of the art MAPS are equipped with a rolling shutter readout. Therefore, the data of one individual event is typically found in more than one data train generated by the sensor. This paper presents a concept to introduce this feature in both simulation and data analysis, taking profit of the sensor topology of the MVD. This topology allows to use for massive parallel data streaming and handling strategies within the FairRoot framework.

  2. Modeling of an integrated active feedback preamplifier in a 025 mu m CMOS technology at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Saramad, Shahyar; Bucher, M; Despeisse, Matthieu; Jarron, Pierre; Pelloux, Nicolas; Rivetti, A

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the modeling of a standard 0.25 mu m CMOS technology at cryogenic temperatures. In the first step of the work, the parameters of the EKV v2.6 model were extracted at different temperatures (300, 150, and 70 K). The extracted parameters were then used to optimize the performance of a room temperature designed active feedback front-end preamplifier (AFP) at 130 K. The results show that with a small adjustment of the extracted parameters it is possible to have a reasonable model at low temperatures. By optimizing the bias conditions at 130 K, a fall time down to 1.5 ns and a double pulse resolution of 6.5 ns were measured for NA60 proton beamscope. The proposed approach will also allow a low temperature design optimization for future projects, which will not be possible using only standard models provided by the foundry. (16 refs).

  3. Non-linear responsivity characterisation of a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for high resolution imaging of the Jovian system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Jovian system is the subject of study for the Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer (JUICE), an ESA mission which is planned to launch in 2022. The scientific payload is designed for both characterisation of the magnetosphere and radiation environment local to the spacecraft, as well as remote characterisation of Jupiter and its satellites. A key instrument on JUICE is the high resolution and wide angle camera, JANUS, whose main science goals include detailed characterisation and study phases of three of the Galilean satellites, Ganymede, Callisto and Europa, as well as studies of other moons, the ring system, and irregular satellites. The CIS115 is a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor from e2v technologies selected for the JANUS camera. It is fabricated using 0.18 μ m CMOS imaging sensor process, with an imaging area of 2000 × 1504 pixels, each 7 μ m square. A 4T pixel architecture allows for efficient correlated double sampling, improving the readout noise to better than 8 electrons rms, whilst the sensor is operated in a rolling shutter mode, sampling at up to 10 Mpixel/s at each of the four parallel outputs.A primary parameter to characterise for an imaging device is the relationship that converts the sensor's voltage output back to the corresponding number of electrons that were detected in a pixel, known as the Charge to Voltage Factor (CVF). In modern CMOS sensors with small feature sizes, the CVF is known to be non-linear with signal level, therefore a signal-dependent measurement of the CIS115's CVF has been undertaken and is presented here. The CVF is well modelled as a quadratic function leading to a measurement of the maximum charge handling capacity of the CIS115 to be 3.4 × 104 electrons. If the CIS115's response is assumed linear, its CVF is 21.1 electrons per mV (1/47.5 μ V per electron)

  4. CMOS circuits manual

    CERN Document Server

    Marston, R M

    1995-01-01

    CMOS Circuits Manual is a user's guide for CMOS. The book emphasizes the practical aspects of CMOS and provides circuits, tables, and graphs to further relate the fundamentals with the applications. The text first discusses the basic principles and characteristics of the CMOS devices. The succeeding chapters detail the types of CMOS IC, including simple inverter, gate and logic ICs and circuits, and complex counters and decoders. The last chapter presents a miscellaneous collection of two dozen useful CMOS circuits. The book will be useful to researchers and professionals who employ CMOS circu

  5. A CMOS active pixel sensor system for laboratory- based x-ray diffraction studies of biological tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohndiek, Sarah E; Cook, Emily J; Arvanitis, Costas D; Olivo, Alessandro; Royle, Gary J; Clark, Andy T; Prydderch, Mark L; Turchetta, Renato; Speller, Robert D

    2008-02-01

    X-ray diffraction studies give material-specific information about biological tissue. Ideally, a large area, low noise, wide dynamic range digital x-ray detector is required for laboratory-based x-ray diffraction studies. The goal of this work is to introduce a novel imaging technology, the CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) that has the potential to fulfil all these requirements, and demonstrate its feasibility for coherent scatter imaging. A prototype CMOS APS has been included in an x-ray diffraction demonstration system. An industrial x-ray source with appropriate beam filtration is used to perform angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD). Optimization of the experimental set-up is detailed including collimator options and detector operating parameters. Scatter signatures are measured for 11 different materials, covering three medical applications: breast cancer diagnosis, kidney stone identification and bone mineral density calculations. Scatter signatures are also recorded for three mixed samples of known composition. Results are verified using two independent models for predicting the APS scatter signature: (1) a linear systems model of the APS and (2) a linear superposition integral combining known monochromatic scatter signatures with the input polychromatic spectrum used in this case. Cross validation of experimental, modelled and literature results proves that APS are able to record biologically relevant scatter signatures. Coherent scatter signatures are sensitive to multiple materials present in a sample and provide a means to quantify composition. In the future, production of a bespoke APS imager for x-ray diffraction studies could enable simultaneous collection of the transmitted beam and scattered radiation in a laboratory-based coherent scatter system, making clinical transfer of the technique attainable. PMID:18199908

  6. Microarray Analysis Reveals the Molecular Basis of Antiarthritic Activity of Huo-Luo-Xiao-Ling Dan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease of autoimmune origin. Huo-luo-xiao-ling dan (HLXL is an herbal mixture that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine over several decades to treat chronic inflammatory diseases including RA. However, the mechanism of the anti-arthritic action of this herbal remedy is poorly understood at the molecular level. In this study, we determined by microarray analysis the effects of HLXL on the global gene expression profile of the draining lymph node cells (LNC in the rat adjuvant arthritis (AA model of human RA. In LNC restimulated in vitro with the disease-related antigen mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65, 84 differentially expressed genes (DEG (64 upregulated and 20 downregulated versus 120 DEG (94 upregulated and 26 downregulated were identified in HLXL-treated versus vehicle (Water-treated rats, respectively, and 62 DEG (45 upregulated and 17 downregulated were shared between the two groups. The most affected pathways in response to HLXL treatment included immune response, inflammation, cellular proliferation and apoptosis, and metabolic processes, many of which are directly relevant to arthritis pathogenesis. These results would advance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the anti-arthritic activity of HLXL.

  7. 50 μm pixel pitch wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray detector for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, C.; Konstantinidis, A. C.; Zheng, Y.; Anaxagoras, T.; Speller, R. D.; Kanicki, J.

    2015-12-01

    Wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensors (APSs) have been developed recently for x-ray imaging applications. The small pixel pitch and low noise are very promising properties for medical imaging applications such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this work, we evaluated experimentally and through modeling the imaging properties of a 50 μm pixel pitch CMOS APS x-ray detector named DynAMITe (Dynamic Range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology). A modified cascaded system model was developed for CMOS APS x-ray detectors by taking into account the device nonlinear signal and noise properties. The imaging properties such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were extracted from both measurements and the nonlinear cascaded system analysis. The results show that the DynAMITe x-ray detector achieves a high spatial resolution of 10 mm-1 and a DQE of around 0.5 at spatial frequencies  microcalcifications at various mean glandular dose (MGD). For an average breast (5 cm thickness, 50% glandular fraction), 165 μm microcalcifications can be distinguished at a MGD of 27% lower than the clinical value (~1.3 mGy). To detect 100 μm microcalcifications, further optimizations of the CMOS APS x-ray detector, image aquisition geometry and image reconstruction techniques should be considered.

  8. Performance of a-Si:H photodiode technology-based advanced CMOS active pixel sensor imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theil, Jeremy A.; Haddad, Homayoon; Snyder, Rick D.; Zelman, Mike; Hula, David; Lindahl, Kirk A.

    2001-12-01

    Amorphous silicon photodiode technology is a very attractive option for image array integrated circuits because it enables large die-size reduction and higher light collection efficiency than c-Si arrays. The concept behind the technology is to place the photosensing element directly above the rest of the circuit, thus eliminating the need to make areal tradeoffs between photodiode and pixel circuit. We have developed an photodiode array technology that is fully compatible with a 0.35 um CMOS process to produce image sensors arrays with 10-bit dynamic range that are 30% smaller than comparable c-Si photodiode arrays. The work presented here will discuss performance issues and solutions to lend itself to cost-effective high-volume manufacturing. The various methods of interconnection of the diode to the array and their advantages will be presented. The effect of doped layer thickness and concentration on quantum efficiency, and the effect of a-Si:H defect concentration on diode performance will be discussed. The photodiode dark leakage current density is about 80 pA/cm2, and its absolute quantum efficiency peaks about 85% at 550 nm. These sensors have 50% higher sensitivity, and 2x lower dark current when compared to bulk silicon sensors of the same design. The cell utilizes a 3 FET design, but allows for 100% photodiode area due to the elevated nature of the design. The VGA (640 X 480), array demonstrated here uses common intrinsic and p-type contact layers, and makes reliable contact to those layers by use of a monolithic transparent conductor strap tied to vias in the interconnect.

  9. Deubiquitylase, deSUMOylase, and deISGylase activity microarrays for assay of substrate preference and functional modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, Christian M; Cuccherini, Charles L; Leach, Craig A; Strickler, James E

    2011-01-01

    Microarray-based proteomics expanded the information potential of DNA arrays to the level of protein translation and interaction, but so far, not much beyond. Although enzymatic activity from immobilized proteins has been reliably studied using surface plasmon resonance, a microarray of catalytically competent enzymes would facilitate high throughput, parallel study of their function. The ability to localize activity from soluble substrates has frustrated development of such an array. Here, we report the novel use of previously developed, highly specific suicide substrates for three families of enzymes: deubiquitylases, deSUMOylases, and deISGylases. We show specificity of each family to its cognate substrate, and demonstrate utility of the array in a secondary screen of small molecule inhibitors.

  10. CMOS Image Sensors for High Speed Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jamal Deen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in deep submicron CMOS technologies and improved pixel designs have enabled CMOS-based imagers to surpass charge-coupled devices (CCD imaging technology for mainstream applications. The parallel outputs that CMOS imagers can offer, in addition to complete camera-on-a-chip solutions due to being fabricated in standard CMOS technologies, result in compelling advantages in speed and system throughput. Since there is a practical limit on the minimum pixel size (4~5 μm due to limitations in the optics, CMOS technology scaling can allow for an increased number of transistors to be integrated into the pixel to improve both detection and signal processing. Such smart pixels truly show the potential of CMOS technology for imaging applications allowing CMOS imagers to achieve the image quality and global shuttering performance necessary to meet the demands of ultrahigh-speed applications. In this paper, a review of CMOS-based high-speed imager design is presented and the various implementations that target ultrahigh-speed imaging are described. This work also discusses the design, layout and simulation results of an ultrahigh acquisition rate CMOS active-pixel sensor imager that can take 8 frames at a rate of more than a billion frames per second (fps.

  11. Ionizing and non Ionizing radiation damage in a large area CMOS active pixel sensor for medical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, Michela; Anaxagoras, Thalis; Price, Tony; Manolopoulos, Spyros; Evans, Philip; Wells, Kevin; Allinson, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Currently, large-area medical sensors are based on amorphous flat panel technology. Sensors based on monolithic CMOS APS can offer many advantages in terms of image quality and reduced dose requirements. One constraint on the take-up of APS has been their restricted operating life due to radiation damage. Here we present a new wafer scale CMOS APS, designed for medical applications and hardened-by-design with reference to its performance in typical operating environments. The detector was ...

  12. Large area CMOS image sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CMOS image sensors, also known as CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APS) or Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), are today the dominant imaging devices. They are omnipresent in our daily life, as image sensors in cellular phones, web cams, digital cameras, ... In these applications, the pixels can be very small, in the micron range, and the sensors themselves tend to be limited in size. However, many scientific applications, like particle or X-ray detection, require large format, often with large pixels, as well as other specific performance, like low noise, radiation hardness or very fast readout. The sensors are also required to be sensitive to a broad spectrum of radiation: photons from the silicon cut-off in the IR down to UV and X- and gamma-rays through the visible spectrum as well as charged particles. This requirement calls for modifications to the substrate to be introduced to provide optimized sensitivity. This paper will review existing CMOS image sensors, whose size can be as large as a single CMOS wafer, and analyse the technical requirements and specific challenges of large format CMOS image sensors.

  13. Large area CMOS image sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchetta, R.; Guerrini, N.; Sedgwick, I.

    2011-01-01

    CMOS image sensors, also known as CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APS) or Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), are today the dominant imaging devices. They are omnipresent in our daily life, as image sensors in cellular phones, web cams, digital cameras, ... In these applications, the pixels can be very small, in the micron range, and the sensors themselves tend to be limited in size. However, many scientific applications, like particle or X-ray detection, require large format, often with large pixels, as well as other specific performance, like low noise, radiation hardness or very fast readout. The sensors are also required to be sensitive to a broad spectrum of radiation: photons from the silicon cut-off in the IR down to UV and X- and gamma-rays through the visible spectrum as well as charged particles. This requirement calls for modifications to the substrate to be introduced to provide optimized sensitivity. This paper will review existing CMOS image sensors, whose size can be as large as a single CMOS wafer, and analyse the technical requirements and specific challenges of large format CMOS image sensors.

  14. Surface-activated microtiter-plate microarray for simultaneous CRP quantification and viral antibody detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitala, Sari M; Jääskeläinen, Anne J; Kelo, Eira; Sirola, Helena; Moilanen, Kirsi; Suni, Jukka; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli; Närvänen, Ale

    2013-02-01

    Microarrays are widely used in high-throughput DNA and RNA hybridization tests and recently adopted to protein and small molecule interaction studies in basic research and diagnostics. Parallel detection of serum antibodies and antigens has several potential applications in epidemiologic research, vaccine development, and in the diagnosis of allergies, autoimmunity, and infectious diseases. This study demonstrates an immobilization method for immunoassay-based microarray in conventional 96-well polystyrene plates for a serologic diagnostic method combined with quantitative C-reactive protein (CRP) assay. A synthetic peptide (HIV-1), a recombinant protein (Puumala hantavirus nucleocapsid), and purified virus preparations (Sindbis and adenoviruses) were used as antigens for virus-specific antibody detection and monoclonal anti-CRP antibody for antigen detection. The microarray was based on conventional enzyme immunoassays and densitometry from photographed results. Peptide and recombinant antigens functioned well, while whole virus antigens gave discrepant results in 1 out of 23 samples from the reference method, tested with human sera with various antibody responses. The CRP results were in concordance in the concentration range 0.5-150 mg/L with 2 commercially available CRP assays: ReaScan rapid test (R(2) = 0.9975) and Cobas 6000 analyzer (R(2) =0.9595). The results indicate that microtiter plates provide a promising platform for further development of microarrays for parallel antibody and antigen detection. PMID:23219230

  15. Synchrotron based planar imaging and digital tomosynthesis of breast and biopsy phantoms using a CMOS active pixel sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szafraniec, Magdalena B; Konstantinidis, Anastasios C; Tromba, Giuliana; Dreossi, Diego; Vecchio, Sara; Rigon, Luigi; Sodini, Nicola; Naday, Steve; Gunn, Spencer; McArthur, Alan; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    The SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at Elettra is performing the first mammography study on human patients using free-space propagation phase contrast imaging. The stricter spatial resolution requirements of this method currently force the use of conventional films or specialized computed radiography (CR) systems. This also prevents the implementation of three-dimensional (3D) approaches. This paper explores the use of an X-ray detector based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology as a possible alternative, for acquisitions both in planar and tomosynthesis geometry. Results indicate higher quality of the images acquired with the synchrotron set-up in both geometries. This improvement can be partly ascribed to the use of parallel, collimated and monochromatic synchrotron radiation (resulting in scatter rejection, no penumbra-induced blurring and optimized X-ray energy), and partly to phase contrast effects. Even though the pixel size of the used detector is still too large - and thus suboptimal - for free-space propagation phase contrast imaging, a degree of phase-induced edge enhancement can clearly be observed in the images. PMID:25498332

  16. A microarray of ubiquitylated proteins for profiling deubiquitylase activity reveals the critical roles of both chain and substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, Christian M; Strickler, James E

    2012-11-01

    Substrate ubiquitylation is a reversible process critical to cellular homeostasis that is often dysregulated in many human pathologies including cancer and neurodegeneration. Elucidating the mechanistic details of this pathway could unlock a large store of information useful to the design of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Proteomic approaches to the questions at hand have generally utilized mass spectrometry (MS), which has been successful in identifying both ubiquitylation substrates and profiling pan-cellular chain linkages, but is generally unable to connect the two. Interacting partners of the deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) have also been reported by MS, although substrates of catalytically competent DUBs generally cannot be. Where they have been used towards the study of ubiquitylation, protein microarrays have usually functioned as platforms for the identification of substrates for specific E3 ubiquitin ligases. Here, we report on the first use of protein microarrays to identify substrates of DUBs, and in so doing demonstrate the first example of microarray proteomics involving multiple (i.e., distinct, sequential and opposing) enzymatic activities. This technique demonstrates the selectivity of DUBs for both substrate and type (mono- versus poly-) of ubiquitylation. This work shows that the vast majority of DUBs are monoubiquitylated in vitro, and are incapable of removing this modification from themselves. This work also underscores the critical role of utilizing both ubiquitin chains and substrates when attempting to characterize DUBs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Ubiquitin Drug Discovery and Diagnostics.

  17. 50 μm pixel pitch wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray detector for digital breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensors (APSs) have been developed recently for x-ray imaging applications. The small pixel pitch and low noise are very promising properties for medical imaging applications such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this work, we evaluated experimentally and through modeling the imaging properties of a 50 μm pixel pitch CMOS APS x-ray detector named DynAMITe (Dynamic Range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology). A modified cascaded system model was developed for CMOS APS x-ray detectors by taking into account the device nonlinear signal and noise properties. The imaging properties such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were extracted from both measurements and the nonlinear cascaded system analysis. The results show that the DynAMITe x-ray detector achieves a high spatial resolution of 10 mm−1 and a DQE of around 0.5 at spatial frequencies  <1 mm−1. In addition, the modeling results were used to calculate the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNRi) of microcalcifications at various mean glandular dose (MGD). For an average breast (5 cm thickness, 50% glandular fraction), 165 μm microcalcifications can be distinguished at a MGD of 27% lower than the clinical value (∼1.3 mGy). To detect 100 μm microcalcifications, further optimizations of the CMOS APS x-ray detector, image aquisition geometry and image reconstruction techniques should be considered. (paper)

  18. Development of CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensors for Low Cost Commercial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, R.; Kemeny, S.; Kim, Q.; Mendis, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nixon, R.; Ortiz, M.; Pain, B.; Staller, C.; Zhou, Z; Fossum, E.

    1994-01-01

    JPL, under sponsorship from the NASA Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology, has been developing a second-generation solid-state image sensor technology. Charge-coupled devices (CCD) are a well-established first generation image sensor technology. For both commercial and NASA applications, CCDs have numerous shortcomings. In response, the active pixel sensor (APS) technology has been under research. The major advantages of APS technology are the ability to integrate on-chip timing, control, signal-processing and analog-to-digital converter functions, reduced sensitivity to radiation effects, low power operation, and random access readout.

  19. Fully CMOS Memristor Based Chaotic Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Yener

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates the design of a fully CMOS chaotic circuit consisting of only DDCC based memristor and inductance simulator. Our design is composed of these active blocks using CMOS 0.18 µm process technology with symmetric ±1.25 V supply voltages. A new single DDCC+ based topology is used as the inductance simulator. Simulation results verify that the design proposed satisfies both memristor properties and the chaotic behavior of the circuit. Simulations performed illustrate the success of the proposed design for the realization of CMOS based chaotic applications.

  20. A new versatile microarray-based method for high-throughput screening of carbohydrate-active enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal Melgosa, Silvia; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Schückel, Julia;

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes have multiple biological roles and industrial applications. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing, together with associated bioinformatic tools have identified vast numbers of putative carbohydrate degrading and modifying enzymes including glycoside hydrolases...... and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. However, there is a paucity of methods for rapidly screening the activities of these enzymes. By combining the multiplexing capacity of carbohydrate microarrays with the specificity of molecular probes, we have developed a sensitive, high-throughput and versatile...... semi-quantitative enzyme-screening technique which requires low amounts of enzyme and substrate. The method can be used to assess the activities of single enzymes, enzyme cocktails and crude culture broths against single substrates, substrate mixtures and biomass samples. Moreover, we show...

  1. Scaling CMOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A Brown

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The scaling of silicon integrated circuits to smaller physical dimensions became a primary activity of advanced device development almost as soon as the basic technology was established. The importance and persistence of this activity is rooted in the confluence of two of the strongest drives governing the business; the push for greater device performance, measured in terms of switching speed, and the desire for greater manufacturing profitability, dependent upon reduced cost per good device built.

  2. Chromosome Microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  3. First tests of CHERWELL, a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor: A CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) using 180 nm technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mylroie-Smith, James, E-mail: j.mylroie-smith@qmul.ac.uk [Queen Mary, University of London (United Kingdom); Kolya, Scott; Velthuis, Jaap [University of Bristol (United Kingdom); Bevan, Adrian; Inguglia, Gianluca [Queen Mary, University of London (United Kingdom); Headspith, Jon; Lazarus, Ian; Lemon, Roy [Daresbury Laboratory, STFC (United Kingdom); Crooks, Jamie; Turchetta, Renato; Wilson, Fergus [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, STFC (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-11

    The Cherwell is a 4T CMOS sensor in 180 nm technology developed for the detection of charged particles. Here, the different test structures on the sensor will be described and first results from tests on the reference pixel variant are shown. The sensors were shown to have a noise of 12 e{sup −} and a signal to noise up to 150 in {sup 55}Fe.

  4. Fully CMOS Memristor Based Chaotic Circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Yener, S. C.; H. H. Kuntman

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the design of a fully CMOS chaotic circuit consisting of only DDCC based memristor and inductance simulator. Our design is composed of these active blocks using CMOS 0.18 µm process technology with symmetric ±1.25 V supply voltages. A new single DDCC+ based topology is used as the inductance simulator. Simulation results verify that the design proposed satisfies both memristor properties and the chaotic behavior of the circuit. Simulations performed illustrate the succ...

  5. CAOS-CMOS camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riza, Nabeel A; La Torre, Juan Pablo; Amin, M Junaid

    2016-06-13

    Proposed and experimentally demonstrated is the CAOS-CMOS camera design that combines the coded access optical sensor (CAOS) imager platform with the CMOS multi-pixel optical sensor. The unique CAOS-CMOS camera engages the classic CMOS sensor light staring mode with the time-frequency-space agile pixel CAOS imager mode within one programmable optical unit to realize a high dynamic range imager for extreme light contrast conditions. The experimentally demonstrated CAOS-CMOS camera is built using a digital micromirror device, a silicon point-photo-detector with a variable gain amplifier, and a silicon CMOS sensor with a maximum rated 51.3 dB dynamic range. White light imaging of three different brightness simultaneously viewed targets, that is not possible by the CMOS sensor, is achieved by the CAOS-CMOS camera demonstrating an 82.06 dB dynamic range. Applications for the camera include industrial machine vision, welding, laser analysis, automotive, night vision, surveillance and multispectral military systems. PMID:27410361

  6. CAOS-CMOS camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riza, Nabeel A; La Torre, Juan Pablo; Amin, M Junaid

    2016-06-13

    Proposed and experimentally demonstrated is the CAOS-CMOS camera design that combines the coded access optical sensor (CAOS) imager platform with the CMOS multi-pixel optical sensor. The unique CAOS-CMOS camera engages the classic CMOS sensor light staring mode with the time-frequency-space agile pixel CAOS imager mode within one programmable optical unit to realize a high dynamic range imager for extreme light contrast conditions. The experimentally demonstrated CAOS-CMOS camera is built using a digital micromirror device, a silicon point-photo-detector with a variable gain amplifier, and a silicon CMOS sensor with a maximum rated 51.3 dB dynamic range. White light imaging of three different brightness simultaneously viewed targets, that is not possible by the CMOS sensor, is achieved by the CAOS-CMOS camera demonstrating an 82.06 dB dynamic range. Applications for the camera include industrial machine vision, welding, laser analysis, automotive, night vision, surveillance and multispectral military systems.

  7. Analog filters in nanometer CMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Uhrmann, Heimo; Zimmermann, Horst

    2014-01-01

    Starting from the basics of analog filters and the poor transistor characteristics in nanometer CMOS 10 high-performance analog filters developed by the authors in 120 nm and 65 nm CMOS are described extensively. Among them are gm-C filters, current-mode filters, and active filters for system-on-chip realization for Bluetooth, WCDMA, UWB, DVB-H, and LTE applications. For the active filters several operational amplifier designs are described. The book, furthermore, contains a review of the newest state of research on low-voltage low-power analog filters. To cover the topic of the book comprehensively, linearization issues and measurement methods for the characterization of advanced analog filters are introduced in addition. Numerous elaborate illustrations promote an easy comprehension. This book will be of value to engineers and researchers in industry as well as scientists and Ph.D students at universities. The book is also recommendable to graduate students specializing on nanoelectronics, microelectronics ...

  8. Pathway modeling of microarray data: A case study of pathway activity changes in the testis following in utero exposure to dibutyl phthalate (DBP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovacik, Meric A. [Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Department, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Sen, Banalata [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Euling, Susan Y. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Gaido, Kevin W. [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Veterinary Medicine, Office of New Animal Drug Evaluation, Division of Human Food Safety, Rockville, MD 20855 (United States); Ierapetritou, Marianthi G. [Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Department, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Androulakis, Ioannis P., E-mail: yannis@rci.rutgers.edu [Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Department, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Biomedical Engineering Department, Rutgers University, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Pathway activity level analysis, the approach pursued in this study, focuses on all genes that are known to be members of metabolic and signaling pathways as defined by the KEGG database. The pathway activity level analysis entails singular value decomposition (SVD) of the expression data of the genes constituting a given pathway. We explore an extension of the pathway activity methodology for application to time-course microarray data. We show that pathway analysis enhances our ability to detect biologically relevant changes in pathway activity using synthetic data. As a case study, we apply the pathway activity level formulation coupled with significance analysis to microarray data from two different rat testes exposed in utero to Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP). In utero DBP exposure in the rat results in developmental toxicity of a number of male reproductive organs, including the testes. One well-characterized mode of action for DBP and the male reproductive developmental effects is the repression of expression of genes involved in cholesterol transport, steroid biosynthesis and testosterone synthesis that lead to a decreased fetal testicular testosterone. Previous analyses of DBP testes microarray data focused on either individual gene expression changes or changes in the expression of specific genes that are hypothesized, or known, to be important in testicular development and testosterone synthesis. However, a pathway analysis may inform whether there are additional affected pathways that could inform additional modes of action linked to DBP developmental toxicity. We show that Pathway activity analysis may be considered for a more comprehensive analysis of microarray data.

  9. Pathway modeling of microarray data: A case study of pathway activity changes in the testis following in utero exposure to dibutyl phthalate (DBP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathway activity level analysis, the approach pursued in this study, focuses on all genes that are known to be members of metabolic and signaling pathways as defined by the KEGG database. The pathway activity level analysis entails singular value decomposition (SVD) of the expression data of the genes constituting a given pathway. We explore an extension of the pathway activity methodology for application to time-course microarray data. We show that pathway analysis enhances our ability to detect biologically relevant changes in pathway activity using synthetic data. As a case study, we apply the pathway activity level formulation coupled with significance analysis to microarray data from two different rat testes exposed in utero to Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP). In utero DBP exposure in the rat results in developmental toxicity of a number of male reproductive organs, including the testes. One well-characterized mode of action for DBP and the male reproductive developmental effects is the repression of expression of genes involved in cholesterol transport, steroid biosynthesis and testosterone synthesis that lead to a decreased fetal testicular testosterone. Previous analyses of DBP testes microarray data focused on either individual gene expression changes or changes in the expression of specific genes that are hypothesized, or known, to be important in testicular development and testosterone synthesis. However, a pathway analysis may inform whether there are additional affected pathways that could inform additional modes of action linked to DBP developmental toxicity. We show that Pathway activity analysis may be considered for a more comprehensive analysis of microarray data

  10. On-chip Phase Locked Loop (PLL) design for clock multiplier in CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS)

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Q; Valin, I; Claus, G; Hu-Guo, Ch; Hu, Yu

    2009-01-01

    In a detector system, clock distribution to sensors must be controlled at a level allowing proper synchronisation. In order to reach theses requirements for the HFT (Heavy Flavor Tracker) upgrade at STAR (Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC), we have proposed to distribute a low frequency clock at 10 MHz which will be multiplied to 160 MHz in each sensor by a PLL. A PLL has been designed for period jitter less than 20 ps rms, low power consumption and manufactured in a 0.35 μm CMOS process.

  11. Longitudinal microarray analysis of cell surface antigens on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV+ individuals on highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Bin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART determined by simultaneous monitoring over 100 cell-surface antigens overtime has not been attempted. We used an antibody microarray to analyze changes in the expression of 135 different cell-surface antigens overtime on PBMC from HIV+ patients on HAART. Two groups were chosen, one (n = 6 achieved sustainable response by maintaining below detectable plasma viremia and the other (n = 6 responded intermittently. Blood samples were collected over an average of 3 years and 5–8 time points were selected for microarray assay and statistical analysis. Results Significant trends over time were observed for the expression of 7 cell surface antigens (CD2, CD3epsilon, CD5, CD95, CD36, CD27 and CD28 for combined patient groups. Between groups, expression levels of 10 cell surface antigens (CD11a, CD29, CD38, CD45RO, CD52, CD56, CD57, CD62E, CD64 and CD33 were found to be differential. Expression levels of CD9, CD11a, CD27, CD28 and CD52, CD44, CD49d, CD49e, CD11c strongly correlated with CD4+ and CD8+ T cell counts, respectively. Conclusion Our findings not only detected markers that may have potential prognostic/diagnostic values in evaluating HAART efficacy, but also showed how density of cell surface antigens could be efficiently exploited in an array-like manner in relation to HAART and HIV-infection. The antigens identified in this study should be further investigated by other methods such as flow cytometry for confirmation as biological analysis of these antigens may help further clarify their role during HAART and HIV infection.

  12. High-voltage CMOS detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrler, F.; Blanco, R.; Leys, R.; Perić, I.

    2016-07-01

    High-voltage CMOS (HVCMOS) pixel sensors are depleted active pixel sensors implemented in standard commercial CMOS processes. The sensor element is the n-well/p-substrate diode. The sensor electronics are entirely placed inside the n-well which is at the same time used as the charge collection electrode. High voltage is used to deplete the part of the substrate around the n-well. HVCMOS sensors allow implementation of complex in-pixel electronics. This, together with fast signal collection, allows a good time resolution, which is required for particle tracking in high energy physics. HVCMOS sensors will be used in Mu3e experiment at PSI and are considered as an option for both ATLAS and CLIC (CERN). Radiation tolerance and time walk compensation have been tested and results are presented.

  13. Radiation-hard Active Pixel Sensors for HL-LHC Detector Upgrades based on HV-CMOS Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Miucci, A; Hemperek, T.; Hügging, F.; Krüger, H.; Obermann, T.; Wermes, N.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Backhaus, M.; Capeans, M.; Feigl, S.; Nessi, M.; Pernegger, H.; Ristic, B.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Ferrere, D.; Iacobucci, G.; Rosa, A.La; Muenstermann, D.; George, M.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Quadt, A.; Rieger, J.; Weingarten, J.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Hynds, D.; Kreidl, C.; Peric, I.; Breugnon, P.; Pangaud, P.; Godiot-Basolo, S.; Fougeron, D.; Bompard, F.; Clemens, J.C.; Liu, J; Barbero, M.; Rozanov, A

    2014-01-01

    Luminosity upgrades are discussed for the LHC (HL-LHC) which would make updates to the detectors necessary, requiring in particular new, even more radiation-hard and granular, sensors for the inner detector region. 1Corresponding author. c CERN 2014, published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License by IOP Publishing Ltd and Sissa Medialab srl. Any further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the published article’s title, journal citation and DOI. doi:10.1088/1748-0221/9/05/C050642014 JINST 9 C05064 A proposal for the next generation of inner detectors is based on HV-CMOS: a new family of silicon sensors based on commercial high-voltage CMOS technology, which enables the fabrication of part of the pixel electronics inside the silicon substrate itself. The main advantages of this technology with respect to the standard silicon sensor technology are: low material budget, fast charge collection time, high radiation tolerance, low cost and operation a...

  14. Empirical electro-optical and x-ray performance evaluation of CMOS active pixels sensor for low dose, high resolution x-ray medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitis, C D; Bohndiek, S E; Royle, G; Blue, A; Liang, H X; Clark, A; Prydderch, M; Turchetta, R; Speller, R

    2007-12-01

    Monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors with high performance have gained attention in the last few years in many scientific and space applications. In order to evaluate the increasing capabilities of this technology, in particular where low dose high resolution x-ray medical imaging is required, critical electro-optical and physical x-ray performance evaluation was determined. The electro-optical performance includes read noise, full well capacity, interacting quantum efficiency, and pixels cross talk. The x-ray performance, including x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detection quantum efficiency, has been evaluated in the mammographic energy range. The sensor is a 525 x 525 standard three transistor CMOS active pixel sensor array with more than 75% fill factor and 25 x 25 microm pixel pitch. Reading at 10 f/s, it is found that the sensor has 114 electrons total additive noise, 10(5) electrons full well capacity with shot noise limited operation, and 34% interacting quantum efficiency at 530 nm. Two different structured CsI:Tl phosphors with thickness 95 and 115 microm, respectively, have been optically coupled via a fiber optic plate to the array resulting in two different system configurations. The sensitivity of the two different system configurations was 43 and 47 electrons per x-ray incident on the sensor. The MTF at 10% of the two different system configurations was 9.5 and 9 cycles/mm with detective quantum efficiency of 0.45 and 0.48, respectively, close to zero frequency at approximately 0.44 microC/kg (1.72 mR) detector entrance exposure. The detector was quantum limited at low spatial frequencies and its performance was comparable with high resolution a: Si and charge coupled device based x-ray imagers. The detector also demonstrates almost an order of magnitude lower noise than active matrix flat panel imagers. The results suggest that CMOS active pixel sensors when coupled

  15. DNA Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C.; Gidrol, X.

    Genomics has revolutionised biological and biomedical research. This revolution was predictable on the basis of its two driving forces: the ever increasing availability of genome sequences and the development of new technology able to exploit them. Up until now, technical limitations meant that molecular biology could only analyse one or two parameters per experiment, providing relatively little information compared with the great complexity of the systems under investigation. This gene by gene approach is inadequate to understand biological systems containing several thousand genes. It is essential to have an overall view of the DNA, RNA, and relevant proteins. A simple inventory of the genome is not sufficient to understand the functions of the genes, or indeed the way that cells and organisms work. For this purpose, functional studies based on whole genomes are needed. Among these new large-scale methods of molecular analysis, DNA microarrays provide a way of studying the genome and the transcriptome. The idea of integrating a large amount of data derived from a support with very small area has led biologists to call these chips, borrowing the term from the microelectronics industry. At the beginning of the 1990s, the development of DNA chips on nylon membranes [1, 2], then on glass [3] and silicon [4] supports, made it possible for the first time to carry out simultaneous measurements of the equilibrium concentration of all the messenger RNA (mRNA) or transcribed RNA in a cell. These microarrays offer a wide range of applications, in both fundamental and clinical research, providing a method for genome-wide characterisation of changes occurring within a cell or tissue, as for example in polymorphism studies, detection of mutations, and quantitative assays of gene copies. With regard to the transcriptome, it provides a way of characterising differentially expressed genes, profiling given biological states, and identifying regulatory channels.

  16. Application of a novel functional gene microarray to probe the functional ecology of ammonia oxidation in nitrifying activated sludge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Short

    Full Text Available We report on the first study trialling a newly-developed, functional gene microarray (FGA for characterising bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidisers in activated sludge. Mixed liquor (ML and media biofilm samples from a full-scale integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS plant were analysed with the FGA to profile the diversity and relative abundance of ammonia-oxidising archaea and bacteria (AOA and AOB respectively. FGA analyses of AOA and AOB communities revealed ubiquitous distribution of AOA across all samples - an important finding for these newly-discovered and poorly characterised organisms. Results also revealed striking differences in the functional ecology of attached versus suspended communities within the IFAS reactor. Quantitative assessment of AOB and AOA functional gene abundance revealed a dominance of AOB in the ML and approximately equal distribution of AOA and AOB in the media-attached biofilm. Subsequent correlations of functional gene abundance data with key water quality parameters suggested an important functional role for media-attached AOB in particular for IFAS reactor nitrification performance and indicate possible functional redundancy in some IFAS ammonia oxidiser communities. Results from this investigation demonstrate the capacity of the FGA to resolve subtle ecological shifts in key microbial communities in nitrifying activated sludge and indicate its value as a tool for better understanding the linkages between the ecology and performance of these engineered systems.

  17. Customized CMOS wavefront sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, D. W. L.; Vdovin, G.; Rocha, J.G.; Iordanov, V.; Loktev, M.; Sarro, P.

    2002-01-01

    We report on an integrated Hartmann wavefront sensor (WFS) using passive-pixel architecture and pixels clustered as position-sensitive detectors for dynamic wavefront analysis. This approach substitutes a conventional imager, such as a CCD or CMOS imager, by a customized detector, thus improving the overall speed performance. CMOS (complementary-metal- oxide-semiconductor) technology enables on-chip integration of several analog and digital circuitry. The sensor performance depends on the fea...

  18. Beyond CMOS nanodevices 1

    CERN Document Server

    Balestra, Francis

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art in innovative Beyond-CMOS nanodevices for developing novel functionalities, logic and memories dedicated to researchers, engineers and students.  It particularly focuses on the interest of nanostructures and nanodevices (nanowires, small slope switches, 2D layers, nanostructured materials, etc.) for advanced More than Moore (RF-nanosensors-energy harvesters, on-chip electronic cooling, etc.) and Beyond-CMOS logic and memories applications

  19. Beyond CMOS nanodevices 2

    CERN Document Server

    Balestra, Francis

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art in innovative Beyond-CMOS nanodevices for developing novel functionalities, logic and memories dedicated to researchers, engineers and students. The book will particularly focus on the interest of nanostructures and nanodevices (nanowires, small slope switches, 2D layers, nanostructured materials, etc.) for advanced More than Moore (RF-nanosensors-energy harvesters, on-chip electronic cooling, etc.) and Beyond-CMOS logic and memories applications.

  20. Extensive innate immune gene activation accompanies brain aging, increasing vulnerability to cognitive decline and neurodegeneration: a microarray study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cribbs David H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study undertakes a systematic and comprehensive analysis of brain gene expression profiles of immune/inflammation-related genes in aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Methods In a well-powered microarray study of young (20 to 59 years, aged (60 to 99 years, and AD (74 to 95 years cases, gene responses were assessed in the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, superior frontal gyrus, and post-central gyrus. Results Several novel concepts emerge. First, immune/inflammation-related genes showed major changes in gene expression over the course of cognitively normal aging, with the extent of gene response far greater in aging than in AD. Of the 759 immune-related probesets interrogated on the microarray, approximately 40% were significantly altered in the SFG, PCG and HC with increasing age, with the majority upregulated (64 to 86%. In contrast, far fewer immune/inflammation genes were significantly changed in the transition to AD (approximately 6% of immune-related probesets, with gene responses primarily restricted to the SFG and HC. Second, relatively few significant changes in immune/inflammation genes were detected in the EC either in aging or AD, although many genes in the EC showed similar trends in responses as in the other brain regions. Third, immune/inflammation genes undergo gender-specific patterns of response in aging and AD, with the most pronounced differences emerging in aging. Finally, there was widespread upregulation of genes reflecting activation of microglia and perivascular macrophages in the aging brain, coupled with a downregulation of select factors (TOLLIP, fractalkine that when present curtail microglial/macrophage activation. Notably, essentially all pathways of the innate immune system were upregulated in aging, including numerous complement components, genes involved in toll-like receptor signaling and inflammasome signaling, as well as genes coding for immunoglobulin (Fc receptors and human

  1. Aptamer Microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel-Syrett, Heather; Collett, Jim; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2009-01-02

    In vitro selection can yield specific, high-affinity aptamers. We and others have devised methods for the automated selection of aptamers, and have begun to use these reagents for the construction of arrays. Arrayed aptamers have proven to be almost as sensitive as their solution phase counterparts, and when ganged together can provide both specific and general diagnostic signals for proteins and other analytes. We describe here technical details regarding the production and processing of aptamer microarrays, including blocking, washing, drying, and scanning. We will also discuss the challenges involved in developing standardized and reproducible methods for binding and quantitating protein targets. While signals from fluorescent analytes or sandwiches are typically captured, it has proven possible for immobilized aptamers to be uniquely coupled to amplification methods not available to protein reagents, thus allowing for protein-binding signals to be greatly amplified. Into the future, many of the biosensor methods described in this book can potentially be adapted to array formats, thus further expanding the utility of and applications for aptamer arrays.

  2. Activity Based High-Throughput Screening for Novel O-GlcNAc Transferase Substrates Using a Dynamic Peptide Microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Shi

    Full Text Available O-GlcNAcylation is a reversible and dynamic protein post-translational modification in mammalian cells. The O-GlcNAc cycle is catalyzed by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT and O-GlcNAcase (OGA. O-GlcNAcylation plays important role in many vital cellular events including transcription, cell cycle regulation, stress response and protein degradation, and altered O-GlcNAcylation has long been implicated in cancer, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, numerous approaches have been developed to identify OGT substrates and study their function, but there is still a strong demand for highly efficient techniques. Here we demonstrated the utility of the peptide microarray approach to discover novel OGT substrates and study its specificity. Interestingly, the protein RBL-2, which is a key regulator of entry into cell division and may function as a tumor suppressor, was identified as a substrate for three isoforms of OGT. Using peptide Ala scanning, we found Ser 420 is one possible O-GlcNAc site in RBL-2. Moreover, substitution of Ser 420, on its own, inhibited OGT activity, raising the possibility of mechanism-based development for selective OGT inhibitors. This approach will prove useful for both discovery of novel OGT substrates and studying OGT specificity.

  3. Angiogenesis interactome and time course microarray data reveal the distinct activation patterns in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Hui Chu

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis involves stimulation of endothelial cells (EC by various cytokines and growth factors, but the signaling mechanisms are not completely understood. Combining dynamic gene expression time-course data for stimulated EC with protein-protein interactions associated with angiogenesis (the "angiome" could reveal how different stimuli result in different patterns of network activation and could implicate signaling intermediates as points for control or intervention. We constructed the protein-protein interaction networks of positive and negative regulation of angiogenesis comprising 367 and 245 proteins, respectively. We used five published gene expression datasets derived from in vitro assays using different types of blood endothelial cells stimulated by VEGFA (vascular endothelial growth factor A. We used the Short Time-series Expression Miner (STEM to identify significant temporal gene expression profiles. The statistically significant patterns between 2D fibronectin and 3D type I collagen substrates for telomerase-immortalized EC (TIME show that different substrates could influence the temporal gene activation patterns in the same cell line. We investigated the different activation patterns among 18 transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors, and experimentally measured the protein level of the tyrosine-kinase receptors VEGFR1, VEGFR2 and VEGFR3 in human umbilical vein EC (HUVEC and human microvascular EC (MEC. The results show that VEGFR1-VEGFR2 levels are more closely coupled than VEGFR1-VEGFR3 or VEGFR2-VEGFR3 in HUVEC and MEC. This computational methodology can be extended to investigate other molecules or biological processes such as cell cycle.

  4. CMOS dot matrix microdisplay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Petrus J.; Bogalecki, Alfons W.; du Plessis, Monuko; Goosen, Marius E.; Nell, Ilse J.; Rademeyer, P.

    2011-03-01

    Display technologies always seem to find a wide range of interesting applications. As devices develop towards miniaturization, niche applications for small displays may emerge. While OLEDs and LCDs dominate the market for small displays, they have some shortcomings as relatively expensive technologies. Although CMOS is certainly not the dominating semiconductor for photonics, its widespread use, favourable cost and robustness present an attractive potential if it could find application in the microdisplay environment. Advances in improving the quantum efficiency of avalanche electroluminescence and the favourable spectral characteristics of light generated through the said mechanism may afford CMOS the possibility to be used as a display technology. This work shows that it is possible to integrate a fully functional display in a completely standard CMOS technology mainly geared towards digital design while using light sources completely compatible with the process and without any post processing required.

  5. Active Fail-Safe Micro-Array Flow Control for Advanced Embedded Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Mace, James L.; Mani, Mori

    2009-01-01

    The primary objective of this research effort was to develop and analytically demonstrate enhanced first generation active "fail-safe" hybrid flow-control techniques to simultaneously manage the boundary layer on the vehicle fore-body and to control the secondary flow generated within modern serpentine or embedded inlet S-duct configurations. The enhanced first-generation technique focused on both micro-vanes and micro-ramps highly-integrated with micro -jets to provide nonlinear augmentation for the "strength' or effectiveness of highly-integrated flow control systems. The study focused on the micro -jet mass flow ratio (Wjet/Waip) range from 0.10 to 0.30 percent and jet total pressure ratios (Pjet/Po) from 1.0 to 3.0. The engine bleed airflow range under study represents about a 10 fold decrease in micro -jet airflow than previously required. Therefore, by pre-conditioning, or injecting a very small amount of high-pressure jet flow into the vortex generated by the micro-vane and/or micro-ramp, active flow control is achieved and substantial augmentation of the controlling flow is realized.

  6. Wideband CMOS receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Luis

    2015-01-01

    This book demonstrates how to design a wideband receiver operating in current mode, in which the noise and non-linearity are reduced, implemented in a low cost single chip, using standard CMOS technology.  The authors present a solution to remove the transimpedance amplifier (TIA) block and connect directly the mixer’s output to a passive second-order continuous-time Σ∆ analog to digital converter (ADC), which operates in current-mode. These techniques enable the reduction of area, power consumption, and cost in modern CMOS receivers.

  7. MicroCMOS design

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Bang-Sup

    2011-01-01

    MicroCMOS Design covers key analog design methodologies with an emphasis on analog systems that can be integrated into systems-on-chip (SoCs). Starting at the transistor level, this book introduces basic concepts in the design of system-level complementary metal-oxide semiconductors (CMOS). It uses practical examples to illustrate circuit construction so that readers can develop an intuitive understanding rather than just assimilate the usual conventional analytical knowledge. As SoCs become increasingly complex, analog/radio frequency (RF) system designers have to master both system- and tran

  8. Bacillus subtilis RNase Y activity in vivo analysed by tiling microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumaya Laalami

    Full Text Available RNase Y is a key endoribonuclease affecting global mRNA stability in Bacillus subtilis. Its characterization provided the first evidence that endonucleolytic cleavage plays a major role in the mRNA metabolism of this organism. RNase Y shares important functional features with the RNA decay initiating RNase E from Escherichia coli, notably a similar cleavage specificity and a preference for 5' monophosphorylated substrates. We used high-resolution tiling arrays to analyze the effect of RNase Y depletion on RNA abundance covering the entire genome. The data confirm that this endoribonuclease plays a key role in initiating the decay of a large number of mRNAs as well as non coding RNAs. The downstream cleavage products are likely to be degraded by the 5' exonucleolytic activity of RNases J1/J2 as we show for a specific case. Comparison of the data with that of two other recent studies revealed very significant differences. About two thirds of the mRNAs upregulated following RNase Y depletion were different when compared to either one of these studies and only about 10% were in common in all three studies. This highlights that experimental conditions and data analysis play an important role in identifying RNase Y substrates by global transcriptional profiling. Our data confirmed already known RNase Y substrates and due to the precision and reproducibility of the profiles allow an exceptionally detailed view of the turnover of hundreds of new RNA substrates.

  9. Fluorescently activated cell sorting followed by microarray profiling of helper T cell subtypes from human peripheral blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiaki Ono

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peripheral blood samples have been subjected to comprehensive gene expression profiling to identify biomarkers for a wide range of diseases. However, blood samples include red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. White blood cells comprise polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes, and various types of lymphocytes. Blood is not distinguishable, irrespective of whether the expression profiles reflect alterations in (a gene expression patterns in each cell type or (b the proportion of cell types in blood. CD4+ Th cells are classified into two functionally distinct subclasses, namely Th1 and Th2 cells, on the basis of the unique characteristics of their secreted cytokines and their roles in the immune system. Th1 and Th2 cells play an important role not only in the pathogenesis of human inflammatory, allergic, and autoimmune diseases, but also in diseases that are not considered to be immune or inflammatory disorders. However, analyses of minor cellular components such as CD4+ cell subpopulations have not been performed, partly because of the limited number of these cells in collected samples. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe fluorescently activated cell sorting followed by microarray (FACS-array technology as a useful experimental strategy for characterizing the expression profiles of specific immune cells in the circulation. We performed reproducible gene expression profiling of Th1 and Th2, respectively. Our data suggest that this procedure provides reliable information on the gene expression profiles of certain small immune cell populations. Moreover, our data suggest that GZMK, GZMH, EOMES, IGFBP3, and STOM may be novel markers for distinguishing Th1 cells from Th2 cells, whereas IL17RB and CNTNAP1 can be Th2-specific markers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our approach may help in identifying aberrations and novel therapeutic or diagnostic targets for diseases that affect Th1 or Th2 responses and elucidating the

  10. Scaling and Pixel Crosstalk Considerations for CMOS Image Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Xiang-liang; CHEN Jie(member,IEEE); QIU Yu-lin

    2003-01-01

    With the scaling development of the minimum lithographic size,the scaling trend of CMOS imager pixel size and fill factor has been computed according to the Moore rule.When the CMOS minimum lithographic feature scales down to 0.35 μm,the CCD image pixel size is not so easy to be reduced and but the CMOS image pixel size benefits from the scaling minimum lithographic feature. However, when the CMOS technology is downscaled to or under 0.35 μm,the fabrication of CMOS image sensors will be limited by the standard CMOS process in both ways of shallow trench isolation and source/drain junction,which results in pixel crosstalk.The impact of the crosstalk on the active pixel CMOS image sensor is analyzed based on the technology scaling.Some suppressed crosstalk methods have been reviewed.The best way is that combining the advantages of CMOS and SOI technology to fabricate the image sensors will reduce the pixel crosstalk.

  11. Implantable CMOS Biomedical Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiko Noda

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of recent research on our implantable CMOS biomedical devices are reviewed. Topics include retinal prosthesis devices and deep-brain implantation devices for small animals. Fundamental device structures and characteristics as well as in vivo experiments are presented.

  12. Microarrays, Integrated Analytical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combinatorial chemistry is used to find materials that form sensor microarrays. This book discusses the fundamentals, and then proceeds to the many applications of microarrays, from measuring gene expression (DNA microarrays) to protein-protein interactions, peptide chemistry, carbodhydrate chemistry, electrochemical detection, and microfluidics.

  13. All-CMOS night vision viewer with integrated microdisplay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goosen, Marius E.; Venter, Petrus J.; du Plessis, Monuko; Faure, Nicolaas M.; Janse van Rensburg, Christo; Rademeyer, Pieter

    2014-02-01

    The unrivalled integration potential of CMOS has made it the dominant technology for digital integrated circuits. With the advent of visible light emission from silicon through hot carrier electroluminescence, several applications arose, all of which rely upon the advantages of mature CMOS technologies for a competitive edge in a very active and attractive market. In this paper we present a low-cost night vision viewer which employs only standard CMOS technologies. A commercial CMOS imager is utilized for near infrared image capturing with a 128x96 pixel all-CMOS microdisplay implemented to convey the image to the user. The display is implemented in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS process, with no process alterations or post processing. The display features a 25 μm pixel pitch and a 3.2 mm x 2.4 mm active area, which through magnification presents the virtual image to the user equivalent of a 19-inch display viewed from a distance of 3 meters. This work represents the first application of a CMOS microdisplay in a low-cost consumer product.

  14. High performances monolithic CMOS detectors for space applications

    OpenAIRE

    Saint-Pé, Olivier; Tulet, Michel; Davancens, Robert; Larnaudie, Franck; Vignon, Bruno; Magnan, Pierre; Farre, Jean; Corbière, Franck; Martin-Gonthier, Philippe

    2001-01-01

    During the last 10 years, research about CMOS image sensors (also called APS -Active Pixel Sensors) has been intensively carried out, in order to offer an alternative to CCDs as image sensors. This is particularly the case for space applications as CMOS image sensors feature characteristics which are obviously of interest for flight hardware: parallel or semi-parallel architecture, on chip control and processing electronics, low power dissipation, high level ofradiation tolerance... Many imag...

  15. CMOS monolithic pixel sensors research and development at LBNL

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Contarato; J-M Bussat; P Denes; L Griender; T Kim; T Stezeberger; H Weiman; M Battaglia; B Hooberman; L Tompkins

    2007-12-01

    This paper summarizes the recent progress in the design and characterization of CMOS pixel sensors at LBNL. Results of lab tests, beam tests and radiation hardness tests carried out at LBNL on a test structure with pixels of various sizes are reported. The first results of the characterization of back-thinned CMOS pixel sensors are also reported, and future plans and activities are discussed.

  16. CMOS Image Sensors: Electronic Camera On A Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    Recent advancements in CMOS image sensor technology are reviewed, including both passive pixel sensors and active pixel sensors. On- chip analog to digital converters and on-chip timing and control circuits permit realization of an electronic camera-on-a-chip. Highly miniaturized imaging systems based on CMOS image sensor technology are emerging as a competitor to charge-coupled devices for low cost uses.

  17. DNA Microarray Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakare SP

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA Microarray is the emerging technique in Biotechnology. The many varieties of DNA microarray or DNA chip devices and systems are described along with their methods for fabrication and their use. It also includes screening and diagnostic applications. The DNA microarray hybridization applications include the important areas of gene expression analysis and genotyping for point mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and short tandem repeats (STRs. In addition to the many molecular biological and genomic research uses, this review covers applications of microarray devices and systems for pharmacogenomic research and drug discovery, infectious and genetic disease and cancer diagnostics, and forensic and genetic identification purposes.

  18. CMOS front ends for millimeter wave wireless communication systems

    CERN Document Server

    Deferm, Noël

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on the development of circuit and system design techniques for millimeter wave wireless communication systems above 90GHz and fabricated in nanometer scale CMOS technologies. The authors demonstrate a hands-on methodology that was applied to design six different chips, in order to overcome a variety of design challenges. Behavior of both actives and passives, and how to design them to achieve high performance is discussed in detail. This book serves as a valuable reference for millimeter wave designers, working at both the transistor level and system level.   Discusses advantages and disadvantages of designing wireless mm-wave communication circuits and systems in CMOS; Analyzes the limitations and pitfalls of building mm-wave circuits in CMOS; Includes mm-wave building block and system design techniques and applies these to 6 different CMOS chips; Provides guidelines for building measurement setups to evaluate high-frequency chips.  

  19. DESIGN AND IMPLEMETTATION OF CMOS IMAGE SENSOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yu; Wang Guoyu

    2007-01-01

    A single Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor based on 0.35 μm process along with its design and implementation is introduced in this paper. The pixel architecture of Active Pixel Sensor (APS) is used in the chip, which comprises a 256×256 pixel array together with column amplifiers, scan array circuits, series interface, control logic and Analog-Digital Converter (ADC). With the use of smart layout design, fill factor of pixel cell is 43%. Moreover, a new method of Dynamic Digital Double Sample (DDDS) which removes Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN) is used.The CMOS image sensor chip is implemented based on the 0.35 μm process of chartered by Multi-Project Wafer (MPW). This chip performs well as expected.

  20. OLED-on-CMOS integration for optoelectronic sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Uwe; Kreye, Daniel; Reckziegel, Sven; Törker, Michael; Grillberger, Christiane; Amelung, Jörg

    2007-02-01

    Highly-efficient, low-voltage organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are well suitable for post-processing integration onto the top metal layer of CMOS devices. This has been proven for OLED microdisplays so far. Moreover, OLEDon- CMOS technology may also be excellently suitable for various optoelectronic sensor applications by combining highly efficient emitters, use of low-cost materials and cost-effective manufacturing together with silicon-inherent photodetectors and CMOS circuitry. The use of OLEDs on CMOS substrates requires a top-emitting, low-voltage and highly efficient OLED structure. By reducing the operating voltage for the OLED below 5V, the costs for the CMOS process can be reduced, because a process without high-voltage option can be used. Red, orange, white, green and blue OLED-stacks with doped charge transport layers were prepared on different dualmetal layer CMOS test substrates without active transistor area. Afterwards, the different devices were measured and compared with respect to their performance (current, luminance, voltage, luminance dependence on viewing angle, optical outcoupling etc.). Low operating voltages of 2.4V at 100cd/m2 for the red p-i-n type phosphorescent emitting OLED stack, 2.5V at 100cd/m2 for the orange phosphorescent emitting OLED stack and 3.2V at 100cd/m2 for the white fluorescent emitting OLED have been achieved here. Therefore, those OLED stacks are suitable for use in a CMOS process even within a regular 5V process option. Moreover, the operating voltage achieved so far is expected to be reduced further when using different top electrode materials. Integrating such OLEDs on a CMOS-substrate provide a preferable choice for silicon-based optical microsystems targeted towards optoelectronic sensor applications, as there are integrated light barriers, optocouplers, or lab-onchip devices.

  1. Monolithic CMOS Pixel R&D for the ILC at LBNL

    OpenAIRE

    M. Battaglia; Abrams, G.; Denes, P.; Greiner, L. C.; Hooberman., B; Tompkins, L.; Wieman, H. H.

    2005-01-01

    An R&D program on monolithic CMOS pixel sensors for application at the ILC has been started at LBNL. This program profits of significant synergies with other R&D activities on CMOS pixel sensors. The project activities after the first semester of the R&D program are reviewed.

  2. Microarray Analysis in Glioblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhawe, Kaumudi M.; Aghi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Microarray analysis in glioblastomas is done using either cell lines or patient samples as starting material. A survey of the current literature points to transcript-based microarrays and immunohistochemistry (IHC)-based tissue microarrays as being the preferred methods of choice in cancers of neurological origin. Microarray analysis may be carried out for various purposes including the following: To correlate gene expression signatures of glioblastoma cell lines or tumors with response to chemotherapy (DeLay et al., Clin Cancer Res 18(10):2930–2942, 2012)To correlate gene expression patterns with biological features like proliferation or invasiveness of the glioblastoma cells (Jiang et al., PLoS One 8(6):e66008, 2013)To discover new tumor classificatory systems based on gene expression signature, and to correlate therapeutic response and prognosis with these signatures (Huse et al., Annu Rev Med 64(1):59–70, 2013; Verhaak et al., Cancer Cell 17(1):98–110, 2010) While investigators can sometimes use archived tumor gene expression data available from repositories such as the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus to answer their questions, new arrays must often be run to adequately answer specific questions. Here, we provide a detailed description of microarray methodologies, how to select the appropriate methodology for a given question, and analytical strategies that can be used. Experimental methodology for protein microarrays is outside the scope of this chapter, but basic sample preparation techniques for transcript-based microarrays are included here. PMID:26113463

  3. Comparators in nanometer CMOS technology

    CERN Document Server

    Goll, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the complete spectrum of the fundamentals of clocked, regenerative comparators, their state-of-the-art, advanced CMOS technologies, innovative comparators inclusive circuit aspects, their characterization and properties. Starting from the basics of comparators and the transistor characteristics in nanometer CMOS, seven high-performance comparators developed by the authors in 120nm and 65nm CMOS are described extensively. Methods and measurement circuits for the characterization of advanced comparators are introduced. A synthesis of the largely differing aspects of demands on modern comparators and the properties of devices being available in nanometer CMOS, which are posed by the so-called nanometer hell of physics, is accomplished. The book summarizes the state of the art in integrated comparators. Advanced measurement circuits for characterization will be introduced as well as the method of characterization by bit-error analysis usually being used for characterization of optical receivers. ...

  4. Microarray analysis of Etrog citron (Citrus medica L.) reveals changes in chloroplast, cell wall, peroxidase and symporter activities in response to viroid infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizza, Serena; Conesa, Ana; Juarez, José; Catara, Antonino; Navarro, Luis; Duran-Vila, Nuria; Ancillo, Gema

    2012-10-01

    Viroids are small (246-401 nucleotides), single-stranded, circular RNA molecules that infect several crop plants and can cause diseases of economic importance. Citrus are the hosts in which the largest number of viroids have been identified. Citrus exocortis viroid (CEVd), the causal agent of citrus exocortis disease, induces considerable losses in citrus crops. Changes in the gene expression profile during the early (pre-symptomatic) and late (post-symptomatic) stages of Etrog citron infected with CEVd were investigated using a citrus cDNA microarray. MaSigPro analysis was performed and, on the basis of gene expression profiles as a function of the time after infection, the differentially expressed genes were classified into five clusters. FatiScan analysis revealed significant enrichment of functional categories for each cluster, indicating that viroid infection triggers important changes in chloroplast, cell wall, peroxidase and symporter activities.

  5. Optimisation algorithms for microarray biclustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Dimitri; Duhamel, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    In providing simultaneous information on expression profiles for thousands of genes, microarray technologies have, in recent years, been largely used to investigate mechanisms of gene expression. Clustering and classification of such data can, indeed, highlight patterns and provide insight on biological processes. A common approach is to consider genes and samples of microarray datasets as nodes in a bipartite graphs, where edges are weighted e.g. based on the expression levels. In this paper, using a previously-evaluated weighting scheme, we focus on search algorithms and evaluate, in the context of biclustering, several variations of Genetic Algorithms. We also introduce a new heuristic "Propagate", which consists in recursively evaluating neighbour solutions with one more or one less active conditions. The results obtained on three well-known datasets show that, for a given weighting scheme, optimal or near-optimal solutions can be identified. PMID:24109756

  6. Novel R pipeline for analyzing biolog phenotypic microarray data.

    OpenAIRE

    Minna Vehkala; Mikhail Shubin; Connor, Thomas R; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Jukka Corander

    2015-01-01

    Data produced by Biolog Phenotype MicroArrays are longitudinal measurements of cells' respiration on distinct substrates. We introduce a three-step pipeline to analyze phenotypic microarray data with novel procedures for grouping, normalization and effect identification. Grouping and normalization are standard problems in the analysis of phenotype microarrays defined as categorizing bacterial responses into active and non-active, and removing systematic errors from the experimental data, resp...

  7. Design and Fabrication of Vertically-Integrated CMOS Image Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Skorka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Technologies to fabricate integrated circuits (IC with 3D structures are an emerging trend in IC design. They are based on vertical stacking of active components to form heterogeneous microsystems. Electronic image sensors will benefit from these technologies because they allow increased pixel-level data processing and device optimization. This paper covers general principles in the design of vertically-integrated (VI CMOS image sensors that are fabricated by flip-chip bonding. These sensors are composed of a CMOS die and a photodetector die. As a specific example, the paper presents a VI-CMOS image sensor that was designed at the University of Alberta, and fabricated with the help of CMC Microsystems and Micralyne Inc. To realize prototypes, CMOS dies with logarithmic active pixels were prepared in a commercial process, and photodetector dies with metal-semiconductor-metal devices were prepared in a custom process using hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The paper also describes a digital camera that was developed to test the prototype. In this camera, scenes captured by the image sensor are read using an FPGA board, and sent in real time to a PC over USB for data processing and display. Experimental results show that the VI-CMOS prototype has a higher dynamic range and a lower dark limit than conventional electronic image sensors.

  8. Development of high gain photodiode array based on commercial CMOS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developing photodiodes in commercial CMOS process and integrating it with readout electronics without any process modification involves formidable challenges. Due to low resistivity of the wafer used in commercial CMOS process, the junction capacitance per area of the PN junction is quite large thereby limiting the size of the active area of the photodiode leading to degradation in high speed response. On the contrary, the sensitivity and quantum efficiency of the optical detector tends to improve with increase in active area of the detector. The major challenge in designing high gain photodiode in sub micron CMOS technology is to avoid the premature perimeter edge breakdown or the soft breakdown. This paper reports two different design approaches of high gain photodiode arrays in commercial 0.35 um CMOS technology and HV CMOS process

  9. Improved Space Object Observation Techniques Using CMOS Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildknecht, T.; Hinze, A.; Schlatter, P.; Silha, J.; Peltonen, J.; Santti, T.; Flohrer, T.

    2013-08-01

    CMOS-sensors, or in general Active Pixel Sensors (APS), are rapidly replacing CCDs in the consumer camera market. Due to significant technological advances during the past years these devices start to compete with CCDs also for demanding scientific imaging applications, in particular in the astronomy community. CMOS detectors offer a series of inherent advantages compared to CCDs, due to the structure of their basic pixel cells, which each contain their own amplifier and readout electronics. The most prominent advantages for space object observations are the extremely fast and flexible readout capabilities, feasibility for electronic shuttering and precise epoch registration, and the potential to perform image processing operations on-chip and in real-time. Presently applied and proposed optical observation strategies for space debris surveys and space surveillance applications had to be analyzed. The major design drivers were identified and potential benefits from using available and future CMOS sensors were assessed. The major challenges and design drivers for ground-based and space-based optical observation strategies have been analyzed. CMOS detector characteristics were critically evaluated and compared with the established CCD technology, especially with respect to the above mentioned observations. Similarly, the desirable on-chip processing functionalities which would further enhance the object detection and image segmentation were identified. Finally, the characteristics of a particular CMOS sensor available at the Zimmerwald observatory were analyzed by performing laboratory test measurements.

  10. Signalling networks associated with urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor PAI-1 in breast cancer tissues: new insights from protein microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Claudia; Malinowsky, Katharina; Berg, Daniela; Schragner, Kerstin; Schuster, Tibor; Walch, Axel; Bronger, Holger; Höfler, Heinz; Becker, Karl-Friedrich

    2011-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and the main uPA inhibitor PAI-1 play important roles in cell migration and invasion in both physiological and pathological contexts. Both factors are clinically applicable predictive markers in node-negative breast cancer patients that are used to stratify patients for adjuvant chemotherapy. In addition to their classical functions in plasmin regulation, both factors are key components in cancer-related cell signalling. Such signalling cascades are well described in cell culture systems, but a better understanding of uPA- and PAI-1-associated signalling networks in clinical tissues is needed. We examined the expression of uPA, PAI-1, and 21 signalling molecules in 201 primary breast cancer tissues using protein microarrays. Expression of uPA was significantly correlated with the expression of ERK and Stat3, while expression of PAI-1 was correlated with the uPA receptor and Akt activation, presumably via integrin and HER-receptor signalling. Analysis of uPA expression did not reveal any significant correlation with staging, grading or age of the patients. The PAI-1 expression was correlated with nodal stage. Network monitoring for uPA and PAI-1 in breast cancer reveals interactions with main signalling cascades and extends the findings from cell culture experiments. Our results reveal possible mechanisms underlying cancer development.

  11. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  12. High gain CMOS image sensor design and fabrication on SOI and bulk technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiquan

    2000-12-01

    The CMOS imager is now competing with the CCD imager, which still dominates the electronic imaging market. By taking advantage of the mature CMOS technology, the CMOS imager can integrate AID converters, digital signal processing (DSP) and timing control circuits on the same chip. This low cost and high-density integration solution to the image capture is the strong driving force in industry. Silicon on insulator (SOI) is considered as the coming mainstream technology. It challenges the current bulk CMOS technology because of its reduced power consumption, high speed, radiation hardness etc. Moving the CMOS imager from the bulk to the SOI substrate will benefit from these intrinsic advantages. In addition, the blooming and the cross-talk between the pixels of the sensor array can be ideally eliminated, unlike those on the bulk technology. Though there are many advantages to integrate CMOS imager on SOI, the problem is that the top silicon film is very thin, such as 2000Å. Many photons can just pass through this layer without being absorbed. A good photo-detector on SOI is critical to integrate SOI CMOS imagers. In this thesis, several methods to make photo-detectors on SOI substrate are investigated. A floating gate MOSFET on SOI substrate, operating in its lateral bipolar mode, is photon sensitive. One step further, the SOI MOSFET gate and body can be tied together. The positive feedback between the body and gate enables this device have a high responsivity. A similar device can be found on the bulk CMOS technology: the gate-well tied PMOSFET. A 32 x 32 CMOS imager is designed and characterized using such a device as the light-sensing element. I also proposed the idea of building hybrid active pixels on SOI substrate. Such devices are fabricated and characterized. The work here represents my contribution on the CMOS imager, especially moving the CMOS imager onto the SOI substrate.

  13. Study of antimutagenic and antioxidant activities of gallic acid and 1,2,3,4,6-pentagalloylglucose from Pistacia lentiscus. Confirmation by microarray expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahed, Afef; Bouhlel, Ines; Skandrani, Ines; Valenti, Kita; Kadri, Malika; Guiraud, Pascal; Steiman, Régine; Mariotte, Anne-Marie; Ghedira, Kamel; Laporte, François; Dijoux-Franca, Marie-Geneviève; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2007-01-01

    In vitro antioxidant and antimutagenic activities of two polyphenols isolated from the fruits of Pistacia lentiscus was assessed. Antioxidant activity was determined by the ability of each compound to scavenge the free radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH*), to inhibit xanthine oxidase and to inhibit the lipid peroxidation induced by H(2)O(2) in K562 cell line. Antimutagenic activity was assayed with SOS chromotest using Escherichia coli PQ37 as tester strain and Comet assay using K562 cell line. 1,2,3,4,6-Pentagalloylglucose was found to be more effective to scavenge DPPH* radical and protect against lipid peroxidation. Moreover, these two compounds induced an inhibitory activity against nifuroxazide and aflatoxin B1 mutagenicity. The protective effect exhibited by these molecules was also determined by analysis of gene expression as response to an oxidative stress. For this purpose, we used a cDNA-microarray containing 82 genes related to cell defense, essentially represented by antioxidant and DNA repair proteins. We found that 1,2,3,4,6-pentagalloylglucose induced a decrease in the expression of 11 transcripts related to antioxidant enzymes family (GPX1, TXN, AOE372, SHC1 and SEPW1) and DNA repair (POLD1, APEX, POLD2, MPG, PARP and XRCC5). The use of Gallic acid, induced expression of TXN, TXNRD1, AOE372, GSS (antioxidant enzymes) and LIG4, POLD2, MPG, GADD45A, PCNA, RPA2, DDIT3, HMOX2, XPA, TDG, ERCC1 and GTF2H1 (DNA repair) as well as the repression of GPX1, SEPW1, POLD1 and SHC1 gene expression. PMID:17129579

  14. Development and Application of a New Microarray- Based Method for High-Throughput Screening of Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal Melgosa, Silvia

    single defined polysaccharides, mixtures of defined polysaccharides and complex biomass extracts. Furthermore, the capacity of the technique to analyse endo- and exo-acting glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases has been confirmed...... will contribute to both the discovery of CAZymes and the empirical characterisation of their activities, thus aiding their industrial utilisation and biological understanding...

  15. Combining Affymetrix microarray results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doerge RW

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the use of microarray technology becomes more prevalent it is not unusual to find several laboratories employing the same microarray technology to identify genes related to the same condition in the same species. Although the experimental specifics are similar, typically a different list of statistically significant genes result from each data analysis. Results We propose a statistically-based meta-analytic approach to microarray analysis for the purpose of systematically combining results from the different laboratories. This approach provides a more precise view of genes that are significantly related to the condition of interest while simultaneously allowing for differences between laboratories. Of particular interest is the widely used Affymetrix oligonucleotide array, the results of which are naturally suited to a meta-analysis. A simulation model based on the Affymetrix platform is developed to examine the adaptive nature of the meta-analytic approach and to illustrate the usefulness of such an approach in combining microarray results across laboratories. The approach is then applied to real data involving a mouse model for multiple sclerosis. Conclusion The quantitative estimates from the meta-analysis model tend to be closer to the "true" degree of differential expression than any single lab. Meta-analytic methods can systematically combine Affymetrix results from different laboratories to gain a clearer understanding of genes' relationships to specific conditions of interest.

  16. Protein microarrays for systems biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lina Yang; Shujuan Guo; Yang Li; Shumin Zhou; Shengce Tao

    2011-01-01

    Systems biology holds the key for understanding biological systems on a system level. It eventually holds the key for the treatment and cure of complex diseases such as cancer,diabetes, obesity, mental disorders, and many others. The '-omics' technologies, such as genomics, transcriptomics,proteomics, and metabonomics, are among the major driving forces of systems biology. Featured as highthroughput, miniaturized, and capable of parallel analysis,protein microarrays have already become an important technology platform for systems biology, In this review, we will focus on the system level or global analysis of biological systems using protein microarrays. Four major types of protein microarrays will be discussed: proteome microarrays, antibody microarrays, reverse-phase protein arrays,and lectin microarrays. We will also discuss the challenges and future directions of protein microarray technologies and their applications for systems biology. We strongly believe that protein microarrays will soon become an indispensable and invaluable tool for systems biology.

  17. Microarray technology and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, UR

    2006-01-01

    It presents detailed overviews of the different techniques of fabricating microarrays, of the chemistries and preparative steps involved, of the different types of microarrays, and of the instrumentation and optical issues involved.

  18. Electrical Interconnections Through CMOS Wafers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Frank Engel

    2003-01-01

    Chips with integrated vias are currently the ultimate miniaturizing solution for 3D packaging of microsystems. Previously the application of vias has almost exclusively been demonstrated within MEMS technology, and only a few of these via technologies have been CMOS compatible. This thesis descri...

  19. CMOS MEMS Fabrication Technologies and Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Qu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems fabrication technologies and enabled micro devices of various sensors and actuators. The technologies are classified based on the sequence of the fabrication of CMOS circuitry and MEMS elements, while SOI (silicon-on-insulator CMOS MEMS are introduced separately. Introduction of associated devices follows the description of the respective CMOS MEMS technologies. Due to the vast array of CMOS MEMS devices, this review focuses only on the most typical MEMS sensors and actuators including pressure sensors, inertial sensors, frequency reference devices and actuators utilizing different physics effects and the fabrication processes introduced. Moreover, the incorporation of MEMS and CMOS is limited to monolithic integration, meaning wafer-bonding-based stacking and other integration approaches, despite their advantages, are excluded from the discussion. Both competitive industrial products and state-of-the-art research results on CMOS MEMS are covered.

  20. Research and Development of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for the Detection of the Elementary Particles; Recherche et developpement de capteurs actifs monolithiques CMOS pour la detection de particules elementaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y

    2007-09-15

    In order to develop high spatial resolution and readout speed vertex detectors for the future International Linear Collider (ILC), fast CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) are studied on this work. Two prototypes of MAPS, MIMOSA 8 and MIMOSA 16, based on the same micro-electronic architecture were developed in CMOS processes with different thickness of epitaxial layer. The size of pixel matrix is 32 x 128: 8 columns of the pixel array are readout directly with analog outputs and the other 24 columns are connected to the column level auto-zero discriminators. The Correlated Double Sampling (CDS) structures are successfully implemented inside pixel and discriminator. The photo diode type pixels with different diode sizes are used in these prototypes. With a {sup 55}Fe X-ray radioactive source, the important parameters, such as Temporal Noise, Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN), Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Charge-to-Voltage conversion Factor (CVF) and Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE), are studied as function of readout speed and diode size. For MIMOSA 8, the effect of fast neutrons irradiation is also. Two beam tests campaigns were made: at DESY with a 5 GeV electrons beam and at CERN with a 180 GeV pions beam. Detection Efficiency and Spatial Resolution are studied in function of the discriminator threshold. For these two parameters, the influences of diode size and SNR of the central pixel of a cluster are also discussed. In order to improve the spatial resolution of the digital outputs, a very compact (25 {mu}m x 1 mm) and low consumption (300 {mu}W) column level ADC is designed in AMS 0.35 {mu}m OPTO process. Based on successive approximation architecture, the auto-offset cancellation structure is integrated. A new column level auto-zero discriminator using static latch is also designed. (author)

  1. Microarray and pathway analysis reveal distinct mechanisms underlying cannabinoid-mediated modulation of LPS-induced activation of BV-2 microglial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Juknat

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids are known to exert immunosuppressive activities. However, the mechanisms which contribute to these effects are unknown. Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS to activate BV-2 microglial cells, we examined how Δ(9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the major psychoactive component of marijuana, and cannabidiol (CBD the non-psychoactive component, modulate the inflammatory response. Microarray analysis of genome-wide mRNA levels was performed using Illumina platform and the resulting expression patterns analyzed using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to identify functional subsets of genes, and the Ingenuity System Database to denote the gene networks regulated by CBD and THC. From the 5338 transcripts that were differentially expressed across treatments, 400 transcripts were found to be upregulated by LPS, 502 by CBD+LPS and 424 by THC+LPS, while 145 were downregulated by LPS, 297 by CBD+LPS and 149 by THC+LPS, by 2-fold or more (p≤0.005. Results clearly link the effects of CBD and THC to inflammatory signaling pathways and identify new cannabinoid targets in the MAPK pathway (Dusp1, Dusp8, Dusp2, cell cycle related (Cdkn2b, Gadd45a as well as JAK/STAT regulatory molecules (Socs3, Cish, Stat1. The impact of CBD on LPS-stimulated gene expression was greater than that of THC. We attribute this difference to the fact that CBD highly upregulated several genes encoding negative regulators of both NFκB and AP-1 transcriptional activities, such as Trib3 and Dusp1 known to be modulated through Nrf2 activation. The CBD-specific expression profile reflected changes associated with oxidative stress and glutathione depletion via Trib3 and expression of ATF4 target genes. Furthermore, the CBD affected genes were shown to be controlled by nuclear factors usually involved in regulation of stress response and inflammation, mainly via Nrf2/Hmox1 axis and the Nrf2/ATF4-Trib3 pathway. These observations indicate that CBD, and less so THC, induce a cellular stress

  2. Navigating public microarray databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkett, Christopher J; Bähler, Jürg

    2004-01-01

    With the ever-escalating amount of data being produced by genome-wide microarray studies, it is of increasing importance that these data are captured in public databases so that researchers can use this information to complement and enhance their own studies. Many groups have set up databases of expression data, ranging from large repositories, which are designed to comprehensively capture all published data, through to more specialized databases. The public repositories, such as ArrayExpress at the European Bioinformatics Institute contain complete datasets in raw format in addition to processed data, whilst the specialist databases tend to provide downstream analysis of normalized data from more focused studies and data sources. Here we provide a guide to the use of these public microarray resources. PMID:18629145

  3. Planar pixel sensors in commercial CMOS technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonella, Laura; Hemperek, Tomasz; Huegging, Fabian; Krueger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Macchiolo, Anna [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    For the upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at the high luminosity LHC, an all-silicon tracker is foreseen to cope with the increased rate and radiation levels. Pixel and strip detectors will have to cover an area of up to 200m2. To produce modules in high number at reduced costs, new sensor and bonding technologies have to be investigated. Commercial CMOS technologies on high resistive substrates can provide significant advantages in this direction. They offer cost effective, large volume sensor production. In addition to this, production is done on 8'' wafers allowing wafer-to-wafer bonding to the electronics, an interconnection technology substantially cheaper than the bump bonding process used for hybrid pixel detectors at the LHC. Both active and passive n-in-p pixel sensor prototypes have been submitted in a 150 nm CMOS technology on a 2kΩ cm substrate. The passive sensor design will be used to characterize sensor properties and to investigate wafer-to-wafer bonding technologies. This first prototype is made of a matrix of 36 x 16 pixels of size compatible with the FE-I4 readout chip (i.e. 50 μm x 250 μm). Results from lab characterization of this first submission are shown together with TCAD simulations. Work towards a full size FE-I4 sensor for wafer-to-wafer bonding is discussed.

  4. A novel colour-sensitive CMOS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langfelder, G.; Longoni, A.; Zaraga, F.

    2009-10-01

    A novel colour-sensitive semiconductor detector is proposed. The device (named Transverse Field Detector (TFD)) can be used to measure the colour of the incident light without any colour filter. The device is completely compatible with standard CMOS processes and is suitable to be integrated in a pixel array for imaging purposes. The working principle is based on the capability of this device to collect at different superficial junctions the carriers, generated at different depths, by means of suitable transverse electric fields. The transverse components of the electric field are generated inside the depleted region by a suitable bias of the superficial junctions. Thanks to the differences in the light absorption coefficients at different wavelengths, the device performs colour separation. Among the advantages of this approach are the capability of an active tuning of the pixel colour response, which can be obtained just by changing the biasing values of collecting junctions, and foreseen higher colour fidelity, thanks to the easy extension to four colour pixels. First test structures of three colours TFD pixels were designed and built in a standard CMOS 90 nm technology. Operative principles of the device and first experimental results are presented.

  5. DNA Microarrays in Comparative Genomics and Transcriptomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni

    2007-01-01

    data. For this, the DNA microarray technology has gained enormous popularity due to its ability to measure the presence or the activity of thousands of genes simultaneously. Microarrays for high throughput data analyses are not limited to a few organisms but may be applied to everything from bacteria...... at identifying the exact breakpoints where DNA has been gained or lost. In this thesis, three popular methods are compared and a realistic simulation model is presented for generating artificial data with known breakpoints and known DNA copy number. By using simulated data, we obtain a realistic evaluation...... of various strains of the bacteria, e.g. Escherichia coli, with regard to genes involved in pathogenesis. Finally, this thesis present results demonstrating that the gene expression level is sequence dependent, that is, it depends on both DNA structure and codon usage bias. Here, microarray data was used...

  6. Planar CMOS analog SiPMs: design, modeling, and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yu; Villa, Federica; Bronzi, Danilo; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Zappa, Franco

    2015-11-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are large area detectors consisting of an array of single-photon-sensitive microcells, which make SiPMs extremely attractive to substitute the photomultiplier tubes in many applications. We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of analog SiPMs in standard planar 0.35 μm CMOS technology, with about 1 mm × 1 mm total area and different kinds of microcells, based on single-photon avalanche diodes with 30 μm diameter reaching 21.0% fill-factor (FF), 50 μm diameter (FF = 58.3%) or 50 μm square active area with rounded corner of 5 μm radius (FF = 73.7%). We also developed the electrical SPICE model for CMOS SiPMs. Our CMOS SiPMs have 25 V breakdown voltage, in line with most commercial SiPMs and higher gain (8.8 × 106, 13.2 × 106, and 15.0 × 106, respectively). Although dark count rate density is slightly higher than state-of-the-art analog SiPMs, the proposed standard CMOS processing opens the feasibility of integration with active electronics, for switching hot pixels off, drastically reducing the overall dark count rate, or for further on-chip processing.

  7. Neutron absorbed dose in a pacemaker CMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja H, C. G.; Guzman G, K. A.; Valero L, C.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Paredes G, L., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    The neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose in a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS), has been estimated using Monte Carlo methods. Eventually a person with a pacemaker becomes an oncology patient that must be treated in a linear accelerator. Pacemaker has integrated circuits as CMOS that are sensitive to intense and pulsed radiation fields. Above 7 MV therapeutic beam is contaminated with photoneutrons that could damage the CMOS. Here, the neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose in a CMOS cell was calculated, also the spectra were calculated in two point-like detectors in the room. Neutron spectrum in the CMOS cell shows a small peak between 0.1 to 1 MeV and a larger peak in the thermal region, joined by epithermal neutrons, same features were observed in the point-like detectors. The absorbed dose in the CMOS was 1.522 x 10{sup -17} Gy per neutron emitted by the source. (Author)

  8. CMOS test and evaluation a physical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Bhushan, Manjul

    2015-01-01

    This book extends test structure applications described in Microelectronic Test Struc­tures for CMOS Technology (Springer 2011) to digital CMOS product chips. Intended for engineering students and professionals, this book provides a single comprehensive source for evaluating CMOS technology and product test data from a basic knowledge of the physical behavior of the constituent components. Elementary circuits that exhibit key properties of complex CMOS chips are simulated and analyzed, and an integrated view of design, test and characterization is developed. Appropriately designed circuit monitors embedded in the CMOS chip serve to correlate CMOS technology models and circuit design tools to the hardware and also aid in test debug. Impact of silicon process variability, reliability, and power and performance sensitivities to a range of product application conditions are described. Circuit simulations exemplify the methodologies presented, and problems are included at the end of the chapters.

  9. Fabrication of CMOS image sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinovich, Yacov; Koltin, Ephie; Choen, David; Shkuri, Moshe; Ben-Simon, Meir

    1999-04-01

    In order to provide its customers with sub-micron CMOS fabrication solutions for imaging applications, Tower Semiconductor initiated a project to characterize the optical parameters of Tower's 0.5-micron process. A special characterization test chip was processed using the TS50 process. The results confirmed a high quality process for optical applications. Perhaps the most important result is the process' very low dark current, of 30-50 pA/cm2, using the entire window of process. This very low dark current characteristic was confirmed for a variety of pixel architectures. Additionally, we have succeeded to reduce and virtually eliminate the white spots on large sensor arrays. As a foundry Tower needs to support fabrication of many different imaging products. Therefore we have developed a fabrication methodology that is adjusted to the special needs of optical applications. In order to establish in-line process monitoring of the optical parameters, Tower places a scribe line optical test chip that enables wafer level measurements of the most important parameters, ensuring the optical quality and repeatability of the process. We have developed complementary capabilities like in house deposition of color filter and fabrication of very large are dice using sub-micron CMOS technologies. Shellcase and Tower are currently developing a new CMOS image sensor optical package.

  10. A Surface Micromachined CMOS MEMS Humidity Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Jian-Qiu Huang; Fei Li; Min Zhao; Kai Wang

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a CMOS MEMS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor micro electromechanical system) piezoresistive humidity sensor fabricated by a surface micromachining process. Both pre-CMOS and post-CMOS technologies were used to fabricate the piezoresistive humidity sensor. Compared with a bulk micromachined humidity sensor, the machining precision and the sizes of the surface micromachined humidity sensor were both improved. The package and test systems of the sensor were designed. A...

  11. Absorbed dose by a CMOS in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja H, C. G.; Valero L, C. Y.; Guzman G, K. A.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Paredes G, L. C., E-mail: candy_borja@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    Absorbed dose by a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuit as part of a pacemaker, has been estimated using Monte Carlo calculations. For a cancer patient who is a pacemaker carrier, scattered radiation could damage pacemaker CMOS circuits affecting patient's health. Absorbed dose in CMOS circuit due to scattered photons is too small and therefore is not the cause of failures in pacemakers, but neutron calculations shown an absorbed dose that could cause damage in CMOS due to neutron-hydrogen interactions. (Author)

  12. Microelectronic test structures for CMOS technology

    CERN Document Server

    Ketchen, Mark B

    2011-01-01

    Microelectronic Test Structures for CMOS Technology and Products addresses the basic concepts of the design of test structures for incorporation within test-vehicles, scribe-lines, and CMOS products. The role of test structures in the development and monitoring of CMOS technologies and products has become ever more important with the increased cost and complexity of development and manufacturing. In this timely volume, IBM scientists Manjul Bhushan and Mark Ketchen emphasize high speed characterization techniques for digital CMOS circuit applications and bridging between circuit performance an

  13. Datenakquisitionsentwicklung und Untergrundstudien für den Weltraumdetektor AMS-02 und den CMOS-Detektor MIMOSA-V

    OpenAIRE

    Schmanau, Mike

    2008-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development of space qualified electronics, detector simulations and realtime data acquisition software. The covered detector designs reach from the AMS-02 experiment, as a large scale multi purpose detector with several sub-detectors for cosmic particle research, to the small single type CMOS-detector MIMOSA-V for autoradiography of micro-arrays within the REGINS project. The presented background study focuses on problems with the simulation of diffractive scattering.

  14. Time-course microarrays reveal early activation of the immune transcriptome and adipokine dysregulation leads to fibrosis in visceral adipose depots during diet-induced obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Eun-Young

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visceral white adipose tissue (WAT hypertrophy, adipokine production, inflammation and fibrosis are strongly associated with obesity, but the time-course of these changes in-vivo are not fully understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish the time-course of changes in adipocyte morphology, adipokines and the global transcriptional landscape in visceral WAT during the development of diet-induced obesity. Results C57BL/6 J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD or normal diet (ND and sacrificed at 8 time-points over 24 weeks. Excessive fat accumulation was evident in visceral WAT depots (Epidydimal, Perirenal, Retroperitoneum, Mesentery after 2–4 weeks. Fibrillar collagen accumulation was evident in epidydimal adipocytes at 24 weeks. Plasma adipokines, leptin, resistin and adipsin, increased early and time-dependently, while adiponectin decreased late after 20 weeks. Only plasma leptin and adiponectin levels were associated with their respective mRNA levels in visceral WAT. Time-course microarrays revealed early and sustained activation of the immune transcriptome in epididymal and mesenteric depots. Up-regulated inflammatory genes included pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines (Tnf, Il1rn, Saa3, Emr1, Adam8, Itgam, Ccl2, 3, 4, 6, 7 and 9 and their upstream signalling pathway genes (multiple Toll-like receptors, Irf5 and Cd14. Early changes also occurred in fibrosis, extracellular matrix, collagen and cathepsin related-genes, but histological fibrosis was only visible in the later stages. Conclusions In diet-induced obesity, early activation of TLR-mediated inflammatory signalling cascades by CD antigen genes, leads to increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, resulting in chronic low-grade inflammation. Early changes in collagen genes may trigger the accumulation of ECM components, promoting fibrosis in the later stages of diet-induced obesity. New therapeutic approaches

  15. The use of microarrays in microbial ecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, G.L.; He, Z.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Zhou, J.

    2009-09-15

    Microarrays have proven to be a useful and high-throughput method to provide targeted DNA sequence information for up to many thousands of specific genetic regions in a single test. A microarray consists of multiple DNA oligonucleotide probes that, under high stringency conditions, hybridize only to specific complementary nucleic acid sequences (targets). A fluorescent signal indicates the presence and, in many cases, the abundance of genetic regions of interest. In this chapter we will look at how microarrays are used in microbial ecology, especially with the recent increase in microbial community DNA sequence data. Of particular interest to microbial ecologists, phylogenetic microarrays are used for the analysis of phylotypes in a community and functional gene arrays are used for the analysis of functional genes, and, by inference, phylotypes in environmental samples. A phylogenetic microarray that has been developed by the Andersen laboratory, the PhyloChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that targets the known diversity within the 16S rRNA gene to determine microbial community composition. Using multiple, confirmatory probes to increase the confidence of detection and a mismatch probe for every perfect match probe to minimize the effect of cross-hybridization by non-target regions, the PhyloChip is able to simultaneously identify any of thousands of taxa present in an environmental sample. The PhyloChip is shown to reveal greater diversity within a community than rRNA gene sequencing due to the placement of the entire gene product on the microarray compared with the analysis of up to thousands of individual molecules by traditional sequencing methods. A functional gene array that has been developed by the Zhou laboratory, the GeoChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that dynamically identifies functional activities of multiple members within a community. The recent version of GeoChip contains more than 24,000 50mer

  16. Carbohydrate Microarrays in Plant Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Pedersen, H.L.; Vidal-Melgosa, S.;

    2012-01-01

    Almost all plant cells are surrounded by glycan-rich cell walls, which form much of the plant body and collectively are the largest source of biomass on earth. Plants use polysaccharides for support, defense, signaling, cell adhesion, and as energy storage, and many plant glycans are also important...... industrially and nutritionally. Understanding the biological roles of plant glycans and the effective exploitation of their useful properties requires a detailed understanding of their structures, occurrence, and molecular interactions. Microarray technology has revolutionized the massively high...... for plant research and can be used to map glycan populations across large numbers of samples to screen antibodies, carbohydrate binding proteins, and carbohydrate binding modules and to investigate enzyme activities....

  17. CMOS digital pixel sensors: technology and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorka, Orit; Joseph, Dileepan

    2014-04-01

    CMOS active pixel sensor technology, which is widely used these days for digital imaging, is based on analog pixels. Transition to digital pixel sensors can boost signal-to-noise ratios and enhance image quality, but can increase pixel area to dimensions that are impractical for the high-volume market of consumer electronic devices. There are two main approaches to digital pixel design. The first uses digitization methods that largely rely on photodetector properties and so are unique to imaging. The second is based on adaptation of a classical analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for in-pixel data conversion. Imaging systems for medical, industrial, and security applications are emerging lower-volume markets that can benefit from these in-pixel ADCs. With these applications, larger pixels are typically acceptable, and imaging may be done in invisible spectral bands.

  18. Compressive Sensing DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Baraniuk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sensing microarrays (CSMs are DNA-based sensors that operate using group testing and compressive sensing (CS principles. In contrast to conventional DNA microarrays, in which each genetic sensor is designed to respond to a single target, in a CSM, each sensor responds to a set of targets. We study the problem of designing CSMs that simultaneously account for both the constraints from CS theory and the biochemistry of probe-target DNA hybridization. An appropriate cross-hybridization model is proposed for CSMs, and several methods are developed for probe design and CS signal recovery based on the new model. Lab experiments suggest that in order to achieve accurate hybridization profiling, consensus probe sequences are required to have sequence homology of at least 80% with all targets to be detected. Furthermore, out-of-equilibrium datasets are usually as accurate as those obtained from equilibrium conditions. Consequently, one can use CSMs in applications in which only short hybridization times are allowed.

  19. X-ray Performance Evaluation of the Dexela CMOS APS X-ray Detector Using Monochromatic Synchrotron Radiation in the Mammographic Energy Range

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinidis, A. C.; Szafraniec, M. B.; Rigon, L.; Tromba, G.; Dreossi, D.; Sodini, N.; Liaparinos, P. F.; Naday, S.; Gunn, S.; McArthur, A.; Speller, R.D.; Olivo, A.

    2013-01-01

    Digital detectors based on complementary metaloxide-semiconductors (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology have been introduced recently in many scientific applications. This work is focused on the X-ray performance evaluation of a novel CMOS APS detector in low energy medical imaging applications using monochromatic synchrotron radiation (i.e., 17–35 keV), which also allows studying how the performance varies with energy. The CMOS sensor was coupled to a Thallium-activated structured ces...

  20. Results of the 2015 testbeam of a 180 nm AMS High-Voltage CMOS sensor prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Benoit, M; de Mendizabal, J. Bilbao; Chen, H; Chen, K; Di Bello, F.A; Ferrere, D; Golling, T; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Iacobucci, G; Lanni, F; Liu, H; Meng, L; Miucci, A; Muenstermann, D; Nessi, M; Peric, I; Rimoldi, M; Ristic, B; Pinto, M. Vicente Barrero; Vossebeld, J; Weber, M; Wu, W; Xu, L

    2016-01-01

    Active pixel sensors based on the High-Voltage CMOS technology are being investigated as a viable option for the future pixel tracker of the ATLAS experiment at the High-Luminosity LHC. This paper reports on the testbeam measurements performed at the H8 beamline of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron on a High-Voltage CMOS sensor prototype produced in 180 nm AMS technology. Results in terms of tracking efficiency and timing performance, for different threshold and bias conditions, are shown.

  1. Results of the 2015 testbeam of a 180 nm AMS High-Voltage CMOS sensor prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Casse, G.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Di Bello, F. A.; Ferrere, D.; Golling, T.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Iacobucci, G.; Lanni, F.; Liu, H.; Meloni, F.; Meng, L.; Miucci, A.; Muenstermann, D.; Nessi, M.; Perić, I.; Rimoldi, M.; Ristic, B.; Barrero Pinto, M. Vicente; Vossebeld, J.; Weber, M.; Wu, W.; Xu, L.

    2016-07-01

    Active pixel sensors based on the High-Voltage CMOS technology are being investigated as a viable option for the future pixel tracker of the ATLAS experiment at the High-Luminosity LHC. This paper reports on the testbeam measurements performed at the H8 beamline of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron on a High-Voltage CMOS sensor prototype produced in 180 nm AMS technology. Results in terms of tracking efficiency and timing performance, for different threshold and bias conditions, are shown.

  2. Sinusoidal Frequency Doublers Circuit With Low Voltage + 1.5 Volt CMOS Inverter

    OpenAIRE

    Bancha Burapattanasiri

    2009-01-01

    This paper is present sinusoidal frequency doublers circuit with low voltage + 1.5 volt CMOS inverter. Main structure of circuit has three parts that is CMOS inverter circuit, differential amplifier circuit, and square root circuit. This circuit has designed to receive input voltage and give output voltage use few MOS transistor, easy to understand, non complex of circuit, high precision, low error and low power. The Simulation of circuit has MOS transistor functional in active and saturation...

  3. CMOS circuits for analog signal processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, Hans

    1988-01-01

    Design choices in CMOS analog signal processing circuits are presented. Special attention is focussed on continuous-time filter technologies. The basics of MOSFET-C continuous-time filters and CMOS Square Law Circuits are explained at the hand of a graphical MOST characteristics representation.

  4. JFET-CMOS microstrip front-end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the CMOS version of the front-end chip developed for the microstrip vertex detector of the Aleph experiment is ready to go into operation, a new development is being carried on to achieve a reduction in noise. The improvement is related to the use of a JFET-CMOS chip design which is described in the present paper. (orig.)

  5. Optoelectronic circuits in nanometer CMOS technology

    CERN Document Server

    Atef, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the newest implementations of integrated photodiodes fabricated in nanometer standard CMOS technologies. It also includes the required fundamentals, the state-of-the-art, and the design of high-performance laser drivers, transimpedance amplifiers, equalizers, and limiting amplifiers fabricated in nanometer CMOS technologies. This book shows the newest results for the performance of integrated optical receivers, laser drivers, modulator drivers and optical sensors in nanometer standard CMOS technologies. Nanometer CMOS technologies rapidly advanced, enabling the implementation of integrated optical receivers for high data rates of several Giga-bits per second and of high-pixel count optical imagers and sensors. In particular, low cost silicon CMOS optoelectronic integrated circuits became very attractive because they can be extensively applied to short-distance optical communications, such as local area network, chip-to-chip and board-to-board interconnects as well as to imaging and medical...

  6. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications. PMID:26614075

  7. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications.

  8. CMOS Active Pixel Sensors Based Detector for High-Energy Particle Tracking%基于CMOS集成有源传感器的新型高能物理粒子轨迹追踪器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李琰; Yavuz De(g)erli; 纪震

    2009-01-01

    本文研究了一个采用标准0.35μm CMOS工艺制造的新型高能物理粒子轨迹追踪器.这个新型的追踪器运用CMOS有源像素传感器技术(CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors,MAPS)将信号的探测与处理电路集成在一起,在像素的内部实现了相关双次采样操作(Correlated Doubled Sampling,CDS).实验芯片包含一个128行×32列的像素矩阵,其中,像素的大小为25×25μm2.通过采用放射源55Fe的测定,得到像素的等效输入随机噪声(Temporal Noise)仅为12个电子而固定噪声(Fixed Pattern Noise,FPN)仅为4个电子.传感器的电荷-电压转换系数(Charge-to-Voltage conversion Factor,CVF)为60μV/e-.测试中,芯片的信号读取速度达到了12μs/帧.

  9. Design and coupled-effect simulations of CMOS micro gas sensors built on SOI thin membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chih-Cheng; Udrea, Florin; Gardner, Julian W.; Setiadi, D.; Dogaru, T.; Tsai, T. H.; Covington, James A.

    2001-04-01

    This paper describes coupled-effect simulations of smart micro gas-sensors based on standard BiCMOS technology. The smart sensor features very low power consumption, high sensitivity and potential low fabrication cost achieved through full CMOS integration. For the first time the micro heaters are made of active CMOS elements (i.e. MOSFET transistors) and embedded in a thin SOI membrane consisting of Si and SiO2 thin layers. Micro gas-sensors such as chemoresistive, microcalorimeteric and Pd/polymer gate FET sensors can be made using this technology. Full numerical analyses including 3D electro- thermo-mechanical simulations, in particular stress and deflection studies on the SOI membranes are presented. The transducer circuit design and the post-CMOS fabrication process, which includes single sided back-etching, are also reported.

  10. Design and Fabrication of Vertically-Integrated CMOS Image Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Orit Skorka; Dileepan Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Technologies to fabricate integrated circuits (IC) with 3D structures are an emerging trend in IC design. They are based on vertical stacking of active components to form heterogeneous microsystems. Electronic image sensors will benefit from these technologies because they allow increased pixel-level data processing and device optimization. This paper covers general principles in the design of vertically-integrated (VI) CMOS image sensors that are fabricated by flip-chip bonding. These sensor...

  11. Evaluation of toxicity of the mycotoxin citrinin using yeast ORF DNA microarray and Oligo DNA microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobumasa Hitoshi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycotoxins are fungal secondary metabolites commonly present in feed and food, and are widely regarded as hazardous contaminants. Citrinin, one of the very well known mycotoxins that was first isolated from Penicillium citrinum, is produced by more than 10 kinds of fungi, and is possibly spread all over the world. However, the information on the action mechanism of the toxin is limited. Thus, we investigated the citrinin-induced genomic response for evaluating its toxicity. Results Citrinin inhibited growth of yeast cells at a concentration higher than 100 ppm. We monitored the citrinin-induced mRNA expression profiles in yeast using the ORF DNA microarray and Oligo DNA microarray, and the expression profiles were compared with those of the other stress-inducing agents. Results obtained from both microarray experiments clustered together, but were different from those of the mycotoxin patulin. The oxidative stress response genes – AADs, FLR1, OYE3, GRE2, and MET17 – were significantly induced. In the functional category, expression of genes involved in "metabolism", "cell rescue, defense and virulence", and "energy" were significantly activated. In the category of "metabolism", genes involved in the glutathione synthesis pathway were activated, and in the category of "cell rescue, defense and virulence", the ABC transporter genes were induced. To alleviate the induced stress, these cells might pump out the citrinin after modification with glutathione. While, the citrinin treatment did not induce the genes involved in the DNA repair. Conclusion Results from both microarray studies suggest that citrinin treatment induced oxidative stress in yeast cells. The genotoxicity was less severe than the patulin, suggesting that citrinin is less toxic than patulin. The reproducibility of the expression profiles was much better with the Oligo DNA microarray. However, the Oligo DNA microarray did not completely overcome cross

  12. Carbon Nanotube Integration with a CMOS Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano S. Perez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the integration of a sensor based on carbon nanotubes using CMOS technology. A chip sensor (CS was designed and manufactured using a 0.30 μm CMOS process, leaving a free window on the passivation layer that allowed the deposition of SWCNTs over the electrodes. We successfully investigated with the CS the effect of humidity and temperature on the electrical transport properties of SWCNTs. The possibility of a large scale integration of SWCNTs with CMOS process opens a new route in the design of more efficient, low cost sensors with high reproducibility in their manufacture.

  13. Carbon Nanotube Integration with a CMOS Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Maximiliano S.; Lerner, Betiana; Resasco, Daniel E.; Pareja Obregon, Pablo D.; Julian, Pedro M.; Mandolesi, Pablo S.; Buffa, Fabian A.; Boselli, Alfredo; Lamagna, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    This work shows the integration of a sensor based on carbon nanotubes using CMOS technology. A chip sensor (CS) was designed and manufactured using a 0.30 μm CMOS process, leaving a free window on the passivation layer that allowed the deposition of SWCNTs over the electrodes. We successfully investigated with the CS the effect of humidity and temperature on the electrical transport properties of SWCNTs. The possibility of a large scale integration of SWCNTs with CMOS process opens a new route in the design of more efficient, low cost sensors with high reproducibility in their manufacture. PMID:22319330

  14. Batch Processing of CMOS Compatible Feedthroughs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, F.E.; Heschel, M.; Hansen, Ole

    2003-01-01

    process scheme allows for post processing of feedthroughs in any kind of fully processed CMOS wafer. The fabrication of the electrical feedthroughs is based on wet etching of through-holes, low temperature deposition of dielectric material, and electrodeposition of photoresist and feedthrough metal. The...... feedthrough technology employs a simple solution to the well-known CMOS compatibility issue of KOH by protecting the CMOS side of the wafer using sputter deposited TiW/Au. The fabricated feedthroughs exhibit excellent electrical performance having a serial resistance of 40 mOmega and a parasitic capacitance...

  15. Improved Space Object Orbit Determination Using CMOS Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildknecht, T.; Peltonen, J.; Sännti, T.; Silha, J.; Flohrer, T.

    2014-09-01

    CMOS-sensors, or in general Active Pixel Sensors (APS), are rapidly replacing CCDs in the consumer camera market. Due to significant technological advances during the past years these devices start to compete with CCDs also for demanding scientific imaging applications, in particular in the astronomy community. CMOS detectors offer a series of inherent advantages compared to CCDs, due to the structure of their basic pixel cells, which each contains their own amplifier and readout electronics. The most prominent advantages for space object observations are the extremely fast and flexible readout capabilities, feasibility for electronic shuttering and precise epoch registration, and the potential to perform image processing operations on-chip and in real-time. The major challenges and design drivers for ground-based and space-based optical observation strategies have been analyzed. CMOS detector characteristics were critically evaluated and compared with the established CCD technology, especially with respect to the above mentioned observations. Similarly, the desirable on-chip processing functionalities which would further enhance the object detection and image segmentation were identified. Finally, we simulated several observation scenarios for ground- and space-based sensor by assuming different observation and sensor properties. We will introduce the analyzed end-to-end simulations of the ground- and space-based strategies in order to investigate the orbit determination accuracy and its sensitivity which may result from different values for the frame-rate, pixel scale, astrometric and epoch registration accuracies. Two cases were simulated, a survey using a ground-based sensor to observe objects in LEO for surveillance applications, and a statistical survey with a space-based sensor orbiting in LEO observing small-size debris in LEO. The ground-based LEO survey uses a dynamical fence close to the Earth shadow a few hours after sunset. For the space-based scenario

  16. Silicon CMOS optical receiver circuits with integrated thin-film compound semiconductor detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Martin A.; Lee, Myunghee; Jokerst, Nan Marie; Camperi-Ginestet, C.

    1995-04-01

    While many circuit designers have tackled the problem of CMOS digital communications receiver design, few have considered the problem of circuitry suitable for an all CMOS digital IC fabrication process. Faced with a high speed receiver design the circuit designer will soon conclude that a high speed analog-oriented fabrication process provides superior performance advantages to a digital CMOS process. However, for applications where there are overwhelming reasons to integrate the receivers on the same IC as large amounts of conventional digital circuitry, the low yield and high cost of the exotic analog-oriented fabrication is no longer an option. The issues that result from a requirement to use a digital CMOS IC process cut across all aspects of receiver design, and result in significant differences in circuit design philosophy and topology. Digital ICs are primarily designed to yield small, fast CMOS devices for digital logic gates, thus no effort is put into providing accurate or high speed resistances, or capacitors. This lack of any reliable resistance or capacitance has a significant impact on receiver design. Since resistance optimization is not a prerogative of the digital IC process engineer, the wisest option is thus to not use these elements, opting instead for active circuitry to replace the functions normally ascribed to resistance and capacitance. Depending on the application receiver noise may be a dominant design constraint. The noise performance of CMOS amplifiers is different than bipolar or GaAs MESFET circuits, shot noise is generally insignificant when compared to channel thermal noise. As a result the optimal input stage topology is significantly different for the different technologies. It is found that, at speeds of operation approaching the limits of the digital CMOS process, open loop designs have noise-power-gain-bandwidth tradeoff performance superior to feedback designs. Furthermore, the lack of good resisters and capacitors

  17. First result on biased CMOS MAPs-on-diamond devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanxheri, K., E-mail: keida.kanxheri@pg.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); INFN Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Citroni, M.; Fanetti, S. [LENS Firenze, Florence (Italy); Lagomarsino, S. [Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence (Italy); INFN Firenze, Pisa (Italy); Morozzi, A. [Università degli Studi di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); INFN Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Parrini, G. [Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Passeri, D. [Università degli Studi di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); INFN Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Sciortino, S. [Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence (Italy); INFN Firenze, Pisa (Italy); Servoli, L. [INFN Perugia, Perugia (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    Recently a new type of device, the MAPS-on-diamond, obtained bonding a thinned to 25 μm CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor to a standard 500 μm pCVD diamond substrate, has been proposed and fabricated, allowing a highly segmented readout (10×10 μm pixel size) of the signal produced in the diamond substrate. The bonding between the two materials has been obtained using a new laser technique to deliver the needed energy at the interface. A biasing scheme has been adopted to polarize the diamond substrate to allow the charge transport inside the diamond without disrupting the functionalities of the CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor. The main concept of this class of devices is the capability of the charges generated in the diamond by ionizing radiation to cross the silicon–diamond interface and to be collected by the MAPS photodiodes. In this work we demonstrate that such passage occurs and measure its overall efficiency. This study has been carried out first calibrating the CMOS MAPS with monochromatic X-rays, and then testing the device with charged particles (electrons) either with and without biasing the diamond substrate, to compare the amount of signal collected.

  18. CMOS-sensors for energy-resolved X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their low noise, CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors are suited to sense X-rays with a few keV quantum energy, which is of interest for high resolution X-ray imaging. Moreover, the good energy resolution of the silicon sensors might be used to measure this quantum energy. Combining both features with the good spatial resolution of CMOS sensors opens the potential to build ''color sensitive' X-ray cameras. Taking such colored images is hampered by the need to operate the CMOS sensors in a single photon counting mode, which restricts the photon flux capability of the sensors. More importantly, the charge sharing between the pixels smears the potentially good energy resolution of the sensors. Based on our experience with CMOS sensors for charged particle tracking, we studied techniques to overcome the latter by means of an offline processing of the data obtained from a CMOS sensor prototype. We found that the energy resolution of the pixels can be recovered at the expense of reduced quantum efficiency. We will introduce the results of our study and discuss the feasibility of taking colored X-ray pictures with CMOS sensors

  19. Microarray Scanner for Fluorescence Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A novel pseudo confocal microarray scanner is introduced, in which one dimension scanning is performed by a galvanometer optical scanner and a telecentric objective, another dimension scanning is performed by a stepping motor.

  20. Recent advances of protein microarrays

    OpenAIRE

    Hultschig, Claus; Kreutzberger, Jürgen; Seitz, Harald; Konthur, Zoltán; Büssow, Konrad; Lehrach, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Technological innovations and novel applications have greatly advanced the field of protein microarrays. Over the past two years, different types of protein microarrays have been used for serum profiling, protein abundance determinations, and identification of proteins that bind DNA or small compounds. However, considerable development is still required to ensure common quality standards and to establish large content repertoires. Here, we summarize applications available to date and discuss ...

  1. On evolution of CMOS image sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Choubey, Bhaskar; Gouveia, Luiz

    2014-01-01

    CMOS Image Sensors have become the principal technology in majority of digital cameras. They started replacing the film and Charge Coupled Devices in the last decade with the promise of lower cost, lower power requirement, higher integration and the potential of focal plane processing. However, the principal factor behind their success has been the ability to utilise the shrinkage in CMOS technology to make smaller pixels, and thereby have more resolution without increasing the cost. With the...

  2. Fully depleted, thick, monolithic CMOS pixels with high quantum efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Centre for Electronic Imaging (CEI) has an active programme of evaluating and designing Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors with high quantum efficiency, for applications in near-infrared and X-ray photon detection. This paper describes the performance characterisation of CMOS devices made on a high resistivity 50 μ m thick p-type substrate with a particular focus on determining the depletion depth and the quantum efficiency. The test devices contain 8 × 8 pixel arrays using CCD-style charge collection, which are manufactured in a low voltage CMOS process by ESPROS Photonics Corporation (EPC). Measurements include determining under which operating conditions the devices become fully depleted. By projecting a spot using a microscope optic and a LED and biasing the devices over a range of voltages, the depletion depth will change, causing the amount of charge collected in the projected spot to change. We determine if the device is fully depleted by measuring the signal collected from the projected spot. The analysis of spot size and shape is still under development

  3. Neutron absorbed dose in a pacemaker CMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja H, C. G.; Guzman G, K. A.; Valero L, C. Y.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Paredes G, L., E-mail: candy_borja@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    The absorbed dose due to neutrons by a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) has been estimated using Monte Carlo methods. Eventually a person with a pacemaker becomes a patient that must be treated by radiotherapy with a linear accelerator; the pacemaker has integrated circuits as CMOS that are sensitive to intense and pulsed radiation fields. When the Linac is working in Bremsstrahlung mode an undesirable neutron field is produced due to photoneutron reactions; these neutrons could damage the CMOS putting the patient at risk during the radiotherapy treatment. In order to estimate the neutron dose in the CMOS a Monte Carlo calculation was carried out where a full radiotherapy vault room was modeled with a W-made spherical shell in whose center was located the source term of photoneutrons produced by a Linac head operating in Bremsstrahlung mode at 18 MV. In the calculations a phantom made of tissue equivalent was modeled while a beam of photoneutrons was applied on the phantom prostatic region using a field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}. During simulation neutrons were isotropically transported from the Linac head to the phantom chest, here a 1 {theta} x 1 cm{sup 2} cylinder made of polystyrene was modeled as the CMOS, where the neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose were estimated. Main damages to CMOS are by protons produced during neutron collisions protective cover made of H-rich materials, here the neutron spectrum that reach the CMOS was calculated showing a small peak around 0.1 MeV and a larger peak in the thermal region, both connected through epithermal neutrons. (Author)

  4. New package for CMOS sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diot, Jean-Luc; Loo, Kum Weng; Moscicki, Jean-Pierre; Ng, Hun Shen; Tee, Tong Yan; Teysseyre, Jerome; Yap, Daniel

    2004-02-01

    Cost is the main drawback of existing packages for C-MOS sensors (mainly CLCC family). Alternative packages are thus developed world-wide. And in particular, S.T.Microelectronics has studied a low cost alternative packages based on QFN structure, still with a cavity. Intensive work was done to optimize the over-molding operation forming the cavity onto a metallic lead-frame (metallic lead-frame is a low cost substrate allowing very good mechanical definition of the final package). Material selection (thermo-set resin and glue for glass sealing) was done through standard reliability tests for cavity packages (Moisture Sensitivity Level 3 followed by temperature cycling, humidity storage and high temperature storage). As this package concept is new (without leads protruding the molded cavity), the effect of variation of package dimensions, as well as board lay-out design, are simulated on package life time (during temperature cycling, thermal mismatch between board and package leads to thermal fatigue of solder joints). These simulations are correlated with an experimental temperature cycling test with daisy-chain packages.

  5. The Stanford Tissue Microarray Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Robert J; Montgomery, Kelli; Liu, Chih Long; Shah, Nigam H; Prapong, Wijan; Nitzberg, Michael; Zachariah, Zachariah K; Sherlock, Gavin J; Natkunam, Yasodha; West, Robert B; van de Rijn, Matt; Brown, Patrick O; Ball, Catherine A

    2008-01-01

    The Stanford Tissue Microarray Database (TMAD; http://tma.stanford.edu) is a public resource for disseminating annotated tissue images and associated expression data. Stanford University pathologists, researchers and their collaborators worldwide use TMAD for designing, viewing, scoring and analyzing their tissue microarrays. The use of tissue microarrays allows hundreds of human tissue cores to be simultaneously probed by antibodies to detect protein abundance (Immunohistochemistry; IHC), or by labeled nucleic acids (in situ hybridization; ISH) to detect transcript abundance. TMAD archives multi-wavelength fluorescence and bright-field images of tissue microarrays for scoring and analysis. As of July 2007, TMAD contained 205 161 images archiving 349 distinct probes on 1488 tissue microarray slides. Of these, 31 306 images for 68 probes on 125 slides have been released to the public. To date, 12 publications have been based on these raw public data. TMAD incorporates the NCI Thesaurus ontology for searching tissues in the cancer domain. Image processing researchers can extract images and scores for training and testing classification algorithms. The production server uses the Apache HTTP Server, Oracle Database and Perl application code. Source code is available to interested researchers under a no-cost license. PMID:17989087

  6. Development of an electroless post-processing technique for depositing gold as electrode material on CMOS devices

    OpenAIRE

    Berdondini, Luca; van der Wal, Peter D.; De Rooij, Nicolaas F; Koudelka-Hep, Milena

    2010-01-01

    The limited electrode density and thus, the limited spatial resolution of substrate-integrated microelectrodes arrays (MEAs) used in in-vitro electrophysiology are currently considered as the main constraints of this technique. By taking advantage of the commercially available complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) standard technology, high density miroelectrode arrays on large active areas could be realized. However, the aluminum alloy used in CMOS as the metallic layer shows poor el...

  7. Delay estimation for CMOS functional cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan

    1991-01-01

    Presents a new RC tree network model for delay estimation of CMOS functional cells. The model is able to reflect topological changes within a cell, which is of particular interest when doing performance driven layout synthesis. Further, a set of algorithms to perform worst case analysis on arbitr...... arbitrary CMOS functional cells using the proposed delay model, is presented. Both model and algorithms have been implemented as a part of a cell compiler (CELLO) working in an experimental silicon compiler environment.......Presents a new RC tree network model for delay estimation of CMOS functional cells. The model is able to reflect topological changes within a cell, which is of particular interest when doing performance driven layout synthesis. Further, a set of algorithms to perform worst case analysis on...

  8. Characterization and reliability of CMOS microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedder, Gary K.; Blanton, Ronald D. S.

    1999-08-01

    This paper provides an overview of high-aspect-ratio CMOS micromachining, focusing on materials characterization, reliability, and fault analysis. Composite microstrutural beam widths and gaps down to 1.2 micrometers are etched out of conventional CMOS dielectric, aluminum, and gate-polysilicon thin films using post-CMOS dry etching for both structural sidewall definition and for release from the substrate. Differences in stress between the multiple metal and dielectric layers cause vertical stress gradients and curl, while misalignment between layers causes lateral stress gradients and curl. Cracking is induced in a resonant fatigue structures at 620 MPa of repetitive stress after over 50 million cycles. Beams have withstood over 1.3 billion cycles at 124 MPa stress levels induced by electrostatic actuation. Failures due to process defects are classified according to the geometrical features of the defective structures. Relative probability of occurrence of each defect type is extracted from the process simulation results.

  9. CMOS Integrated Capacitive DC-DC Converters

    CERN Document Server

    Van Breussegem, Tom

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a detailed analysis of all aspects of capacitive DC-DC converter design: topology selection, control loop design and noise mitigation. Readers will benefit from the authors’ systematic overview that starts from the ground up, in-depth circuit analysis and a thorough review of recently proposed techniques and design methodologies.  Not only design techniques are discussed, but also implementation in CMOS is shown, by pinpointing the technological opportunities of CMOS and demonstrating the implementation based on four state-of-the-art prototypes.  Provides a detailed analysis of all aspects of capacitive DC-DC converter design;  Analyzes the potential of this type of DC-DC converter and introduces a number of techniques to unleash their full potential; Combines system theory with practical implementation techniques; Includes unique analysis of CMOS technology for this application; Provides in-depth analysis of four fabricated prototypes.

  10. CMOS-compatible LVOF-based visible microspectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emadi, A.; Wu, H.; De Graaf, G.; Wolffenbuttel, R.F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a CMOS-Compatible Linear Variable Optical Filter (LVOF) visible micro-spectrometer. The CMOS-compatible post process for fabrication of the LVOF has been used for integration of the LVOF with a CMOS chip containing a 128-element photodiode array and readout circuitry. Fabricati

  11. Noise in sub-micron CMOS image sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, X.

    2008-01-01

    CMOS image sensors are devices that convert illumination signals (light intensity) into electronic signals. The goal of this thesis has been to analyze dominate noise sources in CMOS imagers and to improve the image quality by reducing the noise generated in the CMOS image sensor pixels.

  12. A Standard CMOS Humidity Sensor without Post-Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Oleg Nizhnik; Kazusuke Maenaka; Kohei Higuchi

    2011-01-01

    A 2 µW power dissipation, voltage-output, humidity sensor accurate to 5% relative humidity was developed using the LFoundry 0.15 µm CMOS technology without post-processing. The sensor consists of a woven lateral array of electrodes implemented in CMOS top metal, a Intervia Photodielectric 8023-10 humidity-sensitive layer, and a CMOS capacitance to voltage converter.

  13. An RF (R) MS Power Detector in Standard CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aa, van der F.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    This Master thesis describes the research towards the integration of RF power detectors for 3G cellular phones and base stations in CMOS technology1. It is a feasibility study with the emphasis on the identification of fundamental limitations of CMOS (particularly CMOS9) and of a number of squaring

  14. Scaling CMOS devices through alternative structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The conventional wisdom holds that CMOS devices cannot be scaled much further from where they are today because of several device physics limitations such as the large tunneling current in very thin gate dielectrics. It is shown that alternative device structures can allow CMOS transistors to scale by another 20 times. That is as large a factor of scaling as what the semiconductor industry accomplished in the past 25 years. There will be many opportunities and challenges in finding novel device structures and new processing techniques, and in understanding the physics of future devices.

  15. Radiation-hardened bulk CMOS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolutionary development of a radiation-hardened bulk CMOS technology is reviewed. The metal gate hardened CMOS status is summarized, including both radiation and reliability data. The development of a radiation-hardened bulk silicon gate process which was successfully implemented to a commercial microprocessor family and applied to a new, radiation-hardened, LSI standard cell family is also discussed. The cell family is reviewed and preliminary characterization data is presented. Finally, a brief comparison of the various radiation-hardened technologies with regard to performance, reliability, and availability is made

  16. CMOS circuit design, layout and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, R Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The Third Edition of CMOS Circuit Design, Layout, and Simulation continues to cover the practical design of both analog and digital integrated circuits, offering a vital, contemporary view of a wide range of analog/digital circuit blocks including: phase-locked-loops, delta-sigma sensing circuits, voltage/current references, op-amps, the design of data converters, and much more. Regardless of one's integrated circuit (IC) design skill level, this book allows readers to experience both the theory behind, and the hands-on implementation of, complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) IC design via detailed derivations, discussions, and hundreds of design, layout, and simulation examples.

  17. Modeling of Amperometric Immunosensor for CMOS Integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ce Li; Haigang Yang; Shanhong Xia; Chao Bian

    2006-01-01

    A circuit model of the Amperometric immunosensor for use in the biosensor system-on-chip simulation is proposed in this paper. The model parameters are extracted with several methods and verified by MATLAB and SPICE simulation. A CMOS potentiostat circuit required for conditioning the Amperometric immunosensor is also included in the circuit model. The mean square error norm of the simulated curve against the measured one is 8.65 × 10-17. The whole circuit has been fabricated in a 0.35am CMOS process.

  18. TCAD simulations of High-Voltage-CMOS Pixel structures for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Buckland, Matthew Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The requirements for precision physics and the experimental conditions at CLIC result in stringent constraints for the vertex detector. Capacitively coupled active pixel sensors with 25 μm pitch implemented in a commercial 180 nm High-Voltage CMOS (HV-CMOS) process are currently under study as a candidate technology for the CLIC vertex detector. Laboratory calibration measurements and beam tests with prototypes are complemented by detailed TCAD and electronic circuit simulations, aiming for a comprehensive understanding of the signal formation in the HV-CMOS sensors and subsequent readout stages. In this note 2D and 3D TCAD simulation results of the prototype sensor, the Capacitively Coupled Pixel Detector version three (CCPDv3), will be presented. These include the electric field distribution, leakage current, well capacitance, transient response to minimum ionising particles and charge-collection.

  19. Comparison of gene expression microarray data with count-based RNA measurements informs microarray interpretation

    OpenAIRE

    Richard, Arianne C.; Lyons, Paul A.; Peters, James E.; Biasci, Daniele; Flint, Shaun M; James C Lee; McKinney, Eoin F; Siegel, Richard M.; Smith, Kenneth GC

    2014-01-01

    Background Although numerous investigations have compared gene expression microarray platforms, preprocessing methods and batch correction algorithms using constructed spike-in or dilution datasets, there remains a paucity of studies examining the properties of microarray data using diverse biological samples. Most microarray experiments seek to identify subtle differences between samples with variable background noise, a scenario poorly represented by constructed datasets. Thus, microarray u...

  20. Diagnostic and analytical applications of protein microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dufva, Hans Martin; Christensen, C.B.V.

    2005-01-01

    DNA microarrays have changed the field of biomedical sciences over the past 10 years. For several reasons, antibody and other protein microarrays have not developed at the same rate. However, protein and antibody arrays have emerged as a powerful tool to complement DNA microarrays during the post...

  1. Direct calibration of PICKY-designed microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Pamela C

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few microarrays have been quantitatively calibrated to identify optimal hybridization conditions because it is difficult to precisely determine the hybridization characteristics of a microarray using biologically variable cDNA samples. Results Using synthesized samples with known concentrations of specific oligonucleotides, a series of microarray experiments was conducted to evaluate microarrays designed by PICKY, an oligo microarray design software tool, and to test a direct microarray calibration method based on the PICKY-predicted, thermodynamically closest nontarget information. The complete set of microarray experiment results is archived in the GEO database with series accession number GSE14717. Additional data files and Perl programs described in this paper can be obtained from the website http://www.complex.iastate.edu under the PICKY Download area. Conclusion PICKY-designed microarray probes are highly reliable over a wide range of hybridization temperatures and sample concentrations. The microarray calibration method reported here allows researchers to experimentally optimize their hybridization conditions. Because this method is straightforward, uses existing microarrays and relatively inexpensive synthesized samples, it can be used by any lab that uses microarrays designed by PICKY. In addition, other microarrays can be reanalyzed by PICKY to obtain the thermodynamically closest nontarget information for calibration.

  2. Switched Transconductor Mixer Compatible with Future CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Louwsma, Simon M.; Wienk, Gerard J.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2003-01-01

    Mixers are commonly used in communication systems for frequency translation, and usually exploit switching in some form to implement multiplication by a square wave. However, at the low supply voltages required for new CMOS technologies, switches are non- or poorly conducting in the "middle voltage

  3. Ultra-low Voltage CMOS Cascode Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Torsten; Cassia, Marco

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we design a folded cascode operational transconductance amplifier in a standard CMOS process, which has a measured 69 dB DC gain, a 2 MHz bandwidth and compatible input- and output voltage levels at a 1 V power supply. This is done by a novel Current Driven Bulk (CDB) technique, wh...

  4. Design and realization of CMOS image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Xiao, Zexin

    2008-02-01

    A project was presented that instrumental design of an economical CMOS microscope image sensor. A high performance, low price, black-white camera chip OV5116P was used as the core of the sensor circuit; Designing and realizing peripheral control circuit of sensor; Through the control on dial switch to realize different functions of the sensor chip in the system. For example: auto brightness level descending function on or off; gamma correction function on or off; auto and manual backlight compensation mode conversion and so on. The optical interface of sensor is designed for commercialization and standardization. The images of sample were respectively gathered with CCD and CMOS. Result of the experiment indicates that both performances were identical in several aspects as follows: image definition, contrast control, heating degree and the function can be adjusted according to the demand of user etc. The imperfection was that the CMOS with smaller field and higher noise than CCD; nevertheless, the maximal advantage of choosing the CMOS chip is its low cost. And its imaging quality conformed to requirement of the economical microscope image sensor.

  5. Low noise monolithic CMOS front end electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design considerations for low noise charge measurement and their application in CMOS electronics are described. The amplifier driver combination whose noise performance has been measured in detail as well as the analog multiplexing silicon strip detector readout electronics are designed with low power consumption and can be operated in pulsed mode so as to reduce heat dissipation even further in many applications. (orig.)

  6. Transmission Lines in CMOS: An Explorative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperink, E.A.M.; Kreienkamp, R.; Ellermeyer, T.; Langmann, U.

    2001-01-01

    On-chip transmission line modelling and design become increasingly important as frequencies are continuously going up. This paper explores possibilities to implement transmission lines on CMOS ICs via coupled coplanar strips. EM-field simulations with SONNET are used to estimate important transmissi

  7. Method and circuitry for CMOS transconductor linearization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kundur Subramaniyan, Harish; Klumperink, Eric; Srinivasan, Venkatesh; Kiaei, Ali; Nauta, Bram

    2016-01-01

    Third order distortion is reduced in a CMOS transconductor circuit that includes a first N-channel transistor and a first P-channel transistor, gates of the first N-channel transistor and the first P-channel transistor being coupled to receive an input signal. Drains of the first N-channel transisto

  8. A 24GHz Radar Receiver in CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwok, K.C.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis investigates the system design and circuit implementation of a 24GHz-band short-range radar receiver in CMOS technology. The propagation and penetration properties of EM wave offer the possibility of non-contact based remote sensing and through-the-wall imaging of distance stationary or

  9. Smart temperature sensors in standard CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makinwa, K.A.A.

    2010-01-01

    A smart temperature sensor is an integrated system consisting of a temperature sensor, its bias circuitry and an analog-to-digital converter (ADC). When manufactured in CMOS technology, such sensors have found widespread use due to their low cost, small size and ease of use. In this paper the basic

  10. Low energy CMOS for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Ramesh; Alkalaj, Leon

    1992-01-01

    The current focus of NASA's space flight programs reflects a new thrust towards smaller, less costly, and more frequent space missions, when compared to missions such as Galileo, Magellan, or Cassini. Recently, the concept of a microspacecraft was proposed. In this concept, a small, compact spacecraft that weighs tens of kilograms performs focused scientific objectives such as imaging. Similarly, a Mars Lander micro-rover project is under study that will allow miniature robots weighing less than seven kilograms to explore the Martian surface. To bring the microspacecraft and microrover ideas to fruition, one will have to leverage compact 3D multi-chip module-based multiprocessors (MCM) technologies. Low energy CMOS will become increasingly important because of the thermodynamic considerations in cooling compact 3D MCM implementations and also from considerations of the power budget for space applications. In this paper, we show how the operating voltage is related to the threshold voltage of the CMOS transistors for accomplishing a task in VLSI with minimal energy. We also derive expressions for the noise margins at the optimal operating point. We then look at a low voltage CMOS (LVCMOS) technology developed at Stanford University which improves the power consumption over conventional CMOS by a couple of orders of magnitude and consider the suitability of the technology for space applications by characterizing its SEU immunity.

  11. Analog IC reliability in nanometer CMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Maricau, Elie

    2013-01-01

    This book focuses on modeling, simulation and analysis of analog circuit aging. First, all important nanometer CMOS physical effects resulting in circuit unreliability are reviewed. Then, transistor aging compact models for circuit simulation are discussed and several methods for efficient circuit reliability simulation are explained and compared. Ultimately, the impact of transistor aging on analog circuits is studied. Aging-resilient and aging-immune circuits are identified and the impact of technology scaling is discussed.   The models and simulation techniques described in the book are intended as an aid for device engineers, circuit designers and the EDA community to understand and to mitigate the impact of aging effects on nanometer CMOS ICs.   ·         Enables readers to understand long-term reliability of an integrated circuit; ·         Reviews CMOS unreliability effects, with focus on those that will emerge in future CMOS nodes; ·         Provides overview of models for...

  12. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing

  13. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Justin A., E-mail: jabriggs@stanford.edu [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Naik, Gururaj V.; Baum, Brian K.; Dionne, Jennifer A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Petach, Trevor A.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David [Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  14. A 1 Volt switched transconductor mixer in 0.18 μm CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Louwsma, Simon M.; Wienk, Gerard J.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2003-01-01

    A new CMOS mixer topology can operate at low supply voltages by using switches connected only to the supplies. Mixing is achieved exploiting two cross-coupled transconductors, which are alternatingly activated by the switches. A down conversion mixer prototype with 12 dB conversion gain was designed

  15. CMOS MEMS capacitive absolute pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and characterization of a capacitive pressure sensor using a commercial 0.18 µm CMOS (complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor) process and postprocess. The pressure sensor is capacitive and the structure is formed by an Al top electrode enclosed in a suspended SiO2 membrane, which acts as a movable electrode against a bottom or stationary Al electrode fixed on the SiO2 substrate. Both the movable and fixed electrodes form a variable parallel plate capacitor, whose capacitance varies with the applied pressure on the surface. In order to release the membranes the CMOS layers need to be applied postprocess and this mainly consists of four steps: (1) deposition and patterning of PECVD (plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition) oxide to protect CMOS pads and to open the pressure sensor top surface, (2) etching of the sacrificial layer to release the suspended membrane, (3) deposition of PECVD oxide to seal the etching holes and creating vacuum inside the gap, and finally (4) etching of the passivation oxide to open the pads and allow electrical connections. This sensor design and fabrication is suitable to obey the design rules of a CMOS foundry and since it only uses low-temperature processes, it allows monolithic integration with other types of CMOS compatible sensors and IC (integrated circuit) interface on a single chip. Experimental results showed that the pressure sensor has a highly linear sensitivity of 0.14 fF kPa−1 in the pressure range of 0–300 kPa. (paper)

  16. CMOS MEMS capacitive absolute pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narducci, M.; Yu-Chia, L.; Fang, W.; Tsai, J.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and characterization of a capacitive pressure sensor using a commercial 0.18 µm CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) process and postprocess. The pressure sensor is capacitive and the structure is formed by an Al top electrode enclosed in a suspended SiO2 membrane, which acts as a movable electrode against a bottom or stationary Al electrode fixed on the SiO2 substrate. Both the movable and fixed electrodes form a variable parallel plate capacitor, whose capacitance varies with the applied pressure on the surface. In order to release the membranes the CMOS layers need to be applied postprocess and this mainly consists of four steps: (1) deposition and patterning of PECVD (plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition) oxide to protect CMOS pads and to open the pressure sensor top surface, (2) etching of the sacrificial layer to release the suspended membrane, (3) deposition of PECVD oxide to seal the etching holes and creating vacuum inside the gap, and finally (4) etching of the passivation oxide to open the pads and allow electrical connections. This sensor design and fabrication is suitable to obey the design rules of a CMOS foundry and since it only uses low-temperature processes, it allows monolithic integration with other types of CMOS compatible sensors and IC (integrated circuit) interface on a single chip. Experimental results showed that the pressure sensor has a highly linear sensitivity of 0.14 fF kPa-1 in the pressure range of 0-300 kPa.

  17. Microarray results: how accurate are they?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mane Shrikant

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarray technology is a powerful technique that was recently developed in order to analyze thousands of genes in a short time. Presently, microarrays, or chips, of the cDNA type and oligonucleotide type are available from several sources. The number of publications in this area is increasing exponentially. Results In this study, microarray data obtained from two different commercially available systems were critically evaluated. Our analysis revealed several inconsistencies in the data obtained from the two different microarrays. Problems encountered included inconsistent sequence fidelity of the spotted microarrays, variability of differential expression, low specificity of cDNA microarray probes, discrepancy in fold-change calculation and lack of probe specificity for different isoforms of a gene. Conclusions In view of these pitfalls, data from microarray analysis need to be interpreted cautiously.

  18. Further developments on a novel color sensitive CMOS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langfelder, G.; Longoni, A.; Zaraga, F.

    2009-05-01

    The Transverse Field Detector (TFD) is a recently proposed Silicon pixel device designed to perform color imaging without the use of color filters. The color detection principle is based on the dependence of the Silicon absorption coefficient from the wavelength and relies on the generation of a suitable transverse electric field configuration, within the semiconductor active layer, to drive photocarriers generated at different depths towards different collecting electrodes. Each electrode has in this way a different spectral response with respect to the incoming wavelength. Pixels with three or four different spectral responses can be implemented within ~ 6 μm of pixel dimension. Thanks to the compatibility with standard triple well CMOS processes, the TFD can be used in an Active Pixel Sensor exploiting a dedicated readout topology, based on a single transistor charge amplifier. The overall APS electronics includes five transistors (5T) and a feedback capacitance, with a resulting overall fill factor around 50%. In this work the three colors and four colors TFD pixel simulations and implementations in a 90 nm standard CMOS triple well technology are described. Details on the design of a TFD APS mini matrix are provided and preliminary experimental results on four colors pixels are presented.

  19. How Can Microarrays Unlock Asthma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alen Faiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a complex disease regulated by the interplay of a large number of underlying mechanisms which contribute to the overall pathology. Despite various breakthroughs identifying genes related to asthma, our understanding of the importance of the genetic background remains limited. Although current therapies for asthma are relatively effective, subpopulations of asthmatics do not respond to these regimens. By unlocking the role of these underlying mechanisms, a source of novel and more effective treatments may be identified. In the new age of high-throughput technologies, gene-expression microarrays provide a quick and effective method of identifying novel genes and pathways, which would be impossible to discover using an individual gene screening approach. In this review we follow the history of expression microarray technologies and describe their contributions to advancing our current knowledge and understanding of asthma pathology.

  20. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna

    2016-07-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  1. High-Q CMOS-integrated photonic crystal microcavity devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Karan K; Orcutt, Jason S; Tehar-Zahav, Ofer; Sternberg, Zvi; Bafrali, Reha; Meade, Roy; Ram, Rajeev J

    2014-01-01

    Integrated optical resonators are necessary or beneficial in realizations of various functions in scaled photonic platforms, including filtering, modulation, and detection in classical communication systems, optical sensing, as well as addressing and control of solid state emitters for quantum technologies. Although photonic crystal (PhC) microresonators can be advantageous to the more commonly used microring devices due to the former's low mode volumes, fabrication of PhC cavities has typically relied on electron-beam lithography, which precludes integration with large-scale and reproducible CMOS fabrication. Here, we demonstrate wavelength-scale polycrystalline silicon (pSi) PhC microresonators with Qs up to 60,000 fabricated within a bulk CMOS process. Quasi-1D resonators in lateral p-i-n structures allow for resonant defect-state photodetection in all-silicon devices, exhibiting voltage-dependent quantum efficiencies in the range of a few 10 s of %, few-GHz bandwidths, and low dark currents, in devices with loaded Qs in the range of 4,300-9,300; one device, for example, exhibited a loaded Q of 4,300, 25% quantum efficiency (corresponding to a responsivity of 0.31 A/W), 3 GHz bandwidth, and 30 nA dark current at a reverse bias of 30 V. This work demonstrates the possibility for practical integration of PhC microresonators with active electro-optic capability into large-scale silicon photonic systems.

  2. Noise in a CMOS digital pixel sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Chi; Yao Suying; Xu Jiangtao

    2011-01-01

    Based on the study of noise performance in CMOS digital pixel sensor (DPS),a mathematical model of noise is established with the pulse-width-modulation (PWM) principle.Compared with traditional CMOS image sensors,the integration time is different and A/D conversion is implemented in each PWM DPS pixel.Then,the quantitative calculating formula of system noise is derived.It is found that dark current shot noise is the dominant noise source in low light region while photodiode shot noise becomes significantly important in the bright region.In this model,photodiode shot noise does not vary with luminance,but dark current shot noise does.According to increasing photodiode capacitance and the comparator's reference voltage or optimizing the mismatch in the comparator,the total noise can be reduced.These results serve as a guideline for the design of PWM DPS.

  3. IR CMOS: infrared enhanced silicon imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pralle, M. U.; Carey, J. E.; Haddad, Homayoon; Vineis, C.; Sickler, J.; Li, X.; Jiang, J.; Sahebi, F.; Palsule, C.; McKee, J.

    2013-06-01

    SiOnyx has developed visible and infrared CMOS image sensors leveraging a proprietary ultrafast laser semiconductor process technology. This technology demonstrates 10 fold improvements in infrared sensitivity over incumbent imaging technology while maintaining complete compatibility with standard CMOS image sensor process flows. Furthermore, these sensitivity enhancements are achieved on a focal plane with state of the art noise performance of 2 electrons/pixel. By capturing light in the visible regime as well as infrared light from the night glow, this sensor technology provides imaging in daytime through twilight and into nighttime conditions. The measured 10x quantum efficiency at the critical 1064 nm laser node enables see spot imaging capabilities in a variety of ambient conditions. The spectral sensitivity is from 400 to 1200 nm.

  4. Ultralow-Loss CMOS Copper Plasmonic Waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu; Yakubovsky, Dmitry I; Kirtaev, Roman V; Volkov, Valentyn S

    2016-01-13

    Surface plasmon polaritons can give a unique opportunity to manipulate light at a scale well below the diffraction limit reducing the size of optical components down to that of nanoelectronic circuits. At the same time, plasmonics is mostly based on noble metals, which are not compatible with microelectronics manufacturing technologies. This prevents plasmonic components from integration with both silicon photonics and silicon microelectronics. Here, we demonstrate ultralow-loss copper plasmonic waveguides fabricated in a simple complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible process, which can outperform gold plasmonic waveguides simultaneously providing long (>40 μm) propagation length and deep subwavelength (∼λ(2)/50, where λ is the free-space wavelength) mode confinement in the telecommunication spectral range. These results create the backbone for the development of a CMOS plasmonic platform and its integration in future electronic chips. PMID:26654281

  5. Noise in a CMOS digital pixel sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the study of noise performance in CMOS digital pixel sensor (DPS), a mathematical model of noise is established with the pulse-width-modulation (PWM) principle. Compared with traditional CMOS image sensors, the integration time is different and A/D conversion is implemented in each PWM DPS pixel. Then, the quantitative calculating formula of system noise is derived. It is found that dark current shot noise is the dominant noise source in low light region while photodiode shot noise becomes significantly important in the bright region. In this model, photodiode shot noise does not vary with luminance, but dark current shot noise does. According to increasing photodiode capacitance and the comparator's reference voltage or optimizing the mismatch in the comparator, the total noise can be reduced. These results serve as a guideline for the design of PWM DPS. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  6. An Implantable CMOS Amplifier for Nerve Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannik Hammel; Lehmann, Torsten

    2001-01-01

    on the amplifier input nodes. The method for signal recovery from noisy nerve signals is presented. A prototype amplifier is realized in a standard digital 0.5 μm CMOS single poly, n-well process. The prototype amplifier features a gain of 80 dB over a 3.6 kHz bandwidth, a CMRR of more than 87 dB and a PSRR...

  7. Air Quality Monitoring Using CCD/ CMOS Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Low, Khee Lam; Joanna, Tan Choay Ee; Sim, Keat; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat; and, Khiruddin Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, we showed a method for measuring of the air quality index by using the CCD/CMOS sensor. We showed two examples to obtain index values by using webcam and CCTV. Both devices provided a high correlation between the measured and estimated PM10. So, the imaging method is capable to measure PM10 values in the environment. Futher application can be conducted using different devices.

  8. Cantilever-Based Biosensors in CMOS Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Kirstein, K -U; Zimmermann, M; Vancura, C; Volden, T; Song, W H; Lichtenberg, J; Hierlemannn, A

    2011-01-01

    Single-chip CMOS-based biosensors that feature microcantilevers as transducer elements are presented. The cantilevers are functionalized for the capturing of specific analytes, e.g., proteins or DNA. The binding of the analyte changes the mechanical properties of the cantilevers such as surface stress and resonant frequency, which can be detected by an integrated Wheatstone bridge. The monolithic integrated readout allows for a high signal-to-noise ratio, lowers the sensitivity to external interference and enables autonomous device operation.

  9. A Light Source for Testing CMOS Imagers

    OpenAIRE

    Hancock, Jed J.; Baker, Doran

    2003-01-01

    Testing the optical properties of complementary metal oxide (CMOS) imagers requires a light source. The light source must produce stable uniform light with calibrated wavelength and intensity. Available commercial light source units are costly and often unalterable to a custom test setup. The proposed light source is designed to be affordable and adaptable while maintaining the necessary optical quality. The design consists of an array of light emitting diodes (LED), an infrared (IR) cut-off ...

  10. CMOS Camera Array With Onboard Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gat, Nahum

    2009-01-01

    A compact CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) camera system has been developed with high resolution (1.3 Megapixels), a USB (universal serial bus) 2.0 interface, and an onboard memory. Exposure times, and other operating parameters, are sent from a control PC via the USB port. Data from the camera can be received via the USB port and the interface allows for simple control and data capture through a laptop computer.

  11. Construction of metastatic spinal cancer tissue microarrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xinghai; Chen Huajiang; Xiao Jianru; Yuan Wen; Jia Lianshun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the construction of metastatic spinal cancer (MSC) tissue microarrays and validate its value in immunohistochemical study of MSC. Methods: Paraffin-embedded specimens from 71 MSC cases and 6 primary tumor cases were selected as donor blocks and prepared into MSC tissue microarrays by tissue array arrangement, the steps of which included location, punching, sampling, sample seeding, and re-diagnosis by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) as well as MMP-9 and MMP-14 immunohistochemical staining. Results: The MSC tissue microarrays thus constructed were intact and crackless, containing 154 complete and well arranged microarray points. None of the sectioned tissue microarrays was lost, and the results of HE staining was consistent with the primary pathologic diagnoses. Immunohistochemical staining was also good without non-specific or marginal effect. Conclusion: The MSC tissue microarrays have a high value in the immunohistochemical study of MSC.

  12. CMOS-controlled rapidly tunable photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ray

    With rapidly increasing data bandwidth demands, wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) optical access networks seem unavoidable in the near future. To operate WDM optical networks in an efficient scheme, wavelength reconfigurability and scalability of the network are crucial. Unfortunately, most of the existing wavelength tunable technologies are neither rapidly tunable nor spectrally programmable. This dissertation presents a tunable photodetector that is designed for dynamic-wavelength allocation WDM network environments. The wavelength tuning mechanism is completely different from existing technologies. The spectrum of this detector is programmable through low-voltage digital patterns. Since the wavelength selection is achieved by electronic means, the device wavelength reconfiguration time is as fast as the electronic switching time. In this dissertation work, we have demonstrated a tunable detector that is hybridly integrated with its customized CMOS driver and receiver with nanosecond wavelength reconfiguration time. In addition to its nanosecond wavelength reconfiguration time, the spectrum of this detector is digitally programmable, which means that it can adapt to system changes without re-fabrication. We have theoretically developed and experimentally demonstrated two device operating algorithms based on the same orthogonal device-optics basis. Both the rapid wavelength tuning time and the scalability make this novel device very viable for new reconfigurable WDM networks. By taking advantage of CMOS circuit design, this detector concept can be further extended for simultaneous multiple wavelength detection. We have developed one possible chip architecture and have designed a CMOS tunable optical demux for simultaneous controllable two-wavelength detection.

  13. CMOS imagers from phototransduction to image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Etienne-Cummings, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    The idea of writing a book on CMOS imaging has been brewing for several years. It was placed on a fast track after we agreed to organize a tutorial on CMOS sensors for the 2004 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS 2004). This tutorial defined the structure of the book, but as first time authors/editors, we had a lot to learn about the logistics of putting together information from multiple sources. Needless to say, it was a long road between the tutorial and the book, and it took more than a few months to complete. We hope that you will find our journey worthwhile and the collated information useful. The laboratories of the authors are located at many universities distributed around the world. Their unifying theme, however, is the advancement of knowledge for the development of systems for CMOS imaging and image processing. We hope that this book will highlight the ideas that have been pioneered by the authors, while providing a roadmap for new practitioners in this field to exploit exc...

  14. Dynamic of active microorganisms inhabiting a bioleaching industrial heap of low‐grade copper sulfide ore monitored by real‐time PCR and oligonucleotide prokaryotic acidophile microarray

    OpenAIRE

    Remonsellez, Francisco; Galleguillos, Felipe; Moreno‐Paz, Mercedes; Parro, Víctor; Acosta, Mauricio; Demergasso, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Summary The bioleaching of metal sulfide has developed into a very important industrial process and understanding the microbial dynamic is key to advancing commercial bioleaching operations. Here we report the first quantitative description of the dynamic of active communities in an industrial bioleaching heap. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was the most abundant during the first part of the leaching cycle, while the abundance of Leptospirillum ferriphilum and Ferroplasma acidiphilum increase...

  15. Comprehensive comparison of six microarray technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Yauk, Carole L.; Berndt, M. Lynn; Williams, Andrew; Douglas, George R

    2004-01-01

    Microarray technology is extensively used in biological research. The applied technologies vary greatly between laboratories, and outstanding questions remain regarding the degree of correlation among approaches. Recently, there has been a drive toward ensuring high-quality microarray data by the implementation of MIAME (Minimal Information About a Microarray Experiment) guidelines and an emphasis on ensuring public-availability to all datasets. However, despite its current widespread use and...

  16. MICROARRAYS AND THEIR POTENTIAL IN MEDICINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erick Ling; Jie Xu

    2003-01-01

    Advancement in microarray technology can revolutionize many aspects of medicine. Microarrays have applications in gene expression profiling, genotyping, mutation analysis, gene identification, and pharmacology. This paper provides a brief review on the use of microarrays in studies of cancer, infectious diseases, chromosome disorders, neurological/mental disorders, and drugs, along with a prospect on its great potential in diagnosis, prognosis and the treatment of human diseases.

  17. A Standard CMOS Humidity Sensor without Post-Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Nizhnik

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A 2 µW power dissipation, voltage-output, humidity sensor accurate to 5% relative humidity was developed using the LFoundry 0.15 µm CMOS technology without post-processing. The sensor consists of a woven lateral array of electrodes implemented in CMOS top metal, a Intervia Photodielectric 8023-10 humidity-sensitive layer, and a CMOS capacitance to voltage converter.

  18. Interferometric comparison of the performance of a CMOS and sCMOS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Moreno, J. M.; De la Torre I., Manuel H.; Hernández-Montes, M. S.; Pérez-López, Carlos; Mendoza S., Fernando

    2015-08-01

    We present an analysis of the imaging performance of two state-of-the-art sensors widely used in the nondestructive- testing area (NDT). The analysis is based on the quantification of the signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio from an optical phase image. The calculation of the SNR is based on the relation of the median (average) and standard deviation measurements over specific areas of interest in the phase images of both sensors. This retrieved phase is coming from the vibrational behavior of a large object by means of an out-of-plane holographic interferometer. The SNR is used as a figure-of-merit to evaluate and compare the performance of the CMOS and scientific CMOS (sCMOS) camera as part of the experimental set-up. One of the cameras has a high speed CMOS sensor while the other has a high resolution sCMOS sensor. The object under study is a metallically framed table with a Formica cover with an observable area of 1.1 m2. The vibration induced to the sample is performed by a linear step motor with an attached tip in the motion stage. Each camera is used once at the time to record the deformation keeping the same experimental conditions for each case. These measurements may complement the conventional procedures or technical information commonly used to evaluate a camerás performance such as: quantum efficiency, spatial resolution and others. Results present post processed images from both cameras, but showing a smoother and easy to unwrap optical phase coming from those recorded with the sCMOS camera.

  19. Protein Microarrays for Quantitative Detection of PAI-1 in Serum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Ma; Qing-yun Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Objective:Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAl-1),one crucial component of the plasminogen activator system,is a major player in the pathogenesis of many vascular diseases as well as in cancer.High levels of PAI-1 in breast cancer tissue are associated with poor prognosis.The aim of this study is to evaluate rigorously the potential of serum PAl-1 concentration functioning as a general screening test in diagnostic or prognostic assays.Methods:A protein-microarray-based sandwich fluorescence immunoassay (FIA) was developed to detect PAl-1 in serum.Several conditions of this microarray-based FIA were optimized to establish an efficacious method.Serum specimens of 84 healthy women and 285 women with breast cancer were analyzed using the optimized FIA microarray.Results:The median serum PAl-1 level of breast cancer patients was higher than that of healthy women (109.7 ng/ml vs.63.4 ng/ml).Analysis of covariance revealed that PAl-1 levels of the two groups were significantly different (P<0.001) when controlling for an age effect on PAl-1 levels.However,PAl-1 values in TNM stage Ⅰ-Ⅳ patients respectively were not significantly different from each other.Conclusion:This microarray-based sandwich FIA holds potential for quantitative analysis of tumor markers such as PAl-1.

  20. On-chip solar battery structure for CMOS LSI

    OpenAIRE

    Arima, Yutaka; Ehara, Masaya

    2006-01-01

    A built-in method of on-chip solar battery in a CMOS LSI is proposed. The proposed solar battery can be formed using conventional CMOS process technology. It can generate a high voltage of 0.6-0.83 V by a series connection structure of two types of p-n junction diodes formed with the CMOS circuit simultaneously on the LSI chip. The generated voltage is sufficient to drive the conventional CMOS circuit without modi. cation. The test chip was produced experimentally using conventional 0.35 mu m...

  1. Development of a Depleted Monolithic CMOS Sensor in a 150 nm CMOS Technology for the ATLAS Inner Tracker Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, T; Barbero, M; Degerli, Y; Godiot, S; Guilloux, F; Hemperek, T; Hirono, T; Krüger, H; Liu, J; Orsini, F; Pangaud, P; Rozanov, A; Wermes, N

    2016-01-01

    The recent R&D focus on CMOS sensors with charge collection in a depleted zone has opened new perspectives for CMOS sensors as fast and radiation hard pixel devices. These sensors, labelled as depleted CMOS sensors (DMAPS), have already shown promising performance as feasible candidates for the ATLAS Inner Tracker (ITk) upgrade, possibly replacing the current passive sensors. A further step to exploit the potential of DMAPS is to investigate the suitability of equipping the outer layers of the ATLAS ITk upgrade with fully monolithic CMOS sensors. This paper presents the development of a depleted monolithic CMOS pixel sensor designed in the LFoundry 150 nm CMOS technology, with the focus on design details and simulation results.

  2. Current-mode CMOS hybrid image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyhesan, Mohammad Kassim

    Digital imaging is growing rapidly making Complimentary Metal-Oxide-Semi conductor (CMOS) image sensor-based cameras indispensable in many modern life devices like cell phones, surveillance devices, personal computers, and tablets. For various purposes wireless portable image systems are widely deployed in many indoor and outdoor places such as hospitals, urban areas, streets, highways, forests, mountains, and towers. However, the increased demand on high-resolution image sensors and improved processing features is expected to increase the power consumption of the CMOS sensor-based camera systems. Increased power consumption translates into a reduced battery life-time. The increased power consumption might not be a problem if there is access to a nearby charging station. On the other hand, the problem arises if the image sensor is located in widely spread areas, unfavorable to human intervention, and difficult to reach. Given the limitation of energy sources available for wireless CMOS image sensor, an energy harvesting technique presents a viable solution to extend the sensor life-time. Energy can be harvested from the sun light or the artificial light surrounding the sensor itself. In this thesis, we propose a current-mode CMOS hybrid image sensor capable of energy harvesting and image capture. The proposed sensor is based on a hybrid pixel that can be programmed to perform the task of an image sensor and the task of a solar cell to harvest energy. The basic idea is to design a pixel that can be configured to exploit its internal photodiode to perform two functions: image sensing and energy harvesting. As a proof of concept a 40 x 40 array of hybrid pixels has been designed and fabricated in a standard 0.5 microm CMOS process. Measurement results show that up to 39 microW of power can be harvested from the array under 130 Klux condition with an energy efficiency of 220 nJ /pixel /frame. The proposed image sensor is a current-mode image sensor which has several

  3. "Harshlighting" small blemishes on microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittkowski Knut M

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microscopists are familiar with many blemishes that fluorescence images can have due to dust and debris, glass flaws, uneven distribution of fluids or surface coatings, etc. Microarray scans show similar artefacts, which affect the analysis, particularly when one tries to detect subtle changes. However, most blemishes are hard to find by the unaided eye, particularly in high-density oligonucleotide arrays (HDONAs. Results We present a method that harnesses the statistical power provided by having several HDONAs available, which are obtained under similar conditions except for the experimental factor. This method "harshlights" blemishes and renders them evident. We find empirically that about 25% of our chips are blemished, and we analyze the impact of masking them on screening for differentially expressed genes. Conclusion Experiments attempting to assess subtle expression changes should be carefully screened for blemishes on the chips. The proposed method provides investigators with a novel robust approach to improve the sensitivity of microarray analyses. By utilizing topological information to identify and mask blemishes prior to model based analyses, the method prevents artefacts from confounding the process of background correction, normalization, and summarization.

  4. Current Development of CMOS Image Sensors%CMOS 图像传感器的发展现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宝元; 吴三灵; 温波; 焦明纲; 周发明

    2000-01-01

    Aim To review the current development of CMOS image sensors. Methods The background, architecture and current development of CMOS image sensors is describled. The trade-offs between the CMOS image sensors and the CCD image sensors are put forword. Results The development tendency of CMOS image sensors is discussed. Conclusion The CMOS image sensor has the potential of a wide range of application.%目的 了解当前CMOS图像传感器的发展状况. 方法 详细介绍了图像传感器的历史背景、发展现状、像素单元的结构、工作原理以及 CMOS 图像传感器芯片的整体结构,并比较了 CMOS 图像传感器和 CCD 图像传感器的优、 缺点. 结果 指出了 CMOS 图像传感器发展趋势. 结论 CMOS 图像传感器具有美好的发展前途.

  5. Development of a multi-analyte CMOS sensor for point-of-care testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Klapproth

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A typical microarray experiment requires both a biochip on which the biological reactions take place and a microarray scanner for analysis and visualization of the data. Here, we report on the generation of a chip, which consists of a CMOS photodiode array onto which receptors are immobilized and which are used for the detection and quantification of proteins in sera solution. Such an approach allows direct electronic read-out of the chip via a computer port so that the size of the whole analytical setup is very compact, opening the avenue to the generation of simple handheld devices. ELISA reactions directly performed on the surface of the photodiode arrays are used to measure a number of serum factors with a broad range in concentrations of samples with volumes of less than 10 μl. As in physiological sera analyte concentrations of the different parameters vary frequently by several orders of magnitude, parallel competitive reactions are used to adjust the dynamic range of several ELISA tests on the chip. We show as a demonstration case that this allows to quantify simultaneously C-reactive protein, Immunoglobulin E, Cystatin C, Myoglobin and Ferritin in a single assay.

  6. Disc-based microarrays: principles and analytical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Sergi; Puchades, Rosa; Maquieira, Ángel

    2016-07-01

    The idea of using disk drives to monitor molecular biorecognition events on regular optical discs has received considerable attention during the last decade. CDs, DVDs, Blu-ray discs and other new optical discs are universal and versatile supports with the potential for development of protein and DNA microarrays. Besides, standard disk drives incorporated in personal computers can be used as compact and affordable optical reading devices. Consequently, a CD technology, resulting from the audio-video industry, has been used to develop analytical applications in health care, environmental monitoring, food safety and quality assurance. The review presents and critically evaluates the current state of the art of disc-based microarrays with illustrative examples, including past, current and future developments. Special mention is made of the analytical developments that use either chemically activated or raw standard CDs where proteins, oligonucleotides, peptides, haptens or other biological probes are immobilized. The discs are also used to perform the assays and must maintain their readability with standard optical drives. The concept and principle of evolving disc-based microarrays and the evolution of disk drives as optical detectors are also described. The review concludes with the most relevant uses ordered chronologically to provide an overview of the progress of CD technology applications in the life sciences. Also, it provides a selection of important references to the current literature. Graphical Abstract High density disc-based microarrays. PMID:26922341

  7. Application of microarray technology in pulmonary diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Patlakas George; Tzouvelekis Argyris; Bouros Demosthenes

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Microarrays are a powerful tool that have multiple applications both in clinical and cell biology arenas of common lung diseases. To exemplify how this tool can be useful, in this review, we will provide an overview of the application of microarray technology in research relevant to common lung diseases and present some of the future perspectives.

  8. CMOS APS detector characterization for quantitative X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endrizzi, Marco, E-mail: m.endrizzi@ucl.ac.uk [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Siena, Via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN, sezione di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Oliva, Piernicola [Dipartimento di Chimica e Farmacia, Università di Sassari, via Piandanna 4, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN, Sezione di Cagliari, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Golosio, Bruno [Sezione di Matematica, Fisica e Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Università di Sassari, via Piandanna 4, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN, Sezione di Cagliari, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Delogu, Pasquale [Dipartimento di Fisica “E. Fermi”, Università di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN, sezione di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray Imaging detector based on CMOS Active Pixel Sensor and structured scintillator is characterized for quantitative X-ray imaging in the energy range 11–30 keV. Linearity, dark noise, spatial resolution and flat-field correction are the characteristics of the detector subject of investigation. The detector response, in terms of mean Analog-to-Digital Unit and noise, is modeled as a function of the energy and intensity of the X-rays. The model is directly tested using monochromatic X-ray beams and it is also indirectly validated by means of polychromatic X-ray-tube spectra. Such a characterization is suitable for quantitative X-ray imaging and the model can be used in simulation studies that take into account the actual performance of the detector.

  9. On the response of a europium doped phosphor-coated CMOS digital imaging detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to assess the information content of a high resolution active pixel CMOS imaging sensor coupled to Gd2O2S:Eu phosphor screens in terms of single index image quality metrics such as the information capacity (IC) and the noise equivalent passband (Ne). Methods: The CMOS sensor was coupled to two Gd2O2S:Eu scintillator screens with coating thicknesses of 33.3 and 65.1 mg/cm2. IC and Ne were obtained by means of experimentally determined parameters such as the modulation transfer function (MTF), the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and the noise equivalent quanta (NEQ). Measurements were performed using the standard IEC-RQA5 radiation beam quality (70 kVp) and a W/Rh beam quality (28 kVp). Results: It was found that the detector response function was linear for the exposure ranges under investigation. At 70 kVp, under the RQA 5 conditions IC values were found to range between 1730 and 1851 bits/mm2 and Ne values were found between 2.28 and 2.52 mm−1. At 28 kVp the corresponding IC values were found to range between 2535 and 2747 bits/mm2, while the Ne values were found between 5.91 and 7.09 mm−1. Conclusion: IC and Ne of the red emitting phosphor/CMOS sensor combination were found with high values suggesting an acceptable imaging performance in terms of information content and sharpness, for X-ray digital imaging. -- Highlights: •Gd2O2S:Eu/CMOS combination has comparable image quality parameters to Gd2O2S:Tb/CMOS. •Information capacity was found with high values suggesting an acceptable imaging performance. •Red emitting phosphors coupled to silicon based optical sensors could be used in developing efficient imaging detectors

  10. The EADGENE Microarray Data Analysis Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Koning, Dirk-Jan; Jaffrézic, Florence; Lund, Mogens Sandø;

    2007-01-01

    Microarray analyses have become an important tool in animal genomics. While their use is becoming widespread, there is still a lot of ongoing research regarding the analysis of microarray data. In the context of a European Network of Excellence, 31 researchers representing 14 research groups from...... 10 countries performed and discussed the statistical analyses of real and simulated 2-colour microarray data that were distributed among participants. The real data consisted of 48 microarrays from a disease challenge experiment in dairy cattle, while the simulated data consisted of 10 microarrays...... statistical weights, to omitting a large number of spots or omitting entire slides. Surprisingly, these very different approaches gave quite similar results when applied to the simulated data, although not all participating groups analysed both real and simulated data. The workshop was very successful...

  11. Développement d'un capteur CMOS intégré pour un futur dosimètre électronique personnel de neutrons

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents the development of CMOS sensors for a future neutron sensitive electronic individual dosemeter. Active dosemeters, exist but do not yet give results as satisfactory as passive devices, being however, mandatory for workers in addition to the passive dosimetry since 1995 (IEC 1323). The RaMsEs group in the laboratory IPHC is exploring a new compact device based on CMOS sensors for operational neutron dosimetry. In this thesis, a dedicated sensor, AlphaRad-2, with low noise ...

  12. Développement d'un capteur de pixels CMOS pour les couches externes du détecteur de vertex ILC

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Liang

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the design of a CMOS pixel sensor prototype (called MIMOSA 31) for the outer layers of the International Linear Collider (ILC) vertex detector. CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) also called monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) have demonstrated attractive performance towards the requirements of the vertex detector of the future linear collider. MIMOSA 31developed at IPHC-Strasbourg is the first pixel sensor integrated with 4-bit column-level ADC for the outer layers. It is compo...

  13. DNA Microarrays for Identifying Fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nölte, M.; Weber, H.; Silkenbeumer, N.; Hjörleifsdottir, S.; Hreggvidsson, G. O.; Marteinsson, V.; Kappel, K.; Planes, S.; Tinti, F.; Magoulas, A.; Garcia Vazquez, E.; Turan, C.; Hervet, C.; Campo Falgueras, D.; Antoniou, A.; Landi, M.; Blohm, D.

    2008-01-01

    In many cases marine organisms and especially their diverse developmental stages are difficult to identify by morphological characters. DNA-based identification methods offer an analytically powerful addition or even an alternative. In this study, a DNA microarray has been developed to be able to investigate its potential as a tool for the identification of fish species from European seas based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequences. Eleven commercially important fish species were selected for a first prototype. Oligonucleotide probes were designed based on the 16S rDNA sequences obtained from 230 individuals of 27 fish species. In addition, more than 1200 sequences of 380 species served as sequence background against which the specificity of the probes was tested in silico. Single target hybridisations with Cy5-labelled, PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments from each of the 11 species on microarrays containing the complete set of probes confirmed their suitability. True-positive, fluorescence signals obtained were at least one order of magnitude stronger than false-positive cross-hybridisations. Single nontarget hybridisations resulted in cross-hybridisation signals at approximately 27% of the cases tested, but all of them were at least one order of magnitude lower than true-positive signals. This study demonstrates that the 16S rDNA gene is suitable for designing oligonucleotide probes, which can be used to differentiate 11 fish species. These data are a solid basis for the second step to create a “Fish Chip” for approximately 50 fish species relevant in marine environmental and fisheries research, as well as control of fisheries products. PMID:18270778

  14. From VHF to UHF CMOS-MEMS Monolithically Integrated Resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teva, Jordi; Berini, Abadal Gabriel; Uranga, A.;

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and characterization of microresonators exhibiting resonance frequencies in the VHF and UHF bands, fabricated using the available layers of the standard and commercial CMOS technology, AMS-0.35mum. The resonators are released in a post-CMOS process cons...

  15. Charge-Transfer CMOS Image Sensors: Device and Radiation Aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramachandra Rao, P.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was twofold: investigating the effect of ionizing radiation on 4-T CMOS image sensors and the possibility of realizing a CCD like sensor in standard 0.18-μm CMOS technology (for medical applications). Both the aims are complementary; borrowing and lending many aspects of radia

  16. Charge-Transfer CMOS Image Sensors: Device and Radiation Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandra Rao, P.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was twofold: investigating the effect of ionizing radiation on 4-T CMOS image sensors and the possibility of realizing a CCD like sensor in standard 0.18-μm CMOS technology (for medical applications). Both the aims are complementary; borrowing and lending many aspects of radiation and device physics amongst each other.

  17. BioCMOS Interfaces and Co-Design

    CERN Document Server

    Carrara, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    The application of CMOS circuits and ASIC VLSI systems to problems in medicine and system biology has led to the emergence of Bio/CMOS Interfaces and Co-Design as an exciting and rapidly growing area of research. The mutual inter-relationships between VLSI-CMOS design and the biophysics of molecules interfacing with silicon and/or onto metals has led to the emergence of the interdisciplinary engineering approach to Bio/CMOS interfaces. This new approach, facilitated by 3D circuit design and nanotechnology, has resulted in new concepts and applications for VLSI systems in the bio-world. This book offers an invaluable reference to the state-of-the-art in Bio/CMOS interfaces. It describes leading-edge research in the field of CMOS design and VLSI development for applications requiring integration of biological molecules onto the chip. It provides multidisciplinary content ranging from biochemistry to CMOS design in order to address Bio/CMOS interface co-design in bio-sensing applications.

  18. High-performance VGA-resolution digital color CMOS imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agwani, Suhail; Domer, Steve; Rubacha, Ray; Stanley, Scott

    1999-04-01

    This paper discusses the performance of a new VGA resolution color CMOS imager developed by Motorola on a 0.5micrometers /3.3V CMOS process. This fully integrated, high performance imager has on chip timing, control, and analog signal processing chain for digital imaging applications. The picture elements are based on 7.8micrometers active CMOS pixels that use pinned photodiodes for higher quantum efficiency and low noise performance. The image processing engine includes a bank of programmable gain amplifiers, line rate clamping for dark offset removal, real time auto white balancing, per column gain and offset calibration, and a 10 bit pipelined RSD analog to digital converter with a programmable input range. Post ADC signal processing includes features such as bad pixel replacement based on user defined thresholds levels, 10 to 8 bit companding and 5 tap FIR filtering. The sensor can be programmed via a standard I2C interface that runs on 3.3V clocks. Programmable features include variable frame rates using a constant frequency master clock, electronic exposure control, continuous or single frame capture, progressive or interlace scanning modes. Each pixel is individually addressable allowing region of interest imaging and image subsampling. The sensor operates with master clock frequencies of up to 13.5MHz resulting in 30FPS. A total programmable gain of 27dB is available. The sensor power dissipation is 400mW at full speed of operation. The low noise design yields a measured 'system on a chip' dynamic range of 50dB thus giving over 8 true bits of resolution. Extremely high conversion gain result in an excellent peak sensitivity of 22V/(mu) J/cm2 or 3.3V/lux-sec. This monolithic image capture and processing engine represent a compete imaging solution making it a true 'camera on a chip'. Yet in its operation it remains extremely easy to use requiring only one clock and a 3.3V power supply. Given the available features and performance levels, this sensor will be

  19. Monolithic CMOS imaging x-ray spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Murray, Stephen S.

    2014-07-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff is developing monolithic CMOS detectors optimized for x-ray astronomy. The goal of this multi-year program is to produce CMOS x-ray imaging spectrometers that are Fano noise limited over the 0.1-10keV energy band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Small format test devices from a previous wafer fabrication run (2011-2012) have recently been back-thinned and tested for response below 1keV. These devices perform as expected in regards to dark current, read noise, spectral response and Quantum Efficiency (QE). We demonstrate that running these devices at rates ~> 1Mpix/second eliminates the need for cooling as shot noise from any dark current is greatly mitigated. The test devices were fabricated on 15μm, high resistivity custom (~30kΩ-cm) epitaxial silicon and have a 16 by 192 pixel format. They incorporate 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels which have ~40μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel analog CDS signal chain. Newer, improved, lower noise detectors have just been fabricated (October 2013). These new detectors are fabricated on 9μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. They incorporate similar 16μm pitch, 6TPPD pixels but have ~ 50% higher sensitivity and much (3×) lower read noise. These new detectors have undergone preliminary testing for functionality in Front Illuminated (FI) form and are presently being prepared for back thinning and packaging. Monolithic CMOS devices such as these, would be ideal candidate detectors for the focal planes of Solar, planetary and other space-borne x-ray astronomy missions. The high through-put, low noise and excellent low energy response, provide high dynamic range and good time resolution; bright, time varying x-ray features could be temporally and

  20. Silicon Light Emitting Devices in CMOS Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong-Da; LIU Hai-Jun; LIU Jin-Bin; GU Ming; HUANG Bei-Ju

    2007-01-01

    @@ Two silicon light emitting devices with different structures are realized in standard 0.35 μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. They operate in reverse breakdown mode and can be turned on at 8.3 V. Output optical powers of 13.6nW and 12.1 nW are measured at 10 V and 100 mA, respectively, and both the calculated light emission intensities are more than 1 mW/cm2. The optical spectra of the two devices are between 600-790 nm with a clear peak near 760 nm.

  1. CMOS biomicrosystems where electronics meets biology

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    "The book will address the-state-of-the-art in integrated Bio-Microsystems that integrate microelectronics with fluidics, photonics, and mechanics. New exciting opportunities in emerging applications that will take system performance beyond offered by traditional CMOS based circuits are discussed in detail. The book is a must for anyone serious about microelectronics integration possibilities for future technologies. The book is written by top notch international experts in industry and academia. The intended audience is practicing engineers with electronics background that want to learn about integrated microsystems. The book will be also used as a recommended reading and supplementary material in graduate course curriculum"--

  2. Plasmonic Modulator Using CMOS Compatible Material Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Kinsey, Nathaniel; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a design of ultra-compact plasmonic modulator is proposed and numerically analyzed. The device l ayout utilizes alternative plas monic materials such as tr ansparent conducting oxides and titanium nitride which potentially can be applied for CMOS compatible process. The modulation...... is obtained by varying the ca rrier concentration of th e transparent conducting oxide layer and exciting plasmonic resonance in the structure. The analysis shows that an extinction ratio of 46 dB/μm can be achieved at the telecommunication wavelength. Proposed structure is particularly convenient...

  3. Variation-aware advanced CMOS devices and SRAM

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Changhwan

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of contemporary issues in complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) device design, describing how to overcome process-induced random variations such as line-edge-roughness, random-dopant-fluctuation, and work-function variation, and the applications of novel CMOS devices to cache memory (or Static Random Access Memory, SRAM). The author places emphasis on the physical understanding of process-induced random variation as well as the introduction of novel CMOS device structures and their application to SRAM. The book outlines the technical predicament facing state-of-the-art CMOS technology development, due to the effect of ever-increasing process-induced random/intrinsic variation in transistor performance at the sub-30-nm technology nodes. Therefore, the physical understanding of process-induced random/intrinsic variations and the technical solutions to address these issues plays a key role in new CMOS technology development. This book aims to provide the reade...

  4. A CMOS high speed imaging system design based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hong; Wang, Huawei; Cao, Jianzhong; Qiao, Mingrui

    2015-10-01

    CMOS sensors have more advantages than traditional CCD sensors. The imaging system based on CMOS has become a hot spot in research and development. In order to achieve the real-time data acquisition and high-speed transmission, we design a high-speed CMOS imaging system on account of FPGA. The core control chip of this system is XC6SL75T and we take advantages of CameraLink interface and AM41V4 CMOS image sensors to transmit and acquire image data. AM41V4 is a 4 Megapixel High speed 500 frames per second CMOS image sensor with global shutter and 4/3" optical format. The sensor uses column parallel A/D converters to digitize the images. The CameraLink interface adopts DS90CR287 and it can convert 28 bits of LVCMOS/LVTTL data into four LVDS data stream. The reflected light of objects is photographed by the CMOS detectors. CMOS sensors convert the light to electronic signals and then send them to FPGA. FPGA processes data it received and transmits them to upper computer which has acquisition cards through CameraLink interface configured as full models. Then PC will store, visualize and process images later. The structure and principle of the system are both explained in this paper and this paper introduces the hardware and software design of the system. FPGA introduces the driven clock of CMOS. The data in CMOS is converted to LVDS signals and then transmitted to the data acquisition cards. After simulation, the paper presents a row transfer timing sequence of CMOS. The system realized real-time image acquisition and external controls.

  5. Theoretical performance analysis for CMOS based high resolution detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    High resolution imaging capabilities are essential for accurately guiding successful endovascular interventional procedures. Present x-ray imaging detectors are not always adequate due to their inherent limitations. The newly-developed high-resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF-CCD) detector has demonstrated excellent clinical image quality; however, further improvement in performance and physical design may be possible using CMOS sensors. We have thus calculated the theoretical performance of two proposed CMOS detectors which may be used as a successor to the MAF. The proposed detectors have a 300 μm thick HL-type CsI phosphor, a 50 μm-pixel CMOS sensor with and without a variable gain light image intensifier (LII), and are designated MAF-CMOS-LII and MAF-CMOS, respectively. For the performance evaluation, linear cascade modeling was used. The detector imaging chains were divided into individual stages characterized by one of the basic processes (quantum gain, binomial selection, stochastic and deterministic blurring, additive noise). Ranges of readout noise and exposure were used to calculate the detectors' MTF and DQE. The MAF-CMOS showed slightly better MTF than the MAF-CMOS-LII, but the MAF-CMOS-LII showed far better DQE, especially for lower exposures. The proposed detectors can have improved MTF and DQE compared with the present high resolution MAF detector. The performance of the MAF-CMOS is excellent for the angiography exposure range; however it is limited at fluoroscopic levels due to additive instrumentation noise. The MAF-CMOS-LII, having the advantage of the variable LII gain, can overcome the noise limitation and hence may perform exceptionally for the full range of required exposures; however, it is more complex and hence more expensive. PMID:24353390

  6. Recent Progress on Developments and Characterization of Hybrid CMOS X-ray Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Falcone, Abe D; Griffith, Christopher; Bongiorno, Stephen; Burrows, David N

    2012-01-01

    Future space-based X-ray telescope missions are likely to have significantly increased demands on detector read out rates due to increased collection area, and there will be a desire to minimize radiation damage in the interests of maintaining spectral resolution. While CCDs have met the requirements of past missions, active pixel sensors are likely to be a standard choice for some future missions due to their inherent radiation hardness and fast, flexible read-out architecture. One form of active pixel sensor is the hybrid CMOS sensor. In a joint program of Penn State University and Teledyne Imaging Sensors, hybrid CMOS sensors have been developed for use as X-ray detectors. Results of this development effort and tests of fabricated detectors will be presented, along with potential applications for future missions.

  7. Transcriptome analysis of zebrafish embryogenesis using microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinnakaruppan Mathavan

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Zebrafish (Danio rerio is a well-recognized model for the study of vertebrate developmental genetics, yet at the same time little is known about the transcriptional events that underlie zebrafish embryogenesis. Here we have employed microarray analysis to study the temporal activity of developmentally regulated genes during zebrafish embryogenesis. Transcriptome analysis at 12 different embryonic time points covering five different developmental stages (maternal, blastula, gastrula, segmentation, and pharyngula revealed a highly dynamic transcriptional profile. Hierarchical clustering, stage-specific clustering, and algorithms to detect onset and peak of gene expression revealed clearly demarcated transcript clusters with maximum gene activity at distinct developmental stages as well as co-regulated expression of gene groups involved in dedicated functions such as organogenesis. Our study also revealed a previously unidentified cohort of genes that are transcribed prior to the mid-blastula transition, a time point earlier than when the zygotic genome was traditionally thought to become active. Here we provide, for the first time to our knowledge, a comprehensive list of developmentally regulated zebrafish genes and their expression profiles during embryogenesis, including novel information on the temporal expression of several thousand previously uncharacterized genes. The expression data generated from this study are accessible to all interested scientists from our institute resource database (http://giscompute.gis.a-star.edu.sg/~govind/zebrafish/data_download.html.

  8. MARS: Microarray analysis, retrieval, and storage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheideler Marcel

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray analysis has become a widely used technique for the study of gene-expression patterns on a genomic scale. As more and more laboratories are adopting microarray technology, there is a need for powerful and easy to use microarray databases facilitating array fabrication, labeling, hybridization, and data analysis. The wealth of data generated by this high throughput approach renders adequate database and analysis tools crucial for the pursuit of insights into the transcriptomic behavior of cells. Results MARS (Microarray Analysis and Retrieval System provides a comprehensive MIAME supportive suite for storing, retrieving, and analyzing multi color microarray data. The system comprises a laboratory information management system (LIMS, a quality control management, as well as a sophisticated user management system. MARS is fully integrated into an analytical pipeline of microarray image analysis, normalization, gene expression clustering, and mapping of gene expression data onto biological pathways. The incorporation of ontologies and the use of MAGE-ML enables an export of studies stored in MARS to public repositories and other databases accepting these documents. Conclusion We have developed an integrated system tailored to serve the specific needs of microarray based research projects using a unique fusion of Web based and standalone applications connected to the latest J2EE application server technology. The presented system is freely available for academic and non-profit institutions. More information can be found at http://genome.tugraz.at.

  9. Modulated CMOS camera for fluorescence lifetime microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongtao; Holst, Gerhard; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate method to measure the fluorescence lifetime of entire images. However, the complexity and high costs involved in construction of such a system limit the extensive use of this technique. PCO AG recently released the first luminescence lifetime imaging camera based on a high frequency modulated CMOS image sensor, QMFLIM2. Here we tested and provide operational procedures to calibrate the camera and to improve the accuracy using corrections necessary for image analysis. With its flexible input/output options, we are able to use a modulated laser diode or a 20 MHz pulsed white supercontinuum laser as the light source. The output of the camera consists of a stack of modulated images that can be analyzed by the SimFCS software using the phasor approach. The nonuniform system response across the image sensor must be calibrated at the pixel level. This pixel calibration is crucial and needed for every camera settings, e.g. modulation frequency and exposure time. A significant dependency of the modulation signal on the intensity was also observed and hence an additional calibration is needed for each pixel depending on the pixel intensity level. These corrections are important not only for the fundamental frequency, but also for the higher harmonics when using the pulsed supercontinuum laser. With these post data acquisition corrections, the PCO CMOS-FLIM camera can be used for various biomedical applications requiring a large frame and high speed acquisition. PMID:26500051

  10. A Biologically Inspired CMOS Image Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Mukul

    2013-01-01

    Biological systems are a source of inspiration in the development of small autonomous sensor nodes. The two major types of optical vision systems found in nature are the single aperture human eye and the compound eye of insects. The latter are among the most compact and smallest vision sensors. The eye is a compound of individual lenses with their own photoreceptor arrays.  The visual system of insects allows them to fly with a limited intelligence and brain processing power. A CMOS image sensor replicating the perception of vision in insects is discussed and designed in this book for industrial (machine vision) and medical applications. The CMOS metal layer is used to create an embedded micro-polarizer able to sense polarization information. This polarization information is shown to be useful in applications like real time material classification and autonomous agent navigation. Further the sensor is equipped with in pixel analog and digital memories which allow variation of the dynamic range and in-pixel b...

  11. Modulated CMOS camera for fluorescence lifetime microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongtao; Holst, Gerhard; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate method to measure the fluorescence lifetime of entire images. However, the complexity and high costs involved in construction of such a system limit the extensive use of this technique. PCO AG recently released the first luminescence lifetime imaging camera based on a high frequency modulated CMOS image sensor, QMFLIM2. Here we tested and provide operational procedures to calibrate the camera and to improve the accuracy using corrections necessary for image analysis. With its flexible input/output options, we are able to use a modulated laser diode or a 20 MHz pulsed white supercontinuum laser as the light source. The output of the camera consists of a stack of modulated images that can be analyzed by the SimFCS software using the phasor approach. The nonuniform system response across the image sensor must be calibrated at the pixel level. This pixel calibration is crucial and needed for every camera settings, e.g. modulation frequency and exposure time. A significant dependency of the modulation signal on the intensity was also observed and hence an additional calibration is needed for each pixel depending on the pixel intensity level. These corrections are important not only for the fundamental frequency, but also for the higher harmonics when using the pulsed supercontinuum laser. With these post data acquisition corrections, the PCO CMOS-FLIM camera can be used for various biomedical applications requiring a large frame and high speed acquisition.

  12. Column-Parallel Single Slope ADC with Digital Correlated Multiple Sampling for Low Noise CMOS Image Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Y; Theuwissen, A.J.P.; Chae, Y

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a low noise CMOS image sensor (CIS) using 10/12 bit configurable column-parallel single slope ADCs (SS-ADCs) and digital correlated multiple sampling (CMS). The sensor used is a conventional 4T active pixel with a pinned-photodiode as photon detector. The test sensor was fabricated in a 0.18 colonm CMOS image sensor process from TSMC. The ADC nonlinearity measurement result shows totally 0.58% nonlinearity. Using the proposed column-parallel SS-ADC with digital CMS techniq...

  13. Microarray analysis of gene expression profiles in ripening pineapple fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koia Jonni H

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pineapple (Ananas comosus is a tropical fruit crop of significant commercial importance. Although the physiological changes that occur during pineapple fruit development have been well characterized, little is known about the molecular events that occur during the fruit ripening process. Understanding the molecular basis of pineapple fruit ripening will aid the development of new varieties via molecular breeding or genetic modification. In this study we developed a 9277 element pineapple microarray and used it to profile gene expression changes that occur during pineapple fruit ripening. Results Microarray analyses identified 271 unique cDNAs differentially expressed at least 1.5-fold between the mature green and mature yellow stages of pineapple fruit ripening. Among these 271 sequences, 184 share significant homology with genes encoding proteins of known function, 53 share homology with genes encoding proteins of unknown function and 34 share no significant homology with any database accession. Of the 237 pineapple sequences with homologs, 160 were up-regulated and 77 were down-regulated during pineapple fruit ripening. DAVID Functional Annotation Cluster (FAC analysis of all 237 sequences with homologs revealed confident enrichment scores for redox activity, organic acid metabolism, metalloenzyme activity, glycolysis, vitamin C biosynthesis, antioxidant activity and cysteine peptidase activity, indicating the functional significance and importance of these processes and pathways during pineapple fruit development. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis validated the microarray expression results for nine out of ten genes tested. Conclusions This is the first report of a microarray based gene expression study undertaken in pineapple. Our bioinformatic analyses of the transcript profiles have identified a number of genes, processes and pathways with putative involvement in the pineapple fruit ripening process. This study

  14. Micropower CMOS Integrated Low-Noise Amplification, Filtering, and Digitization of Multimodal Neuropotentials

    OpenAIRE

    Mollazadeh, Mohsen; Murari, Kartikeya; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Thakor, Nitish

    2009-01-01

    Electrical activity in the brain spans a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, requiring simultaneous recording of multiple modalities of neurophysiological signals in order to capture various aspects of brain state dynamics. Here, we present a 16-channel neural interface integrated circuit fabricated in a 0.5 μm 3M2P CMOS process for selective digital acquisition of biopotentials across the spectrum of neural signal modalities in the brain, ranging from single spike action potentials to...

  15. An analog CMOS chip set for neural networks with arbitrary topologies

    OpenAIRE

    Lansner, John; Lehmann, Torsten

    1993-01-01

    An analog CMOS chip set for implementations of artificial neural networks (ANNs) has been fabricated and tested. The chip set consists of two cascadable chips: a neuron chip and a synapse chip. Neurons on the neuron chips can be interconnected at random via synapses on the synapse chips thus implementing an ANN with arbitrary topology. The neuron test chip contains an array of 4 neurons with well defined hyperbolic tangent activation functions which is implemented by using parasitic lateral b...

  16. DNA Microarrays in Herbal Drug Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Chavan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural products are gaining increased applications in drug discovery and development. Being chemically diverse they are able to modulate several targets simultaneously in a complex system. Analysis of gene expression becomes necessary for better understanding of molecular mechanisms. Conventional strategies for expression profiling are optimized for single gene analysis. DNA microarrays serve as suitable high throughput tool for simultaneous analysis of multiple genes. Major practical applicability of DNA microarrays remains in DNA mutation and polymorphism analysis. This review highlights applications of DNA microarrays in pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenomics, toxicogenomics and quality control of herbal drugs and extracts.

  17. CMOS-NEMS Copper Switches Monolithically Integrated Using a 65 nm CMOS Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Muñoz-Gamarra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This work demonstrates the feasibility to obtain copper nanoelectromechanical (NEMS relays using a commercial complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS technology (ST 65 nm following an intra CMOS-MEMS approach. We report experimental demonstration of contact-mode nano-electromechanical switches obtaining low operating voltage (5.5 V, good ION/IOFF (103 ratio, abrupt subthreshold swing (4.3 mV/decade and minimum dimensions (3.50 μm × 100 nm × 180 nm, and gap of 100 nm. With these dimensions, the operable Cell area of the switch will be 3.5 μm (length × 0.2 μm (100 nm width + 100 nm gap = 0.7 μm2 which is the smallest reported one using a top-down fabrication approach.

  18. Column-Parallel Single Slope ADC with Digital Correlated Multiple Sampling for Low Noise CMOS Image Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.; Theuwissen, A.J.P.; Chae, Y.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a low noise CMOS image sensor (CIS) using 10/12 bit configurable column-parallel single slope ADCs (SS-ADCs) and digital correlated multiple sampling (CMS). The sensor used is a conventional 4T active pixel with a pinned-photodiode as photon detector. The test sensor was fabricat

  19. 3D Biomaterial Microarrays for Regenerative Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Andresen, Thomas Lars;

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) biomaterial microarrays hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine because of their ability to accelerate the design and fabrication of biomimetic materials. Such tissue-like biomaterials can provide an appropriate microenvironment for stimulating and controlling stem...

  20. SLIMarray: Lightweight software for microarray facility management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzolf Bruz

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray core facilities are commonplace in biological research organizations, and need systems for accurately tracking various logistical aspects of their operation. Although these different needs could be handled separately, an integrated management system provides benefits in organization, automation and reduction in errors. Results We present SLIMarray (System for Lab Information Management of Microarrays, an open source, modular database web application capable of managing microarray inventories, sample processing and usage charges. The software allows modular configuration and is well suited for further development, providing users the flexibility to adapt it to their needs. SLIMarray Lite, a version of the software that is especially easy to install and run, is also available. Conclusion SLIMarray addresses the previously unmet need for free and open source software for managing the logistics of a microarray core facility.

  1. Small-area and compact CMOS emulator circuit for CMOS/nanoscale memristor co-design

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, SangHak; Choi, Jun-Myung; Cho, Seongik; Min, Kyeong-Sik

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a CMOS emulator circuit that can reproduce nanoscale memristive behavior is proposed. The proposed emulator circuit can mimic the pinched hysteresis loops of nanoscale memristor memory's current-voltage relationship without using any resistor array, complicated circuit blocks, etc. that may occupy very large layout area. Instead of using a resistor array, other complicated circuit blocks, etc., the proposed emulator circuit can describe the nanoscale memristor's current-voltage...

  2. CMOS analog integrated circuit design technology; CMOS anarogu IC sekkei gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, H.; Fujisawa, A. [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-08-10

    In the field of the LSI (large scale integrated circuit) in rapid progress toward high integration and advanced functions, CAD (computer-aided design) technology has become indispensable to LSI development within a short period. Fuji Electric has developed design technologies and automatic design system to develop high-quality analog ICs (integrated circuits), including power supply ICs. within a short period. This paper describes CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) analog macro cell, circuit simulation, automatic routing, and backannotation technologies. (author)

  3. CMOS-compatible LVOF-based visible microspectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    Emadi, A.; Wu, H; De Graaf, G.; Wolffenbuttel, R F

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a CMOS-Compatible Linear Variable Optical Filter (LVOF) visible micro-spectrometer. The CMOS-compatible post process for fabrication of the LVOF has been used for integration of the LVOF with a CMOS chip containing a 128-element photodiode array and readout circuitry. Fabrication of LVOF involves a process for fabrication of very small taper angles, ranging from 0.001° to 0.1°, in SiO2. These layers can be fabricated flexibly in a resist layer by just one lithography ste...

  4. Development of a CMOS process using high energy ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main interest of this thesis is the use of complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) in electronic technology. Problems in developing a CMOS process are mostly related to the isolation well of p-n junctions. It is shown that by using high energy ion implantation, it is possible to reduce lateral dimensions to obtain a rather high packing density. High energy ion implantation is also presented as a means of simplifying CMOS processing, since extended processing steps at elevated temperatures are superfluous. Process development is also simplified. (Auth.)

  5. Polymer microarrays for cell based applications

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Anne Klara Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    The development and identification of new biomaterials that can replace specific tissues and organs is desirable. In the presented PhD thesis polymer microarrays were applied for the screening of polyacrylates and polyurethanes and evaluation for material discovery for applications in the life sciences. In the first part of the thesis, the largest polymer microarray ever made with more than 7000 features was fabricated and subsequently used for the screening of polyacrylates...

  6. Text Mining Perspectives in Microarray Data Mining

    OpenAIRE

    Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2013-01-01

    Current microarray data mining methods such as clustering, classification, and association analysis heavily rely on statistical and machine learning algorithms for analysis of large sets of gene expression data. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in methods that attempt to discover patterns based on multiple but related data sources. Gene expression data and the corresponding literature data are one such example. This paper suggests a new approach to microarray data mining as ...

  7. Fabrication of CMOS-compatible nanopillars for smart bio-mimetic CMOS image sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Saffih, Faycal

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, nanopillars with heights of 1μm to 5μm and widths of 250nm to 500nm have been fabricated with a near room temperature etching process. The nanopillars were achieved with a continuous deep reactive ion etching technique and utilizing PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) and Chromium as masking layers. As opposed to the conventional Bosch process, the usage of the unswitched deep reactive ion etching technique resulted in nanopillars with smooth sidewalls with a measured surface roughness of less than 40nm. Moreover, undercut was nonexistent in the nanopillars. The proposed fabrication method achieves etch rates four times faster when compared to the state-of-the-art, leading to higher throughput and more vertical side walls. The fabrication of the nanopillars was carried out keeping the CMOS process in mind to ultimately obtain a CMOS-compatible process. This work serves as an initial step in the ultimate objective of integrating photo-sensors based on these nanopillars seamlessly along with the controlling transistors to build a complete bio-inspired smart CMOS image sensor on the same wafer. © 2012 IEEE.

  8. New Simple CMOS Realization of Voltage Differencing Transconductance Amplifier and Its RF Filter Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yeşil

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The voltage differencing transconductance amplifier (VDTA is a recently introduced active element for analog signal processing. However, the realization of VDTA is not given by any author yet. In this work, a new and simple CMOS realization of VDTA is presented. The proposed block has two voltage inputs and two kinds of current output, so it is functional for voltage- and transconductance-mode operation. Furthermore, VDTA exhibits two different values of transconductance so that there is no need to external resistors for VDTA based applications which seems to be a good advantage for analog circuit designer. A CMOS implementation of VDTA and a voltage-mode VDTA based filter are proposed and simulated. An application example of fourth order flat-band band-pass amplifier is given and the performance of the circuit is demonstrated by comparing the theory and simulation.

  9. Characterization and performance studies of high-voltage CMOS based pixel sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Smaranda, Dumitru Dan

    2015-01-01

    The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC will push the limits for detectors, specially the silicon trackers which are closest to the interaction point. The ATLAS CMOS Sensor R&D efort is investigating a new technology using high-voltage CMOS processes for producing pixel and strip sensors. In contrast to the currently used technology these devices implement active electronics on the sensor itself, offering a multitude of tuning parameters for achieving the best performance. My summer project revolved around characterising existing samples along with assembling and debugging hardware required for their improvement and functionality. Other tasks involved writing communication protocols using pyBAR to remotely control injection circuitry on a GPAC card, and helping various members of the group with data collection and analysis. Through the summer student programme I have had the opportunity to be part of a vibrant scientic community at the forefront of research, to create bonds with fellow students from univ...

  10. Low Power Design of High Speed CMOS Pulse Stream Neuron Circuit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈继伟; 石秉学

    2000-01-01

    A new pulse stream neuron circuit is presented, which can be obtained in the digital CMOS process and combines both the merits of digital circuits and analog ones. The output is expressed by the frequency of the pulses with transfer characteristic, which is correspondent with the ideal sigmoid curve perfectly. Moreover, the pulse-active strategy is introduced into the design of this CMOS pulse stream neuron circuit for the first time in order to reduce the power dissipation, which is applicable to the low-power design of mixed-signal circuits,too. A simple technical process and compact architecture make this circuit work at a higher speed and with lower power dissipation and smaller area.

  11. PALM and STORM: Into large fields and high-throughput microscopy with sCMOS detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almada, Pedro; Culley, Siân; Henriques, Ricardo

    2015-10-15

    Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM) techniques such as Photo-Activation Localization Microscopy (PALM) and Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM) enable fluorescence microscopy super-resolution: the overcoming of the resolution barrier imposed by the diffraction of light. These techniques are based on acquiring hundreds or thousands of images of single molecules, locating them and reconstructing a higher-resolution image from the high-precision localizations. These methods generally imply a considerable trade-off between imaging speed and resolution, limiting their applicability to high-throughput workflows. Recent advancements in scientific Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (sCMOS) camera sensors and localization algorithms reduce the temporal requirements for SMLM, pushing it toward high-throughput microscopy. Here we outline the decisions researchers face when considering how to adapt hardware on a new system for sCMOS sensors with high-throughput in mind. PMID:26079924

  12. CMOS On-Chip Optoelectronic Neural Interface Device with Integrated Light Source for Optogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawadsaringkarn, Y.; Kimura, H.; Maezawa, Y.; Nakajima, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Sasagawa, K.; Noda, T.; Tokuda, T.; Ohta, J.

    2012-03-01

    A novel optoelectronic neural interface device is proposed for target applications in optogenetics for neural science. The device consists of a light emitting diode (LED) array implemented on a CMOS image sensor for on-chip local light stimulation. In this study, we designed a suitable CMOS image sensor equipped with on-chip electrodes to drive the LEDs, and developed a device structure and packaging process for LED integration. The prototype device produced an illumination intensity of approximately 1 mW with a driving current of 2.0 mA, which is expected to be sufficient to activate channelrhodopsin (ChR2). We also demonstrated the functions of light stimulation and on-chip imaging using a brain slice from a mouse as a target sample.

  13. The Impact of Photobleaching on Microarray Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel von der Haar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA-Microarrays have become a potent technology for high-throughput analysis of genetic regulation. However, the wide dynamic range of signal intensities of fluorophore-based microarrays exceeds the dynamic range of a single array scan by far, thus limiting the key benefit of microarray technology: parallelization. The implementation of multi-scan techniques represents a promising approach to overcome these limitations. These techniques are, in turn, limited by the fluorophores’ susceptibility to photobleaching when exposed to the scanner’s laser light. In this paper the photobleaching characteristics of cyanine-3 and cyanine-5 as part of solid state DNA microarrays are studied. The effects of initial fluorophore intensity as well as laser scanner dependent variables such as the photomultiplier tube’s voltage on bleaching and imaging are investigated. The resulting data is used to develop a model capable of simulating the expected degree of signal intensity reduction caused by photobleaching for each fluorophore individually, allowing for the removal of photobleaching-induced, systematic bias in multi-scan procedures. Single-scan applications also benefit as they rely on pre-scans to determine the optimal scanner settings. These findings constitute a step towards standardization of microarray experiments and analysis and may help to increase the lab-to-lab comparability of microarray experiment results.

  14. Noise Properties of CMOS Current Conveyors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik

    1996-01-01

    The definition of the current conveyor is presented and it is shown how different generations of current conveyors can all be combined into a single definition of a multiple-output second generation current conveyor (CCII). Next, noise sources are introduced into the model, and a general noise...... model for the current conveyor is established. This model is used for the analysis of selected examples of current conveyor based operational amplifier configurations and the relative merits with respect to the noise performance of these configurations are discussed. Finally, the noise model...... is developed for a CMOS current conveyor implementation, and optimization strategies for noise reduction are discussed. It is concluded that a class AB implementation provides more flexibility than does a class A configuration. In both cases it is essential to design low noise current mirrors and current...

  15. Silicon light emitting device in CMOS technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hai-jun; GU Ming; LIU Jin-bin; HUANG Bei-ju; CHEN Hong-da

    2007-01-01

    A novel silicon light emitting device was realized with standard 0.35 μ m 2P4M Mixed Mode/RF CMOS technology. The device functions in a reverse breakdown mode and can be turned on at 8.3 V and operated normally at a wide voltage range of 8.3 V-12.0 V. An output optical power of 13.6 nW was measured at the bias of 10 V and 100 mA, and the emitted light intensity was calculated to be more than 1 mW/cm2. The optical spectrum of the device is in the range of 500-820 nm.

  16. Imaging combined autoimmune and infectious disease microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, Tom; Raha, Sandeep; Kus, Dorothy; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial and viral pathogens are implicated in many severe autoimmune diseases, acting through such mechanisms as molecular mimicry, and superantigen activation of T-cells. For example, Helicobacter pylori, well known cause of stomach ulcers and cancers, is also identified in ischaemic heart disease (mimicry of heat shock protein 65), autoimmune pancreatitis, systemic sclerosis, autoimmune thyroiditis (HLA DRB1*0301 allele susceptibility), and Crohn's disease. Successful antibiotic eradication of H.pylori often accompanies their remission. Yet current diagnostic devices, and test-limiting cost containment, impede recognition of the linkage, delaying both diagnosis and therapeutic intervention until the chronic debilitating stage. We designed a 15 minute low cost 39 antigen microarray assay, combining autoimmune, viral and bacterial antigens1. This enables point-of-care serodiagnosis and cost-effective narrowly targeted concurrent antibiotic and monoclonal anti-T-cell and anti-cytokine immunotherapy. Arrays of 26 pathogen and 13 autoimmune antigens with IgG and IgM dilution series were printed in triplicate on epoxysilane covalent binding slides with Teflon well masks. Sera diluted 1:20 were incubated 10 minutes, washed off, anti-IgG-Cy3 (green) and anti-IgM-Dy647 (red) were incubated for 5 minutes, washed off and the slide was read in an ArrayWoRx(e) scanning CCD imager (Applied Precision, Issaquah, WA). As a preliminary model for the combined infectious disease-autoimmune diagnostic microarray we surveyed 98 unidentified, outdated sera that were discarded after Hepatitis B antibody testing. In these, significant IgG or IgM autoantibody levels were found: dsDNA 5, ssDNA 11, Ro 2, RNP 7, SSB 4, gliadin 2, thyroglobulin 13 cases. Since control sera showed no autoantibodies, the high frequency of anti-DNA and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies found in infected sera lend increased support for linkage of infection to subsequent autoimmune disease. Expansion of the antigen

  17. System and Circuit Design Aspects for CMOS Wireless Handset Receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Jan H.

    developments in CMOS technology are considered and the short-comings from an analog design perspective are evaluated. The lack of high quality passive devices, inductors in particular, is found to be one of the major obstacles in achieving a fully integrated RF design based on CMOS. Following this, an overview......The presented work deals with system and circuit design aspects for Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) implementations of wireless handset receivers. First, an overview, from a historic perspective, on the use of CMOS in cellular applications is provided. Based on this the tremendous...... Division Duplex) direct-conversion receiver (DCR). The wideband nature of the UMTS signal opens up for simple DC-offset cancellation schemes. In line of this the use of highpass filtering as a means to reduce the DC-offset is pursued using link simulations. To simplify receiver planning it is common...

  18. Depleted CMOS pixels for LHC proton-proton experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermes, N.

    2016-07-01

    While so far monolithic pixel detectors have remained in the realm of comparatively low rate and radiation applications outside LHC, new developments exploiting high resistivity substrates with three or four well CMOS process options allow reasonably large depletion depths and full CMOS circuitry in a monolithic structure. This opens up the possibility to target CMOS pixel detectors also for high radiation pp-experiments at the LHC upgrade, either in a hybrid-type fashion or even fully monolithic. Several pixel matrices have been prototyped with high ohmic substrates, high voltage options, and full CMOS electronics. They were characterized in the lab and in test beams. An overview of the necessary development steps and different approaches as well as prototype results are presented in this paper.

  19. CMOS technology and current-feedback op-amps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik

    1993-01-01

    Some of the problems related to the application of CMOS technology to current-feedback operational amplifiers (CFB op-amps) are identified. Problems caused by the low device transconductance and by the absence of matching between p-channel and n-channel transistors are examined, and circuit solut...... poor performance compared to the bipolar designs, but CMOS has a potential for CFB op-amp design if more ingenious circuit configurations are applied...

  20. Delta Doping High Purity CCDs and CMOS for LSST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Elliott, S. Tom; Bebek, Chris; Holland, Steve; Kolbe, Bill

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing delta doping high purity CCD's and CMOS for LSST is shown. The topics include: 1) Overview of JPL s versatile back-surface process for CCDs and CMOS; 2) Application to SNAP and ORION missions; 3) Delta doping as a back-surface electrode for fully depleted LBNL CCDs; 4) Delta doping high purity CCDs for SNAP and ORION; 5) JPL CMP thinning process development; and 6) Antireflection coating process development.

  1. A Low Power Low Voltage High Performance CMOS Current Mirror

    OpenAIRE

    Sirish Rao,; Sampath Kumar V

    2015-01-01

    The current mirrors are one of the most important circuits in designing the analog and mixed-mode circuit. A low power and low voltage high-performance CMOS current mirror with optimized input and output resistance are presented in this paper. SPICE simulations confirm the high-performance CMOS current mirror with power supply close to the threshold voltage of the transistor. In this paper, for achieving the low input resistance and a very high output resistance, the combination o...

  2. A CMOS Humidity Sensor for Passive RFID Sensing Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Fangming Deng; Yigang He; Chaolong Zhang; Wei Feng

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a low-cost low-power CMOS humidity sensor for passive RFID sensing applications. The humidity sensing element is implemented in standard CMOS technology without any further post-processing, which results in low fabrication costs. The interface of this humidity sensor employs a PLL-based architecture transferring sensor signal processing from the voltage domain to the frequency domain. Therefore this architecture allows the use of a fully digital circuit, which can operate ...

  3. Integrating security solutions to support nanoCMOS electronics research

    OpenAIRE

    Sinnott, R.O.; Bayliss, C.; T. Doherty; Martin, D.; Millar, C.; Stewart, G; Watt, J; A. Asenov; Roy, G.; S Roy; Davenhall, C.; Harbulot, B.; Jones, M

    2008-01-01

    The UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) funded Meeting the Design Challenges of nanoCMOS Electronics (nanoCMOS) is developing a research infrastructure for collaborative electronics research across multiple institutions in the UK with especially strong industrial and commercial involvement. Unlike other domains, the electronics industry is driven by the necessity of protecting the intellectual property of the data, designs and software associated with next generation...

  4. Fecal source tracking in water using a mitochondrial DNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Nguyet-Minh; Villemur, Richard; Payment, Pierre; Brousseau, Roland; Topp, Edward; Masson, Luke

    2013-01-01

    A mitochondrial-based microarray (mitoArray) was developed for rapid identification of the presence of 28 animals and one family (cervidae) potentially implicated in fecal pollution in mixed activity watersheds. Oligonucleotide probes for genus or subfamily-level identification were targeted within the 12S rRNA - Val tRNA - 16S rRNA region in the mitochondrial genome. This region, called MI-50, was selected based on three criteria: 1) the ability to be amplified by universal primers 2) these universal primer sequences are present in most commercial and domestic animals of interest in source tracking, and 3) that sufficient sequence variation exists within this region to meet the minimal requirements for microarray probe discrimination. To quantify the overall level of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in samples, a quantitative-PCR (Q-PCR) universal primer pair was also developed. Probe validation was performed using DNA extracted from animal tissues and, for many cases, animal-specific fecal samples. To reduce the amplification of potentially interfering fish mtDNA sequences during the MI-50 enrichment step, a clamping PCR method was designed using a fish-specific peptide nucleic acid. DNA extracted from 19 water samples were subjected to both array and independent PCR analyses. Our results confirm that the mitochondrial microarray approach method could accurately detect the dominant animals present in water samples emphasizing the potential for this methodology in the parallel scanning of a large variety of animals normally monitored in fecal source tracking.

  5. Poly-SiGe for MEMS-above-CMOS sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez Ruiz, Pilar; Witvrouw, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Polycrystalline SiGe has emerged as a promising MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) structural material since it provides the desired mechanical properties at lower temperatures compared to poly-Si, allowing the direct post-processing on top of CMOS. This CMOS-MEMS monolithic integration can lead to more compact MEMS with improved performance. The potential of poly-SiGe for MEMS above-aluminum-backend CMOS integration has already been demonstrated. However, aggressive interconnect scaling has led to the replacement of the traditional aluminum metallization by copper (Cu) metallization, due to its lower resistivity and improved reliability. Poly-SiGe for MEMS-above-CMOS sensors demonstrates the compatibility of poly-SiGe with post-processing above the advanced CMOS technology nodes through the successful fabrication of an integrated poly-SiGe piezoresistive pressure sensor, directly fabricated above 0.13 m Cu-backend CMOS. Furthermore, this book presents the first detailed investigation on the influence o...

  6. Design and image-quality performance of high resolution CMOS-based X-ray imaging detectors for digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In digital X-ray imaging systems, X-ray imaging detectors based on scintillating screens with electronic devices such as charge-coupled devices (CCDs), thin-film transistors (TFT), complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) flat panel imagers have been introduced for general radiography, dental, mammography and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. Recently, a large-area CMOS active-pixel sensor (APS) in combination with scintillation films has been widely used in a variety of digital X-ray imaging applications. We employed a scintillator-based CMOS APS image sensor for high-resolution mammography. In this work, both powder-type Gd2O2S:Tb and a columnar structured CsI:Tl scintillation screens with various thicknesses were fabricated and used as materials to convert X-ray into visible light. These scintillating screens were directly coupled to a CMOS flat panel imager with a 25 × 50 mm2 active area and a 48 μm pixel pitch for high spatial resolution acquisition. We used a W/Al mammographic X-ray source with a 30 kVp energy condition. The imaging characterization of the X-ray detector was measured and analyzed in terms of linearity in incident X-ray dose, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE).

  7. Design and image-quality performance of high resolution CMOS-based X-ray imaging detectors for digital mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, B. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Yun, S.; Cho, G.; Kim, H. K.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In digital X-ray imaging systems, X-ray imaging detectors based on scintillating screens with electronic devices such as charge-coupled devices (CCDs), thin-film transistors (TFT), complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) flat panel imagers have been introduced for general radiography, dental, mammography and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. Recently, a large-area CMOS active-pixel sensor (APS) in combination with scintillation films has been widely used in a variety of digital X-ray imaging applications. We employed a scintillator-based CMOS APS image sensor for high-resolution mammography. In this work, both powder-type Gd2O2S:Tb and a columnar structured CsI:Tl scintillation screens with various thicknesses were fabricated and used as materials to convert X-ray into visible light. These scintillating screens were directly coupled to a CMOS flat panel imager with a 25 × 50 mm2 active area and a 48 μm pixel pitch for high spatial resolution acquisition. We used a W/Al mammographic X-ray source with a 30 kVp energy condition. The imaging characterization of the X-ray detector was measured and analyzed in terms of linearity in incident X-ray dose, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE).

  8. Low-dose performance of wafer-scale CMOS-based X-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Willem H.; Peters, Inge M.; Smit, Chiel; Kessener, Yves; Bosiers, Jan

    2015-03-01

    Compared to published amorphous-silicon (TFT) based X-ray detectors, crystalline silicon CMOS-based active-pixel detectors exploit the benefits of low noise, high speed, on-chip integration and featuring offered by CMOS technology. This presentation focuses on the specific advantage of high image quality at very low dose levels. The measurement of very low dose performance parameters like Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) and Noise Equivalent Dose (NED) is a challenge by itself. Second-order effects like defect pixel behavior, temporal and quantization noise effects, dose measurement accuracy and limitation of the x-ray source settings will influence the measurements at very low dose conditions. Using an analytical model to predict the low dose behavior of a detector from parameters extracted from shot-noise limited dose levels is presented. These models can also provide input for a simulation environment for optimizing the performance of future detectors. In this paper, models for predicting NED and the DQE at very low dose are compared to measurements on different CMOS detectors. Their validity for different sensor and optical stack combinations as well as for different x-ray beam conditions was validated.

  9. Radiation damage studies on STAR250 CMOS sensor at 300 keV for electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruqi, A. R.; Henderson, R.; Holmes, J.

    2006-09-01

    There is a pressing need for better electronic detectors to replace film for recording high-resolution images using electron cryomicroscopy. Our previous work has shown that direct electron detection in CMOS sensors is promising in terms of resolution and efficiency at 120 keV [A.R. Faruqi, R. Henderson, M. Prydderch, R. Turchetta, P. Allport, A. Evans, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 546 (2005) 170], but in addition, the detectors must not be damaged by the electron irradiation. We now present new measurements on the radiation tolerance of a 25 μm pitch CMOS active-pixel sensor, the STAR250, which was designed by FillFactory using radiation-hard technology for space applications. Our tests on the STAR250 aimed to establish the imaging performance at 300 keV following irradiation. The residual contrast, measured on shadow images of a 300 mesh grid, was >80% after corrections for increased dark current, following irradiation with up to 5×10 7 electrons/pixel (equivalent to 80,000 electron/μm 2). A CMOS sensor with this degree of radiation tolerance would survive a year of normal usage for low-dose electron cryomicroscopy, which is a very useful advance.

  10. An investigation of medical radiation detection using CMOS image sensors in smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Han Gyu; Song, Jae-Jun; Lee, Kwonhee; Nam, Ki Chang; Hong, Seong Jong; Kim, Ho Chul

    2016-07-01

    Medical radiation exposure to patients has increased with the development of diagnostic X-ray devices and multi-channel computed tomography (CT). Despite the fact that the low-dose CT technique can significantly reduce medical radiation exposure to patients, the increasing number of CT examinations has increased the total medical radiation exposure to patients. Therefore, medical radiation exposure to patients should be monitored to prevent cancers caused by diagnostic radiation. However, without using thermoluminescence or glass dosimeters, it is hardly measure doses received by patients during medical examinations accurately. Hence, it is necessary to develop radiation monitoring devices and algorithms that are reasonably priced and have superior radiation detection efficiencies. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of medical dose measurement using complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensors in smartphone cameras with an algorithm to extract the X-ray interacted pixels. We characterized the responses of the CMOS sensors in a smartphone with respect to the X-rays generated by a general diagnostic X-ray system. The characteristics of the CMOS sensors in a smartphone camera, such as dose response linearity, dose rate dependence, energy dependence, angular dependence, and minimum detectable activity were evaluated. The high energy gamma-ray of 662 keV from Cs-137 can be detected using the smartphone camera. The smartphone cameras which employ the developed algorithm can detect medical radiations.

  11. Gamma-ray irradiation tests of CMOS sensors used in imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappello Salvatore G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Technologically-enhanced electronic image sensors are used in various fields as diagnostic techniques in medicine or space applications. In the latter case the devices can be exposed to intense radiation fluxes over time which may impair the functioning of the same equipment. In this paper we report the results of gamma-ray irradiation tests on CMOS image sensors simulating the space radiation over a long time period. Gamma-ray irradiation tests were carried out by means of IGS-3 gamma irradiation facility of Palermo University, based on 60Co sources with different activities. To reduce the dose rate and realize a narrow gamma-ray beam, a lead-collimation system was purposely built. It permits to have dose rate values less than 10 mGy/s and to irradiate CMOS Image Sensors during operation. The total ionizing dose to CMOS image sensors was monitored in-situ, during irradiation, up to 1000 Gy and images were acquired every 25 Gy. At the end of the tests, the sensors continued to operate despite a background noise and some pixels were completely saturated. These effects, however, involve isolated pixels and therefore, should not affect the image quality.

  12. AN OVERVIEW OF POWER DISSIPATION AND CONTROL TECHNIQUES IN CMOS TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. ROMLI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Total power dissipation in CMOS circuits has become a huge challenging in current semiconductor industry due to the leakage current and the leakage power. The exponential growth of both static and dynamic power dissipations in any CMOS process technology option has increased the cost and efficiency of the system. Technology options are used for the execution specifications and usually it depends on the optimisation and the performance constraints over the chip. This article reviews the relevant researches of the source or power dissipation, the mechanism to reduce the dynamic power dissipation as well as static power dissipation and an overview of various circuit techniques to control them. Important device parameters including voltage threshold and switching capacitance impact to the circuit performance in lowering both dynamic and static power dissipation are presented. The demand for the reduction of power dissipation in CMOS technology shall remain a challenging and active area of research for years to come. Thus, this review shall work as a guideline for the researchers who wish to work on power dissipation and control techniques.

  13. Design of an ultra low power CMOS pixel sensor for a future neutron personal dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Hu-Guo, C.; Husson, D.; Hu, Y. [Institut Pluridisplinaire Hubert Curien IPHC, Univ. of Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, 23 Rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2011-07-01

    Despite a continuously increasing demand, neutron electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) are still far from being completely established because their development is a very difficult task. A low-noise, ultra low power consumption CMOS pixel sensor for a future neutron personal dosimeter has been implemented in a 0.35 {mu}m CMOS technology. The prototype is composed of a pixel array for detection of charged particles, and the readout electronics is integrated on the same substrate for signal processing. The excess electrons generated by an impinging particle are collected by the pixel array. The charge collection time and the efficiency are the crucial points of a CMOS detector. The 3-D device simulations using the commercially available Synopsys-SENTAURUS package address the detailed charge collection process. Within a time of 1.9 {mu}s, about 59% electrons created by the impact particle are collected in a cluster of 4 x 4 pixels with the pixel pitch of 80 {mu}m. A charge sensitive preamplifier (CSA) and a shaper are employed in the frond-end readout. The tests with electrical signals indicate that our prototype with a total active area of 2.56 x 2.56 mm{sup 2} performs an equivalent noise charge (ENC) of less than 400 e - and 314 {mu}W power consumption, leading to a promising prototype. (authors)

  14. Low-noise CMOS SPAD arrays with in-pixel time-to-digital converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Alberto; Villa, Federica; Bronzi, Danilo; Zou, Yu; Lussana, Rudi; Tamborini, Davide; Tisa, Simone; Durini, Daniel; Weyers, Sascha; Pashen, Uwe; Brockherde, Werner; Zappa, Franco

    2014-05-01

    We present our latest results concerning CMOS Single-Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) arrays for high-throughput parallel single-photon counting. We exploited a high-voltage 0.35 μm CMOS technology in order to develop low-noise CMOS SPADs. The Dark Count Rate is 30 cps at room temperature for 30 μm devices, increases to 2 kcps for 100 μm SPADs and just to 100 kcps for 500 μm ones. Afterpulsing is less than 1% for hold-off time longer than 50 ns, thus allowing to reach high count rates. Photon Detection Efficiency is > 50% at 420 nm, > 40% below 500 nm and is still 5% at 850 nm. Timing jitter is less than 100 ps (FWHM) in SPADs with active area diameter up to 50 μm. We developed CMOS SPAD imagers with 150 μm pixel pitch and 30 μm SPADs. A 64×32 SPAD array is based on pixels including three 9-bit counters for smart phase-resolved photon counting up to 100 kfps. A 32x32 SPAD array includes 1024 10-bit Time-to-Digital Converters (TDC) with 300 ps resolution and 450 ps single-shot precision, for 3D ranging and FLIM. We developed also linear arrays with up to 60 pixels (with 100 μm SPAD, 150 μm pitch and in-pixel 250 ps TDC) for time-resolved parallel spectroscopy with high fill factor.

  15. A CMOS charge preamplifier for silicon drift detectors with on-chip JFET and feedback capacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the Silicon Drift Detector for Hadronic Atom Research by Timing Application (Siddharta) project, we are developing the CMOS readout electronics for the analog processing of about 200 large-area (1 cm2) silicon drift detectors (SDDs). The readout electronics have to provide an energy resolution better than 150 eV at 6 keV, when used with SDDs, and high long-term peak stability, in the order of few eVs, with respect to background variations during the experiment. The high-stability requirement imposes the choice of a charge preamplifier configuration as front-end stage. In our case, the peculiarity of the preamplifier is that the input JFET and the feedback capacitor are integrated in the detector chip, separated by the remaining part of the circuit, which is several centimeters away. In this work we describe a CMOS charge preamplifier designed to meet these specific constraints and characterized by the use of a drain feedback technique for the reset of the leakage current and signal charge. To this aim, a low-frequency loop is designed to actively control the drain of the SDD-JFET with full compatibility with the supplies limits of the CMOS technology. Because of the unpredictable value of the feedback capacitor, the circuit foresees the possibility to externally adjust the preamplifier decay time to achieve the correct pole-zero compensation with the fixed zero of the shaping amplifier. The main features of the circuit, as well as the results of the experimental characterization of a first prototype realized in the 0.35 μm CMOS AMS technology, are presented in the paper

  16. Applications of the Integrated High-Performance CMOS Image Sensor to Range Finders — from Optical Triangulation to the Automotive Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe-Air Jiang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available With their significant features, the applications of complementary metal-oxidesemiconductor (CMOS image sensors covers a very extensive range, from industrialautomation to traffic applications such as aiming systems, blind guidance, active/passiverange finders, etc. In this paper CMOS image sensor-based active and passive rangefinders are presented. The measurement scheme of the proposed active/passive rangefinders is based on a simple triangulation method. The designed range finders chieflyconsist of a CMOS image sensor and some light sources such as lasers or LEDs. Theimplementation cost of our range finders is quite low. Image processing software to adjustthe exposure time (ET of the CMOS image sensor to enhance the performance oftriangulation-based range finders was also developed. An extensive series of experimentswere conducted to evaluate the performance of the designed range finders. From theexperimental results, the distance measurement resolutions achieved by the active rangefinder and the passive range finder can be better than 0.6% and 0.25% within themeasurement ranges of 1 to 8 m and 5 to 45 m, respectively. Feasibility tests onapplications of the developed CMOS image sensor-based range finders to the automotivefield were also conducted. The experimental results demonstrated that our range finders arewell-suited for distance measurements in this field.

  17. An RF energy harvester system using UHF micropower CMOS rectifier based on a diode connected CMOS transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrani, Mohammad Reza; Khoddam, Mojtaba; Hamidon, Mohd Nizar B; Kamsani, Noor Ain; Rokhani, Fakhrul Zaman; Shafie, Suhaidi Bin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new type diode connected MOS transistor to improve CMOS conventional rectifier's performance in RF energy harvester systems for wireless sensor networks in which the circuits are designed in 0.18  μm TSMC CMOS technology. The proposed diode connected MOS transistor uses a new bulk connection which leads to reduction in the threshold voltage and leakage current; therefore, it contributes to increment of the rectifier's output voltage, output current, and efficiency when it is well important in the conventional CMOS rectifiers. The design technique for the rectifiers is explained and a matching network has been proposed to increase the sensitivity of the proposed rectifier. Five-stage rectifier with a matching network is proposed based on the optimization. The simulation results shows 18.2% improvement in the efficiency of the rectifier circuit and increase in sensitivity of RF energy harvester circuit. All circuits are designed in 0.18 μm TSMC CMOS technology.

  18. Novel integrated CMOS pixel structures for vertex detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinfelder, Stuart; Bieser, Fred; Chen, Yandong; Gareus, Robin; Matis, Howard S.; Oldenburg, Markus; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans Georg; Wieman, Howard H.; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2003-10-29

    Novel CMOS active pixel structures for vertex detector applications have been designed and tested. The overriding goal of this work is to increase the signal to noise ratio of the sensors and readout circuits. A large-area native epitaxial silicon photogate was designed with the aim of increasing the charge collected per struck pixel and to reduce charge diffusion to neighboring pixels. The photogate then transfers the charge to a low capacitance readout node to maintain a high charge to voltage conversion gain. Two techniques for noise reduction are also presented. The first is a per-pixel kT/C noise reduction circuit that produces results similar to traditional correlated double sampling (CDS). It has the advantage of requiring only one read, as compared to two for CDS, and no external storage or subtraction is needed. The technique reduced input-referred temporal noise by a factor of 2.5, to 12.8 e{sup -}. Finally, a column-level active reset technique is explored that suppresses kT/C noise during pixel reset. In tests, noise was reduced by a factor of 7.6 times, to an estimated 5.1 e{sup -} input-referred noise. The technique also dramatically reduces fixed pattern (pedestal) noise, by up to a factor of 21 in our tests. The latter feature may possibly reduce pixel-by-pixel pedestal differences to levels low enough to permit sparse data scan without per-pixel offset corrections.

  19. rapmad: Robust analysis of peptide microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothermel Andrée

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptide microarrays offer an enormous potential as a screening tool for peptidomics experiments and have recently seen an increased field of application ranging from immunological studies to systems biology. By allowing the parallel analysis of thousands of peptides in a single run they are suitable for high-throughput settings. Since data characteristics of peptide microarrays differ from DNA oligonucleotide microarrays, computational methods need to be tailored to these specifications to allow a robust and automated data analysis. While follow-up experiments can ensure the specificity of results, sensitivity cannot be recovered in later steps. Providing sensitivity is thus a primary goal of data analysis procedures. To this end we created rapmad (Robust Alignment of Peptide MicroArray Data, a novel computational tool implemented in R. Results We evaluated rapmad in antibody reactivity experiments for several thousand peptide spots and compared it to two existing algorithms for the analysis of peptide microarrays. rapmad displays competitive and superior behavior to existing software solutions. Particularly, it shows substantially improved sensitivity for low intensity settings without sacrificing specificity. It thereby contributes to increasing the effectiveness of high throughput screening experiments. Conclusions rapmad allows the robust and sensitive, automated analysis of high-throughput peptide array data. The rapmad R-package as well as the data sets are available from http://www.tron-mz.de/compmed.

  20. A microarray system for Y chromosomal and mitochondrial single nucleotide polymorphism analysis in chimpanzee populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Olga; Rönn, Ann-Charlotte; Bonhomme, Maxime; Kellermann, Thomas; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte; Doxiadis, Gaby; Verschoor, Ernst J; Goossens, Benoît; Domingo-Roura, Xavier; Bruford, Michael W; Bosch, Montserrat; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2008-05-01

    Chimpanzee populations are diminishing as a consequence of human activities, and as a result this species is now endangered. In the context of conservation programmes, genetic data can add vital information, for instance on the genetic diversity and structure of threatened populations. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are biallelic markers that are widely used in human molecular studies and can be implemented in efficient microarray systems. This technology offers the potential of robust, multiplexed SNP genotyping at low reagent cost in other organisms than humans, but it is not commonly used yet in wild population studies. Here, we describe the characterization of new SNPs in Y-chromosomal intronic regions in chimpanzees and also identify SNPs from mitochondrial genes, with the aim of developing a microarray system that permits the simultaneous study of both paternal and maternal lineages. Our system consists of 42 SNPs for the Y chromosome and 45 SNPs for the mitochondrial genome. We demonstrate the applicability of this microarray in a captive population where genotypes accurately reflected its large pedigree. Two wild-living populations were also analysed and the results show that the microarray will be a useful tool alongside microsatellite markers, since it supplies complementary information about population structure and ecology. SNP genotyping using microarray technology, therefore, is a promising approach and may become an essential tool in conservation genetics to help in the management and study of captive and wild-living populations. Moreover, microarrays that combine SNPs from different genomic regions could replace microsatellite typing in the future. PMID:21585830

  1. Multiband CMOS sensor simplify FPA design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weng Lyang B.; Ling, Jer

    2015-10-01

    Push broom multi-band Focal Plane Array (FPA) design needs to consider optics, image sensor, electronic, mechanic as well as thermal. Conventional FPA use two or several CCD device as an image sensor. The CCD image sensor requires several high speed, high voltage and high current clock drivers as well as analog video processors to support their operation. Signal needs to digitize using external sample / hold and digitized circuit. These support circuits are bulky, consume a lot of power, must be shielded and placed in close to the CCD to minimize the introduction of unwanted noise. The CCD also needs to consider how to dissipate power. The end result is a very complicated FPA and hard to make due to more weighs and draws more power requiring complex heat transfer mechanisms. In this paper, we integrate microelectronic technology and multi-layer soft / hard Printed Circuit Board (PCB) technology to design electronic portion. Since its simplicity and integration, the optics, mechanic, structure and thermal design will become very simple. The whole FPA assembly and dis-assembly reduced to a few days. A multi-band CMOS Sensor (dedicated as C468) was used for this design. The CMOS Sensor, allow for the incorporation of clock drivers, timing generators, signal processing and digitization onto the same Integrated Circuit (IC) as the image sensor arrays. This keeps noise to a minimum while providing high functionality at reasonable power levels. The C468 is a first Multiple System-On-Chip (MSOC) IC. This device used our proprietary wafer butting technology and MSOC technology to combine five long sensor arrays into a size of 120 mm x 23.2 mm and 155 mm x 60 mm for chip and package, respectively. The device composed of one Panchromatic (PAN) and four different Multi- Spectral (MS) sensors. Due to its integration on the electronic design, a lot of room is clear for the thermal design. The optical and mechanical design is become very straight forward. The flight model FPA

  2. Finding consistent disease subnetworks across microarray datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soh Donny

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While contemporary methods of microarray analysis are excellent tools for studying individual microarray datasets, they have a tendency to produce different results from different datasets of the same disease. We aim to solve this reproducibility problem by introducing a technique (SNet. SNet provides both quantitative and descriptive analysis of microarray datasets by identifying specific connected portions of pathways that are significant. We term such portions within pathways as “subnetworks”. Results We tested SNet on independent datasets of several diseases, including childhood ALL, DMD and lung cancer. For each of these diseases, we obtained two independent microarray datasets produced by distinct labs on distinct platforms. In each case, our technique consistently produced almost the same list of significant nontrivial subnetworks from two independent sets of microarray data. The gene-level agreement of these significant subnetworks was between 51.18% to 93.01%. In contrast, when the same pairs of microarray datasets were analysed using GSEA, t-test and SAM, this percentage fell between 2.38% to 28.90% for GSEA, 49.60% tp 73.01% for t-test, and 49.96% to 81.25% for SAM. Furthermore, the genes selected using these existing methods did not form subnetworks of substantial size. Thus it is more probable that the subnetworks selected by our technique can provide the researcher with more descriptive information on the portions of the pathway actually affected by the disease. Conclusions These results clearly demonstrate that our technique generates significant subnetworks and genes that are more consistent and reproducible across datasets compared to the other popular methods available (GSEA, t-test and SAM. The large size of subnetworks which we generate indicates that they are generally more biologically significant (less likely to be spurious. In addition, we have chosen two sample subnetworks and validated them with

  3. Discovering biological progression underlying microarray samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Qiu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In biological systems that undergo processes such as differentiation, a clear concept of progression exists. We present a novel computational approach, called Sample Progression Discovery (SPD, to discover patterns of biological progression underlying microarray gene expression data. SPD assumes that individual samples of a microarray dataset are related by an unknown biological process (i.e., differentiation, development, cell cycle, disease progression, and that each sample represents one unknown point along the progression of that process. SPD aims to organize the samples in a manner that reveals the underlying progression and to simultaneously identify subsets of genes that are responsible for that progression. We demonstrate the performance of SPD on a variety of microarray datasets that were generated by sampling a biological process at different points along its progression, without providing SPD any information of the underlying process. When applied to a cell cycle time series microarray dataset, SPD was not provided any prior knowledge of samples' time order or of which genes are cell-cycle regulated, yet SPD recovered the correct time order and identified many genes that have been associated with the cell cycle. When applied to B-cell differentiation data, SPD recovered the correct order of stages of normal B-cell differentiation and the linkage between preB-ALL tumor cells with their cell origin preB. When applied to mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation data, SPD uncovered a landscape of ESC differentiation into various lineages and genes that represent both generic and lineage specific processes. When applied to a prostate cancer microarray dataset, SPD identified gene modules that reflect a progression consistent with disease stages. SPD may be best viewed as a novel tool for synthesizing biological hypotheses because it provides a likely biological progression underlying a microarray dataset and, perhaps more importantly, the

  4. Development of a large-area CMOS-based detector for real-time x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Sung Kyn; Park, Sung Kyu; Hwang, Sung Ha; Im, Dong Ak; Kosonen, Jari; Kim, Tae Woo; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2010-04-01

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors (APSs) with high electrical and optical performances are now being attractive for digital radiography (DR) and dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). In this study, we report our prototype CMOS-based detectors capable of real-time imaging. The field-of-view of the detector is 12 × 14.4 cm. The detector employs a CsI:Tl scintillator as an x-ray-to-light converter. The electrical performance of the CMOS APS, such as readout noise and full-well capacity, was evaluated. The x-ray imaging characteristics of the detector were evaluated in terms of characteristic curve, pre-sampling modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, detective quantum efficiency, and image lag. The overall performance of the detector is demonstrated with phantom images obtained for DR and CBCT applications. The detailed development description and measurement results are addressed. With the results, we suggest that the prototype CMOS-based detector has the potential for CBCT and real-time x-ray imaging applications.

  5. Design of a covalently bonded glycosphingolipid microarray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arigi, Emma; Blixt, Klas Ola; Buschard, Karsten;

    2012-01-01

    , a monoclonal antibody to sulfatide, Sulph 1; and a polyclonal antiserum reactive to asialo-G(M2)). Preliminary evaluation of the method indicated successful immobilization of the GSLs, and selective binding of test probes. The potential utility of this methodology for designing covalent microarrays......, the major classes of plant and fungal GSLs. In this work, a prototype "universal" GSL-based covalent microarray has been designed, and preliminary evaluation of its potential utility in assaying protein-GSL binding interactions investigated. An essential step in development involved the enzymatic release...

  6. Prominent feature selection of microarray data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yihui Liu

    2009-01-01

    For wavelet transform, a set of orthogonal wavelet basis aims to detect the localized changing features contained in microarray data. In this research, we investigate the performance of the selected wavelet features based on wavelet detail coefficients at the second level and the third level. The genetic algorithm is performed to optimize wavelet detail coefficients to select the best discriminant features. Exper-iments are carried out on four microarray datasets to evaluate the performance of classification. Experimental results prove that wavelet features optimized from detail coefficients efficiently characterize the differences between normal tissues and cancer tissues.

  7. Electrothermal frequency references in standard CMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Kashmiri, S Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    This book describes an alternative method of accurate on-chip frequency generation in standard CMOS IC processes. This method exploits the thermal-diffusivity of silicon, the rate at which heat diffuses through a silicon substrate.  This is the first book describing thermal-diffusivity-based frequency references, including the complete theoretical methodology supported by practical realizations that prove the feasibility of the method.  Coverage also includes several circuit and system-level solutions for the analog electronic circuit design challenges faced.   ·         Surveys the state-of-the-art in all-silicon frequency references; ·         Examines the thermal properties of silicon as a solution for the challenge of on-chip accurate frequency generation; ·         Uses simplified modeling approaches that allow an electronics engineer easily to simulate the electrothermal elements; ·         Follows a top-down methodology in circuit design, in which system-level des...

  8. Low Power CMOS Digitally Controlled Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Pandey,

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Here, two new designs of CMOS digitally controlled oscillators (DCO for low power application have been proposed. First design has been implemented with one driving strength controlled delay cell and withtwo NAND gates used as inverters. The second design with one delay cell and by two NOR gates is presented. The proposed circuits have been simulated in spice with 0.35 μm (micrometer technology at supply voltage of 3.3V. The first design shows 35-40% reduction in power consumption and second design shows 37.5-41.8% power saving as compared to conventional DCO. The frequency range of first and second design varies [3.1316 - 3.1085] GHz and [3.8112 – 3.7867] GHz respectively with the variation in control word from ‘000000’ to ‘000001'. Power consumption of first and second design varies [640.3845 - 700.2977] μW and [617.6616 -6 77.3996] μW respectively.

  9. Fast Hopping Frequency Generation in Digital CMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Farazian, Mohammad; Gudem, Prasad S

    2013-01-01

    Overcoming the agility limitations of conventional frequency synthesizers in multi-band OFDM ultra wideband is a key research goal in digital technology. This volume outlines a frequency plan that can generate all the required frequencies from a single fixed frequency, able to implement center frequencies with no more than two levels of SSB mixing. It recognizes the need for future synthesizers to bypass on-chip inductors and operate at low voltages to enable the increased integration and efficiency of networked appliances. The author examines in depth the architecture of the dividers that generate the necessary frequencies from a single base frequency and are capable of establishing a fractional division ratio.   Presenting the first CMOS inductorless single PLL 14-band frequency synthesizer for MB-OFDMUWB makes this volume a key addition to the literature, and with the synthesizer capable of arbitrary band-hopping in less than two nanoseconds, it operates well within the desired range on a 1.2-volt power s...

  10. CMOS absorbance detection system for capillary electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a cost-effective portable photodetection system for capillary electrophoresis absorptiometry. By using a CMOS BDJ (buried double p-n junction) detector, a dual-wavelength method for absorbance measurement is implemented. This system includes associated electronics for low-noise pre-amplification and A/D conversion, followed by digital signal acquisition and processing. Two signal processing approaches are adopted to enhance the signal to noise ratio. One is variable time synchronous detection, which optimizes the sensitivity and measuring rate compared to a conventional synchronous detection technique. The other is a statistical approach based on principal component analysis, which allows optimal estimation of detected signal. This system has been designed and tested in capillary electrophoresis conditions. Its operation has been verified with performances comparable to those of a commercialized spectrophotometric system (HP-3D CE). With potential on-chip integration of associated electronics, it may be operated as an integrable detection module for microchip electrophoresis and other microanalysis systems

  11. NSC 800, 8-bit CMOS microprocessor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suszko, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    The NSC 800 is an 8-bit CMOS microprocessor manufactured by National Semiconductor Corp., Santa Clara, California. The 8-bit microprocessor chip with 40-pad pin-terminals has eight address buffers (A8-A15), eight data address -- I/O buffers (AD(sub 0)-AD(sub 7)), six interrupt controls and sixteen timing controls with a chip clock generator and an 8-bit dynamic RAM refresh circuit. The 22 internal registers have the capability of addressing 64K bytes of memory and 256 I/O devices. The chip is fabricated on N-type (100) silicon using self-aligned polysilicon gates and local oxidation process technology. The chip interconnect consists of four levels: Aluminum, Polysi 2, Polysi 1, and P(+) and N(+) diffusions. The four levels, except for contact interface, are isolated by interlevel oxide. The chip is packaged in a 40-pin dual-in-line (DIP), side brazed, hermetically sealed, ceramic package with a metal lid. The operating voltage for the device is 5 V. It is available in three operating temperature ranges: 0 to +70 C, -40 to +85 C, and -55 to +125 C. Two devices were submitted for product evaluation by F. Stott, MTS, JPL Microprocessor Specialist. The devices were pencil-marked and photographed for identification.

  12. A CMOS readout circuit for microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we present the design and the results of a CMOS analog channel for silicon microstrips detectors. The readout circuit was initially conceived for the outer layers of the SuperB silicon vertex tracker (SVT), but can serve more generally other microstrip-based detection systems. The strip detectors considered show a very high stray capacitance and high series resistance. Therefore, the noise optimization was the first priority design concern. A necessary compromise on the best peaking time to achieve an acceptable noise level together with efficiency and timing accuracy has been investigated. The ASIC is composed by a preamplifier, shaping amplifier and a Time over Threshold (T.o.T) block for the digitalization of the signals. The chosen shaping function is the third-order semi-Gaussian function implemented with complex poles. An inverter stage is employed in the analog channel in order to operate with signals delivered from both p and n strips. The circuit includes the possibility to select the peaking time of the shaper output from four values: 250 ns, 375 ns, 500 ns and 750 ns. In this way, the noise performances and the signal occupancy can be optimized according to the real background during the experiment. The ASIC prototype has been fabricated in the 130 nm IBM technology which is considered intrinsically radiation hard. The results of the experimental characterization of a produced prototype are satisfactorily matched with simulation

  13. A low-power and small-area column-level ADC for high frame-rate CMOS pixel sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) have demonstrated performances meeting the specifications of the International Linear Collider (ILC) vertex detector (VTX). This paper presents a low-power and small-area 4-bit column-level analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for CMOS pixel sensors. The ADC employs a self-timed trigger and completes the conversion by performing a multi-bit/step approximation. As in the outer layers of the ILC vertex detector hit density is of the order of a few per thousand, in order to reduce power consumption, the ADC is designed to work in two modes: active mode and idle mode. The ADC is fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS process with a pixel pitch of 35 μm. It is implemented with 48 columns in a sensor prototype. Each column ADC covers an area of 35 ×545 μm2. The measured temporal noise and Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN) are 0.96 mV and 0.40 mV, respectively. The power consumption, for a 3 V supply and 6.25 MS/s sampling rate, is 486 μW during idle time, which is by far the most frequently employed one. This value rises to 714 μW in the case of the active mode. The measured differential nonlinearity (DNL) and integral nonlinearity (INL) are 0.49/−0.28 LSB and 0.29/−0.20 LSB, respectively. - Highlights: • CMOS sensor integrated with column-level ADC is proposed for ILC VTX outer layers. • A low-power and small-area column-level ADC for high frame-rate CPS is presented. • The test results demonstrate the power and area efficiency. • The architecture is suitable for the outer layer CMOS sensors

  14. A low-power and small-area column-level ADC for high frame-rate CMOS pixel sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L., E-mail: liang.zhang@iphc.cnrs.fr [School of Physics, Key Laboratory of Particle Physics and Particle Irradiation, Shandong University, 250100 Jinan (China); Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, University of Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3/UDS, 23 rue du loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Morel, F.; Hu-Guo, C.; Hu, Y. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, University of Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3/UDS, 23 rue du loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2014-07-01

    CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) have demonstrated performances meeting the specifications of the International Linear Collider (ILC) vertex detector (VTX). This paper presents a low-power and small-area 4-bit column-level analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for CMOS pixel sensors. The ADC employs a self-timed trigger and completes the conversion by performing a multi-bit/step approximation. As in the outer layers of the ILC vertex detector hit density is of the order of a few per thousand, in order to reduce power consumption, the ADC is designed to work in two modes: active mode and idle mode. The ADC is fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS process with a pixel pitch of 35 μm. It is implemented with 48 columns in a sensor prototype. Each column ADC covers an area of 35 ×545 μm{sup 2}. The measured temporal noise and Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN) are 0.96 mV and 0.40 mV, respectively. The power consumption, for a 3 V supply and 6.25 MS/s sampling rate, is 486 μW during idle time, which is by far the most frequently employed one. This value rises to 714 μW in the case of the active mode. The measured differential nonlinearity (DNL) and integral nonlinearity (INL) are 0.49/−0.28 LSB and 0.29/−0.20 LSB, respectively. - Highlights: • CMOS sensor integrated with column-level ADC is proposed for ILC VTX outer layers. • A low-power and small-area column-level ADC for high frame-rate CPS is presented. • The test results demonstrate the power and area efficiency. • The architecture is suitable for the outer layer CMOS sensors.

  15. Microarray Я US: a user-friendly graphical interface to Bioconductor tools that enables accurate microarray data analysis and expedites comprehensive functional analysis of microarray results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Yilin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray data analysis presents a significant challenge to researchers who are unable to use the powerful Bioconductor and its numerous tools due to their lack of knowledge of R language. Among the few existing software programs that offer a graphic user interface to Bioconductor packages, none have implemented a comprehensive strategy to address the accuracy and reliability issue of microarray data analysis due to the well known probe design problems associated with many widely used microarray chips. There is also a lack of tools that would expedite the functional analysis of microarray results. Findings We present Microarray Я US, an R-based graphical user interface that implements over a dozen popular Bioconductor packages to offer researchers a streamlined workflow for routine differential microarray expression data analysis without the need to learn R language. In order to enable a more accurate analysis and interpretation of microarray data, we incorporated the latest custom probe re-definition and re-annotation for Affymetrix and Illumina chips. A versatile microarray results output utility tool was also implemented for easy and fast generation of input files for over 20 of the most widely used functional analysis software programs. Conclusion Coupled with a well-designed user interface, Microarray Я US leverages cutting edge Bioconductor packages for researchers with no knowledge in R language. It also enables a more reliable and accurate microarray data analysis and expedites downstream functional analysis of microarray results.

  16. Analysis of porcine MHC using microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Wahlberg, Per; Marthey, Sylvain; Esquerré, Diane; Jaffrézic, Florence; Lecardonnel, Jérome; Hugot, Karine; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire

    2012-07-15

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in Mammals is one of the most gene dense regions of the genome and contains the polymorphic histocompatibility gene families known to be involved in pathogen response and control of auto-immunity. The MHC is a complex genetic system that provides an interesting model system to study genome expression regulation and genetic diversity at the megabase scale. The pig MHC or SLA (Swine Leucocyte Antigen) complex spans 2.4 megabases and 151 loci have been annotated. We will review key results from previous RNA expression studies using microarrays containing probes specific to annotated loci within SLA and in addition present novel data obtained using high-density tiling arrays encompassing the whole SLA complex. We have focused on transcriptome modifications of porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with a mixture of phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin known to activate B and T cell proliferation. Our results show that numerous loci mapping to the SLA complex are affected by the treatment. A general decreased level of expression for class I and II genes and an up-regulation of genes involved in peptide processing and transport were observed. Tiling array-based experiments contributed to refined gene annotations as presented for one SLA class I gene referred to as SLA-11. In conclusion, high-density tiling arrays can serve as an excellent tool to draw comprehensive transcription maps, and improve genome annotations for the SLA complex. We are currently studying their relevance to characterize SLA genetic diversity in combination with high throughput next generation sequencing. PMID:21561666

  17. CMOS Imaging Sensor Technology for Aerial Mapping Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Klaus; Welzenbach, Martin; Timm, Martin

    2016-06-01

    In June 2015 Leica Geosystems launched the first large format aerial mapping camera using CMOS sensor technology, the Leica DMC III. This paper describes the motivation to change from CCD sensor technology to CMOS for the development of this new aerial mapping camera. In 2002 the DMC first generation was developed by Z/I Imaging. It was the first large format digital frame sensor designed for mapping applications. In 2009 Z/I Imaging designed the DMC II which was the first digital aerial mapping camera using a single ultra large CCD sensor to avoid stitching of smaller CCDs. The DMC III is now the third generation of large format frame sensor developed by Z/I Imaging and Leica Geosystems for the DMC camera family. It is an evolution of the DMC II using the same system design with one large monolithic PAN sensor and four multi spectral camera heads for R,G, B and NIR. For the first time a 391 Megapixel large CMOS sensor had been used as PAN chromatic sensor, which is an industry record. Along with CMOS technology goes a range of technical benefits. The dynamic range of the CMOS sensor is approx. twice the range of a comparable CCD sensor and the signal to noise ratio is significantly better than with CCDs. Finally results from the first DMC III customer installations and test flights will be presented and compared with other CCD based aerial sensors.

  18. VLSI scaling methods and low power CMOS buffer circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Device scaling is an important part of the very large scale integration (VLSI) design to boost up the success path of VLSI industry, which results in denser and faster integration of the devices. As technology node moves towards the very deep submicron region, leakage current and circuit reliability become the key issues. Both are increasing with the new technology generation and affecting the performance of the overall logic circuit. The VLSI designers must keep the balance in power dissipation and the circuit's performance with scaling of the devices. In this paper, different scaling methods are studied first. These scaling methods are used to identify the effects of those scaling methods on the power dissipation and propagation delay of the CMOS buffer circuit. For mitigating the power dissipation in scaled devices, we have proposed a reliable leakage reduction low power transmission gate (LPTG) approach and tested it on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) buffer circuit. All simulation results are taken on HSPICE tool with Berkeley predictive technology model (BPTM) BSIM4 bulk CMOS files. The LPTG CMOS buffer reduces 95.16% power dissipation with 84.20% improvement in figure of merit at 32 nm technology node. Various process, voltage and temperature variations are analyzed for proving the robustness of the proposed approach. Leakage current uncertainty decreases from 0.91 to 0.43 in the CMOS buffer circuit that causes large circuit reliability. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  19. CMOS Cell Sensors for Point-of-Care Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk Kulah

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The burden of health-care related services in a global era with continuously increasing population and inefficient dissipation of the resources requires effective solutions. From this perspective, point-of-care diagnostics is a demanded field in clinics. It is also necessary both for prompt diagnosis and for providing health services evenly throughout the population, including the rural districts. The requirements can only be fulfilled by technologies whose productivity has already been proven, such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS. CMOS-based products can enable clinical tests in a fast, simple, safe, and reliable manner, with improved sensitivities. Portability due to diminished sensor dimensions and compactness of the test set-ups, along with low sample and power consumption, is another vital feature. CMOS-based sensors for cell studies have the potential to become essential counterparts of point-of-care diagnostics technologies. Hence, this review attempts to inform on the sensors fabricated with CMOS technology for point-of-care diagnostic studies, with a focus on CMOS image sensors and capacitance sensors for cell studies.

  20. Microarray data mining with visual programming

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Qikai; Curk, Tomaž; Shaulsky, Gad; Petrovič, Uroš; Bratko, Ivan; Zupan, Blaž; Demšar, Janez; Leban, Gregor

    2005-01-01

    Visual programming offers an intuitive means of combining known analysis and visualization methods into powerful applications. The system presented here enables users who are not programmers to manage microarray and genomic data flow and to customize their analyses by combining common data analysis tools to fit their needs.

  1. Shrinkage covariance matrix approach for microarray data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Aripin, Rasimah

    2013-04-01

    Microarray technology was developed for the purpose of monitoring the expression levels of thousands of genes. A microarray data set typically consists of tens of thousands of genes (variables) from just dozens of samples due to various constraints including the high cost of producing microarray chips. As a result, the widely used standard covariance estimator is not appropriate for this purpose. One such technique is the Hotelling's T2 statistic which is a multivariate test statistic for comparing means between two groups. It requires that the number of observations (n) exceeds the number of genes (p) in the set but in microarray studies it is common that n Hotelling's T2 statistic with the shrinkage approach is proposed to estimate the covariance matrix for testing differential gene expression. The performance of this approach is then compared with other commonly used multivariate tests using a widely analysed diabetes data set as illustrations. The results across the methods are consistent, implying that this approach provides an alternative to existing techniques.

  2. Diagnostic Oligonucleotide Microarray Fingerprinting of Bacillus Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Alferov, Oleg; Chernov, Boris; Daly, Don S; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander; Protic, Miroslava; Robison, Richard; Schipma, Matthew; White, Amanda; Willse, Alan

    2006-01-01

    A genome-independent microarray and new statistical techniques were used to genotype Bacillus strains and quantitatively compare DNA fingerprints with the known taxonomy of the genus. A synthetic DNA standard was used to understand process level variability and lead to recommended standard operating procedures for microbial forensics and clinical diagnostics.

  3. Single-species microarrays and comparative transcriptomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric J J Chain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prefabricated expression microarrays are currently available for only a few species but methods have been proposed to extend their application to comparisons between divergent genomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that the hybridization intensity of genomic DNA is a poor basis on which to select unbiased probes on Affymetrix expression arrays for studies of comparative transcriptomics, and that doing so produces spurious results. We used the Affymetrix Xenopus laevis microarray to evaluate expression divergence between X. laevis, X. borealis, and their F1 hybrids. When data are analyzed with probes that interrogate only sequences with confirmed identity in both species, we recover results that differ substantially analyses that use genomic DNA hybridizations to select probes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings have implications for the experimental design of comparative expression studies that use single-species microarrays, and for our understanding of divergent expression in hybrid clawed frogs. These findings also highlight important limitations of single-species microarrays for studies of comparative transcriptomics of polyploid species.

  4. Integration of Solar Cells on Top of CMOS Chips - Part II: CIGS Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Jiwu; Liu, Wei; Kovalgin, Alexey Y.; Sun, Yun; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    We present the monolithic integration of deepsubmicrometer complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) microchips with copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) solar cells. Solar cells are manufactured directly on unpackaged CMOS chips. The microchips maintain comparable electronic performance,

  5. Radiation Induced Fault Analysis for Wide Temperature BiCMOS Circuits Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — State of the art Radiation Hardened by Design (RHBD) techniques do not account for wide temperature variations in BiCMOS process. Silicon-Germanium BiCMOS process...

  6. Role of Permutations in Significance Analysis of Microarray and Clustering of Significant Microarray Gene list

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejashree Damle

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Microarray is the gene expression data that represent gene in different biological states. Methods are needed to determine the significance of these changes while accounting for the enormous number of genes. Significance analysis of microarrays (SAM is a statistical technique for determining whether changes in gene expression are statistically significant. During the SAM procedure permutation of microarray data is considered to observe the changes in the overall expression level of data. With increasing number of permutations false discovery rate for gene set varies. In our work we took microarray data of Normal Glucose Tolerance (NGT, and Diabetes Mellitus (DM Type II. In this paper we proposed the result of permutations during execution of SAM algorithm. The hierarchical clustering is applied for observing expression levels of significant data and visualize it with heat map.

  7. A comparative analysis of DNA barcode microarray feature size

    OpenAIRE

    Ammar, Ron; SMITH, ANDREW M.; Heisler, Lawrence E.; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2009-01-01

    Background Microarrays are an invaluable tool in many modern genomic studies. It is generally perceived that decreasing the size of microarray features leads to arrays with higher resolution (due to greater feature density), but this increase in resolution can compromise sensitivity. Results We demonstrate that barcode microarrays with smaller features are equally capable of detecting variation in DNA barcode intensity when compared to larger feature sizes within a specific microarray platfor...

  8. Facilitating functional annotation of chicken microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gresham Cathy R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modeling results from chicken microarray studies is challenging for researchers due to little functional annotation associated with these arrays. The Affymetrix GenChip chicken genome array, one of the biggest arrays that serve as a key research tool for the study of chicken functional genomics, is among the few arrays that link gene products to Gene Ontology (GO. However the GO annotation data presented by Affymetrix is incomplete, for example, they do not show references linked to manually annotated functions. In addition, there is no tool that facilitates microarray researchers to directly retrieve functional annotations for their datasets from the annotated arrays. This costs researchers amount of time in searching multiple GO databases for functional information. Results We have improved the breadth of functional annotations of the gene products associated with probesets on the Affymetrix chicken genome array by 45% and the quality of annotation by 14%. We have also identified the most significant diseases and disorders, different types of genes, and known drug targets represented on Affymetrix chicken genome array. To facilitate functional annotation of other arrays and microarray experimental datasets we developed an Array GO Mapper (AGOM tool to help researchers to quickly retrieve corresponding functional information for their dataset. Conclusion Results from this study will directly facilitate annotation of other chicken arrays and microarray experimental datasets. Researchers will be able to quickly model their microarray dataset into more reliable biological functional information by using AGOM tool. The disease, disorders, gene types and drug targets revealed in the study will allow researchers to learn more about how genes function in complex biological systems and may lead to new drug discovery and development of therapies. The GO annotation data generated will be available for public use via AgBase website and

  9. Identifying Fishes through DNA Barcodes and Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochzius, Marc; Seidel, Christian; Antoniou, Aglaia; Botla, Sandeep Kumar; Campo, Daniel; Cariani, Alessia; Vazquez, Eva Garcia; Hauschild, Janet; Hervet, Caroline; Hjörleifsdottir, Sigridur; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur; Kappel, Kristina; Landi, Monica; Magoulas, Antonios; Marteinsson, Viggo; Nölte, Manfred; Planes, Serge; Tinti, Fausto; Turan, Cemal; Venugopal, Moleyur N.; Weber, Hannes; Blohm, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    Background International fish trade reached an import value of 62.8 billion Euro in 2006, of which 44.6% are covered by the European Union. Species identification is a key problem throughout the life cycle of fishes: from eggs and larvae to adults in fisheries research and control, as well as processed fish products in consumer protection. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aims to evaluate the applicability of the three mitochondrial genes 16S rRNA (16S), cytochrome b (cyt b), and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) for the identification of 50 European marine fish species by combining techniques of “DNA barcoding” and microarrays. In a DNA barcoding approach, neighbour Joining (NJ) phylogenetic trees of 369 16S, 212 cyt b, and 447 COI sequences indicated that cyt b and COI are suitable for unambiguous identification, whereas 16S failed to discriminate closely related flatfish and gurnard species. In course of probe design for DNA microarray development, each of the markers yielded a high number of potentially species-specific probes in silico, although many of them were rejected based on microarray hybridisation experiments. None of the markers provided probes to discriminate the sibling flatfish and gurnard species. However, since 16S-probes were less negatively influenced by the “position of label” effect and showed the lowest rejection rate and the highest mean signal intensity, 16S is more suitable for DNA microarray probe design than cty b and COI. The large portion of rejected COI-probes after hybridisation experiments (>90%) renders the DNA barcoding marker as rather unsuitable for this high-throughput technology. Conclusions/Significance Based on these data, a DNA microarray containing 64 functional oligonucleotide probes for the identification of 30 out of the 50 fish species investigated was developed. It represents the next step towards an automated and easy-to-handle method to identify fish, ichthyoplankton, and fish products. PMID

  10. Identifying Fishes through DNA Barcodes and Microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Kochzius

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: International fish trade reached an import value of 62.8 billion Euro in 2006, of which 44.6% are covered by the European Union. Species identification is a key problem throughout the life cycle of fishes: from eggs and larvae to adults in fisheries research and control, as well as processed fish products in consumer protection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study aims to evaluate the applicability of the three mitochondrial genes 16S rRNA (16S, cytochrome b (cyt b, and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI for the identification of 50 European marine fish species by combining techniques of "DNA barcoding" and microarrays. In a DNA barcoding approach, neighbour Joining (NJ phylogenetic trees of 369 16S, 212 cyt b, and 447 COI sequences indicated that cyt b and COI are suitable for unambiguous identification, whereas 16S failed to discriminate closely related flatfish and gurnard species. In course of probe design for DNA microarray development, each of the markers yielded a high number of potentially species-specific probes in silico, although many of them were rejected based on microarray hybridisation experiments. None of the markers provided probes to discriminate the sibling flatfish and gurnard species. However, since 16S-probes were less negatively influenced by the "position of label" effect and showed the lowest rejection rate and the highest mean signal intensity, 16S is more suitable for DNA microarray probe design than cty b and COI. The large portion of rejected COI-probes after hybridisation experiments (>90% renders the DNA barcoding marker as rather unsuitable for this high-throughput technology. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on these data, a DNA microarray containing 64 functional oligonucleotide probes for the identification of 30 out of the 50 fish species investigated was developed. It represents the next step towards an automated and easy-to-handle method to identify fish, ichthyoplankton, and fish products.

  11. Microinjection of antisense c-mos oligonucleotides prevents meiosis II in the maturing mouse egg.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Keefe, S J; Wolfes, H; Kiessling, A A; Cooper, G M

    1989-01-01

    Injection of antisense oligonucleotides was used to investigate the function of c-mos in murine oocytes. Oocytes injected with antisense c-mos oligonucleotides completed the first meiotic division but failed to initiate meiosis II. Instead, loss of c-mos function led to chromosome decondensation, reformation of a nucleus after meiosis I, and cleavage to two cells. Therefore, c-mos is required for meiosis II during murine oocyte maturation.

  12. Background Adjustment for DNA Microarrays Using a Database of Microarray Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Sui, Yunxia; Zhao, Xiaoyue; Speed, Terence P.; Wu, Zhijin

    2009-01-01

    DNA microarrays have become an indispensable technique in biomedical research. The raw measurements from microarrays undergo a number of preprocessing steps before the data are converted to the genomic level for further analysis. Background adjustment is an important step in preprocessing. Estimating background noise has been challenging because background levels vary a lot from probe to probe, yet there are limited observations on each probe. Most current methods have used the empirical Baye...

  13. A CMOS Humidity Sensor for Passive RFID Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangming Deng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a low-cost low-power CMOS humidity sensor for passive RFID sensing applications. The humidity sensing element is implemented in standard CMOS technology without any further post-processing, which results in low fabrication costs. The interface of this humidity sensor employs a PLL-based architecture transferring sensor signal processing from the voltage domain to the frequency domain. Therefore this architecture allows the use of a fully digital circuit, which can operate on ultra-low supply voltage and thus achieves low-power consumption. The proposed humidity sensor has been fabricated in the TSMC 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurements show this humidity sensor exhibits excellent linearity and stability within the relative humidity range. The sensor interface circuit consumes only 1.05 µW at 0.5 V supply voltage and reduces it at least by an order of magnitude compared to previous designs.

  14. A CMOS humidity sensor for passive RFID sensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Zhang, Chaolong; Feng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a low-cost low-power CMOS humidity sensor for passive RFID sensing applications. The humidity sensing element is implemented in standard CMOS technology without any further post-processing, which results in low fabrication costs. The interface of this humidity sensor employs a PLL-based architecture transferring sensor signal processing from the voltage domain to the frequency domain. Therefore this architecture allows the use of a fully digital circuit, which can operate on ultra-low supply voltage and thus achieves low-power consumption. The proposed humidity sensor has been fabricated in the TSMC 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurements show this humidity sensor exhibits excellent linearity and stability within the relative humidity range. The sensor interface circuit consumes only 1.05 µW at 0.5 V supply voltage and reduces it at least by an order of magnitude compared to previous designs. PMID:24841250

  15. Operation and biasing for single device equivalent to CMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, James D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed are semiconductor devices including at least one junction which is rectifying whether the semiconductor is caused to be N or P-type, by the presence of field induced carriers. In particular, inverting and non-inverting gate voltage channel induced semiconductor single devices with operating characteristics similar to conventional multiple device CMOS systems, which can be operated as modulators, are disclosed as are a non-latching SCR and an approach to blocking parasitic currents. Operation of the gate voltage channel induced semiconductor single devices with operating characteristics similar to multiple device CMOS systems under typical bias schemes is described, and simple demonstrative five mask fabrication procedures for the inverting and non-inverting gate voltage channel induced semiconductor single devices with operating characteristics similar to multiple device CMOS systems are also presented.

  16. High-speed polysilicon CMOS photodetector for telecom and datacom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atabaki, Amir H.; Meng, Huaiyu; Alloatti, Luca; Mehta, Karan K.; Ram, Rajeev J.

    2016-09-01

    Absorption by mid-bandgap states in polysilicon or heavily implanted silicon has been previously utilized to implement guided-wave infrared photodetectors in CMOS compatible photonic platforms. Here, we demonstrate a resonant guided-wave photodetector based on the polysilicon layer that is used for the transistor gate in a microelectronic SOI CMOS process without any change to the foundry process flow ("zero-change" CMOS). Through a combination of doping mask layers, a lateral pn junction diode in the polysilicon is demonstrated with a strong electric field to enable efficient photo-carrier extraction and high-speed operation. This photodetector has a responsivity of more than 0.14 A/W from 1300 to 1600 nm, a 10 GHz bandwidth, and 80 nA dark current at 15 V reverse bias.

  17. Design and characterization of avalanche photodiodes in submicron CMOS technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancheri, L.; Bendib, T.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Stoppa, D.

    2014-03-01

    The fabrication of Avalanche Photodiodes (APDs) in CMOS processes can be exploited in several application domains, including telecommunications, time-resolved optical detection and scintillation detection. CMOS integration allows the realization of systems with a high degree of parallelization which are competitive with hybrid solutions in terms of cost and complexity. In this work, we present a linear-mode APD fabricated in a 0.15μm process, and report its gain and noise characterization. The experimental observations can be accurately predicted using Hayat dead-space noise model. Device simulations based on dead-space model are then used to discuss the current status and the perspectives for the integration of high-performance low-noise devices in standard CMOS processes.

  18. Low-voltage CMOS operational amplifiers theory, design and implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakurai, Satoshi

    1995-01-01

    Low-Voltage CMOS Operational Amplifiers: Theory, Design and Implementation discusses both single and two-stage architectures. Opamps with constant-gm input stage are designed and their excellent performance over the rail-to-rail input common mode range is demonstrated. The first set of CMOS constant-gm input stages was introduced by a group from Technische Universiteit, Delft and Universiteit Twente, the Netherlands. These earlier versions of circuits are discussed, along with new circuits developed at the Ohio State University. The design, fabrication (MOSIS Tiny Chips), and characterization of the new circuits are now complete. Basic analog integrated circuit design concepts should be understood in order to fully appreciate the work presented. However, the topics are presented in a logical order and the circuits are explained in great detail, so that Low-Voltage CMOS Operational Amplifiers can be read and enjoyed by those without much experience in analog circuit design. It is an invaluable reference boo...

  19. Study of CMOS integrated signal processing circuit in capacitive sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yi-jiang; YU Xiang; WANG Lei

    2007-01-01

    A CMOS integrated signal processing circuit based on capacitance resonance principle whose structure is simple in capacitive sensors is designed. The waveform of output voltage is improved by choosing bootstrap reference current mirror with initiate circuit, CMOS analogy switch and positive feedback of double-stage inverter in the circuit. Output voltage of this circuit is a symmetric square wave signal. The variation of sensitive capacitance, which is part of the capacitive sensors, can be denoted by the change of output voltage's frequency. The whole circuit is designed with 1.5 μm P-well CMOS process and simulated by PSpice software.Output frequency varies from 261.05 kHz to 47.93 kHz if capacitance varies in the range of 1PF~15PF. And the variation of frequency can be easily detected using counter or SCU.

  20. Design of Low Voltage Low Power CMOS OP-AMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Khan,

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Operational amplifiers are an integral part of many analog and mixed signal systems. As the demand for mixed mode integrated circuits increases, the design of analog circuits such as operational amplifiers in CMOS technology becomes more critical. This paper presents a two stage CMOS operational amplifier, which operates at ±1.8V power supply using TSMC 0.18um CMOS technology. The OP-AMP designed exhibit unity gain frequency of 12.6 MHz, and gain of 55.5db with 300uw power dissipation. The gain margin and phase margin of OP-AMP is 45˚ and 60˚ respectively. Design and simulation has been carried out in P Spice tool.

  1. Fabrication of the planar angular rotator using the CMOS process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ching-Liang; Chang, Chien-Liu; Chen, Hung-Lin; Chang, Pei-Zen

    2002-05-01

    In this investigation we propose a novel planar angular rotator fabricated by the conventional complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. Following the 0.6 μm single poly triple metal (SPTM) CMOS process, the device is completed by a simple maskless, post-process etching step. The rotor of the planar angular rotator rotates around its geometric center with electrostatic actuation. The proposed design adopts an intelligent mechanism including the slider-crank system to permit simultaneous motion. The CMOS planar angular rotator could be driven with driving voltages of around 40 V. The design proposed here has a shorter response time and longer life, without problems of friction and wear, compared to the more common planar angular micromotor.

  2. IGBT scaling principle toward CMOS compatible wafer processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Omura, Ichiro

    2013-02-01

    A scaling principle for trench gate IGBT is proposed. CMOS technology on large diameter wafer enables to produce various digital circuits with higher performance and lower cost. The transistor cell structure becomes laterally smaller and smaller and vertically shallower and shallower. In contrast, latest IGBTs have rather deeper trench structure to obtain lower on-state voltage drop and turn-off loss. In the aspect of the process uniformity and wafer warpage, manufacturing such structure in the CMOS factory is difficult. In this paper, we show the scaling principle toward shallower structure and better performance. The principle is theoretically explained by our previously proposed "Structure Oriented" analytical model. The principle represents a possibility of technology direction and roadmap for future IGBT for improving the device performance consistent with lower cost and high volume productivity with CMOS compatible large diameter wafer technologies.

  3. 77 FR 26787 - Certain CMOS Image Sensors and Products Containing Same; Notice of Receipt of Complaint...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... COMMISSION Certain CMOS Image Sensors and Products Containing Same; Notice of Receipt of Complaint... complaint entitled Certain CMOS Image Sensors and Products Containing Same, DN 2895; the Commission is... importation of certain CMOS image sensors and products containing same. The complaint names as...

  4. CMOS MAPS in a Homogeneous 3D Process for Charged Particle Tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Manazza, A; Manghisoni, M; Re, V; Traversi, G; Bettarini, S; Forti, F; Morsani, F; Rizzo, G; 10.1109/TNS.2014.2299341

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the characterization of deep n-well (DNW) CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) fabricated in a 130 nm homogeneous, vertically integrated technology. An evaluation of the 3D MAPS device performance, designed for application of the experiments at the future high luminosity colliders, is provided through the characterization of the prototypes, including tests with infrared (IR) laser, 55Fe and 90Sr sources. The radiation hardness study of the technology will also be presented together with its impact on 3D DNW MAPS performance.

  5. A Wide-Band Injection-Locked Frequency Divider in 0.18um CMOS

    OpenAIRE

    Acar, M.; Leenaerts, D. M. W.; Nauta, Bram

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel inductorless Injection-Locked Frequency Divider (ILFD) that can make divisions with ratios 2,4,6 and 8 with wide locking ranges. Fabricated in a digital 0.18μm CMOS process the divider can operate up to 15 GHz. The measured locking ranges of the divider for division ratios 4 and 6 are 1.6 GHz and 1.1 GHz wide respectively. The current consumption of the divider is 3.8 mA operating at 1.8V supply. The active area of the chip is 100x67μm2.

  6. An analog CMOS chip set for neural networks with arbitrary topologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lansner, John; Lehmann, Torsten

    1993-01-01

    An analog CMOS chip set for implementations of artificial neural networks (ANNs) has been fabricated and tested. The chip set consists of two cascadable chips: a neuron chip and a synapse chip. Neurons on the neuron chips can be interconnected at random via synapses on the synapse chips thus...... implementing an ANN with arbitrary topology. The neuron test chip contains an array of 4 neurons with well defined hyperbolic tangent activation functions which is implemented by using parasitic lateral bipolar transistors. The synapse test chip is a cascadable 4×4 matrix-vector multiplier with variable, 10-b...

  7. CMOS pixel sensors on high resistive substrate for high-rate, high-radiation environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirono, Toko; Barbero, Marlon; Breugnon, Patrick; Godiot, Stephanie; Gonella, Laura; Hemperek, Tomasz; Hügging, Fabian; Krüger, Hans; Liu, Jian; Pangaud, Patrick; Peric, Ivan; Pohl, David-Leon; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rymaszewski, Piotr; Wang, Anqing; Wermes, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    A depleted CMOS active pixel sensor (DMAPS) has been developed on a substrate with high resistivity in a high voltage process. High radiation tolerance and high time resolution can be expected because of the charge collection by drift. A prototype of DMAPS was fabricated in a 150 nm process by LFoundry. Two variants of the pixel layout were tested, and the measured depletion depths of the variants are 166 μm and 80 μm. We report the results obtained with the prototype fabricated in this technology.

  8. Reduction of CMOS Image Sensor Read Noise to Enable Photon Counting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Guidash

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent activity in photon counting CMOS image sensors (CIS has been directed to reduction of read noise. Many approaches and methods have been reported. This work is focused on providing sub 1 e− read noise by design and operation of the binary and small signal readout of photon counting CIS. Compensation of transfer gate feed-through was used to provide substantially reduced CDS time and source follower (SF bandwidth. SF read noise was reduced by a factor of 3 with this method. This method can be applied broadly to CIS devices to reduce the read noise for small signals to enable use as a photon counting sensor.

  9. Reduction of CMOS Image Sensor Read Noise to Enable Photon Counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidash, Michael; Ma, Jiaju; Vogelsang, Thomas; Endsley, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Recent activity in photon counting CMOS image sensors (CIS) has been directed to reduction of read noise. Many approaches and methods have been reported. This work is focused on providing sub 1 e(-) read noise by design and operation of the binary and small signal readout of photon counting CIS. Compensation of transfer gate feed-through was used to provide substantially reduced CDS time and source follower (SF) bandwidth. SF read noise was reduced by a factor of 3 with this method. This method can be applied broadly to CIS devices to reduce the read noise for small signals to enable use as a photon counting sensor. PMID:27070625

  10. MuPix7 - A fast monolithic HV-CMOS pixel chip for Mu3e

    CERN Document Server

    Augustin, H; Dittmeier, S; Hammerich, J; Hartenstein, U; Huang, Q; Huth, L; Immig, D; Kozlinskiy, A; Aeschbacher, F Meier; Perić, I; Perrevoort, A -K; Schöning, A; Shrestha, S; Sorokin, I; Tyukin, A; Bruch, D vom; Wauters, F; Wiedner, D; Zimmermann, M

    2016-01-01

    The MuPix7 chip is a monolithic HV-CMOS pixel chip, thinned down to 50 \\mu m. It provides continuous self-triggered, non-shuttered readout at rates up to 30 Mhits/chip of 3x3 mm^2 active area and a pixel size of 103x80 \\mu m^2. The hit efficiency depends on the chosen working point. Settings with a power consumption of 300 mW/cm^2 allow for a hit efficiency >99.5%. A time resolution of 14.2 ns (Gaussian sigma) is achieved. Latest results from 2016 test beam campaigns are shown.

  11. New Multiple-Times Programmable CMOS ROM Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, In-Young; Jeong, Seong Yeol; Seo, Sung Min; Lee, Myungjin; Jang, Taesu; Cha, Seon-Yong; Park, Young June

    New concept of CMOS nonvolatile memory is presented with demonstration of cell implementations. The memory cell, which is a comparator basically, makes use of comparator offset for storage quantity and the FN stress phenomena for cell programming. We also propose the stress-packet operation which is the relevant programming method to finely control the offset of the memory cell. The memory cell is multiple-time programmable while it is implemented in a standard CMOS process. We fabricated the memory cell arrays of the latch comparator and demonstrated that it is rewritten several times. We also investigated the reliability of cell data retention by monitoring programmed offsets for several months.

  12. From vertex detectors to inner trackers with CMOS pixel sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Besson, A.; Pérez, A. Pérez; Spiriti, E.; Baudot, J.; Claus, G; Goffe, M.; de Winter, M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of CMOS Pixel Sensors (CPS) for high resolution and low material vertex detectors has been validated with the 2014 and 2015 physics runs of the STAR-PXL detector at RHIC/BNL. This opens the door to the use of CPS for inner tracking devices, with 10-100 times larger sensitive area, which require therefore a sensor design privileging power saving, response uniformity and robustness. The 350 nm CMOS technology used for the STAR-PXL sensors was considered as too poorly suited to upcoming ...

  13. Modifications in CMOS Dynamic Logic Style: A Review Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Preetisudha; Mahapatra, Kamalakanta

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic logic style is used in high performance circuit design because of its fast speed and less transistors requirement as compared to CMOS logic style. But it is not widely accepted for all types of circuit implementations due to its less noise tolerance and charge sharing problems. A small noise at the input of the dynamic logic can change the desired output. Domino logic uses one static CMOS inverter at the output of dynamic node which is more noise immune and consuming very less power as compared to other proposed circuit. In this paper, an overview and classification of these techniques are first presented and then compared according to their performance.

  14. Process optimization of radiation-hardened CMOS integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of processing steps on the radiation hardness of MOS devices have been systematically investigated. Quantitative relationships between the radiation-induced voltage shifts and processing parameters have been determined, where possible. Using the results of process optimization, a controlled baseline fabrication process for aluminum-gate CMOS has been defined. CMOS inverters which can survive radiation exposures well in excess of 108 rads (Si) have been fabricated. Restrictions that the observed physical dependences place upon possible models for the traps responsible for radiation-induced charging in SiO2 are discussed

  15. CMOS voltage references an analytical and practical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Kok, Chi-Wah

    2013-01-01

    A practical overview of CMOS circuit design, this book covers the technology, analysis, and design techniques of voltage reference circuits.  The design requirements covered follow modern CMOS processes, with an emphasis on low power, low voltage, and low temperature coefficient voltage reference design. Dedicating a chapter to each stage of the design process, the authors have organized the content to give readers the tools they need to implement the technologies themselves. Readers will gain an understanding of device characteristics, the practical considerations behind circuit topology,

  16. Linear CMOS RF power amplifiers a complete design workflow

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz, Hector Solar

    2013-01-01

    The work establishes the design flow for the optimization of linear CMOS power amplifiers from the first steps of the design to the final IC implementation and tests. The authors also focuses on design guidelines of the inductor's geometrical characteristics for power applications and covers their measurement and characterization. Additionally, a model is proposed which would facilitate designs in terms of transistor sizing, required inductor quality factors or minimum supply voltage. The model considers limitations that CMOS processes can impose on implementation. The book also provides diffe

  17. Proton therapy beam dosimetry with silicon CMOS image sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a previous publication, it has been shown how neutron and proton beams in a quite broad energy interval, could be simply monitored with a position sensitive CMOS image detector. The direct read out, the lack of pile up effects, the stability of the signal, the detector linear response with proton energy and current and the very low costs of the device could make the CMOS detector a good candidate in addition to other well established detectors for proton radiation dosimetry. (N.T.)

  18. Effects of Proton Irradiation on a CMOS Image Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Qiang; MENG Xiang-Ti

    2007-01-01

    We perform 9 MeV proton irradiation of a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor at doses from 1×109 to 4×1010 cm-2. In general, the average brightness of dark output images increases with an increasing dose, and reaches the maximum at 1×1010 cm-2. The captured colour images become very blurry at 4×1010 cm-2. These can be explained by change of concentrations of irradiation-induced electron-hole pairs and vacancies in the various layers of CMOS image sensor calculated by the TRIM simulation programme with dose.

  19. CMOS sigma-delta converters practical design guide

    CERN Document Server

    De la Rosa, Jose M

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of Sigma-Delta Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADCs) and a practical guide to their design in nano-scale CMOS for optimal performance. This book presents a systematic and comprehensive compilation of sigma-delta converter operating principles, the new advances in architectures and circuits, design methodologies and practical considerations - going from system-level specifications to silicon integration, packaging and measurements, with emphasis on nanometer CMOS implementation. The book emphasizes practical design issues - from high-level behavioural modelling i

  20. Single-chip RF communications systems in CMOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Ole

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes the state of the art of the Nordic mobile communication project ConFront. This is a cooperation project with 3 Nordic universities and local industry. The ultimate goal is to make a CMOS one-chip mobile phone.......The paper describes the state of the art of the Nordic mobile communication project ConFront. This is a cooperation project with 3 Nordic universities and local industry. The ultimate goal is to make a CMOS one-chip mobile phone....

  1. A 65 nm CMOS LNA for Bolometer Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tom Nan; Boon, Chirn Chye; Zhu, Forest Xi; Yi, Xiang; He, Xiaofeng; Feng, Guangyin; Lim, Wei Meng; Liu, Bei

    2016-04-01

    Modern bolometers generally consist of large-scale arrays of detectors. Implemented in conventional technologies, such bolometer arrays suffer from integrability and productivity issues. Recently, the development of CMOS technologies has presented an opportunity for the massive production of high-performance and highly integrated bolometers. This paper presents a 65-nm CMOS LNA designed for a millimeter-wave bolometer's pre-amplification stage. By properly applying some positive feedback, the noise figure of the proposed LNA is minimized at under 6 dB and the bandwidth is extended to 30 GHz.

  2. Low-power CMOS circuit design for fast infrared imagers

    OpenAIRE

    Margarit Taule, Josep Maria

    2008-01-01

    La present tesi de màster detalla novedoses tècniques circuitals per al disseny de circuits integrats digitals CMOS de lectura compactes, de baixa potència i completament programables, destinats a aplicacions d'IR d'alta velocitat operant a temperatura ambient. En aquest sentit, el treball recull i amplia notablement la recerca iniciada en el Projecte Final de Carrera "Tècniques de disseny CMOS per a sistemes de visió híbrids de pla focal modular" obtenint-se resultats específics en tres dife...

  3. New Curvature-Compensated CMOS Bandgap Voltage Reference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Shen; Ning Ning; Qi Yu; Yan Luo; Chun-Sheng Li

    2007-01-01

    A novel curvaturecompensated CMOS bandgap voltage reference is presented. The reference utilizes two first order temperature compensations generated from the nonlinearity of the finite current gain β of vertical pnp bipolar transistor. The proposed circuit,designed in a standard 0.18 μm CMOS process, achieves a good temperature coefficient of 2.44 ppm/℃ with temperature range from 40 ℃ to 85 ℃, and about 4 mV supply voltage variation in the range from 1.4 V to 2.4 V. With a 1.8 V supply voltage, the power supply rejection ratio is 56 dB at 10 MHz.

  4. CMOS-compatible photonic devices for single-photon generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Chunle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sources of single photons are one of the key building blocks for quantum photonic technologies such as quantum secure communication and powerful quantum computing. To bring the proof-of-principle demonstration of these technologies from the laboratory to the real world, complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS-compatible photonic chips are highly desirable for photon generation, manipulation, processing and even detection because of their compactness, scalability, robustness, and the potential for integration with electronics. In this paper, we review the development of photonic devices made from materials (e.g., silicon and processes that are compatible with CMOS fabrication facilities for the generation of single photons.

  5. CMOS-compatible photonic devices for single-photon generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Chunle; Bell, Bryn; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2016-09-01

    Sources of single photons are one of the key building blocks for quantum photonic technologies such as quantum secure communication and powerful quantum computing. To bring the proof-of-principle demonstration of these technologies from the laboratory to the real world, complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible photonic chips are highly desirable for photon generation, manipulation, processing and even detection because of their compactness, scalability, robustness, and the potential for integration with electronics. In this paper, we review the development of photonic devices made from materials (e.g., silicon) and processes that are compatible with CMOS fabrication facilities for the generation of single photons.

  6. EXPANDER – an integrative program suite for microarray data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiloh Yosef

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression microarrays are a prominent experimental tool in functional genomics which has opened the opportunity for gaining global, systems-level understanding of transcriptional networks. Experiments that apply this technology typically generate overwhelming volumes of data, unprecedented in biological research. Therefore the task of mining meaningful biological knowledge out of the raw data is a major challenge in bioinformatics. Of special need are integrative packages that provide biologist users with advanced but yet easy to use, set of algorithms, together covering the whole range of steps in microarray data analysis. Results Here we present the EXPANDER 2.0 (EXPression ANalyzer and DisplayER software package. EXPANDER 2.0 is an integrative package for the analysis of gene expression data, designed as a 'one-stop shop' tool that implements various data analysis algorithms ranging from the initial steps of normalization and filtering, through clustering and biclustering, to high-level functional enrichment analysis that points to biological processes that are active in the examined conditions, and to promoter cis-regulatory elements analysis that elucidates transcription factors that control the observed transcriptional response. EXPANDER is available with pre-compiled functional Gene Ontology (GO and promoter sequence-derived data files for yeast, worm, fly, rat, mouse and human, supporting high-level analysis applied to data obtained from these six organisms. Conclusion EXPANDER integrated capabilities and its built-in support of multiple organisms make it a very powerful tool for analysis of microarray data. The package is freely available for academic users at http://www.cs.tau.ac.il/~rshamir/expander

  7. CMOS SPADs with up to 500 μm diameter and 55% detection efficiency at 420 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Federica; Bronzi, Danilo; Zou, Yu; Scarcella, Carmelo; Boso, Gianluca; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Zappa, Franco; Durini, Daniel; Weyers, Sascha; Paschen, Uwe; Brockherde, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Many demanding applications require single-photon detectors with very large active area, very low noise, high detection efficiency, and precise time response. Single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) provide all the advantages of solid-state devices, but in many applications other single-photon detectors, like photomultiplier tubes, have been preferred so far due to their larger active area. We developed silicon SPADs with active area diameters as large as 500 μm in a fully standard CMOS process. The 500 μm SPAD exhibits 55% peak photon detection efficiency at 420 nm, 8 kcps of dark counting rate at 0°C, and high uniformity of the sensitivity in the active area. These devices can be used with on-chip integrated quenching circuitry, which reduces the afterpulsing probability, or with external circuits to achieve even better photon-timing performances, as good as 92 ps FWHM for a 100 μm diameter SPAD. Owing to the state-of-the-art performance, not only compared to CMOS SPADs but also SPADs developed in custom technologies, very high uniformity and low crosstalk probability, these CMOS SPADs can be successfully employed in detector arrays and single-chip imagers for single-photon counting and timing applications.

  8. Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Brijesh S; Pokhriyal, Mayank; Ratta, Barkha; Kumar, Ajay; Saxena, Meeta; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips is gaining momentum in recent years. Hence, it is possible to design customized microarray chip for viruses infecting livestock in India. Customized microarray chips identified Bovine herpes virus-1 (BHV-1), Canine Adeno Virus-1 (CAV-1), and Canine Parvo Virus-2 (CPV-2) in clinical samples. Microarray identified specific probes were further confirmed using RT-PCR in all clinical and known samples. Therefore, the application of microarray chips during viral disease outbreaks in Indian livestock is possible where conventional methods are unsuitable. It should be noted that customized application requires a detailed cost efficiency calculation.

  9. Design of automatic data selector for microarray biosensor%微阵列生物传感器的自动数据选通器设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘银松; 李向全; 张成伟; 张仁富; 孔谋夫

    2009-01-01

    为了让微阵列生物传感器的多路并行模拟信号能够分时的串行输出,以便后续电路处理,设计了一种自动数据选通器.该数据选通器主要由CMOS传输门和CMOS移位寄存器构成,能同时适用于数字信号与模拟信号.在0.6 pμm/Level 7 CMOS工艺条件下进行模拟,仿真结果表明:该数据选通器具有较高的性能.%In order to make the multiplex parallel analog signal of the microarray biosensor can be time-sharing output and is easier processed by next circuit, a automatic data selector is designed. This device is constituted by CMOS transmission and CMOS shift register and is able to apply to the digital signal and analog signal at the same time. Simulation is carried out with 0.6μm/Level 7 CMOS,the simulation results indicate that the data selector has a good performance.

  10. A tiling microarray for global analysis of chloroplast genome expression in cucumber and other plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pląder Wojciech

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plastids are small organelles equipped with their own genomes (plastomes. Although these organelles are involved in numerous plant metabolic pathways, current knowledge about the transcriptional activity of plastomes is limited. To solve this problem, we constructed a plastid tiling microarray (PlasTi-microarray consisting of 1629 oligonucleotide probes. The oligonucleotides were designed based on the cucumber chloroplast genomic sequence and targeted both strands of the plastome in a non-contiguous arrangement. Up to 4 specific probes were designed for each gene/exon, and the intergenic regions were covered regularly, with 70-nt intervals. We also developed a protocol for direct chemical labeling and hybridization of as little as 2 micrograms of chloroplast RNA. We used this protocol for profiling the expression of the cucumber chloroplast plastome on the PlasTi-microarray. Owing to the high sequence similarity of plant plastomes, the newly constructed microarray can be used to study plants other than cucumber. Comparative hybridization of chloroplast transcriptomes from cucumber, Arabidopsis, tomato and spinach showed that the PlasTi-microarray is highly versatile.

  11. Low-power high-accuracy micro-digital sun sensor by means of a CMOS image sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, N.; Theuwissen, A.J.P.

    2013-01-01

    A micro-digital sun sensor (μDSS) is a sun detector which senses a satellite’s instant attitude angle with respect to the sun. The core of this sensor is a system-on-chip imaging chip which is referred to as APS+. The APS+ integrates a CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) array of 368×368  pixels , a 12-b

  12. CMOS capacitive sensors for lab-on-chip applications a multidisciplinary approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2010-01-01

    The main components of CMOS capacitive biosensors including sensing electrodes, bio-functionalized sensing layer, interface circuitries and microfluidic packaging are verbosely explained in chapters 2-6 after a brief introduction on CMOS based LoCs in Chapter 1. CMOS Capacitive Sensors for Lab-on-Chip Applications is written in a simple pedagogical way. It emphasises practical aspects of fully integrated CMOS biosensors rather than mathematical calculations and theoretical details. By using CMOS Capacitive Sensors for Lab-on-Chip Applications, the reader will have circuit design methodologies,

  13. Undetected sex chromosome aneuploidy by chromosomal microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus-Bustani, Keren; Yaron, Yuval; Goldstein, Myriam; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ben-Shachar, Shay

    2012-11-01

    We report on a case of a female fetus found to be mosaic for Turner syndrome (45,X) and trisomy X (47,XXX). Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) failed to detect the aneuploidy because of a normal average dosage of the X chromosome. This case represents an unusual instance in which CMA may not detect chromosomal aberrations. Such a possibility should be taken into consideration in similar cases where CMA is used in a clinical setting.

  14. A Gene Expression Barcode for Microarray Data

    OpenAIRE

    Zilliox, Michael J.; Irizarry, Rafael A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to measure genome-wide expression holds great promise for characterizing cells and distinguishing diseased from normal tissues. Thus far, microarray technology has only been useful for measuring relative expression between two or more samples, which has handicapped its ability to classify tissue types. This paper presents the first method that can successfully predict tissue type based on data from a single hybridization. A preliminary web-tool is available at http://rafalab.jhsph...

  15. Pineal Function: Impact of Microarray Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, David C.; Bailey, Michael J; Carter, David A.; Kim, Jong-So; Shi, Qiong; Ho, Anthony; Chik, Constance; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Morin, Fabrice; Ganguly, Surajit; Rath, Martin F.; Møller, Morten; Sugden, David; Rangel, Zoila G.; Peter J Munson

    2009-01-01

    Microarray analysis has provided a new understanding of pineal function by identifying genes that are highly expressed in this tissue relative to other tissues and also by identifying over 600 genes that are expressed on a 24-hour schedule. This effort has highlighted surprising similarity to the retina and has provided reason to explore new avenues of study including intracellular signaling, signal transduction, transcriptional cascades, thyroid/retinoic acid hormone signaling, metal biology...

  16. Linking microarray reporters with protein functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaj Stan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of microarray experiments requires accurate and up-to-date functional annotation of the microarray reporters to optimize the interpretation of the biological processes involved. Pathway visualization tools are used to connect gene expression data with existing biological pathways by using specific database identifiers that link reporters with elements in the pathways. Results This paper proposes a novel method that aims to improve microarray reporter annotation by BLASTing the original reporter sequences against a species-specific EMBL subset, that was derived from and crosslinked back to the highly curated UniProt database. The resulting alignments were filtered using high quality alignment criteria and further compared with the outcome of a more traditional approach, where reporter sequences were BLASTed against EnsEMBL followed by locating the corresponding protein (UniProt entry for the high quality hits. Combining the results of both methods resulted in successful annotation of > 58% of all reporter sequences with UniProt IDs on two commercial array platforms, increasing the amount of Incyte reporters that could be coupled to Gene Ontology terms from 32.7% to 58.3% and to a local GenMAPP pathway from 9.6% to 16.7%. For Agilent, 35.3% of the total reporters are now linked towards GO nodes and 7.1% on local pathways. Conclusion Our methods increased the annotation quality of microarray reporter sequences and allowed us to visualize more reporters using pathway visualization tools. Even in cases where the original reporter annotation showed the correct description the new identifiers often allowed improved pathway and Gene Ontology linking. These methods are freely available at http://www.bigcat.unimaas.nl/public/publications/Gaj_Annotation/.

  17. Tissue Microarrays for Analysis of Expression Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Lindskog Bergström, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are essential building blocks in every living cell, and since the complete human genome was sequenced in 2004, researchers have attempted to map the human proteome, which is the functional representation of the genome. One such initiative is the Human Protein Atlas programme (HPA), which generates monospecific antibodies towards all human proteins and uses these for high-throughput tissue profiling on tissue microarrays (TMAs). The results are publically available at the website www....

  18. A CMOS integrated voltage and power efficient AC/DC converter for energy harvesting applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a fully CMOS integrated active AC/DC converter for energy harvesting applications is presented. The rectifier is realized in a standard 0.35 µm CMOS process without special process options. It works as a full wave rectifier and can be separated into two stages—one passive and one active. The active part is powered from the storage capacitor and consumes about 600 nA at 2 V supply. The input voltage amplitude range is between 1.25 and 3.75 V, and the operating frequency range is from 1 Hz to as much as several 100 kHz. The series voltage drop over the rectifier is less than 20 mV. Measurements in combination with an electromagnetic harvester show a significant increase in the achievable output voltage and power compared to a common, discrete Schottky diode rectifier. The measured efficiency of the rectifier is over 95%. Measurements show a negligible temperature influence on the output voltage between −40 °C and +125 °C

  19. Metadata Management and Semantics in Microarray Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabaş, F; Can, T; Baykal, N

    2011-01-01

    The number of microarray and other high-throughput experiments on primary repositories keeps increasing as do the size and complexity of the results in response to biomedical investigations. Initiatives have been started on standardization of content, object model, exchange format and ontology. However, there are backlogs and inability to exchange data between microarray repositories, which indicate that there is a great need for a standard format and data management. We have introduced a metadata framework that includes a metadata card and semantic nets that make experimental results visible, understandable and usable. These are encoded in syntax encoding schemes and represented in RDF (Resource Description Frame-word), can be integrated with other metadata cards and semantic nets, and can be exchanged, shared and queried. We demonstrated the performance and potential benefits through a case study on a selected microarray repository. We concluded that the backlogs can be reduced and that exchange of information and asking of knowledge discovery questions can become possible with the use of this metadata framework. PMID:24052712

  20. Microarrays for rapid identification of plant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonham, Neil; Tomlinson, Jenny; Mumford, Rick

    2007-01-01

    Many factors affect the development and application of diagnostic techniques. Plant viruses are an inherently diverse group that, unlike cellular pathogens, possess no nucleotide sequence type (e.g., ribosomal RNA sequences) in common. Detection of plant viruses is becoming more challenging as globalization of trade, particularly in ornamentals, and the potential effects of climate change enhance the movement of viruses and their vectors, transforming the diagnostic landscape. Techniques for assessing seed, other propagation materials and field samples for the presence of specific viruses include biological indexing, electron microscopy, antibody-based detection, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and microarray detection. Of these, microarray detection provides the greatest capability for parallel yet specific testing, and can be used to detect individual, or combinations of viruses and, using current approaches, to do so with a sensitivity comparable to ELISA. Methods based on PCR provide the greatest sensitivity among the listed techniques but are limited in parallel detection capability even in "multiplexed" applications. Various aspects of microarray technology, including probe development, array fabrication, assay target preparation, hybridization, washing, scanning, and interpretation are presented and discussed, for both current and developing technology.

  1. Chicken sperm transcriptome profiling by microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R P; Shafeeque, C M; Sharma, S K; Singh, R; Mohan, J; Sastry, K V H; Saxena, V K; Azeez, P A

    2016-03-01

    It has been confirmed that mammalian sperm contain thousands of functional RNAs, and some of them have vital roles in fertilization and early embryonic development. Therefore, we attempted to characterize transcriptome of the sperm of fertile chickens using microarray analysis. Spermatozoal RNA was pooled from 10 fertile males and used for RNA preparation. Prior to performing the microarray, RNA quality was assessed using a bioanalyzer, and gDNA and somatic cell RNA contamination was assessed by CD4 and PTPRC gene amplification. The chicken sperm transcriptome was cross-examined by analysing sperm and testes RNA on a 4 × 44K chicken array, and results were verified by RT-PCR. Microarray analysis identified 21,639 predominantly nuclear-encoded transcripts in chicken sperm. The majority (66.55%) of the sperm transcripts were shared with the testes, while surprisingly, 33.45% transcripts were detected (raw signal intensity greater than 50) only in the sperm and not in the testes. The greatest proportion of up-regulated transcripts were responsible for signal transduction (63.20%) followed by embryonic development (56.76%) and cell structure (56.25%). Of the 20 most abundant transcripts, 18 remain uncharacterized, whereas the least abundant genes were mostly associated with the ribosome. These findings lay a foundation for more detailed investigations on sperm RNAs in chickens to identify sperm-based biomarkers for fertility.

  2. Integrating data from heterogeneous DNA microarray platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Eduardo; Rocha, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarrays are one of the most used technologies for gene expression measurement. However, there are several distinct microarray platforms, from different manufacturers, each with its own measurement protocol, resulting in data that can hardly be compared or directly integrated. Data integration from multiple sources aims to improve the assertiveness of statistical tests, reducing the data dimensionality problem. The integration of heterogeneous DNA microarray platforms comprehends a set of tasks that range from the re-annotation of the features used on gene expression, to data normalization and batch effect elimination. In this work, a complete methodology for gene expression data integration and application is proposed, which comprehends a transcript-based re-annotation process and several methods for batch effect attenuation. The integrated data will be used to select the best feature set and learning algorithm for a brain tumor classification case study. The integration will consider data from heterogeneous Agilent and Affymetrix platforms, collected from public gene expression databases, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas and Gene Expression Omnibus. PMID:26673932

  3. The Potentials and Pitfalls of Microarrays in Neglected Tropical Diseases: A Focus on Human Filarial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwarteng, Alexander; Ahuno, Samuel Terkper

    2016-01-01

    Data obtained from expression microarrays enables deeper understanding of the molecular signatures of infectious diseases. It provides rapid and accurate information on how infections affect the clustering of gene expression profiles, pathways and networks that are transcriptionally active during various infection states compared to conventional diagnostic methods, which primarily focus on single genes or proteins. Thus, microarray technologies offer advantages in understanding host-parasite interactions associated with filarial infections. More importantly, the use of these technologies can aid diagnostics and helps translate current genomic research into effective treatment and interventions for filarial infections. Studying immune responses via microarray following infection can yield insight into genetic pathways and networks that can have a profound influence on the development of anti-parasitic vaccines. PMID:27600086

  4. Multiplex giant magnetoresistive biosensor microarrays identify interferon-associated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Haddon, D. James; Wand, Hannah E.; Price, Jordan V.; Diep, Vivian K.; Hall, Drew A.; Petri, Michelle; Baechler, Emily C.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Utz, Paul J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-06-01

    High titer, class-switched autoantibodies are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Dysregulation of the interferon (IFN) pathway is observed in individuals with active SLE, although the association of specific autoantibodies with chemokine score, a combined measurement of three IFN-regulated chemokines, is not known. To identify autoantibodies associated with chemokine score, we developed giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor microarrays, which allow the parallel measurement of multiple serum antibodies to autoantigens and peptides. We used the microarrays to analyze serum samples from SLE patients and found individuals with high chemokine scores had significantly greater reactivity to 13 autoantigens than individuals with low chemokine scores. Our findings demonstrate that multiple autoantibodies, including antibodies to U1-70K and modified histone H2B tails, are associated with IFN dysregulation in SLE. Further, they show the microarrays are capable of identifying autoantibodies associated with relevant clinical manifestations of SLE, with potential for use as biomarkers in clinical practice.

  5. Design and Implementation of a Hybrid SET-CMOS Based Sequential Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindya Jana

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Single Electron Transistor is a hot cake in the present research area of VLSI design and Microelectron-ics technology. It operates through one-by-one tunneling of electrons through the channel, utilizing the Coulomb blockade Phenomenon. Due to nanoscale feature size, ultralow power dissipation, and unique Coulomb blockade oscillation characteristics it may replace Field Effect Transistor FET. SET is very much advantageous than CMOS in few points. And in few points CMOS is advantageous than SET. So it has been seen that Combination of SET and CMOS is very much effective in the nanoscale, low power VLSI circuits. This paper has given a idea to make different sequential circuits using the Hybrid SET-CMOS. The MIB model for SET and BSIM4 model for CMOS are used. The operations of the proposed circuits are verified in Tanner environment. The performances of CMOS and Hybrid SET-CMOS based circuits are compared. The hybrid SET-CMOS circuit is found to consume lesser power than the CMOS based circuit. Further it is established that hybrid SET-CMOS based circuit is much faster compared to CMOS based circuit.

  6. CMOS image sensors as an efficient platform for glucose monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devadhasan, Jasmine Pramila; Kim, Sanghyo; Choi, Cheol Soo

    2013-10-01

    Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors have been used previously in the analysis of biological samples. In the present study, a CMOS image sensor was used to monitor the concentration of oxidized mouse plasma glucose (86-322 mg dL(-1)) based on photon count variation. Measurement of the concentration of oxidized glucose was dependent on changes in color intensity; color intensity increased with increasing glucose concentration. The high color density of glucose highly prevented photons from passing through the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chip, which suggests that the photon count was altered by color intensity. Photons were detected by a photodiode in the CMOS image sensor and converted to digital numbers by an analog to digital converter (ADC). Additionally, UV-spectral analysis and time-dependent photon analysis proved the efficiency of the detection system. This simple, effective, and consistent method for glucose measurement shows that CMOS image sensors are efficient devices for monitoring glucose in point-of-care applications. PMID:23900281

  7. CMOS-compatible LVOF-based visible microspectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadi, Arvin; Wu, Huaiwen; de Graaf, Ger; Wolffenbuttel, Reinoud F.

    2010-04-01

    This paper reports on a CMOS-Compatible Linear Variable Optical Filter (LVOF) visible micro-spectrometer. The CMOS-compatible post process for fabrication of the LVOF has been used for integration of the LVOF with a CMOS chip containing a 128-element photodiode array and readout circuitry. Fabrication of LVOF involves a process for fabrication of very small taper angles, ranging from 0.001° to 0.1°, in SiO2. These layers can be fabricated flexibly in a resist layer by just one lithography step and a subsequent reflow process. The 3D pattern of the resist structures is subsequently transferred into SiO2 by appropriate etching. Complete LVOF fabrication involves CMOS-compatible deposition of a lower dielectric mirror using a stack of dielectrics on the wafer, tapered layer formation and deposition of the top dielectric mirror. The LVOF has been optimized for 580 nm - 720 nm spectral operating range and has also been mounted on a CCD camera for characterization. The design of LVOF micro-spectrometer, the fabrication and characterization results are presented.

  8. High-Speed Low Power Design in CMOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghani, Arfan; Usmani, S. H.; Stassen, Flemming

    2004-01-01

    consideration. In this work, delay and power metrics for both MCML and CMOS have been studied and a broader analysis of MCML is presented. Near minimum sized transistors are used and power consumption is measured for a wide variety of circuit blocks. The most important goal of this project is to evaluate...

  9. Analysis of the Noise Characteristics of CMOS Current Conveyors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik

    1997-01-01

    is described. This model is used for the analysis of selected examples of current conveyor based operational amplifier configurations and the noise performance of these configurations is compared. Finally, the noise model is developed for a CMOS current conveyor implementation, and approaches...

  10. Simulation toolkit with CMOS detector in the framework of hadrontherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rescigno R.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Proton imaging can be seen as a powerful technique for on-line monitoring of ion range during carbon ion therapy irradiation. The protons detection technique uses, as three-dimensional tracking system, a set of CMOS sensor planes. A simulation toolkit based on GEANT4 and ROOT is presented including detector response and reconstruction algorithm.

  11. Simulation toolkit with CMOS detector in the framework of hadrontherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rescigno R.; Finck Ch.; Juliani D.; Baudot J.; Dauvergne D.; Dedes G.; Krimmer J.; Ray C.; Reithinger V.; Rousseau M.; Testa E; Winter M.

    2014-01-01

    Proton imaging can be seen as a powerful technique for on-line monitoring of ion range during carbon ion therapy irradiation. The protons detection technique uses, as three-dimensional tracking system, a set of CMOS sensor planes. A simulation toolkit based on GEANT4 and ROOT is presented including detector response and reconstruction algorithm.

  12. Photon imaging using post-processed CMOS chips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melai, Joost

    2010-01-01

    This thesis presents our work on an integrated photon detector made by post-processing of CMOS sensor arrays. The aim of the post-processing is to combine all elements of the detector into a single monolithic device. These elements include a photocathode to convert photon radiation into electronic s

  13. Record RF performance of standard 90 nm CMOS technology

    OpenAIRE

    Tiemeijer, L.F.; Havens, R.J.; Kort, de, YAW Yvonne; Scholten, A.J.; Langevelde, van, H.J.; Klaassen, D.B.M.; Sasse, G.T.; Bouttement, Y.; Petot, C.; Bardy, S.; Gloria, D.; Scheer, P.; Boret, S.; Haaren, van, M.; Clement, C.

    2005-01-01

    We have optimized 3 key RF devices realized in standard logic 90 nm CMOS technology and report a record performance in terms of n-MOS maximum oscillation frequency f/sub max/ (280 GHz), varactor tuning range and varactor and inductor quality factor.

  14. New source of random telegraph signal in CMOS image sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Goiffon, Vincent; Magnan, Pierre; Martin-Gonthier, Philippe; Virmontois, Cédric; Gaillardin, Marc

    2012-01-01

    We report a new source of dark current random telegraph signal in CMOS image sensors due to meta-stable Shockley-Read-Hall generation mechanism at oxide interfaces. The role of oxide defects is discriminated thanks to the use of ionizing radiations.

  15. Study of CMOS image sensors for laser beam position detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the study made on commercial CMOS image sensors in order to determine their feasibility for light beam position reconstruction. Measurements of the intrinsic position resolution, sensor photoresponse and uniformity were done. The effect of eventual background illumination was evaluated. The precision on the spatial point reconstruction was determined from linearity measurements. First results on gamma-ray radiation tolerance are presented

  16. Fundamental Characteristics of a Pinned Photodiode CMOS Pixels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis gives an insightful analysis of the pinned photodiode 4T CMOS pixel from three different aspects. Firstly, from the charge accumulated aspect, the PPD full well capacity and related parameters of influence are investigated such as the pinning voltage, and transfer gate potential barrier.

  17. Design for manufacturability and yield for nano-scale CMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, Charles C

    2007-01-01

    Talks about the various aspects of manufacturability and yield in a nano-CMOS process and how to address each aspect at the proper design step starting with the design and layout of standard cells. This book is suitable for practicing IC designer and for graduate students intent on having a career in IC design or in EDA tool development.

  18. A toroidal inductor integrated in a standard CMOS process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandi, Luca; Andreani, Pietro; Temporiti, Enrico;

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a toroidal inductor integrated in a standard 0.13 um CMOS process. Finite-elements preliminary simulations are provided to prove the validity of the concept. In order to extract fundamental parameters by means of direct calculations, two different and well-known approaches...

  19. High performance flexible CMOS SOI FinFETs

    KAUST Repository

    Fahad, Hossain M.

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate the first ever CMOS compatible soft etch back based high performance flexible CMOS SOI FinFETs. The move from planar to non-planar FinFETs has enabled continued scaling down to the 14 nm technology node. This has been possible due to the reduction in off-state leakage and reduced short channel effects on account of the superior electrostatic charge control of multiple gates. At the same time, flexible electronics is an exciting expansion opportunity for next generation electronics. However, a fully integrated low-cost system will need to maintain ultra-large-scale-integration density, high performance and reliability - same as today\\'s traditional electronics. Up until recently, this field has been mainly dominated by very weak performance organic electronics enabled by low temperature processes, conducive to low melting point plastics. Now however, we show the world\\'s highest performing flexible version of 3D FinFET CMOS using a state-of-the-art CMOS compatible fabrication technique for high performance ultra-mobile consumer applications with stylish design. © 2014 IEEE.

  20. An RF Power Amplifier in a Digital CMOS Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Asbeck; Fallesen, Carsten

    2002-01-01

    A two stage class B power amplifier for 1.9 GHz is presented. The amplifier is fabricated in a standard digital EPI-CMOS process with low resistivity substrate. The measured output power is 29 dBm in a 50 Omega load. A design method to find the large signal parameters of the output transistor...

  1. ESD protection device and circuit design for advanced CMOS technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Semenov, Oleg; Sachdev, Manoj

    2008-01-01

    Strategies for design-oriented ESD protectionDistributed ESD protection networks optimized for sub-90nm CMOS ICsESD protection strategies for smart power ICs used in automotive industryThe impact of burn-in testing (accelerated test methods) on the ESD robustnessThe charge board ESD (CBM) testing used for wireless products

  2. CCD AND PIN-CMOS DEVELOPMENTS FOR LARGE OPTICAL TELESCOPE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RADEKA, V.

    2006-04-03

    Higher quantum efficiency in near-IR, narrower point spread function and higher readout speed than with conventional sensors have been receiving increased emphasis in the development of CCDs and silicon PIN-CMOS sensors for use in large optical telescopes. Some key aspects in the development of such devices are reviewed.

  3. Thermal-Diffusivity-Based Frequency References in Standard CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kashmiri, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, a lot of research has been devoted to the realization of accurate integrated frequency references. A thermal-diffusivity-based (TD) frequency reference provides an alternative method of on-chip frequency generation in standard CMOS technology. A frequency-locked loop locks the outpu

  4. CMOS Image Sensor and System for Imaging Hemodynamic Changes in Response to Deep Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Noor, Muhammad S; McCracken, Clinton B; Kiss, Zelma H T; Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Murari, Kartikeya

    2016-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a therapeutic intervention used for a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, but its mechanism of action is not well understood. It is known that DBS modulates neural activity which changes metabolic demands and thus the cerebral circulation state. However, it is unclear whether there are correlations between electrophysiological, hemodynamic and behavioral changes and whether they have any implications for clinical benefits. In order to investigate these questions, we present a miniaturized system for spectroscopic imaging of brain hemodynamics. The system consists of a 144 ×144, [Formula: see text] pixel pitch, high-sensitivity, analog-output CMOS imager fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS process, along with a miniaturized imaging system comprising illumination, focusing, analog-to-digital conversion and μSD card based data storage. This enables stand alone operation without a computer, nor electrical or fiberoptic tethers. To achieve high sensitivity, the pixel uses a capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA). The nMOS transistors are in the pixel while pMOS transistors are column-parallel, resulting in a fill factor (FF) of 26%. Running at 60 fps and exposed to 470 nm light, the CMOS imager has a minimum detectable intensity of 2.3 nW/cm(2) , a maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 49 dB at 2.45 μW/cm(2) leading to a dynamic range (DR) of 61 dB while consuming 167 μA from a 3.3 V supply. In anesthetized rats, the system was able to detect temporal, spatial and spectral hemodynamic changes in response to DBS. PMID:26357405

  5. Discovery of a quorum sensing modulator pharmacophore by 3D small-molecule microarray screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsden, David M; Nicholson, Rebecca L; Skindersoe, Mette E;

    2010-01-01

    ligand-binding domains of the LuxR homolog CarR from Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora. The 3D microarray platform was used to discover the biologically active chloro-pyridine pharmacophore, which was validated using a fluorometric ligand binding assay and ITC. Analogs containing the chloro...

  6. DNA Microarray Data Analysis: A Novel Biclustering Algorithm Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tewfik Ahmed H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Biclustering algorithms refer to a distinct class of clustering algorithms that perform simultaneous row-column clustering. Biclustering problems arise in DNA microarray data analysis, collaborative filtering, market research, information retrieval, text mining, electoral trends, exchange analysis, and so forth. When dealing with DNA microarray experimental data for example, the goal of biclustering algorithms is to find submatrices, that is, subgroups of genes and subgroups of conditions, where the genes exhibit highly correlated activities for every condition. In this study, we develop novel biclustering algorithms using basic linear algebra and arithmetic tools. The proposed biclustering algorithms can be used to search for all biclusters with constant values, biclusters with constant values on rows, biclusters with constant values on columns, and biclusters with coherent values from a set of data in a timely manner and without solving any optimization problem. We also show how one of the proposed biclustering algorithms can be adapted to identify biclusters with coherent evolution. The algorithms developed in this study discover all valid biclusters of each type, while almost all previous biclustering approaches will miss some.

  7. Human genomics and microarrays: implications for the plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jana; Isik, Frank

    2002-09-01

    The Human Genome Project was launched in 1989 in an effort to sequence the entire span of human DNA. Although coding sequences are important in identifying mutations, the static order of DNA does not explain how a cell or organism may respond to normal and abnormal biological processes. By examining the mRNA content of a cell, researchers can determine which genes are being activated in response to a stimulus. Traditional methods in molecular biology generally work on a "one gene: one experiment" basis, which means that the throughput is very limited and the "whole picture" of gene function is hard to obtain. To study each of the 60,000 to 80,000 genes in the human genome under each biological circumstance is not practical. Recently, microarrays (also known as gene or DNA chips) have emerged; these allow for the simultaneous determination of expression for thousands of genes and analysis of genome-wide mRNA expression. The purpose of this article is twofold: first, to provide the clinical plastic surgeon with a working knowledge and understanding of the fields of genomics, microarrays, and bioinformatics and second, to present a case to illustrate how these technologies can be applied in the study of wound healing.

  8. DNA Microarray Data Analysis: A Novel Biclustering Algorithm Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchagang, Alain B.; Tewfik, Ahmed H.

    2006-12-01

    Biclustering algorithms refer to a distinct class of clustering algorithms that perform simultaneous row-column clustering. Biclustering problems arise in DNA microarray data analysis, collaborative filtering, market research, information retrieval, text mining, electoral trends, exchange analysis, and so forth. When dealing with DNA microarray experimental data for example, the goal of biclustering algorithms is to find submatrices, that is, subgroups of genes and subgroups of conditions, where the genes exhibit highly correlated activities for every condition. In this study, we develop novel biclustering algorithms using basic linear algebra and arithmetic tools. The proposed biclustering algorithms can be used to search for all biclusters with constant values, biclusters with constant values on rows, biclusters with constant values on columns, and biclusters with coherent values from a set of data in a timely manner and without solving any optimization problem. We also show how one of the proposed biclustering algorithms can be adapted to identify biclusters with coherent evolution. The algorithms developed in this study discover all valid biclusters of each type, while almost all previous biclustering approaches will miss some.

  9. An RF energy harvester system using UHF micropower CMOS rectifier based on a diode connected CMOS transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrani, Mohammad Reza; Khoddam, Mojtaba; Hamidon, Mohd Nizar B; Kamsani, Noor Ain; Rokhani, Fakhrul Zaman; Shafie, Suhaidi Bin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new type diode connected MOS transistor to improve CMOS conventional rectifier's performance in RF energy harvester systems for wireless sensor networks in which the circuits are designed in 0.18  μm TSMC CMOS technology. The proposed diode connected MOS transistor uses a new bulk connection which leads to reduction in the threshold voltage and leakage current; therefore, it contributes to increment of the rectifier's output voltage, output current, and efficiency when it is well important in the conventional CMOS rectifiers. The design technique for the rectifiers is explained and a matching network has been proposed to increase the sensitivity of the proposed rectifier. Five-stage rectifier with a matching network is proposed based on the optimization. The simulation results shows 18.2% improvement in the efficiency of the rectifier circuit and increase in sensitivity of RF energy harvester circuit. All circuits are designed in 0.18 μm TSMC CMOS technology. PMID:24782680

  10. Design and characterization of high precision in-pixel discriminators for rolling shutter CMOS pixel sensors with full CMOS capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y.; Hu-Guo, C.; Dorokhov, A.; Pham, H.; Hu, Y.

    2013-07-01

    In order to exploit the ability to integrate a charge collecting electrode with analog and digital processing circuitry down to the pixel level, a new type of CMOS pixel sensors with full CMOS capability is presented in this paper. The pixel array is read out based on a column-parallel read-out architecture, where each pixel incorporates a diode, a preamplifier with a double sampling circuitry and a discriminator to completely eliminate analog read-out bottlenecks. The sensor featuring a pixel array of 8 rows and 32 columns with a pixel pitch of 80 μm×16 μm was fabricated in a 0.18 μm CMOS process. The behavior of each pixel-level discriminator isolated from the diode and the preamplifier was studied. The experimental results indicate that all in-pixel discriminators which are fully operational can provide significant improvements in the read-out speed and the power consumption of CMOS pixel sensors.

  11. Progress in voltage and current mode on-chip analog-to-digital converters for CMOS image sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panicacci, Roger; Pain, Bedabrata; Zhou, Zhimin; Nakamura, Junichi; Fossum, Eric R.

    1996-03-01

    Two 8 bit successive approximation analog-to-digital converter (ADC) designs and a 12 bit current mode incremental sigma delta ((Sigma) -(Delta) ) ADC have been designed, fabricated, and tested. The successive approximation test chip designs are compatible with active pixel sensor (APS) column parallel architectures with a 20.4 micrometers pitch in a 1.2 micrometers n-well CMOS process and a 40 micrometers pitch in a 2 micrometers n-well CMOS process. The successive approximation designs consume as little as 49 (mu) W at a 500 KHz conversion rate meeting the low power requirements inherent in column parallel architectures. The current mode incremental (Sigma) -(Delta) ADC test chip is designed to be multiplexed among 8 columns in a semi-column parallel current mode APS architecture. The higher accuracy ADC consumes 800 (mu) W at a 5 KHz conversion rate.

  12. A reliable ground bounce noise reduction technique for nanoscale CMOS circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vijay Kumar; Pattanaik, Manisha

    2015-11-01

    Power gating is the most effective method to reduce the standby leakage power by adding header/footer high-VTH sleep transistors between actual and virtual power/ground rails. When a power gating circuit transitions from sleep mode to active mode, a large instantaneous charge current flows through the sleep transistors. Ground bounce noise (GBN) is the high voltage fluctuation on real ground rail during sleep mode to active mode transitions of power gating circuits. GBN disturbs the logic states of internal nodes of circuits. A novel and reliable power gating structure is proposed in this article to reduce the problem of GBN. The proposed structure contains low-VTH transistors in place of high-VTH footer. The proposed power gating structure not only reduces the GBN but also improves other performance metrics. A large mitigation of leakage power in both modes eliminates the need of high-VTH transistors. A comprehensive and comparative evaluation of proposed technique is presented in this article for a chain of 5-CMOS inverters. The simulation results are compared to other well-known GBN reduction circuit techniques at 22 nm predictive technology model (PTM) bulk CMOS model using HSPICE tool. Robustness against process, voltage and temperature (PVT) variations is estimated through Monte-Carlo simulations.

  13. A low-power and small-area column-level ADC for high frame-rate CMOS pixel sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Morel, F.; Hu-Guo, C.; Hu, Y.

    2014-07-01

    CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) have demonstrated performances meeting the specifications of the International Linear Collider (ILC) vertex detector (VTX). This paper presents a low-power and small-area 4-bit column-level analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for CMOS pixel sensors. The ADC employs a self-timed trigger and completes the conversion by performing a multi-bit/step approximation. As in the outer layers of the ILC vertex detector hit density is of the order of a few per thousand, in order to reduce power consumption, the ADC is designed to work in two modes: active mode and idle mode. The ADC is fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS process with a pixel pitch of 35 μm. It is implemented with 48 columns in a sensor prototype. Each column ADC covers an area of 35 ×545 μm2. The measured temporal noise and Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN) are 0.96 mV and 0.40 mV, respectively. The power consumption, for a 3 V supply and 6.25 MS/s sampling rate, is 486 μW during idle time, which is by far the most frequently employed one. This value rises to 714 μW in the case of the active mode. The measured differential nonlinearity (DNL) and integral nonlinearity (INL) are 0.49/-0.28 LSB and 0.29/-0.20 LSB, respectively.

  14. Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPAD) in CMOS 0.35 µm technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellion, D.; Jradi, K.; Brochard, N. [Le2i – CNRS/Univ. de Bourgogne, Dijon (France); Prêle, D. [APC – CNRS/Univ. Paris Diderot, Paris (France); Ginhac, D. [Le2i – CNRS/Univ. de Bourgogne, Dijon (France)

    2015-07-01

    Some decades ago single photon detection used to be the terrain of photomultiplier tube (PMT), thanks to its characteristics of sensitivity and speed. However, PMT has several disadvantages such as low quantum efficiency, overall dimensions, and cost, making them unsuitable for compact design of integrated systems. So, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in interest in new integrated single-photon detectors called Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPAD) or Geiger-mode APD. SPAD are working in avalanche mode above the breakdown level. When an incident photon is captured, a very fast avalanche is triggered, generating an easily detectable current pulse. This paper discusses SPAD detectors fabricated in a standard CMOS technology featuring both single-photon sensitivity, and excellent timing resolution, while guaranteeing a high integration. In this work, we investigate the design of SPAD detectors using the AMS 0.35 µm CMOS Opto technology. Indeed, such standard CMOS technology allows producing large surface (few mm{sup 2}) of single photon sensitive detectors. Moreover, SPAD in CMOS technologies could be associated to electronic readout such as active quenching, digital to analog converter, memories and any specific processing required to build efficient calorimeters (Silicon PhotoMultiplier – SiPM) or high resolution imagers (SPAD imager). The present work investigates SPAD geometry. MOS transistor has been used instead of resistor to adjust the quenching resistance and find optimum value. From this first set of results, a detailed study of the dark count rate (DCR) has been conducted. Our results show a dark count rate increase with the size of the photodiodes and the temperature (at T=22.5 °C, the DCR of a 10 µm-photodiode is 2020 count s{sup −1} while it is 270 count s{sup −1} at T=−40 °C for a overvoltage of 800 mV). A small pixel size is desirable, because the DCR per unit area decreases with the pixel size. We also found that the adjustment

  15. Generalization of DNA microarray dispersion properties: microarray equivalent of t-distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Jaroslav P; Kim, Seon-Young; Xu, Jun;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: DNA microarrays are a powerful technology that can provide a wealth of gene expression data for disease studies, drug development, and a wide scope of other investigations. Because of the large volume and inherent variability of DNA microarray data, many new statistical methods have...... technology give "true" representation of physical processes, involved in measurement of RNA abundance. REVIEWERS: This article was reviewed by Yoav Gilad (nominated by Doron Lancet), Sach Mukherjee (nominated by Sandrine Dudoit) and Amir Niknejad and Shmuel Friedland (nominated by Neil Smalheiser)....

  16. Formation and characterization of DNA microarrays at silicon nitride substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Mary; Redmond, Gareth

    2005-01-01

    A versatile method for direct, covalent attachment of DNA microarrays at silicon nitride layers, previously deposited by chemical vapor deposition at silicon wafer substrates, is reported. Each microarray fabrication process step, from silicon nitride substrate deposition, surface cleaning, amino-silanation, and attachment of a homobifunctional cross-linking molecule to covalent immobilization of probe oligonucleotides, is defined, characterized, and optimized to yield consistent probe microarray quality, homogeneity, and probe-target hybridization performance. The developed microarray fabrication methodology provides excellent (high signal-to-background ratio) and reproducible responsivity to target oligonucleotide hybridization with a rugged chemical stability that permits exposure of arrays to stringent pre- and posthybridization wash conditions through many sustained cycles of reuse. Overall, the achieved performance features compare very favorably with those of more mature glass based microarrays. It is proposed that this DNA microarray fabrication strategy has the potential to provide a viable route toward the successful realization of future integrated DNA biochips.

  17. Extended -Regular Sequence for Automated Analysis of Microarray Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hee-Jeong

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Microarray study enables us to obtain hundreds of thousands of expressions of genes or genotypes at once, and it is an indispensable technology for genome research. The first step is the analysis of scanned microarray images. This is the most important procedure for obtaining biologically reliable data. Currently most microarray image processing systems require burdensome manual block/spot indexing work. Since the amount of experimental data is increasing very quickly, automated microarray image analysis software becomes important. In this paper, we propose two automated methods for analyzing microarray images. First, we propose the extended -regular sequence to index blocks and spots, which enables a novel automatic gridding procedure. Second, we provide a methodology, hierarchical metagrid alignment, to allow reliable and efficient batch processing for a set of microarray images. Experimental results show that the proposed methods are more reliable and convenient than the commercial tools.

  18. High-Voltage-Input Level Translator Using Standard CMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Jeremy A.; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Vo, Tuan A.; Blalock, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    proposed integrated circuit would translate (1) a pair of input signals having a low differential potential and a possibly high common-mode potential into (2) a pair of output signals having the same low differential potential and a low common-mode potential. As used here, "low" and "high" refer to potentials that are, respectively, below or above the nominal supply potential (3.3 V) at which standard complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits are designed to operate. The input common-mode potential could lie between 0 and 10 V; the output common-mode potential would be 2 V. This translation would make it possible to process the pair of signals by use of standard 3.3-V CMOS analog and/or mixed-signal (analog and digital) circuitry on the same integrated-circuit chip. A schematic of the circuit is shown in the figure. Standard 3.3-V CMOS circuitry cannot withstand input potentials greater than about 4 V. However, there are many applications that involve low-differential-potential, high-common-mode-potential input signal pairs and in which standard 3.3-V CMOS circuitry, which is relatively inexpensive, would be the most appropriate circuitry for performing other functions on the integrated-circuit chip that handles the high-potential input signals. Thus, there is a need to combine high-voltage input circuitry with standard low-voltage CMOS circuitry on the same integrated-circuit chip. The proposed circuit would satisfy this need. In the proposed circuit, the input signals would be coupled into both a level-shifting pair and a common-mode-sensing pair of CMOS transistors. The output of the level-shifting pair would be fed as input to a differential pair of transistors. The resulting differential current output would pass through six standoff transistors to be mirrored into an output branch by four heterojunction bipolar transistors. The mirrored differential current would be converted back to potential by a pair of diode-connected transistors

  19. Gene Expression Analysis Using Agilent DNA Microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Hybridization of labeled cDNA to microarrays is an intuitively simple and a vastly underestimated process. If it is not performed, optimized, and standardized with the same attention to detail as e.g., RNA amplification, information may be overlooked or even lost. Careful balancing of the amount...... of labeled cDNA added to each slide reduces dye-bias and slide to slide variation. Efficient mixing of the hybridization solution throughout the hybridization reaction increases signals several fold. The amount of near perfect target-probe hybrids may be reduced by efficient stringency washes...

  20. Biocompatible polymer microarrays for cellular high-content screening

    OpenAIRE

    Pernagallo, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    The global aim of this thesis was to study the use of microarray technology for the screening and identification of biocompatible polymers, to understand physiological phenomena, and the design of biomaterials, implant surfaces and tissue-engineering scaffolds. This work was based upon the polymer microarray platform developed by the Bradley group. Polymer microarrays were successfully applied to find the best polymer supports for: (i) mouse fibroblast cells and used to eval...

  1. DNA Microarray Assessment of Putative Borrelia burgdorferi Lipoprotein Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Fang Ting; Nelson, F. Kenneth; Fikrig, Erol

    2002-01-01

    A DNA microarray containing fragments of 137 Borrelia burgdorferi B31 putative lipoprotein genes was used to examine Lyme disease spirochetes. DNA from B. burgdorferi sensu stricto B31, 297, and N40; Borrelia garinii IP90; and Borrelia afzelii P/Gau was fluorescently labeled and hybridized to the microarray, demonstrating the degree to which the individual putative lipoprotein genes were conserved among the genospecies. These data show that a DNA microarray can globally examine the genes enco...

  2. Miniaturised Spotter-Compatible Multicapillary Stamping Tool for Microarray Printing

    CERN Document Server

    Drobyshev, A L; Zasedatelev, A S; Drobyshev, Alexei L; Verkhodanov, Nikolai N; Zasedatelev, Alexander S

    2007-01-01

    Novel microstamping tool for microarray printing is proposed. The tool is capable to spot up to 127 droplets of different solutions in single touch. It is easily compatible with commercially available microarray spotters. The tool is based on multichannel funnel with polypropylene capillaries inserted into its channels. Superior flexibility is achieved by ability to replace any printing capillary of the tool. As a practical implementation, hydrogel-based microarrays were stamped and successfully applied to identify the Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance.

  3. A comparative analysis of DNA barcode microarray feature size

    OpenAIRE

    Smith Andrew M; Ammar Ron; Heisler Lawrence E; Giaever Guri; Nislow Corey

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Microarrays are an invaluable tool in many modern genomic studies. It is generally perceived that decreasing the size of microarray features leads to arrays with higher resolution (due to greater feature density), but this increase in resolution can compromise sensitivity. Results We demonstrate that barcode microarrays with smaller features are equally capable of detecting variation in DNA barcode intensity when compared to larger feature sizes within a specific microarra...

  4. Innovative DNA microarray design for bacterial flora composition evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Huyghe, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    During the past decade, the advent of new molecular techniques has led to enormous progress in biology, notably with the development of DNA microarray technology. This technology allows monitoring simultaneously the expression of thousands of genes from a given organism. DNA microarrays have been used in a variety of applications, including the characterization of bacteria in biological samples. In this thesis, two distinct DNA microarray approaches for the characterization of bacterial flora...

  5. Ni based silicides for 45 nm CMOS and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauwers, Anne [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)]. E-mail: lauwersa@imec.be; Kittl, Jorge A. [IMEC, Texas Instruments (Belgium); Van Dal, Mark J.H. [IMEC, Philips Research Leuven (Belgium); Chamirian, Oxana [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Pawlak, Malgorzata A. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Potter, Muriel de [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lindsay, Richard [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Raymakers, Toon [Philips Research Laboratories, Prof. Holstlaan 4, 5656 AA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Pages, Xavier [IMEC, ASM Belgium (Belgium); Mebarki, Bencherki [Applied Materials (Belgium); Mandrekar, Tushar [Applied Materials Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Maex, Karen [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2004-12-15

    Material issues that impact the applicability of Ni based silicides to CMOS flows were studied, including the excessive silicidation of narrow features, the growth kinetics of Ni{sub 2}Si and NiSi on single-crystalline and poly-crystalline silicon and the thermal degradation mechanisms. Ni{sub 2}Si was found to grow by diffusion controlled kinetics with an activation energy of about 1.55 eV on single-crystalline Si. As a result, the excessive silicidation in small features can be reduced in a 2-step Ni-silicide process by reducing the thermal budget of the first RTP step. The mechanisms of thermal degradation of NiSi were studied. Thin NiSi films were found to degrade morphologically while still in the monosilicide phase. Thick NiSi films degrade morphologically at low temperatures and by transformation to NiSi{sub 2} at high temperatures. The reaction of Ni with SiGe substrates and the effect of Ge on the thermal degradation of the Ni-germanosilicide were investigated. Activation energies for the thermal degradation of Ni(SiGe) on SiGe were found to be significantly smaller than the values found for the thermal degradation of NiSi on pure Si. The effect of alloying Ni with Pt or Ta was studied. NiSi films alloyed with Pt or Ta are found to be thermally more stable compared to pure NiSi. Alloying with Pt was found to improve the thermal stability of NiSi on narrow poly-Si gates. The kinetics of Ni{sub 2}Si and NiSi formation on poly silicon were determined as well as their dependence on dopants. The presence of B in high doses was found to slow down the silicide formation significantly. Dopant segregation to the NiSi/oxide interface was observed, which is believed to be responsible for the observed shifts in work function. The sheet resistance of fully Ni-silicided 100 nm poly Si/oxide stacks is found to be stable up to 800 deg. C.

  6. Measuring the X-ray quantum efficiency of a hybrid CMOS detector with 55Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiorno, S. D.; Falcone, A. D.; Prieskorn, Z.; Griffith, C.; Burrows, D. N.

    2015-06-01

    Charge coupled devices (CCDs) are currently the workhorse focal plane arrays operating aboard many orbiting astrophysics X-ray telescopes, e.g. Chandra, XMM-Newton, Swift, and Suzaku. In order to meet the count rate, power, and mission duration requirements defined by next-generation X-ray telescopes, future detectors will need to be read out faster, consume less power, and be more resistant to radiation and micrometeoroid damage than current-generation devices. The hybrid CMOS detector (HCD), a type of active pixel sensor, is currently being developed to meet these requirements. With a design architecture that involves bump bonding two semiconductor substrates together at the pixel level, these devices exhibit both the high read speed and low power consumption of CMOS readout circuitry and the high quantum efficiency (QE) of a deeply depleted silicon absorber. These devices are expected to exhibit the same excellent, high-energy quantum efficiency (QE) as deep-depletion CCDs (QE > 0.9 at 6 keV), while at the same time exhibiting superior readout flexibility, power consumption, and radiation hardness than CCDs. In this work we present a QE model for a Teledyne Imaging Sensors HyViSI HCD, which predicts QE=96% at 55Fe source energies (5.89 and 6.49 keV). We then present a QE measurement of the modeled device at the same energies, which shows QE=97±5% and is in good agreement with the model.

  7. Characterization of Si Hybrid CMOS Detectors for use in the Soft X-ray Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieskorn, Zachary; Griffith, C.; Bongiorno, S.; Falcone, A.; Burrows, D. N.

    2014-01-01

    In a joint program between Penn State University and Teledyne Imaging Sensors a soft X-ray detector based on the HAWAII Hybrid Si CMOS detector (HCD) has been developed. HCDs could potentially be the optimum detectors for the next generation of X-ray missions, especially those with focused optics and/or large effective area. These innovative detectors are active pixel sensors (APS) which allow a pixel to be read through individual in-pixel electronics, without the need to transfer charge across many pixels, in contrast to a CCD. They are made by bonding a Si absorbing layer to a pixelated CMOS readout, allowing the two layers to be optimized independently. The advantages of this design compared to CCDs are high speed timing 100 μs in full imaging mode), a flexible windowed readout to reduce pile-up, dramatically improved radiation hardness and resistance to micrometeoroid damage, and reduced power requirements. We present recent measurements of energy resolution, read noise, inter-pixel crosstalk, quantum efficiency, and dark current for four of these devices.

  8. A high efficiency PWM CMOS class-D audio power amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the difference close-loop feedback technique and the difference pre-amp, a high efficiency PWM CMOS class-D audio power amplifier is proposed. A rail-to-rail PWM comparator with window function has been embedded in the class-D audio power amplifier. Design results based on the CSMC 0.5 μm CMOS process show that the max efficiency is 90%, the PSRR is -75 dB, the power supply voltage range is 2.5-5.5 V, the THD+N in 1 kHz input frequency is less than 0.20%, the quiescent current in no load is 2.8 mA, and the shutdown current is 0.5 μA. The active area of the class-D audio power amplifier is about 1.47 x 1.52 mm2. With the good performance, the class-D audio power amplifier can be applied to several audio power systems.

  9. A high efficiency PWM CMOS class-D audio power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhangming, Zhu; Lianxi, Liu; Yintang, Yang; Han, Lei

    2009-02-01

    Based on the difference close-loop feedback technique and the difference pre-amp, a high efficiency PWM CMOS class-D audio power amplifier is proposed. A rail-to-rail PWM comparator with window function has been embedded in the class-D audio power amplifier. Design results based on the CSMC 0.5 μm CMOS process show that the max efficiency is 90%, the PSRR is -75 dB, the power supply voltage range is 2.5-5.5 V, the THD+N in 1 kHz input frequency is less than 0.20%, the quiescent current in no load is 2.8 mA, and the shutdown current is 0.5 μA. The active area of the class-D audio power amplifier is about 1.47 × 1.52 mm2. With the good performance, the class-D audio power amplifier can be applied to several audio power systems.

  10. A high efficiency PWM CMOS class-D audio power amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Zhangming; Liu Lianxi; Yang Yintang [Institute of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Lei Han, E-mail: zmyh@263.ne [Xi' an Power-Rail Micro Co., Ltd, Xi' an 710075 (China)

    2009-02-15

    Based on the difference close-loop feedback technique and the difference pre-amp, a high efficiency PWM CMOS class-D audio power amplifier is proposed. A rail-to-rail PWM comparator with window function has been embedded in the class-D audio power amplifier. Design results based on the CSMC 0.5 mum CMOS process show that the max efficiency is 90%, the PSRR is -75 dB, the power supply voltage range is 2.5-5.5 V, the THD+N in 1 kHz input frequency is less than 0.20%, the quiescent current in no load is 2.8 mA, and the shutdown current is 0.5 muA. The active area of the class-D audio power amplifier is about 1.47 x 1.52 mm{sup 2}. With the good performance, the class-D audio power amplifier can be applied to several audio power systems.

  11. Proton-counting radiography for proton therapy: a proof of principle using CMOS APS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poludniowski, G; Allinson, N M; Anaxagoras, T; Esposito, M; Green, S; Manolopoulos, S; Nieto-Camero, J; Parker, D J; Price, T; Evans, P M

    2014-06-01

    Despite the early recognition of the potential of proton imaging to assist proton therapy (Cormack 1963 J. Appl. Phys. 34 2722), the modality is still removed from clinical practice, with various approaches in development. For proton-counting radiography applications such as computed tomography (CT), the water-equivalent-path-length that each proton has travelled through an imaged object must be inferred. Typically, scintillator-based technology has been used in various energy/range telescope designs. Here we propose a very different alternative of using radiation-hard CMOS active pixel sensor technology. The ability of such a sensor to resolve the passage of individual protons in a therapy beam has not been previously shown. Here, such capability is demonstrated using a 36 MeV cyclotron beam (University of Birmingham Cyclotron, Birmingham, UK) and a 200 MeV clinical radiotherapy beam (iThemba LABS, Cape Town, SA). The feasibility of tracking individual protons through multiple CMOS layers is also demonstrated using a two-layer stack of sensors. The chief advantages of this solution are the spatial discrimination of events intrinsic to pixelated sensors, combined with the potential provision of information on both the range and residual energy of a proton. The challenges in developing a practical system are discussed.

  12. A high efficiency PWM CMOS class-D audio power amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱樟明; 刘帘曦; 杨银堂; 雷晗

    2009-01-01

    Based on the difference close-loop feedback technique and the difference pre-amp, a high efficiency PWM CMOS class-D audio power amplifier is proposed. A rail-to-rail PWM comparator with window function has been embedded in the class-D audio power amplifier. Design results based on the CSMC 0.5 μm CMOS process show that the max efficiency is 90%, the PSRR is -75 dB, the power supply voltage range is 2.5-5.5 V, the THD+N in 1 kHz input frequency is less than 0.20%, the quiescent current in no load is 2.8 mA, and the shutdown current is 0.5 μA. The active area of the class-D audio power amplifier is about 1.47 × 1.52 mm2. With the good performance, the class-D audio power amplifier can be applied to several audio power systems.

  13. Chemiluminescence microarrays in analytical chemistry: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Michael; Niessner, Reinhard

    2014-09-01

    Multi-analyte immunoassays on microarrays and on multiplex DNA microarrays have been described for quantitative analysis of small organic molecules (e.g., antibiotics, drugs of abuse, small molecule toxins), proteins (e.g., antibodies or protein toxins), and microorganisms, viruses, and eukaryotic cells. In analytical chemistry, multi-analyte detection by use of analytical microarrays has become an innovative research topic because of the possibility of generating several sets of quantitative data for different analyte classes in a short time. Chemiluminescence (CL) microarrays are powerful tools for rapid multiplex analysis of complex matrices. A wide range of applications for CL microarrays is described in the literature dealing with analytical microarrays. The motivation for this review is to summarize the current state of CL-based analytical microarrays. Combining analysis of different compound classes on CL microarrays reduces analysis time, cost of reagents, and use of laboratory space. Applications are discussed, with examples from food safety, water safety, environmental monitoring, diagnostics, forensics, toxicology, and biosecurity. The potential and limitations of research on multiplex analysis by use of CL microarrays are discussed in this review.

  14. Binary CMOS image sensor with a gate/body-tied MOSFET-type photodetector for high-speed operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Byoung-Soo; Jo, Sung-Hyun; Bae, Myunghan; Kim, Sang-Hwan; Shin, Jang-Kyoo

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a binary complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor with a gate/body-tied (GBT) metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET)-type photodetector is presented. The sensitivity of the GBT MOSFET-type photodetector, which was fabricated using the standard CMOS 0.35-μm process, is higher than the sensitivity of the p-n junction photodiode, because the output signal of the photodetector is amplified by the MOSFET. A binary image sensor becomes more efficient when using this photodetector. Lower power consumptions and higher speeds of operation are possible, compared to the conventional image sensors using multi-bit analog to digital converters (ADCs). The frame rate of the proposed image sensor is over 2000 frames per second, which is higher than those of the conventional CMOS image sensors. The output signal of an active pixel sensor is applied to a comparator and compared with a reference level. The 1-bit output data of the binary process is determined by this level. To obtain a video signal, the 1-bit output data is stored in the memory and is read out by horizontal scanning. The proposed chip is composed of a GBT pixel array (144 × 100), binary-process circuit, vertical scanner, horizontal scanner, and readout circuit. The operation mode can be selected from between binary mode and multi-bit mode.

  15. Combined reactor neutron beam and 60Co γ-ray radiation effects on CMOS APS image sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zujun Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The combined reactor neutron beam and 60Co γ-ray radiation effects on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS active pixel sensors (APS have been discussed and some new experimental phenomena are presented. The samples are manufactured in the standard 0.35-μm CMOS technology. Two samples were first exposed to 60Co γ-rays up to the total ionizing dose (TID level of 200 krad(Si at the dose rates of 50.0 and 0.2 rad(Si/s, and then exposed to neutron fluence up to 1 × 1011 n/cm2 (1-MeV equivalent neutron fluence. One sample was first exposed to neutron fluence up to 1 × 1011 n/cm2 (1-MeV equivalent neutron fluence, and then exposed to 60Co γ-rays up to the TID level of 200 krad(Si at the dose rate of 0.2 rad(Si/s. The mean dark signal (KD, the dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU, and the noise (VN versus the total dose and neutron fluence has been investigated. The degradation mechanisms of CMOS APS image sensors have been analyzed, especially for the interaction induced by neutron displacement damage and TID damage.

  16. Combined reactor neutron beam and 60Co γ-ray radiation effects on CMOS APS image sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combined reactor neutron beam and 60Co γ-ray radiation effects on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors (APS) have been discussed and some new experimental phenomena are presented. The samples are manufactured in the standard 0.35-μm CMOS technology. Two samples were first exposed to 60Co γ-rays up to the total ionizing dose (TID) level of 200 krad(Si) at the dose rates of 50.0 and 0.2 rad(Si)/s, and then exposed to neutron fluence up to 1 × 1011 n/cm2 (1-MeV equivalent neutron fluence). One sample was first exposed to neutron fluence up to 1 × 1011 n/cm2 (1-MeV equivalent neutron fluence), and then exposed to 60Co γ-rays up to the TID level of 200 krad(Si) at the dose rate of 0.2 rad(Si)/s. The mean dark signal (KD), the dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), and the noise (VN) versus the total dose and neutron fluence has been investigated. The degradation mechanisms of CMOS APS image sensors have been analyzed, especially for the interaction induced by neutron displacement damage and TID damage

  17. Ultra-thin silicon (UTSi) on insulator CMOS transceiver and time-division multiplexed switch chips for smart pixel integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liping; Sawchuk, Alexander A.

    2001-12-01

    We describe the design, fabrication and functionality of two different 0.5 micron CMOS optoelectronic integrated circuit (OEIC) chips based on the Peregrine Semiconductor Ultra-Thin Silicon on insulator technology. The Peregrine UTSi silicon- on-sapphire (SOS) technology is a member of the silicon-on- insulator (SOI) family. The low-loss synthetic sapphire substrate is optically transparent and has good thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion properties, which meet the requirements for flip-chip bonding of VCSELs and other optoelectronic input-output components. One chip contains transceiver and network components, including four channel high-speed CMOS transceiver modules, pseudo-random bit stream (PRBS) generators, a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) and other test circuits. The transceiver chips can operate in both self-testing mode and networking mode. An on- chip clock and true-single-phase-clock (TSPC) D-flip-flop have been designed to generate a PRBS at over 2.5 Gb/s for the high-speed transceiver arrays to operate in self-testing mode. In the networking mode, an even number of transceiver chips forms a ring network through free-space or fiber ribbon interconnections. The second chip contains four channel optical time-division multiplex (TDM) switches, optical transceiver arrays, an active pixel detector and additional test devices. The eventual applications of these chips will require monolithic OEICs with integrated optical input and output. After fabrication and testing, the CMOS transceiver array dies will be packaged with 850 nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), and metal-semiconductor- metal (MSM) or GaAs p-i-n detector die arrays to achieve high- speed optical interconnections. The hybrid technique could be either wire bonding or flip-chip bonding of the CMOS SOS smart-pixel arrays with arrays of VCSELs and photodetectors onto an optoelectronic chip carrier as a multi-chip module (MCM).

  18. Genome-wide transcription analyses in rice using tiling microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Xiangfeng; Stolc, Viktor;

    2006-01-01

    Sequencing and computational annotation revealed several features, including high gene numbers, unusual composition of the predicted genes and a large number of genes lacking homology to known genes, that distinguish the rice (Oryza sativa) genome from that of other fully sequenced model species....... We report here a full-genome transcription analysis of the indica rice subspecies using high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarrays. Our results provided expression data support for the existence of 35,970 (81.9%) annotated gene models and identified 5,464 unique transcribed intergenic regions...... activity between duplicated segments of the genome. Collectively, our results provide the first whole-genome transcription map useful for further understanding the rice genome. Udgivelsesdato: 2006-Jan...

  19. 4T CMOS Active Pixel Sensors under Ionizing Radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, J.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates the ionizing radiation effects on 4T pixels and the elementary in-pixel test devices with regard to the electrical performance and the optical performance. In addition to an analysis of the macroscopic pixel parameter degradation, the radiation-induced degradation mechanisms

  20. CMOS active pixel sensor type imaging system on a chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nixon, Robert (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A single chip camera which includes an .[.intergrated.]. .Iadd.integrated .Iaddend.image acquisition portion and control portion and which has double sampling/noise reduction capabilities thereon. Part of the .[.intergrated.]. .Iadd.integrated .Iaddend.structure reduces the noise that is picked up during imaging.

  1. Low power RF circuit design in standard CMOS technology

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarado, Unai; Adín, Iñigo

    2012-01-01

    Low Power Consumption is one of the critical issues in the performance of small battery-powered handheld devices. Mobile terminals feature an ever increasing number of wireless communication alternatives including GPS, Bluetooth, GSM, 3G, WiFi or DVB-H. Considering that the total power available for each terminal is limited by the relatively slow increase in battery performance expected in the near future, the need for efficient circuits is now critical. This book presents the basic techniques available to design low power RF CMOS analogue circuits. It gives circuit designers a complete guide of alternatives to optimize power consumption and explains the application of these rules in the most common RF building blocks: LNA, mixers and PLLs. It is set out using practical examples and offers a unique perspective as it targets designers working within the standard CMOS process and all the limitations inherent in these technologies.

  2. TID Simulation of Advanced CMOS Devices for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    This paper focuses on Total Ionizing Dose (TID) effects caused by accumulation of charges at silicon dioxide, substrate/silicon dioxide interface, Shallow Trench Isolation (STI) for scaled CMOS bulk devices as well as at Buried Oxide (BOX) layer in devices based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology to be operated in space radiation environment. The radiation induced leakage current and corresponding density/concentration electrons in leakage current path was presented/depicted for 180nm, 130nm and 65nm NMOS, PMOS transistors based on CMOS bulk as well as SOI process technologies on-board LEO and GEO satellites. On the basis of simulation results, the TID robustness analysis for advanced deep sub-micron technologies was accomplished up to 500 Krad. The correlation between the impact of technology scaling and magnitude of leakage current with corresponding total dose was established utilizing Visual TCAD Genius program.

  3. 65 nm CMOS Sensors Applied to Mathematically Exact Colorimetric Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Mayr, C; Krause, A; Schlüßler, J -U; Schüffny, R

    2014-01-01

    Extracting colorimetric image information from the spectral characteristics of image sensors is a key issue in accurate image acquisition. Technically feasible filter/sensor combinations usually do not replicate colorimetric responses with sufficient accuracy to be directly applicable to color representation. A variety of transformations have been proposed in the literature to compensate for this. However, most of those rely on heuristics and/or introduce a reconstruction dependent on the composition of the incoming illumination. In this work, we present a spectral reconstruction method that is independent of illumination and is derived in a mathematically strict way. It provides a deterministic method to arrive at a least mean squared error approximation of a target spectral characteristic from arbitrary sensor response curves. Further, we present a new CMOS sensor design in a standard digital 65nm CMOS technology. Novel circuit techniques are used to achieve performance comparable with much larger-sized spe...

  4. Nanometer CMOS Sigma-Delta Modulators for Software Defined Radio

    CERN Document Server

    Morgado, Alonso; Rosa, José M

    2012-01-01

    This book presents innovative solutions for the implementation of Sigma-Delta Modulation (SDM) based Analog-to-Digital Conversion (ADC), required for the next generation of wireless hand-held terminals. These devices will be based on the so-called multistandard transceiver chipsets, integrated in nanometer CMOS technologies. One of the most challenging and critical parts in such transceivers is the analog-digital interface, because of the assorted signal bandwidths and dynamic ranges that can be required to handle the A/D conversion for several operation modes.   This book describes new adaptive and reconfigurable SDM ADC topologies, circuit strategies and synthesis methods, specially suited for multi-standard wireless telecom systems and future Software-defined-radios (SDRs) integrated in nanoscale CMOS. It is a practical book, going from basic concepts to the frontiers of SDM architectures and circuit implementations, which are explained in a didactical and systematic way. It gives a comprehensive overview...

  5. Effect of Threshold Voltage on Various CMOS Performance Parameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Abhishek Verma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available SiO2, once thought of as the most precious element in the design of CMOS circuits has not lived up to the expectations of being the perfect gate oxide. Efforts have been made to replace it with High K oxides such as Lanthanum Oxide (La2O3, Hafnium Oxide (HfO2 and many more. This review covers the problems faced by the High K oxides, one of them being escalation in threshold voltage which results in increased power dissipation. The solution to the above stated problem is to reduce the threshold voltage by several techniques, also covered in the review. Effect of threshold voltage on leakage current and power and reliability of CMOS are also taken under consideration.

  6. A linear stepping PGA used in CMOS image sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low power linear stepping digital programming gain amplifier (PGA) is designed for CMOS image sensors. The PGA consists of three stages with gain range from one to nine. The gain is divided into four regions and each range has 128 linear steps. Power consumption of the PGA is saved by good tradeoff between variation of amplifier feedback coefficient, pipeline stages and gain regions. With thermometer-binary mixed coding and linear pipeline gain stepping, the load capacitance keeps constant when the gain of one stage is changed. The PGA is designed in the SMIC 0.18 μm process. Simulation results show that the power consumption is 3.2 mW with 10 bit resolution and 10 MSPS sampling rate. The PGA has been embedded in a 0.3 megapixel CMOS image sensors and fabricated successfully.

  7. A linear stepping PGA used in CMOS image sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐江涛; 李斌桥; 赵士彬; 李红乐; 姚素英

    2009-01-01

    A low power linear stepping digital programming gain amplifier (PGA) is designed for CMOS image sensors. The PGA consists of three stages with gain range from one to nine. The gain is divided into four regions and each range has 128 linear steps. Power consumption of the PGA is saved by good tradeoff between variation of amplifier feedback coefficient, pipeline stages and gain regions. With thermometer-binary mixed coding and linear pipeline gain stepping, the load capacitance keeps constant when the gain of one stage is changed. The PGA is designed in the SMIC 0.18μm process. Simulation results show that the power consumption is 3.2 mW with 10 bit resolution and 10 MSPS sampling rate. The PGA has been embedded in a 0.3 megapixel CMOS image sensors and fabricated successfully.

  8. Monolithic CMOS-compatible zero-index metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Vulis, Daryl I; Reshef, Orad; Camayd-Muñoz, Philip; Yin, Mei; Kita, Shota; Lončar, Marko; Mazur, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Zero-index materials exhibit exotic optical properties that can be utilized for integrated-optics applications. However, practical implementation requires compatibility with complementary metallic-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technologies. We demonstrate a CMOS-compatible zero-index metamaterial consisting of a square array of air holes in a 220-nm-thick silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. This design is achieved through a Dirac-cone dispersion. The metamaterial is entirely composed of silicon and offers compatibility through low-aspect-ratio structures that can be simply fabricated in a standard device layer. This platform enables mass adoption and exploration of zero-index-based photonic devices at low cost and high fidelity.

  9. A New CMOS Current Reference with High Order Temperature Compensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A new high order CMOS temperature compensated current reference is proposed in this paper, which is accomplished by two first order temperature compensation current references. The novel circuit exploits the temperature characteristics of integrated-circuit resistors and gate-source voltage of MOS transistors working in weak inversion. The proposed circuit, designed with a 0.6 (m standard CMOS technology, gives a good temperature coefficient of 31ppm/℃ [(50~100℃] at a 1.8 V supply, and also achieves line regulation of 0.01%/V and (120 dB PSR at 1 MHz. Comparing with other presented work, the proposed circuit shows better temperature coefficient and Line regulation.

  10. Intensity-based segmentation of microarray images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan

    2003-07-01

    The underlying principle in microarray image analysis is that the spot intensity is a measure of the gene expression. This implicitly assumes the gene expression of a spot to be governed entirely by the distribution of the pixel intensities. Thus, a segmentation technique based on the distribution of the pixel intensities is appropriate for the current problem. In this paper, clustering-based segmentation is described to extract the target intensity of the spots. The approximate boundaries of the spots in the microarray are determined by manual adjustment of rectilinear grids. The distribution of the pixel intensity in a grid containing a spot is assumed to be the superposition of the foreground and the local background. The k-means clustering technique and the partitioning around medoids (PAM) were used to generate a binary partition of the pixel intensity distribution. The median (k-means) and the medoid (PAM) of the cluster members are chosen as the cluster representatives. The effectiveness of the clustering-based segmentation techniques was tested on publicly available arrays generated in a lipid metabolism experiment (Callow et al., 2000). The results are compared against those obtained using the region-growing approach (SPOT) (Yang et al., 2001). The effect of additive white Gaussian noise is also investigated. PMID:12906242

  11. Microarray analysis of the developing cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeralul, Mawahib O; Boutros, Paul C; Likhodi, Olga; Okey, Allan B; Van Tol, Hubert H M; Wong, Albert H C

    2006-12-01

    Abnormal development of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is associated with a number of neuropsychiatric disorders that have an onset in childhood or adolescence. Although the basic laminar structure of the PFC is established in utero, extensive remodeling continues into adolescence. To map the overall pattern of changes in cortical gene transcripts during postnatal development, we made serial measurements of mRNA levels in mouse PFC using oligonucleotide microarrays. We observed changes in mRNA transcripts consistent with known postnatal morphological and biochemical events. Overall, most transcripts that changed significantly showed a progressive decrease in abundance after birth, with the majority of change between postnatal weeks 2 and 4. Genes with cell proliferative, cytoskeletal, extracellular matrix, plasma membrane lipid/transport, protein folding, and regulatory functions had decreases in mRNA levels. Quantitative PCR verified the microarray results for six selected genes: DNA methyltransferase 3A (Dnmt3a), procollagen, type III, alpha 1 (Col3a1), solute carrier family 16 (monocarboxylic acid transporters), member 1 (Slc16a1), MARCKS-like 1 (Marcksl1), nidogen 1 (Nid1) and 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (heart, mitochondrial) (Bdh).

  12. Photon imaging using post-processed CMOS chips

    OpenAIRE

    Melai, Joost

    2010-01-01

    This thesis presents our work on an integrated photon detector made by post-processing of CMOS sensor arrays. The aim of the post-processing is to combine all elements of the detector into a single monolithic device. These elements include a photocathode to convert photon radiation into electronic signals (in the extreme case this conversion is from a single photon into a single electron), an electron multiplication structure to increase the magnitude of the signal pulse and a position sensit...

  13. CMOS Image Sensor with a Built-in Lane Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Chen Fu; Hsien-Chein Cheng; Pei-Yung Hsiao; Shih-Shinh Huang

    2009-01-01

    This work develops a new current-mode mixed signal Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) imager, which can capture images and simultaneously produce vehicle lane maps. The adopted lane detection algorithm, which was modified to be compatible with hardware requirements, can achieve a high recognition rate of up to approximately 96% under various weather conditions. Instead of a Personal Computer (PC) based system or embedded platform system equipped with expensive high performance chi...

  14. Smart CMOS image sensor for lightning detection and imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Rolando, Sébastien; Goiffon, Vincent; Magnan, Pierre; Corbière, Franck; Molina, Romain; Tulet, Michel; Bréart-de-Boisanger, Michel; Saint-Pé, Olivier; Guiry, Saïprasad; Larnaudie, Franck; Leone, Bruno; Perez-Cuevas, Leticia; Zayer, Igor

    2013-01-01

    We present a CMOS image sensor dedicated to lightning detection and imaging. The detector has been designed to evaluate the potentiality of an on-chip lightning detection solution based on a smart sensor. This evaluation is performed in the frame of the predevelopment phase of the lightning detector that will be implemented in the Meteosat Third Generation Imager satellite for the European Space Agency. The lightning detection process is performed by a smart detector combining an in-pixel fra...

  15. Nanocantilever based mass sensor integrated with cmos circuitry

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Zachary James; Abadal, G.; Campabadal, F; Figueras, E.; Esteve, J.; Verd, J.; Perez-Murano, F.; Borrise, X.; Nilsson, S. G.; Miximov, I.; Montelius, L.; Barniol, N.; Boisen, Anja

    2003-01-01

    We have demonstrated the successful integration of a cantilever based mass detector with standard CMOS circuitry. The purpose of the circuitry is to facilitate the readout of the cantilever's deflection in order to measure resonant frequency shifts of the cantilever. The principle and design of the mass detector are presented showing that miniaturization of such cantilever based resonant devices leads to highly sensitive mass sensors, which have the potential to detect single molecules. The d...

  16. CMOS Terahertz Sensors and Circuits for Imaging Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Domingues, Suzana

    2014-01-01

    A low-cost THz sensor, with a broadband high responsivity, low noise equivalent power, and capable of working at room temperature is still a challenge. Moreover, sensor integration with signal processing electronics is required in order to realize compact systems to be used in commercial imaging applications. In this thesis, CMOS FET-based THz detectors and with integrated noise-efficient readout circuits are presented as a solution. In an attempt to improve the THz focal plane arrays stat...

  17. Photon detection with CMOS sensors for fast imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Baudot, J.; Dulinski, W.; de Winter, M.; Barbier, R.; Chabanat, E.; Depasse, P.; Estre, N

    2008-01-01

    International audience Pixel detectors employed in high energy physics aim to detect single minimum ionizing particle with micrometric positioning resolution. Monolithic CMOS sensors succeed in this task thanks to a low equivalent noise charge per pixel of around 10 to 15 e-, and a pixel pitch varying from 10 to a few 10 s of microns. Additionally, due to the possibility for integration of some data treatment in the sensor itself, readout times of have been reached for 100 kilo-pixels sens...

  18. Design and Characterization of Vertical Mesh Capacitors in Standard CMOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kåre Tais

    2001-01-01

    This paper shows how good RF capacitors can be made in a standard digital CMOS process. The capacitors which are also well suited for binary weighted switched capacitor banks show very good RF performance: Q-values of 57 at 4.0 GHz, a density of 0.27 fF/μ2, 2.2 μm wide shielded unit capacitors, 6...

  19. Performance Analysis of Visible Light Communication Using CMOS Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Trong-Hop Do; Myungsik Yoo

    2016-01-01

    This paper elucidates the fundamentals of visible light communication systems that use the rolling shutter mechanism of CMOS sensors. All related information involving different subjects, such as photometry, camera operation, photography and image processing, are studied in tandem to explain the system. Then, the system performance is analyzed with respect to signal quality and data rate. To this end, a measure of signal quality, the signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR), is formulat...

  20. CMOS bandgap references and temperature sensors and their applications

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, G.

    2005-01-01

    Two main parts have been presented in this thesis: device characterization and circuit. In integrated bandgap references and temperature sensors, the IC(VBE, characteristics of bipolar transistors are used to generate the basic signals with high accuracy. To investigate the possibilities to fabricate high-precision bandgap references and temperature sensors in low-cost CMOS technology, the electrical characteristics of substrate bipolar pnp transistors have been investigated over a wide tempe...