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Sample records for activated transfected killer

  1. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-04-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections.

  2. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ma

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections.

  3. A Novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae Killer Strain Secreting the X Factor Related to Killer Activity and Inhibition of S. cerevisiae K1, K2 and K28 Killer Toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvydas, Vytautas; Bružauskaitė, Ieva; Gedminienė, Genovaitė; Šiekštelė, Rimantas

    2016-09-01

    It was determined that Kx strains secrete an X factor which can inhibit all known Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer toxins (K1, K2, K28) and some toxins of other yeast species-the phenomenon not yet described in the scientific literature. It was shown that Kx type yeast strains posess a killer phenotype producing small but clear lysis zones not only on the sensitive strain α'1 but also on the lawn of S. cerevisiae K1, K2 and K28 type killer strains at temperatures between 20 and 30 °C. The pH at which killer/antikiller effect of Kx strain reaches its maximum is about 5.0-5.2. The Kx yeast were identified as to belong to S. cerevisiae species. Another newly identified S. cerevisiae killer strain N1 has killer activity but shows no antikilller properties against standard K1, K2 and K28 killer toxins. The genetic basis for Kx killer/antikiller phenotype was associated with the presence of M-dsRNA which is bigger than M-dsRNA of standard S. cerevisiae K1, K2, K28 type killer strains. Killer and antikiller features should be encoded by dsRNA. The phenomenon of antikiller (inhibition) properties was observed against some killer toxins of other yeast species. The molecular weight of newly identified killer toxins which produces Kx type strains might be about 45 kDa.

  4. Killer toxin from a novel killer yeast Pichia kudriavzevii RY55 with idiosyncratic antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Bijender Kumar; Raina, Sandeepu; Singh, Satbir

    2013-08-01

    The killer phenomenon of yeast may have technological implications in many areas like beverage fermentation, food technology, biological control in agriculture, and in medicine. In the present study the killer phenomenon in Pichia kudriavzevii (P. kudriavzevii RY55) is being reported for the first time. The P. kudriavzevii RY55 toxin exhibited excellent antibacterial activity against several pathogens of human health significance such as Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella sp., Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas alcaligenes. Killer toxin was purified to homogeneity by using ammonium sulphate precipitation and ion exchange chromatography and characterized for few properties. P. kudriavzevii RY55 killer toxin may be of vast significance in the development of novel antimicrobial chemotherapeutic agents, new bio-based safer candidates for food preservation and biocontrol, and starter cultures for fermentation industries. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. COBRA1 inhibits AP-1 transcriptional activity in transfected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Hongjun; Zhu Jianhua; Zhang Hao; Ding Lihua; Sun Yan; Huang Cuifen; Ye Qinong

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA1) account for a significant proportion of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. Cofactor of BRCA1 (COBRA1) was isolated as a BRCA1-interacting protein and exhibited a similar chromatin reorganizing activity to that of BRCA1. However, the biological role of COBRA1 remains largely unexplored. Here, we report that ectopic expression of COBRA1 inhibited activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcriptional activity in transfected cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas reduction of endogenous COBRA1 with a small interfering RNA significantly enhanced AP-1-mediated transcriptional activation. COBRA1 physically interacted with the AP-1 family members, c-Jun and c-Fos, and the middle region of COBRA1 bound to c-Fos. Lack of c-Fos binding site in the COBRA1 completely abolished the COBRA1 inhibition of AP-1 trans-activation. These findings suggest that COBRA1 may directly modulate AP-1 pathway and, therefore, may play important roles in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and oncogenesis

  6. Cationic lipids: molecular structure/ transfection activity relationships and interactions with biomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koynova, Rumiana; Tenchov, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Synthetic cationic lipids, which form complexes (lipoplexes) with polyanionic DNA, are presently the most widely used constituents of nonviral gene carriers. A large number of cationic amphiphiles have been synthesized and tested in transfection studies. However, due to the complexity of the transfection pathway, no general schemes have emerged for correlating the cationic lipid chemistry with their transfection efficacy and the approaches for optimizing their molecular structures are still largely empirical. Here we summarize data on the relationships between transfection activity and cationic lipid molecular structure and demonstrate that the transfection activity depends in a systematic way on the lipid hydrocarbon chain structure. A number of examples, including a large series of cationic phosphatidylcholine derivatives, show that optimum transfection is displayed by lipids with chain length of approximately 14 carbon atoms and that the transfection efficiency strongly increases with increase of chain unsaturation, specifically upon replacement of saturated with monounsaturated chains.

  7. Lethal effects of 32P decay on transfecting activity of Bacillus subtillis phage phie DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveday, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    Disintegration of 32 P present in the DNA of Bacillus subtilis phage phie (a phage containing double-strand DNA) results in the loss of viability of intact phage as well as transfecting activity of isolated DNA. Only 1/12 of the 32 P disintegrations per phage DNA equivalent inactivities the intact phage while nearly every disintegration inactivates the transfecting DNA. This result provides evidence for a single-strand intermediate in the transfection of B. subtilis by phie DNA

  8. Lifestyles and mental health status are associated with natural killer cell and lymphokine-activated killer cell activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, K; Takeshita, T; Inoue-Sakurai, C; Maruyama, S

    2001-04-10

    We investigated the association of lifestyle and mental health status with natural killer (NK) cell and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell activities in healthy males. NK cell activity was determined in 105 male workers and LAK cell activity was determined in 54 male workers. Peripheral blood was obtained from each subject and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from the blood. These PBMC were used as effector cells. LAK cells were generated by incubation of PBMC with interleukin-2 for 72 h. NK cell activity against NK-sensitive K562 cells and LAK cell activity against NK-resistant Raji cells were examined by 51Cr release assay. Overall lifestyles were evaluated according to the answers on a questionnaire regarding eight health practices (cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, eating breakfast, hours of sleep, hours of work, physical exercise, nutritional balance, mental stress). Subjects with a good overall lifestyle showed significantly higher NK cell (P mental status had significantly lower NK cell activity than those who reported stable mental status. When subjects were divided into four groups by lifestyle and mental health status, subjects who had poor or moderate lifestyle and reported unstable mental status showed the lowest NK cell activity and subjects who had good lifestyle and reported stable mental status showed the highest NK cell activity among four groups.

  9. Lactobacilli Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    bacteria on regulatory functions of NK-cells. Here, we have investigated how human gut flora-derived non-pathogenic lactobacilli affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human peripheral blood NK cells upon bacterial stimulation. CD3-CD56+ NK cells were isolated from...... having engulfed bacteria, stimulated the growth of the NK cells. In contrast, a Lactobacillus paracasei strain caused the NK cells to proliferate only in the presence of monocytes. These results demonstrate that various lactobacilli have the capacity to activate NK cells in vitro, in a monocyte dependent...

  10. Activation of Natural Killer cells during microbial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir eHorowitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are large granular lymphocytes that express a diverse array of germline encoded inhibitory and activating receptors for MHC Class I and Class I-like molecules, classical co-stimulatory ligands and cytokines. The ability of NK cells to be very rapidly activated by inflammatory cytokines, to secrete effector cytokines and to kill infected or stressed host cells, suggests that they may be among the very early responders during infection. Recent studies have also identified a small number of pathogen-derived ligands that can bind to NK cell surface receptors and directly induce their activation. Here we review recent studies that have begun to elucidate the various pathways by which viral, bacterial and parasite pathogens activate NK cells. We also consider two emerging themes of NK cell-pathogen interactions, namely their contribution to adaptive immune responses and their potential to take on regulatory and immunomodulatory functions.

  11. Fasting enhances TRAIL-mediated liver natural killer cell activity via HSP70 upregulation.

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    Vu T A Dang

    Full Text Available Acute starvation, which is frequently observed in clinical practice, sometimes augments the cytolytic activity of natural killer cells against neoplastic cells. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the enhancement of natural killer cell function by fasting in mice. The total number of liver resident natural killer cells in a unit weight of liver tissue obtained from C57BL/6J mice did not change after a 3-day fast, while the proportions of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL+ and CD69+ natural killer cells were significantly elevated (n = 7, p <0.01, as determined by flow cytometric analysis. Furthermore, we found that TRAIL- natural killer cells that were adoptively transferred into Rag-2-/- γ chain-/- mice could convert into TRAIL+ natural killer cells in fasted mice at a higher proportion than in fed mice. Liver natural killer cells also showed high TRAIL-mediated antitumor function in response to 3-day fasting. Since these fasted mice highly expressed heat shock protein 70 (n = 7, p <0.05 in liver tissues, as determined by western blot, the role of this protein in natural killer cell activation was investigated. Treatment of liver lymphocytes with 50 µg/mL of recombinant heat shock protein 70 led to the upregulation of both TRAIL and CD69 in liver natural killer cells (n = 6, p <0.05. In addition, HSP70 neutralization by intraperitoneally injecting an anti- heat shock protein 70 monoclonal antibody into mice prior to fasting led to the downregulation of TRAIL expression (n = 6, p <0.05. These findings indicate that acute fasting enhances TRAIL-mediated liver natural killer cell activity against neoplastic cells through upregulation of heat shock protein 70.

  12. Cell number and transfection volume dependent peptide nucleic acid antisense activity by cationic delivery methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llovera Nadal, Laia; Berthold, Peter; Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    have now quantitatively compared the cellular activity (in the pLuc705 HeLa cell splice correction system) of PNA antisense oligomers using lipoplex delivery of cholesterol- and bisphosphonate-PNA conjugates, polyplex delivery via a PNA-polyethyleneimine conjugate and CPP delivery via a PNA......Efficient intracellular delivery is essential for high activity of nucleic acids based therapeutics, including antisense agents. Several strategies have been developed and practically all rely on auxiliary transfection reagents such as cationic lipids, cationic polymers and cell penetrating...... peptides as complexing agents and carriers of the nucleic acids. However, uptake mechanisms remain rather poorly understood, and protocols always require optimization of transfection parameters. Considering that cationic transfection complexes bind to and thus may up-concentrate on the cell surface, we...

  13. Immunometabolic Activation of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells

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    Francesca A. Ververs

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are lipid-reactive T cells with profound immunomodulatory potential. They are unique in their restriction to lipid antigens presented in CD1d molecules, which underlies their role in lipid-driven disorders such as obesity and atherosclerosis. In this review, we discuss the contribution of iNKT cell activation to immunometabolic disease, metabolic programming of lipid antigen presentation, and immunometabolic activation of iNKT cells. First, we outline the role of iNKT cells in immunometabolic disease. Second, we discuss the effects of cellular metabolism on lipid antigen processing and presentation to iNKT cells. The synthesis and processing of glycolipids and other potential endogenous lipid antigens depends on metabolic demand and may steer iNKT cells toward adopting a Th1 or Th2 signature. Third, external signals such as toll-like receptor ligands, adipokines, and cytokines modulate antigen presentation and subsequent iNKT cell responses. Finally, we will discuss the relevance of metabolic programming of iNKT cells in human disease, focusing on their role in disorders such as obesity and atherosclerosis. The critical response to metabolic changes places iNKT cells at the helm of immunometabolic disease.

  14. Emotional stability, anxiety, and natural killer activity under examination stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, P; Bargellini, A; Rovesti, S; Pinelli, M; Vivoli, R; Solfrini, V; Vivoli, G

    1999-08-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the relation between a stable personality trait, a mood state and immune response to an examination stress. A self-reported measure of emotional stability (BFQ-ES scale) was obtained in a sample (n = 39) randomly selected from 277 cadets; this personality trait was also investigated by completing a neuroticism scale (Eysenck personality inventory) and a trait-anxiety scale (STAI). Natural killer (NK) cell activity was measured at baseline, long before the examination time and the examination day. The state-anxiety scale evaluated the response to the stressful stimulus. Taking subjects all together, the academic task did not result in significant modification over baseline in NK cell activity. Subjects were then divided into three groups based on emotional stability and state-anxiety scores: high emotional stability/low anxiety, medium, and low emotional stability/high anxiety. Examination stress induced significant increases in NK cell activity in the high emotional stability/low anxiety group, no effect in the medium group, and significant decreases in the low emotional stability/high anxiety group. The repeated-measure ANOVA revealed a significant interaction of group x period (baseline vs. examination) for both lytic units and percent cytolysis. The results did not change after introducing coffee and smoking habits as covariates. Our findings suggest that the state-anxiety acts in concert with a stable personality trait to modulate NK response in healthy subjects exposed to a psychological naturalistic stress. The relation between anxiety and poor immune control has been already described, whereas the ability of emotional stability to associate with an immunoenhancement has not yet reported. The peculiarity of our population, a very homogeneous and healthy group for life style and habits, can have highlighted the role of emotional stability, and may account for the difference with other studies.

  15. Influence of natural and recombinant interferons on development of antiviral condition and activity of natural killers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.P.; Avdeev, G.I.; Vyadro, M.M.; Leikin, Yu.D.; Frolova, I.S.

    1986-01-01

    For the purpose of a preliminary estimate of the therapeutic potential of domestic recombinant alpha 2 -component of human leukocytic interferon (rl) in vitro tests, the authors studied its ability to induce development of antiviral condition in diploid culture of human embryo fibroblasts and to activate the cytolytic effect of natural killers in relation to tumor cells, of the K-562 leukemia line and cells of lung adenocarcinoma. The authors used a medicinal form of rL which was derived by expression of a reconstructed gene in Escherichia coli cells. Part of the tests were conducted with an analogous preparation synthesized using another producer, Pseudomonas sp). The biological effect of both preparations was the same. For comparison, a natural preparation was used in all tests: human leukocytic interferon for injection, II(le). The authors studied activity of natural killers in a fraction of mononuclears isolated from blood of essentially healthy donors and from cancer patients. Cells were incubated for 2 h with various concentrations of interferons, then combined in a ratio of 25-50:1 with target cells labeled with 51 Cr. Cytotoxic reaction was conducted for 4 (4-CTR) or 18 h (18-CTR) at 37 0 C. Natural killers could thus be divided into two subpopulations: killer (4-CTR) and cytotoxic (18-CTR) cells. In preliminary tests, both preparations possessed the ability to active natural killers. The effective concentration for rL was within the limits of 1000-2000 IU/ml, and 50-200 Iu/ml for Le. The data on activation of natural killers in 16 oncological patients (primarily with lung cancer), the authors established that both rL and Le induced activation of natural killers in the overwhelming majority of cases in relation to K-562 target cells and adenocarcinomas of the lung

  16. Transfection of mouse cytotoxic T lymphocyte with an antisense granzyme A vector reduces lytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talento, A; Nguyen, M; Law, S; Wu, J K; Poe, M; Blake, J T; Patel, M; Wu, T J; Manyak, C L; Silberklang, M

    1992-12-15

    Murine CTL have seven serine proteases, known as granzymes, in their lytic granules. Despite considerable effort, convincing evidence that these enzymes play an obligatory role in the lytic process has not been presented. To investigate the function of one of these proteases, granzyme A (GA), we utilized an antisense expression vector to lower the level of the enzyme in the cells. An expression vector containing antisense cDNA for GA and the gene for hygromycin B resistance was constructed and electroporated into the murine CTL line, AR1. Transfectants were selected based on resistance to hygromycin B, and a number of stable lines were developed. One of the antisense lines had greatly reduced levels of GA mRNA, when compared to the parental cells or to control lines transfected with the vector lacking the antisense DNA. The message levels for two other CTL granule proteins, granzyme B and perforin, were unaffected by the antisense vector. The amount of GA, as measured by enzymatic activity, was 3- to 10-fold lower in the transfectant. Most significantly, this line also consistently showed 50 to 70% lower ability to lyse nucleated target cells and to degrade their DNA. Furthermore, it exhibited 90 to 95% lower lytic activity to anti-CD3-coated SRBC. Conjugate formation with target cells, however, was normal. These data provide strong evidence that GA plays an important role in the cytolytic cycle, and that the quantity of enzyme is a limiting factor in these cytolytic cells.

  17. Tumor-derived transforming growth factor-beta 1 and interleukin-6 are chemotactic for lymphokine-activated killer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delens, N.; Torreele, E.; Savelkoul, H.; Baetselier, de P.; Bouwens, L.

    1994-01-01

    Adherent lymphokine-activated killer (A-LAK) cells are purified IL-2 activated natural killer (NK) cells with potent anti-tumor cytotoxic activity. They have been used in the adoptive immunotherapy of metastatic cancers. However, it has been shown that intravenously transferred LAK cells have a poor

  18. Diversity and killer activity of yeasts in Malaysian fermented food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S L; Tay, S T

    2011-08-01

    The biodiversity and the killer activity of yeasts isolated from various types of fermented food in Malaysia were investigated in this study. Of 252 yeasts isolated from 48 fermented food samples in this study, 19 yeast species were identified based on sequence analysis of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 partial fragments of the yeasts. A total of 29 (11.5%) of the yeast isolates demonstrated killer activity to at least one Candida species tested in this study; including 22 isolates of Trichosporon asahii, 4 isolates of Pichia anomala, and one isolate each of Pichia norvegensis, Pichia fermentans and Issatchenkia orientalis, respectively. The presence of killer yeasts reflects antagonism that occurs during microbial interaction in the fermented food, whereby certain yeasts produce killer toxins and possibly other toxic substances in competition for limited nutrients and space. The anti-Candida activity demonstrated by killer yeasts in this study should be further explored for development of alternative therapy against candidiasis.

  19. Immune functions in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas): Evaluation of natural killer cell activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. De Guise (Sylvain); P.S. Ross (Peter); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); D. Martineau (Daniel); P. Beland; M. Fournier (Michel)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractNatural killer (NK) activity, an important non-specific defense mechanism against viral infections and tumors, was demonstrated in beluga whales using two different methods: 51Cr release and flow cytometry. Using the 51Cr release assay, NK activity in belugas was shown to be higher

  20. Determination of yeast killer activity in fermenting sugarcane juice using selected ethanol-making strains

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    Sandra Regina Ceccato-Antonini

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four yeasts out of 342 isolated from the fermentative process showed killer activity and three of them were selected for the fermentative efficiency evaluation in batch system with cell recycle, flask and fermentor experiments. The selected three killer strains did not present similar results to those of pressed (baking yeast concerning ethanol (0.07-0.18; 0.12-0.20; 0.10-0.13; 0.22-0.25 g/g, respectively and biomass (0.19-0.26; 0.33-0.39; 0.13-0.27; 0.47-0.61 g/g, respectively yields and fermentative efficiency (12.3-36.3; 21.0-40.0; 19.3-26.3; 47.6-54.0 %, respectively in sugarcane juice, in flasks. In fermentor, similar behaviour was observed. However, the selected strains showed high cellular viability and killer activity (using cell-free filtrate along the fermentative cycles, in spite of the unfavourable conditions of the medium, like high pH variation of the medium (from 5.5-6.0 to 3.0-4.0, low aeration and higher temperature (30º C, which were not the ideal ones for the production/activity of killer toxins. A Pichia strain (CCA 510 showed the best results among the killer yeasts tested, exhibiting a killer activity against 92% of isolated fermentative yeasts of the process and against the pressed (baking ferment. It also demonstrated killer activity (using crude toxin preparation at higher temperatures (38ºC and low pH (4.0 after 72 hours of incubation, under proliferative and non-proliferative conditions. The results indicated that the killer activity should be a characteristic to be looked for in the strain selection for ethanolic fermentation, beside other important productivity-based characteristics, since it assure the permanence of the selected strain during the process.A atividade 'killer' poderia garantir às leveduras fermentativas uma vantagem competitiva sobre outras linhagens durante a fermentação etanólica, no entanto, pouco se sabe sobre o papel do sistema 'killer' nesse tipo de fermentação alcoólica. A sele

  1. Increase in natural killer cell activity during diethylcarbamazine treatment of patients with filariasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, B K; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Svenson, M

    1987-01-01

    Two patients, one with Bancroftian filariasis and the other with onchocerciasis, and two healthy controls were treated with diethylcarbamazine (DEC). The natural killer (NK) cell activity of the two patients increased during DEC treatment to 2.5 and 2.8 times, respectively, while that of the cont...

  2. Killer whale presence in relation to naval sonar activity and prey abundance in northern Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuningas, S.; Kvadsheim, P.H.; Lam, F.P.A.; Miller, P.J.O.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, retrospective data on naval sonar activity and prey abundance were correlated with killer whale sightings within a fjord basin in northern Norway. In addition, passive acoustic and visual marine mammal surveys were conducted before, during, and after a specific navy exercise in 2006.

  3. Design, synthesis, and in vitro transfection biology of novel tocopherol based monocationic lipids: a structure-activity investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedika, Bhavani; Patri, Srilakshmi V

    2011-01-27

    Herein, we report on the design, synthesis, and in vitro gene delivery efficacies of five novel tocopherol based cationic lipids (1-5) in transfecting CHO, B16F10, A-549, and HepG2 cells. The in vitro gene transfer efficiencies of lipids (1-5) were evaluated by both β-galactosidase reporter gene expression and inverted fluorescent microscopic experiments. The results of the present structure-activity investigation convincingly demonstrate that the tocopherol based lipid with three hydroxyl groups in its headgroup region showed 4-fold better transfection efficiency than the commercial formulation. The results also demonstrate that these tocopherol based lipids may be targeted to liver. Transfection efficiency of all the relevant lipids was maintained even when the serum was present during the transfection conditions. The results indicated that the designed systems are quite capable of transferring the DNA into all four types of cells studied with low or no toxicity.

  4. Transformation and radiosensitivity of human diploid skin fibroblasts transfected with activated ras oncogene and SV40 T-antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, L N; Little, J B

    1992-08-01

    Three normal human diploid cell strains were transfected with an activated Ha-ras oncogene (EJ ras) or SV40 T-antigen. Multiple clones were examined for morphological alterations, growth requirements, ability to grow under anchorage independent conditions, immortality and tumorigenicity in nude mice. Clones expressing SV40 T-antigen alone or in combination with ras protein p21 were significantly radioresistant as compared with their parent cells or clones transfected with the neo gene only. This radioresistant phenotype persisted in post-crisis, immortalized cell lines. Cells transfected with EJ ras alone showed no morphological alterations nor significant changes in radiosensitivity. Cell clones expressing ras and/or SV40 T-antigen showed a reduced requirement for serum supplements, an increase in aneuploidy and chromosomal aberrations, and enhanced growth in soft agar as an early cellular response to SV40 T-antigen expression. The sequential order of transfection with SV40 T-antigen and ras influenced radio-sensitivity but not the induction of morphological changes. These data suggest that expression of the SV40 T-antigen but not activated Ha-ras plays an important role in the radiosensitivity of human diploid cells. The radioresistant phenotype in SV40 T transfected cells was not related to the enhanced level of genetic instability seen in pre-crisis and newly immortalized cells, nor to the process of immortalization itself.

  5. Transformation and radiosensitivity of human diploid skin fibroblasts transfected with activated RAS oncogene and SV40 T-antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, L.-N.; Little, J.B. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States))

    1992-08-01

    Three normal human diploid cell strains were transfected with an activated Ha-ras oncogene (EJ ras) or SV40 T-antigen. Multiple clones were examined for morphological alterations, growth requirements, ability to grow under anchorage independent conditions, immortality and tumorigenicity in nude mice. Clones expressing SV40 T-antigen alone or in combination with ras protein p21 were significantly radioresistant as compared with their parent cells or clones transfected with the neo gene only. This radioresistant phenotype persisted in post-crisis, immortalized cell lines. These data suggest that expression of the SV40 T-antigen but not activated Ha-ras plays an important role in the radiosensitivity of human diploid cells. The radioresistant phenotype in SV40 T transfected cells was not related to the enhanced level of genetic instability seen in pre-crisis and newly immortalized cells, nor to the process of immortalization itself. (author).

  6. Transformation and radiosensitivity of human diploid skin fibroblasts transfected with activated RAS oncogene and SV40 T-antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, L.-N.; Little, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    Three normal human diploid cell strains were transfected with an activated Ha-ras oncogene (EJ ras) or SV40 T-antigen. Multiple clones were examined for morphological alterations, growth requirements, ability to grow under anchorage independent conditions, immortality and tumorigenicity in nude mice. Clones expressing SV40 T-antigen alone or in combination with ras protein p21 were significantly radioresistant as compared with their parent cells or clones transfected with the neo gene only. This radioresistant phenotype persisted in post-crisis, immortalized cell lines. These data suggest that expression of the SV40 T-antigen but not activated Ha-ras plays an important role in the radiosensitivity of human diploid cells. The radioresistant phenotype in SV40 T transfected cells was not related to the enhanced level of genetic instability seen in pre-crisis and newly immortalized cells, nor to the process of immortalization itself. (author)

  7. Structure-transfection activity relationships in a series of novel cationic lipids with heterocyclic head-groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A; Maslov, Mikhail A; Kabilova, Tatyana O; Puchkov, Pavel A; Alekseeva, Anna S; Boldyrev, Ivan A; Vlassov, Valentin V; Serebrennikova, Galina A; Morozova, Nina G; Zenkova, Marina A

    2013-11-07

    Cationic liposomes are promising candidates for the delivery of various therapeutic nucleic acids. Here, we report a convenient synthesis of carbamate-type cationic lipids with various hydrophobic domains (tetradecanol, dialkylglycerol, cholesterol) and positively charged head-groups (pyridinium, N-methylimidazolium, N-methylmorpholinium) and data on the structure-transfection activity relationships. It was found that single-chain lipids possess high surface activity, which correlates with high cytotoxicity due to their ability to disrupt the cellular membrane by combined hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Liposomes containing these lipids also display high cytotoxicity with respect to all cell lines. Irrespective of chemical structures, all cationic lipids form liposomes with similar sizes and surface potentials. The characteristics of complexes composed of cationic liposomes and nucleic acids depend mostly on the type of nucleic acid and P/N ratios. In the case of oligodeoxyribonucleotide delivery, the transfection activity depends on the type of cationic head-group regardless of the type of hydrophobic domain: all types of cationic liposomes mediate efficient oligonucleotide transfer into 80-90% of the eukaryotic cells, and liposomes based on lipids with N-methylmorpholinium cationic head-group display the highest transfection activity. In the case of plasmid DNA and siRNA, the type of hydrophobic domain determines the transfection activity: liposomes composed of cholesterol-based lipids were the most efficient in DNA transfer, while liposomes containing glycerol-based lipids exhibited reasonable activity in siRNA delivery under serum-free conditions.

  8. Structure-activity correlation in transfection promoted by pyridinium cationic lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi-Bahktar, P; Mendez-Campos, J; Raju, L; Khalique, N A; Jubeli, E; Larsen, H; Nicholson, D; Pungente, M D; Fyles, T M

    2016-03-21

    The efficiency of the transfection of a plasmid DNA encoding a galactosidase promoted by a series of pyridinium lipids in mixtures with other cationic lipids and neutral lipids was assessed in CHO-K1 cells. We identify key molecular parameters of the lipids in the mixture - clog P, lipid length, partial molar volume - to predict the morphology of the lipid-DNA lipoplex and then correlate these same parameters with transfection efficiency in an in vitro assay. We define a Transfection Index that provides a linear correlation with normalized transfection efficiency over a series of 90 different lipoplex compositions. We also explore the influence of the same set of molecular parameters on the cytotoxicity of the formulations.

  9. Influence of terbutaline on natural killer cell activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenius-Aarniala, B.; Vesterinen, E.; Kiviranta, K.; Timonen, T.

    1988-01-01

    Studies on the effect of cAMO-inducing agents on NK activity have been contradictory. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of beta-agonists on NK activity in vivo in 15 asthmatics and 3 healthy volunteers. Blood samples of NK activity were taken at regular intervals after placebo and after subcutaneous injection of 7 μg/kg of terbutaline. NK activity was measured by the standard 4-h Chromium 51 release assay against the leukemic line K 562 at a 50:1 effector/target cell ratio. Compared with placebo, terbutaline induced within 30-60 min a significant increase in NK activity which lasted less than 2 h. Further studies are necessary to investigate the effect of long-term beta-agonist treatment on NK activity. (author)

  10. Effect of ranitidine on postoperative suppression of natural killer cell activity and delayed hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Pedersen, B K; Moesgaard, F

    1989-01-01

    hypersensitivity (DTH) antigens, and blood drawn immediately before and 24 hours after skin incision was analyzed for spontaneous and in vitro stimulated (IL-2, IFN-alpha or indomethacin) natural killer (NK) cell activity and PHA and PPD-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. Lymphocyte subsets (helper......-cell activity (p less than 0.02). Postoperative decrease in helper/inducer-T cell numbers was not significantly lessened (p = 0.07), and ranitidine did not influence the levels of suppressor-T cells. PHA and PPD responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were unaltered. The results may suggest potential...

  11. Mechanism of suppression of normal hemopoietic activity by lymphokine-activated killer cells and their products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, F.M.; Malkovska, V.; Myint, A.A.; Meager, A.; Gordon-Smith, E.C.

    1991-01-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2)-activated lymphocytes (lymphokine-activated killer [LAK] cells) have been shown to inhibit the formation of autologous human granulocyte-macrophage hemopoietic progenitors (granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units, CFU-GM) in vitro. Effects of LAK cells on these progenitors may include a number of different mechanisms. LAK cells are potent cytotoxic lymphocytes capable of lysing certain normal autologous cells. They also produce cytokines known to inhibit hemopoiesis (interferon gamma [IFN-gamma] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-alpha]) or enhance it (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, GM-CSF). In the authors' current study they analyzed the mechanism of suppression of autologous CFU-GM by LAK cells. Their results suggest that LAK cells are not directly cytotoxic to normal CFU-GM. They show that it is possible to abolish the hemopoiesis-inhibiting activity of LAK cells without abrogating their cytotoxicity against tumor cell lines using inhibitors of DNA synthesis, namely hydroxyurea or irradiation

  12. Serial killers: ordering caspase activation events in apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slee, E A; Adrain, C; Martin, S J

    1999-11-01

    Caspases participate in the molecular control of apoptosis in several guises; as triggers of the death machinery, as regulatory elements within it, and ultimately as a subset of the effector elements of the machinery itself. The mammalian caspase family is steadily growing and currently contains 14 members. At present, it is unclear whether all of these proteases participate in apoptosis. Thus, current research in this area is focused upon establishing the repertoire and order of caspase activation events that occur during the signalling and demolition phases of cell death. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that proximal caspase activation events are typically initiated by molecules that promote caspase aggregation. As expected, distal caspase activation events are likely to be controlled by caspases activated earlier in the cascade. However, recent data has cast doubt upon the functional demarcation of caspases into signalling (upstream) and effector (downstream) roles based upon their prodomain lengths. In particular, caspase-3 may perform an important role in propagating the caspase cascade, in addition to its role as an effector caspase within the death programme. Here, we discuss the apoptosis-associated caspase cascade and the hierarchy of caspase activation events within it.

  13. Lactic Acid Bacteria Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    antigen presenting cells and T-cells. Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cell compartments, as consumption of certain strains of lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxic activity. On-going research in our lab aims...

  14. Therapeutic Activity of an Engineered Synthetic Killer Antiidiotypic Antibody Fragment against Experimental Mucosal and Systemic Candidiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Polonelli, Luciano; Magliani, Walter; Conti, Stefania; Bracci, Luisa; Lozzi, Luisa; Neri, Paolo; Adriani, Daniela; De Bernardis, Flavia; Cassone, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Peptides derived from the sequence of a single-chain, recombinant, antiidiotypic antibody (IdAb; KT-scFv) acting as a functional internal image of a microbicidal, wide-spectrum yeast killer toxin (KT) were synthesized and studied for their antimicrobial activity by using the KT-susceptible Candida albicans as model organism. A decapeptide containing the first three amino acids (SAS) of the light chain CDR1 was selected and optimized by alanine replacement of a single residue. This peptide exe...

  15. Differential loss of natural killer cell activity in patients with acute myocardial infarction and stable angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenwen; Zhou, Lin; Wen, Siwan; Duan, Qianglin; Huang, Feifei; Tang, Yu; Liu, Xiaohong; Chai, Yongyan; Wang, Lemin

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the activity of natural killer cells through their inhibitory and activating receptors and quantity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells extracted from patients with acute myocardial infarction, stable angina pectoris and the controls. 100 patients with myocardial infarction, 100 with stable angina, and 20 healthy volunteers were recruited into the study. 20 randomly chosen people per group were examined for the whole human genome microarray analysis to detect the gene expressions of all 40 inhibitory and activating natural killer cell receptors. Flow cytometry analysis was applied to all 200 patients to measure the quantity of natural killer cells. In myocardial infarction group, the mRNA expressions of six inhibitory receptors KIR2DL2, KIR3DL3, CD94, NKG2A, KLRB1, KLRG1, and eight activating receptors KIR2DS3, KIR2DS5, NKp30, NTB-A, CRACC, CD2, CD7 and CD96 were significantly down-regulated (Pangina patients and the controls. There was no statistical difference in receptor expressions between angina patients and control group. The quantity of natural killer cells was significantly decreased in both infarction and angina patients compared with normal range (Pangina patients showed a quantitative loss and dysfunction of natural killer cells in myocardial infarction patients.

  16. Resistance of some leukemic blasts to lysis by lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panayotides, P; Sjoegren, A -M; Reizenstein, P; Porwit, A. Immunopathology Lab., Dept. of Pathology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm; Wasserman, J

    1988-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy donors and AML patients in remission were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2). These stimulated cells (lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells) showed increased DNA synthesis as measured by /sup 3/H-Thymidine uptake. A synergistic effect of PHA and IL-2 was found. LAK cells' ability to kill acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts was investigated by the /sup 51/Cr release assay. LAK cells showed a cytotoxicity (over 10% specific /sup 51/Cr release) against 9/12 leukemic blasts, even at effector/target (E/T) ratios as low as 5:1. However, on average only 22.2% (SD 11.8) and 36.5% (SD 12.5) /sup 51/Cr release were obtained in 4- and 18-hour cytotoxicity assays, respectively, at an E/T ratio of 20:1. Leukemic blasts in 3/12 AML cases and normal PBMC were entirely resistant to lysis, even at an E/T ratio of 80:1. Susceptibility to lysis was not correlated to peanut-agglutinin receptor expression. LAK cells were more cytotoxic towards the K-562 cell line (natural killer activity) than unstimulated PBMC.

  17. The Neurological Significance of Abnormal Natural Killer Cell Activity in Chronic Toxigenic Mold Exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebere Anyanwu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxigenic mold activities produce metabolites that are either broad-spectrum antibiotics or mycotoxins that are cytotoxic. Indoor environmental exposure to these toxigenic molds leads to adverse health conditions with the main outcome measure of frequent neuroimmunologic and behavioral consequences. One of the immune system disorders found in patients presenting with toxigenic mold exposure is an abnormal natural killer cell activity. This paper presents an overview of the neurological significance of abnormal natural killer cell (NKC activity in chronic toxigenic mold exposure. A comprehensive review of the literature was carried out to evaluate and assess the conditions under which the immune system could be dysfunctionally interfered with leading to abnormal NKC activity and the involvement of mycotoxins in these processes. The functions, mechanism, the factors that influence NKC activities, and the roles of mycotoxins in NKCs were cited wherever necessary. The major presentations are headache, general debilitating pains, nose bleeding, fevers with body temperatures up to 40�C (104�F, cough, memory loss, depression, mood swings, sleep disturbances, anxiety, chronic fatigue, vertigo/dizziness, and in some cases, seizures. Although sleep is commonly considered a restorative process that is important for the proper functioning of the immune system, it could be disturbed by mycotoxins. Most likely, mycotoxins exert some rigorous effects on the circadian rhythmic processes resulting in sleep deprivation to which an acute and transient increase in NKC activity is observed. Depression, psychological stress, tissue injuries, malignancies, carcinogenesis, chronic fatigue syndrome, and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis could be induced at very low physiological concentrations by mycotoxin-induced NKC activity. In the light of this review, it is concluded that chronic exposures to toxigenic mold could lead to abnormal NKC activity with a wide

  18. Confinement of activating receptors at the plasma membrane controls natural killer cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guia, Sophie; Jaeger, Baptiste N; Piatek, Stefan; Mailfert, Sébastien; Trombik, Tomasz; Fenis, Aurore; Chevrier, Nicolas; Walzer, Thierry; Kerdiles, Yann M; Marguet, Didier; Vivier, Eric; Ugolini, Sophie

    2011-04-05

    Natural killer (NK) cell tolerance to self is partly ensured by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-specific inhibitory receptors on NK cells, which dampen their reactivity when engaged. However, NK cells that do not detect self MHC class I are not autoreactive. We used dynamic fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to show that MHC class I-independent NK cell tolerance in mice was associated with the presence of hyporesponsive NK cells in which both activating and inhibitory receptors were confined in an actin meshwork at the plasma membrane. In contrast, the recognition of self MHC class I by inhibitory receptors "educated" NK cells to become fully reactive, and activating NK cell receptors became dynamically compartmentalized in membrane nanodomains. We propose that the confinement of activating receptors at the plasma membrane is pivotal to ensuring the self-tolerance of NK cells.

  19. Natural killer (NK)-cell activity in sorted subsets of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with severe combined immunodeficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Berge, R. J.; Schellekens, P. T.; Budding-Koppenol, A.; Dooren, L. J.; Vossen, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Natural killer-cell activity for K562 target cells was measured in 13 patients with severe combined immunodeficiency before bone marrow transplantation. Both unseparated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and sorted cell subsets (B73.1 positive, B73.1 negative, OKT3 positive, OKT3 negative) were

  20. The relationship between the acoustic behaviour and surface activity of killer whales (Orcinus orca) that feed on herring (Clupea harengus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simon, M.; McGregor, P.K.; Ugarte, F.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the acoustic behaviour of piscivorous killer whales in Norwegian and Icelandic waters. Whales were assigned to one of three activities (feeding, travelling or other), and sound recordings were made in their proximity with a single hydrophone and a digital audiotape (DAT) recorder. A q...

  1. Glucocorticoid cell reception in mice of different strains with natural killer cell activity depressed during immobilization stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyashko, V.N.; Sukhikh, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    The authors study differences in stress-induced depression of natural killer cell activity in mice of different inbred lines, depending on parameters of glucocorticoid binding with glucorticoid receptors of spleen cells and on the hormonal status of the animals. In determining the parameters of glucocorticoid binding on intact splenocytes, aliquots of a suspension of washed splenocytes were incubated with tritium-labeled dexamethasone

  2. Cytolytic effects of autologous lymphokine-activated killer cells on organotypic multicellular spheroids of gliomas in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaijk, P.; Troost, D.; Dast, P. K.; van den Berg, F.; Leenstra, S.; Bosch, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge about lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell infiltration and LAK cell cytotoxicity is essential to improve the effectiveness of LAK cell therapy against gliomas. In the present study, organotypic multicellular spheroids (OMS) of glioma tissue were used as a culture model to study the

  3. GnRH receptor activation competes at a low level with growth signaling in stably transfected human breast cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, Kevin; Meyer, Colette; Miller, Nicola; Sims, Andrew H; Cagnan, Ilgin; Faratian, Dana; Harrison, David J; Millar, Robert P; Langdon, Simon P

    2011-01-01

    Gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs lower estrogen levels in pre-menopausal breast cancer patients. GnRH receptor (GnRH-R) activation also directly inhibits the growth of certain cells. The applicability of GnRH anti-proliferation to breast cancer was therefore analyzed. GnRH-R expression in 298 primary breast cancer samples was measured by quantitative immunofluorescence. Levels of functional GnRH-R in breast-derived cell lines were assessed using 125 I-ligand binding and stimulation of 3 H-inositol phosphate production. Elevated levels of GnRH-R were stably expressed in cells by transfection. Effects of receptor activation on in vitro cell growth were investigated in comparison with IGF-I and EGF receptor inhibition, and correlated with intracellular signaling using western blotting. GnRH-R immunoscoring was highest in hormone receptor (triple) negative and grade 3 breast tumors. However prior to transfection, functional endogenous GnRH-R were undetectable in four commonly studied breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, ZR-75-1, T47D and MDA-MB-231). After transfection with GnRH-R, high levels of cell surface GnRH-R were detected in SVCT and MDA-MB-231 clones while low-moderate levels of GnRH-R occurred in MCF-7 clones and ZR-75-1 clones. MCF-7 sub-clones with high levels of GnRH-R were isolated following hygromycin phosphotransferase transfection. High level cell surface GnRH-R enabled induction of high levels of 3 H-inositol phosphate and modest growth-inhibition in SVCT cells. In contrast, growth of MCF-7, ZR-75-1 or MDA-MB-231 clones was unaffected by GnRH-R activation. Cell growth was inhibited by IGF-I or EGF receptor inhibitors. IGF-I receptor inhibitor lowered levels of p-ERK1/2 in MCF-7 clones. Washout of IGF-I receptor inhibitor resulted in transient hyper-elevation of p-ERK1/2, but co-addition of GnRH-R agonist did not alter the dynamics of ERK1/2 re-phosphorylation. Breast cancers exhibit a range of GnRH-R immunostaining, with higher levels of

  4. Effect of kumquat (Fortunella crassifolia) pericarp on natural killer cell activity in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Kiyoko; Eto, Nozomu; Shimojo, Tomofumi; Kondoh, Tomomi; Nakahara, Keiko; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Fukui, Keiichi; Suiko, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in innate immune defense against infectious disease and cancer. A reduction of NK activity is likely to be associated with increased risk of these types of disease. In this study, we investigate the activation potential of kumquat pericarp acetone fraction (KP-AF) on NK cells. It is shown to significantly increase IFN-γ production and NK cytotoxic activity in human KHYG-1 NK cells. Moreover, oral administration of KP-AF significantly improves both suppressed plasma IFN-γ levels and NK cytotoxic activity per splenocyte in restraint-stressed mice. These results indicate that raw kumquat pericarp activates NK cells in vitro and in vivo. To identify the active constituents, we also examined IFN-γ production on KHYG-1 cells by the predicted active components. Only β-cryptoxanthin increased IFN-γ production, suggesting that NK cell activation effects of KP-AF may be caused by carotenoids such as β-cryptoxanthin.

  5. Effect of radiotherapy on the natural killer (NK)-cell activity of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnes, K.; Florence, J.; Penny, R.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of radiotherapy on peripheral blood natural killer (NK)-cell number and activity in 15 patients with cancer, prior to the commencement and at the completion of radiotherapy. The following observations were made. Prior to radiotherapy NK activity could not be correlated with the stage of malignancy. In all patients with advanced disease and with subnormal baseline NK activity, the outcome of radiotherapy was unfavorable. Following radiotherapy to sites including the mediastinum, patients had decreased NK activity compared with those receiving treatment to other sites. This decrease was not related to the dose of radiotherapy or stage of malignancy. The tumor response was favorable in most patients whose NK activity decreased as a result of radiotherapy. The decrease in NK activity may be associated with a decrease in the percentage of NK (N901) cells in the peripheral blood. The reduction in NK activity in those patients receiving mediastinal irradiation may be due to the large volume of blood which transits the field, so that the NK cells, or their more radiosensitive precursors, may be damaged and/or differentiation inhibited. Thus, these new observations show that radiotherapy does indeed affect the NK activity in cancer patients predominantly when the irradiation site includes the mediastinum

  6. Effect of Piper chaba Hunter, Piper sarmentosum Roxb. and Piper interruptum Opiz. on natural killer cell activity and lymphocyte proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthong, Sumalee; Itharat, Arunporn

    2014-08-01

    Immune system is the most important system ofhuman body. Thaifolk doctors have used some medicinal plants as an adaptogenic drug or immunomodulatory agent. Piper chaba Hunter, Piper sarmentosum Roxb. and Piper interruptum Opiz. are used by folk doctors to activate immune response in cancer patients. To investigate the effect on natural killer cell activity and on lymphocyte proliferation activity of water extract of P chaba Hunter P. sarmentosum Roxb. and P interruptum Opiz. MATERIAL ANDMETHOD: Plant materials were extracted by decoction method. All extracts were testedfor an immunomodulatory effect using PBMCs from twelve healthy donors by chromium release assay. Lymphocyte proliferation was also determined by 3H-thymidine uptake assay. The degree of activation was expressed as the stimulation index. The water extract of P chaba Hunter significantly increased lymphocyte proliferation at concentrations ofl ng/ml, 10 ng/ml, 1 μg/ml, 5 μg/ml, 10 μg/ml and 100 μg/ml. P sarmentosum Roxb., and P interruptum Opiz. extracts at those concentrations significantly stimulated lymphocyteproliferation. P sarmentosum Roxb. extractsignificantly increased natural killer (NK) cell activity at a concentration of 100 μg/ml but P chaba Hunter and P interruptum Opiz. extracts did not significantly stimulate natural killer cell activity. P chaba Hunter, P interruptum Opiz. andP sarmentosum Roxb. have an immunomodulatory effect especially for P sarmentosum Roxb. extract which can activate both lymphocyte proliferation and NK cell activity.

  7. All-trans retinoic acid negatively regulates cytotoxic activities of nature killer cell line 92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ang; He Meilan; Wang Hui; Qiao Bin; Chen Ping; Gu Hua; Zhang Mengjie; He Shengxiang

    2007-01-01

    NK cells are key components of innate immune systems and their activities are regulated by cytokines and hormones. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), as a metabolite of vitamin A and an immunomodulatory hormone, plays an important role in regulating immune responses. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ATRA on human NK cell line NK92. We found that ATRA dose-dependently suppressed cytotoxic activities of NK92 cells without affecting their proliferation. To explore the mechanisms underlying the ATRA influence on NK92 cells, we examined the production of cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ), gene expression of cytotoxic-associated molecules (perforin, granzyme B, nature killer receptors (NCRs), and NKG2D), and the activation of NF-κB pathways related with immune response. Our results demonstrated that ATRA suppressed NF-κB activity and prevented IκBα degradation in a dose-dependent way, inhibited IFN-γ production and gene expression of granzyme B and NKp46. Our findings suggest that ATRA is a negative regulator of NK92 cell activation and may act as a potential regulator of anti-inflammatory functions in vivo

  8. Natural killer activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes in patients with brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Shin-ichi; Suda, Kinya; Yamashita, Junkoh; Takeuchi, Juji; Handa, Hajime

    1982-01-01

    Natural killer activity (NK activity) of peripheral blood ymphocytes in patients with brain tumors was examined by the method of 51 Cr release assay in order to study the effects of operation and radiotherapy on the immunological activity of the hosts. NK activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes in normal persons was about 50 to 70% and about 30 to 50% (% specific 51 Cr release) at a ratio of target to effector cells of 1 : 25 and 1 : 12.5 respectively. There were no significant differences in NK activity in regard to the histological types of brain tumors. As for the effects of operation on NK activity, NK activity decreased by the end of the 1st week after operation and then increased gradually and returned to the pre-operative level 2 to 3 weeks after operation. The causes of decrease of NK activity after operation are not clear but there are some factors to be considered, such as bleeding during operation, non-specific inflammation, use of steroid after operation and the decrease of the stimulation of tumor antigen. As regards the effects of radiotherapy on NK activity, NK activity increased within 3 weeks after the beginning of radiotherapy. The increase of NK activity may indicate that the immunological resistance to tumor was enhanced in hosts by local irradiation of the tumor. Some characteristics of the effector cells were examined. E rosette non-forming cells had a stronger cytoxicity against target cells than E rosette forming cells. Nylon wool non-adherent cells had slightly higher cytotoxicity than adherent cells but the cytotoxicity was recognized in both fractions. It is felt important to clarify further the clinical significance of changes of NK activity in relation to various treatments and prognosis in patients with brain tumors. (author)

  9. beta. -endorphin augments the cytolytic activity and interferon production of natural killer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandler, R.N.; Biddison, W.E.; Mandler, R.; Serrate, S.A.

    1986-02-01

    The in vitro effects of the neurohormone ..beta..-endorphin (b-end) on natural killer (NK) activity and interferon (IFN) production mediated by large granular lymphocytes (LGL) were investigated. LGL-enriched fractions from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from normal human volunteers were obtained by fractionation over discontinuous Percoll gradients. LGL were preincubated with or without various concentrations of b-end or the closely related peptides ..cap alpha..-endorphin (a-end), ..gamma..-endorphin (g-end), or D-ALA/sub 2/-..beta..-endorphin (D-ALA/sub 2/-b-end), a synthetic b-end analogue. NK activity was assayed on /sup 51/Cr-labeled K562 target cells. Preincubation of LGL effectors (but not K562 targets) for 2 to 18 hr with concentrations of b-end between 10/sup -7/ M and 10/sup -10/ M produced significant augmentation of NK cytolytic activity (mean percentage increase: 63%). The classic opiate antagonist naloxone blocked the enhancing effect when used at a 100-fold molar excess relative to b-end. These findings demonstrate that b-end enhances NK activity and IFN production of purified LGL, and suggests that b-end might bind to an opioid receptor on LGL that can be blocked by naloxone. These results lend support to the concepts of regulation of the immune response by neurohormones and the functional relationship between the nervous and immune systems.

  10. Natural Killer Cell Activity and Interleukin-12 in Metabolically Healthy versus Metabolically Unhealthy Overweight Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjoo; Kim, Minkyung; Yoo, Hye Jin; Lee, Jong Ho

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the immune system is involved in the different metabolic circumstances in healthy and unhealthy overweight individuals. We examined the metabolic and immune characteristics of 117 overweight individuals. Subjects were classified as metabolically healthy overweight (MHO, n = 72) or metabolically unhealthy overweight (MUO, n = 45). The immune response was measured by circulating levels of natural killer (NK) cell activity and cytokines. Both groups were comparable with regards to age, sex distribution, smoking and drinking status, and body mass index. When compared to the MHO group, the MUO group showed higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure, serum levels of triglyceride, glucose, glucose-related markers, and lower levels of HDL cholesterol. Compared to the MHO group, the MUO group showed 39% lower interferon-γ levels (not significant) and 41% lower interleukin (IL)-12 levels (significant). The MUO group also showed lower NK cell activity at E:T ratios of 10:1, 5:1, 2.5:1, and 1.25:1 (all Ps < 0.05) than the MHO group. This study indicates that individuals displaying the MUO phenotype present an unfavorable immune system with lower NK cell activities under all assay conditions and lower serum levels of IL-12 than the activities and levels in similarly overweight MHO individuals. This result suggests that the immune system may be altered in overweight individuals who are at risk for overweight/obesity-related comorbidities. PMID:29238351

  11. Natural Killer Cell Activity and Interleukin-12 in Metabolically Healthy versus Metabolically Unhealthy Overweight Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjoo Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether the immune system is involved in the different metabolic circumstances in healthy and unhealthy overweight individuals. We examined the metabolic and immune characteristics of 117 overweight individuals. Subjects were classified as metabolically healthy overweight (MHO, n = 72 or metabolically unhealthy overweight (MUO, n = 45. The immune response was measured by circulating levels of natural killer (NK cell activity and cytokines. Both groups were comparable with regards to age, sex distribution, smoking and drinking status, and body mass index. When compared to the MHO group, the MUO group showed higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure, serum levels of triglyceride, glucose, glucose-related markers, and lower levels of HDL cholesterol. Compared to the MHO group, the MUO group showed 39% lower interferon-γ levels (not significant and 41% lower interleukin (IL-12 levels (significant. The MUO group also showed lower NK cell activity at E:T ratios of 10:1, 5:1, 2.5:1, and 1.25:1 (all Ps < 0.05 than the MHO group. This study indicates that individuals displaying the MUO phenotype present an unfavorable immune system with lower NK cell activities under all assay conditions and lower serum levels of IL-12 than the activities and levels in similarly overweight MHO individuals. This result suggests that the immune system may be altered in overweight individuals who are at risk for overweight/obesity-related comorbidities.

  12. Natural killer cell activities of synbiotic Lactobacillus casei ssp. casei in conjunction with dextran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, T; Asai, Y; Tamai, R; Makimura, Y; Sakamoto, H; Hashikawa, S; Yasuda, K

    2006-01-01

    We have reported previously that Lactobacillus casei ssp. casei, together with specific substrate dextran, exhibited an adjuvant effect of stimulating humoral immune responses against bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model antigen in BALB/c mice. In the present study, among the Lactobacillus species tested, L. casei ssp. casei with dextran significantly elevated the natural killer (NK) cell activities in spleen mononuclear cells from BALB/c mice in comparison to L. casei ssp. casei alone or other Lactobacillus species with or without dextran. Oral administration of L. casei ssp. casei together with dextran also resulted in a significant increase of NK cell activities in healthy human volunteers. Further, L. casei ssp. casei induced significant production of interleukin (IL)-12 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and IL-15 mRNA expression in the human intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2. L. casei ssp. casei with dextran in food also significantly elevated the survival rate of BALB/c mice bearing Meth-A cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that dietary synbiotic supplementation which is a combination of the L. casei ssp. casei used as a probiotic together with the dextran, a specific substrate as a prebiotic, efficiently elicits murine and human NK cell activities.

  13. Impact of blood processing variations on Natural Killer cell frequency, activation, chemokine receptor expression and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranbhai, Vivek; Bartman, Pat; Ndlovu, Dudu; Ramkalawon, Pamela; Ndung’u, Thumbi; Wilson, Douglas; Altfeld, Marcus; Carr, William H

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the role of natural killer (NK) cells in human disease pathogenesis is crucial and necessitates study of patient samples directly ex vivo. Manipulation of whole blood by density gradient centrifugation or delays in sample processing due to shipping, however, may lead to artifactual changes in immune response measures. Here, we assessed the impact of density gradient centrifugation and delayed processing of both whole blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at multiple timepoints (2–24 hrs) on flow cytometric measures of NK cell frequency, activation status, chemokine receptor expression, and effector functions. We found that density gradient centrifugation activated NK cells and modified chemokine receptor expression. Delays in processing beyond 8 hours activated NK cells in PBMC but not in whole blood. Likewise, processing delays decreased chemokine receptor (CCR4 and CCR7) expression in both PBMC and whole blood. Finally, delays in processing PBMC were associated with a decreased ability of NK cells to degranulate (as measured by CD107a expression) or secrete cytokines (IFN-γ and TNF-α). In summary, our findings suggest that density gradient centrifugation and delayed processing of PBMC can alter measures of clinically relevant NK cell characteristics including effector functions; and therefore should be taken into account in designing clinical research studies. PMID:21255578

  14. Mechanisms of diminished natural killer cell activity in pregnant women and neonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baley, J.E.; Schacter, B.Z.

    1985-01-01

    Because alterations in natural killer (NK) activity in the perinatal period may be important in the maintenance of a healthy pregnancy, the mechanisms by which these alterations are mediated in neonates and in pregnant and postpartum women was examined. NK activity, as measured in a 4-hr 51 Cr-release assay and compared with adult controls, is significantly diminished in all three trimesters of pregnancy and in immediately postpartum women. In postpartum women, NK activity appears to be higher than in pregnant women, although this does not reach statistical significance. Pregnant and postpartum women have normal numbers of large granular lymphocytes and normal target cell binding in an agarose single cell assay but decreased lysis of the bound target cells. NK activity of mononuclear cells from postpartum women, in addition, demonstrate a shift in distribution to higher levels of resistance to gamma-irradiation. Further, sera from postpartum women cause a similar shift to increased radioresistance in mononuclear cells from adult controls. Because radioresistance is a property of interleukin 2-stimulated NK, the shift to radioresistance may represent lymphokine-mediated stimulation occurring during parturition. In contrast, cord blood cells have a more profound decrease in NK activity as determined by 51 Cr-release assay and decreases in both binding and lysis of bound target cells in the single cell assay. The resistance of NK activity in cord cells to gamma-irradiation is also increased, as seen in postpartum women. Cord blood serum, however, did not alter radioresistance or inhibit NK activity. The results suggest that the observed diminished NK activity in pregnant women and neonates arise by different mechanisms: an absence of mature NK cells in the neonate and an alteration of the NK cell in pregnancy leading to decreased killing

  15. Changes of natural killer activity following local 60Co irradiation in intracranial tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Shin-ichi; Suda, Kinya; Yamashita, Junkoh; Takeuchi, Juji; Handa, Hajime

    1982-01-01

    Changes of natural killer activity (NK activity) by local 60 Co irradiation in intracranial tumor-bearing mice were studied by the method of 51 Cr release assay. Local irradiation was administered 10 days after intracranial transplantation of 203-Glioma which had been originally induced by 20-methylcholanthrene in C57BL mice. Irradiation suppressed the growth of tumor and prolonged the mean survival time. The 50% survival time of untreated mice was about 2.5 weeks but that of mice treated by a single dose of 1000 rad and 1500 rad of irradiation was about 4.5 weeks and 6.5 weeks respectively. NK activity of spleen cells in these mice was serially examined. NK activity was gradually increased in mice treated by local irradiation, while it was gradually decreased in mice without treatment. On the other hand, NK activity remained unchanged in non-tumor-bearing control mice. Mice treated with 1000 rad and 1500 rad of irradiation showed 44.0% and 47.6% of % specific 51 Cr release respectively 11 days after irradiation while normal mice showed 18.0%. The increased NK activity after local irradiation suggested that local irradiation might have enhanced the immunological defence mechanisms against the tumor in the tumor-bearing hosts. Some characteristics of effector cells in this assay system were examined. The cytotoxicity of spleen cells was removed by the treatment of anti-BAT serum and complement but was not removed by the treatment of anti-Thy-1.2 serum and complement. Since NK activity reflects the immunological resistance to tumors to some extent, it is felt important to clarify the significance of changes of NK activity in patients with brain tumors in relation to various treatments including surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and immunotherapy in the next step. (author)

  16. Characterization of lymphokine-activated killer cells from peripheral blood and lymph nodes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadkarni, J.J.; Jehaver, K.G.; De, A.K.; Soman, C.S.; Nadkarni, K.S.

    1993-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and lymph node lymphocytes (LNL) from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients were tested for lymphokine-activated killer cells (LAK) cells cytotoxicity using appropriate targets in a short-term 51 chromium-release assay. The results showed a significant depression in LNL-LAK activity suggesting the reduced capacity of LNL to generate LAK cells. LNL-LAK cells demonstrated significantly low percentages of cells expressing CD16, CD56 and CD25 as compared to PBL-LAK and healthy donors. The reduced capacity to generate LAK cells in lymph nodes could by due to the presence of low numbers of natural killer cells which are thought to be the main precursors of LAK cells. The IL-2 producing ability of lymph node mononuclear cells was found to by significantly higher than that of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from both healthy donors and and NHL patients. (author)

  17. ACTIVITY OF NATURAL KILLER CELLS IN BIOLOGICAL FLUIDS FROM PATIENTS WITH COLORECTAL AND OVARIAN CANCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Yunusova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the functional activity of natural killer cells in peripheral blood and ascites from patients with different stages of colorectal and ovarian cancers and benign ovarian tumors. Material and methods. The study included 10 patients with stage IIIC ovarian cancer (FIGO, 2009, 5 patients with benign ovarian tumors (BOTs, and 15 patients with colorectal cancer (T2–4N0–2M0 . The control group consisted of 5 healthy donors. To evaluate the number and functional activity of NK-cells in peripheral blood and ascites, the FACS Canto II Flow Cytometer was used. Results. In peripheral blood of patients with ovarian and colorectal cancers, the relative number of activated NK-cells capable of secreting granzyme B (GB (CD56 + CD107a + GB + PF- was significantly lower and the proportion of degranulated NK-cells (CD56 + CD107a + GB- PF- was higher than those of healthy donors. Low total NK-cell counts in peripheral blood were a distinctive feature of ovarian cancer patients (p<0.05. The proportion of activated peripheral blood NK-cells, containing granules of cytolytic enzymes GB and perforin (PF increased with tumor growth. However, lymph node metastasis in patients with colorectal cancer did not affect the level and activation of NK-cells. The comparative analysis of NK-populations in patients with benign and malignant ovarian tumors revealed that the level of CD56 + cells was significantly higher in tumor ascites compared to peripheral blood. In patients with BTs, the levels of CD56 + CD107a + and activated CD56 + CD107a + GB-PF-degranulated cells was higher in ascites than in blood. In patients with ovarian cancer, the level of degranulated cells was higher in peripheral blood than in malignant ascites. Conclusion. The tumor cells and tumor microenvironment were found to affect the number and the functional activity of NK-cells. The accumulation of free fluid within the peritoneal cavity in patients with both benign and malignant

  18. Expression and purification of soluble and stable ectodomain of natural killer cell receptor LLT1 through high-density transfection of suspension adapted HEK293S GnTI(-) cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bláha, J.; Pachl, Petr; Novák, Petr; Vaněk, O.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 109, May (2015), s. 7-13 ISSN 1046-5928 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others:OPPK(CZ) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24023 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : LLT1 * HEK293S GnTI(-) * C-type lectin-like * NK cell * glycosylation * transfection Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.407, year: 2015

  19. Scintigraphy with In-111 labeled lymphokine-activated killer cells of malignant brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kazuo; Sawamura, Yutaka; Hosokawa, Masuo; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the in vivo distribution and migration of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells to the target malignant foci in four patients with advanced malignant brain tumor. All four patients had failed to respond to prior adoptive immunotherapy. After the intravenous administration of radiolabeled LAK cells, most of the radiolabeled cells were distributed in the liver and spleen, with lesser radioactivity in the lung and bone marrow. Scintigraphy revealed the target malignant foci in all four patients to be areas of increased radioactivity. The number of radiolabeled LAK cells that accumulated in the intracranial malignant lesions, however, seemed to be insufficient to mediate regression of the solid tumor mass by direct cell-to-cell interaction. We conclude that the failure of adoptive immunotherapy could be accounted for by the poor migration of infused LAK cells to the target malignant foci. We also conclude that radionuclide study with radiolabeled lymphokine-activated culture cells against tumors is likely to be helpful as a means to investigate effective possibilities for subsequent adoptive immunotherapy. (author)

  20. Gene-carried hepatoma targeting complex induced high gene transfection efficiency with low toxicity and significant antitumor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao QQ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Qing-Qing Zhao,1,2 Yu-Lan Hu,1 Yang Zhou,3 Ni Li,1 Min Han,1 Gu-Ping Tang,4 Feng Qiu,2 Yasuhiko Tabata,5 Jian-Qing Gao,11Institute of Pharmaceutics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China; 2Department of Pharmacy, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China; 3Institute of Biochemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA; 4Institute of Chemical Biology and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China; 5Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto, JapanBackground: The success of gene transfection is largely dependent on the development of a vehicle or vector that can efficiently deliver a gene to cells with minimal toxicity.Methods: A liver cancer-targeted specific peptide (FQHPSF sequence was successfully synthesized and linked with chitosan-linked polyethylenimine (CP to form a new targeted gene delivery vector called CPT (CP/peptide. The structure of CPT was confirmed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and ultraviolet spectrophotometry. The particle size of CPT/DNA complexes was measured using laser diffraction spectrometry and the cytotoxicity of the copolymer was evaluated by methylthiazol tetrazolium method. The transfection efficiency evaluation of the CP copolymer was performed using luciferase activity assay. Cellular internalization of the CP/DNA complex was observed under confocal laser scanning microscopy. The targeting specificity of the polymer coupled to peptide was measured by competitive inhibition transfection study. The liver targeting specificity of the CPT copolymer in vivo was demonstrated by combining the copolymer with a therapeutic gene, interleukin-12, and assessed by its abilities in suppressing the growth of ascites tumor in mouse model.Results: The results showed that the liver cancer-targeted specific peptide was successfully synthesized and linked with CP to form a new targeted gene delivery vector called CPT. The composition of CPT

  1. Distinct migration and contact dynamics of resting and IL-2-activated human natural killer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Erik Olofsson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells serve as one of the first lines of defense against viral infections and transformed cells. NK cell cytotoxicity is not dependent on antigen presentation by target cells, but is dependent on integration of activating and inhibitory signals triggered by receptor–ligand interactions formed at a tight intercellular contact between the NK and target cell, i.e. the immune synapse. We have studied the single-cell migration behavior and target-cell contact dynamics of resting and IL-2-activated human peripheral blood NK cells. Small populations of NK cells and target cells were confined in microwells and imaged by fluorescence microscopy for >8 h. Only the IL-2-activated population of NK cells showed efficient cytotoxicity against the human embryonic kidney (HEK 293T target cells. We found that although the average migration speeds were comparable, activated NK cells showed significantly more dynamic migration behavior, with more frequent transitions between periods of low and high motility. Resting NK cells formed fewer and weaker contacts with target cells, which manifested as shorter conjugation times and in many cases a complete lack of post-conjugation attachment to target cells. Activated NK cells were approximately twice as big as the resting cells, displayed a more migratory phenotype, and were more likely to employ motile scanning of the target cell surface during conjugation. Taken together, our experiments quantify, at the single-cell level, how activation by IL-2 leads to altered NK cell cytotoxicity, migration behavior and contact dynamics.

  2. [Change in the activity of natural killer cells in normal subjects and in virus diseases on exposure to interferon in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, R V; Saidov, M Z; Koval'chuk, L V; Sorokin, A M; Kaganov, B S

    1984-04-01

    The activity of natural killers was examined in peripheral blood of healthy subjects and patients with chronic hepatitis and disseminated sclerosis. An attempt was made to correct natural killer activity by human leukocyte interferon in vitro. To assess the activity of natural killers, use was made of the method of serial dilutions. An optimal effector/target ratio was employed in experiments. The patients with chronic hepatitis and disseminated sclerosis demonstrated a reduction in the activity of natural killers whatever the effector/target ratio. The action of interferon in vitro is specific immunomodulatory in nature. Administration of interferon in a dose of 250 Units/ml raises the magnitude of the cytotoxic index in healthy donors and in patients with chronic hepatitis and disseminated sclerosis, making the shape of the killer activity curve approach that of normal. Such an approach can be used for preliminary assessment of the sensitivity of natural killers to interferon in viral diseases of man. The potentialities and efficacy of interferon in clinical medicine are discussed.

  3. Expansion of highly activated invariant natural killer T cells with altered phenotype in acute dengue infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaladasa, A.; Wickramasinghe, N.; Adikari, T. N.; Gomes, L.; Shyamali, N. L. A.; Salio, M.; Cerundolo, V.; Ogg, G. S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are capable of rapid activation and production of cytokines upon recognition of antigenic lipids presented by CD1d molecules. They have been shown to play a significant role in many viral infections and were observed to be highly activated in patients with acute dengue infection. In order to characterize further their role in dengue infection, we investigated the proportion of iNKT cells and their phenotype in adult patients with acute dengue infection. The functionality of iNKT cells in patients was investigated by both interferon (IFN)‐γ and interleukin (IL)−4 ex‐vivo enzyme‐linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays following stimulation with alpha‐galactosyl‐ceramide (αGalCer). We found that circulating iNKT cell proportions were significantly higher (P = 0·03) in patients with acute dengue when compared to healthy individuals and were predominantly of the CD4+ subset. iNKT cells of patients with acute dengue had reduced proportions expressing CD8α and CD161 when compared to healthy individuals. The iNKT cells of patients were highly activated and iNKT activation correlated significantly with dengue virus‐specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibody levels. iNKT cells expressing Bcl‐6 (P = 0·0003) and both Bcl‐6 and inducible T cell co‐stimulator (ICOS) (P = 0·006) were increased significantly in patients when compared to healthy individuals. Therefore, our data suggest that in acute dengue infection there is an expansion of highly activated CD4+ iNKT cells, with reduced expression of CD161 markers. PMID:26874822

  4. Effect of lymphokine-activated killer cells with or without radiation therapy against malignant brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Kunio; Kamezaki, Takao; Shibata, Yasushi; Tsunoda, Takashi; Meguro, Kotoo; Nose, Tadao [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    1995-01-01

    The use of autologous lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells to treat malignant brain tumors was evaluated in 10 patients, one with metastatic malignant melanoma and nine with malignant glioma. LAK cells were obtained by culturing autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes with human recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) for 7-28 days. All patients underwent surgery to remove as much tumor as possible and an Ommaya reservoir was implaced in the tumor cavity. Two of the 10 patients had received radiotherapy elsewhere, so were treated with LAK cells alone. Eight patients were treated with a combination of LAK cells and radiotherapy, using 1.8-2.0 Gy fractions given five times a week with a total dosage between 54 and 65 Gy. LAK cells and rIL-2 were injected to the tumor cavity via the Ommaya reservoir once a week for inpatients and once a month for outpatients. The duration of the LAK therapy ranged from 3 to 23 months (mean 13.7 mos). Neuroimaging evaluation revealed two complete responses, three partial responses, four no changes, and one progressive disease. In one patient with pontine glioma, the Karnofsky performance score was raised from 20 to 60. There were no side effects after the injection of LAK cells and rIL-2. The results suggest low-dose LAK therapy is a useful and safe treatment modality for malignant brain tumors. (author).

  5. Lysis of typhus-group rickettsia-infected targets by lymphokine activated killers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, M.; Dasch, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors recently described a subset of OKT8, OKT3-positive lymphocytes from typhus-group rickettsia immune individuals which were capable of lysing autologous PHA-blasts or Epstein-Barr virus transformed B cells (LCL) infected with typhus-group rickettsiae. In order to determine if killing by these effectors was HLA-restricted, they stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from typhus-group rickettsia immune individuals in vitro with typhus-group rickettsia-derived antigen for one week and then measured lysis of autologous LCL or HLA-mismatched LCL in a 4-6 hour Cr 51 -release assay. There was significant lysis of both the autologous and the HLA-mismatched infected targets as compared to the corresponding uninfected targets. Since this suggested that the effectors were lymphokine activated killers (LAK) rather than cytotoxic T lymphocytes, they then tested this hypothesis by stimulating PBMC from both immune and non-immune individuals in vitro for one week with purified interleukin 2 and measuring lysis of infected, autologous LCL. PBMC thus treated, from both immune and non-immune individuals, were capable of significantly lysing autologous, infected LCL as compared to the non-infected control. They therefore conclude that targets infected with typhus-group rickettsiae are susceptible to lysis to LAK

  6. Recombinant interleukin 2 stimulates in vivo proliferation of adoptively transferred lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettinghausen, S.E.; Lipford, E.H. III; Mule, J.J.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    The authors previously reported that the adoptive transfer of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells plus repetitive injections of recombinant interleukin 2 (IL 2) produced a marked reduction in established pulmonary metastases from a variety of murine sarcomas. The requirement for the exogenous administration of IL 2 prompted a subsequent examination of the role of IL 2 in the in vivo function of transferred LAK cells. The in vivo proliferation and migration patterns of lymphoid cells in C57BL/6 mice were examined after i.v. transfer of LAK cells alone, i.p. injection of IL 2 alone, or the combination of LAK cells and IL 2. A model for in vivo labeling of the DNA of dividing cells was used in which mice were injected with 5-[ 125 I]-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine ( 125 IUdR) and, 20 hr later, their tissues were removed and were counted in a gamma analyzer. A proliferation index (PI) was calculated by dividing the mean cpm of organs of experimentally treated mice by the mean cpm of organs of control mice. In animals given LAK cells alone, the lungs and liver demonstrated little if any uptake of 125 IUdR above saline-treated controls, whereas the same organs of mice receiving 6000 U of IL 2 alone displayed higher radiolabel incorporation. When mice were given LAK cells plus 6000 U of IL 2, their tissues showed an additional increase in 125 IUdR uptake

  7. Candidacidal Activity of a Novel Killer Toxin from Wickerhamomyces anomalus against Fluconazole-Susceptible and -Resistant Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Giovati

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The isolation and characterization from the sand fly Phlebotomus perniciosus of a Wickerhamomyces anomalus yeast strain (Wa1F1 displaying the killer phenotype was recently reported. In the present work, the killer toxin (KT produced by Wa1F1 was purified and characterized, and its antimicrobial activity in vitro was investigated against fluconazole- susceptible and -resistant clinical isolates and laboratory strains of Candida albicans and C. glabrata displaying known mutations. Wa1F1-KT showed a differential killing ability against different mutant strains of the same species. The results may be useful for the design of therapeutic molecules based on Wa1F1-KT and the study of yeast resistance mechanisms.

  8. Role of killer factors in the inhibitory activity of bio-control yeasts against Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus ochraceus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro da Silva Portes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the antagonism of killer positive yeast strains (isolated from 11 samples of different frozen fruit pulps against the strains of Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus ochraceus. Of the total 41 killer yeasts tested in YM agar, 19 showed antibiosis against P. expansum and A. ochraceus, with inhibition zone ranging from 10 to 18 mm and 10 to 19 mm, respectively. In the following step, the extracellular activity of Kluyveromyces sp. FP4(13 was tested performing the assay in YM broth. The antifungal activity of Kluyveromyces sp. FP4(13 cell-free culture supernatant (25ºC/96 h was more effective against the conidia germination, showing inhibition rates of 93.33 and 86.44% for P. expansum and A. ochraceus, respectively. The micelial growth inhibition was 28.45 and 21.0%, respectively. The antagonism showed by the selected yeasts could be used as a promising alternative tool to reduce and control the postharvest fungal spoilage of the fruits. However, further studies should be carried out in order to better elucidate the role of innocuous characters in antagonistic microorganisms, as well as the purification and characterization of new killer toxins.

  9. Biology Myth-Killers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, Evan

    2014-01-01

    "Biology Myth-Killers" is an activity designed to identify and correct common misconceptions for high school and college introductory biology courses. Students identify common myths, which double as biology misconceptions, and use appropriate sources to share the "truth" about the myths. This learner-centered activity is a fun…

  10. The anti-canine distemper virus activities of ex vivo-expanded canine natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Yun; Shin, Dong-Jun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Lee, Je-Jung; Suh, Guk-Hyun; Cho, Duck; Kim, Sang-Ki

    2015-04-17

    Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in induction of antiviral effects against various viruses of humans and animals. However, few data on NK cell activities during canine distemper virus (CDV) infections are available. Recently, we established a culture system allowing activation and expansion of canine non-B, non-T, large granular NK lymphocytes from PBMCs of normal dogs. In the present study, we explored the ability of such expanded NK cells to inhibit CDV infection in vitro. Cultured CD3-CD5-CD21- NK cells produced large amounts of IFN-γ, exhibited highly upregulated expression of mRNAs encoding NK-cell-associated receptors, and demonstrated strong natural killing activity against canine tumor cells. Although the expanded NK cells were dose-dependently cytotoxic to both normal and CDV-infected Vero cells, CDV infection rendered Vero cells more susceptible to NK cells. Pretreatment with anti-CDV serum from hyperimmunized dogs enhanced the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of NK cells against CDV-infected Vero cells. The culture supernatants of NK cells, added before or after infection, dose-dependently inhibited both CDV replication and development of CDV-induced cytopathic effects (CPEs) in Vero cells. Anti-IFN-γ antibody neutralized the inhibitory effects of NK cell culture supernatants on CDV replication and CPE induction in Vero cells. Such results emphasize the potential significance of NK cells in controlling CDV infection, and indicate that NK cells may play roles both during CDV infection and in combating such infections, under certain conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Pollen Killer Gene S35 Function Requires Interaction with an Activator That Maps Close to S24, Another Pollen Killer Gene in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Kubo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pollen killer genes disable noncarrier pollens, and are responsible for male sterility and segregation distortion in hybrid populations of distantly related plant species. The genetic networks and the molecular mechanisms underlying the pollen killer system remain largely unknown. Two pollen killer genes, S24 and S35, have been found in an intersubspecific cross of Oryza sativa ssp. indica and japonica. The effect of S24 is counteracted by an unlinked locus EFS. Additionally, S35 has been proposed to interact with S24 to induce pollen sterility. These genetic interactions are suggestive of a single S24-centric genetic pathway (EFS–S24–S35 for the pollen killer system. To examine this hypothetical genetic pathway, the S35 and the S24 regions were further characterized and genetically dissected in this study. Our results indicated that S35 causes pollen sterility independently of both the EFS and S24 genes, but is dependent on a novel gene close to the S24 locus, named incentive for killing pollen (INK. We confirmed the phenotypic effect of the INK gene separately from the S24 gene, and identified the INK locus within an interval of less than 0.6 Mb on rice chromosome 5. This study characterized the genetic effect of the two independent genetic pathways of INK–S35 and EFS–S24 in indica–japonica hybrid progeny. Our results provide clear evidence that hybrid male sterility in rice is caused by several pollen killer networks with multiple factors positively and negatively regulating pollen killer genes.

  12. Pollen Killer Gene S35 Function Requires Interaction with an Activator That Maps Close to S24, Another Pollen Killer Gene in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takahiko; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Kurata, Nori

    2016-05-03

    Pollen killer genes disable noncarrier pollens, and are responsible for male sterility and segregation distortion in hybrid populations of distantly related plant species. The genetic networks and the molecular mechanisms underlying the pollen killer system remain largely unknown. Two pollen killer genes, S24 and S35, have been found in an intersubspecific cross of Oryza sativa ssp. indica and japonica The effect of S24 is counteracted by an unlinked locus EFS Additionally, S35 has been proposed to interact with S24 to induce pollen sterility. These genetic interactions are suggestive of a single S24-centric genetic pathway (EFS-S24-S35) for the pollen killer system. To examine this hypothetical genetic pathway, the S35 and the S24 regions were further characterized and genetically dissected in this study. Our results indicated that S35 causes pollen sterility independently of both the EFS and S24 genes, but is dependent on a novel gene close to the S24 locus, named incentive for killing pollen (INK). We confirmed the phenotypic effect of the INK gene separately from the S24 gene, and identified the INK locus within an interval of less than 0.6 Mb on rice chromosome 5. This study characterized the genetic effect of the two independent genetic pathways of INK-S35 and EFS-S24 in indica-japonica hybrid progeny. Our results provide clear evidence that hybrid male sterility in rice is caused by several pollen killer networks with multiple factors positively and negatively regulating pollen killer genes. Copyright © 2016 Kubo et al.

  13. Effects of chloroquine, mefloquine and quinine on natural killer cell activity in vitro. An analysis of the inhibitory mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, B K; Bygbjerg, I C; Theander, T G

    1986-01-01

    ) or interleukin 2 (Il-2); preincubation of mononuclear cells with IF or Il-2 followed by addition of anti-malarial drugs decreased the inhibitory effects of the drugs. The drug-induced inhibition of the NK cell activity was not dependent on the presence of monocytes. Using monocyte depleted Percoll fractionated......Natural killer (NK) cell activity against K 562 target cells was inhibited by pharmacological concentrations of chloroquine, mefloquine and quinine. The most potent were mefloquine and quinine. The drug-induced inhibition of the NK cell activity was abolished by addition of alpha-interferon (IF...

  14. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Yeon-Jae [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hafis Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Bum-Chan [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Su-Hyung [Laboratory of Translational Immunology and Vaccinology, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Woo [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Eui-Cheol, E-mail: ecshin@kaist.ac.kr [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-21

    Cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP{sup C} in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C} protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} protein was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with the Fc portion of human IgG{sub 1} (PrP{sup C}-Fc). PrP{sup C}-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56{sup dim} NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP{sup C}-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP{sup C}-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} (PrP{sup C}-Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  15. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Yeon-Jae; Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon; Park, Bum-Chan; Park, Su-Hyung; Park, Young Woo; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrP C ) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP C in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP C protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP C protein was generated by fusion of human PrP C with the Fc portion of human IgG 1 (PrP C -Fc). PrP C -Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56 dim NK cells. PrP C -Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP C -Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP C -Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP C -Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP C -Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrP C (PrP C -Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrP C with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrP C -Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrP C -Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrP C -Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways

  16. Suppression of Natural Killer Cell Activity by Regulatory NKT10 Cells Aggravates Alcoholic Hepatosteatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kele Cui

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We and others have found that the functions of hepatic natural killer (NK cells are inhibited but invariant NKT (iNKT cells become activated after alcohol drinking, leaving a possibility that there exists interplay between NK cells and iNKT cells during alcoholic liver disease. Here, in a chronic plus single-binge ethanol consumption mouse model, we observed that NK cells and interferon-γ (IFN-γ protected against ethanol-induced liver steatosis, as both wild-type (WT mice treated with anti-asialo GM1 antibody and IFN-γ-deficient GKO mice developed more severe alcoholic fatty livers. As expected, IFN-γ could directly downregulate lipogenesis in primary hepatocytes in vitro. On the contrary, iNKT cell-deficient Jα18−/− or interleukin-10 (IL-10−/− mice showed fewer alcoholic steatosis, along with the recovered number and IFN-γ release of hepatic NK cells, and exogenous IL-10 injection was sufficient to compensate for iNKT cell deficiency. Furthermore, NK cell depletion in Jα18−/− or IL-10−/− mice caused more severe hepatosteatosis, implying NK cells are the direct effector cells to inhibit liver steatosis. Importantly, adoptive transfer of iNKT cells purified from normal but not IL-10−/− mice resulted in suppression of the number and functions of NK cells and aggravated alcoholic liver injury in Jα18−/− mice, indicating that IL-10-producing iNKT (NKT10 cells are the regulators on NK cells. Conclusion: Ethanol exposure-triggered NKT10 cells antagonize the protective roles of NK cells in alcoholic hepatosteatosis.

  17. Echinococcus multilocularis vesicular fluid inhibits activation and proliferation of natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Mougey, Valentine; Pallandre, Jean-Rene; Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Godet, Yann; Millon, Laurence

    2017-08-25

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a severe chronic helminthic disease that mimics slow-growing liver cancer. The immune evasion strategy of Echinococcus multilocularis Leuckart, 1863 remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the impact of E. multilocularis vesicular fluid (Em-VF) on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and on natural killer (NK) cells. PBMC and NK cells were exposed to Em-VF (1 µg/ml) during six days. The effect of Em-VF was assessed on CD69, viability and proliferation, and on and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 17 (IL-17) and interleukin 10, using flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Exposure to Em-VF had no bearing on PBMC's viability, proliferation and expression of CD69. In contrast, higher levels of IL-17 at day three and of TGF-β at day six were observed in PBMC supernatant after exposure to Em-VF (p Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Exposure to Em-VF induced a significant decrease of CD69 expression of NK cells at day three and a significant decrease of proliferation of NK cells at day six (p Wilcoxon signed-rank test). In contrast, NK cells viability and levels of cytokines did not vary significantly over Em-VF stimulation. Exposure to Em-VF had a significant bearing on activation and proliferation of NK cells. NK cells may play an important role in the immune response of the host against E. multilocularis.

  18. Natural cytotoxicity in immunodeficiency diseases: preservation of natural killer activity and the in vivo appearance of radioresistant killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, G.F.; Polmar, S.H.; Schacter, B.Z.; Brovall, C.; Hornick, D.L.; Sorensen, R.U.

    1986-01-01

    We studied spontaneous natural killer (NK) cell activity and radiation-resistant NK mediated cytotoxicity in four patients with clinically documented severe combined immune deficiency disease (SCID), and in one subject each with intestinal lymphangiectasia and cartilage-hair hypoplasia. We observed the preservation of spontaneous NK activity in all patients despite the presence of profound B- and T-lymphocytopenia and clinical immunodeficiency. NK activity was associated with relatively normal circulating numbers of OKM1+ lymphocytes, a population known to contain NK effectors. Spontaneous NK activity resistant to 3000 rad was increased in all patients, indicating the presence of activated natural killer cells in vivo. The concept of a chronically activated immune system in these patients was further supported by the presence of increased Ia positive T cells in all subjects tested, suggesting that radioresistant NK activity may be a useful parameter to measure when assessing in vivo immune activation. Our data, as well as that of others, supports the hypothesis that at least one population of NK cells is a distinct lineage arising at the differentiation level of myeloid and lymphoid stem cells in the bone marrow

  19. Novel N,N '-diacyl-1,3-diaminopropyl-2-carbamoyl bivalent cationic lipids for gene delivery--synthesis, in vitro transfection activity, and physicochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelios, Michael; Savva, Michalakis

    2008-01-01

    Novel N,N'-diacyl-1,3-diaminopropyl-2-carbamoyl bivalent cationic lipids were synthesized and their physicochemical properties in lamellar assemblies with and without plasmid DNA were evaluated to elucidate the structural requirements of these double-chained pH-sensitive surfactants for potent non-viral gene delivery and expression. The highest in vitro transfection efficacies were induced at +/-4:1 by the dimyristoyl, dipalmitoyl and dioleoyl derivatives 1,3lb2, 1,3lb3 and 1,3lb5, respectively, without inclusion of helper lipids. Transfection activities were reduced in the presence of either 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine alone or in combination with cholesterol for all derivatives except 1,3lb5, which maintained reporter gene expression levels at +/-4:1 and yielded increased lipofection activity at a lower charge ratio of +/-2:1. Ethidium bromide displacement indicated efficient plasmid DNA binding and compaction by the transfection-competent analogs. Dynamic light-scattering and electrophoretic mobility studies revealed lipoplexes of the active lipids with large particle sizes (mean diameter>or=500 nm) and zeta potentials with positive values (low ionic strength) or below neutrality (high ionic strength). Langmuir film balance studies showed high in-plane elasticity of these derivatives in isolation. In agreement with the monolayer experiments, fluorescence polarization studies verified the fluid nature of the highly transfection-efficient amphiphiles, with gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transitions below physiological temperature. The active compounds also interacted with endosome-mimicking vesicles to a greater extent than the poorly active derivative 1,3lb4, as revealed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. Taken together, the results suggest that well-hydrated and highly elastic cationic lipids with increased acyl chain fluidity and minimal cytotoxicity elicit high transfection activity.

  20. Monocyte-Derived Signals Activate Human Natural Killer Cells in Response to Leishmania Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messlinger, Helena; Sebald, Heidi; Heger, Lukas; Dudziak, Diana; Bogdan, Christian; Schleicher, Ulrike

    2018-01-01

    Activated natural killer (NK) cells release interferon (IFN)-γ, which is crucial for the control of intracellular pathogens such as Leishmania. In contrast to experimental murine leishmaniasis, the human NK cell response to Leishmania is still poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the interaction of human blood NK cells with promastigotes of different Leishmania species (Leishmania major, Leishmania mexicana, Leishmania infantum, and Leishmania donovani). When peripheral blood mononuclear cells or purified NK cells and monocytes (all derived from healthy blood donors from Germany without a history of leishmaniasis) were exposed to promastigotes, NK cells showed increased surface expression of the activation marker CD69. The extent of this effect varied depending on the Leishmania species; differences between dermotropic and viscerotropic L. infantum strains were not observed. Upregulation of CD69 required direct contact between monocytes and Leishmania and was partly inhibitable by anti-interleukin (IL)-18. Unexpectedly, IL-18 was undetectable in most of the supernatants (SNs) of monocyte/parasite cocultures. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of non-permeabilized cells revealed that Leishmania-infected monocytes trans-presented IL-18 to NK cells. Native, but not heat-treated SNs of monocyte/Leishmania cocultures also induced CD69 on NK cells, indicating the involvement of a soluble heat-labile factor other than IL-18. A role for the NK cell-activating cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-12, IL-15, IL-21, and IFN-α/β was excluded. The increase of CD69 was not paralleled by NK cell IFN-γ production or enhanced cytotoxicity. However, prior exposure of NK cells to Leishmania parasites synergistically increased their IFN-γ release in response to IL-12, which was dependent on endogenous IL-18. CD1c+ dendritic cells were identified as possible source of Leishmania-induced IL-12. Finally, we observed that direct contact between Leishmania and NK cells reduced the

  1. Monocyte-Derived Signals Activate Human Natural Killer Cells in Response to Leishmania Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Messlinger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated natural killer (NK cells release interferon (IFN-γ, which is crucial for the control of intracellular pathogens such as Leishmania. In contrast to experimental murine leishmaniasis, the human NK cell response to Leishmania is still poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the interaction of human blood NK cells with promastigotes of different Leishmania species (Leishmania major, Leishmania mexicana, Leishmania infantum, and Leishmania donovani. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells or purified NK cells and monocytes (all derived from healthy blood donors from Germany without a history of leishmaniasis were exposed to promastigotes, NK cells showed increased surface expression of the activation marker CD69. The extent of this effect varied depending on the Leishmania species; differences between dermotropic and viscerotropic L. infantum strains were not observed. Upregulation of CD69 required direct contact between monocytes and Leishmania and was partly inhibitable by anti-interleukin (IL-18. Unexpectedly, IL-18 was undetectable in most of the supernatants (SNs of monocyte/parasite cocultures. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of non-permeabilized cells revealed that Leishmania-infected monocytes trans-presented IL-18 to NK cells. Native, but not heat-treated SNs of monocyte/Leishmania cocultures also induced CD69 on NK cells, indicating the involvement of a soluble heat-labile factor other than IL-18. A role for the NK cell-activating cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-12, IL-15, IL-21, and IFN-α/β was excluded. The increase of CD69 was not paralleled by NK cell IFN-γ production or enhanced cytotoxicity. However, prior exposure of NK cells to Leishmania parasites synergistically increased their IFN-γ release in response to IL-12, which was dependent on endogenous IL-18. CD1c+ dendritic cells were identified as possible source of Leishmania-induced IL-12. Finally, we observed that direct contact between Leishmania and NK cells

  2. Peptide Dendrimer/Lipid Hybrid Systems Are Efficient DNA Transfection Reagents: Structure–Activity Relationships Highlight the Role of Charge Distribution Across Dendrimer Generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Efficient DNA delivery into cells is the prerequisite of the genetic manipulation of organisms in molecular and cellular biology as well as, ultimately, in nonviral gene therapy. Current reagents, however, are relatively inefficient, and structure–activity relationships to guide their improvement are hard to come by. We now explore peptide dendrimers as a new type of transfection reagent and provide a quantitative framework for their evaluation. A collection of dendrimers with cationic and hydrophobic amino acid motifs (such as KK, KA, KH, KL, and LL) distributed across three dendrimer generations was synthesized by a solid-phase protocol that provides ready access to dendrimers in milligram quantities. In conjunction with a lipid component (DOTMA/DOPE), the best reagent, G1,2,3-KL ((LysLeu)8(LysLysLeu)4(LysLysLeu)2LysGlySerCys-NH2), improves transfection by 6–10-fold over commercial reagents under their respective optimal conditions. Emerging structure–activity relationships show that dendrimers with cationic and hydrophobic residues distributed in each generation are transfecting most efficiently. The trigenerational dendritic structure has an advantage over a linear analogue worth up to an order of magnitude. The success of placing the decisive cationic charge patterns in inner shells rather than previously on the surface of macromolecules suggests that this class of dendrimers significantly differs from existing transfection reagents. In the future, this platform may be tuned further and coupled to cell-targeting moieties to enhance transfection and cell specificity. PMID:23682947

  3. Brominated flame retardants, tetrabromobisphenol A and hexabromocyclododecane, activate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in human natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cato, Anita; Celada, Lindsay; Kibakaya, Esther Caroline; Simmons, Nadia; Whalen, Margaret M

    2014-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells provide a vital surveillance against virally infected cells, tumor cells, and antibody-coated cells through the release of cytolytic mediators and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a brominated flame retardant used primarily in expanded (EPS) and extruded (XPS) polystyrene foams for thermal insulation in the building and construction industry. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is used both as a reactive and an additive flame retardant in a variety of materials. HBCD and TBBPA contaminate the environment and are found in human blood samples. In previous studies, we have shown that other environmental contaminants, such as the dibutyltin (DBT) and tributyltin (TBT), decrease NK lytic function by activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the NK cells. HBCD and TBBPA also interfere with NK cell(s) lytic function. The current study evaluates whether HBCD and/or TBBPA have the capacity to activate MAPKs and MAPK kinases (MAP2Ks). The effects of concentrations of HBCD and TBBPA that inhibited lytic function on the phosphorylation state and total levels of the MAPKs (p44/42, p38, and JNK) and the phosphorylation and total levels of the MAP2Ks (MEK1/2 and MKK3/6) were examined. Results indicate that exposure of human NK cells to 10-0.5 μM HBCD or TBBPA activate MAPKs and MAP2Ks. This HBCD and TBBPA-induced activation of MAPKs may leave them unavailable for activation by virally infected or tumor target cells and thus contributes to the observed decreases in lytic function seen in NK cells exposed to HBCD and TBBPA.

  4. Effects of 5-azacytidine on natural killer cell activating receptor expression in patients with refractory anemia with excess of blasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Régis T. Costello

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic drugs modify DNA methylation and are used in refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB. These drugs may reactivate anti-oncogene expression and restore a normal phenotype instead of inducing antitumor toxicity, although they also have immunosuppressive effects on T-lymphocytes [1] In RAEB and acute myeloid leukemia, a defect in natural killer (NK cell cytotoxicity has been shown, which relies on abnormal expression of activating receptors. Previous study has shown that 5-azacytidine impaired mRNA synthesis and induced apoptosis in NK cells [2]. In this study we investigated the effect of the demethylating drug 5-azacytidine (Vidaza® on NK receptors with the hypothesis that demethylation of the promoters of activating NK receptor genes induces gene reactivation and thus may increase their expression.

  5. Gut-targeted immunonutrition boosting natural killer cell activity using Saccharomyces boulardii lysates in immuno-compromised healthy elderly subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Yasuhiro; Marotta, Francesco; Kantah, Makoto K; Zerbinati, Nicola; Kushugulova, Almagul; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Illuzzi, Nicola; Sapienza, Chiara; Takadanohara, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Riyichi; Catanzaro, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the immunomodulatory effect of KC-1317 (a symbiotic mixture containing Saccharomyces boulardii lysate in a cranberry, colostrum-derived lactoferrin, fragaria, and lactose mixture) supplementation in immune-compromised but otherwise healthy elderly subjects. A liquid formulation of KC-1317 was administered in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) fashion to healthy volunteers (65-79 years) previously selected for low natural killer (NK) cell activity, and this parameter was checked at the completion of the study. A significant improvement in NK cell activity of KC-1317 consumers was observed as compared to placebo at the end of 2 months. Although preliminary, these beneficial immune-modulatory effects of KC-1317 in aged individuals might indicate its employment within a wider age-management strategy.

  6. 2B4 expression on natural killer cells increases in HIV-1 infected patients followed prospectively during highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, S R; Ullum, H; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection influences natural killer (NK) cell expression of inhibitory NK receptors and activating natural cytotoxicity receptors. It is unknown whether expression of the co-stimulatory NK cell receptor 2B4 (CD244) on NK cells and CD3+ CD8+ cells are affected ...

  7. Anti-tumor efficacy of lymphokine-activated killer cells and recombinant interleukin 2 in vivo: direct correlation between reduction of established metastases and cytolytic activity of lymphokine-activated killer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mule, J.J.; Yang, J.; Shu, S.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that the incubation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes or murine splenocytes in recombinant interleukin 2 (RIL 2) resulted in the generation of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells capable of lysing a broad spectrum of fresh tumors in short-term chromium-release assays. Moreover, injections of LAK cells plus RIL 2 were highly effective in eliminating established 3 day metastases in the lung and liver. We have examined several parameters to define whether or not the cytolytic activity of LAK cells as measured in vitro correlated directly with the in vivo anti-tumor efficacy of adoptively transferred LAK cells. LAK cells plus RIL 2 could mediate marked reductions of established pulmonary metastases in mice rendered T cell deficient by adult thymectomy and lethal, total body irradiation followed by reconstitution with T cell-depleted bone marrow and spleen cells. Thus there was no requirement for additional T lymphocytes of host origin for successful therapy with adoptively transferred LAK cells plus RIL 2. Fresh splenocytes depleted of T cells by anti-Thy-1.2 monoclonal antibody plus complement generated LAK cells that were as highly lytic to fresh tumor in vitro and were as effective in reducing established pulmonary metastases as those generated from untreated or complement-treated splenocytes. Thus, the precursor to LAK cells with anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo did not express the Thy-1 antigenic marker. In contrast, treatment of LAK effector cells (those generated from a 3-day incubation of fresh, normal splenocytes in RIL 2) with anti-Thy-1.2 antibody plus complement reduced or abolished their in vitro cytolytic activity

  8. Skewed distribution of circulating activated natural killer T (NKT) cells in patients with common variable immunodeficiency disorders (CVID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Karina I; Melo, Karina M; Bruno, Fernanda R; Snyder-Cappione, Jennifer E; Nixon, Douglas F; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz T; Kallas, Esper G

    2010-09-09

    Common variable immunodeficiency disorder (CVID) is the commonest cause of primary antibody failure in adults and children, and characterized clinically by recurrent bacterial infections and autoimmune manifestations. Several innate immune defects have been described in CVID, but no study has yet investigated the frequency, phenotype or function of the key regulatory cell population, natural killer T (NKT) cells. We measured the frequencies and subsets of NKT cells in patients with CVID and compared these to healthy controls. Our results show a skewing of NKT cell subsets, with CD4+ NKT cells at higher frequencies, and CD8+ NKT cells at lower frequencies. However, these cells were highly activated and expression CD161. The NKT cells had a higher expression of CCR5 and concomitantly expression of CCR5+CD69+CXCR6 suggesting a compensation of the remaining population of NKT cells for rapid effector action.

  9. Spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) activity in human small-cell lung carcinoma cells following transfection with a genomic SSAT construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Applegren, Nancy B; Devereux, Wendy; Hacker, Amy; Smith, Renee; Wang, Yanlin; Casero, Robert A

    2003-07-15

    Spermidine/spermine N (1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT) activity is typically highly inducible in non-small-cell lung carcinomas in response to treatment with anti-tumour polyamine analogues, and this induction is associated with subsequent cell death. In contrast, cells of the small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) phenotype generally do not respond to these compounds with an increase in SSAT activity, and usually are only moderately affected with respect to growth. The goal of the present study was to produce an SSAT-overexpressing SCLC cell line to further investigate the role of SSAT in response to these anti-tumour analogues. To accomplish this, NCI-H82 SCLC cells were stably transfected with plasmids containing either the SSAT genomic sequence or the corresponding cDNA sequence. Individual clones were selected based on their ability to show induced SSAT activity in response to exposure to a polyamine analogue, and an increase in the steady-state SSAT mRNA level. Cells transfected with the genomic sequence exhibited a significant increase in basal SSAT mRNA expression, as well as enhanced SSAT activity, intracellular polyamine pool depletion and growth inhibition following treatment with the analogue N (1), N (11)-bis(ethyl)norspermine. Cells containing the transfected cDNA also exhibited an increase in the basal SSAT mRNA level, but remained phenotypically similar to vector control cells with respect to their response to analogue exposure. These studies indicate that both the genomic SSAT sequence and polyamine analogue exposure play a role in the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation and subsequent induction of SSAT activity in these cells. Furthermore, this is the first production of a cell line capable of SSAT protein induction from a generally unresponsive parent line.

  10. Intravenous administration of stabilized antisense lipid particles (SALP) leads to activation and expansion of liver natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramson, J L; Bodner, C A; Johnson, J; Semple, S; Hope, M J

    2000-06-01

    Stabilized antisense lipid particles (SALP) have been developed for the systemic delivery of oligonucleotides. The impact of intravenous SALP administration was measured with respect to activation of natural killer (NK) and NK1.1+ T (NKT) cells in the livers of immunocompetent mice. Treatment with a SALP containing a highly mitogenic oligonucleotide (INX-6295) generated an increase in NK cytolytic activity and cell number within the liver but did not appear to affect the number of hepatic NKT cells or their cytolytic activity. The same results were observed after intravenous administration of the mitogenic oligonucleotide alone. Interestingly, treatment with a SALP containing a weakly mitogenic oligonucleotide (INX-6300) also activated the liver NK cells, whereas the oligonucleotide alone was unable to elicit these effects. The NK stimulatory activity of a SALP containing INX-6300 required both lipid and oligonucleotide components. These results demonstrate that in addition to modifying the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of intravenously administered oligonucleotides, SALP possess immunostimulatory activity independent of oligonucleotide mitogenicity, which can serve as an adjuvant to antisense therapies for cancer.

  11. Defective natural killer and phagocytic activities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are restored by glycophosphopeptical (inmunoferón).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, A; Reyes, E; Bernstein, E D; Martinez, B; Monserrat, J; Izquierdo, J L; Callol, L; de LUCAS, P; Alvarez-Sala, R; Alvarez-Sala, J L; Villarrubia, V G; Alvarez-Mon, M

    2001-06-01

    We have investigated both modifications in natural (innate) immunity caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the effects of a glycophosphopeptical immunomodulator (Inmunoferón) treatment on COPD-associated immunoalterations. In a double-blinded clinical trial, 60 patients with COPD received glycophosphopeptical or placebo during 90 consecutive days at oral doses of 3 g/d. Fifty-six sex- and age-matched healthy control subjects were included as a reference group for immunologic parameters. Peripheral blood natural killer (PBNK) cell cytotoxic activity and phagocytic activity of peripheral monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) and polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells were assessed at baseline and then again at the end of treatments. We found both PBNK activity and phagocytic activity to be significantly decreased in patients with COPD compared with levels in healthy volunteers. The treatment with glycophosphopeptical provoked significant stimulatory effects on PBNK cytotoxic activity. This stimulation was not mediated by an increase in CD3(-)CD56(+) NK cells. Further, glycophosphopeptical significantly increased the percentage of monocytes and PMNs that phagocytize Escherichia coli in vitro, as well as increased phagocytic indices. We conclude that peripheral blood cells of patients with COPD show clear defects in natural immunity that are partially rescued by glycophosphopeptical.

  12. Bone regeneration with active angiogenesis by basic fibroblast growth factor gene transfected mesenchymal stem cells seeded on porous beta-TCP ceramic scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaodong; Zheng, Qixin; Kulbatski, Iris; Yuan, Quan; Yang, Shuhua; Shao, Zengwu; Wang, Hong; Xiao, Baojun; Pan, Zhengqi; Tang, Shuo

    2006-09-01

    Large segmental bone defect repair remains a clinical and scientific challenge with increasing interest focused on combining gene transfer with tissue engineering techniques. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is one of the most prominent osteogenic growth factors that has the potential to accelerate bone healing by promoting the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and the regeneration of capillary vasculature. However, the short biological half-lives of growth factors may impose severe restraints on their clinical usefulness. Gene-based delivery systems provide a better way of achieving a sustained high concentration of growth factors locally in the defect and delivering a more biologically active product than that achieved by exogenous application of recombinant proteins. The objective of this experimental study was to investigate whether the bFGF gene modified MSCs could enhance the repair of large segmental bone defects. The pcDNA3-bFGF gene transfected MSCs were seeded on biodegradable porous beta tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) ceramics and allografted into the 15 mm critical-sized segmental bone defects in the radius of 18 New Zealand White rabbits. The pcDNA3 vector gene transfected MSCs were taken as the control. The follow-up times were 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 weeks. Scanning electron microscopic, roentgenographic, histologic and immunohistological studies were used to assess angiogenesis and bone regeneration. In vitro, the proliferation and differentiation of bFGF gene transfected MSCs were more active than that of the control groups. In vivo, significantly more new bone formation accompanied by abundant active capillary regeneration was observed in pores of the ceramics loaded with bFGF gene transfected MSCs, compared with control groups. Transfer of gene encoding bFGF to MSCs increases their osteogenic properties by enhancing capillary regeneration, thus providing a rich blood supply for new bone formation. This new b

  13. Bone regeneration with active angiogenesis by basic fibroblast growth factor gene transfected mesenchymal stem cells seeded on porous {beta}-TCP ceramic scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Xiaodong [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1277 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430022 (China); Zheng Qixin [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1277 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430022 (China); Kulbatski, Iris [Division of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Toronto Western Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2S8 (Canada); Yuan Quan [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1277 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430022 (China); Yang Shuhua [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1277 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430022 (China); Shao Zengwu [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1277 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430022 (China); Wang Hong [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1277 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430022 (China); Xiao Baojun [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1277 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430022 (China); Pan Zhengqi [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1277 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430022 (China); Tang Shuo [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1277 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430022 (China)

    2006-09-15

    Large segmental bone defect repair remains a clinical and scientific challenge with increasing interest focused on combining gene transfer with tissue engineering techniques. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is one of the most prominent osteogenic growth factors that has the potential to accelerate bone healing by promoting the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and the regeneration of capillary vasculature. However, the short biological half-lives of growth factors may impose severe restraints on their clinical usefulness. Gene-based delivery systems provide a better way of achieving a sustained high concentration of growth factors locally in the defect and delivering a more biologically active product than that achieved by exogenous application of recombinant proteins. The objective of this experimental study was to investigate whether the bFGF gene modified MSCs could enhance the repair of large segmental bone defects. The pcDNA3-bFGF gene transfected MSCs were seeded on biodegradable porous {beta} tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) ceramics and allografted into the 15 mm critical-sized segmental bone defects in the radius of 18 New Zealand White rabbits. The pcDNA3 vector gene transfected MSCs were taken as the control. The follow-up times were 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 weeks. Scanning electron microscopic, roentgenographic, histologic and immunohistological studies were used to assess angiogenesis and bone regeneration. In vitro, the proliferation and differentiation of bFGF gene transfected MSCs were more active than that of the control groups. In vivo, significantly more new bone formation accompanied by abundant active capillary regeneration was observed in pores of the ceramics loaded with bFGF gene transfected MSCs, compared with control groups. Transfer of gene encoding bFGF to MSCs increases their osteogenic properties by enhancing capillary regeneration, thus providing a rich blood supply for new bone formation. This new

  14. Bone regeneration with active angiogenesis by basic fibroblast growth factor gene transfected mesenchymal stem cells seeded on porous β-TCP ceramic scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaodong; Zheng Qixin; Kulbatski, Iris; Yuan Quan; Yang Shuhua; Shao Zengwu; Wang Hong; Xiao Baojun; Pan Zhengqi; Tang Shuo

    2006-01-01

    Large segmental bone defect repair remains a clinical and scientific challenge with increasing interest focused on combining gene transfer with tissue engineering techniques. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is one of the most prominent osteogenic growth factors that has the potential to accelerate bone healing by promoting the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and the regeneration of capillary vasculature. However, the short biological half-lives of growth factors may impose severe restraints on their clinical usefulness. Gene-based delivery systems provide a better way of achieving a sustained high concentration of growth factors locally in the defect and delivering a more biologically active product than that achieved by exogenous application of recombinant proteins. The objective of this experimental study was to investigate whether the bFGF gene modified MSCs could enhance the repair of large segmental bone defects. The pcDNA3-bFGF gene transfected MSCs were seeded on biodegradable porous β tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ceramics and allografted into the 15 mm critical-sized segmental bone defects in the radius of 18 New Zealand White rabbits. The pcDNA3 vector gene transfected MSCs were taken as the control. The follow-up times were 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 weeks. Scanning electron microscopic, roentgenographic, histologic and immunohistological studies were used to assess angiogenesis and bone regeneration. In vitro, the proliferation and differentiation of bFGF gene transfected MSCs were more active than that of the control groups. In vivo, significantly more new bone formation accompanied by abundant active capillary regeneration was observed in pores of the ceramics loaded with bFGF gene transfected MSCs, compared with control groups. Transfer of gene encoding bFGF to MSCs increases their osteogenic properties by enhancing capillary regeneration, thus providing a rich blood supply for new bone formation. This new b

  15. Fc gamma receptor activation induces the tyrosine phosphorylation of both phospholipase C (PLC)-gamma 1 and PLC-gamma 2 in natural killer cells

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Crosslinking of the low affinity immunoglobulin G (IgG) Fc receptor (Fc gamma R type III) on natural killer (NK) cells initiates antibody- dependent cellular cytotoxicity. During this process, Fc gamma R stimulation results in the rapid activation of phospholipase C (PLC), which hydrolyzes membrane phosphoinositides, generating inositol-1,4,5- trisphosphate and sn-1,2-diacylglycerol as second messengers. We have recently reported that PLC activation after Fc gamma R stimulation can be inhibit...

  16. Improved Activation toward Primary Colorectal Cancer Cells by Antigen-Specific Targeting Autologous Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Schlimper

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy of malignant diseases with cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells showed promise in a number of trials; the activation of CIK cells from cancer patients towards their autologous cancer cells still needs to be improved. Here, we generated CIK cells ex vivo from blood lymphocytes of colorectal cancer patients and engineered those cells with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with an antibody-defined specificity for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA. CIK cells thereby gained a new specificity as defined by the CAR and showed increase in activation towards CEA+ colon carcinoma cells, but less in presence of CEA− cells, indicated by increased secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Redirected CIK activation was superior by CAR-mediated CD28-CD3ζ than CD3ζ signaling only. CAR-engineered CIK cells from colon carcinoma patients showed improved activation against their autologous, primary carcinoma cells from biopsies resulting in more efficient tumour cell lysis. We assume that adoptive therapy with CAR-modified CIK cells shows improved selectivity in targeting autologous tumour lesions.

  17. Spontaneous focal activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells in mouse liver and kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Jia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells differ from other T cells by their hyperactive effector T-cell status, in addition to the expression of NK lineage receptors and semi-invariant T-cell receptors. It is generally agreed that the immune phenotype of iNKT cells is maintained by repeated activation in peripheral tissues although no explicit evidence for such iNKT cell activity in vivo has so far been reported. Results We used an interferon (IFN-γ-inducible cytoplasmic protein, Irga6, as a histological marker for local IFN-γ production. Irga6 was intensely expressed in small foci of liver parenchymal cells and kidney tubular epithelium. Focal Irga6 expression was unaffected by germ-free status or loss of TLR signalling and was totally dependent on IFN-γ secreted by T cells in the centres of expression foci. These were shown to be iNKT cells by diagnostic T cell receptor usage and their activity was lost in both CD1 d and Jα-deficient mice. Conclusions This is the first report that supplies direct evidence for explicit activation events of NKT cells in vivo and raises issues about the triggering mechanism and consequences for immune functions in liver and kidney.

  18. Keiko, Killer Whale. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    This lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Keiko, the killer whale, lived for a long time in an aquarium and had to be taught to live independently; and that computer users can get updates on how Keiko is doing. The main activity of the lesson involves middle school students working in small groups to produce a…

  19. Lymphocyte-conditioned medium in combination with interleukin-2 effectively induces antitumour autoimmunity by adoptive transfer of short activated killer (SHAK) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buer, J; Hilse, R; Dallmann, I; Grosse, J; Kirchner, H; Zorn, U; Hänninen, E L; Franzke, A; Duensing, S; Poliwoda, H

    1995-03-01

    In this study, effective antitumour immunity was transferred by autologous short activated killer (SHAK) cells induced over four hours with lymphocyte conditioned medium (LCM) and recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2). Among eight patients with progressive metastatic renal cell carcinoma refractory to standard therapy, there were six objective tumour responses to SHAKs. Progression-free survival ranged from 0 to 8+ months, and overall survival ranged from 2 to 14+ months, with a median of 9+ months. Systemic toxicity of SHAKs was limited to flulike symptoms. Patient SHAKs provided a tumour-specific immunity, both cellular and humoral (expression and secretion of secondary cytokines, including IL-2, GM-CSF, INF-gamma and TNF-alpha), far superior to rIL-2 activated killer cells.

  20. Multi-cellular natural killer (NK) cell clusters enhance NK cell activation through localizing IL-2 within the cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miju; Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Hye Mi; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Kyung-Mi

    2017-01-01

    Multi-cellular cluster formation of natural killer (NK) cells occurs during in vivo priming and potentiates their activation to IL-2. However, the precise mechanism underlying this synergy within NK cell clusters remains unclear. We employed lymphocyte-laden microwell technologies to modulate contact-mediated multi-cellular interactions among activating NK cells and to quantitatively assess the molecular events occurring in multi-cellular clusters of NK cells. NK cells in social microwells, which allow cell-to-cell contact, exhibited significantly higher levels of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling compared with those in lonesome microwells, which prevent intercellular contact. Further, CD25, an IL-2R α chain, and lytic granules of NK cells in social microwells were polarized toward MTOC. Live cell imaging of lytic granules revealed their dynamic and prolonged polarization toward neighboring NK cells without degranulation. These results suggest that IL-2 bound on CD25 of one NK cells triggered IL-2 signaling of neighboring NK cells. These results were further corroborated by findings that CD25-KO NK cells exhibited lower proliferation than WT NK cells, and when mixed with WT NK cells, underwent significantly higher level of proliferation. These data highlights the existence of IL-2 trans-presentation between NK cells in the local microenvironment where the availability of IL-2 is limited.

  1. Propionibacterium acnes overabundance and natural killer group 2 member D system activation in corpus-dominant lymphocytic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalban-Arques, Ana; Wurm, Philipp; Trajanoski, Slave; Schauer, Silvia; Kienesberger, Sabine; Halwachs, Bettina; Högenauer, Christoph; Langner, Cord; Gorkiewicz, Gregor

    2016-12-01

    Corpus-dominant lymphocytic gastritis (LyG) is characterized by CD8 + T-cell infiltration of the stomach epithelium by a so far uncharacterized mechanism. Although Helicobacter pylori is typically undetectable in LyG, patients respond to H. pylori antibiotic eradication therapy, suggesting a non-H. pylori microbial trigger for the disease. Comparative microbiota analysis of specimens from LyG, H. pylori gastritis and healthy controls precluded involvement of H. pylori in LyG but identified Propionibacterium acnes as a possible disease trigger. In addition, the natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) system and the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-15 are significantly upregulated in the gastric mucosa of LyG patients, and gastric epithelial cells respond to microbe-derived stimuli, including live P. acnes and the microbial products short-chain fatty acids, with induction of NKG2D ligands. In contrast, H. pylori infection does not activate or even repress NKG2D ligands. Together, our findings identify P. acnes as a possible causative agent for LyG, which is dependent on the NKG2D system and IL-15 activation. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  2. Occurrence of Killer Yeast Strains in Fruit and Berry Wine Yeast Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintare Gulbiniene

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Apple, cranberry, chokeberry and Lithuanian red grape wine yeast populations were used for the determination of killer yeast occurrence. According to the tests of the killer characteristics and immunity the isolated strains were divided into seven groups. In this work the activity of killer toxins purified from some typical strains was evaluated. The analysed strains produced different amounts of active killer toxin and some of them possessed new industrially significant killer properties. Total dsRNA extractions in 11 killer strains of yeast isolated from spontaneous fermentations revealed that the molecular basis of the killer phenomenon was not only dsRNAs, but also unidentified genetic determinants.

  3. One-Year Follow-Up of Natural Killer Cell Activity in Multiple Myeloma Patients Treated With Adjuvant Lenalidomide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Besson

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a proliferation of tumoral plasma B cells that is still incurable. Natural killer (NK cells can recognize and kill MM cells in vitro and can limit MM growth in vivo. Previous reports have shown that NK cell function is impaired during MM progression and suggested that treatment with immunomodulatory drugs (IMIDs such as lenalidomide (LEN could enhance it. However, the effects of IMIDs on NK cells have been tested mostly in vitro or in preclinical models and supporting evidence of their effect in vivo in patients is lacking. Here, we monitored NK cell activity in blood samples from 10 MM patients starting after frontline induction chemotherapy (CTX consisting either of association of bortezomib–lenalidomide–dexamethasone (Velcade Revlimid Dexamethasone or autologous stem-cell transplantation (SCT. We also monitored NK cell activity longitudinally each month during 1 year, after maintenance therapy with LEN. Following frontline chemotherapy, peripheral NK cells displayed a very immature phenotype and retained poor reactivity toward target cells ex vivo. Upon maintenance treatment with LEN, we observed a progressive normalization of NK cell maturation, likely caused by discontinuation of chemotherapy. However, LEN treatment neither activated NK cells nor improved their capacity to degranulate or to secrete IFN-γ or MIP1-β following stimulation with MHC-I-deficient or antibody-coated target cells. Upon LEN discontinuation, there was no reduction of NK cell effector function either. These results caution against the use of LEN as single therapy to improve NK cell activity in patients with cancer and call for more preclinical assessments of the potential of IMIDs in NK cell activation.

  4. Natural killer cells activity in a metastatic colorectal cancer patient with complete and long lasting response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaiano, Alessandro; Napolitano, Maria; Capozzi, Monica; Tafuto, Salvatore; Avallone, Antonio; Scala, Stefania

    2017-11-16

    Here we report a case of a 70-year-old man who received adjuvant chemotherapy with fluorouracile, folinic acid and oxaliplatin after a left hemicolectomy for a stage IIIb adenocarcinoma in May 2009. During follow-up he de-veloped abdominal lymphnodes metastases evidenced by positron emission tomography- computed tomography (PET-CT) scan and increase of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level. Chemotherapy with capecitabine, oxaliplatin and bevacizumab was started in April 2012. Restaging showed a complete response and normalization of CEA. The patient received maintenance therapy with bevacizumab which was stopped in December 2013 for patient choice. In October 2014, a new increase in CEA was documented and PET-CT scan showed lung metastases. Analysis of RAS status revealed the absence of mutations, then the patient started a second-line chemotherapy with fluorouracile, folinic acid, irinotecan (folfiri) and panitumumab achieving, in January 2015, a complete response and normalization of CEA. Thereafter, folfiri was discontinued for toxicity; furthermore, upon the third occurrence of a grade 3 dermatologic toxicity, panitumumab was continued from June 2015 at 60% of the original dose and it was administered every three weeks. Until presentation of this case, the patient maintains a complete response, has no symptoms of disease and CEA is normal. Interestingly, this patient presented a high proportion of circulating natural killer (NK) cells (35.1%) with high cytotoxic activity against tumor cells. Study on the role of NK in patients with advanced colorectal cancer are ongoing.

  5. The anti-hepatocellular carcinoma activity of Mel-P15 is mediated by natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Cui, Tongxing; Peng, Lipan; Kong, Shuai; Zou, Jianqiang; Tian, Xingsong

    2017-12-01

    Mel-P15 is a peptide derived from melittin, the main toxic component in the venom of the European honeybee Apis mellifera . In the present study, the antitumor effects of Mel-P15 and the underlying molecular mechanisms of these effects in vivo were investigated. Mel-P15 directly stimulated natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity in vitro , which was increased to 55.45% at a 4 µg/ml dose of Mel-P15. In the mouse liver cancer (H22) xenograft mice model, Mel-P15 suppressed tumor growth in vivo ; the tumor inhibitory rate was 61.15% following treatment with 2 mg/kg Mel-P15. In addition, the immune response was activated following Mel-P15 treatment. Mel-P15 treatment increased the spleen and thymus indices, promoted splenocyte proliferation, stimulated NK cytotoxicity and upregulated the secretion of cytokines, including interleukin-2, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. In addition, the tumor inhibitory effect of Mel-P15 on BEL-7402-bearing nude mice was abrogated by the selective depletion of NK cells via the intraperitoneal injection of an anti-asialo GM-1 antibody. The results suggest that Mel-P15 inhibits tumor growth in vivo by promoting NK cell cytotoxicity. Mel-P15 may therefore be a potential immunotherapy candidate for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  6. Therapeutic efficacy of interleukin-2 activated killer cells against adriamycin resistant mouse B16-BL6 melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, S C; Chikkala, N F; Lewis, I; Grabowski, D R; Finke, J H; Ganapathi, R

    1992-01-01

    Development of multidrug-resistance (MDR) remains a major cause of failure in the treatment of cancer with chemotherapeutic agents. In our efforts to explore alternative treatment regimens for multidrug-resistant tumors we have examined the sensitivity of MDR tumor cell lines to lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells. Adriamycin (ADM) resistant B16-BL6 melanoma, L1210 and P388 leukemic cell lines were tested for sensitivity to lysis by LAK cells in vitro. While ADM-resistant B16-BL6 and L1210 sublines were found to exhibit at least 2-fold greater susceptibility to lysis by LAK cells, sensitivity of ADM-resistant P388 cell was similar to that of parental cells. Since ADM-resistant B16-BL6 cells were efficiently lysed by LAK cells in vitro, the efficacy of therapy with LAK cells against the ADM-resistant B16-BL6 subline in vivo was evaluated. Compared to mice bearing parental B16-BL6 tumor cells, the adoptive transfer of LAK cells and rIL2 significantly reduced formation of experimental metastases (P less than 0.009) and extended median survival time (P less than 0.001) of mice bearing ADM-resistant B16-BL6 tumor cells. Results suggest that immunotherapy with LAK cells and rIL2 may be a useful modality in the treatment of cancers with the MDR phenotype.

  7. Early activation of natural killer and B cells in response to primary dengue virus infection in A/J mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shresta, Sujan; Kyle, Jennifer L.; Robert Beatty, P.; Harris, Eva

    2004-01-01

    Dengue virus (DEN) causes the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral illness in humans worldwide. Immune mechanisms that are involved in protection and pathogenesis of DEN infection have not been fully elucidated due largely to the lack of an adequate animal model. Therefore, as a first step, we characterized the primary immune response in immunocompetent inbred A/J mice that were infected intravenously with a non-mouse-adapted DEN type 2 (DEN2) strain. A subset (55%) of infected mice developed paralysis by 14 days post-infection (p.i.), harbored infectious DEN in the central nervous system (CNS), and had an elevated hematocrit and a decreased white blood cell (WBC) count. Immunologic studies detected (i) increased numbers of CD69 + splenic natural killer (NK) and B cells at day 3 p.i., (ii) DEN-specific IgM and IgG responses by days 3 and 7 p.i., respectively, and (iii) splenocyte production of IFNγ at day 14 p.i. We conclude that the early activities of NK cells, B cells and IgM, and later actions of IFNγ and IgG likely play a role in the defense against DEN infection

  8. Use of lymphokine-activated killer cells to prevent bone marrow graft rejection and lethal graft-vs-host disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Kaplan, J.

    1989-01-01

    Prompted by our recent finding that lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells mediate both veto and natural suppression, we tested the ability of adoptively transferred LAK cells to block two in vivo alloreactions which complicate bone marrow transplantation: resistance to transplanted allogeneic bone marrow cells, and lethal graft-vs-host disease. Adoptive transfer of either donor type B6D2 or recipient-type B6 lymphokine-activated bone marrow cells, cells found to have strong LAK activity, abrogated or inhibited the resistance of irradiated B6 mice to both B6D2 marrow and third party-unrelated C3H marrow as measured by CFU in spleen on day 7. The ability of lymphokine-activated bone marrow cells to abrogate allogeneic resistance was eliminated by C lysis depletion of cells expressing asialo-GM1, NK1.1, and, to a variable degree, Thy-1, but not by depletion of cells expressing Lyt-2, indicating that the responsible cells had a LAK cell phenotype. Similar findings were obtained by using splenic LAK cells generated by 3 to 7 days of culture with rIL-2. Demonstration that allogeneic resistance could be blocked by a cloned LAK cell line provided direct evidence that LAK cells inhibit allogeneic resistance. In addition to inhibiting allogeneic resistance, adoptively transferred recipient-type LAK cells prevented lethal graft-vs-host disease, and permitted long term engraftment of allogeneic marrow. Irradiation prevented LAK cell inhibition of both allogeneic resistance and lethal graft-vs-host disease. These findings suggest that adoptive immunotherapy with LAK cells may prove useful in preventing graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease in human bone marrow transplant recipients

  9. Deficient natural killer cell function in preeclampsia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alanen, A.; Lassila, O.

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer cell activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes was measured against K-562 target cells with a 4-hour /sup 51/Cr release assay in 15 primigravid women with preeclamptic symptoms. Nineteen primigravid women with an uncomplicated pregnancy and 18 nonpregnant women served as controls. The natural killer cell activity of preeclamptic women was observed to be significantly lower than that of both control groups. Natural killer cells in preeclamptic women responded normally to augmentation caused by interferon. These findings give further evidence for the participation of the maternal immune system in this pregnancy disorder.

  10. Deficient natural killer cell function in preeclampsia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanen, A.; Lassila, O.

    1982-01-01

    Natural killer cell activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes was measured against K-562 target cells with a 4-hour 51 Cr release assay in 15 primigravid women with preeclamptic symptoms. Nineteen primigravid women with an uncomplicated pregnancy and 18 nonpregnant women served as controls. The natural killer cell activity of preeclamptic women was observed to be significantly lower than that of both control groups. Natural killer cells in preeclamptic women responded normally to augmentation caused by interferon. These findings give further evidence for the participation of the maternal immune system in this pregnancy disorder

  11. Population dynamics of the murine lymphokine activated killer system: precursor frequency and kinetics of maturation and renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen-Schaub, L B; Hemstreet, G P; Hemingway, L L; Abraham, S R; DeBault, L E

    1987-11-01

    The proliferation kinetics and population renewal of recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2)-induced murine lymphokine activated killers (LAK) arising from splenic precursors was studied. Extensive proliferation has been shown to accompany the de novo generation of LAK cytotoxicity. In this report, a thymidine 'hot pulse' suicide technique was employed to examine the sensitivity of LAK progenitors during various time periods following culture initiation. Hot pulse during the first 24 hr of culture resulted in a 30-35% reduction in lytic activity when assayed on day 5. Pulse periods between days 1 and 4 resulted in almost complete inhibition (90-95%) of lytic function when assayed on day 5. Proliferation of LAK progenitors was documented by limiting dilution analysis comparison of splenic precursors and functionally mature LAK cultures. These studies showed a 75- to 80-fold enrichment of LAK progenitors after 3 days culture in rIL-2. By flow cytometric cell cycle analysis, we demonstrated that the number of cells in the S/G2/M phase increased with the length of rIL-2 culture and represented approximately 40% of the cells by day 4. Finally, we used the rate of decay of lytic activity following irradiation as a factor to define the mean life span of a cytotoxic effector in the absence of cellular input. An exponential decrease to approximately 50% of controls was observed within 8-9 hr after irradiation. Taken together, these results suggest that the LAK system is highly dynamic and requires continuous cellular proliferation for its maintenance.

  12. In vitro and in vivo activity of a killer peptide against Malassezia pachydermatis causing otitis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarchia, Claudia; Immediato, Davide; Paola, Giancarlo Di; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Conti, Stefania; Otranto, Domenico; Polonelli, Luciano

    2014-05-01

    In order to overcome the limitations inherent in current pharmacological treatments for Malassezia pachydermatis, the cause of otitis externa in dogs, the efficacy of a killer decapeptide (KP) was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Sixteen dogs with naturally occurring M. pachydermatis otitis externa were enrolled, and the in vitro fungicidal activity of KP was evaluated using yeasts recovered from these animals. The therapeutic activity was evaluated in four groups of four animals each. The dogs were topically treated with KP (150 μl, 2 mg/ml) three times per week (group A) or every day (group B), treated with a scramble peptide every day (group C), or left untreated (group D). Assessment of clinical signs (pruritus, erythema, and lichenification and/or hyperpigmentation), expressed as mean of the total clinical index score (mTCIS), the population size of M. pachydermatis at the cytological examination (mean number of yeast cells at 40× magnification [mYC]), and culture testing (mean number of log10 CFU/swab [mCFU]), were conducted daily from the first day of treatment (T0) until two consecutive negative cultures (mCFU ≤ 2). KP showed an in vitro fungicidal effect against M. pachydermatis isolates, with an MFC90 value of 1 μg/ml. The mTCIS, mYC and mCFU were negative only in animals in group B after T8. Daily administration of KP for 8 days was safe and effective in controlling both clinical signs and the population size of M. pachydermatis causing otitis externa, thus offering an alternative to the currently available therapeutic or prophylactic protocols for recurrent cases of Malassezia otitis in dogs.

  13. Effects of Butyltins (BTs) on Mitogen-Activated-Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase (MAP3K) and Ras Activity in Human Natural Killer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celada, Lindsay J.; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2013-01-01

    Butyltins (BTs) contaminate the environment and are found in human blood. BTs, tributyltin (TBT) and dibutyltin (DBT), diminish the cytotoxic function and levels of key proteins of human natural killer (NK) cells. NK cells are an initial immune defense against tumors, virally-infected cells and antibody-coated cells and thus critical to human health. The signaling pathways that regulate NK cell functions include mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Studies have shown that exposure to BTs leads to the activation of specific MAPKs and MAPK kinases (MAP2Ks) in human NK cells. MAP2K kinases (MAP3Ks) are upstream activators of MAP2Ks, which then activate MAPKs. The current study examined if BT-induced activation of MAP3Ks was responsible for MAP2K and thus, MAPK activation. This study examines the effects of TBT and DBT on the total levels of two MAP3Ks, c-Raf and ASK1, as well as activating and inhibitory phosphorylation sites on these MAP3Ks. In addition, the immediate upstream activator of c-Raf, Ras, was examined for BT-induced alterations. Our results show significant activation of the MAP3K, c-Raf, in human NK cells within 10 minutes of TBT exposure and the MAP3K, ASK1, after one hour exposures to TBT. In addition, our results suggest that both TBT and DBT are impacting the regulation of c-Raf. PMID:24038145

  14. Bovine natural killer cells are present in Escherichia coli infected mammary gland tissue and show antimicrobial activity in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipka, Anja; Pomeroy, Brianna; Klaessig, Suzanne; Schukken, Ynte

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are early responders in bacterial infections but their role in bovine mastitis has not been characterized. For the first time, we show the presence of NK cells (NKp46+/CD3) in bovine mammary gland tissue after an intramammary challenge with

  15. Bovine natural killer cells are present in Escherichia coli infected mammary gland tissue and show antimicrobial activity in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipka, Anja; Pomeroy, Brianna; Klaessig, Suzanne; Schukken, Ynte

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are early responders in bacterial infections but their role in bovine mastitis has not been characterized. For the first time, we show the presence of NK cells (NKp46+/CD3−) in bovine mammary gland tissue after an intramammary challenge with Escherichia (E.) coli. A small

  16. Enhanced natural killer cell activation by exopolysaccharides derived from yogurt fermented with Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Seiya; Sato, Asako; Goto, Ayako; Nakamura, Marie; Ogawa, Miho; Chiba, Yoshika; Hemmi, Jun; Kano, Hiroshi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Okumura, Ko; Asami, Yukio

    2016-02-01

    Yogurt is generally recognized as a beneficial food for our health, but research into its physiological effects has focused mainly on intestinal dysfunctions such as constipation and diarrhea. We previously found yogurt fermented with Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1 (hereafter OLL1073R-1) could reduce risks of catching the common cold and flu in human trials. It was assumed that immunostimulatory exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced from OLL1073R-1 play an important role in this context. However, few studies have examined the immunostimulatory effects of traditional Bulgarian yogurts fermented with different strains of lactobacilli and their metabolites. Therefore, we screened 139 L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus strains and identified OLL1073R-1 as the most robust producer of EPS. This strain was also the only strain that induced the production of IFN-γ in vitro. Oral administration of the EPS or yogurt fermented with OLL1073R-1 and Streptococcus thermophilus OLS3059 (OLL1073R-1 yogurt) augmented natural killer (NK) cell activity and induced IFN-γ production in spleen cells in mice, whereas 2 other yogurts fermented with other strains had no effect on NK cell activity. Cellular preparations of the OLL1073R-1 strain also slightly augmented NK cell activity, but were less effective than EPS itself. The EPS-dependent stimulation of NK cell activity was abrogated in IFN-γ knockout mice and in myeloid differentiation factor 88 knockout mice. Furthermore, IFN-γ production from spleen cells stimulated with EPS was completely blocked with both anti-IL-12 and anti-IL-18 antibodies in vitro. These findings suggest that NK cell activation by OLL1073R-1 yogurt is EPS-dependent, occurs via IL-12- and IL-18-mediated IFN-γ production, and requires myeloid differentiation factor 88. We showed that traditional Bulgarian yogurt could exert immunostimulatory effects by selecting starter strains and part of the mechanisms depend on IFN-γ inducible EPS produced

  17. PENGARUH EKSTRAK JAMU TERHADAP AKTIVITAS SEL NATURAL KILLER DALAM MELISIS ALUR SEL LEUKIMIA (K-562 SECARA IN VITRO [The Effects of Commercial “Jamu” Extracts on Natural Killer Cell Activity in Lysing Leukemic Cell Line (K-562 in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Veronica D.C. 2

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cell consitutes white blood cells which specifically functions in lysing tumor and virus invected cells. In this research, a commercial “Jamu” was tested to observe its effect on NK cells activity against leukemic cell lines (K562 in vitro. Jamu was extracted with hot water, diluted and added into cell cultures consisted of a mixture of human peripheric limphocyte cells, as the source of the effector NK cells, and K562 cell line i.e., the target cells which were cell line derived from human leukemia and had been labelled with H3-thymidine. The mixture of the cells were made by culturing the two cells at the ratio of 50:1 and 100 : 1, respectively. The results showed that lysing activity of NK cells in the presence of “Jamu” water extract measured as lysing percentage and lysing index increased only slightly, which were not statiscally significant. It should be considered that the test used in this research represents only a part of the lysing mechanism by NK cells against the target cells. An in vivo test for a period of time will be recessary to elucidate ffurther this NK cell activity.

  18. Circadian variations of interferon-induced enhancement of human natural killer (NK) cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, G; Cavallo, R; Sartori, M L; Carignola, R; Masera, R; Delponte, D; Salvadori, A; Angeli, A

    1988-01-01

    We searched for circadian changes in the enhancement of the NK activity after exposure to IFN-gamma of peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM) cells obtained serially throughout the 24-h cycle. In August-October 1986, blood was drawn from 7 healthy, diurnally active and nocturnally resting male volunteers (22-34 yr) at 4-h intervals for 24 h starting at 08:00. PBM cells were immediately separated and assayed for NK cell activity, using K 562 cultured cells as a target in a 4-h 51Cr release assay after prior incubation for 20 h with buffer or 300 IU rIFN-gamma. Circadian variations of the spontaneous NK cell cytotoxicity were apparent; the activity was at its maximum at the end of the night or in the early morning and then declined in the afternoon. The 24-h rhythmic pattern was validated with statistical significance by the Cosinor method (p less than 0.02; acrophase 04:22). Maximum enhancement by IFN-gamma was attained in the second part of the night or in the early morning, i.e. in phase with the peak of the spontaneous NK cell activity. A significant circadian rhythm of the percent increase above control levels was validated by the Cosinor method (p less than 0.01; acrophase 04:03). Our findings may be of relevance to a better understanding of the mechanisms of control of human NK activity and warrant consideration as an approach to improve the effectiveness of time-qualified immunotherapy.

  19. Suicide in serial killers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David; White, John

    2010-02-01

    In a sample of 248 killers of two victims in America from 1900 to 2005, obtained from an encyclopedia of serial killers by Newton (2006), those completing suicide did not differ in sex, race, or the motive for the killing from those who were arrested.

  20. Natural Killer Cells Are Activated by Lactic Acid Bacteria-Matured Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    of certain lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxicity. Here, we investigated how human gut flora-derived lactobacilli affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human NK cells upon bacterial stimulation. Human peripheral blood NK cells were....... In contrast, a Lactobacillus paracasei strain caused the NK cells to proliferate only in the presence of monocytes. These results demonstrate that various strains of lactobacilli have the capacity to activate NK cells in vitro, in a monocyte dependent or independent way. Hence, the encounter of NK cells...

  1. Killer "Killer Examples" for Design Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspersen, Michael Edelgaard; Alphonce, Carl; Decker, Adrienne

    2007-01-01

    Giving students an appreciation of the benefits of using design patterns and an ability to use them effectively in developing code presents several interesting pedagogical challenges. This paper discusses pedagogical lessons learned at the "Killer Examples" for Design Patterns and Objects First s...... series of workshops held at the Object Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages and Applications (OOPSLA) conference over the past four years. It also showcases three "killer examples" which can be used to support the teaching of design patterns.......Giving students an appreciation of the benefits of using design patterns and an ability to use them effectively in developing code presents several interesting pedagogical challenges. This paper discusses pedagogical lessons learned at the "Killer Examples" for Design Patterns and Objects First...

  2. 'Killer' character of yeasts isolated from ethanolic fermentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceccato-Antonini Sandra Regina

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of killer, neutral and sensitive yeasts was determined from strains isolated from substrates related to alcoholic fermentations. From 113 isolates, 24 showed killer activity against NCYC 1006 (standard sensitive strain, while 30 were sensitive to NCYC 738 (standard killer strain, and 59 had no reaction in assays at 25-27°C. Two wild yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and one of Candida colliculosa were tested against 10 standard killer strains and one standard sensitive strain in a cell x cell and well-test assays at four different pHs. None of the isolates displayed strong killer activity or were sensitive to the standard strains. All belonged to the neutral type. It was concluded that although the number of killer strains was high, this character cannot be used to protect ethanol fermentation processes against yeast contaminants like those which form cell clusters.

  3. Transfection of Platyhelminthes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Moguel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flatworms are one of the most diverse groups within Lophotrochozoa with more than 20,000 known species, distributed worldwide in different ecosystems, from the free-living organisms in the seas and lakes to highly specialized parasites living in a variety of hosts, including humans. Several infections caused by flatworms are considered major neglected diseases affecting countries in the Americas, Asia, and Africa. For several decades, a particular interest on free-living flatworms was due to their ability to regenerate considerable portions of the body, implying the presence of germ cells that could be important for medicine. The relevance of reverse genetics for this group is clear; understanding the phenotypic characteristics of specific genes will shed light on developmental traits of free-living and parasite worms. The genetic manipulation of flatworms will allow learning more about the mechanisms for tissue regeneration, designing new and more effective anthelmintic drugs, and explaining the host-parasite molecular crosstalk so far partially inaccessible for experimentation. In this review, availability of transfection techniques is analyzed across flatworms, from the initial transient achievements to the stable manipulations now developed for free-living and parasite species.

  4. Combination of HIF-1α gene transfection and HIF-1-activated bone marrow-derived angiogenic cell infusion improves burn wound healing in aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, J; Liu, L; Lay, F; Wang, Q; Dou, C; Zhang, X; Hosseini, S M; Simon, A; Rees, D J; Ahmed, A K; Sebastian, R; Sarkar, K; Milner, S; Marti, G P; Semenza, G L; Harmon, J W

    2013-11-01

    Impaired burn wound healing in the elderly represents a major clinical problem. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a transcriptional activator that orchestrates the cellular response to hypoxia. Its actions in dermal wounds promote angiogenesis and improve healing. In a murine burn wound model, aged mice had impaired wound healing associated with reduced levels of HIF-1. When gene therapy with HIF-1 alone did not correct these deficits, we explored the potential benefit of HIF-1 gene therapy combined with the intravenous infusion of bone marrow-derived angiogenic cells (BMDACs) cultured with dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG). DMOG is known to reduce oxidative degradation of HIF-1. The mice treated with a plasmid DNA construct expressing a stabilized mutant form of HIF-1α (CA5-HIF-1α)+BMDACs had more rapid wound closure. By day 17, there were more mice with completely closed wounds in the treated group (χ(2), P=0.05). The dermal blood flow measured by laser Doppler showed significantly increased wound perfusion on day 11. Homing of BMDACs to the burn wound was dramatically enhanced by CA5-HIF-1α gene therapy. HIF-1α mRNA expression in the burn wound was increased after transfection with CA5-HIF-1α plasmid. Our findings offer insight into the pathophysiology of burns in the elderly and point to potential targets for developing new therapeutic strategies.

  5. Adoptive immunotherapy of human pancreatic cancer with lymphokine-activated killer cells and interleukin-2 in a nude mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marincola, F.M.; Da Pozzo, L.F.; Drucker, B.J.; Holder, W.D. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A pancreatic cancer cell line was grown in orthotopic and heterotopic positions in young Swiss/NIH nude mice, which were tested with adoptive immunotherapy. Mice were injected with 1 x 10(7) human cancer cells in the subcutaneous tissue and duodenal lobe of the pancreas. The mice were randomly divided into four groups: group IA (LAK + IL-2) (N = 25) received 2 X 10(7) human lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells from normal donors by tail vein injection followed by 10,000 units of human recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) given intraperitoneally every 12 hours for 28 days; group IB (IL-2) (N = 27) was given the same dose of IL-2 alone; group IC (RPMI-1640) (N = 18) received a placebo consisting of 1 ml of RPMI-1640 intraperitoneally every 12 hours; and group ID (LAK) (N = 14) received 2 X 10(7) LAK cells but no IL-2. Toxicity was significantly higher in group IB, with a mortality rate of 45.5% (10/22 animals) versus a 0% mortality (0/25) in group IA. None of the group IA or IB animals died of pancreatic cancer during the experiment. The animals that did not receive IL-2 died before 28 days in 14.2% of group IC and in 16.7% of group ID. The area under the growth curve of subcutaneous tumors during the course of treatment and the pancreatic tumor weight at the end of treatment were compared in each group. Subcutaneous tumors had a reduced rate of growth in group IA animals compared to all the other treatments. Pancreatic tumor growth was slowed in group IA. The animals treated with IL-2 alone (group IB) showed some slowing of tumor growth that was intermediate between group IA, group IC, and group ID. A similar experiment was done with irradiated (375 rad) mice. Nine nude mice with tumors were treated with LAK + IL-2 (group IIA), eight received IL-2 alone (group IIB), and seven received placebo (group IIC)

  6. Reverse Transfection Using Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Fujita, Satoshi; Uchimura, Eiichiro; Miyake, Masato; Miyake, Jun

    Reverse transfection from a solid surface has the potential to deliver genes into various types of cell and tissue more effectively than conventional methods of transfection. We present a method for reverse transfection using a gold colloid (GC) as a nanoscaffold by generating nanoclusters of the DNA/reagentcomplex on a glass surface, which could then be used for the regulation of the particle size of the complex and delivery of DNA into nuclei. With this method, we have found that the conjugation of gold nanoparticles (20 nm in particle size) to the pEGFP-N1/Jet-PEI complex resulted in an increase in the intensity of fluorescence of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) (based on the efficiency of transfection) from human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), as compared with the control without GC. In this manner, we constructed a method for reverse transfection using GC to deliver genes into the cells effectively.

  7. Interleukin-2 (rIL-2)-induced lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells and their precursors express the VGO1 antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denegri, J.F.; Peterson, J.; Tilley, P.

    1989-01-01

    Precursor and effector cells of recombinant interleukin-2 (r-IL-2)-induced lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) activity were investigated for their expression of VGO1. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from normal donors were purified and separated in a FACS 420 into VGO1+- and VGO1- cell fractions before and after culture for 96 hr with 100 U/ml of r-IL-2. Their lytic activity against K 562 and Daudi cells was measured in a 51Cr release assay. The majority, if not all, of the LAK effector and precursor cells was VGO1+ lymphocytes. The expression of VGO1 by LAK precursor cells remained stable under the culture conditions used in our experiments. VGO1- lymphocytes cultured with r-IL-2 demonstrated neither LAK-induced activity nor expression of VGO1 antigen

  8. Classifying serial killers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promish, D I; Lester, D

    1999-11-08

    We attempted to match the appearance and demeanor of 27 serial killers to the postmortem 'signatures' found on their victims' bodies. Our results suggest that a link may exist between postmortem signatures and two complementary appearance-demeanor types.

  9. The Size of Activating and Inhibitory Killer Ig-like Receptor Nanoclusters Is Controlled by the Transmembrane Sequence and Affects Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Oszmiana

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Super-resolution microscopy has revealed that immune cell receptors are organized in nanoscale clusters at cell surfaces and immune synapses. However, mechanisms and functions for this nanoscale organization remain unclear. Here, we used super-resolution microscopy to compare the surface organization of paired killer Ig-like receptors (KIR, KIR2DL1 and KIR2DS1, on human primary natural killer cells and cell lines. Activating KIR2DS1 assembled in clusters two-fold larger than its inhibitory counterpart KIR2DL1. Site-directed mutagenesis established that the size of nanoclusters is controlled by transmembrane amino acid 233, a lysine in KIR2DS1. Super-resolution microscopy also revealed two ways in which the nanoscale clustering of KIR affects signaling. First, KIR2DS1 and DAP12 nanoclusters are juxtaposed in the resting cell state but coalesce upon receptor ligation. Second, quantitative super-resolution microscopy revealed that phosphorylation of the kinase ZAP-70 or phosphatase SHP-1 is favored in larger KIR nanoclusters. Thus, the size of KIR nanoclusters depends on the transmembrane sequence and affects downstream signaling.

  10. Agonist/antagonist interactions with cloned human 5-HT(1A) receptors: Variations in intrinsic activity studied in transfected HeLa cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boddeke, H.W.G.M.; Fargin, A.; Raymond, J.R.; Schoeffter, P.; Hoyer, D.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of 5-HT(1A)-recognition sites and receptor-mediated release of intracellular calcium were established in two transfected HeLa cell lines (HA 6 and HA 7) expressing different levels of human 5-HT(1A) receptors (about 3000 and 500 fmol/mg protein, Fargin et al. 1989; 1991; Raymond

  11. Stochastic modeling of a serial killer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkin, M V; Roychowdhury, V P

    2014-08-21

    We analyze the time pattern of the activity of a serial killer, who during 12 years had murdered 53 people. The plot of the cumulative number of murders as a function of time is of "Devil's staircase" type. The distribution of the intervals between murders (step length) follows a power law with the exponent of 1.4. We propose a model according to which the serial killer commits murders when neuronal excitation in his brain exceeds certain threshold. We model this neural activity as a branching process, which in turn is approximated by a random walk. As the distribution of the random walk return times is a power law with the exponent 1.5, the distribution of the inter-murder intervals is thus explained. We illustrate analytical results by numerical simulation. Time pattern activity data from two other serial killers further substantiate our analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Transfected poly(I:C) activates different dsRNA receptors, leading to apoptosis or immunoadjuvant response in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchetti, Sara; Starace, Donatella; De Cesaris, Paola; Filippini, Antonio; Ziparo, Elio; Riccioli, Anna

    2015-02-27

    Despite the effectiveness of surgery or radiation therapy for the treatment of early-stage prostate cancer (PCa), there is currently no effective strategy for late-stage disease. New therapeutic targets are emerging; in particular, dsRNA receptors Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and cytosolic helicases expressed by cancer cells, once activated, exert a pro-apoptotic effect in different tumors. We previously demonstrated that the synthetic analog of dsRNA poly(I:C) induces apoptosis in the androgen-dependent PCa cell line LNCaP in a TLR3-dependent fashion, whereas only a weak apoptotic effect is observed in the more aggressive and androgen-independent PCa cells PC3 and DU145. In this paper, we characterize the receptors and the signaling pathways involved in the remarkable apoptosis induced by poly(I:C) transfected by Lipofectamine (in-poly(I:C)) compared with the 12-fold higher free poly(I:C) concentration in PC3 and DU145 cells. By using genetic inhibition of different poly(I:C) receptors, we demonstrate the crucial role of TLR3 and Src in in-poly(I:C)-induced apoptosis. Therefore, we show that the increased in-poly(I:C) apoptotic efficacy is due to a higher binding of endosomal TLR3. On the other hand, we show that in-poly(I:C) binding to cytosolic receptors MDA5 and RIG-I triggers IRF3-mediated signaling, leading uniquely to the up-regulation of IFN-β, which likely in turn induces increased TLR3, MDA5, and RIG-I proteins. In summary, in-poly(I:C) activates two distinct antitumor pathways in PC3 and DU145 cells: one mediated by the TLR3/Src/STAT1 axis, leading to apoptosis, and the other one mediated by MDA5/RIG-I/IRF3, leading to immunoadjuvant IFN-β expression. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. The Violence of Collection: "Indian Killer"'s Archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Janet

    2008-01-01

    At the close of Sherman Alexie's "Indian Killer," in a final chapter titled "Creation Story," a killer carries a backpack containing, among other things, "dozens of owl feathers, a scrapbook, and two bloody scalps in a plastic bag." Readers schooled in the psychopathologies of real and fictional serial killers will be familiar with the detail:…

  14. Grass and weed killer poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002838.htm Grass and weed killer poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Many weed killers contain dangerous chemicals that are harmful if ...

  15. Ultrasound-targeted transfection of tissue-type plasminogen activator gene carried by albumin nanoparticles to dog myocardium to prevent thrombosis after heart mechanical valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ji Jun, Ji Shang-Yi, Yang Jian-An, He Xia, Yang Xiao-Han, Ling Wen-Ping, Chen Xiao-LingDepartment of Pathology and Cardiovascular Surgery, Shenzhen Sun Yat-Sen Cardiovascular Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: There are more than 300,000 prosthetic heart valve replacements each year worldwide. These patients are faced with a higher risk of thromboembolic events after heart valve surgery and long-term or even life-long anticoagulative and antiplatelet therapies are necessary. Some severe complications such as hemorrhaging or rebound thrombosis can occur when the therapy ceases. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA is a thrombolytic agent. One of the best strategies is gene therapy, which offers a local high expression of t-PA over a prolonged time period to avoid both systemic hemorrhaging and local rebound thrombosis. There are some issues with t-PA that need to be addressed: currently, there is no up-to-date report on how the t-PA gene targets the heart in vivo and the gene vector for t-PA needs to be determined.Aims: To fabricate an albumin nano-t-PA gene ultrasound-targeted agent and investigate its targeting effect on prevention of thrombosis after heart mechanic valve replacement under therapeutic ultrasound.Methods: A dog model of mechanical tricuspid valve replacement was constructed. A highly expressive t-PA gene plasmid was constructed and packaged by nanoparticles prepared with bovine serum albumin. This nanopackaged t-PA gene plasmid was further cross-linked to ultrasonic microbubbles prepared with sucrose and bovine serum albumin to form the ultrasonic-targeted agent for t-PA gene transfection. The agent was given intravenously followed by a therapeutic ultrasound treatment (1 MHz, 1.5 w/cm2, 10 minutes of the heart soon after valve replacement had been performed. The expression of t-PA in myocardium was detected with multiclonal antibodies to t-PA by the indirect immunohistochemical method

  16. Lysis of autologous human macrophages by lymphokine-activated killer cells: interaction of effector cell and target cell conjugates analyzed by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streck, R J; Helinski, E H; Ovak, G M; Pauly, J L

    1990-09-01

    Lymphokine (i.e., interleukin 2; IL-2)-activated killer (LAK) cells derived from normal human blood are known to destroy human tumor target cells. Accordingly, immunotherapy modalities using IL-2, either alone or in combination with LAK cells, have been evaluated for eradicating metastatic cancer. In studies conducted to characterize receptors on LAK cell membrane ultrastructures, we observed that LAK cells kill autologous human monocyte-derived macrophages (M phi). In these experiments, peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy adult donor were cultured to generate LAK cells and autologous non-adherent M phi. Thereafter, conjugates were prepared by incubating for 3 h autologous populations of LAK cells and M phi. Examination of the conjugates by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) identified LAK cell-mediated killing of M phi. Moreover, SEM analysis of the LAK cell membrane architecture identified microvilli-like ultrastructures that provided a physical bridge that joined together the LAK cell and M phi. The immunological mechanism(s) underling LAK cell killing of autologous M phi is not known; nevertheless, these conjugates will provide a useful model to study membrane receptors on ultrastructures that mediate the initial stages of cytolysis that include target cell recognition and cell-to-cell adhesion. The results of our observations and the findings of other investigators who have also demonstrated LAK cell killing of autologous normal human leukocytes are discussed in the context of the association of IL-2 and IL-2-activated killer cells with side effects observed in ongoing clinical trials and with autoimmune disorders.

  17. Natural killer activity and suppressor cells in irradiated mice repopulated with a mixture of cells from normal and 89Sr-treated donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, E.M.; Kumar, V.; Bennett, M.

    1981-01-01

    Mice that have been injected with 89 Sr have fairly normal B and T cell function, but are abnormal in that they lack natural killer (NK) activity and other functions that require an intact bone marrow. These mice also have an increased potential for suppressor cell activity. We had previously shown that spleen cells from 89 Sr-treated mice could transfer low NK activity and increased suppressor cell function to lethally irradiated syngeneic recipients. To investigate the mechanisms involved in perpetuating these defects, groups of normal spleen or bone marrow cells. Recipients were assayed for their NK activity and suppressor cell function 5 to 14 wk later. it was found that the addition of normal cells in the donor inoculum resulted in normal NK activity. This indicates that low NK activity in 89 Sr-treated mice was not due to the presence of a suppressor cell that prevented NK cell generation. It was additionally found that low NK activity in recipient mice could be boosted by interferon inducers. This would indicate that NK activity in the recipients was not due to a lack of interferon-sensitive pre-NK cells. Suppressor cell function in recipient mice depended on the type and number of normal cells in the donor inoculum. Bone marrow cells were very efficient in overcoming the tendency to produce suppressor cells. It took approximately 20 times more normal spleen cells to produce the same results. The implications of these findings are discussed

  18. Dysregulated cellular functions and cell stress pathways provide critical cues for activating and targeting natural killer cells to transformed and infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raulet, David H; Marcus, Assaf; Coscoy, Laurent

    2017-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells recognize and kill cancer cells and infected cells by engaging cell surface ligands that are induced preferentially or exclusively on these cells. These ligands are recognized by activating receptors on NK cells, such as NKG2D. In addition to activation by cell surface ligands, the acquisition of optimal effector activity by NK cells is driven in vivo by cytokines and other signals. This review addresses a developing theme in NK cell biology: that NK-activating ligands on cells, and the provision of cytokines and other signals that drive high effector function in NK cells, are driven by abnormalities that arise from transformation or the infected state. The pathways include genomic damage, which causes self DNA to be exposed in the cytosol of affected cells, where it activates the DNA sensor cGAS. The resulting signaling induces NKG2D ligands and also mobilizes NK cell activation. Other key pathways that regulate NKG2D ligands include PI-3 kinase activation, histone acetylation, and the integrated stress response. This review summarizes the roles of these pathways and their relevance in both viral infections and cancer. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Oncogenic activation of JAK3-STAT signaling confers clinical sensitivity to PRN371, a novel selective and potent JAK3 inhibitor, in natural killer/T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairismägi, M -L; Gerritsen, M E; Li, Z M; Wijaya, G C; Chia, B K H; Laurensia, Y; Lim, J Q; Yeoh, K W; Yao, X S; Pang, W L; Bisconte, A; Hill, R J; Bradshaw, J M; Huang, D; Song, T L L; Ng, C C Y; Rajasegaran, V; Tang, T; Tang, Q Q; Xia, X J; Kang, T B; Teh, B T; Lim, S T; Ong, C K; Tan, J

    2018-05-01

    Aberrant activation of the JAK3-STAT signaling pathway is a characteristic feature of many hematological malignancies. In particular, hyperactivity of this cascade has been observed in natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTL) cases. Although the first-in-class JAK3 inhibitor tofacitinib blocks JAK3 activity in NKTL both in vitro and in vivo, its clinical utilization in cancer therapy has been limited by the pan-JAK inhibition activity. To improve the therapeutic efficacy of JAK3 inhibition in NKTL, we have developed a highly selective and durable JAK3 inhibitor PRN371 that potently inhibits JAK3 activity over the other JAK family members JAK1, JAK2, and TYK2. PRN371 effectively suppresses NKTL cell proliferation and induces apoptosis through abrogation of the JAK3-STAT signaling. Moreover, the activity of PRN371 has a more durable inhibition on JAK3 compared to tofacitinib in vitro, leading to significant tumor growth inhibition in a NKTL xenograft model harboring JAK3 activating mutation. These findings provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of NKTL.

  20. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-01-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leuko...

  1. Role of protein kinase C in TBT-induced inhibition of lytic function and MAPK activation in human natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraha, Abraham B; Rana, Krupa; Whalen, Margaret M

    2010-11-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that destroy tumor and virally infected cells. Previous studies have shown that exposure of NK cells to tributyltin (TBT) greatly diminishes their ability to destroy tumor cells (lytic function) while activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) (p44/42, p38, and JNK) in NK cells. The signaling pathway that regulates NK lytic function appears to include activation of protein kinase C(PKC) as well as MAPK activity. TBT-induced activation of MAPKs would trigger a portion of the NK lytic signaling pathway, which would then leave the NK cell unable to trigger this pathway in response to a subsequent encounter with a target cell. In the present study we evaluated the involvement of PKC in inhibition of NK lysis of tumor cells and activation of MAPKs caused by TBT exposure. TBT caused a 2–3-fold activation of PKC at concentrations ranging from 50 to 300 nM (16–98 ng/ml),indicating that activation of PKC occurs in response to TBT exposure. This would then leave the NK cell unable to respond to targets. Treatment with the PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I, caused an 85% decrease in the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor cells, validating the involvement of PKC in the lytic signaling pathway. The role of PKC in the activation of MAPKs by TBT was also investigated using bisindolylmaleimide I. The results indicated that, in NK cells where PKC activation was blocked, there was no activation of the MAPK, p44/42 in response to TBT.However, TBT-induced activation of the MAPKs, p38 and JNK did not require PKC activation. These results indicate the pivotal role of PKC in the TBT-induced loss of NK lytic function including activation of p44/42 by TBT in NK cells.

  2. Role of protein kinase C in the TBT-induced inhibition of lytic function and MAPK activation in human natural killer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraha, Abraham B.; Rana, Krupa; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2010-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that destroy tumor and virally infected cells. Previous studies have shown that exposures of NK cells to tributyltin (TBT) greatly diminish their ability to destroy tumor cells (lytic function) while activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) (p44/42, p38, and JNK) in the NK cells. The signaling pathway that regulates NK lytic function appears to include activation of protein kinase C (PKC) as well as MAPK activity. The TBT-induced activation of MAPKs would trigger a portion of the NK lytic signaling pathway, which would then leave the NK cell unable to trigger this pathway in response to a subsequent encounter with a target cell. In the present study we evaluated the involvement of PKC in the inhibition of NK lysis of tumor cells and activation of MAPKs caused by TBT exposures. TBT caused a 2–3 fold activation of PKC at concentrations ranging from 50–300 nM (16–98 ng/mL), indicating that activation of PKC occurs in response to TBT exposures. This would then leave the NK cell unable to respond to targets. Treatment with the PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I, caused an 85% decrease in the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor cells validating the involvement of PKC in the lytic signaling pathway. The role of PKC in the activation of MAPKs by TBT was also investigated using bisindolylmaleimide I. The results indicated that in NK cells where PKC activation was blocked there was no activation of the MAPK, p44/42 in response to TBT. However, TBT-induced activation of the MAPKs, p38 and JNK did not require PKC activation. These results indicate the pivotal role of PKC in the TBT-induced loss of NK lytic function including the activation of p44/42 by TBT in NK cells. PMID:20390410

  3. GMP-compliant, large-scale expanded allogeneic natural killer cells have potent cytolytic activity against cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okjae Lim

    Full Text Available Ex vivo-expanded, allogeneic natural killer (NK cells can be used for the treatment of various types of cancer. In allogeneic NK cell therapy, NK cells from healthy donors must be expanded in order to obtain a sufficient number of highly purified, activated NK cells. In the present study, we established a simplified and efficient method for the large-scale expansion and activation of NK cells from healthy donors under good manufacturing practice (GMP conditions. After a single step of magnetic depletion of CD3(+ T cells, the depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were stimulated and expanded with irradiated autologous PBMCs in the presence of OKT3 and IL-2 for 14 days, resulting in a highly pure population of CD3(-CD16(+CD56(+ NK cells which is desired for allogeneic purpose. Compared with freshly isolated NK cells, these expanded NK cells showed robust cytokine production and potent cytolytic activity against various cancer cell lines. Of note, expanded NK cells selectively killed cancer cells without demonstrating cytotoxicity against allogeneic non-tumor cells in coculture assays. The anti-tumor activity of expanded human NK cells was examined in SCID mice injected with human lymphoma cells. In this model, expanded NK cells efficiently controlled lymphoma progression. In conclusion, allogeneic NK cells were efficiently expanded in a GMP-compliant facility and demonstrated potent anti-tumor activity both in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Natural killer cell activity, lymphocyte proliferation, and cytokine profile in tumor-bearing mice treated with MAPA, a magnesium aggregated polymer from Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justo, G Z; Durán, N; Queiroz, M L S

    2003-08-01

    The present study examined the effects of MAPA, an antitumor aggregated polymer of protein magnesium ammonium phospholinoleate-palmitoleate anhydride, isolated from Aspergillus oryzae, on concanavalin A (Con A)-induced spleen cell proliferation, cytokine production and on natural killer (NK) cell activity in Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice. The Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) growth led to diminished mitogen-induced expansion of spleen cell populations and total NK activity. This was accompanied by striking spleen enlargement, with a marked increase in total cell counts. Moreover, a substantial enhancement in IL-10 levels, paralleled by a significant decrease in IL-2 was observed, while production of IL-4 and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was not altered. Treatment of mice with 5 mg/kg MAPA for 7 days promoted spleen cell proliferation, IL-2 production and NK cell activity regardless of tumor outgrowth. In addition, MAPA treatment markedly enhanced IFN-gamma levels and reduced IL-10 production relative to EAT mice. A 35% reduction in splenomegaly with normal number of nucleated cells was also found. Altogether, our results suggest that MAPA directly and/or indirectly modulates immune cell activity, and probably disengages tumor-induced suppression of these responses. Clearly, MAPA has an impact and may delay tumor outgrowth through immunotherapeutic mechanisms.

  5. Requirement of T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase for TRAIL resistance of human HeLa cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hyeok-Ran; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Kyung Bok; Oh, Sang-Muk

    2010-01-01

    T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) appears to be highly expressed in various cancer cells and to play an important role in maintaining proliferation of cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism by which TOPK regulates growth of cancer cells remains elusive. Here we report that upregulated endogenous TOPK augments resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). Stable knocking down of TOPK markedly increased TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of human HeLa cervical cancer cells, as compared with control cells. Caspase 8 or caspase 3 activities in response to TRAIL were greatly incremented in TOPK-depleted cells. Ablation of TOPK negatively regulated TRAIL-mediated NF-κB activity. Furthermore, expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (c-IAP1), or X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) was reduced in TOPK-depleted cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that TOPK contributed to TRAIL resistance of cancer cells via NF-κB activity, suggesting that TOPK might be a potential molecular target for successful cancer therapy using TRAIL.

  6. Activation of Protein Kinase C and Protein Kinase D in Human Natural Killer Cells: Effects of Tributyltin, Dibutyltin, and Tetrabromobisphenol A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Krupa; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, the ability of target cells to activate protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase D (PKD) (which is often a downstream target of PKC) has not been examined in natural killer (NK) lymphocytes. Here we examined whether exposure of human NK cells to lysis sensitive tumor cells activated PKC and PKD. The results of these studies show for the first time that activation of PKC and PKD occurs in response to target cell binding to NK cells. Exposure of NK cells to K562 tumor cells for 10 and 30 minutes increased phosphorylation/activation of both PKC and PKD by roughly 2 fold. Butyltins (tributyltin (TBT); dibutyltin (DBT)) and brominated compounds (tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA)) are environmental contaminants that are found in human blood. Exposures of NK cells to TBT, DBT or TBBPA decrease NK cell lytic function in part by activating the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) that are part of the NK lytic pathway. We established that PKC and PKD are part of the lytic pathway upstream of MAPKs and thus we investigated whether DBT, TBT, and TBBPA exposures activated PKC and PKD. TBT activated PKC by 2–3 fold at 10 min at concentrations ranging from 50–300 nM while DBT caused a 1.3 fold activation at 2.5 μM at 10 min. Both TBT and DBT caused an approximately 2 fold increase in phosphorylation/activation of PKC. Exposures to TBBPA caused no statistically significant changes in either PKC or PKD activation. PMID:26228090

  7. Expression Profiles of Ligands for Activating Natural Killer Cell Receptors on HIV Infected and Uninfected CD4⁺ T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay-McLean, Alexandra; Bruneau, Julie; Lebouché, Bertrand; Lisovsky, Irene; Song, Rujun; Bernard, Nicole F

    2017-10-12

    Natural Killer (NK) cell responses to HIV-infected CD4 T cells (iCD4) depend on the integration of signals received through inhibitory (iNKR) and activating NK receptors (aNKR). iCD4 activate NK cells to inhibit HIV replication. HIV infection-dependent changes in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligands for iNKR on iCD4 are well documented. By contrast, less is known regarding the HIV infection related changes in ligands for aNKR on iCD4. We examined the aNKR ligand profiles HIV p24⁺ HIV iCD4s that maintained cell surface CD4 (iCD4⁺), did not maintain CD4 (iCD4 - ) and uninfected CD4 (unCD4) T cells for expression of unique long (UL)-16 binding proteins-1 (ULBP-1), ULBP-2/5/6, ULBP-3, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class 1-related (MIC)-A, MIC-B, CD48, CD80, CD86, CD112, CD155, Intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, ICAM-2, HLA-E, HLA-F, HLA-A2, HLA-C, and the ligands to NKp30, NKp44, NKp46, and killer immunoglobulin-like receptor 3DS1 (KIR3DS1) by flow cytometry on CD4 T cells from 17 HIV-1 seronegative donors activated and infected with HIV. iCD4⁺ cells had higher expression of aNKR ligands than did unCD4. However, the expression of aNKR ligands on iCD4 where CD4 was downregulated (iCD4 - ) was similar to (ULBP-1, ULBP-2/5/6, ULBP-3, MIC-A, CD48, CD80, CD86 and CD155) or significantly lower than (MIC-B, CD112 and ICAM-2) what was observed on unCD4. Thus, HIV infection can be associated with increased expression of aNKR ligands or either baseline or lower than baseline levels of aNKR ligands, concomitantly with the HIV-mediated downregulation of cell surface CD4 on infected cells.

  8. Recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibits growth of methylcholanthrene-induced sarcoma and enhances natural killer activity of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in aging rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziolkowska, Maria; Nowak Joanna, J.; Janiak, Marek; Ryzewska, Alicja

    1994-01-01

    The effect of recombinant human tumor necrosis factors alpha (rHuTNF-α) on the growth of immunogenic, methylcholanthrene-induced sarcoma (MC-Sa) and natural killer (NK) cell activity of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in adult and aging rats was investigated. In both groups of animals the growth of transplantable MC-Sa was markedly and similarly inhibited by multiple intratumoral (i.t.) injections of rHuTF-α. This effect was accompanied by stimulation of NK activity of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in adult as well as in aging rats. Studies ''in vitro'' demonstrated additionally that rHuTNF-α was a potent stimulator of NK but not of ADCC (antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity) activity of spleen lymphocytes from healthy animals. Our results indicate that the antitumor effect of TNF-α is comparable in adult and in aging rats bearing immunogenic MC-Sa. The inhibition of MC-Sa growth may be attributed not only to the TNF-α-induced necrosis of the neoplastic tissue but also to the ''in vivo'' stimulatory effect of this cytokine upon the NK-type function of lymphocytes infiltrating the tumor mass. (author). 31 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  9. Pattern of MAP kinases p44/42 and JNK activation by non-lethal doses of tributyltin in human natural killer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aluoch, Aloice O. [Tennessee State University, Department of Biological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Odman-Ghazi, Sabah O.; Whalen, Margaret M. [Tennessee State University, Department of Chemistry, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Tributyltin (TBT) has been shown to disrupt the ability of natural killer (NK) cells to destroy tumor targets in vitro even at exposures of 25 nM for 24 h, but cell viability was not significantly impacted. Thus, evaluation of intracellular molecular events that regulate cell viability in TBT exposed NK cells are of interest. It has been suggested that activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), may promote apoptosis while activation of the MAPK p44/42 may be crucial in mediating anti-apoptotic stimuli. However, it is well established that increases in pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family members, such as Bax, results in cell death. We have set out to study the effects of a range of TBT concentrations on the MAPKs, JNK and p44/42. Additionally, we examined the effects of TBT on the levels of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and p53 as well as anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. The results show that 300-25 nM TBT activated JNK within 10 min. MAPK p44/42 was also activated by 300-50 nM TBT within 10 min. These data show that while 300-200 nM TBT activates p44/42 significantly more than JNK, the pattern of 100-25 nM TBT activation of these MAPKs may be similar. TBT exposure alters neither pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and p53 nor anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 levels at any exposure studied. The results suggest that exposure to TBT activated the anti-apoptotic regulatory p44/42 pathway to a greater extent than the pro-apoptotic JNK pathway, which may explain to some extent how NK cell viability is maintained. (orig.)

  10. Activation of p44/42 in Human Natural Killer Cells Decreases Cell-surface Protein Expression: Relationship to Tributyltin-induced alterations of protein expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudimah, Fred D.; Abraha, Abraham; Wang, Xiaofei; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2010-01-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) activates the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), p44/42 in human natural killer (NK) cells. TBT also reduces NK cytotoxic function and decreases the expression of several NK-cell proteins. To understand the role that p44/42 activation plays in TBT-induced loss of NK cell function, we have investigated how selective activation of p44/42 by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) affects NK cells. Previously we showed that PMA caused losses of lytic function similar to those seen with TBT exposures. Here we examined activation of p44/42 in the regulation of NK-cell protein expression and how this regulation may explain the protein expression changes seen with TBT exposures. NK cells exposed to PMA were examined for levels of cell-surface proteins, granzyme mRNA, and perforin mRNA expression. The expression of CD11a, CD16, CD18, and CD56 were reduced, perforin mRNA levels were unchanged and granzyme mRNA levels were increased. To verify that activation of p44/42 was responsible for the alterations seen in CD11a, CD16, CD18, and CD56 with PMA, NK cells were treated with the p44/42 pathway inhibitor (PD98059) prior to PMA exposures. In the presence of PD98059, PMA caused no decreases in the expression of the cell-surface proteins. Results of these studies indicate that the activation of p44/42 may lead to the loss of NK cell cytotoxic function by decreasing the expression of CD11a, CD16, CD18, and CD56. Further, activation of p44/42 appears to be at least in part responsible for the TBT-induced decreases in expression of CD16, CD18, and CD56. PMID:20883105

  11. Consumption of Dairy Yogurt Containing Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei, Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis and Heat-Treated Lactobacillus plantarum Improves Immune Function Including Natural Killer Cell Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ayoung; Lee, Young Ju; Yoo, Hye Jin; Kim, Minkyung; Chang, Yeeun; Lee, Dong Seog; Lee, Jong Ho

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of consuming dairy yogurt containing Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei (L. paracasei), Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis (B. lactis) and heat-treated Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) on immune function. A randomized, open-label, placebo-controlled study was conducted on 200 nondiabetic subjects. Over a twelve-week period, the test group consumed dairy yogurt containing probiotics each day, whereas the placebo group consumed milk. Natural killer (NK) cell activity, interleukin (IL)-12 and immunoglobulin (Ig) G1 levels were significantly increased in the test group at twelve weeks compared to baseline. Additionally, the test group had significantly greater increases in serum NK cell activity and interferon (IFN)-γ and IgG1 than placebo group. Daily consumption of dairy yogurt containing L. paracasei, B. lactis and heat-treated L. plantarum could be an effective option to improve immune function by enhancing NK cell function and IFN-γ concentration (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03051425). PMID:28561762

  12. Simultaneous development of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and natural killer (NK) activity in irradiated mice reconstituted with bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sihvola, M.; Hurme, M.

    1987-01-01

    Spleen cells from irradiated, bone marrow-reconstituted mice were tested for their ability to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against P815 target (ADCC-P815), ADCC against sheep red blood cells (ADCC-SRBC), and natural killer (NK) activity judged as YAC-1 lysis at different times after bone marrow reconstitution. Donor-derived ADCC-P815 effectors were found to appear in the spleens 10-12 days after bone marrow reconstitution simultaneously with the appearance of donor-derived NK cells. NK cells recently derived from bone marrow are known to express the Thy-1 antigen; the phenotype of the ''early'' ADCC-P815 effectors was found to be the same as that of NK cells, i.e., Thy-1+, asialo-GM1+. These data suggest that ADCC-P815 effector cells belong to the NK cell population. ADCC-SRBC, in contrast to ADCC-P815 and NK activity, was already high on Day 7 after bone marrow reconstitution. However, it was mediated partly by recipient-derived effectors. ADCC-SRBC effectors were characterized to be different from ADCC-P815 effectors

  13. Consumption of Dairy Yogurt Containing Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei, Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis and Heat-Treated Lactobacillus plantarum Improves Immune Function Including Natural Killer Cell Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoung Lee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of consuming dairy yogurt containing Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei (L. paracasei, Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis (B. lactis and heat-treated Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum on immune function. A randomized, open-label, placebo-controlled study was conducted on 200 nondiabetic subjects. Over a twelve-week period, the test group consumed dairy yogurt containing probiotics each day, whereas the placebo group consumed milk. Natural killer (NK cell activity, interleukin (IL-12 and immunoglobulin (Ig G1 levels were significantly increased in the test group at twelve weeks compared to baseline. Additionally, the test group had significantly greater increases in serum NK cell activity and interferon (IFN-γ and IgG1 than placebo group. Daily consumption of dairy yogurt containing L. paracasei, B. lactis and heat-treated L. plantarum could be an effective option to improve immune function by enhancing NK cell function and IFN-γ concentration (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03051425.

  14. Consumption of Dairy Yogurt Containing Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei, Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis and Heat-Treated Lactobacillus plantarum Improves Immune Function Including Natural Killer Cell Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ayoung; Lee, Young Ju; Yoo, Hye Jin; Kim, Minkyung; Chang, Yeeun; Lee, Dong Seog; Lee, Jong Ho

    2017-05-31

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of consuming dairy yogurt containing Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei ( L. paracasei ), Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis ( B. lactis ) and heat-treated Lactobacillus plantarum ( L. plantarum ) on immune function. A randomized, open-label, placebo-controlled study was conducted on 200 nondiabetic subjects. Over a twelve-week period, the test group consumed dairy yogurt containing probiotics each day, whereas the placebo group consumed milk. Natural killer (NK) cell activity, interleukin (IL)-12 and immunoglobulin (Ig) G1 levels were significantly increased in the test group at twelve weeks compared to baseline. Additionally, the test group had significantly greater increases in serum NK cell activity and interferon (IFN)-γ and IgG1 than placebo group. Daily consumption of dairy yogurt containing L. paracasei , B. lactis and heat-treated L. plantarum could be an effective option to improve immune function by enhancing NK cell function and IFN-γ concentration (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03051425).

  15. Delaware's first serial killer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguito, G B; Sekula-Perlman, A; Lynch, M J; Callery, R T

    2000-11-01

    The violent murder of Shirley Ellis on November 29, 1987, marked the beginning of the strange and terrible tale of Steven Bryan Pennell's reign as the state of Delaware's first convicted serial killer. Three more bodies followed the first victim, and all had been brutally beaten and sadistically tortured. The body of a fifth woman has never been found. State and county police collaborated with the FBI to identify and hunt down their suspect, forming a task force of over 100 officers and spending about one million dollars. Through their knowledge and experience with other serial killers, the FBI was able to make an amazingly accurate psychological profile of Delaware's serial killer. After months of around-the-clock surveillance, Steven Pennell was arrested on November 29, 1988, one year to the day after the first victim was found. Pennell was found guilty in the deaths of the first two victims on November 29, 1989, and plead no contest to the murder of two others on October 30, 1991. Still maintaining his innocence, he asked for the death penalty so that he could spare his family further agony. Steven Pennell was executed by lethal injection on March 15, 1992.

  16. Activation of p44/42 MAPK plays a role in the TBT-induced loss of human natural killer (NK) cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudimah, Fred D; Griffey, Denisha; Wang, Xiaofei; Whalen, Margaret M

    2010-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells destroy (lyse) tumor cells, virally infected cells, and antibody-coated cells. Previous studies indicated that exposure to the environmental contaminant tributyltin (TBT) decreases the lytic function of NK cells and activates mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), including p44/42 (Aluoch and Whalen Toxicology 209:263-277, 2005). If activation of p44/42 is required for TBT-induced decreases of lytic function, then activation of p44/42 to similar extents by pharmacological agents such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) should mimic to some extent changes induced in NK cells with TBT exposures. NK cells were exposed to PMA concentrations between 0.25 and 10 nM for 10 min, 1 h, and 6 h before determining the lytic function ((51)Cr release assay) and phosphorylation state of MAPKs (Western blot). A 1-h exposure of NK cells to 5 nM PMA resulted in a loss of lytic function of 47%. Western blot analysis showed that a 1-h exposure to 5 nM PMA caused a sixfold increase in phospho-p44/42 levels. Previous studies showed a fivefold increase in phospho-p44/42 in response to a 1-h exposure to 300 nM TBT. Exposure to 300 nM TBT caused about a 40% decrease in lytic function. This study supports the hypothesis that p44/42 activation (as seen with TBT exposures) can cause a loss of NK-cell lytic function.

  17. Activation of p44/42 MAPK Plays a Role in the TBT-induced Loss of Human Natural Killer (NK) Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudimah, Fred D.; Griffey, Denisha; Wang, Xiaofei; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2009-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells destroy (lyse) tumor cells, virally infected cells and antibody-coated cells. Previous studies indicated that exposure to the environmental contaminant tributyltin (TBT) decreases the lytic function of NK cells and activates mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), including p44/42 (Aluoch and Whalen, 2005). If activation of p44/42 is required for TBT-induced decreases of lytic function, then activation of p44/42 to similar extents by pharmacological agents such as Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) should mimic to some extent changes induced in NK cells with TBT exposures. NK cells were exposed to PMA concentrations between 0.25 and 10 nM for 10 min, 1 h, and 6 h before determining the lytic function (51Cr release assay) and phosphorylation state of MAPKs (Western blot). A 1 h exposure of NK cells to 5 nM PMA resulted in a loss of lytic function of 47%. Western blot analysis showed that a 1 h exposure to 5 nM PMA caused a 6 fold increase in phospho-p44/42 levels. Previous studies showed a 5 fold increase in phospho-p44/42 in response to a 1 h exposure to 300 nM TBT. Exposure to 300 nM TBT caused about a 40% decrease in lytic function. This study supports the hypothesis that p44/42 activation (as seen with TBT exposures) can cause a loss of NK-cell lytic function. PMID:20213532

  18. T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) as a prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target in glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Qiuhong; Yuan, Ping; Xue, Peipei; Lu, Hui; Yan, Meng; Guo, Dongsheng; Xu, Sanpeng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Lin, Xuan; Wang, Yong; Dogan, Soner; Zhang, Jianmin; Zhu, Feng; Ke, Changshu; Liu, Lin

    2018-01-01

    TOPK is overexpressed in various types of cancer and associated with poor outcomes in different types of cancer. In this study, we first found that the expression of T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) was significantly higher in Grade III or Grade IV than that in Grade II in glioma (P = 0.007 and P < 0.001, respectively). Expression of TOPK was positively correlated with Ki67 (P < 0.001). Knockdown of TOPK significantly inhibited cell growth, colony formation and increased sensitivities to temozolomide (TMZ) in U-87 MG or U-251 cells, while TOPK overexpression promoted cell growth and colony formation in Hs 683 or A-172 cells. Glioma patients expressing high levels of TOPK have poor survival compared with those expressing low levels of TOPK in high-grade or low-grade gliomas (hazard ratio = 0.2995; 95% CI, 0.1262 to 0.7108; P = 0.0063 and hazard ratio = 0.1509; 95% CI, 0.05928 to 0.3842; P < 0.0001, respectively). The level of TOPK was low in TMZ-sensitive patients compared with TMZ-resistant patients (P = 0.0056). In TMZ-resistant population, patients expressing high TOPK have two months’ shorter survival time than those expressing low TOPK. Our findings demonstrated that TOPK might represent as a promising prognostic and predictive factor and potential therapeutic target for glioma. PMID:29487691

  19. Cationic Phospholipids Forming Cubic Phases: Lipoplex Structure and Transfection Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koynova, Rumiana; Wang, Li; MacDonald, Robert C. (NWU)

    2008-10-29

    The transfection activity and the phase behavior of two novel cationic O-alkyl-phosphatidylcholines, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-hexylphosphocholine (C6-DOPC) and 1,2-dierucoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (di22:1-EPC), have been examined with the aim of more completely understanding the mechanism of lipid-mediated DNA delivery. Both lipids form cubic phases: C6-DOPC in the entire temperature range from -10 to 90 C, while di22:1-EPC exhibits an irreversible lamellar-cubic transition between 50 and 70 C on heating. The lipoplexes formed by C6-DOPC arrange into hexagonal phase, while the lipoplexes of di22:1-EPC are lamellar. Both lipids exhibit lower transfection activity than the lamellar-forming 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EDOPC). Thus, for the studied cationic phospholipid-DNA systems, the lipoplex phase state is a factor that does not seem to correlate with transfection activity. The parameter that exhibits better correlation with the transfection activity within the present data set is the phase state of the lipid dispersion prior to the addition of DNA. Thus, the lamellar lipid dispersion (EDOPC) produces more efficient lipoplexes than the dispersion with coexisting lamellar and cubic aggregates (diC22:1-EPC), which is even more efficient than the purely cubic dispersions (C6-DOPC; diC22:1-EPC after heating). It could be inferred from these data and from previous research that cubic phase lipid aggregates are unlikely to be beneficial to transfection. The lack of correlation between the phase state of lipoplexes and their transfection activity observed within the present data set does not mean that lipid phase state is generally unimportant for lipofection: a viewpoint now emerging from our previous studies is that the critical factor in lipid-mediated transfection is the structural evolution of lipoplexes within the cell, upon interacting and mixing with cellular lipids.

  20. Cationic phospholipids forming cubic phases: lipoplex structure and transfection efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koynova, Rumiana; Wang, Li; Macdonald, Robert C

    2008-01-01

    The transfection activity and the phase behavior of two novel cationic O-alkyl-phosphatidylcholines, 1,2-dioleoyl- sn-glycero-3-hexylphosphocholine (C6-DOPC) and 1,2-dierucoyl- sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (di22:1-EPC), have been examined with the aim of more completely understanding the mechanism of lipid-mediated DNA delivery. Both lipids form cubic phases: C6-DOPC in the entire temperature range from -10 to 90 degrees C, while di22:1-EPC exhibits an irreversible lamellar-cubic transition between 50 and 70 degrees C on heating. The lipoplexes formed by C6-DOPC arrange into hexagonal phase, while the lipoplexes of di22:1-EPC are lamellar. Both lipids exhibit lower transfection activity than the lamellar-forming 1,2-dioleoyl- sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EDOPC). Thus, for the studied cationic phospholipid-DNA systems, the lipoplex phase state is a factor that does not seem to correlate with transfection activity. The parameter that exhibits better correlation with the transfection activity within the present data set is the phase state of the lipid dispersion prior to the addition of DNA. Thus, the lamellar lipid dispersion (EDOPC) produces more efficient lipoplexes than the dispersion with coexisting lamellar and cubic aggregates (diC22:1-EPC), which is even more efficient than the purely cubic dispersions (C6-DOPC; diC22:1-EPC after heating). It could be inferred from these data and from previous research that cubic phase lipid aggregates are unlikely to be beneficial to transfection. The lack of correlation between the phase state of lipoplexes and their transfection activity observed within the present data set does not mean that lipid phase state is generally unimportant for lipofection: a viewpoint now emerging from our previous studies is that the critical factor in lipid-mediated transfection is the structural evolution of lipoplexes within the cell, upon interacting and mixing with cellular lipids.

  1. Natural killer T cells in lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Getz, Godfrey S; VanderLaan, Paul A; Reardon, Catherine A

    2011-01-01

    Cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system participate in the development of atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disorder of medium and large arteries. Natural killer T (NKT) cells express surface markers characteristic of natural killer cells and conventional T cells and bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems. The development and activation of NKT cells is dependent upon CD1d, a MHC-class I-type molecule that presents lipids, especially glycolipids to the TCR on NKT cells...

  2. Atorvastatin prevents age-related and amyloid-β-induced microglial activation by blocking interferon-γ release from natural killer cells in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Rachael

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microglial function is modulated by several factors reflecting the numerous receptors expressed on the cell surface, however endogenous factors which contribute to the age-related increase in microglial activation remain largely unknown. One possible factor which may contribute is interferon-γ (IFNγ. IFNγ has been shown to increase in the aged brain and potently activates microglia, although its endogenous cell source in the brain remains unidentified. Methods Male Wistar rats were used to assess the effect of age and amyloid-β (Aβ on NK cell infiltration into the brain. The effect of the anti-inflammatory compound, atorvastatin was also assessed under these conditions. We measured cytokine and chemokine (IFNγ, IL-2, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and IFNγ-induced protein 10 kDa (IP-10, expression in the brain by appropriate methods. We also looked at NK cell markers, CD161, NKp30 and NKp46 using flow cytometry and western blot. Results Natural killer (NK cells are a major source of IFNγ in the periphery and here we report the presence of CD161+ NKp30+ cells and expression of CD161 and NKp46 in the brain of aged and Aβ-treated rats. Furthermore, we demonstrate that isolated CD161+ cells respond to interleukin-2 (IL-2 by releasing IFNγ. Atorvastatin, the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, attenuates the increase in CD161 and NKp46 observed in hippocampus of aged and Aβ-treated rats. This was paralleled by a decrease in IFNγ, markers of microglial activation and the chemokines, MCP-1 and IP-10 which are chemotactic for NK cells. Conclusions We propose that NK cells contribute to the age-related and Aβ-induced neuroinflammatory changes and demonstrate that these changes can be modulated by atorvastatin treatment.

  3. Atorvastatin prevents age-related and amyloid-beta-induced microglial activation by blocking interferon-gamma release from natural killer cells in the brain

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyons, Anthony

    2011-03-31

    Abstract Background Microglial function is modulated by several factors reflecting the numerous receptors expressed on the cell surface, however endogenous factors which contribute to the age-related increase in microglial activation remain largely unknown. One possible factor which may contribute is interferon-γ (IFNγ). IFNγ has been shown to increase in the aged brain and potently activates microglia, although its endogenous cell source in the brain remains unidentified. Methods Male Wistar rats were used to assess the effect of age and amyloid-β (Aβ) on NK cell infiltration into the brain. The effect of the anti-inflammatory compound, atorvastatin was also assessed under these conditions. We measured cytokine and chemokine (IFNγ, IL-2, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and IFNγ-induced protein 10 kDa (IP-10)), expression in the brain by appropriate methods. We also looked at NK cell markers, CD161, NKp30 and NKp46 using flow cytometry and western blot. Results Natural killer (NK) cells are a major source of IFNγ in the periphery and here we report the presence of CD161+ NKp30+ cells and expression of CD161 and NKp46 in the brain of aged and Aβ-treated rats. Furthermore, we demonstrate that isolated CD161+ cells respond to interleukin-2 (IL-2) by releasing IFNγ. Atorvastatin, the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, attenuates the increase in CD161 and NKp46 observed in hippocampus of aged and Aβ-treated rats. This was paralleled by a decrease in IFNγ, markers of microglial activation and the chemokines, MCP-1 and IP-10 which are chemotactic for NK cells. Conclusions We propose that NK cells contribute to the age-related and Aβ-induced neuroinflammatory changes and demonstrate that these changes can be modulated by atorvastatin treatment.

  4. The eyeball killer: serial killings with postmortem globe enucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Julie; Ross, Karen F; Barnard, Jeffrey J; Peacock, Elizabeth; Linch, Charles A; Prahlow, Joseph A

    2015-05-01

    Although serial killings are relatively rare, they can be the cause of a great deal of anxiety while the killer remains at-large. Despite the fact that the motivations for serial killings are typically quite complex, the psychological analysis of a serial killer can provide valuable insight into how and why certain individuals become serial killers. Such knowledge may be instrumental in preventing future serial killings or in solving ongoing cases. In certain serial killings, the various incidents have a variety of similar features. Identification of similarities between separate homicidal incidents is necessary to recognize that a serial killer may be actively killing. In this report, the authors present a group of serial killings involving three prostitutes who were shot to death over a 3-month period. Scene and autopsy findings, including the unusual finding of postmortem enucleation of the eyes, led investigators to recognize the serial nature of the homicides. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  5. Conversion of adipose-derived stem cells into natural killer-like cells with anti-tumor activities in nude mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiu Ning

    Full Text Available Efforts to develop peripheral blood-derived nature killer (NK cells into therapeutic products have been hampered by these cells' low abundance and histoincompatibility. On the other hand, derivation of NK-like cells from more abundant cell sources such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs and umbilical cord blood (UCB requires the selection of rare CD34+ cells. Thus, we sought to convert adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs, which are abundant and natively CD34+, into NK-like cells. When grown in hematopoietic induction medium, ADSCs formed sphere clusters and expressed hematopoietic markers CD34, CD45, and KDR. Further induction in NK cell-specific medium resulted in a population of cells that expressed NK cell marker CD56, and thus termed ADSC-NK. Alternatively, the hematopoietically induced ADSCs were transduced with NK cell-specific transcription factor E4BP4 prior to induction in NK cell-specific medium. This latter population of cells, termed ADSC-NKE, expressed CD56 and additional NK cell markers such as CD16, CD94, CD158, CD314, FasL, and NKp46. ADSC-NKE was as potent as NK leukemia cell NKL in killing breast cancer cell MCF7 and prostate cancer cells DU145, PC3, LnCap, DuPro, C4-2 and CWR22, but exhibited no killing activity toward normal endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In nude mice test ADSC-NKE was able to significantly delay the progression of tumors formed by MCF7 and PC3. When injected into immunocompetent rats, ADSC-NKE was detectable in bone marrow and spleen for at least 5 weeks. Together, these results suggest that ADSCs can be converted into NK-like cells with anti-tumor activities.

  6. Irradiation-induced up-regulation of HLA-E on macrovascular endothelial cells confers protection against killing by activated natural killer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Riederer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apart from the platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1, CD31, endoglin (CD105 and a positive factor VIII-related antigen staining, human primary and immortalized macro- and microvascular endothelial cells (ECs differ in their cell surface expression of activating and inhibitory ligands for natural killer (NK cells. Here we comparatively study the effects of irradiation on the phenotype of ECs and their interaction with resting and activated NK cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Primary macrovascular human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs only express UL16 binding protein 2 (ULBP2 and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I chain-related protein MIC-A (MIC-A as activating signals for NK cells, whereas the corresponding immortalized EA.hy926 EC cell line additionally present ULBP3, membrane heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70, intercellular adhesion molecule ICAM-1 (CD54 and HLA-E. Apart from MIC-B, the immortalized human microvascular endothelial cell line HMEC, resembles the phenotype of EA.hy926. Surprisingly, primary HUVECs are more sensitive to Hsp70 peptide (TKD plus IL-2 (TKD/IL-2-activated NK cells than their immortalized EC counterpatrs. This finding is most likely due to the absence of the inhibitory ligand HLA-E, since the activating ligands are shared among the ECs. The co-culture of HUVECs with activated NK cells induces ICAM-1 (CD54 and HLA-E expression on the former which drops to the initial low levels (below 5% when NK cells are removed. Sublethal irradiation of HUVECs induces similar but less pronounced effects on HUVECs. Along with these findings, irradiation also induces HLA-E expression on macrovascular ECs and this correlates with an increased resistance to killing by activated NK cells. Irradiation had no effect on HLA-E expression on microvascular ECs and the sensitivity of these cells to NK cells remained unaffected. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These data emphasize that an irradiation

  7. Dengue Virus-Infected Dendritic Cells, but Not Monocytes, Activate Natural Killer Cells through a Contact-Dependent Mechanism Involving Adhesion Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Vivian Vasconcelos; Ye, Weijian; Chen, Qingfeng; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Preiser, Peter; Ooi, Eng Eong; Chen, Jianzhu

    2017-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a protective role against dengue virus (DENV) infection, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Using an optimized humanized mouse model, we show that human NK cells, through the secretion of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), are critical in the early defense against DENV infection. Depletion of NK cells or neutralization of IFN-γ leads to increased viremia and more severe thrombocytopenia and liver damage in humanized mice. In vitro studies using autologous human NK cells show that DENV-infected monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs), but not monocytes, activate NK cells in a contact-dependent manner, resulting in upregulation of CD69 and CD25 and secretion of IFN-γ. Blocking adhesion molecules (LFA-1, DNAM-1, CD2, and 2β4) on NK cells abolishes NK cell activation, IFN-γ secretion, and the control of DENV replication. NK cells activated by infected MDDCs also inhibit DENV infection in monocytes. These findings show the essential role of human NK cells in protection against acute DENV infection in vivo , identify adhesion molecules and dendritic cells required for NK cell activation, and delineate the sequence of events for NK cell activation and protection against DENV infection. IMPORTANCE Dengue is a mosquito-transmitted viral disease with a range of symptoms, from mild fever to life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever. The diverse disease manifestation is thought to result from a complex interplay between viral and host factors. Using mice engrafted with a human immune system, we show that human NK cells inhibit virus infection through secretion of the cytokine gamma interferon and reduce disease pathogenesis, including depletion of platelets and liver damage. During a natural infection, DENV initially infects dendritic cells in the skin. We find that NK cells interact with infected dendritic cells through physical contact mediated by adhesion molecules and become activated before they can control

  8. Effects of dendritic cell-activated and cytokine-induced killer cell therapy on 22 children with acute myeloid leukemia after chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yan; Zheng, Jin-e; Wang, Nan; Cai, He-hua; Zhai, Li-na; Wu, Yao-hui; Wang, Fang; Jin, Run-ming; Zhou, Dong-feng

    2015-10-01

    The efficiency of dendritic cell-activated and cytokine-induced killer cell (DC-CIK) therapy on children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after chemotherapy was investigated. Mononuclear cells were collected from children achieving complete remission after chemotherapy, cultured in vitro and transfused back into the same patient. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) was injected subcutaneously every other day 10 times at the dose of 1 × 10(6) units. Peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets and minimal residual disease (MRD) were detected by flow cytometry. Function of bone marrow was monitored by methods of morphology, immunology, cytogenetics and molecular biology. The side effects were also observed during the treatment. The average follow-up period for all the 22 patients was 71 months and relapse occurred in two AML patients (9.1%). The percentage of CD3(+)/CD8(+) cells in peripheral blood of 15 patients at the 3rd month after DC-CIK treatment (36.73% ± 12.51%) was dramatically higher than that before treatment (29.20% ± 8.34%, P 0.1% in 5 patients before the treatment, and became lower than 0.1% 3 months after the treatment. During the transfusion of DC-CIK, side effects including fever, chills and hives appeared in 7 out of 22 (31.82%) cases but disappeared quickly after symptomatic treatments. There were no changes in electrocardiography and liver-renal functions after the treatment. MRD in children with AML can be eliminated by DC-CIK therapy which is safe and has fewer side effects.

  9. The Expression of Activating Receptor Gene of Natural Killer Cells (KLRC3 in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Shalaby

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify the possible role of natural killer (NK cells in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM through studying the expression of the KLRC3 gene, which encodes the NK cell activating receptor (NKG2E. Methods: This study was conducted at Alexandria University Children’s Hospital from April to October 2015. The study was conducted with 30 newly diagnosed T1DM patients (15 males and 15 females, aged 7–13 years (10.6±1.8 years and 20 non-diabetic subjects served as age- and sex-matched controls. The patients were further sub-divided into two groups; group I included patients who first presented with classical symptoms of DM (polyuria, polydipsia, and polyphagia without diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA and group II included patients who first presented with DKA. The expression of the KLRC3 gene was measured in each group using the real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: KLRC3 gene expression was significantly downregulated in T1DM cases compared to healthy controls (p = 0.001. Expression was more downregulated in group I patients (p = 0.008. Moreover, there was higher mean value of glycated heamoglobin and lower C-peptide levels in group I than group II. Serum pancreatic amylase showed no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions: KLRC3 gene expression was downregulated in patients with T1DM compared to healthy controls. Downregulation of expression was greater in DKA patients compared to those who presented with classical symptoms. Expression of KLRC3 in T1DM might play a role in the pathogenesis of T1DM and could be a predictor of its severity.

  10. The Expression of Activating Receptor Gene of Natural Killer Cells (KLRC3) in Patients with 
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, Dalia; Saied, Marwa; Khater, Doaa; Abou Zeid, Abla

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To identify the possible role of natural killer (NK) cells in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) through studying the expression of the KLRC3 gene, which encodes the NK cell activating receptor (NKG2E). Methods This study was conducted at Alexandria University Children’s Hospital from April to October 2015. The study was conducted with 30 newly diagnosed T1DM patients (15 males and 15 females), aged 7–13 years (10.6±1.8 years) and 20 non-diabetic subjects served as age- and sex-matched controls. The patients were further sub-divided into two groups; group I included patients who first presented with classical symptoms of DM (polyuria, polydipsia, and polyphagia) without diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) and group II included patients who first presented with DKA. The expression of the KLRC3 gene was measured in each group using the real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results KLRC3 gene expression was significantly downregulated in T1DM cases compared to healthy controls (p = 0.001). Expression was more downregulated in group I patients (p = 0.008). Moreover, there was higher mean value of glycated heamoglobin and lower C-peptide levels in group I than group II. Serum pancreatic amylase showed no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions KLRC3 gene expression was downregulated in patients with T1DM compared to healthy controls. Downregulation of expression was greater in DKA patients compared to those who presented with classical symptoms. Expression of KLRC3 in T1DM might play a role in the pathogenesis of T1DM and could be a predictor of its severity. PMID:28804584

  11. Increased ICAM-1 Expression in Transformed Human Oral Epithelial Cells: Molecular Mechanism and Functional Role in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Adhesion and Lymphokine-Activated-Killer Cell Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, George T.-J.; Zhang, Xinli; Park, No-Hee

    2012-01-01

    The intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, CD54) serves as a counter-receptor for the β2-integrins, LFA-1 and Mac-1, which are expressed on leukocytes. Although expression of ICAM-1 on tumor cells has a role in tumor progression and development, information on ICAM-1 expression and its role in oral cancer has not been established. Normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK), human papilloma virus (HPV)-immortalized human oral keratinocyte lines (HOK-16B, HOK-18A, and HOK-18C), and six human oral neoplastic cell lines (HOK-16B-BaP-T1, SCC-4, SCC-9, HEp-2, Tu-177 and 1483) were used to study ICAM-1 expression and its functional role in vitro. Our results demonstrated that NHOK express negligible levels of ICAM-1, whereas immortalized human oral keratinocytes and cancer cells express significantly higher levels of ICAM-1, except for HOK-16B-BaP-T1 and HEp-2. Altered mRNA half-lives did not fully account for the increased accumulation of ICAM-1 mRNA. Adhesion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to epithelial cells correlated with cell surface ICAM-1 expression levels. This adhesion was inhibited by antibodies specific for either ICAM-1 or LFA-1/Mac-1, suggesting a role for these molecules in adhesion. In contrast, lymphokine-activated-killer (LAK) cell cytotoxic killing of epithelial cells did not correlate with ICAM-1 levels or with adhesion. Nonetheless, within each cell line, blocking of ICAM-1 or LFA-1/Mac-1 reduced LAK cells killing, suggesting that ICAM-1 is involved in mediating this killing. PMID:10938387

  12. Natural killer cells in psoriasis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tobin, A M

    2012-02-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common immune-mediated disorders. There is evidence that it is mediated by Th1 and, more recently, Th17 cells. The cytokine pattern, particularly the dominance of TNF-alpha, implicates the innate immune system in psoriasis pathogenesis. Of the many components of the innate immune system known to be involved in psoriatic lesions, natural killer and natural killer T cells appear to have a unique role. We review the evidence supporting a role for natural killer cells in psoriasis.

  13. Killer Whale Genetic Data - Southern resident killer whale pedigree analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In this project, we are using genetic variation to infer mating patterns in the southern killer whale community. In Canada, this population was listed as threatened...

  14. Immunoliposome-mediated delivery of neomycin phosphotransferase for the lineage-specific selection of differentiated/committed stem cell progenies: potential advantages over transfection with marker genes, fluorescence-activated and magnetic affinity cell-sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Boon Chin; Cao, Tong

    2005-01-01

    A major challenge in the therapeutic application of stem cells in regenerative medicine is the lineage-specific selection of their committed/differentiated progenies for transplantation. This is necessary to avoid engraftment of undesired lineages at the transplantation site, i.e. fibroblastic scar tissue, as well as to enhance the efficacy of transplantation therapy. Commonly used techniques for lineage-specific selection of committed/differentiated stem cell progenies include marker gene transfection, fluorescence-activated (FACS) and magnetic-affinity (MACS) cell-sorting. Nevertheless, these have their disadvantages for therapeutic applications. Marker gene transfection invariably leads to permanent genetic modification of stem cells, which in turn limits their use in human clinical therapy due to overwhelming ethical and safety concerns. FACS requires expensive instrumentation and highly-skilled personnel, and is unsuited for handling bulk quantities of cells that would almost certainly be required for transplantation therapy. MACS is a cheaper alternative, but the level of purity attained is also reduced. A possible novel approach that has yet to be investigated is immunoliposome-mediated delivery of neomycin phosphotranferase (NPT) for lineage-specific selection of stem cell progenies. This would avoid permanent genetic modification to the cell, unlike recombinant NPT expression linked to activation of specific promoter sequences. Moreover, it could potentially provide a much more practical and cost-effective alternative for handling bulk quantities of cells that would be required for transplantation therapy, as compared to FACS or MACS. As such, this alternative approach needs to be rigorously investigated, in view of its potentially useful applications in stem cell therapeutics.

  15. Cytokine profile and natural killer cell activity in Listeria monocytogenes infected mice treated orally with Petiveria alliacea extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, M L; Quadros, M R; Santos, L M

    2000-08-01

    In this work, we investigated the effects of Petiveria alliacea extract on the production of Th1-type and Th2-type cytokines and on NK cells activity in normal and Listeria monocytogenes infected mice. Our results demonstrated that in normal/non-infected mice P. alliacea administration led to increased levels of Interleukin-2 (IL-2). The infection alone enhanced INF-gamma levels and NK cell activity at 48 and 72 hours of infection. The treatment with five consecutive doses of 1000 mg/kg/day of P. alliacea extract, given previously to infection, led to further increases in IL-2 levels, in relation to normal/non-infected/P. alliacea treated controls, and in INF-gamma levels at 72 h of infection, compared to infected mice. On the other hand, the production of IL-4 and IL-10 were not altered either by the infection or by the treatment with P. alliacea extract. NK cells activity increased at 48 h and 72 h following the inoculation of the bacteria. When mice were treated with P. alliacea previously to infection, NK activity was higher than that observed at 48 h, 72 h and 120 h of infection in the infected animal. Based on these findings we suggest that P. alliacea up-regulates anti-bacterial immune response by enhancing both Th1 function and the activity of NK cells.

  16. [Electroacupuncture Intervention Enhances Splenic Natural Killer Cell Activity via Inhibiting Phosphorylation of ERK 5 in the Hypothalamus of Surgically Traumatized Rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Li, Jing; Zhu, Ke-ying; Xiao, Sheng; Wang, Yan-qing; Wu, Gen-cheng; Wang, Jun

    2015-06-01

    To observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on cytotoxic activity of splenic natural killer (NK) cells after surgical trauma via extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 5 pathway in the rats' hypothalamus, so as to explore its mechanism underlying improving immune disorders after surgery. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the following 6 groups: control, trauma model, EA, sham EA, 4 nmol-BIX 02188 (an inhibitor for ERK 5 catalytic activity) and 20 nmol-BIX 02188 (n = 6 rats per group). The surgical trauma model was established by making a longitudinal incision (6 cm in length) along the median line of the back to expose the spinal column and another longitudinal incision along the abdominal median line. EA (2 Hz/15 Hz, 1 - 2 mA) was applied to bilateral "Zusanli" (ST 36) for 30 min immediately after surgery. For rats of the BIX groups, intra-lateral ventricular microinjection of BIX 02188 (10 µL, 4 nmol or 20 nmol, or saline for control rats) was conducted 30 min before the surgery. The expression level and protein of phosphorylated ERK 5 (p-ERK 5) and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) protein were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot, respectively. The cytotoxicity of splenic NK cells and the expression of splenic Perforin and Granzyme-B genes were measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay and real-time PCR, respectively. In comparison with the control group, hypothalamic p-ERK 5 immunoactivity, p-ERK 5 protein and CRF protein expression levels were significantly up-regulated in the model group (Psplenic NK cell cytotoxicity and Perforin mRNA and Granzyme-B mRNA expression levels were notably down-regulated in the model group (P 0. 05) except the increased p-ERK 5 protein in the 4 nmol-BIX 02188 group. In addition, the down-regulated NK cell activity, Perforin mRNA and Granzyme-B mRNA expression levels were significantly reversed in the EA and 20 nmol-BIX 02188 groups (Psplenic NK cytotoxicity and Perforin and

  17. Extremely Low Frequency-Magnetic Fields (ELF-EMF) occupational exposure and natural killer activity in peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobba, Fabriziomaria; Bargellini, Annalisa; Scaringi, Meri; Bravo, Giulia; Borella, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Extremely Low Frequency-Magnetic Fields (ELF-MF) are possible carcinogens to humans and some data suggest that they can act as promoters or progressors. Since NK cells play a major role in the control of cancer development, an adverse effect on ELF-MF on NK function has been hypothesized. We examined NK activity in 52 workers exposed to different levels of ELF-MF in various activities. Individual exposure was monitored during 3 complete work-shifts using personal dosimeters. Environmental exposure was also monitored. ELF-MF levels in the workers were expressed as Time-Weighted Average (TWA) values. NK activity was measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). In the whole group the median occupational TWA was 0.21 μT. According to the TWA levels, workers were classified as low exposed (26 subjects, TWA ≤ 0.2 μT) and higher exposed workers (26 subjects; TWA > 0.2 μT). In higher exposed workers, we observed a trend to reduce NK activity compared to low exposed, but the difference was not significant. Then we selected a subgroup of highest exposed workers (12 subjects; TWA > 1 μT); no difference was observed between low and highest exposed subjects in the main personal variables. Considering both E:T ratios from 12:1 to 50:1 and Lytic Units, a significant reduction in NK activity was observed in the highest exposed workers compared to the low exposed. Multivariate analysis showed a significant negative correlation between exposure and LU, while no correlation was evidenced with other personal characteristics. ELF-MF are considered possible carcinogens, and existing data suggest that they can act as promoters. Due to the role of NK activity in host defence against cancer, the results obtained in this study in workers exposed to ELF-MF levels exceeding 1 μT are in agreement with this hypothesis, and support the need for further investigation in this field

  18. Expression of activating natural killer-cell receptors is a hallmark of the innate-like T-cell neoplasm in peripheral T-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Yu; Isobe, Yasushi; Uchida, Akiko; Asano, Junko; Nishio, Yuji; Sakai, Hirotaka; Hoshikawa, Masahiro; Takagi, Masayuki; Nakamura, Naoya; Miura, Ikuo

    2018-04-01

    Peripheral T- or natural killer (NK)-cell lymphomas are rare and difficult-to-recognize diseases. It remains arduous to distinguish between NK cell- and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-derived lymphomas through routine histological evaluation. To clarify the cells of origin, we focused on NK-cell receptors and examined the expression using immunohistochemistry in 22 cases with T- and NK-cell neoplasms comprising angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive and -negative anaplastic large-cell lymphomas, extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, monomorphic epitheliotropic intestinal T-cell lymphoma, aggressive NK-cell leukemia, and other peripheral T-cell lymphomas. Inhibitory receptor leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor subfamily B member 1 (LILRB1) was detected in 14 (64%) cases, whereas activating receptors DNAM1, NKp46, and NKG2D were expressed in 7 (32%), 9 (41%), and 5 (23%) cases, respectively. Although LILRB1 was detected regardless of the disease entity, the activating NK-cell receptors were expressed predominantly in TIA-1-positive neoplasms (DNAM1, 49%; NKp46, 69%; and NKG2D, 38%). In addition, NKp46 and NKG2D were detected only in NK-cell neoplasms and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-derived lymphomas including monomorphic epitheliotropic intestinal T-cell lymphoma. One Epstein-Barr virus-harboring cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-derived lymphoma mimicking extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type lacked these NK-cell receptors, indicating different cell origin from NK and innate-like T cells. Furthermore, NKG2D expression showed a negative impact on survival among the 22 examined cases, which mainly received the standard chemotherapy regimen (log-rank test, P = .024). We propose that the presence of activating NK-cell receptors may provide new insights into understanding peripheral T-cell lymphomas and characterizing them as innate-like T-cell neoplasm. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on

  19. Lysis of endogenously infected CD4+ T cell blasts by rIL-2 activated autologous natural killer cells from HIV-infected viremic individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Fogli

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the cellular mechanisms that ensure an appropriate innate immune response against viral pathogens is an important challenge of biomedical research. In vitro studies have shown that natural killer (NK cells purified from healthy donors can kill heterologous cell lines or autologous CD4+ T cell blasts exogenously infected with several strains of HIV-1. However, it is not known whether the deleterious effects of high HIV-1 viremia interferes with the NK cell-mediated cytolysis of autologous, endogenously HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells. Here, we stimulate primary CD4+ T cells, purified ex vivo from HIV-1-infected viremic patients, with PHA and rIL2 (with or without rIL-7. This experimental procedure allows for the significant expansion and isolation of endogenously infected CD4+ T cell blasts detected by intracellular staining of p24 HIV-1 core antigen. We show that, subsequent to the selective down-modulation of MHC class-I (MHC-I molecules, HIV-1-infected p24(pos blasts become partially susceptible to lysis by rIL-2-activated NK cells, while uninfected p24(neg blasts are spared from killing. This NK cell-mediated killing occurs mainly through the NKG2D activation pathway. However, the degree of NK cell cytolytic activity against autologous, endogenously HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cell blasts that down-modulate HLA-A and -B alleles and against heterologous MHC-I(neg cell lines is particularly low. This phenomenon is associated with the defective surface expression and engagement of natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs and with the high frequency of the anergic CD56(neg/CD16(pos subsets of highly dysfunctional NK cells from HIV-1-infected viremic patients. Collectively, our data demonstrate that the chronic viral replication of HIV-1 in infected individuals results in several phenotypic and functional aberrancies that interfere with the NK cell-mediated killing of autologous p24(pos blasts derived from primary T cells.

  20. Protective Effect of Panax notoginseng Root Water Extract against Influenza A Virus Infection by Enhancing Antiviral Interferon-Mediated Immune Responses and Natural Killer Cell Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Gi Choi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is an acute respiratory illness caused by the influenza A virus, which causes economic losses and social disruption mainly by increasing hospitalization and mortality rates among the elderly and people with chronic diseases. Influenza vaccines are the most effective means of preventing seasonal influenza, but can be completely ineffective if there is an antigenic mismatch between the seasonal vaccine virus and the virus circulating in the community. In addition, influenza viruses resistant to antiviral drugs are emerging worldwide. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop new vaccines and antiviral drugs against these viruses. In this study, we conducted in vitro and in vivo analyses of the antiviral effect of Panax notoginseng root (PNR, which is used as an herbal medicine and nutritional supplement in Korea and China. We confirmed that PNR significantly prevented influenza virus infection in a concentration-dependent manner in mouse macrophages. In addition, PNR pretreatment inhibited viral protein (PB1, PB2, HA, NA, M1, PA, M2, and NP and viral mRNA (NS1, HA, PB2, PA, NP, M1, and M2 expression. PNR pretreatment also increased the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6] and interferon (IFN-beta and the phosphorylation of type-I IFN-related proteins (TANK-binding kinase 1, STAT1, and IRF3 in vitro. In mice exposed to the influenza A H1N1 virus, PNR treatment decreased mortality by 90% and prevented weight loss (by approximately 10% compared with the findings in untreated animals. In addition, splenocytes from PNR-administered mice displayed significantly enhanced natural killer (NK cell activity against YAC-1 cells. Taking these findings together, PNR stimulates an antiviral response in murine macrophages and mice that protects against viral infection, which may be attributable to its ability to stimulate NK cell activity. Further investigations are needed to reveal the molecular

  1. Transfection in Primary Cultured Neuronal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwick, Katie F M; Hardingham, Giles E

    2017-01-01

    Transfection allows the introduction of foreign nucleic acid into eukaryotic cells. It is an important tool in understanding the roles of NMDARs in neurons. Here, we describe using lipofection-mediated transfection to introduce cDNA encoding NMDAR subunits into postmitotic rodent primary cortical neurons maintained in culture.

  2. A new wine Torulaspora delbrueckii killer strain with broad antifungal activity and its toxin-encoding double-stranded RNA virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Manuel; Velázquez, Rocío; Maqueda, Matilde; López-Piñeiro, Antonio; Ribas, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Wine Torulaspora delbrueckii strains producing a new killer toxin (Kbarr-1) were isolated and selected for wine making. They killed all the previously known Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer strains, in addition to other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. The Kbarr-1 phenotype is encoded by a medium-size 1.7 kb dsRNA, TdV-Mbarr-1, which seems to depend on a large-size 4.6 kb dsRNA virus (TdV-LAbarr) for stable maintenance and replication. The TdV-Mbarr-1 dsRNA was sequenced by new generation sequencing techniques. Its genome structure is similar to those of S. cerevisiae killer M dsRNAs, with a 5′-end coding region followed by an internal A-rich sequence and a 3′-end non-coding region. Mbarr-1 RNA positive strand carries cis acting signals at its 5′ and 3′ termini for transcription and replication respectively, similar to those RNAs of yeast killer viruses. The ORF at the 5′ region codes for a putative preprotoxin with an N-terminal secretion signal, potential Kex2p/Kexlp processing sites, and N-glycosylation sites. No relevant sequence identity was found either between the full sequence of Mbarr-1 dsRNA and other yeast M dsRNAs, or between their respective toxin-encoded proteins. However, a relevant identity of TdV-Mbarr-1 RNA regions to the putative replication and packaging signals of most of the M-virus RNAs suggests that they are all evolutionarily related. PMID:26441913

  3. Evaluation on the Clinical Efficacy of Dendritic Cell-Activated Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Combined with Conventional Therapy in the Treatment of Malignant Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong WEI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of dendritic cell-activated cytokine-induced killer (DC-CIK cells combined with conventional therapy in the treatment of malignant tumors.Methods: A total of 100 patients with malignant tumors were randomly divided into two groups. Treatment group received conventional therapy combined with DC-CIK while control group received conventional therapy alone. The short-term efficacy, adverse reactions and changes of lymphocyte subpopulation were all compared between two groups after treatment.Results: The overall response rate (ORR was higher in treatment group (86.00% than in control group (54.00%, the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05. White blood cell count (WBC reduced after treatment when compared with treatment before (P=0.001, but liver and kidney function had no obvious change in treatment group (P>0.05. WBC reduced markedly, but the level of alanine aminotransferase (ALT increased obviously after treatment in control group (P<0.001. WBC was higher, but the level of ALT was lower in treatment group than in control group (P<0.001. However, there was no difference between two groups regarding serum creatinine (Scr and blood urea nitrogen (BUN (P>0.05. In treatment group, the levels of CD3+, CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+, and CD3+CD56+ increased (P<0.05, but the level of CD4+/CD8+ had no significant change (P>0.05. In control group, the levels of CD3+ and CD3+CD4+ reduced (P<0.05, while the levels of CD3+CD8+, CD3+CD56+ and CD4+/CD8+ had no significant change (P>0.05. The levels of CD3+, CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD56+ in treatment group were higher than those in control group (P<0.01, whereas CD4+/CD8+ was lower than that in control group (P<0.01.Conclusion: DC-CIK combined with conventional therapy, safe and effective, is capable of promoting the recovery of leukocytes and liver and kidney function, and improving the cellular immune function, which may provide a new therapeutic regimen for

  4. Impact of partial versus whole breast radiation therapy on fatigue, perceived stress, quality of life and natural killer cell activity in women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Kevin; Tell, Dina; Lobo, Philip; Millbrandt, Linda; Mathews, Herbert L; Janusek, Linda Witek

    2012-06-18

    This pilot study used a prospective longitudinal design to compare the effect of adjuvant whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) versus partial breast radiation therapy (PBRT) on fatigue, perceived stress, quality of life and natural killer cell activity (NKCA) in women receiving radiation after breast cancer surgery. Women (N = 30) with early-stage breast cancer received either PBRT, Mammosite brachytherapy at dose of 34 Gy 10 fractions/5 days, (N = 15) or WBRT, 3-D conformal techniques at dose of 50 Gy +10 Gy Boost/30 fractions, (N = 15). Treatment was determined by the attending oncologist after discussion with the patient and the choice was based on tumor stage and clinical need. Women were assessed prior to initiation of radiation therapy and twice after completion of radiation therapy. At each assessment, blood was obtained for determination of NKCA and the following instruments were administered: Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Fatigue (FACT-F), and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G). Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was used to evaluate group differences in initial outcomes and change in outcomes over time. Fatigue (FACT-F) levels, which were similar prior to radiation therapy, demonstrated a significant difference in trajectory. Women who received PBRT reported progressively lower fatigue; conversely fatigue worsened over time for women who received WBRT. No difference in perceived stress was observed between women who received PBRT or WBRT. Both groups of women reported similar levels of quality of life (FACT-G) prior to initiation of radiation therapy. However, HLM analysis revealed significant group differences in the trajectory of quality of life, such that women receiving PBRT exhibited a linear increase in quality of life over time after completion of radiation therapy; whereas women receiving WBRT showed a decreasing trajectory. NKCA was also similar between therapy

  5. Allergen-induced activation of natural killer cells represents an early-life immune response in the development of allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Matthew C; Whalen, Elizabeth; Togias, Alkis; O'Connor, George T; Bacharier, Leonard B; Bloomberg, Gordon R; Kattan, Meyer; Wood, Robert A; Presnell, Scott; LeBeau, Petra; Jaffee, Katy; Visness, Cynthia M; Busse, William W; Gern, James E

    2018-03-05

    Childhood asthma in inner-city populations is a major public health burden, and understanding early-life immune mechanisms that promote asthma onset is key to disease prevention. Children with asthma demonstrate a high prevalence of aeroallergen sensitization and T H 2-type inflammation; however, the early-life immune events that lead to T H 2 skewing and disease development are unknown. We sought to use RNA sequencing of PBMCs collected at age 2 years to determine networks of immune responses that occur in children with allergy and asthma. In an inner-city birth cohort with high asthma risk, we compared gene expression using RNA sequencing in PBMCs collected at age 2 years between children with 2 or more aeroallergen sensitizations, including dust mite, cockroach, or both, by age 3 years and asthma by age 7 years (cases) and matched control subjects who did not have any aeroallergen sensitization or asthma by age 7 years. PBMCs from the cases showed higher levels of expression of natural killer (NK) cell-related genes. After cockroach or dust mite allergen but not tetanus antigen stimulation, PBMCs from the cases compared with the control subjects showed differential expression of 244 genes. This gene set included upregulation of a densely interconnected NK cell-like gene network reflecting a pattern of cell activation and induction of inflammatory signaling molecules, including the key T H 2-type cytokines IL9, IL13, and CCL17, as well as a dendritic cell-like gene network, including upregulation of CD1 lipid antigen presentation molecules. The NK cell-like response was reproducible in an independent group of children with later-onset allergic sensitization and asthma and was found to be specific to only those children with both aeroallergen sensitization and asthma. These findings provide important mechanistic insight into an early-life immune pathway involved in T H 2 polarization, leading to the development of allergic asthma. Copyright © 2018 American

  6. Production and characterization of active recombinant interleukin-12/eGFP fusion protein in stably-transfected DF1 chicken cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsing Chieh; Chen, Yu San; Shen, Pin Chun; Shien, Jui Hung; Lee, Long Huw; Chiu, Hua Hsien

    2015-01-01

    The adjuvant activity of chicken interleukin-12 (chIL-12) protein has been described as similar to that of mammalian IL-12. Recombinant chIL-12 can be produced using several methods, but chIL-12 production in eukaryotic cells is lower than that in prokaryotic cells. Stimulating compounds, such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), can be added to animal cell cultures to overcome this drawback. In this study, we constructed a cell line, DF1/chIL-12 which stably expressed a fusion protein, chIL-12 and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) connected by a (G4 S)3 linker sequence. Fusion protein production was increased when cells were cultured in the presence of DMSO. When 1 × 10(6) DF1/chIL-12 cells were inoculated in a T-175 flask containing 30 mL of media, incubated for 15 h, and further cultivated in the presence of 4% DMSO for 48 h, the production of total fusion protein was mostly enhanced compared with the production of total fusion protein by using cell lysates induced with DMSO at other concentrations. The concentrations of the unpurified and purified total fusion proteins in cell lysates were 2,781 ± 2.72 ng mL(-1) and 2,207 ± 3.28 ng mL(-1) , respectively. The recovery rate was 79%. The fusion protein stimulated chicken splenocytes to produce IFN-γ, which was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, in the culture supernatant, indicating that treating DF1/chIL-12 cells with DMSO or producing chIL-12 in a fusion protein form does not have adverse effects on the bioactivity of chIL-12. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  7. Production of functional killer protein in batch cultures upon a shift from aerobic to anaerobic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gildo Almeida da Silva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the production of functional protein in yeast culture. The cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Embrapa 1B (K+R+ killed a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Embrapa 26B (K-R-in grape must and YEPD media. The lethal effect of toxin-containing supernatant and the effect of aeration upon functional killer production and the correlation between the products of anaerobic metabolism and the functional toxin formation were evaluated. The results showed that at low sugar concentration, the toxin of the killer strain of Sacch. cerevisiae was only produced under anaerobic conditions . The system of killer protein production showed to be regulated by Pasteur and Crabtree effects. As soon as the ethanol was formed, the functional killer toxin was produced. The synthesis of the active killer toxin seemed to be somewhat associated with the switch to fermentation process and with concomitant alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH activity.

  8. Improved biolistic transfection of hair cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Zhao

    Full Text Available Transient transfection of hair cells has proven challenging. Here we describe modifications to the Bio-Rad Helios Gene Gun that, along with an optimized protocol, improve transfection of bullfrog, chick, and mouse hair cells. The increased penetrating power afforded by our method allowed us to transfect mouse hair cells from the basal side, through the basilar membrane; this configuration protects hair bundles from damage during the procedure. We characterized the efficiency of transfection of mouse hair cells with fluorescently-tagged actin fusion protein using both the optimized procedure and a published procedure; while the efficiency of the two methods was similar, the morphology of transfected hair cells was improved with the new procedure. In addition, using the improved method, we were able to transfect hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus and chick cochlea for the first time. We used fluorescent-protein fusions of harmonin b (USH1C and PMCA2 (ATP2B2; plasma-membrane Ca(2+-ATPase isoform 2 to examine protein distribution in hair cells. While PMCA2-EGFP localization was similar to endogenous PMCA2 detected with antibodies, high levels of harmonin-EGFP were found at stereocilia tapers in bullfrog and chick, but not mouse; by contrast, harmonin-EGFP was concentrated in stereocilia tips in mouse hair cells.

  9. Natural Killer T Cells in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Shiny; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are specialized CD1d-restricted T cells that recognize lipid antigens. Following stimulation, NKT cells lead to downstream activation of both innate and adaptive immune cells in the tumor microenvironment. This has impelled the development of NKT cell-targeted immunotherapies for treating cancer. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the stimulatory and regulatory functions of NKT cells in tumor immunity as well as highlight preclinical and clinical studies based on NKT cells. Finally, we discuss future perspectives to better harness the potential of NKT cells for cancer therapy. PMID:29018445

  10. Radioimmunoassay for yeast killer toxin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, F.A.; Bussey, H.

    1981-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay was developed for the K1 killer toxin from strain T158C/S14a of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Iodine 125-labelled toxin was made to a specific activity of 100 μCi/mg of protein. Antibody to purified toxin was prepared in rabbits using toxin cross-linked to itself. These antibodies, partially purified by 50 percent ammonium sulfate precipitation and Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography, produced one precipitation band with killer toxin and bound 125 I-labelled toxin in a radioimmunoassay. The antibody preparation also bound with the toxins from another K1 killer, A364A, and three chromosomal superkiller mutants derived from it. (auth)

  11. CD16xCD33 bispecific killer cell engager (BiKE) activates NK cells against primary MDS and MDSC CD33+ targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Michelle K; Ross, Julie A; Warlick, Erica D; Lund, Troy C; Verneris, Michael R; Wiernik, Andres; Spellman, Stephen; Haagenson, Michael D; Lenvik, Alexander J; Litzow, Mark R; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K; Blazar, Bruce R; Weiner, Louis M; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Vallera, Daniel A; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2014-05-08

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are stem cell disorders that can progress to acute myeloid leukemia. Although hematopoietic cell transplantation can be curative, additional therapies are needed for a disease that disproportionally afflicts the elderly. We tested the ability of a CD16xCD33 BiKE to induce natural killer (NK) cell function in 67 MDS patients. Compared with age-matched normal controls, CD7(+) lymphocytes, NK cells, and CD16 expression were markedly decreased in MDS patients. Despite this, reverse antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays showed potent degranulation and cytokine production when resting MDS-NK cells were triggered with an agonistic CD16 monoclonal antibody. Blood and marrow MDS-NK cells treated with bispecific killer cell engager (BiKE) significantly enhanced degranulation and tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ production against HL-60 and endogenous CD33(+) MDS targets. MDS patients had a significantly increased proportion of immunosuppressive CD33(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) that negatively correlated with MDS lymphocyte populations and CD16 loss on NK cells. Treatment with the CD16xCD33 BiKE successfully reversed MDSC immunosuppression of NK cells and induced MDSC target cell lysis. Lastly, the BiKE induced optimal MDS-NK cell function irrespective of disease stage. Our data suggest that the CD16xCD33 BiKE functions against both CD33(+) MDS and MDSC targets and may be therapeutically beneficial for MDS patients.

  12. Behaviour of Southern sea lions in presence of killer whales during fishing operations in Central Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Hückstädt

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The killer whale is an opportunistic top-predator of ecosystems worldwide and its diet varies locally and seasonally, which is reflected in diverse feeding behaviours associated with its prey. We report the occurrence of killer whales presumably predating on southern sea lions associated with the jack mackerel fishing fleet in central Chile. The presence of killer whales was recorded during 4 fishing sets. All sightings consisted of 3-5 individual pods of females and calves. The number of sea lions was not significantly affected by the presence of killer whales, but their behaviour was, by reducing the number of behavioural displays, as they stopped feeding and resting activities and stayed close to the hull of the vessel after net retrieval ended. We propose that killer whales could be using the fishery as an indirect source of prey to benefit from the aggregation of sea lions around the vessel, far away from land.

  13. Construction of killer industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 and its fermentation performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijender K. Bajaj

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1, a time tested industrial yeast possesses most of the desirable fermentation characteristics like fast growth and fermentation rate, osmotolerance, high ethanol tolerance, ability to ferment molasses, and to ferment at elevated temperatures etc. However, this yeast was found to be sensitive against the killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study, killer trait was introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 by protoplast fusion with Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 475, a killer strain. The resultant fusants were characterized for desirable fermentation characteristics. All the technologically important characteristics of distillery yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 were retained in the fusants, and in addition the killer trait was also introduced into them. Further, the killer activity was found to be stably maintained during hostile conditions of ethanol fermentations in dextrose or molasses, and even during biomass recycling.

  14. Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Predation on Beaked Whales (Mesoplodon spp.) in the Bremer Sub-Basin, Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellard, Rebecca; Lightbody, Keith; Fouda, Leila; Blewitt, Michelle; Riggs, David; Erbe, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Observations of killer whales (Orcinus orca) feeding on the remains of beaked whales have been previously documented; however, to date, there has been no published account of killer whales actively preying upon beaked whales. This article describes the first field observations of killer whales interacting with, hunting and preying upon beaked whales (Mesoplodon spp.) on four separate occasions during 2014, 2015 and 2016 in the Bremer Sub-Basin, off the south coast of Western Australia.

  15. Structural Characteristics of the Novel Polysaccharide FVPA1 from Winter Culinary-Medicinal Mushroom, Flammulina velutipes (Agaricomycetes), Capable of Enhancing Natural Killer Cell Activity against K562 Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wei; Feng, Jie; Zhang, Jing-Song; Lin, Chi-Chung; Wang, Wen-Han; Chen, Hong-Ge

    2017-01-01

    FVPA1, a novel polysaccharide, has been isolated from fruiting bodies of the culinary-medicinal mushroom Flammulina velutipes, a historically popular, widely cultivated and consumed functional food with an attractive taste, beneficial nutraceutical properties such as antitumor and immunomodulatory effects, and a number of essential biological activities. The average molecular weight was estimated to be ~1.8 × 104 Da based on high-performance size exclusion chromatography. Sugar analyses, methylation analyses, and 1H, 13C, and 2-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed the following structure of the repeating units of the FVPA1 polysaccharide Identification of this structure would conceivably lead to better understanding of the nutraceutical functions of this very important edible fungus. Bioactivity tests in vitro indicated that FVPA1 could significantly enhance natural killer cell activity against K562 tumor cells.

  16. Development of Anti-Human Mesothelin-Targeted Chimeric Antigen Receptor Messenger RNA-transfected Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes for Ovarian Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chien-Fu; Xu, Xuequn; Li, Linhong; Ma, Ying; Jin, Qiu; Viley, Angelia; Allen, Cornell; Natarajan, Pachai; Shivakumar, Rama; Peshwa, Madhusudan V; Emens, Leisha A

    2018-04-02

    CD19-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) engineered T/natural killer (NK)-cell therapies can result in durable clinical responses in B-cell malignancies. However, CAR-based immunotherapies have been much less successful in solid cancers, in part due to "on-target off-tumor" toxicity related to expression of target tumor antigens on normal tissue. Based on preliminary observations of safety and clinical activity in proof-of-concept clinical trials, tumor antigen-specific messenger RNA (mRNA) CAR transfection into selected, activated, and expanded T/NK cells may permit prospective control of "on-target off-tumor" toxicity. To develop a commercial product for solid tumors, mesothelin was selected as an antigen target based on its association with poor prognosis and overexpression in multiple solid cancers. It was hypothesized that selecting, activating, and expanding cells ex vivo prior to mRNA CAR transfection would not be necessary, thus simplifying the complexity and cost of manufacturing. Now, the development of anti-human mesothelin mRNA CAR transfected peripheral blood lymphocytes (CARMA-hMeso) is reported, demonstrating the manufacture and cryopreservation of multiple cell aliquots for repeat administrations from a single human leukapheresis. A rapid, automated, closed system for cGMP-compliant transfection of mRNA CAR in up to 20 × 10 9 peripheral blood lymphocytes was developed. Here we show that CARMA-hMeso cells recognize and lyse tumor cells in a mesothelin-specific manner. Expression of CAR was detectable over approximately 7 days in vitro, with a progressive decline of CAR expression that appears to correlate with in vitro cell expansion. In a murine ovarian cancer model, a single intraperitoneal injection of CARMA-hMeso resulted in the dose-dependent inhibition of tumor growth and improved survival of mice. Furthermore, repeat weekly intraperitoneal administrations of the optimal CARMA-hMeso dose further prolonged disease control and survival

  17. In Vivo Imaging of Natural Killer Cell Trafficking in Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galli, Filippo; Rapisarda, Anna Serafina; Stabile, Helena; Malviya, Gaurav; Manni, Isabella; Bonanno, Elena; Piaggio, Giulia; Gismondi, Angela; Santoni, Angela; Signore, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NKs) are important effectors of the innate immune system, with marked antitumor activity. Imaging NK trafficking in vivo may be relevant to following up the efficacy of new therapeutic approaches aiming at increasing tumor-infiltrating NKs (TINKs). The specific aims of present

  18. On the communicative significance of whistles in wild killer whales (Orcinus orca)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Frank; Franck, Dierk; Ford, John

    2002-08-01

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) use pulsed calls and whistles in underwater communication. Unlike pulsed calls, whistles have received little study and thus their function is poorly known. In this study, whistle activities of groups of individually known killer whales were compared quantitatively across behavioural categories. Acoustic recordings and simultaneous behavioural observations were made of northern resident killer whales off Vancouver Island in 1996 and 1997. Whistles were produced at greater rates than discrete calls during close-range behavioural activities than during long-range activities. They were the predominant sound-type recorded during socializing. The number of whistles per animal per minute was significantly higher during close-range behavioural activities than during long-range activities. Evidently, whistles play an important role in the close-range acoustic communication in northern resident killer whales.

  19. Killer whale prey - Determining prey selection by southern resident killer whales (SRKW)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Prey selectivity by southern resident killer whales is being determined by analyses of fish scales and tissue from predation events and feces. Information on killer...

  20. Revving up Natural Killer Cells and Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Hematological Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittari, Gianfranco; Filippini, Perla; Gentilcore, Giusy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Rutella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to innate immunity and exhibit cytolytic activity against infectious pathogens and tumor cells. NK-cell function is finely tuned by receptors that transduce inhibitory or activating signals, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors, NK Group 2 member D (NKG2D), NKG2A/CD94, NKp46, and others, and recognize both foreign and self-antigens expressed by NK-susceptible targets. Recent insights into NK-cell developmental intermediates have translated into a more accurate definition of culture conditions for the in vitro generation and propagation of human NK cells. In this respect, interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-21 are instrumental in driving NK-cell differentiation and maturation, and hold great promise for the design of optimal NK-cell culture protocols. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells possess phenotypic and functional hallmarks of both T cells and NK cells. Similar to T cells, they express CD3 and are expandable in culture, while not requiring functional priming for in vivo activity, like NK cells. CIK cells may offer some advantages over other cell therapy products, including ease of in vitro propagation and no need for exogenous administration of IL-2 for in vivo priming. NK cells and CIK cells can be expanded using a variety of clinical-grade approaches, before their infusion into patients with cancer. Herein, we discuss GMP-compliant strategies to isolate and expand human NK and CIK cells for immunotherapy purposes, focusing on clinical trials of adoptive transfer to patients with hematological malignancies.

  1. Revving up natural killer cells and cytokine-induced killer cells against hematological malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco ePittari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells belong to innate immunity and exhibit cytolytic activity against infectious pathogens and tumor cells. NK-cell function is finely tuned by receptors that transduce inhibitory or activating signals, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR, NK Group 2 member D (NKG2D, NKG2A/CD94, NKp46 and others, and recognize both foreign and self-antigens expressed by NK-susceptible targets. Recent insights into NK-cell developmental intermediates have translated into a more accurate definition of culture conditions for the in vitro generation and propagation of human NK cells. In this respect, interleukin (IL-15 and IL-21 are instrumental in driving NK-cell differentiation and maturation, and hold great promise for the design of optimal NK-cell culture protocols.Cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells possess phenotypic and functional hallmarks of both T cells and NK cells. Similar to T cells, they express CD3 and are expandable in culture, while not requiring functional priming for in vivo activity, like NK cells. CIK cells may offer some advantages over other cell therapy products, including ease of in vitro propagation and no need for exogenous administration of IL-2 for in vivo priming.NK cells and CIK cells can be expanded using a variety of clinical-grade approaches, before their infusion into patients with cancer. Herein, we discuss GMP-compliant strategies to isolate and expand human NK and CIK cells for immunotherapy purposes, focusing on clinical trials of adoptive transfer to patients with hematological malignancies.

  2. Herpesvirus Evasion of Natural Killer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pelsmaeker, Steffi; Romero, Nicolas; Vitale, Massimo; Favoreel, Herman W

    2018-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in the host response against viral infections and cancer development. They are able to kill virus-infected and tumor cells, and they produce different important cytokines that stimulate the antiviral and antitumor adaptive immune response, particularly interferon gamma. NK cells are of particular importance in herpesvirus infections, which is illustrated by systemic and life-threatening herpesvirus disease symptoms in patients with deficiencies in NK cell activity and by the myriad of reports describing herpesvirus NK cell evasion strategies. The latter is particularly obvious for cytomegaloviruses, but increasing evidence indicates that most, if not all, members of the herpesvirus family suppress NK cell activity to some extent. This review discusses the different NK cell evasion strategies described for herpesviruses and how this knowledge may translate to clinical applications. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. Lipid-based Transfection Reagents Exhibit Cryo-induced Increase in Transfection Efficiency

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    Helena Sork

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of lipid-based transfection reagents have permitted their widespread use in molecular biology and gene therapy. This study outlines the effect of cryo-manipulation of a cationic lipid-based formulation, Lipofectamine 2000, which, after being frozen and thawed, showed orders of magnitude higher plasmid delivery efficiency throughout eight different cell lines, without compromising cell viability. Increased transfection efficiency with the freeze-thawed reagent was also seen with 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligonucleotide delivery and in a splice-correction assay. Most importantly, a log-scale improvement in gene delivery using the freeze-thawed reagent was seen in vivo. Using three different methods, we detected considerable differences in the polydispersity of the different nucleic acid complexes as well as observed a clear difference in their surface spreading and sedimentation, with the freeze-thawed ones displaying substantially higher rate of dispersion and deposition on the glass surface. This hitherto overlooked elevated potency of the freeze-thawed reagent facilitates the targeting of hard-to-transfect cells, accomplishes higher transfection rates, and decreases the overall amount of reagent needed for delivery. Additionally, as we also saw a slight increase in plasmid delivery using other freeze-thawed transfection reagents, we postulate that freeze-thawing might prove to be useful for an even wider variety of transfection reagents.

  4. Phototoxic effects of lysosome-associated genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O.; Ryumina, Alina P.; Boulina, Maria E.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Bogdanova, Ekaterina A.; Lukyanov, Sergey A.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.

    2014-07-01

    KillerRed is a unique phototoxic red fluorescent protein that can be used to induce local oxidative stress by green-orange light illumination. Here we studied phototoxicity of KillerRed targeted to cytoplasmic surface of lysosomes via fusion with Rab7, a small GTPase that is known to be attached to membranes of late endosomes and lysosomes. It was found that lysosome-associated KillerRed ensures efficient light-induced cell death similar to previously reported mitochondria- and plasma membrane-localized KillerRed. Inhibitory analysis demonstrated that lysosomal cathepsins play an important role in the manifestation of KillerRed-Rab7 phototoxicity. Time-lapse monitoring of cell morphology, membrane integrity, and nuclei shape allowed us to conclude that KillerRed-Rab7-mediated cell death occurs via necrosis at high light intensity or via apoptosis at lower light intensity. Potentially, KillerRed-Rab7 can be used as an optogenetic tool to direct target cell populations to either apoptosis or necrosis.

  5. Antigen-Addicted T Cell Reserves Trickle Charge the Frontline Killers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Vandana; Sarkar, Surojit

    2016-07-19

    Highly active killer T cells mediate a stable standoff during controlled persistent infections. In this issue of Immunity, Robey and colleagues describe a unique antigen-addicted T cell population bearing characteristics of both effector and memory CD8(+) T cells that provides a continuous supply of potent killer T cells to curb Toxoplasma gondii growth during latency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Modus operandi of female serial killers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, W; Hilton, T

    1998-04-01

    The modus operandi of female serial killers was examined from a chronology of 58 cases in America and 47 cases in 17 other countries, compiled over 25-year intervals. Female serial killers in other countries accounted for a disproportionately greater number of victims, but those in America managed a longer killing career when associated with a low profile modus operandi.

  7. VSVΔG/EBOV GP-induced innate protection enhances natural killer cell activity to increase survival in a lethal mouse adapted Ebola virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kinola J N; Qiu, Xiangguo; Fernando, Lisa; Jones, Steven M; Alimonti, Judie B

    2015-02-01

    Members of the species Zaire ebolavirus cause severe hemorrhagic fever with up to a 90% mortality rate in humans. The VSVΔG/EBOV GP vaccine has provided 100% protection in the mouse, guinea pig, and nonhuman primate (NHP) models, and has also been utilized as a post-exposure therapeutic to protect mice, guinea pigs, and NHPs from a lethal challenge of Ebola virus (EBOV). EBOV infection causes rapid mortality in human and animal models, with death occurring as early as 6 days after infection, suggesting a vital role for the innate immune system to control the infection before cells of the adaptive immune system can assume control. Natural killer (NK) cells are the predominant cell of the innate immune response, which has been shown to expand with VSVΔG/EBOV GP treatment. In the current study, an in vivo mouse model of the VSVΔG/EBOV GP post-exposure treatment was used for a mouse adapted (MA)-EBOV infection, to determine the putative VSVΔG/EBOV GP-induced protective mechanism of NK cells. NK depletion studies demonstrated that mice with NK cells survive longer in a MA-EBOV infection, which is further enhanced with VSVΔG/EBOV GP treatment. NK cell mediated cytotoxicity and IFN-γ secretion was significantly higher with VSVΔG/EBOV GP treatment. Cell mediated cytotoxicity assays and perforin knockout mice experiments suggest that there are perforin-dependent and -independent mechanisms involved. Together, these data suggest that NK cells play an important role in VSVΔG/EBOV GP-induced protection of EBOV by increasing NK cytotoxicity, and IFN-γ secretion.

  8. Natural killer cells in leukemogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, H.J.; Stolz, W.; Sutter, H.; Kreja, L.

    1986-01-01

    In order to relate a reduced natural killer (NK) cell function to leukemogenesis, NK cells in the spleen and peritoneal exudate cells, with and without stimulation by Corynebacterium parvum, were tested in mice of various strains after split dose irradiation and after leukemogenic treatment with butyl- and methylnitrosourea. The investigations included also mice submitted to non-leukemogenic irradiation (1 x 1.5 and 1 x 4.5 Gy) and mice submitted to an additional treatment with hydrocortisone, which delays leukemia development after methylnitrosourea. There was, indeed, a NK-cell depression, but no major differences were seen between mice prone to leukemia development and those after cytotoxic, but nonleukemogenic, treatment.

  9. Improving ultrasound gene transfection efficiency by controlling ultrasound excitation of microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Z.; Chen, D.; Deng, C.X.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound application in the presence of microbubbles has shown great potential for non-viral gene transfection via transient disruption of cell membrane (sonoporation). However, improvement of its efficiency has largely relied on empirical approaches without consistent and translatable results. The goal of this study is to develop a rational strategy based on new results obtained using novel experimental techniques and analysis to improve sonoporation gene transfection. We conducted experiments using targeted microbubbles that were attached to cell membrane to facilitate sonoporation. We quantified the dynamic activities of microbubbles exposed to pulsed ultrasound and the resulting sonoporation outcome and identified distinct regimes of characteristic microbubble behaviors: stable cavitation, coalescence and translation, and inertial cavitation. We found that inertial cavitation generated the highest rate of membrane poration. By establishing direct correlation of ultrasound-induced bubble activities with intracellular uptake and pore size, we designed a ramped pulse exposure scheme for optimizing microbubble excitation to improve sonoporation gene transfection. We implemented a novel sonoporation gene transfection system using an aqueous two phase system (ATPS) for efficient use of reagents and high throughput operation. Using plasmid coding for the green fluorescence protein (GFP), we achieved a sonoporation transfection efficiency in rate aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs) of 6.9% ± 2.2% (n = 9), comparable with lipofection (7.5% ± 0.8%, n = 9). Our results reveal characteristic microbubble behaviors responsible for sonoporation and demonstrated a rational strategy to improve sonoporation gene transfection. PMID:23770009

  10. Optimizing conditions for calcium phosphate mediated transient transfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Guo

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Calcium phosphate mediated transfection is the most low-cost approach to introduce recombinant DNA into culture cells. However, the utility of this procedure is limited in highly-differentiated cells. Here we describe the specific HBS-buffered saline, PH, glycerol shock, vortex strength, transfection medium, and particle concentrations conditions necessary to optimize this transfection method in highly differentiated cells.

  11. K2 killer toxin-induced physiological changes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orentaite, Irma; Poranen, Minna M; Oksanen, Hanna M; Daugelavicius, Rimantas; Bamford, Dennis H

    2016-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells produce killer toxins, such as K1, K2 and K28, that can modulate the growth of other yeasts giving advantage for the killer strains. Here we focused on the physiological changes induced by K2 toxin on a non-toxin-producing yeast strain as well as K1, K2 and K28 killer strains. Potentiometric measurements were adjusted to observe that K2 toxin immediately acts on the sensitive cells leading to membrane permeability. This correlated with reduced respiration activity, lowered intracellular ATP content and decrease in cell viability. However, we did not detect any significant ATP leakage from the cells treated by killer toxin K2. Strains producing heterologous toxins K1 and K28 were less sensitive to K2 than the non-toxin producing one suggesting partial cross-protection between the different killer systems. This phenomenon may be connected to the observed differences in respiratory activities of the killer strains and the non-toxin-producing strain at low pH. This might also have practical consequences in wine industry; both as beneficial ones in controlling contaminating yeasts and non-beneficial ones causing sluggish fermentation. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Notorious Cases of Serial Killers

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    Iosub Elena-Cătălina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of a death scene provides an overall picture of the crime and will indicate the murder as an event or one of a series of events and also the criminal. But when the criminal is declared a serial killer, many questions are raised up. How could a person kill some else without a reason or why people react in such a disorganized way and become so brutal or what made them act like that and so many questions with also so many answers. This project explains the psychology of a murderer, his own way of thinking and acting by presuming that we may accurately discover what is in their minds when they kill. It is about a very complex issue regarding murder investigations, biological factors and psychological profile of a serial killer. Dealing with this problem we will at last reach to the question that could solve finally the puzzle: ―Are serial murderers distorted reflections of society's own values?

  13. MANUFACTURING NATURAL KILLER CELLS AS MEDICINAL PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian CHABANNON

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are Innate Lymphoid Cells (ILC with cytotoxic and regulatory properties. Their functions are tightly regulated by an array of inhibitory and activating receptors, and their mechanisms of activation strongly differ from antigen recognition in the context of HLA presentation as needed for T-cell activation. NK cells thus offer unique opportunities for new and improved therapeutic manipulation, either in vivo or in vitro, in a variety of human diseases, including cancers. NK cell activity can possibly be modulated in vivo through direct or indirect actions exerted by small molecules or monoclonal antibodies. NK cells can also be adoptively transferred following more or less substantial modifications through cell and gene manufacturing, in order to empower them with new or improved functions and ensure their controlled persistence and activity in the recipient. In the present review, we will focus on the technological and regulatory challenges of NK cell manufacturing, and discuss conditions in which these innovative cellular therapies can be brought to the clinic.

  14. A large gene family in fission yeast encodes spore killers that subvert Mendel’s law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen; Jiang, Zhao-Di; Suo, Fang; Zheng, Jin-Xin; He, Wan-Zhong; Du, Li-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Spore killers in fungi are selfish genetic elements that distort Mendelian segregation in their favor. It remains unclear how many species harbor them and how diverse their mechanisms are. Here, we discover two spore killers from a natural isolate of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Both killers belong to the previously uncharacterized wtf gene family with 25 members in the reference genome. These two killers act in strain-background-independent and genome-location-independent manners to perturb the maturation of spores not inheriting them. Spores carrying one killer are protected from its killing effect but not that of the other killer. The killing and protecting activities can be uncoupled by mutation. The numbers and sequences of wtf genes vary considerably between S. pombe isolates, indicating rapid divergence. We propose that wtf genes contribute to the extensive intraspecific reproductive isolation in S. pombe, and represent ideal models for understanding how segregation-distorting elements act and evolve. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26057.001 PMID:28631610

  15. Transfection Agent Induced Nanoparticle Cell Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Montet-Abou

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Loading cells with magnetic nanoparticles, and tracking their fate in vivo by high resolution MRI, is an attractive approach for enhancing the efficacy of cell-based therapies including those utilizing hematopoietic stem cells, neuroprogenitor cells, and T cells. The transfection agent (internalization agent assisted loading with the Feridex IV® nanoparticle is an attractive method of loading because of the low cost of materials, and possible low regulatory barriers for eventual clinical use. We therefore explored the interaction between Feridex IV® and three internalization agents protamine (PRO, polylysine (PLL, and lipofectamine (LFA. Feridex reacted with internalization agents to form aggregates, except when either the internalization agent or Feridex was present in large excess. When Jurkat T cells were incubated with Feridex/LFA or Feridex/PRO mixtures, and washed by centrifugation, nanoparticle aggregates co-purified with cells. With C17.2 cells large iron oxide particles adhered to the cell surface. At 30 μg/mL Feridex and 3 μg/mL LFA, internalization was largely mediated by LFA and was largely cytoplasmic. However, we found that the conditions used to label cells with Feridex and transfection agents need to be carefully selected to avoid the problems of surface adsorption and nanoparticle precipitation.

  16. Serial killer: il database mondiale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano parente

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The complex and multisided study of serial killers is partly made difficult by the current level of progress that has led these deviant people to evolve in relation to the aspects of shrewdness (concerning the staging and mobility. Despite the important work of some scholars who proposed important theories, all this shows that, concerning serial murders, it is still particularly frequent not to pay attention to links among homicides committed by the same person but in different parts of the world. It is therefore crucial to develop a worldwide database that allows all police forces to access information collected on crime scenes of murders which are particularly absurd and committed without any apparent reason. It will then be up to the profiler, through ad hoc and technologically advanced tools, to collect this information on the crime scene that would be made available to all police forces thanks to the worldwide database.

  17. Fractalkine expression induces endothelial progenitor cell lysis by natural killer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilyana Todorova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circulating CD34(+ cells, a population that includes endothelial progenitors, participate in the maintenance of endothelial integrity. Better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate their survival is crucial to improve their regenerative activity in cardiovascular and renal diseases. Chemokine-receptor cross talk is critical in regulating cell homeostasis. We hypothesized that cell surface expression of the chemokine fractalkine (FKN could target progenitor cell injury by Natural Killer (NK cells, thereby limiting their availability for vascular repair. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that CD34(+-derived Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFC can express FKN in response to TNF-α and IFN-γ inflammatory cytokines and that FKN expression by ECFC stimulates NK cell adhesion, NK cell-mediated ECFC lysis and microparticles release in vitro. The specific involvement of membrane FKN in these processes was demonstrated using FKN-transfected ECFC and anti-FKN blocking antibody. FKN expression was also evidenced on circulating CD34(+ progenitor cells and was detected at higher frequency in kidney transplant recipients, when compared to healthy controls. The proportion of CD34(+ cells expressing FKN was identified as an independent variable inversely correlated to CD34(+ progenitor cell count. We further showed that treatment of CD34(+ circulating cells isolated from adult blood donors with transplant serum or TNF-α/IFN-γ can induce FKN expression. CONCLUSIONS: Our data highlights a novel mechanism by which FKN expression on CD34(+ progenitor cells may target their NK cell mediated killing and participate to their immune depletion in transplant recipients. Considering the numerous diseased contexts shown to promote FKN expression, our data identify FKN as a hallmark of altered progenitor cell homeostasis with potential implications in better evaluation of vascular repair in patients.

  18. Peripheral Arterial Disease Can Be a Killer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Peripheral Arterial Disease Can Be a Killer Past Issues / ... Color changes in skin, paleness, or blueness Lower temperature in one leg compared to the other leg ...

  19. Epstein-Barr virus-negative aggressive natural killer-cell leukaemia with high P-glycoprotein activity and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Perkovic

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive natural killer-cell leukaemia (ANKL is a rare type of disease with fulminant course and poor outcome. The disease is more prevalent among Asians than in other ethnic groups and shows strong association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and P-glycoprotein (P-gp expression associated with multidrug resistance. Here we present a case of a 47 year old Caucasian female with a prior medical history of azathioprine treated ulcerative colitis who developed EBV-negative form of ANKL. The patient presented with hepatosplenomegaly, fever and nausea with peripheral blood and bone marrow infiltration with up to 70% of atypical lymphoid cells positive for cCD3, CD2, CD7, CD56, CD38, CD45, TIA1 and granzyme B, and negative for sCD3, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD34 and CD123 indicative of ANKL. Neoplastic CD56+ NK-cells showed high level of P-glycoprotein expression and activity, but also strong expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2 MAP kinase. The patient was treated with an intensive polychemotherapy regimen designed for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, but one month after admission developed sepsis, coma and died of cardiorespiratory arrest. We present additional evidence that, except for the immunophenotype, leukaemic NK-cells resemble normal NK-cells in terms of P-gp functional capacity and expression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 signalling molecule. In that sense drugs that block P-glycoprotein activity and activated signalling pathways might represent new means for targeted therapy.

  20. Persistence in the Shadow of Killers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Michael Sinclair

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Killing is perhaps the most definite form of communication possible. Microbes such as yeasts and gutbacteria have been shown to exhibit killer phenotypes. The killer strains are able to kill othermicrobes occupying the same ecological niche, and do so with impunity. It would therefore beexpected that, wherever a killer phenotype has arisen, all members of the population would soon bekillers or dead. Surprisingly, (i one can find both killer and sensitive strains in coexistence, both inthe wild and in in-vitro experiments, and (ii the absolute fitness cost of the killer phenotype oftenseems to be very small. We present an explicit model of such coexistence in a fragmented or discreteenvironment. A killer strain may kill all sensitive cells in one patch (one piece of rotting fruit, onecave or one human gut, for example, allowing sensitives to exist only in the absence of killer strainson the same patch. In our model, populations spread easily between patches, but in a stochasticmanner: One can imagine spores borne by the wind over a field of untended apple trees, or entericdisease transmission in a region in which travel is effectively unrestricted. What we show is thatcoexistence is not only possible, but that it is possible even if the absolute fitness advantage of thesensitive strain over the killer strain is arbitrarily small. We do this by performing a specificallytargeted mathematical analysis on our model, rather than via simulations. Our model does not assumelarge population densities, and may thus be useful in the context of understanding the ecology ofextreme environments.

  1. Toxicity of a plant based mosquito repellent/killer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prakash Raj; Mohanty, Manoj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The mission to make humans less attractive to mosquitoes has fuelled decades of scientific research on mosquito behaviour and control. The search for the perfect topical insect repellent/killer continues. This analysis was conducted to review and explore the scientific information on toxicity produced by the ingredients/contents of a herbal product. In this process of systemic review the following methodology was applied. By doing a MEDLINE search with key words of selected plants, plant based insect repellents/killers pertinent articles published in journals and authentic books were reviewed. The World Wide Web and the Extension Toxicity Network database (IPCS-ITOX) were also searched for toxicology data and other pertinent information. Repellents do not all share a single mode of action and surprisingly little is known about how repellents act on their target insects. Moreover, different mosquito species may react differently to the same repellent. After analysis of available data and information on the ingredient, of the product in relation to medicinal uses, acute and chronic toxicity of the selected medicinal plants, it can be concluded that the ingredients included in the herbal product can be used as active agents against mosquitoes. If the product which contains the powder of the above said plants is applied with care and safety, it is suitable fo use as a mosquito repellent/killer. PMID:23554562

  2. Present and future of allogeneic natural killer cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okjae eLim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate lymphocytes that are capable of eliminating tumor cells and are therefore used for cancer therapy. Although many early investigators used autologous NK cells, including lymphokine-activated killer cells, the clinical efficacies were not satisfactory. Meanwhile, human leukocyte antigen (HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation revealed the anti-tumor effect of allogeneic NK cells, and HLA-haploidentical, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR ligand-mismatched allogeneic NK cells are currently used for many protocols requiring NK cells. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors have been recently used in cancer therapy. The use of allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors allows the selection of donor NK cells with higher flexibility and to prepare expanded, cryopreserved NK cells for instant administration without delay for ex vivo expansion. In cancer therapy with allogeneic NK cells, optimal matching of donors and recipients is important to maximize the efficacy of the therapy. In this review, we summarize the present state of allogeneic NK cell therapy and its future directions.

  3. Evaluation of the potential immunotoxicity of 3-monochloro-1,2-propanediol in Balb/c mice I. Effect on antibody forming cell, mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation, splenic subset, and natural killer cell activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Kwon; Byun, Jung A.; Park, Seung Hee; Kim, Hyung Soo; Park, Jae Hyun; Eom, Juno H.; Oh, Hye Young

    2004-01-01

    3-Monochloro-1,2-propanediol (MCPD) is a well-known by-product of acid-hydrolyzed soy sauce during its manufacturing process. MCPD has been reported genotoxic in vitro, and reproductive toxicity and carcinogenicity in rats. However, no previous studies have investigated MCPD-induced alterations in the immune system. In the present study, MCPD was administered by gavage for 14 days at 0, 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg per day to female Balb/c mice. The antibody-mediated immune response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) was assessed using the antibody-forming cell (AFC) assay, and splenic cell phenotypes were quantified by flow cytometry. Hematological and histopathological changes were assessed. Mitogen-stimulated spleen lymphocyte proliferation and natural killer (NK) cell activity were evaluated. The T-lymphocyte blastogenesis by concanavalin A (Con A) or anti-CD3 and B-lymphocyte blastogenesis by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were not significantly changed. There were no significant changes in the hematological and histopathological findings of MCPD-treated mice. However, the significant decrease in thymus weight was observed in 100 mg dose group, even though that did not change body weight gain. The cellularities of spleen and thymus were significantly reduced in high-dose group. Exposure to high dose of MCPD decreased the AFC response to SRBC in mice. There was a significant decrease in NK cell activity of mice treated with high dose of MCPD. These results indicate that MCPD could modulate the immune function in Balb/c mice

  4. Production of an Engineered Killer Peptide in Nicotiana benthamiana by Using a Potato virus X Expression System

    OpenAIRE

    Donini, Marcello; Lico, Chiara; Baschieri, Selene; Conti, Stefania; Magliani, Walter; Polonelli, Luciano; Benvenuto, Eugenio

    2005-01-01

    The decapeptide killer peptide (KP) derived from the sequence of a single-chain, anti-idiotypic antibody acting as a functional internal image of a microbicidal, broad-spectrum yeast killer toxin (KT) was shown to exert a strong microbicidal activity against human pathogens. With the aim to exploit this peptide to confer resistance to plant pathogens, we assayed its antimicrobial activity against a broad spectrum of phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi. Synthetic KP exhibited antimicrobial acti...

  5. Lipoplex morphologies and their influences on transfection efficiency in gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baichao; Zhang, Shubiao; Jiang, Huiming; Zhao, Budiao; Lv, Hongtao

    2007-11-20

    Cationic lipid-mediated gene transfer is widely used for their advantages over viral gene transfer because it is non-immunogenic, easy to produce and not oncogenic. The main drawback of the application of cationic lipids is their low transfection efficiency. Many reports about transfection efficiency of cationic lipids have been published in recent years. In this review, the current status and prospects for transfection efficiency of different morphologies of lipoplexes are discussed. High transfection activity will be acquired for H(C)(II) structure when membrane fusion is dominant, but when serum is present L(C)(alpha) lipoplexes show great superiority for their inhibition dissociation by serum during lipoplexes transporting. Increasing DOPE often gains high activity for the H(C)(II) structure promoted by DOPE. High lipofection will be gained from large lipoplexes when endocytosis is dominant, because large particles facilitate membrane contact and fusion. We suggest morphologies of lipoplex should be characterized at two levels, lipoplex size and self-assemble structures of lipoplexes, and understanding these would be very important for scientists to prepare novel cationic lipids and design novel formulations with high transfection efficiency.

  6. THE RELATIONSHIP OF THE GENERAL REACTION SCORE WITH THE NATURAL KILLER CELLS ACTIVITY AMONG WOMEN WITH AIRCRAFT NOISE EXPOSURE IN THE AREA OF ADI SOEMARMO AIRPORT SOLO (Hubungan antara general reaction score dengan aktivitas sel NK pada wanita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartono Hartono

    2011-07-01

    performance. For other effects such as changes in the immune system and birth defects, the evidence is limited.The aims of the research is  to find out the correlation of the general reaction score with The Natural Killer cell activity among women with aircraft noise exposure in the area of Adi Sumarmo Airport Solo.The research findings are expected to contribute to the scientific knowledge development and to give benefits for local government and among people in the area of Adi Sumarmo Airport in preventing the effect of aircraft noise. The research design was an analytical survey with a cross sectional approach, taking place at the Dibal and Gagak Sipat Village, Ngemplak Sub district, Boyolali District. The research was conducted from July 2008 to June 2009. The number of respondens was 39. They were divided into 3 groups; group 1 was exposed to 92.29 dB of noise level (13 respondents; group 2 was exposed to 71.79 dB of noise level (13 respondents; and group 3 was exposed to 52.17 dB of noise level (13 respondents. The samples were taken using simple random sampling. The data were analyzed by Pearson Correlation and Anova followed by Post Hoc Test using LSD test completed with Homogenous Subsets. The Anova test showed that there was significant differences in the general reaction score among all groups (p = 0.000. The Pearson correlation test showed that there was a negative association between the general reaction score with the Natural Killer cells activity (r = - 0.613; p < 0.05.

  7. Inducement of radionuclides targeting therapy by gene transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Quanyong

    2001-01-01

    The author presents an overview of gene transfection methods to genetically induce tumor cells to express enhanced levels of cell surface antigens and receptors to intake radiolabeled antibody and peptide targeting and thus increase their therapeutic effect in radiotherapy. The current research include inducement of radioimmunotherapy through CEA gene transfection, inducement of iodine-131 therapy by sodium iodide symporter gene transfection and inducement of MIBG therapy by noradrenaline transporter gene transfection. These studies raise the prospect that gene-therapy techniques could be used to enable the treatment of a wide range of tumors with radiopharmaceuticals of established clinical acceptability

  8. Activation of natural killer T cells promotes M2 macrophage polarization in adipose tissue and improves systemic glucose tolerance via the IL-4/STAT6 signaling axis in obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, Yewei; Sun, Shengyi; Xu, Aimin; Yang, Liu; Bhargava, Prerna; Lam, Karen S.; Gao, Bin; Lee, Chih-Hao; Kersten, Sander; Qi, Ling

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are important therapeutic targets in various disease models and under clinical trials for cancer patients. However, their function in obesity and type 2 diabetes remains unclear. Our data show that adipose tissues of both mice and humans contain a population of type-1

  9. Activation of natural killer T Cells promotes M2 macrophage polarization in adipose tissue and improves systemic glucose tolerance via interleukin-4 (IL-4)/STAT6 protein signalling axis in obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, Y.; Sun, S.; Xu, Aimin; Bhargava, P.; Yang, Liu; Lam, K.S.L.; Gao, Bin; Lee, Chih-Hao; Kersten, A.H.; Qi, L.

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are important therapeutic targets in various disease models and are under clinical trials for cancer patients. However, their function in obesity and type 2 diabetes remains unclear. Our data show that adipose tissues of both mice and humans contain a population of type

  10. Interleukin-15-activated natural killer cells kill autologous osteoclasts via LFA-1, DNAM-1 and TRAIL, and inhibit osteoclast-mediated bone erosion in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Shan; Madsen, Suzi H; Viller, Natasja N

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts reside on bone and are the main bone resorbing cells playing an important role in bone homeostasis, while natural killer (NK) cells are bone-marrow-derived cells known to play a crucial role in immune defence against viral infections. Although mature NK cells traffic through bone marrow...

  11. Fucoidan from Sargassum sp. and Fucus vesiculosus reduces cell viability of lung carcinoma and melanoma cells in vitro and activates natural killer cells in mice in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ale, Marcel Tutor; Maruyama, Hiroko; Tamauchi, Hidekazu

    2011-01-01

    Fucoidan is known to exhibit crucial biological activities, including anti-tumor activity. In this study, we examined the influence of crude fucoidan extracted from Sargassum sp. (MTA) and Fucus vesiculosus (SIG) on Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LCC) and melanoma B16 cells (MC). In vitro studies we...

  12. Guanidinylated polyethyleneimine-polyoxypropylene-polyoxyethylene conjugates as gene transfection agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, Lev; Raduyk, Svetlana; Hatton, T Alan; Concheiro, Angel; Rodriguez-Valencia, Cosme; Silva, Maite; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2009-05-20

    Conjugates of linear and branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) and monoamine polyether Jeffamine M-2070 (PO/EO mol ratio 10/31, 2000 Da) were synthesized through polyether activation by cyanuric chloride followed by attachment to PEI and guanidinylation by 1H-pyrazole-carboxamidine hydrochloride. The resulting guanidinylated PEI-polyether conjugates (termed gPEI-Jeffamine) efficiently complexed plasmid DNA, and their polyplexes possessed enhanced colloidal stability in the presence of serum proteins. In vitro studies with mammalian CHO-1, 3T3, and Cos-7 cell lines demonstrated improved transfection efficiency of the pCMVbeta-gal plasmid/gPEI-Jeffamine polyplexes. The guanidinylation of the amino groups of PEI and the conjugation of PEI with the Jeffamine polyether enhanced the conjugates' interaction with genetic material and reduced the cytotoxicity of the polyplexes in experiments with the L929 cell line.

  13. Immune monitoring using mRNA-transfected dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Troels Holz; Svane, Inge Marie; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are known to be the most potent antigen presenting cell in the immune system and are used as cellular adjuvants in therapeutic anticancer vaccines using various tumor-associated antigens or their derivatives. One way of loading antigen into the dendritic cells is by m......RNA electroporation, ensuring presentation of antigen through major histocompatibility complex I and potentially activating T cells, enabling them to kill the tumor cells. Despite extensive research in the field, only one dendritic cell-based vaccine has been approved. There is therefore a great need to elucidate...... and understand the immunological impact of dendritic cell vaccination in order to improve clinical benefit. In this chapter, we describe a method for performing immune monitoring using peripheral blood mononuclear cells and autologous dendritic cells transfected with tumor-associated antigen-encoding mRNA....

  14. Killer whale (Orcinus orca) behavioral audiograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branstetter, Brian K; St Leger, Judy; Acton, Doug; Stewart, John; Houser, Dorian; Finneran, James J; Jenkins, Keith

    2017-04-01

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are one of the most cosmopolitan marine mammal species with potential widespread exposure to anthropogenic noise impacts. Previous audiometric data on this species were from two adult females [Szymanski, Bain, Kiehl, Pennington, Wong, and Henry (1999). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1322-1326] and one sub-adult male [Hall and Johnson (1972). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 51, 515-517] with apparent high-frequency hearing loss. All three killer whales had best sensitivity between 15 and 20 kHz, with thresholds lower than any odontocete tested to date, suggesting this species might be particularly sensitive to acoustic disturbance. The current study reports the behavioral audiograms of eight killer whales at two different facilities. Hearing sensitivity was measured from 100 Hz to 160 kHz in killer whales ranging in age from 12 to 52 year. Previously measured low thresholds at 20 kHz were not replicated in any individual. Hearing in the killer whales was generally similar to other delphinids, with lowest threshold (49 dB re 1 μPa) at approximately 34 kHz, good hearing (i.e., within 20 dB of best sensitivity) from 5 to 81 kHz, and low- and high-frequency hearing cutoffs (>100 dB re μPa) of 600 Hz and 114 kHz, respectively.

  15. Impact of "Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor /Ligand" Genotypes on Outcome following Surgery among Patients with Colorectal Cancer: Activating KIRs Are Associated with Long-Term Disease Free Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Beksac

    Full Text Available Approximately 30% of patients with stage II/III colorectal cancer develop recurrence following surgery. How individual regulation of host mediated anti-tumor cytotoxicity is modified by the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIRs genotype is essential for prediction of outcome. We analyzed the frequency of KIR and KIR ligand Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I genotypes, and their effects on recurrence and disease-free survival (DFS. Out of randomly selected 87 colorectal cancer patients who underwent R0 resection operations between 2005 and 2008, 29 patients whose cancers progressed within a median five-year follow-up period were compared with 58 patients with no recurrence within the same time period. Recurrent cases shared similar tumor stages with non-recurrent cases, but had different localizations. We used DNA isolated from pathological archival lymphoid and tumor tissues for KIR and KIR ligand (HLA-C, group C1, group C2, and HLA-A-Bw4 genotyping. Among cases with recurrence, KIR2DL1 (inhibitory KIR and A-Bw4 (ligand for inhibitory KIR3DL1 were observed more frequently (p=0.017 and p=0.024; and KIR2DS2 and KIR2DS3 (both activating KIRs were observed less frequently (p=0.005 and p=0.043. Similarly, in the non-recurrent group, inhibitory KIR-ligand combinations 2DL1-C2 and 2DL3-C1 were less frequent, while the activating combination 2DS2-C1 was more frequent. The lack of KIR2DL1, 2DL1-C2, and 2DL3-C1 improved disease-free survival (DFS (100% vs. 62.3%, p=0.05; 93.8% vs. 60.0%, p=0.035; 73.6% vs. 55.9%, p=0.07. The presence of KIR2DS2, 2DS3, and 2DS2-C1 improved DFS (77.8% vs. 48.5%, p=0.01; 79.4% vs. 58.5%, p=0.003; 76.9% vs. 51.4%, p=0.023. KIR2DS3 reduced the risk of recurrence (HR=0.263, 95% CI = 0.080-0.863, p=0.028. The number of activating KIRs are correlated strongly with DFS, none/ one/ two KIR : 54/77/98 months (p=0.004. In conclusion the inheritance of increasing numbers of activating KIRs and lack of inhibitory KIRs

  16. Proteome alteration induced by hTERT transfection of human fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzucchelli, Gabriel D; Gabelica, Valérie; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Fléron, Maximilien; Ashimwe, Wilson; Rosu, Frédéric; De Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire; Riou, Jean-François; De Pauw, Edwin

    2008-04-17

    Telomerase confers cellular immortality by elongating telomeres, thereby circumventing the Hayflick limit. Extended-life-span cells have been generated by transfection with the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene. hTERT transfected cell lines may be of outstanding interest to monitor the effect of drugs targeting the telomerase activity. The incidence of hTERT gene transfection at the proteome level is a prerequisite to that purpose. The effect of the transfection has been studied on the proteome of human fibroblast (WI38). Cytosolic and nuclear fractions of WI38 cells, empty vector transfected WI38 (WI38-HPV) and hTERT WI38 cells were submitted to a 2D-DIGE (Two-Dimensional Differential In-Gel Electrophoresis) analysis. Only spots that had a similar abundance in WI38 and WI38-HPV, but were differentially expressed in WI38 hTERT were selected for MS identification. This method directly points to the proteins linked with the hTERT expression. Number of false positive differentially expressed proteins has been excluded by using control WI38-HPV cells. The proteome alteration induced by hTERT WI38 transfection should be taken into account in subsequent use of the cell line for anti-telomerase drugs evaluation. 2D-DIGE experiment shows that 57 spots out of 2246 are significantly differentially expressed in the cytosolic fraction due to hTERT transfection, and 38 were confidently identified. In the nuclear fraction, 44 spots out of 2172 were selected in the differential proteome analysis, and 14 were identified. The results show that, in addition to elongating telomeres, hTERT gene transfection has other physiological roles, among which an enhanced ER capacity and a potent cell protection against apoptosis. We show that the methodology reduces the complexity of the proteome analysis and highlights proteins implicated in other processes than telomere elongation. hTERT induced proteome changes suggest that telomerase expression enhances natural cell repair

  17. Transfection of brain capillary endothelial cells in primary culture with defined blood-brain barrier properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Annette; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Thomsen, Maj Schneider; Lichota, Jacek; Fazakas, Csilla; Krizbai, István; Moos, Torben

    2015-08-07

    Primary brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) are a promising tool to study the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro, as they maintain many important characteristics of the BBB in vivo, especially when co-cultured with pericytes and/or astrocytes. A novel strategy for drug delivery to the brain is to transform BCECs into protein factories by genetic modifications leading to secretion of otherwise BBB impermeable proteins into the central nervous system. However, a huge challenge underlying this strategy is to enable transfection of non-mitotic BCECs, taking a non-viral approach. We therefore aimed to study transfection in primary, non-mitotic BCECs cultured with defined BBB properties without disrupting the cells' integrity. Primary cultures of BCECs, pericytes and astrocytes were generated from rat brains and used in three different in vitro BBB experimental arrangements, which were characterised based on a their expression of tight junction proteins and other BBB specific proteins, high trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER), and low passive permeability to radiolabeled mannitol. Recombinant gene expression and protein synthesis were examined in primary BCECs. The BCECs were transfected using a commercially available transfection agent Turbofect™ to express the red fluorescent protein HcRed1-C1. The BCECs were transfected at different time points to monitor transfection in relation to mitotic or non-mitotic cells, as indicated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis after 5-and 6-carboxylfluorescein diacetate succinidyl ester incorporation. The cell cultures exhibited important BBB characteristics judged from their expression of BBB specific proteins, high TEER values, and low passive permeability. Among the three in vitro BBB models, co-culturing with BCECs and astrocytes was well suited for the transfection studies. Transfection was independent of cell division and with equal efficacy between the mitotic and non-mitotic BCECs. Importantly

  18. Proteome alteration induced by hTERT transfection of human fibroblast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riou Jean-François

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomerase confers cellular immortality by elongating telomeres, thereby circumventing the Hayflick limit. Extended-life-span cells have been generated by transfection with the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene. hTERT transfected cell lines may be of outstanding interest to monitor the effect of drugs targeting the telomerase activity. The incidence of hTERT gene transfection at the proteome level is a prerequisite to that purpose. The effect of the transfection has been studied on the proteome of human fibroblast (WI38. Cytosolic and nuclear fractions of WI38 cells, empty vector transfected WI38 (WI38-HPV and hTERT WI38 cells were submitted to a 2D-DIGE (Two-Dimensional Differential In-Gel Electrophoresis analysis. Only spots that had a similar abundance in WI38 and WI38-HPV, but were differentially expressed in WI38 hTERT were selected for MS identification. This method directly points to the proteins linked with the hTERT expression. Number of false positive differentially expressed proteins has been excluded by using control WI38-HPV cells. The proteome alteration induced by hTERT WI38 transfection should be taken into account in subsequent use of the cell line for anti-telomerase drugs evaluation. Results 2D-DIGE experiment shows that 57 spots out of 2246 are significantly differentially expressed in the cytosolic fraction due to hTERT transfection, and 38 were confidently identified. In the nuclear fraction, 44 spots out of 2172 were selected in the differential proteome analysis, and 14 were identified. The results show that, in addition to elongating telomeres, hTERT gene transfection has other physiological roles, among which an enhanced ER capacity and a potent cell protection against apoptosis. Conclusion We show that the methodology reduces the complexity of the proteome analysis and highlights proteins implicated in other processes than telomere elongation. hTERT induced proteome changes suggest

  19. Enhancement of natural killer cell activity in healthy subjects by Immulina®, a Spirulina extract enriched for Braun-type lipoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Balachandran, Premalatha; Christensen, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Immulina®, a commercial extract of Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis is a potent activator of THP-1 monocytes and CD4+ T cells IN VITRO and enhances several immunological functions in mice. We further characterized Immulina® by determining that Braun-type lipoproteins are responsible for a major...

  20. Correlation between cationic lipid-based transfection and cell division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchenbuechler, Inka; Kirchenbuechler, David; Elbaum, Michael, E-mail: michael@elbaum.ac.il

    2016-07-01

    We evaluate the temporal relation between protein expression by cationic lipid-mediated transfection and cell division using time lapse fluorescence microscopy. Detailed image analysis provides new insights on the single cell level while simultaneously achieving appropriate statistics. Earlier evidence by less direct methods such as flow cytometry indicates a primary route for transfection involving nuclear envelope breakdown, but also suggests the existence of a pathway independent of mitosis. We confirm and quantify both mechanisms. We found the timing for successful transfection to be unexpectedly flexible, contrary to assertions of a narrow time window. Specifically, cells dividing more than 24 h after exposure to the transfection medium express the probed protein at a comparable level to cells in a mitotic state during or shortly after transfection. This finding can have a profound impact on the guidance and development of non-viral gene delivery materials. - Highlights: • Cationic lipid-based transfection supports protein expression without cell division. • Protein expression is unrelated to cell cycle status at the time of transfection. • Time-lapse imaging provides direct evaluation without statistical averaging. • Lipoplex dissociation is a likely target for improvement of transfection efficiency.

  1. Improving ultrasound gene transfection efficiency by controlling ultrasound excitation of microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Z; Chen, D; Deng, C X

    2013-09-28

    Ultrasound application in the presence of microbubbles has shown great potential for non-viral gene transfection via transient disruption of cell membrane (sonoporation). However, improvement of its efficiency has largely relied on empirical approaches without consistent and translatable results. The goal of this study is to develop a rational strategy based on new results obtained using novel experimental techniques and analysis to improve sonoporation gene transfection. In this study, we conducted experiments using targeted microbubbles that were attached to cell membrane to facilitate sonoporation. We quantified the dynamic activities of microbubbles exposed to pulsed ultrasound and the resulting sonoporation outcome, and identified distinct regimes of characteristic microbubble behaviors: stable cavitation, coalescence and translation, and inertial cavitation. We found that inertial cavitation generated the highest rate of membrane poration. By establishing direct correlation of ultrasound-induced bubble activities with intracellular uptake and pore size, we designed a ramped pulse exposure scheme for optimizing microbubble excitation to improve sonoporation gene transfection. We implemented a novel sonoporation gene transfection system using an aqueous two phase system (ATPS) for efficient use of reagents and high throughput operation. Using plasmids coding for the green fluorescence protein (GFP), we achieved a sonoporation transfection efficiency in rate aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs) of 6.9%±2.2% (n=9), comparable with lipofection (7.5%±0.8%, n=9). Our results reveal characteristic microbubble behaviors responsible for sonoporation and demonstrated a rational strategy to improve sonoporation gene transfection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Importance of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Santana Alessio Franceschi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the treatment of choice for many hematologic diseases, such as multiple myeloma, bone marrow aplasia and leukemia. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA compatibility is an important tool to prevent post-transplant complications such as graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease, but the high rates of relapse limit the survival of transplant patients. Natural Killer cells, a type of lymphocyte that is a key element in the defense against tumor cells, cells infected with viruses and intracellular microbes, have different receptors on their surfaces that regulate their cytotoxicity. Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors are the most important, interacting consistently with human leukocyte antigen class I molecules present in other cells and thus controlling the activation of natural killer cells. Several studies have shown that certain combinations of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and human leukocyte antigens (in both donors and recipients can affect the chances of survival of transplant patients, particularly in relation to the graft-versusleukemia effect, which may be associated to decreased relapse rates in certain groups. This review aims to shed light on the mechanisms and effects of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors - human leukocyte antigen associations and their implications following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and to critically analyze the results obtained by the studies presented herein.

  3. Protein translation and cell death: the role of rare tRNAs in biofilm formation and in activating dormant phage killer genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo García-Contreras

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We discovered previously that the small Escherichia coli proteins Hha (hemolysin expression modulating protein and the adjacent, poorly-characterized YbaJ are important for biofilm formation; however, their roles have been nebulous. Biofilms are intricate communities in which cell signaling often converts single cells into primitive tissues. Here we show that Hha decreases biofilm formation dramatically by repressing the transcription of rare codon tRNAs which serves to inhibit fimbriae production and by repressing to some extent transcription of fimbrial genes fimA and ihfA. In vivo binding studies show Hha binds to the rare codon tRNAs argU, ileX, ileY, and proL and to two prophage clusters D1P12 and CP4-57. Real-time PCR corroborated that Hha represses argU and proL, and Hha type I fimbriae repression is abolished by the addition of extra copies of argU, ileY, and proL. The repression of transcription of rare codon tRNAs by Hha also leads to cell lysis and biofilm dispersal due to activation of prophage lytic genes rzpD, yfjZ, appY, and alpA and due to induction of ClpP/ClpX proteases which activate toxins by degrading antitoxins. YbaJ serves to mediate the toxicity of Hha. Hence, we have identified that a single protein (Hha can control biofilm formation by limiting fimbriae production as well as by controlling cell death. The mechanism used by Hha is the control of translation via the availability of rare codon tRNAs which reduces fimbriae production and activates prophage lytic genes. Therefore, Hha acts as a toxin in conjunction with co-transcribed YbaJ (TomB that attenuates Hha toxicity.

  4. Expression of natural killer cell activity with CD107a on ectopic endometrium in woman with endometriosis compared with non-endometriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubis, H. P.; Aldiansyah, D.; Siregar, H. S.; Rivany, R.; Hariadi, T. S.

    2018-03-01

    Some factors have an important role in endometriosis pathogenesis; there is an immune cell that plays an important role in endometrial cells that have reflux. Woman with endometriosis experienced the cellular immune disorder. It is suspected that decrease of NK cell in the peritoneal fluid caused by its qualitative defect with CD107a expression as the best marker. The aim of this study was to compare expression of NK Cell activity with CD107a between awoman with endometriosis and non-endometriosis. A case-control study from March until July 2015 in Haji Adam Malik General Hospital. The case group was ectopic endometrial tissue block paraffin and control group was normal endometrial tissue block paraffin. This study included 23 patients in endometriosis group and control group respectively. A majority proportion of CD107a expression in endometriosis group was +1 (16 patients (69.6%)), while the control group was +3 (9 patients (39.1%)). Expression of NK cell activity with CD107a in patients with endometriosis was lower than the control group (pendometriosis.

  5. Noninvasive imaging of transplanted living functional cells transfected with a reporter estrogen receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamatsu, Shinji [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaizuki, Matsuoka, Yoshida, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan)]. E-mail: shinjit@fmsrsa.fukui-med.ac.jp; Furukawa, Takako [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaizuki, Matsuoka, Yoshida, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Mori, Tetsuya [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaizuki, Matsuoka, Yoshida, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Yonekura, Yoshiharu [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaizuki, Matsuoka, Yoshida, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaizuki, Matsuoka, Yoshida, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan)

    2005-11-01

    The transplantation of functional cells such as dopaminergic cells into damaged tissue is now clinically ongoing, but at present the population of surviving cells at the transplantation site mostly cannot be noninvasively examined. To visualize surviving transplanted functional cells using a noninvasive method, we chose the estrogen receptor ligand binding domain (ERL) as a reporter molecule and 16{alpha}-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-17{beta}-estradiol (FES) for its ligand. We used a mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell line for recipient cells as a model. To obtain ES cells that constitutively or inducibly express ERL, we transfected two types of expression vectors into EB5 parental ES cell line using the lipofection method and obtained about 30 clones for each of the two types of transfectants. Then, to examine the expression level of ERL, we performed Western blotting analysis. Ligand uptake experiments were carried out using [{sup 3}H]-estradiol with or without excessive unlabeled estradiol for control cells and ERL transfectants. Each selected clone was also used for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies involving FES in nude mice transplanted with control cells and ERL transfectants. In some of the clones transfected with the inducible-type ERL gene, protein was expressed much higher than in the controls. However, constitutive-type ERL gene-transfected ES cells showed no protein production in spite of their gene expression activity being considerably high. All clones also expressed equal levels of the Oct-3/4 gene, a marker of pluripotency, in comparison with the parental cells. Also, the specific uptake of [{sup 3}H]-estradiol was over 30 times higher in inducer-treated ERL-expressing ES cells compared to untreated control cells. Finally, by performing dynamic PET imaging, we successfully visualized ERL-expressing teratomas using FES.

  6. Noninvasive imaging of transplanted living functional cells transfected with a reporter estrogen receptor gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, Shinji; Furukawa, Takako; Mori, Tetsuya; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa

    2005-01-01

    The transplantation of functional cells such as dopaminergic cells into damaged tissue is now clinically ongoing, but at present the population of surviving cells at the transplantation site mostly cannot be noninvasively examined. To visualize surviving transplanted functional cells using a noninvasive method, we chose the estrogen receptor ligand binding domain (ERL) as a reporter molecule and 16α-[ 18 F]-fluoro-17β-estradiol (FES) for its ligand. We used a mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell line for recipient cells as a model. To obtain ES cells that constitutively or inducibly express ERL, we transfected two types of expression vectors into EB5 parental ES cell line using the lipofection method and obtained about 30 clones for each of the two types of transfectants. Then, to examine the expression level of ERL, we performed Western blotting analysis. Ligand uptake experiments were carried out using [ 3 H]-estradiol with or without excessive unlabeled estradiol for control cells and ERL transfectants. Each selected clone was also used for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies involving FES in nude mice transplanted with control cells and ERL transfectants. In some of the clones transfected with the inducible-type ERL gene, protein was expressed much higher than in the controls. However, constitutive-type ERL gene-transfected ES cells showed no protein production in spite of their gene expression activity being considerably high. All clones also expressed equal levels of the Oct-3/4 gene, a marker of pluripotency, in comparison with the parental cells. Also, the specific uptake of [ 3 H]-estradiol was over 30 times higher in inducer-treated ERL-expressing ES cells compared to untreated control cells. Finally, by performing dynamic PET imaging, we successfully visualized ERL-expressing teratomas using FES

  7. UV-C irradiation of HSV-1 infected fibroblasts (HSV-FS) enhances human natural killer (NK) cell activity against these targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettera, L.; Fitzgerald-Bocarsly, P.

    1991-01-01

    Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) immediate early gene products has been bound to be sufficient for NK cell mediated lysis of HSV-1 infected FS. To block the targets at various stages in the infectious cycle, HSV-FS were irradiated with UV light for 1 min at 2, 6, and 20 hr post-infection. NK mediated lysis of 2 hr and 5 hr UV treated HSV-FS was 2-fold higher than non-UV treated HSV-FS despite a >99% inhibition in virus yield. In contrast, 20 hr infected targets were lysed less well than 2 and 6 hr targets despite strong glycoprotein expression and induction of high levels of interferon-alpha (IFN-α) production by effector PBMC's; this lysis was not enhanced by UV treatment. Since NK lysis of HSV-FS has been found to be dependent on an HLA-DR + accessory cell (AC), lysis of irradiated HSV-FS by PBMC's depleted of AC was measured. Such depletion eradicated NK lysis of the UV treated HSV-FS indicating that irradiation does not overcome the AC requirement for NK lysis. UV irradiation of another HLA-DR + dependent target, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) infected FS led to a dramatic reduction in both NK lysis and IFN-α induction. HSV-1 is a DNA virus whose genes are expressed in a cascade fashion whereas VSV is an RNA virus. The authors hypothesize that the enhancement in AC dependent NK activity observed for UV irradiated HSV-FS, but not VSV-FS, targets is due to overproduction of either a cellular or viral gene product which specifically occurs early in the HSV-1 infectious cycle and is downregulated by 20 hr post-infection

  8. Enhancement of DNA-transfection frequency by X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Ryota; Fushimi, Kazuo; Hiraki, Yoshio; Namba, Masayoshi [Okayama University Medical School (Japan). Institute of Cellular and Molecular Biology

    1997-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the frequency of DNA transfection into human cells following X-ray irradiation. We transfected plasmid DNA (pSV2neo) into human cells, HeLa and PA-1, by either calcium phosphate precipitation or the lipofection method immediately after irradiating the cells with various doses of X-rays. The transfection frequency was evaluated by counting the number of G418-resistant colonies. When circular plasmid DNA was used, irradiation up to a dose of 2 Gy dose-dependently increased the transfection frequency, which reached a maximum of 5 to 10-fold that of the control unirradiated cells. When linear plasmid DNA was used, the transfection frequency was 2 times higher than that of circular DNA. All five of the clones that were randomly chosen expressed the transfected neo gene. In addition, the pSV2neo gene was randomly integrated into the genomic DNA of each clone. These findings indicate that X-ray treatment can facilitate foreign DNA transfer into human cells and that radiation-induced DNA breaks may promote the insertion of foreign DNA into host DNA. The enhancement of DNA transfection with X-rays may be instrumental in practicing gene therapy. (author)

  9. Enhancement of DNA-transfection frequency by X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Ryota; Fushimi, Kazuo; Hiraki, Yoshio; Namba, Masayoshi

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the frequency of DNA transfection into human cells following X-ray irradiation. We transfected plasmid DNA (pSV2neo) into human cells, HeLa and PA-1, by either calcium phosphate precipitation or the lipofection method immediately after irradiating the cells with various doses of X-rays. The transfection frequency was evaluated by counting the number of G418-resistant colonies. When circular plasmid DNA was used, irradiation up to a dose of 2 Gy dose-dependently increased the transfection frequency, which reached a maximum of 5 to 10-fold that of the control unirradiated cells. When linear plasmid DNA was used, the transfection frequency was 2 times higher than that of circular DNA. All five of the clones that were randomly chosen expressed the transfected neo gene. In addition, the pSV2neo gene was randomly integrated into the genomic DNA of each clone. These findings indicate that X-ray treatment can facilitate foreign DNA transfer into human cells and that radiation-induced DNA breaks may promote the insertion of foreign DNA into host DNA. The enhancement of DNA transfection with X-rays may be instrumental in practicing gene therapy. (author)

  10. Transfection of bone marrow derived cells with immunoregulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khantakova, Julia N; Silkov, Alexander N; Tereshchenko, Valeriy P; Gavrilova, Elena V; Maksyutov, Rinat A; Sennikov, Sergey V

    2018-03-23

    In vitro electroporation gene transfer was first performed in 1982. Today, this technology has become one of the major vehicles for non-viral transfection of cells. All non-viral transfections, such as calcium phosphate precipitation, lipofection, and magnetic transfection, have been shown to achieve a transfection efficiency of up to 70% in commonly used cell lines, but not in primary cells. Here we describe the use of electroporation to transfect primary mouse bone marrow-derived cells, such as macrophages (Mφ) and dendritic cells (DCs) with high efficiencies (45%-72%) and minimal cell death. The transfection efficiencies and cell death varied depending on the culture duration of the DCs and Mφ. Moreover, the electroporation efficiency was increased when conditioning medium was used for culturing the cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that measuring the plasmid-encoded secreted proteins is a highly sensitive method for determining the transfection efficiency. In summary, electroporation with plasmid vectors is an efficient method for producing DCs and Mφ with transient expression of immunoregulatory proteins. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ultrasonic destruction of albumin microbubbles enhances gene transfection and expression in cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-zhong; Liu, Jing-hua; Lü, Shu-zheng; Lü, Yun; Guo, Cheng-jun; Zhao, Dong-hui; Fang, Dong-ping; He, Dong-fang; Zhou, Yuan; Ge, Chang-jiang

    2011-05-01

    It has been proven that ultrasonic destruction of microbubbles can enhance gene transfection efficiency into the noncardiac cells, but there are few reports about cardiac myocytes. Moreover, the exact mechanisms are not yet clear; whether the characteristic of microbubbles can affect the gene transfection efficiency or not is still controversial. This study was designed to investigate whether the ultrasound destruction of gene-loaded microbubbles could enhance the plasmids carried reporter gene transfection in primary cultured myocardial cell, and evaluate the effects of microbubbles characteristics on the transgene expression in cardiac myocytes. The β-galactosidase plasmids attached to the two types of microbubbles, air-contained sonicated dextrose albumin (ASDA) and perfluoropropane-exposed sonicated dextrose albumin (PESDA) were prepared. The gene transfection into cardiac myocytes was performed in vitro by naked plasmids, ultrasound exposure, ultrasonic destruction of gene-loaded microbubbles and calcium phosphate precipitation, and then the gene expression and cell viability were analyzed. The ultrasonic destruction of gene-loaded microbubbles enhanced gene expression in cardiac myocytes compared with naked plasmid transfection ((51.95 ± 2.41) U/g or (29.28 ± 3.65) U/g vs. (0.84 ± 0.21) U/g, P ASDA ((51.95 ± 2.41) U/g vs. (29.28 ± 3.65) U/g, P < 0.05). Ultrasonic destruction of microbubbles during calcium phosphate precipitation gene transfection enhanced β-galactosidase activity nearly 8-fold compared with calcium phosphate precipitation gene transfection alone ((111.35 ± 11.21) U/g protein vs. (14.13 ± 2.58) U/g protein, P < 0.01). Even 6 hours after calcium phosphate precipitation gene transfection, ultrasound-mediated microbubbles destruction resulted in more intense gene expression ((35.63 ± 7.65) U/g vs. (14.13 ± 2.58) U/g, P < 0.05). Ultrasonic destruction of microbubbles might be a promising method for the delivery of non-viral DNA into

  12. Infectious alphavirus production from a simple plasmid transfection+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Ken E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have developed a new method for producing infectious double subgenomic alphaviruses from plasmids transfected into mammalian cells. A double subgenomic Sindbis virus (TE3'2J was transcribed from a cytomegalovirus PolII promoter, which results in the production of infectious virus. Transfection of as little as 125 ng of plasmid is able to produce 1 × 108 plaque forming units/ml (PFU/ml of infectious virus 48 hours post-transfection. This system represents a more efficient method for producing recombinant Sindbis viruses.

  13. Natural born killers?: the development of the sexually sadistic serial killer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B R; Becker, J V

    1997-01-01

    Today's society seems enthralled with serial killers in the news and the media. Forensic psychiatrists often interview serial killers after they have been caught. There are retrospective studies and case reports of individuals who have committed sexually sadistic serial murders. However, there exists a dearth of case reports on adolescents who have expressed serious fantasies about becoming serial killer prior to actualizing their fantasy. This article presents nine clinical cases of 14- to 18-year-olds who have clinically significant fantasies of becoming a serial killer. Similarities exist in these adolescent cases when compared with retrospective studies and case reports of serial killers on the role of sexually sadistic fantasies and actual killings. Since it has been established that sexual paraphilias may develop at a young age, one can surmise that sadistic paraphilias may also develop in some adolescents. The question is posed, can we predict which of these adolescents may go on to actually become serial killers? This article focuses on how the sexually sadistic fantasy can eventually be acted out and possible motives for the act to be repeated multiple times. Finally, recommendations are made about assessing and treating a youngster who expresses violent sexually sadistic killing fantasies so that attempts can be made to interrupt the progression to actual killing.

  14. RNA polymerase of the killer virus of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgopoulos, D.E.; Leibowitz, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The L/sub A/ and M double-stranded (ds) RNA segments of the cytoplasmically inherited killer virus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are encapsidated in virions that contain a DNA-independent transcriptase activity. This enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of full-length (+) stranded copies of the genomic dsRNA segments, denoted l/sub A/ and m. The L/sub A/ dsRNA segment appears to encode the major capsid protein in which both dsRNA molecules are encapsidated, while M dsRNA encodes products responsible for the two killer phenotypes of toxin production and resistance to toxin. Proteins extracted from transcriptionally active virions fail to cross-react with antibody to yeast DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, suggesting that none of the subunits of the host cell polymerases are active in viral transcription. Sequence analysis of the in vitro transcripts reveals neither to be 3'-terminally polyadenylated, although m contains an apparent internal polyA-like tract. In the presence of any three ribonucleoside triphosphates (0.5 mM), the fourth ribonucleoside triphosphate shows an optimal rate of incorporation into transcript at a concentration of 20 μM. However, in a 3-hour reaction, the yield of a product RNA increases with the concentration of the limiting ribonucleotide up to 0.5 mM. Gel electrophoresis of the reaction products reveals that increasing the substrate concentration accelerates the appearance of radioactivity in full-length l/sub A/ and m transcripts

  15. Killer plasma ready to devour the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Uhlig, R; Highfield, R

    2001-01-01

    A chance fluctuation of the 'vacuum universe' could disintegrate all atoms, according to CERN associate, Dr Allanach. Alternatively, so-called killer strangelets could "eat up the universe from the inside out". Should either of these scenarios occur, the most likely starting point is the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider in Long Island, New York state (1 page).

  16. Natural killer cells facilitate PRAME-specific T-cell reactivity against neuroblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spel, Lotte; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Van Der Steen, Dirk M.; Blokland, Nina J G; van Noesel, Max M.; Molenaar, Jan J.; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Boes, Marianne; Nierkens, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumor in children with an estimated 5-year progression free survival of 20-40% in stage 4 disease. Neuroblastoma actively avoids recognition by natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Although immunotherapy has gained traction for

  17. Mass spectrometric analysis of the glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomains of rat natural killer cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Man, Petr; Novák, Petr; Cebecauer, M.; Horváth, Ondřej; Fišerová, Anna; Havlíček, Vladimír; Bezouška, Karel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 5, - (2005), s. 113-122 ISSN 1615-9853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV312/98/K034 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : activation receptor * mebrane microdomains * natural killer cells Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 6.088, year: 2005

  18. Transient transfection of serum-free suspension HEK 293 cell culture for efficient production of human rFVIII

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Hemophilia A is a bleeding disorder caused by deficiency in coagulation factor VIII. Recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) is an alternative to plasma-derived FVIII for the treatment of hemophilia A. However, commercial manufacturing of rFVIII products is inefficient and costly and is associated to high prices and product shortage, even in economically privileged countries. This situation may be solved by adopting more efficient production methods. Here, we evaluated the potential of transient transfection in producing rFVIII in serum-free suspension HEK 293 cell cultures and investigated the effects of different DNA concentration (0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 μg/106 cells) and repeated transfections done at 34° and 37°C. Results We observed a decrease in cell growth when high DNA concentrations were used, but no significant differences in transfection efficiency and in the biological activity of the rFVIII were noticed. The best condition for rFVIII production was obtained with repeated transfections at 34°C using 0.4 μg DNA/106 cells through which almost 50 IU of active rFVIII was produced six days post-transfection. Conclusion Serum-free suspension transient transfection is thus a viable option for high-yield-rFVIII production. Work is in progress to further optimize the process and validate its scalability. PMID:22115125

  19. Impaired liver regeneration is associated with reduced cyclin B1 in natural killer T cell-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ya'acov, Ami; Meir, Hadar; Zolotaryova, Lydia; Ilan, Yaron; Shteyer, Eyal

    2017-03-23

    It has been shown that the proportion of natural killer T cells is markedly elevated during liver regeneration and their activation under different conditions can modulate this process. As natural killer T cells and liver injury are central in liver regeneration, elucidating their role is important. The aim of the current study is to explore the role of natural killer T cells in impaired liver regeneration. Concanvalin A was injected 4 days before partial hepatectomy to natural killer T cells- deficient mice or to anti CD1d1-treated mice. Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen were used to measure hepatocytes proliferation. Expression of hepatic cyclin B1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen were evaluated by Western Blot and liver injury was assessed by ALT and histology. Natural killer T cells- deficient or mice injected with anti CD1d antibodies exhibited reduced liver regeneration. These mice were considerably resistant to ConA-induced liver injury. In the absence of NKT cells hepatic proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cyclin B1 decreased in mice injected with Concanvalin A before partial hepatectomy. This was accompanied with reduced serum interleukin-6 levels. Natural killer T cells play an important role in liver regeneration, which is associated with cyclin B1 and interleukin-6.

  20. DyNAvectors: dynamic constitutional vectors for adaptive DNA transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clima, Lilia; Peptanariu, Dragos; Pinteala, Mariana; Salic, Adrian; Barboiu, Mihail

    2015-12-25

    Dynamic constitutional frameworks, based on squalene, PEG and PEI components, reversibly connected to core centers, allow the efficient identification of adaptive vectors for good DNA transfection efficiency and are well tolerated by mammalian cells.

  1. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors and their Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajik N.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Natural killer (NK cells are a subset of lymphocytes comprising around 10% of total lymphocytes in peripheral blood. Due to their role in the innate response, NK cells provide a ‘first line of defense’ against infectious agents and cancer and are also thought to play a role in autoimmunity. The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR are regulatory surface molecules, found on NK cells and on a subset of T lymphocytes. The genes for KIR are present on chromosome 19 in the leukocyte receptor complex and show a major difference for both the type and number of KIR genes present among different ethnic groups. They have been divided into two groups of 2D or 3D, depending on the number of external immunoglobulin domains. The presence of a long cytoplasmic tail with two immune tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIM allows the transduction of inhibitory signals and characterizes the inhibitory KIRs (2DL and 3DL, whereas the presence of short cytoplasmic tails corresponds to the activating KIR receptors (2DS and 3DS.These polymorphic receptors interact with specific motifs on human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I molecules, modulate NK cytolytic activity. Some KIRs are known to interact with HLA-C molecules of target cells, HLA-Bw4 molecules and HLA-A3/11. For some KIRs the corresponding ligands are still unknown.

  2. Rat embryo cells immortalized with transfected oncogenes are transformed by gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endlich, B; Salavati, R; Sullivan, T; Ling, C C

    1992-12-01

    Cesium-137 gamma rays were used to transform rat embryo cells (REC) which were first transfected with activated c-myc or c-Ha-ras oncogenes to produce immortal cell lines (REC:myc and REC:ras). When exposed to 6 Gy of 137Cs gamma rays, some cells became morphologically transformed with focus formation frequencies of approximately 3 x 10(-4) for REC:myc and approximately 1 x 10(-4) for REC:ras, respectively. Cells isolated from foci of gamma-ray-transformed REC:myc (REC:myc:gamma) formed anchorage-independent colonies and were tumorigenic in nude mice, but foci from gamma-ray-transformed REC:ras (REC:ras:gamma) did not exhibit either of these criteria of transformation. Similar to the results with gamma irradiation, we observed a sequence-dependent phenomenon when myc and ras were transfected into REC, one at a time. REC immortalized by ras transfection were not converted to a tumorigenic phenotype by secondary transfection with myc, but REC transfected with myc were very susceptible to transformation by subsequent ras transfection. This suggests that myc-immortalized cells are more permissive to transformation via secondary treatments. In sequentially transfected REC, myc expression was high whether it was transfected first or second, whereas ras expression was highest when the ras gene was transfected secondarily into myc-containing REC. Molecular analysis of REC:ras:gamma transformants showed no alterations in structure of the transfected ras or of the endogenous ras, myc, p53, or fos genes. The expression of ras and p53 was increased in some isolates of REC:ras:gamma, but myc and fos expression were not affected. Similarly, REC:myc:gamma transformants did not demonstrate rearrangement or amplification of the transfected or the endogenous myc genes, or of the potentially cooperating Ha-, Ki-, or N-ras genes. Northern hybridization analysis revealed increased expression of N-ras in two isolates, REC:myc:gamma 33 and gamma 41, but no alterations in the expression

  3. Biotechnological exploitation of Tetrapisispora phaffii killer toxin: heterologous production in Komagataella phaffii (Pichia pastoris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessa, Rossella; Landolfo, Sara; Ciani, Maurizio; Budroni, Marilena; Zara, Severino; Ustun, Murat; Cakar, Zeynep Petek; Mannazzu, Ilaria

    2017-04-01

    The use of natural antimicrobials from plants, animals and microorganisms to inhibit the growth of pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms is becoming more frequent. This parallels the increased consumer interest towards consumption of minimally processed food and 'greener' food and beverage additives. Among the natural antimicrobials of microbial origin, the killer toxin produced by the yeast Tetrapisispora phaffii, known as Kpkt, appears to be a promising natural antimicrobial agent. Kpkt is a glycoprotein with β-1,3-glucanase and killer activity, which induces ultrastructural modifications to the cell wall of yeast of the genera Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora and Zygosaccharomyces. Moreover, Kpkt maintains its killer activity in grape must for at least 14 days under winemaking conditions, thus suggesting its use against spoilage yeast in wine making and the sweet beverage industry. Here, the aim was to explore the possibility of high production of Kpkt for biotechnological exploitation. Molecular tools for heterologous production of Kpkt in Komagataella phaffii GS115 were developed, and two recombinant clones that produce up to 23 mg/L recombinant Kpkt (rKpkt) were obtained. Similar to native Kpkt, rKpkt has β-glucanase and killer activities. Moreover, it shows a wider spectrum of action with respect to native Kpkt. This includes effects on Dekkera bruxellensis, a spoilage yeast of interest not only in wine making, but also for the biofuel industry, thus widening the potential applications of this rKpkt.

  4. Development of a confocal ultrasound device using an inertial cavitation control for transfection in-vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestas, J. L.; Chettab, K.; Roux, S.; Prieur, F.; Lafond, M.; Dumontet, C.; Lafon, C.

    2015-12-01

    Sonoporation using low-frequency high-pressure ultrasound (US) is a non-viral approach for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. We developed a new sonoporation device designed for spatial and temporal control of ultrasound cavitation. This device was evaluated for the in vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid coding for Green Fluorescent Protein (peGFP- C1) in adherent and non-adherent cell lines. The frequency spectrum of the signal receive by a hydrophone is used to compute a cavitation index (CI) representative of the inertial cavitation activity. The influence of the CI on transfection efficiency, as well as reproducibility were determined. A real-time feedback loop control on CI was integrated in the process to regulate the cavitation level during sonoporation. In both adherent and non-adherent cell lines, the sonoporation device produced a highly efficient transfection of peGFP-C1 (40-80%), as determined by flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression, along with a low rate of mortality assessed by propidium iodide staining. Moreover, the sonoporation of non-adherent cell lines Jurkat and K562 was found to be equivalent to nucleofection in terms of efficiency and toxicity while these two cell lines were resistant to transfection with lipofection.

  5. Rigid aromatic linking moiety in cationic lipids for enhanced gene transfection efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Zhao, Rui-Mo; Zhang, Ji; Liu, Yan-Hong; Huang, Zheng; Yu, Qing-Ying; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2017-08-18

    Although numerous cationic lipids have been developed as non-viral gene vectors, the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of these materials remains unclear and needs further investigation. In this work, a series of lysine-derived cationic lipids containing linkages with different rigidity were designed and synthesized. SAR studies showed that lipids with rigid aromatic linkage could promote the formation of tight liposomes and enhance DNA condensation, which is essential for the gene delivery process. These lipids could give much higher transfection efficiency than those containing more flexible aliphatic linkage in various cell lines. Moreover, the rigid aromatic linkage also affords the material higher serum tolerance ability. Flow cytometry assay revealed that the target lipids have good cellular uptake, while confocal microscopy observation showed weaker endosome escape than Lipofectamine 2000. To solve such problem and further increase the transfection efficiency, some lysosomotropic reagents were used to improve the endosome escape of lipoplex. As expected, higher transfection efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000 could be obtained via this strategy. Cytotoxicity assay showed that these lipids have lower toxicity in various cell lines than Lipofectamine 2000, suggesting their potential for further application. This work demonstrates that a rigid aromatic linkage might distinctly improve the gene transfection abilities of cationic lipids and affords information to construct safe and efficient gene vector towards practical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. h5-HT1B receptor-mediated constitutive Gαi3-protein activation in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells: an antibody capture assay reveals protean efficacy of 5-HT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Cussac, Didier; Marini, Laetitia; Touzard, Manuelle; Millan, Mark J

    2003-01-01

    Serotonin 5-HT1B receptors couple to G-proteins of the Gi/o family. However, their activation of specific G-protein subtypes is poorly characterised. Using an innovative antibody capture/guanosine-5′-0-(3-[35S]thio)-triphosphate ([35S]GTPγS) binding strategy, we characterised Gαi3 subunit activation by h5-HT1B receptors stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The agonists, 5-HT, alniditan and BMS181,101, stimulated Gαi3, whereas methiothepin and SB224,289 behaved as inverse agonists. The selective 5-HT1B receptor ligand, S18127, modestly stimulated Gαi3 and reversed the actions of both 5-HT and methiothepin. S18127 (1 μM) also produced parallel, dextral shifts of the 5-HT and methiothepin isotherms. Isotopic dilution experiments ([35S]GTPγS versus GTPγS) revealed high-affinity [35S]GTPγS binding to Gαi3 subunits in the absence of receptor ligands indicating constitutive activity. High-affinity [35S]GTPγS binding was increased 2.8-fold by 5-HT with an increase in the affinity of GTPγS for Gαi3 subunits. In contrast, methiothepin halved the number of high-affinity binding sites and decreased their affinity. h5-HT1B receptor-mediated Gαi3 subunit activation was dependent on the concentration of NaCl. At 300 mM, 5-HT stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding, basal Gαi3 activation was low and methiothepin was inactive. In contrast, at 10 mM NaCl, basal activity was enhanced and the inverse agonist activity of methiothepin was accentuated. Under these conditions, 5-HT decreased Gαi3 activation. In conclusion, at h5-HT1B receptors expressed in CHO cells: (i) inverse agonist induced inhibition of Gαi3, and its reversal by S18127, reveals constitutive activation of this Gα subunit; (ii) constitutive Gαi3 activation can be quantified by isotopic dilution [35S]GTPγS binding and (iii) decreasing NaCl concentrations enhances Gαi3 activation and leads to protean agonist properties of 5-HT: that is a switch to inhibition of Gαi3. PMID:12684263

  7. h5-HT(1B) receptor-mediated constitutive Galphai3-protein activation in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells: an antibody capture assay reveals protean efficacy of 5-HT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Cussac, Didier; Marini, Laetitia; Touzard, Manuelle; Millan, Mark J

    2003-03-01

    1. Serotonin 5-HT(1B) receptors couple to G-proteins of the Gi/o family. However, their activation of specific G-protein subtypes is poorly characterised. Using an innovative antibody capture/guanosine-5'-0-(3-[(35)S]thio)-triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPgammaS) binding strategy, we characterised Galpha(i3) subunit activation by h5-HT(1B) receptors stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. 2. The agonists, 5-HT, alniditan and BMS181,101, stimulated Galpha(i3), whereas methiothepin and SB224,289 behaved as inverse agonists. The selective 5-HT(1B) receptor ligand, S18127, modestly stimulated Galpha(i3) and reversed the actions of both 5-HT and methiothepin. S18127 (1 micro M) also produced parallel, dextral shifts of the 5-HT and methiothepin isotherms. 3. Isotopic dilution experiments ([(35)S]GTPgammaS versus GTPgammaS) revealed high-affinity [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding to Galpha(i3) subunits in the absence of receptor ligands indicating constitutive activity. High-affinity [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding was increased 2.8-fold by 5-HT with an increase in the affinity of GTPgammaS for Galpha(i3) subunits. In contrast, methiothepin halved the number of high-affinity binding sites and decreased their affinity. 4. h5-HT(1B) receptor-mediated Galpha(i3) subunit activation was dependent on the concentration of NaCl. At 300 mM, 5-HT stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding, basal Galpha(i3) activation was low and methiothepin was inactive. In contrast, at 10 mM NaCl, basal activity was enhanced and the inverse agonist activity of methiothepin was accentuated. Under these conditions, 5-HT decreased Galpha(i3) activation. 5. In conclusion, at h5-HT(1B) receptors expressed in CHO cells: (i) inverse agonist induced inhibition of Galpha(i3), and its reversal by S18127, reveals constitutive activation of this Galpha subunit; (ii) constitutive Galpha(i3) activation can be quantified by isotopic dilution [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding and (iii) decreasing NaCl concentrations enhances Galpha(i3

  8. Construction of rat beta defensin-2 eukaryotic expression vector and expression in the transfected rat corneal epithelial cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Dan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To construct a recombinant eukaryotic expression vector of rat beta defensin-2(rBD-2, transfect it into the rat corneal epithelial cells with lipofection, determine the expression of target gene in the transfected cells, and discuss the potentiality of recombinant plasmid expressed in corneal epithelial cells, hoping to provide an experimental foundation for further study on the antimicrobial activity of rBD-2 in vitro and in vivo and to assess the probability of defensins as a new application for infectious corneal diseases in the future. METHODS: The synthetic rBD-2 DNA fragment was inserted between the XhoI and BamHI restriction enzyme cutting sites of eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2-ZsGreen1 to construct the recombinant plasmid pIRES2-ZsGreen1-rBD-2, then transformed it into E.coli DH5α, positive clones were screened by kanamycin and identified with restriction endonucleases and sequencing analysis. Transfection into the rat corneal epithelial cells was performed by lipofection. Then the experiment was divided into three groups: rat corneal epithelial cell was transfected with the recombinant plasmid pIRES2- ZsGreen1-rBD-2, rat corneal epithelial cell was transfected with the empty plasmid pIRES2-ZsGreen1 and the non-transfected group. The inverted fluorescence microscope was used to observe the transfection process. At last, the level of rBD-2 mRNA expressed in the transfected cells and the control groups are compared by the real-time fluoresence relative quantitative PCR. RESULTS: The recombinant eukaryotic expression vector of pIRES2-ZsGreen1-rBD-2 was successfully constructed. The level of rBD-2 mRNA in transfected cells was significantly higher than that in control groups through the real-time fluorescence relative quantitative PCR. CONCLUSION: The recombinant eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2-ZsGreen1-rBD-2 could be transfected into rat corneal epithelial cells, and exogenous rBD-2 gene could be transcripted into mRNA in

  9. DODAB:monoolein-based lipoplexes as non-viral vectors for transfection of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J P Neves; Oliveira, A C N; Casal, M P P A; Gomes, A C; Coutinho, P J G; Coutinho, O P; Oliveira, M E C D Real

    2011-10-01

    DNA/Cationic liposome complexes (lipoplexes) have been widely used as non-viral vectors for transfection. Neutral lipids in liposomal formulation are determinant for transfection efficiency using these vectors. In this work, we studied the potential of monoolein (MO) as helper lipid for cellular transfection. Lipoplexes composed of pDNA and dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB)/1-monooleoyl-rac-glycerol (MO) at different molar ratios (4:1, 2:1 and 1:1) and at different cationic lipid/DNA ratios were investigated. The physicochemical properties of the lipoplexes (size, charge and structure), were studied by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Zeta Potential (ζ) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). The effect of MO on pDNA condensation and the effect of heparin and heparan sulphate on the percentage of pDNA release from the lipoplexes were also studied by Ethidium Bromide (EtBr) exclusion assays and electrophoresis. Cytotoxicity and transfection efficiency of these lipoplexes were evaluated using 293T cells and compared with the golden standard helper lipids 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-hosphoethanolamine (DOPE) and cholesterol (Chol) as well as with a commercial transfection agent (Lipofectamine™ LTX). The internalization of transfected fluorescently-labeled pDNA was also visualized using the same cell line. The results demonstrate that the presence of MO not only increases pDNA compactation efficiency, but also affects the physicochemical properties of the lipoplexes, which can interfere with lipoplex-cell interactions. The DODAB:MO formulations tested showed little toxicity and successfully mediated in vitro cell transfection. These results were supported by fluorescence microscopy studies, which illustrated that lipoplexes were able to access the cytosol and deliver pDNA to the nucleus. DODAB:MO-based lipoplexes were thus validated as non-toxic, efficient lipofection vectors for genetic modification of mammalian cells. Understanding the

  10. Covalently bound DNA on naked iron oxide nanoparticles: Intelligent colloidal nano-vector for cell transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, Massimiliano; Martinello, Tiziana; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Gomiero, Chiara; Baratella, Davide; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Cozza, Giorgio; Patruno, Marco; Zboril, Radek; Vianello, Fabio

    2017-11-01

    Conversely to common coated iron oxide nanoparticles, novel naked surface active maghemite nanoparticles (SAMNs) can covalently bind DNA. Plasmid (pDNA) harboring the coding gene for GFP was directly chemisorbed onto SAMNs, leading to a novel DNA nanovector (SAMN@pDNA). The spontaneous internalization of SAMN@pDNA into cells was compared with an extensively studied fluorescent SAMN derivative (SAMN@RITC). Moreover, the transfection efficiency of SAMN@pDNA was evaluated and explained by computational model. SAMN@pDNA was prepared and characterized by spectroscopic and computational methods, and molecular dynamic simulation. The size and hydrodynamic properties of SAMN@pDNA and SAMN@RITC were studied by electron transmission microscopy, light scattering and zeta-potential. The two nanomaterials were tested by confocal scanning microscopy on equine peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ePB-MSCs) and GFP expression by SAMN@pDNA was determined. Nanomaterials characterized by similar hydrodynamic properties were successfully internalized and stored into mesenchymal stem cells. Transfection by SAMN@pDNA occurred and GFP expression was higher than lipofectamine procedure, even in the absence of an external magnetic field. A computational model clarified that transfection efficiency can be ascribed to DNA availability inside cells. Direct covalent binding of DNA on naked magnetic nanoparticles led to an extremely robust gene delivery tool. Hydrodynamic and chemical-physical properties of SAMN@pDNA were responsible of the successful uptake by cells and of the efficiency of GFP gene transfection. SAMNs are characterized by colloidal stability, excellent cell uptake, persistence in the host cells, low toxicity and are proposed as novel intelligent DNA nanovectors for efficient cell transfection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Personality disorders, psychopathy and serial killers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morana, Hilda C P; Stone, Michael H; Abdalla-Filho, Elias

    2006-10-01

    To illustrate the basic characteristics of several specific personality disorders, focusing mainly in antisocial personality disorder. The differences between antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy are highlighted. Serial killers and its psychopathic aspects are also discussed. A bibliographic review was completed in order to outline convergences and divergences among different authors about this controversial issue, especially those concerning the possibility of treatment. While anti-social personality disorder is a medical diagnosis, the term "psychopathy" (which belongs to the sphere of forensic psychiatry) may be understood as a "legal diagnosis". It is not still possible to identify an effective treatment for serial killers. Personality disorders, especially of the antisocial type, still represent a formidable challenge to forensic psychiatry today. Questions as yet unanswered include the best and most humane place for patients with this condition and the nature of a standardised treatment recommendation.

  12. Natural Killer Dendritic Cells Enhance Immune Responses Elicited by α-Galactosylceramide-Stimulated Natural Killer T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Won Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer dendritic cells (NKDCs possess potent anti-tumor activity, but the cellular effect of NKDC interactions with other innate immune cells is unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that the interaction of NKDCs and natural killer T (NKT cells is required for the anti-tumor immune responses that are elicited by α-galactosylceramide (α-GC in mice. The rapid and strong expression of interferon-γ by NKDCs after α-GC stimulation was dependent on NKT cells. Various NK and DC molecular markers and cytotoxic molecules were up-regulated following α-GC administration. This up-regulation could improve NKDC presentation of tumor antigens and increase cytotoxicity against tumor cells. NKDCs were required for the stimulation of DCs, NK cells, and NKT cells. The strong anti-tumor immune responses elicited by α-GC may be due to the down-regulation of regulatory T cells. Furthermore, the depletion of NKDCs dampened the tumor clearance mediated by α-GC-stimulated NKT cells in vivo. Taken together, these results indicate that complex interactions of innate immune cells might be required to achieve optimal anti-tumor immune responses during the early stages of tumorigenesis.

  13. Representation of the serial killer on the Italian Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villano, P; Bastianoni, P; Melotti, G

    2001-10-01

    The representation of serial killers was examined from the analysis of 317 Web pages in the Italian language to study how the psychological profiles of serial killers are described on the Italian Internet. The correspondence analysis of the content of these Web pages shows that in Italy the serial killer is associated with words such as "monster" and "horror," which suggest and imply psychological perversion and aberrant acts. These traits are peculiar for the Italian scenario.

  14. Transfection of bovine spermatogonial stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajik, P; Hoseini Pajooh, Kh; Fazle Elahi, Z; Javdani Shahedin, G; Ghasemzadeh-Nava, H

    2017-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are the only stem cells in adults that can transfer genetic information to the future generations. Considering the fact that a single SSC gives rise to a vast number of spermatozoa, genetic manipulation of these cells is a potential novel technology with feasible application to various animal species. The aim of this study was to evaluate enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene transfection into bovine SSCs via liposome carrier and assess the best incubation day in uptake exogenous gene by SSCs. Transfection efficiency of EGFP gene with lipofectamine 2000 was determined in days following each three day of transfection (day 4, 6 and 8 of the culture) by fluorescent microscope. Results showed that the transfected cells through lipofection increased significantly (Ptransfection in comparison with those of the control groups. The transfected SSCs were higher in comparison with those of the free exogenous gene carrier groups (Ptransfection proceeds at day four. It was concluded that lipofectamine can be used safely for direct loading exogenous DNA to SSCs particularly during the fourth day of culture.

  15. Unexpected transcellular protein crossover occurs during canonical DNA transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, Jason; Cuijpers, Sabine A G; Niranjan, Dhevahi; Davletov, Bazbek

    2014-12-01

    Transfection of DNA has been invaluable for biological sciences, yet the effects upon membrane homeostasis are far from negligible. Here, we demonstrate that Neuro2A cells transfected using Lipofectamine LTX with the fluorescently coupled Botulinum serotype A holoenzyme (EGFP-LcA) cDNA express this SNAP25 protease that can, once translated, escape the transfected host cytosol and become endocytosed into untransfected cells, without its innate binding and translocation domains. Fluorescent readouts revealed moderate transfection rates (30-50%) while immunoblotting revealed a surprisingly total enzymatic cleavage of SNAP25; the transgenic protein acted beyond the confines of its host cell. Using intracellular dyes, no important cytotoxic effects were observed from reagent treatment alone, which excluded the possibility of membrane ruptures, though noticeably, intracellular acidic organelles were redistributed towards the plasma membrane. This drastic, yet frequently unobserved, change in protein permeability and endosomal trafficking following reagent treatment highlights important concerns for all studies using transient transfection. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Transfection in perfused microfluidic cell culture devices: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimes, William; Rubi, Mathieu; Super, Alexandre; Marques, Marco P C; Veraitch, Farlan; Szita, Nicolas

    2017-08-01

    Automated microfluidic devices are a promising route towards a point-of-care autologous cell therapy. The initial steps of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) derivation involve transfection and long term cell culture. Integration of these steps would help reduce the cost and footprint of micro-scale devices with applications in cell reprogramming or gene correction. Current examples of transfection integration focus on maximising efficiency rather than viable long-term culture. Here we look for whole process compatibility by integrating automated transfection with a perfused microfluidic device designed for homogeneous culture conditions. The injection process was characterised using fluorescein to establish a LabVIEW-based routine for user-defined automation. Proof-of-concept is demonstrated by chemically transfecting a GFP plasmid into mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Cells transfected in the device showed an improvement in efficiency (34%, n = 3) compared with standard protocols (17.2%, n = 3). This represents a first step towards microfluidic processing systems for cell reprogramming or gene therapy.

  17. Transformation and radiosensitivity of human diploid skin fibroblasts transfected with SV40 T-antigen mutants defective in RB and P53 binding domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LingNah Su; Little, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    A series of human diploid fibroblast cell clones were developed by DNA transfection with either wild-type SV40 T-antigen (SV40T) or T-antigen mutants defective in its various functional domains. Cell clones expressing the wild-type SV40 T were significantly radioresistant as compared with clones transfected with the neo gene only (D o 192 ± 13 vs 127 ± 19). This radioresistance persisted in post-crisis, immortalized cell lines. A series of mutants with point or deletion mutations within each functionally active domain of SV40 T were also examined for their ability to alter radiosensitivity and induce morphological transformation. Cell clones transfected with T-antigen mutants defective in nuclear localization or origin binding showed increased radioresistance similar to clones transfected with wild-type T-antigen, and expressed morphological changes characteristic of SV40 T-transfected cells. (author)

  18. A psychological profile of a serial killer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, T D; Leenaars, Antoon A; Chadha, R K; Manju, Mehta; Lalwani, Sanjeev; Sood, Mamta; Lester, David; Raina, Anupuma; Behera, C

    2012-01-01

    Serial killers have always fascinated society. A serial killer is typically defined as a perpetrator who murders three or more people over a period of time. Most reported cases of serial killers come from the United States and Canada. In India, there are few reported cases. We present, to the best of our knowledge, the first Indian case in the literature. The present case is of a 28-year-old man, Surinder Koli. The Department of Forensic Medicine & Toxicology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delphi handled the forensic study. We present a most unique psychological investigation into the mind of a serial killer.

  19. Paucity of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells in human neuromyelitis optica lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadoun, Samira; Bridges, Leslie R.; Verkman, A. S.; Papadopoulos, Marios C.

    2013-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica is a severe inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Most patients with neuromyelitis optica have circulating immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the astrocytic water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4), which are pathogenic. Anti-AQP4 IgG-mediated complement-dependent astrocyte toxicity is a key mechanism of central nervous system damage in neuromyelitis optica, but the role of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells is unknown. Our objective was to determine whether natural killer and cytotoxic T cells play a role in human neuromyelitis optica lesions. We immunostained four actively demyelinating lesions, obtained from patients with anti-AQP4 IgG positive neuromyelitis optica, for Granzyme B and Perforin. The inflammatory cells were perivascular neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages, with only occasional Granzyme B+ or Perforin + cells. Greater than 95% of inflamed vessels in each lesion had no surrounding Granzyme B+ or Perforin + cells. Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells were abundant in human spleen (positive control). Although natural killer cells produce central nervous system damage in mice injected with anti-AQP4 IgG, our findings here indicate that natural killer-mediated and T cell-mediated cytotoxicity are probably not involved in central nervous system damage in human neuromyelitis optica. PMID:23108041

  20. Evaluation of the magnetic field requirements for nanomagnetic gene transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouriki, A.; Farrow, N.; Clements, M.A.; Dobson, J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to examine the effects of magnet distance (and by proxy, field strength) on nanomagnetic transfection efficiency. Methods non-viral magnetic nanoparticle-based transfection was evaluated using both static and oscillating magnet arrays. Results Fluorescence intensity (firefly luciferase) of transfected H292 cells showed no increase using a 96-well NdFeB magnet array when the magnets were 5 mm from the cell culture plate or nearer. At 6 mm and higher, fluorescence intensity decreased systematically. Conclusion In all cases, fluorescence intensity was higher when using an oscillating array compared to a static array. For distances closer than 5 mm, the oscillating system also outperformed Lipofectamine 2000™. PMID:22110859

  1. Evaluation of the magnetic field requirements for nanomagnetic gene transfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fouriki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to examine the effects of magnet distance (and by proxy, field strength on nanomagnetic transfection efficiency. Methods: non-viral magnetic nanoparticle-based transfection was evaluated using both static and oscillating magnet arrays. Results: Fluorescence intensity (firefly luciferase of transfected H292 cells showed no increase using a 96-well NdFeB magnet array when the magnets were 5 mm from the cell culture plate or nearer. At 6 mm and higher, fluorescence intensity decreased systematically. Conclusion: In all cases, fluorescence intensity was higher when using an oscillating array compared to a static array. For distances closer than 5 mm, the oscillating system also outperformed Lipofectamine 2000™.

  2. Nonviral transfection of adipose tissue stromal cells: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatina, T V; Kalinina, N I; Parfyonova, E V

    2009-04-01

    Delivery of plasmid DNA and interfering RNA into adipose tissue stromal cells was carried out by the methods of lipofection, calcium phosphate method, and by electroporation. The percent of transfected cells after delivery of plasmid DNA by the calcium phosphate method and lipofection was 0 and 15%, respectively, vs. more than 50% after electroporation. Similar results were obtained for delivery of short-strand RNA into cells. These data indicate that electroporation is the most effective method of nonviral transfection of adipose tissue stromal cells.

  3. Cell transfection as a tool to study growth hormone action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norstedt, G; Enberg, B; Francis, S

    1994-01-01

    The isolation of growth hormone receptor (GHR) cDNA clones has made possible the transfection of GHRs into cultured cells. Our aim in this minireview is to show how the application of such approaches have benefited GHR research. GH stimulation of cells expressing GHR cDNAs can cause an alteration...... is important in GH action. The GH signals are transmitted to the nucleus and GH regulated genes have now begun to be characterized. The ability to use cell transfection for mechanistic studies of GH action will be instrumental to define domains within the receptor that are of functional importance...

  4. Targeted transfection increases siRNA uptake and gene silencing of primary endothelial cells in vitro--a quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgeirsdóttir, Sigridur A; Talman, Eduard G; de Graaf, Inge A; Kamps, Jan A A M; Satchell, Simon C; Mathieson, Peter W; Ruiters, Marcel H J; Molema, Grietje

    2010-01-25

    Applications of small-interfering RNA (siRNA) call for specific and efficient delivery of siRNA into particular cell types. We developed a novel, non-viral targeting system to deliver siRNA specifically into inflammation-activated endothelial cells. This was achieved by conjugating the cationic amphiphilic lipid SAINT to antibodies recognizing the inflammatory cell adhesion molecule E-selectin. These anti-E-selectin-SAINT lipoplexes (SAINTarg) maintained antigen recognition capacity of the parental antibody in vitro, and ex vivo in human kidney tissue slices subjected to inflammatory conditions. Regular SAINT mediated transfection resulted in efficient gene silencing in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) and conditionally immortalized glomerular endothelial cells (ciGEnC). However, primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) transfected poorly, a phenomenon that we could quantitatively correlate with a cell-type specific capacity to facilitate siRNA uptake. Importantly, SAINTarg increased siRNA uptake and transfection specificity for activated endothelial cells. Transfection with SAINTarg delivered significantly more siRNA into activated HUVEC, compared to transfection with non-targeted SAINT. The enhanced uptake of siRNA was corroborated by improved silencing of both gene- and protein expression of VE-cadherin in activated HUVEC, indicating that SAINTarg delivered functionally active siRNA into endothelial cells. The obtained results demonstrate a successful design of a small nucleotide carrier system with improved and specific siRNA delivery into otherwise difficult-to-transfect primary endothelial cells, which in addition reduced considerably the amount of siRNA needed for gene silencing. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Octaarginine-modified chitosan as a nonviral gene delivery vector: properties and in vitro transfection efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiaoli; Li Zhaoyang; Liu Wenguang; Lam, Wingmoon; Sun Peng; Kao, Richard Y. T.; Luk, Keith D. K.; Lu, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Protein transduction domains (PTD) have been identified to have the capacity to facilitate molecular cargo to translocate through cell membrane. This study aims to utilize the cell membrane penetrating ability of octaarginine oligopeptide, a simplified prototype of the PTD, to enhance the transfection efficiency of chitosan. Octaarginine-modified chitosan (R 8 -CS) was synthesized as a gene transfer carrier by carbodiimide chemistry. The structure and composition of R 8 -CSs were characterized using FTIR and 1 H NMR. Agarose gel electrophoresis assay showed that R 8 -CS could efficiently condense the DNA. The particle size of R 8 -CS/DNA complexes were determined to be around 100–200 nm. The nanoparticle complexes exhibited a spherical and compact morphology. R 8 -CS demonstrated higher transfection activity and lower cytotoxicity as compared to the unmodified chitosan and also showed good serum resistance.

  6. MicroRNA-122 mimic transfection contributes to apoptosis in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongyan; Zhu, Yueyong; Li, Shaoyang

    2015-11-01

    There is currently a requirement for effective treatment strategies for human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a leading cause of cancer‑associated mortality. MicroRNA-122 (miR-122), a repressor of the endogenous apoptosis regulator Bcl‑w, is frequently downregulated in HCC. Thus, it is hypothesized that the activation of miR‑122 may induce selective hepatocellular apoptosis via caspase activation in a model of HCC. In the present study, an miR‑122 mimic transfection was performed in HepG2 cells, and used to investigate the role and therapeutic potential of miR‑122 in the regulation of HCC‑derived cell lines. The apoptotic rates of HepG2 cells were significantly increased following miR‑122 mimic transfection. Reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that Bcl‑w mRNA was significantly reduced, while the mRNA levels of caspase‑9 and caspase‑3 were markedly increased. The immunocytochemistry results supported the mRNA trends. Collectively, the present results suggest that endogenous miR‑122 contributes to HepG2 apoptosis and that transfection of mimic miR‑122 normalizes apoptotic levels in a model of HCC.

  7. Recruitment of activation receptors at inhibitory NK cell immune synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Schleinitz

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cell activation receptors accumulate by an actin-dependent process at cytotoxic immune synapses where they provide synergistic signals that trigger NK cell effector functions. In contrast, NK cell inhibitory receptors, including members of the MHC class I-specific killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR family, accumulate at inhibitory immune synapses, block actin dynamics, and prevent actin-dependent phosphorylation of activation receptors. Therefore, one would predict inhibition of actin-dependent accumulation of activation receptors when inhibitory receptors are engaged. By confocal imaging of primary human NK cells in contact with target cells expressing physiological ligands of NK cell receptors, we show here that this prediction is incorrect. Target cells included a human cell line and transfected Drosophila insect cells that expressed ligands of NK cell activation receptors in combination with an MHC class I ligand of inhibitory KIR. The two NK cell activation receptors CD2 and 2B4 accumulated and co-localized with KIR at inhibitory immune synapses. In fact, KIR promoted CD2 and 2B4 clustering, as CD2 and 2B4 accumulated more efficiently at inhibitory synapses. In contrast, accumulation of KIR and of activation receptors at inhibitory synapses correlated with reduced density of the integrin LFA-1. These results imply that inhibitory KIR does not prevent CD2 and 2B4 signaling by blocking their accumulation at NK cell immune synapses, but by blocking their ability to signal within inhibitory synapses.

  8. Natural Killer T Cells: An Ecological Evolutionary Developmental Biology Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amrendra; Suryadevara, Naveenchandra; Hill, Timothy M.; Bezbradica, Jelena S.; Van Kaer, Luc; Joyce, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Type I natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate-like T lymphocytes that recognize glycolipid antigens presented by the MHC class I-like protein CD1d. Agonistic activation of NKT cells leads to rapid pro-inflammatory and immune modulatory cytokine and chemokine responses. This property of NKT cells, in conjunction with their interactions with antigen-presenting cells, controls downstream innate and adaptive immune responses against cancers and infectious diseases, as well as in several inflammatory disorders. NKT cell properties are acquired during development in the thymus and by interactions with the host microbial consortium in the gut, the nature of which can be influenced by NKT cells. This latter property, together with the role of the host microbiota in cancer therapy, necessitates a new perspective. Hence, this review provides an initial approach to understanding NKT cells from an ecological evolutionary developmental biology (eco-evo-devo) perspective. PMID:29312339

  9. Natural Killer T Cells: An Ecological Evolutionary Developmental Biology Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amrendra; Suryadevara, Naveenchandra; Hill, Timothy M; Bezbradica, Jelena S; Van Kaer, Luc; Joyce, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Type I natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate-like T lymphocytes that recognize glycolipid antigens presented by the MHC class I-like protein CD1d. Agonistic activation of NKT cells leads to rapid pro-inflammatory and immune modulatory cytokine and chemokine responses. This property of NKT cells, in conjunction with their interactions with antigen-presenting cells, controls downstream innate and adaptive immune responses against cancers and infectious diseases, as well as in several inflammatory disorders. NKT cell properties are acquired during development in the thymus and by interactions with the host microbial consortium in the gut, the nature of which can be influenced by NKT cells. This latter property, together with the role of the host microbiota in cancer therapy, necessitates a new perspective. Hence, this review provides an initial approach to understanding NKT cells from an ecological evolutionary developmental biology (eco-evo-devo) perspective.

  10. Natural Killer T Cells: An Ecological Evolutionary Developmental Biology Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrendra Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Type I natural killer T (NKT cells are innate-like T lymphocytes that recognize glycolipid antigens presented by the MHC class I-like protein CD1d. Agonistic activation of NKT cells leads to rapid pro-inflammatory and immune modulatory cytokine and chemokine responses. This property of NKT cells, in conjunction with their interactions with antigen-presenting cells, controls downstream innate and adaptive immune responses against cancers and infectious diseases, as well as in several inflammatory disorders. NKT cell properties are acquired during development in the thymus and by interactions with the host microbial consortium in the gut, the nature of which can be influenced by NKT cells. This latter property, together with the role of the host microbiota in cancer therapy, necessitates a new perspective. Hence, this review provides an initial approach to understanding NKT cells from an ecological evolutionary developmental biology (eco-evo-devo perspective.

  11. Enhanced photo-transfection efficiency of mammalian cells on graphene coated substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mthunzi, Patience; He, Kuang; Ngcobo, Sandile; Warner, Jamie W.

    2014-03-01

    Literature reports graphene, an atomic-thick sheet of carbon atoms as one of the promising biocompatible scaffolds that promotes cellular proliferation in human mesenchymal stem cells. On the other hand, different mammalian cell lines including the induced pluripotent stem cells exhibited an accelerated proliferation rate when cultured on graphene or graphene oxide coated substrates. These findings provide strong motivation to explore the full capability of graphene in further pluripotent stem cell research activities as there exists an urgent requirement to preserve their therapeutic potential. This therefore calls for non-invasive procedures for handling stem cells in-vitro. For example, resent literature has shown successful laser light driven transfection in both multipotent and pluripotent stem cells. In order to explore the non-invasive nature of optical transfection alongside biocompatible qualities of graphene, in this work we investigated the impact of optically transfecting mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells plated on graphene coated sample chambers. Using Chinese Hamster Ovary cells (CHO-K1), we further studied the influence of graphene on cell viability as well as cell cytotoxicity through assessing changes in levels of mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) activity and the release of cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase (LHD) respectively. Our results showed that compared to those treated on plain glass, CHO-K1 cells optically treated while plated on graphene coated substrates exhibited a higher production of ATP and a milder release of LDH. In addition there was enhanced photo-transfection efficiency in both CHO-K1 and mES cells irradiated on graphene sample chambers.

  12. Killer whales ( Orcinus orca ) at Marion Island, Southern Ocean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) were studied using data obtained on an opportunistic basis between 1973 and 1996 at Marion Island (46°54'S, 37°45'E) in the Southern Indian Ocean. A clear seasonal pattern of occurrence with the main peak between October and December was evident. Most killer whales were observed ...

  13. An endometrial histomorphometric study of CD56 + natural killer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The number of peripheral blood and endometrial natural killer cells varies greatly during implantation and the first trimester of pregnancy and is thought to play a role in the maintenance of a healthy pregnancy. However, the role of endometrial CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells as an immunological mechanism in ...

  14. The effect of pegylation on the transfection activity of two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pegylated liposomes (80 - 150 nm diameter) formed electrostatic complexes with plasmid DNA in the 1.5:1 – 2.5:1 range of liposome (positive): DNA (negative) charge ratio, which afforded protection to the DNA cargo against serum nuclease digestion. Plasmid pGL3-containing pegylated lipoplexes were only weakly ...

  15. Optimization of in vitro culture and transfection condition of bovine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study aimed to optimize the in vitro culture and transfection efficiency of bovine primary spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). To this end, SSCs were obtained from newborn Holstein bull calves by two-step enzymatic digestion. After enrichment and culture, SSCs were characterized by using alkaline phosphatase ...

  16. Epizone: Interlaboratory Ring Trial to Compare Dna Transfection Efficiencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dory, Daniel; Albina, Emmanuel; Kwiatek, Olivier

    Chemical-based transfection of DNA into cultured cells is routinely used to study for example viral or cellular gene functions involved in virus replication, to analyse cellular defence mechanisms or develop specific strategies to interfere with virus replication. Other applications include rescu...

  17. Transfection of Primary Human Skin Fibroblasts for Peroxisomal Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Janet; Waterham, Hans R.

    2017-01-01

    Functional studies with primary human skin fibroblasts from patients with a peroxisomal disorder often require efficient transfection with plasmids to correct the genetic defect or to express heterologous reporter proteins. Here, we describe a protocol we commonly use for efficient nonviral

  18. Optical transfection using an endoscope-like system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Nan; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2011-02-01

    Optical transfection is a powerful method for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to biological cells. A tightly focused pulsed laser beam may transiently change the permeability of a cell membrane to facilitate the delivery of foreign genetic material into cells. We report the first realization of an endoscope-like integrated system for optical transfection. An imaging fiber (coherent optical fiber bundle) with ∼ 6000 cores (pixels) embedded in a fiber cladding of ∼ 300 μm in diameter, produces an image circle (area) of ∼ 270 μm diam. This imaging fiber, with an ordered axicon lens array chemically etched at its exit face, is used for the delivery of a femtosecond laser to the cell membrane for optical transfection along with subcellular resolution imaging. A microcapillary-based microfluidic system for localized drug delivery was also combined in this miniature, flexible system. Using this novel system, a plasmid transfection efficiency up to ∼ 72% was obtained for CHO-K1 cells. This endoscope-like system opens a range of exciting applications, in particular, in the targeted in vivo optical microsurgery area.

  19. Optical sorting and photo-transfection of mammalian cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthunzi, P

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available and that the scattering force can enable sorting through axial guiding onto laminin coated glass coverslips upon which the selected cells adhere. Following this, I report on transient photo-transfection of mammalian cells including neuroblastomas (rat/mouse and human...

  20. Establishing malaria parasite transfection technology in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Brummelen, AC

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available -richness and intracellular location of the organism. As a result such successful transfection often requires prolonged periods (up to 2-3 months) of constant and patient culturing and selection. In addition, plasmids usually have a complicated composition and require lengthy...

  1. Photo-transfection of mammalian cells via femtosecond laser pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthunzi, P

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available on transient photo-transfection of ovary (CHO-Kl), neuroblastoma (NG-I08 & SKN-SH) and embryonic kidney (HEK-293) as well as primary non-differentiated stem cells (EI4g2a) using a tightly focused titanium sapphire laser beam (1.1 urn diameter spot size...

  2. High efficiency non-viral transfection of retinal and iris pigment epithelial cells with pigment epithelium-derived factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumann, G; Stöcker, M; Maltusch, C; Salz, A K; Barth, S; Walter, P; Johnen, S

    2010-02-01

    Transplantation of pigment epithelial cells in patients with age-related macular degeneration and Parkinson's disease has the potential to improve functional rehabilitation. Genetic modification of cells before transplantation may allow the delivery of neuroprotective factors to achieve functional improvement. As transplantation of cells modified using viral vectors is complicated by the possible dissemination of viral particles and severe immune reactions, we have explored non-viral methods to insert genetic material in pigment epithelial cells. Using lipofection or nucleofection ARPE-19 cells, freshly isolated and primary retinal and iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cells were transfected with plasmids encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) and with three plasmids encoding recombinant pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) and GFP. Transfection efficiency was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and stability of protein expression by immunoblotting. Pigment epithelial cells were successfully transfected with plasmid encoding GFP. Expression of GFP in ARPE-19 was transient, but was observed for up to 1 year in IPE cells. Analysis of pigment epithelial cells transfected with PEDF plasmids revealed that PEDF fusion proteins were successfully expressed and functionally active. In conclusion, efficient transfer of genetic information in pigment epithelial cells can be achieved using non-viral transfection protocols.

  3. Transfection of Eimeria mitis with yellow fluorescent protein as reporter and the endogenous development of the transgenic parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Qin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Advancements have been made in the genetic manipulation of apicomplexan parasites. Both the in vitro transient and in vivo stable transfection of Eimeria tenella have been developed successfully. Herein, we report the transient and stable transfection of Eimeria mitis. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Sporozoites of E. mitis transfected with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP expression plasmid were inoculated into chickens via the cloacal route. The recovered fluorescent oocysts were sorted by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS and then passaged 6 generations successively in chickens. The resulting population was analyzed by genome walking and Western blot. The endogenous development of the transgenic E. mitis was observed and its reproduction potential was tested. The stable transfection of E. mitis was developed. Genome walking confirmed the random integration of plasmid DNA into the genome; while Western blot analysis demonstrated the expression of foreign proteins. Constitutive expression of EYFP was observed in all stages of merogony, gametogony and sporogony. The peak of the transgenic oocyst output was delayed by 24 h and the total oocyst reproduction was reduced by 7-fold when compared to the parental strain. CONCLUSION: Stable transfection of E. mitis was successfully developed. The expression of foreign antigens in the transgenic parasites will facilitate the development of transgenic E. mitis as a vaccine vector.

  4. Positive selection on the killer whale mitogenome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foote, Andrew David; Morin, Phillip A.; Durban, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria produce up to 95 per cent of the eukaryotic cell's energy. The coding genes of the mitochondrial DNA may therefore evolve under selection owing to metabolic requirements. The killer whale, Orcinus orca, is polymorphic, has a global distribution and occupies a range of ecological niches....... It is therefore a suitable organism for testing this hypothesis. We compared a global dataset of the complete mitochondrial genomes of 139 individuals for amino acid changes that were associated with radical physico-chemical property changes and were influenced by positive selection. Two such selected non...

  5. Personality disorders, psychopathy and serial killers

    OpenAIRE

    Morana, Hilda C P; Stone, Michael H; Abdalla-Filho, Elias

    2006-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Apresentar as características básicas dos diversos transtornos específicos de personalidade, mas centrando-se no transtorno de personalidade anti-social, fazendo sua diferenciação com psicopatia. O estudo ainda se propõe a abordar a figura do serial killer, apontando a presença de aspectos psicopáticos no homicídio seriado. MÉTODO: Uma revisão bibliográfica foi feita no sentido de se abordar convergências e divergências entre diversos autores sobre um assunto tão polêmico, sobretudo...

  6. X-ray sensitive strains of CHO cells show decreased frequency of stable transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeggo, P.; Smith, J.

    1987-01-01

    Six X-ray sensitive (xrs) strains of the Chinese hamster ovary cell line have previously been isolated and shown to have a defect in double strand break rejoining. In this study, these strains have been investigated for their ability to take up and integrate foreign DNA. All the xrs strains investigated so far have shown a decreased frequency of stable transfectants compared to their parent line, in experiments using the plasmid pSV2gpt, which contains the selectable bacterial gene, guanine phosphoribosyl transferase. This decreased frequency is observed over a wide range of DNA concentrations (0.1 to 20 μg DNA) but is more pronounced at higher DNA concentrations. In contrast, these xrs strains show the same level of transfection proficiency as the wild type parent using a transient transfection system with a plasmid containing the bacterial CAT (chloramphenicol acetyl transferase) gene. Since the level of CAT activity does not depend on integration of foreign DNA, this suggests that the xrs strains are able to take up the same amount of DNA as the parent strains, but have a defect in the integration of foreign DNA. Since this integration of foreign DNA probably occurs by non-homologous recombination, this may indicate a role of the xrs gene product in this process

  7. New Transfection Agents Based on Liposomes Containing Biosurfactant MEL-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Mamoru; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Furuno, Tadahide

    2013-08-16

    Nano vectors are useful tools to deliver foreign DNAs, oligonucleotides, and small interfering double-stranded RNAs (siRNAs) into mammalian cells with gene transfection and gene regulation. In such experiments we have found the liposomes with a biosurfacant mannosylerythriol lipid (MEL-A) are useful because of their high transfer efficiency, and their unique mechanism to transfer genes to target cells with the lowest toxicity. In the present review we will describe our current work, which may contribute to the great advance of gene transfer to target cells and gene regulations. For more than two decades, the liposome technologies have changed dramatically and various methods have been proposed in the fields of biochemistry, cell biology, biotechnology, and so on. In addition, they were towards to pharmaceutics and clinical applications. The liposome technologies were expected to use gene therapy, however, they have not reached a requested goal as of yet. In the present paper we would like to present an approach using a biosurfactant, MEL-A, which is a surface-active compound produced by microorganisms growing on water-insoluble substrates and increases efficiency in gene transfection. The present work shows new transfection agents based on liposomes containing biosurfactant MEL-A.

  8. New Transfection Agents Based on Liposomes Containing Biosurfactant MEL-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahide Furuno

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nano vectors are useful tools to deliver foreign DNAs, oligonucleotides, and small interfering double-stranded RNAs (siRNAs into mammalian cells with gene transfection and gene regulation. In such experiments we have found the liposomes with a biosurfacant mannosylerythriol lipid (MEL-A are useful because of their high transfer efficiency, and their unique mechanism to transfer genes to target cells with the lowest toxicity. In the present review we will describe our current work, which may contribute to the great advance of gene transfer to target cells and gene regulations. For more than two decades, the liposome technologies have changed dramatically and various methods have been proposed in the fields of biochemistry, cell biology, biotechnology, and so on. In addition, they were towards to pharmaceutics and clinical applications. The liposome technologies were expected to use gene therapy, however, they have not reached a requested goal as of yet. In the present paper we would like to present an approach using a biosurfactant, MEL-A, which is a surface-active compound produced by microorganisms growing on water-insoluble substrates and increases efficiency in gene transfection. The present work shows new transfection agents based on liposomes containing biosurfactant MEL-A.

  9. El Killer. Representaciones inestables de un homicida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Oliver Fuentes

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available El Killer, de Josué Montijo narra los asesinatos en serie de Juan Benito Aybar, un ciudadano “común” que súbitamente comienza a liquidar a los drogadictos de San Juan de Puerto Rico. Pero lejos de ofrecer una visión unilateral del asesino que permita descifrarlo como un psicópata tradicional, la novela entrega un conjunto de versiones contradictorias que imposibilitan cualquier intento de clasificación. En el proceso, lo siniestro irrumpe en la novela pues el lector descubre que el asesino es el último defensor del “orden convencional” en una sociedad en franca descomposición. El Killer by Josué Montijo describes the serial murders of Juan Benito Aybar, a “common” citizen who suddenly starts killing the drug addicts of San Juan. But far beyond of offering a unilateral vision of the assassin as the prototype of the “traditional psychopath”, the novel offers a set of contradictory versions making imposible any attempt of classification. In the process a sinister turn out for justice emerge as the assassin becomes a sort of defender of the “right order”.

  10. Invariant natural killer T cells trigger adaptive lymphocytes to churn up bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Sebastian; Van Kaer, Luc

    2008-05-15

    How innate immune response causes autoimmunity has remained an enigma. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Mattner et al. demonstrate that invariant natural killer T cells activated by the mucosal commensal Novosphingobium aromaticivorans precipitate chronic T cell-mediated autoimmunity against small bile ducts that mirrors human primary biliary cirrhosis. These findings provide a mechanistic understanding of the role of innate immunity toward a microbe in the development of autoimmunity.

  11. Liposome-based DNA carriers may induce cellular stress response and change gene expression pattern in transfected cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background During functional studies on the rat stress-inducible Hspa1b (hsp70.1) gene we noticed that some liposome-based DNA carriers, which are used for transfection, induce its promoter activity. This observation concerned commercial liposome formulations (LA), Lipofectin and Lipofectamine 2000. This work was aimed to understand better the mechanism of this phenomenon and its potential biological and practical consequences. Results We found that a reporter gene driven by Hspa1b promoter is activated both in the case of transient transfections and in the stably transfected cells treated with LA. Using several deletion clones containing different fragments of Hspa1b promoter, we found that the regulatory elements responsible for most efficient LA-driven inducibility were located between nucleotides -269 and +85, relative to the transcription start site. Further studies showed that the induction mechanism was independent of the classical HSE-HSF interaction that is responsible for gene activation during heat stress. Using DNA microarrays we also detected significant activation of the endogenous Hspa1b gene in cells treated with Lipofectamine 2000. Several other stress genes were also induced, along with numerous genes involved in cellular metabolism, cell cycle control and pro-apoptotic pathways. Conclusions Our observations suggest that i) some cationic liposomes may not be suitable for functional studies on hsp promoters, ii) lipofection may cause unintended changes in global gene expression in the transfected cells. PMID:21663599

  12. Liposome-based DNA carriers may induce cellular stress response and change gene expression pattern in transfected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisowska Katarzyna Marta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During functional studies on the rat stress-inducible Hspa1b (hsp70.1 gene we noticed that some liposome-based DNA carriers, which are used for transfection, induce its promoter activity. This observation concerned commercial liposome formulations (LA, Lipofectin and Lipofectamine 2000. This work was aimed to understand better the mechanism of this phenomenon and its potential biological and practical consequences. Results We found that a reporter gene driven by Hspa1b promoter is activated both in the case of transient transfections and in the stably transfected cells treated with LA. Using several deletion clones containing different fragments of Hspa1b promoter, we found that the regulatory elements responsible for most efficient LA-driven inducibility were located between nucleotides -269 and +85, relative to the transcription start site. Further studies showed that the induction mechanism was independent of the classical HSE-HSF interaction that is responsible for gene activation during heat stress. Using DNA microarrays we also detected significant activation of the endogenous Hspa1b gene in cells treated with Lipofectamine 2000. Several other stress genes were also induced, along with numerous genes involved in cellular metabolism, cell cycle control and pro-apoptotic pathways. Conclusions Our observations suggest that i some cationic liposomes may not be suitable for functional studies on hsp promoters, ii lipofection may cause unintended changes in global gene expression in the transfected cells.

  13. The influence of physicochemical parameters on the efficacy of non-viral DNA transfection complexes : A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneuer, Carsten; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Bakowsky, Heike; Kumar, M. N. V. Ravi; Oberle, Volker; Lehr, Claus M.; Hoekstra, Dick; Bakowsky, Udo

    2006-01-01

    Various polycationic vehicles have been developed to facilitate the transfer of foreign DNA into mammalian cells. Structure-activity studies suggested that biophysical properties, such as size, charge, and morphology of the resulting DNA complexes determine transfection efficiency within one class

  14. Transfection effect of microbubbles on cells in superposed ultrasound waves and behavior of cavitation bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Tetsuya; Tomita, Yukio; Koshiyama, Ken-Ichiro; Blomley, Martin J K

    2006-06-01

    The combination of ultrasound and ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) is able to induce transient membrane permeability leading to direct delivery of exogenous molecules into cells. Cavitation bubbles are believed to be involved in the membrane permeability; however, the detailed mechanism is still unknown. In the present study, the effects of ultrasound and the UCAs, Optison on transfection in vitro for different medium heights and the related dynamic behaviors of cavitation bubbles were investigated. Cultured CHO-E cells mixed with reporter genes (luciferase or beta-gal plasmid DNA) and UCAs were exposed to 1 MHz ultrasound in 24-well plates. Ultrasound was applied from the bottom of the well and reflected at the free surface of the medium, resulting in the superposition of ultrasound waves within the well. Cells cultured on the bottom of 24-well plates were located near the first node (displacement node) of the incident ultrasound downstream. Transfection activity was a function determined with the height of the medium (wave traveling distance), as well as the concentration of UCAs and the exposure time was also determined with the concentration of UCAs and the exposure duration. Survival fraction was determined by MTT assay, also changes with these values in the reverse pattern compared with luciferase activity. With shallow medium height, high transfection efficacy and high survival fraction were obtained at a low concentration of UCAs. In addition, capillary waves and subsequent atomized particles became significant as the medium height decreased. These phenomena suggested cavitation bubbles were being generated in the medium. To determine the effect of UCAs on bubble generation, we repeated the experiments using crushed heat-treated Optison solution instead of the standard microbubble preparation. The transfection ratio and survival fraction showed no additional benefit when ultrasound was used. These results suggested that cavitation bubbles created by the

  15. Natural killer cell signal integration balances synapse symmetry and migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona J Culley

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells discern the health of other cells by recognising the balance of activating and inhibitory ligands expressed by each target cell. However, how the integration of activating and inhibitory signals relates to formation of the NK cell immune synapse remains a central question in our understanding of NK cell recognition. Here we report that ligation of LFA-1 on NK cells induced asymmetrical cell spreading and migration. In contrast, ligation of the activating receptor NKG2D induced symmetrical spreading of ruffled lamellipodia encompassing a dynamic ring of f-actin, concurrent with polarization towards a target cell and a "stop" signal. Ligation of both LFA-1 and NKG2D together resulted in symmetrical spreading but co-ligation of inhibitory receptors reverted NK cells to an asymmetrical migratory configuration leading to inhibitory synapses being smaller and more rapidly disassembled. Using micropatterned activating and inhibitory ligands, signals were found to be continuously and locally integrated during spreading. Together, these data demonstrate that NK cells spread to form large, stable, symmetrical synapses if activating signals dominate, whereas asymmetrical migratory "kinapses" are favoured if inhibitory signals dominate. This clarifies how the integration of activating and inhibitory receptor signals is translated to an appropriate NK cell response.

  16. Highly Effective Gene Transfection In Vivo by Alkylated Polyethylenimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Fortune

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We mechanistically explored the effect of increased hydrophobicity of the polycation on the efficacy and specificity of gene delivery in mice. N-Alkylated linear PEIs with varying alkyl chain lengths and extent of substitution were synthesized and characterized by biophysical methods. Their in vivo transfection efficiency, specificity, and biodistribution were investigated. N-Ethylation improves the in vivo efficacy of gene expression in the mouse lung 26-fold relative to the parent polycation and more than quadruples the ratio of expression in the lung to that in all other organs. N-Propyl-PEI was the best performer in the liver and heart (581- and 3.5-fold enhancements, resp. while N-octyl-PEI improved expression in the kidneys over the parent polymer 221-fold. As these enhancements in gene expression occur without changing the plasmid biodistribution, alkylation does not alter the cellular uptake but rather enhances transfection subsequent to cellular uptake.

  17. Simulation of micro/nano electroporation for cell transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guocheng; Fan, Na; Jiang, Hai; Guo, Jian; Peng, Bei

    2018-03-01

    The 3D micro/nano electroporation for transfection has become a powerful biological cell research technique with the development of micro-nano manufacturing technology. The micro channels connected the cells with transfection reagents on the chip were important to the transmemnbrane potentical, which directly influences the electroporation efficiency. In this study, a two-dimensional model for electroporation of cells was designed to address the effects of channels’ sizes and number on transmembrane potential. The simulation results indicated that the transmembrane potential increased with increasing size of channels’ entrances. Moreover, compared with single channel entrance, the transmembrane potential was higher when the cells located at multiple channels entrances. These results suggest that it IS required to develop higher micro manufacturing technology to create channels as we expected size.

  18. A nonviral DNA delivery system based on surface modified silica-nanoparticles can efficiently transfect cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneuer, C; Sameti, M; Bakowsky, U; Schiestel, T; Schirra, H; Schmidt, H; Lehr, C M

    2000-01-01

    Diverse polycationic polymers have been used as nonviral transfection agents. Here we report the ability of colloidal silica particles with covalently attached cationic surface modifications to transfect plasmid DNA in vitro and make an attempt to describe the structure of the resulting transfection complexes. In analogy to the terms lipoplex and polyplex, we propose to describe the nanoparticle-DNA complexes by the term "nanoplex". Three batches, Si10E, Si100E, and Si26H, sized between 10 and 100 nm and with zeta potentials ranging from +7 to +31 mV at pH 7.4 were evaluated. The galactosidase expression plasmid DNA pCMVbeta was immobilized on the particle surface and efficiently transfected Cos-1 cells. The transfection activity was accompanied by very low cytotoxicity, with LD(50) values in the milligrams per milliliter range. The most active batch, Si26H, was produced by modification of commercially available silica particles with N-(6-aminohexyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane, yielding spherical nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 26 nm and a zeta potential of +31 mV at pH 7.4. Complexes of Si26H and pCMVbeta plasmid DNA formed at w/w ratios of 10 were most effective in promoting transfection of Cos-1 cells in the absence of serum. At this ratio, >90% of the DNA was associated with the particles, yielding nanoplexes with a net negative surface charge. When the transfection medium was supplemented with 10% serum, maximum gene expression was observed at a w/w ratio of 30, at which the resulting particle-DNA complexes possessed a positive surface charge. Transfection was strongly increased in the presence of 100 microM chloroquine in the incubation medium and reached approximately 30% of the efficiency of a 60 kDa polyethylenimine. In contrast to polyethylenimine, no toxicity was observed at the concentrations required. Atomic force microscopy of Si26H-DNA complexes revealed a spaghetti-meatball-like structure. The surface of complexes prepared at a w/w ratio of

  19. Cytokine-induced killer cells are type II natural killer T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G.H.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Until now, cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells were assumed to be part of the type I natural killer T (NKT cell population, but it was not yet investigated if this is correct. Methods: For analysis, CIK cells were generated by various culture conditions. Human type I NKT cells express a T cell receptor (TCR composed of an invariant Vα24-JαQ chain combined with one of several Vβ chains. The Vα24 is a reliable marker for the presence of these TCRs. Results: While comparing cultures stimulated with different substances, we observed the lack of any Vα24 on the surface of CIK culture cells. Conclusion: We conclude that CIK cells do not belong to the type I NKT cells.

  20. Células natural killer e vigilância imunológica Natural killer cells and immune surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Jobim

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Analisar a importância das células natural killer, de seus receptores killer immunoglobulin-like receptors e correspondentes genes (KIR na vigilância imunológica do organismo contra agentes infecciosos, transplantes de células-tronco hematopoiéticas, assim como sua participação na auto-imunidade. As características e o polimorfismo dos genes e receptores KIR na população brasileira serão descritos. FONTES DOS DADOS: Livros, artigos de revisão e artigos científicos recentes são citados e listados na bibliografia. A experiência pessoal é também apresentada. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: Identificamos o perfil de genes e haplótipos KIR na população caucasóide brasileira, sendo de importância esse conhecimento para a análise da relação desse sistema com doenças. Examinamos 116 indivíduos doadores voluntários de medula óssea, identificando-se 32 genótipos e a presença de 51 e 49% de haplótipos A e B, respectivamente. Foi realizado estudo comparativo entre os nossos genótipos e os de outras populações. CONCLUSÕES: A imunidade inata é uma barreira antiinfecciosa de importância em pediatria. Ela atua de maneira independente da imunidade celular e humoral, sendo mais rápida que as demais fontes de proteção do organismo. Ao mesmo tempo, ela estimula os linfócitos T CD8 a agirem e amplificarem a rede de proteção imunológica. Entretanto, como na maioria das vezes em que a imunidade atua, ela também pode ser prejudicial, agredindo o organismo por mecanismos auto-imunes ou mesmo, na sua ausência, oferecer espaço aos agentes infecciosos para agirem de forma impune.OBJECTIVES: To analyze the importance of natural killer cells, their killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR and genes in autoimmunity and in the immune surveillance against infectious agents and stem cells transplantation. The characteristics and polymorphisms of the KIR genes and receptors in the Brazilian population is described. SOURCES

  1. Towards gene therapy based on femtosecond optical transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antkowiak, M.; Torres-Mapa, M. L.; McGinty, J.; Chahine, M.; Bugeon, L.; Rose, A.; Finn, A.; Moleirinho, S.; Okuse, K.; Dallman, M.; French, P.; Harding, S. E.; Reynolds, P.; Gunn-Moore, F.; Dholakia, K.

    2012-06-01

    Gene therapy poses a great promise in treatment and prevention of a variety of diseases. However, crucial to studying and the development of this therapeutic approach is a reliable and efficient technique of gene and drug delivery into primary cell types. These cells, freshly derived from an organ or tissue, mimic more closely the in vivo state and present more physiologically relevant information compared to cultured cell lines. However, primary cells are known to be difficult to transfect and are typically transfected using viral methods, which are not only questionable in the context of an in vivo application but rely on time consuming vector construction and may also result in cell de-differentiation and loss of functionality. At the same time, well established non-viral methods do not guarantee satisfactory efficiency and viability. Recently, optical laser mediated poration of cell membrane has received interest as a viable gene and drug delivery technique. It has been shown to deliver a variety of biomolecules and genes into cultured mammalian cells; however, its applicability to primary cells remains to be proven. We demonstrate how optical transfection can be an enabling technique in research areas, such as neuropathic pain, neurodegenerative diseases, heart failure and immune or inflammatory-related diseases. Several primary cell types are used in this study, namely cardiomyocytes, dendritic cells, and neurons. We present our recent progress in optimizing this technique's efficiency and post-treatment cell viability for these types of cells and discuss future directions towards in vivo applications.

  2. Characterization of cell lines stably transfected with rubella virus replicons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Xu, Jie; Frey, Teryl K.

    2012-01-01

    Rubella virus (RUBV) replicons expressing a drug resistance gene and a gene of interest were used to select cell lines uniformly harboring the replicon. Replicons expressing GFP and a virus capsid protein GFP fusion (C-GFP) were compared. Vero or BHK cells transfected with either replicon survived drug selection and grew into a monolayer. However, survival was ∼9-fold greater following transfection with the C-GFP-replicon than with the GFP-expressing replicon and while the C-GFP-replicon cells grew similarly to non-transfected cells, the GFP-replicon cells grew slower. Neither was due to the ability of the CP to enhance RNA synthesis but survival during drug selection was correlated with the ability of CP to inhibit apoptosis. Additionally, C-GFP-replicon cells were not cured of the replicon in the absence of drug selection. Interferon-alpha suppressed replicon RNA and protein synthesis, but did not cure the cells, explaining in part the ability of RUBV to establish persistent infections.

  3. Characterization of cell lines stably transfected with rubella virus replicons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Xu, Jie [Department of Biology, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 4010, Atlanta GA 30302-4010 (United States); Frey, Teryl K., E-mail: tfrey@gsu.edu [Department of Biology, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 4010, Atlanta GA 30302-4010 (United States)

    2012-07-20

    Rubella virus (RUBV) replicons expressing a drug resistance gene and a gene of interest were used to select cell lines uniformly harboring the replicon. Replicons expressing GFP and a virus capsid protein GFP fusion (C-GFP) were compared. Vero or BHK cells transfected with either replicon survived drug selection and grew into a monolayer. However, survival was {approx}9-fold greater following transfection with the C-GFP-replicon than with the GFP-expressing replicon and while the C-GFP-replicon cells grew similarly to non-transfected cells, the GFP-replicon cells grew slower. Neither was due to the ability of the CP to enhance RNA synthesis but survival during drug selection was correlated with the ability of CP to inhibit apoptosis. Additionally, C-GFP-replicon cells were not cured of the replicon in the absence of drug selection. Interferon-alpha suppressed replicon RNA and protein synthesis, but did not cure the cells, explaining in part the ability of RUBV to establish persistent infections.

  4. Natural Killer cell recognition of melanoma: new clues for a more effective immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel eTarazona

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer cells participate in the early immune response against melanoma and also contribute to the development of an adequate adaptive immune response by their crosstalk with dendritic cells and cytokine secretion. Melanoma resistance to conventional therapies together with its high immunogenicity justifies the development of novel therapies aimed to stimulate effective immune responses against melanoma. However, melanoma cells frequently escape to CD8 T cell recognition by the down-regulation of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. In this scenario, Natural killer cells emerge as potential candidates for melanoma immunotherapy due to their capacity to recognize and destroy melanoma cells expressing low levels of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. In addition, the possibility to combine immune checkpoint blockade with other NK cell potentiating strategies (e.g. cytokine induction of activating receptors has opened new perspectives in the potential use of adoptive NK cell-based immunotherapy in melanoma.

  5. One pyrimidine dimer inactivates expression of a transfected gene in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protic-Sabljic, M.; Kraemer, K.H.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have developed a host cell reactivation assay of DNA repair utilizing UV-treated plasmid vectors. The assay primarily reflects cellular repair of transcriptional activity of damaged DNA measured indirectly as enzyme activity of the transfected genes. They studied three plasmids (pSV2cat, 5020 base pairs; pSV2catSVgpt, 7268 base pairs; and pRSVcat, 5027 base pairs) with different sizes and promoters carrying the bacterial cat gene (CAT, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) in a construction that permits cat expression in human cells. All human simian virus 40-transformed cells studied expressed high levels of the transfected cat gene. UV treatment of the plasmids prior to transfection resulted in differential decrease in CAT activity in different cell lines. With pSV2catSVgpt, UV inactivation of CAT expression was greater in the xeroderma pigmentosum group A and D lines than in the other human cell lines tested. The D 0 of the CAT inactivation curve was 50 J X m-2 for pSV2cat and for pRSVcat in the xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells. The similarity of the D0 data in the xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells for three plasmids of different size and promoters implies they all have similar UV-inactivation target size. UV-induced pyrimidine dimer formation in the plasmids was quantified by assay of the number of UV-induced T4 endonuclease V-sensitive sites. In the most sensitive xeroderma pigmentosum cells, with all three plasmids, one UV-induced pyrimidine dimer inactivates a target of about 2 kilobases, close to the size of the putative CAT mRNA

  6. Non-Viral Transfection Methods Optimized for Gene Delivery to a Lung Cancer Cell Line

    OpenAIRE

    Salimzadeh, Loghman; Jaberipour, Mansooreh; Hosseini, Ahmad; Ghaderi, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Background Mehr-80 is a newly established adherent human large cell lung cancer cell line that has not been transfected until now. This study aims to define the optimal transfection conditions and effects of some critical elements for enhancing gene delivery to this cell line by utilizing different non-viral transfection Procedures. Methods In the current study, calcium phosphate (CaP), DEAE-dextran, superfect, electroporation and lipofection transfection methods were used to optimize deliver...

  7. Regulatory natural killer cell expression in atopic childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    by different types of NK cells. Keywords: Natural killer, regulatory, asthma, children, allergy. ... aspergillus, cockroach, cat epithelia, and pollens) as well as positive histamine ..... also relied on detecting surface receptors for recognizing NK and ...

  8. Gulf of Mexico killer whale photo-ID catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Photo-identification data on killer whales occupying the northern Gulf of Mexico have been collected in association with large vessel surveys since 1991. Photographs...

  9. Antiproton cell experiment: antimatter is a better killer

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "European Organization for Nuclear Research is reporting that results from a three year study of antiprotons for neoplasm irrdiation showed a better cellular killer with a smaller lethal dose." (1,5 page)

  10. A Survey of Wood Protection Chemicals, Tree Killers and Sprayers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chemicals used in wood protection (preservation) within Makurdi metropolis. A purposive, non-random sampling was undertaken in Makurdi metropolis to identify wood protection chemicals/tree-killers available in agrochemical stores, ...

  11. Using Behavior Sequence Analysis to Map Serial Killers' Life Histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keatley, David A; Golightly, Hayley; Shephard, Rebecca; Yaksic, Enzo; Reid, Sasha

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the current research was to provide a novel method for mapping the developmental sequences of serial killers' life histories. An in-depth biographical account of serial killers' lives, from birth through to conviction, was gained and analyzed using Behavior Sequence Analysis. The analyses highlight similarities in behavioral events across the serial killers' lives, indicating not only which risk factors occur, but the temporal order of these factors. Results focused on early childhood environment, indicating the role of parental abuse; behaviors and events surrounding criminal histories of serial killers, showing that many had previous convictions and were known to police for other crimes; behaviors surrounding their murders, highlighting differences in victim choice and modus operandi; and, finally, trial pleas and convictions. The present research, therefore, provides a novel approach to synthesizing large volumes of data on criminals and presenting results in accessible, understandable outcomes.

  12. Insights into the multifunctional role of natural killer enhancing factor-A (NKEF-A/Prx1) in big-belly seahorse (Hippocampus abdominalis): DNA protection, insulin reduction, H2O2 scavenging, and immune modulation activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godahewa, G I; Perera, N C N; Lee, Jehee

    2018-02-05

    Natural killer enhancing factor A (NKEF-A), also known as peroxiredoxin 1 (Prx1), is a well-known antioxidant involved in innate immunity. Although NKEF-A/Prx1 has been studied in different fish species, the present study broadens the knowledge of NKEF-A gene in terms of molecular structure, function, and immune responses in fish species. Hippocampus abdominalis NKEF-A (HaNKEF-A) cDNA encoded a putative protein of 198 amino acids containing a thioredoxin_2 domain, VCP motifs, and three conserved cysteine residues including peroxidatic and resolving cysteines. Amino acid sequence comparison and phylogenetic breakdown showed the higher sequence identity and closer evolutionary position of HaNKEF-A to those of other fish counterparts. A recombinant protein of HaNKEF-A was shown to i) protect supercoiled DNA against mixed catalyzed oxidation, ii) reduce insulin disulfide bonds, and iii) scavenge extracellular H 2 O 2 . Results of in vitro assays demonstrated the concentration dependent antioxidant function of recombinant HaNKEF-A. In addition, qPCR assessments revealed that the HaNKEF-A transcripts were constitutively expressed in fourteen tissues with the highest expression in liver. As an innate immune response, HaNKEF-A transcripts were up-regulated in liver post injection of LPS, Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus iniae, and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid. Thus, HaNKEF-A can safeguards big-belly seahorse from oxidative damage and pathogenic infections. This study provides insight into the functions of NKEF-A/Prx1 in fish species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Towards PDT with Genetically Encoded Photosensitizer KillerRed: A Comparison of Continuous and Pulsed Laser Regimens in an Animal Tumor Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Shirmanova

    Full Text Available The strong phototoxicity of the red fluorescent protein KillerRed allows it to be considered as a potential genetically encoded photosensitizer for the photodynamic therapy (PDT of cancer. The advantages of KillerRed over chemical photosensitizers are its expression in tumor cells transduced with the appropriate gene and direct killing of cells through precise damage to any desired cell compartment. The ability of KillerRed to affect cell division and to induce cell death has already been demonstrated in cancer cell lines in vitro and HeLa tumor xenografts in vivo. However, the further development of this approach for PDT requires optimization of the method of treatment. In this study we tested the continuous wave (593 nm and pulsed laser (584 nm, 10 Hz, 18 ns modes to achieve an antitumor effect. The research was implemented on CT26 subcutaneous mouse tumors expressing KillerRed in fusion with histone H2B. The results showed that the pulsed mode provided a higher rate of photobleaching of KillerRed without any temperature increase on the tumor surface. PDT with the continuous wave laser was ineffective against CT26 tumors in mice, whereas the pulsed laser induced pronounced histopathological changes and inhibition of tumor growth. Therefore, we selected an effective regimen for PDT when using the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed and pulsed laser irradiation.

  14. Off-resonance plasmonic enhanced femtosecond laser optoporation and transfection of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Judith; Humbert, Laure; Boulais, Étienne; Lachaine, Rémi; Lebrun, Jean-Jaques; Meunier, Michel

    2012-03-01

    A femtosecond laser based transfection method using off-resonance plasmonic gold nanoparticles is described. For human cancer melanoma cells, the treatment leads to a very high perforation rate of 70%, transfection efficiency three times higher than for conventional lipofection, and very low toxicity (transfection for skin cancer treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Targeting and Therapy of Glioblastoma in a Mouse Model Using Exosomes Derived From Natural Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liya Zhu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveGlioblastoma is a highly aggressive primary brain tumor that is resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Natural killer (NK cells have been used to treat incurable cancers. Recent studies have investigated the effectiveness of NK-cell-derived exosomes (NK-Exo for treating incurable cancers such as melanoma, leukemia, and neuroblastoma; however, NK-Exo have not been used to treat glioblastoma. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effects of NK-Exo against aggressive glioblastoma both in vitro and in vivo and determined the tumor-targeting ability of NK-Exo by performing fluorescence imaging.MethodsU87/MG cells were transfected with the enhanced firefly luciferase (effluc and thy1.1 genes; thy1.1-positive cells were selected using microbeads. U87/MG/F cells were assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, western blotting, and luciferase-activity assays. NK-Exo were isolated by ultracentrifugation, purified by density gradient centrifugation, and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS, nanoparticle-tracking analysis (NTA, and western blotting. Cytokine levels in NK-Exo were compared to those in NK cells and NK-cell medium by performing an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. NK-Exo-induced apoptosis of cancer cells was confirmed by flow cytometry and western blotting. In vivo therapeutic effects and specificity of NK-Exo against glioblastoma were assessed in a xenograft mouse model by fluorescence imaging. Xenograft mice were treated with NK-Exo, which was administered seven times through the tail vein. Tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI, and tumor volume was measured by ultrasound imaging. The mice were intraperitoneally injected with dextran sulfate 2 h before NK-Exo injection to decrease the liver uptake and increase the tumor specificity of NK-Exo.ResultsRT-PCR and western blotting confirmed the gene and protein

  16. Evolution of male-killer suppression in a natural population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A Hornett

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Male-killing bacteria are widespread in arthropods, and can profoundly alter the reproductive biology of their host species. Here we detail the first case of complete suppression of a male killer. The nymphalid butterfly Hypolimnas bolina is infected with a strain of the bacterium Wolbachia, wBol1, which kills male host embryos in Polynesian populations, but does not do so in many areas of Southeast Asia, where both males and female adults are naturally infected, and wBol1-infected females produce a 1:1 sex ratio. We demonstrate that absence of male killing by wBol1 is associated with dominant zygotic suppression of the action of the male killer. Simulations demonstrate host suppressors of male-killer action can spread very rapidly, and historical data indicating the presence of male killing in Southeast Asia in the very recent past suggests suppressor spread has been a very recent occurrence. Thus, male killer/host interactions are much more dynamic than previously recognised, with rapid and dramatic loss of the phenotype. Our results also indicate that suppression can render male killers completely quiescent, leading to the conclusion that some species that do not currently express a male killer may have done so in the past, and thus that more species have had their biology affected by these parasites than previously believed.

  17. Transient killer whale range - Satellite tagging of West Coast transient killer whales to determine range and movement patterns

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Transient killers whales inhabit the West Coast of the United States. Their range and movement patterns are difficult to ascertain, but are vital to understanding...

  18. Tissue Engineering Using Transfected Growth-Factor Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Langer, Robert S.; Freed, Lisa E.; Trippel, Stephen; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2005-01-01

    A method of growing bioengineered tissues includes, as a major component, the use of mammalian cells that have been transfected with genes for secretion of regulator and growth-factor substances. In a typical application, one either seeds the cells onto an artificial matrix made of a synthetic or natural biocompatible material, or else one cultures the cells until they secrete a desired amount of an extracellular matrix. If such a bioengineered tissue construct is to be used for surgical replacement of injured tissue, then the cells should preferably be the patient s own cells or, if not, at least cells matched to the patient s cells according to a human-leucocyteantigen (HLA) test. The bioengineered tissue construct is typically implanted in the patient's injured natural tissue, wherein the growth-factor genes enhance metabolic functions that promote the in vitro development of functional tissue constructs and their integration with native tissues. If the matrix is biodegradable, then one of the results of metabolism could be absorption of the matrix and replacement of the matrix with tissue formed at least partly by the transfected cells. The method was developed for articular chondrocytes but can (at least in principle) be extended to a variety of cell types and biocompatible matrix materials, including ones that have been exploited in prior tissue-engineering methods. Examples of cell types include chondrocytes, hepatocytes, islet cells, nerve cells, muscle cells, other organ cells, bone- and cartilage-forming cells, epithelial and endothelial cells, connective- tissue stem cells, mesodermal stem cells, and cells of the liver and the pancreas. Cells can be obtained from cell-line cultures, biopsies, and tissue banks. Genes, molecules, or nucleic acids that secrete factors that influence the growth of cells, the production of extracellular matrix material, and other cell functions can be inserted in cells by any of a variety of standard transfection techniques.

  19. Conceptual and technical aspects of transfection and gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Lars; Scholz, Anke; Lipp, Peter

    2015-03-15

    Genetically modified animals are state of the art in biomedical research as gene therapy is a promising perspective in the attempt to cure hereditary diseases. Both approaches have in common that modified or corrected genetic information must be transferred into cells in general or into particular cell types of an organism. Here we give an overview of established and emerging methods of transfection and gene delivery and provide conceptual and technical advantages and drawbacks of their particular use. Additionally, based on a flow chart, we compiled a rough guideline to choose a gene transfer method for a particular field of application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Uptake of DNA by cancer cells without a transfection reagent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Kong

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer cells exhibit elevated levels of glucose uptake and may obtain pre-formed, diet-derived fatty acids from the bloodstream to boost their rapid growth; they may also use nucleic acid from their microenvironment. The study of processing nucleic acid by cancer cells will help improve the understanding of the metabolism of cancer. DNA is commonly packaged into a viral or lipid particle to be transferred into cells; this process is called transfection in laboratory. Cancer cells are known for having gene mutations and the evolving ability of endocytosis. Their uptake of DNAs might be different from normal cells; they may take in DNAs directly from the environment. In this report, we studied the uptake of DNAs in cancer cells without a transfection reagent. Methods A group of DNA fragments were prepared with PCR and labeled with isotope phosphorous-32 to test their uptake by Huh 7 (liver cancer and THLE3 (normal liver cells after incubation overnight by counting radioactivity of the cells’ genomic DNA. Multiple cell lines including breast cancer and lung cancer were tested with the same method. DNA molecules were also labeled with fluorescence to test the location in the cells using a kit of “label it fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH” from Mirus (USA. Results The data demonstrated that hepatocellular carcinoma cells possess the ability to take in large DNA fragments directly without a transfection reagent whereas normal liver cells cannot. Huh7 and MDA-MB231 cells displayed a significantly higher Rhodamine density in the cytoplasmic phagosomes and this suggests that the mechanism of uptake of large DNA by cancer cells is likely endocytosis. The efficacy of uptake is related to the DNA’s size. Some cell lines of lung cancer and breast cancer also showed similar uptake of DNA. Conclusions In the present study, we have revealed the evidence that some cancer cells, but not nontumorigenic cells, can take DNA

  1. Transfection and imaging of diamond nanocrystals as scattering optical labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Bradley R.; Niebert, Marcus; Plakhotnik, Taras; Zvyagin, Andrei V.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the first demonstration of nanodiamond (ND) as a scattering optical label in a biological environment. NDs were efficiently transfected into cells using cationic liposomes, and imaged using differential interference and Hoffman modulation 'space' contrast microscopy techniques. We have shown that 55 nm NDs are biologically inert and produce a bright signal compared to the cell background. ND as a scattering label presents the possibility for extended biological imaging with relatively little thermal or biochemical perturbations due to the optical transparency and biologically inert nature of diamond

  2. Stimulation of Natural Killer T Cells by Glycolipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian L. Anderson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells are a subset of T cells that recognize glycolipid antigens presented by the CD1d protein. The initial discovery of immunostimulatory glycolipids from a marine sponge and the T cells that respond to the compounds has led to extensive research by chemists and immunologists to understand how glycolipids are recognized, possible responses by NKT cells, and the structural features of glycolipids necessary for stimulatory activity. The presence of this cell type in humans and most mammals suggests that it plays critical roles in antigen recognition and the interface between innate and adaptive immunity. Both endogenous and exogenous natural antigens for NKT cells have been identified, and it is likely that glycolipid antigens remain to be discovered. Multiple series of structurally varied glycolipids have been synthesized and tested for stimulatory activity. The structural features of glycolipids necessary for NKT cell stimulation are moderately well understood, and designed compounds have proven to be much more potent antigens than their natural counterparts. Nevertheless, control over NKT cell responses by designed glycolipids has not been optimized, and further research will be required to fully reveal the therapeutic potential of this cell type.

  3. Antitumor Responses of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie B. Altman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells are innate-like lymphocytes that were first described in the late 1980s. Since their initial description, numerous studies have collectively shed light on their development and effector function. These studies have highlighted the unique requirements for the activation of these lymphocytes and the functional responses that distinguish these cells from other effector lymphocyte populations such as conventional T cells and NK cells. This body of literature suggests that NKT cells play diverse nonredundant roles in a number of disease processes, including the initiation and propagation of airway hyperreactivity, protection against a variety of pathogens, development of autoimmunity, and mediation of allograft responses. In this review, however, we focus on the role of a specific lineage of NKT cells in antitumor immunity. Specifically, we describe the development of invariant NKT (iNKT cells and the factors that are critical for their acquisition of effector function. Next, we delineate the mechanisms by which iNKT cells influence and modulate the activity of other immune cells to directly or indirectly affect tumor growth. Finally, we review the successes and failures of clinical trials employing iNKT cell-based immunotherapies and explore the future prospects for the use of such strategies.

  4. Macrophage Polarization in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases: Killers or Builders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baci, Denisa; Tremolati, Marco; Fanuli, Matteo; Farronato, Giampietro; Mortara, Lorenzo

    2018-01-01

    Macrophages are key cellular components of the innate immunity, acting as the main player in the first-line defence against the pathogens and modulating homeostatic and inflammatory responses. Plasticity is a major feature of macrophages resulting in extreme heterogeneity both in normal and in pathological conditions. Macrophages are not homogenous, and they are generally categorized into two broad but distinct subsets as either classically activated (M1) or alternatively activated (M2). However, macrophages represent a continuum of highly plastic effector cells, resembling a spectrum of diverse phenotype states. Induction of specific macrophage functions is closely related to the surrounding environment that acts as a relevant orchestrator of macrophage functions. This phenomenon, termed polarization, results from cell/cell, cell/molecule interaction, governing macrophage functionality within the hosting tissues. Here, we summarized relevant cellular and molecular mechanisms driving macrophage polarization in “distant” pathological conditions, such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and periodontitis that share macrophage-driven inflammation as a key feature, playing their dual role as killers (M1-like) and/or builders (M2-like). We also dissect the physio/pathological consequences related to macrophage polarization within selected chronic inflammatory diseases, placing polarized macrophages as a relevant hallmark, putative biomarkers, and possible target for prevention/therapy. PMID:29507865

  5. Macrophage Polarization in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases: Killers or Builders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Parisi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are key cellular components of the innate immunity, acting as the main player in the first-line defence against the pathogens and modulating homeostatic and inflammatory responses. Plasticity is a major feature of macrophages resulting in extreme heterogeneity both in normal and in pathological conditions. Macrophages are not homogenous, and they are generally categorized into two broad but distinct subsets as either classically activated (M1 or alternatively activated (M2. However, macrophages represent a continuum of highly plastic effector cells, resembling a spectrum of diverse phenotype states. Induction of specific macrophage functions is closely related to the surrounding environment that acts as a relevant orchestrator of macrophage functions. This phenomenon, termed polarization, results from cell/cell, cell/molecule interaction, governing macrophage functionality within the hosting tissues. Here, we summarized relevant cellular and molecular mechanisms driving macrophage polarization in “distant” pathological conditions, such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and periodontitis that share macrophage-driven inflammation as a key feature, playing their dual role as killers (M1-like and/or builders (M2-like. We also dissect the physio/pathological consequences related to macrophage polarization within selected chronic inflammatory diseases, placing polarized macrophages as a relevant hallmark, putative biomarkers, and possible target for prevention/therapy.

  6. “It’s Always the Same, and It’s Always Different” Mythologisation and the Serial Killer in Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer.

    OpenAIRE

    Smyth, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Serial killers are important in American horror because of their ability to exist between ‘myth’ and ‘reality’. The serial killer is one of the most important American myths, but it is one firmly rooted in real life: unlike Paul Bunyan or Superman, serial killers do exist. This essay examines the relationship between the ‘myth’ and the ‘reality’ of serial killers, and the complex relationship between the American public and the serial killer, using Henry: Portrait of a Serial K...

  7. Natural killer cells and interleukin-1: a possible role in natural killer-tumor cell interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traub, L M

    1986-01-01

    Effector cells with broad cytolytic reactivity against various tumor cell lines have been detected in the peripheral blood of normal individuals. This phenomenon, known as natural killing, appeared to be significantly depressed in a small group of patients with extensive primary hepatocellular carcinoma. These data, together with that of others showing depressed interleukin-1 (IL-1) production in these patients, were taken to indicate that IL-1 played a functional role in natural killer (NK) cell biology. The hypothesis was confirmed by the demonstration that preincubation of tumor target cells with IL-1 enhanced their susceptibility to NK cell killing. In this study tumor target cells were labelled with /sup 51/Cr.

  8. Transtornos de personalidade, psicopatia e serial killers Personality disorders, psychopathy and serial killers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda C P Morana

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar as características básicas dos diversos transtornos específicos de personalidade, mas centrando-se no transtorno de personalidade anti-social, fazendo sua diferenciação com psicopatia. O estudo ainda se propõe a abordar a figura do serial killer, apontando a presença de aspectos psicopáticos no homicídio seriado. MÉTODO: Uma revisão bibliográfica foi feita no sentido de se abordar convergências e divergências entre diversos autores sobre um assunto tão polêmico, sobretudo quanto à viabilidade de tratamento dessa clientela forense. RESULTADOS: Enquanto o transtorno de personalidade anti-social é um diagnóstico médico, pode-se entender o termo "psicopatia", pertencente à esfera psiquiátrico-forense, como um "diagnóstico legal". Não se pode falar ainda de tratamento eficaz para os chamados "serial killers". CONCLUSÃO: Os transtornos de personalidade, especialmente o tipo anti-social, representam ainda hoje um verdadeiro desafio para a psiquiatria forense. O local mais adequado e justo para seus portadores, bem como recomendação homogênea e padronizada de tratamento são questões ainda não respondidas.OBJECTIVE: To illustrate the basic characteristics of several specific personality disorders, focusing mainly in antisocial personality disorder. The differences between antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy are highlighted. Serial killers and its psychopathic aspects are also discussed. METHOD: A bibliographic review was completed in order to outline convergences and divergences among different authors about this controversial issue, especially those concerning the possibility of treatment. RESULTS: While anti-social personality disorder is a medical diagnosis, the term "psychopathy" (which belongs to the sphere of forensic psychiatry may be understood as a "legal diagnosis". It is not still possible to identify an effective treatment for serial killers. CONCLUSION: Personality disorders

  9. Lipophosphoramidate-based bipolar amphiphiles: their syntheses and transfection properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchel, Mathieu; Le Gall, Tony; Lozach, Olivier; Haelters, Jean-Pierre; Montier, Tristan; Jaffrès, Paul-Alain

    2016-03-14

    Six new cationic bolaamphiphiles (also called bipolar amphiphiles, bolaform amphiphiles, or bolalipids) were readily prepared by a thiol-ene click reaction that engaged a mercapto-alcohol (mercapto-ethanol or mercapto-hexanol) and a cationic based lipophosphoramidate. The cationic lipophosphoramidates contain two lipid chains that end in an alkene group and a selected cationic polar head group (trimethylammonium, dimethyl hydroxyethyl ammonium, or methylimidazolium). These compounds were formulated in water (with or without DOPE as a colipid) to produce supramolecular aggregates. These aggregates, before (i.e. bolasomes) and after (i.e. bolaplexes) mixing with plasmid DNA (pDNA) at various charge ratios, were characterized with regard to their sizes and zeta potentials. In the case of bolasomes, the suspensions were unstable since precipitation occurred after only a few hours at room temperature. On the other hand, bolaplex formulations exhibited clearly a better colloidal stability. Then, the gene delivery properties of the cationic bolasomes were investigated using two human-derived epithelial cell lines (A549 and 16HBE). Compared to the commercially available lipofection reagent (Lipofectamine), most of the cationic bolaamphiphiles were able to efficiently transfect these cells when they were formulated with DOPE in a 1 : 1 molar ratio. We report herein that bolaamphiphiles possessing a trimethylammonium or a dimethyl hydroxyethyl ammonium head group were the most efficient in terms of transfection efficiency while exhibiting no significant cytotoxicity.

  10. Transfection of genetically encoded photoswitchable probes for STORM imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Mark; Jones, Sara A; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2013-06-01

    Conventional fluorescence microscopy is limited by its spatial resolution, leaving many biological structures too small to be studied in detail. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) is a method for superresolution fluorescence imaging based on the high accuracy localization of individual fluorophores. It uses optically switchable fluorophores: molecules that can be switched between a nonfluorescent and a fluorescent state by exposure to light. This protocol describes the transfection of genetically encoded photoswitchable probes for STORM imaging. It includes a discussion of how to choose a photoswitchable fluorescent protein; standard molecular biology techniques should be used to generate a plasmid containing the sequence of the photoswitchable protein linked to the gene of interest. Once the plasmid has been generated and has been verified, it can be introduced into cells via any standard means of gene delivery, such as lipofection or electroporation. Optimal conditions will vary considerably for different cell lines and plasmids. Here, we present an example protocol for the transfection of BS-C-1 cells with an mEos2-vimentin plasmid using the lipid-based reagent FuGENE6.

  11. Molecular studies of fibroblasts transfected with hepatitis B virus DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, M.L.; Hood, A.; Thung, S.N.; Gerber, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Two subclones (D7 and F8) derived from an NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line after transfection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) genomes, secreted significantly different amounts of HBsAg and HBeAg. DNA extracted from the subclones revealed only integrated and no extrachromosomal HBV DNA sequences as determined by the Southern blot technique with a /sup 32/P-labeled full length HBV DNA probe. The amount and integration sites of HBV sequences were significantly different in the two subclones. HBV DNA sequences coding for HBsAg and HBcAg were detected by alkaline phosphatase-conjugated, single-stranded synthetic gene-specific oligonucleotide probes revealing a larger number of copies in D7 DNA than in F8 DNA. Using a biotinylated probe for in situ hybridization, HBV DNA was found in the nuclei of all D7 cells with predominant localization to a single chromsome, but only in 10-20% of F8 cells. These observations demonstrate different integration patterns of HBV and DNA in two subclones derived from a transfected cell line and suggest that the amount of integrated HBV DNA is proportional to the amount of HBV antigens produced

  12. Molecular genetic transfection of the coccidian parasite Sarcocystis neurona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaji, Rajshekhar Y; Zhang, Deqing; Breathnach, Cormac C; Vaishnava, Shipra; Striepen, Boris; Howe, Daniel K

    2006-11-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is an apicomplexan parasite that is the major cause of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). The biology of this pathogen remains poorly understood in part due to unavailability of molecular genetic tools. Hence, with an objective to develop DNA transfection capabilities for S. neurona, the 5' flanking region of the SnSAG1 gene was isolated from a genomic library and used to construct expression plasmids. In transient assays, the reporter molecules beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) could be detected in electroporated S. neurona, thereby confirming the feasibility of transgene expression in this organism. Stable transformation of S. neurona was achieved using a mutant dihydrofolate reductase thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) gene of Toxoplasma gondii that confers resistance to pyrimethamine. This selection system was used to create transgenic S. neurona that stably express beta-gal and YFP. As shown in this study, these transgenic clones can be useful for analyzing growth rate of parasites in vitro and for assessing drug sensitivities. More importantly, the DNA transfection methods described herein should greatly facilitate studies examining intracellular parasitism by this important coccidian pathogen.

  13. Alloreactive natural killer cells for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia: from stem cell transplantation to adoptive immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana eRuggeri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer cells express activating and inhibitory receptors which recognize MHC class I alleles, termed Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIRs. Preclinical and clinical data from haploidentical T-cell depleted stem cell transplantation have demonstrated that alloreactive KIR-L mismatched natural killer cells play a major role as effectors against acute myeloid leukemia. Outside the transplantation setting, several reports have proven the safety and feasibility of natural killer cell infusion in acute myeloid leukemia patients and, in some cases, provided evidence that transferred NK cells are functionally alloreactive and may have a role in disease control. Aim of the present work is to briefly summarize the most recent advances in the field by moving from the first preclinical and clinical demonstration of donor NK alloreactivity in the transplantation setting to the most recent attempts of exploiting the use of alloreactive NK cell infusion as a means of adoptive immunotherapy against acute myeloid leukemia. Altogether, these data highlight the pivotal role of NK cells for the development of novel immunological approaches in the clinical management of acute myeloid leukemia.

  14. KILLER CELL IMMUNOGLOBULIN-LIKE RECEPTOR GENES AND THEIR HLA-C LIGANDS IN HASHIMOTO THYROIDITIS IN A CHINESE POPULATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Ting; Guo, Cheng; Li, Ming-Long; Wei, Yong-Qing; Hou, Yan-Feng; Jiao, Yu-Lian; Zhao, Yue-Ran; Sun, Hui; Xu, Jin; Cao, Ming-Feng; Feng, Li; Yu, Gui-Na; Gao, Ling; Liu, Yi-Qing; Zhang, Bing-Chang; Zhao, Jia-Jun; Zhang, Hai-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells serve as primary immune surveillance and are partially regulated by combinations of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and their human leukocyte antigen-C (HLA-C) ligands. Alterations in NK cell activity have been associated with Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT). The aim of this study was to determine whether certain KIR/HLA-C genotype combinations play a role in HT pathogenesis. The present study enrolled 107 unrelated HT patients and 108 random healthy individuals in a case-control study. Blood was collected for DNA extraction; typing of KIR genes and HLA-C alleles was performed by polymerase chain reaction with sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP), followed by electrophoresis on agarose gels. Among a panel of KIR2D/HLA-C genotype combinations, the frequency of KIR2DS2/HLA-C1 was significantly increased in HT patients compared to controls (33.64% vs. 12.96%, PHashimoto thyroiditis KIR = killer immunoglobulin-like receptor NK = natural killer PCR = polymerase chain reaction.

  15. Photobiomodulation on KATP Channels of Kir6.2-Transfected HEK-293 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-qing Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channel couples cell metabolism to excitability. To explore role of KATP channels in cellular photobiomodulation, we designed experiment to study effect of low intensity 808 nm laser irradiation on the activity of membrane KATP channel. Study Design/Materials and Methods. Plasmids encoding Kir6.2 was constructed and heterologously expressed in cultured mammalian HEK-293 cells. The patch-clamp and data acquisition systems were used to record KATP channel current before and after irradiation. A laser beam of Ga-As 808 nm at 5 mW/cm2 was used in experiments. A one-way ANOVA test followed by a post hoc Student-Newman-Keuls test was used to assess the statistical differences between data groups. Results. Obvious openings of KATP channels of Kir6.2-transfected HEK-293 cells and excised patches were recorded during and after low intensity 808 nm laser irradiation. Compared with the channels that did not undergo irradiation, open probability, current amplitude, and dwell time of KATP channels after irradiation improved. Conclusions. Low intensity 808 nm laser irradiation may activate membrane KATP channels of Kir6.2-transfected HEK-293 cells and in excised patches.

  16. Transfection of the Human Heme Oxygenase Gene Into Rabbit Coronary Microvessel Endothelial Cells: Protective Effect Against Heme and Hemoglobin Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, N. G.; Lavrovsky, Y.; Schwartzman, M. L.; Stoltz, R. A.; Levere, R. D.; Gerritsen, M. E.

    1995-07-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is a stress protein and has been suggested to participate in defense mechanisms against agents that may induce oxidative injury such as metals, endotoxin, heme/hemoglobin, and various cytokines. Overexpression of HO in cells might therefore protect against oxidative stress produced by certain of these agents, specifically heme and hemoglobin, by catalyzing their degradation to bilirubin, which itself has antioxidant properties. We report here the successful in vitro transfection of rabbit coronary microvessel endothelial cells with a functioning gene encoding the human HO enzyme. A plasmid containing the cytomegalovirus promoter and the human HO cDNA complexed to cationic liposomes (Lipofectin) was used to transfect rabbit endothelial cells. Cells transfected with human HO exhibited an ≈3.0-fold increase in enzyme activity and expressed a severalfold induction of human HO mRNA as compared with endogenous rabbit HO mRNA. Transfected and nontransfected cells expressed factor VIII antigen and exhibited similar acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake (two important features that characterize endothelial cells) with >85% of cells staining positive for each marker. Moreover, cells transfected with the human HO gene acquired substantial resistance to toxicity produced by exposure to recombinant hemoglobin and heme as compared with nontransfected cells. The protective effect of HO overexpression against heme/hemoglobin toxicity in endothelial cells shown in these studies provides direct evidence that the inductive response of human HO to such injurious stimuli represents an important tissue adaptive mechanism for moderating the severity of cell damage produced by these blood components.

  17. Transfected Babesia bovis Expressing a Tick GST as a Live Vector Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldiges, Daiane P.; Laughery, Jacob M.; Tagliari, Nelson Junior; Leite Filho, Ronaldo Viana; Davis, William C.; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Termignoni, Carlos; Knowles, Donald P.; Suarez, Carlos E.

    2016-01-01

    The Rhipicephalus microplus tick is a notorious blood-feeding ectoparasite of livestock, especially cattle, responsible for massive losses in animal production. It is the main vector for transmission of pathogenic bacteria and parasites, including Babesia bovis, an intraerythrocytic apicomplexan protozoan parasite responsible for bovine Babesiosis. This study describes the development and testing of a live B. bovis vaccine expressing the protective tick antigen glutathione-S-transferase from Haemaphysalis longicornis (HlGST). The B. bovis S74-T3B parasites were electroporated with a plasmid containing the bidirectional Ef-1α (elongation factor 1 alpha) promoter of B. bovis controlling expression of two independent genes, the selectable marker GFP-BSD (green fluorescent protein–blasticidin deaminase), and HlGST fused to the MSA-1 (merozoite surface antigen 1) signal peptide from B. bovis. Electroporation followed by blasticidin selection resulted in the emergence of a mixed B. bovis transfected line (termed HlGST) in in vitro cultures, containing parasites with distinct patterns of insertion of both exogenous genes, either in or outside the Ef-1α locus. A B. bovis clonal line termed HlGST-Cln expressing intracellular GFP and HlGST in the surface of merozoites was then derived from the mixed parasite line HlGST using a fluorescent activated cell sorter. Two independent calf immunization trials were performed via intravenous inoculation of the HlGST-Cln and a previously described control consisting of an irrelevant transfected clonal line of B. bovis designated GFP-Cln. The control GFP-Cln line contains a copy of the GFP-BSD gene inserted into the Ef-1α locus of B. bovis in an identical fashion as the HIGST-Cln parasites. All animals inoculated with the HlGST-Cln and GFP-Cln transfected parasites developed mild babesiosis. Tick egg fertility and fully engorged female tick weight was reduced significantly in R. microplus feeding on HlGST-Cln-immunized calves

  18. Transfected Babesia bovis Expressing a Tick GST as a Live Vector Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane P Oldiges

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Rhipicephalus microplus tick is a notorious blood-feeding ectoparasite of livestock, especially cattle, responsible for massive losses in animal production. It is the main vector for transmission of pathogenic bacteria and parasites, including Babesia bovis, an intraerythrocytic apicomplexan protozoan parasite responsible for bovine Babesiosis. This study describes the development and testing of a live B. bovis vaccine expressing the protective tick antigen glutathione-S-transferase from Haemaphysalis longicornis (HlGST. The B. bovis S74-T3B parasites were electroporated with a plasmid containing the bidirectional Ef-1α (elongation factor 1 alpha promoter of B. bovis controlling expression of two independent genes, the selectable marker GFP-BSD (green fluorescent protein-blasticidin deaminase, and HlGST fused to the MSA-1 (merozoite surface antigen 1 signal peptide from B. bovis. Electroporation followed by blasticidin selection resulted in the emergence of a mixed B. bovis transfected line (termed HlGST in in vitro cultures, containing parasites with distinct patterns of insertion of both exogenous genes, either in or outside the Ef-1α locus. A B. bovis clonal line termed HlGST-Cln expressing intracellular GFP and HlGST in the surface of merozoites was then derived from the mixed parasite line HlGST using a fluorescent activated cell sorter. Two independent calf immunization trials were performed via intravenous inoculation of the HlGST-Cln and a previously described control consisting of an irrelevant transfected clonal line of B. bovis designated GFP-Cln. The control GFP-Cln line contains a copy of the GFP-BSD gene inserted into the Ef-1α locus of B. bovis in an identical fashion as the HIGST-Cln parasites. All animals inoculated with the HlGST-Cln and GFP-Cln transfected parasites developed mild babesiosis. Tick egg fertility and fully engorged female tick weight was reduced significantly in R. microplus feeding on Hl

  19. Transfection using hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in the inner ear via an intact round window membrane in chinchilla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xuewen; Ding Dalian; Jiang Haiyan; XingXiaowei; Huang, Suping; Liu Hong; Chen Zhedong; Sun Hong

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAT) are known to have excellent biocompatibility, and have attracted increasing attention as new candidates of non-viral vectors for gene therapy. In our previous studies, nHAT carrying a therapeutic gene and a reporter gene were successfully transfected into the spiral ganglion neurons in the inner ear of guinea pigs in vivo as well as in the cultured cell lines, although the transfection efficiencies were never higher than 30%. In this study, the surface modification of nHAT with polyethylenimine (PEI) was made (PEI–nHAT, diameter = 73.09 ± 27.32 nm) and a recombinant plasmid carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) gene was constructed as pEGFPC2–NT3. The PEI modified nHAT and the recombinant plasmid was then connected to form the nHAT-based vector–gene complex (PEI–nHAT–pEGFPC2–NT3). This complex was then placed onto the intact round window membranes of the chinchillas for inner ear transfection. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) was tested to evaluate auditory function. Green fluorescence of EGFP was observed using confocal microscopy 48 h after administering vector–gene complexes. There was no significant threshold shift in tone burst-evoked ABR at any tested frequency. Abundant, condensed green fluorescence was found in dark cells on both sides of the crista and around the macula of the utricle. Scattered EGFP signals were also detected in vestibular hair cells, some Schwann cells in the cochlear spiral ganglion region, some outer pillar cells in the organ of Corti, and a few cells in the stria vascularis. The density of green fluorescence-marked cells was obviously higher in the vestibular dark cell area than in other areas of the inner ear, suggesting that vestibular dark cells may have the ability to actively engulf the nHAT-based vector–gene complexes. Considering the high transfection efficiency in the vestibular system, PEI–nHAT may be a potential vector for

  20. Transfection using hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in the inner ear via an intact round window membrane in chinchilla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Xuewen; Ding Dalian [Central South University, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, The Third Xiangya Hospital (China); Jiang Haiyan [State University of New York at Buffalo, Center for Hearing and Deafness (United States); XingXiaowei [Central South University, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, The Third Xiangya Hospital (China); Huang, Suping [Central South University, State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy (China); Liu Hong [Central South University, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, The Third Xiangya Hospital (China); Chen Zhedong [Central South University, State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy (China); Sun Hong, E-mail: shjhaj@vip.163.com [Central South University, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Xiangya Hospital (China)

    2012-01-15

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAT) are known to have excellent biocompatibility, and have attracted increasing attention as new candidates of non-viral vectors for gene therapy. In our previous studies, nHAT carrying a therapeutic gene and a reporter gene were successfully transfected into the spiral ganglion neurons in the inner ear of guinea pigs in vivo as well as in the cultured cell lines, although the transfection efficiencies were never higher than 30%. In this study, the surface modification of nHAT with polyethylenimine (PEI) was made (PEI-nHAT, diameter = 73.09 {+-} 27.32 nm) and a recombinant plasmid carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) gene was constructed as pEGFPC2-NT3. The PEI modified nHAT and the recombinant plasmid was then connected to form the nHAT-based vector-gene complex (PEI-nHAT-pEGFPC2-NT3). This complex was then placed onto the intact round window membranes of the chinchillas for inner ear transfection. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) was tested to evaluate auditory function. Green fluorescence of EGFP was observed using confocal microscopy 48 h after administering vector-gene complexes. There was no significant threshold shift in tone burst-evoked ABR at any tested frequency. Abundant, condensed green fluorescence was found in dark cells on both sides of the crista and around the macula of the utricle. Scattered EGFP signals were also detected in vestibular hair cells, some Schwann cells in the cochlear spiral ganglion region, some outer pillar cells in the organ of Corti, and a few cells in the stria vascularis. The density of green fluorescence-marked cells was obviously higher in the vestibular dark cell area than in other areas of the inner ear, suggesting that vestibular dark cells may have the ability to actively engulf the nHAT-based vector-gene complexes. Considering the high transfection efficiency in the vestibular system, PEI-nHAT may be a potential vector for gene therapy of

  1. Unraveling Natural Killer T-Cells Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bianca Bennstein

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T-cells are a subset of innate-like T-cells with the ability to bridge innate and adaptive immunity. There is great interest in harnessing these cells to improve tumor therapy; however, greater understanding of invariant NKT (iNKT cell biology is needed. The first step is to learn more about NKT development within the thymus. Recent studies suggest lineage separation of murine iNKT cells into iNKT1, iNKT2, and iNKT17 cells instead of shared developmental stages. This review will focus on these new studies and will discuss the evidence for lineage separation in contrast to shared developmental stages. The author will also highlight the classifications of murine iNKT cells according to identified transcription factors and cytokine production, and will discuss transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations, and the role of mammalian target of rapamycin. Finally, the importance of these findings for human cancer therapy will be briefly discussed.

  2. Natural Killer cells and liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eFasbender

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 40 years since the discovery of Natural Killer (NK cells it has been well established that these innate lymphocytes are important for early and effective immune responses against transformed cells and infections with different pathogens. In addition to these classical functions of NK cells, we now know that they are part of a larger family of innate lymphoid cells and that they can even mediate memory-like responses. Additionally, tissue resident NK cells with distinct phenotypical and functional characteristics have been identified. Here we focus on the phenotype of different NK cell subpopulations that can be found in the liver and summarize the current knowledge about the functional role of these cells with a special emphasis on liver fibrosis. NK cell cytotoxicity can contribute to liver damage in different forms of liver disease. However, NK cells can limit liver fibrosis by killing hepatic stellate cell-derived myofibroblasts, which play a key role in this pathogenic process. Therefore, liver NK cells need to be tightly regulated in order to balance these beneficial and pathological effects.

  3. The effect of ionizing radiation and bleomycin on transfecting ability of Bacillus subtilis phage DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schafers, F.; Kohnlein, W.

    1979-01-01

    Infectious DNA of Bacillus subtilis phage 029 and SPP1 has been subjected to ionizing radiation and/or bleomycin treatment. The extent of degradation of the treated DNA was determined on sucrose gradients and biological activity was analyzed using the transfection principle. It was found that loss of biological activity following irradiation or bleomycin treatment of the DNA cannot be accounted for by the production of single- or double-strand breaks. Furthermore, it was observed that pre-irradiation exhibits a synergistic effect on loss of biological activity and production of strand breaks following bleomycin treatment. The authors propose here a simple system capable of detecting biological damage in DNA following irradiation doses as low as 0.5 Gy prior to bleomycin treatment. (Auth.)

  4. Interactions between human mesenchymal stem cells and natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulou, Panagiota A; Perez, Sonia A; Gritzapis, Angelos D; Baxevanis, Constantin N; Papamichail, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitor cells representing an attractive therapeutic tool for regenerative medicine. They possess unique immunomodulatory properties, being capable of suppressing T-cell responses and modifying dendritic cell differentiation, maturation, and function, whereas they are not inherently immunogenic, failing to induce alloreactivity to T cells and freshly isolated natural killer (NK) cells. To clarify the generation of host immune responses to implanted MSCs in tissue engineering and their potential use as immunosuppressive elements, the effect of MSCs on NK cells was investigated. We demonstrate that at low NK-to-MSC ratios, MSCs alter the phenotype of NK cells and suppress proliferation, cytokine secretion, and cyto-toxicity against HLA-class I- expressing targets. Some of these effects require cell-to-cell contact, whereas others are mediated by soluble factors, including transforming growth factor-beta1 and prostaglandin E2, suggesting the existence of diverse mechanisms for MSC-mediated NK-cell suppression. On the other hand, MSCs are susceptible to lysis by activated NK cells. Overall, these data improve our knowledge of interactions between MSCs and NK cells and consequently of their effect on innate immune responses and their contribution to the regulation of adaptive immunity, graft rejection, and cancer immunotherapy.

  5. rRNA fragmentation induced by a yeast killer toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Alene; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2014-02-01

    Virus like dsDNA elements (VLE) in yeast were previously shown to encode the killer toxins PaT and zymocin, which target distinct tRNA species via specific anticodon nuclease (ACNase) activities. Here, we characterize a third member of the VLE-encoded toxins, PiT from Pichia inositovora, and identify PiOrf4 as the cytotoxic subunit by conditional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to the tRNA targeting toxins, however, neither a change of the wobble uridine modification status by introduction of elp3 or trm9 mutations nor tRNA overexpression rescued from PiOrf4 toxicity. Consistent with a distinct RNA target, expression of PiOrf4 causes specific fragmentation of the 25S and 18S rRNA. A stable cleavage product comprising the first ∼ 130 nucleotides of the 18S rRNA was purified and characterized by linker ligation and subsequent reverse transcription; 3'-termini were mapped to nucleotide 131 and 132 of the 18S rRNA sequence, a region showing some similarity to the anticodon loop of tRNA(Glu)(UUC), the zymocin target. PiOrf4 residues Glu9 and His214, corresponding to catalytic sites Glu9 and His209 in the ACNase subunit of zymocin are essential for in vivo toxicity and rRNA fragmentation, raising the possibility of functionally conserved RNase modules in both proteins. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. SRKW seasonal occurence - Patterns of seasonal occurrence of Southern Resident Killer Whales

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Patterns of seasonal occurrence of Southern Resident Killer Whales (SRKW) throughout their range. Southern Resident Killer Whales are listed as a Distinct Population...

  7. Enhanced transfection by antioxidative polymeric gene carrier that reduces polyplex-mediated cellular oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Sang; Kim, Nak Won; Lee, Kyuri; Kim, Hongtae; Jeong, Ji Hoon

    2013-06-01

    To test the hypothesis in which polyplex-induced oxidative stress may affect overall transfection efficiency, an antioxidative transfection system minimizing cellular oxidative stress was designed for enhanced transfection. An amphiphilic copolymer (PEI-PLGA) was synthesized and used as a micelle-type gene carrier containing hydrophobic antioxidant, α-tocopherol. Cellular oxidative stress and the change of mitochondrial membrane potential after transfection was measured by using a fluorescent probe (H₂DCFDA) and lipophilic cationic probe (JC-1), respectively. Transfection efficiency was determined by measuring a reporter gene (luciferase) expression level. The initial transfection study with conventional PEI/plasmid DNA polyplex showed significant generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The PEI-PLGA copolymer successfully carried out the simultaneous delivery of α-tocopherol and plasmid DNA (PEI-PLGA/Toco/pDNA polyplex) into cells, resulting in a significant reduction in cellular ROS generation after transfection and helped to maintain the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ). In addition, the transfection efficiency was dramatically increased using the antioxidative transfection system. This work showed that oxidative stress would be one of the important factors that should be considered in designing non-viral gene carriers and suggested a possible way to reduce the carrier-mediated oxidative stress, which consequently leads to enhanced transfection.

  8. Specific transfection of inflamed brain by macrophages: a new therapeutic strategy for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Haney

    Full Text Available The ability to precisely upregulate genes in inflamed brain holds great therapeutic promise. Here we report a novel class of vectors, genetically modified macrophages that carry reporter and therapeutic genes to neural cells. Systemic administration of macrophages transfected ex vivo with a plasmid DNA (pDNA encoding a potent antioxidant enzyme, catalase, produced month-long expression levels of catalase in the brain resulting in three-fold reductions in inflammation and complete neuroprotection in mouse models of Parkinson's disease (PD. This resulted in significant improvements in motor functions in PD mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that transfected macrophages secreted extracellular vesicles, exosomes, packed with catalase genetic material, pDNA and mRNA, active catalase, and NF-κb, a transcription factor involved in the encoded gene expression. Exosomes efficiently transfer their contents to contiguous neurons resulting in de novo protein synthesis in target cells. Thus, genetically modified macrophages serve as a highly efficient system for reproduction, packaging, and targeted gene and drug delivery to treat inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. Recruitment of SHP-1 protein tyrosine phosphatase and signalling by a chimeric T-cell receptor-killer inhibitory receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M D; Geisler, C

    2000-01-01

    Receptors expressing the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) in their cytoplasmic tail play an important role in the negative regulation of natural killer and B-cell activation. A subpopulation of T cells expresses the ITIM containing killer cell inhibitory receptor (KIR), which...... recognize MHC class I molecules. Following coligation of KIR with an activating receptor, the tyrosine in the ITIM is phosphorylated and the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 is recruited to the ITIM via its SH2 domains. It is still not clear how SHP-1 affects T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling...... regarding total protein tyrosine phosphorylation, TCR down-regulation, mobilization of intracellular free calcium, or induction of the activation markers CD69 and CD25....

  10. 50 CFR 226.206 - Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... killer whale (Orcinus orca). 226.206 Section 226.206 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES... CRITICAL HABITAT § 226.206 Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca). Critical habitat is designated for the Southern Resident killer whale as described in this section. The textual...

  11. Spatial and Temporal Control of Cavitation Allows High In Vitro Transfection Efficiency in the Absence of Transfection Reagents or Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chettab, Kamel; Roux, Stéphanie; Mathé, Doriane; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Lafond, Maxime; Lafon, Cyril; Dumontet, Charles; Mestas, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Sonoporation using low-frequency high-pressure ultrasound (US) is a non-viral approach for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. In this study, we developed a new sonoporation device designed for spatial and temporal control of ultrasound cavitation. The regulation system incorporated in the device allowed a real-time control of the cavitation level during sonoporation. This device was evaluated for the in vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid coding for Green Fluorescent Protein (pEGFP-C1) in adherent and non-adherent cell lines. The transfection efficiency of the device was compared to those observed with lipofection and nucleofection methods. In both adherent and non-adherent cell lines, the sonoporation device allowed high rate of transfection of pEGFP-C1 (40–80%), as determined by flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression, along with a low rate of mortality assessed by propidium iodide staining. The transfection efficiency and toxicity of sonoporation on the non-adherent cell lines Jurkat and K562 were similar to those of nucleofection, while these two cell lines were resistant to transfection by lipofection. Moreover, sonoporation was used to produce three stably transfected human lymphoma and leukemia lines. Significant transfection efficiency was also observed in two fresh samples of human acute myeloid leukemia cells. In conclusion, we developed a user-friendly and cost-effective ultrasound device, well adapted for routine in vitro high-yield transfection experiments and which does not require the use of any transfection reagent or gas micro-bubbles. PMID:26274324

  12. Spatial and Temporal Control of Cavitation Allows High In Vitro Transfection Efficiency in the Absence of Transfection Reagents or Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chettab, Kamel; Roux, Stéphanie; Mathé, Doriane; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Lafond, Maxime; Lafon, Cyril; Dumontet, Charles; Mestas, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Sonoporation using low-frequency high-pressure ultrasound (US) is a non-viral approach for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. In this study, we developed a new sonoporation device designed for spatial and temporal control of ultrasound cavitation. The regulation system incorporated in the device allowed a real-time control of the cavitation level during sonoporation. This device was evaluated for the in vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid coding for Green Fluorescent Protein (pEGFP-C1) in adherent and non-adherent cell lines. The transfection efficiency of the device was compared to those observed with lipofection and nucleofection methods. In both adherent and non-adherent cell lines, the sonoporation device allowed high rate of transfection of pEGFP-C1 (40-80%), as determined by flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression, along with a low rate of mortality assessed by propidium iodide staining. The transfection efficiency and toxicity of sonoporation on the non-adherent cell lines Jurkat and K562 were similar to those of nucleofection, while these two cell lines were resistant to transfection by lipofection. Moreover, sonoporation was used to produce three stably transfected human lymphoma and leukemia lines. Significant transfection efficiency was also observed in two fresh samples of human acute myeloid leukemia cells. In conclusion, we developed a user-friendly and cost-effective ultrasound device, well adapted for routine in vitro high-yield transfection experiments and which does not require the use of any transfection reagent or gas micro-bubbles.

  13. Spatial and Temporal Control of Cavitation Allows High In Vitro Transfection Efficiency in the Absence of Transfection Reagents or Contrast Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Chettab

    Full Text Available Sonoporation using low-frequency high-pressure ultrasound (US is a non-viral approach for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. In this study, we developed a new sonoporation device designed for spatial and temporal control of ultrasound cavitation. The regulation system incorporated in the device allowed a real-time control of the cavitation level during sonoporation. This device was evaluated for the in vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid coding for Green Fluorescent Protein (pEGFP-C1 in adherent and non-adherent cell lines. The transfection efficiency of the device was compared to those observed with lipofection and nucleofection methods. In both adherent and non-adherent cell lines, the sonoporation device allowed high rate of transfection of pEGFP-C1 (40-80%, as determined by flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression, along with a low rate of mortality assessed by propidium iodide staining. The transfection efficiency and toxicity of sonoporation on the non-adherent cell lines Jurkat and K562 were similar to those of nucleofection, while these two cell lines were resistant to transfection by lipofection. Moreover, sonoporation was used to produce three stably transfected human lymphoma and leukemia lines. Significant transfection efficiency was also observed in two fresh samples of human acute myeloid leukemia cells. In conclusion, we developed a user-friendly and cost-effective ultrasound device, well adapted for routine in vitro high-yield transfection experiments and which does not require the use of any transfection reagent or gas micro-bubbles.

  14. In vitro studies of magnetically enhanced transfection in COS-7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, D.; Tay, C.Y.; Tan, L.P.; Preiser, P.R.; Ramanujan, R.V.

    2011-01-01

    In the magnetically enhanced gene delivery technique, DNA complexed with polymer coated aggregated magnetic nanoparticles (AMNPs) is used for effecting transfection. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between transfection efficiency and the physical characteristics of the polymer coated AMNPs. In vitro studies of transfection efficiency in COS-7 cells were carried out using pEGFP-N1 and pMIR-REPORT complexed polyethylenimine (PEI) coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles. PEI coated AMNPs (PEI-AMNPs) with average individual particle diameters in the range of 8 nm to 30 nm were studied and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, X-ray diffractometry, thermal gravimetric analysis and photon correlation spectroscopy methods. PEI-A8MNP and PEI-A30MNP yielded higher transfection efficiency compared to commercial polyMAG particles as well as PEI of equivalent molar ratio of nitrogen/phosphorous (N/P ratio). The transfection efficiency was related to the physical characteristics of the PEI-AMNPs and its complexes: transfection efficiency was strongly positively correlated with saturation magnetization (Ms) and susceptibility (χ), strongly negatively correlated with N/P ratio, moderately positively correlated to zeta potential and moderately negatively correlated to hydrodynamic diameter of the complex. PEI-A8MNP and PEI-A30MNP possessing higher Ms, χ, lower N/P ratio and smaller complex size exhibited higher transfection efficiency compared to PEI-A16MNP which have weaker magnetic properties, higher N/P ratio and larger complex size. We have demonstrated that optimization of the physical properties of PEI-AMNPs is needed to maximize transfection efficiency. - Research highlights: →The transfection efficiency in magnetically enhanced gene delivery was studied. →Transfection efficiency was strongly positively correlated to magnetic properties. →Transfection efficiency was strongly negatively correlated with

  15. Role of Natural Killer and Dendritic Cell Crosstalk in Immunomodulation by Commensal Bacteria Probiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzello, Valeria; Bonaccorsi, Irene; Dongarra, Maria Luisa

    2011-01-01

    A cooperative dialogue between natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DCs) has been elucidated in the last years. They help each other to acquire their complete functions, both in the periphery and in the secondary lymphoid organs. Thus, NK cells' activation by dendritic cells allows the ......-dependent immunomodulatory effects. We particularly aim to highlight the ability of distinct species of commensal bacterial probiotics to differently affect the outcome of DC/NK cross-talk and consequently to differently influence the polarization of the adaptive immune response....

  16. Efficient transfection of DNA into primarily cultured rat sertoli cells by electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuping; Yamaguchi, Kohei; Okada, Keisuke; Matsushita, Kei; Enatsu, Noritoshi; Chiba, Koji; Yue, Huanxun; Fujisawa, Masato

    2013-03-01

    The expression of exogenous DNA in Sertoli cells is essential for studying its functional genomics, pathway analysis, and medical applications. Electroporation is a valuable tool for nucleic acid delivery, even in primarily cultured cells, which are considered difficult to transfect. In this study, we developed an optimized protocol for electroporation-based transfection of Sertoli cells and compared its efficiency with conventional lipofection. Sertoli cells were transfected with pCMV-GFP plasmid by square-wave electroporation under different conditions. After transfection of plasmid into Sertoli cells, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression could be easily detected by fluorescent microscopy, and cell survival was evaluated by dye exclusion assay using Trypan blue. In terms of both cell survival and the percentage expressing EGFP, 250 V was determined to produce the greatest number of transiently transfected cells. Keeping the voltage constant (250 V), relatively high cell survival (76.5% ± 3.4%) and transfection efficiency (30.6% ± 5.6%) were observed with a pulse length of 20 μm. The number of pulses significantly affected cell survival and EGFP expression (P transfection methods, the transfection efficiency of electroporation (21.5% ± 5.7%) was significantly higher than those of Lipofectamine 2000 (2.9% ± 1.0%) and Effectene (1.9% ± 0.8%) in this experiment (P transfection of Sertoli cells.

  17. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, M; Ratho, R; Chawla, Y; Singh, M P

    2014-01-01

    The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA) and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET) technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures.

  18. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Majumdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P < 0.0001, even at a low concentration of 40 picomoles without affecting the cell viability. Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures.

  19. NATURAL KILLER T CELLS IN HEPATIC LEUCOCYTE INFILTRATES IN PATIENTS WITH MALIGNANT PROCESS AND VIRAL HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Lebedinskaya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphology, topography, and immunohistochemical features of leukocyte infiltrates were studied in various sites of the liver samples from the patients with metastatic disease, been affected by hepatitis B and C viruses at different degree of activity. Liver of СВА mice with implanted САО-1 tumour was also under study. Histochemical, and functional features, as well as immune phenotype of these cells were investigated. It has been shown that the major fraction of leukocyte infiltrates, mostly associated with implanted tumours in experimental mice, and in the areas adjacent to the tumor in humans, like as on the peak of viral hepatitis activity, is composed of lymphocytes. They are presented by large numvers of activated proliferating and differentiating cells bearing specific antigens, as well as natural killers and T-lymphocytes, possessing high-level killer activity towards NK-sensitive, and autologous lines of cancer cells. Hence, the results of our study, generally, confirm the data from literature reporting on existence of a special lymphocyte subpopulation, NKT cells, in human or murine liver affected by hepatitis virus or malignant tumors. The data concerning functional properties of these cells may be used for development of immunotherapy methods of viral diseases and oncological conditions complicated by liver metastases.

  20. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on natural killer cell function in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nived, O.; Johansson, I.; Sturfelt, G. (University Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Rheumatology)

    1992-06-01

    In vitro irradiation with long wavelength ultraviolet light (UV-A), in clinically relevant dosages, of a natural killer cell line containing cell preparations from 17 control subjects reduced natural killer cell cytotoxicity with the cell line K562 as target. The spontaneous function of natural killer cells from 12 patients with systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) correlated inversely with the one hour erythrocyte sedimentation rate, but not with glucocorticoid doses. After UV-A exposure, natural killer cells from patients with SLE exert either increased or decreased cytotoxicity, and the direction of change is inversely correlated with the spontaneous natural killer cell function. (Author).

  1. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on natural killer cell function in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nived, O.; Johansson, I.; Sturfelt, G.

    1992-01-01

    In vitro irradiation with long wavelength ultraviolet light (UV-A), in clinically relevant dosages, of a natural killer cell line containing cell preparations from 17 control subjects reduced natural killer cell cytotoxicity with the cell line K562 as target. The spontaneous function of natural killer cells from 12 patients with systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) correlated inversely with the one hour erythrocyte sedimentation rate, but not with glucocorticoid doses. After UV-A exposure, natural killer cells from patients with SLE exert either increased or decreased cytotoxicity, and the direction of change is inversely correlated with the spontaneous natural killer cell function. (Author)

  2. Protein-free transfection of CHO host cells with an IgG-fusion protein: selection and characterization of stable high producers and comparison to conventionally transfected clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattenmayer, Christine; Loeschel, Martina; Schriebl, Kornelia; Steinfellner, Willibald; Sterovsky, Thomas; Trummer, Evelyn; Vorauer-Uhl, Karola; Müller, Dethardt; Katinger, Hermann; Kunert, Renate

    2007-04-15

    In order to improve the current techniques of cell cultivation in the absence of serum, we have developed a protein-free transfection protocol for CHO cells, based on the Nucleofector technology. After starting with a heterogeneous pool of primary transfectants which express the fusion protein EpoFc, we isolated single clones and compared them with parallel clones generated by lipofection in serum-dependent cultivation. Our intensive characterization program was based on determination of specific productivity (q(p)) and analysis of genetic parameters. In two nucleofection experiments, transfection with 5 microg of DNA resulted in best productivities of the primary cell pools. After subcloning, the q(p) could be raised up to 27 pg x cells(-1) x day(-1). While the serum-dependent transfectants exhibited specific productivities up to 57 pg x cells(-1) x day(-1) in serum-dependent cultivation, a significant decrease that resulted in the range of q(p) of the protein-free transfectants was observed after switching to protein-free conditions. Investigation of genetic parameters revealed higher mRNA levels and gene copy numbers (GCN) for the protein-free adapted serum-dependent transfectants. Therefore, we assume that problems during protein-free adaptation (PFA) lead to a less efficient translation machinery after serum deprivation. We describe the generation of stable-producing recombinant CHO clones by protein-free transfection of a protein-free adapted host cell line, which reduces the risk of adverse clonal changes after PFA. The main advantage of this approach is the earlier predictability of clone behavior, which makes the generation of production clones by protein-free transfection, a viable and highly efficient strategy for recombinant cell line development. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A method to detect transfected chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene expression in intact animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, R.; Jastreboff, M.M.; Chiu, Chang Fang; Ito, Etsuro; Bertino, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    A rapid procedure is described for assaying chloramphenicol acetyltransferase enzyme activity in intact animals following transfection of the RSV CAT plasmid into mouse bone marrow cells by electroporation. The reconstituted mice were injected with [ 14 C]chloramphenicol and ethyl acetate extracts of 24-h urine samples were analyzed by TLC autoradiography for the excretion of 14 C-labeled metabolites. CAT expression in vivo can be detected by the presence of acetylated 14 C-labeled metabolites in the urine within 1 week after bone marrow transplantation and, under the conditions described, these metabolites can be detected for at least 3 months. CAT expression in intact mice as monitored by the urine assay correlates with the CAT expression in the hematopoietic tissues assayed in vitro. This method offers a quick mode of screening for introduced CAT gene expression in vivo without sacrificing the mice

  4. Killing defect of natural killer cells with the absence of natural killer cytotoxic factors in a child with Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiyama, A.; Kawai, H.; Yamada, S.; Kato, M.; Yanagisawa, M.; Miyagawa, Y.; Akabane, T.

    1987-01-01

    A killing defect of natural killer (NK) cells in the absence of NK cytotoxic factors (NKCF) was first demonstrated in a child with Hodgkin's disease. The patient lacked detectable NK cell activity in every phase of the disease as measured by a four-hour 51 Cr-release assay using K562 cells as a target. The percent lysis at a 40:1 effector:target ratio by the patient's lymphocytes was persistently below 0.3% as compared with the normal lymphocyte value of 46.2% +/- 5.8% (mean +/- SD). NK cell activity was not detectable at effector:target ratios of 10:1 to 80:1 and by prolongation of the incubation time, and the NK cell defect was not restored or improved by lymphocyte stimulation with polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid, interferon (IFN)-alpha, or interleukin 2 (IL 2). The numbers of Leu-7+ cells and Leu-11+ cells were normal as counted by flow cytometry. A single cell-in-agarose assay demonstrated normal numbers of target binding cells (TBCs), and they showed the morphology of large granular lymphocytes. However, there were no TBCs with dead targets. These results indicated that the patient's lymphocytes contained normal numbers of NK cells that were capable of recognizing and binding to a target but were incapable of killing the bound target cell. The patient's lymphocytes were then studied for their release of NKCF upon interaction with K562 cells. The patient's cells did not release NKCF, and the NK cell defect was not restored or improved by stimulation of the cells with IFN or IL 2. It is suggested that the deficient release of NKCF may have been related to the killing defect of the NK cells in this patient

  5. Tumor transfection after systemic injection of DNA lipid nanocapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morille, Marie; Passirani, Catherine; Dufort, Sandrine; Bastiat, Guillaume; Pitard, Bruno; Coll, Jean-Luc; Benoit, Jean-Pierre

    2011-03-01

    With the goal of generating an efficient vector for systemic gene delivery, a new kind of nanocarrier consisting of lipid nanocapsules encapsulating DOTAP/DOPE lipoplexes (DNA LNCs) was pegylated by the post-insertion of amphiphilic and flexible polymers. The aim of this surface modification was to create a long-circulating vector, able to circulate in the blood stream and efficient in transfecting tumoral cells after passive targeting by enhanced permeability and retention effect (EPR effect). PEG conformation, electrostatic features, and hydrophylicity are known to be important factors able to influence the pharmacokinetic behaviour of vectors. In this context, the surface structure characteristics of the newly pegylated DNA LNCs were studied by measuring electrophoretic mobility as a function of ionic strength in order to establish a correlation between surface properties and in vivo performance of the vector. Finally, thanks to this PEGylation, gene expression was measured up to 84-fold higher in tumor compared to other tested organs after intravenous injection. The present results indicate that PEGylated DNA LNCs are promising carriers for an efficient cancer gene therapy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Regulatory natural killer cell expression in atopic childhood asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Different subsets of natural killer (NK) cells were found to play a role in pathogenesis of allergy. We sought to investigate the expression of regulatory NK cells (CD56+CD16+CD158+) in atopic children with bronchial asthma in order to outline the value of these cells as biomarkers of disease severity and/or ...

  7. Review: Natural killer cells enhance the immune surveillance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All the cells of the immune system cooperatively work against infectious agents and cancerous cells but Natural killer (NK) cells are playing an important role to respond to tumor by enhancing the expression of complementary domain (CD86) on dendritic cells (DCs) and production of IL-12. NK cells demolished tumor ...

  8. Recognition of microbial glycolipids by Natural Killer T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Michael Zajonc

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available T cells can recognize microbial antigens when presented by dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. While peptides are presented by classical members of the Major Histocompatibility (MHC family (MHC I and II, lipids, glycolipids and lipopeptides can be presented by the non-classical MHC member CD1. The best studied subset of lipid-reactive T cells are Type I Natural killer T (iNKT cells that recognize a variety of different antigens when presented by the non-classical MHCI homolog CD1d. iNKT cells have been shown to be important for the protection against various microbial pathogens, including B. burgdorferi the causative agents of Lyme disease and S. pneumoniae, which causes pneumococcal meningitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Both pathogens carry microbial glycolipids that can trigger the T cell antigen receptor (TCR, leading to iNKT cell activation. iNKT cells have an evolutionary conserved TCR alpha chain, yet retain the ability to recognize structurally diverse glycolipids. They do so using a conserved recognition mode, in which the TCR enforces a conserved binding orientation on CD1d. TCR binding is accompanied by structural changes within the TCR binding site of CD1d, as well as the glycolipid antigen itself. In addition to direct recognition of microbial antigens, iNKT cells can also be activated by a combination of cytokines (IL-12/IL-18 and TCR stimulation. Many microbes carry TLR antigens and microbial infections can lead to TLR activation. The subsequent cytokine response in turn lower the threshold of TCR mediated iNKT cell activation, especially when weak microbial or even self-antigens are presented during the cause of the infection. In summary, iNKT cells can be directly activated through TCR triggering of strong antigens, while cytokines produced by the innate immune response may be necessary for TCR triggering and iNKT cell activation in the presence of weak antigens. Here we will review the molecular basis of iNKT cell

  9. Are natural killer cells protecting the metabolically healthy obese patient?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, Lydia A

    2012-02-01

    With the emerging obesity pandemic, identifying those who appear to be protected from adverse consequences such as type 2 diabetes and certain malignancies will become important. We propose that the circulating immune system plays a role in the development of these comorbidities. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 52 patients with severe obesity attending a hospital weight-management clinic and 11 lean healthy controls. Patients were classified into metabolically "healthy obese" (n = 26; mean age 42.6 years, mean BMI 46.8 kg\\/m(2)) or "unhealthy obese" (n = 26; mean age 45 years, mean BMI 47.5 kg\\/m(2)) groups, based upon standard cutoff points for blood pressure, lipid profile, and fasting glucose. Circulating lymphoid populations and phenotypes were assessed by flow cytometry. Obese patients had significantly less circulating natural killer (NK) and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) compared to lean controls. There were significantly higher levels of NK cells and CTLs in the healthy obese group compared to the unhealthy obese group (NK: 11.7% vs. 6.5%, P < 0.0001, CD8 13.4% vs. 9.3%, P = 0.04), independent of age and BMI and these NK cells were also less activated in the healthy compared to the unhealthy group (CD69, 4.1% vs. 11.8%, P = 0.03). This is the first time that quantitative differences in the circulating immune system of obese patients with similar BMI but different metabolic profiles have been described. The significantly higher levels of CTLs and NK cells, which express fewer inhibitory molecules, could protect against malignancy, infection, and metabolic disease seen in obesity.

  10. Biodegradable gadolinium-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers for gene transfection and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xiaolong; Wang, Gangmin; Shi, Ting; Shao, Zhihong; Zhao, Peng; Shi, Donglu; Ren, Jie; Lin, Chao; Wang, Peijun

    2016-01-01

    Theranostic nano-polyplexes containing gene and imaging agents hold a great promise for tumor diagnosis and therapy. In this work, we develop a group of new gadolinium (Gd)-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide)s for gene delivery and T 1 -weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Cationic poly(urethane amide)s (denoted as CPUAs) having multiple disulfide bonds, urethane and amide linkages were synthesized by stepwise polycondensation reaction between 1,4-bis(3-aminopropyl)piperazine and a mixture of di(4-nitrophenyl)-2, 2′-dithiodiethanocarbonate (DTDE-PNC) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) dianhydride at varied molar ratios. Then, Gd-chelated CPUAs (denoted as GdCPUAs) were produced by chelating Gd(III) ions with DTPA residues of CPUAs. These GdCPUAs could condense gene into nanosized and positively-charged polyplexes in a physiological condition and, however, liberated gene in an intracellular reductive environment. In vitro transfection experiments revealed that the GdCPUA at a DTDE-PNC/DTPA residue molar ratio of 85/15 induced the highest transfection efficiency in different cancer cells. This efficiency was higher than that yielded with 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine as a positive control. GdCPUAs and their polyplexes exhibited low cytotoxicity when an optimal transfection activity was detected. Moreover, GdCPUAs may serve as contrast agents for T 1 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The results of this work indicate that biodegradable Gd-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers have high potential for tumor theranostics. - Highlights: • Novel cationic gadolinium-chelated poly(urethane amide)s (GdCPUAs) are prepared. • GdCPUAs can induce a high transfection efficacy in different cancer cells. • GdCPUAs reveal good cyto-compatibility against cancer cells. • GdCPUAs may be applied as T 1 -contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. • GdCPUAs hold high potential for cancer theranostics.

  11. Acute pain induces an instant increase in natural killer cell cytotoxicity in humans and this response is abolished by local anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, J.; Hokland, Marianne; Grøfte, Thorbjørn

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of pain without tissue injury on natural killer (NK) cell activity in peripheral blood in humans and the effect of local anaesthesia on the response. Ten subjects were investigated during two sessions. First, self-controlled painful electric stimulation was applied...

  12. Transfection of small numbers of human endothelial cells by electroporation and synthetic amphiphiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, E B; van der Veen, A Y; Hoekstra, D; Engberts, J B; Halie, M R; van der Meer, J; Ruiters, M H

    OBJECTIVES: This study compared the efficiency of electroporation and synthetic amphiphiles. (SAINT-2pp/DOPE) in transfecting small numbers of human endothelial cells. METHODS AND RESULTS: Optimal transfection conditions were tested and appeared to be 400 V and 960 microF for electroporation and a

  13. Non-Viral Transfection Methods Optimized for Gene Delivery to a Lung Cancer Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimzadeh, Loghman; Jaberipour, Mansooreh; Hosseini, Ahmad; Ghaderi, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Background Mehr-80 is a newly established adherent human large cell lung cancer cell line that has not been transfected until now. This study aims to define the optimal transfection conditions and effects of some critical elements for enhancing gene delivery to this cell line by utilizing different non-viral transfection Procedures. Methods In the current study, calcium phosphate (CaP), DEAE-dextran, superfect, electroporation and lipofection transfection methods were used to optimize delivery of a plasmid construct that expressed Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). Transgene expression was detected by fluorescent microscopy and flowcytometry. Toxicities of the methods were estimated by trypan blue staining. In order to evaluate the density of the transfected gene, we used a plasmid construct that expressed the Stromal cell-Derived Factor-1 (SDF-1) gene and measured its expression by real-time PCR. Results Mean levels of GFP-expressing cells 48 hr after transfection were 8.4% (CaP), 8.2% (DEAE-dextran), 4.9% (superfect), 34.1% (electroporation), and 40.1% (lipofection). Lipofection had the highest intense SDF-1 expression of the analyzed methods. Conclusion This study has shown that the lipofection and electroporation methods were more efficient at gene delivery to Mehr-80 cells. The quantity of DNA per transfection, reagent concentration, and incubation time were identified as essential factors for successful transfection in all of the studied methods. PMID:23799175

  14. Non-viral transfection methods optimized for gene delivery to a lung cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimzadeh, Loghman; Jaberipour, Mansooreh; Hosseini, Ahmad; Ghaderi, Abbas

    2013-04-01

    Mehr-80 is a newly established adherent human large cell lung cancer cell line that has not been transfected until now. This study aims to define the optimal transfection conditions and effects of some critical elements for enhancing gene delivery to this cell line by utilizing different non-viral transfection Procedures. In the current study, calcium phosphate (CaP), DEAE-dextran, superfect, electroporation and lipofection transfection methods were used to optimize delivery of a plasmid construct that expressed Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). Transgene expression was detected by fluorescent microscopy and flowcytometry. Toxicities of the methods were estimated by trypan blue staining. In order to evaluate the density of the transfected gene, we used a plasmid construct that expressed the Stromal cell-Derived Factor-1 (SDF-1) gene and measured its expression by real-time PCR. Mean levels of GFP-expressing cells 48 hr after transfection were 8.4% (CaP), 8.2% (DEAE-dextran), 4.9% (superfect), 34.1% (electroporation), and 40.1% (lipofection). Lipofection had the highest intense SDF-1 expression of the analyzed methods. This study has shown that the lipofection and electroporation methods were more efficient at gene delivery to Mehr-80 cells. The quantity of DNA per transfection, reagent concentration, and incubation time were identified as essential factors for successful transfection in all of the studied methods.

  15. Effect of albumin and dextrose concentration on ultrasound and microbubble mediated gene transfection in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Richard J; Mulvana, Helen; Tang, Meng-Xing; Hajnal, Jo V; Wells, Dominic J; Eckersley, Robert J

    2012-06-01

    Ultrasound and microbubble mediated gene transfection has great potential for site-selective, safe gene delivery. Albumin-based microbubbles have shown the greatest transfection efficiency but have not been optimised specifically for this purpose. Additionally, few studies have highlighted desirable properties for transfection specific microbubbles. In this article, microbubbles were made with 2% or 5% (w/v) albumin and 20% or 40% (w/v) dextrose solutions, yielding four distinct bubble types. These were acoustically characterised and their efficiency in transfecting a luciferase plasmid (pGL4.13) into female, CD1 mice myocardia was measured. For either albumin concentration, increasing the dextrose concentration increased scattering, attenuation and resistance to ultrasound, resulting in significantly increased transfection. A significant interaction was noted between albumin and dextrose; 2% albumin bubbles made with 20% dextrose showed the least transfection but the most transfection with 40% dextrose. This trend was seen for both nonlinear scattering and attenuation behaviour but not for resistance to ultrasound or total scatter. We have determined that the attenuation behaviour is an important microbubble characteristic for effective gene transfection using ultrasound. Microbubble behaviour can also be simply controlled by altering the initial ingredients used during manufacture. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Targeted surface expression of an exogenous antigen in stably transfected babesia bovis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babesia bovis is a tick-borne intraerythocytic protozoan responsible for acute disease in cattle which can be controlled by vaccination with attenuated B. bovis strains. Emerging B. bovis transfection technologies may increase the usefulness of these live vaccines. Here we propose using transfected ...

  17. Spontaneous gene transfection of human bone cells using 3D mineralized alginate-chitosan macrocapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W; Kim, Eun-Jung; Jung, Han-Sung

    2015-09-01

    The effectiveness of nonviral gene therapy remains uncertain because of low transfection efficiencies and high toxicities compared with viral-based strategies. We describe a simple system for transient transfection of continuous human cell lines, with low toxicity, using mineral-coated chitosan and alginate capsules. As proof-of-concept, we demonstrate transfection of Saos-2 and MG63 human osteosarcoma continuous cell lines with gfp, LacZ reporter genes, and a Sox-9 carrying plasmid, to illustrate expression of a functional gene with therapeutic relevance. We show that continuous cell lines transfect with significant efficiency of up to 65% possibly through the interplay between chitosan and DNA complexation and calcium/phosphate-induced translocation into cells entrapped within the 3D polysaccharide based environment, as evidenced by an absence of transfection in unmineralized and chitosan-free capsules. We demonstrated that our transfection system was equally effective at transfection of primary human bone marrow stromal cells. To illustrate, the Sox-9, DNA plasmid was spontaneously expressed in primary human bone marrow stromal cells at 7 days with up to 90% efficiency in two repeats. Mineralized polysaccharide macrocapsules are gene delivery vehicles with a number of biological and practical advantages. They are highly efficient at self-transfecting primary bone cells, with programmable spatial and temporal delivery prospects, premineralized bone-like environments, and have no cytotoxic effects, as compared with many other nonviral systems. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Bio-Orthogonal Mediated Nucleic Acid Transfection of Cells via Cell Surface Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Paul J; Elahipanah, Sina; Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2017-05-24

    The efficient delivery of foreign nucleic acids (transfection) into cells is a critical tool for fundamental biomedical research and a pillar of several biotechnology industries. There are currently three main strategies for transfection including reagent, instrument, and viral based methods. Each technology has significantly advanced cell transfection; however, reagent based methods have captured the majority of the transfection market due to their relatively low cost and ease of use. This general method relies on the efficient packaging of a reagent with nucleic acids to form a stable complex that is subsequently associated and delivered to cells via nonspecific electrostatic targeting. Reagent transfection methods generally use various polyamine cationic type molecules to condense with negatively charged nucleic acids into a highly positively charged complex, which is subsequently delivered to negatively charged cells in culture for association, internalization, release, and expression. Although this appears to be a straightforward procedure, there are several major issues including toxicity, low efficiency, sorting of viable transfected from nontransfected cells, and limited scope of transfectable cell types. Herein, we report a new strategy (SnapFect) for nucleic acid transfection to cells that does not rely on electrostatic interactions but instead uses an integrated approach combining bio-orthogonal liposome fusion, click chemistry, and cell surface engineering. We show that a target cell population is rapidly and efficiently engineered to present a bio-orthogonal functional group on its cell surface through nanoparticle liposome delivery and fusion. A complementary bio-orthogonal nucleic acid complex is then formed and delivered to which chemoselective click chemistry induced transfection occurs to the primed cell. This new strategy requires minimal time, steps, and reagents and leads to superior transfection results for a broad range of cell types

  19. Data from: Rapid multiple-level coevolution in experimental populations of yeast killer and non-killer strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieczynska, M.D.; Wloch-Salamon, D.; Korona, R.; Visser, de J.A.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Coevolution between different biological entities is considered an important evolutionary mechanism at all levels of biological organization. Here we provide evidence for coevolution of a yeast killer strain (K) carrying cytoplasmic dsRNA viruses coding for anti-competitor toxins and an isogenic

  20. Role of cholesterol on the transfection barriers of cationic lipid/DNA complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Daniela; Cardarelli, Francesco; Salomone, Fabrizio; Marchini, Cristina; Amenitsch, Heinz; Barbera, Giorgia La; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2014-08-01

    Most lipid formulations need cholesterol for efficient transfection, but the precise motivation remains unclear. Here, we have investigated the effect of cholesterol on the transfection efficiency (TE) of cationic liposomes made of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane and dioleoylphosphocholine in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The transfection mechanisms of cholesterol-containing lipoplexes have been investigated by TE, synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering, and laser scanning confocal microscopy experiments. We prove that cholesterol-containing lipoplexes enter the cells using different endocytosis pathways. Formulations with high cholesterol content efficiently escape from endosomes and exhibit a lamellar-nonlamellar phase transition in mixture with biomembrane mimicking lipid formulations. This might explain both the DNA release ability and the high transfection efficiency. These studies highlight the enrichment in cholesterol as a decisive factor for transfection and will contribute to the rational design of lipid nanocarriers with superior TE.

  1. Membrane fusion inducers, chloroquine and spermidine increase lipoplex-mediated gene transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Bustos, Israel; Serna, Manuel; Tescucano, Alonso; Alcantara-Farfan, Veronica; Ibanez, Miguel; Montanez, Cecilia; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Gene transfection into mammalian cells can be achieved with viral and non-viral vectors. Non-viral vectors, such as cationic lipids that form lipoplexes with DNA, are safer and more stable than viral vectors, but their transfection efficiencies are lower. Here we describe that the simultaneous treatment with a membrane fusion inducer (chlorpromazine or procainamide) plus the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine increases lipoplex-mediated gene transfection in human (HEK293 and C-33 A) and rat (PC12) cell lines (up to 9.2-fold), as well as in situ in BALB/c mice spleens and livers (up to 6-fold); and that the polyamine spermidine increases lipoplex-mediated gene transfection and expression in cell cultures. The use of these four drugs provides a novel, safe and relatively inexpensive way to considerably increase lipoplex-mediated gene transfection efficiency.

  2. The Role of Natural Killer T Cells in Cancer—A Phenotypical and Functional Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijgsman, Daniëlle; Hokland, Marianne; Kuppen, Peter J. K.

    2018-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of CD1d-restricted T cells at the interface between the innate and adaptive immune system. NKT cells can be subdivided into functional subsets that respond rapidly to a wide variety of glycolipids and stress-related proteins using T- or natural killer (NK) cell-like effector mechanisms. Because of their major modulating effects on immune responses via secretion of cytokines, NKT cells are also considered important players in tumor immunosurveillance. During early tumor development, T helper (TH)1-like NKT cell subsets have the potential to rapidly stimulate tumor-specific T cells and effector NK cells that can eliminate tumor cells. In case of tumor progression, NKT cells may become overstimulated and anergic leading to deletion of a part of the NKT cell population in patients via activation-induced cell death. In addition, the remaining NKT cells become hyporesponsive, or switch to immunosuppressive TH2-/T regulatory-like NKT cell subsets, thereby facilitating tumor progression and immune escape. In this review, we discuss this important role of NKT cells in tumor development and we conclude that there should be three important focuses of future research in cancer patients in relation with NKT cells: (1) expansion of the NKT cell population, (2) prevention and breaking of NKT cell anergy, and (3) skewing of NKT cells toward TH1-like subsets with antitumor activity. PMID:29535734

  3. Boosting Natural Killer Cell-Based Immunotherapy with Anticancer Drugs: a Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifaldi, Loredana; Locatelli, Franco; Marasco, Emiliano; Moretta, Lorenzo; Pistoia, Vito

    2017-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells efficiently recognize and kill tumor cells through several mechanisms including the expression of ligands for NK cell-activating receptors on target cells. Different clinical trials indicate that NK cell-based immunotherapy represents a promising antitumor treatment. However, tumors develop immune-evasion strategies, including downregulation of ligands for NK cell-activating receptors, that can negatively affect antitumor activity of NK cells, which either reside endogenously, or are adoptively transferred. Thus, restoration of the expression of NK cell-activating ligands on tumor cells represents a strategic therapeutic goal. As discussed here, various anticancer drugs can fulfill this task via different mechanisms. We envision that the combination of selected chemotherapeutic agents with NK cell adoptive transfer may represent a novel strategy for cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Green fluorescent protein (GFP color reporter gene visualizes parvovirus B19 non-structural segment 1 (NS1 transfected endothelial modification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wurster

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human Parvovirus B19 (PVB19 has been associated with myocarditis putative due to endothelial infection. Whether PVB19 infects endothelial cells and causes a modification of endothelial function and inflammation and, thus, disturbance of microcirculation has not been elucidated and could not be visualized so far. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To examine the PVB19-induced endothelial modification, we used green fluorescent protein (GFP color reporter gene in the non-structural segment 1 (NS1 of PVB19. NS1-GFP-PVB19 or GFP plasmid as control were transfected in an endothelial-like cell line (ECV304. The endothelial surface expression of intercellular-adhesion molecule-1 (CD54/ICAM-1 and extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN/CD147 were evaluated by flow cytometry after NS-1-GFP or control-GFP transfection. To evaluate platelet adhesion on NS-1 transfected ECs, we performed a dynamic adhesion assay (flow chamber. NS-1 transfection causes endothelial activation and enhanced expression of ICAM-1 (CD54: mean ± standard deviation: NS1-GFP vs. control-GFP: 85.3 ± 11.2 vs. 61.6 ± 8.1; P<0.05 and induces endothelial expression of EMMPRIN/CD147 (CD147: mean ± SEM: NS1-GFP vs. control-GFP: 114 ± 15.3 vs. 80 ± 0.91; P<0.05 compared to control-GFP transfected cells. Dynamic adhesion assays showed that adhesion of platelets is significantly enhanced on NS1 transfected ECs when compared to control-GFP (P<0.05. The transfection of ECs was verified simultaneously through flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis. CONCLUSIONS: GFP color reporter gene shows transfection of ECs and may help to visualize NS1-PVB19 induced endothelial activation and platelet adhesion as well as an enhanced monocyte adhesion directly, providing in vitro evidence of possible microcirculatory dysfunction in PVB19-induced myocarditis and, thus, myocardial tissue damage.

  5. Pharmaceutical studies for gene therapy: expression of human Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase gene transfected by lipofection in rat skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, K; Ishida, K; Nakajima, M; Maeda, T; Komada, F; Iwakawa, S; Tanigawara, Y; Okumura, K

    1996-08-01

    To evaluate whether lipofection using Lipofectin is suitable for delivering foreign genes into skin fibroblasts as target cells, we performed experiments using human superoxide dismutase (hSOD) and neomycin-resistance (Neo) genes as models in rat skin fibroblasts (FR and primary cells) in vitro. The amounts of DNA used in the lipofection procedure significantly affected the transfection efficiencies, and the optimal amounts were determined for all cells used. However, the efficiencies in rat skin fibroblasts were about 20-fold higher than that in rat lung epithelial-like cells (L2 cells). The differences in plasmid vectors (pRc/RSV-SOD and pRc/CMV-SOD) hardly affected the transfection efficiencies. The amounts of Lipofectin significantly affected the transfection efficiencies, and the optimal amounts were determined for both types of skin fibroblasts. However, cytotoxic effects in both skin fibroblasts were observed with high doses of Lipofectin. On the other hand, with optimal amounts of DNA and Lipofectin, the reporter gene (NeoT) introduced into cells was mainly integrated into the host cell chromosome. Western blot analysis showed the continuous expression of hSOD protein for at least 45 d in skin fibroblasts transfected with the expression plasmid for hSOD by Lipofectin under the optimal conditions, and the cellular SOD activity fluctuated in parallel with the expression of hSOD protein. Differences in the type of cells also affected the expression of hSOD. These results indicate that it is necessary to set up optimal conditions for transfection using Lipofectin for each cell type, and that transfection with Lipofectin under optimal conditions may be an efficient method for introduction of foreign genes into skin fibroblasts for use as a clinical delivery system of therapeutic protein.

  6. The Impact of HLA Class I-Specific Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors on Antibody-Dependent Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Organ Allograft Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalingam, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play an important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during the developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self-HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation) or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation). NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR-binding self-HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR-HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants.

  7. The impact of HLA class I-specific killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors on antibody-dependent natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity and organ allograft rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Rajalingam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self HLA class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during a developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation. NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR binding self HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC, triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR-HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants.

  8. Thermal biology of Pacific cicada killers, Sphecius convallis Patton, in the Upper Sonoran Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Joseph R; Holliday, Charles W; Hastings, Jon M; Phillips, Christy M

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the Pacific cicada killer, Sphecius convallis Patton, was undertaken to examine the behavioral and physiological mechanisms by which they are able to complete their life cycle in the thermal extremes of the Upper Sonoran Desert. S. convallis were endothermic, exhibiting elevated and relatively constant thorax temperatures during many activities. Males basked in trees at dawn to warm up, then used a variety of behaviors and perching strategies to maintain thorax temperature during territorial behavior. The thorax temperature of females was highest during provisioning and orientation flights, somewhat lower while investigating burrows, and lowest while digging burrows. The optimal thorax temperature for flight was about 40°C, which was approximated most closely by males resting in the shade during the afternoon. In mating clusters, the mated male was the hottest, the female was coolest and the other males were intermediate. Wasps lost about 5% of body mass during heating treatments, and may use evaporative water loss for cooling. Pacific cicada killers use a complex suite of behavioral and physiological adaptations to regulate body temperature during their nesting season. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor and Ligand Matching in Donor Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meral Beksaç

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite all efforts to improve HLA typing and immunosuppression, it is still impossible to prevent severe graft versus host disease (GVHD which can be fatal. GVHD is not always associated with graft versus malignancy and can prevent stem cell transplantation from reaching its goals. Overall T-cell alloreactivity is not the sole mechanism modulating the immune defense. Innate immune system has its own antigens, ligands, and mediators. The bridge between HLA and natural killer (NK cell-mediated reactions is becoming better understood in the context of stem cell transplantation. Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs constitute a wide range of alleles/antigens segregated independently from the HLA alleles and classified into two major haplotypes which imprints the person's ability to suppress or to amplify T-cell alloreactivity. This paper will summarize the impact of both activating and inhibitory KIRs and their ligands on stem cell transplantation outcome. The ultimate goal is to develop algorithms based on KIR profiles to select donors with maximum antileukemic and minimum antihost effects.

  10. Natural killer cells: the journey from puzzles in biology to treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Madhana, Rajaram Mohan Rao; Sriram, Chandra Shaker

    2015-02-28

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are innate immune effectors that are primarily involved in immunosurveillance to spontaneously eliminate malignantly transformed and virally infected cells without prior sensitization. NK cells trigger targeted attack through release of cytotoxic granules, and secrete various cytokines and chemokines to promote subsequent adaptive immune responses. NK cells selectively attack target cells with diminished major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression. This "Missing-self" recognition by NK cells at first puzzled researchers in the early 1990s, and the mystery was solved with the discovery of germ line encoded killer immunoglobulin receptors that recognize MHC-I molecules. This review summarizes the biology of NK cells detailing the phenotypes, receptors and functions; interactions of NK cells with dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages and T cells. Further we discuss the various strategies to modulate NK cell activity and the practice of NK cells in cancer immunotherapy employing NK cell lines, autologous, allogeneic and genetically engineered cell populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Classification of human natural killer cells based on migration behavior and cytotoxic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanherberghen, Bruno; Olofsson, Per E; Forslund, Elin; Sternberg-Simon, Michal; Khorshidi, Mohammad Ali; Pacouret, Simon; Guldevall, Karolin; Enqvist, Monika; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Mehr, Ramit; Önfelt, Björn

    2013-02-21

    Despite intense scrutiny of the molecular interactions between natural killer (NK) and target cells, few studies have been devoted to dissection of the basic functional heterogeneity in individual NK cell behavior. Using a microchip-based, time-lapse imaging approach allowing the entire contact history of each NK cell to be recorded, in the present study, we were able to quantify how the cytotoxic response varied between individual NK cells. Strikingly, approximately half of the NK cells did not kill any target cells at all, whereas a minority of NK cells was responsible for a majority of the target cell deaths. These dynamic cytotoxicity data allowed categorization of NK cells into 5 distinct classes. A small but particularly active subclass of NK cells killed several target cells in a consecutive fashion. These "serial killers" delivered their lytic hits faster and induced faster target cell death than other NK cells. Fast, necrotic target cell death was correlated with the amount of perforin released by the NK cells. Our data are consistent with a model in which a small fraction of NK cells drives tumor elimination and inflammation.

  12. mRNA transfection of mouse and human neural stem cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel McLenachan

    Full Text Available The use of synthetic mRNA as an alternative gene delivery vector to traditional DNA-based constructs provides an effective method for inducing transient gene expression in cell cultures without genetic modification. Delivery of mRNA has been proposed as a safer alternative to viral vectors in the induction of pluripotent cells for regenerative therapies. Although mRNA transfection of fibroblasts, dendritic and embryonic stem cells has been described, mRNA delivery to neurosphere cultures has not been previously reported. Here we sought to establish an efficient method for delivering mRNA to primary neurosphere cultures. Neurospheres derived from the subventricular zone of adult mice or from human embryonic stem cells were transfected with EGFP mRNA by lipofection and electroporation. Transfection efficiency and expression levels were monitored by flow cytometry. Cell survival following transfection was examined using live cell counting and the MTT assay. Both lipofection and electroporation provided high efficiency transfection of neurospheres. In comparison with lipofection, electroporation resulted in increased transfection efficiencies, but lower expression per cell and shorter durations of expression. Additional rounds of lipofection renewed EGFP expression in neurospheres, suggesting this method may be suitable for reprogramming applications. In summary, we have developed a protocol for achieving high efficiency transfection rates in mouse and human neurosphere cell culture that can be applied for future studies of gene function studies in neural stem cells, such as defining efficient differentiation protocols for glial and neuronal linages.

  13. mRNA Transfection of Mouse and Human Neural Stem Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLenachan, Samuel; Zhang, Dan; Palomo, Ana Belén Alvarez; Edel, Michael J.; Chen, Fred K.

    2013-01-01

    The use of synthetic mRNA as an alternative gene delivery vector to traditional DNA-based constructs provides an effective method for inducing transient gene expression in cell cultures without genetic modification. Delivery of mRNA has been proposed as a safer alternative to viral vectors in the induction of pluripotent cells for regenerative therapies. Although mRNA transfection of fibroblasts, dendritic and embryonic stem cells has been described, mRNA delivery to neurosphere cultures has not been previously reported. Here we sought to establish an efficient method for delivering mRNA to primary neurosphere cultures. Neurospheres derived from the subventricular zone of adult mice or from human embryonic stem cells were transfected with EGFP mRNA by lipofection and electroporation. Transfection efficiency and expression levels were monitored by flow cytometry. Cell survival following transfection was examined using live cell counting and the MTT assay. Both lipofection and electroporation provided high efficiency transfection of neurospheres. In comparison with lipofection, electroporation resulted in increased transfection efficiencies, but lower expression per cell and shorter durations of expression. Additional rounds of lipofection renewed EGFP expression in neurospheres, suggesting this method may be suitable for reprogramming applications. In summary, we have developed a protocol for achieving high efficiency transfection rates in mouse and human neurosphere cell culture that can be applied for future studies of gene function studies in neural stem cells, such as defining efficient differentiation protocols for glial and neuronal linages. PMID:24386231

  14. mRNA transfection of mouse and human neural stem cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLenachan, Samuel; Zhang, Dan; Palomo, Ana Belén Alvarez; Edel, Michael J; Chen, Fred K

    2013-01-01

    The use of synthetic mRNA as an alternative gene delivery vector to traditional DNA-based constructs provides an effective method for inducing transient gene expression in cell cultures without genetic modification. Delivery of mRNA has been proposed as a safer alternative to viral vectors in the induction of pluripotent cells for regenerative therapies. Although mRNA transfection of fibroblasts, dendritic and embryonic stem cells has been described, mRNA delivery to neurosphere cultures has not been previously reported. Here we sought to establish an efficient method for delivering mRNA to primary neurosphere cultures. Neurospheres derived from the subventricular zone of adult mice or from human embryonic stem cells were transfected with EGFP mRNA by lipofection and electroporation. Transfection efficiency and expression levels were monitored by flow cytometry. Cell survival following transfection was examined using live cell counting and the MTT assay. Both lipofection and electroporation provided high efficiency transfection of neurospheres. In comparison with lipofection, electroporation resulted in increased transfection efficiencies, but lower expression per cell and shorter durations of expression. Additional rounds of lipofection renewed EGFP expression in neurospheres, suggesting this method may be suitable for reprogramming applications. In summary, we have developed a protocol for achieving high efficiency transfection rates in mouse and human neurosphere cell culture that can be applied for future studies of gene function studies in neural stem cells, such as defining efficient differentiation protocols for glial and neuronal linages.

  15. Anchoring cationic amphiphiles for nucleotide delivery: significance of DNA release from cationic liposomes for transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashima, Naohide; Minatani, Kazuhiro; Hattori, Yoshifumi; Ohwada, Tomohiko; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2007-06-01

    We have designed and synthesized lithocholic acid-based cationic amphiphile molecules as components of cationic liposomes for gene transfection (lipofection). To study the relationship between the molecular structures of those amphiphilic molecules, particularly the extended hydrophobic appendant (anchor) at the 3-hydroxyl group, and transfection efficiency, we synthesized several lithocholic and isolithocholic acid derivatives, and examined their transfection efficiency. We also compared the physico-chemical properties of cationic liposomes prepared from these derivatives. We found that isolithocholic acid derivatives exhibit higher transfection efficiency than the corresponding lithocholic acid derivatives. This result indicates that the orientation and extension of hydrophobic regions influence the gene transfection process. Isolithocholic acid derivatives showed a high ability to encapsulate DNA in a compact liposome-DNA complex and to protect it from enzymatic degradation. Isolithocholic acid derivatives also facilitated the release of DNA from the liposome-DNA complex, which is a crucial step for DNA entry into the nucleus. Our results show that the transfection efficiency is directly influenced by the ability of the liposome complex to release DNA, rather than by the DNA-encapsulating ability. Molecular modeling revealed that isolithocholic acid derivatives take relatively extended conformations, while the lithocholic acid derivatives take folded structures. Thus, the efficiency of release of DNA from cationic liposomes in the cytoplasm, which contributes to high transfection efficiency, appears to be dependent upon the molecular shape of the cationic amphiphiles.

  16. Effects of molecular size and chemical factor on plasma gene transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Motomura, Hideki; Kido, Yugo; Satoh, Susumu; Jinno, Masafumi

    2016-07-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of plasma gene transfection, the relationship between transfection efficiency and transferred molecular size was investigated. Molecules with low molecular mass (less than 50 kDa; dye or dye-labeled oligonucleotide) and high molecular mass (more than 1 MDa; plasmid DNA or fragment of plasmid DNA) were transferred to L-929 cells. It was found that the transfection efficiency decreases with increasing in transferred molecular size and also depends on the tertiary structure of transferred molecules. Moreover, it was suggested the transfection mechanism is different between the molecules with low (less than 50 kDa) and high molecular mass (higher than 1 MDa). For the amount of gene transfection after plasma irradiation, which is comparable to that during plasma irradiation, it is shown that H2O2 molecules are the main contributor. The transfection efficiency decreased to 0.40 ± 0.22 upon scavenging the H2O2 generated by plasma irradiation using the catalase. On the other hand, when the H2O2 solution is dropped into the cell suspension without plasma irradiation, the transfection efficiency is almost 0%. In these results, it is also suggested that there is a synergetic effect of H2O2 with electrical factors or other reactive species generated by plasma irradiation.

  17. Antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 messenger RNA fail to treat experimental tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, C.D.; Trombone, A.P.F.; Lorenzi, J.C.C.; Almeida, L.P.; Gembre, A.F.; Padilha, E. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Ramos, S.G. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Silva, C.L.; Coelho-Castelo, A.A.M. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-21

    In the last several years, the use of dendritic cells has been studied as a therapeutic strategy against tumors. Dendritic cells can be pulsed with peptides or full-length protein, or they can be transfected with DNA or RNA. However, comparative studies suggest that transfecting dendritic cells with messenger RNA (mRNA) is superior to other antigen-loading techniques in generating immunocompetent dendritic cells. In the present study, we evaluated a new therapeutic strategy to fight tuberculosis using dendritic cells and macrophages transfected with Hsp65 mRNA. First, we demonstrated that antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 mRNA exhibit a higher level of expression of co-stimulatory molecules, suggesting that Hsp65 mRNA has immunostimulatory properties. We also demonstrated that spleen cells obtained from animals immunized with mock and Hsp65 mRNA-transfected dendritic cells were able to generate a mixed Th1/Th2 response with production not only of IFN-γ but also of IL-5 and IL-10. In contrast, cells recovered from mice immunized with Hsp65 mRNA-transfected macrophages were able to produce only IL-5. When mice were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and treated with antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 mRNA (therapeutic immunization), we did not detect any decrease in the lung bacterial load or any preservation of the lung parenchyma, indicating the inability of transfected cells to confer curative effects against tuberculosis. In spite of the lack of therapeutic efficacy, this study reports for the first time the use of antigen-presenting cells transfected with mRNA in experimental tuberculosis.

  18. Repeated Gene Transfection Impairs the Engraftment of Transplanted Porcine Neonatal Pancreatic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Koo Seo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPreviously, we reported that neonatal porcine pancreatic cells transfected with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF gene in an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-based plasmid (pEBVHGF showed improved proliferation and differentiation compared to those of the control. In this study, we examined if pancreatic cells transfected repeatedly with pEBVHGF can be successfully grafted to control blood glucose in a diabetes mouse model.MethodsNeonatal porcine pancreatic cells were cultured as a monolayer and were transfected with pEBVHGF every other day for a total of three transfections. The transfected pancreatic cells were re-aggregated and transplanted into kidney capsules of diabetic nude mice or normal nude mice. Blood glucose level and body weight were measured every other day after transplantation. The engraftment of the transplanted cells and differentiation into beta cells were assessed using immunohistochemistry.ResultsRe-aggregation of the pancreatic cells before transplantation improved engraftment of the cells and facilitated neovascularization of the graft. Right before transplantation, pancreatic cells that were transfected with pEBVHGF and then re-aggregated showed ductal cell marker expression. However, ductal cells disappeared and the cells underwent fibrosis in a diabetes mouse model two to five weeks after transplantation; these mice also did not show controlled blood glucose levels. Furthermore, pancreatic cells transplanted into nude mice with normal blood glucose showed poor graft survival regardless of the type of transfected plasmid (pCEP4, pHGF, or pEBVHGF.ConclusionFor clinical application of transfected neonatal porcine pancreatic cells, further studies are required to develop methods of overcoming the damage for the cells caused by repeated transfection and to re-aggregate them into islet-like structures.

  19. Aspects of nonviral gene therapy: correlation of molecular parameters with lipoplex structure and transfection efficacy in pyridinium-based cationic lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Paria; Jubeli, Emile; Raju, Liji; Khalique, Nada Abdul; Almeer, Ahmed; Allam, Hebatalla; Manaa, Maryem Al; Larsen, Helge; Nicholson, David; Pungente, Michael D; Fyles, Thomas M

    2014-01-30

    This study seeks correlations between the molecular structures of cationic and neutral lipids, the lipid phase behavior of the mixed-lipid lipoplexes they form with plasmid DNA, and the transfection efficacy of the lipoplexes. Synthetic cationic pyridinium lipids were co-formulated (1:1) with the cationic lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EPC), and these lipids were co-formulated (3:2) with the neutral lipids 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) or cholesterol. All lipoplex formulations exhibited plasmid DNA binding and a level of protection from DNase I degradation. Composition-dependent transfection (beta-galactosidase and GFP) and cytotoxicity was observed in Chinese hamster ovarian-K1 cells. The most active formulations containing the pyridinium lipids were less cytotoxic but of comparable activity to a Lipofectamine 2000™ control. Molecular structure parameters and partition coefficients were calculated for all lipids using fragment additive methods. The derived shape parameter values correctly correlated with observed hexagonal lipid phase behavior of lipoplexes as derived from small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. A transfection index applicable to hexagonal phase lipoplexes derived from calculated parameters of the lipid mixture (partition coefficient, shape parameter, lipoplex packing) produced a direct correlation with transfection efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Can self-destructive killers be classified so easily?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Vincent

    2014-08-01

    Lankford makes many useful points regarding the myths and shibboleths underlying our understanding of self-destructive killers and suicide bombers. He has collated an impressive data set on such offenders. However, his classification scheme is not built on sufficient evidence to support his proposed discrete categories of conventional, coerced, escapist, and indirect suicide terrorists. It would be straightforward to analyse the data, but it is unlikely that the resulting model would reflect that anticipated.

  1. ["Bolt projectiles" discharged from modified humane killers (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, S; Reiter, C

    1981-01-01

    Some common types of "humane killers" are supplied with rubber bushings and recoil springs holding back the bolt, which afterwards is rebound into the barrel. Removal of the rubber bush and withdrawal spring before firing can cause the bolt to break and become a free projectile. A suicide case is reported, in which a livestock stunner discharged a steel bolt penetrating the forehead and getting stuck in the skull.

  2. Martyrdom redefined: self-destructive killers and vulnerable narcissism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobadilla, Leonardo

    2014-08-01

    Lankford shows that suicide terrorists have much in common with maladjusted persons who die by suicide. However, what differentiates suicidal killers from those who "only" commit suicide? A key element may be vulnerable narcissism. Narcissism has been simultaneously linked to interpersonal aggression, achievement, and depression. These traits may explain the paradoxical picture of a person who may appear "normal" in some aspects, and yet hate himself and others so intensely as to seek mutual destruction.

  3. Public opinion and the politics of the killer robots debate

    OpenAIRE

    Michael C Horowitz

    2016-01-01

    The possibility that today’s drones could become tomorrow’s killer robots has attracted the attention of people around the world. Scientists and business leaders, from Stephen Hawking to Elon Musk, recently signed a letter urging the world to ban autonomous weapons. Part of the argument against these systems is that they violate the public conscience provision of the Martens Clause due to public opposition, making them illegal under international law. What, however, does the US public think o...

  4. Which serial killers commit suicide? An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David; White, John

    2012-11-30

    In a sample of 483 serial killers, 6.2% were documented to have committed suicide. Those who committed suicide were found to come from more dysfunctional homes characterized by more psychiatric disturbance in the parents. The sexual acts involved in the murders by the suicides seemed to be more deviant in some aspects, such as committing more bizarre sexual acts or more often taping the murder. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Induction of PLSCR1 in a STING/IRF3-dependent manner upon vector transfection in ovarian epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik M Kodigepalli

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are the primary sensors of the innate immune system that recognize pathogenic nucleic acids including double-stranded plasmid DNA (dsDNA. TLR signaling activates multiple pathways including IRF3 which is involved in transcriptional induction of inflammatory cytokines (i.e. interferons (IFNs. Phospholipid scramblase 1, PLSCR1, is a highly inducible IFN-regulated gene mediating anti-viral properties of IFNs. Herein, we report a novel finding that dsDNA transfection in T80 immortalized normal ovarian surface epithelial cell line leads to a marked increase in PLSCR1 mRNA and protein. We also noted a comparable response in primary mammary epithelial cells (HMECs. Similar to IFN-2α treated cells, de novo synthesized PLSCR1 was localized predominantly to the plasma membrane. dsDNA transfection, in T80 and HMEC cells, led to activation of MAPK and IRF3. Although inhibition of MAPK (using U0126 did not modulate PLSCR1 mRNA and protein, IRF3 knockdown (using siRNA significantly ablated the PLSCR1 induction. In prior studies, the activation of IRF3 was shown to be mediated by cGAS-STING pathway. To investigate the contribution of STING to PLSCR1 induction, we utilized siRNA to reduce STING expression and observed that PLSCR1 protein was markedly reduced. In contrast to normal T80/HMECs, the phosphorylation of IRF3 as well as induction of STING and PLSCR1 were absent in ovarian cancer cells (serous, clear cell, and endometrioid suggesting that the STING/IRF3 pathway may be dysregulated in these cancer cells. However, we also noted induction of different TLR and IFN mRNAs between the T80 and HEY (serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma cell lines upon dsDNA transfection. Collectively, these results indicate that the STING/IRF3 pathway, activated following dsDNA transfection, contributes to upregulation of PLSCR1 in ovarian epithelial cells.

  6. A nonviral DNA delivery system based on surface modified silica-nanoparticles can efficiently transfect cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneuer, C; Sameti, M; Bakowsky, U; Schiestel, T; Schirra, H

    2000-01-01

    Diverse polycationic polymers have been used as nonviral transfection agents. Here we report the ability of colloidal silica particles with covalently attached cationic surface modifications to transfect plasmid DNA in vitro and make an attempt to describe the structure of the resulting transfection

  7. In Vitro Repair of UV-Irradiated Micrococcus luteus Bacteriophage N1 Transfecting DNA 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Inga; George, Jeanne; Grossman, Lawrence

    1974-01-01

    Calcium-treated UV-sensitive, host cell reactivation− strains of Micrococcus luteus are infected with UV-irradiated N1 DNA. In strains lacking UV endonuclease, in vitro treatment of the irradiated DNA results in transfection enhancement. PMID:4823319

  8. Photo-transfection of mouse embryonic stem cells with plasmid DNA using femtosecond laser pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thobakgale, Lebogang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This presentation is about the photo-transfection of mouse embryonic stem cells with plasmid DNA using femtosecond laser pulses. It outlines the background on embryonic stem cells (ES) and phototransfection....

  9. Photo-transfection of mouse embryonic stem cells with plasmid DNA using femtosecond laser pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thobakgale, Lebogang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available disease- iPS, dopaminergic neurons Transplantation • Autologous- bone marrow, tissue defects, leukemia • Haematopoietic- blood dieases, autoimmune disorders • Mesenchymal- neurological disorders Phototransfection • Transfection refers...

  10. Effect of NCAM-transfection on growth and invasion of a human cancer cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvardsen, K; Bock, E; Jirus, S

    1997-01-01

    of modulating NCAM expression in vivo. In nude mice, NCAM-transfected cells developed tumors with longer latency periods and slower growth rates than tumors induced by NCAM-negative control cells, implying that NCAM may be involved not only in adhesive and motile behavior of tumor cells but also in their growth......-transfected cells. The fact that NCAM expression influences growth regulation attributes a pivotal role to this cell adhesion molecule during ontogenesis and tumor development.......A cDNA encoding the human transmembrane 140 kDa isoform of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) was transfected into the highly invasive MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line. Transfectants with a homogeneous expression of NCAM showed a restricted capacity for penetration of an artificial...

  11. Protocol for Lipid-Mediated Transient Transfection in A549 Epithelial Lung Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos-Vadillo, Elena; García-Sánchez, Asunción

    2016-01-01

    Trials of transfection in eukaryotic cells are essential tools for the study of gene and protein function. They have been used in a wide range of research fields. In this chapter, a method of transient transfection of the A549 cell line, human lung cells of alveolar epithelium, with an expression plasmid is described. In addition, the fundamental characteristics of this experimental procedure are addressed.

  12. Structure-function relationships of new lipids designed for DNA transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Matthias; Heinze, Martin; Wölk, Christian; Funari, Sergio S; Dobner, Bodo; Möhwald, Helmuth; Brezesinski, Gerald

    2011-08-22

    Cationic liposome/DNA complexes can be used as nonviral vectors for direct delivery of DNA-based biopharmaceuticals to damaged cells and tissues. To obtain more effective and safer liposome-based gene transfection systems, two cationic lipids with identical head groups but different chain structures are investigated with respect to their in vitro gene-transfer activity, their cell-damaging characteristics, and their physicochemical properties. The gene-transfer activities of the two lipids are very different. Differential scanning calorimetry and synchrotron small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering give valuable structural insight. A subgel-like structure with high packing density and high phase-transition temperature from gel to liquid-crystalline state are found for lipid 7 (N'-2-[(2,6-diamino-1-oxohexyl)amino]ethyl-2,N-bis(hexadecyl)propanediamide) containing two saturated chains. Additionally, an ordered head-group lattice based on formation of a hydrogen-bond network is present. In contrast, lipid 8 (N'-2-[(2,6-diamino-1-oxohexyl)amino]ethyl-2-hexadecyl-N-[(9Z)-octadec-9-enyl]propanediamide) with one unsaturated and one saturated chain shows a lower phase-transition temperature and a reduced packing density. These properties enhance incorporation of the helper lipid cholesterol needed for gene transfection. Both lipids, either pure or in mixtures with cholesterol, form lamellar phases, which are preserved after addition of DNA. However, the system separates into phases containing DNA and phases without DNA. On increasing the temperature, DNA is released and only a lipid phase without intercalated DNA strands is observed. The conversion temperatures are very different in the two systems studied. The important parameter seems to be the charge density of the lipid membranes, which is a result of different solubility of cholesterol in the two lipid membranes. Therefore, different binding affinities of the DNA to the lipid mixtures are achieved. Copyright © 2011

  13. Inorganic nanoparticles for transfection of mammalian cells and removal of viruses from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Nils; Brunner, Tobias J; Dreesen, Imke A J; Stark, Wendelin J; Fussenegger, Martin

    2007-12-01

    Owing to their small size, synthetic nanoparticles show unprecedented biophysical and biochemical properties which may foster novel advances in life-science research. Using flame-spray synthesis technology we have produced non-coated aluminum-, calcium-, cerium-, and zirconium-derived inorganic metal oxide nanoparticles which not only exhibit high affinity for nucleic acids, but can sequester such compounds from aqueous solution. This non-covalent DNA-binding capacity was successfully used to transiently transfect a variety of mammalian cells including human, reaching transfection efficiencies which compared favorably with classic calcium phosphate precipitation (CaP) procedures and lipofection. In this straightforward protocol, transfection was enabled by simply mixing nanoparticles with DNA in solution prior to addition to the target cell population. Transiently transfected cells showed higher production levels of the human secreted glycoprotein SEAP compared to isogenic populations transfected with established technologies. Inorganic metal oxide nanoparticles also showed a high binding capacity to human-pathogenic viruses including adenovirus, adeno-associated virus and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and were able to clear these pathogens from aqueous solutions. The DNA transfection and viral clearance capacities of inorganic metal oxide nanoparticles may provide cost-effective biopharmaceutical manufacturing and water treatment in developing countries.

  14. siRNA transfection in larvae of the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, G.

    2015-06-25

    RNA interference (RNAi) provides an efficient and specific technique for functional genomic studies. Yet, no successful application of RNAi has been reported in barnacles. In this study, siRNA against p38 MAPK was synthesized and then transfected into A. amphitrite larvae at either the nauplius or cyprid stage, or at both stages. Effects of siRNA transfection on the p38 MAPK level were hardly detectable in the cyprids when they were transfected at the nauplius stage. In contrast, larvae that were transfected at the cyprid stage showed lower levels of p38 MAPK than the blank and reagent controls. However, significantly decreased levels of phosphorylated p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK) and reduced settlement rates were observed only in ‘double transfections’, in which larvae were exposed to siRNA solution at both the nauplius and cyprid stages. A relatively longer transfection time and more larval cells directly exposed to siRNA might explain the higher efficiency of double transfection experiments.

  15. Gene Transfection Method Using Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric-Barrier Discharge Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Shota; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2013-09-01

    Gene transfection which is the process of deliberately introducing nucleic acids into cells is expected to play an important role in medical treatment because the process is necessary for gene therapy and creation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the conventional transfection methods have some problems, so we focus attention on promising transfection methods by atmospheric pressure dielectric-barrier discharge (AP-DBD) plasmas. AP-DBD He plasmas are irradiated to the living cell covered with genes. Preliminarily, we use fluorescent dye YOYO-1 instead of the genes and use LIVE/DEAD Stain for cell viability test, and we analyze the transfection efficiency and cell viability under the various conditions. It is clarified that the transfection efficiency is strongly dependence on the plasma irradiation time and cell viability rates is high rates (>90%) regardless of long plasma irradiation time. These results suggest that ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) and electric field generated by the plasma affect the gene transfection. In addition to this (the plasma irradiation time) dependency, we now investigate the effect of the plasma irradiation under the various conditions.

  16. Investigation of transfection efficacy with transcatheter arterial transporting transferring to enhance p53 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Qin; Niu Huanzhang; Zhu Guangyu; An Yanli; Qiu Dinghong; Teng Gaojun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the function of transferrin-DNA complex, transported by transferrin(Tf) and trans-arterial injection via interventional approach be the duel-target-orientated delivery and the transferring into malignant cells to get more effective therapy. Methods: p53-LipofectAMINE ligand with different concentrations of Tf (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 μg)transfected the 4 strains including LM6,Hep3B,YY and L02 in vitro to evaluate the gene transfection efficiency through western blot. Then, after setting up the VX2 hepatocarcinoma models, we delivered the Tf-p53-LipofectAMlNE complex into the hepatic arteries via interventional techniques to analyse the transfection efficiency in vivo. Results: Tf, within the range of l0 100 μg, could increase gene transfection efficiency mediated by liposome, and the efficiency increases with the raise of Tf concentration. Combination with interventional technique to inject Tf-DNA complex into tumor arteries, gene transfection efficiency was enhanced in rabbit models. Conclusion: Tf can enhance gene-liposome transfection efficiency, furthermore with combination of interventional catheter technique, there would be a potential duel-target-orientated gene therapy method. (authors)

  17. Exploring the Correlation Between Lipid Packaging in Lipoplexes and Their Transfection Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Behfar; McNeil, Sarah E.; Zheng, Qinguo; Mohammed, Afzal R.; Perrie, Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    Whilst there is a large body of evidence looking at the design of cationic liposomes as transfection agents, correlates of formulation to function remain elusive. In this research, we investigate if lipid packaging can give further insights into transfection efficacy. DNA lipoplexes composed of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) or 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DSPE) in combination with 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) or 1,2-stearoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DSTAP) were prepared by the lipid hydration method. Each of the formulations was prepared by hydration in dH2O or phosphate buffer saline (PBS) to investigate the effect of buffer salts on lipoplex physicochemical characteristics and in vitro transfection. In addition, Langmuir monolayer studies were performed to investigate any possible correlation between lipid packaging and liposome attributes. Using PBS, rather than dH2O, to prepare the lipoplexes increased the size of vesicles in most of formulations and resulted in variation in transfection efficacies. However, one combination of lipids (DSPE:DOTAP) could not form liposomes in PBS, whilst the DSPE:DSTAP combination could not form liposomes in either aqueous media. Monolayer studies demonstrated saturated lipid combinations offered dramatically closer molecular packing compared to the other combinations which could suggest why this lipid combination could not form vesicles. Of the lipoplexes prepared, those formulated with DSTAP showed higher transfection efficacy, however, the effect of buffer on transfection efficiency was formulation dependent. PMID:24309311

  18. Toward establishing model organisms for marine protists: Successful transfection protocols for Parabodo caudatus (Kinetoplastida: Excavata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Fatma; Garcia, Paulo A; Delaney, Jennifer; Girguis, Peter R; Buie, Cullen R; Edgcomb, Virginia P

    2017-09-01

    We developed protocols for, and demonstrated successful transfection of, the free-living kinetoplastid flagellate Parabodo caudatus with three plasmids carrying a fluorescence reporter gene (pEF-GFP with the EF1 alpha promoter, pUB-GFP with Ubiquitin C promoter, and pEYFP-Mitotrap with CMV promoter). We evaluated three electroporation approaches: (1) a square-wave electroporator designed for eukaryotes, (2) a novel microfluidic transfection system employing hydrodynamically-controlled electric field waveforms, and (3) a traditional exponential decay electroporator. We found the microfluidic device provides a simple and efficient platform to quickly test a wide range of electric field parameters to find the optimal set of conditions for electroporation of target species. It also allows for processing large sample volumes (>10 ml) within minutes, increasing throughput 100 times over cuvettes. Fluorescence signal from the reporter gene was detected a few hours after transfection and persisted for 3 days in cells transfected by pEF-GFP and pUB-GFP plasmids and for at least 5 days post-transfection for cells transfected with pEYFP-Mitotrap. Expression of the reporter genes (GFP and YFP) was also confirmed using reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). This work opens the door for further efforts with this taxon and close relatives toward establishing model systems for genome editing. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. siRNA transfection in larvae of the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, G.; He, L.-S.; Wong, Y. H.; Yu, L.; Qian, P.-Y.

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) provides an efficient and specific technique for functional genomic studies. Yet, no successful application of RNAi has been reported in barnacles. In this study, siRNA against p38 MAPK was synthesized and then transfected into A. amphitrite larvae at either the nauplius or cyprid stage, or at both stages. Effects of siRNA transfection on the p38 MAPK level were hardly detectable in the cyprids when they were transfected at the nauplius stage. In contrast, larvae that were transfected at the cyprid stage showed lower levels of p38 MAPK than the blank and reagent controls. However, significantly decreased levels of phosphorylated p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK) and reduced settlement rates were observed only in ‘double transfections’, in which larvae were exposed to siRNA solution at both the nauplius and cyprid stages. A relatively longer transfection time and more larval cells directly exposed to siRNA might explain the higher efficiency of double transfection experiments.

  20. Investigation of transfection efficacy with transcatheter arterial transporting transferring to enhance p53 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Lu; Huanzhang, Niu; Guangyu, Zhu; Yanli, An; Dinghong, Qiu; Gaojun, Teng [Radiologic Department, Zhongda Hospital, Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China)

    2007-02-15

    Objective: To investigate the function of transferrin-DNA complex, transported by transferrin(Tf) and trans-arterial injection via interventional approach be the duel-target-orientated delivery and the transferring into malignant cells to get more effective therapy. Methods: p53-LipofectAMINE ligand with different concentrations of Tf (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 {mu}g)transfected the 4 strains including LM6,Hep3B,YY and L02 in vitro to evaluate the gene transfection efficiency through western blot. Then, after setting up the VX2 hepatocarcinoma models, we delivered the Tf-p53-LipofectAMlNE complex into the hepatic arteries via interventional techniques to analyse the transfection efficiency in vivo. Results: Tf, within the range of l0 100 {mu}g, could increase gene transfection efficiency mediated by liposome, and the efficiency increases with the raise of Tf concentration. Combination with interventional technique to inject Tf-DNA complex into tumor arteries, gene transfection efficiency was enhanced in rabbit models. Conclusion: Tf can enhance gene-liposome transfection efficiency, furthermore with combination of interventional catheter technique, there would be a potential duel-target-orientated gene therapy method. (authors)

  1. Efficient transfection of Xenobiotic Responsive Element-biosensor plasmid using diether lipid and phosphatidylcholine liposomes in differentiated HepaRG cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demazeau, Maxime; Quesnot, Nicolas; Ripoche, Nicolas; Rauch, Claudine; Jeftić, Jelena; Morel, Fabrice; Gauffre, Fabienne; Benvegnu, Thierry; Loyer, Pascal

    2017-05-30

    In this study, we evaluated cationic liposomes prepared from diether-NH 2 and egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) for in vitro gene delivery. The impact of the lipid composition, i.e. the EPC and Diether-NH 2 molar ratio, on in vitro transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity was investigated using the human HEK293T and hepatoma HepaRG cells known to be permissive and poorly permissive cells for liposome-mediated gene transfer, respectively. Here, we report that EPC/Diether-NH 2 -based liposomes enabled a very efficient transfection with low cytotoxicity compared to commercial transfection reagents in both HEK293T and proliferating progenitor HepaRG cells. Taking advantage of these non-toxic EPC/Diether-NH 2 -based liposomes, we developed a method to efficiently transfect differentiated hepatocyte-like HepaRG cells and a biosensor plasmid containing a Xenobiotic Responsive Element and a minimal promoter driving the transcription of the luciferase reporter gene. We demonstrated that the luciferase activity was induced by a canonical inducer of cytochrome P450 genes, the benzo[a]pyrene, and two environmental contaminants, the fluoranthene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and the endosulfan, an organochlorine insecticide, known to induce toxicity and genotoxicity in differentiated HepaRG cells. In conclusion, we established a new efficient lipofection-mediated gene transfer in hepatocyte-like HepaRG cells opening new perspectives in drug evaluation relying on xenobiotic inducible biosensor plasmids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of HIV infection and ART on phenotype and function of circulating monocytes, natural killer, and innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabatanzi, Rose; Cose, Stephen; Joloba, Moses; Jones, Sarah Rowland; Nakanjako, Damalie

    2018-03-15

    HIV infection causes upregulation of markers of inflammation, immune activation and apoptosis of host adaptive, and innate immune cells particularly monocytes, natural killer (NK) and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) restores CD4 T-cell counts, the persistent aberrant activation of monocytes, NK and ILCs observed likely contributes to the incomplete recovery of T-cell effector functions. A better understanding of the effects of HIV infection and ART on the phenotype and function of circulating monocytes, NK, and ILCs is required to guide development of novel therapeutic interventions to optimize immune recovery.

  3. Anticoagulant drugs increase natural killer cell activity in lung cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bobek, M.; Boubelík, Michael; Fišerová, Anna; Luptovcová, Martina; Vannucci, Luca; Kacprzak, G.; Kolodzej, J.; Majewski, A.M.; Hoffman, R. M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2005), s. 215-223 ISSN 0169-5002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : anticoagulant drugs * lung cancer * NK cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.172, year: 2005

  4. Eradication of melanoma in vitro and in vivo via targeting with a Killer-Red-containing telomerase-dependent adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Kiyoto; Yano, Shuya; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Narii, Nobuhiro; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Urata, Yasuo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-08-18

    Melanoma is a highly recalcitrant cancer and transformative therapy is necessary for the cure of this disease. We recently developed a telomerase-dependent adenovirus containing the fluorescent protein Killer-Red. In the present report, we first determined the efficacy of Killer-Red adenovirus combined with laser irradiation on human melanoma cell lines in vitro. Cell viability of human melanoma cells was reduced in a dose-dependent and irradiation-time-dependent manner. We used an intradermal xenografted melanoma model in nude mice to determine efficacy of the Killer-Red adenovirus. Intratumoral injection of Killer-Red adenovirus, combined with laser irradiation, eradicated the melanoma indicating the potential of a new paradigm of cancer therapy.

  5. The Synergistic Effect between Electrical and Chemical Factors in Plasma Gene/Molecule-Transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    This study has been done to know what kind of factors in plasma and processes on cells promote plasma gene/molecule transfection. We have discovered a new plasma source using a microcapillary electrode which enables high transfection efficiency and high cell survivability simultaneously. However, the mechanism of the transfection by plasma was not clear. To clarify the transfection mechanisms by micro plasma, we focused on the effects of electrical (current, charge, field, etc.) and chemical (radicals, RONS, etc.) factors generated by the micro plasma and evaluated the contribution weight of three groups of the effects and processes, i.e. electrical, chemical and biochemical ones. At first, the necessity of the electrical factors was estimated by the laser produced plasma (LPP). Mouse L-929 fibroblast cell was cultured on a 96-well plate or 12-well micro slide chamber. Plasmids pCX-EGFP in Tris-EDTA buffer was dropped on the cells and they were exposed to the capillary discharge plasma (CDP) or the LPP. In the case of the CDP, the plasma was generated between the tip of the capillary electrode and the cells so that both electrical and chemical factors were supplied to the cells. In this setup, about 20% of average transfection efficiency was obtained. In the case of the LPP, the plasma was generated apart from the cells so that electrical factors were not supplied to the cells. In this setup, no transfection was observed. These results show that the electrical factors are necessary for the plasma gene transfection. Next, the necessity of the chemical factors was estimated the effect of catalase to remove H2O2 in CDP. The transfection efficiency decreased to 0.4 by scavenging H2O2 with catalase. However, only the solution of H2O2 caused no gene transfection in cells. These results shows that H2O2 is important species to cause gene/molecule transfection but still needs a synergistic effect with electrical or other chemical factors. This work was partly supported by

  6. Exploiting natural killer group 2D receptors for CAR T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoulin, Benjamin; Cook, W James; Murad, Joana; Graber, David J; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Lonez, Caroline; Gilham, David E; Sentman, Charles L; Agaugue, Sophie

    2017-08-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are genetically engineered proteins that combine an extracellular antigen-specific recognition domain with one or several intracellular T-cell signaling domains. When expressed in T cells, these CARs specifically trigger T-cell activation upon antigen recognition. While the clinical proof of principle of CAR T-cell therapy has been established in hematological cancers, CAR T cells are only at the early stages of being explored to tackle solid cancers. This special report discusses the concept of exploiting natural killer cell receptors as an approach that could broaden the specificity of CAR T cells and potentially enhance the efficacy of this therapy against solid tumors. New data demonstrating feasibility of this approach in humans and supporting the ongoing clinical trial are also presented.

  7. Actin retrograde flow controls natural killer cell response by regulating the conformation state of SHP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalon, Omri; Ben-Shmuel, Aviad; Kivelevitz, Jessica; Sabag, Batel; Fried, Sophia; Joseph, Noah; Noy, Elad; Biber, Guy; Barda-Saad, Mira

    2018-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a powerful weapon against viral infections and tumor growth. Although the actin-myosin (actomyosin) cytoskeleton is crucial for a variety of cellular processes, the role of mechanotransduction, the conversion of actomyosin mechanical forces into signaling cascades, was never explored in NK cells. Here, we demonstrate that actomyosin retrograde flow (ARF) controls the immune response of primary human NK cells through a novel interaction between β-actin and the SH2-domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1), converting its conformation state, and thereby regulating NK cell cytotoxicity. Our results identify ARF as a master regulator of the NK cell immune response. Since actin dynamics occur in multiple cellular processes, this mechanism might also regulate the activity of SHP-1 in additional cellular systems. © 2018 The Authors.

  8. Building tolerance by dismantling synapses: inhibitory receptor signaling in natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huse, Morgan; Catherine Milanoski, S; Abeyweera, Thushara P

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface receptors bearing immunotyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) maintain natural killer (NK) cell tolerance to normal host tissues. These receptors are difficult to analyze mechanistically because they block activating responses in a rapid and comprehensive manner. The advent of high-resolution single cell imaging techniques has enabled investigators to explore the cell biological basis of the inhibitory response. Recent studies using these approaches indicate that ITIM-containing receptors function at least in part by structurally undermining the immunological synapse between the NK cell and its target. In this review, we discuss these new advances and how they might relate to what is known about the biochemistry of inhibitory signaling in NK cells and other cell types. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection for efficient siRNA mediated gene knock down.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dag Heinemann

    Full Text Available Laser based transfection methods have proven to be an efficient and gentle alternative to established molecule delivery methods like lipofection or electroporation. Among the laser based methods, gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection bears the major advantage of high throughput and easy usability. This approach uses plasmon resonances on gold nanoparticles unspecifically attached to the cell membrane to evoke transient and spatially defined cell membrane permeabilization. In this study, we explore the parameter regime for gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection for the delivery of molecules into cell lines and prove its suitability for siRNA mediated gene knock down. The developed setup allows easy usage and safe laser operation in a normal lab environment. We applied a 532 nm Nd:YAG microchip laser emitting 850 ps pulses at a repetition rate of 20.25 kHz. Scanning velocities of the laser spot over the sample of up to 200 mm/s were tested without a decline in perforation efficiency. This velocity leads to a process speed of ∼8 s per well of a 96 well plate. The optimal particle density was determined to be ∼6 particles per cell using environmental scanning electron microscopy. Applying the optimized parameters transfection efficiencies of 88% were achieved in canine pleomorphic adenoma ZMTH3 cells using a fluorescent labeled siRNA while maintaining a high cell viability of >90%. Gene knock down of d2-EGFP was demonstrated and validated by fluorescence repression and western blot analysis. On basis of our findings and established mathematical models we suppose a mixed transfection mechanism consisting of thermal and multiphoton near field effects. Our findings emphasize that gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection provides an excellent tool for molecular delivery for both, high throughput purposes and the transfection of sensitive cells types.

  10. Gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection for efficient siRNA mediated gene knock down.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Kalies, Stefan; Schieck, Maximilian; Carlson, Regina; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Laser based transfection methods have proven to be an efficient and gentle alternative to established molecule delivery methods like lipofection or electroporation. Among the laser based methods, gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection bears the major advantage of high throughput and easy usability. This approach uses plasmon resonances on gold nanoparticles unspecifically attached to the cell membrane to evoke transient and spatially defined cell membrane permeabilization. In this study, we explore the parameter regime for gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection for the delivery of molecules into cell lines and prove its suitability for siRNA mediated gene knock down. The developed setup allows easy usage and safe laser operation in a normal lab environment. We applied a 532 nm Nd:YAG microchip laser emitting 850 ps pulses at a repetition rate of 20.25 kHz. Scanning velocities of the laser spot over the sample of up to 200 mm/s were tested without a decline in perforation efficiency. This velocity leads to a process speed of ∼8 s per well of a 96 well plate. The optimal particle density was determined to be ∼6 particles per cell using environmental scanning electron microscopy. Applying the optimized parameters transfection efficiencies of 88% were achieved in canine pleomorphic adenoma ZMTH3 cells using a fluorescent labeled siRNA while maintaining a high cell viability of >90%. Gene knock down of d2-EGFP was demonstrated and validated by fluorescence repression and western blot analysis. On basis of our findings and established mathematical models we suppose a mixed transfection mechanism consisting of thermal and multiphoton near field effects. Our findings emphasize that gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection provides an excellent tool for molecular delivery for both, high throughput purposes and the transfection of sensitive cells types.

  11. Gold Nanoparticle Mediated Laser Transfection for Efficient siRNA Mediated Gene Knock Down

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Kalies, Stefan; Schieck, Maximilian; Carlson, Regina; Escobar, Hugo Murua; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Laser based transfection methods have proven to be an efficient and gentle alternative to established molecule delivery methods like lipofection or electroporation. Among the laser based methods, gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection bears the major advantage of high throughput and easy usability. This approach uses plasmon resonances on gold nanoparticles unspecifically attached to the cell membrane to evoke transient and spatially defined cell membrane permeabilization. In this study, we explore the parameter regime for gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection for the delivery of molecules into cell lines and prove its suitability for siRNA mediated gene knock down. The developed setup allows easy usage and safe laser operation in a normal lab environment. We applied a 532 nm Nd:YAG microchip laser emitting 850 ps pulses at a repetition rate of 20.25 kHz. Scanning velocities of the laser spot over the sample of up to 200 mm/s were tested without a decline in perforation efficiency. This velocity leads to a process speed of ∼8 s per well of a 96 well plate. The optimal particle density was determined to be ∼6 particles per cell using environmental scanning electron microscopy. Applying the optimized parameters transfection efficiencies of 88% were achieved in canine pleomorphic adenoma ZMTH3 cells using a fluorescent labeled siRNA while maintaining a high cell viability of >90%. Gene knock down of d2-EGFP was demonstrated and validated by fluorescence repression and western blot analysis. On basis of our findings and established mathematical models we suppose a mixed transfection mechanism consisting of thermal and multiphoton near field effects. Our findings emphasize that gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection provides an excellent tool for molecular delivery for both, high throughput purposes and the transfection of sensitive cells types. PMID:23536802

  12. Preparation, characterization, and efficient transfection of cationic liposomes and nanomagnetic cationic liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samadikhah HR

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Hamid Reza Samadikhah1,*, Asia Majidi2,*, Maryam Nikkhah2, Saman Hosseinkhani11Department of Biochemistry, 2Department of Nanobiotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Cationic liposomes (CLs are composed of phospholipid bilayers. One of the most important applications of these particles is in drug and gene delivery. However, using CLs to deliver therapeutic nucleic acids and drugs to target organs has some problems, including low transfection efficiency in vivo. The aim of this study was to develop novel CLs containing magnetite to overcome the deficiencies. Patients and methods: CLs and magnetic cationic liposomes (MCLs were prepared using the freeze-dried empty liposome method. Luciferase-harboring vectors (pGL3 were transferred into liposomes and the transfection efficiencies were determined by luciferase assay. Firefly luciferase is one of most popular reporter genes often used to measure the efficiency of gene transfer in vivo and in vitro. Different formulations of liposomes have been used for delivery of different kinds of gene reporters. Lipoplex (liposome–plasmid DNA complexes formation was monitored by gel retardation assay. Size and charge of lipoplexes were determined using particle size analysis. Chinese hamster ovary cells were transfected by lipoplexes (liposome-pGL3; transfection efficiency and gene expression level was evaluated by luciferase assay. Results: High transfection efficiency of plasmid by CLs and novel nanomagnetic CLs was achieved. Moreover, lipoplexes showed less cytotoxicity than polyethyleneimine and Lipofectamine™. Conclusion: Novel liposome compositions (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine [DPPC]/dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide [DOAB] and DPPC/cholesterol/DOAB with high transfection efficiency can be useful in gene delivery in vitro. MCLs can also be used for targeted gene delivery, due to

  13. 77 FR 71259 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Commercial Fishing Operations; False Killer Whale Take...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-29

    ... (i.e., straighten with less force) than the Japanese-style tuna hooks used by a portion of the... the affected false killer whale stocks, describe the final FKWTRP management measures, summarize the... Report (SAR), there are five Pacific Islands Region management stocks of false killer whales: (1) The...

  14. Clearance of Giardia muris infection in mice deficient in natural killer cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Heyworth, M F; Kung, J E; Eriksson, E C

    1986-01-01

    Immunocompetent C57BL/6J mice and beige mice (which are deficient in natural killer cells) were infected with Giardia muris. Both types of mice cleared G. muris infection at similar rates. This observation suggests that clearance of G. muris parasites from the mouse intestine is not mediated by natural killer cells.

  15. Prey and seasonal abundance of killer whales at sub-Antarctic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diet of killer whales Orcinus orca was investigated from 48 predation events observed during sightings at sub-Antarctic Marion Island between 2006 and 2009. From these events, there were 10 cases where prey could be identified. Killer whales fed on fur seals Arctocephalus tropicalis, elephant seals Mirounga leonina ...

  16. Biodegradable gadolinium-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers for gene transfection and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xiaolong [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200065 (China); Wang, Gangmin [Department of Urology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Shi, Ting [The Institute for Translational Nanomedicine, Shanghai East Hospital, Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nanoscience, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Shao, Zhihong [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200065 (China); Zhao, Peng; Shi, Donglu [The Institute for Translational Nanomedicine, Shanghai East Hospital, Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nanoscience, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Ren, Jie [Institute of Nano and Biopolymeric Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 4800 Caoan Road, Shanghai 201804 (China); Lin, Chao, E-mail: chaolin@tongji.edu.cn [The Institute for Translational Nanomedicine, Shanghai East Hospital, Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nanoscience, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang, Peijun, E-mail: tjpjwang@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200065 (China)

    2016-08-01

    Theranostic nano-polyplexes containing gene and imaging agents hold a great promise for tumor diagnosis and therapy. In this work, we develop a group of new gadolinium (Gd)-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide)s for gene delivery and T{sub 1}-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Cationic poly(urethane amide)s (denoted as CPUAs) having multiple disulfide bonds, urethane and amide linkages were synthesized by stepwise polycondensation reaction between 1,4-bis(3-aminopropyl)piperazine and a mixture of di(4-nitrophenyl)-2, 2′-dithiodiethanocarbonate (DTDE-PNC) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) dianhydride at varied molar ratios. Then, Gd-chelated CPUAs (denoted as GdCPUAs) were produced by chelating Gd(III) ions with DTPA residues of CPUAs. These GdCPUAs could condense gene into nanosized and positively-charged polyplexes in a physiological condition and, however, liberated gene in an intracellular reductive environment. In vitro transfection experiments revealed that the GdCPUA at a DTDE-PNC/DTPA residue molar ratio of 85/15 induced the highest transfection efficiency in different cancer cells. This efficiency was higher than that yielded with 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine as a positive control. GdCPUAs and their polyplexes exhibited low cytotoxicity when an optimal transfection activity was detected. Moreover, GdCPUAs may serve as contrast agents for T{sub 1}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The results of this work indicate that biodegradable Gd-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers have high potential for tumor theranostics. - Highlights: • Novel cationic gadolinium-chelated poly(urethane amide)s (GdCPUAs) are prepared. • GdCPUAs can induce a high transfection efficacy in different cancer cells. • GdCPUAs reveal good cyto-compatibility against cancer cells. • GdCPUAs may be applied as T{sub 1}-contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. • GdCPUAs hold high potential for cancer theranostics.

  17. Autologous glioma cell vaccine admixed with interleukin-4 gene transfected fibroblasts in the treatment of patients with malignant gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Trejo Alejandro

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis for malignant gliomas remains dismal. We addressed the safety, feasibility and preliminary clinical activity of the vaccinations using autologous glioma cells and interleukin (IL-4 gene transfected fibroblasts. Methods In University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI protocol 95-033, adult participants with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM or anaplastic astrocytoma (AA received gross total resection (GTR of the recurrent tumors, followed by two vaccinations with autologous fibroblasts retrovirally transfected with TFG-IL4-Neo-TK vector admixed with irradiated autologous glioma cells. In UPCI 99-111, adult participants with newly diagnosed GBM or AA, following GTR and radiation therapy, received two intradermal vaccinations with the TFG-IL4-Neo-TK-transfected fibroblasts admixed with type-1 dendritic cells (DC loaded with autologous tumor lysate. The participants were evaluated for occurrence of adverse events, immune response, and clinical response by radiological imaging. Results and Discussion In UPCI 95-033, only 2 of 6 participants received the vaccinations. Four other participants were withdrawn from the trial because of tumor progression prior to production of the cellular vaccine. However, both participants who received two vaccinations demonstrated encouraging immunological and clinical responses. Biopsies from the local vaccine sites from one participant displayed IL-4 dose-dependent infiltration of CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells. Interferon (IFN-γ Enzyme-Linked Immuno-SPOT (ELISPOT assay in another human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A2+ participant demonstrated systemic T-cell responses against an HLA-A2-restricted glioma-associated antigen (GAA epitope EphA2883–891. Moreover, both participants demonstrated clinical and radiological improvement with no evidence of allergic encephalitis, although both participants eventually succumbed with the tumor recurrence. In 99-111, 5 of 6 enrolled participants

  18. Reproductive Conflict and the Evolution of Menopause in Killer Whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Darren P; Johnstone, Rufus A; Ellis, Samuel; Nattrass, Stuart; Franks, Daniel W; Brent, Lauren J N; Mazzi, Sonia; Balcomb, Kenneth C; Ford, John K B; Cant, Michael A

    2017-01-23

    Why females of some species cease ovulation prior to the end of their natural lifespan is a long-standing evolutionary puzzle [1-4]. The fitness benefits of post-reproductive helping could in principle select for menopause [1, 2, 5], but the magnitude of these benefits appears insufficient to explain the timing of menopause [6-8]. Recent theory suggests that the cost of inter-generational reproductive conflict between younger and older females of the same social unit is a critical missing term in classical inclusive fitness calculations (the "reproductive conflict hypothesis" [6, 9]). Using a unique long-term dataset on wild resident killer whales, where females can live decades after their final parturition, we provide the first test of this hypothesis in a non-human animal. First, we confirm previous theoretical predictions that local relatedness increases with female age up to the end of reproduction. Second, we construct a new evolutionary model and show that given these kinship dynamics, selection will favor younger females that invest more in competition, and thus have greater reproductive success, than older females (their mothers) when breeding at the same time. Third, we test this prediction using 43 years of individual-based demographic data in resident killer whales and show that when mothers and daughters co-breed, the mortality hazard of calves from older-generation females is 1.7 times that of calves from younger-generation females. Intergenerational conflict combined with the known benefits conveyed to kin by post-reproductive females can explain why killer whales have evolved the longest post-reproductive lifespan of all non-human animals. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Yeast Killer Toxin K28: Biology and Unique Strategy of Host Cell Intoxication and Killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Becker

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The initial discovery of killer toxin-secreting brewery strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae in the mid-sixties of the last century marked the beginning of intensive research in the yeast virology field. So far, four different S. cerevisiae killer toxins (K28, K1, K2, and Klus, encoded by cytoplasmic inherited double-stranded RNA viruses (dsRNA of the Totiviridae family, have been identified. Among these, K28 represents the unique example of a yeast viral killer toxin that enters a sensitive cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis to reach its intracellular target(s. This review summarizes and discusses the most recent advances and current knowledge on yeast killer toxin K28, with special emphasis on its endocytosis and intracellular trafficking, pointing towards future directions and open questions in this still timely and fascinating field of killer yeast research.

  20. Retroviral expression screening of oncogenes in natural killer cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Lim; Moriuchi, Ryozo; Osawa, Mitsujiro; Iwama, Atsushi; Makishima, Hideki; Wada, Tomoaki; Kisanuki, Hiroyuki; Kaneda, Ruri; Ota, Jun; Koinuma, Koji; Ishikawa, Madoka; Takada, Shuji; Yamashita, Yoshihiro; Oshimi, Kazuo; Mano, Hiroyuki

    2005-08-01

    Aggressive natural killer cell leukemia (ANKL) is an intractable malignancy that is characterized by the outgrowth of NK cells. To identify transforming genes in ANKL, we constructed a retroviral cDNA expression library from an ANKL cell line KHYG-1. Infection of 3T3 cells with recombinant retroviruses yielded 33 transformed foci. Nucleotide sequencing of the DNA inserts recovered from these foci revealed that 31 of them encoded KRAS2 with a glycine-to-alanine mutation at codon 12. Mutation-specific PCR analysis indicated that the KRAS mutation was present only in KHYG-1 cells, not in another ANKL cell line or in clinical specimens (n=8).

  1. The mitochondrial death squad: hardened killers or innocent bystanders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekert, Paul G; Vaux, David L

    2005-12-01

    Since the discovery that formation of the apoptosome in mammalian cells is triggered by cytochrome c released from the mitochondria, many other mitochondrial proteins have been suspected to be part of a conspiracy to cause cell death. AIF, EndoG, ANT, cyclophilin D, Bit1, p53AIP, GRIM-19, DAP3, Nur77/TR3/NGFB-1, HtrA2/Omi and Smac/Diablo have all been convicted as killers, but new genetic technology is raising questions about their guilt. Gene knockout experiments suggest that many were wrongly convicted on circumstantial evidence, and just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time.

  2. Defective Natural Killer cell antiviral capacity in paediatric HBV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ida Louise; Laura J., Pallett; Winther, Thilde Nordmann

    2015-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells exhibit dysregulated effector function in adult chronic HBV infection (CHB), which may contribute to virus persistence. The role of NK cells in children infected perinatally with HBV is less studied. Access to a unique cohort enabled the cross-sectional evaluation of NK...... cell frequency, phenotype and function in HBV-infected children relative to uninfected children. We observed a selective defect in NK cell IFN-γ production, with conserved cytolytic function, mirroring the functional dichotomy observed in adult infection. Reduced expression of NKp30 on NK cells...

  3. Natural Killer Cells in the Orchestration of Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Parisi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation, altered immune cell phenotype, and functions are key features shared by diverse chronic diseases, including cardiovascular, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cancer. Natural killer cells are innate lymphoid cells primarily involved in the immune system response to non-self-components but their plasticity is largely influenced by the pathological microenvironment. Altered NK phenotype and function have been reported in several pathological conditions, basically related to impaired or enhanced toxicity. Here we reviewed and discussed the role of NKs in selected, different, and “distant” chronic diseases, cancer, diabetes, periodontitis, and atherosclerosis, placing NK cells as crucial orchestrator of these pathologic conditions.

  4. Transferrin-facilitated lipofection gene delivery strategy: characterization of the transfection complexes and intracellular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshee, Nirmal; Bastola, Dhundy R; Cheng, Pi-Wan

    2002-11-01

    We previously showed that mixing transferrin with a cationic liposome prior to the addition of DNA, greatly enhanced the lipofection efficiency. Here, we report characterization of the transfection complexes in formulations prepared with transferrin, lipofectin, and DNA (pCMVlacZ) in various formulations. DNA in all the formulations that contain lipofectin was resistant to DNase I treatment. Transfection experiments performed in Panc 1 cells showed that the standard formulation, which was prepared by adding DNA to a mixture of transferrin and lipofectin, yielded highest transfection efficiency. There was no apparent difference in zeta potential among these formulations, but the most efficient formulation contained complexes with a mean diameter of three to four times that of liposome and the complexes in other gene delivery formulations. Transmission electron microscopic examination of the standard transfection complexes formulated using gold-labeled transferrin showed extended circular DNA decorated with transferrin as compared to extensively condensed DNA found in lipofectin-DNA complexes and heterogeneous structures in other formulations. By confocal microscopy, DNA and transferrin were found to colocalize at the perinuclear space and in the nucleus, suggesting cotransportation intracellularly, including nuclear transport. We propose that transferrin enhances the transfection efficiency of the standard lipofection formulation by preventing DNA condensation, and facilitating endocytosis and nuclear targeting.

  5. Ultrasound-mediated interferon β gene transfection inhibits growth of malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Kazuki; Feril, Loreto B.; Tachibana, Katsuro; Takahashi, Akira; Matsuo, Miki; Endo, Hitomi; Harada, Yoshimi; Nakayama, Juichiro

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Successful ultrasound-mediated transfection of melanoma (C32) cells with IFN-β genes both in vitro and in vivo. → Ultrasound-mediated IFN-β transfection inhibited proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro. → Ultrasound-mediated IFN-β transfection inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. -- Abstract: We investigated the effects of ultrasound-mediated transfection (sonotransfection) of interferon β (IFN-β) gene on melanoma (C32) both in vitro and in vivo. C32 cells were sonotransfected with IFN-β in vitro. Subcutaneous C32 tumors in mice were sonicated weekly immediately after intra-tumor injection with IFN-β genes mixed with microbubbles. Successful sonotransfection with IFN-β gene in vitro was confirmed by ELISA, which resulted in C32 growth inhibition. In vivo, the growth ratio of tumors transfected with IFN-β gene was significantly lower than the other experimental groups. These results may lead to a new method of treatment against melanoma and other hard-to-treat cancers.

  6. Structure relationship of cationic lipids on gene transfection mediated by cationic liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paecharoenchai, Orapan; Niyomtham, Nattisa; Apirakaramwong, Auayporn; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-ek; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the transfection efficiency of cationic liposomes formulated with phosphatidylcholine (PC) and novel synthesized diethanolamine-based cationic lipids at a molar ratio of 5:1 in comparison with Lipofectamine™ 2000. Factors affecting transfection efficiency and cell viability, including the chemical structure of the cationic lipids, such as different amine head group (diamine and polyamine; and non-spermine and spermine) and acyl chain lengths (C14, C16, and C18) and the weight ratio of liposomes to DNA were evaluated on a human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa cells) using the pDNA encoding green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C2). Characterizations of these lipoplexes in terms of size and charge measurement and agarose gel electrophoresis were performed. The results from this study revealed that almost no transfection was observed in the liposome formulations composed of cationic lipids with a non-spermine head group. In addition, the transfection efficiency of these cationic liposomes was in the following order: spermine-C14 > spermine-C16 > spermine-C18. The highest transfection efficiency was observed in the formulation of spermine-C14 liposomes at a weight ratio of 25; furthermore, this formulation was safe for use in vitro. In conclusion, cationic liposomes containing spermine head groups demonstrated promising potential as gene carriers.

  7. Photoenhanced gene transfection by a curcumin loaded CS-g-PZLL micelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian-Tao; Pan, Wen-Jia; Zhang, Jun-Ai; Wang, Wei; Zhong, Jia; Su, Jia-Min; Li, Tong; Zou, Ying; Wang, Guan-Hai

    2017-09-01

    The codelivery of drug and gene is a promising method for cancer treatment. In our previous works, we prepared a cationic micelles based on chitosan and poly-(N-3-carbobenzyloxylysine) (CS-g-PZLL), but transfection ratio of CS-g-PZLL to Hela cell was low. Herein, to improve the transfection efficiency of CS-g-PZLL, curcumin was loaded in the CS-g-PZLL micelle. After irradiation, the obtained curcumin loaded micelle showed a better transfection, and the p53 protein expression in Hela cells was higher. The apoptosis assay showed that the complex could induce a more significant apoptosis to Hela cells than that of curcumin or p53 used alone, and the curcumin loaded micelle inducing apoptosis was best after irradiation. Therefore, CS-g-PZLL is a safe and effective carrier for the codelivery of drug/gene, and curcumin could be used as a photosensitizer to induce a photoenhanced gene transfection, which should be encouraged in improving transfection and tumor therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Effects of daratumumab on natural killer cells and impact on clinical outcomes in relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casneuf, Tineke; Xu, Xu Steven; Adams, Homer C

    2017-01-01

    Daratumumab, a human CD38 imunoglobulin G 1κ monoclonal antibody, has demonstrated clinical activity and a manageable safety profile in monotherapy and combination therapy clinical trials in relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma. CD38 is expressed at high levels on myeloma cells and......, to a lesser extent, on immune effector cells, including natural killer (NK) cells, which are important for daratumumab-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Here, the pharmacodynamic effects of daratumumab monotherapy on NK cells, and the effect of NK cell dynamics on daratumumab efficacy...

  9. Natural Killer p46 Controls Hepatitis B Virus Replication and Modulates Liver Inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanyu Li

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells play an important role in hepatitis B virus (HBV infection control, and are regulated by a complex network of activating and inhibitory receptors. However, NK cell activity in HBV patients remains poorly understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the phenotypic and functional characteristics of circulating NK cells in patients during different chronic hepatitis B (CHB infection stages. We investigated NK cell phenotypes, receptor expression and function in 86 CHB patients and 20 healthy controls. NK cells were purified and NK cell subsets were characterized by flow cytometry. Cytotoxic activity (CD107a and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ secretion were examined, and Natural Killer p46 (NKP46 blockade and spontaneous NK cell cytolytic activity against K562, HepG2 and HepG2.215 cell lines was studied. Activating NKp46 receptor expression was higher in inactive HBsAg carriers when compared with other groups (p = 0.008. NKp46 expression negatively correlated with HBV DNA (R = -0.253, p = 0.049 and ALT (R = -0.256, p = 0.045 levels. CD107a was higher in immune-activated groups when compared with immune-tolerant groups (p = 0.039. CD107a expression was related to viral load (p = 0.02 and HBeAg status (p = 0.024. In vitro NKp46 blockade reduced NK cell cytolytic activity against HepG2 and HepG2.215 cell lines (p = 0.02; p = 0.039. Furthermore, NK cells from high viral load CHB patients displayed significantly lower specific cytolytic activity against anti-NKp46-loaded K562 targets (p = 0.0321. No significant differences were observed in IFN-γ secretion (p > 0.05. In conclusion, NKp46 expression regulates NK cell cytolytic function. NKp46 may moderate NK cell activity during HBV replication suppression and HBV-associated liver damage and may be critical for NK cell activity during CHB infection.

  10. The M1 muscarinic receptor and its second messenger coupling in human neuroblastoma cells and transfected murine fibroblast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, Lin.

    1989-01-01

    The data of this study indicate that pirenzepine (PZ)-high affinity muscarinic receptors (mAChRs) are coupled to the hydrolysis of inositol lipids and not to the adenylate cyclase system in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The maximal carbachol(CCh)-stimulated [ 3 H]IP 1 accumulation in the SH-SY5Y cells was decreased in the presence of 1μg/ml pertussis toxin, suggesting that a pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein may be involved in the coupling. Several cell clones which express only M 1 mAChR were generated by transfecting the murine fibroblast B82 cells with the cloned rat genomic m 1 gene. The transfected B82 cells (cTB10) showed specific [ 3 H](-)QNB binding activity. The mAChRs in these cells are of the M 1 type defined by their high affinity for PZ and low affinity for AF-DX 116 and coupled to hydrolysis of inositol lipids, possibly via a pertussis toxin sensitive G protein. The relationship between the M 1 mAChR density and the receptor-mediated hydrolysis of inositol lipids was studied in 7 clones. The M 1 mAChR densities in these cells characterized by [ 3 H](-)MQNB binding ranged from 12 fmol/10 6 cells in LK3-1 cells to 260 fmol/10 6 cells in the LK3-8 cells

  11. Establishing malaria parasite transfection technology in South Africa.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Brummelen, AC

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available reported to have bidirectional promoter activity, was utilized to drive expression through two genes (i.e. the antibiotic-resistance gene, human dhfr and the reporter gene) in a head-to-head orientation. In addition, protocols were adjusted by including DNA...

  12. Regulation of Murine Natural Killer Cell Commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D Huntington

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available NK cells can derive from the same precursors as B and T cells, however to achieve lineage specificity, several transcription factors need to be activated or annulled. While a few important transcription factors have identified for NK genesis the mechanisms of how this is achieved is far from resolved. Adding to the complexity of this, NK cells are found and potentially develop in diverse locations in vivo and it remains to be addressed if a common NK cell precursor seeds diverse niches and how transcription factors may differentially regulate NK cell commitment in distinct microenvironments. Here we will summarise some recent findings in NK cell commitment and discuss how a NK cell transcriptional network might be organised, while addressing some misconceptions and anomalies along the way.

  13. Malignant transformation of diploid human fibroblasts by transfection of oncogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    This document consist of brief reports prepared by postdoctoral students supported by the project, each describing his accomplishments under the grant. Topics include (1) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1. 1 Cells by Gamma Radiation, (2) Correlation between Levels of ras Expression and Presence of Transformed Phenotypes Including Tumorigenicity, Using a Modulatable Promoter, (3) Relation between Specific rad Oncogene Expression, (4) Correlation of Genetic Changes in Fibroblastic Tumors with Malignancies, (5)Transformation of MSU-1.1 Cells by sis Oncogene, (6) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1.0 Cells, (7) Correlation of Urokinase Plasminogen Activation (mu-PA) with Malignant Phenotype, (8)Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Studies of the Proteins of the Major Cell Strains of the MSU-1 Family of Cells, and (9) Correlation between Proteinase Activity Levels and Malignancy.

  14. Malignant transformation of diploid human fibroblasts by transfection of oncogenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    This document consist of brief reports prepared by postdoctoral students supported by the project, each describing his accomplishments under the grant. Topics include (1) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1. 1 Cells by Gamma Radiation, (2) Correlation between Levels of ras Expression and Presence of Transformed Phenotypes Including Tumorigenicity, Using a Modulatable Promoter, (3) Relation between Specific rad Oncogene Expression, (4) Correlation of Genetic Changes in Fibroblastic Tumors with Malignancies, (5)Transformation of MSU-1.1 Cells by sis Oncogene, (6) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1.0 Cells, (7) Correlation of Urokinase Plasminogen Activation (mu-PA) with Malignant Phenotype, (8)Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Studies of the Proteins of the Major Cell Strains of the MSU-1 Family of Cells, and (9) Correlation between Proteinase Activity Levels and Malignancy

  15. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of blood natural killer cells from melanoma patients at different clinical stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Fregni

    Full Text Available Melanomas are aggressive skin tumors characterized by high metastatic potential. Immunotherapy is a valuable alternative for metastatic melanoma patients resistant to chemotherapy. Natural Killer (NK cells are efficient anti-tumor cytotoxic effectors. We previously showed that blood NK cells from stage IV metastatic melanoma patients display decreased NK receptors and that chemotherapy modifies the functional status of blood NK cells. To investigate the role of NK cells along melanoma progression, we have here studied NK cells from patients at different stages of the disease. First, we showed that ex vivo NK cells from certain stage III-IV patients displayed low degranulation potential. Using a dynamic label-free assay, we found that immunoselected IL-2 activated blood NK cells from patients efficiently lysed melanoma cells through NKp46 and NKG2D receptors, independently to the clinical stage. Moreover, the ex vivo phenotype of circulating NK cells from 33 patients (stage I to IV was extensively analyzed. NK cells from patients displayed higher variability in the percentages of Natural Cytotoxicity Receptors (NCR and Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D receptor expression compared to donor NK cells. The main defect was the decreased expression of NCR1 (NKp46 by NK cells from metastatic patients. Interestingly, we found a positive correlation between the NK cell percentages of NKp46 and the duration of stage IV in melanoma patients. Finally, we showed that NK cells infiltrated primary melanomas and displayed a predominant peritumoral distribution. These results are new arguments for the development of NK-based therapies in melanoma patients.

  16. IL-15 STIMULATED NATURAL KILLER CELLS CLEAR HIV-1 INFECTED CELLS FOLLOWING LATENCY REVERSAL EX VIVO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Carolina; Abad-Fernandez, Maria; Tuyishime, Marina; Pollara, Justin J; Ferrari, Guido; Soriano-Sarabia, Natalia; Margolis, David M

    2018-03-28

    Current efforts towards HIV eradication include approaches to augment immune recognition and elimination of persistently infected cells following latency reversal. Natural killer (NK) cells, the main effectors of the innate immune system, recognize and clear targets using different mechanisms than CD8 + T cells, offering an alternative or complementary approach for HIV clearance strategies. We assessed the impact of IL-15 treatment on NK cell function and the potential of stimulated NK cells to clear the HIV reservoir. We measured NK cell receptor expression, antibody-dependent cell-dependent cytotoxicity (ADCC), cytotoxicity, IFN-γ production and antiviral activity in autologous HIV replication systems. All NK cell functions were uniformly improved by IL-15, and more importantly, IL-15-treated NK cells were able to clear latently HIV infected cells after exposure to vorinostat, a clinically relevant latency reversing agent. We also demonstrate that NK cells from HIV infected individuals aviremic on antiretroviral therapy can be efficiently stimulated with IL-15. Our work opens a promising line of investigation towards future immunotherapies to clear persistent HIV infection using NK cells. IMPORTANCE In the search for an HIV cure, strategies to enhance immune function to allow recognition and clearance of HIV infected cells following latency reversal are being evaluated. Natural killer (NK) cells possess characteristics that can be exploited for immunotherapy against persistent HIV infection. We demonstrate that NK cells from HIV-positive donors can be strongly stimulated with IL-15, improving their antiviral and cytotoxic potential, and more importantly, clearing HIV infected cells after latency reversal with a clinically relevant drug. Our results encourage further investigation to design NK cell-based immunotherapies to achieve HIV eradication. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Lipofection: A Highly Efficient, Lipid-Mediated DNA-Transfection Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgner, Philip L.; Gadek, Thomas R.; Holm, Marilyn; Roman, Richard; Chan, Hardy W.; Wenz, Michael; Northrop, Jeffrey P.; Ringold, Gordon M.; Danielsen, Mark

    1987-11-01

    A DNA-transfection protocol has been developed that makes use of a synthetic cationic lipid, N-[1-(2,3-dioleyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride (DOTMA). Small unilamellar liposomes containing DOTMA interact spontaneously with DNA to form lipid-DNA complexes with 100% entrapment of the DNA. DOTMA facilitates fusion of the complex with the plasma membrane of tissue culture cells, resulting in both uptake and expression of the DNA. The technique is simple, highly reproducible, and effective for both transient and stable expression of transfected DNA. Depending upon the cell line, lipofection is from 5- to >100-fold more effective than either the calcium phosphate or the DEAE-dextran transfection technique.

  18. Relationship between the supramolecular structure and the transfection efficiency for cationic micelle/DNA complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuragi, Mina; Kusuki, Shota; Hamada, Emi; Sakurai, Kazuo; Masunaga, Hiroyasu; Sasaki, Sono

    2009-01-01

    We synthesized a cationic lipid benzyl amine derivative bearing a primary amine as the head group and evaluated its transfection efficiency as a DNA carrier. A lipoplex (complex of DNA and lipid micelle) was prepared by mixing BA and two neutral colipids (DOPE and DLPC). When we compared the transfection efficiency at various compositions, we found that B-lipoplex (BA/DOPE/DLPC=1/2/1) was the most efficient while A-lipoplex (BA/DLPC=1/1) showed no transfection. We compared A-lipoplex with B-lipoplex by use of SAXS, fluorescence spectrum of ethidium bromide and pyrene. These results indicated that A-lipoplex formed a lamellar or cylinder structure within which DNA molecules were trapped in the lipid alkyl chain, while B-lipoplex formed cylinders where DNAs were intercalated between the lipid micelle cylinders. (author)

  19. Flocculent killer yeast for ethanol fermentation of beet molasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, Kazuhito; Shimoii, Hitoshi; Sato, Shun' ichi; Saito, Kazuo; Tadenuma, Makoto

    1987-09-25

    When ethanol is produced using beet molasses, the concentration of ethanol is lower than that obtained using suger cane molasses. Yeast strain improvement was conducted to enhance ethanol production from beet molasses. The procedures and the results are as follows: (1) After giving ethanol tolerance to the flocculent yeast, strain 180 and the killer yeast, strain 909-1, strain 180-A-7, and strain 909-1-A-4 were isolated. These ethanol tolerant strains had better alcoholic fermentation capability and had more surviving cells in mash in the later process of fermentation than the parental strains. (2) Strain H-1 was bred by spore to cell mating between these two ethanol tolerant strains. Strain H-1 is both flocculent and killer and has better alcoholic fermentation capability than the parental strains. (3) In the fermentation test of beet molasses, strain H-1 showed 12.8% of alcoholic fermentation capability. It is equal to that of sugar cane molasses. Fermentation with reused cells were also successful. (5 figs, 21 refs)

  20. Energy Security: From Deal Killers to Game Changers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Charlie

    2010-03-01

    Five energy security ``deal killers" are identified: 1) Global warming and CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion; 2) Intermittent energy sources (wind, solar) and the presence and stability of the grid; 3) Penetration of plant defenses to produce transportation fuels from biomass; 4) Mimicking nature: artificial photosynthesis for solar energy to fuels; and 5) Spent fuel from nuclear power reactors. Transformational basic research is required to successfully change the ground rules, to transform these ``deal killers" into ``game changers." T hey are: 1) Offsetting carbon capture and storage costs through enhanced oil recovery and methane generation from high temperature geothermal saline aquifers; 2) Electrical energy storage, through batteries and super-capacitors; 3) Genetic modification of plant cell walls, and catalytic methods for transforming plant sugars into fuels; 4) Separation of solar-induced electrons from holes, and catalysis to produce fuels; and 5) Closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Basic research can revolutionize our approach to carbon-free energy by enhancing nature to achieve energy security.

  1. Runaway electron generation during plasma shutdown by killer pellet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, K; Feher, T; Smith, H; Fueloep, T; Helander, P

    2008-01-01

    Tokamak discharges are sometimes terminated by disruptions that may cause large mechanical and thermal loads on the vessel. To mitigate disruption-induced problems it has been proposed that 'killer' pellets could be injected into the plasma in order to safely terminate the discharge. Killer pellets enhance radiative energy loss and thereby lead to rapid cooling and shutdown of the discharge. But pellets may also cause runaway electron generation, as has been observed in experiments in several tokamaks. In this work, runaway dynamics in connection with deuterium or carbon pellet-induced fast plasma shutdown is considered. A pellet code, which calculates the material deposition and initial cooling caused by the pellet is coupled to a runaway code, which determines the subsequent temperature evolution and runaway generation. In this way, a tool has been created to test the suitability of different pellet injection scenarios for disruption mitigation. If runaway generation is avoided, the resulting current quench times are too long to safely avoid large forces on the vessel due to halo currents

  2. Pig BMSCs Transfected with Human TFPI Combat Species Incompatibility and Regulate the Human TF Pathway in Vitro and in a Rodent Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongchen Ji

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The activation of tissue factor (TF is one of the major reasons for coagulation dysregulation after pig-to-primate xenotransplantation. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI is the most important inhibitor of TF. Studies have demonstrated species incompatibility between pig TFPI and human TF. Methods: A pig-to-macaque heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation model was established to determine the origin of activated TF. Chimeric proteins of human and pig TFPI were constructed to assess the role of Kunitz domains in species incompatibility. Immortalised pig bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transfected with human TFPI were tested for their ability to inhibit clotting in vitro. Results: TF from recipient was activated early after liver xenotransplantation. Pig TFPI Kunitz domain 2 bound human FXa, but Kunitz domain 1 did not effectively inhibit human TF/FVIIa. Immortalised pig bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BMSCs transfected with human TFPI showed a prolonged recalcification time in vitro and in a rodent model. Conclusion: Recipient TF is relevant to dysregulated coagulation after xenotransplantation. Kunitz domain 1 plays the most important role in species incompatibility between pig TFPI and human TF, and clotting can be inhibited by human TFPI-transfected pig BMSCs. Our study shows a possible way to resolve the incompatibility of pig TFPI.

  3. Occurrence of nodular lymphocyte-predominant hodgkin lymphoma in hermansky-pudlak type 2 syndrome is associated to natural killer and natural killer T cell defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Lorenzi

    Full Text Available Hermansky Pudlak type 2 syndrome (HPS2 is a rare autosomal recessive primary immune deficiency caused by mutations on β3A gene (AP3B1 gene. The defect results in the impairment of the adaptor protein 3 (AP-3 complex, responsible for protein sorting to secretory lysosomes leading to oculo-cutaneous albinism, bleeding disorders and immunodeficiency. We have studied peripheral blood and lymph node biopsies from two siblings affected by HPS2. Lymph node histology showed a nodular lymphocyte predominance type Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL in both HPS2 siblings. By immunohistochemistry, CD8 T-cells from HPS2 NLPHL contained an increased amount of perforin (Prf + suggesting a defect in the release of this granules-associated protein. By analyzing peripheral blood immune cells we found a significant reduction of circulating NKT cells and of CD56(brightCD16(- Natural Killer (NK cells subset. Functionally, NK cells were defective in their cytotoxic activity against tumor cell lines including Hodgkin Lymphoma as well as in IFN-γ production. This defect was associated with increased baseline level of CD107a and CD63 at the surface level of unstimulated and IL-2-activated NK cells. In summary, these results suggest that a combined and profound defect of innate and adaptive effector cells might explain the susceptibility to infections and lymphoma in these HPS2 patients.

  4. Proteasomal targeting and minigene repetition improve cell-surface presentation of a transfected, modified melanoma tumour antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, A B; Zocca, M-B; Bonefeld, C M

    2004-01-01

    Melanoma antigen recognized by T cell 1 (MART-1) is regarded as a candidate peptide for vaccination against malignant melanoma, and it is of importance to develop strategies to improve the vaccine-elicited T-cell activation towards MART-1. T-cell activation is, among other determinants, dependent...... on the density of specific major histocompatibility complex-peptide complexes on the surface of the antigen-presenting cell. In this study, we explored the cell-surface presentation of a substituted MART-1 peptide encoded by transfected minigenes. We investigated the potential of proteasomal targeting compared...... to non-proteasomal targeting of the epitope to increase its cell-surface presentation. Furthermore, we explored the potential of incorporating multiple minigenes instead of one to increase cell-surface presentation. We show that both proteasomal targeting and repetition of the minigene increase cell...

  5. Transfection of glioma cells with the neural-cell adhesion molecule NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvardsen, K; Pedersen, P H; Bjerkvig, R

    1994-01-01

    The tumor growth and the invasive capacity of a rat glioma cell line (BT4Cn) were studied after transfection with the human transmembrane 140-kDa isoform of the neural-cell adhesion molecule, NCAM. After s.c. injection, the NCAM-transfected cells showed a slower growth rate than the parent cell...... of the injection site, with a sharply demarcated border between the tumor and brain tissue. In contrast, the parental cell line showed single-cell infiltration and more pronounced destruction of normal brain tissue. Using a 51Cr-release assay, spleen cells from rats transplanted with BT4Cn tumor cells generally...

  6. pSv3neo transfection and radiosensitivity of human cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parris, C.N.; Masters, J.R.W.; Green, M.H.L.

    1990-01-01

    Immortalisation of human fibroblasts by transfection with a plasmid, pSV3neo, results in an increase in their radioresistance. The change in radiosensitivity may either be a consequence of transformation or due to expression of the SV40 T-antigen in pSV3neo. To investigate these two possibilities, we transfected pSV3neo into cells already transformed and immortalised. The radiosensitivies of three human bladder cancer cell lines were unaltered in clones expressing T-antigen, indicating that the changes observed in fibroblasts probably are a consequence of transformation, and not the presence of SV40 T-antigen. (author)

  7. A novel Leishmania infantum nuclear phosphoprotein Lepp12 which stimulates IL1-beta synthesis in THP-1 transfectants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mograbi Baharia

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report cloning and characterization of a novel Leishmania infantum protein which we termed Lepp12, and we examine its possible implication in the interference with intramacrophage signaling pathways. Results The protein Lepp12 contains 87 amino acid sequence and exhibits 5 potential phosphorylation sites by protein kinase C (PKC. Recombinant GST-Lepp12 is phosphorylated in vitro by exogenous PKC and by PKC-like activities present in promastigote and in the myelomonocytic THP-1 cell line, indicating that at least one phosphorylation site is functional on the recombinant Lepp12. The natural Lepp12 protein is present in L. infantum promastigotes, as evidenced using specific anti-Lepp12 antibodies produced by immunopurification from acute phase VL patient sera. Interestingly, human patient sera are strongly reactive with GST-Lepp12, demonstrating immunogenic properties of Lepp12 in man, but no immune response to Lepp12 is detectable in experimentally infected animals. When isolated from promastigotes, Lepp12 migrates as two species of apparent MW of 18.3 kDa (major and 14 kDa (minor, localizes in the nuclear fraction and appears constitutively phosphorylated. Natural Lepp12 is phosphorylable in vitro by both exogenous PKC and PKC-like activity present in THP-1 extracts. The intracellular Lepp12 transfected into THP-1 cells activates these cells to produce IL-1beta and induces an enhancing effect on PMA stimulated IL-1beta synthesis, as demonstrated using GST-Lepp12 transfectants. Conclusions Together these results indicate that Lepp12 represents a substrate for PKC or other PKC-like activities present in the promastigote form and the host cell and therefore may interfere with signal transduction pathways involving PKC.

  8. Paternal HLA-C and Maternal Killer-Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Genotypes in the Development of Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamliel, Moriya; Anderson, Karen L; Ebstein, Richard P; Yirmiya, Nurit; Mankuta, David

    2016-01-01

    Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are a family of cell surface proteins found on natural killer cells, which are components of the innate immune system. KIRs recognize MHC class I proteins, mainly HLA-C and are further divided into two groups: short-tailed 2/3DS activating receptors and long-tailed 2/3DL inhibitory receptors. Based on the Barker Hypothesis, the origins of illness can be traced back to embryonic development in the uterus, and since KIR:HLA interaction figures prominently in the maternal-fetal interface, we investigated whether specific KIR:HLA combinations may be found in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) children compared with their healthy parents. This study enrolled 49 ASD children from different Israeli families, and their healthy parents. Among the parents, a higher frequency of HLA-C2 allotypes was found in the fathers, while its corresponding ligand 2DS1 was found in higher percentage in the maternal group. However, such skewing in KIR:HLA frequencies did not appear in the ASD children. Additionally, analysis of "overall activation" indicated higher activation in maternal than in paternal cohorts.

  9. Natural killer cell lines preferentially kill clonogenic multiple myeloma cells and decrease myeloma engraftment in a bioluminescent xenograft mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Brenna E; Williams, Brent A; Kosaka, Yoko; Wang, Xing-Hua; Medin, Jeffrey A; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Keating, Armand

    2012-07-01

    Novel therapies capable of targeting drug resistant clonogenic MM cells are required for more effective treatment of multiple myeloma. This study investigates the cytotoxicity of natural killer cell lines against bulk and clonogenic multiple myeloma and evaluates the tumor burden after NK cell therapy in a bioluminescent xenograft mouse model. The cytotoxicity of natural killer cell lines was evaluated against bulk multiple myeloma cell lines using chromium release and flow cytometry cytotoxicity assays. Selected activating receptors on natural killer cells were blocked to determine their role in multiple myeloma recognition. Growth inhibition of clonogenic multiple myeloma cells was assessed in a methylcellulose clonogenic assay in combination with secondary replating to evaluate the self-renewal of residual progenitors after natural killer cell treatment. A bioluminescent mouse model was developed using the human U266 cell line transduced to express green fluorescent protein and luciferase (U266eGFPluc) to monitor disease progression in vivo and assess bone marrow engraftment after intravenous NK-92 cell therapy. Three multiple myeloma cell lines were sensitive to NK-92 and KHYG-1 cytotoxicity mediated by NKp30, NKp46, NKG2D and DNAM-1 activating receptors. NK-92 and KHYG-1 demonstrated 2- to 3-fold greater inhibition of clonogenic multiple myeloma growth, compared with killing of the bulk tumor population. In addition, the residual colonies after treatment formed significantly fewer colonies compared to the control in a secondary replating for a cumulative clonogenic inhibition of 89-99% at the 20:1 effector to target ratio. Multiple myeloma tumor burden was reduced by NK-92 in a xenograft mouse model as measured by bioluminescence imaging and reduction in bone marrow engraftment of U266eGFPluc cells by flow cytometry. This study demonstrates that NK-92 and KHYG-1 are capable of killing clonogenic and bulk multiple myeloma cells. In addition, multiple myeloma

  10. Effects of new Torulaspora delbrueckii killer yeasts on the must fermentation kinetics and aroma compounds of white table wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío eVelázquez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Torulaspora delbrueckii is becoming widely recommended for improving some specific characteristics of wines. However, its impact on wine quality is still far from satisfactory at the winery level, mostly because it is easily replaced by S. cerevisiae-like yeasts during must fermentation. New T. delbrueckii killer strains were here isolated and selected for winemaking. They killed S. cerevisiae yeasts and were able to dominate and complete the fermentation of sterile grape must. Sequential yeast inoculation of non-sterile white must with T. delbrueckii followed by S. cerevisiae did not ensure T. delbrueckii dominance or wine quality improvement. Only a single initial must inoculation at high cell concentrations allowed the T. delbrueckii killer strains to dominate and complete the must fermentation to reach above 11% ethanol, but not the non-killer strains. None of the wines underwent malolactic fermentation as long as the must had low turbidity and pH. Although no statistically significant differences were found in the wine quality score, the S. cerevisiae-dominated wines were preferred over the T. delbrueckii-dominated ones because the former had high-intensity fresh fruit aromas while the latter had lower intensity, but nevertheless nice and unusual dried fruit/pastry aromas. Except for ethyl propanoate and 3-ethoxy-1-propanol, which were more abundant in the T. delbrueckii–dominated wines, most of the compounds with fresh fruit odour descriptors, including those with the greatest odour activity values (isoamyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl octanoate, were more abundant in the S. cerevisiae–dominated wines. The low relative concentrations of these fruity compounds made it possible to detect in the T. delbrueckii–dominated wines the low-relative-concentration compounds with dried fruit and pastry odours. An example was γ-ethoxy-butyrolactone which was significantly more abundant in these wines than in those dominated by S

  11. Effects of new Torulaspora delbrueckii killer yeasts on the must fermentation kinetics and aroma compounds of white table wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Rocío; Zamora, Emiliano; Álvarez, María L; Hernández, Luis M; Ramírez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Torulaspora delbrueckii is becoming widely recommended for improving some specific characteristics of wines. However, its impact on wine quality is still far from satisfactory at the winery level, mostly because it is easily replaced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae-like yeasts during must fermentation. New T. delbrueckii killer strains were here isolated and selected for winemaking. They killed S. cerevisiae yeasts and were able to dominate and complete the fermentation of sterile grape must. Sequential yeast inoculation of non-sterile white must with T. delbrueckii followed by S. cerevisiae did not ensure T. delbrueckii dominance or wine quality improvement. Only a single initial must inoculation at high cell concentrations allowed the T. delbrueckii killer strains to dominate and complete the must fermentation to reach above 11% ethanol, but not the non-killer strains. None of the wines underwent malolactic fermentation as long as the must had low turbidity and pH. Although no statistically significant differences were found in the wine quality score, the S. cerevisiae-dominated wines were preferred over the T. delbrueckii-dominated ones because the former had high-intensity fresh fruit aromas while the latter had lower intensity, but nevertheless nice and unusual dried fruit/pastry aromas. Except for ethyl propanoate and 3-ethoxy-1-propanol, which were more abundant in the T. delbrueckii-dominated wines, most of the compounds with fresh fruit odor descriptors, including those with the greatest odor activity values (isoamyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl octanoate), were more abundant in the S. cerevisiae-dominated wines. The low relative concentrations of these fruity compounds made it possible to detect in the T. delbrueckii-dominated wines the low-relative-concentration compounds with dried fruit and pastry odors. An example was γ-ethoxy-butyrolactone which was significantly more abundant in these wines than in those dominated by S. cerevisiae.

  12. Effects of new Torulaspora delbrueckii killer yeasts on the must fermentation kinetics and aroma compounds of white table wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Rocío; Zamora, Emiliano; Álvarez, María L.; Hernández, Luis M.; Ramírez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Torulaspora delbrueckii is becoming widely recommended for improving some specific characteristics of wines. However, its impact on wine quality is still far from satisfactory at the winery level, mostly because it is easily replaced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae-like yeasts during must fermentation. New T. delbrueckii killer strains were here isolated and selected for winemaking. They killed S. cerevisiae yeasts and were able to dominate and complete the fermentation of sterile grape must. Sequential yeast inoculation of non-sterile white must with T. delbrueckii followed by S. cerevisiae did not ensure T. delbrueckii dominance or wine quality improvement. Only a single initial must inoculation at high cell concentrations allowed the T. delbrueckii killer strains to dominate and complete the must fermentation to reach above 11% ethanol, but not the non-killer strains. None of the wines underwent malolactic fermentation as long as the must had low turbidity and pH. Although no statistically significant differences were found in the wine quality score, the S. cerevisiae-dominated wines were preferred over the T. delbrueckii-dominated ones because the former had high-intensity fresh fruit aromas while the latter had lower intensity, but nevertheless nice and unusual dried fruit/pastry aromas. Except for ethyl propanoate and 3-ethoxy-1-propanol, which were more abundant in the T. delbrueckii–dominated wines, most of the compounds with fresh fruit odor descriptors, including those with the greatest odor activity values (isoamyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl octanoate), were more abundant in the S. cerevisiae–dominated wines. The low relative concentrations of these fruity compounds made it possible to detect in the T. delbrueckii–dominated wines the low-relative-concentration compounds with dried fruit and pastry odors. An example was γ-ethoxy-butyrolactone which was significantly more abundant in these wines than in those dominated by S. cerevisiae. PMID

  13. Transfection of wild type ADVP53 gene into human brain tumor cell lines has a radiosensitizing effect independent of apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, L.; Walter, S; Vaughan, A.T.M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Despite attempts with a variety of therapeutic approaches there has been little impact on the survival of patients with Glioblastoma multiforme, with median survivals reported of approximately 12 months. In this study a replication restricted adenovirus vector is used to transfer the wild type p53 gene into two cell lines derived from a human astrocytoma U87MG or glioblastoma T98G, to determine its ability to act as a radiosensitizer in conjunction with conventional radiotherapy. Methods: An adenovirus vector containing the human wild type p53 (Advp53) gene was used in addition to a control vector containing the β-galactosidase (Advγgal) reporter gene. To achieve cellular incorporation both vectors were incubated with cells for 30 minutes - washed and returned to culture. The successful incorporation of each vector was determined by either a p53 assay using either a western blotting or flow cytometry techniques, or specific staining for β-galactosidase activity. The presence of each vector was assayed until the constructs were eliminated from the cell. To determine the effects of these vectors on cell survival sufficient vector was added to produce a measurable reduction in clonogenic survival and this value was used in subsequent irradiation experiments. To determine the ability of wild type p53 to induce apoptosis the cells were examined from 1 to 5 days after irradiation by H and E staining for the characteristic morphology indicating an apoptotic process. Results: Both the Advp53 and Advβgal vectors were successfully incorporated into each cell line. Expression of each gene was reduced to approximately half by 5 days and virtually eliminated by 15 days after transfection in both lines. At the doses used the wild type Advp53 adenovirus was toxic to both cell lines giving surviving fractions between 39-74%. When this toxicity was taken into account the presence of the Advp53 gene had a radiosensitizing effect in each cell line. To determine the

  14. Interferon-¿ production by human T cells and natural killer cells in vitro in response to antigens from the two intracellular pathogens Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Leishmania major

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, K; Hviid, L; Kharazmi, A

    1997-01-01

    protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD) and Leishmania antigens. It was found that IFN-gamma was produced in response to both PPD and Leishmania stimulant by T cells in the cultures. Activation of IFN-gamma producing natural killer (NK) cells was demonstrated only in some cultures, and only...

  15. Mechanistic evaluation of the transfection barriers involved in lipid-mediated gene delivery: Interplay between nanostructure and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, D.; Marchini, C.; Cardarelli, F.; Salomone, F.; Coppola, S.; Montani, M.; Zabaleta, M. Elexpuru; Digman, M.A.; Gratton, E.; Colapicchioni, V.; Caracciolo, G.

    2014-01-01

    Here we present a quantitative mechanism-based investigation aimed at comparing the cell uptake, intracellular trafficking, endosomal escape and final fate of lipoplexes and lipid–protamine/deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (LPD) nanoparticles (NPs) in living Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. As a model, two lipid formulations were used for comparison. The first formulation is made of the cationic lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) and the zwitterionic lipid dioleoylphosphocholine (DOPC), while the second mixture is made of the cationic 3β-[N-(N,N-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol (DC-Chol) and the zwitterionic helper lipid dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Our findings indicate that lipoplexes are efficiently taken up through fluid-phase macropinocytosis, while a less efficient uptake of LPD NPs occurs through a combination of both macropinocytosis and clathrin-dependent pathways. Inside the cell, both lipoplexes and LPD NPs are actively transported towards the cell nucleus, as quantitatively addressed by spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS). For each lipid formulation, LPD NPs escape from endosomes more efficiently than lipoplexes. When cells were treated with DOTAP–DOPC-containing systems the majority of the DNA was trapped in the lysosome compartment, suggesting that extensive lysosomal degradation was the rate-limiting factors in DOTAP–DOPC-mediated transfection. On the other side, escape from endosomes is large for DC-Chol–DOPE-containing systems most likely due to DOPE and cholesterol-like molecules, which are able to destabilize the endosomal membrane. The lipid-dependent and structure-dependent enhancement of transfection activity suggests that DNA is delivered to the nucleus synergistically: the process requires both the membrane-fusogenic activity of the nanocarrier envelope and the employment of lipid species with intrinsic endosomal rupture ability. PMID:24296066