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Sample records for activation martensitic clam

  1. Fracture toughness of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kunfeng [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Liu, Shaojun, E-mail: shaojun.liu@fds.org.cn [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Huang, Qunying [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Xu, Gang; Jiang, Siben [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • The fracture toughness of CLAM steel at room temperature is 417.9 kJ/m{sup 2} measured by unloading compliance method according to the ASTM E1820-11. • The fracture toughness of CLAM steel at room temperature can be calculated on the basis of the fractal dimensions measured under plane strain conditions. The calculated result and relative error for this experiment are 454.6 kJ/m{sup 2} and 8.78% respectively. • The calculation method could be used to estimate the fracture toughness of materials with analysis of the fracture surface. - Abstract: The fracture toughness (J{sub IC}) of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel was tested at room temperature through the compact tension specimen, the result is 417.9 kJ/m{sup 2}, which is similar to the JLF-1 at same experimental conditions. The microstructural observation of the fracture surface shows that the fracture mode is a typical ductile fracture. Meanwhile, the fracture toughness is also calculated on the basis of the fractal dimension and the calculated result is 454.6 kJ/m{sup 2}, which is consistent well with the experimental result. This method could be used to estimate the fracture toughness of materials by analyzing of the fracture surface.

  2. R and D status of China low activation martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Qunying; Li Chunjing; Li Yanfen; Liu Shaojun; Wu Yican; Li Jiangang; Shan Yiyin; Yu Jinnan; Zhu Shengyun; Zhang Pinyuan; Yang Jianfeng; Han Fusheng; Kong Mingguang; Li Heqin; Muroga, T.; Nagasaka, T.

    2007-01-01

    The Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel is considered as the primary candidate structural material for DEMO and the first fusion plant, and widely studied in the world. China low activation martensitic steel (CLAM) is being developed in Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, under wide collaboration with many other domestic and foreign institutes and universities. This paper summarized the main R and D progress on CLAM, which covered composition optimization of the CLAM, smelting and processing techniques, physical and mechanical property test and evaluation before and after irradiation, compatibility with liquid LiPb, welding techniques etc. Finally, further research and development, and the prospects on its application were stated. (authors)

  3. Hydroforming simulation and preparation of low activation martensitic steel Y-shapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, X.Z.; Tao, J.; Yuan, Z.; Tang, Q.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We hydroformed CLAM Y-shapes successfully after optimizing important parameters. → The feed of left punch decreased with the increasing protrusion angle. → The axial feed of the right punch increased with increasing the angle. → To obtain the highest protrusion, loading path 3 was the optimum. → The friction coefficient value of 0.07 is relatively superior. - Abstract: The hydroforming process to prepare China low activation Martensitic steel (CLAM) Y-shapes with desired protrusion height and uniform thinning rate was studied in this work. The axial feed distances for Y-shapes of the different protrusion angles were determined. Then, the effects of the loading path and the friction coefficient on the protrusion height and the distribution of thinning rate of the 45 o Y-shapes were investigated by numerical simulation, respectively. The optimized parameters were obtained: left axial feed 79 mm, right axial feed 60 mm and friction coefficient 0.07. In addition, the optimal loading path with the maximum rise rate of the internal pressure was determined. Subsequently, CLAM Y-shapes were hydroformed successfully based on the simulation results. The experimental results were approximately accordant with the simulative ones. It was indicated that the qualified CLAM Y-shapes could be obtained by the optimized hydroforming process.

  4. Continuous cooling transformation behaviors of CLAM steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Qing-sheng; Zheng, Shu-hui; Huang, Qun-ying; Liu, Shao-jun; Han, Yang-yang

    2013-01-01

    The continuous cooling transformation (CCT) behaviors of CLAM (China Low Activation Martensitic) steel were studied, the CCT diagram was constructed, and the influence of cooling rates on the microstructures was also investigated. The microstructures were investigated using optical microscopy (OM) and microhardness tests were also carried out. The results showed that CLAM steel possessed high hardenability and there were ferrite and martensite transformation regions only. The maximum cooling rate to form ferrite microstructure was found to be 10–12 K/min. In order to obtain fully ferrite microstructure, the cooling rate should be lower than 1 K/min. The CCT diagram also gave relevant parameters such as the transformation temperatures, i.e., A c1 , A c3 , M s and M f were 1124 K, 1193 K, 705 K and 593 K, respectively. The diagram made it possible to predict the microstructures and properties of CLAM steel with different cooling rates

  5. Activation volume of martensitic ODS steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. W.; Noh, S.; Kim, T. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Apparent activation volume as a function of temperature is 86b{sup 3}-42b{sup 3}. Activation volume decreases with increasing temperature. Activation volume changes scarcely with decreasing strain rate. Strain rate sensitivity increases with increasing temperature and decreasing strain rate. Nano-sized oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) martensitic steel has a high strength, low thermal expansion coefficient, high thermal conductivity, and a good swelling resistance. Martensitic ODS steel is a candidate material for fuel cladding of sodium cooled fast breeder reactor (SFR). The plastic flow stress is determined through the interaction of dislocations with the obstacles encountered inside lattice. Dislocation movement through the lattice or past an obstacle requires surmounting of the energy barrier by a combination of applied stress and thermal activation. The plastic deformation of materials is a thermally activated process dependent upon time, temperature, and strain rate. Characterization of the rate controlling mechanism for plastic deformation due to dislocation motion in crystalline materials is done by the assessment of activation volume based on thermal activation analysis.

  6. Interdiffusion behaviors of iron aluminide coatings on China low activation martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X. X.; Yang, H. G.; Yuan, X. M.; Zhao, W. W.; Zhan, Q.

    2014-12-01

    The iron aluminide coating on China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel was prepared by pack cementation and subsequent heat treatment. A surface Fe2Al5 layer was formed on CLAM substrate by pack cementation process with Fe2Al5 donor powder and NH4Cl activator. Diffusion heat treatment was performed in order to allow the phase transformation from Fe2Al5 to a phase with lower aluminum content. Morphology and composition of the coatings were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). There is a need to study the interdiffusion behaviors in these Al containing systems, as a basis for controlling the formation and subsequent degradation of the coating. In this paper, a predictive model was developed to describe the phase transformation of Fe2Al5 as a function of processing parameters. The Wagner's equation was used to calculate the interdiffusion coefficients based on the analysis of the Al concentration profiles. The results showed that the interdiffusion coefficients in the FeAl and α-Fe(Al) phase strongly depends on Al content and showed a maximum at about 28 at.% Al.

  7. Interdiffusion behaviors of iron aluminide coatings on China low activation martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, X.X.; Yang, H.G.; Yuan, X.M.; Zhao, W.W.; Zhan, Q.

    2014-01-01

    The iron aluminide coating on China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel was prepared by pack cementation and subsequent heat treatment. A surface Fe 2 Al 5 layer was formed on CLAM substrate by pack cementation process with Fe 2 Al 5 donor powder and NH 4 Cl activator. Diffusion heat treatment was performed in order to allow the phase transformation from Fe 2 Al 5 to a phase with lower aluminum content. Morphology and composition of the coatings were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). There is a need to study the interdiffusion behaviors in these Al containing systems, as a basis for controlling the formation and subsequent degradation of the coating. In this paper, a predictive model was developed to describe the phase transformation of Fe 2 Al 5 as a function of processing parameters. The Wagner’s equation was used to calculate the interdiffusion coefficients based on the analysis of the Al concentration profiles. The results showed that the interdiffusion coefficients in the FeAl and α-Fe(Al) phase strongly depends on Al content and showed a maximum at about 28 at.% Al

  8. Low cycle fatigue properties of CLAM steel at 823 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xue [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Huang, Lixin [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Yan, Wei; Wang, Wei [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Sha, Wei [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 5AG (United Kingdom); Shan, Yiyin, E-mail: yyshan@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Yang, Ke, E-mail: kyang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2014-09-08

    China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel is considered to be the main candidate material for the first wall components of future fusion reactors in China. In this paper, the low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of CLAM steel is studied under fully reversed tension–compression loading at 823 K in air. Total strain amplitude was controlled from 0.14% to 1.8% with a constant strain rate of 2.4×10{sup −3} s{sup −1}. The corresponding plastic strain amplitude ranged from 0.023% to 1.613%. The CLAM steel displayed continuous softening to failure at 823 K. The relationship between strain, stress and fatigue life was obtained using the parameters obtained from fatigue tests. The LCF properties of CLAM steel at 823 K followed Coffin–Manson relationship. Furthermore, irregular serration was observed on the stress–strain hysteresis loops of CLAM steel tested with the total strain amplitude of 0.45–1.8%, which was attributed to the dynamic strain aging (DSA) effect. During continuous cyclic deformation, the microstructure and precipitate distribution of CLAM steel changed gradually. Many tempered martensitic laths were decomposed into subgrains, and the size and number of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide and MX carbonitride precipitates decreased with the increase of total strain amplitude. The response cyclic stress promoted the recovery of martensitic lath, while the thermal activation mainly played an important role on the growth of precipitates in CLAM steel at 823 K. In order to have a better understanding of high-temperature LCF behavior, the potential mechanisms controlling stress–strain response, DSA phenomenon and microstructure changes have also been evaluated.

  9. Microstructure anisotropy and its effect on mechanical properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel fabricated by selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Zhai, Yutao; Liu, Shaojun; Mao, Xiaodong

    2018-03-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is a promising way for the fabrication of complex reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel components. The microstructure of the SLM built China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel plates was observed and analyzed. The hardness, Charpy impact and tensile testing of the specimens in different orientations were performed at room temperature. The results showed that the difference in the mechanical properties was related to the anisotropy in microstructure. The planer unmelted porosity in the interface of the adjacent layers induced opening/tensile mode when the tensile samples parallel to the build direction were tested whereas the samples vertical to the build direction fractured in the shear mode with the grains being sheared in a slant angle. Moreover, the impact absorbed energy (IAE) of all impact specimens was significantly lower than that of the wrought CLAM steel, and the IAE of the samples vertical to the build direction was higher than that of the samples parallel to the build direction. The impact fracture surfaces revealed that the load parallel to the build layers caused laminated tearing among the layers, and the load vertical to the layers induced intergranular fracture across the layers.

  10. Extraction residue analysis on F82H-BA07 heat and other reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaka, Takuya; Hishinuma, Yoshimitsu; Muroga, Takeo; Li, Yanfen; Watanabe, Hideo; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Sakasegawa, Hideo; Ando, Masami

    2011-01-01

    Extraction residue analysis was conducted on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels, such as F82H-BA07 heat, F82H-IEA heat, JLF-1 JOYO heat and CLAM steel. M 23 C 6 type precipitates, TaC precipitates and Fe 2 W Laves phase were identified in the present analyses. M 23 C 6 precipitates were coarsened in F82H-BA07 compared with the other steels at as-normalized and tempered (NT) condition. TaC precipitate formation was enhanced in JLF-1 and CLAM compared with F82H-BA07 and F82H-IEA at as-NT condition. Laves phase were detected in F82H-IEA after aging above 550 o C, where solid solution W was significantly decreased. F82H-IEA exhibited hardening after aging at 400 and 500 o C for 100 khr, whereas softening at 600 and 650 o C. This behavior is similar to JLF-1 and CLAM, and can be understood by precipitation of TaC and Laves phase.

  11. Continuous cooling transformation behaviors of CLAM steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qing-sheng, E-mail: qingsheng.wu@fds.org.cn; Zheng, Shu-hui; Huang, Qun-ying; Liu, Shao-jun; Han, Yang-yang

    2013-11-15

    The continuous cooling transformation (CCT) behaviors of CLAM (China Low Activation Martensitic) steel were studied, the CCT diagram was constructed, and the influence of cooling rates on the microstructures was also investigated. The microstructures were investigated using optical microscopy (OM) and microhardness tests were also carried out. The results showed that CLAM steel possessed high hardenability and there were ferrite and martensite transformation regions only. The maximum cooling rate to form ferrite microstructure was found to be 10–12 K/min. In order to obtain fully ferrite microstructure, the cooling rate should be lower than 1 K/min. The CCT diagram also gave relevant parameters such as the transformation temperatures, i.e., A{sub c1}, A{sub c3}, M{sub s} and M{sub f} were 1124 K, 1193 K, 705 K and 593 K, respectively. The diagram made it possible to predict the microstructures and properties of CLAM steel with different cooling rates.

  12. Microstructure and mechanical properties of China low activation martensitic steel joint by TIG multi-pass welding with a new filler wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Bo [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Zhang, Junyu [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Wu, Qingsheng, E-mail: qingsheng.wu@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Tungsten Inner Gas (TIG) welding is employed for joining of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel. A new filler wire was proposed, and the investigation on welding with various heat input and welding passes were conducted to lower the tendency towards the residual of δ ferrite in the joint. With the optimized welding parameters, a butt joint by multi-pass welding with the new filler wire was prepared to investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties. The microstructure of the joint was observed by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The hardness, Charpy impact and tensile tests of the joint were implemented at room temperature (25 °C). The results revealed that almost full martensite free from ferrite in the joints were obtained by multipass welding with the heat input of 2.26 kJ/mm. A certain degree of softening occurred at the heat affected zone of the joint according to the results of tensile and hardness tests. The as welded joints showed brittle fracture in the impact tests. However, the joints showed toughness fracture after tempering and relatively better comprehensive performance were achieved when the joints were tempered at 740 °C for 2 h. - Highlights: •A new filler material was proposed to control ferrite content in CLAM weld metal. •Heat input affected ferrite content through influencing cooling rate during welding. •Multipass welding was a promising way to eliminate the ferrite in the weld.

  13. Triangular gold nanoparticles modify shell characteristics and increase antioxidant enzyme activities in the clam Ruditapes decussatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhafidh, Khazri; Badreddine, Sellami; Mezni, Amine; Mouhamed, Dellali; Wiem, Saidani; Imen, Bouzidi; David, Sheehan; Mahmoudi, Ezzeddine; Hamouda, Beyrem

    2018-04-19

    Nanoparticles may cause adverse environmental effects but there is limited information on their interactions with marine organisms. Our aim was to examine the effects of triangular gold nanoparticles (Tr-Au NPs) on the clam, Ruditapes decussatus. Clams were exposed to Tr-Au1 = 5 µg/L and Tr-Au2 = 10 µg/L for 2 and 7 days. Effects on shell structure were investigated. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione transferase (GST) activities, protein carbonyl levels and malondialdehyde content were used to assess biochemical status. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) showed that Tr-Au NPs modified shell structure and morphology. Tr-Au NPs size increased forming aggregate particles. Tr-Au NPs increased SOD, CAT and GST activities in gill and digestive gland in a concentration- and time-dependent manner indicating defence against oxidative stress. Enhanced lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl levels confirmed oxidative stress. Tr-Au NPs cause oxidative stress and affect shell structure of clams. These findings may have relevance to other marine species.

  14. Thermally activated growth of lath martensite in Fe–Cr–Ni–Al stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Pantleon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The austenite to martensite transformation in a semi-austenitic stainless steel containing 17 wt-%Cr, 7 wt-%Ni and 1 wt-%Al was investigated with vibrating sample magnetometry and electron backscatter diffraction. Magnetometry demonstrated that, within experimental accuracy, martensite formation...... can be suppressed on fast cooling to 77 K as well as on subsequent fast heating to 373 K. Surprisingly, martensite formation was observed during moderate heating from 77 K, instead. Electron backscatter diffraction demonstrated that the morphology of martensite is lath type. The kinetics...... of the transformation is interpreted in terms of athermal nucleation of lath martensite followed by thermally activated growth. It is anticipated that substantial autocatalytic martensite formation occurs during thermally activated growth. The observation of a retardation of the transformation followed by a new...

  15. Assessment of thermo-mechanical behavior in CLAM steel first wall structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fubin; Yao Man

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► China Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAM) as FW the structural material. ► The thermo-mechanical behavior of the FW was analyzed under the condition of normal ITER operation combined effect of plasma heat flux and neutron heating. ► The temperature dependence of the material physical properties of CLAM is summarized. - Abstract: The temperature and strain distributions of the mockup with distinct structural material (SS316L or China Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAM)) in two-dimensional model were calculated and analyzed, based on a high heat flux (HHF) test recently reported with heat flux of 3.2 MW/m 2 . The calculated temperature and strain results in the first wall (FW), in which SS316L is as the structural material, showed good agreement with HHF test. By substituting CLAM steel for SS316L the contrast analysis indicates that the thermo-mechanical property for CLAM steel is better than that of SS316 at the same condition. Furthermore, the thermo-mechanical behavior of the FW was analyzed under the condition of normal ITER operation combined effect of plasma heat flux and neutron heating.

  16. Assessment of thermo-mechanical behavior in CLAM steel first wall structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Fubin, E-mail: liufubin_1216@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, Liaoning (China); Yao Man, E-mail: yaoman@dlut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, Liaoning (China)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer China Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAM) as FW the structural material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermo-mechanical behavior of the FW was analyzed under the condition of normal ITER operation combined effect of plasma heat flux and neutron heating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The temperature dependence of the material physical properties of CLAM is summarized. - Abstract: The temperature and strain distributions of the mockup with distinct structural material (SS316L or China Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAM)) in two-dimensional model were calculated and analyzed, based on a high heat flux (HHF) test recently reported with heat flux of 3.2 MW/m{sup 2}. The calculated temperature and strain results in the first wall (FW), in which SS316L is as the structural material, showed good agreement with HHF test. By substituting CLAM steel for SS316L the contrast analysis indicates that the thermo-mechanical property for CLAM steel is better than that of SS316 at the same condition. Furthermore, the thermo-mechanical behavior of the FW was analyzed under the condition of normal ITER operation combined effect of plasma heat flux and neutron heating.

  17. Corrosion behavior of CLAM steel weldment in flowing liquid Pb-17Li at 480 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xizhang; Shen Zheng; Chen Xing; Lei Yucheng; Huang Qunying

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► The research shows that the CLAM steel weldment have its own corrosion mechanism in liquid Pb-17Li alloy. The basic rule of the corrosion behaviour of weldments is that the coorosion rate decreases obviously with the increasing of exposed time. ► The weight loss of CLAM steel weldment is far higer than the base metal after exposed to Pb-17Li alloy. Corrosion has little effects on elements of weldment sample surfaces. And an easier corrosion area in the weld joint are found. ► A simple presumably corrosion behavior model is established. The model demonstrate that the easier corroded area will be formed when the direction of martensite laths form small-angle with the specimen surface, The easy corrosion area is the martensite lath area lack of Cr and distributes like laths, the cross-section area is 1 μm 2 to 4 μm 2, the existence of the easier corrosion area is one of the reasons that lead to the difference of the corrosion rate. - Abstract: CLAM (China Low Activation Martensitic) steel is considered as one of the candidate structural materials in liquid LiPb blanket concepts. Welding is one of the essential technologies for its practical application, CLAM steel weldment shows a great difference with base metal due to the effect of welding thermal cycle. In order to investigate the corrosion behavior and mechanism of CLAM weldments in liquid Pb-17Li, the experiments were performed by exposing the TIG weldment samples in flowing LiPb at 480 °C. The weight loss test of exposed specimens show that in 500 h, 1000 h dynamic conditions, corrosion resistance of CLAM steel weldment is poor, SEM analysis shows that the thicker martensite lath in weld area lead to higher corrosion amount, EDS results show that the influence of corrosion on surface elements is small, and surface corrosion is even, EDX analysis shows that the penetration of Pb-17Li does not exist in the joint. With the increasing of exposure time, the corrosion rate decreases

  18. Materials design data for reduced activation martensitic steel type EUROFER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassoli, A.-A.F. E-mail: tavassoli@cea.fr; Alamo, A.; Bedel, L.; Forest, L.; Gentzbittel, J.-M.; Rensman, J.-W.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Schirra, M.; Schmitt, R.; Schneider, H.C.; Petersen, C.; Lancha, A.-M.; Fernandez, P.; Filacchioni, G.; Maday, M.F.; Mergia, K.; Boukos, N.; Baluc,; Spaetig, P.; Alves, E.; Lucon, E

    2004-08-01

    Materials design limits derived so far from the data generated in Europe for the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel type Eurofer are presented. These data address the short-term needs of the ITER Test Blanket Modules and a DEMOnstration fusion reactor. Products tested include plates, bars, tubes, TIG and EB welds, as well as powder consolidated blocks and solid-solid HIP joints. Effects of thermal ageing and low dose neutron irradiation are also included. Results are sorted and screened according to design code requirements before being introduced in reference databases. From the physical properties databases, variations of magnetic properties, modulus of elasticity, density, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, mean and instantaneous linear coefficients of thermal expansion versus temperature are derived. From the tensile and creep properties databases design allowable stresses are derived. From the instrumented Charpy impact and fracture toughness databases, ductile to brittle transition temperature, toughness and behavior of materials in different fracture modes are evaluated. From the fatigue database, total strain range versus number of cycles to failure curves are plotted and used to derive fatigue design curves. Cyclic curves are also derived and compared with monotonic hardening curves. Finally, irradiated and aged materials data are compared to ensure that the safety margins incorporated in unirradiated design limits are not exceeded.

  19. An overview of the welding technologies of CLAM steels for fusion application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xizhang, E-mail: kernel.chen@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Huang Yuming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Madigan, Bruce [Montana Tech. of University of Montana, Butte, MT 59701 (United States); Zhou Jianzhong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 221013 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Welding technologies of China Low Activation Martensitic steel is overviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most welding technologies in use are discussed and suggestions are given. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proper welding technologies could ensure weld properties but more detailed work are necessary. - Abstract: China Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAMs), a kind of RAFM steel with Chinese intellectual property rights, is considered as the primary structural material for the China-designed ITER test blanket module (TBM). As one of the key issues in the fabrication of the fusion reactor, the welding technologies of CLAMs are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the weldability of CLAMs by different welding methods, and on the properties of as-welded and post-weld heat-treated joints. Recent highlights in research and development for the welding of CLAMs show that proper welding procedure could provide welds with adequate tensile strength but the welds exhibit lower impact toughness compared with the base metal. Post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) and the application of ultrasonic energy during TIG welding could dramatically improve impact toughness. Research also shows that welds in CLAMs have sufficient resistance to swelling under irradiation as well as suitable compatibility with liquid LiPb. The microstructure, mechanical and other physical properties of welds are significantly different from those of the base metal due to the complicated welding thermal cycle. The weld joint is the area most likely to fail one or more of the design requirements within the fusion reactor. Therefore significant additional research is necessary to ensure safe application of welded CLAM steel for fusion reactor construction.

  20. Activation energy of time-dependent martensite formation in steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2018-01-01

    The kinetics of {557}γ lath martensite formation in (wt%) 17Cr-7Ni-1Al-0.09C and 15Cr-7Ni-2Mo-1Al-0.08C steels was assessed with magnetometry at sub-zero Celsius temperatures. Samples were cooled to 77 K by immersion in boiling nitrogen to suppress martensite formation. Thereafter, thermally...... applied to evaluate the data available in the literature. The overall analysis showed that EA varies in the range 2–27 kJ mol−1 and increases logarithmically with the total fraction of interstitials in the steel....

  1. Microstructure and nanoindentation of the CLAM steel with nanocrystalline grains under Xe irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yongqin, E-mail: chang@ustb.edu.cn; Zhang, Jing; Li, Xiaolin; Guo, Qiang; Wan, Farong; Long, Yi

    2014-12-15

    This work presents an early look at irradiation effects on China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel with nanocrystalline grains (NC-CLAM steels) under 500 keV Xe-ion bombardment at room temperature to doses up to 5.3 displacements per atom (dpa). The microstructure in the topmost region of the steel is composed of nanocrystalline grains with an average diameter of 13 nm. As the samples were implanted at low dose, the nanocrystalline grains had martensite lath structure, and many dislocations and high density bubbles were introduced into the NC-CLAM steels. As the irradiation dose up to 5.3 dpa, a tangled dislocation network exists in the lath region, and the size of the bubbles increases. X-ray diffraction results show that the crystal quality decreases after irradiation, although the nanocrystals obviously coarsen. Grain growth under irradiation may be ascribed to the direct impact of the thermal spike on grain boundaries in the NC-CLAM steels. In irradiated samples, a compressive stress exists in the surface layer because of grain growth and irradiation-introduced defects, while the irradiation introduced grain-size coarsening and defects gradients from the surface to matrix result in a tensile stress in the irradiated NC-CLAM steels. Nanoindentation was used to estimate changes in mechanical properties during irradiation, and the results show that the hardness of the NC-CLAM steels increases with increasing irradiation dose, which was ascribed to the competition between the grain boundaries and the irradiation-introduced defects.

  2. Microstructure evolution of the oxide dispersion strengthened CLAM steel during mechanical alloying process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Liangliang [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Liu, Shaojun, E-mail: shaojun.liu@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Mao, Xiaodong [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A nano-sized oxides dispersed ODS-CLAM steel was obtained by MA and HIP. • A minimum saturated grain size of down to 30 nm was achieved by varying the milling time from 0 to 100 h. • Solution of W in the MA powder could be significantly improved by increasing MA rotation speed. - Abstracts: Oxide dispersion strengthened Ferritic/Martensitic steel is considered as one of the most potential structural material for future fusion reactor, owing to its high mechanical properties and good irradiation resistance. The oxide dispersion strengthened China Low Activation Martensitic (ODS-CLAM) steel was fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The microstructural evolutions during the process of ball milling and subsequent consolidation were investigated by SEM, XRD and TEM. The results showed that increasing the milling time during the first 36 h milling could effectively decrease the grain size to a value of around 30 nm, over which grain sized remained nearly constant. Increasing the rotation speed promoted the solution of tungsten (W) element obviously and decreased the grain size to a certain degree. Observation on the consolidated and further heat-treated ODS-CLAM steel samples indicated that a martensite microstructure with a high density of nano-particles was achieved.

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties in TIG welding of CLAM steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Qiang; Lei Yucheng; Chen Xizhang; Ren Wenjie; Ju Xin; Ye Yimin

    2011-01-01

    Tungsten insert gas (TIG) welding on China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel under identical conditions was performed. Microhardness test, tensile test, Charpy impact test and microstructure measurements were carried out on TIG welded joints after post weld heat-treatment. Hardening at WM and softening in HAZ is detected in the TIG weld joint. Microhardness in WM decreased when the temperature of PWHT increased. The ultimate tensile stress of weld metal is higher than that of HAZ and BM. Absorbed energy increased with PWHT temperature rising, until PWHT was done at 760 deg. C/30 min, the specimen ductile fractured in local area. The microstructure of the weld metal for every specimen was found to be tempered martensite with a little of delta ferrite. M 23 C 6 particles are the predominant type of carbides. Oxide precipitate phases appeared in WM, which are the primary crack initiation sites and it is critically important minimize their formation.

  4. Microstructure and mechanical properties of China low activation martensitic steel joint by TIG multi-pass welding with a new filler wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Zhang, Junyu; Wu, Qingsheng

    2017-07-01

    Tungsten Inner Gas (TIG) welding is employed for joining of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel. A new filler wire was proposed, and the investigation on welding with various heat input and welding passes were conducted to lower the tendency towards the residual of δ ferrite in the joint. With the optimized welding parameters, a butt joint by multi-pass welding with the new filler wire was prepared to investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties. The microstructure of the joint was observed by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The hardness, Charpy impact and tensile tests of the joint were implemented at room temperature (25 °C). The results revealed that almost full martensite free from ferrite in the joints were obtained by multipass welding with the heat input of 2.26 kJ/mm. A certain degree of softening occurred at the heat affected zone of the joint according to the results of tensile and hardness tests. The as welded joints showed brittle fracture in the impact tests. However, the joints showed toughness fracture after tempering and relatively better comprehensive performance were achieved when the joints were tempered at 740 °C for 2 h.

  5. Soft shell clams Mya arenaria with disseminated neoplasia demonstrate reverse transcriptase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, M.L.; Kim, C.H.; Reno, P.W.

    1998-01-01

    Disseminated neoplasia (DN), a proliferative cell disorder of the circulatory system of bivalves, was first reported in oysters in 1969. Since that time, the disease has been determined to be transmissible through water-borne exposure, but the etiological agent has not been unequivocally identified. In order to determine if a viral agent, possibly a retrovirus, could be the causative agent of DN, transmission experiments were performed, using both a cell-free filtrate and a sucrose gradient-purified preparation of a cell-free filtrate of DN positive materials. Additionally, a PCR-enhanced reverse transcriptase assay was used to determine if reverse transcriptase was present in tissues or hemolymph from DN positive soft shell clams Mya arenaria. DN was transmitted to healthy clams by injection with whole DN cells, but not with cell-free flitrates prepared from either tissues from DN positive clams, or DN cells. The cell-free preparations from DN-positive tissues and hemolymph having high levels of DN cells in circulation exhibited positive reactions in the PCR-enhanced reverse transcriptase assay. Cell-free preparations of hemolymph from clams having low levels of DN (<0.1% of cells abnormal), hemocytes from normal soft shell clams, and normal soft shell clam tissues did not produce a positive reaction in the PCR enhanced reverse transcriptase assay.

  6. Distribution of 137Cs activities in clams, Tivela mactroidea collected along the northern coast of Venezuela and the island of Margarita

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBrecque, J.J.; Alfonso, J.A.; Cordoves, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    Clam meats were obtained directly from the fishermen on the beaches in front of where the clams were collected at eight sites; seven along the northern coast of Venezuela and one on the northern coast of the island of Margarita (Venezuela). Marine sediments were also collected in the same corresponding areas as the clams. 137 Cs was determined both in clam meats and the marine sediments by high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry employing a hyperpure germanium detector. About 5 kg portions of clam meats were washed and dried in the laboratory, before 500 cm 3 volumes were transferred and weighed in the measuring containers. Similarly, 500 cm 3 volumes of marine sediments that were dried and ground to pass a 85 μm sieve were transferred to the measuring containers. The samples were counted for 150,000 seconds of real time. The 137 Cs activity of the clam meats ranged from -1 (our detection limit) to 0.36 Bq x kg -1 (dried weigh). These values are all within the range of values considered for environmental fallout from the nuclear weapons tests. Finally, all the values for the corresponding marine sediments were below our detection limit of 0.1 Bq x kg -1 of 137 Cs (dried weigh). (author)

  7. Tensile and impact behaviour of BATMAN II steels, Ti-bearing reduced activation martensitic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchioni, G.; Casagrande, E.; De Angelis, U.; De Santis, G.; Ferrara, D.; Pilloni, L.

    Two series of Reduced Activation Ferrous alloys (RAF) have been produced and studied by Casaccia's Laboratories. These martensitic alloys are named BATMAN steels. They are among the few presently developed RAF materials to exploit Ti as a carbide forming and grain size stabilizing element instead of Ta. In this work their mechanical properties are illustrated.

  8. Effect of mining activities on the clam fisheries and bottom fauna of Goa estuaries

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parulekar, A.H.; Ansari, Z.A.; Ingole, B.S.

    Comparison of two clam beds and associated benthic fauna, in Mandovi and Cumbarjua canal estuarine system of Goa, India, severely affected by massive inputs of mining rejects, revealed that, in less than 10 years (1972-73 to 1982-83), high biotic...

  9. Recent progress of R and D activities on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Q., E-mail: qunying.huang@fds.org.cn [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1135, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Baluc, N. [CRPP-EPFL, ODGA C110 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Dai, Y. [LNM, PSI, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Jitsukawa, S. [JAEA, 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-Mura, Ibaraki-Ken 319-1195 (Japan); Kimura, A. [IAE, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Konys, J. [KIT, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kurtz, R.J. [PNNL, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Lindau, R. [KIT, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Muroga, T. [NIFS, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Odette, G.R. [UCSB, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Raj, B. [IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Stoller, R.E.; Tan, L. [ORNL, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Tanigawa, H. [JAEA, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Tavassoli, A.-A.F. [DMN/Dir, DEN, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Yamamoto, T. [UCSB, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Wan, F. [DMPC, USTB, Beijing 100083 (China); Wu, Y. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1135, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Several types of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel have been developed over the past 30 years in China, Europe, India, Japan, Russia and the USA for application in ITER test blanket modules (TBMs) and future fusion DEMO and power reactors. The progress has been particularly important during the past few years with evaluation of mechanical properties of these steels before and after irradiation and in contact with different cooling media. This paper presents recent RAFM steel results obtained in ITER partner countries in relation to different TBM and DEMO options.

  10. Low cycle fatigue properties of CLAM steel at 450 °C and 550 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yanyun; Zhai, Xiangwei; Liu, Shaojun, E-mail: shaojun.liu@fds.org.cn

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Low cycle fatigue properties of CLAM steel were investigated at 450 °C and 550 °C. • CLAM steel showed the continuous softening up to fail failure under cyclic loading. The degree of softening increased with increasing temperature. • Dislocation density decrease and subgrain coarsening during the test process were the possible reasons for the cyclic softening of the CLAM steel. - Abstract: The low cycle fatigue behavior of China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel has been studied using a constant strain rate of 8 × 10{sup −3}/s with the strain amplitudes ranging from 0.3% to 0.8% at 450 °C and 550 °C. Cyclic stress response showed a gradual softening until complete failure. The fatigue life decreased with increasing test temperature, and the effect of temperature on fatigue life was more pronounced at lower strain amplitudes. The cyclic deformation behavior at different temperatures has been analyzed according to the hysteresis loop, and the mechanism of cyclic softening was interpreted in view of the changes taking place in dislocation density and lath structures. Evaluation of low cycle fatigue properties of CLAM steel at 450 °C and 550 °C can help in design of the Chinese Test Blanket Module (TBM) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and a future fusion power plant.

  11. Effect of post-weld heat treatment on the mechanical properties of CLAM/316L dissimilar joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Junyu [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Huang, Bo [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Wu, Qingsheng, E-mail: qingsheng.wu@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Li, Chunjing; Huang, Qunying [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Dissimilar joints between CLAM and 316L steels welded by TIG were investigated. • After PWHTs, the hardening in HAZ on the CLAM steel side decreased remarkably. • Tempering at 740 °C for 2 h was considered as the preferable treatment rule. - Abstract: Dissimilar welding between China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel and 316L austenitic stainless steel was investigated to achieve the reliable connection between test blanket modules (TBMs) and piping system in the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER). The dissimilar joints were welded by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process with a filler material type-309. In order to stabilize the microstructure and improve the strength and toughness, post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) of tempering at 740 °C, 780 °C and 820 °C, respectively, for 2 h were performed. The microstructure observation showed that tempering at 740 °C for 2 h was the preferable PWHT rule in this work. After the treatment, the hardening in heat affected zone (HAZ) on the CLAM steel side decreased remarkably. The tensile strength of the joint was roughly the same as that of the base metal. The impact toughness of HAZ on the CLAM steel side was 77% of that of the base metal. The absorbed energy of HAZ of 316L steel decreased by 93 J, and that of weld metal (WM) was 110 J after the treatment.

  12. Creep deformation and rupture behavior of CLAM steel at 823 K and 873 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Boyu; Huang, Bo; Li, Chunjing; Liu, Shaojun; Xu, Gang; Zhao, Yanyun; Huang, Qunying

    2014-12-01

    China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel is selected as the candidate structural material in Fusion Design Study (FDS) series fusion reactor conceptual designs. The creep property of CLAM steel has been studied in this paper. Creep tests have been carried out at 823 K and 873 K over a stress range of 150-230 MPa. The creep curves showed three creep regimes, primary creep, steady-state creep and tertiary creep. The relationship between minimum creep rate (ε˙min) and the applied stress (σ) could be described by Norton power law, and the stress exponent n was decreased with the increase of the creep temperature. The creep mechanism was analyzed with the fractographes of the rupture specimens which were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The coarsening of precipitates observed with transmission electron microscope (TEM) indicated the microstructural degradation after creep test.

  13. Creep deformation and rupture behavior of CLAM steel at 823 K and 873 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Boyu; Huang, Bo; Li, Chunjing; Liu, Shaojun; Xu, Gang; Zhao, Yanyun; Huang, Qunying

    2014-01-01

    China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel is selected as the candidate structural material in Fusion Design Study (FDS) series fusion reactor conceptual designs. The creep property of CLAM steel has been studied in this paper. Creep tests have been carried out at 823 K and 873 K over a stress range of 150–230 MPa. The creep curves showed three creep regimes, primary creep, steady-state creep and tertiary creep. The relationship between minimum creep rate (ε-dot min ) and the applied stress (σ) could be described by Norton power law, and the stress exponent n was decreased with the increase of the creep temperature. The creep mechanism was analyzed with the fractographes of the rupture specimens which were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The coarsening of precipitates observed with transmission electron microscope (TEM) indicated the microstructural degradation after creep test

  14. Enhanced trace element concentrations in tissues of the clam Ruditapes decussatus transplanted to areas influenced by human activities (Ria Formosa, Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria João Botelho

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To examine the extent to which human activities near the Ria Formosa coastal lagoon influence the accumulation of trace elements (TE in Ruditapes decussatus, individuals were transplanted from a natural bank located in the lower lagoon to three sites located in clam growth grounds under the influence of a small city (Faro, a fish farming centre (Olhão and a site near the lagoon inlet (Lavajo. Concentrations were determined in substrate of the clam grounds and in the digestive gland, gills, mantle plus siphons, and remaining tissues of clams in four periods of the year. These measurements were accomplished with the monthly survey of the gametogenic stages, condition index, proteins, glycogen, total lipids, pH and osmolarity of hemolymph. Arsenic, Cu, Mn, V, Cr and Pb were preferentially linked to the digestive gland, while Cd was linked to the gills. TE concentrations in the digestive gland and remaining tissues were higher in winter, most likely reflecting additional inputs associated with rain. The lack of disruptions in biological parameters and the prolonged period of spawning and gonad recovery in clams suggest that the current TE availability in the lagoon has a minor influence on the reproductive cycle and hence on clam production.

  15. Strain-rate behavior in tension of the tempered martensitic reduced activation steel Eurofer97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadoni, Ezio; Dotta, Matteo; Forni, Daniele [University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland, P.O. Box 105, CH-6952 Canobbio (Switzerland); Spaetig, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.spatig@psi.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2011-07-31

    The tensile properties of the high-chromium tempered martensitic reduced activation steel Eurofer97 were determined from tests carried out over a wide range of strain-rates on cylindrical specimens. The quasi-static tests were performed with a universal electro-mechanical machine, whereas a hydro-pneumatic machine and a JRC-split Hopkinson tensile bar apparatus were used for medium and high strain-rates respectively. This tempered martensitic stainless steel showed significant strain-rate sensitivity. The constitutive behavior was investigated within a framework of dislocations dynamics model using Kock's approach. The parameters of the model were determined and then used to predict the deformation range of the tensile deformation stability. A very good agreement between the experimental results and predictions of the model was found.

  16. Behavior of helium gas atoms and bubbles in low activation 9Cr martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Shiraishi, Haruki; Matsui, Hideki; Abe, Katsunori

    1994-09-01

    The behavior of helium-gas release from helium-implanted 9Cr martensitic steels (500 appm implanted at 873 K) during tensile testing at 873 K was studied. Modified 9Cr-1Mo, low-activation 9Cr-2W and 9Cr-0.5V were investigated. Cold-worked AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel was also investigated as a reference which was susceptible helium embrittlement at high temperature. A helium release peak was observed at the moment of rupture in all the specimens. The total quantity of helium released from these 9Cr steels was in the same range but smaller than that of 316CW steel. Helium gas in the 9Cr steels should be considered to remain in the matrix at their lath-packets even if deformed at 873 K. This is the reason why the martensitic steels have high resistance to helium embrittlement.

  17. Strain-rate behavior in tension of the tempered martensitic reduced activation steel Eurofer97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadoni, Ezio; Dotta, Matteo; Forni, Daniele; Spaetig, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The tensile properties of the high-chromium tempered martensitic reduced activation steel Eurofer97 were determined from tests carried out over a wide range of strain-rates on cylindrical specimens. The quasi-static tests were performed with a universal electro-mechanical machine, whereas a hydro-pneumatic machine and a JRC-split Hopkinson tensile bar apparatus were used for medium and high strain-rates respectively. This tempered martensitic stainless steel showed significant strain-rate sensitivity. The constitutive behavior was investigated within a framework of dislocations dynamics model using Kock's approach. The parameters of the model were determined and then used to predict the deformation range of the tensile deformation stability. A very good agreement between the experimental results and predictions of the model was found.

  18. Behavior of helium gas atoms and bubbles in low activation 9Cr martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Shiraishi, Haruki; Matsui, Hideki; Abe, Katsunori

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of helium-gas release from helium-implanted 9Cr martensitic steels (500 appm implanted at 873 K) during tensile testing at 873 K was studied. Modified 9Cr-1Mo, low-activation 9Cr-2W and 9Cr-0.5V were investigated. Cold-worked AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel was also investigated as a reference which was susceptible helium embrittlement at high temperature. A helium release peak was observed at the moment of rupture in all the specimens. The total quantity of helium released from these 9Cr steels was in the same range but smaller than that of 316CW steel. Helium gas in the 9Cr steels should be considered to remain in the matrix at their lath-packets even if deformed at 873 K. This is the reason why the martensitic steels have high resistance to helium embrittlement. ((orig.))

  19. Chemical compatibility study of lithium titanate with Indian reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonak, Sagar; Jain, Uttam; Haldar, Rumu; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Chemical compatibility between Li_2TiO_3 and Indian RAFM steel has been studied at ITER operating temperature. • The lithium titanate chemically reacted with ferritic martensitic steel to form a brittle and non-adherent oxide layer. • The layer grew in a parabolic manner as a function of heating time. • Diffusion of oxygen (from Li_2TiO_3) appears to be controlling the oxide layer. - Abstract: Chemical compatibility between lithium titanate and Indian reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel (In-RAFMS) was studied for the first time under ITER operating temperature. Lithium titanate required for the study was synthesized in-house. Coupons of In-RAFMS were packed inside lithium titanate powder and heated at 550 °C up to 900 h under inert argon atmosphere. The lithium titanate chemically reacted with ferritic martensitic steel to form a brittle and non-adherent oxide layer. The layer grew in a parabolic manner as a function of heating time. Microstructural and phase evolution of this oxide layer was studied using XRD, SEM and EPMA. Iron and chromium enriched zones were found within the oxide layer. Diffusion of oxygen (from Li_2TiO_3) appears to be controlling the oxide layer.

  20. Influence of Prior Fatigue Cycling on Creep Behavior of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Aritra; Vijayanand, V. D.; Parameswaran, P.; Shankar, Vani; Sandhya, R.; Laha, K.; Mathew, M. D.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2014-06-01

    Creep tests were carried out at 823 K (550 °C) and 210 MPa on Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) steel which was subjected to different extents of prior fatigue exposure at 823 K at a strain amplitude of ±0.6 pct to assess the effect of prior fatigue exposure on creep behavior. Extensive cyclic softening that characterized the fatigue damage was found to be immensely deleterious for creep strength of the tempered martensitic steel. Creep rupture life was reduced to 60 pct of that of the virgin steel when the steel was exposed to as low as 1 pct of fatigue life. However, creep life saturated after fatigue exposure of 40 pct. Increase in minimum creep rate and decrease in creep rupture ductility with a saturating trend were observed with prior fatigue exposures. To substantiate these findings, detailed transmission electron microscopy studies were carried out on the steel. With fatigue exposures, extensive recovery of martensitic-lath structure was distinctly observed which supported the cyclic softening behavior that was introduced due to prior fatigue. Consequently, prior fatigue exposures were considered responsible for decrease in creep ductility and associated reduction in the creep rupture strength.

  1. Structural and mechanical properties of welded joints of reduced activation martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filacchioni, G.; Montanari, R.; Tata, M.E.; Pilloni, L.

    2002-01-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding and electron beam welding methods were used to realise welding pools on plates of reduced activation martensitic steels. Structural and mechanical features of these simulated joints have been investigated in as-welded and post-welding heat-treated conditions. The research allowed to assess how each welding technique affects the original mechanical properties of materials and to find suitable post-welding heat treatments. This paper reports results from experimental activities on BATMAN II and F82H mod. steels carried out in the frame of the European Blanket Project - Structural Materials Program

  2. Preliminary Study on Hot Isostatic Pressing Diffusion Bonding for CLAM Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chunjing Li; Qunying Huang; Yican Wu

    2006-01-01

    China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel is being developed in ASIPP (Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) since three years ago. CLAM is selected as the major candidate structure materials for the FDS series design of fusion reactors and for China liquid metal LiPb Test Blanket Module (TBM) for ITER i.e. DFLL-TBM, which are being carried out in ASIPP. Since the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonding technique is one of the main candidate bonding techniques for manufacturing of the first wall of a fusion reactor, research of the HIP technique on CLAM/CLAM is greatly needed. Preliminary HIP diffusion bonding experiments on CLAM steel have been performed. A few machining approaches such as dry-milling, turnery and grounding etc. were used to prepare the sample surfaces and then they were degreased with a mixture of alcohol, ether and acetone in an ultrasonic bath. The samples were joined by HIP diffusion bonding with the compression pressure of 150 MPa and the holding time of 2 ∼ 3 hours under different temperatures between 950 deg. and 1100 deg.. Different seal techniques of the capsules were studied as well. Then appropriate post heat treatment was done. Tests on mechanical properties of the joints such as tensile strength and impact toughness have been performed. The preliminary results show that the tensile properties are roughly the same as those of the base material. The absorbed energy of the joints at present is a little low and further research is needed to increase it. Microstructure of the joints was studied by optical microscope, SEM and TEM. Compositions of the defects on the joining line were analyzed by EDS. Through analysis of the results, optimized parameters for HIP are given. (author)

  3. Hydrogen behaviour in the aged low activation martensitic steel F82H for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benamati, G.

    1997-10-01

    A time dependent permeation method is used to measure the permeability, diffusivity and solubility of hydrogen in the low activation martensitic steel F82H aged for 2000 h under vacuum at 773 K. The measurements cover the temperature range from 373 to 723 K which includes the onset of hydrogen trapping effects on diffusivity and solubility. The results are interpreted using a trapping model. The number of trap sites and their average energies for hydrogen in the aged F82H steel are determined. These data are compared with those obtained for deuterium in F82H steel

  4. Report of IEA workshop on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    IEA Workshop on Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels under implementing agreement for program of research and development on fusion materials was held at Tokyo Yayoi Kaikan and JAERI headquarter on November 2-3, 2000. The objective of this workshop was a review of the fusion material development programs, the progress of the collaboration and the irradiation effects studies on RAF/M steels in the collaborating parties (Europe, Russia the United States, and Japan). Moreover, the development of plans for future collaboration was discussed. The present report contains viewgraphs presented at the workshop. (author)

  5. On the interpretation of differential scanning calorimetry results for thermoelastic martensitic transformations: Athermal versus thermally activated kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Humbeeck, J.; Planes, A.

    1996-01-01

    Experimentally, two distinct classes of martensitic transformations are considered: athermal and isothermal. In the former class, on cooling, at some well-defined start temperature (M s ), isolated small regions of the martensitic product begin to appear in the parent phase. The transformation at any temperature appears to be instantaneous in practical time scales, and the amount of transformed material (x) does not depend on time, i.e., it increases at each step of lowering temperature. The transition is not completed until the temperature is lowered below M f (martensite finish temperature). The transformation temperatures are only determined by chemical (composition and degree of order) and microstructural factors. The external controlling parameter (T or applied stress) determines the free energy difference between the high and the low temperature phases, which provides the driving force for the transition. In the development of athermal martensite activation kinetics is secondary. Athermal martensite, as observed in the well known shape memory alloys Cu-Zn-Al, Cu-Al-Ni and Ni-Ti, cannot be attributed to a thermally activated mechanism for which kinetics are generally described by the Arrhenius rate equation. However, the latter has been applied by Lipe and Morris to results for the Martensitic Transformation of Cu-Al-Ni-B-Mn obtained by conventional Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). It is the concern of the authors of this letter to point out the incongruences arising from the analysis of calorimetric results, corresponding to forward and reverse thermoelastic martensitic transformations, in terms of standard kinetic analysis based on the Arrhenius rate equation

  6. Development of an extensive database of mechanical properties for Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigawa, H.; Shiba, K.; Ando, M.; Wakai, E.; Jitsukawa, S.; Hirose, T.; Kasada, R.; Kimura, A.; Kohyama, A.; Kohno, Y.; Klueh, R.L.; Sokolov, M.; Stoller, R.; Zinklek, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Odette, G.; Kurtz, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs) are recognized as the primary candidate structural materials for fusion blanket systems, as they have been developed based on massive industrial experience of ferritic/martensitic steel replacing Mo and Nb of high chromium heat resistant martensitic steels (such as modified 9Cr-1Mo) with W and Ta, respectively. F82H (8Cr-2W-0.2V-0.04Ta-0.1C) and JLF-1 (9Cr-2W-0.2V-0.08Ta-0.1C) are RAFMs, which have been developed and studied in Japan and the various effects of irradiation were reported. F82H is designed with emphasis on high temperature property and weldablility, and was provided and evaluated in various countries as a part of the IEA fusion materials development collaboration. The Japan/US collaboration program also has been conducted with the emphasis on heavy irradiation effects of F82H, JLF-1 and ORNL9Cr2WVTa over the past two decades using Fast Flux Testing Facility (FFTF) of PNNL and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of ORNL, and the irradiation condition of the irradiation capsules of those reactors were precisely controlled by the well matured capsule designing and instrumentation. Now, among the existing database for RAFMs the most extensive one is that for F82H. The objective of this paper is to review the database status of RAFMs, mainly on F82H, to identify the key issues for the future development of database. Tensile, fracture toughness, creep and fatigue properties and microstructural studies before and after irradiation are summarized. (authors)

  7. Current status of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels R and D for fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Akihiko

    2005-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAF/M) steels have been considered to be the prime candidate for the fusion blanket structural material. The irradiation data obtained up to now indicates rather high feasibility of the steels for application to fusion reactors because of their high resistance to degradation of material performance caused by both the irradiation-induced displacement damage and transmutation helium atoms. The martensitic structure of RAF/M steels consists of a large number of lattice defects before the irradiation, which strongly retards the formation of displacement damage through absorption and annihilation of the point defects generated by irradiation. Transmutation helium can be also trapped at those defects in the martensitic structure so that the growth of helium bubbles at grain boundaries is suppressed. The major properties of the steels are well within our knowledge, and processing technologies are mostly developed for fusion application. RAF/M steels are now certainly ready to proceed to the next stage, that is, the construction of International Thermo-nuclear Experimental Reactor Test Blanket Modules (ITER-TBM). Oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) steels have been developed for higher thermal efficiency of fusion power plants. Recent irradiation experiments indicated that the steels were quite highly resistant to neutron irradiation embrittlement, showing hardening accompanied by no loss of ductility. High-Cr ODS steels whose chromium concentration was in the range from 14 to 19 mass% showed high resistance to corrosion in supercritical pressurized water. It is shown that the 14Cr-ODS steel is susceptible to neither hydrogen nor helium embrittlement. A combined utilization of ODS steels with RAF/M steels will be effective to realize fusion power early at a reasonable thermal efficiency. (author)

  8. Development of an extensive database of mechanical properties for Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigawa, H.; Shiba, K.; Ando, M.; Wakai, E.; Jitsukawa, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Hirose, T. [Blanket Engineering Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Kasada, R.; Kimura, A.; Kohyama, A. [Kyoto Univ., lnstitute of Advanced Energy (Japan); Kohno, Y. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan); Klueh, R.L. [0ak Ridge Noational Laboratory, TN (United States); Sokolov, M.; Stoller, R.; Zinklek, S. [0ak Ridge Noational Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Div., TN (United States); Yamamoto, T.; Odette, G. [UCSB, Dept. of Chemical Engineering UCSB, Santa-Barbara (United States); Kurtz, R.J. [Pacifie Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs) are recognized as the primary candidate structural materials for fusion blanket systems, as they have been developed based on massive industrial experience of ferritic/martensitic steel replacing Mo and Nb of high chromium heat resistant martensitic steels (such as modified 9Cr-1Mo) with W and Ta, respectively. F82H (8Cr-2W-0.2V-0.04Ta-0.1C) and JLF-1 (9Cr-2W-0.2V-0.08Ta-0.1C) are RAFMs, which have been developed and studied in Japan and the various effects of irradiation were reported. F82H is designed with emphasis on high temperature property and weldablility, and was provided and evaluated in various countries as a part of the IEA fusion materials development collaboration. The Japan/US collaboration program also has been conducted with the emphasis on heavy irradiation effects of F82H, JLF-1 and ORNL9Cr2WVTa over the past two decades using Fast Flux Testing Facility (FFTF) of PNNL and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of ORNL, and the irradiation condition of the irradiation capsules of those reactors were precisely controlled by the well matured capsule designing and instrumentation. Now, among the existing database for RAFMs the most extensive one is that for F82H. The objective of this paper is to review the database status of RAFMs, mainly on F82H, to identify the key issues for the future development of database. Tensile, fracture toughness, creep and fatigue properties and microstructural studies before and after irradiation are summarized. (authors)

  9. OPTIFER, a further step in development of Low Activation Martensitic Steels. Results of Characterization Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, M.P.; Lapena, J.; Hernandez, M.T.; Schirra, M.

    1996-01-01

    Within the framework of the development of low activation structural materials to be used in nuclear fusion reactors four martensitic Fe-9,5 Cr alloys were conceived with different contentsof tungsten-tantalum and/or germanium as substitutions for Mo, Ni, Nb and Al. As a result of recent activation calculations, the maximum concentrations of all accompanying elements, which are not desirable under radiological aspects, were determined for the first time for these OPTIFER steels, and laid down in specifications for the manufacturers of the alloys. After double-vacuum melting, only the real alloys with some of these accompanying elements added are within the specifications. For the majority of alloys the gap between request in radiological terms and the metallurgical/analytical reality is still considerable. The behavior during transformation and heat treatment roughly corresponds to that of conventional martensitic 9-12degree centigree Cr steels. Progress has been conspicuous as regards the notch impact tougness behavior. Both at upper shelf level and in ductile brittle transition (DBTT) the W(Ce) alloyed OPTIFER variant exhibits more favorable values than the conventional MANET-II steel from the fusion program, with better strength characteristics above 500 degree centigree. With only a moderate decrease in strenght values (compared to MANET-II), the Ge (Ce) variant excels by a distinct improvement in notch impact tougness values and, theoretically, a stronger reduction in dose rate than the W(Ce) variant and comes close to the decay curve of pure iron

  10. OPTIFER, a further step in development of Low Activation Martensitic Steels. Results of Characterization Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, M.P.; Lapena, J.; Hernandez, M.T.; Schirra, M.

    1996-01-01

    Within the framework of the development of low activation structural materials to be used in nuclear fusion reactors four martensitic Fe-9,5 Cr alloys were conceived with different contents of tungsten-tantalum and/or germanium as substitutions for Mo, Ni, Nb and Al. As a result of recent activation calculations, the maximum concentrations of all accompanying elements, which are not desirable under radiological aspects, were determined for the first time for these OPTIFER steels, and laid down in specifications for the manufacturers of the alloys, after double-vacuum melting, only the real alloys with some of these accompanying elements added are within the specifications. For the majority of alloys the gap between request in radiological terms and the metallurgical/analytical reality is still considerable. The behavior during transformation and heat treatment roughly corresponds to that of conventional martensitic 9-12%Cr steels. Progress has been conspicuous as regards the notch impact toughness behavior, both at upper shelf level and in ductile brittle transition (DBTT) the W(Ce) alloyed OPTIFER variant exhibits more favorable values than the conventional MANET-II steel from the fusion program, with better strength characteristics above 500 degree centigree. With only a moderate decrease in strength values (compared to MANET-II), the Ge (Ce) variant excels by a distinct improvement in notch impact toughness values and, theoretically, a stronger reduction in dose rate than the W(Ce) variant and comes close to the decay curve of pure iron. (Author) 21 refs

  11. High Temperature Elastic Properties of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) Steel Using Impulse Excitation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Haraprasanna; Raju, Subramanian; Hajra, Raj Narayan; Saibaba, Saroja

    2018-03-01

    The polycrystalline elastic constants of an indigenous variant of 9Cr-1W-based reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel have been determined as a function of temperature from 298 K to 1323 K (25 °C to 1000 °C), using impulse excitation technique (IET). The three elastic constants namely, Young's modulus E, shear modulus G, and bulk modulus B, exhibited significant softening with increasing temperature, in a pronounced non-linear fashion. In addition, clearly marked discontinuities in their temperature variations are noticed in the region, where ferrite + carbides → austenite phase transformation occurred upon heating. Further, the incidence of austenite → martensite transformation upon cooling has also been marked by a step-like jump in both elastic E and shear moduli G. The martensite start M s and M f finish temperatures estimated from this study are, M s = 652 K (379 °C) and M f =580 K (307 °C). Similarly, the measured ferrite + carbide → austenite transformation onset ( Ac 1) and completion ( Ac 3) temperatures are found to be 1126 K and 1143 K (853 °C and 870 °C), respectively. The Poisson ratio μ exhibited distinct discontinuities at phase transformation temperatures; but however, is found to vary in the range 0.27 to 0.29. The room temperature estimates of E, G, and μ for normalized and tempered microstructure are found to be 219 GPa, 86.65 GPa, and 0.27, respectively. For the metastable austenite phase, the corresponding values are: 197 GPa, 76.5 GPa, and 0.29, respectively. The measured elastic properties as well as their temperature dependencies are found to be in good accord with reported estimates for other 9Cr-based ferritic-martensitic steel grades. Estimates of θ D el , the elastic Debye temperature and γ G, the thermal Grüneisen parameter obtained from measured bulk elastic properties are found to be θ D el = 465 K (192 °C) and γ G = 1.57.

  12. Comparison of corrosion behavior of EUROFER and CLAM steels in flowing Pb–15.7Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konys, J., E-mail: juergen.konys@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Krauss, W. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Zhu, Z.; Huang, Q. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Ferritic martensitic steels are envisaged to be applied as structural materials in HCLL blanket systems. Their compatibility with the liquid breeder, which is in direct contact with the structural alloy, will be essential for reliable and safe operation of the designed blankets. Formerly performed corrosion tests of RAFM steels in PICOLO loop of KIT were mainly done at high flow velocities, e.g., 0.22 m/s and delivered severe attack with material loss rates above 400 μm/yr at 823 K. Meanwhile, flow velocities for corrosion testing have been reduced into the “cm range” to be near fusion relevant conditions. Among the international ITER-partners, many varieties of RAFM steels have been developed and manufactured within the last decade, e.g., the so-called Chinese Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAM). In this paper, the long term corrosion behavior of EUROFER and CLAM steel in flowing Pb–15.7Li will be presented at a flow velocity of about 0.10 m/s and compared with earlier obtained results of RAFM steels exposed at other operation parameters of PICOLO loop. The observed corrosion attack is near 220 μm/yr and fits well to predictions made by MATLIM-modeling for low flow velocities in the turbulent flow regime.

  13. Compatibility of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels with liquid breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroga, T.; Nagasaka, T.; Kondo, M.; Sagara, A.; Noda, N.; Suzuki, A.; Terai, T.

    2008-10-01

    The compatibility of Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel (RAFM) with liquid Li and molten-salt Flibe have been characterized and accessed. Static compatibility tests were carried out in which the specimens were immersed into liquid Li or Flibe in isothermal autoclaves. Also carried out were compatibility tests in flowing liquid Li by thermal convection loops. In the case of liquid Li, the corrosion rate increased with temperature significantly. The corrosion was almost one order larger for the loop tests than for the static tests. Chemical analysis showed that the corrosion was enhanced when the level of N in Li is increased. Transformation from martensitic to ferritic phase and the resulting softening were observed in near-surface area of Li-exposed specimens, which were shown to be induced by decarburization. In the case of Flibe, the corrosion loss was much larger in a Ni crucible than in a RAFM crucible. Both fluorides and oxides were observed on the surfaces. Thus, the key corrosion process of Flibe is the competing process of fluoridation and oxidation. Possible mechanism of the enhanced corrosion in Ni crucible is electrochemical circuit effect. It was suggested that the corrosion loss rate of RAFM by liquid Li and Flibe can be reduced by reducing the level of impurity N in Li and avoiding the use of dissimilar materials in Flibe, respectively. (author)

  14. Effect of Microstructures and Tempering Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of 9Cr-2W Reduced-Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Min-Gu; Kang, Nam Hyun; Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Tae-Ho; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Hyoung Chan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of microstructures (martensite, ferrite, or mixed ferrite and martensite) on the mechanical properties. Of particular interest was the Charpy impact results for 9Cr-2W reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels. Under normalized conditions, steel with martensitic microstructure showed superior tensile strength and Charpy impact results. This may result from auto-tempering during the transformation of martensite. On the other hand, both ferrite, and ferrite mixed with martensite, showed unusually poor Charpy impact results. This is because the ferrite phases, and coarse M_23C_6 carbides at the ferrite-grain boundaries acted as cleavage crack propagation paths, and as preferential initiation sites for cleavage cracks, respectively. After the tempering heat treatment, although tensile strength decreased, the energy absorbed during the Charpy impact test drastically increased for martensite, and ferrite mixed with martensite. This was due to the tempered martensite. On the other hand, there were no distinctive differences in tensile and Charpy impact properties of steel with ferrite microstructure, when comparing normalized and tempered conditions.

  15. Mechanical characterization of a reduced activation 9 Cr ferritic/martensitic steel of spanish production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, D.; Serrano, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper shows the first results concerning the characterization of two heats of a reduced activation 9 Cr ferritic/martensitic steel (RAFM) made in Spain, called AF1B and AF2A. The results of this characterization are compared with their European counterparts, EUROFER97-2, which was chosen as reference material. All activities described were performed in the Structural Materials Unit of CIEMAT, within the national project TECNO-FUS CONSOLIDER INGENIO.The two Spanish heats have the same production process and heat treatment. Both heats have a similar tensile behaviour similar to EUROFER97-2, but on the other hand impact properties are lower. The microstructure of AF1B reveals large biphasic inclusions that affecting its mechanical properties, especially the impact properties. AF2A casting was free of these inclusions. (Author) 24 refs.

  16. Thermally activated formation of martensite in Fe-C alloys and Fe-17%Cr-C stainless steels during heating from boiling nitrogen temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The thermally activated austenite-to-martensite transformation was investigated by magnetometry in three Fe-C alloys and in two 17%Cr stainless steels. After quenching to room temperature, samples were immersed in boiling nitrogen and martensite formation was followed during subsequent (re......)heating to room temperature. Different tests were performed applying heating rates from 0.5 K/min to 10 K/min. An additional test consisted in fast (re)heating the samples by immersion in water. Thermally activated martensite formation was demonstrated for all investigated materials by a heating rate......-dependent transformation curve. Moreover, magnetometry showed that the heating rate had an influence on the fraction of martensite formed during sub-zero Celsius treatment. The activation energy for thermally activated martensite formation was quantified in the range 11‒21 kJ/mol by a Kissinger-like method....

  17. Damage behavior in helium-irradiated reduced-activation martensitic steels at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Fengfeng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen, Jihong; Li, Tiecheng; Zheng, Zhongcheng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yao, Z. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen’s University, Kingston K7L 3N6, ON (Canada); Suo, Jinping [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Dislocation loops induced by helium irradiation at elevated temperatures in reduced-activation martensitic steels were investigated using transmission electron microscopy. Steels were irradiated with 100 keV helium ions to 0.8 dpa between 300 K and 723 K. At irradiation temperatures T{sub irr} ⩽ 573 K, small defects with both Burger vectors b = 1/2〈1 1 1〉 and b = 〈1 0 0〉 were observed, while at T{sub irr} ⩾ 623 K, the microstructure was dominated by large convoluted interstitial dislocation loops with b = 〈1 0 0〉. Only small cavities were found in the steels irradiated at 723 K.

  18. Microstructural evolution of reduced-activation martensitic steel under single and sequential ion irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Fengfeng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Jin, Shuoxue; Li, Tiecheng; Zheng, Zhongcheng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yang, Feng; Xiong, Xuesong; Suo, Jinping [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Microstructural evolution of super-clean reduced-activation martensitic steels irradiated with single-beam (Fe{sup +}) and sequential-beam (Fe{sup +} plus He{sup +}) at 350 °C and 550 °C was studied. Sequential-beam irradiation induced smaller size and larger number density of precipitates compared to single-beam irradiation at 350 °C. The largest size of cavities was observed after sequential-beam irradiation at 550 °C. The segregation of Cr and W and depletion of Fe in carbides were observed, and the maximum depletion of Fe and enrichment of Cr occurred under irradiation at 350 °C.

  19. Development of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steels and fabrication technologies for Indian test blanket module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, Baldev [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Jayakumar, T., E-mail: tjk@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2011-10-01

    For the development of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel (RAFMS), for the Indian Test Blanket Module for ITER, a 3-phase programme has been adopted. The first phase consists of melting and detailed characterization of a laboratory scale heat conforming to Eurofer 97 composition, to demonstrate the capability of the Indian industry for producing fusion grade steel. In the second phase which is currently in progress, the chemical composition will be optimized with respect to tungsten and tantalum for better combination of mechanical properties. Characterization of the optimized commercial scale India-specific RAFM steel will be carried out in the third phase. The first phase of the programme has been successfully completed and the tensile, impact and creep properties are comparable with Eurofer 97. Laser and electron beam welding parameters have been optimized and welding consumables were developed for Narrow Gap - Gas Tungsten Arc welding and for laser-hybrid welding.

  20. TIG of Reduced Activation Ferrite/Martensitic Steel for the Korean ITER-TBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, Duck Young; Ahn, Mu Young; Yu, In Keun; Cho, Seun Gyon; Oh, Seung Jin

    2010-01-01

    Test Blanket Modules (TBM) will be tested in ITER to verify the capability of tritium breeding and recovery and the extraction of thermal energy suitable for the production of electricity. A Helium Cooled Solid Breeder (HCSB) TBM has been developed in Korea to accomplish these goals. Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel has been chosen as the primary candidate structural material for Korean TBM. Due to the complexity of the First wall (FW) and Side wall (SW), it is necessary to develop various joining technologies, such as Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP), Electron Beam Welding (EBW) and Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding, for the successful fabrication of TBM. In this study, the mechanical properties of TIG welded RAFM steel were investigated. Various mechanical tests of TIG-welded RAFM steel were performed to obtain the optimized TIG welding process for RAFM steel

  1. TIG of Reduced Activation Ferrite/Martensitic Steel for the Korean ITER-TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, Duck Young; Ahn, Mu Young; Yu, In Keun; Cho, Seun Gyon [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seung Jin [KHNP, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Test Blanket Modules (TBM) will be tested in ITER to verify the capability of tritium breeding and recovery and the extraction of thermal energy suitable for the production of electricity. A Helium Cooled Solid Breeder (HCSB) TBM has been developed in Korea to accomplish these goals. Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel has been chosen as the primary candidate structural material for Korean TBM. Due to the complexity of the First wall (FW) and Side wall (SW), it is necessary to develop various joining technologies, such as Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP), Electron Beam Welding (EBW) and Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding, for the successful fabrication of TBM. In this study, the mechanical properties of TIG welded RAFM steel were investigated. Various mechanical tests of TIG-welded RAFM steel were performed to obtain the optimized TIG welding process for RAFM steel

  2. Technical issues of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fabrication of ITER test blanket modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigawa, H.; Hirose, T.; Shiba, K.; Kasada, R.; Wakai, E.; Serizawa, H.; Kawahito, Y.; Jitsukawa, S.; Kimura, A.; Kohno, Y.; Kohyama, A.; Katayama, S.; Mori, H.; Nishimoto, K.; Klueh, R.L.; Sokolov, M.A.; Stoller, R.E.; Zinkle, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs) are recognized as the primary candidate structural materials for fusion blanket systems. The RAFM F82H was developed in Japan with emphasis on high-temperature properties and weldability. Extensive irradiation studies have conducted on F82H, and it has the most extensive available database of irradiated and unirradiated properties of all RAFMs. The objective of this paper is to review the R and D status of F82H and to identify the key technical issues for the fabrication of an ITER test blanket module (TBM) suggested from the recent research achievements in Japan. This work clarified that the primary issues with F82H involve welding techniques and the mechanical properties of weld joints. This is the result of the distinctive nature of the joint caused by the phase transformation that occurs in the weld joint during cooling, and its impact on the design of a TBM will be discussed

  3. Thermo-mechanical fatigue behavior of reduced activation ferrite/martensite stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, C.; Rodrian, D.

    2002-01-01

    The thermo-mechanical cycling fatigue (TMCF) behavior of reduced activation ferrite/martensite stainless steels is examined. The test rig consists of a stiff load frame, which is directly heated by the digitally controlled ohmic heating device. Cylindrical specimens are used with a wall thickness of 0.4 mm. Variable strain rates are applied at TMCF test mode, due to the constant heating rate of 5.8 K/s and variable temperature changes. TMCF results of as received EUROFER 97 in the temperature range between 100 and 500-600 deg. C show a reduction in life time (a factor of 2) compared to F82H mod. and OPTIFER IV. TMCF-experiments with hold times of 100 and 1000 s show dramatic reduction in life time for all three materials

  4. Radiation effects on low cycle fatigue properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, T.; Tanigawa, H.; Ando, M.; Kohyama, A.; Katoh, Y.; Narui, M.

    2002-01-01

    The reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, RAFs F82H IEA heat has been fatigue-tested at ambient temperature under diametral strain controlled conditions. In order to evaluate the effects of radiation damage and transmutation damage on fatigue characteristics, post-neutron irradiation and post-helium ion implantation fatigue tests were carried out. Fracture surfaces and fatigue crack initiation on the specimen surface were observed by SEM. Low-temperature irradiation caused an increase in stress amplitude and a reduction in fatigue lifetime corresponding to radiation hardening and loss of ductility. Neutron irradiated samples showed brittle fracture surface, and it was significant for large strain tests. On the other hand, helium implantation caused delay of cyclic softening. However, brittle crack initiation and propagation did not depend on the helium concentration profiles

  5. Interfacial properties of HIP joint between beryllium and reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, T.; Ogiwara, H.; Enoeda, M.; Akiba, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: ITER test blanket module is the most important components to validate energy production and fuel breeding process for future demonstration reactor. Reduced activation ferritic / martensitic steel is recognized as a promising structural material for breeding blanket systems. And Beryllium must be used as plasma facing materials for ITER in vessel components. In this work, interfacial properties of beryllium/reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (RAF/Ms) joint were investigated for a first wall of ITER test blanket module (TBM). The starting materials were ITER grade Beryllium, S65C and a Japanese RAF/M, F82H. The joint was produced by solid state hot isostatic pressing (HIP) method. Chromium layer with the thickness of 1 μm and 10 μm were formed by plasma vapor deposition on the beryllium surface as a diffusion barrier. The HIP was carried out at 1023 K and 1233 K which are determined by standard normalizing and tempering temperature of F82H. The joint made at 1233 K was followed by tempering at 1033 K. The bonding interface was characterized by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The bonding strength was also investigated by isometric four point bending tests at ambient temperature. EPMA showed chromium layer effectively worked as a diffusion barrier at 1023 K. However, the beryllium rich layer was formed in F82H after HIP at 1233 K followed by tempering. Bending tests revealed that thin chromium layer and low temperature HIP is preferable. The high temperature HIP introduce brittle BeFe inter metallic compounds along bonding interface. On the other hand, joint with thick chromium layer suffer from brittleness of chromium itself. (authors)

  6. Interfacial properties of HIP joint between beryllium and reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, T. [Blanket Engineering Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Ogiwara, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Enoeda, M. [Naka Fusion Research Establishment, J.A.E.R.I., Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Akiba, M. [Naka Fusion Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: ITER test blanket module is the most important components to validate energy production and fuel breeding process for future demonstration reactor. Reduced activation ferritic / martensitic steel is recognized as a promising structural material for breeding blanket systems. And Beryllium must be used as plasma facing materials for ITER in vessel components. In this work, interfacial properties of beryllium/reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (RAF/Ms) joint were investigated for a first wall of ITER test blanket module (TBM). The starting materials were ITER grade Beryllium, S65C and a Japanese RAF/M, F82H. The joint was produced by solid state hot isostatic pressing (HIP) method. Chromium layer with the thickness of 1 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m were formed by plasma vapor deposition on the beryllium surface as a diffusion barrier. The HIP was carried out at 1023 K and 1233 K which are determined by standard normalizing and tempering temperature of F82H. The joint made at 1233 K was followed by tempering at 1033 K. The bonding interface was characterized by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The bonding strength was also investigated by isometric four point bending tests at ambient temperature. EPMA showed chromium layer effectively worked as a diffusion barrier at 1023 K. However, the beryllium rich layer was formed in F82H after HIP at 1233 K followed by tempering. Bending tests revealed that thin chromium layer and low temperature HIP is preferable. The high temperature HIP introduce brittle BeFe inter metallic compounds along bonding interface. On the other hand, joint with thick chromium layer suffer from brittleness of chromium itself. (authors)

  7. Effect of weld spacing on microstructure and mechanical properties of CLAM electron beam welding joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Yutao; Huang, Bo, E-mail: aufa0007@163.com; Zhang, Junyu; Zhang, Baoren; Liu, Shaojun; Huang, Qunying

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The welded joints of CLAM steel with different weld spacings have been fabricated with electron beam welding, and a simplified model of CLAM sheet was proposed. • The microstructure and mechanical properties such as microhardness, impact and tensile were investigated at different welding spacing for both conditions of as-welded and post weld heat treatment (PWHT). • The effect of the welding thermal cycle was significantly when the weld spacings were smaller than 4 mm. • When the weld spacing was small enough, the original microstructures would be fragmented with the high heat input. - Abstract: China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel has been chosen as the primary structural material in the designs of dual function lithium-lead (DFLL) blanket for fusion reactors, China helium cooled ceramic breeder (HCCB) test blanket module (TBM) for ITER and China fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR) blanket. The cooling components of the blankets are designed with high density cooling channels (HDCCs) to remove the high nuclear thermal effectively. Hence, the welding spacing among the channels are small. In this paper, the welded joints of CLAM steel with different weld spacings have been fabricated with electron beam welding (EBW). The weld spacing was designed to be 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm and 8 mm. The microstructure and mechanical properties such as microhardness, impact and tensile were investigated at different welding spacing for both conditions of as-welded and post weld heat treatment (PWHT). The PWHT is tempering at 740 °C for 120 min. The results showed that the grain size in the heat affected zone (HAZ) increased with the increasing weld spacing, and the joint with small weld spacing had a better performance after PWHT. This work would give useful guidance to improve the preparation of the cooling components of blanket.

  8. Development of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Y. B.; Choi, B. K.; Han, C. H.; Lee, D. W.; Cho, S.; Kim, T. K.; Jeong, Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    In the mid-1980s research programs for development of low activation materials began. This is based on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Guidelines (10CFR part 61) that were developed to reduce longlived radioactive isotopes, which allows nuclear reactor waste to be disposed of by shallow land burial when removed from service. Development of low activation materials is also key issue in nuclear fusion systems, as the structural components can became radioactive due to nuclear transmutation caused by exposure to high dose neutron irradiation. Reduced-activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steels have been developed in the leading countries in nuclear fusion technology, and are now being considered as candidate structural material for the test blanket module (TBM) in the international thermonuclear experiment reactor (ITER). South Korea joined the ITER program in 2003 and since then extensive effort has been made for developing the helium-cooled solid-breeder (HCSB) TBM which is scheduled to be tested in the ITER program. However, there has been no research activity to develop RAFM steels in South Korea, while all the participants in the ITER program have developed their own RAFM steels. It is recently that the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) started the Korean RAFM steel research program, aiming at an application for the HCSB-type TBM structure in ITER. In what follows, the current status of RAFM steels and the R and D program led by KAERI to develop Korean RAFM steels are summarized

  9. Calculating the Contribution of Zooxanthellae to Giant Clams Respiration Energy Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Ambariyanto

    2002-01-01

    Giant clams (Tridacnidae) are known to live in association with photosynthetic single cell dinoflagellate algae commonly called zooxanthellae. These algae which can be found in the mantle of the clams are capable of transferring part of their photosynthates which become an important source of energy to the host ( apart from filter feeding activity). In order to understand the basic biological processes of the giant clams , the contribution of zooxanthellae to the clam's energy requirement nee...

  10. Progress of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jitsukawa, S.; Kimura, A.; Kohyama, A.; Ukai, S.; Sawai, T.; Wakai, E.; Shiba, K.; Miwa, Y.; Furuya, K.; Tanigawa, H.; Ando, M.

    2005-01-01

    Recent accomplishment by the Japanese activity for the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (RAF/M) development has been reviewed. Some of the results obtained in EU and US by international collaborative activities are also introduced. Effect of irradiation on the shift of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) has been evaluated to a dose of 20dpa. Results suggest that RAF/M appears to satisfy the requirement on DBTT-shift for the blanket application in the dose range up to several tens of dpa. Also, enhancement effect of DBTT-shift by transmutation produced helium (He) atoms was revealed to be smaller than has been suggested previously. Preliminary studies about the effect of irradiation on fatigue mechanism, the susceptibility to environmentally assisted cracking in water and flow stress-strain relation have been conducted for the specimens irradiated to several dpa, including the post irradiation tensile property examination of the joints by Hot-isostatic press (HIP) bonding method. The results also indicate that RAF/Ms exhibit suitable properties for ITER test blanket module. (author)

  11. The microstructural stability and mechanical properties of two low activation martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria, M.; Marmy, P.; Batawi, E.; Peters, J.; Briguet, C.; Rezai-Aria, F.; Gavillet, D.

    1996-01-01

    A desirable feature of future magnetically confined fusion reactors is the prospect of producing low level radioactive waste. In order to minimize the volume of radioactive material, in particular from the first wall and blanket structures, reduced long term activation alloys are being developed. Here, a low activation composition of a martensitic 9% Cr steel has been studied, based on the DIN (Deutsches Inst. fuer Normung) 1.4914 composition (MANET) but replacing Ni, Mo and Nb by the low activation elements W, V and Ta. Two casts were produced from high purity components, in which the effects of controlled additions of Mn (0.58 and 0.055 wt. %) and N (7 and 290 wt. ppm) were studied, so that the final compositions resulted in one cast with high Mn and low N (steel A) and the other with the opposite conditions (steel B). The two steels were evaluated in terms of structural stability and mechanical properties under tensile, fatigue and fracture toughness tests. It has been found that both alloys have a DBTT below room temperature, which in the case of the steel A is 70 K below that of MANET. Although the tensile strength is somewhat below that of the parent steel, both steels have longer fatigue life

  12. Studies on A-TIG welding of Low Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (LAFM) steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasantharaja, P.; Vasudevan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Low Activation Ferritic–Martensitic steels (LAFM) are chosen as the candidate material for structural components in fusion reactors. The structural components are generally fabricated by welding processes. Activated Tungsten Inert Gas (A-TIG) welding is an emerging process for welding of thicker components. In the present work, attempt was made to develop A-TIG welding technology for LAFM steel plates of 10 mm thick. Activated flux was developed for LAFM steel by carrying out various bead-on-plate TIG welds without flux and with flux. The optimum flux was identified as one which gave maximum depth of penetration at minimum heat input values. With the optimized flux composition, LAFM steel plate of 10 mm thickness was welded in square butt weld joint configuration using double side welding technique. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy was used for characterizing the microstructures. Microhardness measurements were made across the weld cross section for as welded and post weld heat treated samples. Tensile and impact toughness properties were determined. The mechanical properties values obtained in A-TIG weld joint were comparable to that obtained in weld joints of LAFM steel made by Electron beam welding process.

  13. Studies on A-TIG welding of Low Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (LAFM) steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasantharaja, P.; Vasudevan, M.

    2012-02-01

    Low Activation Ferritic-Martensitic steels (LAFM) are chosen as the candidate material for structural components in fusion reactors. The structural components are generally fabricated by welding processes. Activated Tungsten Inert Gas (A-TIG) welding is an emerging process for welding of thicker components. In the present work, attempt was made to develop A-TIG welding technology for LAFM steel plates of 10 mm thick. Activated flux was developed for LAFM steel by carrying out various bead-on-plate TIG welds without flux and with flux. The optimum flux was identified as one which gave maximum depth of penetration at minimum heat input values. With the optimized flux composition, LAFM steel plate of 10 mm thickness was welded in square butt weld joint configuration using double side welding technique. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy was used for characterizing the microstructures. Microhardness measurements were made across the weld cross section for as welded and post weld heat treated samples. Tensile and impact toughness properties were determined. The mechanical properties values obtained in A-TIG weld joint were comparable to that obtained in weld joints of LAFM steel made by Electron beam welding process.

  14. Development of an extensive database of mechanical and physical properties for reduced-activation martensitic steel F82H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jitsukawa, S. E-mail: jitsukawa@ifmif.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Tamura, M.; Schaaf, B. van der; Klueh, R.L.; Alamo, A.; Petersen, C.; Schirra, M.; Spaetig, P.; Odette, G.R.; Tavassoli, A.A.; Shiba, K.; Kohyama, A.; Kimura, A

    2002-12-01

    Tensile, fracture toughness, creep and fatigue properties and microstructural studies of the reduced-activation martensitic steel F82H (8Cr-2W-0.04Ta-0.1C) before and after irradiation are reported. The design concept used for the development of this alloy is also introduced. A large number of collaborative test results including those generated under the International Energy Agency (IEA) implementing agreements are collected and are used to evaluate the feasibility of using reduced-activation martensitic steels for fusion reactor structural materials, with F82H as one of the reference alloys. All the specimens used in these tests were prepared from plates obtained from 5-ton heats of F82H supplied to all participating laboratories by JAERI. Many of the results have been entered into relational databases with emphasis on traceability of records on how the specimens were prepared from plates and ingots.

  15. Development of an extensive database of mechanical and physical properties for reduced-activation martensitic steel F82H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jitsukawa, S.; Tamura, M.; Schaaf, B. van der; Klueh, R.L.; Alamo, A.; Petersen, C.; Schirra, M.; Spaetig, P.; Odette, G.R.; Tavassoli, A.A.; Shiba, K.; Kohyama, A.; Kimura, A.

    2002-01-01

    Tensile, fracture toughness, creep and fatigue properties and microstructural studies of the reduced-activation martensitic steel F82H (8Cr-2W-0.04Ta-0.1C) before and after irradiation are reported. The design concept used for the development of this alloy is also introduced. A large number of collaborative test results including those generated under the International Energy Agency (IEA) implementing agreements are collected and are used to evaluate the feasibility of using reduced-activation martensitic steels for fusion reactor structural materials, with F82H as one of the reference alloys. All the specimens used in these tests were prepared from plates obtained from 5-ton heats of F82H supplied to all participating laboratories by JAERI. Many of the results have been entered into relational databases with emphasis on traceability of records on how the specimens were prepared from plates and ingots

  16. Influence of traps on the deuterium behaviour in the low activation martensitic steels F82H and Batman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra, E.

    1997-01-01

    A time dependent permeation method is used to measure the permeability, diffusivity and solubility of deuterium in the low activation martensitic steels F82H and Batman. The measurements cover the temperature range from 373 to 743 K which includes the onset of deuterium trapping effects on diffusivity and solubility. The results are interpreted using a trapping model. The number of trap sites and their average energies for deuterium in F82H and Batman steels are determined. (orig.)

  17. Influence of traps on the deuterium behaviour in the low activation martensitic steels F82H and Batman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, E.; Perujo, A.; Benamati, G.

    1997-06-01

    A time dependent permeation method is used to measure the permeability, diffusivity and solubility of deuterium in the low activation martensitic steels F82H and Batman. The measurements cover the temperature range from 373 to 743 K which includes the onset of deuterium trapping effects on diffusivity and solubility. The results are interpreted using a trapping model. The number of trap sites and their average energies for deuterium in F82H and Batman steels are determined.

  18. Thermal and mechanical behaviour of the reduced-activation-ferritic-martensitic steel EUROFER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindau, R.; Moeslang, A.; Schirra, M.

    2002-01-01

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are being considered for structural application in potential fusion energy systems. Based on the substantial experience with RAFM developmental steels of OPTIFER type, an industrial 3.5 tons batch of a 9CrWVTa-RAFM steel, called EUROFER 97 had been specified and ordered. A characterisation programme has been launched to determine the relevant mechanical and physical-metallurgical properties in order to qualify the steel for fusion application. The hardening, tempering and transformation behaviour of EUROFER is in good agreement with that of other RAFM-steels like OPTIFER and the Japanese industrial scale heat F82H mod. Tensile tests, performed between RT and 750 deg. C, show comparable strength and ductility values that are not strongly affected by different heat treatments and ageing at 580 and 600 deg. C up to 3300 h. Impact bending tests indicate a superior ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of EUROFER in the as-received condition compared with that of F82H mod. Creep tests between 450 and 650 deg. C up to test times of 15000 h reveal a creep strength similar to other RAFM steels like OPTIFER and F82H mod. EUROFER shows a good low-cycle fatigue behaviour with longer lifetimes than F82H mod. The deformation and softening behaviour is similar

  19. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sam, Shiju, E-mail: shiju@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India); Das, C.R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  20. Fatigue life assessment based on crack growth behavior in reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogami, Shuhei; Sato, Yuki; Hasegawa, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Crack growth behavior under low cycle fatigue in reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H IEA-heat (Fe-8Cr-2W-0.2V-0.02Ta), was investigated to improve the fatigue life assessment method of fusion reactor structural material. Low cycle fatigue test was carried out at room temperature in air at a total strain range of 0.4-1.5% using an hourglass-type miniature fatigue specimen. The relationship between the surface crack length and life fraction was described using one equation independent of the total strain range. Therefore, the fatigue life and residual life could be estimated using the surface crack length. Moreover, the microcrack initiation life could be estimated using the total strain range if there was a one-to-one correspondence between the total strain range and number of cycles to failure. The crack growth rate could be estimated using the total strain range and surface crack length by introducing the concept of the normalized crack growth rate. (author)

  1. Optimum alloy compositions in reduced-activation martensitic 9Cr steels for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, F.; Noda, T.; Okada, M.

    1992-01-01

    In order to obtain potential reduced-activation ferritic steels suitable for fusion reactor structures, the effect of alloying elements W and V on the microstructural evolution, toughness, high-temperature creep and irradiation hardening behavior was investigated for simple 9Cr-W and 9Cr-V steels. The creep strength of the 9Cr-W steels increased but their toughness decreased with increasing W concentration. The 9Cr-V steels exhibited poor creep rupture strength, far below that of a conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb steel and poor toughness after aging at 873 K. It was also found that the Δ-ferrite should be avoided, because it degraded both the roughness and high-temperature creep strength. Based on the results on the simple steels, optimized martensitic 9Cr steels were alloy-designed from a standpoint of enough thoughness and high-temperature creep strength. Two kinds of optimized 9Cr steels with low and high levels of W were obtained; 9Cr-1WVTa and 9Cr-3WVTa. These steels indeed exhibited excellent toughness and creep strength, respectively. The 9Cr-1WVTa steel exhibiting an excellent roughness was shown to be the most promising for relatively low-temperature application below 500deg C, where irradiation embrittlement is significant. The 9Cr-3WVTa steel was the most promising for high temperature application above 500deg C from the standpoint of enough high-temperature strength. (orig.)

  2. Multiscale simulation of yield strength in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chen Chong; Zhang, Chi; Yang, Zhigang [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Zhao, Ji Jun [State Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Electron, and Ion Beams, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology and College of Advanced Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China)

    2017-04-15

    One of the important requirements for the application of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel is to retain proper mechanical properties under irradiation and high-temperature conditions. To simulate the yield strength and stress-strain curve of steels during high-temperature and irradiation conditions, a multiscale simulation method consisting of both microstructure and strengthening simulations was established. The simulation results of microstructure parameters were added to a superposition strengthening model, which consisted of constitutive models of different strengthening methods. Based on the simulation results, the strength contribution for different strengthening methods at both room temperature and high-temperature conditions was analyzed. The simulation results of the yield strength in irradiation and high-temperature conditions were mainly consistent with the experimental results. The optimal application field of this multiscale model was 9Cr series (7–9 wt.%Cr) RAFM steels in a condition characterized by 0.1–5 dpa (or 0 dpa) and a temperature range of 25–500°C.

  3. Evaluation of mechanical properties of weldments for reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, T. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineeering, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan); Tanigawa, H.; Ando, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Komazaki, S.; Kohno, Y. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are the first candidate material for fusion reactor, and will be used as the structural materials of ITER test blanket modules (TBM). TBM will be assembled by welding various parts, it is important to be clearly mechanical properties of weldments to qualify TBM structure. In this paper, unirradiated mechanical properties of weldments, which is consisted of weld metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal region, obtained from TIG and EB welded F82H IEA-heat were evaluated by tensile, Charpy impact and creep test. Charpy impact test revealed that impact properties of weld metal does not deteriorate compared with that of base metal. The creep tests were carried out at temperatures of 773-873 K and at stress levels of 130-280 MPa, with the specimens which include weld metal and HAZ region in the gage section. In these conditions, rupture time of weldments yield to about 100-1000 hours. In the high-stress range, creep lives of welded joint decreased about 40% of base metal. However, in the low-stress range, creep lives of welded joint decrease about 60 to 70% of base metal. The failure at fine grain HAZ region (Type IV failure) does not occur in these conditions. The mechanism of these properties deterioration will be discussed based on the detailed analyses on microstructure changes. (authors)

  4. Effect of helium on fatigue crack growth and life of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogami, Shuhei; Takahashi, Manabu; Hasegawa, Akira; Yamazaki, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    The effects of helium on the fatigue life, micro-crack growth behavior up to final fatigue failure, and fracture mode under fatigue in the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H IEA-heat, were investigated by low cycle fatigue tests at room temperature in air at a total strain range of 0.6–1.5%. Significant reduction of the fatigue life due to helium implantation was observed for a total strain range of 1.0–1.5%, which might be attributable to an increase in the micro-crack propagation rate. However, the reduction of fatigue life due to helium implantation was not significant for a total strain range of 0.6–0.8%. A brittle fracture surface (an original point of micro-crack initiation) and a cleavage fracture surface were observed in the helium-implanted region of fracture surface. A striation pattern was observed in the non-implanted region. These fracture modes of the helium-implanted specimen were independent of the strain range

  5. A study of the prospects for development of low-activation martensitic stainless steels for first-wall and blanket structures in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tupholme, K.W.; Orr, J.; Dulieu, D.; Butterworth, G.J.

    1986-04-01

    This study examines the potential of the elemental substitution approach to the design of low-activity martensitic stainless steels, subject to the requirement that the contact γ dose rate falls to a value that would allow essentially unrestricted handling of discarded material after a cooling period of 100 years. The factors governing the structure and properties of the 9-12%Cr martensitic steels are reviewed. Practicable substitutes for the proscribed elements molybdenum, nickel and niobium include tungsten, tantalum and an increased vanadium content in conjunction with optimised carbon, nitrogen and boron levels. Given the generally attractive combination of properties offered by the martensitic steels, the prospects for developing a satisfactory low-activity composition appear favourable. A series of experimental compositions and a programme of investigations are proposed to explore possible alloys with the objective of reproducing, as far as possible, the characteristics of existing fully martensitic high strength stainless steels. (author)

  6. Technical issues of fabrication technologies of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Sakasegawa, Hideo; Hirose, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The key technical issues of RAFM steel fabrication are the control of Ta, and deoxidation of the steel with a limited amount of Al addition. • Addition of Ta with poor deoxidation might results in the agglomeration of inclusions at 1/2t position. • ESR was proved to be effective removing Ta oxide inclusions and avoiding agglomeration of inclusions at 1/2t position, and achieving low oxygen concentration. -- Abstract: The key issue for DEMO application is that Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels fabrication technologies has to be highly assured, especially with respect to high availability, reliability and reduced activation capability on the DEMO level fabrication, which requires not a few tons but thousand tons RAFM fabrication. One of the key technical issues of RAFM fabrication is the control of Ta, and deoxidation of the steel with a limited amount of Al addition. The series of F82H (Fe–8Cr–2W–V, Ta) melting revealed that Ta have tendency to form oxide on melting process, and this will have large impact on reliability of the steels. Al is also the key elements, as it is commonly used for deoxidation of steels, and achieving lower oxygen level is essential to obtain good mechanical properties, but the maximum concentration of Al is limited in view of reduced activation capability. These tendency and limitation resulted in the Ta oxide agglomeration in the middle of plate, but the remelting process, ESR (electro slag remelting), was found to be successful on removing those Ta oxides

  7. Effect of microstructural evolution by isothermal aging on the mechanical properties of 9Cr-1WVTa reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min-Gu [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Hoon, E-mail: lee1626@kims.re.kr [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Joonoh; Park, Jun Young; Lee, Tae-Ho [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Namhyun [Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Chan Kim, Hyoung [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The influence of microstructural changes caused by aging condition on tensile and Charpy impact properties was investigated for reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) 9Cr-1WVTa steels having single martensite and a mixed microstructure of martensite and ferrite. For the mixed microstructure of martensite and ferrite, the Charpy impact properties deteriorated in both as-normalized and tempered conditions due to the ferrite and the accompanying M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides at the ferrite grain boundaries which act as path and initiation sites for cleavage cracks, respectively. However, aging at 550 °C for 20–100 h recovered gradually the Charpy impact toughness without any distinct drop in strength, as a result of the spheroidization of the coarse M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides at the ferrite grain boundaries, which makes crack initiation more difficult.

  8. Materials design data for reduced activation martensitic steel type F82H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassoli, A.-A.F. E-mail: tavassoli@cea.fr; Rensman, J.-W.; Schirra, M.; Shiba, K

    2002-11-01

    This paper presents materials data for design of ITER test blanket modules with the reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel type F82H as structural material. From the physical properties databases, variations of modulus of elasticity, density, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, mean and instantaneous linear coefficients of thermal expansion versus temperature are derived. Also reported are Poisson's ratio and magnetic properties. From the tension test results, nominal and minimum stress values of S{sub y} and S{sub u} are derived and used for calculation of allowable primary membrane stress intensity S{sub m}. Likewise, uniform and total elongations, as well as reduction of area data, are used for calculation of minimum and true ductility at rupture values. From the instrumented Charpy impact and fracture toughness test data, ductile to brittle transition temperature, toughness and behavior of material in different fracture modes are evaluated. The effect of specimen size and geometry are discussed but preference is given to standard size specimens. From the fatigue data, total strain range versus number of cycles to failure curves are plotted and used to derive fatigue design curves, using a reduction factor of 2 on strain and a reduction factor of 20 on number of cycles to failure. Cyclic hardening curves are also derived and compared with monotonic hardening curves. From the creep data, time dependent allowable stresses S{sub r} and S{sub t} are calculated. Combination of tension and creep results are used to deduce S{sub mt} and isochronus curves. Finally, irradiated and aged materials data are compared to insure that the safety margins incorporated in unirradiated design limits are not exceeded.

  9. Hardening and embrittlement mechanisms of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated at 573 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge Noational Laboratory, TN (United States); Hashimoto, N. [Hokkaido Univ., Materials Science and Engineering Div., Graduate School of Engineering, Sapporo (Japan); Sokolov, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Div., TN (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: It has been reported that reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs), such as F82H, ORNL9Cr-2WVTa, and JLF-1, showed a variety of changes in ductile-brittle transition temperature and yield stress after irradiation at 573 K up to 5 dpa, and those differences could not be interpreted solely by the difference of dislocation microstructure induced by irradiation. To investigate the impact of other microstructural feature, i.e. precipitates, the precipitation behavior of F82H, ORNL 9Cr-2WVTa, and JLF-1 was examined. It was revealed that irradiation-induced precipitation and amorphization of precipitates partly occurred and caused the different precipitation on block, packet and prior austenitic grain boundaries. In addition to these phenomena, irradiation-induced nano-size precipitates were also observed in the matrix. It was also revealed that the chemical compositions of precipitates approached the calculated thermal equilibrium state of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} at an irradiation temperature of 573 K. The calculation also suggests the presence of Laves phase at 573 K, which is usually not observed at this temperature, but the ion irradiation on aged F82H with Laves phase suggests that Laves phase becomes amorphous and could not be stable under irradiation at 573 K. This observation indicates the possibility that the irradiation-induced nano-size precipitation could be the consequence of the conflict between precipitation and amorphization of Laves phase. Over all, these observations suggests that the variety of embrittlement and hardening of RAFMs observed at 573 K irradiation up to 5 dpa might be the consequence of the transition phenomena that occur as the microstructure approaches thermal equilibrium during irradiation at 573 K. (authors)

  10. Material science and manufacturing of heat-resistant reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioltukhovskiy, A.G.; Blokhin, A.I.; Budylkin, N.I.; Chernov, V.M.; Leont'eva-Smirnova, M.V.; Mironova, E.G.; Medvedeva, E.A.; Solonin, M.I.; Porollo, S.I.; Zavyalsky, L.P.

    2000-01-01

    A number of issues regarding the development and use of 10-12% Cr reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels (RAFMS) for fusion are considered. These include: (1) problems of manufacturing and modifying their composition and metallurgical condition; (2) the influence on properties of their composition, purity, δ-ferrite concentration and cooling rates in the final stages of manufacturing; and (3) the effects of neutron irradiation at 320-650 deg. C up to 108 dpa on their mechanical properties. In addition, neutron activation and nuclear accumulation of elements in RAFMS with different initial concentrations of alloying and impurity elements for typical fusion reactor (DEMO) irradiation regimes have been calculated

  11. Fractographic examination of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel charpy specimens irradiated to 30 dpa at 370{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Schubert, L.E. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Fractographic examinations are reported for a series of reduced activation ferritic/Martensitic steel Charpy impact specimens tested following irradiation to 30 dpa at 370{degrees}C in FFTF. One-third size specimens of six low activation steels developed for potential application as structural materials in fusion reactors were examined. A shift in brittle fracture appearance from cleavage to grain boundary failure was noted with increasing manganese content. The results are interpreted in light of transmutation induced composition changes in a fusion environment.

  12. Overview on the welding technologies of CLAM steel and the DFLL TBM fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dual Functional Lithium Lead (DFLL blanket was proposed for its advantages of high energy exchange efficiency and on-line tritium extraction, and it was selected as the candidate test blanket module (TBM for China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR and the blanket for Fusion Design Study (FDS series fusion reactors. Considering the influence of high energy fusion neutron irradiation and high heat flux thermal load on the blanket, China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM steel was selected as the structural material for DFLL blanket. The structure of the blanket and the cooling internal components were pretty complicated. Meanwhile, high precision and reliability were required in the blanket fabrication. Therefore, several welding techniques, such as hot isostatic pressing diffusion bonding, tungsten inner gas welding, electron beam welding and laser beam welding were developed for the fabrication of cooling internals and the assembly of the blanket. In this work, the weldability on CLAM steel by different welding methods and the properties of as-welded and post-weld heat-treated joints were investigated. Meanwhile, the welding schemes and the assembly strategy for TBM fabrication were raised. Many tests and research efforts on scheme feasibility, process standardization, component qualification and blanket assembly were reviewed.

  13. Phase transformation and impact properties in the experimentally simulated weld heat-affected zone of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joonoh, E-mail: mjo99@kims.re.kr [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Min-Ho [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-ku, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Min-Gu [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Material Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, 30 Jangjeon-Dong, Geumjeong-gu, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Heung Nam [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    In this work, the phase transformation and impact properties in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel are investigated. The HAZs were experimentally simulated using a Gleeble simulator. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite through normalizing at 1000 °C and tempering at 750 °C, while the HAZs consisted of martensite, δ-ferrite and a small volume of autotempered martensite. The impact properties using a Charpy V-notch impact test revealed that the HAZs showed poor impact properties due to the formation of martensite and δ-ferrite as compared with the base steel. In addition, the impact properties of the HAZs further deteriorated with an increase in the δ-ferrite fraction caused by increasing the peak temperature. The impact properties of the HAZs could be improved through the formation of tempered martensite after post weld heat treatment (PWHT), but they remained lower than that of the base steel because the δ-ferrite remained in the tempered HAZs.

  14. Metallurgical Characterization of Reduced Activation Martensitic Steel F-82H Modified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Lancha, A.M.; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Schirra, M.

    1999-12-01

    During 1995-1998 within of research and development programs on reduced ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion, metallurgical characterization of 8Cr-2WVTa steel, denominated F-28H modified, have been carried out. The work has focused on studying the microstructural and mechanical (tensile, creep, low cycle fatigue and charpy) characteristics of as-received state and aged material in the temperature range 300 degree centigrade to 600 degree centigrade for periods up to 5000 h. (Author) 45 refs

  15. Convoluted dislocation loops induced by helium irradiation in reduced-activation martensitic steel and their impact on mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Fengfeng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yao, Z. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Suo, Jinping [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wen, Yongming [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Helium irradiation induced dislocation loops in reduced-activation martensitic steels were investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The specimens were irradiated with 100 keV helium ions to 0.8 dpa at 350 °C. Unexpectedly, very large dislocation loops were found, significantly larger than that induced by other types of irradiations under the same dose. Moreover, the large loops were convoluted and formed interesting flower-like shape. The large loops were determined as interstitial type. Loops with the Burgers vectors of b=〈100〉 were only observed. Furthermore, irradiation induced hardening caused by these large loops was observed using the nano-indentation technique.

  16. Effects of irradiation on low cycle fatigue properties for reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.W.; Tanigawa, H.; Hirose, T.; Kohyama, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In materials life decision for a commercial blanket, thermal fatigue property of materials is a particularly important. The loading of structural materials in fusion reactor is, besides the plasma surface interactions, a combined effect of high heat fluxes and neutron irradiation. Depending on the pulse lengths, the operating conditions, and the thermal conductivity, these oscillating temperature gradients will cause elastic and elastic-plastic cyclic deformation giving rise to (creep-) fatigue in structural first wall and blanket components. Especially, investigation of the fatigue property in Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAF/M) steel and establishment of the evaluation technology are demanded in particular immediately for design/manufacturing of ITER-TBM. And also, fatigue testing after irradiation will be carried out in hot cells with remote control system. Considering limited ability of specimen manipulation in the cells, the specimen and the test method need to be simple for operation. The existing data bases of RAF/M steel provide baseline data set including post-irradiation fatigue data. However, to perform the accurate fatigue lifetime assessment for ITER-TBM and beyond utilizing the existing data base, the mechanical understanding of fatigue fracture is mandatory. It has been previously reported by co-authors that dislocation cell structure was developed on low cycle fatigued RAF/M steel, and led the fatigue crack to develop along prior austenitic grain boundary. In this work, the effects of nuclear irradiation on low cycle fatigue properties for RAF/M steels and its fracture mechanisms were examined based on the flow stress analysis and detailed microstructure analysis. Fracture surfaces and crack initiation site were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was also applied to clarify the microstructural features of fatigue behavior. It is also important to

  17. Stress Corrosion cracking susceptibility of reduced-activation martensitic steel F82H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miwa, Y. [Nuclear Energy and Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Jitsukawa, S.; Tsukada, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: For fusion power source in near future, supercritical water-cooled type blanket system was planned in Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The blankest system was designed by the present knowledge base and a reasonable extrapolation in material and design technology. Reduced-activation martensitic steel, F82H, is one of the blanket system structural materials. Therefore durability of the F82H for corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is one of the concerns for this water-cooling concept of the blanket system. In this paper, SCC susceptibility of F82H was studied after heat treatments simulating post weld heat treatment (PWHT) or neutron-irradiation at 493 K to a dose level of 2.2 dpa. In order to evaluate SCC susceptibility of F82H, slow strain rate testing (SSRT) in high-purity, circulating water was conducted at 513-603 K in an autoclave. The strain rate was 1.0- 2.0x10{sup -7} s{sup -1}. Concentration of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen of the circulating water was controlled by bubbling with these gases. Specimens were heat treated after normalization at 1313 K for 40 min and water quenching. Some of the specimens were tempered at 873-1073 K for 1 h. Since the temperature control during PWHT in vacuum vessel by remote handling will be difficult, it is expected the tempering temperature will be different at place to place. Some specimens after tempering at 1033 K for 1 h were irradiated at 493 K to 2.2 dpa in Japan Research Reactor No.3 at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The SSRT results showed the as-normalized specimens failed by IGSCC in oxygenated temperature water at 573 K. SSRT results of specimens with other tempering temperature conditions will be presented at conference. In irradiated specimen, IGSCC did not occur in oxygenated water at 5113-603 K. IGSCC also did not occur in hydrogenated water at 573 K. However TGSCC occurred in the irradiated specimen with a round notch (radius= {approx}0.2 mm) in oxygenated water at 573 K

  18. Effects of irradiation on low cycle fatigue properties for reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.W. [Kyoto Univ., Graduate School of Energy Science (Japan); Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Hirose, T. [Blanket Engineering Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Kohyama, A. [Kyoto Univ., lnstitute of Advanced Energy (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In materials life decision for a commercial blanket, thermal fatigue property of materials is a particularly important. The loading of structural materials in fusion reactor is, besides the plasma surface interactions, a combined effect of high heat fluxes and neutron irradiation. Depending on the pulse lengths, the operating conditions, and the thermal conductivity, these oscillating temperature gradients will cause elastic and elastic-plastic cyclic deformation giving rise to (creep-) fatigue in structural first wall and blanket components. Especially, investigation of the fatigue property in Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAF/M) steel and establishment of the evaluation technology are demanded in particular immediately for design/manufacturing of ITER-TBM. And also, fatigue testing after irradiation will be carried out in hot cells with remote control system. Considering limited ability of specimen manipulation in the cells, the specimen and the test method need to be simple for operation. The existing data bases of RAF/M steel provide baseline data set including post-irradiation fatigue data. However, to perform the accurate fatigue lifetime assessment for ITER-TBM and beyond utilizing the existing data base, the mechanical understanding of fatigue fracture is mandatory. It has been previously reported by co-authors that dislocation cell structure was developed on low cycle fatigued RAF/M steel, and led the fatigue crack to develop along prior austenitic grain boundary. In this work, the effects of nuclear irradiation on low cycle fatigue properties for RAF/M steels and its fracture mechanisms were examined based on the flow stress analysis and detailed microstructure analysis. Fracture surfaces and crack initiation site were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was also applied to clarify the microstructural features of fatigue behavior. It is also important to

  19. Recent status and improvement of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, L., E-mail: tanl@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Katoh, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Tavassoli, A.-A.F.; Henry, J. [DMN/Dir, DEN, CEA Saclay, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Rieth, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, 76021 (Germany); Sakasegawa, H. [National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Rokkasho, Aomori, 039-3212 (Japan); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Tanigawa, H. [National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Rokkasho, Aomori, 039-3212 (Japan); Huang, Q. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels, candidate structural materials for fusion reactors, have achieved technological maturity after about three decades of research and development. The recent status of a few developmental aspects of current RAFM steels, such as aging resistance, plate thickness effects, fracture toughness, and fatigue, is updated in this paper, together with ongoing efforts to develop next-generation RAFM steels for superior high-temperature performance. In addition to thermomechanical treatments, including nonstandard heat treatment, alloy chemistry refinements and modifications have demonstrated some improvements in high-temperature performance. Castable nanostructured alloys (CNAs) were developed by significantly increasing the amount of nanoscale MX (M = V/Ta/Ti, X = C/N) precipitates and reducing coarse M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (M = Cr). Preliminary results showed promising improvement in creep resistance and Charpy impact toughness. Limited low-dose neutron irradiation results for one of the CNAs and China low activation martensitic are presented and compared with data for F82H and Eurofer97 irradiated up to ∼70 displacements per atom at ∼300–325 °C.

  20. Development of next generation tempered and ODS reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkle, S. J.; Boutard, J. L.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Kimura, A.; Lindau, R.; Odette, G. R.; Rieth, M.; Tan, L.; Tanigawa, H.

    2017-09-01

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are currently the most technologically mature option for the structural material of proposed fusion energy reactors. Advanced next-generation higher performance steels offer the opportunity for improvements in fusion reactor operational lifetime and reliability, superior neutron radiation damage resistance, higher thermodynamic efficiency, and reduced construction costs. The two main strategies for developing improved steels for fusion energy applications are based on (1) an evolutionary pathway using computational thermodynamics modelling and modified thermomechanical treatments (TMT) to produce higher performance reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels and (2) a higher risk, potentially higher payoff approach based on powder metallurgy techniques to produce very high strength oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels capable of operation to very high temperatures and with potentially very high resistance to fusion neutron-induced property degradation. The current development status of these next-generation high performance steels is summarized, and research and development challenges for the successful development of these materials are outlined. Material properties including temperature-dependent uniaxial yield strengths, tensile elongations, high-temperature thermal creep, Charpy impact ductile to brittle transient temperature (DBTT) and fracture toughness behaviour, and neutron irradiation-induced low-temperature hardening and embrittlement and intermediate-temperature volumetric void swelling (including effects associated with fusion-relevant helium and hydrogen generation) are described for research heats of the new steels.

  1. Fracture toughness and fracture behavior of CLAM steel in the temperature range of 450 °C-550 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanyun; Liang, Mengtian; Zhang, Zhenyu; Jiang, Man; Liu, Shaojun

    2018-04-01

    In order to analyze the fracture toughness and fracture behavior (J-R curves) of China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel under the design service temperature of Test Blanket Module of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, the quasi-static fracture experiment of CLAM steel was carried out under the temperature range of 450 °C-550 °C. The results indicated that the fracture behavior of CLAM steel was greatly influenced by test temperature. The fracture toughness increased slightly as the temperature increased from 450 °C to 500 °C. In the meanwhile, the fracture toughness at 550 °C could not be obtained due to the plastic deformation near the crack tip zone. The microstructure analysis based on the fracture topography and the interaction between dislocations and lath boundaries showed two different sub-crack propagation modes: growth along 45° of the main crack direction at 450 °C and growth perpendicular to the main crack at 500 °C.

  2. Effect of thermal aging on grain structural characteristic and Ductile-to-Brittle transition temperature of CLAM steel at 550 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Chen, Jianwei [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Xu, Gang, E-mail: gang.xu@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The grain boundary length per unit area decreased with the increasing aging time. • The fraction of LABs increased obviously after thermal aging. • Prior austenitic grain refinement is more important to improve low temperature toughness. - Abstract: In this work, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to investigate the grain structure evolution of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel samples which were aged at 550 °C for 0 h, 2000 h, 4000 h and 10,000 h. The results showed that the prior austenitic grain size increased with the aging time, which led to the decrease of grain boundary length. The fraction of misorientation angle in a range from about 4 to 10° increased obviously after thermal aging for 10,000 h, and it indicated that the fine subgrains formed in the CLAM steel during the long-term thermal exposure. Furthermore, Charpy impact experiments were carried out to analyze the toughness of the CLAM steel before and after aging, particularly the Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Temperature (DBTT). Though amounts of fine subgrians formed in matrix, a substantial increase in DBTT (∼40.1 °C) had been noticed after aging for 10,000 h. The results showed that the high angle boundaries such as prior austenitic grain boundaries are more effective in retarding the propagation of cleavage crack than subgrain boundaries.

  3. Creep strength of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel Eurofer'97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lancha, A.M.; Lapena, J.; Lindau, R.; Rieth, M.; Schirra, M.

    2005-01-01

    Creep rupture strength of tempered martensitic steel Eurofer'97 has been investigated. Different products form (plate and bar) have been tested in the temperature range from 450 deg. C to 650 deg. C at different loads. No significant differences in the creep rupture properties have been found between the studied product forms. The Eurofer'97 has shown adequate creep rupture strength levels at short creep rupture tests, similar to those of the F-82 H mod. steel. However, for long testing times (>9000 h) the results available up to now at 500 deg. C and 550 deg. C seem to indicate a change in the creep degradation mechanism

  4. Comments on the interpretation of differential scanning calorimetry results for thermoelastic martensitic transformations: Athermal versus thermally activated kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, A.; Lipe, T.

    1996-01-01

    In a previous article Van Humbeeck and Planes have made a number of criticisms of the authors' recent paper concerning the interpretation of the results obtained by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) from the Martensitic Transformation of Cu-Al-Ni-Mn-B alloys. Although the martensitic transformation of these shape memory alloys is generally classified as athermal, it has been confirmed that the capacity of the alloys to undergo a more complete thermoelastic transformation (i.e. better reversibility of the transformation) increased with the Mn content. This behavior has been explained by interpreting the DSC results obtained during thermal cycling in terms of a thermally activated mechanism controlling the direct and reverse transformations. When the heating rate increases during the reverse transformation the DSC curves shift towards higher temperatures while they shift towards the lower temperatures when the cooling rate was increased during the direct transformation. Since the starting transformation temperatures (As, Ms) do not shift, Van Humbeeck and Planes state that there is no real peak shift and assume that the DCS experiments were carried out without taking into account the thermal lag effect between sample and cell. On the following line they deduce a time constant, τ, of 60 seconds because the peak maximum shifts. In fact the assumption made by Van Humbeeck and Planes is false

  5. Mechanical properties of 9Cr–1W reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel weldment prepared by electron beam welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, C.R., E-mail: chitta@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Albert, S.K. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Sam, Shiju [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India); Mastanaiah, P. [Defense Research and Development Laboratory, Hyderabad (India); Chaitanya, G.M.S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Murthy, C.V.S. [Defense Research and Development Laboratory, Hyderabad (India); Kumar, E. Rajendra [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Width of HAZ is smaller in the 9Cr–1W RAFM weldment prepared by EB process compared to that reported for TIG weldments in literature. • Weld joint is stronger than that of the base metal. • Toughness of weld metal prepared by EB welding process is comparable to that (in PWHT condition) prepared by TIG process. • DBTT of as-welded 9Cr–1W RAFM weldment prepared by EB process is comparable to that reported for TIG weld metal in PWHT condition. - Abstract: Microstructure and mechanical properties of the weldments prepared from 9Cr–1W reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel using electron beam welding (EBW) process were studied. Microstructure consists of tempered lath martensite where precipitates decorating the boundaries in post weld heat treated (PWHT) condition. Lath and precipitate sizes were found to be finer in the weld metal than in base metal. Accordingly, hardness of the weld metal was found to be higher than the base metal. Tensile strength of the cross weldment specimen was 684 MPa, which was comparable with the base metal tensile strength of 670 MPa. On the other hand, DBTT of 9Cr–1W weld metal in as-welded condition is similar to that reported for TIG weld metal in PWHT condition.

  6. Mechanical properties of 9Cr–1W reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel weldment prepared by electron beam welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, C.R.; Albert, S.K.; Sam, Shiju; Mastanaiah, P.; Chaitanya, G.M.S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Murthy, C.V.S.; Kumar, E. Rajendra

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Width of HAZ is smaller in the 9Cr–1W RAFM weldment prepared by EB process compared to that reported for TIG weldments in literature. • Weld joint is stronger than that of the base metal. • Toughness of weld metal prepared by EB welding process is comparable to that (in PWHT condition) prepared by TIG process. • DBTT of as-welded 9Cr–1W RAFM weldment prepared by EB process is comparable to that reported for TIG weld metal in PWHT condition. - Abstract: Microstructure and mechanical properties of the weldments prepared from 9Cr–1W reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel using electron beam welding (EBW) process were studied. Microstructure consists of tempered lath martensite where precipitates decorating the boundaries in post weld heat treated (PWHT) condition. Lath and precipitate sizes were found to be finer in the weld metal than in base metal. Accordingly, hardness of the weld metal was found to be higher than the base metal. Tensile strength of the cross weldment specimen was 684 MPa, which was comparable with the base metal tensile strength of 670 MPa. On the other hand, DBTT of 9Cr–1W weld metal in as-welded condition is similar to that reported for TIG weld metal in PWHT condition

  7. Microstructure and mechanical properties in the weld heat affected zone of 9Cr-2W-VTa reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Changhoon; Lee, Taeho; Jang, Minho; Park, Mingu [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Chan [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel demonstrated excellent resistance to the neutron irradiation and mechanical properties. The investigation of weldability in company with the development of RAFM steel is essential for construction of the fusion reactor. Generally, the superior mechanical properties of the RAFM steel can be upset during welding process due to microstructural change by rapid heating and cooling in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ). The phase transformation and mechanical properties in the weld HAZ of RAFM steel were investigated. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite and two carbides. During rapid welding thermal cycle, the microstructure of the base steel was transformed into martensite and δ-ferrite. In addition, the volume fraction of δ-ferrite and grain size increased with increase in the peak temperature and heat input. The strength of the HAZs was higher than that of the base steel due to the formation of martensite, whereas the impact properties of the HAZs deteriorated as compared with the base steel due to the formation of δ-ferrite. The PWHT improved the impact properties of the HAZs, resulting from the formation of tempered martensite.

  8. Metallurgical characterization of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel Eurofer'97 on as-received condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lancha, A.M.; Lapena, J.; Hernandez-Mayoral, M.

    2001-01-01

    A new European reduced activation ferrous alloy (denominated Eurofer'97) developed as possible first wall and breeder blanket structural material for fusion applications is being characterized. In this paper, activities specially focussed to investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties of this material on the as-received state (normalized at 980 degree sign C/27' plus tempered at 760 degree sign C/90'/air cooled) are presented. Chemical analyses, a detailed microstructural study, hardness, tensile and Charpy tests have been carried out and are compared to the reduced activation material F-82H modified previously studied. The results show that the Eurofer'97 is a fully martensitic steel free of δ-ferrite with similar tensile and better impact properties than the F-82H modified steel. Two types of carbides have been observed in the Eurofer'97, namely, Cr rich precipitates and Ta/V rich precipitates, tentatively identified as M 23 C 6 type and (Ta,V)C type, respectively

  9. Behavior of Eurofer97 reduced activation martensitic steel upon heating and continuous cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danon, A.; Alamo, A.

    2002-01-01

    The phase transformation behavior of the Eurofer97 steel (Fe9Cr1WVTa) has been investigated. The transformation temperatures upon heating and cooling were determined by dilatometry for different rates in the range 0.0028-100 deg. C/s. The prior austenitic grain size of Eurofer97, measured as a function of the austenitization temperature, does not change appreciably up to 1050 deg. C and then increases with increasing austenite temperature from 1050 up to 1200 deg. C. Continuous cooling transformation diagrams were determined for the austenitization temperatures of 980, 1060 and 1140 deg. C. They show a well-known form with two main phase fields, martensite and ferrite. Values of the critical cooling rates and ferrite start temperatures depend on the austenitization temperature. After thermal cycles samples were further characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and thermoelectric power measurements

  10. Effect of W and Ta on creep–fatigue interaction behavior of reduced activation ferritic–martensitic (RAFM) steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar, Vani, E-mail: vani@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Institute for Plasma Research, Ahmedabad 382428 (India); Mariappan, K.; Sandhya, R.; Laha, K.; Jayakumar, T.; Kumar, E. Rajendra [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Institute for Plasma Research, Ahmedabad 382428 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • SR correlated with deformation under CFI in RAFM steels. • Stress relaxation directly related to plastic strain accumulated, inversely to CFI life. • Optimum combination of W and Ta best for CFI life. • RAFM steels demonstrated compressive dwell sensitivity. • SR tends toward constant value at long hold. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to understand the effect of varying tungsten and tantalum contents on creep–fatigue interaction (CFI) behavior of reduced activation ferritic–martensitic (RAFM) steels. Increase in W improved CFI life. Effect of changing Ta and W upon the resultant CFI life seems to be interrelated and an optimum combination of both W and Ta works out to be the best for CFI life. Stress relaxation obtained during application of hold can be a useful parameter to relate deformation and damage in the RAFM steels.

  11. Effect of pre-strain on susceptibility of Indian Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel to hydrogen embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonak, Sagar; Tiwari, Abhishek; Jain, Uttam; Keskar, Nachiket; Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, Ram N.; Dey, Gautam K.

    2015-01-01

    The role of pre-strain on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of Indian Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel was investigated using constant nominal strain-rate tension test. The samples were pre-strained to different levels of plastic strain and their mechanical behavior and mode of fracture under the influence of hydrogen was studied. The effect of plastic pre-strain in the range of 0.5–2% on the ductility of the samples was prominent. Compared to samples without any pre-straining, effect of hydrogen was more pronounced on pre-strained samples. Prior deformation reduced the material ductility under the influence of hydrogen. Up to 35% reduction in the total strain was observed under the influence of hydrogen in pre-strained samples. Hydrogen charging resulted in increased occurrence of brittle zones on the fracture surface. Hydrogen Enhanced Decohesion (HEDE) was found to be the dominant mechanism of fracture.

  12. Effect of W and Ta on creep–fatigue interaction behavior of reduced activation ferritic–martensitic (RAFM) steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, Vani; Mariappan, K.; Sandhya, R.; Laha, K.; Jayakumar, T.; Kumar, E. Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • SR correlated with deformation under CFI in RAFM steels. • Stress relaxation directly related to plastic strain accumulated, inversely to CFI life. • Optimum combination of W and Ta best for CFI life. • RAFM steels demonstrated compressive dwell sensitivity. • SR tends toward constant value at long hold. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to understand the effect of varying tungsten and tantalum contents on creep–fatigue interaction (CFI) behavior of reduced activation ferritic–martensitic (RAFM) steels. Increase in W improved CFI life. Effect of changing Ta and W upon the resultant CFI life seems to be interrelated and an optimum combination of both W and Ta works out to be the best for CFI life. Stress relaxation obtained during application of hold can be a useful parameter to relate deformation and damage in the RAFM steels.

  13. Effects of LSP on micro-structures and residual stresses in a 4 mm CLAM steel weld joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xizhang, E-mail: chenxizhang@wzu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Wenzhou University., Wenzhou 325035 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China); Fang, Yuanyuan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Shuyan; Kelleher, Joe F. [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Zhou, Jianzhong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China)

    2015-05-15

    The effects of laser shock processing (LSP) on the distribution of residual stress and micro-structure of China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel weldment were investigated via neutron diffraction and optical microscope (OM). A pair of 4 mm CLAM steel plates joined by GTA welding. Special attention is paid to the generation of high level compressive residual stresses introduced by LSP. Residual stress in longitudinal, normal and transversal direction at weldment surface and longitudinal stress through thickness are evaluated via neutron diffraction. Compressive residual stress after LSP occurred at more than 90% areas within the weld joint, it is almost double the areas of compressive stress compare to weldment surface before LSP. The maximum compressive normal residual stress becomes to −183 MPa after LSP from −63 MPa before LSP. The Modification of surface micro-structures including weld zone (WZ), heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal (BM) are also discussed. Results to date demonstrate that laser shock processing has been a great potential method for the improvement of mechanical performance of components.

  14. Ancient clam gardens, traditional management portfolios, and the resilience of coupled human-ocean systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Jackley

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous communities have actively managed their environments for millennia using a diversity of resource use and conservation strategies. Clam gardens, ancient rock-walled intertidal beach terraces, represent one example of an early mariculture technology that may have been used to improve food security and confer resilience to coupled human-ocean systems. We surveyed a coastal landscape for evidence of past resource use and management to gain insight into ancient resource stewardship practices on the central coast of British Columbia, Canada. We found that clam gardens are embedded within a diverse portfolio of resource use and management strategies and were likely one component of a larger, complex resource management system. We compared clam diversity, density, recruitment, and biomass in three clam gardens and three unmodified nonwalled beaches. Evidence suggests that butter clams (Saxidomus gigantea had 1.96 times the biomass and 2.44 times the density in clam gardens relative to unmodified beaches. This was due to a reduction in beach slope and thus an increase in the optimal tidal range where clams grow and survive best. The most pronounced differences in butter clam density between nonwalled beaches and clam gardens were found at high tidal elevations at the top of the beach. Finally, clam recruits (0.5-2 mm in length tended to be greater in clam gardens compared to nonwalled beaches and may be attributed to the addition of shell hash by ancient people, which remains on the landscape today. As part of a broader social-ecological system, clam garden sites were among several modifications made by humans that collectively may have conferred resilience to past communities by providing reliable and diverse access to food resources.

  15. Investigation on microstructure and properties of narrow-gap laser welding on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel CLF-1 with a thickness of 35 mm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shikai; Zhang, Jianchao; Yang, Jiaoxi; Lu, Junxia; Liao, Hongbin; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2018-05-01

    Reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel is chosen as a structural material for test blanket modules (TBMs) to be constructed in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR). Chinese specific RAFM steel named with CLF-1 has been developed for CFETR. In this paper, a narrow-gap groove laser multi-pass welding of CLF-1 steel with thickness of 35 mm is conduced by YLS-15000 fiber laser. Further, the microstructures of different regions in the weld joint were characterized, and tensile impact and micro-hardness tests were carried out for evaluating the mecharical properties. The results show that the butt weld joint of CLF-1 steel with a thickness of 35 mm was well-formed using the optimal narrow-gap laser filler wire welding and no obvious defects was found such as incomplete fusion cracks and pores. The microstructures of backing layer is dominated by lath martensites and the Heat-Affected Zone (HAZ) was mainly filled with two-phase hybrid structures of secondary-tempering sorbites and martensites. The filler layer is similar to the backing layer in microstructures. In tensile tests, the tensile samples from different parts of the joint all fractured at base metal (BM). The micro-hardness of weld metal (WM) was found to be higher than that of BM and the Heat-Affected Zone (HAZ) exhibited no obvious softening. After post weld heat treatment (PWHT), it can be observed that the fusion zone of the autogenous welding bead and the upper filling beads mainly consist of lath martensites which caused the lower impact absorbing energy. The HAZ mainly included two-phase hybrid structures of secondary-tempering sorbites and martensites and exhibited favorable impact toughness.

  16. Morula-like cells in photo-symbiotic clams harboring zooxanthellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, K; Nishijima, M; Maruyama, T

    1998-06-01

    Symbiosis is observed between zooxanthellae, symbiotic dinoflagellates, and giant clams and related clams which belong to the families Tridacnidae and Cardiidae. We have previously shown that a photo-symbiotic clam Tridacna crocea has three types of hemocytes, the eosinophilic granular hemocyte with phagocytic activity, the agranular cell with electron lucent granules, and the morula-like cell with large (ca. 2 mum in diameter) colorless granules. The function of the morula-like cell is not clear, but it has not been reported in any other bivalves except photo-symbiotic clams T. crocea and Tridacna maxima. In order to clarify whether it is specific to photo-symbiotic clams or not, we studied hemocytes in the photo-symbiotic clams Tridacna derasa (Tridacnidae), Hippopus hippopus (Tridacnidae) and Corculum cardissa (Cardiidae), and a closely related non-symbiotic clam Fulvia mutica (Cardiidae). The eosinophilic granular hemocytes and the agranular cells were found in all of the clams examined. However, the morula-like cells which were packed with many large electron dense granules (ca. 2 mum in diameter), were observed only in the photo-symbiotic clams. In F. mutica, a closely related non-symbiotic clam, this type of hemocyte was not found. Instead a hemocyte with vacuoles and a few large granules containing peroxidase activity was observed. The large granules of F. mutica varied in size from ca. 1-9 mum in diameter. Present data suggests that the presence of morula-like cells is restricted to photo-symbiotic clams and that the hemocytes associated with the morula-like cells may have some functional relationship to symbiosis with zooxanthellae.

  17. Microstructural characterization of weld joints of 9Cr reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel fabricated by different joining methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Saroja, S.; Albert, S.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E., E-mail: vtp@igcar.gov.in

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents a detailed electron microscopy study on the microstructure of various regions of weldment fabricated by three welding methods namely tungsten inert gas welding, electron beam welding and laser beam welding in an indigenously developed 9Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. Electron back scatter diffraction studies showed a random micro-texture in all the three welds. Microstructural changes during thermal exposures were studied and corroborated with hardness and optimized conditions for the post weld heat treatment have been identified for this steel. Hollomon–Jaffe parameter has been used to estimate the extent of tempering. The activation energy for the tempering process has been evaluated and found to be corresponding to interstitial diffusion of carbon in ferrite matrix. The type and microchemistry of secondary phases in different regions of the weldment have been identified by analytical transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: • Comparison of microstructural parameters in TIG, electron beam and laser welds of RAFM steel • EBSD studies to illustrate the absence of preferred orientation and identification of prior austenite grain size using phase identification map • Optimization of PWHT conditions for indigenous RAFM steel • Study of kinetics of tempering and estimation of apparent activation energy of the process.

  18. Effect of permethrin, anthracene and mixture exposure on shell components, enzymatic activities and proteins status in the Mediterranean clam Venerupis decussata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellami, Badreddine; Khazri, Abdelhafidh; Mezni, Amine; Louati, Héla; Dellali, Mohamed; Aissa, Patricia; Mahmoudi, Ezzeddine; Beyrem, Hamouda; Sheehan, David

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We assessed toxicity of anthracene, permethrin and their mixture on clams. • Tissue and stressor-dependent changes were observed in biochemical responses. • Permethrin induces phase transition from aragonite to calcite in shell structure. • Interactive effects were observed on digestive gland and gill biomarkers. • Both approaches give new vision to risk assessment of organic pollution. - Abstract: Anthracene (ANT) and permethrin (PER) are two of the more toxic compounds reaching the marine environment. This study aimed to determine the impact of these molecules on Venerupis decussata, an economically important species cultured on the Tunisian coast. Shell structure and its possible transformation upon exposure to the two contaminants were studied by X-ray diffraction and gravimetric analyses. Results revealed a phase transition in shell composition from aragonite to calcite after PER exposure, to a mixture of PER and ANT (Mix) but not for ANT alone. Catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione transferase (GST) activities were determined in digestive gland and gills after exposure to ANT, PER and Mix to assess the impact of the contamination on the oxidative status of V. decussata. Enzyme activities increased in the digestive gland after PER treatment and in the gills after ANT treatment. PER exposure significantly reduced the levels of free thiols and increased levels of carbonylated proteins in the digestive gland, as compared to controls. In contrast, ANT exposure significantly reduced free thiols and increased the number of carbonylated proteins in the gills. Mix induced additive effects as measured by both enzymatic and proteomic approaches. The present study suggests that PER has a strong effect on shell structure; that PER and ANT exposure generate compound-dependent oxidative stress in the tissues of V. decussata and that a mixture of the two compounds has synergistic effects on biochemical response

  19. Effect of permethrin, anthracene and mixture exposure on shell components, enzymatic activities and proteins status in the Mediterranean clam Venerupis decussata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellami, Badreddine, E-mail: sellamibadreddine@gmail.com [Laboratory of Environment Biomonitoring, Coastal Ecology Unit, Faculty of Sciences of Bizerta, University of Carthage, 7021 Zarzouna (Tunisia); Khazri, Abdelhafidh [Laboratory of Environment Biomonitoring, Coastal Ecology Unit, Faculty of Sciences of Bizerta, University of Carthage, 7021 Zarzouna (Tunisia); Mezni, Amine [Unit of Research 99/UR12-30, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences of Bizerte, 7021 Jarzouna (Tunisia); Louati, Héla; Dellali, Mohamed; Aissa, Patricia; Mahmoudi, Ezzeddine; Beyrem, Hamouda [Laboratory of Environment Biomonitoring, Coastal Ecology Unit, Faculty of Sciences of Bizerta, University of Carthage, 7021 Zarzouna (Tunisia); Sheehan, David, E-mail: d.sheehan@ucc.ie [Environmental Research Institute and Department of Biochemistry, University College Cork, Western Gateway Building, Western Road, Cork (Ireland)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • We assessed toxicity of anthracene, permethrin and their mixture on clams. • Tissue and stressor-dependent changes were observed in biochemical responses. • Permethrin induces phase transition from aragonite to calcite in shell structure. • Interactive effects were observed on digestive gland and gill biomarkers. • Both approaches give new vision to risk assessment of organic pollution. - Abstract: Anthracene (ANT) and permethrin (PER) are two of the more toxic compounds reaching the marine environment. This study aimed to determine the impact of these molecules on Venerupis decussata, an economically important species cultured on the Tunisian coast. Shell structure and its possible transformation upon exposure to the two contaminants were studied by X-ray diffraction and gravimetric analyses. Results revealed a phase transition in shell composition from aragonite to calcite after PER exposure, to a mixture of PER and ANT (Mix) but not for ANT alone. Catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione transferase (GST) activities were determined in digestive gland and gills after exposure to ANT, PER and Mix to assess the impact of the contamination on the oxidative status of V. decussata. Enzyme activities increased in the digestive gland after PER treatment and in the gills after ANT treatment. PER exposure significantly reduced the levels of free thiols and increased levels of carbonylated proteins in the digestive gland, as compared to controls. In contrast, ANT exposure significantly reduced free thiols and increased the number of carbonylated proteins in the gills. Mix induced additive effects as measured by both enzymatic and proteomic approaches. The present study suggests that PER has a strong effect on shell structure; that PER and ANT exposure generate compound-dependent oxidative stress in the tissues of V. decussata and that a mixture of the two compounds has synergistic effects on biochemical response.

  20. Toxicity of a traditional molluscicide to asian clam veligers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layhee, Megan J.; ,; Miho Yoshioka,; Bahram Farokhkish,; ,; Gross, Jackson A.; Sepulveda, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Aquaculture and hatchery industries are in need of effective control methods to reduce the risk of spreading aquatic invasive species, such as the Asian clam Corbicula fluminea, through aquaculture and hatchery activities. The planktonic nature of Asian clam veligers enables this life stage to enter water-based infrastructure undetected, including hatchery trucks used to stock fish. Once in hatchery trucks, veligers can disperse overland and establish in previously uninvaded habitats. As a result, there is a need to develop techniques that result in veliger mortality but do not harm fish. In September 2012, we conducted laboratory trials to determine if a molluscicide (750 mg/L potassium chloride and 25 mg/L formalin) commonly used to kill zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) veligers in hatchery trucks can also effectively kill Asian clam veligers. We exposed Asian clam veligers to this molluscicide for 1, 3, and 5 h in each of two water types: deionized water and filtered lake water. We found ,20% mortality at the 1-h exposure period and 100% mortality at both the 3-h and 5-h exposure periods, regardless of water type. This laboratory study represents an important step toward reducing the spread of Asian clams by aquaculture facilities.

  1. Influence of strain rate and temperature on tensile properties and flow behaviour of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanaja, J., E-mail: jvanaja4@gmail.com [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Laha, K. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sam, Shiju [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India)

    2012-05-15

    Tensile strength and flow behaviour of a Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) steel (9Cr-1W-0.06Ta-0.22V-0.08C) have been investigated over a temperature range of 300-873 K at different strain rates. Tensile strength of the steel decreased with temperature and increased with strain rate except at intermediate temperatures. Negative strain rate sensitivity of flow stress of the steel at intermediate temperatures revealed the occurrence of dynamic strain ageing in the steel, even though no serrated flow was observed. The tensile flow behaviour of the material was well represented by the Voce strain hardening equation for all the test conditions. Temperature and strain rate dependence of the various parameters of Voce equation were interpreted with the possible deformation mechanisms. The equivalence between the saturation stress at a given strain rate in tensile test and steady state deformation rate at a given stress in creep test was found to be satisfied by the RAFM steel.

  2. Effect of tungsten and tantalum on the low cycle fatigue behavior of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar, Vani, E-mail: vani@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India); Mariappan, K.; Nagesha, A.; Prasad Reddy, G.V.; Sandhya, R.; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of tungsten and tantalum on low cycle fatigue behavior of RAFM steels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both alloying elements W and Ta improved fatigue life. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase in Ta content improved fatigue life more than W. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimization of W content at 1.4 wt.%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Softening behavior closely related to W and Ta content. - Abstract: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are candidate materials for the test blanket modules of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Several degradation mechanisms such as thermal fatigue, low cycle fatigue, creep fatigue interaction, creep, irradiation hardening, swelling and phase instability associated irradiation embrittlement must be understood in order to estimate the component lifetime and issues concerning the structural integrity of components. The current work focuses on the effect of tungsten and tantalum on the low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of RAFM steels. Both alloying elements tungsten and tantalum improved the fatigue life. Influence of Ta on increasing fatigue life was an order of magnitude higher than the influence of W on improving the fatigue life. Based on the present study, the W content was optimized at 1.4 wt.%. Softening behavior of RAFM steels showed a strong dependence on W and Ta content in RAFM steels.

  3. Influence of strain rate and temperature on tensile properties and flow behaviour of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, K.; Sam, Shiju; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Mathew, M. D.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2012-05-01

    Tensile strength and flow behaviour of a Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) steel (9Cr-1W-0.06Ta-0.22V-0.08C) have been investigated over a temperature range of 300-873 K at different strain rates. Tensile strength of the steel decreased with temperature and increased with strain rate except at intermediate temperatures. Negative strain rate sensitivity of flow stress of the steel at intermediate temperatures revealed the occurrence of dynamic strain ageing in the steel, even though no serrated flow was observed. The tensile flow behaviour of the material was well represented by the Voce strain hardening equation for all the test conditions. Temperature and strain rate dependence of the various parameters of Voce equation were interpreted with the possible deformation mechanisms. The equivalence between the saturation stress at a given strain rate in tensile test and steady state deformation rate at a given stress in creep test was found to be satisfied by the RAFM steel.

  4. Influence of strain rate and temperature on tensile properties and flow behaviour of a reduced activation ferritic–martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, K.; Sam, Shiju; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2012-01-01

    Tensile strength and flow behaviour of a Reduced Activation Ferritic–Martensitic (RAFM) steel (9Cr–1W–0.06Ta–0.22V–0.08C) have been investigated over a temperature range of 300–873 K at different strain rates. Tensile strength of the steel decreased with temperature and increased with strain rate except at intermediate temperatures. Negative strain rate sensitivity of flow stress of the steel at intermediate temperatures revealed the occurrence of dynamic strain ageing in the steel, even though no serrated flow was observed. The tensile flow behaviour of the material was well represented by the Voce strain hardening equation for all the test conditions. Temperature and strain rate dependence of the various parameters of Voce equation were interpreted with the possible deformation mechanisms. The equivalence between the saturation stress at a given strain rate in tensile test and steady state deformation rate at a given stress in creep test was found to be satisfied by the RAFM steel.

  5. Cyclic softening as a parameter for prediction of remnant creep rupture life of a Indian reduced activation ferritic–martensitic (IN-RAFM) steel subjected to fatigue exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Aritra, E-mail: aritra@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Vijayanand, V.D.; Shankar, Vani; Parameswaran, P.; Sandhya, R.; Laha, K.; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Rajendrakumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India)

    2014-12-15

    Sequential fatigue-creep tests were conducted on Indian reduced activation ferritic–martensitic steel at 823 K leading to sharp decrease in residual creep life with increase in prior fatigue exposures. Extensive recovery of martensitic-lath structure taking place during fatigue deformation, manifested as cyclic softening in the cyclic stress response, shortens the residual creep life. Based on the experimental results, cyclic softening occurring during fatigue stage can be correlated with residual creep life, evolving in an empirical model which predicts residual creep life as a function of cyclic softening. Predicted creep lives for specimens pre-cycled at various strain amplitudes are explained on the basis of mechanism of cyclic softening.

  6. Light exposure enhances urea absorption in the fluted giant clam, Tridacna squamosa, and up-regulates the protein abundance of a light-dependent urea active transporter, DUR3-like, in its ctenidium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Christabel Y L; Hiong, Kum C; Boo, Mel V; Choo, Celine Y L; Wong, Wai P; Chew, Shit F; Ip, Yuen K

    2018-04-19

    Giant clams live in nutrient-poor reef waters of the Indo-Pacific and rely on symbiotic dinoflagellates ( Symbiodinium spp., also known as zooxanthellae) for nutrients. As the symbionts are nitrogen deficient, the host clam has to absorb exogenous nitrogen and supply it to them. This study aimed to demonstrate light-enhanced urea absorption in the fluted giant clam, Tridacna squamosa , and to clone and characterize the urea active transporter DUR3-like from its ctenidium (gill). The results indicate that T. squamosa absorbs exogenous urea, and the rate of urea uptake in the light was significantly higher than that in darkness. The DUR3-like coding sequence obtained from its ctenidium comprised 2346 bp, encoding a protein of 782 amino acids and 87.0 kDa. DUR3-like was expressed strongly in the ctenidium, outer mantle and kidney. Twelve hours of exposure to light had no significant effect on the transcript level of ctenidial DUR3-like However, between 3 and 12 h of light exposure, DUR3-like protein abundance increased progressively in the ctenidium, and became significantly greater than that in the control at 12 h. DUR3-like had an apical localization in the epithelia of the ctenidial filaments and tertiary water channels. Taken together, these results indicate that DUR3-like might participate in light-enhanced urea absorption in the ctenidium of T. squamosa When made available to the symbiotic zooxanthellae that are known to possess urease, the absorbed urea can be metabolized to NH 3 and CO 2 to support amino acid synthesis and photosynthesis, respectively, during insolation. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Low cycle fatigue design data for India-specific reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (IN-RAFM) steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariappan, K.; Shankar, Vani, E-mail: vani@igcar.gov.in; Sandhya, R.; Laha, K.

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Generation of first set of experimental data related to LCF performance of the commercial heat of IN-RAFM steel. • Analysis of cyclic behavior from the perspective of both design and material characteristics. • Various correction factors to account for various plastic strain accumulations, change in Poisson’s ratio and asymmetry of loadings. • Low cycle fatigue design parameters and correction factor values were comparable with P91 steel as reported in RCC-MR design code. - Abstract: The objective of the present paper is to provide first hand experimental data and analysis on the low cycle fatigue (LCF) performance of a commercial heat of Indian reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (IN-RAFM) steel. Since this material is not yet codified in RCC-MR, cyclic properties were generated for the design of the structural material of the Test Blanket Modules (TBM) made of RAFM steel. Hence, as a part of the material development program, LCF experiments were conducted on IN-RAFM steel obtained in the normalized and tempered condition. Total axial strain controlled experiments were performed in air by employing strain amplitudes ranging from ±0.25 to ±1.0% and at temperatures of 300, 673, 723, 823, and 873 K and a nominal strain rate, 3 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}. In the present work, various cyclic parameters that are useful for the design oriented fatigue analysis are derived as per the systematic procedure given in the RCC-MR design code. The physical significance of each design parameter such as elasto-plastic corrections based on Neuber analysis has been explained and correlated with the material behavior such as the cyclic softening nature of the RAFM steel.

  8. Impact properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H jointed by hot isostatic pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiwara, H.; Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Hirose, T. [Blanket Engineering Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Enoeda, M. [Naka Fusion Research Establishment, J.A.E.R.I., Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Kohyama, A. [Kyoto Univ., lnstitute of Advanced Energy (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are the leading candidate structural material for the blanket system of fusion reactors. The important issue at the current stage is the finalization of a detailed manufacturing specification for ITER test blanket module. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) process is one of the most important methods to fabricate the first wall with cooling channels. The objective of this paper is to optimize HIP condition to obtain the excellent joints mechanical properties. The materials used were F82H steels. The joint was produced by solid state HIP method. Before HIP treatments, specimens were heated in vacuum condition to out-gas. This treatment was conducted to decrease oxidation on the surfaces. HIP treatments were carried out for 2 h at 1100 deg. C - 140 MPa. The specimens were normalized at 960 deg. C for 0.5 h and tempered at 750 deg. C for 1.5 h. The bonding interface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Charpy impact tests and tensile tests were conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties of the HIP joint. Impact tests revealed that there were no significant differences in the ductile-brittle transition temperatures of HIP jointed specimens and base metal specimens, but the upper-shelf energy (USE) of the HIP joint specimens at room temperature was only about 10% of that of the base metal specimens. SEM observations of the fracture surface of HIP joint specimens revealed that a large number of oxides were formed on the HIP joint. This result indicates that oxides formed on the HIP joint are the dominant factor of the impact properties. Based on these results, the pre-HIP treatment conditions had been optimized to reduce the number of oxides, and USE of HIP joint specimens increased to about 50% of that of the base metal. The detailed analyses on the HIP joint microstructure will be reported. (authors)

  9. Preliminary study of HDA coating on CLAM steel followed by high temperature oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoqiang, E-mail: newboy.chen@163.com; Huang, Qunying; Yan, Zilin; Song, Yong; Liu, Shaojun; Jiang, Zhizhong

    2013-11-15

    A hot-dip aluminizing process is expected to produce aluminide coatings on structural materials to resist tritium permeation, corrosion, and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects in the fusion reactor blanket. China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel, which is the candidate structural material for the LiPb blanket system in China, was coated with pure aluminum and with an Al–Si alloy. Factors affecting the thickness and morphology of the aluminide coatings were studied. After the hot-dipping treatment, FeAl{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} were observed at the Al/steel interface. The existence of silicon in the molten aluminum suppressed the growth of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}, built up the thickness of FeAl{sub 3} slightly, and contributed to reducing the thickness of the intermetallic layer. The brittle phase of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} had completely transformed to ductile phases of FeAl{sub 2}, FeAl and α-Fe(Al) after high temperature heat-treatment in air. Kirkendall voids were found in the diffusion layer, due to the rapid interdiffusion of iron and aluminum during oxidation. Cracks and pores were observed on the coating surface and at the interlayer. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction indicates the presence of α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the oxide layer.

  10. Isothermal Martensite Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo

    Isothermal (i.e. time dependent) martensite formation in steel was first observed in the 40ies of the XXth century and is still treated as an anomaly in the description of martensite formation which is considered as a-thermal (i.e. independent of time). Recently, the clarification of the mechanism...... of lattice strains provided fundamental information on the state of stress in the material and clarified the role of the strain energy on martensite formation. Electron backscatter diffraction revealed that the microstructure of the material and the morphology of martensite were independent on the cooling...... leading to isothermal kinetics acquired new practical relevance because of the identification of isothermal martensite formation as the most likely process responsible for enhanced performances of sub-zero Celsius treated high carbon steel products. In the present work, different iron based alloys...

  11. Creep rupture strength and creep behavior of low-activation martensitic OPTIFER alloys. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirra, M.; Falkenstein, A.; Heger, S.; Lapena, J.

    2001-07-01

    The creep rupture strength and creep experiments performed on low-activation OPTIFER alloys in the temperature range of 450-700 C shall be summarized in the present report. Together with the reference alloy of the type 9.5Cr1W-Mn-V-Ta, W-free variants (+Ge) with a more favorable activation and decay behavior shall be studied. Their smaller strength values are compensated by far better toughness characteristics. Of each development line, several batches of slightly varying chemical composition have been investigated over service lives of up to 40,000 h. Apart from the impact of a reference thermal treatment at a hardening temperature of 1075 C and an annealing temperature of 750 C, the influence of reduced hardening temperatures (up to 950 C) has been determined. A long-term use at increased temperatures (max. 550 C-20,000 h) produces an aging effect with strength being decreased in the annealed state. To determine this aging effect quantitatively, creep rupture experiments have been performed using specimens that were subjected to variable types of T/t annealing (550 -650 C, 330-5000 h). Based on all test results, minimum values for the 1% time-strain limit and creep rupture in the T range of 400-600 C can be given as design curves for 20,000 h. The minimum creep rates obtained from the creep curves recorded as a function of the experimental stress yield the stress exponent n (n=Norton) for the individual test temperatures. Creep behavior as a function of the test temperature yields the values for the effective activation energy of creeping Q K . The influence of a preceding temperature transient up to 800 C (≤Ac 1b ) or 840 C (>Ac 1b ) with subsequent creep rupture tests at 500 C and 550 C, respectively, shall be described. The results obtained for the OPTIFER alloys shall be compared with the results achieved for the Japanese 2% W-containing F82H-mod. alloy. (orig.) [de

  12. Recent results of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jitsukawa, S. E-mail: jitsukawa@ifmif.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Kimura, A.; Kohyama, A.; Klueh, R.L.; Tavassoli, A.A.; Schaaf, B. van der; Odette, G.R.; Rensman, J.W.; Victoria, M.; Petersen, C

    2004-08-01

    Significant progress has been achieved in the international research effort on reduced-activation steels. Extensive tensile, fracture toughness, fatigue, and creep properties in unirradiated and irradiated conditions have been performed and evaluated. Since it is not possible to include all work in this limited review, selected areas will be presented to indicate the scope and progress of recent international efforts. These include (1) results from mechanical properties studies that have been combined in databases to determine materials design limits for the preliminary design of an ITER blanket module. (2) Results indicate that the effect of transmutation-produced helium on fracture toughness is smaller than indicated previously. (3) Further efforts to reduce irradiation-induced degradation of fracture toughness. (4) The introduction of a post-irradiation constitutive equation for plastic deformation. (5) The production of ODS steels that have been used to improve high-temperature strength. (6) The method developed to improve fracture toughness of ODS steels.

  13. Effects of Ti element on the microstructural stability of 9Cr–WVTiN reduced activation martensitic steel under ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Fengfeng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Jin, Shuoxue; Li, Tiecheng; Chen, Jihong [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Suo, Jinping; Yang, Feng [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yao, Z. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen’s University, Kingston K7L 3N6, ON (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    Microstructure of 9Cr–WVTiN reduced-activation martensitic steels with two different Ti concentrations irradiated with Fe{sup +}, He{sup +} and H{sup +} at 300 °C was studied with transmission electron microscopy. Small dislocation loops were observed in the irradiated steels. The mean size and number density of dislocation loops decreased with the increase of Ti concentration. The segregation of Cr and Fe in carbides was observed in both irradiated steels, and the enrichment of Cr and depletion of Fe were more severe in the low Ti-concentration 9Cr–WVTiN steel.

  14. Development of filler wires for welding of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel for India's test blanket module of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, G.; Arivazhagan, B.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Indigenous development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel has become necessary for India as a participant in the International Thermo-nuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) programme. Optimisation of RAFM steel is in an advanced stage for the fabrication of test blanket module (TBM) components. Simultaneously, development of RAFM steel filler wires has been undertaken since there is no commercial filler wires are available for fabrication of components using RAFM steel. The purpose of this study is to develop filler wires that can be directly used for both gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and for narrow-gap gas tungsten arc welding (NG-GTAW) that reduces the deposited weld metal volume and heat affected zone (HAZ) width. Further, the filler wires would also be used for hybrid laser-MIG welding for thick section joints. In view of meeting all the requirements, a detailed specification was prepared for the development of filler wires for welding of RAFM steel. Meanwhile, welding trials have been carried out on 2.5 mm thick plates of the RAFM steel using GTAW process at various heat inputs with a preheat temperature of 250 C followed by various post weld heat treatments (PWHT). The microstructure of the weld metal in most of the cases showed the presence of some amount of delta-ferrite. Filler wires as per specifications have also been developed with minor variations on the chemistry against the specified values. Welding parameters and PWHT parameters were optimized to qualify the filler wires without the presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal and with optimized mechanical properties. Results showed that the weld metals are free from delta-ferrite. Tensile properties at ambient temperature and at 500 C are well above the specified values, and are much higher than the base metal values. Ductile Brittle Transition Temperature (DBTT) has been evaluated as -81 C based on the 68 J criteria. The present study highlights the basis and methodology

  15. Effects of impurity elements on mechanical properties and microstructures of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawahata, A. [Ibaraki Univ., Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Hitachi (Japan); Tanigawa, H.; Shiba, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Enomoto, M. [Ibaraki Univ., Dept. of Materials Science, Faculty of Engineering, Hitachi (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFs), such as F82H (Fe-8Cr-2W-0.2V- 0.04Ta-0.1C, in wt%), are one of the leading candidates for structural materials of fusion reactors. Impact property of F82H can be improved by adjusting the amount of tantalum or titanium concentration. On the other hand, it was reported by microstructure analyses of IEA steel that tantalum has a tendency to form oxides and causes a large dispersion of fracture toughness. In this study, the correlation between titanium or tantalum concentration and the impact property were reported focusing on difference in microstructure. Charpy impact test and microstructure analyses were carried out against modified F82H series of which titanium, nitrogen and tantalum composition were controlled. Charpy impact test results showed that the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of T05A (0.05Ta- 0.0014N-

  16. The influence of inclusions on the low cycle fatigue properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.H.; Kima, S.W. [Kyoto Univ., Graduate School of Energy Science (Japan); Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Hirose, T. [Blanket Engineering Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Kohyama, A. [Kyoto Univ., lnstitute of Advanced Energy (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels, such as F82H, are the primary near-term candidate for the blanket structural material of nuclear fusion reactors. During operation, blanket structural materials will be subjected to cyclic loading caused by start-up and shut-down procedure or plasma disruption. Therefore, investigation of fatigue property is essential to reactor design. It is considered that fatigue properties depend on the material factor such as the inclusion distribution, surface morphology and so on. Especially, many experimental results show that inclusions become the fracture origin in a given volume of material subjected to cyclic stress, and fracture failure is most likely to initiate at the largest inclusion in the volume. Therefore, the prediction of the size of maximum inclusion and its impact on fatigue properties would be essential to the fusion reactor materials development and application. This paper examines the possible relation between fatigue life and inclusion parameters such as size, shape, distribution and composition. The low cycle fatigue behavior of F82H steel at room temperature in air condition under fully reversed push-pull triangular wave was studied using miniaturized hourglass-type specimens with 1.25 mm in diameter. Total strain range is selected from 0.8% to 2.4%, and the strain rate was 0.04%/s. To examine the size and composition of the inclusions, fracture surfaces and crack initiation region were investigated by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and EDS. The inclusions such as TaO{sub x}, TaO{sub x}- Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with the size below 10 {mu}m are observed on specimen surface. The surface observation of the specimen which discontinued testing at 20 and 500 cycle tested at the strain range of 1.4% revealed that fatigue loading induced separation of inclusions from the matrix in initial stage, then micro-crack induced around the inclusions

  17. Martens-ite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druce Dunne

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Martensite and martensitic transformations in metals and alloys have been intensively studied for more than a century and many comprehensive and informative reviews have been published. The current review differs insofar as the analysis is performed largely through the prism of detailed studies of the changes in the martensitic transformation in Fe3Pt alloy as a result of austenite ordering. This important alloy is the first ferrous alloy identified as exhibiting thermoelastic transformation and shape memory. The effect of parent phase order on the martensitic transformation offers significant insights into general understanding of the nature of martensitic transformation, particularly the factors contributing to reversible and irreversible transformation. It is concluded that for crystallograhically reversible transformation to occur both strain limiting and strain accommodating factors must be present and that these factors collectively constitute the sufficient condition for reversible martensitic transformation. Although the crystallography of individual plates formed in a given alloy can change with their temperature of formation, this intrinsic variability has not been considered in analyses using phenomenological theory. Significant variability can exist in measured quantities such as habit plane normals and orientation relationships used to test theoretical predictions. Measured lattice parameters, essential data for theoretical calculations, can also differ from the actual parameters existing at the temperature of plate formation.

  18. Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel Eurofer 97 as Possible Structural Material for Fusion Devices. Metallurgical Characterization on As-Received Condition and after Simulated Services Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lancha, A. M.; Lapena, J.; Serrano, M.; Hernandez-Mayoral, M.

    2004-01-01

    Metallurgical Characterization of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel Eurofer'97, on as-received condition and after thermal ageing treatment in the temperature range from 400 degree centigree to 600 degree centigree for periods up to 10.000 h, was carried out. The microstructure of the steel remained stable (tempered martensite with M 2 3 C 6 and MX precipitates) after the thermal ageing treatments studied in this work. In general, this stability was also observed in the mechanical properties. The Eurofer'97 steel exhibited similar values of hardness, ultimate tensile stress, 0,2% proof stress, USE and T 0 3 regardless of the investigated material condition. However, ageing at 600 degree centigree for 10.000 ha caused a slight increase in the DBTT, of approximately 23 . In terms of creep properties, the steel shows in general adequate creep rupture strength levels for short rupture times. However, the results obtained up to now for long time creep rupture tests at 500 degree centigree suggests a change in the deformation mechanisms. (Author) 62 refs

  19. New polymorphic microsatellite markers derived from hemocyte cDNA library of Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum challenged by the protozoan parasite Perkinsus olseni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Sil; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Park, Kyung-Il; Cho, Moonjae; Youn, Seok-Hyun; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2017-03-01

    Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum is one of the most important benthic animals in the coastal north Pacific region, where clam populations have been mixed genetically through trade and aquaculture activities. Accordingly, identification of the genetically different clam populations has become one of the most important issues to manage interbreeding of the local and introduced clam populations. To identify genetically different populations of clam populations, we developed 11 expressed sequence tag (EST)-microsatellite loci (i.e., simple sequence repeat, SSR) from 1,128 clam hemocyte cDNA clones challenged by the protozoan parasite Perkinsus olseni. Genotype analysis using the markers developed in this study demonstrated that clams from a tidal flat on the west coast contained 6 to 19 alleles per locus, and a population from Jeju Island had 4 to 20 alleles per locus. The expected heterozygosity of the 2 clam populations ranged from 0.472 to 0.919 for clams from the west coast, and 0.494 to 0.919 for clams from Jeju Island, respectively. Among the 11 loci discovered in this study, 7 loci significantly deviated from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after Bonferroni correction. The 5 loci developed in this study also successfully amplified the SSRs of R. variegatus, a clam species taxonomically very close to R. philippinarum, from Hong Kong and Jeju Island. We believe that the 11 novel polymorphic SSR developed in this study can be utilized successfully in Manila clam genetic diversity analysis, as well as in genetic discrimination of different clam populations.

  20. In vitro exposure of haemocytes of the clam Ruditapes philippinarum to titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles: nanoparticle characterisation, effects on phagocytic activity and internalisation of nanoparticles into haemocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marisa, Ilaria; Marin, Maria Gabriella; Caicci, Federico; Franceschinis, Erica; Martucci, Alessandro; Matozzo, Valerio

    2015-02-01

    The continuous growth of nanotechnology and nano-industries, the considerable increase of products containing nanoparticles (NPs) and the potential release of NPs in aquatic environments suggest a need to study NP effects on aquatic organisms. In this context, in vitro assays are commonly used for evaluating or predicting the negative effects of chemicals and for understanding their mechanisms of action. In this study, a physico-chemical characterisation of titanium dioxide NPs (n-TiO2) was performed, and an in vitro approach was used to investigate the effects of n-TiO2 on haemocytes of the clam Ruditapes philippinarum. In particular, the effects on haemocyte phagocytic activity were evaluated in two different experiments (with and without pre-treatment of haemocytes) by exposing cells to P25 n-TiO2 (0, 1 and 10 μg/mL). In addition, the capability of n-TiO2 to interact with clam haemocytes was evaluated with a transmission electron microscope (TEM). In this study, n-TiO2 particles showed a mean diameter of approximately 21 nm, and both anatase (70%) and rutile (30%) phases were revealed. In both experiments, n-TiO2 significantly decreased the phagocytic index compared with the control, suggesting that NPs are able to interfere with cell functions. The results of the TEM analysis support this hypothesis. Indeed, we observed that TiO2 NPs interact with cell membranes and enter haemocyte cytoplasm and vacuoles after 60 min of exposure. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the internalisation of TiO2 NPs into R. philippinarum haemocytes. The present study can contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of action of TiO2 NPs in bivalve molluscs, at least at the haemocyte level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Metallurgical properties of reduced activation martensitic steel Eurofer'97 in the as-received condition and after thermal ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lancha, A.M.; Lapena, J.; Serrano, M.; Hernandez-Mayoral, M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the microstructural studies and the mechanical testing (hardness, tensile and charpy tests) performed on the Eurofer'97 steel in the as-received condition and after thermal ageing treatments up to 600 deg. C. In addition, fracture toughness tests on the as-received condition have been carried out in order to determine the Master Curve. During the thermal ageing treatments studied (500 deg. C/5000 h and 600 deg. C/1000 h) the general microstructure of the steel (tempered martensite with M 23 C 6 and MX precipitates) remained stable. Only a slight growth of the particles has been observed. In terms of mechanical properties, the Eurofer'97 steel exhibited similar values of tensile properties (tensile and yield strength) and ductile-brittle transition temperature regardless of the material condition studied.

  2. Production and qualification for fusion applications, a steel of low activity ferritic-martensitic ASTURFER; Produccion y cualificacion, para aplicaciones de fusion, de un acero de baja actividad ferritico-martensitico, ASTURFER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, A.; Belzunce, J.; Artimez, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    This article details the work carried out in the design and development pilot plant scale of a steel ferritic-martensitic of reduced activity, Asturfer, with a chemical composition and metallurgical properties similar to steel Eurofer. We describe the different stages of steel production and the results of the characterizations made in the context of an extensive test program.

  3. Characterization of martensitic transformations using acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatro, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a highly sensitive technique which can reveal changes in materials not detectable by other means. The goal of this project was to obtain basic information on the AE response to martensitic transformation in steel. This information will enable the use of AE for improved quality assurance testing of rough-cut component blanks and semifinished parts. The AE response was measured as a function of temperature in four steels undergoing martensitic transformation, and the AE response was compared with martensitic start temperature M/sub s/ and finish temperature M/sub f/ obtained by other methods. As measured by AE activity, M/sub s/ occurred as much as 26 0 C higher than previously reported using less sensitive measurement techniques. It was also found that 10 to 30% of an alloy of Fe-0.2% C-27% Ni transformed to martensite during one AE burst. These results show that AE can be used to study transformations both inside and outside the classical M/sub s/-M/sub f/ ranges. The findings will help to achieve the goal of using AE for quality assurance testing, and will add to the knowledge of the basic materials science of martensitic transformations

  4. Effect of heat treatment and irradiation temperature on mechanical properties and structure of reduced-activation Cr-W-V steels of bainitic, martensitic, and martensitic-ferritic classes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorynin, I.V.; Rybin, V.V.; Kursevich, I.P.; Lapin, A.N.; Nesterova, E.V.; Klepikov, E.Yu.

    2000-01-01

    Effects of molybdenum replacement by tungsten in steels of the bainitic, martensitic, and martensitic-ferritic classes containing 2.5%, 8% and 11% Cr, respectively, were investigated. The phase composition and structure of the bainitic steels were varied by changing the cooling rates from the austenitization temperature (from values typical for normalization up to V=3.3 x 10 -2 deg. C/s) and then tempering. The steels were irradiated to a fluence of 4x10 23 n/m 2 (≥0.5 MeV) at 270 deg. C and to fluences of 1.3x10 23 and 1.2x10 24 n/m 2 (≥0.5 MeV) at 70 deg. C. The 2.5Cr-1.4WV and 8Cr-1.5WV steels have shown lower values of the shifts in ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) under irradiation in comparison with corresponding Cr-Mo steels. Radiation embrittlement at elevated irradiation temperature was lowest in bainitic 2.5Cr-1.4WV steel and martensitic-ferritic 11Cr-1.5WV steel. The positive effect of molybdenum replacement by tungsten at irradiation temperature ∼300 deg. C is reversed at T irr =70 deg. C

  5. Microstructure and mechanical properties of the TIG welded joints of fusion CLAM steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Zhizhong, E-mail: zhizhongjiang2006@yahoo.com.c [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Ren Litian; Huang Jihua; Ju Xin; Wu Huibin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Huang Qunying; Wu Yican [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2010-12-15

    The CLAM steel plates were butt-welded through manual tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) process, and the following post-welding heat treatment (PWHT) at 740 {sup o}C for 1 h. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joints were measured. The results show that both hardening and softening occur in the weld joints before PWHT, but the hardening is not removed completely in the weld metal and the fusion zone after PWHT. In as-welded condition, the microstructure of the weld metal is coarse lath martensite, and softened zone in heat-affected zone (HAZ) consists of a mixture of tempered martensite and ferrite. After PWHT, a lot of carbides precipitate at all zones in weld joints. The microstructure of softened zone transforms to tempered sorbite. Tensile strength of the weld metal is higher than that of HAZ and base metal regardless of PWHT. However, the weld metal has poor toughness without PWHT. The impact energy of the weld metal after PWHT reaches almost the same level as the base metal. So it is concluded that microstructure and mechanical properties of the CLAM steel welded joints can be improved by a reasonable PWHT.

  6. Influence of Tool Rotational Speed and Post-Weld Heat Treatments on Friction Stir Welded Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manugula, Vijaya L.; Rajulapati, Koteswararao V.; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan; Mythili, R.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2017-08-01

    The effects of tool rotational speed (200 and 700 rpm) on evolving microstructure during friction stir welding (FSW) of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel (RAFMS) in the stir zone (SZ), thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ), and heat-affected zone (HAZ) have been explored in detail. The influence of post-weld direct tempering (PWDT: 1033 K (760 °C)/ 90 minutes + air cooling) and post-weld normalizing and tempering (PWNT: 1253 K (980 °C)/30 minutes + air cooling + tempering 1033 K (760 °C)/90 minutes + air cooling) treatments on microstructure and mechanical properties has also been assessed. The base metal (BM) microstructure was tempered martensite comprising Cr-rich M23C6 on prior austenite grain and lath boundaries with intra-lath precipitation of V- and Ta-rich MC precipitates. The tool rotational speed exerted profound influence on evolving microstructure in SZ, TMAZ, and HAZ in the as-welded and post-weld heat-treated states. Very high proportion of prior austenitic grains and martensite lath boundaries in SZ and TMAZ in the as-welded state showed lack of strengthening precipitates, though very high hardness was recorded in SZ irrespective of the tool speed. Very fine-needle-like Fe3C precipitates were found at both the rotational speeds in SZ. The Fe3C was dissolved and fresh precipitation of strengthening precipitates occurred on both prior austenite grain and sub-grain boundaries in SZ during PWNT and PWDT. The post-weld direct tempering caused coarsening and coalescence of strengthening precipitates, in both matrix and grain boundary regions of TMAZ and HAZ, which led to inhomogeneous distribution of hardness across the weld joint. The PWNT heat treatment has shown fresh precipitation of M23C6 on lath and grain boundaries and very fine V-rich MC precipitates in the intragranular regions, which is very much similar to that prevailed in BM prior to FSW. Both the PWDT and PWNT treatments caused considerable reduction in the hardness of SZ

  7. Who's working on giant clam culture?

    OpenAIRE

    Vega, M.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    An examination is made of the literature on giant clam (Tridacna ) culture methods induced spawning, larvae, larval and post-larval rearing and socioeconomics. ASFA and the ICLARM library and professional staff collections were used for the search.

  8. Immune- and Pollution-mediated DNA Damage in Two Wild Mya arenaria Clam Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Gagné

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In aquatic environments, genotoxicity results from the effects of pollution combined with the inflammatory response triggered by the immune system. Indeed, the production of nitrosylated DNA and proteins are though to arise from the production of peroxinitrite during phagocytosis and inflammation. The purpose of this study was to examine new DNA biomarkers that differentiate between immune- and pollution-mediated genotoxicity in wild clam populations. Intertidal clam populations were sampled and analyzed for gonadal DNA strand breaks, DNA nitrosylation and xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR activity (purine salvage pathway. The clam weight-to-shell-length ratio, the gonado-somatic index (GSI, age status, lipid peroxidation, xenobiotic conjugation activity (glutathione S-transferase (GST and phagocytic activity were examined to shed light on their relationships with the observed genotoxic endpoints. XOR activity and DNA strand breaks were generally elevated at polluted sites and correlated significantly with clam weight-to-shell-length ratios and DNA nitrosylation. DNA nitrosylation was also higher at some sites and correlated significantly with phagocytic activity and with DNA strand breaks. This study showed that DNA strand breaks were associated with both immune- and pollution-mediated effects. This suggests that there is a loss of DNA repair capacity due to the combined effects of aging, pollution and immune response in wild clam populations that are impacted by anthropogenic activity.

  9. Creep deformation and rupture behaviour of 9Cr–1W–0.2V–0.06Ta Reduced Activation Ferritic–Martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, K.; Mythili, R.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Saroja, S.; Mathew, M.D.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Creep tests on broad temperature and stress ranges were carried out. ► Microstructural instability on creep and thermal exposures were studied using TEM. ► Creep damage tolerance factor of the material was estimated. - Abstract: This paper presents the creep deformation and rupture behaviour of indigenously produced 9Cr–1W–0.2V–0.06Ta Reduced Activation Ferritic–Martensitic (RAFM) steel for fusion reactor application. Creep studies were carried out at 773, 823 and 873 K over a stress range of 100–300 MPa. The creep deformation of the steel was found to proceed with relatively shorter primary regime followed by an extended tertiary regime with virtually no secondary regime. The variation of minimum creep rate of the material with applied stress followed a power law relation, ε m = Aσ n , with stress exponent value ‘n’ decreasing with increase in temperature. The product of minimum creep rate and creep rupture life was found to obey the modified Monkman–Grant relation. The time to onset of tertiary stage of deformation was directly proportional to rupture life. TEM studies revealed relatively large changes in martensitic sub-structure and coarsening of precipitates in the steel on creep exposure as compared to thermal exposure. Microstructural degradation was considered as the prime cause of extended tertiary stage of creep deformation, which was also reflected in the damage tolerance factor λ with a value more than 2.5. In view of the microstructural instability of the material on creep exposure, the variation of minimum creep rate with stress and temperature did not obey Dorn's equation modified by invoking Lagneborg and Bergman's concepts of back stress.

  10. Influence of different cooling rates on the microstructure of the HAZ and welding CCT diagram of CLAM steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Shuhui, E-mail: shzheng@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Wu Qingsheng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Huang Qunying [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Liu Shaojun; Han Yangyang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2011-10-15

    The evolution of microstructure in the weld HAZ (Heat Affected Zone) under welding thermal cycle was simulated by Gleeble-1500. The microstructures and properties of HAZ at different cooling rates were investigated by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microhardness test. The results showed that when the cooling rates ranged from 3600 K/min to 60 K/min, fully martensitic transformations were achieved, and the cooling rates had little influence on the microstructure and microhardness of martensite. The maximum cooling rate to form ferrite was 60 K/min. When the cooling rates ranged from 60 K/min to 1 K/min, the microhardness of the HAZ began to decrease due to the presence of ferrite, and the lath sizes grew up to 0.13-0.15 {mu}m. The critical cooling rate to gain fully ferrite was found to be slower than 1 K/min. The welding CCT diagram of CLAM steel was constructed and it showed that there were ferrite and martensite transformation regions only. The diagram made it possible to predict the microstructures and properties of HAZ and became an important tool to evaluate weldability of CLAM steel.

  11. Influence of different cooling rates on the microstructure of the HAZ and welding CCT diagram of CLAM steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Shuhui; Wu Qingsheng; Huang Qunying; Liu Shaojun; Han Yangyang

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure in the weld HAZ (Heat Affected Zone) under welding thermal cycle was simulated by Gleeble-1500. The microstructures and properties of HAZ at different cooling rates were investigated by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microhardness test. The results showed that when the cooling rates ranged from 3600 K/min to 60 K/min, fully martensitic transformations were achieved, and the cooling rates had little influence on the microstructure and microhardness of martensite. The maximum cooling rate to form ferrite was 60 K/min. When the cooling rates ranged from 60 K/min to 1 K/min, the microhardness of the HAZ began to decrease due to the presence of ferrite, and the lath sizes grew up to 0.13-0.15 μm. The critical cooling rate to gain fully ferrite was found to be slower than 1 K/min. The welding CCT diagram of CLAM steel was constructed and it showed that there were ferrite and martensite transformation regions only. The diagram made it possible to predict the microstructures and properties of HAZ and became an important tool to evaluate weldability of CLAM steel.

  12. Microstructural Variations Across a Dissimilar 316L Austenitic: 9Cr Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel Weld Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Karthikeyan, T.; Dasgupta, Arup; Sudha, C.; Hajra, R. N.; Albert, S. K.; Saroja, S.; Jayakumar, T.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discuss the microstructural variations across a dissimilar weld joint between SS316 and 9Cr-RAFM steel and its modifications on post weld heat treatments (PWHT). Detailed characterization showed a mixed microstructure of austenite and martensite in the weld which is in agreement with the phases predicted using Schaeffler diagram based on composition measurements. The presence of very low volume fraction of δ-ferrite in SS316L has been identified employing state of the art electron back-scattered diffraction technique. PWHT of the ferritic steel did not reduce the hardness in the weld metal. Thermal exposure at 973 K (700 °C) showed a progressive reduction in hardness of weld joint with duration of treatment except in austenitic base metal. However, diffusion annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) for 100 hours resulted in an unexpected increase in hardness of weld metal, which is a manifestation of the dilution effects and enrichment of Ni on the transformation characteristics of the weld zone. Migration of carbon from ferritic steel aided the precipitation of fine carbides in the austenitic base metal on annealing at 973 K (700 °C); but enhanced diffusion at 1073 K (880 °C) resulted in coarsening of carbides and thereby reduction of hardness.

  13. Gene transcription and biomarker responses in the clam Ruditapes philippinarum after exposure to ibuprofen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milan, Massimo; Pauletto, Marianna; Patarnello, Tomaso; Bargelloni, Luca; Marin, Maria Gabriella; Matozzo, Valerio

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals are a class of emerging environmental contaminants that continuously enter aquatic environments. Presently, little information is available about the effects of these substances on non-target organisms, such as bivalves. We investigated the effects of ibuprofen (IBU) on the clam Ruditapes philippinarum. Clams were exposed for 1, 3, 5 and 7 days to 0, 100 and 1000 μg IBU/L, and established biomarker responses (haemolymph lysozyme, gill acetylcholinesterase and digestive gland superoxide dismutase activities) as well as digestive gland transcriptome were evaluated. A two-way ANOVA revealed significant effects of both “IBU concentration” and “exposure duration” on biomarker responses. Overall, the enzyme activities were generally lower in IBU-exposed clams than in controls. Although limited knowledge of the mollusc transcriptome makes it difficult to interpret the effects of IBU on clams, the gene transcription analysis using DNA microarrays enabled the identification of the putative molecular mode of action of the IBU. The functional analysis of differentially transcribed genes suggests that IBU can interfere with various signalling pathways in clams, such as arachidonic acid metabolism, apoptosis, peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptors, and nuclear factor-kappa B. In addition, several genes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics (e.g., glutathione S-transferase, sulfotransferase, cytochrome P450) were also found to be significantly affected by IBU exposure. In summary, the integrated approach of gene transcription analysis and biomarker responses facilitated the elucidation of the putative mechanisms of action of IBU in non-target species.

  14. Direct contribution of clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) to benthic fluxes, nitrification, denitrification and nitrous oxide emission in a farmed sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, David T.; Nizzoli, Daniele; Fano, Elisa A.; Viaroli, Pierluigi

    2015-03-01

    The influence of the manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) on N-cycle processes, and oxygen and nutrient fluxes in a farmed sediment was investigated using a multiple core incubation approach and parallel incubations of individual clams. Clam population/biomass density varied ∼8-fold between cores and all sediment-water column solute (O2. N2, N2O, NH4+, NOX and DIN) fluxes and benthic process (N-regeneration, nitrification and denitrification) rates were strongly and significantly correlated with clam density/biomass. Isolated clams exhibited high rates of respiration, N-excretion, nitrification and denitrification of 2050 ± 70, 395 ± 49, 201 ± 42 and 235 ± 40 nmol individual-1 h-1, respectively. The direct contribution of the clams and their associated microbiota to benthic processes was estimated by multiplying the per individual rates by the number of clams in each incubated core. The clams on average directly accounted for 64-133% of total rates of sediment oxygen demand, N-regeneration, nitrification and denitrification, indicating that they regulated processes primarily through their own metabolic activity and that of bacteria that colonise them. Clams and the farmed sediments were significant sources of the greenhouse gas N2O, but this was primarily due to their high nitrification and denitrification rates, rather than high specific N2O yields, as N2O emissions represented farmed sediments had a high denitrification efficiency of 67 ± 10%, but this ecosystem service came at the environmental cost of increased N-regeneration and N2O emission rates. The measured N2O emissions indicate that bivalve aquaculture may be a significant source of N2O. It is therefore recommended that N2O emissions should be included in the impact assessments of current and future bivalve-farming projects.

  15. Evaluation of mechanically alloyed Cu-based powders as filler alloy for brazing tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Prado, J.; Sánchez, M.; Ureña, A.

    2017-07-01

    80Cu-20Ti powders were evaluated for their use as filler alloy for high temperature brazing of tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (Eurofer), and its application for the first wall of the DEMO fusion reactor. The use of alloyed powders has not been widely considered for brazing purposes and could improve the operational brazeability of the studied system due to its narrower melting range, determined by DTA analysis, which enhances the spreading capabilities of the filler. Ti contained in the filler composition acts as an activator element, reacting and forming several interfacial layers at the Eurofer-braze, which enhances the wettability properties and chemical interaction at the brazing interface. Brazing thermal cycle also activated the diffusion phenomena, which mainly affected to the Eurofer alloying elements causing in it a softening band of approximately 400 μm of thickness. However, this softening effect did not degrade the shear strength of the brazed joints (94 ± 23 MPa), because failure during testing was always located at the tungsten-braze interface.

  16. Evaluation of mechanically alloyed Cu-based powders as filler alloy for brazing tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, J. de, E-mail: javier.deprado@urjc.es; Sánchez, M.; Ureña, A.

    2017-07-15

    80Cu-20Ti powders were evaluated for their use as filler alloy for high temperature brazing of tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (Eurofer), and its application for the first wall of the DEMO fusion reactor. The use of alloyed powders has not been widely considered for brazing purposes and could improve the operational brazeability of the studied system due to its narrower melting range, determined by DTA analysis, which enhances the spreading capabilities of the filler. Ti contained in the filler composition acts as an activator element, reacting and forming several interfacial layers at the Eurofer-braze, which enhances the wettability properties and chemical interaction at the brazing interface. Brazing thermal cycle also activated the diffusion phenomena, which mainly affected to the Eurofer alloying elements causing in it a softening band of approximately 400 μm of thickness. However, this softening effect did not degrade the shear strength of the brazed joints (94 ± 23 MPa), because failure during testing was always located at the tungsten-braze interface. - Highlights: •W-Eurofer brazed joints, manufactured using Cu-based mechanically alloyed powders as filler is proposed. •The benefits derivate from the alloyed composition could improve the operational brazeability of the studied system. •Tested pre-alloyed fillers have a more homogeneous melting stage which enhances its spreading and flowing capabilities. •This behaviour could lead to work with higher heating rates and lower brazing temperatures.

  17. The Role of Symbiotic Zooxanthellae on Giant Clam Nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Ambariyanto

    1997-01-01

    Zooxanthellae, Symbiodinium sp, are single cell dinoflagellate algae known to live in association with many marine invertebrates such as hermatypic corals, sea anemones, jellyfish and giant clams (family Tridacnidae). In giant clams, these photosynthetic algae are located in a tubular system (known as Z tube system) which occurs within the clams. Apart from filter feeding, the nutrition of the clams is provided by zooxanthellae. These algae are capable of translocating part of their photosynt...

  18. The Clam Trail: Blending Science Education, Public Art, and Tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscio, Cara; Flimlin, Gef; Bushnell, Rick

    2011-01-01

    The Barnegat Bay Shellfish Restoration's Clam Trail is an award-winning scavenger hunt that combines science education, public art, and tourism. This family adventure has participants seeking out giant painted fiberglass clams, upweller clam nurseries, and points of interest in search of science facts to record on their forms. Upon returning these…

  19. Effects of Ti and Ta addition on microstructure stability and tensile properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel for nuclear fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Kyu; Lee, Ji Won; Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Chang Hoon; Hong, Hyun Uk

    2018-03-01

    The effects of Ti and Ta addition on microstructure stability and tensile properties of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel have been investigated. Ti addition of 0.06 wt% to conventional RAFM reference base steel (Fe-9.3Cr-0.93W-0.22V-0.094Ta-0.1C) was intended to promote the precipitation of nano-sized (Ti,W) carbides with a high resistance to coarsening. In addition, the Ti addition was substituted for 0.094 wt% Ta. The Ti-added RAFM steel (Ti-RAFM) exhibited a higher yield strength (ΔYS = 32 MPa) at 600 °C than the reference base steel due to additional precipitation hardening by (Ti,W)-rich MX with an average size of 6.1 nm and the area fraction of 2.39%. However, after thermal exposure at 600 °C for 1000 h, this Ti-RAFM was more susceptible to degradation than the reference base steel; the block width increased by 77.6% in Ti-RAFM after thermal exposure while the reference base steel showed only 9.1% increase. In order to suppress diffusion rate during thermal exposure, the large-sized Ta element with low activation was added to Ti-RAFM. The Ta-added Ti-RAFM steel exhibited good properties with outstanding microstructure stability. Quantitative comparison in microstructures was discussed with a consideration of Ti and Ta addition.

  20. Phylogenetic diversity and functional characterization of the Manila clam microbiota: a culture-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Laura; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Raymond, Natalie; Henriques, Isabel; Garabetian, Frédéric; Alves, Artur

    2017-09-01

    According to the hologenome theory, the microbiota contributes to the fitness of the holobiont having an important role in its adaptation, survival, development, health, and evolution. Environmental stress also affects the microbiota and its capability to assist the holobiont in coping with stress factors. Here, we analyzed the diversity of cultivable bacteria associated with Manila clam tissues (mantle, gills, hemolymph) in two non-contaminated sites (Portugal and France) and one metal-contaminated site (Portugal). A total of 240 isolates were obtained. Representative isolates (n = 198) of the overall diversity were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing and subjected to functional characterization. Isolates affiliated with Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. Proteobacteria (mostly Pseudoalteromonadaceae and Vibrionaceae) were dominant in non-contaminated sites while Actinobacteria (mostly Microbacteriaceae) dominated in the metal-contaminated site. The main factor affecting the microbiota composition was contamination. No significant differences were observed between clam tissues and geographic regions. Several isolates tested positive for antibacterial activity, biofilm formation, protease, and siderophore production. The results show that the Manila clam harbors a diverse microbiota that may contribute to clam protection and overall fitness, as well as to its adaptation to stressful environments. In addition, the Manila clam microbiota is revealed as a promising source of novel probiotics with potential application in aquaculture.

  1. Impact of High Hydrostatic Pressure on the Shelling Efficacy, Physicochemical Properties, and Microstructure of Fresh Razor Clam (Sinonovacula constricta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Xiao-Ting; Cui, Yan; Lin, Xu-Dong; Yu, Jing-Feng; Liao, Xiao-Jun; Ling, Jian-Gang; Shang, Hai-Tao

    2018-02-01

    The effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatments (200, 300, and 400 MPa for 1, 3, 5 and 10 min) on the shelling efficacy (the rate of shelling, the rate of integrity and yield of razor clam meat) and the physicochemical (drip loss, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, lipid oxidation, Ca 2+ -ATPase activity, myofibrillar protein content), microbiological (total viable counts) and microstructural properties of fresh razor clam (Sinonovacula constricta) were investigated. HHP treatments significantly (P hydrostatic pressure (HHP) is now well known as a nonthermal processing technology and becoming increasingly acknowledged. However, it has not been widely applied to shell seafood due to its uncertain influence on its quality and shelling property. This study could provide valuable information regarding the shelling efficacy, physicochemical properties, and microstructure of razor clam treated by HHP. And it demonstrated that HHP showed a positive impact on quality of razor clam treated by HHP. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  2. Martensitic phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petry, W.; Neuhaus, J.

    1996-01-01

    Many elements transform from a high temperature bcc phase to a more dense packed temperature phase. The great majority of these transitions are of 1st order, displacive and reconstructive. The lattice potentials which govern these martensitic transitions can be probed by inelastic neutron scattering, thereby answering fundamental questions like : Will the transition be announced by dynamical or static fluctuations? What are the trajectories for the displacements needed for the transformation? Does the vibrational entropy stabilize the high temperature phase? Are the unusual transport properties in these materials related to their ability to transform? (author) 17 figs., 1 tab., 46 refs

  3. Martensitic phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petry, W; Neuhaus, J [Techn. Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E13, Munich (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Many elements transform from a high temperature bcc phase to a more dense packed temperature phase. The great majority of these transitions are of 1st order, displacive and reconstructive. The lattice potentials which govern these martensitic transitions can be probed by inelastic neutron scattering, thereby answering fundamental questions like : Will the transition be announced by dynamical or static fluctuations? What are the trajectories for the displacements needed for the transformation? Does the vibrational entropy stabilize the high temperature phase? Are the unusual transport properties in these materials related to their ability to transform? (author) 17 figs., 1 tab., 46 refs.

  4. Synergistic effects on dislocation loops in reduced-activation martensitic steel investigated by single and sequential hydrogen/helium ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weiping [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Luo, Fengfeng [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Institute of Applied Physics, Jiangxi Academy of Sciences, Nanchang 330029 (China); Yu, Yanxia; Zheng, Zhongcheng; Shen, Zhenyu [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Ren, Yaoyao [Center for Electron Microscopy, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Suo, Jinping [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Single-beam and sequential-beam irradiations were performed to investigate the H/He synergistic effect on dislocation loops in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels. The irradiations were carried out with 10 keV H{sup +}, 18 keV He{sup +} and 160 keV Ar{sup +}, alone and in combination at 723 K. He{sup +} single-beam irradiation induced much larger dislocation loops than that induced by both H{sup +} and Ar{sup +} single-beam irradiation. H{sup +} post-irradiation after He{sup +} irradiation further increased the size of dislocation loops, whilst He{sup +} post-irradiation or Ar{sup +} post-irradiation following H{sup +} irradiation only slightly increased the size of dislocation loops. The experiment results indicate that pre-implanted H{sup +} can drastically inhibit the growth while post-implanted H{sup +} can significantly enhance the growth of dislocation loops induced by He{sup +} irradiation. The mechanisms behind the complex synergistic phenomena between H and He and the different roles that H and He played in the growth of dislocation loops are discussed.

  5. A study on influence of heat input variation on microstructure of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel weld metal produced by GTAW process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, B.; Srinivasan, G.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel is a major structural material for test blanket module (TBM) to be incorporated in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) programme to study the breeding of tritium in fusion reactors. This material has been mainly developed to achieve significant reduction in the induced radioactivity from the structural material used. Fabrication of TBM involves extensive welding, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process is one of the welding processes being considered for this purpose. In the present work, the effect of heat input on microstructure of indigenously developed RAFM steel weld metal produced by GTAW process has been studied. Autogenous bead-on-plate welding, autogenous butt-welding, butt-welding with filler wire addition, and pulsed welding on RAFMS have been carried out using GTAW process respectively. The weld metal is found to contain δ-ferrite and its volume fraction increased with increase in heat input. This fact suggests that δ-ferrite content in the weld metal is influenced by the cooling rate during welding. It was also observed that the hardness of the weld metal decreased with increase in δ-ferrite content. This paper highlights the effect of heat input and PWHT duration on microstructure and hardness of welds.

  6. Martensitic transformation in zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deville, Sylvain; Guenin, Gerard; Chevalier, Jerome

    2004-01-01

    We investigate by atomic force microscopy (AFM) the surface relief resulting from martensitic tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation induced by low temperature autoclave aging in ceria-stabilized zirconia. AFM appears as a very powerful tool to investigate martensite relief quantitatively and with a great precision. The crystallographic phenomenological theory is used to predict the expected relief induced by the transformation, for the particular case of lattice correspondence ABC1, where tetragonal c axis becomes the monoclinic c axis. A model for variants spatial arrangement for this lattice correspondence is proposed and validated by the experimental observations. An excellent agreement is found between the quantitative calculations outputs and the experimental measurements at nanometer scale yielded by AFM. All the observed features are explained fully quantitatively by the calculations, with discrepancies between calculations and quantitative experimental measurements within the measurements and calculations precision range. In particular, the crystallographic orientation of the transformed grains is determined from the local characteristics of transformation induced relief. It is finally demonstrated that the strain energy is the controlling factor of the surface transformation induced by low temperature autoclave treatments in this material

  7. Light induces changes in activities of Na+/K+(NH4+-ATPase, H+/K+(NH4+-ATPase and glutamine synthetase in tissues involved directly or indirectly in light-enhanced calcification in the giant clam Tridacna squamosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Y K Ip

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effects of 12 h of exposure to light, as compared with 12 h of exposure to darkness (control, on enzymatic activities of transporters involved in the transport of NH4+ or H+, and activities of enzymes involved in converting NH4+ to glutamate/glutamine in inner mantle, outer mantle and ctenidia of the giant clam, Tridacna squamosa. Exposure to light resulted in a significant increase in the effectiveness of NH4+ in substitution for K+ to activate Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA, manifested as a significant increase in the Na+/NH4+-activated-NKA activity in the inner mantle. However, similar phenomena were not observed in the extensible outer mantle, which contained abundant symbiotic zooxanthellae. Hence, during light-enhanced calcification, H+ released from CaCO3 deposition could react with NH3 to form NH4+ in the extrapallial fluid, and NH4+ could probably be transported into the shell-facing inner mantle epithelium through NKA. Light also induced an increase in the activity of glutamine synthetase, which converts NH4+ and glutamate to glutamine, in the inner mantle. Taken together, these results explained observations reported elsewhere that light induced a significant increase in pH and a significant decrease in ammonia concentration in the extrapallial fluid, as well as a significant increase in the glutamine concentration in the inner mantle, of T. squamosa. Exposure of T. squamosa to light also led to a significant decrease in the N-ethylmaleimide (NEM-sensitive-V-H+-ATPase (VATPase in the inner mantle, and significant increases in the Na+/K+-activated-NKA, H+/NH4+-activated-H+/K+-ATPase and NEM-sensitive-VATPase activities in ctenidia, indicating that light-enhanced calcification might perturb Na+ homeostasis and acid/base balance in the hemolymph, and might involve the active uptake of NH4+ from the environment. This is the first report on light having direct enhancing effects on activities of certain

  8. Compatibility of CLAM steel weldments with static LiPb alloy at 550 Degree-Sign C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xizhang, E-mail: kernel.chen@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Shen Zheng; Li Peng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Madigan, Bruce [Montana Tech. of University of Montana, Butte, MT 59701 (United States); Huang Yuming; Lei Yucheng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Huang Qunying [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 031 (China); Zhou Jianzhong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, ZhenJiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosion extent of weld zone is higher than that of HAZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thick martensite lath and large residual stress lead to higher corrosion rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cr on the surface of weld zone decreases by about 50%, W increases slightly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After 500 h and 1000 h of corrosion, weight losses are 0.272 mg/cm{sup 2} and 0.403 mg/cm{sup 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With the increasing of corrosion time, the corrosion rate decreases significantly. - Abstract: CLAM steel is considered as a structural material to be used in the Test Blanket Module as a barrier or blanket adjacent to liquid LiPb in fusion reactors. In this paper, CLAM steel is welded by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, and the compatibility of the weldment with liquid LiPb is tested. Specimens were corroded in static liquid LiPb, with corrosion times of 500 h and 1000 h, at 550 Degree-Sign C, and the corresponding weight losses are 0.272 mg/cm{sup 2} and 0.403 mg/cm{sup 2} respectively. Also the corrosion rate decreases with increased corrosion time. In the as-welded condition, corrosion resistance of the weld zone is higher than that of the HAZ (Heat Affected Zone). Likely, thick martensite lath and large residual stresses at the welding zone result in higher corrosion rates. The compatibility of CLAM steel weld joints with high temperature liquid LiPb can be improved to some extent through a post-weld tempering process. The surface of the as-welded CLAM steel is uniformly corroded and the concentration of Cr on the surface decreases by about 50% after corrosion. Penetration of LiPb into the matrix is observed for neither the as-welded nor the as-tempered conditions. Influenced by thick martensite lath and large residual stresses, the welded area, especially the weld zone, is easily corroded, therefore it is of primary importance to protect the welded area in the solid blanket of the fusion reactor.

  9. Synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen for bubble swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel under sequential helium and hydrogen irradiation at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wenhui [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen, Jihong; Luo, Fengfeng; Li, Tiecheng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Ren, Yaoyao [Center for Electron Microscopy, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Suo, Jinping; Yang, Feng [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • Helium/hydrogen synergistic effect can increase irradiation swelling of RAFM steel. • Hydrogen can be trapped to the outer surface of helium bubbles. • Too large a helium bubble can become movable. • Point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations at high temperature. • The peak swelling temperature for RAFM steel is 450 °C. - Abstract: In order to investigate the synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen on swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel, specimens were separately irradiated by single He{sup +} beam and sequential He{sup +} and H{sup +} beams at different temperatures from 250 to 650 °C. Transmission electron microscope observation showed that implantation of hydrogen into the specimens pre-irradiated by helium can result in obvious enhancement of bubble size and swelling rate which can be regarded as a consequence of hydrogen being trapped by helium bubbles. But when temperature increased, Ostwald ripening mechanism would become dominant, besides, too large a bubble could become mobile and swallow many tiny bubbles on their way moving, reducing bubble number density. And these effects were most remarkable at 450 °C which was the peak bubble swelling temperature for RAMF steel. When temperature was high enough, say above 450, point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations or surface. As a consequence, helium could no longer effectively diffuse and clustering in materials and bubble formation was suppressed. When temperature was above 500, helium bubbles would become unstable and decompose or migrate out of surface. Finally no bubble was observed at 650 °C.

  10. Synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen for bubble swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel under sequential helium and hydrogen irradiation at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Wenhui; Guo, Liping; Chen, Jihong; Luo, Fengfeng; Li, Tiecheng; Ren, Yaoyao; Suo, Jinping; Yang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Helium/hydrogen synergistic effect can increase irradiation swelling of RAFM steel. • Hydrogen can be trapped to the outer surface of helium bubbles. • Too large a helium bubble can become movable. • Point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations at high temperature. • The peak swelling temperature for RAFM steel is 450 °C. - Abstract: In order to investigate the synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen on swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel, specimens were separately irradiated by single He + beam and sequential He + and H + beams at different temperatures from 250 to 650 °C. Transmission electron microscope observation showed that implantation of hydrogen into the specimens pre-irradiated by helium can result in obvious enhancement of bubble size and swelling rate which can be regarded as a consequence of hydrogen being trapped by helium bubbles. But when temperature increased, Ostwald ripening mechanism would become dominant, besides, too large a bubble could become mobile and swallow many tiny bubbles on their way moving, reducing bubble number density. And these effects were most remarkable at 450 °C which was the peak bubble swelling temperature for RAMF steel. When temperature was high enough, say above 450, point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations or surface. As a consequence, helium could no longer effectively diffuse and clustering in materials and bubble formation was suppressed. When temperature was above 500, helium bubbles would become unstable and decompose or migrate out of surface. Finally no bubble was observed at 650 °C

  11. Martensitic cubic → tetragonal transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, H.

    1983-01-01

    Indium-thallium alloys containing 14 to 30% At. Tl have a cubic face-centred beta phase wich changes into a tetragonal face-centred alpha martensite during solidification. The martensite contains twin crystals that are large enough to be seen by means of a light microscope. The phenomenological crystallographic martensite theory was used to calculate Miller's index of the habit plane, the formation of the surface relief, the orientation relations and the critical thickness ratio of the twins. In a beta monocrystal frequently only one of the 24 crystallographic possible habit planes are formed at one end of the sample and migrate through the whole crystal when the temperature drops. Externally applied tension and compression influence in different ways the direction in which the habit plane moves and can even destroy the twinned structure, i.e. they can modify the substructure of the martensite crystal. This induces superelasticity, an effect that has also been described quantitatively. (author)

  12. Analysis of trace elements in the shell of asari clams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, J.; Sakamoto, W.; Arai, N.; Yoshida, K.

    1999-01-01

    Strontium concentration in the shells of asari clams collected at different locations was analyzed by PIXE. The Sr concentration of external surface of shell umbo was ranged from 1000 to 3500 ppm for individuals. The Sr concentration of clams collected at Shirahama showed positive correlation with shell length, whereas clams collected at Maizuru did not show significant correlation. This result may be caused from the difference of the spawning seasons between two areas. (author)

  13. Intra-specific diet shift in manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) as revealed by carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes and fatty acid biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Y.; Shin, K.

    2011-12-01

    Manila clams sampled in Seonjae Island, Korea with shell lengths (SL) below 19.76 mm in average showed a significantly depleted carbon and nitrogen isotope values (Pcultured in IFHRI. The result of fatty acid composition of manila clams in relation to size or growth rate suggests that fast growing clams would have rapid metabolism of fatty acids not required by the animals and an accumulation of the essential fatty acids (PUFA). In addition, their higher energy requirement and more active state of development would further diminish lipid reserve of the species.

  14. Gene transcription and biomarker responses in the clam Ruditapes philippinarum after exposure to ibuprofen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milan, Massimo; Pauletto, Marianna; Patarnello, Tomaso; Bargelloni, Luca [Department of Comparative Biomedicine and Food Science, University of Padova, Viale dell' Universita 16, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Marin, Maria Gabriella [Department of Biology, University of Padova, Via Ugo Bassi 58/B, 35131 Padova (Italy); Matozzo, Valerio, E-mail: matozzo@bio.unipd.it [Department of Biology, University of Padova, Via Ugo Bassi 58/B, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    Pharmaceuticals are a class of emerging environmental contaminants that continuously enter aquatic environments. Presently, little information is available about the effects of these substances on non-target organisms, such as bivalves. We investigated the effects of ibuprofen (IBU) on the clam Ruditapes philippinarum. Clams were exposed for 1, 3, 5 and 7 days to 0, 100 and 1000 {mu}g IBU/L, and established biomarker responses (haemolymph lysozyme, gill acetylcholinesterase and digestive gland superoxide dismutase activities) as well as digestive gland transcriptome were evaluated. A two-way ANOVA revealed significant effects of both 'IBU concentration' and 'exposure duration' on biomarker responses. Overall, the enzyme activities were generally lower in IBU-exposed clams than in controls. Although limited knowledge of the mollusc transcriptome makes it difficult to interpret the effects of IBU on clams, the gene transcription analysis using DNA microarrays enabled the identification of the putative molecular mode of action of the IBU. The functional analysis of differentially transcribed genes suggests that IBU can interfere with various signalling pathways in clams, such as arachidonic acid metabolism, apoptosis, peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptors, and nuclear factor-kappa B. In addition, several genes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics (e.g., glutathione S-transferase, sulfotransferase, cytochrome P450) were also found to be significantly affected by IBU exposure. In summary, the integrated approach of gene transcription analysis and biomarker responses facilitated the elucidation of the putative mechanisms of action of IBU in non-target species.

  15. Allometric relationships in the bioconcentration of heavy metals by the edible tropical clam Gafrarium tumidum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedouin, L.; Metian, M.; Teyssie, J.-L.; Fowler, S.W.; Fichez, R.; Warnau, M.

    2006-01-01

    Although metal contamination is a problem of major concern in the lagoon of New Caledonia due to intense mining activities conducted on land, very little is known on the metal ecotoxicology of local marine organisms. The clam Gafrarium tumidum was investigated to assess its usefulness as a bioindicator species of metal contamination in this lagoon. More particularly, allometric relationships between metal accumulation and clam size were determined for five common metals in New Caledonian lagoon waters (Cd, Cr, Co, Zn and Ag) using a highly sensitive radiotracer technique. Experimental results showed that allometric relationships were dependent on the element and on the body compartment considered. As a rule, allometric relationships of metal concentration factor were more pronounced in shell than in soft parts. Significant relationships with clam size for Cd, Cr, Co and Zn followed inverse power functions. In contrast, the degree of Ag bioaccumulation was positively correlated with size. In view of the literature on Ag in bivalves, the latter observation suggests the occurrence of a specific detoxification mechanism (sequestration) that would be more efficient in old individuals. Overall, the experimental results indicate that the use of G. tumidum as a bioindicator in monitoring programmes requires selecting individuals of a specific size range in order to obtain comparable information about ambient metal levels. Since the size effect is greatest among smaller individuals, it is recommended to select clams with a shell width greater than 35 mm

  16. Cadmium sulfide quantum dots induce oxidative stress and behavioral impairments in the marine clam Scrobicularia plana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Zalouk-Vergnoux, Aurore; Poirier, Laurence; Lopes, Christelle; Risso-de-Faverney, Christine; Guibbolini, Marielle; Gilliland, Douglas; Perrein-Ettajani, Hanane; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots have a number of current applications in electronics and solar cells and significant future potential in medicine. The aim of the present study was to examine the toxic effects of CdS quantum dots on the marine clam Scrobicularia plana exposed for 14 d to these nanomaterials (10 µg Cd L(-1) ) in natural seawater and to compare them with soluble Cd. Measurement of labile Cd released from CdS quantum dots showed that 52% of CdS quantum dots remained in the nanoparticulate form. Clams accumulated the same levels of Cd regardless of the form in which it was delivered (soluble Cd vs CdS quantum dots). However, significant changes in biochemical responses were observed in clams exposed to CdS quantum dots compared with soluble Cd. Increased activities of catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were significantly higher in clams exposed in seawater to Cd as the nanoparticulate versus the soluble form, suggesting a specific nano effect. The behavior of S. plana in sediment showed impairments of foot movements only in the case of exposure to CdS quantum dots. The results show that oxidative stress and behavior biomarkers are sensitive predictors of CdS quantum dots toxicity in S. plana. Such responses, appearing well before changes might occur at the population level, demonstrate the usefulness of this model species and type of biomarker in the assessment of nanoparticle contamination in estuarine ecosystems. © 2015 SETAC.

  17. Allometric relationships in the bioconcentration of heavy metals by the edible tropical clam Gafrarium tumidum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedouin, L. [International Atomic Energy Agency-Marine Environment Laboratory, 4 Quai Antoine 1er, MC-98000 Monaco (Monaco); Laboratoire de Biologie et d' Environnement Marins, FRE 2727, La Rochelle University, 22 Av. Michel Crepeau, F-17000 La Rochelle (France); Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement, Centre d' Oceanologie de Marseille, Station Marine d' Endoume, Rue de la Batterie des Lions, F-13007 Marseille (France); Metian, M. [International Atomic Energy Agency-Marine Environment Laboratory, 4 Quai Antoine 1er, MC-98000 Monaco (Monaco); Teyssie, J.-L. [International Atomic Energy Agency-Marine Environment Laboratory, 4 Quai Antoine 1er, MC-98000 Monaco (Monaco); Fowler, S.W. [International Atomic Energy Agency-Marine Environment Laboratory, 4 Quai Antoine 1er, MC-98000 Monaco (Monaco); Fichez, R. [Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement, Centre d' Oceanologie de Marseille, Station Marine d' Endoume, Rue de la Batterie des Lions, F-13007 Marseille (France); Warnau, M. [International Atomic Energy Agency-Marine Environment Laboratory, 4 Quai Antoine 1er, MC-98000 Monaco (Monaco)]. E-mail: m.warnau@iaea.org

    2006-07-31

    Although metal contamination is a problem of major concern in the lagoon of New Caledonia due to intense mining activities conducted on land, very little is known on the metal ecotoxicology of local marine organisms. The clam Gafrarium tumidum was investigated to assess its usefulness as a bioindicator species of metal contamination in this lagoon. More particularly, allometric relationships between metal accumulation and clam size were determined for five common metals in New Caledonian lagoon waters (Cd, Cr, Co, Zn and Ag) using a highly sensitive radiotracer technique. Experimental results showed that allometric relationships were dependent on the element and on the body compartment considered. As a rule, allometric relationships of metal concentration factor were more pronounced in shell than in soft parts. Significant relationships with clam size for Cd, Cr, Co and Zn followed inverse power functions. In contrast, the degree of Ag bioaccumulation was positively correlated with size. In view of the literature on Ag in bivalves, the latter observation suggests the occurrence of a specific detoxification mechanism (sequestration) that would be more efficient in old individuals. Overall, the experimental results indicate that the use of G. tumidum as a bioindicator in monitoring programmes requires selecting individuals of a specific size range in order to obtain comparable information about ambient metal levels. Since the size effect is greatest among smaller individuals, it is recommended to select clams with a shell width greater than 35 mm.

  18. Radiation induced microstructural evolution in ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohno, Y.; Kohyama, A.; Asakura, K.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    R and D of ferritic/martensitic steels as structural materials for fusion reactor is one of the most important issues of fusion technology. The efforts to characterize microstructural evolution under irradiation in the conventional Fe-Cr-Mo steels as well as newly developed Fe-Cr-Mn or Fe-Cr-W low activation ferritic/ martensitic steels have been continued. This paper provides some of the recent results of heavy irradiation effects on the microstructural evolution of ferritic/martensitic steels neutron irradiated in the FFTF/MOTA (Fast Flux Test Facility/Materials Open Test Assembly). Materials examined are Fe-10Cr-2Mo dual phase steel (JFMS: Japanese Ferritic/Martensitic Steel), Fe-12Cr-XMn-1Mo manganese stabilized martensitic steels and Fe-8Cr-2W Tungsten stabilized low activation martensitic steel (F82H). JFMS showed excellent void swelling resistance similar to 12Cr martensitic steel such as HT-9, while the manganese stabilized steels and F82H showed less void swelling resistance with small amount of void swelling at 640-700 K (F82H: 0.14% at 678 K). As for irradiation response of precipitate behavior, significant formation of intermetallic χ phase was observed in the manganese stabilized steels along grain boundaries which is though to cause mechanical property degradation. On the other hand, precipitates identified were the same type as those in unirradiated condition in F82H with no recognition of irradiation induced precipitates, which suggested satisfactory mechanical properties of F82H after the irradiation. (author)

  19. Giant Clams and Rising CO2: Light May Ameliorate Effects of Ocean Acidification on a Solar-Powered Animal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue-Ann Watson

    Full Text Available Global climate change and ocean acidification pose a serious threat to marine life. Marine invertebrates are particularly susceptible to ocean acidification, especially highly calcareous taxa such as molluscs, echinoderms and corals. The largest of all bivalve molluscs, giant clams, are already threatened by a variety of local pressures, including overharvesting, and are in decline worldwide. Several giant clam species are listed as 'Vulnerable' on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and now climate change and ocean acidification pose an additional threat to their conservation. Unlike most other molluscs, giant clams are 'solar-powered' animals containing photosynthetic algal symbionts suggesting that light could influence the effects of ocean acidification on these vulnerable animals. In this study, juvenile fluted giant clams Tridacna squamosa were exposed to three levels of carbon dioxide (CO2 (control ~400, mid ~650 and high ~950 μatm and light (photosynthetically active radiation 35, 65 and 304 μmol photons m-2 s-1. Elevated CO2 projected for the end of this century (~650 and ~950 μatm reduced giant clam survival and growth at mid-light levels. However, effects of CO2 on survival were absent at high-light, with 100% survival across all CO2 levels. Effects of CO2 on growth of surviving clams were lessened, but not removed, at high-light levels. Shell growth and total animal mass gain were still reduced at high-CO2. This study demonstrates the potential for light to alleviate effects of ocean acidification on survival and growth in a threatened calcareous marine invertebrate. Managing water quality (e.g. turbidity and sedimentation in coastal areas to maintain water clarity may help ameliorate some negative effects of ocean acidification on giant clams and potentially other solar-powered calcifiers, such as hard corals.

  20. Giant Clams and Rising CO2: Light May Ameliorate Effects of Ocean Acidification on a Solar-Powered Animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Sue-Ann

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change and ocean acidification pose a serious threat to marine life. Marine invertebrates are particularly susceptible to ocean acidification, especially highly calcareous taxa such as molluscs, echinoderms and corals. The largest of all bivalve molluscs, giant clams, are already threatened by a variety of local pressures, including overharvesting, and are in decline worldwide. Several giant clam species are listed as 'Vulnerable' on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and now climate change and ocean acidification pose an additional threat to their conservation. Unlike most other molluscs, giant clams are 'solar-powered' animals containing photosynthetic algal symbionts suggesting that light could influence the effects of ocean acidification on these vulnerable animals. In this study, juvenile fluted giant clams Tridacna squamosa were exposed to three levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) (control ~400, mid ~650 and high ~950 μatm) and light (photosynthetically active radiation 35, 65 and 304 μmol photons m-2 s-1). Elevated CO2 projected for the end of this century (~650 and ~950 μatm) reduced giant clam survival and growth at mid-light levels. However, effects of CO2 on survival were absent at high-light, with 100% survival across all CO2 levels. Effects of CO2 on growth of surviving clams were lessened, but not removed, at high-light levels. Shell growth and total animal mass gain were still reduced at high-CO2. This study demonstrates the potential for light to alleviate effects of ocean acidification on survival and growth in a threatened calcareous marine invertebrate. Managing water quality (e.g. turbidity and sedimentation) in coastal areas to maintain water clarity may help ameliorate some negative effects of ocean acidification on giant clams and potentially other solar-powered calcifiers, such as hard corals.

  1. Development of filler wires for welding of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel for India's test blanket module of ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, G.; Arivazhagan, B.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2010-07-01

    Indigenous development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel has become necessary for India as a participant in the International Thermo-nuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) programme. Optimisation of RAFM steel is in an advanced stage for the fabrication of test blanket module (TBM) components. Simultaneously, development of RAFM steel filler wires has been undertaken since there is no commercial filler wires are available for fabrication of components using RAFM steel. The purpose of this study is to develop filler wires that can be directly used for both gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and for narrow-gap gas tungsten arc welding (NG-GTAW) that reduces the deposited weld metal volume and heat affected zone (HAZ) width. Further, the filler wires would also be used for hybrid laser-MIG welding for thick section joints. In view of meeting all the requirements, a detailed specification was prepared for the development of filler wires for welding of RAFM steel. Meanwhile, welding trials have been carried out on 2.5 mm thick plates of the RAFM steel using GTAW process at various heat inputs with a preheat temperature of 250 C followed by various post weld heat treatments (PWHT). The microstructure of the weld metal in most of the cases showed the presence of some amount of delta-ferrite. Filler wires as per specifications have also been developed with minor variations on the chemistry against the specified values. Welding parameters and PWHT parameters were optimized to qualify the filler wires without the presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal and with optimized mechanical properties. Results showed that the weld metals are free from delta-ferrite. Tensile properties at ambient temperature and at 500 C are well above the specified values, and are much higher than the base metal values. Ductile Brittle Transition Temperature (DBTT) has been evaluated as -81 C based on the 68 J criteria. The present study highlights the basis and methodology

  2. Diversity of lactic acid bacteria in sian-sianzih (fermented clams), a traditional fermented food in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-sheng; Wu, Hui-chung; Li, Ya-han; Leong, Kun-hon; Pua, Xiao-hui; Weng, Ming-kai; Yanagida, Fujitoshi

    2012-01-30

    Sian-sianzih (fermented clams) is a popular traditional fermented food in Taiwan. The lactic acid bacteria (LAB) microflora in sian-sianzih have not been studied in detail. In this study, LAB from sian-sianzih were isolated, characterized and identified. A total of 186 cultures of LAB were isolated from seven sian-sianzih samples and 29 cultures were isolated from its main raw substrate: clams. The identification results revealed up to 11 distinct bacterial species belonging to five genera in sian-sianzih, and three species belonging to two genera in clams. The most common bacterial genera in sian-sianzih were Lactobacillus and Weissella, followed by Leuconostoc, Pediococcus and Lactococcus. A regional similarity in LAB, with differences in diversity, was observed in the current study. On the other hand, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis was the most common species found in raw clam samples. The results also suggested that greater LAB diversity could be observed in wild clams than in cultured ones. Furthermore, antibacterial activities of the isolates were determined, and one Weisella hellenica strain showed inhibitory activity against the indicator strain Lactobacilluas sakei JCM 1157(T) . A sensory assessment of seven sian-sianzih samples was also performed and the results indicated that diversity of LAB has a great effect on its aroma and taste formation. The results demonstrate that various LAB species are distributed in sian-sianzih and have a great effect on the flavor of sian-sianzih. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Gaseous surface hardening of martensitic stainless steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibollo, Chiara; Villa, Matteo; Christiansen, Thomas L.

    The present work addresses heat and surface treatments of martensitic stainless steel EN 1.4028. Different combinations of heat treatments and surface treatments were performed: conventional austenitisation, cryogenic treatment and in particular high temperature solution nitriding (HTSN) and low...... that cubic lath martensite in conventionally austenitised EN 1.4028 dissolves nitrogen and develops expanded martensite (ferrite) during LTSH. HTSN leads to a microstructure of tetragonal plate martensite and retained austenite. The content of retained austenite can be reduced by a cryo...

  4. Future directions for ferritic/martensitic steels for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Swindeman, R.W.

    2000-01-01

    High-chromium (7-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels are being considered for nuclear applications for both fission and fusion reactors. Conventional 9-12Cr Cr-Mo steels were the first candidates for these applications. For fusion reactors, reduced-activation steels were developed that were patterned on the conventional steels but with molybdenum replaced by tungsten and niobium replaced by tantalum. Both the conventional and reduced-activation steels are considered to have an upper operating temperature limit of about 550degC. For improved reactor efficiency, higher operating temperatures are required. For ferritic/martensitic steels that could meet such requirements, oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are being considered. In this paper, the ferritic/martensitic steels that are candidate steels for nuclear applications will be reviewed, the prospect for ODS steel development and the development of steels produced by conventional processes will be discussed. (author)

  5. Martensite decomposition in Cu–Al–Mn–Ag alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Camila Maria Andrade dos, E-mail: camilaandr@gmail.com [Departamento de Físico-Química, Instituto de Química, UNESP, Caixa Postal 355, 14801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Adorno, Antonio Tallarico [Departamento de Físico-Química, Instituto de Química, UNESP, Caixa Postal 355, 14801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Galdino da Silva, Ricardo Alexandre [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, UNIFESP, 09972-270 Diadema, SP (Brazil); Carvalho, Thaisa Mary [Departamento de Físico-Química, Instituto de Química, UNESP, Caixa Postal 355, 14801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Martensite decomposition in Cu–Al–Mn–Ag alloys is mainly influenced by Mn. • Interaction between Cu–Mn atomic pairs increases activation energy. • Cu diffusion is disturbed by the interaction between Cu–Mn atomic pairs. - Abstract: The influence of Mn and Ag additions on the isothermal kinetics of martensite decomposition in the Cu–9wt.%Al alloy was studied using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXS) and microhardness changes measurements with temperature and time. The results indicated that the reaction is disturbed by the increase of Mn, an effect associated with the increase in the Al–Mn and Cu–Mn atomic pairs, which disturbs Cu diffusion and increases the activation energy for the martensite decomposition reaction.

  6. OPTIFER, a further step in development of Low Activation Martensitic Steels. Results of Characterization Experiments; OPTIFER, un paso mas hacia el desarrollo de un acero martensitico de baja activacion. Resultados de los ensayos de caracterizacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, M.P.; Lapena, J.; Hernandez, M.T.; Schirra, M.

    1996-07-01

    Within the framework of the development of low activation structural materials to be used in nuclear fusion reactors four martensitic Fe-9,5 Cr alloys were conceived with different contents of tungsten-tantalum and/or germanium as substitutions for Mo, Ni, Nb and Al. As a result of recent activation calculations, the maximum concentrations of all accompanying elements, which are not desirable under radiological aspects, were determined for the first time for these OPTIFER steels, and laid down in specifications for the manufacturers of the alloys, after double-vacuum melting, only the real alloys with some of these accompanying elements added are within the specifications. For the majority of alloys the gap between request in radiological terms and the metallurgical/analytical reality is still considerable. The behavior during transformation and heat treatment roughly corresponds to that of conventional martensitic 9-12%Cr steels. Progress has been conspicuous as regards the notch impact toughness behavior, both at upper shelf level and in ductile brittle transition (DBTT) the W(Ce) alloyed OPTIFER variant exhibits more favorable values than the conventional MANET-II steel from the fusion program, with better strength characteristics above 500 degree centigree. With only a moderate decrease in strength values (compared to MANET-II), the Ge (Ce) variant excels by a distinct improvement in notch impact toughness values and, theoretically, a stronger reduction in dose rate than the W(Ce) variant and comes close to the decay curve of pure iron. (Author) 21 refs.

  7. Nitrogen-alloyed martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berns, H.

    1988-01-01

    A report is presented on initial results with pressure-nitrided martensitic steels. In heat-resistant steels, thermal stability and toughness are raised by nitrogen. In cold work steel, there is a more favourable corrosion behaviour. (orig./MM) [de

  8. Manila clams from Hg polluted sediments of Marano and Grado lagoons (Italy) harbor detoxifying Hg resistant bacteria in soft tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, Franco; Gallo, Michele; Marchetto, Davide; Faleri, Claudia; Maida, Isabel; Fani, Renato

    2013-01-01

    A mechanism of mercury detoxification has been suggested by a previous study on Hg bioaccumulation in Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) in the polluted Marano and Grado lagoons and in this study we demonstrate that this event could be partly related to the detoxifying activities of Hg-resistant bacteria (MRB) harbored in clam soft tissues. Therefore, natural clams were collected in six stations during two different periods (winter and spring) from Marano and Grado Lagoons. Siphons, gills and hepatopancreas from acclimatized clams were sterile dissected to isolate MRB. These anatomical parts were glass homogenized or used for whole, and they were lying on a solid medium containing 5 mg l −1 HgCl 2 and incubated at 30 °C. A total of fourteen bacterial strains were isolated and were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing and analysis, revealing that strains were representative of eight bacterial genera, four of which were Gram-positive (Enterococcus, Bacillus, Jeotgalicoccus and Staphylococcus) and other four were Gram-negative (Stenotrophomonas, Vibrio, Raoultella and Enterobacter). Plasmids and merA genes were found and their sequences determined. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique shows the presence of Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria by using different molecular probes in siphon and gills. Bacterial clumps inside clam flesh were observed and even a Gram-negative endosymbiont was disclosed by transmission electronic microscope inside clam cells. Bacteria harbored in cavities of soft tissue have mercury detoxifying activity. This feature was confirmed by the determination of mercuric reductase in glass-homogenized siphons and gills. -- Highlights: ► We isolated Gram-positive and Gram-negative Hg resistant strains from soft tissues of Ruditapes philippinarum. ► We identify 14 mercury resistant strains by 16S rRNA gene sequences. ► Bacteria in siphon and gill tissues of clams were observed by TEM and identified with

  9. Manila clams from Hg polluted sediments of Marano and Grado lagoons (Italy) harbor detoxifying Hg resistant bacteria in soft tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldi, Franco [Dipartimento di Scienze Molecolari e Nanosistemi, Cà Foscari University of Venice, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Gallo, Michele; Marchetto, Davide [Dipartimento di Scienze Molecolari e Nanosistemi, Cà Foscari University of Venice, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Faleri, Claudia [Department of Environmental Science ‘G. Sarfatti’, University of Siena, 53100 Siena (Italy); Maida, Isabel; Fani, Renato [Dipartimento di Biologia Evoluzionistica, Via Romana, 17, University of Florence, 50125 Florence (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    A mechanism of mercury detoxification has been suggested by a previous study on Hg bioaccumulation in Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) in the polluted Marano and Grado lagoons and in this study we demonstrate that this event could be partly related to the detoxifying activities of Hg-resistant bacteria (MRB) harbored in clam soft tissues. Therefore, natural clams were collected in six stations during two different periods (winter and spring) from Marano and Grado Lagoons. Siphons, gills and hepatopancreas from acclimatized clams were sterile dissected to isolate MRB. These anatomical parts were glass homogenized or used for whole, and they were lying on a solid medium containing 5 mg l{sup −1} HgCl{sub 2} and incubated at 30 °C. A total of fourteen bacterial strains were isolated and were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing and analysis, revealing that strains were representative of eight bacterial genera, four of which were Gram-positive (Enterococcus, Bacillus, Jeotgalicoccus and Staphylococcus) and other four were Gram-negative (Stenotrophomonas, Vibrio, Raoultella and Enterobacter). Plasmids and merA genes were found and their sequences determined. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique shows the presence of Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria by using different molecular probes in siphon and gills. Bacterial clumps inside clam flesh were observed and even a Gram-negative endosymbiont was disclosed by transmission electronic microscope inside clam cells. Bacteria harbored in cavities of soft tissue have mercury detoxifying activity. This feature was confirmed by the determination of mercuric reductase in glass-homogenized siphons and gills. -- Highlights: ► We isolated Gram-positive and Gram-negative Hg resistant strains from soft tissues of Ruditapes philippinarum. ► We identify 14 mercury resistant strains by 16S rRNA gene sequences. ► Bacteria in siphon and gill tissues of clams were observed by TEM and identified

  10. Mechanical characterization of a reduced activation 9 Cr ferritic/martensitic steel of spanish production; Caracterizacion mecanica de un acero ferritico/martenitico de activacion reducida de produccion espanola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, D.; Serrano, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper shows the first results concerning the characterization of two heats of a reduced activation 9 Cr ferritic/martensitic steel (RAFM) made in Spain, called AF1B and AF2A. The results of this characterization are compared with their European counterparts, EUROFER97-2, which was chosen as reference material. All activities described were performed in the Structural Materials Unit of CIEMAT, within the national project TECNO-FUS CONSOLIDER INGENIO.The two Spanish heats have the same production process and heat treatment. Both heats have a similar tensile behaviour similar to EUROFER97-2, but on the other hand impact properties are lower. The microstructure of AF1B reveals large biphasic inclusions that affecting its mechanical properties, especially the impact properties. AF2A casting was free of these inclusions. (Author) 24 refs.

  11. Razor clam to RoboClam: burrowing drag reduction mechanisms and their robotic adaptation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, A G; V; Dorsch, D S; Slocum, A H; Hosoi, A E; Deits, R L H

    2014-01-01

    Estimates based on the strength, size, and shape of the Atlantic razor clam (Ensis directus) indicate that the animal's burrow depth should be physically limited to a few centimeters; yet razor clams can dig as deep as 70 cm. By measuring soil deformations around burrowing E. directus, we have found the animal reduces drag by contracting its valves to initially fail, and then fluidize, the surrounding substrate. The characteristic contraction time to achieve fluidization can be calculated directly from soil properties. The geometry of the fluidized zone is dictated by two commonly-measured geotechnical parameters: coefficient of lateral earth pressure and friction angle. Calculations using full ranges for both parameters indicate that the fluidized zone is a local effect, occurring between 1–5 body radii away from the animal. The energy associated with motion through fluidized substrate—characterized by a depth-independent density and viscosity—scales linearly with depth. In contrast, moving through static soil requires energy that scales with depth squared. For E. directus, this translates to a 10X reduction in the energy required to reach observed burrow depths. For engineers, localized fluidization offers a mechanically simple and purely kinematic method to dramatically reduce energy costs associated with digging. This concept is demonstrated with RoboClam, an E. directus-inspired robot. Using a genetic algorithm to find optimal digging kinematics, RoboClam has achieved localized fluidization burrowing performance comparable to that of the animal, with a linear energy-depth relationship, in both idealized granular glass beads and E. directus' native cohesive mudflat habitat. (paper)

  12. PARTICLE REMOVAL RATES BY THE MUD SHRIMP UPOGEBIA PUGETTENSIS, ITS BURROW, AND A COMMENSAL CLAM: EFFECTS ON ESTUARINE PHYTOPLANKTON ABUNDANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The burrowing shrimp Upogebia pugettensis is an abundant intertidal inhabitant of Pacific Northwest bays and estuaries where it lives commensally with the bivalve Cryptomya californica. Suspension-feeding activities by the shrimp and by its commensal clam, as well as particle se...

  13. Ecotoxicological Effects of Chemical Contaminants Adsorbed to Microplastics in the Clam Scrobicularia plana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit O'Donovan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Although microplastics (MPs are distributed globally in the marine environment, a great deal of unknowns relating to their ecotoxicological effects on the marine biota remains. Due to their lipophilic nature, microplastics have the potential to adsorb persistent organic pollutants present in contaminated regions, which may increase their detrimental impact once assimilated by organisms. This study investigates the ecotoxicological effects of exposure to low-density polyethylene (LDPE microplastics (11–13 μm, with and without adsorbed contaminants (benzo[a]pyrene—BaP and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid—PFOS, in the peppery furrow shell clam, Scrobicularia plana. Environmentally relevant concentrations of contaminants (BaP−16.87 ± 0.22 μg g−1 and PFOS−70.22 ± 12.41 μg g−1 were adsorbed to microplastics to evaluate the potential role of plastic particles as a source of chemical contamination once ingested. S. plana were exposed to microplastics, at a concentration of 1 mg L−1, in a water-sediment exposure setup for 14 days. Clams were sampled at the beginning of the experiment (day 0 and after 3, 7, and 14 days. BaP accumulation, in whole clam tissues, was analyzed. A multi-biomarker assessment was conducted in the gills, digestive gland, and haemolymph of clams to clarify the effects of exposure. This included the quantification of antioxidant (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and biotransformation (glutathione-S-transferases enzyme activities, oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation levels, genotoxicity (single and double strand DNA breaks, and neurotoxicity (acetylcholinesterase activity. Results suggest a potential mechanical injury of gills caused by ingestion of microplastics that may also affect the analyzed biomarkers. The digestive gland seems less affected by mechanical damage caused by virgin microplastic exposure, with the MPs-adsorbed BaP and PFOS exerting a negative influence over the assessed

  14. Microbiota and environmental stress: how pollution affects microbial communities in Manila clams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, M; Carraro, L; Fariselli, P; Martino, M E; Cavalieri, D; Vitali, F; Boffo, L; Patarnello, T; Bargelloni, L; Cardazzo, B

    2018-01-01

    Given the crucial role of microbiota in host development, health, and environmental interactions, genomic analyses focusing on host-microbiota interactions should certainly be considered in the investigation of the adaptive mechanisms to environmental stress. Recently, several studies suggested that microbiota associated to digestive tract is a key, although still not fully understood, player that must be considered to assess the toxicity of environmental contaminants. Bacteria-dependent metabolism of xenobiotics may indeed modulate the host toxicity. Conversely, environmental variables (including pollution) may alter the microbial community and/or its metabolic activity leading to host physiological alterations that may contribute to their toxicity. Here, 16s rRNA gene amplicon sequencing has been applied to characterize the hepatopancreas microbiota composition of the Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum. The animals were collected in the Venice lagoon area, which is subject to different anthropogenic pressures, mainly represented by the industrial activities of Porto Marghera (PM). Seasonal and geographic differences in clam microbiotas were explored and linked to host response to chemical stress identified in a previous study at the transcriptome level, establishing potential interactions among hosts, microbes, and environmental parameters. The obtained results showed the recurrent presence of putatively detoxifying bacterial taxa in PM clams during winter and over-representation of several metabolic pathways involved in xenobiotic degradation, which suggested the potential for host-microbial synergistic detoxifying actions. Strong interaction between seasonal and chemically-induced responses was also observed, which partially obscured such potentially synergistic actions. Seasonal variables and exposure to toxicants were therefore shown to interact and substantially affect clam microbiota, which appeared to mirror host response to environmental variation. It

  15. Reproduction and recruitment patterns of the surf clam Donax serra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reproduction and recruitment patterns of the surf clam Donax serra (Bivalvia, Donacidae) on two ... Keywords: condition index, Donax serra, histology, Namibia, recruitment, reproduction, sandy beach ecology ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  16. Toxicological effects of paracetamol on the clam Ruditapes philippinarum: exposure vs recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Bruno; Nunes, Joana; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Figueira, Etelvina; Freitas, Rosa

    2017-11-01

    Exposure of wild organisms to anthropogenic substances never follows a definite time-course and pulsed events can often determine biological responses to such chemicals, confounding the interpretation of toxicological data. This is the case of specific chemicals such as pharmaceutical drugs, which are commonly released by sewage systems into sensitive areas, including estuaries. The presence and amount of these chemicals in the wild can be modulated by events such as dilution due to heavy rain, floods, or by varying patterns of domestic water use (daily vs. seasonal). The present study aimed to obtain additional data about the toxicity of paracetamol towards the marine clam species Ruditapes philippinarum, following realistic modes of exposure. Thus, the toxicity assessment was made after an acute exposure to different concentrations of paracetamol, followed by a recovery period. The adopted toxicological endpoints included energy-related parameters (glycogen content, GLY; protein content, PROT; electron transport system activity, ETS), activity of antioxidant and biotransformation enzymes (superoxide dismutase, SOD; glutathione peroxidase, GPx; Glutathione-S-transferases, GSTs), levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), neurotoxicity (cholinesterases activity, ChEs), and indicators of oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation, LPO). The here obtained results showed an increase in SOD and GPx activities after exposure. In organisms exposed to the highest concentration tested it was also possible to observe a significant increase in GSTs activity. However, these alterations in the antioxidant defence system were not able to prevent the occurrence of oxidative stress in exposed organisms. Furthermore, exposure to paracetamol induced neurotoxicity in clams, with a concentration-dependent ChEs inhibition along the exposure concentrations. Exposure to paracetamol also led to an increase of GLY content which resulted from metabolic activity depression along the increasing exposure

  17. Biomarker responses and contamination levels in the clam Ruditapes philippinarum for biomonitoring the Lagoon of Venice (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matozzo, Valerio; Binelli, Andrea; Parolini, Marco; Locatello, Lisa; Marin, Maria Gabriella

    2010-03-01

    A multibiomarker approach was used to assess effects of environmental contaminants in the clam Ruditapes philippinarum from the Lagoon of Venice. Bivalves were collected in 8 sites of the Lagoon (Campalto, Marghera, Palude del Monte, Valle di Brenta, Cà Roman, San Servolo, Fusina and Canale Dese), differently influenced by both anthropogenic impact and natural conditions. The following biomarkers were chosen: total haemocyte count and lysozyme activity in cell-free haemolymph as immunomarkers, acetylcholinesterase activity in gills as a biomarker of exposure to neurotoxic compounds, vitellogenin-like protein levels in both digestive gland and cell-free haemolymph as a biomarker of exposure to estrogenic compounds, and survival-in-air widely used to evaluate general stress conditions in clams. In addition, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (p,p'-DDT) and its breakdown products (DDE, DDD), hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) were measured in clams. Results demonstrated that the integrated approach between biomarkers and chemical analyses in R. philippinarum is a useful tool in biomonitoring the Lagoon of Venice. The biomarker responses suggested quite similar contamination levels in the entire Lagoon, although the relative impact of differing classes of pollutants changed among sites according to potential sources, as chemical analyses demonstrated. Overall, among the sampling sites investigated, Palude del Monte can represent an environmental risk area, bearing in mind its peculiar use for clam culture.

  18. Intersex related gene expression profiles in clams Scrobicularia plana: Molecular markers and environmental application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocan, Corina M.; Cubero-Leon, Elena; Langston, William J.; Pope, Nick; Cornelius, Keith; Hill, E.M.; Alvarez-Munoz, Diana; Indiveri, Paolo; Lerebours, Adelaide; Minier, Christophe; Rotchell, Jeanette M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Expression of intersex-related genes was analysed in clam gonads sampled from the Channel. • Genes were differentially expressed at sites with varying levels of intersex and contaminants. • Correlations between gene expressions, key contaminants and sampling sites were identified. • No single gene expression studied correlated with intersex incidence. - Abstract: Intersex, the appearance of female characteristics in male gonads, has been identified in several aquatic species. It is a widespread phenomenon in populations of the bivalve, Scrobicularia plana, from the southwest coast of the U.K. Genes previously identified as differentially expressed (ferritin, testicular haploid expressed gene, THEG, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PCNA; receptor activated protein kinase C, RACK; cytochrome B, CYB; and cytochrome c oxidase 1, COX1) in intersex clams relative to normal male clams, were selected for characterisation and an environmental survey of the Channel region. Transcripts were significantly differentially expressed at sites with varying intersex incidence and contaminant burdens. Significant correlations between specific gene expressions, key contaminants and sampling locations have been identified, though no single gene was associated with intersex incidence. The results highlight the difficulty in understanding the intersex phenomenon in molluscs where there is still a lack of knowledge on the control of normal reproduction

  19. Changes in fatty acid composition in the giant clam Tridacna maxima in response to thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubousquet, Vaimiti; Gros, Emmanuelle; Berteaux-Lecellier, Véronique; Viguier, Bruno; Raharivelomanana, Phila; Bertrand, Cédric; Lecellier, Gaël J

    2016-10-15

    Temperature can modify membrane fluidity and thus affects cellular functions and physiological activities. This study examines lipid remodelling in the marine symbiotic organism, Tridacna maxima, during a time series of induced thermal stress, with an emphasis on the morphology of their symbiont Symbiodinium First, we show that the French Polynesian giant clams harbour an important proportion of saturated fatty acids (SFA), which reflects their tropical location. Second, in contrast to most marine organisms, the total lipid content in giant clams remained constant under stress, though some changes in their composition were shown. Third, the stress-induced changes in fatty acid (FA) diversity were accompanied by an upregulation of genes involved in lipids and ROS pathways. Finally, our microscopic analysis revealed that for the giant clam's symbiont, Symbiodinium, thermal stress led to two sequential cell death processes. Our data suggests that the degradation of Symbiodinium cells could provide an additional source of energy to T maxima in response to heat stress. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Deformation induced martensitic transformation in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, E.; Mertinger, V.; Tranta, F.; Solyom, J.

    2003-01-01

    Deformation induced martensitic transformation was investigated in metastable austenitic stainless steel. This steel can present a microstructure of austenite (γ), α' martensite and non magnetic ε martensite. Uni-axial tensile test was used for loading at different temperatures below room temperature (from -120 to 20 deg. C). During the deformation the transformation takes place at certain places in an anisotropic way and texture also develops. Quantitative phase analysis was done by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetic methods while the texture was described by X-ray diffraction using a special inverse pole figure. The quantitative phase analysis has shown that the formation of α' and ε martensite from austenite is the function of deformation rate, and deformation temperature. The transformation of the textured austenite takes place in an anisotropic way and a well defined crystallographic relationship between the parent and α' martensite phase has been measured

  1. Ancient Clam Gardens Increased Shellfish Production: Adaptive Strategies from the Past Can Inform Food Security Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groesbeck, Amy S.; Rowell, Kirsten; Lepofsky, Dana; Salomon, Anne K.

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining food production while sustaining productive ecosystems is among the central challenges of our time, yet, it has been for millennia. Ancient clam gardens, intertidal rock-walled terraces constructed by humans during the late Holocene, are thought to have improved the growing conditions for clams. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the beach slope, intertidal height, and biomass and density of bivalves at replicate clam garden and non-walled clam beaches in British Columbia, Canada. We also quantified the variation in growth and survival rates of littleneck clams (Leukoma staminea) we experimentally transplanted across these two beach types. We found that clam gardens had significantly shallower slopes than non-walled beaches and greater densities of L. staminea and Saxidomus giganteus, particularly at smaller size classes. Overall, clam gardens contained 4 times as many butter clams and over twice as many littleneck clams relative to non-walled beaches. As predicted, this relationship varied as a function of intertidal height, whereby clam density and biomass tended to be greater in clam gardens compared to non-walled beaches at relatively higher intertidal heights. Transplanted juvenile L. staminea grew 1.7 times faster and smaller size classes were more likely to survive in clam gardens than non-walled beaches, specifically at the top and bottom of beaches. Consequently, we provide strong evidence that ancient clam gardens likely increased clam productivity by altering the slope of soft-sediment beaches, expanding optimal intertidal clam habitat, thereby enhancing growing conditions for clams. These results reveal how ancient shellfish aquaculture practices may have supported food security strategies in the past and provide insight into tools for the conservation, management, and governance of intertidal seascapes today. PMID:24618748

  2. Effect of low salinity on the yellow clam Mesodesma mactroides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YBM. Carvalho

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the lethal salinity (LC50 for the yellow clam Mesodesma mactroides (Bivalvia: Mesodesmatidae and identify histopathological alterations that could be used to diagnose structural changes in clam tissue. Clams in two size classes (adults and juveniles were placed in 10 L chambers and exposed to salinities of 35, 30, 25, 20, 15, 10, and 5 g/L. There were triplicate chambers with seven clams each for each salinity. The LC50 values for a 48 h exposure were 6.5 g/L and 5.7 g/L for adults and juveniles, respectively. For a 96 h exposure, the LC50 values were 10.5 g/L for adults and 8.8 g/L for juveniles. The histological examination of yellow clams exposed to 10 g/L for 96 h showed intercellular oedema and necrotic foci in the epithelium of the digestive gland and occlusion of the lumen of the digestive gland. In conclusion, M. mactroides can be characterised as a moderately euryhaline species, tolerating salinities from 35 to 15 g/L.

  3. Microcystin uptake and biochemical responses in the freshwater clam Corbicula leana P. exposed to toxic and non-toxic Microcystis aeruginosa: Evidence of tolerance to cyanotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thanh-Luu; Shimizu, Kazuya; Dao, Thanh-Son; Hong-Do, Lan-Chi; Utsumi, Motoo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the accumulation and adverse effects of toxic and non-toxic Microcystis in the edible clam Corbicula leana . Treated clams were exposed to toxic Microcystis at 100 μg of MC (microcystin)-LR eq  L -1 for 10 days. The experimental organism was then placed in toxin-free water and fed on non-toxic Microcystis for the following 10 days for depuration. Filtering rates (FRs) by C. leana of toxic and non-toxic Microcystis and of the green alga Chlorella vulgaris as a control were estimated. Adverse effects were evaluated though the activity of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). Clam accumulated MCs (up to 12.7 ± 2.5 μg g -1 dry weight (DW) of free MC and 4.2 ± 0.6 μg g -1 DW of covalently bound MC). Our results suggest that although both toxic and non-toxic cyanobacteria caused adverse effects by inducing the detoxification and antioxidant defense system, the clam was quite resistant to cyanotoxins. The estimated MC concentration in C. leana was far beyond the World Health Organization's (WHO) provisional tolerable daily intake (0.04 μg kg -1  day -1 ), suggesting that consuming clams harvested during cyanobacterial blooms carries a high health risk.

  4. Microcystin uptake and biochemical responses in the freshwater clam Corbicula leana P. exposed to toxic and non-toxic Microcystis aeruginosa: Evidence of tolerance to cyanotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh-Luu Pham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the accumulation and adverse effects of toxic and non-toxic Microcystis in the edible clam Corbicula leana. Treated clams were exposed to toxic Microcystis at 100 μg of MC (microcystin-LReq L−1 for 10 days. The experimental organism was then placed in toxin-free water and fed on non-toxic Microcystis for the following 10 days for depuration. Filtering rates (FRs by C. leana of toxic and non-toxic Microcystis and of the green alga Chlorella vulgaris as a control were estimated. Adverse effects were evaluated though the activity of catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione S-transferase (GST. Clam accumulated MCs (up to 12.7 ± 2.5 μg g−1 dry weight (DW of free MC and 4.2 ± 0.6 μg g−1 DW of covalently bound MC. Our results suggest that although both toxic and non-toxic cyanobacteria caused adverse effects by inducing the detoxification and antioxidant defense system, the clam was quite resistant to cyanotoxins. The estimated MC concentration in C. leana was far beyond the World Health Organization's (WHO provisional tolerable daily intake (0.04 μg kg−1 day−1, suggesting that consuming clams harvested during cyanobacterial blooms carries a high health risk.

  5. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-10-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  6. Microstructure of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available and martensite with 10% ferrite for Material B. Table 7 - Proposed martensitic stainless steel alloys for laser cladding Material C* Cr Ni Mn Si Mo Co Ms (ºC)* Cr eq Ni eq Material A 0.4 13 - 1 0.5 2.5 5.5 120 16.5 12.5 Material B 0.2 15 2 1 0.7 2.5 5.5 117... dilution, low heat input, less distortion, increased mechanical and corrosion properties excellent repeatability and control of process parameters. Solidification of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel is primarily austenitic. Microstructures...

  7. The basic elementary particles as martensitic nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguinaco-Bravo, V. J.; Onoro, J.

    1999-01-01

    The martensitic transformation is a diffusional structural change that produces an important modification of the microstructure and properties of materials. In this paper we propose how the martensitic phase is nucleated from a basic elementary particle (bep). The bep is formed in several stages. Vacancies, divacancies, etc. are formed at high temperature, which collapse into prismatic dislocation loops during the cooling process. We define a bep as a dislocation loop reaching a critical radius and fulfilling certain elastic energy conditions. A martensitic nucleus is a bep that coincides crystallographically with the habit plane of the matrix. (Author) 16 refs

  8. Twinning processes in Cu-Al-Ni martensite single crystals investigated by neutron single crystal diffraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, P.; Sittner, P.; Novak, V.; Lukas, P.

    2008-01-01

    A neutron single crystal diffraction method for inspecting the quality of martensite single crystals is introduced. True interface-free martensite single crystals are indispensable for, e.g. measurement of elastic constants of phases by ultrasonic techniques. The neutron diffraction method was used to detect and distinguish the presence of individual lattice correspondence variants of the 2H orthorhombic martensite phase in Cu-Al-Ni as well as to follow the activity of twinning processes during the deformation test on the martensite variant single crystals. When preparing the martensite single variant prism-shaped crystals by compression deformation method, typically a small fraction of second unwanted martensitic variant (compound twin) remains in the prism samples. Due to the very low stress (∼1 MPa) for the compound twinning in many shape memory alloys, it is quite difficult not only to deplete the martensite prisms of all internal interfaces but mainly to keep them in the martensite single variant state for a long time needed for further investigations

  9. The neutronic basis for elemental substitution in martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublet, J.-Ch.; Butterworth, G. J.

    1994-09-01

    A simple graphical approach has been developed to facilitate the design of low-activation steels by elemental tailoring. Noting that the iron base provides the best achievable target, the influence of candidate alloying elements becomes readily apparent when the contribution each makes to a particular activation parameter such as specific activity, dose rate or decay power, is expressed relative to the contribution from the iron base. This approach highlights the most critical activation parameters and times after shutdown with respect to safety and environmental objectives. Its application to the design of low activation martensitic stainless steels is discussed.

  10. Morphological and functional characterization of hemocytes from two deep-sea vesicomyid clams Phreagena okutanii and Abyssogena phaseoliformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tame, Akihiro; Ozawa, Genki; Maruyama, Tadashi; Yoshida, Takao

    2018-03-01

    Deep-sea vesicomyid clams harboring intracellular symbiotic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are often dominant in chemosynthetic animal communities. Although they are known to have erythrocytes, little is known about other hemocytes. To investigate the types and roles of various hemocytes in vesicomyid clams, we performed morphological, histochemical and functional characterization of the hemocytes in two species, Phreagena okutanii, collected from 873 to 978 m depth, and Abyssogena phaseoliformis, from 5199 to 5355 m. Both were found to have three types of hemocytes: erythrocytes (ERCs), eosinophilic granulocytes (EGs), and basophilic granulocytes (BGs). The ERCs contain hemoglobin in the cytoplasm, with basophilic vacuoles containing acid polysaccharide, neutral lipids, and peroxidase. The EGs were found to contain acid polysaccharides and eosinophilic granules containing lysosomal enzymes, acid and alkaline phosphatases, chloroacetate esterase, and peroxidase. Although BGs had some basophilic granules with alkaline phosphatase, they lacked acid phosphatase and acid polysaccharides. The EGs and BGs were shown to have phagocytic ability, while the ERCs exhibited no phagocytosis. The EGs showed higher phagocytic activity as well as a higher phagosome-lysosome fusion rate than BGs. The hemocytes of the two vesicomyid species differed in the intracellular structures. In A. phaseoliformis, ERCs additionally contained neutral polysaccharides in vacuoles and had vesicles with acinus-like acidic mucus in the cytoplasm, neither of which were observed in P. okutanii. The eosinophilic granules in the EGs had heteromorphically-elongated shapes containing homogeneously electron-dense material in P. okutanii, but were more spherical and composed of fibrous structures in A. phaseoliformis. The difference in hemocytes between the two clams seems to be reflective of phylogenetically differentiated lineages adapting to differing conditions in their respective deep-sea environments

  11. Cubic martensite in high carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulin; Xiao, Wenlong; Jiao, Kun; Ping, Dehai; Xu, Huibin; Zhao, Xinqing; Wang, Yunzhi

    2018-05-01

    A distinguished structural characteristic of martensite in Fe-C steels is its tetragonality originating from carbon atoms occupying only one set of the three available octahedral interstitial sites in the body-centered-cubic (bcc) Fe lattice. Such a body-centered-tetragonal (bct) structure is believed to be thermodynamically stable because of elastic interactions between the interstitial carbon atoms. For such phase stability, however, there has been a lack of direct experimental evidence despite extensive studies of phase transformations in steels over one century. In this Rapid Communication, we report that the martensite formed in a high carbon Fe-8Ni-1.26C (wt%) steel at room temperature induced by applied stress/strain has actually a bcc rather than a bct crystal structure. This finding not only challenges the existing theories on the stability of bcc vs bct martensite in high carbon steels, but also provides insights into the mechanism for martensitic transformation in ferrous alloys.

  12. Theory and Model for Martensitic Transformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1986-01-01

    Martensitic transformations are shown to be driven by the interplay between two fluctuating strain components. No soft mode is needed, but a central peak occurs representing the dynamics of strain clusters. A two-dimensional magnetic-analog model with the martensitic-transition symmetry is constr......Martensitic transformations are shown to be driven by the interplay between two fluctuating strain components. No soft mode is needed, but a central peak occurs representing the dynamics of strain clusters. A two-dimensional magnetic-analog model with the martensitic-transition symmetry...... is constructed and analyzed by computer simulation and by a theory which accounts for correlation effects. Dramatic precursor effects at the first-order transition are demonstrated. The model is also of relevance for surface reconstruction transitions....

  13. Martensitic transformations in Ni-Mn-Ga system affected by external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernenko, V.; Babii, O.; L'vov, V.; McCormick, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure, uniaxial stress and magnetic field on the martensitic transformation temperatures for the ferromagnetic single crystalline Ni-Mn-Ga alloys is studied. It is shown that the experimental results are satisfactorily described by the Landau theory. Ni-Mn-Ga L2 1 -type ordered alloys exhibit a number of the first order and weak first order structural transformations in a ferromagnetic or paramagnetic parent phase depending on the alloy composition and being either thermally or stress activated. Most of these phase transformations are of the martensitic type, i.e., they are accompanied by the spontaneous elastic strains forming a multicomponent order parameter in the Landau expansion for the Gibbs potential. In this work we analyze the influence of the external fields (mechanical and magnetic) on the martensitic transformation (MT) from cubic parent phase (P) to five-layered martensitic one (5M-martensite) usually exhibited by the ferromagnetic ordered Ni-Mn-Ga alloys. In accordance with, we treat the 5M-martensite as a twinned tetragonal phase and, so, describe the experimental results in the framework of the theory of cubic-tetragonal MT. The original experimental data of high magnetic field influence on MT in near stoichiometric Ni 2 MnGa compound are presented to compare with the theoretical estimations. (orig.)

  14. Thermal expansion characteristics of Fe-9Cr-0.12C-0.56Mn-0.24V-1.38W-0.06Ta (wt.%) reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Raju; Tripathy, Haraprasanna; Rai, Arun Kumar; Hajra, Raj Narayan; Saibaba, Saroja; Jayakumar, Tammana; Rajendra Kumar, Ellappan

    2015-04-01

    The lattice and bulk thermal expansion behavior of an Indian version of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (INRAFM) steel has been quantified using high temperature X-ray diffraction and dilatometry. The lattice parameter of tempered α-ferrite phase exhibited a smooth quadratic increase with temperature, while that of γ-austenite remained fairly linear up to 1273 K. The results suggest that α-ferrite + Carbides → γ-austenite transformation occurs upon continuous heating in the temperature range, 1146 ⩽ T ⩽ 1173 K. Further, this transformation is found to be accompanied by a reduction in average atomic volume. The mean linear thermal expansion coefficients of tempered α-ferrite and γ-austenite phases are estimated to be about 1.48 × 10-5 and 2.4 × 10-5 K-1 respectively. The magnetic contribution to relative thermal dilatation (Δl/l298)mag is found to be small and negative, as compared to phonon contribution.

  15. Thermal expansion characteristics of Fe–9Cr–0.12C–0.56Mn–0.24V–1.38W–0.06Ta (wt.%) reduced activation ferritic–martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Raju, E-mail: sraju@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Tripathy, Haraprasanna; Rai, Arun Kumar; Hajra, Raj Narayan; Saibaba, Saroja; Jayakumar, Tammana [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Rajendra Kumar, Ellappan [TBM Division, Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhi Nagar (India)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Lattice & bulk thermal expansion of RAFM steel characterized by HTXRD and dilatometry. • Mean thermal expansion of α-ferrite is 1.48 × 10{sup −5} K{sup −1}; that of γ-austenite, 2.4 × 10{sup −5} K{sup −1}. • Magnetism makes a small negative contribution to overall thermal expansion. - Abstract: The lattice and bulk thermal expansion behavior of an Indian version of reduced activation ferritic–martensitic (INRAFM) steel has been quantified using high temperature X-ray diffraction and dilatometry. The lattice parameter of tempered α-ferrite phase exhibited a smooth quadratic increase with temperature, while that of γ-austenite remained fairly linear up to 1273 K. The results suggest that α-ferrite + Carbides → γ-austenite transformation occurs upon continuous heating in the temperature range, 1146 ⩽ T ⩽ 1173 K. Further, this transformation is found to be accompanied by a reduction in average atomic volume. The mean linear thermal expansion coefficients of tempered α-ferrite and γ-austenite phases are estimated to be about 1.48 × 10{sup −5} and 2.4 × 10{sup −5} K{sup −1} respectively. The magnetic contribution to relative thermal dilatation (Δl/l{sub 298}){sub mag} is found to be small and negative, as compared to phonon contribution.

  16. Characterization of long term aged martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubota, M.; Hattori, K.; Okada, T.

    1992-01-01

    Types CA6NM (13Cr), 431 and 630 (17Cr) were aged at 400 degrees C and 350 degrees C for up to 10000 hours, and their hardness change and SCC susceptibility in 288 degrees C water were investigated. Hardness of the alloys increased with aging. Hardness of type 431 aged at 400 degrees C for 10000 hours exceeded 340 in Hv, over which tempered martensitic stainless steels had become susceptible to SCC, and showed high SCC susceptibility. Type 630 had high SCC susceptibility in before and after aged condition, and the hardness in both conditions was more than Hv 340. Therefore, hardness was considered to be a parameter which could describe the SCC susceptibility of martensitic stainless steels. Using activation energy for hardness change 105-125kJ/mol and the critical hardness level Hv=340, the marginal life-time for martensitic stainless steels at 288 degrees C was estimated. Predicted life of type 431 and CA6NM were around 10 5 hours and more than 10 6 hours, respectively. Activation energies obtained for toughness change and hardness change were different. Consequently, it was concluded that at least two factors should be taken into consideration for determining the total life-limit for usage of martensitic stainless steels in the light water reactor environment. The meaning of the existence of critical hardness for SCC susceptibility has been also discussed. Higher than 340 in Hv, yield strength and strain for uniform deformation showed a tendency of saturation. Therefore, it was conjectured that some extreme internal strain level, which may change the plastic deformation manner, is the absolute factor for determining the SCC susceptibility of the alloys in high temperature water

  17. Effects of predation by sea ducks on clam abundance in soft-bottom intertidal habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tyler; Esler, Daniel N.; Boyd, W. Sean

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have documented strong, top-down predation effects of sea ducks on mussel populations in rocky intertidal communities. However, the impact of these gregarious predators in soft-bottom communities has been largely unexplored. We evaluated effects of predation by wintering surf scoters Melanitta perspicillata and white-winged scoters M. fusca on clam populations in soft-bottom intertidal habitats of the Strait of Georgia, British Columbia. Specifically, we documented spatial and temporal variation in clam density (clams m–2), scoter diet composition, and the consequences of scoter predation on clam abundance. Of the 3 most numerous clams, Manila clams Venerupis philippinarum and varnish clams Nuttallia obscurata were the primary prey items of both scoter species, while clams of the genus Macoma were rarely consumed by scoters. Between scoter arrival in the fall and departure in the spring, Manila clams decreased in density at most sample sites, while varnish clam densities did not change or declined slightly. Our estimates of numbers of clams consumed by scoters accounted for most of the observed declines in combined abundance of Manila and varnish clams, despite the presence of numerous other vertebrate and invertebrate species known to consume clams. For Macoma spp., we detected an over-winter increase in density, presumably due to growth of clams too small to be retained by our sieve (<5 mm) during fall sampling, in addition to the lack of predation pressure by scoters. These results illustrate the strong predation potential of scoters in soft-bottom intertidal habitats, as well as their potentially important role in shaping community structure.

  18. Martensite transformation kinetics in 9Cr–1.7W–0.4Mo–Co ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Qiuzhi, E-mail: neuqgao@163.com [School of Resources and Materials, Northeastern University at Qinhuangdao, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066000 (China); Wang, Cong; Qu, Fu; Wang, Yingling [School of Resources and Materials, Northeastern University at Qinhuangdao, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066000 (China); Qiao, Zhixia [School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin University of Commerce, Tianjin 300134 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The obtained M{sub s} temperatures of samples austenitized at 1150 °C are higher than at 900 °C. • Martensite-start transformation is slower for austenitizing at 1150 °C than at 900 °C. • Martensite transformation was controlled by nucleation rate. • Growth of martensite plates was controlled by thermal activation of atoms. - Abstract: Martensite transformation features in the 9Cr–1.7W–0.4Mo–Co ferritic steel, was conducted on a Netzsch Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), after austenitized at 900 °C and 1150 °C followed by cooling at various rates to room temperature were studied. A martensite transformation kinetics model based on assumption of continuous nucleation and consideration of impingement was introduced to investigate the influence of austenitizing temperature and cooling rate on the martensite transformation behaviors. The obtained interface velocity and the activation energy for interface-controlling growth are lower than 10{sup −5} m/s and 40 kJ/mol, respectively, according to the fitted data. Both indicated that martensite transformation in the 9Cr–1.7W–0.4Mo–Co ferritic steel was controlled by nucleation rate, and that growth of plates was controlled by thermal activation of atoms.

  19. Martensite transformation kinetics in 9Cr–1.7W–0.4Mo–Co ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Qiuzhi; Wang, Cong; Qu, Fu; Wang, Yingling; Qiao, Zhixia

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The obtained M s temperatures of samples austenitized at 1150 °C are higher than at 900 °C. • Martensite-start transformation is slower for austenitizing at 1150 °C than at 900 °C. • Martensite transformation was controlled by nucleation rate. • Growth of martensite plates was controlled by thermal activation of atoms. - Abstract: Martensite transformation features in the 9Cr–1.7W–0.4Mo–Co ferritic steel, was conducted on a Netzsch Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), after austenitized at 900 °C and 1150 °C followed by cooling at various rates to room temperature were studied. A martensite transformation kinetics model based on assumption of continuous nucleation and consideration of impingement was introduced to investigate the influence of austenitizing temperature and cooling rate on the martensite transformation behaviors. The obtained interface velocity and the activation energy for interface-controlling growth are lower than 10 −5 m/s and 40 kJ/mol, respectively, according to the fitted data. Both indicated that martensite transformation in the 9Cr–1.7W–0.4Mo–Co ferritic steel was controlled by nucleation rate, and that growth of plates was controlled by thermal activation of atoms

  20. Photosymbiotic giant clams are transformers of solar flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Amanda L; Vahidinia, Sanaz; Gagnon, Yakir Luc; Morse, Daniel E; Sweeney, Alison M

    2014-12-06

    'Giant' tridacnid clams have evolved a three-dimensional, spatially efficient, photodamage-preventing system for photosymbiosis. We discovered that the mantle tissue of giant clams, which harbours symbiotic nutrition-providing microalgae, contains a layer of iridescent cells called iridocytes that serve to distribute photosynthetically productive wavelengths by lateral and forward-scattering of light into the tissue while back-reflecting non-productive wavelengths with a Bragg mirror. The wavelength- and angle-dependent scattering from the iridocytes is geometrically coupled to the vertically pillared microalgae, resulting in an even re-distribution of the incoming light along the sides of the pillars, thus enabling photosynthesis deep in the tissue. There is a physical analogy between the evolved function of the clam system and an electric transformer, which changes energy flux per area in a system while conserving total energy. At incident light levels found on shallow coral reefs, this arrangement may allow algae within the clam system to both efficiently use all incident solar energy and avoid the photodamage and efficiency losses due to non-photochemical quenching that occur in the reef-building coral photosymbiosis. Both intra-tissue radiometry and multiscale optical modelling support our interpretation of the system's photophysics. This highly evolved 'three-dimensional' biophotonic system suggests a strategy for more efficient, damage-resistant photovoltaic materials and more spatially efficient solar production of algal biofuels, foods and chemicals.

  1. The Clam-Gallas Palace in Prague: Emblematic Architecture?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konečný, Lubomír

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 18, - (2010), s. 1-10 ISSN 0885-968X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80330511 Keywords : Clam-Gallas Palace * Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach * architecture * emblem s * imprints Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  2. Microstructural and crystallographic characteristics of modulated martensite, non-modulated martensite, and pre-martensitic tweed austenite in Ni-Mn-Ga alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Le; Schneider, Matthew M.; Giri, Anit; Cho, Kyu; Sohn, Yongho

    2017-01-01

    A combinatorial approach using diffusion couples and TEM analyses was carried out to investigate the composition-dependent martensitic transformation in NiMnGa alloys. The compositions cover a large portion of the off-stoichiometric Ni 2 MnGa compositions and some Mn-rich compositions. Crystallographic variations of the martensitic phase, including non-modulated (NM) martensite, modulated (5M or 7M) martensite, and austenitic phase were identified in the diffusion couples and investigated with respect to their microstructure and crystallography. The 5M and 7M martensitic structures were only found near the interphase boundary between austenite and martensite, while the NM martensitic structures were found mostly away from the interphase boundary. The tetragonality ratio (c/a) for NM martensite generally increases with e/a ratio, but was also dependent on the composition. The habit plane and martensitic microstructure that consists of twinned variants with differing orientations were documented using electron diffraction. The pre-martensitic state was observed in the austenitic phase that was located near the interphase boundary between austenite and martensite, with distinctive tweed microstructure and a strain field originating from the local lattice distortions. The combinatorial approach proves to be efficient and systematic in studying the composition-dependent martensitic transformation in NiMnGa alloys and can be potentially applied to other shape memory alloys.

  3. Can ecological history influence response to pollutants? Transcriptomic analysis of Manila clam collected in different Venice lagoon areas and exposed to heavy metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, Massimo; Matozzo, Valerio; Pauletto, Marianna; Di Camillo, Barbara; Giacomazzo, Matteo; Boffo, Luciano; Binato, Giovanni; Marin, Maria Gabriella; Patarnello, Tomaso; Bargelloni, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Chronic exposure to environmental pollutants can exert strong selective pressures on natural populations, favoring the transmission over generations of traits that enable individuals to survive and thrive in highly impacted environments. The lagoon of Venice is an ecosystem subject to heavy anthropogenic impact, mainly due to the industrial activities of Porto Marghera (PM), which led to a severe chemical contamination of soil, groundwater, and sediments. Gene expression analysis on wild Manila clams collected in different Venice lagoon areas enabled to identify differences in gene expression profiles between clams collected in PM and those sampled in clean areas, and the definition of molecular signatures of chemical stress. However, it remains largely unexplored to which extent modifications of gene expression patterns persists after removing the source of contamination. It is also relatively unknown whether chronic exposure to xenobiotics affects the response to other chemical pollutants. To start exploring such issues, in the present study a common-garden experiment was coupled with transcriptomic analysis, to compare gene expression profiles of PM clams with those of clams collected in the less impacted area of Chioggia (CH) during a period under the same control conditions. Part of the two experimental groups were also exposed to copper for seven days to assess whether different "ecological history" does influence response to such pollutant. The results obtained suggest that the chronic exposure to chemical pollution generated a response at the transcriptional level that persists after removal for the contaminated site. These transcriptional changes are centered on key biological processes, such as defense against either oxidative stress or tissue/protein damage, and detoxification, suggesting an adaptive strategy for surviving in the deeply impacted environment of Porto Marghera. On the other hand, CH clams appeared to respond more effectively to copper

  4. Prevalence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in oyster and clam culturing environments in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei-Ting; Jong, Koa-Jen; Lin, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Shing-en; Tey, Yao Hsien; Wong, Hin-chung

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the most prevalent gastroenteritis pathogen in Taiwan and some other Asian countries, and it frequently occurs in oysters and other seafood. This study monitors changes in the density of V. parahaemolyticus and environmental parameters in oyster and hard clam aquacultural environments in Taiwan. Water, sediment and shellfish samples were collected from five sampling sites in 2008-2010, and analyzed for environmental physiochemical parameters, numbers of indicator bacteria (total aerobic counts, total coliforms and fecal coliforms), Vibrio and V. parahaemolyticus present. The results for open oyster farms and hard clam ponds did not differ significantly. V. parahaemolyticus was detected in 77.5, 77.5, 70.8 and 68.8% of the water, sediment, oyster and clam samples, respectively. The densities of V. parahaemolyticus were significantly higher in shellfish than in sediment or water samples, with mean values of 1.33, 1.04 and -0.02 Log CFU/g, respectively. Among these five sampling sites, Shengang and Fangyuan yielded significantly different data from those obtained at the other three sites. As determined by linear multiple regression, V. parahaemolyticus density in water samples depended significantly on the precipitation and Vibrio count, while the V. parahaemolyticus density in the sediment or shellfish samples depended significantly on the salinity of the seawater. Among 1076 isolates examined, a total of three putative pathogenic isolates were identified from 2.5% of the examined samples, and these isolates exhibited hemolytic or urease activities and the presence of gene markers for tdh, trh, type III secretion system (T3SS) 1 (vcrD1) or T3SS2α (vcrD2). The results herein may facilitate the assessment of risk associated with this pathogen in Taiwan and other geographically similar regions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Orientation relationship in Eurofer martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcelo, F.; De Carlan, Y.; Bechade, J.L.; Fournier, B.

    2009-01-01

    Both TEM and SEM/EBSD orientation measurements are carried out on a Eurofer97 martensitic steel. The influence of the prior austenitic grain size is studied using dedicated heat treatments. The intra laths misorientation is estimated by TEM. SEM/EBSD orientation mapping enable to study the actual orientation relationship (OR) between the parent austenitic phase and the martensitic phase. Neither the Nishiyama-Wasserman nor the Kurdjumov-Sachs OR is able to account for both the misorientation angle distributions, the pole figure and the misorientation axes measured. The mixed OR recently proposed by Gourgues et al. (Electron backscattering diffraction study of acicular ferrite, bainite, and martensite steel microstructures, Mater. Sci. Tech. 16 (2000), p. 26-40.) and Sonderegger et al. (Martensite laths in creep resistant martensitic 9-12% Cr steels - Calculation and measurement of misorientations, Mater. Characterization (2006), in Press.) seems to be able to account for most of these results. Based on this OR, a new angular criterion is proposed to detect blocks of laths. (authors)

  6. Crystallographic theory of the martensitic transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwar A. Torres-López

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The martensitic transformation is one of the most researched topics in the materials science during the 20th century. The second half of this century was mainly remembered by the development of several theories related with the kinetics of phase transformation, the mechanisms involved in the nucleation phenomenon, and the way as the crystallographic change is produced. In this paper are described the fundamental concepts that are defined in the crystallographic framework of the martensitic transformation. The study is focused on the application of the most outstanding crystallographic models: the Bain; the Wechsler, Lieberman & Read; and the Bowles & Mackenzie. The topic is presented based upon the particular features of the martensitic transformation, such as its non-diffusional character, type of interface between parent (austenite and product (martensite phases, the formation of substructural defects, and the shape change; all of these features are mathematically described by equations aimed to predict how the transformation will take place rather than to explain the actual movement of the atoms within the structure. This mathematical development is known as the Phenomenological Theory of Martensite Crystallography (PTMC.

  7. Inactivation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in hard clams (Mercanaria mercanaria) by high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) and the effect of HHP on the physical characteristics of hard clam meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mootian, Gabriel K; Flimlin, George E; Karwe, Mukund V; Schaffner, Donald W

    2013-02-01

    Shellfish may internalize dangerous pathogens during filter feeding. Traditional methods of depuration have been found ineffective against certain pathogens. The objective was to explore high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) as an alternative to the traditional depuration process. The effect of HHP on the survival of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in live clams (Mercanaria mercanaria) and the impact of HHP on physical characteristics of clam meat were investigated. Clams were inoculated with up to 7 log CFU/g of a cocktail of V. parahaemolyticus strains via filter feeding. Clams were processed at pressures ranging from 250 to 552 MPa for hold times ranging between 2 and 6 min. Processing conditions of 450 MPa for 4 min and 350 MPa for 6 min reduced the initial concentration of V. parahaemolyticus to a nondetectable level (5 log reductions. The volume of clam meat (processed in shell) increased with negligible change in mass after exposure to pressure at 552 MPa for 3 min, while the drip loss was reduced. Clams processed at 552 MPa were softer compared to those processed at 276 MPa. However, all HHP processed clams were found to be harder compared to unprocessed. The lightness (L*) of the meat increased although the redness (a*) decreased with increasing pressure. Although high pressure-processed clams may pose a significantly lower risk from V. parahaemolyticus, the effect of the accompanied physical changes on the consumer's decision to purchase HHP clams remains to be determined. Shellfish may contain dangerous foodborne pathogens. Traditional methods of removing those pathogen have been found ineffective against certain pathogens. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of high hydrostatic pressure on V. parahaemolyticus in clams. Processing conditions of 450 MPa for 4 min and 350 MPa for 6 min reduced the initial concentration of V. parahaemolyticus to a nondetectable level, achieving >5 log reductions. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Ferritic/martensitic steels: Promises and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Ehrlich, K.; Abe, F.

    1992-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for fusion reactors because of their higher swelling resistance, higher thermal conductivity, lower thermal expansion, and better liquid-metal compatibility than austenitic steels. Irradiation effects will ultimately determine the applicability of these steels, and the effects of irradiation on microstructure and swelling, and on the tensile, fatigue, and impact properties of the ferritic/martensitic steels are discussed. Most irradiation studies have been carried out in fast reactors, where little transmutation helium forms. Helium has been shown to enhance swelling and affect tensile and fracture behavior, making helium a critical issue, since high helium concentrations will be generated in conjunction with displacement damage in a fusion reactor. These issues are reviewed to evaluate the status of ferritic/martensitic steels and to assess the research required to insure that such steels are viable candidates for fusion applications

  9. Microstructure and cleavage in lath martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, John W Jr; Kinney, Chris; Pytlewski, Ken; Adachi, Y

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the microstructure of lath martensitic steels and the mechanisms by which it controls cleavage fracture. The specific experimental example is a 9Ni (9 wt% Ni) steel annealed to have a large prior austenite grain size, then examined and tested in the as-quenched condition to produce a relatively coarse lath martensite. The microstructure is shown to approximate the recently identified ‘classic’ lath martensite structure: prior austenite grains are divided into packets, packets are subdivided into blocks, and blocks contain interleaved laths whose variants are the two Kurjumov–Sachs relations that share the same Bain axis of the transformation. When the steel is fractured in brittle cleavage, the laths in the block share {100} cleavage planes and cleave as a unit. However, cleavage cracks deflect or blunt at the boundaries between blocks with different Bain axes. It follows that, as predicted, the block size governs the effective grain size for cleavage. (paper)

  10. Time-temperature equivalence in Martensite tempering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackenberg, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thomas, Grant A. [CSM; Speer, John G. [CSM; Matlock, David K. [CSM; Krauss, George [CSM

    2008-06-16

    The relationship between time and temperature is of great consequence in many materials-related processes including the tempering of martensite. In 1945, Hollomon and Jaffe quantified the 'degree of tempering' as a function of both tempering time, t, and tempering temperature, T, using the expression, T(log t + c). Here, c is thought to be a material constant and appears to decrease linearly with increasing carbon content. The Hollomon-Jaffe tempering parameter is frequently cited in the literature. This work reviews the original derivation of the tempering parameter concept, and presents the use of the characteristics diffusion distance as an alternative time-temperature relationship during martensite tempering. During the tempering of martensite, interstitial carbon atoms diffuse to form carbides. In addition, austenite decomposes, dislocations and grain boundaries rearrange, associated with iron self diffusion. Since these are all diffusional processes, it is reasonable to expect the degree of tempering to relate to the extent of diffusion.

  11. Risk-based approach to appraise valve closure in the clam Corbicula fluminea in response to waterborne metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, C.-M.; Jou, L.-J.; Chen, B.-C.

    2005-01-01

    We developed a risk-based approach to assess how the valve closure behavior of Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea responds to waterborne copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd). We reanalyzed the valve closure response data from published literature to reconstruct the response time-dependent dose-response profiles based on an empirical three-parameter Hill equation model. We integrated probabilistic exposure profiles of measured environmental Cu and Cd concentrations in the western coastal areas of Taiwan with the reconstructed dose-response relationships at different integration times of response to quantitatively estimate the valve response risk. The risk assessment results implicate exposure to waterborne Cu and Cd may pose no significant risk to clam valve activity in the short-time response periods (e.g., <30 min), yet a relative high risk for valve closure response to waterborne Cu at response times greater than 120 min is alarming. We successfully linked reconstructed dose-response profiles and EC50-time relationships associated with the fitted daily valve opening/closing rhythm characterized by a three-parameter lognormal function to predict the time-varying bivalve closure rhythm response to waterborne metals. We parameterized the proposed predictive model that should encourage a risk-management framework for discussion of future design of biological monitoring systems. - A model was developed to link valve closure in clams to concentrations of metals in water

  12. Metabolic physiology of the invasive clam, Potamocorbula amurensis: the interactive role of temperature, salinity, and food availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathan A; Chen, Xi; Stillman, Jonathon H

    2014-01-01

    In biological systems energy serves as the ultimate commodity, often determining species distributions, abundances, and interactions including the potential impact of invasive species on native communities. The Asian clam Potamocorbula amurensis invaded the San Francisco Estuary (SFE) in 1986 and is implicated in the decline of native fish species through resource competition. Using a combined laboratory/field study we examined how energy expenditure in this clam is influenced by salinity, temperature and food availability. Measures of metabolism were made at whole organism (metabolic rate) and biochemical (pyruvate kinase (PK) and citrate synthase (CS) enzyme activities) levels. We found in the field, over the course of a year, the ratio of PK to CS was typically 1.0 suggesting that aerobic and fermentative metabolism were roughly equivalent, except for particular periods characterized by low salinity, higher temperatures, and intermediate food availabilities. In a 30-day laboratory acclimation experiment, however, neither metabolic rate nor PK:CS ratio was consistently influenced by the same variables, though the potential for fermentative pathways did predominate. We conclude that in field collected animals, the addition of biochemical measures of energetic state provide little additional information to the previously measured whole organism metabolic rate. In addition, much of the variation in the laboratory remained unexplained and additional variables, including reproductive stage or body condition may influence laboratory-based results. Further study of adult clams must consider the role of organismal condition, especially reproductive state, in comparisons of laboratory experiments and field observations.

  13. Population dynamics of the freshwater clam Galatea paradoxa from the Volta River, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adjei-Boateng D.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Population parameters such as asymptotic (L∞, growth coefficient (K, mortality rates (Z,F and M, exploitation level (E and recruitment pattern of the freshwater clam Galatea paradoxa were estimated using length-frequency data from the Volta River estuary, Ghana. The L∞ for G. paradoxa at the Volta estuary was 105.7 mm, the growth coefficient (K and the growth performance index (Ǿ ranged between 0.14–0.18 year-1 and 3.108–3.192, respectively. Total mortality (Z was 0.65–0.82 year-1, while natural mortality (M and fishing mortality (F were 0.35–0.44 year-1 and 0.21–0.47 year-1, respectively, with an exploitation level of 0.32–0.57. The recruitment pattern suggested that G. paradoxa has year-round recruitment with a single pulse over an extended period (October–March in the Volta River. The Volta River stock of G. paradoxa is overfished and requires immediate action to conserve it. This can be achieved by implementing a minimum landing size restriction and intensifying the culture of smaller clams which is a traditional activity at the estuary.

  14. Clams sensitivity towards As and Hg: A comprehensive assessment of native and exotic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Cátia; Freitas, Rosa; Antunes, Sara C; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Figueira, Etelvina

    2016-03-01

    To assess the environmental impact of As and Hg, bioindicator organisms such as bivalves have been used. Nevertheless, few studies have assessed the impacts of As and Hg in Ruditapes decussatus and Ruditapes philippinarum, which are native and exotic species in Europe, respectively. The main goal of the present study was to assess elements' partitioning and detoxification strategies of R. decussatus and R. philippinarum. Both clams showed a higher capacity to bioconcentrate Hg (BCF 2.29-7.49), when compared to As (0.59-1.09). Furthermore, As accumulation in both species was similar in the soluble and insoluble fractions, while in both species the majority of Hg was found in the insoluble fraction. Clams exposed to As showed different detoxification strategies, since R. decussatus had higher ability to enhance antioxidant enzymes and metallothioneins in order to reduce toxicity, and R.philippinarum increased glutathione S-transferase Ω activity, that catalyzes monomethyl arsenate reduction, the rate-limiting reaction in arsenic biotransformation. When exposed to Hg, R. decussatus presented, higher synthesis of antioxidant enzymes and lower LPO, being able to better tolerate Hg than the exotic species R. philippinarum. Thus under relevant levels of As and Hg contamination our work evidenced the higher ability of R. decussatus to survive and inhabit coastal environments not heavily contaminated by Hg and As. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Formation of Martensitic Austenite During Nitridation of Martensitic and Duplex Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangiabadi, Amirali; Dalton, John C.; Wang, Danqi; Ernst, Frank; Heuer, Arthur H.

    2017-01-01

    Isothermal martensite/ferrite-to-austenite phase transformations have been observed after low-temperature nitridation in the martensite and δ-ferrite phases in 15-5 PH (precipitation hardening), 17-7 PH, and 2205 (duplex) stainless steels. These transformations, in the region with nitrogen concentrations of 8 to 16 at. pct, are consistent with the notion that nitrogen is a strong austenite stabilizer and substitutional diffusion is effectively frozen at the paraequilibrium temperatures of our experiments. Our microstructural and diffraction analyses provide conclusive evidence for the martensitic nature of these phase transformations.

  16. Biodiesel Production from Castor Oil by Using Calcium Oxide Derived from Mud Clam Shell

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, S.; Ahmed, A. S.; Anr, Reddy; Hamdan, S.

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic potential of calcium oxide synthesized from mud clam shell as a heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production was studied. The mud clam shell calcium oxide was characterized using particle size analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and BET gas sorption analyzer. The catalyst performance of mud clam shell calcium oxide was studied in the transesterification of castor oil as biodiesel. Catalyst characterization and transesterification s...

  17. General Aspects about the Martensitic Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwar A. Torres-López

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available With the time, the number of studies associated to the martensitic transformation has been expanded; therefore, understand as this mechanism operates and as it confers different characteristics to diverse materials where it occurs, many studies has been conducted in different areas carrying out to discoveries at microstructural, kinetic and crystallographic level. This paper presents an overview of the martensitic transformation, beginning with a historical development, through a review on their morphology and kinetically characteristics, in addition to an analysis of the prospects of the studies carried out in the area, with a special interest in the phenomena of thermo-elasticity and shape memory.

  18. Mechanical properties of martensitic alloy AISI 422

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.; Hu, W.L.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1992-09-01

    HT9 is a martensitic stainless steel that has been considered for structural applications in liquid metal reactors (LMRs) as well as in fusion reactors. AISI 422 is a commercially available martensitic stainless steel that closely resembles HT9, and was studied briefly under the auspices of the US LMR program. Previously unpublished tensile, fracture toughness and charpy impact data on AISI 422 were reexamined for potential insights into the consequences of the compositional differences between the two alloys, particularly with respect to current questions concerning the origin of the radiation-induced embrittlement observed in HT9. 8 refs, 8 figs

  19. Further development of the SEA-Clam wave energy converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellamy, N.W.; Peatfield, A.M.

    1984-04-01

    The final design of the SEA-Clam as a unit for a large 2 GW scheme has been described. This is the leading wave energy device arising out of the UK National Wave Energy Program and is seen as having the greatest potential for further development particularly for smaller scale applications. The small scale market for wave energy is examined and the design and cost parameters evaluated for the 250 kW to 1000 kW range of SEA-Clam units. Building a demonstration prototype rated at 650 kW and producing an annual average output of 250 kW is identified as the next step towards the commercial exploitation of wave energy.

  20. Evaluation of 4-nonylphenol toxicity in the clam Tapes philippinarum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matozzo, Valerio; Deppieri, Martina; Oschino, Vanessa; Marin, M.G.

    2003-01-01

    Lethal and sub lethal effects of 4-nonylphenol (NP) were investigated in the clam Tapes philippinarum from the Lagoon of Venice. In a 96-h lethality test, bivalves were exposed to the following NP concentrations: 0, 0+acetone, .19, 0.38, 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 mg NP/L. The 96-h LC 50 value was 1.12 mg P/L. No mortality was observed at 0.19 mg NP/L, whereas at 1.5 and 3.0 mg P/L both siphons and foot of clams were often cut-off, the animals being unable to withdraw them before shell closure, suggesting the possible narcotic effect of NP. Lower concentrations (0, 0+acetone, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, nd 0.2 mg NP/L) were then used to evaluate sub lethal NP effects on clearance rate (CR), respiration rate (RR), scope for growth (SFG), and survival in ir. Following a 7-day exposure, decreased RRs were found at all NP concentrations tested. Significant decreases in the CR and SFG were only observed at the two highest NP concentrations (0.1 and 0.2 mg/L), with SFG reductions reaching 54% and 71%, respectively. Last, the highest concentrations tested significantly decreased the resistance of clams to exposure to air and enhanced the mortality rate. As the lowest effective NP concentrations are similar to environmentally realistic levels, a condition of potential risk for the well-being of clam populations in estuarine areas is highlighted

  1. Martensitic/ferritic steels as container materials for liquid mercury target of ESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Y.

    1996-01-01

    In the previous report, the suitability of steels as the ESS liquid mercury target container material was discussed on the basis of the existing database on conventional austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels, especially on their representatives, solution annealed 316 stainless steel (SA 316) and Sandvik HT-9 martensitic steel (HT-9). Compared to solution annealed austenitic stainless steels, martensitic/ferritic steels have superior properties in terms of strength, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, mercury corrosion resistance, void swelling and irradiation creep resistance. The main limitation for conventional martensitic/ferritic steels (CMFS) is embrittlement after low temperature (≤380 degrees C) irradiation. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) can increase as much as 250 to 300 degrees C and the upper-shelf energy (USE), at the same time, reduce more than 50%. This makes the application temperature range of CMFS is likely between 300 degrees C to 500 degrees C. For the present target design concept, the temperature at the container will be likely controlled in a temperature range between 180 degrees C to 330 degrees C. Hence, CMFS seem to be difficult to apply. However, solution annealed austenitic stainless steels are also difficult to apply as the maximum stress level at the container will be higher than the design stress. The solution to the problem is very likely to use advanced low-activation martensitic/ferritic steels (LAMS) developed by the fusion materials community though the present database on the materials is still very limited

  2. Sensory Characteristics of Mud Clam (Polymesoda Erosa) Hydrolysate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normah Ismail; Noorasma Mustakim

    2016-01-01

    Mud clam (Polymesoda erosa) was hydrolysed using two different microbial enzymes; alcalase and flavourzyme. The volatile compounds, amino acids and molecular weight associated with umami and bitter taste in mud clam hydrolysate were determined by head space solid phase micro-extraction gas chromatography (HS-SPME-GCMS), High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The characteristics of hydrolysates produced using alcalase and flavourzyme were compared. In total, eighteen, seven and six volatile compounds were identified in the flesh, alcalase hydrolysate and flavourzyme hydrolysate, respectively. 2-piperidinone volatile compound content which is associated with bitterness was 6.79 % in alcalase hydrolysate and 3.78 % in flavourzyme hydrolysate. SDS-PAGE results showed that alcalase hydrolysate contains smaller peptide (<52 kDa) compared to flavourzyme hydrolysate (<126 kDa). In addition, sensory analysis using quantitative descriptive analysis (QDA) showed that flavourzyme hydroysate was the least bitter but elicited more umami taste compared to alcalase hydrolysate. Further treatments are still needed to enhance umami taste and to remove bitter taste in mud clam hydrolysate. (author)

  3. Bitterness and Physichochemical Properties of Angelwing Clam (Pholas Orientalis) Hydrolysate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normah Ismail; Nurul Fasihah Razak

    2016-01-01

    Protein hydrolysates from angelwing clam were obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis using bromelain. The bitterness of hydrolysates was evaluated based on the degree hydrolysis (DH), sensory analysis, molecular weight distribution and functional group. By using 3 % of enzyme substrate ratio bromelain resulted in high DH value at 12.57 % when angelwing clam was hydrolysed for 2 hours. Sensory analysis showed that angelwing hydrolysate was bitter. Angelwing hydrolysate had molecular weight below 50 kDa. The lower molecular weight indicated that the protein has been degraded into smaller peptide chains which contribute to bitter taste. Moreover, the high peak of amine group in angelwing hydrolysate (3385.6 cm -1 ) suggested that bitterness exists. Angelwing hydrolysate had higher protein content, lower fat content and had good water holding capacity than the flesh. This result suggested that angelwing hydrolysate could be useful as food ingredient even though bitter taste developed after the hydrolysis. Thus, debittering should be considered in order to pave the way for full utilization of angelwing clam hydrolysate as a food ingredient. (author)

  4. How life history influences the responses of the clam Scrobicularia plana to the combined impacts of carbamazepine and pH decrease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Rosa; Almeida, Ângela; Calisto, Vânia; Velez, Cátia; Moreira, Anthony; Schneider, Rudolf J.; Esteves, Valdemar I.; Wrona, Frederick J.; Soares, Amadeu M.V. M.; Figueira, Etelvina

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the bivalve Scrobicularia plana, collected from two contrasting areas (pristine location and mercury contaminated area), was selected to assess the biochemical alterations imposed by pH decrease, carbamazepine (an antiepileptic) and the combined effect of both stressors. The effects on oxidative stress related biomarkers after 96 h exposure revealed that pH decrease and carbamazepine induced alterations on clams, with greater impacts on individuals from the contaminated area which presented higher mortality, higher lipid peroxidation and higher glutathione S-transferase activity. These results emphasize the risk of extrapolating results from one area to another, since the same species inhabiting different areas may be affected differently when exposed to the same stressors. Furthermore, the results obtained showed that, when combined, the impact of pH decrease and carbamazepine was lower than each stressor acting alone, which could be related to the defence mechanism of valves closure when bivalves are under higher stressful conditions. - Highlights: • Environmentally relevant concentrations of CBZ and pH 7.1 impacted the performance of Scrobicularia plana. • The combination of CBZ and pH 7.1 did not induce higher impacts compared with stressors acting alone. • Clams from a polluted area showed greater alterations than clams collected from an unpolluted area. - pH decrease and carbamazepine induced biochemical alterations on clams (Scrobicularia plana), with greater impacts on individuals from the contaminated area

  5. Use of antioxidant enzymes of clam Ruditapes philippinarum as biomarker to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Tang, Xuexi; Wang, Ying; Sui, Yadong; Xiao, Hui

    2016-03-01

    The typical organic pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) anthracene was selected as a contaminant to investigate its effects on the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in the clam Ruditapes philippinarum. The results show that SOD, CAT and GSH-Px had diff erent induction and inhibition reactions to anthracene stress, and that three diff erent organs in R. philippinarum (visceral mass, muscle tissue and mantle) had diff erent sensitivities to anthracene stress. This study suggest that SOD activities of the visceral mass, CAT activitities of the mantle and the visceral mass, and GSH-Px activity of the muscle tissue could be used as sensitive indicators of anthracene stress in R. philippinarum.

  6. Tents and tunnels on martensitic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, K.; Hane, K.F.; James, R.D.; Palmstroem, C.J.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we outline a strategy for producing certain deformable structures - tents and tunnels - on epitaxially grown martensitic single crystal films. These structures are intended to be the basic building blocks of micropumps and microactuators. We give specific predictions for the systems Ni 2 MnGa, PbTiO 3 and Cu-Zn-Al. (orig.)

  7. Japanese great pioneer and leader, Zenji Nishiyama, on studies of martensitic transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, K.

    2003-10-01

    Professor Zenji Nishiyama passed away on March 12, 1991, at the age of 89. He was born on October 14, 1901, and so the last year was the centennial birthday anniversary. In such a occasion, his personality and academic achievements will be introduced, because he had been one of great leaders of the world-wide martensite community for a long time, as is well known. The introduction consists of his personal history and academic activities and achievements on martensitic transformations. In addition, some hidden stories will be introduced as to publication of the well-known Nishiyama's orientation relationship and of the crystal structure of a Cu-Al alloy martensite, and as to several works which were carried out during the 2nd world-war and so not published in English.

  8. Proceedings of the IEA Working Group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    An IEA working group on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, European Union, USA, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus, Culham, UK. At the meeting, preliminary data generated on the large heats of steels purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. Second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The majority of this report consists of viewographs for the presentations

  9. Ionic nitriding of high chromium martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhl, S.P; Charadia, R; Vaca, L.S; Cimetta, J

    2008-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels are used in industrial applications where resistance to corrosion and mechanical resistance are needed simultaneously. These steels are normally used in tempering and annealing condition which gives them hardnesses of 500 and 600 HV (about 54 HRC). Ionic nitriding is an assisted diffusion technique that has recently been successfully applied to harden austenitic stainless steels without reducing their resistance to corrosion. The application with AISI 420 martensitic steels has not given good results yet, because in most cases, it affects their corrosion resistance. This work presents the results of the pulsed nitriding of martensitic steels with a higher chrome content, such as the M340 and M333 Boehler steels and they are compared with the same materials after tempering and annealing, without nitriding. The influence of the variations in the parameters of the process, such as the percentage of active time in the pulsed wave, partial nitrogen pressure, current density and effective tension in the microstructure, hardness and wear and corrosion resistance was studied. The microstructure was studied with an optic microscope; the wear resistance with abrasion tests following ASTM G-65 and corrosion with 100 hour long saline haze tests, in a device built according to ASTM B117. Hardness was found to rise to values of 1000 to 1350 HV in all the steels after ionic nitriding, the modified layers oscillated from 3 to 15 microns. As a result, wear resistance also increased, with differences depending on the microstructure and the thickness of the modified layer. However, corrosion resistance was not good, except in the case of the M333 steel test piece with less hardness and a less thick nitrided layer without a noticeable interphase (au)

  10. Distribution of haemic neoplasia of soft-shelled clams in Prince Edward Island: an examination of anthropogenic factors and effects of experimental fungicide exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, D R; MacCallum, G S; McGladdery, S E; Davidson, J

    2016-05-01

    Haemic neoplasia was first considered a disease of concern for soft-shell clams in Prince Edward Island (PEI) when it was diagnosed as the cause of mass mortalities in 1999. The aetiology of the disease remains elusive, but has been associated with environmental degradation. In this study, a 2-year (2001-2002) geographic and seasonal survey was conducted for haemic neoplasia, using histology, in soft-shell clams from PEI. In addition, using geographic information system, the association between anthropogenic factors in the watersheds at sites affected by haemic neoplasia and the prevalence of the disease was investigated. Finally, histopathological changes were assessed in soft-shell clams experimentally exposed to four concentrations of chlorothalonil for 27 days. Haemic neoplasia could not be induced at any concentration of chlorothalonil. Clams exposed to a concentration of 1000 μg L(-1) of the fungicide, however, exhibited an LC50 of 17 days. Although this information provides additional toxicity information (LC50) for soft-shell clams, further experiments are required to assess longer term exposure to the fungicide. The highest prevalences of haemic neoplasia in PEI were found in North River and Miscouche (28.3-50.9% and 33.0-77.8%, respectively). No clear seasonal patterns were found. There was a correlation between haemic neoplasia prevalence and watersheds with a high percentage of potato acreage and forest coverage (P = 0.026 and P = 0.045, respectively), suggesting a link between anthropogenic activity and the prevalence of the disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A SOCIAL COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A SMALL-SCALE CLAM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results from the CBA yielded positive net present values (NPVs) for project options involving live clams being sold on the export market (to Hong Kong) for R24.70 kg-1 and negative NPVs for domestic market options (Johannesburg and Cape Town), where the clam would be sold for R6.50 kg-1. Assuming a discount rate ...

  12. The Stability of the Giant Clam Holobiont over Time and during Bleaching Stress

    KAUST Repository

    Pappas, Melissa

    2017-12-01

    The stability of marine photosymbiotic holobionts has major implications for the future of coral reef communities. This study aims to describe the stability of the Red Sea giant clam holobiont over the duration of one year and during induced bleaching stress under laboratory thermal manipulations. Tridacnid clams of the species Tridacna maxima were sampled at three reef locations near the central Saudi coast of the Red Sea. Associated Symbiodinium of Red Sea giant clams have previously been described to be part of only Clade A, which suggests a strong specificity in the clam-algal partnership, but specific types and potential shifting of types within this clade have not been examined for giant clams. The results from this study confirm that tridacnid symbiont types shift over time and the change between three A1 types suggests a biological and functional significance of two undescribed A1 Symbiodinium types. Experimental bleaching shows that Red Sea giant clams, although exposed to rather hot temperatures naturally, will bleach at 34°C after two weeks, and severely bleached clams likely will not recover. During bleaching, Symbiodinium types shift as well, and shift more drastically than seasonal shifts during the year. This shifting may be an evolved characteristic of the giant clam to aid in surviving major changes in the environment. However, more research is needed to determine if these holobionts are capable of keeping up with the global forecast of warming in reef environments.

  13. Assessment of clam ruditapes philippinarum as Heavy metal bioindicators using NMR-based metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Linbao; You, Liping [Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environment Processes, CAS, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environment Processes, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai (China); The Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Yu, Junbao; Cong, Ming; Wang, Qing; Li, Fei; Li, Lianzhen; Zhao, Jianmin; Li, Chenghua; Wu, Huifeng [Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environment Processes, CAS, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environment Processes, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai (China)

    2011-08-15

    There are mainly distributed three pedigrees (White, Liangdao Red, and Zebra) of Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum in Yantai population along the Bohai marine and coast. However, the biological differences to environmental stressors have been ignored in toxicology studies, which could lead to the distortion of biological interpretations of toxicological effects induced by environmental contaminants. In this study, we applied a system biology approach, metabolomics to compare the metabolic profiles in digestive gland from three pedigrees of clam and characterize and compare the metabolic responses induced by mercury in clam digestive gland tissues to determine a sensitive pedigree of clam as a preferable bioindicator for metal pollution monitoring and toxicology research. The most abundant metabolites, respectively, included branched-chain amino acids, alanine, and arginine in White samples, glutamate, dimethylglycine, and glycine in Zebra clams and acetylcholine, betaine, glucose, and glycogen in Liangdao Red clams. After 48 h exposure of 20 {mu}g L{sup -1} Hg{sup 2+}, the metabolic profiles from the three pedigrees of clams showed differentially significant changes in alanine, glutamate, succinate, taurine, hypotaurine, glycine, arginine, glucose, etc. Our findings indicate the toxicological effects of mercury exposure in Manila clams including the neurotoxicity, disturbances in energetic metabolisms and osmoregulation in the digestive glands and suggest that Liangdao Red pedigree of clam could be a preferable bioindicator for the metal pollution monitoring based on the more sensitive classes of metabolic changes from digestive glands compared with other two (White and Zebra) pedigrees of clams. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Bioaccumulation of gasoline in brackish green algae and popular clams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gihan A. El-Shoubaky

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The green algae (Ulva lactuca and Enteromorpha clathrata and the clams (Tapes decussates and Venerupis aurea grow together in Timsah Lake, Suez Canal, Egypt. Our ultimate goal is to validate the bioaccumulation of gasoline in the marine organisms and their behavior after exposure to the pollutant, experimentally. These species were treated with a serial treatment of gasoline (1000, 4000, 16,000 and 64,000 μl in aquaria with brackish sea-water for 72 h. The tested green algae and clams were taken for an analysis of total hydrocarbon accumulation daily. The statistical analysis showed significant differences between the four species and also between the duration of exposure. The accumulation of gasoline in U. lactuca and E. clathrata reached their maximum after 48 h at 1000 and 4000 μl. The highest absorption was registered after 24 h only at 16,000 and at 64,000 μl. U. lactuca recorded complete mortality in 64,000 μl at 72 h whereas E. clathrata registered death at 48 h and 72 h in the same treatment. V. aurea was more sensitive than T. decussates. The accumulation of gasoline reached its maximum in V. aurea after only 24 h in the first treatment while it retarded to 48 h in T. decussates with a lesser accumulation. However, both clam species accumulated the highest amount of petroleum hydrocarbons during the first hour of exposure at the first treatment. In the third and fourth treatments, clams did not accumulate gasoline but began to dispose it from their tissues till it became less than that in the control. Mortality gradually increased with time in each treatment except the last one (64,000 μl in which 100% death of the specimens was observed. In general, the bioaccumulation of gasoline level was in a descending order as follows: U. lactuca > E. clathrata > V. aurea > T. decussates. Their behavior changed from accumulation to detoxification with time and with the increase in pollutant concentration. Generally, these

  15. Report on feasibility study of the Clam Wave Energy Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    The main emphasis of the feasibility study has been towards producing an acceptable spine design for the Clam wave energy converter. Concrete and steel designs based on a mathematical model of the waveloading have been produced. Progress is also reported in the design of a bellows for a low-pressure air power transmission system. A narrow wave tank and scale model have been constructed in order to carry out a test programme on various aspects of the device's construction and performance.

  16. Second generation wave energy device - the clam concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellamy, N.W.

    1981-01-01

    A device concept is presented which has arisen from a system approach adopted by a research group with considerable experience in the discipline of wave energy. The Clam, which can be classified as a spine-based pneumatic terminator, is deemed to be a second generation wave energy device in that it tries to utilize system components already identified as attractive, while at the same time avoiding known problem areas. A working model of this wave power device at an engineering scale is discussed for trials in real waves. 3 refs.

  17. Photosymbiotic Giant Clams are Transformers of Solar Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    function to forward-scatter light reflected from high albedo sand or from the highly reflec- tive clam shell itself (M. Lim 2014, personal communication...grains: aggregates made of crystalline water ice . Icarus 215, 682–694. (doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2011.04.011) 17. Denton EJ, Land MF. 1971 Mechanism of...2005.50.5.1490) 29. McFarland WN, Munz FW. 1975 Part II: the photic environment of clear tropical seas during the day. Vis. Res. 15, 1063–1070. (doi

  18. Postirradiation thermocyclic loading of ferritic-martensitic structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, L.; Orychtchenko, A.; Petersen, C.; Rybin, V.

    Thermonuclear fusion reactors of the Tokamak-type will be unique power engineering plants to operate in thermocyclic mode only. Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels are prime candidate structural materials for test blankets of the ITER fusion reactor. Beyond the radiation damage, thermomechanical cyclic loading is considered as the most detrimental lifetime limiting phenomenon for the above structure. With a Russian and a German facility for thermal fatigue testing of neutron irradiated materials a cooperation has been undertaken. Ampule devices to irradiate specimens for postirradiation thermal fatigue tests have been developed by the Russian partner. The irradiation of these ampule devices loaded with specimens of ferritic-martensitic steels, like the European MANET-II, the Russian 05K12N2M and the Japanese Low Activation Material F82H-mod, in a WWR-M-type reactor just started. A description of the irradiation facility, the qualification of the ampule device and the modification of the German thermal fatigue facility will be presented.

  19. Step-wise stimulated martensitic transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airoldi, G.; Riva, G.

    1991-01-01

    NiTi alloys, widely known both for their shape memory properties and for unusual pseudoelastic behaviour, are now on the forefront attention for step-wise induced memory processes, thermal or stress stimulated. Literature results related to step-wise stimulated martensite (direct transformation) are examined and contrasted with step-wise thermal stimulated parent phase (reverse transformation). Hypothesis are given to explain the key characters of both transformations, a thermodynamic model from first principles being till now lacking

  20. PCDD/F and dioxin-like PCB bioaccumulation by Manila clam from polluted areas of Venice lagoon (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sfriso, Adriano; Facca, Chiara; Raccanelli, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    POP bioaccumulation pathways in the clam Tapes philippinarum were examined for two years from juveniles to adult size. Two polluted sites, one with sandy sediment, the other muddy were compared with a reference site characterized by low contamination levels. Juvenile clams coming from a hatchery were reared both on the sediment and in nets suspended at 30 cm from the bottom. POP changes in clam tissue were related to the concentrations recorded in sediments and in the particulate matter during the entire fattening period. Results provided interesting data on the relationships between environmental contamination and bioaccumulation. Contrary to studies on the decontamination times of the clams collected in polluted areas, this work investigates the preferential clam bioaccumulation pathways during growth under different environmental conditions. In general POP bioaccumulation resulted to be correlated to concentrations in SPM rather than in sediments and was higher in S-clams rather than in B-clams. -- Highlights: • PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like PCB accumulation in clam tissues during growth. • Muddy and sandy polluted areas. • How sediment and suspended matter contamination affect clam toxicity. • Clam toxicity and law limits. -- Clam bioaccumulation pathways in polluted areas

  1. PCDD/F and dioxin-like PCB bioaccumulation by Manila clam from polluted areas of Venice lagoon (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfriso, Adriano; Facca, Chiara; Raccanelli, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    POP bioaccumulation pathways in the clam Tapes philippinarum were examined for two years from juveniles to adult size. Two polluted sites, one with sandy sediment, the other muddy were compared with a reference site characterized by low contamination levels. Juvenile clams coming from a hatchery were reared both on the sediment and in nets suspended at 30 cm from the bottom. POP changes in clam tissue were related to the concentrations recorded in sediments and in the particulate matter during the entire fattening period. Results provided interesting data on the relationships between environmental contamination and bioaccumulation. Contrary to studies on the decontamination times of the clams collected in polluted areas, this work investigates the preferential clam bioaccumulation pathways during growth under different environmental conditions. In general POP bioaccumulation resulted to be correlated to concentrations in SPM rather than in sediments and was higher in S-clams rather than in B-clams. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiation swelling of steels with lath martensite-austenic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagaradze, V.V.; Pavlov, V.A.; Alyab'ev, V.M.; Lapin, S.S.; Ermishkin, V.A.; Antonova, O.V.

    1987-01-01

    Influence of electron radiation in the column of the JEM-1000 electron microscope on radiation swelling of austenite as austenitic fields and thin plates surrounded by α-martensite crystals is investigated. Formation of lath structure of alternating dispersive plates of martensite and invert austenite formed as a result of partial inverse martensite transformation α→γ is shown to restrain radiation swelling and formation of vacancy voids in stainless steels

  3. Isothermal martensite formation at sub-zero temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojko, Allan; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Slycke, Jan

    2010-01-01

    austenitized and quenched in oil and thereafter investigated with vibrating sample agnetometry, which allows a quantitative assessment of the fraction of retained austenite as a function of the subzero temperature and time. Isothermal martensite formation was observed on interrupting the continuous cooling (5...... with a continuation of the martensitic transformation. On prolonged isothermal holding a volume reduction was observed for AISI 52100, but not for AISI 1070. A mechanism is proposed that explains the occurrence of isothermal martensite formation....

  4. Coping with seawater acidification and the emerging contaminant diclofenac at the larval stage: A tale from the clam Ruditapes philippinarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munari, Marco; Chemello, Giulia; Finos, Livio; Ingrosso, Gianmarco; Giani, Michele; Marin, Maria G

    2016-10-01

    Seawater acidification could alter the susceptibility of marine organisms to emerging contaminants, such as pharmaceuticals. In this study, the combined effects of seawater acidification and the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac on survival, growth and oxidative stress-related parameters (catalase activity and lipid peroxidation) in the larvae of the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum were investigated for the first time. An experimental flow-through system was set up to carry out a 96-h exposure of clam larvae. Two pH levels (pH 8.0, the control, and pH 7.8, the predicted pH by the end of this century) were tested with and without diclofenac (0.5 μg/L). After 4 days, mortality was dramatically higher under reduced pH, particularly in the presence of diclofenac (62% of the larvae dead). Shell morphology was negatively affected by both acidification and diclofenac from the first day of exposure. The percentage of abnormal larvae was always higher at pH 7.8 than in controls, peaking at 98% in the presence of diclofenac after 96 h. Instead, shell length, shell height or the ratio of these values were only negatively influenced by reduced pH throughout the whole experiment. After 96 h, catalase activity was significantly increased in all larvae kept at pH 7.8, whereas no significant difference in lipid peroxidation was found among the treatments. This study demonstrates a high susceptibility of R. philippinarum larvae to a slight reduction in seawater pH. Furthermore, the results obtained highlight that acidification enhances the sensitivity of clam larvae to environmentally relevant concentrations of diclofenac. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Size dependent bioaccumulation and ecotoxicity of gold nanoparticles in an endobenthic invertebrate: The Tellinid clam Scrobicularia plana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jinfen; Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Poirier, Laurence; Amiard-Triquet, Claude; Gilliland, Douglas; Joubert, Yolaine; Pilet, Paul; Guibbolini, Marielle; Risso de Faverney, Christine; Roméo, Michèle; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have important technological applications resulting in an increased potential for release to the environment, and a greater possibility of toxicological effects. The marine bivalve Scrobicularia plana was exposed to AuNPs of size 5, 15 and 40 nm during a 16 d laboratory exposure at 100 μg Au L −1 . After exposure to AuNPs forming aggregates (>700 nm), the clams accumulated Au in their soft tissues. Biochemical (biomarkers) and behavioral (burrowing and feeding) responses were investigated. Au NPs were responsible of metallothionein induction (5, 40 nm), increased activities of catalase (15, 40 nm) and superoxide dismutase (40 nm) and of glutathione S-transferase by the three sizes of AuNPs indicating defense against oxidative stress. Exposure to AuNPs impaired burrowing behavior. However, it must be underlined that these effects were observed at a dose much higher than expected in the environment. - Highlights: ► AuNPs were aggregated to a maximum distribution peak at 0.6 μm in seawater. ► Scrobicularia plana accumulated Au with higher accumulation for bigger NPs. ► Induction of MT, CAT, SOD and GST showed oxidative stress in clams. ► TBARS levels advocated no significant oxidative damage in clams. ► Gold is an inert metal, ecotoxic effects are probably due to the nanoparticle form. - AuNPs were aggregated in seawater, Scrobicularia plana accumulated Au with higher accumulation for bigger NPs and increased activities of biomarkers showed oxidative stress.

  6. Isothermal martensitic transformation as an internal-stress-increasing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Xie, Z.L.; Haenninen, H.; Humbeeck, J. van; Pietikaeinen, J.

    1995-01-01

    Based on the results that the magnitude of the stabilization of retained austenite increases with increasing the amount of martensite transformed, it has been assumed that the martensitic transformation is accompanied with an increase in internal resisting stress which subsequently results in the stabilization of retained austenite. By simplifying this internal resisting stress to be a type of hydrostatic compressive stress acting on retained austenite due to surrounding martensite plates, a thermodynamical analysis for an isothermal martensitic transformation under applied hydrostatic pressure has been performed. The calculated results, to some extent, show a good agreement with the experimental data. (orig.)

  7. Ecotoxicological evaluation of tributyltin toxicity to the equilateral venus clam, Gomphina veneriformis (Bivalvia: Veneridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kiyun; Kim, Rosa; Park, Jung Jun; Shin, Hyun Chool; Lee, Jung Sick; Cho, Hyeon Seo; Lee, Yeon Gyu; Kim, Jongkyu; Kwak, Inn-Sil

    2012-03-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is the most common pesticide in marine and freshwater environments. To evaluate the potential ecological risk posed by TBT, we measured biological responses such as growth rate, gonad index, sex ratio, the percentage of intersex gonads, filtration rate, and gill abnormalities in the equilateral venus clam (Gomphina veneriformis). Additionally, the biochemical and molecular responses were evaluated in G. veneriformis exposed to various concentrations of TBT. The growth of G. veneriformis was significantly delayed in a dose-dependent manner after exposure to all tested TBT concentrations. After TBT was administered to G. veneriformis, the gonad index decreased and the sex balance was altered. The percentage of intersex gonads also increased significantly in treated females, whereas no intersex gonads were detected in the solvent control group. Additionally, intersex gonads were detected in male G. veneriformis specimens exposed to relatively high TBT concentrations (20 μg L⁻¹). The filtration rate was also reduced in a dose-dependent manner in TBT-exposed G. veneriformis. We also noted abnormal gill morphology in TBT-exposed G. veneriformis. Furthermore, increases in antioxidant enzyme activities were observed in TBT-exposed G. veneriformis clams, regardless of dosage. Vitellogenin gene expression also increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner in G. veneriformis exposed to TBT. These results provide valuable information regarding our understanding of the toxicology of TBT in G. veneriformis. Moreover, the responses of biological and molecular factors could be utilized as information for risk assessments and marine monitoring of TBT toxicity. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Great Lakes clams find refuge from zebra mussels in restored, lake-connected marsh (Ohio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, S. Jerrine; Wilcox, Douglas A.

    2004-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, more than 95 percent of the freshwater clams once found in Lake Erie have died due to the exotic zebara mussel (Dreissena polymorpha). Zebra mussels attach themselves to native clams in large numbers, impeding the ability of the clams to eat and burrow. However, in 1996, we discovered a population of native clams in Metzger Marsh in western Lake Erie (about 50 miles [80 km] east of Toledo) that were thriving despite the longtime presence of zebra mussel in surrounding waters. At that time, Metzger Marsh was undergoing extensive restoration, including construction of a dike to replace the eroded barrier beach and of a water-control structure to maintain hydrologic connections with the lake (Wilcox and Whillans 1999). The restoration plan called for a drawdown of water levels to promote plant growth from the seedbank -- a process that would also destroy most of the clam population. State and federal resource managers recommended removing as many clams as possible to a site that was isolated from zebra mussels, and then returning them to the marsh after it was restored. We removed about 7,000 native clams in 1996 and moved them back to Metzger Marsh in 1999.

  9. Recovery of intertidal hardshelled clams in Prince William Sound from Exxon Valdez oiling and shoreline treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houghton, J.P.; Lees, D.C.; Driskell, W.B.

    1994-01-01

    Native little neck (Protothaca staminea) and butter clams (Saxidomus giganteus) were quantitatively surveyed from 1989 through 1993 to evaluate effects from the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Hydraulic washing of sand and gravel beaches altered beach morphology by transporting material down slope from upper elevations, often burying the lower beach in several centimeters of sediment having a relatively low content of fines and organic carbon. Hydraulically washed beaches showed significant reductions in clam densities in 1989 and 1990. Recruitment of clams was very limited on these beaches through 1993; as a result, clam densities on these hydraulically washed beaches remain very depressed compared to those on beaches that were unoiled or oiled but not washed. Littlenecks transplanted from a reference site to a heavily oiled but untreated site showed significant patterns of increased mortality, decreased growth, and increased bioaccumulation of PAH in response to a gradient in sediment PAH, This same heavily oiled site has consistently had among the highest rates of hardshelled clam recruitment of any of the sites sampled. Littlenecks also were transplanted to another heavily oiled beach that had been hydraulically washed and had little remaining hydrocarbons. These clams showed very high survival, yet this beach has had very little clam recruitment. It is hypothesized that recruitment at this site may be inhibited by the low level of finer sediments and low organic content remaining after washing

  10. Concentrations of organotin compounds in sediment and clams collected from coastal areas in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midorikawa, Sayaka; Arai, Takaomi; Harino, Hiroya; Ohji, Madoka; Nguyen Duc Cu; Miyazaki, Nobuyuki

    2004-01-01

    Levels of butyltin (BT) and phenyltin (PT) compounds were determined in sediments and clam Meretrix spp. collected from north and central coastal areas in Vietnam. Concentrations of TBT in sediments ranged from 0.89 to 34 ng g -1 dry wt and those in clams ranged from 1.4 to 56 ng g -1 wet wt. The levels of TBT in sediments and clams from Vietnam were within limits reported from other countries. Further, the TBT level in clams was lower than the tolerable average residue level (TARL) estimated based on tolerable daily intake (TDI). Trace amounts of PTs were also found in both sediment and clam samples. In sediments from north and central Vietnam, the concentrations of TBT were highest in the order of Hue (28 ng g -1 dry wt), Cua Luc (15 ng g -1 dry wt), Sam Son (6.3 ng g -1 dry wt), and Tra Co (5.5 ng g -1 dry wt). Among the clams from north and central Vietnam, the levels of TBT in clams from Cua Luc were dramatically high at 47 ng g -1 wet wt. TBT formed the principal butyltin species in sediment at all sites studied. The ratios of TBT in sediment were higher among BT compounds at all study sites. Of total BTs, TBT was the dominant species in clams from almost all sites studied. In spatial distribution, TPT showed a pattern similar to TBT, suggesting the use of TPT as an antifouling paint. The partition coefficient between sediment and calms was calculated. The partition coefficients of TBT and TPT were 2.01 (0.56-5.5) and 9.23 (3.1-20), respectively. These results show that sediment-bound TBT is a source of contamination to clams in addition to dissolved TBT

  11. Identification of clam plasma proteins that bind its pathogen Quahog Parasite Unknown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Rachel; Pales Espinosa, Emmanuelle; Allam, Bassem

    2018-06-01

    The hard clam (Mercenaria mercenaria) is among the most economically-important marine species along the east coast of the United States, representing the first marine resource in several Northeastern states. The species is rather resilient to infections and the only important disease of hard clams results from an infection caused by Quahog Parasite Unknown (QPX), a protistan parasite that can lead to significant mortality events in wild and aquacultured clam stocks. Though the presence of QPX disease has been documented since the 1960s, little information is available on cellular and molecular interactions between the parasite and the host. This study examined the interactions between the clam immune system and QPX cells. First, the effect of clam plasma on the binding of hemocytes to parasite cells was evaluated. Second, clam plasma proteins that bind QPX cells were identified through proteomic (LC-MS/MS) analyses. Finally, the effect of prior clam exposure to QPX on the abundance of QPX-reactive proteins in the plasma was evaluated. Results showed that plasma factors enhance the attachment of hemocytes to QPX. Among the proteins that specifically bind to QPX cells, several lectins were identified, as well as complement component proteins and proteolytic enzymes. Furthermore, results showed that some of these lectins and complement-related proteins are inducible as their abundance significantly increased following QPX challenge. These results shed light on plasma proteins involved in the recognition and binding of parasite cells and provide molecular targets for future investigations of factors involved in clam resistance to the disease, and ultimately for the selection of resistant clam stocks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides Derived from Enzymatic Hydrolysates of Razor Clam Sinonovacula constricta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory activity of razor clam hydrolysates produced using five proteases, namely, pepsin, trypsin, alcalase, flavourzyme and proteases from Actinomucor elegans T3 was investigated. Flavourzyme hydrolysate showed the highest level of degree of hydrolysis (DH (45.87% followed by A. elegans T3 proteases hydrolysate (37.84% and alcalase (30.55%. The A. elegans T3 proteases was observed to be more effective in generating small peptides with ACE-inhibitory activity. The 3 kDa membrane permeate of A. elegans T3 proteases hydrolysate showed the highest ACE-inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 0.79 mg/mL. After chromatographic separation by Sephadex G-15 gel filtration and reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography, the potent fraction was subjected to MALDI/TOF-TOF MS/MS for identification. A novel ACE-inhibitory peptide (VQY was identified exhibiting an IC50 of 9.8 μM. The inhibitory kinetics investigation by Lineweaver-Burk plots demonstrated that the peptide acts as a competitive ACE inhibitor. The razor clam hydrolysate obtained by A. elegans T3 proteases could serve as a source of functional peptides with ACE-inhibitory activity for physiological benefits.

  13. Martensitic transformation in Eurofer-97 and ODS-Eurofer steels: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilnyk, K.D.; Oliveira, V.B.; Sandim, H.R.Z.; Möslang, A.; Raabe, D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Martensitic transformation of RAFM steels promotes significant grain fragmentation. • Austenite grain growth occurs in Eurofer-97 steel but not in ODS-Eurofer steel. • Boundary misorientation distribution of the as-quenched steels show two maxima peaks. • The amount of retained austenite varies from one steel to another. - Abstract: Reduced-activation ferritic–martensitic Eurofer-97 and ODS-Eurofer steels are potential candidates for structural applications in advanced nuclear reactors. Samples of both steel grades in the as-tempered condition were austenitized in vacuum for 1 h from 900 °C to 1300 °C followed by air cooling to room temperature. The microstructure was characterized by dilatometry, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Thermodynamic calculations provided by Thermo-Calc software were used to determine their transformation temperatures. Even having similar chemical composition, important changes were observed after martensitic transformation in these steels. Significant austenitic grain growth was observed in Eurofer-97 steel leading to the development of coarser martensitic packets. Contrastingly, austenitic grain growth was prevented in ODS-Eurofer steel due to fine and stable dispersion of Y-based particles

  14. Recolonization of reactor cooling water system by the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    Recolonization rates for the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea ranged from 3.0 to 5.6 metric tons per year in cooling water basins for a nuclear production reactor at the Savannah River Plant. However, a 10-month cleaning cycle for each basin (flow area, 6100 m 2 ) keeps the depth of the silt/clam layer low. With this cleaning frequency, Corbicula are not reaching heat exchangers at sufficient size or in sufficient numbers to restrict flow. Data are presented on the size/age distribution for clams recolonizing cooling water basins between cleanings

  15. The Stability of the Giant Clam Holobiont over Time and during Bleaching Stress

    KAUST Repository

    Pappas, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Experimental bleaching shows that Red Sea giant clams, although exposed to rather hot temperatures naturally, will bleach at 34°C after two weeks, and severely bleached clams likely will not recover. During bleaching, Symbiodinium types shift as well, and shift more drastically than seasonal shifts during the year. This shifting may be an evolved characteristic of the giant clam to aid in surviving major changes in the environment. However, more research is needed to determine if these holobionts are capable of keeping up with the global forecast of warming in reef environments.

  16. Risk-based probabilistic approach to assess the impact of false mussel invasions on farmed hard clams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chung-Min; Ju, Yun-Ru; Chio, Chia-Pin; Chen, Wei-Yu

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a risk-based predictive model to assess the impact of false mussel Mytilopsis sallei invasions on hard clam Meretrix lusoria farms in the southwestern region of Taiwan. The actual spread of invasive false mussel was predicted by using analytical models based on advection-diffusion and gravity models. The proportion of hard clam colonized and infestation by false mussel were used to characterize risk estimates. A mortality model was parameterized to assess hard clam mortality risk characterized by false mussel density and infestation intensity. The published data were reanalyzed to parameterize a predictive threshold model described by a cumulative Weibull distribution function that can be used to estimate the exceeding thresholds of proportion of hard clam colonized and infestation. Results indicated that the infestation thresholds were 2-17 ind clam(-1) for adult hard clams, whereas 4 ind clam(-1) for nursery hard clams. The average colonization thresholds were estimated to be 81-89% for cultivated and nursery hard clam farms, respectively. Our results indicated that false mussel density and infestation, which caused 50% hard clam mortality, were estimated to be 2,812 ind m(-2) and 31 ind clam(-1), respectively. This study further indicated that hard clam farms that are close to the coastal area have at least 50% probability for 43% mortality caused by infestation. This study highlighted that a probabilistic risk-based framework characterized by probability distributions and risk curves is an effective representation of scientific assessments for farmed hard clam in response to the nonnative false mussel invasion.

  17. Haemocytic leukemia in Prince Edward Island (PEI) soft shell clam (Mya arenaria): Spatial distribution in agriculturally impacted estuaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muttray, Annette; Reinisch, Carol; Miller, Jason; Ernst, William; Gillis, Patricia; Losier, Melanie; Sherry, James

    2012-01-01

    Intensive farming of potatoes in Prince Edward Island (PEI) relies on the repeated and widespread application of fertilizers and pesticides. In PEI the main potato farming areas are in close proximity and drain directly to estuaries. Runoff from high agricultural activity watersheds could impact benthic organism health in the depositional zone of downstream estuaries. The estuarine filter feeder Mya arenaria (soft-shell clam) could be particularly vulnerable to both particle-adsorbed and water soluble contaminants. M. arenaria is susceptible to haemocytic leukemia. In May 2009, we established that heavily proliferated leukemia (HPL) prevalence was generally higher in PEI estuaries located downstream of high intensity potato farming (Dunk and Wilmot estuaries) watersheds than in estuaries downstream of lower intensity areas. Using Mab-1E10 based immunocytochemistry we observed that leukemic haemocytes from the Dunk and Wilmot estuaries were 1E10 negative whereas those from the Ox/Sheep estuary (low potato farming intensity) were 1E10 positive. The expression of genes in the p53 tumour suppressor pathway enabled us to differentiate groups of leukemic and normal M. arenaria, validating our diagnoses. In October 2009, we confirmed that HPL prevalence was elevated in the Dunk and Wilmot estuaries compared to reference (Souris River). Moreover, leukemia prevalence declined with distance from the river mouths along transects through the Dunk and Wilmot estuaries. The pesticides ß-endosulfan and α-endosulfan were detected in surface sediments from the Dunk and Wilmot estuaries, but not in sediments from either the Souris River or several other lower intensity potato farming watersheds. Our study provides evidence of an association between intensity of potato farming and prevalence of clam leukemia at downstream estuaries in PEI. - Highlights: ► We examined leukemia prevalence in PEI clams Mya arenaria. ► Prevalence was generally higher downstream of high intensity

  18. Haemocytic leukemia in Prince Edward Island (PEI) soft shell clam (Mya arenaria): Spatial distribution in agriculturally impacted estuaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muttray, Annette, E-mail: amuttray@rescan.com [Environment Canada, Water Science and Technology Directorate, 867 Lakeshore Road, Burlington, ON, Canada L7R 4A6 (Canada); Reinisch, Carol, E-mail: creinisch@mbl.edu [Visiting Scientist Environment Canada, Water Science and Technology Directorate, 867 Lakeshore Road, Burlington, ON, Canada L7R 4A6 (Canada); Miller, Jason, E-mail: j.miller@ec.gc.ca [Environment Canada, Water Science and Technology Directorate, 867 Lakeshore Road, Burlington, ON, Canada L7R 4A6 (Canada); Ernst, William, E-mail: bill.ernst@ec.gc.ca [Environment Canada, Water Science and Technology Directorate, 45 Alderney Drive, Dartmouth, NS, Canada B2Y 2N6 (Canada); Gillis, Patricia, E-mail: patty.gillis@ec.gc.ca [Environment Canada, Water Science and Technology Directorate, 867 Lakeshore Road, Burlington, ON, Canada L7R 4A6 (Canada); Losier, Melanie, E-mail: melanie.losier@ec.gc.ca [Environment Canada, Atlantic Laboratory for Environmental Testing, Environmental Science Centre, P.O. Box 23005 Moncton, NB, Canada E1A 6S8 (Canada); Sherry, James, E-mail: jim.sherry@ec.gc.ca [Environment Canada, Water Science and Technology Directorate, 867 Lakeshore Road, Burlington, ON, Canada L7R 4A6 (Canada)

    2012-05-01

    Intensive farming of potatoes in Prince Edward Island (PEI) relies on the repeated and widespread application of fertilizers and pesticides. In PEI the main potato farming areas are in close proximity and drain directly to estuaries. Runoff from high agricultural activity watersheds could impact benthic organism health in the depositional zone of downstream estuaries. The estuarine filter feeder Mya arenaria (soft-shell clam) could be particularly vulnerable to both particle-adsorbed and water soluble contaminants. M. arenaria is susceptible to haemocytic leukemia. In May 2009, we established that heavily proliferated leukemia (HPL) prevalence was generally higher in PEI estuaries located downstream of high intensity potato farming (Dunk and Wilmot estuaries) watersheds than in estuaries downstream of lower intensity areas. Using Mab-1E10 based immunocytochemistry we observed that leukemic haemocytes from the Dunk and Wilmot estuaries were 1E10 negative whereas those from the Ox/Sheep estuary (low potato farming intensity) were 1E10 positive. The expression of genes in the p53 tumour suppressor pathway enabled us to differentiate groups of leukemic and normal M. arenaria, validating our diagnoses. In October 2009, we confirmed that HPL prevalence was elevated in the Dunk and Wilmot estuaries compared to reference (Souris River). Moreover, leukemia prevalence declined with distance from the river mouths along transects through the Dunk and Wilmot estuaries. The pesticides ss-endosulfan and {alpha}-endosulfan were detected in surface sediments from the Dunk and Wilmot estuaries, but not in sediments from either the Souris River or several other lower intensity potato farming watersheds. Our study provides evidence of an association between intensity of potato farming and prevalence of clam leukemia at downstream estuaries in PEI. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined leukemia prevalence in PEI clams Mya arenaria. Black

  19. Tribocorrosion wear of austenitic and martensitic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rozing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of tribocorrosion wear caused by an aggressive acidic media. Tests were conducted on samples made of stainless steel AISI 316L, 304L and 440C. Austenitic steels were tested in their nitrided state and martensitic in quenched and tempered and then induction hardened state. Electrochemical corrosion resistance testing and analysis of the microstructure and hardness in the cross section was carried out on samples of selected steels. To test the possibility of applying surface modification of selected materials in conditions of use, tests were conducted on samples/parts in a worm press for final pressing.

  20. Martensitic textures: Multiscale consequences of elastic compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenoy, S.R.; Lookman, T.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    2001-03-01

    We show that a free energy entirely in the order-parameter strain variable(s), rather than the displacement field, provides a unified understanding of martensitic textures. We use compatibility equations, linking the strain tensor components in the bulk and at interfaces, that induce anisotropic order-parameter strain interactions. These two long-range bulk/interface potentials, together with local compositional fluctuations, drive the formation of global elastic textures. Relaxational simulations show the spontaneous formation (and evolution under stress/temperature quenches) of equal width parallel twins, branched twins, and tweed, including characteristic scaling of twin width with twin length. (author)

  1. Anomalous kinetics of lath martensite formation in stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Pantleon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of lath martensite formation in Fe-17.3 wt-%Cr-7.1 wt-%Ni-1.1 wt-%Al-0.08 wt-%C stainless steel was investigated with magnetometry and microscopy. Lath martensite forms during cooling, heating and isothermally. For the first time, it is shown by magnetometry during extremely slow...

  2. Modulated martensite: why it forms and why it deforms easily

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, S; Niemann, R; Thersleff, T; Roessler, U K; Heczko, O; Buschbeck, J; Holzapfel, B; Schultz, L; Faehler, S

    2011-01-01

    Diffusionless phase transitions are at the core of the multifunctionality of (magnetic) shape memory alloys, ferroelectrics and multiferroics. Giant strain effects under external fields are obtained in low symmetric modulated martensitic phases. We outline the origin of modulated phases, their connection with tetragonal martensite and consequences owing to their functional properties by analysing the martensitic microstructure of epitaxial Ni-Mn-Ga films from the atomic to the macroscale. Geometrical constraints at an austenite-martensite phase boundary act down to the atomic scale. Hence, a martensitic microstructure of nanotwinned tetragonal martensite can form. Coarsening of twin variants can reduce twin boundary energy, a process we could observe from the atomic to the millimetre scale. Coarsening is a fractal process, proceeding in discrete steps by doubling twin periodicity. The collective defect energy results in a substantial hysteresis, which allows the retention of modulated martensite as a metastable phase at room temperature. In this metastable state, elastic energy is released by the formation of a 'twins within twins' microstructure that can be observed from the nanometre to the millimetre scale. This hierarchical twinning results in mesoscopic twin boundaries. Our analysis indicates that mesoscopic boundaries are broad and diffuse, in contrast to the common atomically sharp twin boundaries of tetragonal martensite. We suggest that the observed extraordinarily high mobility of such mesoscopic twin boundaries originates from their diffuse nature that renders pinning by atomistic point defects ineffective.

  3. Elimination of Escherichia coli and Salmonella in Clam by Using Zeolite in a Station of Depuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gdoura, Morsi; Sellami, Hanen; Khannous, Lamia; Ketata, Najib; Neila, Idriss Ben; Traore, Al Ibrahim; Chekir, Zouhair; Gdoura, Radhouane

    2017-09-01

      The application of natural zeolite for water and wastewater treatment has been carried out and is still a promising technique in environmental cleaning processes. Natural zeolite can be used to improve the purification process of clams (Ruditapes decussatus). Thus, our study aimed at improving the clam purification system in order to reduce Escherichia coli and eliminate Salmonella in samples artificially contaminated with this bacterium using a natural zeolite to replace the biological filter. The results showed that zeolite used in a depuration system improved the clam purification process. Moreover, natural zeolite exhibited high performance in the adsorption of bacteria and allowed to reduce the Escherichia coli abundance in 24 h, thus ensuring purified clams conformity with the ISO 16649-3 standard. These results indicate the beneficial effects of using zeolite in the adsorption of bacteria and the reduction in the abundance of Escherichia coli and set the Salmonella from marine organisms.

  4. Biodiesel Production from Castor Oil by Using Calcium Oxide Derived from Mud Clam Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic potential of calcium oxide synthesized from mud clam shell as a heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production was studied. The mud clam shell calcium oxide was characterized using particle size analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and BET gas sorption analyzer. The catalyst performance of mud clam shell calcium oxide was studied in the transesterification of castor oil as biodiesel. Catalyst characterization and transesterification study results of synthesized catalyst proved the efficiency of the natural derived catalyst for biodiesel production. A highest biodiesel yield of 96.7% was obtained at optimal parameters such as 1 : 14 oil-to-methanol molar ratio, 3% w/w catalyst concentration, 60°C reaction temperature, and 2-hour reaction time. Catalyst reusability test shows that the synthesized calcium oxide from mud clam shell is reusable up to 5 times.

  5. Martensitic transformations in titanium nickelide subject to sock wave loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zel'dovich, V.I.; Shorokhov, E.V.; Gundyrev, V.M.; Khejfets, A.Eh.; Frolova, N.Yu.; Khomskaya, I.V.

    2000-01-01

    The plates of titanium nickelide (Ti-50.5 at. % Ni) rolled in an austenitic state and subjected to impact shock with pressure of 10 and 50 GPa are under study. Dilatometric and X-ray diffraction studied show that shock wave loading induces anisotropic martensitic transformations in the plates. The anisotropy of transformations is conditioned by directed motion of the substance of the plate in shock waves. Austenitic memory of specimens prior to loading is changed to martensitic one typical of deformation of martensite. Martensitic memory not preserve after the reserve martensitic transformation, the specimens recall the initial state with austenitic memory. The particles of Ti 3 N 4 precipitated phase and the dislocation structure formed in rolling are the carriers of memory [ru

  6. Resistance to small plastic strains during martensite tempering under tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabil' skij, V.V.; Sarrak, V.I. (AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Fiziki Metallov)

    1982-11-01

    The mechanism of plastic deformation of martensite of a series of hardened steels (N18, 20KhG, 50KhFA and others) during tempering under tension and the role of residual internal microstresses and phase transformations are studied. It is shown that martensite low resistance to small plastic deformations during tempering under tension which is usually associated with phase transformations depends as well on the level of residual internal microstresses in the martensite structure. The decrease of resistance to deformation in the course of the decomposition of a solid solution is due to weakening of martensitic matrix because of carbon departure from the solid solution and carbide coarsening. An assumption is made that martensite plastic deformation during tempering under tension is realized at the expense of the directed microplastic deformation in the regions of higher concentration of internal stresses.

  7. Addressing Sustainability of Clam Farming in the Venice Lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donata Melaku Canu

    2011-09-01

    According to the System Approach Framework (SAF, based on previous studies and stakeholder interactions, we developed a model integrating ecological, social, and economic (ESE aspects. We chose the aspects necessary to represent the essential dynamics of major ecological, social, and economic clam farming system components to project the consequences of implementing alternative management policies and to address the ecological and social carrying capacity. Results of the simulations suggest that a properly managed farming system can sustain an acceptable income and support the local community, while reducing negative environmental impacts, social conflicts, and consumer health risks and improving system resilience. The results highlight the importance of an interdisciplinary, participatory, and adaptive approach in planning the management of this important renewable resource.

  8. Welding techniques development of CLAM steel for Test Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Chunjing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China)], E-mail: lcj@ipp.ac.cn; Huang Qunying; Wu Qingsheng; Liu Shaojun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Lei Yucheng [Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212013 (China); Muroga, Takeo; Nagasaka, Takuya [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Jifu, 509-5292 (Japan); Zhang Jianxun [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shanxi, 710049 (China); Li Jinglong [Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shanxi, 710072 (China)

    2009-06-15

    Fabrication techniques for Test Blanket Module (TBM) with CLAM are being under development. Effect of surface preparation on the HIP diffusion bonding joints was studied and good joints with Charpy impact absorbed energy close to that of base metal have been obtained. The mechanical properties test showed that effect of HIP process on the mechanical properties of base metal was little. Uniaxial diffusion bonding experiments were carried out to study the effect of temperature on microstructure and mechanical properties. And preliminary experiments on Electron Beam Welding (EBW), Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding and Laser Beam Welding (LBW) were performed to find proper welding techniques to assemble the TBM. In addition, the thermal processes assessed with a Gleeble thermal-mechanical machine were carried out as well to assist the fusion welding research.

  9. Martensite in steels: its significance, recent developments and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz-Beenken, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Martensite is generally known as a hard but brittle microstructure. This is only true for high carbon plate martensite. Recently developed steels with a lath martensite microstructure offer an excellent toughness at yield strength of 1000 MPa yield strength. A transformation into lath martensite by glide as invariant shear mechanism is only possible at a carbon content below 0,03%. The source of both high strength and good toughness is the high dislocation density and the narrow lath width off less than 1 μm. By a thermomechanical treatment, that leads to a finer lath structure both strength and ductility can be improved to a yield strength of 1150 MPa and an elongation of 18%. As, unlike high carbon plate martensite, the hardness of lath martensite is not achieved by the distortion of the tetragonal cell by carbon atoms, the hardness of lath martensite remains stable up during an annealing treatment up to 600 C. This thermal stability of the lath martensit microstructure makes an additional increase of hardness by the precipitation of different types of intermetallic phases possible. The increase of the hardness from 300 HV to 600 HV by precipitation without volume changes and good cold deformability reveals many new application in manufacturing. In plate martensite too, comparatively high toughness values can be achieved, if carbon is replaced by nitrogen. The refining influence of nitrides on the austenite grain sizes and the precipitation of fine nitrides during the annealing process leads to impact values three times higher than those of comparable high carbon plate martensite. (orig.)

  10. Sublethal Effects of Tributyltin on the Hard Shell Clam, Mercenaria mercenaria,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    7) Laughlin, R.8., Jr., R.G. Gustafson and Peter Distribution/ Pendoley. 1987. Acute toxicity of tributyltin Avaiabilty Cdes( TBT ) to early life...Dist rSpecial Gustafson. 1987. Chronic embryo larval toxicity I of tributyltin ( TBT ) to the hard shell clam, All Aercenaria mercenaria. In preparation... tributyltin compounds ( TBT ). Post-set clams microalgae, Isochyis galmna Tahiti strain. TBT survived exposures up to 7.5 1i / for 25 days. No corentrations in

  11. Gametogenic development and spawning of the mud clam, Polymesoda erosa (Solander, 1876) at Chorao Island, Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Clemente, S.; Ingole, B.S.

    islands of tropical and sub-tropical regions (Meehan 1982). Given the extensive use of the mangrove clam in the diet of many tropical islanders, the potential exists to exploit this clam commercially. An under- standing of the reproductive biology...: baban@nio.org Published in collaboration with the University of Bergen and the Institute of Marine Research, Norway, and the Marine Biological Laboratory, University of Copenhagen, Denmark Marine Biology Research, 2009; 5: 109C1121 (Accepted 12 June 2008...

  12. Antiproliferative activity of protein extracts from the black clam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MB-231 cell lines with IC50 values of 138.035 and 157.19 μg/ml, respectively, and 2F2 showed IC50 values of 67.46 μg/ml on HeLa cells. These results suggest that protein extracts from C. fluctifraga might be potential anticancer agents.

  13. Antiproliferative activity of protein extracts from the black clam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hiessu

    2016-02-24

    Feb 24, 2016 ... 4CTAOA, Centro de Investigaciones en Alimentación y Desarrollo A.C, Carretera a la Victoria Km 0.6, ... cervical cancer are the main cancer related cause of death in ... breast, colon and hepatic (Leng et al., 2005; Ning et al.,.

  14. Martensite transformation in antimony implanted stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Littmark, U.; Johansen, A.; Christodoulides, C.

    1981-01-01

    The authors have used Rutherford backscattering analysis (RBS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and diffraction to investigate austenitic stainless steel crystals implanted at room temperature with 80 keV Sb + ions to a fluence of 5 x 10 20 ions/m 2 , thus providing implantation with a heavy group V element. RBS channeling spectra from implanted crystals show a damage peak which approaches the height of the random level and therefore indicates a very high degree of disorder in the implanted layers. The distribution of the disorder extends to a depth 3-5 times the depth of the primary radiation damage. The Sb peaks under channeling as well as random conditions are indistinguishable, confirming that substitutionality during implantation is negligible. To establish the nature of the disorder which cannot be assessed from the RBS analysis alone, and in particular to assess whether an amorphous alloy is formed in the implanted layer as indicated from the RBS spectra, samples implanted under similar conditions were investigated in the TEM. Significant extra spots in the patterns can be ascribed to the presence of a radiation induced b.c.c. phase of martensitic origin. The result that a significant amount of martensite can be induced by antimony implantation seems to indicate that the main driving force for the transition is due to damage induced stress concentrations. (Auth.)

  15. Cold deformation of ADI castings: Martensitic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navea, Lilian R; Mannheim, Rodolfo M; Garin, Jorge L

    2004-01-01

    Research and applications in austempered ductile iron (ADI castings) have recently undergone noticeable progress in the industrialized world, becoming a highly competitive engineering material. The notable properties of these castings derive from their austenitic matrix stabilized by carbon, a thermally stable austenite during the austenizing process but possibly turning into martensite when undergoing plastic deformation. This work aims to study the changing structure of an ADI casting caused by one directional cold lamination. The samples that were studied were obtained from two nodular castings, one without alloying and the other alloyed with Cu, Ni and Mo. The samples were austenized in the first stage of the austempering process at 910 o C for 80 min. Then in the second stage the unalloyed samples were austempered at 410 o C for 10 min and the alloyed samples for 120 min. After the thermal treatment, the test pieces were deformed 0% to 25% by cold lamination. The quantification of the phases was performed using x-ray diffraction and the metallographic study using optic and Scanning Electronic Microscopy. The results show that the martensitic phase obtained by deformation is a very fine structure that evolves into a thicker one when the deformation of the samples increases (CW)

  16. REVIEW: Symbiosis between the Giant Clams (Bivalvia: Cardiidae and Zooxanthellae (Dinophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UDHI EKO HERNAWAN

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant clams are the largest bivalves in the world that maintain a mutual relationship with zooxanthellae. Individual giant clam can harbor heterogeneous zooxanthellae, at least four taxa in genus Symbiodinium. The Symbiodinium lives in the zooxanthellal tubular system, a tube structure arising from one of the diverticular duct of the clam’s stomach. Since the numbers of zooxanthellae is the one of some significant factors contributing to the clams growth and survival, the giant clams need to adjust the number of zooxanthellae for physiological reason with unclear mechanism. The important role of the symbiotic relationship to the clams can be seen on the survival, growth and nutrition of the clams. There are at least two significant factors determining the symbiosis, i.e. water temperature in related with level of light intensities and ammonium-phosphate rate. Some topic is still unclear, i.e. the determination of species in genus Symbiodinium, the mechanism for adjusting the population numbers of the algae and what kind of environmental factors determining the symbiosis. Thereby further research is still needed to clarify those missing.

  17. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate in six species of giant clams and the evolution of dimethylsulfide after death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.W.; Hill, S.D. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Zoology; Dacey, J.W.H. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., Woods Hole, MA (United States). Dept. of Biology; Edward, A. [Micronesia College, Pohnpei (Micronesia, Federated States); Hicks, W.A. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Bioichemistry and Molecular Biology

    2004-05-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) could accumulate in large concentrations in animals living symbiotically with algae. The giant clam family Tridacnidae accumulates DMSP because they have a symbiotic relationship with dinoflagellates (or zooxanthellae). In this study, well preserved clam tissues from the western Pacific Islands were analyzed to provide definitive evidence of DMSP in the tissues. Six of the common species in the Tridacnidae family were examined. The objective was to test the hypothesis that dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is released from clam tissues soon after death due to the breakdown of DMSP tissue. In particular, it determined if DMS is responsible for the problem of potent odours and off-taste that have hindered the commercial success of giant clams mariculture. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry was used in this study to measure DMSP concentrations in siphonal mantle, byssal mantle, adductor muscle and gill tissues. The formation of DMS by tissues after death was documented. It was suggested that since giant clams associate with dinoflagellates, they could accumulate DMSP to high concentrations which could affect multiple properties and functions. It was concluded that the perishability of giant clam tissues is most likely due to the high concentrations of DMS produced one day post mortem. 15 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  18. Analysis of the non-isothermal austenite-martensite transformation in 13% Cr-type martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-De-Andris, C.; Alvarez, L.F.

    1996-01-01

    In martensitic stainless steels, as in other alloyed containing carbide-forming elements, the carbide dissolution and precipitation processes that take place during heat treatment can cause modifications to the chemical composition of the austenite phase of these steels. The chemical composition of this phase is a fundamental factor for the evolution of the martensitic transformation. As a result of their influence on the dissolution and precipitation processes, the parameters of the quenching heat treatment exert a strong influence on the behavior of the martensitic transformation in these steels. In the present study, the effect of the heating temperature and the cooling rate on the martensitic transformation in two 13% Cr-type martensitic stainless steels with different carbon contents were properly evaluated. (author)

  19. The Whitish Inner Mantle of the Giant Clam, Tridacna squamosa, Expresses an Apical Plasma Membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA Which Displays Light-Dependent Gene and Protein Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen K. Ip

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Giant clams live in symbiosis with extracellular zooxanthellae and display high rates of growth and shell formation (calcification in light. Light-enhanced calcification requires an increase in the supply of Ca2+ to, and simultaneously an augmented removal of H+ from, the extrapallial fluid where shell formation occurs. We have obtained the complete coding cDNA sequence of Plasma Membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA from the thin and whitish inner mantle, which is in touch with the extrapallial fluid, of the giant clam Tridacna squamosa. The deduced PMCA sequence consisted of an apical targeting element. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed that PMCA had an apical localization in the shell-facing epithelium of the inner mantle, whereby it can actively secrete Ca2+ in exchange for H+. More importantly, the apical PMCA-immunofluorescence of the shell-facing epithelium of the inner mantle increased significantly after 12 h of exposure to light. The transcript and protein levels of PMCA/PMCA also increased significantly in the inner mantle after 6 or 12 h of light exposure. These results offer insights into a light-dependable mechanism of shell formation in T. squamosa and a novel explanation of light-enhanced calcification in general. As the inner mantle normally lacks light sensitive pigments, our results support a previous proposition that symbiotic zooxanthellae, particularly those in the colorful and extensible outer mantle, may act as light-sensing elements for the host clam.

  20. Laboratory simulation reveals significant impacts of ocean acidification on microbial community composition and host-pathogen interactions between the blood clam and Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Shanjie; Liu, Saixi; Su, Wenhao; Shi, Wei; Xiao, Guoqiang; Yan, Maocang; Liu, Guangxu

    2017-12-01

    It has been suggested that climate change may promote the outbreaks of diseases in the sea through altering the host susceptibility, the pathogen virulence, and the host-pathogen interaction. However, the impacts of ocean acidification (OA) on the pathogen components of bacterial community and the host-pathogen interaction of marine bivalves are still poorly understood. Therefore, 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing and host-pathogen interaction analysis between blood clam (Tegillarca granosa) and Vibrio harveyi were conducted in the present study to gain a better understanding of the ecological impacts of ocean acidification. The results obtained revealed a significant impact of ocean acidification on the composition of microbial community at laboratory scale. Notably, the abundance of Vibrio, a major group of pathogens to many marine organisms, was significantly increased under ocean acidification condition. In addition, the survival rate and haemolytic activity of V. harveyi were significantly higher in the presence of haemolymph of OA treated T. granosa, indicating a compromised immunity of the clam and enhanced virulence of V. harveyi under future ocean acidification scenarios. Conclusively, the results obtained in this study suggest that future ocean acidification may increase the risk of Vibrio pathogen infection for marine bivalve species, such as blood clams. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of temper embrittlement of martensitic and ferritic-martensitic steels by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yusho; Takahashi, Hideaki; Shoji, Tetsuo

    1987-01-01

    Martensitic (HT-9) and ferritic-martensitic steels (9Cr-2Mo) are considered as fusion first wall materials. In this investigation in order to understand the sensitivity of temper embrittlement in these steels under actual service condition, fracture toughness testing was made by use of acoustic emission technique. The temper embrittlement was characterized in terms of fracture toughness. The fracture toughness of these steels under 500 deg C, 100 hrs, and 1000 hrs heat treatment was decreased and their changes in micro-fracture process have been observed. The fracture toughness changes by temper embrittlement was discussed by the characteristic of AE, AE spectrum analysis and fractographic investigation. The relation between micro-fracture processes and AE has been clarified. (author)

  2. Computer simulation of martensitic transformations in idealized systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.H.R.

    1979-06-01

    Very little theoretical work on the development of the martensitic transformation and the characteristics of the resulting microstructure exists. This thesis advances the theory of the martensite transformation by constructing a computer model of a martensitic transformation in an idealized system. The model has its source in the general observation that the characteristics of martensitic transformations in solids are largely determined by accomodating the strain associated with the martensitic distortion of the crystal lattice. A review and adaptation of prior theoretical work leads to the development of a theory which allows the straightforward computation of the elastic energy associated with an arbitrary distribution of defects in an elastically anisotropic body under the assumption that the body has uniform elastic constants and that anharmonic effects may be neglected. Equations are cast in which the energy is written as a simple sum of binary interactions in which the defects influence one another according to an elastic potential whose form can be calculated. At the time that the energetic equations take a simple form the kinematics of the process involving the appearance of elastic inclusions are also known to be simple. The martiensitic transformation is modeled as a transformation which occurs through the sequential formation of individual martensitic elements, each carries the elementary transformation strain. Statistical equations developed govern the selection of the transformation path, or sequence that elementary martensite particles appear in the model, and specifies the kinetics of transformation.A useful representative path is defined as the minimum energy path. The model is used for the detailed simulation of a martensitic transformation in a pseudo two-dimensional system. Virtually all interesting qualitative aspects of the developing martensitic transformation are shown to be inherently present within it

  3. Crystallography of lath martensite and stabilization of retained austenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarikaya. M.

    1982-10-01

    TEM was used to study the morphology and crystallography of lath martensite in low and medium carbon steels in the as-quenched and 200/sup 0/C tempered conditions. The steels have microduplex structures of dislocated lath martensite and continuous thin films of retained austenite at the lath interfaces. Stacks of laths form the packets which are derived from different (111) variants of the same austenite grain. The residual parent austenite enables microdiffraction experiments with small electron beam spot sizes for the orientation relationships (OR) between austenite and martensite. All three most commonly observed ORs, namely Kurdjumov-Sachs, Nishiyama-Wassermann, and Greninger-Troiano, operate within the same sample.

  4. Crystallography of lath martensite and stabilization of retained austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarikaya, M.

    1982-10-01

    TEM was used to study the morphology and crystallography of lath martensite in low and medium carbon steels in the as-quenched and 200 0 C tempered conditions. The steels have microduplex structures of dislocated lath martensite and continuous thin films of retained austenite at the lath interfaces. Stacks of laths form the packets which are derived from different [111] variants of the same austenite grain. The residual parent austenite enables microdiffraction experiments with small electron beam spot sizes for the orientation relationships (OR) between austenite and martensite. All three most commonly observed ORs, namely Kurdjumov-Sachs, Nishiyama-Wassermann, and Greninger-Troiano, operate within the same sample

  5. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2017-01-31

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, copper, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  6. Structure analysis of NiAl martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Y.; Shapiro, S.M.; Shirane, G.; Yamada, Y.; Fuchizaki, K.; Tanner, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron elastic scattering experiments were performed in order to investigate the structure of the low temperature martensitic phase of Ni 62.5 Al 37.5 alloy. The average structure analyzed from the integrated intensity was approximately described by the (5,-2) structure proposed by Martynov et al. Small deviation from the exact (5,-2) model in the positional parameters and the anomalously large Debye-Waller factor were obtained. The observed satellite profiles show asymmetrical broadening, and the peak positions shift from the regular reciprocal lattice points. These anomalous features of scattering profiles were tentatively interpreted by introducing spatial modulation of the strain and order parameters. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  7. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2015-11-13

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6 carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  8. Summary of the IEA workshop/working group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    An International Energy Agency (IEA) Working Group on Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for Fusion Applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, the European Union, the United States, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, United Kingdom, 24-25 October 1996. At the meeting preliminary data generated on the large heats of steel purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. The second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The next meeting will be held in conjunction with the International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-8) in Sendai, Japan, 23-31 October 1997.

  9. Summary of the IEA workshop/working group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    An International Energy Agency (IEA) Working Group on Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for Fusion Applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, the European Union, the United States, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, United Kingdom, 24-25 October 1996. At the meeting preliminary data generated on the large heats of steel purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. The second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The next meeting will be held in conjunction with the International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-8) in Sendai, Japan, 23-31 October 1997

  10. Martensitic transformation in a high textured Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobrero, C; Roatta, A; Malarria, J; Bolmaro, R.

    2008-01-01

    The formation of the 18R1 martensite in copper based shape memory alloys occurs spontaneously during cooling by the localized formation of four self-accommodating variants in a plate group. Each of the six plate groups have four self-accommodating variants, resulting on twenty four transformation variants from de parent phase (β 1 ) to the martensitic one (β 1 '). In the current work experimental texture measurements for both phases and simulations have been carried out to establish the effect of the different activated variants in the transformation texture. The high temperature textures were measured with an on purpose designed stage and the samples were cycled a few times to evaluate texture degradation

  11. In-situ investigation of martensite formation in AISI 52100 bearing steel at sub-zero Celsius temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Pantleon, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Martensite formation in AISI 52100 bearing steel at sub-zero Celsius temperature was investigated with Vibrating Sample Magnetometry. The investigation reports the stabilization of retained austenite in quenched samples during storage at room temperature and reveals the thermally activated nature...

  12. Literature Review: Impact Toughness of Bainite vs. Martensite

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Niccols, Edwin

    1976-01-01

    .... Tempered martensite is found to have generally superior mechanical properties for lower (less than .5%) carbon content steels, but two specific bainitic heat treatments are described which may yield optimum properties.

  13. Carbon diffusion and kinetics during the lath martensite formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zuyao

    1995-01-01

    Calculations verify that carbon diffusion may occur during the lath martensite formation. Accordingly, the diffusion of interstitial atoms or ions must be taken into account when martensitic transformation is defined as a diffusionless transformation. In derivation of the kinetics equation of the athermal martensitic transformation, regarding the carbon diffusion, i.e. the enrichment of the austenite during the lath martensite formation, and ΔG γ fehler being function of the temperature and the carbon content in austenite, the kinetics equation is modified to a general form as: f=1-exp[β(C1-C0)-α(Ms-Tq)] where C0 and C1 are carbon contents in the austenite before and after quenching respectively. Consequently, the alloying element not only influences Ms, but also the diffusibility of carbon and both factors govern the amount of retained austenite in quenched steel which dominates in determing the toughness of the steel. (orig.)

  14. Influence of plastic strain on deformation-induced martensitic transformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Groen, M.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of plastic strain on deformation-induced martensitic transformations have been investigated experimentally. Austenitic metastable stainless steel samples were heated to a temperature at which the transformation is suppressed and were plastically strained to different amounts. The

  15. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  16. Depth distribution of martensite in xenon implanted stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, A.; Johnson, E.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Steenstrup, S.; Hayashi, N.; Sakamoto, I.

    1989-01-01

    The amount of stress-induced martensite and its distribution in depth in xenon implanted austenitic stainless steel poly- and single crystals have been measured by Rutherford backscattering and channeling analysis, depth selective conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis. In low nickel 17/7, 304 and 316 commercial stainless steels and in 17:13 single crystals the martensitic transformation starts at the surface and develops towards greater depth with increasing xenon fluence. The implanted layer is nearly completely transformed, and the interface between martensite and austenite is rather sharp and well defined. In high nickel 310 commercial stainless steel and 15:19 and 20:19 single crystals, on the other hand, only insignificant amounts of martensite are observed. (orig.)

  17. Crystallography and Interphase Boundary of Martensite and Bainite in Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhara, Tadashi; Chiba, Tadachika; Kaneshita, Takeshi; Wu, Huidong; Miyamoto, Goro

    2017-06-01

    Grain refinements in lath martensite and bainite structures are crucial for strengthening and toughening of high-strength structural steels. Clearly, crystallography of transformation plays an important role in determining the "grain" sizes in these structures. In the present study, crystallography and intrinsic boundary structure of martensite and bainite are described. Furthermore, various extrinsic factors affecting variant selection and growth kinetics, such as elastic/plastic strain and alloying effects on interphase boundary migration, are discussed.

  18. EBSD characterization of deformed lath martensite in if steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Z.A.; Zhang, Xiaodan; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2017-01-01

    Rolling deformation results in the transformation of a lath martensite structure to a lamellar structure characteristic to that of IF steel cold-rolled to medium and high strains. The structural transition takes place from low to medium strain, and electron backscatter diffraction analysis shows...... and the strength are characterized for lath martensite rolled to a thickness reduction of 30%, showing that large changes in the misorientation take place, while the strain hardening rate is low....

  19. Isothermal martensite formation at sub-zero temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojko, Allan; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Slycke, Jan

    2012-01-01

    , quenched in oil, and thereafter investigated with vibrating sample magnetometry, which allows a quantitative assessment of the fraction of retained austenite as a function of the sub-zero temperature and time. Isothermal martensite formation was observed on interrupting the continuous cooling (5 K...... with a continuation of the martensitic transformation. On prolonged isothermal holding, a volume reduction was observed for AISI 52100, but not for AISI 1070. Copyright © 2011 by ASTM International....

  20. Energy Barriers and Hysteresis in Martensitic Phase Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    glacial acetic acid (CH3COOH) and 10-15% perchloric acid (HCLO4) by volume, the cathode was stainless steel , the anode was stainless steel or Ti, the...Submitted to Acta Materialia Energy barriers and hysteresis in martensitic phase transformations Zhiyong Zhang, Richard D. James and Stefan Müller...hysteresis based on the growth from a small scale of fully developed austenite martensite needles. In this theory the energy of the transition layer plays a

  1. Microstructural Characterization of Low Temperature Gas Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present work presents microstructural investigations of the surface zone of low temperature gas nitrided precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel AISI 630. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate the present phases after successive removal of very thin sections...... of the sample surface. The development of epsilon nitride, expanded austenite and expanded martensite resulted from the low temperature nitriding treatments. The microstructural features, hardness and phase composition are discussed with emphasis on the influence of nitriding duration and nitriding potential....

  2. Strength of zirconium--titanium martensites and deformation behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.; Vijayakar, S.J.; Krishnan, R.

    1978-01-01

    The deformation behavior of pure zirconium and of zirconium--titanium alloys containing 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt % titanium was studied in two heat treated conditions: furnace cooled and water quenched from the β phase field. By comparing the flow stresses of the furnace cooled α and the water quenched α' (martensite) structures it was possible to isolate the strengthening contributions of the martensitic structure (comprising the contributions due to the small size of the martensite units and to the distributions of defects like dislocations and internal twins) from those arising from the solid solution. The internally twinned plate martensite structure in the Zr--15% Ti and the Zr--20% Ti alloys was responsible for a significant increase in strength, while the strengthening due to the dislocated lath martensite structure in the more dilute alloys was only marginal. Stress relaxation experiments revealed that strengthening associated with the martensite structure was mainly due to an increase in the athermal component of the flow stress. The effectiveness of the lath boundaries and the (10 anti 11) twin boundaries in offering resistance to an approaching deformation front (either slip or twin) was examined. While the lath boundaries were found to be transparent with respect to the propagation of slip dislocations and deformation twins, a majority of plate as well as twin boundaries were effective barriers against their propagation. TEM observations showed an extensive accumulation of geometrically necessary dislocations in the plastically deformed twinned martensites. Enhanced work hardening was related to the geometric slip distances in these structures in accordance with Ashby's one parameter work hardening theory for plastically inhomogeneous materials. The effect of the martensite structure on different components of the flow stress (dependent on or independent of grain size and strain) was discussed

  3. Magnetic domains in martensite of Ni-Mg-Ga alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokorin, V.V.; Babij, O.M.; Dubinko, S.V.; Prokopov, A.R.

    2006-01-01

    The structural changes attendant on intermartensitic transformation in a Ni-Mg-Ga shape memory alloy are considered using magneto-optical visualization with the help of ferrite-garnet monocrystalline films. It is established that on the intermartensitic transformation the complete reorganization of martensite macrostructure fails. Martensite crystals resulted from the basic transformation change somewhat their sizes on intermartensitic transition. The existence of large-scale labyrinth magnetic domain structure is revealed [ru

  4. Comparative genomics of vesicomyid clam (Bivalvia: Mollusca chemosynthetic symbionts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girguis Peter R

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Vesicomyidae (Bivalvia: Mollusca are a family of clams that form symbioses with chemosynthetic gamma-proteobacteria. They exist in environments such as hydrothermal vents and cold seeps and have a reduced gut and feeding groove, indicating a large dependence on their endosymbionts for nutrition. Recently, two vesicomyid symbiont genomes were sequenced, illuminating the possible nutritional contributions of the symbiont to the host and making genome-wide evolutionary analyses possible. Results To examine the genomic evolution of the vesicomyid symbionts, a comparative genomics framework, including the existing genomic data combined with heterologous microarray hybridization results, was used to analyze conserved gene content in four vesicomyid symbiont genomes. These four symbionts were chosen to include a broad phylogenetic sampling of the vesicomyid symbionts and represent distinct chemosynthetic environments: cold seeps and hydrothermal vents. Conclusion The results of this comparative genomics analysis emphasize the importance of the symbionts' chemoautotrophic metabolism within their hosts. The fact that these symbionts appear to be metabolically capable autotrophs underscores the extent to which the host depends on them for nutrition and reveals the key to invertebrate colonization of these challenging environments.

  5. Aquaculture Land-Use Policy: The Case of Clam Farming in Thaibinh Province, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Thu Hang NGO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Policy-making and enforcement remains centralized in Vietnam. Policies have been formulated with less scientific and public justification, thus being largely bureaucratic and infeasible, and in many cases, they have created plagues for people at the grass-roots levels. This article focuses on the implementation of policies related to intertidal land-use and supports for clam farming in the Thaibinh province as a case study to explore the impacts of policies on clam farming and farmers. During the period of 2011–2013, provincial policies on intertidal land allocation and technical and financial supports had boosted clam farming development in the province to a surprising extent. Rapid expansion of the clam farming area has created significant consequences for the farming sector, as well as farmer’s lives. However, for the same provincial policies, but with different enforcement, different farming outcomes for clam farmers in the three study communes have resulted. Where farmers had more of a voice and choice in bidding for the intertidal areas they preferred, they faced fewer problems. It is, thus, suggested that a more decentralized policy-making and enforcement are needed, in which more scientific assessment and farmer participation are required to not only make government policy more successful in supporting farmers and achieving their expected outcomes, but also to provide farmers with more room to make their own farming decisions from which farming and marketing risks could be mitigated.

  6. Impediment to Symbiosis Establishment between Giant Clams and Symbiodinium Algae Due to Sterilization of Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Takeo; Yamada, Hideaki; Inoue, Ken; Iwai, Kenji; Hatta, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    To survive the juvenile stage, giant clam juveniles need to establish a symbiotic relationship with the microalgae Symbiodinium occurring in the environment. The percentage of giant clam juveniles succeeding in symbiosis establishment (“symbiosis rate”) is often low, which is problematic for seed producers. We investigated how and why symbiosis rates vary, depending on whether giant clam seeds are continuously reared in UV treated or non treated seawater. Results repeatedly demonstrated that symbiosis rates were lower for UV treated seawater than for non treated seawater. Symbiosis rates were also lower for autoclaved seawater and 0.2-µm filtered seawater than for non treated seawater. The decreased symbiosis rates in various sterilized seawater suggest the possibility that some factors helping symbiosis establishment in natural seawater are weakened owing to sterilization. The possible factors include vitality of giant clam seeds, since additional experiments revealed that survival rates of seeds reared alone without Symbiodinium were lower in sterilized seawater than in non treated seawater. In conclusion, UV treatment of seawater was found to lead to decreased symbiosis rates, which is due possibly to some adverse effects common to the various sterilization techniques and relates to the vitality of the giant clam seeds. PMID:23613802

  7. Continuous water quality monitoring for the hard clam industry in Florida, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergquist, Derk C; Heuberger, David; Sturmer, Leslie N; Baker, Shirley M

    2009-01-01

    In 2000, Florida's fast-growing hard clam aquaculture industry became eligible for federal agricultural crop insurance through the US Department of Agriculture, but the responsibility for identifying the cause of mortality remained with the grower. Here we describe the continuous water quality monitoring system used to monitor hard clam aquaculture areas in Florida and show examples of the data collected with the system. Systems recording temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, water depth, turbidity and chlorophyll at 30 min intervals were installed at 10 aquaculture lease areas along Florida's Gulf and Atlantic coasts. Six of these systems sent data in real-time to a public website, and all 10 systems provided data for web-accessible archives. The systems documented environmental conditions that could negatively impact clam survival and productivity and identified biologically relevant water quality differences among clam aquaculture areas. Both the real-time and archived data were used widely by clam growers and nursery managers to make management decisions and in filing crop loss insurance claims. While the systems were labor and time intensive, we recommend adjustments that could reduce costs and staff time requirements.

  8. Impediment to symbiosis establishment between giant clams and Symbiodinium algae due to sterilization of seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Takeo; Yamada, Hideaki; Inoue, Ken; Iwai, Kenji; Hatta, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    To survive the juvenile stage, giant clam juveniles need to establish a symbiotic relationship with the microalgae Symbiodinium occurring in the environment. The percentage of giant clam juveniles succeeding in symbiosis establishment ("symbiosis rate") is often low, which is problematic for seed producers. We investigated how and why symbiosis rates vary, depending on whether giant clam seeds are continuously reared in UV treated or non treated seawater. Results repeatedly demonstrated that symbiosis rates were lower for UV treated seawater than for non treated seawater. Symbiosis rates were also lower for autoclaved seawater and 0.2-µm filtered seawater than for non treated seawater. The decreased symbiosis rates in various sterilized seawater suggest the possibility that some factors helping symbiosis establishment in natural seawater are weakened owing to sterilization. The possible factors include vitality of giant clam seeds, since additional experiments revealed that survival rates of seeds reared alone without Symbiodinium were lower in sterilized seawater than in non treated seawater. In conclusion, UV treatment of seawater was found to lead to decreased symbiosis rates, which is due possibly to some adverse effects common to the various sterilization techniques and relates to the vitality of the giant clam seeds.

  9. Alloying effect on martensite transformation in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulyaev, A.P.; Shlyamnev, A.P.; Sorokina, N.A.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of cobalt, nickel, molybdenum on the martensite transformation kinetics in stainless steels containing 9 to 13% Cr has been studied. Cobalt in Fe-Cr base alloys decreases the temperature of the Msub(in) and Msub(fin) points without a considerable decrease of the martensite phase amount after the transformation. Nickel reduces the martensite transformation temperature range, the nickel effect being enhanced in the presence of cobalt, which is characterized by a change of the linear dependence Msub(in)=f(%Ni) for a quadratic one. Molybdenum decreases the temperature of the Msub(in) and Msub(fin) points intensively, thus, substantially increasing the residual austenite amount. In the steels investigated Ni and Co decrease, whereas Mo increases, to some extent, the temperature of the reverse a-γ-transformation. The reduction of chromium content from 13 to 9% stimulates the martensite transformation initiation, that is why, in alloys containing 9% Cr, the increase in the contents of Ni, Co., Mo with the martensite structure maintained is possible. A further alloying of steel containing 13% Cr with these elements is rather limited due to the inhibition of the martensite transformation

  10. Long-Term Surveys Show Invasive Overbite Clams (Potamocorbula amurensis are Spatially Limited in Suisun Marsh, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Baumsteiger

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available https://doi.org/10.15447/sfews.2017v15iss2art6The overbite clam (Potamocorbula amurensis is a major invasive species in the San Francisco Estuary, California, and has been implicated in the decline of pelagic productivity and native fish species. Little is known of its impact on Suisun Marsh, a large brackish tidal region of the estuary. We looked at the abundance and spatial distribution of clams in the marsh, including examining the influence of water quality, using long-term (1988–2015 otter trawl surveys. Temporal trends indicated that overbite clam abundance has been increasing, but adult clams were spatially restricted to a single large slough (Suisun. Clams were absent from most interior channels, limiting their overall effect on the marsh aquatic ecosystem. Abiotic variables, particularly salinity, proved important predictors of overbite clam abundance, although the variables examined alone could not explain overbite clam distributions. We propose that connectivity, detritus loads, and/or predation pressure may work in conjunction with abiotic variables to cause poor survival rates for recruits in interior marsh sites, keeping the distribution limited. Overall results are encouraging for restoration projects in brackish tidal marshes that need to deal with overbite clams.

  11. Complement C3 gene: Expression characterization and innate immune response in razor clam Sinonovacula constricta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Maoxiao; Niu, Donghong; Wang, Fei; Chen, Zhiyi; Li, Jiale

    2016-08-01

    Complement component 3 (C3) is central to the complement system, playing an important role in immune defense, immune regulation and immune pathology. Several C3 genes have been characterized in invertebrates but very few in shellfish. The C3 gene was identified from the razor clam Sinonovacula constricta, referred to here as Sc-C3. It was found to be highly homologous with the C3 gene of Ruditapes decussatus. All eight model motifs of the C3 gene were found to be included in the thiolester bond and the C345C region. Sc-C3 was widely expressed in all healthy tissues with expression being highest in hemolymph. A significant difference in expression was revealed at the umbo larvae development stage. The expression of Sc-C3 was highly regulated in the hemolymph and liver, with a distinct response pattern being noted after a challenge with Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Vibrio parahemolyticus. It is therefore suggested that a complicated and unique response pathway may be present in S. constricta. Further, serum of S. constricta containing Sc-C3 was extracted. This was activated by LPS or bacterium for verification for function. The more obvious immune function of Sc-C3 was described as an effective membrane rupture in hemocyte cells of rabbit, V. parahemolyticus and Vibrio anguillarum. Thus, Sc-C3 plays an essential role in the immune defense of S. constricta. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Study of electroless Ni-W-P alloy coating on martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitasari, Arini, E-mail: arini-nikitasari@yahoo.com; Mabruri, Efendi, E-mail: efendi-lipi@yahoo.com [Research Center for Metallurgy and Materials, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (470 Building, Puspiptek, Serpong, Indonesia 15313) (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    Electroless nickel phospor (Ni-P) is widely used in many industries due to their corrosion and wear resistance, coating uniformity, and ability to coat non-conductive surfaces. The unique properties of tungsten such as high hardness, higher melting point, lower coefficient of linear thermal expansion, and high tensile strength have created a lot of interest in developing ternary Ni-W-P alloys. This article presents the study of electroless Ni-W-P alloys coating using acid or alkaline bath on martensitic stainless steel. Nickel sulfate and sodium tungstate were used as nickel and tungsten sources, respectively, and sodium hypophosphite was used as a reducing agent. Acid or alkaline bath refer to bath pH condition was adjusted by adding sulfuric acid. Martensitic stainless steel was immersed in Ni-W-P bath for 15, 30, and 60 minutes. The substrate of martensitic stainless steel was subjected to pre-treatment (polishing and cleaning) and activation prior to electroless plating. The plating characteristics were investigated for concentration ratio of nickel and hypophosphite (1:3), sodium tungstate concentration 0,1 M, immersion time (15 min, 30 min, 60 min), and bath condition (acid, alkaline). The electroless Ni-W-P plating was heat treated at 400°C for 1 hour. Deposits were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and corrosion measurement system (CMS).

  13. Review on the Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Malaysian Clams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Faruk Hossen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current review discusses the levels of six heavy metals in different clam species from 34 sites of Malaysian coasts. The concentrations (µg/g dry weight of these heavy metals ranged around 0.18–8.51, 0.13–17.20, 2.17–7.80, 0.84–36.00, 24.13–368.00, and 177.82–1912.00 for Cd, Pb, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Fe, respectively. It was observed that the concentrations of metals slightly depend on different clam species but mostly depend on site locations. According to Malaysian Food Regulation (1985, about 30% and more than 50% sites are safe from Cd and Pb contamination, respectively, and also the clam species from the other populations studied were safe for consumption.

  14. Numerical simulation and experimental study of CLAM T-shapes for fusion applications by hydroforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xunzhong; Tao Jie; Liu Hongbing; Li Ming

    2010-01-01

    The integral hydroforming process to prepare CLAM T-shapes for fusion applications was evaluated by means of numerical simulation. The paper firstly investigated the effect of different paths on the protrusion height and distribution of thickness thinning rate of T-shapes. Then, it discussed that the friction coefficient between die and tube blank played an important role in manufacturing high quality T-shapes. Subsequently, the practical hydroforming was performed based on the simulation results with the aid of special lubrication coatings with friction coefficient 0.07. It is obviously indicated that the simulation results agree well with the experimental ones in geometry size and wall thickness distribution. The results indicate that the numerical simulation guides the practical hydroforming of CLAM tube effectively and determines the actual cold forming process parameters rapidly. The sound CLAM T-shapes with proper geometry size and thickness distribution can be obtained by the optimal hydroforming process. (authors)

  15. Occurrence of antibiotics in mussels and clams from various FAO areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Luca Maria; Nobile, Maria; Malandra, Renato; Panseri, Sara; Arioli, Francesco

    2018-02-01

    Filter feeders, like mussels and clams, are suitable bioindicators of environmental pollution. These shellfish, when destined for human consumption, undergo a depuration step that aims to nullify their pathogenic microorganism load and decrease chemical contamination. Nevertheless, the lack of contamination by drugs may not be guaranteed. Antimicrobials are a class of drugs of particular concern due to the increasing phenomenon of antibiotic resistance. Their use in breeding and aquaculture is a major cause of this. We developed a multiclass method for the HPLC-MS/MS analysis of 29 antimicrobials, validated according to the Commission Decision 2002/657/UE guidelines, and applied it to 50 mussel and 50 clam samples derived from various Food and Agricultural Organisation marine zones. The results obtained, indicate a negligible presence of antibiotics. Just one clam sample showed the presence of oxytetracycline at a concentration slightly higher than the European Union Maximum residue limit set for fish. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Environmental context and trophic trait plasticity in a key species, the tellinid clam Macoma balthica L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Törnroos, Anna; Nordström, M. C.; Aarnio, K.

    2015-01-01

    Species show varying levels of plasticity regarding morphology, physiology and behaviour in relation to their immediate environment, and several trait characteristics are habitat-dependent. Determining when and how the environmental context changes trait expression is of key importance...... for understanding the role of individual species for ecosystem functioning. The tellinid clam Macoma balthica can vary its feeding behaviour, shifting between deposit- and suspension-feeding. In order to study the context-dependency of this trophic plasticity in adult clams, we conducted an experiment assessing...... food uptake by using stable isotope signatures (delta C-13 and delta N-15). We transplanted individuals between and within two shallow bays differing in exposure (exposed sheltered) and sediment characteristics. Our results show that isotope signatures of clams differed between the two habitats...

  17. Clam bioaccumulation of Alkylphenols and Polyciclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Venice lagoon under different pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ademollo, N; Patrolecco, L; Matozzo, V; Marin, M G; Valsecchi, S; Polesello, S

    2017-11-15

    Biota-Sediment Accumulation Factors (BSAFs) of nonylphenols (NPs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Ruditapes philippinarum from the Venice Lagoon (Italy) were determined with the aim to verify whether the routine biomonitoring studies are reliable in contaminated sites. Clams and sediments were collected in field campaigns (October 2003 to June 2004) in three sites of the Venice Lagoon. Results showed that Marghera and Campalto sediments were more contaminated by NPs and PAHs than Poveglia. Different trends were observed in the contamination of clams with the highest BSAFs found at Poveglia. BSAF trend appeared to be inversely related to the contaminant pressure on the sites. These results suggest that clam bioaccumulation is not always representative of the chemical pressure on aquatic biota. The direct correlation between sediment and biota concentrations in contaminated sites can be lost as a function of the site-specific conditions such as sediment toxicity and food availability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Review on the Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Malaysian Clams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossen, Md Faruk; Hamdan, Sinin; Rahman, Md Rezaur

    2015-01-01

    The current review discusses the levels of six heavy metals in different clam species from 34 sites of Malaysian coasts. The concentrations (µg/g dry weight) of these heavy metals ranged around 0.18-8.51, 0.13-17.20, 2.17-7.80, 0.84-36.00, 24.13-368.00, and 177.82-1912.00 for Cd, Pb, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Fe, respectively. It was observed that the concentrations of metals slightly depend on different clam species but mostly depend on site locations. According to Malaysian Food Regulation (1985), about 30% and more than 50% sites are safe from Cd and Pb contamination, respectively, and also the clam species from the other populations studied were safe for consumption.

  19. Atomic force microscopy study of stacking modes of martensitic transformation in Fe-Mn-Si based shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.Z.; Kikuchi, T.; Kajiwara, S.; Shinya, N.

    2000-01-01

    Stacking modes of thermally induced and stress-induced martensitic transformation in Fe-28Mn-6Si-5Cr shape memory alloys have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). It has been found that thermally induced martensite plates appear with the self-accommodated stacking form, in which all the three possible variants with different left angle 112 right angle shear directions in a {111} plane are activated and formed in parallel but at separate places; i.e. each plate corresponds to one variant. In addition, a plastic deformation band is always induced in austenite between two different variants. On the other hand, stress-induced martensite plates appear with the mono-partial stacking form, i.e. only single variant is activated in a {111} plane in a grain. The difference between stacking modes of thermally induced and stress-induced martensites makes them play a different role in contributing to shape memory effect in Fe-Mn-Si based shape memory alloys. (orig.)

  20. Effect of coastal eutrophication on heavy metal bioaccumulation and oral bioavailability in the razor clam, Sinonovacula constricta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, Tengxiu; Li, Shunxing; Chen, Lihui; Zheng, Fengying; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Razor clams are often exposed to coastal eutrophication. • The bioaccumulation of Fe, Ni, V, and As was promoted by eutrophication. • Bionic gastrointestinal tract was used for metal oral bioavailability assessment. • Eutrophication decreased oral bioavailability of Fe and Pb but enhanced for V. • The daily maximum allowable intakes are controlled by eutrophication levels. - Abstract: As traditional seafoods, the razor clams are widely distributed from tropical to temperate areas. Coastal razor clams are often exposed to eutrophication. Heavy metal contamination is critical for seafood safety. However, how eutrophication affects bioaccumulation and oral bioavailability of heavy metals in the razor clams is unknown. After a four-month field experimental cultivation, heavy metals (Fe, Cu, Ni, V, As, and Pb) could be bioaccumulated by the razor clams (Sinonovacula constricta) through exposure to metals present in water and sediments or in the food chain, and then transferred to human via consumption of razor clams. Bionic gastrointestinal digestion and monolayer liposome extraction are used for metal oral bioavailability (OBA) assessment. The influence of eutrophication on OBA is decreased for Fe and Pb and increased for V. A significant positive linear correlation was observed between the bioaccumulation factors of Fe, Ni, V, and As in razor clams and the coastal eutrophication. These results may be due to the effect of eutrophication on metal species transformation in coastal seawater and subcellular distribution in razor clams. The maximum allowable daily intakes of razor clams are controlled by eutrophication status and the concentration of affinity-liposome As in razor clams

  1. Effect of coastal eutrophication on heavy metal bioaccumulation and oral bioavailability in the razor clam, Sinonovacula constricta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Tengxiu [College of Chemistry and Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Li, Shunxing, E-mail: lishunxing@mnnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Modern Analytical Science and Separation Technology (China); Chen, Lihui [College of Chemistry and Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Zheng, Fengying; Huang, Xu-Guang [College of Chemistry and Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Modern Analytical Science and Separation Technology (China)

    2014-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Razor clams are often exposed to coastal eutrophication. • The bioaccumulation of Fe, Ni, V, and As was promoted by eutrophication. • Bionic gastrointestinal tract was used for metal oral bioavailability assessment. • Eutrophication decreased oral bioavailability of Fe and Pb but enhanced for V. • The daily maximum allowable intakes are controlled by eutrophication levels. - Abstract: As traditional seafoods, the razor clams are widely distributed from tropical to temperate areas. Coastal razor clams are often exposed to eutrophication. Heavy metal contamination is critical for seafood safety. However, how eutrophication affects bioaccumulation and oral bioavailability of heavy metals in the razor clams is unknown. After a four-month field experimental cultivation, heavy metals (Fe, Cu, Ni, V, As, and Pb) could be bioaccumulated by the razor clams (Sinonovacula constricta) through exposure to metals present in water and sediments or in the food chain, and then transferred to human via consumption of razor clams. Bionic gastrointestinal digestion and monolayer liposome extraction are used for metal oral bioavailability (OBA) assessment. The influence of eutrophication on OBA is decreased for Fe and Pb and increased for V. A significant positive linear correlation was observed between the bioaccumulation factors of Fe, Ni, V, and As in razor clams and the coastal eutrophication. These results may be due to the effect of eutrophication on metal species transformation in coastal seawater and subcellular distribution in razor clams. The maximum allowable daily intakes of razor clams are controlled by eutrophication status and the concentration of affinity-liposome As in razor clams.

  2. Martensitic transformation, shape memory effects, and other curious mechanical effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandermeer, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review tutorially the subject of martensitic transformations in uranium alloys emphasizing their role in the shape memory effect (SME). We examine first what a martensitic transformation is, illustrating some of its characteristics with specific examples. As well as being athermal in nature, as expected, data are presented indicating that martensitic transformations in some uranium alloys also have a strong isothermal component. In addition, a few alloys are known to exhibit thermoelastic martensitic reactions. The SME, which is associated with these, is defined and demonstrated graphically with data from a uranium-6 wt % niobium alloy. Some of the important variables influencing SME behavior are described. Specifically, these are reheat temperature, amount of deformation, crystal structure, and composition. A mechanism for SME is postulated and the association with martensitic transformation is detailed. A self-induced shape instability in the uranium-7.5 wt % niobium-2.5 wt % zirconium alloy with a rationalization of the behavior in terms of texture and lattice parameter change during aging is reviewed and discussed. 24 figures

  3. Deformation induced martensite in AISI 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, N.; Solomon, I.

    2010-01-01

    The forming process leads to a considerable differentiation of the strain field within the billet, and finally causes the non-uniform distribution of the total strain, microstructure and properties of the material over the product cross-section. This paper focus on the influence of stress states on the deformation-induced a martensitic transformation in AISI Type 316 austenitic stainless steel. The formation of deformation-induced martensite is related to the austenite (g) instability at temperatures close or below room temperature. The structural transformation susceptibility is correlated to the stacking fault energy (SFE), which is a function not only of the chemical composition, but also of the testing temperature. Austenitic stainless steels possess high plasticity and can be easily cold formed. However, during cold processing the hardening phenomena always occurs. Nevertheless, the deformation-induced martensite transformation may enhance the rate of work-hardening and it may or may not be in favour of further material processing. Due to their high corrosion resistance and versatile mechanical properties the austenitic stainless steels are used in pressing of heat exchanger plates. However, this corrosion resistance is influenced by the amount of martensite formed during processing. In order to establish the links between total plastic strain, and martensitic transformation, the experimental tests were followed by numerical simulation. (Author) 21 refs.

  4. Modeling mechanical effects on promotion and retardation of martensitic transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maalekian, Mehran, E-mail: mehran.maalekian@ubc.ca [Department of Materials Engineering, University of British Columbia, 309-6350 Stores Road, Vancouver, B.C. V61Z4 (Canada); Kozeschnik, Ernst [Christian Doppler Laboratory for ' Early Stages of Precipitation' , Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Vienna University of Technology (Austria)

    2011-01-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Compressive elastic stresses up to 250 MPa are applied in continuous cooling. {yields} Using the thermodynamic data and maximum value of the mechanical driving force the predicted increase in M{sub s} ({approx}0.1 K/MPa) is in agreement with experiment {yields} Austenite was deformed plastically at different temperatures (800 deg. C-1100 deg. C). {yields} High deformation temperature (i.e. 1100 deg. C) as well as low plastic strain (i.e. {epsilon}{sub ave} {approx} 30%) do not affect martensite transformation noticeably, whereas lower deformation temperature (e.g. 900 deg. C) and large plastic strain (i.e. {epsilon}{sub ave} {approx} 70%) retards martensite transformation. {yields} The theory of mechanical stabilization predicts the depression of M{sub s}. - Abstract: The influence of compressive stress and prior plastic deformation of austenite on the martensite transformation in a eutectoid steel is studied both experimentally and theoretically. It is demonstrated that martensite formation is assisted by stress but it is retarded when transformation occurs from deformed austenite. With the quantitative modeling of the problem based on the theory of displacive shear transformation, the explanation of the two opposite roles of mechanical treatment prior to or simultaneously to martensite transformation is presented.

  5. Crystallographic features of lath martensite in low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitahara, Hiromoto; Ueji, Rintaro; Tsuji, Nobuhiro; Minamino, Yoritoshi

    2006-01-01

    Electron backscattering diffraction with field-emission scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze crystallographically the lath martensite structure in a 0.20% carbon steel. The crystallographic features of the lath martensite structure, of the order of the prior austenite grain size or larger, were clarified. Although the orientations of the martensite crystals were scattered around the ideal variant orientations, the martensite in this steel maintained the Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) orientation relationship. The procedures of the crystallographic analysis of the martensite (ferrite) phase with the K-S orientation relationship were explained in detail. Variant analysis showed that all 24 possible variants did not necessarily appear within a single prior austenite grain and that all six variants did not necessarily appear within each packet. Specific combinations of two variants appeared within local regions (sub-blocks), indicating a strict rule for variant selection. Prior austenite grain boundaries and most of the packet boundaries were clearly recognized. However, it was difficult to determine the block boundaries within the sub-blocks

  6. Effect of hardness of martensite and ferrite on void formation in dual phase steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azuma, M.; Goutianos, Stergios; Hansen, Niels

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the hardness of martensite and ferrite phases in dual phase steel on void formation has been investigated by in situ tensile loading in a scanning electron microscope. Microstructural observations have shown that most voids form in martensite by evolving four steps: plastic...... deformation of martensite, crack initiation at the martensite/ferrite interface, crack propagation leading to fracture of martensite particles and void formation by separation of particle fragments. It has been identified that the hardness effect is associated with the following aspects: strain partitioning...... between martensite and ferrite, strain localisation and critical strain required for void formation. Reducing the hardness difference between martensite and ferrite phases by tempering has been shown to be an effective approach to retard the void formation in martensite and thereby is expected to improve...

  7. Ten-month recolonization of the k-area cooling water system by the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    The Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea was found in the Savannah River near Augusta, Georgia, in 1973. In 1975, Corbicula clogged heat exchangers and caused a shutdown of P Reactor, one of three operating nuclear production reactors (P, K, and C) at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Clams were subsequently removed from K-Area and C-Area cooling water systems. At K Area, large volumes of river water are discharged into three 23-megaliter basins (Figure 1) where some settling occurs before the water is pumped through heat exchangers in the reactor area. The deposited silt provides a suitable substrate for Corbicula growth and reproduction. The silt must be removed at regular inervals to prevent heat exchanger pluggage arising from high populations of clams in the basins. The 186 basins at K Area were sampled to determine: the buildup of the Corbicula population since the basins were last cleaned, the size/age distribution of the clam population, and the occurrence of clam larvae. In addition, debris from flushes of Emergency Cooling Water Headers CW-39 and RW-1 were analyzed to determine: the relative abundance of live and dead clams, the size/age distribution of clams, and the volume of individual debris components

  8. Uptake and release of paralytic shellfish toxins by the clam Ruditapes decussatus exposed to Gymnodinium catenatum and subsequent depuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Maria João; Vale, Carlos; Grilo, Rita Velez; Ferreira, João Gomes

    2012-06-01

    A laboratory experiment was performed with the clam Ruditapes decussatus, fed with the toxic dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum and the non-toxic algae Isochrysis galbana (14 days) and subsequently only with I. galbana (15 days). Individual paralytic shellfish toxins were determined by LC-FLD in G. catenatum cells, whole clam tissues, and particulate organic matter (POM) produced by clams. The toxins dcSTX and dcGTX2 + 3 in the algae were less abundant than C1 + 2 and B1, but were predominant in clams during both the exposure and depuration phases. The toxin dcNEO was only detected in clams during a short period, indicating conversion from other compounds. The toxin composition of the POM indicated the export of dcSTX as faeces or pseudo-faeces along the entire experiment (2.5-14 nmol mg(-1)), B1 was present in a short period of the exposure and C1 + 2 and dcGTX2 + 3 absent. A mass balance calculation indicated that approximately 95% of C1 + 2 and 85% of B1 supplied to the clams were converted into other toxins or lost in solution. Conversely, the net gain of 512, 61 and 31 nmol for dcSTX, dcGTX2 + 3 and dcNEO, respectively, suggests the conversion from other assimilated compounds by clams during exposure and depuration phases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of microscopic strain heterogeneity on the formability of martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettanini, Alvise Miotti; Delannay, Laurent; Jacques, Pascal J.; Pardoen, Thomas; Badinier, Guillaume; Mithieux, Jean-Denis

    2017-10-01

    Both finite element modeling and mean field (Mori-Tanaka) modeling are used to predict the strain partitioning in the martensite-ferrite microstructure of an AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel. Numerical predictions reproduce experimental trends according to which macroscopic strength is increased when the dissolution of carbides leads to carbon enrichment of martensite. However, the increased strength contrast of ferrite and martensite favours strain localization and high stress triaxiality in ferrite, which in turn promotes ductile damage development.

  10. Martensitic transformation in SUS304 steels with the same Ni equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, T.; Okino, Y.; Takahashi, S.; Echigoya, J.; Kamada, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of martensitic transformation due to plastic deformation at room temperature was investigated in SUS304 austenitic stainless steels with the same nickel equivalent. The absolute volume of the martensitic phase was obtained by saturation magnetization. We discuss the shapes of the martensitic phase caused by different values of coercive force. Martensitic transformation depends on the applied stress but is independent of nickel content with same nickel equivalent. We investigated applications to nondestructive testing on the basis of the present study. (author)

  11. Friction Stir Welding of HT9 Ferritic-Martensitic Steel: An Assessment of Microstructure and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    report of FSW on a ferritic- martensitic stainless steel is the work of Chung, which applied this approach to a dissimilar weld between F82H (ferritic... martensitic ) and SUS304 (austenitic stainless ) [43]. 7 D. CORROSION OF FERRITIC/ MARTENSITIC STEELS IN HIGH TEMPERATURE MOLTEN SALT COOLANTS In...Philadelphia, PA, 1992, pp. 1267–1286, March 1990. [15] S. Rosenwasser, ―The application of martensitic stainless steels in a lifelong fusion first wall

  12. Molecular characteristics of hemoglobins in blood clam and their immune responses to bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Zhang, Yanan; Jing, Zhao; Fan, Tingjun

    2017-06-01

    Bivalve hemoglobins have antibacterial activities, while the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In our study, three full-length cDNAs of hemoglobins from blood clam skHbs were obtained, encoding putative polypeptides of 147, 150, and 152 amino acids, respectively. Predicted advanced protein structures showed that the skHbs had amphipathic antibacterial structures, displayed the typical structural characteristics of proteins with globin-like fold containing numerous alpha-helixes, and forming a homodimeric skHbI and a heterotetrameric skHbII complex. After injected with alive and heat-killed Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis, the mRNA levels of skHbI and skHbII were both significantly upregulated through increasing the expression of peptidoglycan recognition protein-like (PGRP-like) protein and Toll-like receptor (TLR-like) protein induced by peptidoglycan on the surface of the bacteria, but there were no obvious differences in their protein levels. Besides, reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected to participate in the resistance to B. subtilis. These implied that skHbs could involve in the innate immune responses to Gram-positive bacterial infection directly with their amphipathic structures and indirectly by increasing ROS production through PGRP triggering Toll pathway. In conclusion, our findings reveal the structural characteristics of skHbs and their mechanism against Gram-positive bacteria thereby providing the molecular evidence for fundamental innate antibacterial activities by invoking respiratory proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Parent-martensite interface structure in ferrous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, X.; Pond, R.C.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, a Topological Model of martensitic transformations has been presented wherein the habit plane is a semi-coherent structure, and the transformation mechanism is shown explicitly to be diffusionless. This approach is used here to model martensitic transformations in ferrous alloys. The habit plane comprises coherent (1 1 1) γ parallel (0 1 1) α terraces where the coherency strains are accommodated by a network of dislocations, originating in the martensite phase, and disconnections (transformation dislocations). The disconnections can move conservatively across the interface, thereby effecting the transformation. Since the disconnections exhibit step character, the overall habit plane deviates from the terrace plane. A range of network geometries is predicted corresponding to orientation relationships varying from Nishiyama-Wasserman to Kurdjumov-Sachs. This range of solutions includes habit planes close to {2 9 5}, {5 7 5} and {1 2 1}, in good agreement with experimental observations in various ferrous alloys

  14. Ultrafine Structure and High Strength in Cold-Rolled Martensite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xiaoxu; Morito, S.; Hansen, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Structural refinement by cold rolling (10 to 80 pct reductions) of interstitial free (IF) steel containing Mn and B has been investigated from samples with different initial structures: (a) lath martensite, (b) coarse ferrite (grain size 150 mu m), and (c) fine ferrite (22 mu m). Unalloyed IF steel....... At low to medium strains, lath martensite transforms into a cell block structure composed of cell block boundaries and cell boundaries with only a negligible change in strength. At medium to large strains, cell block structures in all samples refine with increasing strain and the hardening rate...... is constant (stage IV). A strong effect of the initial structure is observed on both the structural refinement and the strength increase. This effect is largest in lath martensite and smallest in unalloyed ferrite. No saturation in structural refinement and strength is observed. The discussion covers...

  15. Martensitic transformation induced by irradiation and deformation in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimkin, O.P.

    1997-01-01

    In the present work the peculiarities of martensite γ → α , (γ → ε → α , ) transformation in the steels with a low stacking fault energy (12Cr18Ni10T, Cr15AG14) irradiated by neutrons, α-particles and electrons (pulse and stationary) and then deformed with the various strain rates in the temperature range - 20 - 1000 C are considered. It is established by the electron-microscope research that the phase γ → α ' transition in irradiated and deformed steels is observed on the definite stage of evolution of the dislocation structure (after the cell formation) and the martensite formation preferentially occurs on a stacking fault aggregation. The regularities of the irradiation by high energy particles effect on the formation parameters and martensite α , -phase accumulation kinetics ones and also their role in forming of the strength and ductile properties in steels are analysed. (A.A.D.)

  16. Microstructure and martensitic transformation of Ni-Ti-Pr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chunwang [Inner Mongolia University of Technology, College of Science, Hohhot (China); Shanghai Maritime University, College of Arts and Sciences, Shanghai (China); Zhao, Shilei; Jin, Yongjun; Hou, Qingyu [Inner Mongolia University of Technology, College of Science, Hohhot (China); Guo, Shaoqiang [Beihang University, Key Laboratory of Micro-nano Measurement, Manipulation and Physics (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-09-15

    The effect of Pr addition on the microstructure and martensitic transformation behavior of Ni{sub 50}Ti{sub 50-x}Pr{sub x} (x = 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9) alloys were investigated experimentally. Results show that the microstructures of Ni-Ti-Pr alloys consist of the NiTi matrix and the NiPr precipitate with the Ti solute. The martensitic transformation start temperature decreases gradually with the increase in Pr fraction. The stress around NiPr precipitates is responsible for the decrease in martensitic transformation temperature with the increase in Pr fraction in Ni-Ti-Pr alloys. (orig.)

  17. Martensitic transformation in helium implanted 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimatsu, Manabu; Tsukuda, Noboru

    1997-01-01

    In order to simulate surface deterioration phenomenon due to particle loading of SUS-316 steel which is one of candidate materials for nuclear fusion reactor vacuum wall structure material, helium ion implanting was conducted at room temperature, 473 K and 573 K. To martensitic phase formed as a results, implantation dose dependence, implanting temperature dependence, and annealing under 1073 K were conducted. Formation of the martensitic phase was suppressed at high implanting temperature. At room temperature implantation, the martensitic phase disappeared at more than 873 K, but at high temperature implantation, it increased abnormally near at 973 K. This showed that deterioration of materials depended extremely upon using temperature and temperature history. (G.K.)

  18. Deformation-induced martensite and resistance to cavitation erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richman, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure to cavitating liquids can induce surface transformation in metastable alloys, notably the 18Cr-8Ni class of stainless steels. The question of whether such transformation contributes to erosion resistance has not been resolved. To address that issue, two metastable stainless steels (Types 301 and 304L) and a near-equiatomic NiTi alloy were subjected to cavitation. Magnetic measurements during and after cavitation erosion indicate that substantial reversion of deformation-induced martensite occurs in the highly deformed surface layers of the stainless steels. Thus, cyclic formation and reversion of martensite is deduced to be a non-trivial energy-adsorption mechanism in those steels. The extreme case of cyclic induction and essentially complete reversion of martensite is illustrated by superelastic NiTi, which is extraordinarily resistant to cavitation damage. (orig.)

  19. Nanotribological behavior of deep cryogenically treated martensitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Prieto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cryogenic treatments are increasingly used to improve the wear resistance of various steel alloys by means of transformation of retained austenite, deformation of virgin martensite and carbide refinement. In this work the nanotribological behavior and mechanical properties at the nano-scale of cryogenically and conventionally treated AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel were evaluated. Conventionally treated specimens were subjected to quenching and annealing, while the deep cryogenically treated samples were quenched, soaked in liquid nitrogen for 2 h and annealed. The elastic–plastic parameters of the materials were assessed by nanoindentation tests under displacement control, while the friction behavior and wear rate were evaluated by a nanoscratch testing methodology that it is used for the first time in steels. It was found that cryogenic treatments increased both hardness and elastic limit of a low-carbon martensitic stainless steel, while its tribological performance was enhanced marginally.

  20. Nanotribological behavior of deep cryogenically treated martensitic stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Germán; Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D; Tuckart, Walter R; Broitman, Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Cryogenic treatments are increasingly used to improve the wear resistance of various steel alloys by means of transformation of retained austenite, deformation of virgin martensite and carbide refinement. In this work the nanotribological behavior and mechanical properties at the nano-scale of cryogenically and conventionally treated AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel were evaluated. Conventionally treated specimens were subjected to quenching and annealing, while the deep cryogenically treated samples were quenched, soaked in liquid nitrogen for 2 h and annealed. The elastic-plastic parameters of the materials were assessed by nanoindentation tests under displacement control, while the friction behavior and wear rate were evaluated by a nanoscratch testing methodology that it is used for the first time in steels. It was found that cryogenic treatments increased both hardness and elastic limit of a low-carbon martensitic stainless steel, while its tribological performance was enhanced marginally.

  1. The clam (Chamelea gallina: evaluation of the effects of solids suspended in seawater on bivalve molluscs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatora Angela Angioni

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to evaluate the effects of solids in suspension in seawater on clams (Chamelea gallina. The aim was to investigate the possible correlation between the widespread deaths of clams in the coastal waters of the central and northern Adriatic in the last five years and increased concentrations of solids in suspension. The research involved conducting 96-hour tests on clams farmed in aquariums containing filtered seawater. The tests were preceded by a 7-day adaptation stage to allow the molluscs to acclimatise. During this period, the clams were fed on unicellular seaweed (Dunaliella tertiolecta. The molluscs were exposed to particles of solids in suspension consisting of pools of silica gel (SiO2 granules of various sizes, similar to those constituting silt, whose presence and suspension in the sea considerably increase after heavy rain and heavy seas. The study established that the number of deaths caused by solids suspended in seawater at the concentrations used in the tests was not statistically significant.

  2. Allozyme electrophoresis as a tool for distinguishing different zooxanthellae symbiotic with giant clams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, B. K.; Monje, V.; Silvestre, V.; Sison, M.; Belda-Baillie, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    The taxonomy of zooxanthellae in marine invertebrate symbioses is not well understood owing mainly to their lack of reliable morphological differences. Nevertheless, previous work using protein and DNA electrophoreses has set the stage for advancing our taxonomic understanding of cnidarian zooxanthellae. Here we present the use of allozymes as genetic markers for distinguishing algal isolates from tridacnid hosts. Zooxanthellae from seven Tridacna and Hippopus species were isolated and maintained in axenic clonal cultures over many generations. Of 16 enzyme systems, α- and β-esterase (EST), esterase-F (EST-F), glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) were found suitable polymorphic markers of genetic differences among clonal cultures. Of 39 clonal isolates, 97% were found to be genetically distinguishable. This high extent of genetic variation in zooxanthellae within and between clam species was unexpected, and is difficult to explain based solely on the general notion of asexual reproduction in symbiotic zooxanthellae. Our results are also consistent with the occurrence of sexual reproduction in clam zooxanthellae. The close genetic similarity of the symbionts of Tridacna gigas, the largest and fastest-growing clam species, and the difficulty of initiating their clonal cultures in the given nutrient medium, compared with the symbionts of other clam species, are further indicative of possibly distinct algal symbionts in T. gigas. These findings are discussed in light of current taxonomic understanding of these organisms.

  3. CLAM - CoLlAborative eMbedded networks for submarine surveillance: An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meratnia, Nirvana; Havinga, Paul J.M.; Casari, Paolo; Petrioli, Chiara; Grythe, Knut; Husoy, Thor; Zorzi, Michele

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the CLAM project, which aims at developing a collaborative embedded monitoring and control platform for submarine surveillance by combining cutting edge acoustic vector sensor technology and 1D, 2D, 3D sensor arrays, underwater wireless sensor networks protocol

  4. Influence of tempering on mechanical properties of ferritic martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Y. B.; Han, C. H.; Choi, B. K.; Lee, D. W.; Kim, T. K.; Jeong, Y. H.; Cho, S.

    2012-01-01

    In the mid-1980s research programs for development of low activation materials began. This is based on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Guidelines (10CFR part 61) that were developed to reduce long-lived radioactive isotopes, which allows nuclear reactor waste to be disposed of by shallow land burial when removed from service. Development of low activation materials is also key issue in nuclear fusion systems, as the structural components can became radioactive due to nuclear transmutation caused by exposure to high dose neutron irradiation. Reduced-activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steels have been developed in the leading countries in nuclear fusion technology, and are now being considered as primary candidate material for the test blanket module (TBM) in the international thermonuclear experiment reactor (ITER). RAFM steels developed so far (e.g., EUROFER 97 and F82H) meet the requirement for structural application in the ITER. However, if such alloys are used in the DEMO or commercial fusion reactor is still unclear, as the reactors are designed to operate under much severe conditions (i.e., higher outlet coolant temperature and neutron fluences). Such harsh operating conditions lead to development of RAFM steels with better creep and irradiation resistances. Mechanical properties of RAFM steels are strongly affected by microstructural features including the distribution, size and type of precipitates, dislocation density and grain size. For a given composition, such microstructural characteristics are determined mainly by thermo-mechanical process employed to fabricate the final product, and accordingly a final heat treatment, i.e., tempering is the key step to control the microstructure and mechanical properties. In the present work, we investigated mechanical properties of the RAFM steels with a particular attention being paid to effects of tempering on impact and creep properties

  5. A study on fatigue crack growth in dual phase martensitic steel in air

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dual phase (DP) steel was intercritically annealed at different temperatures from fully martensitic state to achieve martensite plus ferrite, microstructures with martensite contents in the range of 32 to 76%. Fatigue crack growth (FCG) and fracture toughness tests were carried out as per ASTM standards E 647 and E 399, ...

  6. AM363 martensitic stainless steel: A multiphase equation of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia; Crockett, Scott D.

    2017-01-01

    A multiphase equation of state for stainless steel AM363 has been developed within the Opensesame approach and has been entered as material 4295 in the LANL-SESAME Library. Three phases were constructed separately: the low pressure martensitic phase, the austenitic phase and the liquid. Room temperature data and the explicit introduction of a magnetic contribution to the free energy determined the martensitic phase, while shock Hugoniot data was used to determine the austenitic phase and the phase boundaries. More experimental data or First Principles calculations would be useful to better characterize the liquid.

  7. Joining method for pressure tube and martensitic stainless steel tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimoto, Hiroshi; Koike, Hiromitsu.

    1993-01-01

    In a joining portion of zirconium alloy and a stainless steel, the surface of martensitic stainless steel being in contact with Zr and Zr alloy is applied with a laser quenching solidification treatment before expanding joining of them to improve the surface. This can provide the surface with refined coagulated cell tissues and make deposits and impurities homogeneous and solubilized. As a result, the surface of the martensitic stainless steel has highly corrosion resistance, to suppress contact corrosion with Zr and Zr alloy. Accordingly, even if it is exposed to high temperature water of 200 to 350degC, failures of Zr and Zr alloy can be suppressed. (T.M.)

  8. Influence of magnetic fields on structural martensitic transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lashley, J C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cooley, J C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, J L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fisher, R A [NON LANL; Modic, K A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, X- D [TEMPLE UNIV; Riseborough, P S [TEMPLE UNIV.; Opeil, C P [BOSTON COLLEGE; Finlayson, T R [UNIV OF MELBOURNE; Goddard, P A [UNIV OF OXFORD; Silhanek, A V [INPAC

    2009-01-01

    We show evidence that a structural martensitic transition is related to significant changes in the electronic structure, as revealed in thermodynamic measurements made in high-magnetic fields. The magnetic field dependence is considered unusual as many influential investigations of martensitic transitions have emphasized that the structural transitions are primarily lattice dynamical and are driven by the entropy due to the phonons. We provide a theoretical framework which can be used to describe the effect of magnetic field on the lattice dynamics in which the field dependence originates from the dielectric constant.

  9. Magnetic anisotropy of nonmodulated Ni-Mn-Ga martensite revisited

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heczko, Oleg; Straka, L.; Novák, Václav; Fähler, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 9 (2010), 09A914/1-09A914/3 ISSN 0021-8979 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100100913 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic anisotropy of non-modulated martensite * temperature dependence of anisotropy * Ni-Mn-Ga * adaptive martensite Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.064, year: 2010 http://jap.aip.org/resource/1/japiau/v107/i9/p09A914_s1

  10. Kinetic of martensitic transformations induced by hydrogen in the austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Sergio P. de; Saavedra, A.; Miranda, P.E.V. de

    1986-01-01

    The X-ray diffractometry technique was used, with an automatic data acquisition system to determine the kinetics of hydrogen induced martensitic phase transformations in an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel type, used in nuclear power plants. Hydrogenation was performed cathodically in a 1N sulfuric acid solution, containing 100 mg/l of arsenic trioxide, at 50 0 C, during 2 hours and with a current density of 200 A/m 2 . It was found that the microstructure of the steel plays a role on the generation of hydrogen induced martensitic phases and surface micro cracks. Both kinetics were slower on a pre-cold rolled steel. (Author) [pt

  11. A biomineralization study of the Indo-Pacific giant clam Tridacna gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, M. E.; Pérez-Huerta, A.; Aharon, P.; Street, S. C.

    2017-06-01

    The giant clam, Tridacna gigas, is an important faunal component of reef ecosystems of the Indo-Pacific region. In addition to its ecological role, shells of this bivalve species are useful bioarchives for past climate and environmental reconstructions. However, the biomineralization processes involved in shell aragonite deposition are insufficiently understood. Here, we present a study of the shell microstructure of modern specimens from Palm Island, Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia, and Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea (PNG), using a combination of petrography, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and stable carbon isotope ratios. Daily growth increments were recognizable in all specimens through ontogeny, and counting these growth lines provides a robust specimen age estimate. For the internal layers, paired increments of organized aragonitic needles and compact, oblong crystals were recognized in a specimen from PNG, whereas specimens from GBR were composed of shield-like crystals that were not definable at the microscale. The combination of nutrient availability, rainfall and solar irradiance are likely to be the most significant factors controlling shell growth and may explain the observed differences in microstructure. The external layer, identical in all specimens, was composed of dendritic microstructure that is significantly enriched in 13C compared to the internal layer, suggesting different metabolic controls on layer deposition. We propose that the mineralization of the internal and external layers is independent from each other and associated with the activity of specific mantles. Future studies using T. gigas shells as bioarchives should consider the microstructure as it reflects the environment in which the individual lived and the differences in mineralization pathways of internal and external layers.

  12. Avalanche criticality in thermal-driven martensitic transitions: the asymmetry of the forward and reverse transitions in shape-memory materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planes, Antoni; Vives, Eduard

    2017-08-01

    Martensitic transitions take place intermittently as a sequence of avalanches which are accompanied by the emission of acoustic waves. The study of this acoustic emission (AE) reveals the scale-free nature of the avalanches. In a number of shape memory materials undergoing a martensitic transition it has been found that, in spite of relatively low hysteresis, the dynamics of forward and reverse transitions are different, which may explain the fact that the AE activity is different in both forward and reverse transitions. The asymmetry could be a consequence of the fact that, while nucleation is required for the transition from the parent to martensitic phase to take place, reverse transition occurs by fast shrinkage of martensitic domains. We have analysed in detail the distribution of avalanches in cooling and heating runs in Fe-Pd and Cu-Zn-Al shape-memory alloys. In the former, the martensitic transition is weakly first order while it shows a significant first order character in the latter. We have found that in Fe-Pd the distributions are power law for the forward and reverse transitions characterized by the same critical exponents. For Cu-Zn-Al the distribution of avalanches is critical in forward transitions but exponentially damped in the reverse transition. It is suggested that this different behaviour could originate from the different dynamic mechanisms in forward and reverse transitions. This paper is dedicated to our friend Ekhard Salje in the occasion of his 70th birthday.

  13. Acoustic emission on thermoelastic martensitic transformations in alloys in the course of mechanical loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnikov, V.A.; Kokhanenko, D.V.

    2004-01-01

    The connection of the emission process with the process of the deformation accumulation and relaxation in the cycle of the martensitic transformations is studied. The martensitic transformations cycling was investigated by cycling change in the temperature in the Ti 50 Ni 50 Cu 10 alloys. The deformation accumulation and recovery is observed in the alloys undergoing the thermoelastic martensitic transformations under the mechanical loading conditions. The acoustic emission, accompanying the martensitic transformations, reflects the peculiarities of the alloy deformation behavior by the martensitic transformations. The anomalous acoustic effect correlates with the reversible deformation accumulation and does not correlates with the irreversible deformation accumulation [ru

  14. The effect of deformation mode on the sensitisation of partially martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briant, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    The metallurgical process by which austenitic stainless steels become susceptible to corrosion is defined as sensitisation. It is now well established that if the austenite is partially transformed to martensite by deformation, the kinetics of sensitisation will be accelerated. In this paper the effects of martensite induced by various deformation modes on sensitisation are examined. It will be shown that in all cases the martensite accelerates sensitisation which in turn leads to rapid corrosion. This effect is independent of the way the martensite is induced. The results also show that this effect is observed over a wide range of martensite content. (author)

  15. Influence of particle characteristics and organic matter content on the bioavailability and bioaccumulation of pyrene by clams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verrengia Guerrero, N.R.; Taylor, M.G.; Wider, E.A.; Simkiss, K.

    2003-01-01

    An experimental model with artificial particles and humic acids describes bioavailability of sediment-bound pyrene to clams. - Hydrophobic chemicals are known to associate with sediment particles including those from both suspended particulate matter and bottom deposits. The complex and variable composition of natural particles makes it very difficult therefore, to predict the bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants. To overcome these problems we have previously devised a test system using artificial particles, with or without humic acids, for use as an experimental model of natural sediments. In the present work we have applied this experimental technique to investigate the bioavailability and bioaccumulation of pyrene by the freshwater fingernail clam Sphaerium corneum. The uptake and accumulation of pyrene in clams exposed to the chemical in the presence of a sample of natural sediment was also investigated. According to the results obtained, particle surface properties and organic matter content are the key factors for assessing the bioavailability and bioaccumulation of pyrene by clams

  16. Bioaccumulation of hydrocarbons derived from terrestrial and anthropogenic sources in the Asian clam, Potamocorbula amurensis, in San Francisco Bay estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Wilfred E.; Hostettler, Frances D.; Rapp, John B.

    1992-01-01

    An assessment was made in Suisun Bay, California, of the distributions of hydrocarbons in estuarine bed and suspended sediments and in the recently introduced asian clam, Potamocorbula amurensis. Sediments and clams were contaminated with hydrocarbons derived from petrogenic and pyrogenic sources. Distributions of alkanes and of hopane and sterane biomarkers in sediments and clams were similar, indicating that petroleum hydrocarbons associated with sediments are bioavailable to Potamocorbula amurensis. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the sediments and clams were derived mainly from combustion sources. Potamocorbula amurensis is therefore a useful bioindicator of hydrocarbon contamination, and may be used as a biomonitor of hydrocarbon pollution in San Francisco Bay.

  17. Martensitic nature of δ → γ allotropic transformation in plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, P.C.; Cost, J.R.; Axler, K.M.

    1996-09-01

    Isothermal and isoplethal studies using differential scanning calorimetry have been conducted to characterize the allotropic transformations of plutonium. The δ-γ transformation (upon cooling) was observed to have a classic martensitic nature. The work described herein is the first quantitative study of this phenomena in plutonium

  18. A multi-scale model of martensitic transformation plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouznetsova, V.G.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2008-01-01

    The remarkable mechanical engineering properties of many advanced steels, e.g. TRIP steels and metastable austenitic stainless steels, are related to their complex microstructural behaviour, resulting from the interaction between plastic deformation of the phases and the austenite to martensite

  19. Modulated martensite: why it forms and why it deforms easily

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaufmann, S.; Niemann, R.; Thersleff, T.; Roßler, U.K.; Heczko, Oleg; Buschbeck, J.; Holzapfel, B.; Schultz, L.; Fähler, S.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 5 (2011), 053029/1-053029/24 ISSN 1367-2630 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100100913 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : modulated martensite * adaptive phase * Ni-Mn-Ga * magnetic shape memory effect Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.177, year: 2011

  20. Block and sub-block boundary strengthening in lath martensite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, C.; Hoefnagels, J.P.M.; Vaes, R.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2016-01-01

    Well-defined uniaxial micro-tensile tests were performed on lath martensite single block specimens and multi-block specimens with different number of block boundaries parallel to the loading direction. Detailed slip trace analyses consistently revealed that in the {110}<111> slip system with the

  1. Phase-field simulation of lenticular martensite and inheritance of the accommodation dislocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundin Julia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A phase-field simulation is performed to study the substructure evolution of lenticular martensite in TRIP steels. The evolution of martensitic phase variants and dislocations is calculated by a coupled phase-field micro-elasticity model. The simulations at isothermal conditions show that during the phase transformation, the accommodation dislocations evolving in the austenite are inherited by the martensitic phase and cause the further evolution of a single martensitic variant in the direction of the dislocation slip. As a result of the interaction, a change of the growth mode from twining to slip can be observed in accordance to the substructure formation of lenticular martensite. This interaction between the dislocations and martensitic phase depends on dislocation slip systems and the orientation of the martensitic variants as well as on the energy barriers for the phase transformation and for the dislocation motion.

  2. Thermodynamic assessment of the stabilization effect in deformed shape memory alloy martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Yohei; Sasaki, Kazuaki

    2011-01-01

    When a martensitic shape memory alloy is deformed, the reverse transformation occurs at higher temperature than that of undeformed martensite. This is a typical case of the stabilization effect of martensite that is commonly observed in shape memory alloys. Regarding previous results measured by electric resistance and/or dilatometoric methods in NiTi and CuAlNi shape memory alloys, this study has performed calorimetric measurement in these alloys in order to re-examine the stabilization effect in terms of thermodynamics. Experimental evidence for appreciable changes in the reverse transformation temperature due to variant change of the martensite is presented. The elastic energy stored in the deformed martensite and the irreversible energy dissipated during the reverse transformation are estimated from the transformation temperatures, the stress-strain curves of the martensite and the latent heat of transformation. The temperatures of the reverse martensitic transformation have been related to these energies in explicit form.

  3. Water corrosion resistance of ODS ferritic-martensitic steel tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Takeshi; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Matsuda, Yasuji

    2008-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels have superior radiation resistance; it is possible to achieve a service temperature of up to around 973 K because of their superior creep strength. These advantages of ODS steels facilities their application to long-life cladding tubes in advanced fast reactor fuel elements. In addition to neutron radiation resistance, sufficient general corrosion resistance to maintain the strength of the cladding, and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance for spent-fuel-pool cooling systems and high-temperature oxidation for the fuel-clad chemical interaction (FCCI) of ODS ferritic steel are required. Although the addition of Cr to ODS is effective in preventing water corrosion and high-temperature oxidation, an excessively high amount of Cr leads to embrittlement due to the formation of a Cr-rich α' precipitate. The Cr content in 9Cr-ODS martensite and 12Cr-ODS ferrite, the ODS steels developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), is controlled. In a previous paper, it has been demonstrated that the resistances of 9Cr- and 12Cr-ODS ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature oxidation are superior to those of conventional 12Cr ferritic steel. However, the water corrosion data of ODS ferritic-martensitic steels are very limited. In this study, a water corrosion test was conducted on ODS steels in consideration of the spent-fuel-pool cooling condition, and the results were compared with those of conventional austenitic stainless steel and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. (author)

  4. Size-related and seasonal diet of the manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum), as determined using dual stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Yeon Jee; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2013-12-01

    Stable isotope ratios of lab-cultured Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) and those from natural tidal flats of Seonjae Island in Korea were investigated in terms of their dietary uptake patterns in relation to body size and season. The smallest size group of wild Manila clams revealed significantly depleted δ15N based on the results of a one-way ANOVA. There was significant seasonal change in the proportional contribution of food sources, especially in winter, from benthic particulate organic matter (BPOM) to pelagic particulate organic matter (POM). Laboratory-cultured Manila clams showed growth rates of 6.02-37.75 mm/yr, and smaller-sized clams did not fully utilise the microalgal diets that were provided constantly. Instead, they derived most of their energy from detritus or dead microalgae that had settled on the bottom. Bigger clams, however, exhibited well-balanced source contributions, converting the microalgal diets into biomass. This demonstrates intra-specific differences in the growth rates and preferred diet uptakes of Manila clams, even under similar environmental conditions.

  5. Effects of clam size, food type, sediment characteristic, and seawater carbonate chemistry on grazing capacity of Venus clam Cyclina sinensis (Gmelin, 1791)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tingting; Zhou, Kai; Liu, Xin; Lai, Qifang; Zhang, Dong; Shi, Liyan

    2017-09-01

    Aquaculture in saline-alkaline water has a major problem: microalgal blooming causes the pH of water to increase dramatically, thereby causing damage to the reared organisms. To solve this problem, we set out to find a candidate filter-feeding bivalve species suitable for saline-alkaline water to graze on microalgae and to control the pH. In the current study, we investigated the effect of carbonate alkalinity (CA, 2.5, 10.0, and 20.0 meq/L) and pH (8.0, 8.5, and 9.0) on the grazing capacity (GC) of the clam Cyclina sinensis. Additionally, the effect of clam size (small, medium, and large) and microalgae species ( Nannochloropsis oculata, Chaetoceros müelleri, and Isochrysis galbana), and the effect of bottom sediment characteristic (mud, sandy mud, and muddy sand) and thickness (3 and 6 cm) were analyzed as well. The results show that the GC on I. galbana was the highest and small size had the maximum GC/ W ( W: wet weight including body and shells). No significant differences were observed between sediment type and thickness. Regarding CA and pH, a significant decrease in GC by the pH or by their interaction was found. The GC of C. sinensis was not greatly reduced in the treatments of pH≤8.5 and CA≤20.0, and also not affected by bottom sediment type, indicating that this clam is capable to manage microalgal concentrations and might be a candidate species for pH reduction in saline-alkaline water ponds.

  6. Effects of Freshwater Clam Extract Supplementation on Time to Exhaustion, Muscle Damage, Pro/Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines, and Liver Injury in Rats after Exhaustive Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Wen Liao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The potent anti-inflammatory activities and tissue-protective effects of freshwater clams (Corbicula fluminea have been well reported. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of freshwater clam extract (FCE supplementation on time to exhaustion, muscle damage, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and liver injury in rats after exhaustive exercise. Thirty-two rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control (SC; SC group with FCE supplementation (SC+FCE; exhaustive exercise (E; and E group with FCE supplementation (E+FCE. The SC+FCE and E+FCE groups were treated with gavage administration of 20 mg/kg for seven consecutive days. Blood samples were collected for the evaluation of biochemical parameters. The cytokine levels of TNF-α and IL-10 were also examined. Twenty-four hours after exhaustive exercise, the rat livers were removed for H & E staining. The FCE supplementation could extend the time to exhaustion in exercised rats. The levels of CPK, LDH, AST, ALT, lactate, TNF-α and H & E stains of the liver injury were significantly decreased in the E+FCE group, but the blood glucose and IL-10 were significantly higher in comparison with the E group. This study suggests that FCE supplementation may improve endurance performance and reduce exercise-induced muscle damage, inflammatory stress and liver injury.

  7. Magnetic interactions in martensitic Ni-Mn based Heusler systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksoy, Seda

    2010-04-22

    In this work, magnetic, magnetocaloric and structural properties are investigated in Ni-Mn-based martensitic Heusler alloys with the aim to tailor these properties as well as to understand in detail the magnetic interactions in the various crystallographic states of these alloys. We choose Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 34}In{sub 16} as a prototype which undergoes a martensitic transformation and exhibits field-induced strain and the inverse magnetocaloric effect. Using the structural phase diagram of martensitic Ni-Mn-based Heusler alloys, we substitute gallium and tin for indium to carry these effects systematically closer to room temperature by shifting the martensitic transformation. A magneto-calorimeter is designed and built to measure adiabatically the magnetocaloric effect in these alloys. The temperature dependence of strain under an external magnetic field is studied in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 50-x}Z{sub x} (Z: Ga, Sn, In and Sb) and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 34}In{sub 16-x}Z{sub x} (Z: Ga and Sn). An argument based on the effect of the applied magnetic field on martensite nucleation is adopted to extract information on the direction of the magnetization easy axis in the martensitic unit cell in Heusler alloys. Parallel to these studies, the structure in the presence of an external field is also studied by powder neutron diffraction. It is demonstrated that martensite nucleation is influenced by cooling the sample under a magnetic field such that the austenite phase is arrested within the martensitic state. The magnetic interactions in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 37}Sn{sub 13} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 40}Sb{sub 10} are characterized by using neutron polarization analysis. Below the martensitic transformation temperature, M{sub s}, an antiferromagnetically correlated state is found. Ferromagnetic resonance experiments are carried out on Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 37}Sn{sub 13} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 34}In{sub 16} to gain more detailed information on the nature of the magnetic interactions. The experimental

  8. Heavy metal concentrations in the razor clams (Solen spp.) from Muara Tebas, Sarawak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devagi Kanakaraju; Connie Jios; Shabdin Mohd Long

    2008-01-01

    The razor clams (Solen spp) or locally known as ambal in Sarawak collected from Muara Tebas were studied for their heavy metals contents in tissues and shells. Sediment samples were also tested for their metal contents. Concentrations of Pb, Fe, Zn, Cu, Cd and Mn were determined by using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (FAAS). Tissues of razor clams showed highest concentrations of Fe and Zn, while shells accumulated highest concentrations of Pb and Mn. The lowest metal concentrations found were Cu and Cd. In general, the levels of metals in ambal were within the permissible limit recommended by international standard, the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO). However, the study revealed that the sediments at Muara Tebas fall under the category of slightly polluted (for Pb) when compared to the guidelines suggested by United States Environment Protection Agency (USEPA). (author)

  9. Relationship between local deformation behavior and crystallographic features of as-quenched lath martensite during uniaxial tensile deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michiuchi, M.; Nambu, S.; Ishimoto, Y.; Inoue, J.; Koseki, T.

    2009-01-01

    Electron backscattering diffraction patterns were used to investigate the relationship between local deformation behavior and the crystallographic features of as-quenched lath martensite of low-carbon steel during uniform elongation in tensile tests. The slip system operating during the deformation up to a strain of 20% was estimated by comparing the crystal rotation of each martensite block after deformation of 20% strain with predictions by the Taylor and Sachs models. The results indicate that the in-lath-plane slip system was preferentially activated compared to the out-of-lath-plane system up to this strain level. Further detailed analysis of crystal rotation at intervals of approximately 5% strain confirmed that the constraint on the operative slip system by the lath structure begins at a strain of 8% and that the local strain hardening of the primary slip systems occurred at approximately 15% strain.

  10. Acute and chronic exposure in mussel (aulacomya ater) and clam (semelle solida) with Cs137

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bringas, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    Two of the most common Peruvian benthonic molluscs, have been shown to be effective concentrators of Cesium-137 and have also proven useful as indicators of that radionuclide in their natural environment, according with results in this paper. However the clam is a better indicator, when determining environmental acute release of Cesium-137 due to reactor accidents, nuclear tests, accidents in nuclear ships, submarines and radioactive material transport, and the mussel for a continuous monitoring of environmental radio contaminant levels. (author). 11 refs

  11. Composting clam processing wastes in a laboratory- and pilot-scale in-vessel system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhenhu; Lane, Robert; Wen, Zhiyou

    2009-01-01

    Waste materials from the clam processing industry (offal, shells) have several special characteristics such as a high salinity level, a high nitrogen content, and a low C/N ratio. The traditional disposal of clam waste through landfilling is facing the challenges of limited land available, increasing tipping fees, and strict environmental and regulatory scrutiny. The aim of this work is to investigate the performance of in-vessel composting as an alternative for landfill application of these materials. Experiments were performed in both laboratory-scale (5L) and pilot-scale (120L) reactors, with woodchips as the bulking agent. In the laboratory-scale composting test, the clam waste and woodchips were mixed in ratios from 1:0.5 to 1:3 (w/w, wet weight). The high ratios resulted in a better temperature performance, a higher electrical conductivity, and a higher ash content than the low-ratio composting. The C/N ratio of the composts was in the range of 9:1-18:1. In the pilot-scale composting test, a 1:1 ratio of clam waste to woodchips was used. The temperature profile during the composting process met the US Environmental Protection Agency sanitary requirement. The final cured compost had a C/N ratio of 14.6, with an ash content of 167.0+/-14.1g/kg dry matter. In addition to the major nutrients (carbon, nitrogen, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, sulfur, and sodium), the compost also contained trace amounts of zinc, manganese, copper, and boron, indicating that the material can be used as a good resource for plant nutrients.

  12. Clam-Gallasův palác - emblematická architektura?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konečný, Lubomír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 28, - (2009), s. 91-98 ISSN 0231-7443. [Život pražských paláců. Praha, 09.10.2007-11.10.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80330511 Keywords : Clam-Gallas Palace * Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach * architecture * emblem s * imprints Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  13. The effect of nitrogen on martensite formation in a Cr-Mn-Ni stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggs, T.; Knutsen, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of nitrogen (0 to 0.27 wt%) on martensite formation in an experimental low-nickel stainless-steel alloy (Fe-17Cr-7Mn-4Ni) has been investigated. The alloys containing 0.1 wt% or more nitrogen are fully austenitic at room temperature; those containing less nitrogen consist of a mixture of austenite, martensite and δ-ferrite. The alloys containing less than 0.2 wt% nitrogen are metastable and undergo a transformation from austenite to martensite on deformation. Transmission electron microscopy investigations suggest that, within the nitrogen range considered in this investigation, the addition of nitrogen causes an increase in stacking fault energy which in turn inhibits the nucleation of martensite. As the low-nitrogen alloys (less than 0.2 wt% nitrogen) undergo deformation, ε-martensite (with the [ anti 110] γ and [ anti 12 anti 10] ε zone axes parallel) is observed at the intersection of stacking faults. With increasing strain, the presence of α'-martensite is observed in conjunction with the ε-martensite, and only α'-martensite is observed at very high strains. Both the Nishiyama-Wasserman and Kurdjumov-Sachs orientation relationships are observed between austenite and α'-martensite. The transformation to martensite during deformation causes a significant variation in room-temperature mechanical properties, despite the overall narrow range in composition considered. (orig.)

  14. Effect of Tantalum content on the low cycle fatigue properties of CLAM steel at 823 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Xiangwei [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Liu, Shaojun, E-mail: shaojun.liu@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Zhao, Yanyun; Wang, Kun [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The fatigue life initially decreased and then increased as the Ta content was increased from 0.027 wt% to 0.18 wt%. • The softening rate had declined with Ta content increased and the reduced softening rate was attributed to the increased number of Ta-rich MX particles. • The grain size and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} were closely associated with the Ta content. • The crack distribution was quite sensitive to the Ta content. - Abstract: The effect of tantalum (Ta) content on the low cycle fatigue (LCF) properties of CLAM steel at 823 K was investigated in this paper. Low cycle fatigue tests were carried out on four ingots of CLAM steel with Ta contents of 0.027 wt%, 0.078 wt%, 0.15 wt% and 0.18 wt%, respectively. The results showed that the fatigue life and softening behavior of CLAM steel were influenced by Ta content. The fatigue life initially decreased and then increased as the Ta content was increased from 0.027 wt% to 0.18 wt%. The softening rate had declined with Ta content increased and the reduced softening rate was attributed to the increased number of Ta-rich MX particles.

  15. Assessment of relationship between rainfall and Escherichia coli in clams (Chamelea gallina using the Bayes Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Ciccarelli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of bivalve shellfish harvested from water contaminated with sewage pollution presents a risk of human infections and targeting control measures require a good understanding of environmental factors influencing the transport and the fate of faecal contaminants within the hydrological catchments. Although there has been extensive development of regression models, the point of this paper, focused on the relationship between rainfall events and concentrations of Escherichia coli monitored in clams, was the use of a Bayesian approach, by the Bayes Factor. The study was conducted on clams harvested from the south coast of Marche Region (Italy, a coastal area impacted by continuous treated effluents, intermittent rainfalldependent untreated sewage spillage - as a consequence of stormwater overflowing - and rivers with an ephemeral flow regime. The work compared the different interpretation criteria of Bayes Factor, confirmed that E. coli concentrations in clams from the studied area varied in correlation with rainfall events, and demonstrated the effectiveness of Bayes Factor in the assessment of shellfish quality in coastal marine waters. However, it suggested that further investigations would be warranted to determine which environmental factors provide the better basis for accurate and timely predictions. Furthermore the gathered data could be useful, to the local authorities of Marche Region, in the definition of flexible monitoring programmes, taking into account the atmospheric events that could affect the correct functioning of sewage managing systems and the flow of tributary rivers.

  16. Modeling habitat suitability of the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea in a Neotropical shallow lagoon, southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. L. Silveira

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to model the habitat suitability for an invasive clam Corbicula fluminea in a coastal shallow lagoon in the southern Neotropical region (–30.22, –50.55. The lagoon (19km2, maximum deep 2.5m was sampled with an Ekman dredge in an orthogonal matrix comprising 84 points. At each sampling point, were obtained environmental descriptors as depth, organic matter content (OMC, average granulometry (Avgran, and the percentage of sand (Pcsand. Prediction performance of Generalized Linear Models (GLM, Generalized Additive Models (GAM and Boosted Regression Tree (BRT were compared. Also, niche overlapping with other native clam species (Castalia martensi, Neocorbicula limosa and Anodontites trapesialis was examined. A BRT model with 1400 trees was selected as the best model, with cross-validated correlation of 0.82. The relative contributions of predictors were Pcsand-42.6%, OMC-35.8%, Avgran-10.9% and Depth-10.8%. Were identified that C. fluminea occur mainly in sandy sediments with few organic matter, in shallow areas nor by the shore. The PCA showed a wide niche overlap with the native clam species C. martensi, N. limosa and A. trapesialis.

  17. Histopathology and stress biomarkers in the clam Venerupis philippinarum from the Venice Lagoon (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscolo Papo, Michele; Bertotto, Daniela; Quaglio, Francesco; Vascellari, Marta; Pascoli, Francesco; Negrato, Elena; Binato, Giovanni; Radaelli, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the histomorphology and the stress response in the bivalve Venerupis philippinarum sampled in four differently polluted sites of the Venice Lagoon (Palude del Monte, Marghera, Ca' Roman and Val di Brenta). This species is often used as bioindicator of environmental pollution since it can bioaccumulate a large variety of pollutants because of its filter feeding. Chemical analyses for heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Hg and Pb) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were performed on whole soft tissues of V. philippinarum. The histological evaluation of clams revealed the presence of Perkinsus sp. infection in animals from all sites, although a very high prevalence of parasites was evidenced in clams from Ca' Roman. Perkinsus sp. were systemically distributed in the mantle, in the intestine and digestive gland, in gonads and gills. The trophozoites of Perkinsus sp. were found isolated or in cluster surrounded by a heavy hemocitical response. Haemocytes always exhibited an immunopositivity to cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and nitrotyrosine (NT) antibodies. The digestive gland of animals from Palude del Monte showed the highest malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, whereas clams from Ca' Roman exhibited the highest quantity of metallothioneins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Irradiation control of pathogenic bacteria and their growth during storage in short neckde clam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Hua; Wang Feng; Ha Yiming; Liu Shuliang

    2009-01-01

    The growth of pathogenic bacteria during storage and their D 10 values by irradiation in short necked clam were evaluated. The results showed that the D 10 values of the total bacteria count, E. coli, Vibrio parahaemolyticus in short necked clam at 0 degree C ∼ 4 degree C condition were 0.70, 0.56, 0.20kGy, respectively. The results showed that total bacteria count in vacuum packaged short necked clam sample was 4.46 log (CFU/g) after 3kGy 60 Co γ-irradiation and 28 days stored under 0 degree C ∼ 4 degree C, which could meet the requirement of related aquatic product standards, the E. coli and Vibrio parahaemolyticus would not detected after 0.4kGy irradiation and 7 days storage at 0 degree C ∼ 4 degree C. Therefore, micro-organisms could be controled effectively by 3 kGy irradiation and its shelf-life could extend to 28 days. (authors)

  19. Growth and Histological Effects to Protothaca staminea (Littleneck Clam) of Long-Term Exposure to Chlorinated Sea Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, C. I.; Hillman, A. E.; Wilkinson, P.; Woodruff, D. L.

    1980-08-01

    There has been considerable concern about the potential for long-term effects to marine organisms from chlorinated sea water. As part of a larger study to investigate the effects of materials resulting from seawater chlorination on marine organisms, groups of littleneck clams, Protothaca staminea, were exposed to sea water that had been chlorinated. Two experiments were conducted. In one test, groups of littleneck clams were exposed to dilutions of chlorinated sea water that had average chlorine produced oxidant (CPO) concentrations of 16 {micro}g/l or less. In the second test, groups of clams were exposed to chlorinated seawater-unchlorinated seawater mixtures that had target CPO concentrations of 0, 6, 12, 25, 50 and 100 {micro}g/l. In the first experiment, length measurements were made on all clams at approximately one-month intervals for three months. In the second test, length, weight, depth, width and edge etching were used to measure growth, and subsamples were harvested and measured at one-month intervals. In addition, clams were preserved for histological examination. The clams in the first experiment all had negative growth. In the second test, growth was inhibited under all conditions through the first four months of exposure. During the last four months, there was positive signs of growth at the 0, 6 and 12 {micro}g/l CPO test conditions. Histological examination indicates that P. staminea does not adapt well to being held in aquaria. Most clams, tram all test and control conditions, showed evidence of necrosis at one month. This condition seemed to improve with longer exposure at lower CPO concentrations but persisted at CPO concentrations of 25 {micro}g/l and higher. Other histological effects were apparent at the higher exposure concentrations as the length of exposure increased.

  20. Strength of 10CR-N martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahrami, F.; Hendry, A.

    1993-01-01

    10Cr stainless steel has been employed to examine the effect of nitrogen on microstructure and strength. Applying Solid state gaseous nitrogenising treatments a whole range of nitrogen martensite structures containing up to 0.45 wt% were obtained. It was found that a linear relationship exists between strength and nitrogen content in precipitate free martensitic structures. Yield strength increased from 705 to 1295 MPa for nitrogen free base material and alloys with 0.35 wt%N respectively. Pronounce secondary hardening was observed at a tempering temperature of 500 C. A linear relationship was also observed between the lattice parameter and nitrogen concentration in these alloys. A model for mechanical behaviour is presented. (orig.)

  1. Reversible martensitic ω-α transformation in Ti and Zr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al'shevskij, Yu.L.; Kul'nitskij, B.A.; Konyaev, Yu.S.; Rojtburt, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism of phase transformation in pure Ti and Zr in samples with initial ω-structure, produced as a result of heating to 1400 K with subsequent increase in pressure up to 8 GPa and a sharp decrease in temperature and pressure to normal values, has been studies. As a result of α → β → ω transformation, occurring in the process of the above-mentioned treatment, grains of ω-phase with perfect rystal structure are formed. With ω-phase heating to 650 K formation of α-phase takes place, and it is accompanied by the appearance of characteristic martensitic relief on the sample surface. Subsequent application of high pressure results in the reverse α → ω transformation with the disappearance of surface relief.The data suggest that direct ω → α transformation while heating and reverse α → ω transformation under pressure are realized according to martensitic mechanism

  2. An enhanced Brinson model with modified kinetics for martensite transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-Jin; Lee, Jung Ju [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Ju-Won [Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jae Hyuk [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    We propose an enhanced Brinson model with modified kinetics for martensite transformation. Two additional material constants are considered to follow the stress-temperature diagram above austenite start temperature (As) along with treatment to keep the continuity of the martensite volume fraction and the path dependency of the phase transformation. To demonstrate the performance of the proposed model, we implement this algorithm into ABAQUS user subroutine, then conduct several numerical simulations and compare their results with SMA wire experiments as well as those of three-dimensional SMA constitutive models. From the results, it turns out that the proposed model is as accurate as the three-dimensional models and shows better accuracy over original Brinson model in terms of recovery stress.

  3. MARTENSITIC CREEP RESISTANT STEEL STRENGTHENED BY Z-PHASE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to steel alloys having a martensitic or martensitic- ferritic structure and comprising Z-phase (CrXN) particles, where X is one or more of the elements V, Nb, Ta, and where the Z-phase particles have an average size of less than 400 nm. The alloy comprises by wt...... % the following components: 9 to 15% Cr, 0.01-0.20% N, C in an amount less than 0.1%, one or more of: 0.01- 0.5%V,0.01-1%Nb, 0.01-2%Ta, and a balance being substantially iron and inevitable impurities. The invention further relates to a method of manufacturing such a steel alloy, a component comprising...... such a steel alloy, and to the use of such a steel alloy for high temperature components....

  4. Aging in PWR conditions of martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boursier, J.M.; Buisine, D.; Fronteau, M.; Michel, D.; Rouillon, Y.; Yrieix, B.; Meyzaud, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels are largely used in Nuclear Power Plant (pump impeller, valve stem...) because of their high mechanical characteristics and their good resistance to corrosion. Nevertheless some of those components could operate at temperature higher than 250 deg.C, which could embrittle the material by the precipitation of a chromium-rich phase during aging. In collaboration with Framatome, Electricite de France has undertaken numerous studies in order to understand this process of embrittlement. This paper presents a review of the metallurgical investigations on martensitic stainless steels components which were performed in the EDF hot laboratory. In peculiar, it should be noted the good correlation between inservice experience and the modelling developed by EDF R and D division. Finally and in association with safety analysis, these results will allow to establish the maintenance strategy of the French Nuclear Power Plants. (authors)

  5. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mabruri, Efendi, E-mail: effe004@lipi.go.id; Anwar, Moch Syaiful, E-mail: moch.syaiful.anwar@lipi.go.id; Prifiharni, Siska, E-mail: siska.prifiharni@lipi.go.id; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang [Research Center for Metallurgy and Materials, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) Kawasan Puspiptek Gd. 470 Serpong, Tangerang Selatan 15314 (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  6. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Anwar, Moch Syaiful; Prifiharni, Siska; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  7. Electrochemical characterisation of a martensitic stainless steel in a neutral chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcelin, Sabrina; Pébère, Nadine; Régnier, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A better knowledge of the electrochemical behaviour of a martensitic stainless steel in bulk electrolyte was obtained. ► Quantitative parameters were obtained from impedance measurements. ► The study will be used as reference to investigate crevice corrosion using a thin layer cell. - Abstract: This paper focuses on the characterisation of the electrochemical behaviour of a martensitic stainless steel in 0.1 M NaCl + 0.04 M Na 2 SO 4 solution and is a part of a study devoted to crevice corrosion resistance of stainless steels. Polarisation curves and electrochemical impedance measurements were obtained for different experimental conditions in bulk electrolyte. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyse the passive films. At the corrosion potential, the stainless steel was in the passive state and the corrosion process was controlled by the properties of the passive film formed during air exposure. During immersion in the deaerated solution, the passive film was only slightly modified, whereas it was altered both in composition and thickness during immersion in the aerated solution. After cathodic polarisation of the stainless steel electrode surface, the oxide film was almost totally removed and the surface appeared to be uniformly active for oxygen reduction. The new passive film, formed at the corrosion potential, was enriched with iron species and less protective. Impedance diagrams allowed the characterisation of both the oxide film (high-frequency range) and the charge transfer process (low-frequency range).

  8. Effect of nanograin-boundary networks generation on corrosion of carburized martensitic stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonruang, Chatdanai; Thong-On, Atcharawadi; Kidkhunthod, Pinit

    2018-02-02

    Martensitic stainless steel parts used in carbonaceous atmosphere at high temperature are subject to corrosion which results in a large amount of lost energy and high repair and maintenance costs. This work therefore proposes a model for surface development and corrosion mechanism as a solution to reduce corrosion costs. The morphology, phase, and corrosion behavior of steel are investigated using GIXRD, XANES, and EIS. The results show formation of nanograin-boundary networks in the protective layer of martensitic stainless steel. This Cr 2 O 3 -Cr 7 C 3 nanograin mixture on the FeCr 2 O 4 layer causes ion transport which is the main reason for the corrosion reaction during carburizing of the steel. The results reveal the rate determining steps in the corrosion mechanism during carburizing of steel. These steps are the diffusion of uncharged active gases in the stagnant-gas layer over the steel surface followed by the conversion of C into C 4- and O into O 2- at the gas-oxide interface simultaneously with the migration of Cr 3+ from the metal-oxide interface to the gas-oxide interface. It is proposed that previous research on Al 2 O 3 coatings may be the solution to producing effective coatings that overcome the corrosion challenges discussed in this work.

  9. Acidified seawater increases accumulation of cobalt but not cesium in manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, Narin; Kocaoğlan, Hasan Oğuz; Kılıç, Önder; Lacoue-Labarthe, Thomas; Belivermiş, Murat

    2018-04-01

    The pH of seawater around the world is expected to continue its decline in the near future in response to ocean acidification that is driven by heightened atmospheric CO 2 emissions. Concomitantly, economically-important molluscs that live in coastal waters including estuaries and embayments, may be exposed to a wide assortment of contaminants, including trace metals and radionuclides. Seawater acidification may alter both the chemical speciation of select elements as well as the physiology of organisms, and may thus pose at risk to many shellfish species, including the manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum. The bioconcentration efficiency of two common radionuclides associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, 134 Cs and 57 Co, were investigated by exposing live clams to dissolved 134 Cs and 57 Co at control (pH = 8.1) and two lowered pH (pH = 7.8 and 7.5) levels using controlled aquaria. The uptake and depuration kinetics of the two radionuclides in the whole-body clam were followed for 21 and 35 days, respectively. At steady-state equilibrium, the concentration factor (CF ss ) for 57 Co increased as the pH decreased (i.e. 130 ± 5, 194 ± 6, and 258 ± 10 at pH levels 8.1, 7.8 and 7.5, respectively), whereas the 134 Cs uptake was not influenced by a change in pH conditions. During depuration, the lowest depuration rate constant of 57 Co by the manila clam was observed at the intermediate pH of 7.8. An increase in the accumulation of 57 Co at the intermediate pH value was thought to be caused mainly by the aragonitic shell of the clam, as well as the low salinity and alkalinity of seawater used in the experiment. Considering that accumulation consists of uptake and depuration, among the three pH conditions moderately acidified seawater enhanced most the accumulation of 57 Co. Accumulation of 134 Cs was not strongly influenced by a reduced pH condition, as represented by an analogous uptake constant rate and CF ss in each treatment. Such results suggest that

  10. Development status und future possibilities for martensitic creep resistant steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hald, J. [Technical Univ. Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    In the last four decades new stronger modified 9%Cr martensitic creep resistant steels have been introduced in power plants, which has enabled increases in maximum achievable steam conditions from the previous 250 bar and 540-560 C up to the values of 300 bar and 600-620 C currently being introduced all over the world. In order to further increase the steam parameters of steel based power plants up to a target value of 650 C/325 bar it is necessary to double the creep strength of the martensitic steels. At the same time the resistance against steam oxidation must be improved by an increase of the chromium content in the steels from 9% to 12%. However, so far all attempts to make stronger 12%Cr steels have led to breakdowns in long-term creep strength. Significant progress has been achieved in the understanding of microstructure stability of the martensitic 9-12%Cr steels: Observed microstructure instabilities in 11-12%Cr steels are explained by Z-phase precipitation, which dissolves fine MN nitrides. Improved understanding of effects of B and N on long-term creep properties has formed the basis of a series of new stronger 9%Cr test alloys with improved creep strength. In parallel 9%Cr test steels with low C content show very promising behavior in long-term tests. However, the 9%Cr steels must be surface coated to protect against steam oxidation at high temperature applications above 620%C. A possibility to use fine Z-phases for strengthening of the martensitic steels has been identified, and this opens a new pathway for development of stable strong 12%Cr steels. There are still good prospects for the realization of a 325 bar / 650 C steam power plant all based on steel. (orig.)

  11. The role of adaptive martensite in magnetic shape memory alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niemann, R.; Rößler, U.K.; Gruner, M.E.; Heczko, Oleg; Schultz, L.; Fähler, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 8 (2012), s. 562-581 ISSN 1438-1656 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100100913 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : Ni-Mn-Ga * magnetic shape memory alloy * ferromagnetic martensite * modulated structure * adaptive phase * mobility of twin boundary Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.608, year: 2012

  12. Diffuse scattering as an indicator for martensitic variant selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Lei; Ding, Xiangdong; Zong, Hongxiang; Lookman, Turab; Sun, Jun; Ren, Xiaobing; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse scattering is an important precursor phenomenon prior to the martensitic transformation (MT). It is related to the correlated atomic position fluctuations prior to the MT and can provide important hints of the transformation mechanism. However, the role of this precursor phenomenon in the MT is not clear so far. Here we study the evolution of diffraction patterns prior to temperature- and stress-induced MTs and consider the evolution of atomic configurations during the whole MT process, using molecular dynamics simulations on a generic body-centered cubic–hexagonal close-packed transformation as an example. Our results show that, although the diffuse scattering changes with external fields, there exists a general relationship between the transformation pathways, the diffuse scattering streaks and the martensitic products. Two preferred transformation pathways with opposite shuffle directions lead to a single specific diffuse scattering streak prior to the MT and form one pair of anti-variants after the MT. Thus the distribution of diffuse scattering acts as an indicator of the selection of martensitic variants. In addition, we find that the applied stress can change the shear order parameter of the phase transformation, and subsequently determines the preferred transformation pathways and the distribution of diffuse scattering streaks. This work establishes a relationship between the transformation mechanism, the precursor phenomenon and the products after the MT under the influence of external fields

  13. Reversed austenite for enhancing ductility of martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieck, S.; Rosemann, P.; Kromm, A.; Halle, T.

    2017-03-01

    The novel heat treatment concept, “quenching and partitioning” (Q&P) has been developed for high strength steels with enhanced formability. This heat treatment involves quenching of austenite to a temperature between martensite start and finish, to receive a several amount of retained austenite. During the subsequent annealing treatment, the so called partitioning, the retained austenite is stabilized due to carbon diffusion, which results in enhanced formability and strength regarding strain induced austenite to martensite transformation. In this study a Q&P heat treatment was applied to a Fe-0.45C-0.65Mn-0.34Si-13.95Cr stainless martensite. Thereby the initial quench end temperature and the partitioning time were varied to characterize their influence on microstructural evolution. The microstructural changes were analysed by dilatometer measurements, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, including electron back-scatter diffraction. Compression testing was made to examine the mechanical behaviour. It was found that an increasing partitioning time up to 30 min leads to an enhanced formability without loss in strength due to a higher amount of stabilized retained and reversed austenite as well as precipitation hardening.

  14. In-service thermal ageing of martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tampigny, R.; Molinie, E.; Foct, F.; Dignocourt, P.

    2011-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels are largely used in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) mainly as valve stems, bolts or nuts due to their high mechanical properties and their good resistance to corrosion in primary water. At the end of the eighties, research studies have demonstrated a thermal ageing irreversible embrittlement due to the precipitation of a chromium-rich phase for X6 CrNiCu 17-04, X6 CrNiMo 16.04 and X12 Cr 13 martensitic stainless steels and a semi-empirical modeling has been proposed. Numerous metallurgical examinations have been performed in hot laboratories to consolidate the good correlation between in-service experience and the modeling developed by EDF RD. According to the feedback analysis, thermal ageing embrittlement can appear at different in-service temperatures or do not appear in relation with chemical composition of martensitic stainless steels and end of manufacturing heat treatments associated. A new campaign of metallurgical examinations has been proposed to consolidate previous studies and to contribute to maintenance policy for the next ten years after the third decennial outages for 900 MWe NPP. Influence of real in-service temperatures and end of manufacturing heat treatments have been examined to understand reasons why in some cases thermal ageing embrittlement does not occur or occur with a lowest intensity. These new results have contributed to reinforce EDF RD modeling validity and technical specifications defined in RCC-M for new valve stems, bolts or nuts. (authors)

  15. Microstructure and tensile properties of high strength duplex ferrite-martensite (DFM) steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborti, P.C.; Mitra, M.K.

    2007-01-01

    Duplex ferrite-martensite (DFM) steels containing 38-80% martensite of varying morphologies were developed by batch intercritical annealing of a commercial variety vanadium bearing 0.2% C-Mn steel at different temperatures. Microstructures before intercritical annealing were found to control the morphological distribution of the phase constituents of the developed DFM steels. Tensile test results revealed best strength-ductility combination for finely distributed lamellar ferrite-martensite phase aggregate containing ∼60% martensite developed from a prior martensitic structure. Taking consideration of the modified law of mechanical mixture the experimental tensile strength data of the developed DFM steels has been formulated with some success and very good estimation for tensile strengths of pure ferrite and low carbon martensite has been made from tensile strength data of DFM steels

  16. Correlation between microstructure and mechanical properties of stable mixtures formed by austenite and martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckstein, C.B.

    1982-03-01

    The influence of martensite in mechanical properties of stable mixtures formed by austenite and martensite was studied by varying the amount of martensite in the mixtures. Microstructural parameters were determined by Optical Quantitative Metallography and used to establish the correlation between the mechanical response of the mixtures in tension and their microstructures. The 'in situ' deformation of each phase in mixtures was determined experimentally in terms of the rule of mixtures. It is shown that the partitioning of the deformation depends on the amount of martensite in the mixture and that it tends to a condition of isostrain at higher martensite volume fractions. Optical observation of fractured specimens showed that the beginning of the fracture process may related to regions of the austenite grain boundaries where they meet martensite plates. (Author) [pt

  17. A review on the martensitic transformation and shape memory effect in Fe-Mn-Si alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Q.; Humbeeck, J. van; Delaey, L.

    1994-01-01

    The martensitic transformation and the shape memory effect in Fe-Mn-Si alloys received great attention recently due to its potential commercial value. In this paper, the mechanisms for the martensitic transformation and various parameters influencing the shape memory effect like alloy composition, applied stress, prestrain, crystal orientation, temperature, grain size, pre-existing martensite, thermal cycling and training etc. are reviewed and discussed. (orig.)

  18. Linear Friction Welding Process Model for Carpenter Custom 465 Precipitation-Hardened Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-11

    Carpenter Custom 465 precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel to develop a linear friction welding (LFW) process model for this material...Model for Carpenter Custom 465 Precipitation-Hardened Martensitic Stainless Steel The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are... Martensitic Stainless Steel Report Title An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite-element analysis is combined with thermo-mechanical material

  19. Influence of the Martensitic Transformation on the Microscale Plastic Strain Heterogeneities in a Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechartier, Audrey; Martin, Guilhem; Comby, Solène; Roussel-Dherbey, Francine; Deschamps, Alexis; Mantel, Marc; Meyer, Nicolas; Verdier, Marc; Veron, Muriel

    2017-01-01

    The influence of the martensitic transformation on microscale plastic strain heterogeneity of a duplex stainless steel has been investigated. Microscale strain heterogeneities were measured by digital image correlation during an in situ tensile test within the SEM. The martensitic transformation was monitored in situ during tensile testing by high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A clear correlation is shown between the plasticity-induced transformation of austenite to martensite and the development of plastic strain heterogeneities at the phase level.

  20. Diffusion Couple Alloying of Refractory Metals in Austenitic and Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    stainless steel and ferritic/ martensitic steel can vary from structural and support components in the reactor core to reactor fuel...of ferritic/ martensitic steels compared to type 316 stainless steel after irradiation in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at 420 ºC to ~80dpa (From...ferritic martensitic steel at Sandia National Laboratories. The 316 stainless steel had a certified composition of:

  1. Investigation of Microstructure and Corrosion Propagation Behaviour of Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel Plates

    OpenAIRE

    Abidin Kamal Ariff Zainal; Ismail Elya Atikah; Zainuddin Azman; Hussain Patthi

    2014-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels are commonly used for fabricating components. For many applications, an increase in surface hardness and wear resistance can be beneficial to improve performance and extend service life. However, the improvement in hardness of martensitic steels is usually accompanied by a reduction in corrosion strength. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of nitriding on AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel, in terms of microstructure and corrosion propagat...

  2. Martensite. gamma. -->. cap alpha. transformations in various purity Fe-Ni-Mo alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitina, I.I.; Rozhkova, A.S. (Tsentral' nyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Chernoj Metallurgii, Moscow (USSR))

    1982-06-01

    Kinetics of isothermal and athermal ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..cap alpha.. martensitic transitions in the Fe-25.5% Ni-4.5% Mo alloys with different degree of purity is studied. The determinant role of dislocation blocking by interstitials in stabilization of isothermal martensitic transformation is displayed. Presented are the data permitting to consider that the character of martensitic transition kinetics is determined by the ratio of the process moving force and resistance to microplastic deformation.

  3. Purification and Characterization of Hemagglutinating Proteins from Poker-Chip Venus (Meretrix lusoria and Corbicula Clam (Corbicula fluminea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Fu Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemagglutinating proteins (HAPs were purified from Poker-chip Venus (Meretrix lusoria and Corbicula clam (Corbicula fluminea using gel-filtration chromatography on a Sephacryl S-300 column. The molecular weights of the HAPs obtained from Poker-chip Venus and Corbicula clam were 358 kDa and 380 kDa, respectively. Purified HAP from Poker-chip Venus yielded two subunits with molecular weights of 26 kDa and 29 kDa. However, only one HAP subunit was purified from Corbicula clam, and its molecular weight was 32 kDa. The two Poker-chip Venus HAPs possessed hemagglutinating ability (HAA for erythrocytes of some vertebrate animal species, especially tilapia. Moreover, HAA of the HAP purified from Poker-chip Venus was higher than that of the HAP of Corbicula clam. Furthermore, Poker-chip Venus HAPs possessed better HAA at a pH higher than 7.0. When the temperature was at 4°C–10°C or the salinity was less than 0.5‰, the two Poker-chip Venus HAPs possessed better HAA compared with that of Corbicula clam.

  4. In situ studies with Asian clams (Carbacula fluminea) detect acid mine drainage and nutrient inputs in low-order streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soucek, D. J.; Schmidt, T. S.; Cherry, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluates the correlation between transplanted Asiatic clam and indigenous community responses to acid mine drainage and nutrient loading in first-to-third-order streams, by comparing the toxicological endpoints of clam survival and growth with benthic macro-invertebrate community indices as community responses to both acid mine drainage and nutrient loading. Clam survival was found to be positively correlated with water column pH and negatively correlated with conductivity and metal concentrations. There was also a positive correlation with the relative abundance of the macro-invertebrate Ephemeroptera, the most sensitive taxonomic group, to acid mine drainage in this watershed. No correlation was found between clam growth and acid mine drainage inputs, but there was evidence of positive correlation with nitrate concentrations and the relative abundance of collector-filterer functional feeding groups. These results suggest that clam growth is related to nutrient levels and accurately reflect benthic macro-invertebrate responses to nutrient loading. 28 refs., 5 tabs., 1 fig

  5. A novel approach for acid mine drainage pollution biomonitoring using rare earth elements bioaccumulated in the freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnail, Estefanía; Pérez-López, Rafael; Sarmiento, Aguasanta M; Nieto, José Miguel; DelValls, T Ángel

    2017-09-15

    Lanthanide series have been used as a record of the water-rock interaction and work as a tool for identifying impacts of acid mine drainage (lixiviate residue derived from sulphide oxidation). The application of North-American Shale Composite-normalized rare earth elements patterns to these minority elements allows determining the origin of the contamination. In the current study, geochemical patterns were applied to rare earth elements bioaccumulated in the soft tissue of the freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea after exposure to different acid mine drainage contaminated environments. Results show significant bioaccumulation of rare earth elements in soft tissue of the clam after 14 days of exposure to acid mine drainage contaminated sediment (ΣREE=1.3-8μg/gdw). Furthermore, it was possible to biomonitor different degrees of contamination based on rare earth elements in tissue. The pattern of this type of contamination describes a particular curve characterized by an enrichment in the middle rare earth elements; a homologous pattern (E MREE =0.90) has also been observed when applied NASC normalization in clam tissues. Results of lanthanides found in clams were contrasted with the paucity of toxicity studies, determining risk caused by light rare earth elements in the Odiel River close to the Estuary. The current study purposes the use of clam as an innovative "bio-tool" for the biogeochemical monitoring of pollution inputs that determines the acid mine drainage networks affection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Anomalous acoustic effect during martensitic transformations in titanium nickelide base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnikov, V.A.; Kokhanenko, D.V.

    2002-01-01

    One carried out experiments to determine effect of external static stress on martensitic transformations and acoustic emission, Martensitic transformations in titanium nickelide base alloys under mechanical stress were determined to change nature of acoustic emission to anomalous one - cycling of transformations under gradual increase of mechanical stress during direct martensitic transformation was followed by increase of acoustic emission energy instead of reduction. The mentioned nature of acoustic emission is indicative of essential effect of external stress on martensitic transformations and energy dissipation during transformations [ru

  7. Martensitic phase transformations in Ni–Ti-based shape memory alloys: The Landau theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchyglo, Oleg; Salman, Umut; Finel, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple Landau free energy functional for cubic-to-orthorhombic and cubic-to-monoclinic martensitic phase transformations. The functional is derived following group–subgroup relations between different martensitic phases – tetragonal, trigonal, orthorhombic and monoclinic – in order to fully capture the symmetry properties of the free energy of the austenite and martensite phases. The derived free energy functional is fitted to the elastic and thermodynamic properties of NiTi and NiTiCu shape memory alloys which exhibit cubic-to-monoclinic and cubic-to-orthorhombic martensitic phase transformations, respectively.

  8. Investigation of strain-induced martensitic transformation in metastable austenite using nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, T.-H.; Oh, C.-S.; Kim, D.H.; Oh, K.H.; Bei, H.; George, E.P.; Han, H.N.

    2010-01-01

    Strain-induced martensitic transformation of metastable austenite was investigated by nanoindentation of individual austenite grains in multi-phase steel. A cross-section prepared through one of these indented regions using focused ion beam milling was examined by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of martensite underneath the indent indicates that the pop-ins observed on the load-displacement curve during nanoindentation correspond to the onset of strain-induced martensitic transformation. The pop-ins can be understood as resulting from the selection of a favorable martensite variant during nanoindentation.

  9. Investigation of Strain-Induced Martensitic Transformation in Metastable Austenite using Nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, T.-H. [Seoul National University; Oh, C.-S. [Korean Institute of Materials Science; Kim, D. H. [Seoul National University; Oh, K. H. [Seoul National University; Bei, Hongbin [ORNL; George, Easo P [ORNL; Han, H. N. [Seoul National University

    2010-01-01

    Strain-induced martensitic transformation of metastable austenite was investigated by nanoindentation of individual austenite grains in multi-phase steel. A cross-section prepared through one of these indented regions using focused ion beam milling was examined by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of martensite underneath the indent indicates that the pop-ins observed on the load-displacement curve during nanoindentation correspond to the onset of strain-induced martensitic transformation. The pop-ins can be understood as resulting from the selection of a favorable martensite variant during nanoindentation.

  10. Twinning and martensitic transformations in nickel-enriched 304 austenitic steel during tensile and indentation deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussev, M.N., E-mail: gussevmn@ornl.gov; Busby, J.T.; Byun, T.S.; Parish, C.M.

    2013-12-20

    Twinning and martensitic transformation have been investigated in nickel-enriched AISI 304 stainless steel subjected to tensile and indentation deformation. Using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), the morphology of α- and ε-martensite and the effect of grain orientation to load axis on phase and structure transformations were analyzed in detail. It was found that the twinning occurred less frequently under indentation than under tension; also, twinning was not observed in [001] and [101] grains. In tensile tests, the martensite particles preferably formed at the deformation twins, intersections between twins, or at the twin-grain boundary intersections. Conversely, martensite formation in the indentation tests was not closely associated with twinning; instead, the majority of martensite was concentrated in the dense colonies near grain boundaries. Martensitic transformation seemed to be obstructed in the [001] grains in both tensile and indentation test cases. Under a tensile stress of 800 MPa, both α- and ε-martensites were found in the microstructure, but at 1100 MPa only α-martensite presented in the specimen. Under indentation, α- and ε-martensite were observed in the material regardless of the stress level.

  11. NMR-Based Metabolomic Investigations on the Differential Responses in Adductor Muscles from Two Pedigrees of Manila Clam Ruditapes philippinarum to Cadmium and Zinc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbao Yu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum is one of the most important economic species in shellfishery in China due to its wide geographic distribution and high tolerance to environmental changes (e.g., salinity, temperature. In addition, Manila clam is a good biomonitor/bioindicator in “Mussel Watch Programs” and marine environmental toxicology. However, there are several pedigrees of R. philippinarum distributed in the marine environment in China. No attention has been paid to the biological differences between various pedigrees of Manila clams, which may introduce undesirable biological variation in toxicology studies. In this study, we applied NMR-based metabolomics to detect the biological differences in two main pedigrees (White and Zebra of R. philippinarum and their differential responses to heavy metal exposures (Cadmium and Zinc using adductor muscle as a target tissue to define one sensitive pedigree of R. philippinarum as biomonitor for heavy metals. Our results indicated that there were significant metabolic differences in adductor muscle tissues between White and Zebra clams, including higher levels of alanine, glutamine, hypotaurine, phosphocholine and homarine in White clam muscles and higher levels of branched chain amino acids (valine, leucine and isoleucine, succinate and 4-aminobutyrate in Zebra clam muscles, respectively. Differential metabolic responses to heavy metals between White and Zebra clams were also found. Overall, we concluded that White pedigree of clam could be a preferable bioindicator/biomonitor in marine toxicology studies and for marine heavy metals based on the relatively high sensitivity to heavy metals.

  12. Study of isotope effects in the hydrogen transport of an 8% CrWVTa martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, G.A.; Sedano, L.A.; Perujo, A.; Douglas, K.

    2001-01-01

    A time-dependent gas-phase isovolumetric desorption technique has been used to assess the isotope effects in the diffusive transport parameters of hydrogen in an 8% CrWVTa reduced activation martensitic steel in the temperature range of 423-892 K and driving pressures from 4 x 10 4 - 1 x 10 5 Pa. The experiments have been run with both protium and deuterium obtaining their respective transport parameters, diffusivity (D), Sieverts' constant (K S ), permeability (Φ), trap site density (η t ) and the trapping activation energy (E t ). Isotope effects on steel are analysed and compared with α-iron. A new way to derive more accurate tritium transport parameters is proposed. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of Using Caged Clams to Monitor Contaminated Groundwater Exposure in the Near-Shore Environment of the Hanford Site 300 Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Kyle B.; Poston, Ted M.; Tiller, Brett L.

    2008-01-31

    The Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) has been identified as an indicator species for locating and monitoring contaminated groundwater in the Columbia River. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a field study to explore the use of caged Asiatic clams to monitor contaminated groundwater upwelling in the 300 Area near-shore environment and assess seasonal differences in uranium uptake in relation to seasonal flow regimes of the Columbia River. Additional objectives included examining the potential effects of uranium accumulation on growth, survival, and tissue condition of the clams. This report documents the field conditions and procedures, laboratory procedures, and statistical analyses used in collecting samples and processing the data. Detailed results are presented and illustrated, followed by a discussion comparing uranium concentrations in Asiatic clams collected at the 300 Area and describing the relationship between river discharge, groundwater indicators, and uranium in clams. Growth and survival, histology, and other sources of environmental variation also are discussed.

  14. Ocean Acidification Affects the Cytoskeleton, Lysozymes, and Nitric Oxide of Hemocytes: A Possible Explanation for the Hampered Phagocytosis in Blood Clams, Tegillarca granosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wenhao; Rong, Jiahuan; Zha, Shanjie; Yan, Maocang; Fang, Jun; Liu, Guangxu

    2018-01-01

    An enormous amount of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) has been dissolved into the ocean, leading to a lower pH and changes in the chemical properties of seawater, which has been termed ocean acidification (OA). The impacts of p CO 2 -driven acidification on immunity have been revealed recently in various marine organisms. However, the mechanism causing the reduction in phagocytosis still remains unclear. Therefore, the impacts of p CO 2 -driven OA at present and near-future levels (pH values of 8.1, 7.8, and 7.4) on the rate of phagocytosis, the abundance of cytoskeleton components, the levels of nitric oxide (NO), and the concentration and activity of lysozymes (LZM) of hemocytes were investigated in a commercial bivalve species, the blood clam ( Tegillarca granosa ). In addition, the effects of OA on the expression of genes regulating actin skeleton and nitric oxide synthesis 2 ( NOS2 ) were also analyzed. The results obtained showed that the phagocytic rate, cytoskeleton component abundance, concentration and activity of LZM of hemocytes were all significantly reduced after a 2-week exposure to the future OA scenario of a pH of 7.4. On the contrary, a remarkable increase in the concentration of NO compared to that of the control was detected in clams exposed to OA. Furthermore, the expression of genes regulating the actin cytoskeleton and NOS were significantly up-regulated after OA exposure. Though the mechanism causing phagocytosis seemed to be complicated based on the results obtained in the present study and those reported previously, our results suggested that OA may reduce the phagocytosis of hemocytes by (1) decreasing the abundance of cytoskeleton components and therefore hampering the cytoskeleton-mediated process of engulfment, (2) reducing the concentration and activity of LZM and therefore constraining the degradation of the engulfed pathogen through an oxygen-independent pathway, and (3) inducing the production of NO, which may negatively

  15. Verification of the effect of surface preparation on Hot Isostatic Pressing diffusion bonding joints of CLAM steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yanyun [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Li, Chunjing, E-mail: chunjing.li@fds.org.cn [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Huang, Bo; Liu, Shaojun [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Huang, Qunying [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) diffusion bonding with CLAM steel is the primary candidate fabrication technique for the first wall (FW) of DFLL-TBM. Surface state is one of the key factors for the joints quality. The effect of surface state prepared with grinder and miller on HIP diffusion bonding joints of CLAM steel was investigated. HIP diffusion bonding was performed at 140 MPa and 1373 K within 3 h. The mechanical properties of the joints were investigated with instrumented Charpy V-notch impact tests and the microstructures of the joints were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the milled samples with fine surface roughness were more suitable for CLAM steel HIP diffusion bonding.

  16. Size-dependent effects of low level cadmium and zinc exposure on the metabolome of the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spann, Nicole, E-mail: nicole.spann@web.de [Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ (United Kingdom); Aldridge, David C., E-mail: da113@cam.ac.uk [Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ (United Kingdom); Griffin, Julian L., E-mail: jlg40@mole.bio.cam.ac.uk [Sanger Building, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, 80 Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1GA (United Kingdom); Jones, Oliver A.H., E-mail: o.jones@gmail.com [Sanger Building, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, 80 Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1GA (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: Small and large Corbicula fluminea were exposed to cadmium and zinc spiked sediment. Metabolomic changes in the freshwater clams were determined by NMR and GC-MS. Metabolic perturbations were related to amino acid and energy related metabolism. Small and large clams were differentiated by their metabolic composition. Size classes showed opposite responses to metal stress. - Abstract: The toxic effects of low level metal contamination in sediments are currently poorly understood. We exposed different sized Asian clams, Corbicula fluminea, to sediment spiked with environmentally relevant concentrations of either zinc, cadmium or a zinc-cadmium mixture for one week. This freshwater bivalve is well suited for sediment toxicity tests as it lives partly buried in the sediment and utilises sediment particles as a food resource. After one week, the whole tissue composition of low molecular weight metabolites was analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The condition index (ratio of tissue dry weight to volume inside the shell valves) was also measured. Small and large clams were clearly differentiated by their metabolic composition and the two size classes showed opposite responses to the mixture spiked sediment. No effects of zinc alone on the metabolome were found and cadmium only influenced the smaller size class. The main perturbations were seen in amino acid and energy metabolism, with small clams using amino acids as an energy resource and larger clams primarily drawing on their larger storage reserves of carbohydrates. Our study demonstrates that metabolomics is a useful technique to test for low level toxicity which does not manifest in mortality or condition index changes. The differing effects between the two size classes stress that it is important to consider age/size when conducting metabolomic and ecotoxicology assessments, since testing for the effects on only one size class makes

  17. Size-dependent effects of low level cadmium and zinc exposure on the metabolome of the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spann, Nicole; Aldridge, David C.; Griffin, Julian L.; Jones, Oliver A.H.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: Small and large Corbicula fluminea were exposed to cadmium and zinc spiked sediment. Metabolomic changes in the freshwater clams were determined by NMR and GC–MS. Metabolic perturbations were related to amino acid and energy related metabolism. Small and large clams were differentiated by their metabolic composition. Size classes showed opposite responses to metal stress. - Abstract: The toxic effects of low level metal contamination in sediments are currently poorly understood. We exposed different sized Asian clams, Corbicula fluminea, to sediment spiked with environmentally relevant concentrations of either zinc, cadmium or a zinc–cadmium mixture for one week. This freshwater bivalve is well suited for sediment toxicity tests as it lives partly buried in the sediment and utilises sediment particles as a food resource. After one week, the whole tissue composition of low molecular weight metabolites was analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). The condition index (ratio of tissue dry weight to volume inside the shell valves) was also measured. Small and large clams were clearly differentiated by their metabolic composition and the two size classes showed opposite responses to the mixture spiked sediment. No effects of zinc alone on the metabolome were found and cadmium only influenced the smaller size class. The main perturbations were seen in amino acid and energy metabolism, with small clams using amino acids as an energy resource and larger clams primarily drawing on their larger storage reserves of carbohydrates. Our study demonstrates that metabolomics is a useful technique to test for low level toxicity which does not manifest in mortality or condition index changes. The differing effects between the two size classes stress that it is important to consider age/size when conducting metabolomic and ecotoxicology assessments, since testing for the effects on only one size

  18. Recruitment of mud clam Polymesoda erosa (Solander, 1876 in a mangrove habitat of Chorao island, Goa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Clemente

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Habitat-specific settlement success results either from active habitat selection or differential mortality after non-selective settlement. The mud clam Polymesoda erosa (Solander, 1876 is an ecologically and economically important benthic invertebrate with high abundance in the mangrove forests of Chorao Island, Goa, India. A one-year study (Jul 2004-Jul 2005 was conducted to characterize the patterns of post-larval settlement and survival of P. erosa in the mangrove habitat. The mean density of settling post-larvae was 28 no.m-2 with a majority of settlers during Sept 04. The density of adult clams in the landward zone ranged from 7-12 no.m-2 (mean: 9 ± 6 sd; n=122. In the seaward region, adults were completely absent at the low tide level. Higher densities of juveniles observed at the low- and mid-tide levels were assumed to be due to frequent inundation which allowed the young individuals to feed adequately and attain the critical sizes at which vulnerability to physical and biological constraints is substantially reduced, whereas, at high-tide level, increased desiccation may account for the mortality of settlers. It is speculated that initially the settlers settle according to the hydrodynamic conditions for sedimentation; however, adult survival is affected by their recruitment in a suitable habitat (e.g. substrates near Avicennia sp.. Thus, habitat dependent viability during the post-settlement phase could be the best explanation for the non-random, patchy distribution of P. erosa observed in the Chorao mangrove swamp.Um assentamento larval bem sucedido resulta da seleção ativa do habitat pelas larvas ou da mortalidade diferencial destas após o assentamento não seletivo. Nos manguezais da ilha Chorao, Goa, India, a ostra do lodo Polymesoda erosa (Solander, 1876 é um invertebrado muito abundante e de importância econômica. O presente trabalho, realizado durante um ano (julho de 2004 a julho de 2005, visou caracterizar os padr

  19. Presence of enteric viruses, bioaccumulation and stability in Anomalocardia brasiliana clams (Gmelin, 1791).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Doris Sobral Marques; Dominot, Ana Ferreira Ávila; Moresco, Vanessa; Barardi, Célia Regina Monte

    2018-02-02

    Bivalve mollusks are filter feeders and may accumulate human pathogens in their tissues. Many studies demonstrated human diseases associated with bivalve consumption, especially oysters. Anomalocardia brasiliana clams are distributed along the Brazilian coastal area and are an exotic ingredient for some typical dishes in Brazil. Even though there are several reports describing the contamination of oysters and mussels with human pathogens, there is a lack of studies reporting contamination of A. brasiliana with human pathogens. An evaluation of natural microbiological contamination in A. brasiliana samples over a period of 18months (November 2014 to April 2016) showed that the bacteria indices were in accordance with Brazilian regulations (E. colitime period. NoV GI was the most adsorbed virus after 24h. HAV concentration was time, reaching its highest values after 24h (times (0, 1, 1.5, 3 and 5mins), viral infectivity was evaluated using ICC-et-RT-qPCR. The temperature inside the DT remained time and after 5min of cooking the HAdV reached a decay of 90% (1 log 10 ). The results showed a real warn to the consumers that can be exposed to infectious human viruses if they eat these clams improperly cooked. HAV was the most detected virus in these animals, which may lead to outbreaks. A. brasiliana exhibited distinct behavior in NoV GI bioaccumulation and persistence, pointing to the need for further studies about the cellular ligands used by these viruses to become attached to these clams. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. ALAM/CLAM and some applications of computer algebra systems to problems in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell-Clark, R.A.

    1973-01-01

    This paper is divided into three parts. Part A presents a historical survey of the development of the system, a brief description of its features and, finally, a critical assessment. ALAM and CLAM have been used in many problems in General Relativity; the vast majority of these belong to a set of standard calculations termed ''metric applications''. However, four large non-standard applications have been attempted successfully and these are described in Part B. CAMAL is the only other system which has been used extensively for work in relativity. CAMAL has played an important role in two research projects and details of these are given in Part C

  1. Expression of cyp1a protein in the freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vranković Jelena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the expression of CYP1A in the foot, gill and visceral mass of the freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea in relation to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs exposure. Different PCBs congeners were found in the foot and visceral mass, while the expression of CYP1A was observed only in the visceral mass. However the level of CYP1A expression in the visceral mass was not related to the level of PCBs present in the tissue. Our results indicate a higher rate of biotransformation and lower threshold of CYP1A induction in the visceral mass compared with other tissues.

  2. Reproductive Cycle of Hard Clam, Meretrix lyrata Sowerby, 1851 (Bivalvia: Veneridae) from Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamli, Hadi; Idris, Mohd Hanafi; Rajaee, Amy Halimah; Kamal, Abu Hena Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    A study of the reproductive cycle of the hard clam, Meretrix lyrata, was documented based on histological observation and Gonad Index (GI). Samples were taken from estuarine waters of the Buntal River in Sarawak, Malaysia. The gonad of M. lyrata started to develop in September 2013. Gametogenesis continued to develop until the maturation and spawning stage from February to April 2014. The GI pattern for a one-year cycle showed a significant correlation with chlorophyll a. The corresponding GI with chlorophyll a suggested that the development of the reproductive cycle of M. lyrata required a high amount of food to increase gametogenesis.

  3. Development of Continuous Galvanization-compatible Martensitic Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Y. F.; Song, T. J.; Kim, Han S.; De Cooman [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, J. H. [POSCO Gwangyang Works, Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The development of martensitic grades which can be processed in continuous galvanizing lines requires the reduction of the oxides formed on the steel during the hot dip process. This reduction mechanism was investigated in detail by means of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) of cross-sectional samples. Annealing of a martensitic steel in a 10% H{sub 2} + N{sub 2} atmosphere with the dew point of -35 .deg. C resulted in the formation of a thin c-xMno.SiO{sub 2} (x>1) oxide film and amorphous a-xMnO.SiO{sub 2} oxide particles on the surface. During the hot dip galvanizing in Zn-0.13%Al, the thin c-xMnO.SiO{sub 2} (x>1) oxide films was reduced by the Al. The a-xMnO.SiO{sub 2} (x<0.9) and a-SiO{sub 2} (x>1) oxide film was also reduced and the amorphous a-xMnO.SiO{sub 2} and a-SiO{sub 2} particles were embedded in the Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5-x}Zn{sub x} inhibition layer formed at the steel/coating interface during hot dipping. The results clearly show that Al in the liquid Zn bath can reduce the crystalline c-xMn.SiO{sub 2} (x>1) oxides but not the amorphous a-xMnO.SiO{sub 2} (x<0.9) and a-SiO{sub 2} oxides. These oxides remain embedded in the Zn layer or in the inhibition layer, making it possible to apply a Zn or Zn-alloy coating on martensitic steel by hot dipping. The hot dipping process was also found to deteriorate the mechanical properties, independently of the Zn bath composition.

  4. Model for the interaction between interface migration and carbon diffusion during annealing of martensite-austenite microstructures in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santofimia, M.J.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between carbon partitioning from martensite to austenite and interface migration during annealing of martensite-austenite microstructures is modeled, assuming the same chemical potential of carbon in martensite and austenite at the interface and allowing the motion of the phase interface when a free-energy difference occurs. The simulations show that the motion of the martensite-austenite interface can be significant and can takes place in either direction

  5. Martensite and bainite in steels: transformation mechanism and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H.

    1997-01-01

    Many essential properties of iron alloys depend on what actually happens when one allotropic form gives way to another, i.e. on the mechanism of phase change. The dependence of the mechanical properties on the atomic mechanism by which bainite and martensite grow is the focus of this paper. The discussion is illustrated in the context of some common engineering design parameters, and with a brief example of the inverse problem in which the mechanism may be a function of the mechanical properties. (orig.)

  6. Characteristics of modified martensitic stainless steel surfaces under tribocorrosion conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozing, Goran; Marusic, Vlatko; Alar, Vesna

    2017-01-01

    Stainless steel samples were tested in the laboratory and under real conditions of tribocorrosion wear. Electrochemical tests were also carried out to verify the corrosion resistance of modified steel surfaces. Metallographic analysis and hardness testing were conducted on stainless steel samples X20Cr13 and X17CrNi16 2. The possibilities of applications of modified surfaces of the selected steels were investigated by testing the samples under real wear conditions. The results have shown that the induction hardened and subsequently nitrided martensitic steels achieved an average wear resistance of up to three orders of magnitude higher as compared to the delivered condition.

  7. Physical metallurgy of BATMAN II Ti-bearing martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilloni, L.; Attura, F.; Calza-Bini, A.; Santis, G. de; Filacchioni, G.

    1998-01-01

    Seven laboratory experimental casts of 7-9% Cr Ti-bearing martensitic steels were obtained via VIM process. Plates of 25 mm thickness were produced by hot rolling. On each cast CCT diagrams and critical temperatures were determined. Several austenitizing treatments were performed to study the grain size evolution. The effect of microstructure on impact properties were finally investigated. This paper discusses the role of chemical composition on microstructural and physical properties and shows the beneficial effect either of low-temperature austenitizing or double-austenitizing steps on impact properties. (orig.)

  8. Characterization of a Laser Surface-Treated Martensitic Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    S.R. Al-Sayed; A.A. Hussein; A.A. Nofal; S.I. Hassab Elnaby; H. Elgazzar

    2017-01-01

    Laser surface treatment was carried out on AISI 416 machinable martensitic stainless steel containing 0.225 wt.% sulfur. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used. The aim was to compare the physical and chemical properties achieved by this type of selective surface treatment with those achieved by the conventional treatment. Laser power of different values (700 and 1000 W) with four corresponding different laser scanning speeds (0.5, 1, 2, and 3 m?min?1) was adopted to reach the op...

  9. Characteristics of modified martensitic stainless steel surfaces under tribocorrosion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozing, Goran [Osijek Univ. (Croatia). Chair of Mechanical Engineering; Marusic, Vlatko [Osijek Univ. (Croatia). Dept. of Engineering Materials; Alar, Vesna [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Dept. Materials

    2017-04-01

    Stainless steel samples were tested in the laboratory and under real conditions of tribocorrosion wear. Electrochemical tests were also carried out to verify the corrosion resistance of modified steel surfaces. Metallographic analysis and hardness testing were conducted on stainless steel samples X20Cr13 and X17CrNi16 2. The possibilities of applications of modified surfaces of the selected steels were investigated by testing the samples under real wear conditions. The results have shown that the induction hardened and subsequently nitrided martensitic steels achieved an average wear resistance of up to three orders of magnitude higher as compared to the delivered condition.

  10. Evolution of microstructure in stainless martensitic steel for seamless tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyshmintsev, I. Yu.; Bityukov, S. M.; Pastukhov, V. I.; Danilov, S. V.; Vedernikova, L. O.; Lobanov, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with orientation analysis by the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) method is used to study microstructures and textures formed in the 0.08C-13Cr-3Ni-Mo-V-Nb steel through seamless tube production route: after hot deformation by extrusion; after quenching from various temperatures and subsequent high tempering. It is shown that the martensitic microstructure formed both after hot deformation and after quenching is characterized by the presence of deformation crystallographic texture, which is predetermined by the texture of austenite. The effect of heat treatment on texture, packet refinement, lath width, precipitation of carbides and Charpy impact energy is analyzed.

  11. The morphology of lath martensite: a new perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koumatos Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical framework is proposed to predict the features of the (5 5 7 lath transformation in low-carbon steels based on energy minimisation. This theory generates a one-parameter family of possible habit plane normals and a selection mechanism then identifies the (5 5 7 normals as those arising from a deformation with small atomic movement and maximal compatibility. While the calculations bear some resemblance to those of double shear theories, the assumptions and conclusions are different. Interestingly, the predicted microstructure morphology resembles that of plate martensite, in the sense that a type of twinning mechanism is involved.

  12. Comparative Study of Hardening Mechanisms During Aging of a 304 Stainless Steel Containing α'-Martensite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S. W.; Kang, U. G.; Choi, J. Y.; Nam, W. J.

    2012-09-01

    Strain aging and hardening behaviors of a 304 stainless steel containing deformation-induced martensite were investigated by examining mechanical properties and microstructural evolution for different aging temperature and time. Introduced age hardening mechanisms of a cold rolled 304 stainless steel were the additional formation of α'-martensite, hardening of α'-martensite, and hardening of deformed austenite. The increased amount of α'-martensite at an aging temperature of 450 °C confirmed the additional formation of α'-martensite as a hardening mechanism in a cold rolled 304 stainless steel. Additionally, the increased hardness in both α'-martensite and austenite phases with aging temperature proved that hardening of both α'-martensite and austenite phases would be effective as hardening mechanisms in cold rolled and aged 304 stainless steels. The results suggested that among hardening mechanisms, hardening of an α'-martensite phase, including the diffusion of interstitial solute carbon atoms to dislocations and the precipitation of fine carbide particles would become a major hardening mechanism during aging of cold rolled 304 stainless steels.

  13. Martensitic transformation and stress partitioning in a high-carbon steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg; Pantleon, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Martensitic transformation in a high-carbon steel was investigated with (synchrotron) X-ray diffraction at sub-zero Celsius temperature. In situ angular X-ray diffraction was applied to: (i) quantitatively determine the fractions of retained austenite and martensite; and (ii) measure the evolutio...

  14. Modelling the interaction between plasticity and the austenite-martensite transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouznetsova, V.G.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2007-01-01

    Many advanced steels, such as high strength steels and TRIP steels, owe their excellent combination of strength and ductility to the complex microstructural behaviour involving the austenite to martensite phase transformation. In this paper a physically-based model for martensitic transformation

  15. Effects of high magnetic field on martensitic transformation behavior and structure in Fe-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuka, H.; Wada, H.; Ghosh, G.

    2000-01-01

    Effects of magnetic field on lath-type martensitic transformation behavior and the reverse transformation behavior from lath math martensite to austenite have been investigated in 18Ni maraging steel. It was found that the reverse transformation temperature during heating is increased by magnetic field. Reverse transformation behavior during isothermal holding was also found to be retarded by magnetic field. (orig.)

  16. A study on martensitic structure in Fe-4Cr-0.4C steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    Morphology, dependence of prior austenite grain size and packet size upon austenitizing temperature, distribution of lath width, and habit plane of martensitic structure in Fe-4Cr-0.4C steel has been studied by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results obtained are as follows. 1) Optical microstructures of martensitic Fe-4Cr-0.4C steel consist of lath martensite and lens martensite. Also the four types of morphology are observed by electron microscopy. The most common morphologies are a regular paralleled martensite and an irregular dovetailed lath martensite, while the remainder of microstructures consists mainly of groups of internally twinned martensite and autotempered laths. 2) Prior austenite grain size and packet size increased with austenizing temperature, and also the numbers of lath contained in a prior austenite grain or a packet are increased with austenizing temperature. 3) The mean width of lath in Fe-4Cr-0.4C steel is about 0.23μm and most of lath widths are below 0.5μm. 4) Martensite habit plane of Fe-4Cr-0.4C steel is nearly [110]α'. (author)

  17. On the Nature of Internal Interfaces in Tempered Martensite Ferritic Steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dronhofer, A.; Pešička, J.; Dlouhý, Antonín; Eggeler, G.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 5 (2003), s. 511-520 ISSN 0044-3093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/99/1172 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : Tempered martensite ferritic steels * martensite variants * orientation imaging Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.637, year: 2003

  18. The Investigation of Strain-Induced Martensite Reverse Transformation in AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cios, G.; Tokarski, T.; Żywczak, A.; Dziurka, R.; Stępień, M.; Gondek, Ł.; Marciszko, M.; Pawłowski, B.; Wieczerzak, K.; Bała, P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive study on the strain-induced martensitic transformation and reversion transformation of the strain-induced martensite in AISI 304 stainless steel using a number of complementary techniques such as dilatometry, calorimetry, magnetometry, and in-situ X-ray diffraction, coupled with high-resolution microstructural transmission Kikuchi diffraction analysis. Tensile deformation was applied at temperatures between room temperature and 213 K (-60 °C) in order to obtain a different volume fraction of strain-induced martensite (up to 70 pct). The volume fraction of the strain-induced martensite, measured by the magnetometric method, was correlated with the total elongation, hardness, and linear thermal expansion coefficient. The thermal expansion coefficient, as well as the hardness of the strain-induced martensitic phase was evaluated. The in-situ thermal treatment experiments showed unusual changes in the kinetics of the reverse transformation (α' → γ). The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the reverse transformation may be stress assisted—strains inherited from the martensitic transformation may increase its kinetics at the lower annealing temperature range. More importantly, the transmission Kikuchi diffraction measurements showed that the reverse transformation of the strain-induced martensite proceeds through a displacive, diffusionless mechanism, maintaining the Kurdjumov-Sachs crystallographic relationship between the martensite and the reverted austenite. This finding is in contradiction to the results reported by other researchers for a similar alloy composition.

  19. Microstructural development during laser cladding of low-C martensitic stainless steel.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Heat input plays an important role in the microstructural development of 12%Cr martensitic stainless steel. The microstructure of low-C 12%Cr martensitic stainless steel resulting from laser cladding was investigated. For 410L a ferritic...

  20. On the multiplication of dislocations during martensitic transformations in NiTi shape memory alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Simon, T.; Kröger, A.; Somsen, Ch.; Dlouhý, Antonín; Eggeler, G.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 5 (2010), s. 1850-1860 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/1913 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : NiTi * Martensitic transformations * Dislocation multiplication mechanism * Martensite variants * Dislocations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.781, year: 2010

  1. Kinetics of martensitic transformations in magnetic field or under hydrostatic pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Kakeshita, Jung-min Nam and Takashi Fukuda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently constructed a phenomenological theory that provides a unified explanation for athermal and isothermal martensitic transformation processes. On the basis of this theory, we predict some properties of martensitic transformation and confirm them experimentally using some Fe-based alloys and a Ni–Co–Mn–In magnetic shape memory alloy.

  2. Self-stabilization of untransformed austenite by hydrostatic pressure via martensitic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Nobuo; Ishibashi, Yuji; Tsuchiyama, Toshihiro; Takaki, Setsuo

    2016-01-01

    For improving the understanding of austenite stability in steel, hydrostatic pressure in untransformed austenite that is generated via martensitic transformation was evaluated from macro- and micro-viewpoints, and its effect on austenite stability was investigated in a Fe-27%Ni austenitic alloy. X-ray diffractometry revealed that the lattice parameter of untransformed austenite is continuously decreased via martensitic transformation only when martensite becomes the dominant phase in the microstructure. This suggests that the untransformed austenite is isotropically compressed by the surrounding martensite grains, i.e., hydrostatic pressure is generated in untransformed austenite dynamically at a later stage of martensitic transformation. On the other hand, microscopic strain mapping using the electron backscatter diffraction technique indicated that a finer untransformed austenite grain has a higher hydrostatic pressure, while a high density of dislocations is also introduced in untransformed austenite near the austenite/martensite interface because of lattice-invariant shear characterized by non-thermoelastic martensitic transformation. Furthermore, it was experimentally demonstrated that the hydrostatic pressure stabilizes the untransformed austenite; however, the austenite stabilization effect alone is not large enough to fully explain a large gap between martensite start and finish temperatures in steel.

  3. Plastic flow properties and fracture toughness characterization of unirradiated and irradiated tempered martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaetig, P.; Bonade, R.; Odette, G.R.; Rensman, J.W.; Campitelli, E.N.; Mueller, P.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the plastic flow properties at low and high temperature of the tempered martensitic steel Eurofer97. We show that below room temperature, where the Peierls friction on the screw dislocation is active, it is necessary to modify the usual Taylor's equation between the flow stress and the square root of the dislocation density and to include explicitly the Peierls friction stress in the equation. Then, we compare the fracture properties of the Eurofer97 with those of the F82H steel. A clear difference of the fracture toughness-temperature behavior was found in the low transition region. The results indicate a sharper transition for Eurofer97 than for the F82H. Finally, the shift of the median toughness-temperature curve of the F82H steel was determined after two neutron irradiations performed in the High Flux Reactor in Petten

  4. Gas metal arc weldability of 1.5 GPa grade martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Insung; Yun, Hyeonsang; Kim, Dongcheol; Kang, Munjin; Kim, Young-Min

    2018-01-01

    The gas metal arc weldability of 1.5 GPa grade martensitic (MART) steel was evaluated using both inverter direct current (DC) and DC pulse power type welders, under conditions of different welding currents, welding speeds, and shielding gasses. By investigating the bead appearance, tensile strength, and arc stability, it was determined that DC pulse power is better than inverter DC power for arc welding of 1.3 mm thick 1.5 GPa grade MART steel. Further, from the results of the weldability for various shielding gases, it was determined that mixed shielding gas is more effective for welding 1.5 GPa grade MART steel than is pure inert gas (Ar) or active (CO2) gas. In the case of pure shielding gas, no sound bead was formed under any conditions. However, when the mixed shielding gas was used, sound and fine beads were obtained.

  5. Effect of thermal cycling on martensitic transformation and mechanical strengthening of stainless steels – A phase-field study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yeddu, Hemantha Kumar; Shaw, Brian A.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2017-01-01

    A 3D elastoplastic phase-field model is used to study the effect of thermal cycling on martensitic transformationas well as on mechanical strengthening of both austenite and martensite in stainless steel. The results show that with an increasing number of thermal cycles, martensite becomes more...

  6. In Situ Study of Phase Transformations during Non-Isothermal Tempering of Bainitic and Martensitic Microstructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hesamodin Talebi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Phase transformations during non-isothermal tempering of bainitic or martensitic microstructures obtained after quenching of a medium-carbon low-alloy steel was studied. The microstructures correspond to different locations of an as-quenched large-sized forged ingot used as a die material in the automotive industry. High-resolution dilatometry experiments were conducted to simulate the heat treatment process, as well as to investigate different phenomena occurring during non-isothermal tempering. The microstructures were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Dilatometry analyses demonstrated that tempering behavior varied significantly from bainitic to martensitic microstructures. Retained austenite, which exists between bainitic ferrite sheaves, decomposes to lower bainite causing a remarkable volume increase. It was found that this decomposition finishes below 386 °C. By contrast, martensite tempering was accompanied with a volume decrease due to the decomposition of medium-carbon martensite to low carbon martensite and carbides.

  7. Influence of stress on martensitic transformation and mechanical properties of hot stamped AHSS parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.; Li, X.D.; Zhao, K.M.; Wang, C.Y.; Zheng, G.J.; Hu, P.; Dong, H.

    2015-01-01

    Non-isothermal tension and compression tests of 22MnB5 boron steel were carried out in this study. How different stress state influences the martensitic transformation of advanced high strength steel (AHSS) parts was analyzed. The analysis reveals that the martensitic transformation starting temperature (M s ) changes with different stress states. Specifically, the M s temperature rises with increasing tensile stress, however, it rises first and then drops with increasing compressive stress. Moreover, a higher initial forming temperature leads to a higher M s temperature under the same stress. Simulation of an actual hot-formed AHSS B-pillar together with the microscopic metallography, hardness and martensitic content shows that in higher tensile stress dominated area, the martensitic content and hardness are usually higher than in other areas. Although the stress can promote the M s temperature, a lower cooling rate may lead to less martensite fraction

  8. Numerical simulation of transformation-induced microscopic residual stress in ferrite-martensite lamellar steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, Y; Inao, A; Mochizuki, M; Toyoda, M

    2009-01-01

    The effect of transformation-induced microscopic residual stress on fatigue crack propagation behavior of ferrite-martensite lamellar steel was discussed. Fatigue tests of prestrained and non-prestrained specimens were performed. Inflections and branches at ferrite-martensite boundaries were observed in the non-prestrained specimens. On the other hand, less inflections and branches were found in the prestrained specimens. The experimental results showed that the transformation induced microscopic residual stress has influence on the fatigue crack propagation behavior. To estimate the microscopic residual, a numerical simulation method for the calculation of microscopic residual stress stress induced by martensitic transformation was performed. The simulation showed that compressive residual stress was generated in martensite layer, and the result agree with the experimental result that inflections and branches were observed at ferrite-martensite boundaries.

  9. Morphology and substructure of lath martensites in dilute Zr--Nb alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, D.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Banerjee, S.

    2000-01-01

    The morphology and substructure of lath martensites formed in β quenched dilute Zr--Nb alloys are described. The laths are arranged in a nearly parallel manner within any given colony or packet. Packets of alternately twin related laths and clusters of three mutually twin related lath martensite variants have been observed and the twinning plane is of {1 anti 101} H type. With increasing niobium content a continuous transition from large colonies of lath martensites, through smaller lath colonies, to individual plates of the acicular martensites occurs. The lath-lath interface consists of regularly spaced parallel arrays of dislocations of type. The habit plane traces of lath martensite lie close to {334} type poles and the operating lattice invariant shear mode is { anti 1101} H H shear system. This result is consistent with results predicted by the phenomenological theory. The preferred two and three habit plane variant grouping clustering is explained on the basis of self-accommodation effects. (orig.)

  10. Kinetics of anomalous multi-step formation of lath martensite in steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, Matteo; Pantleon, Karen; Reich, Michael; Kessler, Olaf; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2014-01-01

    A steel containing 16 wt.% Cr, 5 wt.% Ni and 3 wt.% Cu was transformed into martensite by applying isochronal, i.e. constant rate, cooling followed by isothermal holding. The formation of martensite was monitored with dilatometry. A series of retardations and accelerations of the transformation was observed during isochronal cooling for cooling rates ranging from 1.5 to 50 K min −1 . The cooling rate in the isochronal stage was observed to influence the transformation rate in the isothermal stage. Electron backscatter diffraction was applied to determine the morphology of the martensite, which was of lath type, and to investigate the microstructure of the material. No influence of the cooling rate on the scale of the microstructure was observed. The series of retardations and accelerations of the transformation is interpreted in terms of the combined effect of the strain and interfacial energy introduced in the system during martensite formation, which stabilizes austenite, and autocatalytic nucleation of martensite

  11. Structural analysis and martensitic transformation in equiatomic HfPd alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisada, S.; Matsuda, M.; Takashima, K.; Yamabe-Mitarai, Y.

    2018-02-01

    We investigated the crystal structure and the martensitic transformation in equiatomic HfPd alloy. The analysis of the crystal structure by electron diffraction and Rietveld refinement using X-ray diffraction data indicates that the space group of the martensitic phase is Cmcm, and the lattice parameters are a = 0.329 nm, b = 1.021 nm, and c = 0.438 nm. Martensitic variants are composed of the plate-like morphology of several hundred nm, and the boundaries between the variants have (021)Cmcm twin relations. This (021)Cmcm twin boundary seems to be sharp without ledge and steps. Differential scanning calorimetry measurement indicates that each martensitic transformation temperature is determined to be Ms = 819 K, Mf = 794 K, As = 928 K, and Af = 954 K. Based on the dimension change using a thermo-mechanical analyzer, the expansion and shrinkage of the sample occurred with the forward and reverse martensitic transformation, respectively.

  12. Role of magnetism on the martensitic transformation in Ni–Mn-based magnetic shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez-Alarcos, V.; Recarte, V.; Pérez-Landazábal, J.I.; Gómez-Polo, C.; Rodríguez-Velamazán, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of magnetism on the martensitic structural transformation has been analyzed through the evolution of the transformation temperatures of several Ni–Mn–Ga and Ni–Mn–In alloys subjected to high-temperature quenching and post-quench annealing thermal treatments. It is found that the atomic order variations associated with the thermal treatments affect the structural transformation in different ways depending on the character of the magnetic ordering in the austenitic and the martensitic phases. In particular, regardless of composition, the variation in the atomic order affects the martensitic transformation temperature only in those alloys in which at least one of the structural phases show magnetic order at the transformation temperature, whereas those transformations taking place between paramagnetic phases remain unaffected. The observed behaviors are explained in terms of the effect of the magnetic exchange coupling variations on the free energy difference between austenite and martensite. The results confirm the key role of magnetism in the martensitic transformation.

  13. Effect of solute Cu on ductile-to-brittle behavior of martensitic Fe-8% Ni alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junaidi Syarif; Tsuchiyama, Toshihiro; Takaki, Setsuo

    2007-01-01

    Effect of solute Cu on the ductile-to-brittle (DBT) behaviour of martensitic Fe-8mass%Ni alloy is investigated to understand the effect of solute Cu on mechanical properties of martensitic steel. The DBT behaviours of the Fe-8mass%Ni and the Fe-8mass%Ni-1mass%Cu alloys are almost the same. It is thought to be due to disappearance of the solid solution softening in the martensitic Fe-8mass%Ni-Cu alloys. The solute Cu gives small influence on temperature and strain rate dependences of yield stress and suppressing the twin deformation at lower temperature in the martensitic Fe-8mass%Ni alloy. Therefore, the DBT temperature of the martensitic Fe-8mass%Ni-Cu alloy was not shifted to lower side. (author)

  14. Role of stress-assisted martensite in the design of strong ultrafine-grained duplex steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, Hung-Wei; Ooi, Steve Woei; Eizadjou, Mehdi; Breen, Andrew; Huang, Ching-Yuan; Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H.; Ringer, Simon P.

    2015-01-01

    This work explains the occurrence of transformation-induced plasticity via stress-assisted martensite, when designing ultrafine-grained duplex steels. It is found that, when the austenite is reduced to a fine scale of about 300 nm, the initial deformation-induced microstructure can be dominated by parallel lamellae of ε martensite or mechanical twinning, which cannot efficiently provide nucleation sites for strain-induced martensite. Hence, α′ martensite nucleation occurs independently by a stress-assisted process that enhances transformation-induced plasticity in ultrafine-grained austenite. This metallurgical principle was validated experimentally by using a combination of transmission Kikuchi diffraction mapping, transmission electron microscopy and atom probe microscopy, and demonstrated theoretically by the thermodynamics model of stress-assisted martensite

  15. Tempering response to different morphologies of martensite in tensile deformation of dual-phase steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, E.; Manzoor, T.; Sarwar, M.; Arif, M.; Hussain, N.

    2011-01-01

    A low alloy steel containing 0.2% C was heat treated with three cycles of heat treatments with the aim to acquire different morphologies of martensite in dual phase microstructure. Microscopic examination revealed that the morphologies consisting of grain boundary growth, scattered laths and bulk form of martensite were obtained. These morphologies have their distinct patterns of distribution in the matrix (ferrite). In tensile properties observations the dual phase steel with bulk morphology of martensite showed minimum of ductility but high tensile strength as compared to other two morphologies. This may be due to poor alignments of bulk martensite particles along tensile axes during deformation. Tempering was employed with various holding times at 550 deg. C to induce ductility in the heat treated material. The tempering progressively increased the ductility by increasing holding time. However, tempering response to strengths and ductilities was different to all three morphologies of martensite. (author)

  16. Influence of stress on martensitic transformation and mechanical properties of hot stamped AHSS parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.; Li, X.D. [School of Automotive Engineering, National Key Laboratory of Industrial Equipment Structural Analysis, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, K.M., E-mail: kmzhao@dlut.edu.cn [School of Automotive Engineering, National Key Laboratory of Industrial Equipment Structural Analysis, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, C.Y. [Institute for Special Steels, Central Iron & Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Zheng, G.J.; Hu, P. [School of Automotive Engineering, National Key Laboratory of Industrial Equipment Structural Analysis, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Dong, H. [Institute for Special Steels, Central Iron & Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-04-01

    Non-isothermal tension and compression tests of 22MnB5 boron steel were carried out in this study. How different stress state influences the martensitic transformation of advanced high strength steel (AHSS) parts was analyzed. The analysis reveals that the martensitic transformation starting temperature (M{sub s}) changes with different stress states. Specifically, the M{sub s} temperature rises with increasing tensile stress, however, it rises first and then drops with increasing compressive stress. Moreover, a higher initial forming temperature leads to a higher M{sub s} temperature under the same stress. Simulation of an actual hot-formed AHSS B-pillar together with the microscopic metallography, hardness and martensitic content shows that in higher tensile stress dominated area, the martensitic content and hardness are usually higher than in other areas. Although the stress can promote the M{sub s} temperature, a lower cooling rate may lead to less martensite fraction.

  17. Plastic Strain Induced Damage Evolution and Martensitic Transformation in Ductile Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C

    2002-01-01

    The Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steels are well known for their ductile behaviour at cryogenic temperatures. This implies development and evolution of plastic strain fields in the stainless steel components subjected to thermo-mechanical loads at low temperatures. The evolution of plastic strain fields is usually associated with two phenomena: ductile damage and strain induced martensitic transformation. Ductile damage is described by the kinetic law of damage evolution. Here, the assumption of isotropic distribution of damage (microcracks and microvoids) in the Representative Volume Element (RVE) is made. Formation of the plastic strain induced martensite (irreversible process) leads to the presence of quasi-rigid inclusions of martensite in the austenitic matrix. The amount of martensite platelets in the RVE depends on the intensity of the plastic strain fields and on the temperature. The evolution of the volume fraction of martensite is governed by a kinetic law based on the accumulated plastic strain. Both of thes...

  18. Relationship between thermomechanical treatment, microstructure and α' martensite in stainless Fe-based shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otubo, J.; Mei, P.R.; Shinohara, A.H.; Suzuki, C.K.

    1999-01-01

    This work presents some preliminary results relating training treatment, training temperature and the formation of α' martensite to the shape recovery effect of stainless shape memory alloys. For the composition tested, the sample shows some mechanical memory (constant tensile stress at 4% strain and constant yield stress throughout the training cycles) with a very good shape recovery (95% after 4% tensile strain) at a training temperature of 873 K. Its residual strain is related to the generation of perfect dislocations only. For the sample trained at 723 K, the residual strain could be attributed to incomplete reversion of stress-induced ε martensite, in part due to the blocking effect of α' martensite and also to the generation of perfect dislocations. The influence of α' martensite on shape recovery is relative and is dependent on training temperature, and the preferential growth of α' martensite is shown to occur for large grain size. (orig.)

  19. Can the hemoglobin characteristics of vesicomyid clam species influence their distribution in deep-sea sulfide-rich sediments? A case study in the Angola Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, C.; Zorn, N.; Le Bruchec, J.; Caprais, J. C.; Potier, N.; Leize-Wagner, E.; Lallier, F. H.; Olu, K.; Andersen, A. C.

    2017-08-01

    Vesicomyids live in endosymbiosis with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and therefore need hydrogen sulfide to survive. They can nevertheless live in a wide range of sulfide and oxygen levels and depths, which may explain the exceptional diversity of this clam family in deep-sea habitats. In the Gulf of Guinea, nine species of vesicomyid clams are known to live in cold-seep areas with pockmarks from 600 to 3200 m deep, as well as in the organic-rich sediments of the Congo deep-sea fan at 5000 m deep. Our previous study showed that two species living in a giant pockmark have different oxygen carriers, suggesting different adaptations to hypoxia. Here, we studied the hemoglobin structure and oxygen affinity in three other species, Calyptogena valdiviae, Elenaconcha guiness and Abyssogena southwardae to determine whether the characteristics of their oxygen carriers contribute to their distribution in sulfide-rich sediments at a regional scale. Documenting pairwise species associations in various proportions, we give a semi-quantitative account of their local distribution and oxygen and sulfide measurements at seven sites. Mass spectrometry showed that each vesicomyid species has four intracellular monomeric hemoglobin molecules of 15-16 kDa, all differing in their molecular mass. As expected, the monomers showed no cooperativity in oxygen binding. Their oxygen affinities were very high (below 1 Torr), but differed significantly. C. valdiviae had the highest affinity and was dominant in the Harp pockmark, the site with the lowest oxygen content (half the value of fully oxygenated water). A. southwardae dominated in the Congo Lobe area, the site with the deepest sulfides. We discuss how hemoglobin may favor an active, vertical distribution of vesicomyids in sulfide-rich sediments.

  20. Genetic diversity of giant clams (Tridacna spp.) and their associated Symbiodinium in the central Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Pappas, Melissa

    2017-05-19

    The biodiversity of the Red Sea remains relatively understudied, particularly for invertebrate taxa. Documenting present patterns of biodiversity is essential for better understanding Red Sea reef ecosystems and how these ecosystems may be impacted by stressors (such as fishing and climate change). Several species of giant clams (genus Tridacna) are reported from the Red Sea, although the majority of research effort has occurred in the Gulf of Aqaba. We investigated the genetic diversity (16S rDNA) of the Tridacna species found in the central Saudi Arabian Red Sea. We also investigated the genetic diversity (ITS rDNA) of symbiotic dinoflagellates Symbiodinium associated with these clams. Samples were collected from nine reefs on a cross-shelf gradient near Thuwal, Saudi Arabia. Two species, T. squamosa and T. maxima, were recorded, with the latter being the most abundant. Tridacna squamosina, a species recently reported in the northern Red Sea, was not found, suggesting that this species is not present or is very rare in our study region. All tridacnids sampled were found to harbor Symbiodinium grouped in Clade A, considered an opportunistic, heat-tolerant symbiont group in anemones and corals. The consistent association with Clade A Symbiodinium in central Red Sea tridacnids may reflect the consequence of adaptation to the relatively extreme conditions of the Red Sea. This study contributes to an ever-growing catalog of Red Sea biodiversity and serves as important baseline information for a region experiencing dynamic pressures.

  1. Genetic diversity of giant clams (Tridacna spp.) and their associated Symbiodinium in the central Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Pappas, Melissa; He, Song; Hardenstine, Royale; Kanee, Hana; Berumen, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    The biodiversity of the Red Sea remains relatively understudied, particularly for invertebrate taxa. Documenting present patterns of biodiversity is essential for better understanding Red Sea reef ecosystems and how these ecosystems may be impacted by stressors (such as fishing and climate change). Several species of giant clams (genus Tridacna) are reported from the Red Sea, although the majority of research effort has occurred in the Gulf of Aqaba. We investigated the genetic diversity (16S rDNA) of the Tridacna species found in the central Saudi Arabian Red Sea. We also investigated the genetic diversity (ITS rDNA) of symbiotic dinoflagellates Symbiodinium associated with these clams. Samples were collected from nine reefs on a cross-shelf gradient near Thuwal, Saudi Arabia. Two species, T. squamosa and T. maxima, were recorded, with the latter being the most abundant. Tridacna squamosina, a species recently reported in the northern Red Sea, was not found, suggesting that this species is not present or is very rare in our study region. All tridacnids sampled were found to harbor Symbiodinium grouped in Clade A, considered an opportunistic, heat-tolerant symbiont group in anemones and corals. The consistent association with Clade A Symbiodinium in central Red Sea tridacnids may reflect the consequence of adaptation to the relatively extreme conditions of the Red Sea. This study contributes to an ever-growing catalog of Red Sea biodiversity and serves as important baseline information for a region experiencing dynamic pressures.

  2. Two new miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements in the genome of the clam Donax trunculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šatović, Eva; Plohl, Miroslav

    2017-10-01

    Repetitive sequences are important components of eukaryotic genomes that drive their evolution. Among them are different types of mobile elements that share the ability to spread throughout the genome and form interspersed repeats. To broaden the generally scarce knowledge on bivalves at the genome level, in the clam Donax trunculus we described two new non-autonomous DNA transposons, miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs), named DTC M1 and DTC M2. Like other MITEs, they are characterized by their small size, their A + T richness, and the presence of terminal inverted repeats (TIRs). DTC M1 and DTC M2 are 261 and 286 bp long, respectively, and in addition to TIRs, both of them contain a long imperfect palindrome sequence in their central parts. These elements are present in complete and truncated versions within the genome of the clam D. trunculus. The two new MITEs share only structural similarity, but lack any nucleotide sequence similarity to each other. In a search for related elements in databases, blast search revealed within the Crassostrea gigas genome a larger element sharing sequence similarity only to DTC M1 in its TIR sequences. The lack of sequence similarity with any previously published mobile elements indicates that DTC M1 and DTC M2 elements may be unique to D. trunculus.

  3. Fishery of the short-necked clam Paphia undulata in Southern Negros Occidental, Central Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Villarta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study documents the fishery of the short-necked clam Paphia undulata in coastal waters of southern Negros Occidental. Catch and effort estimates were determined based on daily records of compressor divers gathered between February-July 2008 in Himamaylan City and July 2008-May 2009 in the town of Hinigaran. Fishing and marketing practices in both areas were also documented and population biology information noted.Compared to earlier conditions, present fishing patterns show a worsened stage of overexploitation primarily characterized by collection of predominantly small and immature (mostly <45 mm shell lengths sizes. Intensity/duration and location of fishing also varied due to both abundance and demand factors.The difference in sizes of clams and the varying fishing durations in each area suggest a non-uniform pattern of settlement resulting most likely from differential larval recruitment, the likely factors causing the local boom and bust fishery. The larger and long term extent of the effect of these factors can only be further investigated by parallel 2-3 year fishery-dependent and -independent surveys

  4. Deformation twinning in irradiated ferritic/martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Dai, Y.; Spätig, P.

    2018-04-01

    Two different ferritic/martensitic steels were tensile tested to gain insight into the mechanisms of embrittlement induced by the combined effects of displacement damage and helium after proton/neutron irradiation in SINQ, the Swiss spallation neutron source. The irradiation conditions were in the range: 15.8-19.8 dpa (displacement per atom) with 1370-1750 appm He at 245-300 °C. All the samples fractured in brittle mode with intergranular or cleavage fracture surfaces when tested at room temperature (RT) or 300 °C. After tensile test, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was employed to investigate the deformation microstructures. TEM-lamella samples were extracted directly below the intergranular fracture surfaces or cleavage surfaces by using the focused ion beam technique. Deformation twinning was observed in irradiated specimens at high irradiation dose. Only twins with {112} plane were observed in all of the samples. The average thickness of twins is about 40 nm. Twins initiated at the fracture surface, became gradually thinner with distance away from the fracture surface and finally stopped in the matrix. Novel features such as twin-precipitate interactions, twin-grain boundary and/or twin-lath boundary interactions were observed. Twinning bands were seen to be arrested by grain boundaries or large precipitates, but could penetrate martensitic lath boundaries. Unlike the case of defect free channels, small defect-clusters, dislocation loops and dense small helium bubbles were observed inside twins.

  5. Development of martensitic steels for high neutron damage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels have been developed for both in-core applications in advanced liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) and for first wall and structural materials applications for commercial fusion reactors. It can now be shown that these steels can be expected to maintain properties to levels as high as 175 or 200 dpa, respectively. The 12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.2C alloy HT-9 has been extensively tested for LMFBR applications and shown to resist radiation damage, providing a creep and swelling resistant alternative to austenitic steels. Degradation of fracture toughness and Charpy impact properties have been observed, but properties are sufficient to provide reliable service. In comparison, alloys with lower chromium contents are found to decarburize in contact with liquid sodium and are therefore not recommended. Tungsten stabilized martensitic stainless steels have appropriate properties for fusion applications. Radioactivity levels are being less than 500 years after service, radiation damage resistance is excellent, including impact properties, and swelling is modest. This report describes the history of the development effort. (author)

  6. Development of martensitic steels for high neutron damage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1996-12-01

    Martensitic stainless steels have been developed for both in-core applications in advanced liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) and for first wall and structural materials applications for commercial fusion reactors. It can now be shown that these steels can be expected to maintain properties to levels as high as 175 or 200 dpa, respectively. The 12Cr1Mo0.5W0.2C alloy HT-9 has been extensively tested for LMFBR applications and shown to resist radiation damage, providing a creep and swelling resistant alternative to austenitic steels. Degradation of fracture toughness and Charpy impact properties have been observed, but properties are sufficient to provide reliable service. In comparison, alloys with lower chromium contents are found to decarburize in contact with liquid sodium and are therefore not recommended. Tungsten stabilized martensitic stainless steels have appropriate properties for fusion applications. Radioactivity levels are benign less than 500 years after service, radiation damage resistance is excellent, including impact properties, and swelling is modest. This report describes the history of the development effort.

  7. Assessment of martensitic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wareing, J.; Tavassoli, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Martensitic steels are currently considered in Europe to be prime structural candidate materials for the first wall and breeding blanket of the DEMO fusion reactor. In this design, reactor power and wall loading will be significantly higher than those of an experimental reactor. ITER and will give rise to component operating temperatures in the range 250 to 550 0 C with neutron doses higher than 70 dpa. These conditions render austenitic stainless steel, which will be used in ITER, less favourable. Factors contributing to the promotion of martensitic steels are their excellent resistance to irradiation induced swelling, low thermal expansion and high thermal conductivity allied to advanced industrial maturity, compared to other candidate materials vanadium alloys. This paper described the development and optimisation of the steel and weld metal. Using data design rules generated on modified 9 Cr 1 Mo steel during its qualification as a steam generator material for the European Fast Reactor (EFR), interim design guidelines are formulated. Whilst the merits of the steel are validated, it is shown that irradiation embrittlement at low temperature, allied to the need for prolonged post-weld hat treatment and the long term creep response of welds remain areas of some concern. (author). 18 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Mesoscale martensitic transformation in single crystals of topological defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao; Martínez-González, José A.; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P.; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo; Zhou, Ye; Sadati, Monirosadat; Zhang, Rui; Nealey, Paul F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2017-09-05

    Liquid crystal blue phases (BPs) are highly ordered at two levels. Molecules exhibit orientational order at nanometer length scales, while chirality leads to ordered arrays of doubletwisted cylinders over micrometer scales. Past studies of polycrystalline BPs were challenged by grain boundaries between randomly oriented crystalline nanodomains. Here, the nucleation of BPs is controlled with considerable precision by relying on chemically nano-patterned surfaces, leading to macroscopic single-crystal BP specimens where the dynamics of meso-crystal formation can be directly observed. Theory and experiments show that transitions between two BPs having a different network structure proceed through local re-organization of the crystalline array, without diffusion of the double twisted cylinders. In solid crystals, martensitic transformations between crystal structures involve the concerted motion of a few atoms, without diffusion. The transformation between BPs, where crystal features arise in the sub-micron regime, is found to be martensitic in nature, with the diffusion-less feature associated to the collective behavior of the double twist cylinders. Single-crystal BPs are shown to offer fertile grounds for the study of directed crystal-nucleation and the controlled growth of soft matter.

  9. Why does the martensitic transformation temperature strongly depend on composition?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, X.; Otsuka, K.

    2000-01-01

    The reason for the strong composition and heat-treatment dependence of the martensitic transformation temperature was investigated by a simple Landau-type model. Assuming the anharmonic and coupling coefficients are insensitive to composition, we obtained an important result martensitic transformation occurs at a critical elastic constant c' and a critical TA 2 phonon energy ω η 2 , which are independent of alloy composition. This result gained support from a large body of experimental data of Cu-based alloys. Since c' and phonon energy are strongly dependent on composition, the constancy of c' at Ms demands that the (transformation) temperature must exhibit an opposite effect to compensate the composition effect. Therefore, the lower the c', the higher the Ms is. Because the temperature dependence of c' is weak (due to the 1 st order nature of the transformation), the big c' change by a slight composition change must be compensated by a large change in temperature. Thus Ms has strong composition dependence. The effect of quench is to increase point defects, being equivalent to a composition change, thus has a strong effect on Ms. From the present study, we can conclude that the strong composition dependence of Ms is mainly a harmonic effect. (orig.)

  10. High carbon microalloyed martensitic steel with ultrahigh strength-ductility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wang, Ying [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Dianji University, Shanghai 200245 (China); Chen, Nailu, E-mail: nlchen@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-04-29

    Based on the idea of rising the mechanical stability of retained austenite by the addition of Si in Fe-Mn based steels, an Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb was designed, then its hot rolled plate was successively tread by normalization process as pretreatment of novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) process. Product of tensile and elongation (PSE) of 53.94 GPa% were obtained for this high carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel, and the PSE (40.18 GPa%) obtained by the conversion of tensile sample size using Oliver formula still is more excellent PSE than those of other microalloyed advanced high strength steels reported. The microstructural characterization reveals origin of ultrahigh PSE resulting from both the increase of considerable and dispersed carbon enriched retained austenite with relative high mechanical stability in volume fraction and the decrease of brittle twin-type martensite with the sensitivity of notch.

  11. Significance of rate of work hardening in tempered martensite embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietikainen, J.

    1995-01-01

    The main explanations for tempered martensite embrittlement are based on the effects of impurities and cementite precipitation on the prior austenite grain boundaries. There are some studies where the rate of work hardening is proposed as a potential reason for the brittleness. One steel was studied by means of a specially developed precision torsional testing device. The test steel had a high Si and Ni content so ε carbide and Fe 3 C appear in quite different tempering temperature ranges. The M S temperature is low enough so that self tempering does not occur. With the testing device it was possible to obtain the true stress - true strain curves to very high deformations. The minimum toughness was always associated with the minimum of rate of work hardening. The change of deformed steel volume before the loss of mechanical stability is proposed as at least one reason for tempered martensite embrittlement. The reasons for the minimum of the rate of work hardening are considered. (orig.)

  12. Creep characteristics of precipitation hardened carbon free martensitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muneki, S.; Igarashi, M.; Abe, F.

    2000-01-01

    A new attempt has been demonstrated using carbon free Fe-Ni-Co martensitic alloys strengthened by Laves phase such as Fe 2 W or Fe 2 Mo to achieve homogeneous creep deformation at high temperatures under low stress levels. Creep behavior of the alloys is found to be completely different from that of the conventional high-Cr ferritic steels. The alloys exhibit gradual change in the creep rate with strain both in the transient and acceleration creep regions, and give a larger strain for the minimum creep rate. In these alloys the creep deformation takes place very homogeneously and no heterogeneous creep deformation is enhanced even at low stress levels. The minimum creep rates of the Fe-Ni-Co alloys at 700 C are found to be much lower than that of the conventional steel, which is due to fine dispersion strengthening useful even at 700 C in these alloys. It is thus concluded that the Fe-Ni-Co martensite strengthened by Laves phase is very useful to increase the creep resistance at elevated temperatures over 650 C. (orig.)

  13. Martensitic phase transitions in Co-0.85 at % Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prem, M.

    1997-12-01

    Co-0.85at%Fe shows the two martensitic phase transitions hcp-dhcp and dhcp-fcc. The lattice dynamics of Co-0.85at%Fe was investigated by the means of inelastic neutron scattering at a series of temperatures up to 750K in order to understand the two martensitic phase transitions of this system. In all of the measured phonon branches anomalies were neither found near the hcp-dhcp phase transition nor going through the dhcp-fcc transition. Lattice-parameter scans were performed through the whole temperature range. Diffuse neutron scattering revealed a lattice parameter shift between the dhcp and fcc phase of ∼0.4 % measured at the same temperature. This was possible because the system shows a wide temperature hysteresis at the two phase transitions. In the temperature region of coexistence of dhcp and fcc phase diffuse satellites arose near the (111)fcc Bragg peak (which is equivalent to the (00.2)dhcp peak). Their intensity varied in accordance to the volume fraction of the phases but vanished on changing wavelength. The elastic measurements were performed at the Austrian triple axis spectrometer VALSE located at the Laboratoire Leon Brillouin (LLB) in Saclay (F); the inelastic measurements were performed at the spectrometers IN3 and INS of the Institute Laue Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble (F). (author)

  14. Surface martensitization of Carbon steel using Arc Plasma Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyudi, Haris; Dimyati, Arbi; Sebayang, Darwin

    2018-03-01

    In this paper new technology of surface structure modification of steel by short plasma exposure in Arc Plasma Sintering (APS) device is presented. APS is an apparatus working based on plasma generated by DC pulsed current originally used for synthesizing materials via sintering and melting. Plasma exposure in APS was applied into the specimens for 1 and 3 seconds which generate temperature approximately about 1300-1500°C. The SUP9, pearlitic carbon steel samples were used. The hardness, hardening depth and microstructure of the specimens have been investigated by Vickers micro hardness test and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) supported by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The results have showed that the mechanical property was significantly improved due to the formation of single martensitic structures as identified by SEM. The hardness of treated surface evaluated by Vickers hardness test showed significant improvement nearly three time from 190 VHN before to 524 VHN after treatment. Furthermore, EDX confirmed that the formation of martensite layer occurred without altering its composition. The APS also produced uniform hardened layer up to 250 μm. The experiment has demonstrated that arc plasma process was successfully improved the mechanical properties of steel in relatively very short time.

  15. Deformation induced martensite in AISI 316 stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon, N.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The forming process leads to a considerable differentiation of the strain field within the billet, and finally causes the non-uniform distribution of the total strain, microstrusture and properties of the material over the product cross-section. This paper focus on the influence of stress states on the deformation-induced a’ martensitic transformation in AISI Type 316 austenitic stainless steel. The formation of deformation-induced martensite is related to the austenite (g instability at temperatures close or below room temperature. The structural transformation susceptibility is correlated to the stacking fault energy (SFE, which is a function not only of the chemical composition, but also of the testing temperature. Austenitic stainless steels possess high plasticity and can be easily cold formed. However, during cold processing the hardening phenomena always occurs. Nevertheless, the deformation-induced martensite transformation may enhance the rate of work-hardening and it may or may not be in favour of further material processing. Due to their high corrosion resistance and versatile mechanical properties the austenitic stainless steels are used in pressing of heat exchanger plates. However, this corrosion resistance is influenced by the amount of martensite formed during processing. In order to establish the links between total plastic strain, and martensitic transformation, the experimental tests were followed by numerical simulation.

    El proceso de conformación da a lugar a una considerable diferenciación del campo de tensiones dentro de una barra de extrusión y, finalmente, causa una distribución no uniforme de la tensión total, la microestructura y propiedades del material sobre el corte transversal. En este trabajo se estudia la influencia de los estados de tensión sobre la transformación martensítica inducida por deformación en un acero inoxidable austenítico tipo AISI 316. La formación de martensita inducida por

  16. It was the demonstration of industrial steel production capacity ferritic-martensitic Spanish ASTURFER scale demand ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coto, R.; Serrano, M.; Moran, A.; Rodriguez, D.; Artimez, J. A.; Belzunce, J.; Sedano, L.

    2013-01-01

    Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic (RAFM) structural steels are considered as candidate materials with notable possibilities to be incorporated to fusion reactor ITER, nowadays under construction, and future fusion reactor DEMO, involving a notable forecasting of supply materials, with a considerable limitation due to the few number of furnishes currently on the market. The manufacture at an industrial scale of the ASTURFER steel, developed at laboratory scale by ITMA Materials Technology and the Structural Materials Division of the Technology Division of CIEMAT would be a significant business opportunity for steelwork companies.

  17. Positron annihilation lifetime measurements of austenitic stainless and ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in the SINQ target irradiation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K.; Xu, Q.; Yoshiie, T.; Dai, Y.; Kikuchi, K.

    2012-12-01

    Titanium-doped austenitic stainless steel (JPCA) and reduced activated ferritic/martensitic steel (F82H) irradiated with high-energy protons and spallation neutrons were investigated by positron annihilation lifetime measurements. Subnanometer-sized (steel, the positron annihilation lifetime of the bubbles decreased with increasing irradiation dose and annealing temperature because the bubbles absorb additional He atoms. In the case of JPCA steel, the positron annihilation lifetime increased with increasing annealing temperature above 773 K, in which case the dissociation of complexes of vacancy clusters with He atoms and the growth of He bubbles was detected. He bubble size and density were also discussed.

  18. A quantitative estimation of the energetic cost of brown ring disease in the Manila clam using Dynamic Energy Budget theory.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flye Sainte Marie, J.G.; Jean, F.; Paillard, C.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    2009-01-01

    Brown ring disease (BRD) in the Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum, is a bacterial disease caused by the pathogen Vibrio tapetis. This disease induces the formation of a characteristic brown conchiolin deposit on the inner shell and is associated with a decrease in condition index indicating that

  19. Species Profiles: Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Pacific Southwest). Common Littleneck Clam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    cells in clam (P. tenerrima) in having December and January (Quayle 1943). w , , radiating ribs more prominent than The growth of gametes reaches a...reproductive cycle levels in intertidal mollusks of of Protothaca stamine ’ using histo- California. Veliger 14(4):365-372. logical, wet weight-dry

  20. Radio-resistance of some bacterial pathogens in soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) and mussels (Mytilus edulis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licciardello, J.J.; D'Entremont, D.L.; Lundstrom, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Gamma-irradiation decimal reduction doses were determined for E. coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella flexneri, Strept. faecalis, Staph, aureus, and the Total Plate Count in a soft-shell clam or mussel substrate. Factors to be considered for designing and irradiation bacterial-decontamination process for shellfish are discussed