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Sample records for action program radiological

  1. Generic radiological characterization protocol for surveys conducted for DOE remedial action programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berven, B.A.; Cottrell, W.D.; Leggett, R.W.; Little, C.A.; Myrick, T.E.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1986-05-01

    This report describes goals and methodology that can be used by radiological survey contractors in surveys at properties associated with the Department of Energy's remedial action programs. The description includes: (1) a general discussion of the history of the remedial action programs; (2) the types of surveys that may be employed by the Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) contractor; (3) generic survey methods that may be used during radiological surveys; and (4) a format for presenting information and data in a survey report. 9 refs

  2. Radiological protection guidelines for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and remote Surplus Facilities Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    The need for a definitive basis for radiological guidelines and criteria for FUSRAP became apparent by 1981 and led ORO to sponsor a joint ANL/BNI/LANL/ORO effort under the chairmanship of Wayne Hansen (LANL) that resulted in a final FUSRAP radiological guidelines document in March 1983. A separate effort to develop guidelines for remedial action criteria for SFMP was in progress at PNL. The need to coordinate both efforts with impending revisions of DOE Radiological Protection Standards and impending new developments in EPA and NRC Radiological Protection Standards led to convening of the first DOE Workshop on Remedial Action Criteria in Gaithersburg, Maryland, in February 1984, followed by a second workshop in June 1984 at ANL. The major decisions were to base the criteria on dosimetry models and basic limits currently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, to emphasize the development and use of site-specific rather than generic guidelines and criteria for residual radionuclide concentrations in the ground, and to prepare a manual to accompany the guidelines that would present procedures and tables for deriving site-specific soil guidelines and criteria for the remedial action programs. A joint ANL/LANL/ORNL/PNL effort to prepare a definitive set of guidelines and a manual has been initiated. The scope, status, and current plans for this effort, and some of the key issues, are presented. 10 references, 1 table

  3. Radiological protection guidelines for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    The need for a definitive basis for radiological guidelines and criteria for FUSRAP became apparent by 1981 and led ORO to sponsor a joint ANL/BNI/LANL/ORO effort under the chairmanship of Wayne Hansen (LANL) that resulted in a final FUSRAP radiological guidelines document in March 1983. A separate effort to develop guidelines for remedial action criteria for SFMP was in progress at PNL. The need to coordinate both efforts with impending revisions of DOE Radiological Protection Standards and impending new developments in EPA and NRC Radiological Protection Standards led to convening of the first DOE Workshop on Remedial Action Criteria in Gaithersburg, Maryland, in February 1984, followed by a second workshop in June 1984 at ANL. The major decisions were to base the criteria on dosimetry models and basic limits currently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, to emphasize the development and use of site-specific rather than generic guidelines and criteria for residual radionuclide concentrations in the ground, and to prepare a manual to accompany the guidelines that would present procedures and tables for deriving site-specific soil guidelines and criteria for the remedial action programs. A joint ANL/LANL/ORNL/PNL effort to prepare a definitive set of guidelines and a manual has been initiated. The scope, status, and current plans for this effort, and some of the key issues, are presented. 10 references, 1 table

  4. Radiological assistance program: Region I. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musolino, S.V.; Kuehner, A.V.; Hull, A.P.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is to make DOE resources available and provide emergency assistance to state and local agencies in order to control radiological hazards, protect the public health and safety, and minimize the loss of property. This plan is an integral part of a nationwide program of radiological assistance established by the US DOE, and is implemented on a regional basis. The Brookhaven Area Office (BHO) Radiological Assistance Program is applicable to DOE Region I, which consists of the New England States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland and the District of Columbia. The BHO RAP-1 has been developed to: (a) ensure the availability of an effective radiological assistance capability to ensure the protection of persons and property; (b) provide guidelines to RAP-1 Team personnel for the evaluation of radiological incidents and implementation of corrective actions; (c) maintain liaison with other DOE installations, Federal, State and local organizations which may become involved in radiological assistance operations in Region I; and (d) encourage development of a local capability to cope with radiological incidents

  5. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program post-remedial-action radiological survey of Kent Chemical Laboratory, the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-05-01

    A comprehensive radiological assessment of Kent Laboratory was conducted during September 1977, by the ANL Radiological Survey Group to determine if any radioactive contamination remained. The results of the assessment indicated the need for remedial action. Since 1977, the University has decontaminated this laboratory building, and in May 1983, the Department of Energy requested the ANL Radiological Survey Group to conduct a post-remedial-action survey. All the contaminated areas identified during the 1977 assessment were rechecked. Contamination remained in six of the rooms. Further decontamination of these areas was conducted by university personnel, and as a result, these areas are now free of contamination. However, a contaminated clay pipe in the attic remained. The clay pipe has since been removed and disposed of as solid radioactive waste. During the post-remedial-action survey, six soil samples were collected from excavation trenches dug in Rooms 1 and 2 as part of the University's remedial action efforts. Also, four sludge samples were taken from below the manhole covers in the basement of Kent Chemical Laboratory to assess the radiological condition of the sewer system. A radiological assessment of the sewer system had not been accomplished during the 1977 survey as per program direction. Radiochemical (fluorometric) and gamma-spectral analyses indicated that eight out of ten soil and sludge samples contained levels of radioactivity above expected background concentrations. The soil has since been further excavated. The building is now free of radioactive contamination in excess of background levels; however, the sewers do contain radioactive materials above background levels since contamination was found at appropriate access points. 6 references, 16 figures, 7 tables

  6. Quality assurance program plan for the radiological survey activities program: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, S.J.; Berven, B.A.; Little, C.A.

    1986-08-01

    The Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for surveying designated sites in the vicinity of 24 inactive mill sites involved in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). The purpose of these surveys is to provide a recommendation to DOE whether to include or exclude the site from UMTRAP based on whether the onsite residual radioactive material (if any) originated from the former mill sites, and radiation levels onsite are in excess of appropriate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. This report describes the quality assurance program plan for the RASA program in conducting all activities related to the UMTRA project. All quality assurance provisions given by the DOE, DOE/UMTRA, and ORNL organizations are integrated into this plan. Specifically, this report identifies the policies and procedures followed in accomplishing the RASA/UMTRAP QA program, identifies those organizational units involved in the implementation of these procedures, and outlines the respective responsibilities of those groups

  7. Quality assurance program plan for the Radiological Survey Activities Program - Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, S.J.; Berven, B.A.; Little, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for surveying designated sites in the vicinity of 24 inactive mill sites involved in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). The purpose of these surveys is to provide a recommendation to DOE whether to include or exclude the site from UMTRAP based on whether the onsite residual radioactive material (if any) originated from the former mill sites, and radiation levels onsite are in excess of appropriate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. This report describes the quality assurance program plan for the RASA program in conducting all activities related to the UMTRA project. All quality assurance provisions given by the DOE, DOE/UMTRA, and ORNL organizations are integrated into this plan. Specifically, this report identifies the policies and procedures followed in accomplishing the RASA/UMTRAP QA program, identifies those organizational units involved in the implementation of these procedures, and outlines the respective responsibilities of those groups

  8. Comprehensive resurvey program to prevent radiological incidents at a national laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipton, W.V.; Hunckler, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive resurvey program in a general purpose research building at Argonne National Laboratory is being implemented. The program was designed to prevent radiological incidents by increasing the awareness of Health Physics personnel of radiological hazards, initiating corrective actions, and providing information for improving routine survey schedules, and for establishing manpower requirements. The following aspects of the program are described: scheduling, surveys, records, follow-up, and statistics

  9. Criteria and actions facing a radiological environmental contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, Jose; Montero, Milagros

    2008-01-01

    An approach to improve the management of the radiological risk due to an environmental contamination is presented. The experience gained in emergency response has clearly demonstrated the importance to have an efficient emergency system including planning, procedures and operational internally consistent criteria. The lack of these components in the emergency system could lead to important radiological and non radiological consequences. The setting of internationally agreed criteria and guides is very important in the anticipated emergency response plan. The paper firstly reviews the approaches proposed by international recommendations and norms. From this review, a substantial coincidence on the basic principles is stated, in spite of small differences in its formulation. Also, a need for harmonization is endorsed. So, generic levels, in terms of imparted dose or avoided dose due to intervention, and, in some cases, derived levels, in terms of activity concentration, are proposed. Numerical values for emergency actions are also identified. The second part deals with the adaptation of the existing prediction and decision systems to the above radiological criteria. Relations among deposition, activity concentrations and annual doses for different scenarios, exposure pathways and age groups are established. Also, the sensibility of the radiological impact against different characteristics of the intervention scenarios is stated. This makes easy to assess the radiological significance of different contamination situations by comparison to the existing action generic levels. Furthermore, the radiological impact can be numerically incorporated in a decision system which includes non radiological aspects of the applicable intervention options. Agricultural, urban and mixed scenarios are presented and solved for a 137 Cs contamination. The results can be further used to develop a methodology guide for setting action generic levels in post-accidental interventions and

  10. Radiological surveillance of Remedial Action activities at the processing site, Falls City, Texas. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project's Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) performed a radiological surveillance of the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), MK-Ferguson and CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., at the processing site in Falls City, Texas. This surveillance was conducted March 22--26, 1993. No findings were identified during the surveillance. Three site-specific observations and three programmatic observations are presented in this report. The overall conclusion from the surveillance is that the radiological aspects of the Falls City, Texas, remedial action program are performed adequately. However, some of the observations identify that there is potential for improving certain aspects of the occupational radiological air sampling, ensuring analytical data quality, and in communicating with the DOE and TAC on the ore sampling methods. The TAC has also received and is currently reviewing the RAC's responses regarding the observations identified during the radiological surveillance performed October 29--30, 1992

  11. Procedures manual for the ORNL Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Cottrell, W.D.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1987-04-01

    The portion of the radiological survey program performed by ORNL is the subject of this Procedures Manual. The RASA group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at ORNL is responsible for the planning, conducting, and reporting of the results of radiological surveys at specified sites and associated vicinity properties. The results of these surveys are used by DOE in determining the need for and extent of remedial actions. Upon completion of the necessary remedial actions, the ORNL-RASA group or other OOS contractor may be called upon to verify the effectiveness of the remedial action. Information from these postremedial action surveys is included as part of the data base used by DOE in certifying a site for unrestricted use

  12. Procedures manual for the ORNL Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Cottrell, W.D.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1987-04-01

    The portion of the radiological survey program performed by ORNL is the subject of this Procedures Manual. The RASA group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at ORNL is responsible for the planning, conducting, and reporting of the results of radiological surveys at specified sites and associated vicinity properties. The results of these surveys are used by DOE in determining the need for and extent of remedial actions. Upon completion of the necessary remedial actions, the ORNL-RASA group or other OOS contractor may be called upon to verify the effectiveness of the remedial action. Information from these postremedial action surveys is included as part of the data base used by DOE in certifying a site for unrestricted use.

  13. Standarized radiological hazard analysis for a broad based operational safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadman, W.W. III; Andrews, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Radiological hazard Analysis (RHA) Manual provides a methodology and detailed guidance for systematic analysis of radiological hazards over a broad spectrum of program functions, housed in a wide variety of facilities. Radiological programs at LANL include: research and experimentation; routine materials operations; production; non-destructive examination or testing; isotope and machine produced radiations; chemistry; and metallurgy. The RHA permits uniform evaluation of hazard types over a range of several orders of magnitude of hazard severity. The results are used to estimate risk, evaluate types and level or resource allocations, identify deficiencies, and plan corrective actions for safe working environments. 2 refs

  14. Standardized radiological hazard analysis for a broad based operational safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadman, W. III; Andrews, L.

    1992-01-01

    The Radiological Hazard Analysis (RHA) Manual provides a methodology and detailed guidance for systematic analysis of radiological hazards over a broad spectrum of program functions, housed in a wide variety of facilities. Radiological programs at LANL include: research and experimentation routine materials operations; production; non-destructive examination or testing; isotope and machine produced radiations; chemistry; and metallurgy. The RHA permits uniform evaluation of hazard types over a range of several orders of magnitude of hazard severity. The results are used to estimate risk, evaluate types and level of resource allocations, identify deficiencies, and plan corrective actions for safe working environments. (author)

  15. DOE's Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, D.H.; Stenner, R.D.; Welty, C.G. Jr.; Needels, T.S.

    1985-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Operational Safety (OOS) is presently developing and implementing the Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA) to overview DOE's Remedial Action programs. APRA's objective is to ensure the adequacy of environmental, safety and health (ES and H) protection practices within the four DOE Remedial Action programs: Grand Junction Remedial Action Program (GJRAP), Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program (UMTRAP), Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), and Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). APRA encompasses all ES and H practices of DOE and its contractors/subcontractors within the four Remedial Action programs. Specific activities of APRA include document reviews, selected site visits, and program office appraisals. Technical support and assistance to OOS is being provided by APRA contractors in the evaluation of radiological standards and criteria, quality assurance measures, radiation measurements, and risk assessment practices. This paper provides an overview of these activities and discusses program to date, including the roles of OOS and the respective contractors. The contractors involved in providing technical support and assistance to OOS are Aerospace Corporation, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory

  16. DOE's Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, D.H.; Stenner, R.D.; Welty, C.G. Jr.; Needels, T.S.

    1984-10-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Operational Safety (OOS) is presently developing and implementing the Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA) to overview DOE's Remedial Action programs. APRA's objective is to ensure the adequacy of environmental, safety and health (ES and H) protection practices within the four DOE Remedial Action programs: Grand Junction Remedial Action Program (GJRAP), Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program (UMTRAP), Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), and Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). APRA encompasses all ES and H practices of DOE and its contractors/subcontractors within the four Remedial Action programs. Specific activities of APRA include document reviews, selected site visits, and program office appraisals. Technical support and assistance to OOS is being provided by APRA contractors in the evaluation of radiological standards and criteria, quality assurance measures, radiation measurements, and risk assessment practices. This paper provides an overview of these activities and discusses progress to date, including the roles of OOS and the respective contractors. The contractors involved in providing technical support and assistance to OOS are Aerospace Corporation, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory

  17. General Employee Radiological Training and Radiological Worker Training: Program management manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This manual defines and describes the DOE General Employee Radiological Training (GERT) and Radiological Worker I and II (RW I and II) Training programs. It includes material development requirements, standards and policies, and program administration. This manual applies to General Employee Radiological Training and Radiological Worker Training at all DOE contractor sites. The training materials of both GERT and RW I and II training reflect the requirements identified in the DOE Radiological Control Manual and DOE Order 5480.11. The training programs represent the minimum requirement for the standardized core materials. Each contractor shall implement the program in its entirety and may augment the standardized core materials to increase the general employee and radiological worker level of competency

  18. Description of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The background and the results to date of the Department of Energy program to identify and evaluate the radiological conditions at sites formerly utilized by the Corps of Engineers' Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) are summarized. The sites of concern were federally, privately, and institutionally owned and were used primarily for research, processing, and storage of uranium and thorium ores, concentrates, or residues. Some sites were subsequently released for other purposes without radiological restriction. Surveys have been conducted since 1974 to document radiological conditions at such sites. Based on radiological surveys, sites are identified in this document that require, or are projected to require, remedial action to remove potential restrictions on the use of the property due to the presence of residual low-level radioactive contamination. Specific recommendations for each site will result from more detailed environmental and engineering surveys to be conducted at those sites and, if necessary, an environmental impact assessment or environmental impact statement will be prepared. Section 3.0 describes the current standards and guidelines now being used to conduct remedial actions. Current authority of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to proceed with remedial actions and the new authority required are summarized. A plan to implement the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in accordance with the new authority is presented, including the objectives, scope, general approach, and a summary schedule. Key issues affecting schedule and cost are discussed

  19. Description of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    The background and the results to date of the Department of Energy program to identify and evaluate the radiological conditions at sites formerly utilized by the Corps of Engineers' Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) are summarized. The sites of concern were federally, privately, and institutionally owned and were used primarily for research, processing, and storage of uranium and thorium ores, concentrates, or residues. Some sites were subsequently released for other purposes without radiological restriction. Surveys have been conducted since 1974 to document radiological conditions at such sites. Based on radiological surveys, sites are identified in this document that require, or are projected to require, remedial action to remove potential restrictions on the use of the property due to the presence of residual low-level radioactive contamination. Specific recommendations for each site will result from more detailed environmental and engineering surveys to be conducted at those sites and, if necessary, an environmental impact assessment or environmental impact statement will be prepared. Section 3.0 describes the current standards and guidelines now being used to conduct remedial actions. Current authority of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to proceed with remedial actions and the new authority required are summarized. A plan to implement the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in accordance with the new authority is presented, including the objectives, scope, general approach, and a summary schedule. Key issues affecting schedule and cost are discussed.

  20. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Annual status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    Progress made during FY 1982, present status, and plans for FY 1983 are described for the following programs: radiological surveys and inclusion of vicinity properties; establishment of cooperative agreements; promulgation of standards for remedial action; acquisition of lands and materials; reprocessing of residual radioactive materials; National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation; program planning; technology development; remedial action; public participation; other federal agency activities; state and Indian tribe activities; and status of designated sites. Program funding is given

  1. Review of standards and guidelines pertinent to DOE's remedial action programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldat, J.K.; Denham, D.H.

    1984-10-01

    A number of radiological standards, guidelines, and dose criteria have been promulgated that may be relevant to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Remedial Action programs. Some of these will be applied to remedial actions undertaken by DOE to ensure that health and safety aspects will be adequately addressed. Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff are reviewing and evaluating existing and proposed environmental radiological standards and criteria for their applicability. National and international environmental standards and criteria, and studies conducted by other DOE contractors are being evaluated. The aim of the review is to identify gaps in these standards and guidelines and to recommend further development as necessary. This paper provides a summary of the standards and guidelines evaluated for applicability to DOE's Remedial Action programs. 33 references, 5 tables

  2. Implementation of a Radiological Safety Coach program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzen, K.K. [Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Langsted, J.M. [M.H. Chew and Associates, Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-02-01

    The Safe Sites of Colorado Radiological Safety program has implemented a Safety Coach position, responsible for mentoring workers and line management by providing effective on-the-job radiological skills training and explanation of the rational for radiological safety requirements. This position is significantly different from a traditional classroom instructor or a facility health physicist, and provides workers with a level of radiological safety guidance not routinely provided by typical training programs. Implementation of this position presents a challenge in providing effective instruction, requiring rapport with the radiological worker not typically developed in the routine radiological training environment. The value of this unique training is discussed in perspective with cost-savings through better radiological control. Measures of success were developed to quantify program performance and providing a realistic picture of the benefits of providing one-on-one or small group training. This paper provides a description of the unique features of the program, measures of success for the program, a formula for implementing this program at other facilities, and a strong argument for the success (or failure) of the program in a time of increased radiological safety emphasis and reduced radiological safety budgets.

  3. Implementation of a Radiological Safety Coach program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzen, K.K.

    1998-01-01

    The Safe Sites of Colorado Radiological Safety program has implemented a Safety Coach position, responsible for mentoring workers and line management by providing effective on-the-job radiological skills training and explanation of the rational for radiological safety requirements. This position is significantly different from a traditional classroom instructor or a facility health physicist, and provides workers with a level of radiological safety guidance not routinely provided by typical training programs. Implementation of this position presents a challenge in providing effective instruction, requiring rapport with the radiological worker not typically developed in the routine radiological training environment. The value of this unique training is discussed in perspective with cost-savings through better radiological control. Measures of success were developed to quantify program performance and providing a realistic picture of the benefits of providing one-on-one or small group training. This paper provides a description of the unique features of the program, measures of success for the program, a formula for implementing this program at other facilities, and a strong argument for the success (or failure) of the program in a time of increased radiological safety emphasis and reduced radiological safety budgets

  4. Review of standards and guidelines pertinent to DOE's Remedial Action programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldat, J.K.; Denham, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    A number of radiological standards, guidelines, and dose criteria have been promulgated that may be relevant to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Remedial Action programs. Some of these are being applied to remedial actions undertaken by DOE to ensure that health and safety aspects are adequately addressed. Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff reviewed existing and proposed environmental radiological standards and criteria for their applicability to DOE's Remedial Action Programs. National and international environmental standards and criteria, and studies conducted by other DOE contractors were reviewed. The review indicated that there is a lack of uniformity between the dose guidelines developed by the various agencies. A uniform dose standard is needed for DandD, at least as an upper limit with application of the ALARA philosophy. 33 references, 5 tables

  5. Monitoring activities review of the Radiological Environmental Surveillance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, P.D.

    1992-03-01

    The 1992 Monitoring Activities Review (MAR) is directed at the Radiological Environment Surveillance Program (RESP) activities at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of Idaho Engineering Laboratory (INEL). MAR panelists studied RESP documents and discussed their concerns with Environmental Monitoring Unit (EMU) staff and other panel members. These concerns were subsequently consolidated into a collection of recommendations with supporting discussions. Recommendations focus on specific monitoring activities, as well as the overall program. The MAR report also contains pertinent comments that should not require further action

  6. Radiological emergency preparedness (REP) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowski, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    This talk focuses on the accomplishments of Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program. Major topics include the following: strengthening the partnership between FEMA, the States, and the Industry; the Standard Exercise Report Format (SERF); Multi-year performance partnership agreement (MYPPA); new REP Program guidance; comprehensive exercise program; federal radiological emergency response plan (FRERP); international interest; REP user fee; implementation EPA PAGs and Dose Limits; Contamination monitoring standard for portal monitors; guidance documents and training

  7. DOE Radiological Control Manual Core Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, H.L.; Maisler, J.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past year, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health (EH-40) has taken a leading role in the development of new standardized radiological control training programs for use throughout the DOE complex. The Department promulgated its Radiological Control (RadCon) Manual in June 1992. To ensure consistent application of the criteria presented in the RadCon Manual, standardized radiological control core training courses and training materials have been developed for implementation at all DOE facilities. In producing local training programs, standardized core courses are to be supplemented with site-specific lesson plans, viewgraphs, student handbooks, qualification standards, question banks, and wallet-sized training certificates. Training programs for General Employee Radiological Training, Radiological Worker I and II Training, and Radiological Control Technician Training have been disseminated. Also, training committees under the direction of the Office of Health (EH-40) have been established for the development of additional core training courses, development of examination banks, and the update of the existing core training courses. This paper discusses the current activities and future direction of the DOE radiological control core training program

  8. Program of environmental radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    This Regulation refers to the requirement of the Regulation CNEN-NN.3.01, 'Basic Act of Radiological Protection', as expressed in the section 5.14, related to the Program of Environmental Radiological Monitoring (PMRA)

  9. Radiological guidelines for application to DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    The US Department of Energy has implemented a program to evaluate and, where necessary, take action to protect the public from contamination at sites that were used in the past to process and/or store radioactive materials for the former US Army Corps of Engineers Manhattan Engineer District or the US Atomic Energy Commission. The program is identified as the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). This document describes methods considered appropriate for the evaluation of health effects that might possible be caused by radioactive contamination at FUSRAP sites. This assessment methodology is applied to a typical site for the purposeof deriving guidelines for the cleanup of contaminated soil. Additional guidance is provided for planning site-specific remedial action that is consistent with the overall objectives of FUSRAP

  10. Action research regarding the optimisation of radiological protection for nurses during vascular interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroshige

    2015-01-01

    The optimisation and decision-making processes for radiological protection have been broadened by the introduction of re-examination or feedback after introducing protective measures. In this study, action research was used to reduce the occupational exposure of vascular interventional radiology (IR) nurses. Four radiological protection improvement measures were continuously performed in cooperation with the researchers, nurses and stakeholders, and the nurses’ annual effective doses were compared before and after the improvements. First, the dosimetry equipment was changed from one electronic personal dosimeter (EPD) to two silver-activated phosphate glass dosimeters (PGDs). Second, the nurses were educated regarding maintaining a safe distance from the sources of scattered and leakage radiation. Third, portable radiation shielding screens were placed in the IR rooms. Fourth, the x-ray units’ pulse rates were reduced by half. On changing the dosimetry method, the two PGDs recorded a 4.4 fold greater dose than the single EPD. Educating nurses regarding radiological protection and reducing the pulse rates by half decreased their effective doses to one-third and two-fifths of the baseline dose, respectively. No significant difference in their doses was detected after the placement of the shielding screens. Therefore, the action research effectively decreased the occupational doses of the vascular IR nurses. (practical matter)

  11. Action research regarding the optimisation of radiological protection for nurses during vascular interventional radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hiroshige

    2015-06-01

    The optimisation and decision-making processes for radiological protection have been broadened by the introduction of re-examination or feedback after introducing protective measures. In this study, action research was used to reduce the occupational exposure of vascular interventional radiology (IR) nurses. Four radiological protection improvement measures were continuously performed in cooperation with the researchers, nurses and stakeholders, and the nurses' annual effective doses were compared before and after the improvements. First, the dosimetry equipment was changed from one electronic personal dosimeter (EPD) to two silver-activated phosphate glass dosimeters (PGDs). Second, the nurses were educated regarding maintaining a safe distance from the sources of scattered and leakage radiation. Third, portable radiation shielding screens were placed in the IR rooms. Fourth, the x-ray units' pulse rates were reduced by half. On changing the dosimetry method, the two PGDs recorded a 4.4 fold greater dose than the single EPD. Educating nurses regarding radiological protection and reducing the pulse rates by half decreased their effective doses to one-third and two-fifths of the baseline dose, respectively. No significant difference in their doses was detected after the placement of the shielding screens. Therefore, the action research effectively decreased the occupational doses of the vascular IR nurses.

  12. Directory of personnel responsible for radiological health programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This is a directory of professional personnel who administer the radiological health program activities in state and local governmental agencies. Included in the directory is a listing of each state health officer or the head of the agency responsible for the radiological health program. The name, address, and telephone number of the radiological health personnel are listed, followed by the alternate contact who, in many instances, may be chief of a larger administrative unit of which the radiological health program is a subunit. The address for the program is also included if it differs from the official health department or agency. Generally, the titles of the personnel listed will indicate the administrative status of the radiological health program. The directory also includes a list of key professional personnel in the Bureau of Radiological Health, Radiation Operations Staff, Regional Radiological Health Representatives, Winchester Engineering and Analytical Center, Food and Drug Administration; Office of Radiation Programs, Regional Radiation Representatives, National Environmental Research Center, and Eastern Environmental Radiation Laboratory, Environmental Protection Agency; selected personnel in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and selected personnel in the National Bureau of Standards

  13. Radiological control technician: Training program management manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This manual defines and describes the DOE Radiological Control Technician Core Training Program qualification and training process, material development requirements, standards and policies, and administration. The manual applies to Radiological Control Technician Training Programs at all DOE contractor sites

  14. Guidelines for a radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    This manual presents guidelines for hospitals on a radiology quality assurance and dose measurement audit program and a system of planned actions that monitor and record the performance and effectiveness of the radiological service

  15. New Jersey state information handbook: Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Under the implied authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, radiological surveys and research work has been conducted to determine radiological conditions at former MED/AEC sites. As of this time, 31 sites in 13 states have been identified that require or may require remedial action. This volume is one of a series produced under contract with DOE, Office of Nuclear Waste Management, by POLITECH CORPORATION to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of New Jersey. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations. The loose-leaf format used in these volumes will allow the material to be updated periodically as the Remedial Action Program progresses

  16. New Jersey state information handbook: Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-31

    Under the implied authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, radiological surveys and research work has been conducted to determine radiological conditions at former MED/AEC sites. As of this time, 31 sites in 13 states have been identified that require or may require remedial action. This volume is one of a series produced under contract with DOE, Office of Nuclear Waste Management, by POLITECH CORPORATION to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of New Jersey. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations. The loose-leaf format used in these volumes will allow the material to be updated periodically as the Remedial Action Program progresses.

  17. Application of computers in a radiological survey program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berven, B.A.; Blair, M.S.; Doane, R.W.; Little, C.A.; Perdue, P.T.

    1984-01-01

    Computers have become increasingly important in data analysis and data management as well as assisting in report preparation in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) Program. The primary function of the RASA program is to collect, analyze, report, and manage data collected to characterize the radiological condition of potentially contaminated sites identified in the Department of Energy's (DOE) remedial action programs. Three different computer systems are routinely utilized in ORNL/RASA operations. Two of these systems are employed in specific functions. A Nuclear Data (ND) 682 is used to perform isotopic analysis of gamma spectroscopic data generated by high-purity germanium detectors for air, water and soil samples. The ND682 employs a 16,000-channel analyzer that is routinely used with four germanium spectrometers. Word processing and data management are accomplished using the INtext system implemented on a DEC PDP-11 computer. A group of personal computers are used to perform a diverse number of functions. These computer systems are Commodore Business Machines (CBM) Model 8032 with a dual floppy disk storage medium and line printers (with optional X-Y plotters). The CBM's are utilized for: (1) data analysis -- raw data from radiation detection instrumentation are stored and manipulated with customized computer programs; (2) data reduction -- raw data are converted into report-ready tables using customized programs; (3) data management -- radionuclide data on each air, water and soil sample are stored on diskettes along with location of archived samples; and (4) program management -- site surveys and report status are tracked by computer files as well as program budget information to provide contemporary information of program status

  18. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Partial radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH14 Shiprock, New Mexico, October-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-06-01

    As part of a detailed radiological assessment of the vicinity properties at Shiprock, a comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH14 was initiated during October and November 1982. At the time of the survey, vicinity property SH14 consisted of about 20 acres of open lands to the northeast of, and directly across the San Juan River from, the upper tailings pile at Shiprock. The lands consisted of a sandy soil, sparsley covered with trees and other vegetation. The partial assessment activities included determination of surface radiation levels on about a 2-meter grid spacing through direct instrument surveys and analysis of a soil sample collected from the area. The partial radiological assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at several general areas within the open lands. Radiochemical analyses of the soil sample collected from one of these areas indicated a radium concentration of 18 +- 2 pCi/g, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface, as specified in the EPA Standard (40 CFR 192). Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Further measurements required to completely determine and accurately report the radiological status of this vicinity property, including additional direct instrument surveys, collection and analyses of soil samples, and the establishment of a 200-ft grid system, were planned for the final phase of this assessment. However, that phase of the program was cancelled before these measurements were accomplished. The total extent of the radiological contamination of vicinity property SH14 is presently unknown. Nonetheless, since the surface soil contamination levels exceeded the limits specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  19. Determination of action zone in the nuclear / radiology handling process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ade Awalludin

    2013-01-01

    Assessment has been conducted on determination of action zone in nuclear or radiological emergency. The assessment is taken into account radiological risk level in nuclear or radiological emergency management process outside nuclear installation. Managing of nuclear emergency is same as that one of other emergency by adding the principles of radiation protection. This study aims to provide guidance in making of safety and security perimeter outside the nuclear installation for first responders during nuclear/radiological emergency based on dose rate, contamination level or distance from the scene. Separation of working zone is important for first responder safety that works in radiological environment in the event of nuclear or radiation emergency without violating their standard operating procedure. Value limit of safety and security perimeter has been made according to the conditions in Indonesia and considering the applicability in practical. (author)

  20. Background report for the uranium-mill-tailings-sites remedial-action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, Public Law 95-604, mandates remedial action responsibilities to the Department of Energy for designated inactive uranium processing sites. To comply with the mandates of the Act, a program to survey and evaluate the radiological conditions at inactive uranium processing sites and at vicinity properties containing residual radioactive material derived from the sites is being conducted; the Remedial Action Program Office, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy is implementing remedial actions at these processing sites. This report provides a brief history of the program, a description of the scope of the program, and a set of site-specific summaries for the 22 locations specified in the Act and three additional locations designated in response to Federal Register notices issued on August 17 and September 5, 1979. It is designed to be a quick source of background information on sites covered by the implementation program for Public Law 95-604

  1. Factors Influencing the Gender Breakdown of Academic Radiology Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James C; Yoon, Sora C; Cater, Sarah Wallace; Grimm, Lars J

    2017-07-01

    To determine the gender distribution of radiology residency programs and identify associations with radiology departmental factors. The residency programs affiliated with the top 50 research medical school from US News and World Report were identified. The gender of all radiology residency graduates from each program from 2011 to 2015 were collected. Radiology departmental factors were collected: gender of chairperson, gender of program director, gender of faculty, geographic location, and city population of the residency program. The median percentage of female radiology faculty and residents were calculated and classified as above or below the median. Comparisons were made between residency programs and departmental factors via a Pearson χ 2 univariate test or logistic regression. There were 618 (27.9%) female and 1,598 (72.1%) male residents in our study, with a median female representation of 26.4% in each program. Programs with a female residency program director were significantly more likely to have an above-median percentage of female residents versus a male program director (68.4% versus 38.7%, P = .04). Programs in the Northeast (70.6%) and West (70.0%) had higher above-median female representation than the South (10.0%) and Midwest (38.5%, P < .01). There was no association with city population size (P = .40), gender of faculty (P = .40), residency size (P = .91), or faculty size (P = .15). Radiology residency programs with a female residency program director and those in the Northeast or West have a greater concentration of female residents. Residency programs that aim to increase female representation should investigate modifiable factors that can improve their recruitment practices. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Intervention levels for protective action in the radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, G.Y.; Khang, B.O.; Lee, M.; Lee, J.T.

    1998-09-01

    In the event of nuclear accident or radiological emergency, the protective action based on intervention levels prepared in advance should be implemented in order to minimize the public hazard. There are several protective measures such as sheltering, evacuation, iodine prophylaxis, foodstuff restrictions, temporary relocation, permanent resettlement, etc. for protecting the public. The protective measures should be implemented on the basis of operational intervention level of action level. This report describes the basic principles of intervention and the methodology for deriving intervention levels, and also recommendations for the intervention levels suggested from IAEA, ICRP, WHO and EU are summarized to apply to the domestic radiological emergency. This report also contains a revision procedure of operational intervention levels to meet a difference accident condition. Therefore, it can be usefully applied to establish revised operational intervention levels considering or the regional characteristics of our country. (author). 20 refs

  3. Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) Regions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) in the 1950s to make DOE resources and expertise available to organizations...

  4. Independent auto evaluation of an operative radiological protection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medrano L, M.A.; Rodriguez C, C.C.; Linares R, D.; Zarate M, N.; Zempoalteca B, R.

    2006-01-01

    The program of operative radiological protection of a nuclear power plant consists of multiple procedures and associate tasks that have as purpose the radiological protection of the workers of the power station. It is for this reason that the constant evaluation of the one it programs it is an important tool in the identification of their weaknesses (and strengths), so they can be assisted appropriately. In this work the main elements of the program of independent auto evaluation of the program of operative radiological protection of the Laguna Verde Central that has been developed and implemented by the National Institute of Nuclear Research are described. (Author)

  5. Radiological protection Program of CDTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Radiological protection program of CDTN, its purposes and rules, responsabilities, physical control, monitoring, personnel radiation protection, radiation sources and radioactive wastes control, emergency and accidents and siting are described. (C.M.) [pt

  6. ERC Radiological Glovebag Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellesen, A.L.

    1997-07-01

    This document establishes the requirements and responsibilities for the standardized methods for installation, use, and dismantlement of glovebags within the Hanford Site Environmental Contractor Radiological Glovebag Program. This document addresses the following topics: Containment selection and fabrication, Glovebag fabrication, Containment installation and inspection, General glovebag containment work practices, Emergency situations, and Containment removal

  7. Quality assurance program in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacovenco, Alejandro; Borges, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Aiming to elaborate a methodology to optimize the performance of the Radiology Service of the Military Police Hospital, in Rio dee Janeiro, some goals were established: improvement of the attendance to patients; improvement of the qualification of technicians; achievement and maintenance of high degrees of quality in each step of the radiological process; improvement of the image quality; optimization of dose per examination and cost reduction. The procedure used to detect faults in the radiological process was the analysis of causes of film losses. Results show a 70% reduction in the film rejection rate. 74% of total identified faults were due to equipment, 11% to films, 10% to patients and 5% to developing. The reduction in the cost of developed film reached 75%. A training course given to the staff of the radiological service fully reached its goals, contributing, with the staff motivation, mostly to the success of the program. This success indicates that, with a serious persistent work, it is possible to offer to patients services within their expectations, even at a public hospital. Such programs should be supported by health authorities, not only due to their technical and economic needs but, mostly, due to their social implications. (author). 10 refs., 11 figs

  8. Development of a computer program for supporting to the radiological adviser in the management of an emergency situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loureiro, E.C.M.; Ferreira F, A.L.; Andrade L, F.R. de

    2006-01-01

    One of the more important aspects of the handling of a radiological emergency it is the capacity for, in an immediate and appropriate way, to take the actions to protect the public members and the personnel that intervenes in the emergency. The evaluation of the radiological accident should keep in mind the whole available pertinent information in any moment and it should be an iterative and dynamic process directed to examine the answer in the measure that more complete and detailed information is available. This work presents a program in Delphi, with the tools, generic procedures and the necessary data to support to the radiological advisory in the initial answer to a radiological accident. It is based on the IAEA document, Generic Procedures for the Evaluation and Answer during a radiological emergency, the IAEA-TECDOC-1162. These procedures offer clear, concise and predetermined action criteria, based on the current knowledge and in the accumulated experiences, allowing the immediate decision making. The philosophy is to maintain the simple and quick, but effective process. The objective is to toast, through a laptop, practical and quick orientation for the answer to emergencies that of being implemented, it will provide an estimation or basic evaluation of the situation and it will guarantee the capacity of necessary answer to protect the public and the workers in the event of different types of radiological emergencies. Besides the recommendations of actions of appropriate protection, also it will toast, when it is necessary, orientations on the recovery of sources and initial operations of cleaning. (Author)

  9. DOE Region 6 Radiological Assistance Program plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubowski, F.M.

    1995-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) since the 1950's. The RAP is designed to make DOE resources available to other DOE facilities, state, tribal, local, private businesses, and individuals for the explicit purpose of assisting during radiological incidents. The DOE has an obligation, through the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, to provide resources through the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP, Nov. 1985) in the event of a radiological incident. Toward this end, the RAP program is implemented on a regional basis, and has planned for an incremental response capability with regional coordination between states and DOE response elements. This regional coordination is intended to foster a working relationship between DOE radiological assistance elements and those state, tribal, and local agencies responsible for first response to protect public health and safety

  10. Radiological guidelines for application to DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. [FUSRAP sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-03-01

    The US Department of Energy has implemented a program to evaluate and, where necessary, take action to protect the public from contamination at sites that were used in the past to process and/or store radioactive materials for the former US Army Corps of Engineers Manhattan Engineer District or the US Atomic Energy Commission. The program is identified as the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). This document describes methods considered appropriate for the evaluation of health effects that might possible be caused by radioactive contamination at FUSRAP sites. This assessment methodology is applied to a typical site for the purposeof deriving guidelines for the cleanup of contaminated soil. Additional guidance is provided for planning site-specific remedial action that is consistent with the overall objectives of FUSRAP.

  11. A reference standard-based quality assurance program for radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Patrick T; Johnson, C Daniel; Miranda, Rafael; Patel, Maitray D; Phillips, Carrie J

    2010-01-01

    The authors have developed a comprehensive radiology quality assurance (QA) program that evaluates radiology interpretations and procedures by comparing them with reference standards. Performance metrics are calculated and then compared with benchmarks or goals on the basis of published multicenter data and meta-analyses. Additional workload for physicians is kept to a minimum by having trained allied health staff members perform the comparisons of radiology reports with the reference standards. The performance metrics tracked by the QA program include the accuracy of CT colonography for detecting polyps, the false-negative rate for mammographic detection of breast cancer, the accuracy of CT angiography detection of coronary artery stenosis, the accuracy of meniscal tear detection on MRI, the accuracy of carotid artery stenosis detection on MR angiography, the accuracy of parathyroid adenoma detection by parathyroid scintigraphy, the success rate for obtaining cortical tissue on ultrasound-guided core biopsies of pelvic renal transplants, and the technical success rate for peripheral arterial angioplasty procedures. In contrast with peer-review programs, this reference standard-based QA program minimizes the possibilities of reviewer bias and erroneous second reviewer interpretations. The more objective assessment of performance afforded by the QA program will provide data that can easily be used for education and management conferences, research projects, and multicenter evaluations. Additionally, such performance data could be used by radiology departments to demonstrate their value over nonradiology competitors to referring clinicians, hospitals, patients, and third-party payers. Copyright 2010 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A concerted action towards improved international response to nuclear and radiological events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugletveit, F.

    2006-01-01

    After the Chernobyl accident in 1986, two conventions, the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency, were established in order to provide a framework for enhanced international cooperation in the response to such events. It has however been widely recognised that a better practical implementation of these conventions could significantly enhance our response capabilities. In order to achieve this the IAEA Member States, their Competent Authorities and the IAEA Secretariat have developed an International Action Plan for Strengthening the International Preparedness and Response System for Nuclear and Radiological Emergencies, 2004-2009. This Action Plan has three main elements: International communication International assistance Sustainable infrastructure and Working Groups and Expert Groups have been established to carry out the work in accordance with the plan. The implementation of the Action Plan is managed jointly by the IAEA Secretariat and the National Competent Authority Coordinating Group, N.C.A.C.G.. Currently some 65 experts from about 30 different states and international organisations are taking part. Two of the main goals of this work are to develop standardised/harmonized response procedures necessary for efficient provision of international assistance and establishment of a common unified communication platform. A more detailed update on the development of the work will be given. The development and implementation of this Action Plan is an important milestone in nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response and will offer an opportunity for the international society to establish a better and more cost efficient response capability. The standardised procedures and the unified communication platform established will subsequently have to be adopted and implemented by states and international organisations. This may have significant

  13. Radiological audit of remedial action activities at the processing sites Mexican Hat, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Audit date: May 3--7, 1993, Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project's Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) performed a radiological audit of the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), MK-Ferguson and CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., at the processing sites in Mexican Hat, Utah, and Monument Valley, Arizona. This audit was conducted May 3--7, 1993, by Bill James and Gerry Simiele of the TAC. Three site-specific findings and four observations were identified during the audit and are presented in this report. The overall conclusion from the audit is that the majority of the radiological aspects of the Mexican Hat, Utah, and Monument Valley, Arizona, remedial action programs are performed adequately. However, the findings identify that there is some inconsistency in following procedures and meeting requirements for contamination control, and a lack of communication between the RAC and the DOE on variances from the published remedial action plan (RAP)

  14. Follow-up radiological surveillance, Marshall Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhouse, N.A.

    1978-01-01

    The political approvals have been given for the return of Bikini and Enewetak Atolls to their original inhabitants. These two regions, which comprised the Pacific Nuclear Testing Areas from 1946 to 1958, are now being repopulated by their original inhabitants and their families. Recent assessments of internal and external exposure pathways at Bikini and Enewetak have indicated that doses and dose commitments in excess of current radiation protection guidelines are possible or even likely for persons living in these areas. Rongelap and Utirik Atolls, which were downwind of the 1954 Bravo event, also received significant fallout; potential radiological problems exist in these areas as well. In view of this prospect, follow-up environmental monitoring and personnel monitoring programs are being established to maintain our cognizance of radiological conditions, and to make corrective action where necessary. The unexpected finding of detectable amounts (above background) of plutonium in the urine of individuals at Bikini and Rongelap Atolls also raises the possibility of radiological problems in the long term from environmentally-derived plutonium via pathways which are not completely understood. This finding adds further impetus to the surveillance programs for an area where real radiological concerns for the general public are already known to exist. The continuing environmental and personnel monitoring programs which this paper describes are a necessary part of the BNL radiological safety program in the Marshall Islands, which is designed to do the following: (1) elucidate the internal exposure pathways; (2) define the external radiation environment; (3) assess the doses and dose commitments from radioactivity in the environment; (4) provide the feedback necessary to improve existing predictive modelling of radiological trends; and (5) suggest actions which will minimize doses via the more significant pathways. (author)

  15. Interactive, Computer-Based Training Program for Radiological Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinoskey, P.A.; Camacho, P.I.; Wells, L.

    2000-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is redesigning its Computer-Based Training (CBT) program for radiological workers. The redesign represents a major effort to produce a single, highly interactive and flexible CBT program that will meet the training needs of a wide range of radiological workers--from researchers and x-ray operators to individuals working in tritium, uranium, plutonium, and accelerator facilities. The new CBT program addresses the broad diversity of backgrounds found at a national laboratory. When a training audience is homogeneous in terms of education level and type of work performed, it is difficult to duplicate the effectiveness of a flexible, technically competent instructor who can tailor a course to the express needs and concerns of a course's participants. Unfortunately, such homogeneity is rare. At LLNL, they have a diverse workforce engaged in a wide range of radiological activities, from the fairly common to the quite exotic. As a result, the Laboratory must offer a wide variety of radiological worker courses. These include a general contamination-control course in addition to radioactive-material-handling courses for both low-level laboratory (i.e., bench-top) activities as well as high-level work in tritium, uranium, and plutonium facilities. They also offer training courses for employees who work with radiation-generating devices--x-ray, accelerator, and E-beam operators, for instance. However, even with the number and variety of courses the Laboratory offers, they are constrained by the diversity of backgrounds (i.e., knowledge and experience) of those to be trained. Moreover, time constraints often preclude in-depth coverage of site- and/or task-specific details. In response to this situation, several years ago LLNL began moving toward computer-based training for radiological workers. Today, that CBT effort includes a general radiological safety course developed by the Department of Energy's Hanford facility and a

  16. An overview of dental radiology: a primer on dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manny, E.F.; Carlson, K.C.; McClean, P.M.; Rachlin, J.A.; Segal, P.

    1980-01-01

    To provide medical and scientific background on certain selected technologies generally considered to be of particular significance, the National Center for Health Care Technology (NCHCT) has commissioned a series of overview papers. This is one of several projects entered into jointly by the Bureau of Radiological Health (BRH) and NCHCT relating to the use of radiation for health care. Dental radiation protection has been a long-time interest of BRH. Both past and on-going efforts to minimize population radiation exposure from electronic products have included specific action programs directed at minimizing unnecessary radiation exposure to the population from dental radiology. Current efforts in quality assurance and referral criteria are two aspects of NCHCT's own assessment of this technology which are described within the larger picture presented in this overview. The issues considered in this document go beyond the radiation exposure aspects of dental x-ray procedures. To be responsive to the informational needs of NCHCT, the assessment includes various other factors that influence the practice of dental radiology. It is hoped this analysis will serve as the basis for planning and conducting future programs to improve the practice of dental radiology

  17. Study on the action guidelines for medical support team for nuclear and radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chang'an; Liu Ying; Geng Xiusheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the action guidelines for medical support team for nuclear and radiological emergency. Methods: It is based on the experience and lessons learned in the course of meeting the emergencies preparedness and response of nuclear and radiological emergencies in China and abroad with the reference of the relevant reports of International Atomic Energy Agency. Results: Essential requirements and practical recommendations for the roles, responsibilities, emergency preparedness, principles and procedures of medical assistance at the scene, as well as the radiological protection of medical support team were provided. Conclusion: The document mentioned above can be applied to direct the establishment, effective medical preparedness and response of the medical support team for nuclear and radiological emergency. (authors)

  18. Efficient radiologic reading environment by using an open-source macro program as connection software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Han

    2012-01-01

    The objectives are (1) to introduce an easy open-source macro program as connection software and (2) to illustrate the practical usages in radiologic reading environment by simulating the radiologic reading process. The simulation is a set of radiologic reading process to do a practical task in the radiologic reading room. The principal processes are: (1) to view radiologic images on the Picture Archiving and Communicating System (PACS), (2) to connect the HIS/EMR (Hospital Information System/Electronic Medical Record) system, (3) to make an automatic radiologic reporting system, and (4) to record and recall information of interesting cases. This simulation environment was designed by using open-source macro program as connection software. The simulation performed well on the Window-based PACS workstation. Radiologists practiced the steps of the simulation comfortably by utilizing the macro-powered radiologic environment. This macro program could automate several manual cumbersome steps in the radiologic reading process. This program successfully acts as connection software for the PACS software, EMR/HIS, spreadsheet, and other various input devices in the radiologic reading environment. A user-friendly efficient radiologic reading environment could be established by utilizing open-source macro program as connection software. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Efficient radiologic reading environment by using an open-source macro program as connection software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Han

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives are (1) to introduce an easy open-source macro program as connection software and (2) to illustrate the practical usages in radiologic reading environment by simulating the radiologic reading process. Materials and methods: The simulation is a set of radiologic reading process to do a practical task in the radiologic reading room. The principal processes are: (1) to view radiologic images on the Picture Archiving and Communicating System (PACS), (2) to connect the HIS/EMR (Hospital Information System/Electronic Medical Record) system, (3) to make an automatic radiologic reporting system, and (4) to record and recall information of interesting cases. This simulation environment was designed by using open-source macro program as connection software. Results: The simulation performed well on the Window-based PACS workstation. Radiologists practiced the steps of the simulation comfortably by utilizing the macro-powered radiologic environment. This macro program could automate several manual cumbersome steps in the radiologic reading process. This program successfully acts as connection software for the PACS software, EMR/HIS, spreadsheet, and other various input devices in the radiologic reading environment. Conclusion: A user-friendly efficient radiologic reading environment could be established by utilizing open-source macro program as connection software.

  20. AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proctor, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    Measuring terrestrial gamma radiation from airborne platforms has proved to be a useful method for characterizing radiation levels over large areas. Over 300 aerial radiological surveys have been carried out over the past 25 years including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, commercial nuclear power plants, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program/Uranium Mine Tailing Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP/UMTRAP) sites, nuclear weapons test sites, contaminated industrial areas, and nuclear accident sites. This paper describes the aerial measurement technology currently in use by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) for routine environmental surveys and emergency response activities. Equipment, data-collection and -analysis methods, and examples of survey results are described

  1. Region 8 radiological assistance program team response manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide guidance so that a request for radiological assistance is responded to in an effective and consistent manner. These procedures are specific to the trained and qualified members of the Region 8 Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) team. Procedures provide steps for responding to the request, notification and activation of the team members, position descriptions, and checklists

  2. Radiological surveillance of Remedial Action activities at the processing site, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, April 12--16, 1993. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project's Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) performed a radiological surveillance of the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), MK-Ferguson and CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., at the processing site in Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. The requirements and attributes examined during the audit were developed from reviewing working-level procedures developed by the RAC. Objective evidence, comments, and observations were verified based on investigating procedures, documentation, records located at the site, personal interviews, and tours of the site. No findings were identified during this audit. Ten site-specific observations, three good practice observations, and five programmatic observations are presented in this report. The overall conclusion from the surveillance is that the radiological aspects of the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, remedial action program are performed adequately. The results of the good practice observations indicate that the site health physics (HP) staff is taking the initiative to address and resolve potential issues, and implement suggestions useful to the UMTRA Project. However, potential exists for improving designated storage areas for general items, and the RAC Project Office should consider resolving site-specific and procedural inconsistencies

  3. The R+D radiological protection program in the European Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingot Buades, F.

    1993-01-01

    The R+D program a radiological protection for the year 1992 has lied basically on three areas: I .- Radiological exposure of man II .- Radiation effects on man (evaluation, prevention and treatment) III.- Risks and management of radiation exposure

  4. Quality assurance programs from laboratories offering radiological protection services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrero Garcia, M.; Prendes Alonso, M.; Jova Sed, L.; Morales Monzon, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    The implementation of an adequate program for quality assurance in institutions servicing radiological protection programs will become an additional tool to achieve security targets included in that program. All scientific and technical services offered by CPHR employ quality assurance systems

  5. Risk assessment in the DOE Assurance Program for Remedial Action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, S.; Cross, F.T.; Denham, D.H.; Kennedy, W.E.; Stenner, R.D.

    1985-08-01

    This document provides information obtained during the performance of risk assessment tasks in support of the Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA) sponsored by the Office of Operational Safety of the Department of Energy. We have presented a method for the estimation of projected health effects at properties in the vicinity of uranium mill tailing piles due to transported tailings or emissions from the piles. Because radon and radon daughter exposure is identified as the principal factor contributing to health effects at such properties, the basis for estimating lung cancer risk as a result of such exposure is discussed in detail. Modeling of health risk due to a secondary pathway, ingestion of contaminated, home-grown food products, is also discussed since it is a potentially important additional source of exposure in certain geographic locations. Risk assessment methods used in various mill tailings reports are reviewed. The protocols for radiological surveys conducted in DOE-sponsored remedial action programs are critically reviewed with respect to their relevance to the needs of health risk estimation. The relevance of risk assessment to the APRA program is discussed briefly

  6. Use of certification programs in the radiological protection of the patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucino, Sergio; Touzet, Rodolfo

    2008-01-01

    Full text: One of the main recommendations of the Congress of Malaga on Radiological Protection of the Patient is 'the qualification and training of the staff'. This goal cannot be reached in a country, in complete and systematic form, without the help of existing national programs who allow designing a program of continuous development of the professional capacities. This program must be able to adapt in permanent form to the needs of the Program of Radiological Protection of the Patient that change and evolve in constant form. In case of the Argentina it was adapted to these needs the 'National Program of Certification and Re-certification of medical professionals in Radiology and Radio-Diagnosis'. On the base of the existing program, general requirements were established for the radiological protection of the patient and in addition, special requirements for four specialties: a) General and pediatrics radiology; b) Computed tomography; c) Interventional radiology; d) Radiotherapy. The National Program of Certification was established in 1997 with a 'Top Permanent Council' formed by the National Minister of Health advised by a scientific council. It was also creates the 'National Council of Certification and professional Re-certification' integrated by the Minister of Education, the National Academy of Medicine, the Faculties of Medicine of the whole country, the medical Federations, the trade-union Associations and the Argentine Medical Association. The process of certification can be delegated to academic or university entities, medical colleges and medical chambers that have been recognized path and ethical conduct. The certification is voluntary but it becomes obligatory to be recognized as a specialist. The certification has duration of 5 years and is renewable on the basis of a system of credits that considers different elements of the developed activities and the written theoretical and practical evaluations. It is a transparent process where the ethical

  7. General programs of specialized education of radiological physicists in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, P.; Judas, L.; Richter, V.; Novak, L.

    2005-01-01

    Specialized Education of Czech radiological physicists in diagnostic radiology (DR), nuclear medicine (NM) or radiotherapy (RT) follows-up to regulated university master program. A form and content of Specialized Education which will be defined by General Programs must therefore reflect previous step. Graduates from Specialized Education will be fully competent clinical radiological physicists for DR, NM or RT according to their branch. Therefore, we strongly recommend that General Programs are made very carefully reflecting requirements of Specialized Education and current status of the field in the Czech Republic. Currently, CAMP works on its own version of General Program for each branch. CAMP is ready to collaborate closely with all other bodies included in preparation of General Programs and with the Czech Ministry of Health. (authors)

  8. The role of radiologic technologist in radiation protection and quality assurance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djurovic, B.; Spasci -Jokic, V.; Misovic, M.

    2001-01-01

    The most important sources of ionizing radiation for general public are medical sources. Good working protocols and radiological protections measurements provided significant reduction of patients and professional doses. Medical users of ionizing radiation are radiological technologists. The purpose of this paper is to point out to several facts and errors in radiation protection educational programs for radiological technologists. Medical College educational program covers main specific topics in radiation protection, but there are some omissions in training process. Radiological technologists must be actively involved in radiation protection. Following ethical standards they will reach higher standards than the law requires

  9. Evaluation of Stress and a Stress-Reduction Program Among Radiologic Technologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reingold, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    To investigate stress levels and causes of stress among radiologic technologists and determine whether an intervention could reduce stress in a selected radiologic technologist population. Demographic characteristics and data on preintervention stress sources and levels were collected through Internet-based questionnaires. A 6-week, self-administered, mindfulness-based stress-reduction program was conducted as a pilot intervention with 42 radiologic technologists from the Veterans Administration Medical Center. Data also were collected postintervention. Identified sources of stress were compared with findings from previous studies. Some radiologic technologists experienced improvement in their perceptions of stress after the intervention. Sources of stress for radiologic technologists were similar to those shown in earlier research, including inconsistent management, poor management communication, conflicting demands, long work hours, excessive workloads, lack of work breaks, and time pressures. The mindfulness-based stress-reduction program is an example of an inexpensive method that could improve personal well-being, reduce work errors, improve relationships in the workplace, and increase job satisfaction. More research is needed to determine the best type of intervention for stress reduction in a larger radiologic technologist population.

  10. Waste management and environmental compliance aspects of a major remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, J.S.; Beskid, N.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) is one of four major programs undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to remediate various sites where radiological contamination remained from programs conducted during the nation's early years of research and development in atomic energy. The remedial actions at the 33 sites that are currently in FUSRAP could generate an estimated total volume of about 1.6 million cubic meters of radioactive waste. Waste disposal is currently estimated to represent about one-third of the total estimated $2.1 billion cost for the entire program over its total duration. Waste management aspects within the program are diverse. The sites range in size from small areas used only for storage operations to large-scale decommissioned industrial facilities where uranium processing and other operations were carried out in the past. Currently, four sites are on the National Priorities List for remediation. Remedial actions at FUSRAP sites have to satisfy the requirements of both the National Environmental Policy Act and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, as amended. In addition, a number of federal, state, and local laws as well as Executive Orders and DOE Orders may be applicable or relevant to each site. Several key issues currently face the program, including the mixed waste issue, both from the environmental compliance (with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) and the disposal technology perspectives. 7 refs., 1 tab

  11. Development of interactive patient-based multimedia computer programs in veterinary orthopedic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, S.L.; Hoskinson, J.J.; Mussman, J.M.; Michaels, W.E.; Mclaughlin, R.; Gaughan, E.M.; Roush, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    Three computerized multimedia programs on large and small animal veterinary orthopedic radiology were developed and implemented for the radiology curriculum as an alternative to traditional film-based laboratory learning. Programs utilized ''hot words'' (colored text words that displayed an overlaid image label that highlighted lesions) and interactive quizzes which responded appropriately to selected answers. ''Hot words'' helped students develop confidence in accurate lesion detection and the interactive quizzes transformed learning from a passive to an active process. Multiple examples were provided for reinforcement and concepts were incorporated from other clinical disciplines for curriculum integration. Programs were written using a presentation software program, Toolbook for DOS based platform, and contained radiographic images made by laser-scanning digitization. Multiple students could simultaneously access the programs through a network server. These pilot programs were implemented successfully and computerized multimedia presentation proved to be well suited to teaching radiology. Development of the programs required attention to a number of hardware, software, time and cost factors

  12. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Medical Radiologic Technology (Radiography) (CIP: 51.0907--Medical Radiologic Technology). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the radiologic technology program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies for the program,…

  13. DOE'S remedial action assurance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welty, C.G. Jr.; Needels, T.S.; Denham, D.H.

    1984-10-01

    The formulation and initial implementation of DOE's Assurance Program for Remedial Action are described. It was initiated in FY 84 and is expected to be further implemented in FY 85 as the activities of DOE's Remedial Action programs continue to expand. Further APRA implementation will include additional document reviews, site inspections, and program office appraisals with emphasis on Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program and Surplus Facilities Management Program

  14. The American Board of Radiology Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Program in Radiologic Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Stephen R.; Hendee, William R.; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.

    2005-01-01

    Maintenance of Certification (MOC) recognizes that in addition to medical knowledge, several essential elements involved in delivering quality care must be developed and maintained throughout one's career. The MOC process is designed to facilitate and document the professional development of each diplomate of The American Board of Radiology (ABR) through its focus on the essential elements of quality care in Diagnostic Radiology and its subspecialties, and in the specialties of Radiation Oncology and Radiologic Physics. The initial elements of the ABR-MOC have been developed in accord with guidelines of The American Board of Medical Specialties. All diplomates with a ten-year, time-limited primary certificate in Diagnostic Radiologic Physics, Therapeutic Radiologic Physics, or Medical Nuclear Physics who wish to maintain certification must successfully complete the requirements of the appropriate ABR-MOC program for their specialty. Holders of multiple certificates must meet ABR-MOC requirements specific to the certificates held. Diplomates with lifelong certificates are not required to participate in the MOC, but are strongly encouraged to do so. MOC is based on documentation of individual participation in the four components of MOC: (1) professional standing, (2) lifelong learning and self-assessment, (3) cognitive expertise, and (4) performance in practice. Within these components, MOC addresses six competencies: medical knowledge, patient care, interpersonal and communication skills, professionalism, practice-based learning and improvement, and systems-based practice

  15. Evaluation of radiological teaching programs in the Internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, J.; Schubert, S.; Voelk, M.; Scheibl, K.; Paetzel, C.; Schreyer, A.; Djavidani, B.; Feuerbach, S.; Strotzer, M.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of web based training programs,which can be contacted from the homepages of radiological departments of German universities.Material and method From june 2000 to january 2002 the 75 web based training programs of 57 providers,which can be contacted from the web pages of the radiological departments of german universities were evaluated in a prospective study.A medical student experienced in using the world wide web examined each training program three times in an interval of six months using the following criteria: availability of the web sites,target group,kind of training program,contents and structure and the technical solution. 51 of the 57 the homepages were fully available at each visit. 64 of the 75 web based training programs which could be connected from these sites were available at all three visitis.One program was only partially available at one spot check. 8 of the 75 programs were designed for physicians and medically trained personal, 23 were made for medical students and 44 addressed both target groups (partially more than once mentioned).The number of the presented cases ranged between one single and 3700. In 31 of 75 training programs links to other teaching files were found.A complete presentation of cases was presented by 48 of the 75 web sites.5 of the 75 web sites offered physiological images for comparison. In 20 training programs the pathological changes were optically marked in the x-ray images.A logical and didactical structure was found in 24 teaching files, 14 gave the possibility to check the learning results.No provider made use of the possibility to pass credits to the students or physicians acount with regard to official training programs. Multimedia techniques were used in 15 training programs.43 sites used data reduced preview images (thumbnails).The latest update of the site is mentioned in 55 of the 75 web sites. 19 of 57 providers had either no possibility of contact or did not answer to an e-mail. From the homepages

  16. Practical Implications for an Effective Radiology Residency Quality Improvement Program for Milestone Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, Rebecca; Lewis, Madelene; Ackerman, Susan; Hill, Jeanne; Thacker, Paul; Matheus, Maria; Tipnis, Sameer; Gordon, Leonie

    2017-01-01

    Utilization of a radiology resident-specific quality improvement (QI) program and curriculum based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) milestones can enable a program's assessment of the systems-based practice component and prepare residents for QI implementation post graduation. This article outlines the development process, curriculum, QI committee formation, and resident QI project requirements of one institution's designated radiology resident QI program. A method of mapping the curriculum to the ACGME milestones and assessment of resident competence by postgraduate year level is provided. Sample projects, challenges to success, and lessons learned are also described. Survey data of current trainees and alumni about the program reveal that the majority of residents and alumni responders valued the QI curriculum and felt comfortable with principles and understanding of QI. The most highly valued aspect of the program was the utilization of a resident education committee. The majority of alumni responders felt the residency quality curriculum improved understanding of QI, assisted with preparation for the American Board of Radiology examination, and prepared them for QI in their careers. In addition to the survey results, outcomes of resident project completion and resident scholarly activity in QI are evidence of the success of this program. It is hoped that this description of our experiences with a radiology resident QI program, in accordance with the ACGME milestones, may facilitate the development of successful QI programs in other diagnostic radiology residencies. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Interactive computer-based training program for radiological workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinoskey, P.A.; Camacho, P.I.; Wells, L.

    2000-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is redesigning its existing Computer-Based Training (CBT) programs for radiological workers. The redesign represents a major effort that is aimed at producing a single highly interactive and flexible CBT program. The new CBT program is designed to address a variety of radiological workers, including researchers, x-ray operators, and individuals working in tritium, uranium, plutonium, and accelerator facilities. The program addresses the diversity of backgrounds found at a national laboratory. The CBT program includes photographs, line drawings and illustrations, sound, video, and simulations, and it allows for easy insertion and replacement of text, graphics, sound, and video. The new design supports timely updates and customization for use at other University of California sites. The CBT program is divided into ten basic modules. Introduction and Lessons Learned, History and Uses, Fundamentals, Background Radiation, Biological Effects of Radiation, Characteristics of Radionuclides, Radiological Controls, Monitoring, Emergency Response, Responsibilities. Some of the main modules features as many as seven or eight submodules. For example, the module on Characteristics of Radionuclides features submodules on common radionuclides, tritium uranium, plutonium, x-ray machines, E-beam devices, radiographic devices, and accelerators. Required submodules are tailored to an individual's type of work and facility, and they are determined by the answers to an onscreen questionnaire given at the outset of training. Individuals can challenge most individual modules, but certain submodules will be mandatory based on the initial survey. For example, individuals working in the uranium facility will be required to complete the submodule on 'History and Uses of Uranium'. However, all other submodules under the main module, 'History and Uses', will be available if selected for preview. For each module, an opportunity is provided for further

  18. Radiological assessment and remedial action report for the ''Son of Lansdowne'' property, 186 North Lansdowne Avenue, Lansdowne, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    This document reports the results of a radiological assessment and remedial action program conducted by Argonne National Laboratory personnel at a radioactively contaminated private residence in Lansdowne, Pennsylvania. The program was conducted on the residence at 186 Lansdowne Avenue. The survey conducted by the ANL personnel indicated that several dozen areas or spots of contamination were present on all floors and the basement of the three-story house. Contamination was found on furniture, carpeting, walls, floors, woodwork, and ceilings. Remedial action undertaken to remove the contamination ranged from scrubbing, to scraping, to shaving of wood, to removal and disposal of items and material that could not be adequately decontaminated. Outdoors, contaminated soil was removed from the backyard, and the driveway was dug up so the contaminated subsurface material could be removed. The remedial action generated quantities of radioactive waste, including four 55-gallon drums and one M-III bin (120 ft 3 ) containing floor tile, concrete, personal items, furniture, floor scrapings, vermiculite absorbed scrub water, and other items. In addition, there were 24 M-III bins containing approximately 112 tons of contaminated soil and rock from the two contaminated areas in the backyard and from the contaminated subsurface of the driveway. 2 refs., 39 figs., 12 tabs

  19. Environmental Radiological Impact of Nuclear Power. Monitoring and Control Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    Radioactive contamination of the environment and public exposure to ionizing radiation may result from releases from programmed or accidental operations in regulated activities, or they may be due to preexisting situations such as contamination caused by past accidents, radioactive rain caused by nuclear tests, or increased natural radioactivity resulting from human activities. In many cases, both the emission sources and the environment should be monitored to determine the risk to the population and verify to what extent the limits and conditions established by competent authorities are being observed. Monitoring can be divided into three categories: monitoring of the emission source, of the receiving medium and of members of the public; individual monitoring of the population is extremely rare and would only be considered when estimated doses substantially exceed the annual public dose limit. In practices likely to produce significant radioactive releases, as is the case of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the limits and conditions for monitoring and controlling them and the requirements for environmental radiological monitoring are established in the licensing process. Programs implemented during normal operation of the facilities form the basis for monitoring in the event of accidents. in addition to environmental radiological monitoring associated with facilities, different countries have monitoring programs outside the facilities zones of influence, in order to ascertain the nationwide radiological fund and determine possible increases in this fund. In Spain, the facilities that generate radioactive waste have effluent storage, treatment and removal systems and radiological monitoring programs based on site and discharge characteristics. The environmental radiological monitoring system is composed of the network implemented by the owners in the nuclear fuel cycle facilities zones of influence, and by nationwide monitoring networks managed by the Consejo de

  20. Effective radiological safety program for electron linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, W.P.

    1980-10-01

    An outline is presented of some of the main elements of an electron accelerator radiological safety program. The discussion includes types of accelerator facilities, types of radiations to be anticipated, activity induced in components, air and water, and production of toxic gases. Concepts of radiation shielding design are briefly discussed and organizational aspects are considered as an integral part of the overall safety program

  1. Surface radiological free release program for the Battelle Columbus Laboratory Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, C.N.

    1995-01-01

    This paper was prepared for the Second Residual Radioactivity and Recycling Criteria Workshop and discusses decommissioning and decontamination activities at the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP). The BCLDP is a joint effort between the Department of Energy (DOE) and Battelle Columbus Operations to decontaminate fifteen Battelle-owned buildings contaminated with DOE radioactive materials. The privately owned buildings located across the street from The Ohio State University campus became contaminated with natural uranium and thorium during nuclear research activities. BCLDP waste management is supported by an extensive radiological free-release program. Miscellaneous materials and building surfaces have been free-released from the BCLDP. The free-release program has substantially reduced radioactive waste volumes and supported waste minimization. Free release for unrestricted use has challenged regulators and NRC licensees since the development of early surface-release criteria. This paper discusses the surface radiological free-release program incorporated by the BCLDP and the historical development of the surface radiological free-release criteria. Concerns regarding radiological free-release criteria are also presented. (author)

  2. Use of the analytical tree technique to develop a radiological protection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domenech N, H.; Jova S, L.

    1996-01-01

    The results obtained by the Cuban Center for Radiological Protection and Hygiene by using an analytical tree technique to develop its general operational radiation protection program are presented. By the application of this method, some factors such as the organization of the radiation protection services, the provision of administrative requirements, the existing general laboratories requirements, the viability of resources and the current documentation was evaluated. Main components were considered such as: complete normative and regulatory documentation; automatic radiological protection data management; scope of 'on the-job'and radiological protection training for the personnel; previous radiological appraisal for the safety performance of the works and application of dose constrains for the personnel and the public. The detailed development of the program allowed to identify the basic aims to be achieved in its maintenance and improvement. (authors). 3 refs

  3. Creating a comprehensive customer service program to help convey critical and acute results of radiology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towbin, Alexander J; Hall, Seth; Moskovitz, Jay; Johnson, Neil D; Donnelly, Lane F

    2011-01-01

    Communication of acute or critical results between the radiology department and referring clinicians has been a deficiency of many radiology departments. The failure to perform or document these communications can lead to poor patient care, patient safety issues, medical-legal issues, and complaints from referring clinicians. To mitigate these factors, a communication and documentation tool was created and incorporated into our departmental customer service program. This article will describe the implementation of a comprehensive customer service program in a hospital-based radiology department. A comprehensive customer service program was created in the radiology department. Customer service representatives were hired to answer the telephone calls to the radiology reading rooms and to help convey radiology results. The radiologists, referring clinicians, and customer service representatives were then linked via a novel workflow management system. This workflow management system provided tools to help facilitate the communication needs of each group. The number of studies with results conveyed was recorded from the implementation of the workflow management system. Between the implementation of the workflow management system on August 1, 2005, and June 1, 2009, 116,844 radiology results were conveyed to the referring clinicians and documented in the system. This accounts for more than 14% of the 828,516 radiology cases performed in this time frame. We have been successful in creating a comprehensive customer service program to convey and document communication of radiology results. This program has been widely used by the ordering clinicians as well as radiologists since its inception.

  4. Application of computers in a Radiological Survey Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berven, B.A.; Blair, M.S.; Doane, R.W.; Little, C.A.; Perdue, P.T.

    1984-01-01

    A brief description of some of the applications of computers in a radiological survey program is presented. It has been our experience that computers and computer software have allowed our staff personnel to more productively use their time by using computers to perform the mechanical acquisition, analyses, and storage of data. It is hoped that other organizations may similarly profit from this experience. This effort will ultimately minimize errors and reduce program costs

  5. Main radiation protection actions for medical personnel as primary responders front of an event with radiological dispersive device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duque, Hildanielle Ramos

    2015-01-01

    After the terrorist attack in New York, USA, in 2001, there was a worldwide concern about possible attacks using radioactive material in conventional detonators, called as Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) or 'dirty bomb'. Several studies have been and are being made to form a global knowledge about this type of event. As until now, fortunately, there has not been an event with RDD, the Goiania Radiological Accident in Brazil, 1987, is used as a reference for decision-making. Several teams with technical experts should act in an event with RDD, but the medical staffs who respond quickly to the event must be properly protected from the harmful effects of radiation. Based on the radiological protection experts performance during the Goiania accident and the knowledge from lessons learned of many radiological accidents worldwide, this work presents an adaptation of the radiation protection actions for an event with RDD that helps a medical team as primary responders. The following aspects are presented: the problem of radioactive contamination from the explosion of the device in underground environment, the actions of the first responders and evaluation of health radiation effects. This work was based on specialized articles and papers about radiological accidents and RDD; as well as personal communication and academic information of the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry. The radiation protection actions, adapted to a terrorist attack event with RDD, have as a scenario a subway station in the capital. The main results are: the use of the basic radiation protection principle of time because there is no condition to take care of a patient keeping distance or using a shielding; the use of full appropriate protection cloths for contaminating materials ensuring the physical safety of professionals, and the medical team monitoring at the end of a medical procedure, checking for surface contamination. The main conclusion is that all medical actions

  6. Radiological Assistance Program, DOE Region 6 response plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubowski, F.M.

    1993-02-01

    This program plan meets all the requirements identified in DOE Order 5530.3, Radiological Assistance Program and supports those requirements leading to the establishment of a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) as required by DOE 5530-5. Requests for radiological assistance may come from other DOE facilities, Federal or state agencies, tribal officials, or from any private corporation or individual. Many of the requests will be handled by a telephone call, a conference or a letter, teletype or memorandum. Other requests for assistance may involve radioactive material in serious accidents, fire, personal injuries, contamination or possible hazards to the general public. Some occurrences may require the dispatch of trained personnel equipped with radiation monitoring instruments and related equipment necessary to evaluate, control and neutralize the hazard. The primary responsibility for incidents involving radioactive material always remains with the party having custody of the radioactive materials. In addition, the DOE recognizes that the assistance provided shall not in any way preempt state, tribal, or local authority and/or responsibility on state or tribal properties. Toward this end, DOE assistance for non-DOE radioactive materials, is limited to technical assistance, advice, measurement and other resources as deemed necessary by the local authorities but excludes DOE interface with the public media. This is a function handled by the local or state Incident Commander

  7. The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer Program (RSAC-5) user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzel, D.R.

    1994-02-01

    The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer Program (RSAC-5) calculates the consequences of the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Using a personal computer, a user can generate a fission product inventory from either reactor operating history or nuclear criticalities. RSAC-5 models the effects of high-efficiency particulate air filters or other cleanup systems and calculates decay and ingrowth during transport through processes, facilities, and the environment. Doses are calculated through the inhalation, immersion, ground surface, and ingestion pathways. RSAC+, a menu-driven companion program to RSAC-5, assists users in creating and running RSAC-5 input files. This user's manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for RSAC-5 and RSAC+. Instructions, screens, and examples are provided to guide the user through the functions provided by RSAC-5 and RSAC+. These programs are designed for users who are familiar with radiological dose assessment methods

  8. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary: First quarter 1995 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1995-04-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of the operational environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site. The surveys included in this program consist of inactive waste sites; outdoor radiological control areas; tank farm perimeters and associated diversion boxes, lift stations, and vent stations; perimeters of active or uncovered waste sites such as burial grounds, retention basins, ponds, process trenches, and ditches; and road and rail surfaces. This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed during the First Quarter of 1995. The status of corrective actions required from current and past reports are also discussed

  9. US DOE Radiological Assistance Program: personnel, equipment and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, A.P.; Kuehner, A.V.; Phillips, L.F.

    1982-01-01

    The Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is intended to provide emergency advice and assistance in the event of radiological incidents. Each of DOE's eight Regional Coordinating Offices in the US provide a 24-hour reporting and response capability. Specifically, the Brookhaven Area Office (BHO) is responsible for DOE's Region I, which includes the 11 northeastern states of the US. Although an inventory of dedicated equipment is assigned to BHO-RAP, it draws upon the resources of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for trained personnel in health physics and for other specialized personnel in both the day to day operation of the program and in the on-the-scene response to an incident. The organization of the BHO-RAP program and its response procedures are described in detail. An inventory and brief description of the contents of a variety of emergency equipment kits and of additional state-of-the-art instruments is included. The BHO-RAP guidelines and requirements for field operations are also indicated, as are other DOE resources upon which it can draw

  10. Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.0 Users’ Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Bradley J Schrader

    2009-03-01

    The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.0 (RSAC-7) is the newest version of the RSAC legacy code. It calculates the consequences of a release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. A user can generate a fission product inventory from either reactor operating history or a nuclear criticality event. RSAC-7 models the effects of high-efficiency particulate air filters or other cleanup systems and calculates the decay and ingrowth during transport through processes, facilities, and the environment. Doses are calculated for inhalation, air immersion, ground surface, ingestion, and cloud gamma pathways. RSAC-7 can be used as a tool to evaluate accident conditions in emergency response scenarios, radiological sabotage events and to evaluate safety basis accident consequences. This users’ manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for RSAC-7. Instructions, screens, and examples are provided to guide the user through the functions provided by RSAC-7. This program was designed for users who are familiar with radiological dose assessment methods.

  11. Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.2 Users’ Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Bradley J Schrader

    2010-10-01

    The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.2 (RSAC-7) is the newest version of the RSAC legacy code. It calculates the consequences of a release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. A user can generate a fission product inventory from either reactor operating history or a nuclear criticality event. RSAC-7 models the effects of high-efficiency particulate air filters or other cleanup systems and calculates the decay and ingrowth during transport through processes, facilities, and the environment. Doses are calculated for inhalation, air immersion, ground surface, ingestion, and cloud gamma pathways. RSAC-7 can be used as a tool to evaluate accident conditions in emergency response scenarios, radiological sabotage events and to evaluate safety basis accident consequences. This users’ manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for RSAC-7. Instructions, screens, and examples are provided to guide the user through the functions provided by RSAC-7. This program was designed for users who are familiar with radiological dose assessment methods.

  12. Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.0 Users Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrader, Bradley J.

    2009-01-01

    The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.0 (RSAC-7) is the newest version of the RSAC legacy code. It calculates the consequences of a release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. A user can generate a fission product inventory from either reactor operating history or a nuclear criticality event. RSAC-7 models the effects of high-efficiency particulate air filters or other cleanup systems and calculates the decay and ingrowth during transport through processes, facilities, and the environment. Doses are calculated for inhalation, air immersion, ground surface, ingestion, and cloud gamma pathways. RSAC-7 can be used as a tool to evaluate accident conditions in emergency response scenarios, radiological sabotage events and to evaluate safety basis accident consequences. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for RSAC-7. Instructions, screens, and examples are provided to guide the user through the functions provided by RSAC-7. This program was designed for users who are familiar with radiological dose assessment methods

  13. DOE Radiological Calibrations Intercomparison Program: Results of fiscal year 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, F.M.; McDonald, J.C.

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the FY 1987 results of the radiological calibrations intercomparison program. The intercomparison operation is discussed, and the equipment is described, particularly the instrument set, the beta source set, and relevant calculations. Solutions to problems and improvements in the program are suggested, and conclusions are then introduced. 9 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs

  14. Restart of the Armenia-2 Nuclear Power Station: Radiological emergency preparedness considerations for the nearby American community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargo, G.J.; Sherwood, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    The Armenia Nuclear Power Station is located at Metsamor, approximately 30 km NW of the capital, Yerevan. The station, a two-unit, first-generation Soviet-designed VVER-440/270 pressurized water reactor plant was closed following the 1988 earthquake near Spitak. Because of a severe energy shortage the Government of Armenia has undertaken a program to recommission Unit 2. The plant design and circumstances surrounding its closure caused members of the U.S. Embassy staff and the American community in Armenia to express concerns for their safety in the event of a radiological emergency. In response, two representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy's International Nuclear Safety Program traveled to Armenia to review the Status of radiological emergency preparedness, meet with the American community, and make protective action recommendations. In this presentation we examine the major issues associated with recommissioning of Armenia-2, the challenges involved with developing a radiological emergency preparedness program for the American community, and our recommendations for protective actions in the absence of a strong communications and radiological monitoring infrastructure

  15. Remedial Action Program annual conference: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Within the DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration ampersand Waste Management, the Office of Environmental Restoration manages a number of programs whose purposes are to complete remedial actions at DOE facilities and sites located throughout the United States. The programs include the Surplus Facilities Management Program, the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, and the West Valley Demonstration Project. These programs involve the decontamination and decommissioning of radioactively-contaminated structures and equipment, the disposal of uranium mill tailings, and the cleanup or restoration of soils and ground water that have been contaminated with radioactive or hazardous substances. Each year the DOE and DOE-contractor staff who conduct these programs meet to exchange information and experience in common technical areas. This year's meeting was hosted by the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, DOE-AL, and was held in Albuquerque, NM. This volume of proceedings is the record of that conference. The proceedings consist of abstracts, summaries, or actual text for each presentation made and any visual aids used by the speakers

  16. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Partial radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH13 Shiprock, New Mexico, November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    As part of a detailed radiological assessment of the vicinity properties at Shiprock, a comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH13 was initiated on November 19, 1982. At that time, a single residential structure existed in the northwest corner of the property. The lands surrounding the structure were extensively cluttered with junk. The initial assessment activities were limited to measurements within the residential structure of the ambient external penetrating radiation level at a 1-meter height and analyses of indoor air samples for airborne radioactivity. The external penetrating radiation exposure rate (12.3 μR/h) was less than the 20 μR/h above background limit specified in the EPA Standard (40 CFR 192.12[b][2]). As determined by the air samples, the short-term radon daughter concentration within the structure (0.36 mWL) did not exceed the 0.02 WL (or 20 mWL) limit for average annual concentration including background as specified in the EPA Standard. Further measurements required to completely determine the radiological status of this vicinity property, such as measurements of surface radiation both indoors and outdoors and collection and analyses of soil samples, were planned for the final phase of this assessment. However, that phase of the program was terminated before these measurements were accomplished. Thus, the extent of outdoor radiological contamination is presently unknown, and the evaluation of indoor contamination (if any) is incomplete

  17. Evaluation of management of communication in the actions of preparedness and response to nuclear and radiological emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello Filho, Mauro Otto de Cavalcanti; Beserra, Marcela Tatiana Fernandes, E-mail: maurootto@cefet-rj.br, E-mail: maurootto@gmail.com, E-mail: mbeserra@cefet-rj.br [Centro Federal de Educacao Celso Sucknow da Fonseca (CEFET-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Wasserman, Maria Angelica Vergara, E-mail: mwasserman@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Wasserman, Julio Cesar de Faria Alvim, E-mail: geowass@vm.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The use of practices involving the use of ionizing radiation in diverse areas of knowledge increases every day. This growth warning about the increased probability of accidents, radiological and nuclear emergencies, with possible consequences for the public, workers and the environment. Within this scenario, it is clear that studies and reassessments of the emergency response actions, receive proposals for continuous improvement. The achievement of the objectives of the response must be sustained by tactical, operation and logistics optimized processes. The articulation through communication between the teams involved in the response must be adaptable to each accident or emergency, respecting its size. The objectives of this study is to perform an assessment on the management of communication in the actions of Preparedness and Response to Nuclear and Radiological Emergencies. This assessment is supported by best practices of the Incident Command System (ICS) and the Institute of Project Management (Project Management Institute-PMI). For this purpose, based on models referred were established performance indicators supported by the BSC (Balanced Scorecard). These indicators allowed to evaluate more objectively the performance of the communication processes associated with each phase of the response. The study resulted in the proposed model documents aiming to assist planning of communications exercises in preparation and response actions, supported and adapted the best practices of PMI. These methodologies were evaluated by real cases selected from radiological and nuclear emergencies published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (author)

  18. Evaluation of management of communication in the actions of preparedness and response to nuclear and radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello Filho, Mauro Otto de Cavalcanti; Beserra, Marcela Tatiana Fernandes; Wasserman, Maria Angelica Vergara; Wasserman, Julio Cesar de Faria Alvim

    2013-01-01

    The use of practices involving the use of ionizing radiation in diverse areas of knowledge increases every day. This growth warning about the increased probability of accidents, radiological and nuclear emergencies, with possible consequences for the public, workers and the environment. Within this scenario, it is clear that studies and reassessments of the emergency response actions, receive proposals for continuous improvement. The achievement of the objectives of the response must be sustained by tactical, operation and logistics optimized processes. The articulation through communication between the teams involved in the response must be adaptable to each accident or emergency, respecting its size. The objectives of this study is to perform an assessment on the management of communication in the actions of Preparedness and Response to Nuclear and Radiological Emergencies. This assessment is supported by best practices of the Incident Command System (ICS) and the Institute of Project Management (Project Management Institute-PMI). For this purpose, based on models referred were established performance indicators supported by the BSC (Balanced Scorecard). These indicators allowed to evaluate more objectively the performance of the communication processes associated with each phase of the response. The study resulted in the proposed model documents aiming to assist planning of communications exercises in preparation and response actions, supported and adapted the best practices of PMI. These methodologies were evaluated by real cases selected from radiological and nuclear emergencies published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (author)

  19. Radiological survey results at 1 Shady Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ095)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action at the Stepan property in Maywood, New Jersey and several vicinity properties in Lodi, New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS), adjacent to the former Maywood Chemical Works facility. The property at One Shady Lane, Lodi, New Jersey was not one of these vicinity properties but was surveyed by DOE at the request of the owner. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted in November 1994, was to confirm whether remedial actions were to be performed on the property in order to be in compliance with the identified Guidelines. The radiological survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at One Shady Lane, Lodi, New Jersey, were comparable to background levels in the area, and well within the limits prescribed by DOE radiological guidelines. Based on the results of the radiological survey data, this property does not meet guidelines for inclusion under FUSRAP

  20. Administrative organization in diagnostic radiology residency program leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Grant R; Mullins, Mark E; Chen, Zhengjia; Meltzer, Carolyn C

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to document the current state of administrative structure in US diagnostic radiology (DR) residency program leadership. A secondary objective was to assess for correlation(s), if any, with DR residency programs that equipped positions such as assistant, associate, and emeritus program director (PD) with respect to residency size and region of the country. The Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database, as well as direct communication and programmatic Web site searches, were used to gather data regarding current US DR residency leadership. Data collected included the presence of additional leadership titles, including assistant PD, associate PD, and PD emeritus, and how many faculty members currently held each position. Programs were excluded if results could not be identified. Analysis of variance and t tests were used to estimate the correlations of the size of a residency with having additional or shared PD positions and the types of positions, respectively. Chi-square tests were used to assess for any regional differences. As of the time of this project, the Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database defined 186 US DR residency programs. A total of 173 programs (93%) were included in the analysis; the remainder were excluded because of unavailability of relevant data. Seventy-two percent (124 of 173) of programs had additional DR leadership positions. Of these, 30 programs (17%) had more than one such position. There were no significant differences in the sizes of the programs that used these additional positions (mean, 25 ± 12; range, 6-72) compared with those that did not (mean, 24 ± 12; range, 7-51). There were no significant differences between programs that had additional positions with respect to region of the country. The majority of US DR residency programs used some form of additional DR leadership position. In the majority of cases, this was in the form of an assistant or associate PD. Nearly one

  1. Remedial Action Programs annual meeting: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Within the DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology manages a number of programs whose purposes are to complete remedial actions at DOE facilities and sites located throughout the United States. These programs include the Surplus Facilities Management Program, the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the Uranium Mill Tailings remedial Action Program and the West Valley Demonstration Project. The programs involve the decontamination and decommissioning of radioactively-contaminated structures and equipment, the disposal of uranium mill tailings, and the cleanup or restoration of soils and ground water that have been contaminated with radioactive hazardous substances. Each year the DOE and DOE-contractor staff who conduct these programs meet to exchange information and experience in common technical areas. This year's meeting was hosted by the Surplus Facilities Management Program and was held near DOE Headquarters, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. This volume of proceedings provides the record for the meeting. The proceedings consist of abstracts for each presentation made at the meeting, and the visual aids (if any) used by the speakers. The material is organized in the following pages according to the five different sessions at the meeting: Session 1: Environmental Compliance--Policy; Session 2: Environmental Compliance--Practice; Session 3: Reports from working groups; Session 4: DandD Technology; and Session 5: Remedial Action Technology. The agenda for the meeting and the list of meeting registrants are provided in Appendix A and B, respectively. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base

  2. Program of radiological monitoring environmental a nuclear facility in latency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blas, A. de; Riego, A.; Batalla, E.; Tapia, C.; Garcia, R.; Sanchez, J.; Toral, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the Radiological Environmental Monitoring program of the Vandellos I nuclear power plant in the latency period. This facility was dismantled to level 2, as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The program is an adaptation of the implanted one during the dismantling, taking into account the isotopes that may be present, as well as the main transfer routes. Along with the description of the program the results obtained in the latent period from 2005 until 2012 are presented.

  3. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center advanced part phase response actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, B.

    1997-01-01

    Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response actions are carried out in Advance Party and Main Party phases of deployment. Response activities are initiated by a FRMAC Home Team prior to and during Advance Party deployment, with Home Team support continuing until the FRMAC Main Party is fully deployed. Upon arrival at the incident scene, the Advance Party establishes communications with other federal, state, and local response organizations, Following an Advance Party Meeting with these response organizations, FRMAC begins formulation of an initial monitoring and sampling plan, in coordination with the jurisdictional state and the Lead Federal Agency, and initiates detailed logistical arrangements for Main Party deployment and operations

  4. Comparison of radiology residency programs in ten countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willatt, J.M.G.; Mason, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare various aspects of radiology training schemes in ten countries. A questionnaire was sent to senior residents in the UK, USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Italy, Egypt, India, Malaysia and Greece. The questions concerned length of training, required pre-training experience, the organization of the training scheme, teaching, resources, stages at which residents can independently perform and report examinations, fellowships, and progression to jobs. A wide variety of training, ranging from highly scheduled programs with detailed aims and objectives, to self-learning occurs across the world. Examinations and assessments are also variable. There are lessons to be learned from varying practices; more exchanges of ideas should be encouraged. In view of the ''internationalization'' of radiology services and the variation in training styles an international qualification for quality assurance purposes may be desirable. (orig.)

  5. Objectives and actions of Public Health Authorities in external radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera V, L.; Aguilar P, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    Here are discussed actions and objectives that the public health authorities could think about uncontrolled liberation of radioactive materials. The approaches on the more convenient actions to continue are established upon assimilating the Chernobyl experience. We will enumerate problems that, they could arise with the foregone actions in order to diminish the population detriment. In the face of the uncontrolled liberation of radioactive material in the Nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, Veracruz, classified like external radiological emergency, the objective of these serious authorities reduce the deleterious effect to the health of the inhabitants around the CNLV, due to the radioactive material liberated to the atmosphere. In consequence, it is necessary carry out actions of protection for the population affected directly by the external irradiation, for the contamination deposited on inhabited areas, cultivation zones, shepherding, manufacturing and farms. The early actions or immediate are in order to limit deterministic damages to the population and give attendance to people with radio lesions. And the intermediate or they of recuperation are in order to maintain for under an acceptable value the risk to the population due to radiation stochastic effects. In the recuperation phase the plan of water and foods control should consider: foods destined to the self consume in the affected region for the liberation and foods processed for the sale or exportation. We will discuss the stage in a mediate phase after the evacuation of the population. The general tasks could be: 1. Actions in order to impede the contamination propagation. 2. Sampling of waters and foods, contamination situation and its quantification. And acceptance quality in elaborated foods. 3. Safeguard of the material and polluted areas. 4. Election of the actions to continue in function of the reference levels and the comparison of the risk of several alternatives. (Author)

  6. Radiological safety programs in the petroleum and petrochemistry industry of Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero M, C.

    1996-01-01

    A diagnosis carried out five years ago showed that in Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) and its subsidiaries, exist about 530 radioactive sources. Also, about 1500 workers were also occupationally exposed, during operations such as industrial radiography and well logging. The same study determined the occurrence of some non-reported accidents and incidents with the overexposure of workers, specially contractors. Most of these problems were the result of the bad application of the radiological protection practices, and on the other hand, the disregarding of the governmental authorities in applying the regulatory standards. In order to solve this situation, PDVSA settled the safety guide for working with ionizing radiation, in which guidelines and technical advice are stablished to perform a safer work with radioactive elements. A radiological protection program was also organized in all the company operational areas. The paper includes the programs, practices and procedures implemented by PDVSA and its subsidiaries. Besides, the result of applying this comprehensive radiation protection program will be showed. (author). 1 ref

  7. Development of software to provide practical guidance in the managing of a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira Filho, Alfredo L.; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Loureiro, Eduardo C.M.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of managing a radiological emergency is the ability to promptly and adequately determine and take actions to protect members of public and emergency workers. This work brings up to date a computer software program in Delphi, with the tools, generic procedures and the data necessary to support the Incident Commander, the Radiological Assessor and other members of a generic response organization in case of radiological accident. The aim is also to provide practical guidance for the first responders who will respond during the first few hours to a radiological emergency and for the national officials who would support this early response. Software is now based on the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency (EPR-First Responders), published in 2006 as part of the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, as well as in the IAEA technical document, Generic Procedures for Assessment and Response during a Radiological Emergency, the IAEA-TECDOC-1162, taking account of the lessons learned from using this last document in the area of early response and first responders' actions. The proposed procedures provide action criteria that are clear, concise and predetermined, based on the present knowledge and the accumulated experiences, allowing the immediate decision-making. The objective is to provide, through a portable computer, practical guidance, in the form of action guides, instructions, and supporting data for emergency response that, if implemented, will provide a basic assessment and the response capability needed to protect public and workers in case of different types of radiological emergencies. In addition to appropriate protective action recommendations, it will also provide, when it is necessary, general guidance on the recovery of radioactive sources and initial cleanup operations. The philosophy is to keep the process simple and fast, yet effective. Software is available in Spanish, English and Portuguese

  8. Development of a Program on quality assurance in radiotherapy and radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovar, Julio

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the development of a program of QA in radiotherapy and radiology is described. The objectives, resources, manpower and the cooperation between the IAEA and the Direccion General de Energia are outlined

  9. Knowledge Based Understanding of Radiology Text

    OpenAIRE

    Ranum, David L.

    1988-01-01

    A data acquisition tool which will extract pertinent diagnostic information from radiology reports has been designed and implemented. Pertinent diagnostic information is defined as that clinical data which is used by the HELP medical expert system. The program uses a memory based semantic parsing technique to “understand” the text. Moreover, the memory structures and lexicon necessary to perform this action are automatically generated from the diagnostic knowledge base by using a special purp...

  10. Independent auto evaluation of an operative radiological protection program; Autoevaluacion independiente de un programa de proteccion radiologica operativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medrano L, M.A.; Rodriguez C, C.C.; Linares R, D.; Zarate M, N.; Zempoalteca B, R. [Gerencia Subsede Sureste Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: maam@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    The program of operative radiological protection of a nuclear power plant consists of multiple procedures and associate tasks that have as purpose the radiological protection of the workers of the power station. It is for this reason that the constant evaluation of the one it programs it is an important tool in the identification of their weaknesses (and strengths), so they can be assisted appropriately. In this work the main elements of the program of independent auto evaluation of the program of operative radiological protection of the Laguna Verde Central that has been developed and implemented by the National Institute of Nuclear Research are described. (Author)

  11. A report on the current status of grand rounds in radiology residency programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablon, Corrie M; Wu, Jim S; Slanetz, Priscilla J; Eisenberg, Ronald L

    2011-12-01

    A national needs assessment of radiology program directors was performed to characterize grand rounds (GR) programs, assess the perceived educational value of GR programs, and determine the impact of the recent economic downturn on GR. A 28-question survey was developed querying the organizational logistics of GR programs, types of speakers, content of talks, honoraria, types of speakers invited, response to the economic downturn, types of speaker interaction with residents, and perceived educational value of GR. Questions were in multiple-choice, yes-or-no, and five-point Likert-type formats. The survey was distributed to the program directors of all radiology residencies within the United States. Fifty-seven of 163 programs responded, resulting in a response rate of 36%. Thirty-eight programs (67%) were university residencies and 10 (18%) were university affiliated. Eighty-two percent of university and 60% of university-affiliated residencies had their own GR programs, while only 14% of community and no military residencies held GR. GR were held weekly in 18% of programs, biweekly in 8%, monthly in 42%, bimonthly in 16%, and less frequently than every 2 months in 16%. All 38 programs hosting GR reported a broad spectrum of presentations, including talks on medical education (66%), clinical and evidence-based medicine (55%), professionalism (45%), ethics (45%), quality assurance (34%), global health (26%), and resident presentations (26%). All programs invited speakers from outside the institution, but there was variability with regard to the frequency of visits and whether invited speakers were from out of town. As a result of recent economic events, one radiology residency (3%) completely canceled its GR program. Others decreased the number of speakers from outside their cities (40%) or decreased the number of speakers from within their own cities (16%). Honoraria were paid to speakers by 95% of responding programs. Most program directors (79%) who had their own

  12. Sampling on radiological protection training in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.

    2001-01-01

    Radiological security aspects were evaluated in radiology departments from Mexico City. The study was carried out in two stages, the first one evaluated 40 departments just before the implementation of the new Official Mexican Standards related to Radiological Security and Quality Control in Radiology; in the second stage 33 departments were evaluated 2 years after those standards were implanted, showing a favorable impact of the training programs for the type of answers obtained [es

  13. Learning on human resources management in the radiology residency program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Aparecido Ferreira de; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Batista, Nildo Alves, E-mail: aparecidoliveira@ig.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina

    2014-03-15

    Objective: to investigate the process of learning on human resource management in the radiology residency program at Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, aiming at improving radiologists' education. Materials and methods: exploratory study with a quantitative and qualitative approach developed with the faculty staff, preceptors and residents of the program, utilizing a Likert questionnaire (46), taped interviews (18), and categorization based on thematic analysis. Results: According to 71% of the participants, residents have clarity about their role in the development of their activities, and 48% said that residents have no opportunity to learn how to manage their work in a multidisciplinary team. Conclusion: Isolation at medical records room, little interactivity between sectors with diversified and fixed activities, absence of a previous culture and lack of a training program on human resources management may interfere in the development of skills for the residents' practice. There is a need to review objectives of the medical residency in the field of radiology, incorporating, whenever possible, the commitment to the training of skills related to human resources management thus widening the scope of abilities of the future radiologists. (author)

  14. Learning on human resources management in the radiology residency program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Aparecido Ferreira de; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Batista, Nildo Alves

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to investigate the process of learning on human resource management in the radiology residency program at Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, aiming at improving radiologists' education. Materials and methods: exploratory study with a quantitative and qualitative approach developed with the faculty staff, preceptors and residents of the program, utilizing a Likert questionnaire (46), taped interviews (18), and categorization based on thematic analysis. Results: According to 71% of the participants, residents have clarity about their role in the development of their activities, and 48% said that residents have no opportunity to learn how to manage their work in a multidisciplinary team. Conclusion: Isolation at medical records room, little interactivity between sectors with diversified and fixed activities, absence of a previous culture and lack of a training program on human resources management may interfere in the development of skills for the residents' practice. There is a need to review objectives of the medical residency in the field of radiology, incorporating, whenever possible, the commitment to the training of skills related to human resources management thus widening the scope of abilities of the future radiologists. (author)

  15. Quality Assurance Program Plan for the radiological survey activities program --- Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, R.R.; Little, C.A.

    1991-08-01

    The Pollutant Assessments Group (PAG) at the Grand Junction Office (GJO), Colorado, of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for surveying designated sites in the vicinity of 24 inactive mill sites involved in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). The purpose of these surveys is to provide a recommendation to DOE whether to include or exclude these sites from UMTRAP based on whether the on-site residual radioactive material (if any) originated from the former mill sites, and radiation levels on-site are in excess of appropriate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. This report describes the Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for the PAG in conducting all activities related to UMTRAP. All quality assurance provisions given by the DOE, DOE/UMTRA and ORNL organizations are integrated into this plan. Specifically, this report identifies the policies and procedures followed in accomplishing the PAG/UMTRA QA program, identifies those organizational units involved in the implementation of these procedures, and outlines the respective responsibilities of those groups. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Training for the medical response in radiological emergency experiences and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas Herrera, J.; Lopez Forteza, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The use of the nuclear techniques int he social practice confers a special imporatnce to the relative aspects to the safety of the practices and radiationsources, for what the implementation of efficient programs of radiation protection constitutes a priority. However in spite of the will before expressed, regrettably radiological situations happen accidental assocaited to multiple causes taht suggest the creation of response capacities to intervention before these fortuitous facts. The experiences accumulated in the last decades related with accidental exposures have evidenced the convenience of having properly qualified human resources for the Medical Response in Radiological Emergencies. The training in the medical aspects of the radiological emergencies acquires a singular character. In such a sense when valuing the national situation put onof manifest deficiences as for the training in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies that advised the development of training programs in such aspects for the different response groups linked to the topic. After identified the training necessities and the scope of the same ones, the contents of the training program were elaborated. The program has as general purpose the invigoration of the capacity of the medical response in front of accidental radiological situations, by means of actions that they bear to prepare groups of medical response in the handling of people accident victims and to the identification of potentials,accidental scenarios, as well as of the necessary resources to confront them. The program content approaches theoretical and paractical aspects to the medical aspect to radiological emergencies. The program include the different topics about fundamental of physical biological to radiation protection, radiation protection during exposure of radiological accidents, medical care for overexposed or contaminated persons, drill, exercises and concludes with designation of a strategy as preparation and

  17. Short radiological emergency response training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.D.; Greenhouse, N.A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents an outline of a radiological emergency response training program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the health physics and safety training staff. This course is given to groups from local, county, state, and federal agencies and industrial organizations. It is normally three days in length, although the structure is flexible to accommodate individual needs and prior training. An important feature of the course is an emergency exercise utilizing a short lived radionuclide to better simulate real accident conditions. Groups are encouraged to use their own instruments to gain better familiarity with their operating characteristics under field conditions. Immediately following the exercise, a critical review of the students' performance is conducted

  18. Westinghouse corporate development of a decision software program for Radiological Evaluation Decision Input (REDI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, T.S.

    1995-01-01

    In December 1992, the Department of Energy (DOE) implemented the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO) submitted an implementation plan showing how compliance with the manual would be achieved. This implementation plan was approved by DOE in November 1992. Although WINCO had already been working under a similar Westinghouse RCM, the DOE RCM brought some new and challenging requirements. One such requirement was that of having procedure writers and job planners create the radiological input in work control procedures. Until this time, that information was being provided by radiological engineering or a radiation safety representative. As a result of this requirement, Westinghouse developed the Radiological Evaluation Decision Input (REDI) program

  19. Westinghouse corporate development of a decision software program for Radiological Evaluation Decision Input (REDI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, T.S. [Westinghosue Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In December 1992, the Department of Energy (DOE) implemented the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO) submitted an implementation plan showing how compliance with the manual would be achieved. This implementation plan was approved by DOE in November 1992. Although WINCO had already been working under a similar Westinghouse RCM, the DOE RCM brought some new and challenging requirements. One such requirement was that of having procedure writers and job planners create the radiological input in work control procedures. Until this time, that information was being provided by radiological engineering or a radiation safety representative. As a result of this requirement, Westinghouse developed the Radiological Evaluation Decision Input (REDI) program.

  20. Radiologic safety program for ionizing radiation facilities in Parana, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, M.F.S.; Tilly Junior, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    A radiologic safety program for inspection, licensing and control of the use of ionizing radiation in medical, industrial and research facilities in Parana, Brazil is presented. The program includes stages such as: 1- division into implementation phases considering the activity development for each area; 2-use of the existing structure to implement and to improve services. The development of the program will permit to evaluate the improvement reached and to correct operational strategic. As a result, a quality enhancement at the services performed, a reduction for radiation dose exposure and a faster response for emergency situations will be expected

  1. Department of Energy hazardous waste remedial actions program: Quality assurance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horne, T.E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the Quality Assurance Program developed for the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Support Contractor Office (HAZWRAP SCO). Key topics discussed include an overview of the HAZWRAP SCO mission and organization, the basic quality assurance program requirements and the requirements for the control of quality for the Department of Energy and Work for Others hazardous waste management programs, and the role of ensuring quality through the project team concept for the management of remedial response actions. The paper focuses on planning for quality assurance for this remedial waste management process from preliminary assessments of remedial sites to feasibility studies. Some observations concerning the control of quality during the implementation of remedial actions are presented. (2 refs.)

  2. SHIELD 1.0: development of a shielding calculator program in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Romulo R.; Real, Jessica V.; Luz, Renata M. da; Friedrich, Barbara Q.; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da

    2013-01-01

    In shielding calculation of radiological facilities, several parameters are required, such as occupancy, use factor, number of patients, source-barrier distance, area type (controlled and uncontrolled), radiation (primary or secondary) and material used in the barrier. The shielding design optimization requires a review of several options about the physical facility design and, mainly, the achievement of the best cost-benefit relationship for the shielding material. To facilitate the development of this kind of design, a program to calculate the shielding in diagnostic radiology was implemented, based on data and limits established by National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 147 and SVS-MS 453/98. The program was developed in C⌗ language, and presents a graphical interface for user data input and reporting capabilities. The module initially implemented, called SHIELD 1.0, refers to calculating barriers for conventional X-ray rooms. The program validation was performed by the comparison with the results of examples of shielding calculations presented in NCRP 147.

  3. Uranium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH03, Shiprock, NM, July-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-04-01

    A comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH03 was conducted on an intermittent basis from July 26 to November 11, 1982. At the time of the survey, three structures were located on the property - a residential trailer, the main structure, and an old gas pump housing. The lands surrounding the structures were either sparsely covered with arid vegetation or paved. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air, soil, and other material samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found inside the trailer. However, the results of the radiological assessment did indicate the occurrence of elevated levels of gamma, surface alpha, and radon daughter radioactivity within the main structure. The short-term radon daughter measurements exceeded the limit of 0.02 Working Level for average annual concentration including background. The assessment also indicated elevated levels of radioactivity in the outdoor environs, encompassing about 32,000 ft 2 of the grounds adjacent to and surrounding the main structure on the east, south, and west sides. The contamination appeared to be due to the presence of unprocessed uranium ore. Analysis of surface soil samples collected from the environs indicated radium concentrations in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background specified in the EPA Standard. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Since the surface soil contamination levels exceeded the limits specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  4. Radiological control aspects of the fabrication of the Light Water Breeder Reactor core (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, B.G.

    1979-05-01

    A description is presented of the radiological control aspects of the fabrication of the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core. Included are the radiological control criteria applied for the design and use of fabrication facilities, the controls and limits imposed to minimize radiaion exposure to personnel, and an evaluation of the applied radiological program in meeting the program objectives. The goal of the LWBR program is to develop the technology to breed in light water reactors so that nuclear fuel may be used significantly more efficiently in these reactors. This technology is being developed by designing and fabricating a breeder reactor core, utilizing thoria (ThO 2 ) and binary thoria--urania (ThO 2 - 233 UO 2 ) fuel, to be operated in the existing pressurized water reactor plant owned by the Department of Energy at Shippingport, Pennsylvania

  5. Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program -12184

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Christopher [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC; Kothari, Vijendra [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, West Virginia; Starr, Ken [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado; Widdop, Michael; Gillespie, Joey [SM Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado

    2012-02-26

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) methods and protocols allow evaluation of remediation and final site conditions to determine if remediated sites remain protective. Two case studies are presented that involve the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) and associated vicinity properties (VPs), which are being remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are a part of the former Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW). In response to stakeholders concerns about whether certain remediated NFSS VPs were putting them at risk, DOE met with stakeholders and agreed to evaluate protectiveness. Documentation in the DOE records collection adequately described assessed and final radiological conditions at the completed VPs. All FUSRAP wastes at the completed sites were cleaned up to meet DOE guidelines for unrestricted use. DOE compiled the results of the investigation in a report that was released for public comment. In conducting the review of site conditions, DOE found that stakeholders were also concerned about waste from the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) that was handled at LOOW. DOE agreed to determine if SPRU waste remained at that needed to be remediated. DOE reviewed records of waste characterization, historical handling locations and methods, and assessment and remediation data. DOE concluded that the SPRU waste was remediated on the LOOW to levels that pose no unacceptable risk and allow unrestricted use and unlimited exposure. This work confirms the following points as tenets of an effective long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) program: Stakeholder interaction must be open and transparent, and DOE must respond promptly to stakeholder concerns. DOE, as the long-term custodian, must collect and preserve site records in order to demonstrate that remediated sites pose no unacceptable risk. DOE must continue to maintain constructive relationships with the U

  6. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary: Second Quarter 1995 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of the operational environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site. The Second Quarter 1995 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports are summarized

  7. Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary. Fourth quarter, 1995 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, S.M.; Markes, B.M.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of the operational environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site. The Fourth Quarter 1995 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports are described

  8. Model for the elaboration of program of environmental radiological monitoring reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    This Regulation refers to the requirements of the Regulation CNEN-NN.3.01 'Basic Guidelines for Radiation Protection', expressed in the section 5.14, and its application related to the emission of reports of Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program to be submitted to CNEN evaluation

  9. Training Programs on Radiological Safety for users of Ionizing Radiations in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Gironzini, E.

    2003-01-01

    In Peru, people who work with ionizing radiations must have an authorization (Individual License) as established in the Radiological Safety Regulations, which are the mandatory rules. The Technical Office of the National Authority (OTAN), which is the technical organ of the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN) in charge of controlling radiations within the country , grants the authorization after the candidate demonstrates that he/she knows the specific use of the technique using radiations, as well a s the aspects related to safety and radiological protection. Since it was created in 1972, the Superior Center of Nuclear Studies (VSEN) from IPEN has carried out different training courses so that people can work safety with ionizing radiations in medicine, industry and investigation. The analysis of the radiological safety programs carried out by CSEN during the last 30 years, which allowed the training of more than 2200 people in the country and, at the same time, made possible the securing of the respective Individual License, is presented in this work. The courses, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, industrial radiography, nuclear gauges gamma irradiator, etc...) and are part of the continuous education program of CSEN. (Author)

  10. Value management program: performance, quantification, and presentation of imaging value-added actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Samir

    2015-03-01

    Health care is in a state of transition, shifting from volume-based success to value-based success. Hospital executives and referring physicians often do not understand the total value a radiology group provides. A template for easy, cost-effective implementation in clinical practice for most radiology groups to demonstrate the value they provide to their clients (patients, physicians, health care executives) has not been well described. A value management program was developed to document all of the value-added activities performed by on-site radiologists, quantify them in terms of time spent on each activity (investment), and present the benefits to internal and external stakeholders (outcomes). The radiology value-added matrix is the platform from which value-added activities are categorized and synthesized into a template for defining investments and outcomes. The value management program was first implemented systemwide in 2013. Across all serviced locations, 9,931.75 hours were invested. An annual executive summary report template demonstrating outcomes is given to clients. The mean and median individual value-added hours per radiologist were 134.52 and 113.33, respectively. If this program were extrapolated to the entire field of radiology, approximately 30,000 radiologists, this would have resulted in 10,641,161 uncompensated value-added hours documented in 2013, with an estimated economic value of $2.21 billion. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation to a long term remediation actions after Goiania radiological accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochedo, Elaine R.R.; Rio, Monica A. Pires do; Coutinho, Celia M.C.; Acar, Maria E.D.; Romeiro, Carlos H.

    2000-01-01

    Ten years after the Goiania radiological accident, the results obtained by the IRD Environmental Monitoring Program are compared to the values adopted for establishing the intervention levels at the time of the accident occurrence (1987), and to the values of the parameters obtained by European countries, after the Chernobyl accident. Significant differences were observed in parameter values, particularly, those related to a long term prediction of the contamination behaviour in an urban area. This paper shows the importance of the survey for the environmental behaviour of pollutants in tropical climate conditions. (author)

  12. Mining Repair Actions for Guiding Automated Program Fixing

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez , Matias; Monperrus , Martin

    2012-01-01

    Automated program fixing consists of generating source code in order to fix bugs in an automated manner. Our intuition is that automated program fixing can imitate human-based program fixing. Hence, we present a method to mine repair actions from software repositories. A repair action is a small semantic modification on code such as adding a method call. We then decorate repair actions with a probability distribution also learnt from software repositories. Our probabilistic repair models enab...

  13. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) Compliance Program Guidance Manual (FY 88). Section 4. Medical and radiological devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The FDA Compliance Program Guidance Manual provides a system for issuing and filing program plans and instructions directed to Food and Drug Administration Field operations for project implementation. Section IV provides those chapters of the Compliance Program Guidance Manual which pertain to the areas of medical and radiological devices. Some of the areas of coverage include laser and sunlamp standards inspections, compliance testing of various radiation-emitting products such as television receivers and microwave ovens, emergency response planning and policy, premarket approval and device manufacturers inspections, device problem reporting, sterilization of devices, and consumer education programs on medical and radiological devices

  14. Environmental and radiological remediation under Canada's global partnership program 2004-11 - 59185

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washer, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Following the '911' attack on the USA in 2001 the international community under Canada's G8 leadership established a $20 billion Global Partnership initiative in 2002 to collaboratively address threats to global security posed by the proliferation and potential terrorist use of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction (WMMD) and related materials and knowledge. This major international initiative addressed four priority areas: (1) Chemical Weapon Destruction (2) Nuclear powered submarine eliminations (3) Nuclear and radiological security; and (4) Employment for former weapon scientists. Additionally the initiative has addressed Biological Non- Proliferation. Canada's execution of all these program areas has resulted in substantial environmental benefits aside from the eradication and securing of WMMD. This paper reviews the environmental and radiological remediation achievements of the four primary Global Partnership program areas addressed under Canadian funding 2004 through 2011. (author)

  15. Environmental Restoration Remedial Action Program records management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, L.E.

    1991-07-01

    The US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) Environmental Restoration Field Office Management Plan [(FOMP) DOE-RL 1989] describes the plans, organization, and control systems to be used for management of the Hanford Site environmental restoration remedial action program. The FOMP, in conjunction with the Environmental Restoration Remedial Action Quality Assurance Requirements document [(QARD) DOE-RL 1991], provides all the environmental restoration remedial action program requirements governing environmental restoration work on the Hanford Site. The FOMP requires a records management plan be written. The Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) Environmental Restoration Remedial Action (ERRA) Program Office has developed this ERRA Records Management Plan to fulfill the requirements of the FOMP. This records management plan will enable the program office to identify, control, and maintain the quality assurance, decisional, or regulatory prescribed records generated and used in support of the ERRA Program. 8 refs., 1 fig

  16. Radiological survey results at 914 Black Oak Ridge Road, Wayne, New Jersey (WJ005)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at several vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at 914 Black Oak Ridge Road, Wayne, New Jersey was not one of these vicinity properties; however the owner requested that his property be radiologically surveyed. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological scoping survey of this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted in early November 1993, was to determine whether any radiological contamination might be present on the property. The radiological survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at one meter, and the collection of soil and/or debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations or radiation measurements in excess of applicable DOE guidelines

  17. U.S. Department of Energy Region 6 Radiological Assistance Program response plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubowski, F.M.

    1998-02-01

    Upon request, the DOE, through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP), makes available and will provide radiological advice, monitoring, and assessment activities during radiological incidents where the release of radioactive materials is suspected or has occurred. Assistance will end when the need for such assistance is over, or if there are other resources available to adequately address the incident. The implementation of the RAP is usually accomplished through the recommendation of the DOE Regional Coordinating Office's (RCO) on duty Regional Response Coordinator (RRC) with the approval of the Regional Coordinating Office Director (RCOD). The DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is the designated RCO for DOE Region 6 RAP. The purpose of this document is: to describe the mechanism for responding to any organization or private citizen requesting assistance to radiological incidents; to coordinate radiological assistance among participating federal agencies, states, and tribes in DOE Region 6; and to describe the RAP Scaled Response concept of operations

  18. Dosimetry in Interventional Radiology - Effective Dose Estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miljanic, S.; Buls, N.; Clerinx, P.; Jarvinen, H.; Nikodemova, D.; Ranogajec-Komor, M; D'Errico, F.

    2008-01-01

    Interventional radiological procedures can lead to significant radiation doses to patients and to staff members. In order to evaluate the personal doses with respect to the regulatory dose limits, doses measured by dosimeters have to be converted to effective doses (E). Measurement of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) using a single unshielded dosimeter above the lead apron can lead to significant overestimation of the effective dose, while the measurement with dosimeter under the apron can lead to underestimation. To improve the accuracy, measurements with two dosimeters, one above and the other under the apron have been suggested ( d ouble dosimetry ) . The ICRP has recommended that interventional radiology departments develop a policy that staff should wear two dosimeters. The aim of this study was to review the double dosimetry algorithms for the calculation of effective dose in high dose interventional radiology procedures. The results will be used to develop general guidelines for personal dosimetry in interventional radiology procedures. This work has been carried out by Working Group 9 (Radiation protection dosimetry of medical staff) of the CONRAD project, which is a Coordination Action supported by the European Commission within its 6th Framework Program.(author)

  19. Quality assurance program in diagnostic radiology; Programa de garantia de qualidade em radiologia diagnostica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yacovenco, Alejandro; Borges, J.C. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia; Lira, S.H. [Hospital Central da Policia Militar, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia; Mota, H.C. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1994-07-01

    Aiming to elaborate a methodology to optimize the performance of the Radiology Service of the Military Police Hospital, in Rio dee Janeiro, some goals were established: improvement of the attendance to patients; improvement of the qualification of technicians; achievement and maintenance of high degrees of quality in each step of the radiological process; improvement of the image quality; optimization of dose per examination and cost reduction. The procedure used to detect faults in the radiological process was the analysis of causes of film losses. Results show a 70% reduction in the film rejection rate. 74% of total identified faults were due to equipment, 11% to films, 10% to patients and 5% to developing. The reduction in the cost of developed film reached 75%. A training course given to the staff of the radiological service fully reached its goals, contributing, with the staff motivation, mostly to the success of the program. This success indicates that, with a serious persistent work, it is possible to offer to patients services within their expectations, even at a public hospital. Such programs should be supported by health authorities, not only due to their technical and economic needs but, mostly, due to their social implications. (author). 10 refs., 11 figs.

  20. Radiology Resident Supply and Demand: A Regional Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Cory M

    2017-09-01

    Radiology was subject to crippling deficits in the number of jobs available to graduates of training programs from 2012 through 2015. As the specialty transitions to the assimilation of osteopathic training programs and the welcoming of direct competition from new integrated interventional radiology programs, the assessment of growth in radiology training positions over the 10 years preceding this pivotal time will serve to characterize the genesis of the crisis while inspiring stakeholders to avoid similar negative fluctuations in the future. The number of per capita radiology trainees in each region was derived from data published by the National Resident Matching Program, as were annual match statistics over the years 2012 through 2016. Data regarding new interventional radiology and diagnostic radiology enrollees were also obtained from the National Resident Matching Program. The seven states with the most per capita radiology residents were in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern United States in both 2006 and 2016, and three of these seven also showed the greatest per capita growth over the course of the 10 years studied. New radiology programs were accredited during the peak of the job shortage. Integrated interventional radiology training created 24 de novo radiology residents in the 2017 match. Fill rates are weakly positively correlated with program size. Unregulated radiology program growth persisted during the decade leading up to 2016. The region with the fewest jobs available since 2012 is also home to the greatest number of per capita radiology residents. Numerous published opinions during the crisis did not result in enforced policy change. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. RCRA corrective action program guide (Interim)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for compliance with an increasingly complex spectrum of environmental regulations. One of the most complex programs is the corrective action program proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The proposed regulations were published on July 27, 1990. The proposed Subpart S rule creates a comprehensive program for investigating and remediating releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous waste constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. This proposed rule directly impacts many DOE facilities which conduct such activities. This guidance document explains the entire RCRA Corrective Action process as outlined by the proposed Subpart S rule, and provides guidance intended to assist those persons responsible for implementing RCRA Corrective Action at DOE facilities.

  2. Training in radiological protection: Curricula and programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    An important activity of the International Atomic Energy Agency is the promotion of training in radiological protection. Through its organized training courses, its fellowship training programme and its field experts, the Agency has assisted many Member States to train an essential group of scientists in radiological protection. Many Member States are now developing their own national training programmes in radiological protection and this report has been prepared to provide the guidance that may be required in this development. In the report the various types of training which are encountered in a radiological protection programme are fully discussed, curricula are suggested and examples of established training courses are annexed

  3. Development of a computer program for supporting to the radiological adviser in the management of an emergency situation; Desarrollo de un programa de computadora para apoyar al asesor radiologico en el manejo de una situacion de emergencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, E.C.M. [Escola Politecnica da Universidade de Pernambuco, POLI/UPE, Rua Benfica 455, Madalena, 50751-470 Recife (Brazil); Ferreira F, A.L.; Andrade L, F.R. de [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares, CRCN/CNEN, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire, 1 Cidade Universitaria, 50740-540, Recife (Brazil)]. e-mail: eduloureiro@uol.com.br

    2006-07-01

    One of the more important aspects of the handling of a radiological emergency it is the capacity for, in an immediate and appropriate way, to take the actions to protect the public members and the personnel that intervenes in the emergency. The evaluation of the radiological accident should keep in mind the whole available pertinent information in any moment and it should be an iterative and dynamic process directed to examine the answer in the measure that more complete and detailed information is available. This work presents a program in Delphi, with the tools, generic procedures and the necessary data to support to the radiological advisory in the initial answer to a radiological accident. It is based on the IAEA document, Generic Procedures for the Evaluation and Answer during a radiological emergency, the IAEA-TECDOC-1162. These procedures offer clear, concise and predetermined action criteria, based on the current knowledge and in the accumulated experiences, allowing the immediate decision making. The philosophy is to maintain the simple and quick, but effective process. The objective is to toast, through a laptop, practical and quick orientation for the answer to emergencies that of being implemented, it will provide an estimation or basic evaluation of the situation and it will guarantee the capacity of necessary answer to protect the public and the workers in the event of different types of radiological emergencies. Besides the recommendations of actions of appropriate protection, also it will toast, when it is necessary, orientations on the recovery of sources and initial operations of cleaning. (Author)

  4. Self-assessment program and actions in ANAV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Since 1999, the Association Nuclear Asco-Vandellos II, AIE (ANAV) has a self-assessment program in place and controls and tracks the actions with the support of different databases. This article describes the improvements made in the self-assessment programs and actions of ANAV between 1999 up to the present, all the fruit of the experience gained in the application of these programs, Sector guidelines and international trends, as well as standardization with the other Spanish nuclear power plants. (Author)

  5. Overview of the aerial radiological measuring system (ARMS) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deal, L.J.; Doyle, J.F. III.

    1975-01-01

    Since 1960 EG and G, Inc. has developed and maintained for the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) a state-of-the-art radiation surveillance program called the Aerial Radiological Measuring System (ARMS). Radiological surveys covering more than 300,000 square miles have been performed. In addition to the radiation detector gear, the system includes an inertial navigation system, radar altimeter, meteorological probes, air sampler, air sample analyzer, multispectral cameras, aerial mapping camera and infrared scanner. The recently improved data acquisition system, REDAR, records all inputs digitally on magnetic tape and is readily mounted in fixed-wing aircraft or helicopters. The data analysis system, REDAC, is mounted in a mobile processing laboratory which accompanies the aircraft on surveys. Radiation isopleth maps, both for gross counts and selected isotopes, can be prepared in the field. Special computer software enables the ARMS to detect changes of less than 1.0 μR/hr in exposure rates between successive surveys of a given site

  6. Continuous quality improvement programs provide new opportunities to drive value innovation initiatives in hospital-based radiology practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph R; Schomer, Don F

    2009-07-01

    Imaging services constitute a huge portion of the of the total dollar investment within the health care enterprise. Accordingly, this generates competition among medical specialties organized along service lines for their pieces of the pie and increased scrutiny from third-party payers and government regulators. These market and political forces create challenge and opportunity for a hospital-based radiology practice. Clearly, change that creates or builds greater value for patients also creates sustainable competitive advantage for a radiology practice. The somewhat amorphous concept of quality constitutes a significant value driver for innovation in this scenario. Quality initiatives and programs seek to define and manage this amorphous concept and provide tools for a radiology practice to create or build more value. Leadership and the early adoption of these inevitable programs by a radiology practice strengthens relationships with hospital partners and slows the attrition of imaging service lines to competitors.

  7. Urandium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH06, Shiprock, New Mexico, August-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    The radiological assessment conducted at the Shiprock vicinity property SH06 by the ANL Radiological Survey Group indicated background levels of radioactivity within the residential structure. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 μR/h above background limit specified in the EPA Standard (40 CFR 192.12[b][2]). Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL (or 20 mWL) limit for average annual concentration including background as specified in the EPA Standard (40 CFR 192.12[b][1]). The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at several areas in the outside environs. General areas of elevated radioactivity were found over almost the entire frontyard, encompassing about 1300 ft 2 (120 m 2 ), and at the west side of the residence, encompassing about 460 ft 2 (43 m 2 ). Radiochemical analysis of the soil sample collected from the frontyard near the residence indicated a radium concentration of 24 +- 2 pCi/g, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface, as specified in Section 192.12(a)(1) of the EPA Standard. Elevated levels were also found at a 37-ft 2 (3.4-m 2 ) strip of land along the east property line, and in the backyard, at a small shack encompassing about 21 ft 2 (2.0 m 2 ) of land. From soil sample analyses and the history of the site, the contaminating material appears to be residual radioactive material under the provisions of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 in the form of radium-enhanced material (i.e., tailings). Since the surface soil contamination levels exceed the limits specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered. 9 references, 4 figures, 5 tables

  8. Improving the interactivity and functionality of Web-based radiology teaching files with the Java programming language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, J

    1997-01-01

    Java is a programming language that runs on a "virtual machine" built into World Wide Web (WWW)-browsing programs on multiple hardware platforms. Web pages were developed with Java to enable Web-browsing programs to overlay transparent graphics and text on displayed images so that the user could control the display of labels and annotations on the images, a key feature not available with standard Web pages. This feature was extended to include the presentation of normal radiologic anatomy. Java programming was also used to make Web browsers compatible with the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) file format. By enhancing the functionality of Web pages, Java technology should provide greater incentive for using a Web-based approach in the development of radiology teaching material.

  9. Final report on Phase II remedial action at the former Middlesex Sampling Plant and associated properties. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    Volume 2 presents the radiological measurement data taken after remedial action on properties surrounding the former Middlesex Sampling Plant during Phase II of the DOE Middlesex Remedial Action Program. Also included are analyses of the confirmatory radiological survey data for each parcel with respect to the remedial action criteria established by DOE for the Phase II cleanup and a discussion of the final status of each property. Engineering details of this project and a description of the associated health physics and environmental monitoring activities are presented in Volume 1

  10. Alternatives for management of wastes generated by the formerly utilized sites remedial action program and supplement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, T.L.; Peterson, J.M.; Vocke, R.W.; Alexander, J.K.

    1983-03-01

    Alternatives for disposal or stabilization of the wastes generated by the US Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) are identified and compared, with emphasis on the long-term aspects. These wastes consist of soil material and rubble containing trace amounts of radionuclides. A detailed pathway analysis for the dose to the maximally exposed individual is carried out using an adaptation of the natural analogue method. Comparisons of the different alternatives, based on the results of the pathway analysis and qualitative cost considerations, indicate that, if the hazard is such that the wastes must be removed and disposed of rather than stabilized in place, disposal by immediate dispersal is preferable to containment, and containment followed by slow planned dispersal is preferable to containment without dispersal. The Supplement presents refinements of work that was reported at the 1982 International Decommissioning Symposium. The new material consists of revisions of the estimates of the predicted potential dose to the maximally exposed individual and a more detailed comparative assessment of the radiological impacts of alternatives for management of wastes generated by the US Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

  11. Health surveillance of radiological work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauw, H.; Vliet, J.V.D.; Zuidema, H.

    1988-01-01

    Shielding x-ray devices and issuing film badges to radiological workers in 1936 can be considered the start of radiological protection in the Philips enterprises in the Netherlands. Shielding and equipment were constantly improved based upon the dosimetry results of the filmbadges. The problem of radioactive waste led to the foundation of a central Philips committee for radiological protection in 1956, which in 1960 also issued an internal license system in order to regulate the proper precautions to be taken : workplace design and layout, technological provisions and working procedures. An evaluation of all radiological work in 1971 learnt that a stricter health surveillance program was needed to follow up the precautions issued by the license. On one hand a health surveillance program was established and on the other hand all types of radiological work were classified. In this way an obligatory and optimal health surveillance program was issued for each type of radiological work

  12. Marshall Islands radiological followup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhouse, N.A.; McGraw, T.F.

    1976-01-01

    In August, 1968, President Johnson announced that the people of Bikini Atoll would be able to return to their homeland. Thereafter, similar approval was given for the return of the peoples of Enewetak. These two regions, which comprised the Pacific Nuclear Testing Areas from 1946 to 1958, will probably be repopulated by the original inhabitants and their families within the next year. As part of its continuing responsibility to insure the pulbic health and safety in connection with the nuclear program under its sponsorship, ERDA (formerly AEC) has contracted Brookhaven National Laboratory to establish radiological safety and environmental monitoring programs for the returning Bikini and Enewetak peoples. These programs are designed to define the external radiation environment, assess radiation doses from internal emitters in the human food chain, make long range predictions of total doses and dose commitments to individuals an to each population group, and to suggest actions which will minimize doses via the more significant pathways

  13. Marshall Islands radiological followup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhouse, N.A.; McCraw, T.F.

    In August, 1968, President Johnson announced that the people of Bikini Atoll would be able to return to their homeland. Thereafter, similar approval was given for the return of the peoples of Enewetak. These two regions, which comprised the Pacific Nuclear Testing Areas from 1946 to 1958, will probably be repopulated by the original inhabitants and their families within the next year. As part of its continuing responsibility to insure the public health and safety in connection with the nuclear programs under its sponsorship, ERDA (formerly AEC) has contracted Brookhaven National Laboratory to establish radiological safety and environmental monitoring programs for the returning Bikini and Enewetak peoples. These programs are described in the following paper. They are designed to define the external radiation environment, assess radiation doses from internal emitters in the human food chain, make long range predictions of total doses and dose commitments to individuals and to each population group, and to suggest actions which will minimize doses via the more significant pathways

  14. Radiological survey activities: uranium mill tailings remedial action project procedures manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, C.A.; Berven, B.A.; Carter, T.E.

    1986-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) was assigned the responsibility for conducting remedial action at 24 sites, which are located in one eastern and nine western states. The DOE's responsibilities are being met through its Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office (UMTRA-PO) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The purpose of this Procedures Manual is to provide a standardized set of procedures that document in an auditable manner the activities performed by the Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) group in the Dosimetry and Biophysical Transport Section (DABTS) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), in its role as the Inclusion Survey Contractor (ISC). Members of the RASA group assigned to the UMTRA Project are headquartered in the ORNL/RASA office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and report to the ORNL/RASA Project Manager. The Procedures Manual ensures that the organizational, administrative, and technical activities of the RASA/UMTRA group conform properly to those of the ISC as described in the Vicinity Properties Management and Implementation Manual and the Summary Protocol. This manual also ensures that the techniques and procedures used by the RASA/UMTRA group and contractor personnel meet the requirements of applicable governmental, scientific, and industrial standards

  15. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Affirmative Action Program. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Affirmative Action Program (AAP) serves as a working document that describes current policies, practices, and results in the area of affirmative action. It represents the Laboratory`s framework for an affirmative approach to increasing the representation of people of color and women in segments of our work force where they have been underrepresented and taking action to increase the employment of persons with disabilities and special disabled and Vietnam era veterans. The AAP describes the hierarchy of responsibility for Laboratory affirmative action, the mechanisms that exist for full Laboratory participation in the AAP, the policies and procedures governing recruitment at all levels, the Laboratory`s plan for monitoring, reporting, and evaluating affirmative action progress, and a description of special affirmative action programs and plans the Laboratory has used and will use in its efforts to increase the representation and retention of groups historically underrepresented in our work force.

  16. How to optimize radiological images captured from digital cameras, using the Adobe Photoshop 6.0 program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalazonitis, A N; Koumarianos, D; Tzovara, J; Chronopoulos, P

    2003-06-01

    Over the past decade, the technology that permits images to be digitized and the reduction in the cost of digital equipment allows quick digital transfer of any conventional radiological film. Images then can be transferred to a personal computer, and several software programs are available that can manipulate their digital appearance. In this article, the fundamentals of digital imaging are discussed, as well as the wide variety of optional adjustments that the Adobe Photoshop 6.0 (Adobe Systems, San Jose, CA) program can offer to present radiological images with satisfactory digital imaging quality.

  17. Emergency radiological monitoring and analysis United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. Following a major radiological incident the FRERP authorizes the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). The FRMAC is established to coordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted states and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division is responsible for coordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis and quality assurance. This program includes: (1) Aerial Radiological Monitoring - Fixed Wing and Helicopter, (2) Field Monitoring and Sampling, (3) Radioanalysis - Mobile and Fixed Laboratories, (4) Radiation Detection Instrumentation - Calibration and Maintenance, (5) Environmental Dosimetry, and (6) An integrated program of Quality Assurance. To assure consistency, completeness and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures handbook is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets and operations of FRMAC monitoring and analysis and the content and preparation of this handbook

  18. Radiation protection program of Petrobras in industrial radiography area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signorini, M.

    1988-01-01

    Industrial hygiene has as main purpose the preservation of employees physical integrity when exposed to certain agressive agents. PETROBRAS Industrial hygiene program forecasts preventive policies in several specific fields. For the ionizing radiations area it was developed the ''Radiologic Protection Program'' which also deals with specific actions in industrial radiography jobs. These actions are hereinafter presented. (C.M.) [pt

  19. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Annual Environmental Monitoring Report calendar year 1992: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report describes environmental monitoring and compliance at eight UMTRA sites where remedial action was underway during 1992 and at the ten sites that were complete at the end of 1992. Volume I contains information for Ambrosia Lake, NM; Cannonsburg/Burrell, PA; Durango, CO; Falls City, TX; Grand Junction, CO; Green River, UT; and Gunnison, CO. Each site report contains a site description, compliance summary, environmental program information, environmental radiological and non-radiological program information, water resources protection, and quality assurance information

  20. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Annual Environmental Monitoring Report calendar year 1992: Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-12-31

    This report describes environmental monitoring and compliance at eight UMTRA sites where remedial action was underway during 1992 and at the ten sites that were complete at the end of 1992. Volume I contains information for Ambrosia Lake, NM; Cannonsburg/Burrell, PA; Durango, CO; Falls City, TX; Grand Junction, CO; Green River, UT; and Gunnison, CO. Each site report contains a site description, compliance summary, environmental program information, environmental radiological and non-radiological program information, water resources protection, and quality assurance information.

  1. The Role of Artificial Intelligence in Diagnostic Radiology: A Survey at a Single Radiology Residency Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Mesa, Fernando; Alvarez, Edilberto; Arheart, Kris

    2018-02-21

    Advances in artificial intelligence applied to diagnostic radiology are predicted to have a major impact on this medical specialty. With the goal of establishing a baseline upon which to build educational activities on this topic, a survey was conducted among trainees and attending radiologists at a single residency program. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed. Comparisons of categorical data between groups (trainees and attending radiologists) were made using Pearson χ 2 analysis or an exact analysis when required. Comparisons were made using the Wilcoxon rank sum test when the data were not normally distributed. An α level of 0.05 was used. The overall response rate was 66% (69 of 104). Thirty-six percent of participants (n = 25) reported not having read a scientific medical article on the topic of artificial intelligence during the past 12 months. Twenty-nine percent of respondents (n = 12) reported using artificial intelligence tools during their daily work. Trainees were more likely to express doubts on whether they would have pursued diagnostic radiology as a career had they known of the potential impact artificial intelligence is predicted to have on the specialty (P = .0254) and were also more likely to plan to learn about the topic (P = .0401). Radiologists lack exposure to current scientific medical articles on artificial intelligence. Trainees are concerned by the implications artificial intelligence may have on their jobs and desire to learn about the topic. There is a need to develop educational resources to help radiologists assume an active role in guiding and facilitating the development and implementation of artificial intelligence tools in diagnostic radiology. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of a quality assurance program in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethlin, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Retake analysis before and after introduction of a quality assurance program showed a 45% reduction of the retake rate. The most important changes concerning equipment and organizing of labour were: (1) More detailed inspection of development machines and X-ray generators, (2) new cassettes and intensifying screens, (3) reduction of the number of film formats used, (4) information and instruction of personnel. Cost reductions and profit from increased examination rate amounted to 4.5% of the overall operating costs of the radiologic department. (author)

  3. Implementation of a radiological safety management system in a hospital of Mexico City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez V, D.; Rivera M, T.; Velez D, V.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The reflection of this work is based in some radiological accidents that its have happened in some hospital centers or of research. The over exposure of some people is due to the pursuit of the procedures, the lack of quality assurance of the equipment or the inappropriate actions of the technicians. In Mexico one has seen in several hospitals the lack of existence of a Quality Assurance Program to prevent the accidents, the execution of the same ones and those good practices and the lack of Safety Culture makes that the hospital radiological safety it is faulty. The objective of the present work is the implementation of a radiological safety management in a hospital of Mexico City. (Author)

  4. Remedial action at the Acid/Pueblo Canyon site, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    The Acid/Pueblo Canyon site (TA-45) was designated in 1976 for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). During the period 1943 to 1964 untreated and treated liquid wastes generated by nuclear weapons research activities at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) were discharged into the two canyons. A survey of the site conducted by LASL in 1976 to 1977 identified two areas where radiological contamination exceeded criteria levels. The selected remedial action was based on extensive radiological characterization and comprehensive engineering assessments and comprised the excavation and disposal of 390 yd 3 of contaminated soil and rock. This document describes the background to the remedial action, the parties involved in administering and executing it, the chronology of the work, verification of the adequacy of the remedial action, and the cost incurred. 14 references, 5 figures, 5 tables

  5. Quality assurance program on diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacovenco, Alejandro; Borges, Jose Carlos; Mota, Helvecio Correa

    1995-01-01

    Aiming to elaborate a methodology to optimize the performance of the Radiology Service of the Military Police Hospital, in Rio de Janeiro, some goals were established: improvement of the attendance to patients; improvement of the qualification of technicians; achievement and maintenance of high degrees of quality in each step of the radiological process; improvement of the image quality; optimization of dose per examination and cost reduction. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs

  6. Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program: integrating waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, J.L.; Sharples, F.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program was established to integrate Defense Programs' activities in hazardous and mixed waste management. The Program currently provides centralized planning and technical support to the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs. More direct project management responsibilities may be assumed in the future. The Program, under the direction of the ASDP's Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management, interacts with numerous organizational entities of the Department. The Oak Ridge Operations Office has been designated as the Lead Field Office. The Program's four current components cover remedial action project identification and prioritization; technology adaptation; an informative system; and a strategy study for long-term, ''corporate'' project and facility planning

  7. A project: 'Radiological protection in radiology', IAEA - Universidad Central de Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, A.R.; Salazar, G.; Fermin, R.; Gonzalez, M.

    2001-01-01

    For several years a reference center of the UCV has been working on the project VEN/9/007 on dose reduction in diagnostic radiology sponsored by the IAEA. The dose and quality image was evaluated for different types of radiological study (conventional radiology, CT, mammography, interventional radiology) in different facilities at Caracas and others regions of the Venezuela. TL dosimeters were used to assess dose and reduction in dose. Based on the recommendations given by CEC documents on diagnostic quality criteria, a quality control program in radiological protection of patients and staff has been developed, for example: Pilot study by using TLD in personnel radiation monitoring. Comparative study between high and low kVp in chest. Evaluation and dose reduction in chest pediatric. Reduction of radiation dose in studies of billiards via Quality Image and reduction of the dose in studies of colon by enema. Radiation dose of staff in fluoroscopy procedures. Evaluation and dose reduction in dental radiography in public Institutions. A mammography accreditation program for Venezuela, applied to public hospitals. (author)

  8. 78 FR 42071 - Updates to Protective Action Guides Manual: Protective Action Guides (PAGs) and Planning Guidance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... Guides Manual: Protective Action Guides (PAGs) and Planning Guidance for Radiological Incidents AGENCY... guidance ``PAG Manual: Protective Action Guides (PAGs) and Planning Guidance for Radiological Incidents... ``anonymous access'' system, which means the EPA will not know your identity or contact information unless you...

  9. Mobile technology in radiology resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbage, Aiham C; Bedi, Harprit S

    2012-06-01

    The authors hypothesized that ownership of a mobile electronic device would result in more time spent learning radiology. Current trends in radiology residents' studying habits, their use of electronic and printed radiology learning resources, and how much of the funds allotted to them are being used toward printed vs electronic education tools were assessed in this study. A survey study was conducted among radiology residents across the United States from June 13 to July 5, 2011. Program directors listed in the Association of Program Directors in Radiology e-mail list server received an e-mail asking for residents to participate in an online survey. The questionnaire consisted of 12 questions and assessed the type of institution, the levels of training of the respondents, and book funds allocated to residents. It also assessed the residents' study habits, access to portable devices, and use of printed and electronic radiology resources. Radiology residents are adopters of new technologies, with 74% owning smart phones and 37% owning tablet devices. Respondents spend nearly an equal amount of time learning radiology from printed textbooks as they do from electronic resources. Eighty-one percent of respondents believe that they would spend more time learning radiology if provided with tablet devices. There is considerable use of online and electronic resources and mobile devices among the current generation of radiology residents. Benefits, such as more study time, may be obtained by radiology programs that incorporate tablet devices into the education of their residents. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of the Middlesex Sampling Plant, Middlesex, New Jersey. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    The results of a radiological survey of the former Middlesex Sampling Plant, Middlesex, New Jersey, are presented in this report. The surveyed property served as a uranium ore sampling plant during the 1940's and early 1950's. It was released for unrestricted use in 1968 following a radiological survey by the Atomic Energy Commission and is now a reserve training center for the U.S. Marine Sixth Motor Transport Battalion. The present survey was undertaken to determine whether the existing radiological status of the property is consistent with current health guidelines and radiation protection practices. The radiological survey included measurement of residual alpha and beta-gamma contamination levels, radon and radon daughter concentrations in buildings, external gamma radiation levels on the site and on adjacent property, and radium concentrations in soil on the site and on adjacent property. Surface contamination levels exceeded U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guidelines and 222 Rn concentration levels exceeded the non-occupational maximum permissible concentration MPC/sub a/ of 3 pCi/liter in some structures. These results indicate the possible need for extensive radon and radon daughter measurements in structures both onsite and offsite over periods as suggested by the U.S. Surgeon General

  11. Radiological emergency: road map for radiation accident victim transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, V.S.G.; Alcantara, Y.P.; Lima, C.M.A.; Silva, F. C. A. da

    2017-01-01

    During a radiological or nuclear emergency, a number of necessary actions are taken, both within the radiation protection of individuals and the environment, involving many institutions and highly specialized personnel. Among them it is possible to emphasize the air transportation of radiation accident victims.The procedures and measures for the safe transport of these radiation accident victims are generally the responsibility of the armed forces, specifically the Aeronautics, with the action denominated 'Aeromedical Military Evacuation of Radiation Accident Victims'. The experience with the Radiological Accident of Goiânia demonstrated the importance of adequate preparation and response during a radiological emergency and the need for procedures and measures with regard to the transport of radiation victims are clearly defined and clearly presented for the effectiveness of the actions. This work presents the necessary actions for the transport of radiation accident victim during a radiological emergency, through the road map technique, which has been widely used in scientific technical area to facilitate understanding and show the way to be followed to reach the proposed objectives

  12. Status of activities on the inactive uranium mill tailings sites remedial action program. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    This report on the status of the Office of Environment's program for inactive uranium mill tailings sites is an analysis of the current status and a forecast of future activities of the Office of Environment. The termination date for receipt of information was September 30, 1980. Aerial radiological surveys and detailed ground radiological assessments of properties within the communities in the vicinity of the designated processing sites in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Boise, Idaho led to the designation of an initial group of vicinity properties for remedial action. The potential health effects of the residual radioactive materials on or near these properties were estimated, and the Assistant Secretary for Environment recommended priorities for performing remedial action to the Department's Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy. In designating these properties and establishing recommended priorities for performing remedial action, the Office of Environment consulted with the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, representatives from the affected State and local governments, and individual property owners. After notifying the Governors of each of the affected States and the Navajo Nation of the Secretary of Energy's designation of processing sites within their areas of jurisdiction and establishment of remedial action priorities, a Sample Cooperative Agreement was developed by the Department in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and provided to the affected States and the Navajo Nation for comments. During September 1980, a Cooperative Agreement with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for the designated Canonsburg processing site was executed by the Department. It is anticipated that a Cooperative Agreement between the State of Utah and the Department to perform remedial actions at the designated Salt Lake City site will be executed in the near future.

  13. Status of activities on the inactive uranium mill tailings sites remedial action program. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    This report on the status of the Office of Environment's program for inactive uranium mill tailings sites is an analysis of the current status and a forecast of future activities of the Office of Environment. The termination date for receipt of information was September 30, 1980. Aerial radiological surveys and detailed ground radiological assessments of properties within the communities in the vicinity of the designated processing sites in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Boise, Idaho led to the designation of an initial group of vicinity properties for remedial action. The potential health effects of the residual radioactive materials on or near these properties were estimated, and the Assistant Secretary for Environment recommended priorities for performing remedial action to the Department's Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy. In designating these properties and establishing recommended priorities for performing remedial action, the Office of Environment consulted with the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, representatives from the affected State and local governments, and individual property owners. After notifying the Governors of each of the affected States and the Navajo Nation of the Secretary of Energy's designation of processing sites within their areas of jurisdiction and establishment of remedial action priorities, a Sample Cooperative Agreement was developed by the Department in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and provided to the affected States and the Navajo Nation for comments. During September 1980, a Cooperative Agreement with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for the designated Canonsburg processing site was executed by the Department. It is anticipated that a Cooperative Agreement between the State of Utah and the Department to perform remedial actions at the designated Salt Lake City site will be executed in the near future

  14. Successful community relations efforts at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, James E. Jr.; Meyer, Linda L.

    1992-01-01

    The Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) Community Relations Program involves many participants from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Prime Management Contractor (PMC) composed of M.K. Ferguson and Jacobs Engineering. The proactive community relations plan exceeds the compliance requirements of NEPA and CERCLA and is coordinated by a three-person staff of professional communicators. The program permeates many of the operating decisions and the result has been public acceptance of the Project and its actions to date, which has been to conduct remedial actions that will place the site in a radiologically and chemically safe condition, eliminating potential hazards to the public and environment. (author)

  15. Proposal of inspection methodology for environment radiological control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Nadia Soido Falcao

    2005-01-01

    The Radiation Protection and Dosimetry Institute (IRD) of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) is in charge of verifying that the self-monitoring operator is effective to control the radiological quality of environmental around the nuclear facilities and carried out in accordance with the regulatory requirements. While a long time, the verification of compliance was kept by the conduction of large scale monitoring programs around all the authorized installations. The IRD decided to reformulate its performance behavior, starting another kind of control program, due to the number increase of nuclear installations and the diversity of activities conducted by the operators. This program, so-called Monitoring Control Program (PCM) is a regulatory activity developed by the Environmental Impact Assessment Service (SEAIA) of IRD and has the aim of check the effectiveness of authorized self-control. Actually the regulatory control of environmental radiological integrity around the authorized nuclear installation essentially depends on the effectiveness of regulatory inspections fulfilled by the SEAIA/IRD. Due to the implementation of modern practices of management in the IRD, specially the quality management system on regulatory inspection activities, emerged the need of unify these actions. It was also necessary to establish standard procedures required for inspection conduction. This work proposes one methodology for the inspections of environmental radiological control suitable to assure the compliance and effectiveness of environmental and effluent monitoring programs conducted by the operator, through the systematic verification of compliance and data quality assessment. The proposed methodology seeks to attend the appeals for high control standards of environment protection and public health. Here, we presented as products of this work: The inspection handbook and checklists for inspections; one framework for sampling, handling, recording and reporting of

  16. Corrective action program reengineering project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernick, H.R.

    1996-01-01

    A series of similar refueling floor events that occurred during the early 1990s prompted Susquehanna steam electric station (SSES) management to launch a broad-based review of how the Nuclear Department conducts business. This was accomplished through the formation of several improvement initiative teams. Clearly, one of the key areas that benefited from this management initiative was the corrective action program. The corrective action improvement team was charged with taking a comprehensive look at how the Nuclear Department identified and resolved problems. The 10-member team included management and bargaining unit personnel as well as an external management consultant. This paper provides a summary of this self-assessment initiative, including a discussion of the issues identified, opportunities for improvement, and subsequent completed or planned actions

  17. Results of the radiological survey at the former Heppenstall Company site, 4620 Hatfield Street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Quillen, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    As part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing a program to determine the radiological conditions at sites that were used to process radioactive materials under contract with the department's predecessor agencies. During 1955 the former Heppenstall Company site in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was used by an Atomic Energy Commission contractor to process approximately 100,000 lbs of normal uranium metal. Because of insufficient records to document cleanup procedures and to verify the radiological condition of this site, DOE requested a survey. The radiological survey discussed in this report for the site of the former Heppenstall Company, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was conducted by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in July of 1989. The survey included a surface gamma scan of the warehouse, collection of indoor soil and dust samples and one outdoor sample, and measurement of direct and transferable alpha and beta-gamma activity. Results of this radiological assessment indicate no detection of radiation levels or radionuclide concentrations above DOE guidelines. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Effectiveness of a radiology-anatomy instructional module in a clinical course on oral radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanaka, Masahiro; Tamaki, Yoh; Nomura, Yoshiaki

    2007-01-01

    An insufficient knowledge of anatomy often complicates the interpretation of radiological findings by students learning clinical medicine. During a 3-week clinical course in oral radiology, students attended lectures on anatomy for half of each day. Our objectives were to evaluate this program and determine why some students remained unmotivated to learn anatomy. Surveys were carried out using two questionnaires, one for evaluating the students' beliefs regarding the necessity of knowing anatomy and their understanding of radiology and anatomy, and the other for determining the value of the educational program. In total, 126 questionnaires were analyzed. Structural equation modeling and decision analysis were used to analyze the data obtained. Beliefs regarding the necessity of knowing anatomy were explained by three variables: the necessity of knowing imaging anatomy, the necessity of knowing gross anatomy, and understanding of anatomy. Awareness of the necessity of knowing anatomy and understanding of graphical images were not strongly correlated. The educational program was characterized by two factors: 'value' and 'appropriateness' These were strongly correlated. Student interest in the content of the course was found to be the most important factor in student evaluations of the educational program. Students who answered 'agree', 'disagree' or 'strongly disagree' to three items, interested in the content of the course', 'obtained knowledge through the course' and 'expected the course to be useful in the near future were likely to have insufficient understanding of and awareness of the necessity of radiology and anatomy. The inclusion of lectures on anatomy is beneficial for improving student understanding of oral radiology. Student interest in the content is important in evaluations of radiology-anatomy programs. (author)

  19. 36 CFR 72.11 - Action program components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of the Action Program will be placed on the rehabilitation of deteriorating facilities, it also will describe how the rehabilitation effort is linked to the overall goals, priorities and strategies of the... linked to the objectives, needs, plans, and institutional arrangements of the community. The Action...

  20. Action to be taken in the event of a radiological accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresson, G.; Nenot, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    In the event of a radiological accident affecting people, the measures that have to be taken are the responsibility of a large number of persons whose original disciplines differ widely. In the interest of efficiency, it is obviously essential that these measures should be co-ordinated; this implies smoothly functioning liaison between the persons responsible for action at different levels. These levels of action are numerous and differ very considerably; they include, in the first place, the links between the nuclear facility and the medical authorities, either directly within the hospital framework or through the intermediary of an industrial medicine service; then the links between the hospital sector and the large number of experts concerned with the highly specialized aspects of the diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic problems of irradiation or contamination by radioisotopes; lastly, the links between these various specialists. In view of the wide variety of the parameters involved in accidents, the organization of the action to be taken cannot be encompassed within a rigid framework, especially as it should be possible to apply this organization at both the national and the international level, taking into account the diversity of the medico-legal aspects. The efficiency of the means applied is therefore governed by the flexibility of the procedure; however, the relative scarcity of accidents, i.e. the absence of any involvement of persons and equipment on a true scale, makes it imperative that a high degree of precision be applied in preparing emergency plans, since the omission of one step or one link may have serious or irreparable consequences which cannot always be offset by improvization. The outline of such an operational organization is presented and discussed in the light of past experience. (author)

  1. eLearning-radiology.com. Sustainability for quality assurance; eLearning-radiology.com. Nachhaltigkeit im Sinne der Qualitaetssicherung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelsen, D. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Talanow, R. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin; Uder, M. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Grunewald, M. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik

    2009-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to analyze the availability of published radiological e-learning tools and to establish a solution for quality assurance. Materials and Methods: Substantial pubmed research was performed to identify radiological e-learning tools. 181 e-learning programs were selected. As examples two databases expanding their programs with external links, Compare (n = 435 external links) and TNT-Radiology (n = 1078 external links), were evaluated. A concept for quality assurance was developed by an international taskforce. Results: At the time of assessment, 56.4 % (102/181) of the investigated e-learning tools were accessible at their original URL. A subgroup analysis of programs published 5 to 8 years ago showed significantly inferior availability to programs published 3 to 5 years ago (p < 0.01). The analysis of external links showed 49.2 % and 61.0 % accessible links for the programs Compare (published 2003) and TNT-Radiology (published 2006), respectively. As a consequence, the domain www.eLearning-radiology.com was developed by the taskforce and published online. This tool allows authors to present their programs and users to evaluate the e-learning tools depending on several criteria in order to remove inoperable links and to obtain information about the complexity and quality of the e-learning tools. (orig.)

  2. Radiation protection of workers in radiological emergency situation. Proceedings of the technical day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rannou, Alain; Gosset, Eric; Lahaye, Thierry; Foucher, Laurent; Couasnon, Olivier; Bouchery, Pascal; Gaillard-Lecanu, Emmanuelle; Pectorin, Xavier; Fusil, Laurence; Boudergui, Karim; Adhemar, Bruno; Devin, Patrick; Mace, Jean-Reynald; Chevallier, Michel; Leautaud, Jean-Marc; LANCE, Benoit

    2015-03-01

    Following the Fukushima-Daichi accident, several actions have been taken in France from the lessons learnt from the accident: the elaboration of a national plan for the management of a major nuclear or radiological accident, and the safety complementary evaluations to be carried out by nuclear operators. As a complement to the measures to be implemented for the protection of the overall population in emergency radiological situation, the protection of workers mobilized for the management of the crisis has also to be taken into account in the framework of these measures. The French Society of Radiation Protection (SFRP) has organized a technical day to take stock of this question. The program comprises 4 topical sessions dealing with: the main actions taken at the national scale after the Fukushima-Daichi accident, the strategies and intervention means of nuclear operators in case of radiological emergency, the radiation protection R and D for the protection of intervenors in case of radiological emergency, and the main actions implemented at the international scale and their perspectives. This document brings together the abstracts and the presentations (slides) of the different talks given at the meeting: 1 - Health status and lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident - workers (Alain RANNOU, IRSN); 2 - National response plan to a major nuclear or radiologic accident (Eric GOSSET, SGDSN); 3 - Legal framework applicable to intervenors (Thierry LAHAYE, DGT); 4 - Prescriptions linked with complementary safety and liability studies (Laurent FOUCHER, ASN); 5 - EDF: radiological risk management in emergency situation (Pascal BOUCHERY, EDF); 6 - CEA: intervention strategy, means and radiation protection (Xavier PECTORIN, Laurence FUSIL - CEA); 7 - AREVA: FINA's Intervention and workers' radiation protection (Bruno ADHEMAR, Patrick DEVIN - AREVA); 8 - Intervention in radiological emergency situation: the INTRA (Robots intervention on accidents) economic

  3. Radiological verification survey results at 14 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ001V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W. R. Grace facility. The property at 14 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at 14 Peck Ave. were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives

  4. Radiological verification survey results at 3 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ002V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at 3 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at 3 Peck Ave. were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives

  5. Radiological verification survey results at 15 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ005V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at 15 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at 15 Peck Ave. were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives

  6. Radiological verification survey results at 17 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ006V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at 17 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at 17 Peck Ave. were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives

  7. Radiological verification survey results at 7 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ003V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at 7 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at 7 Peck Ave. were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives

  8. Radiological verification survey results as 13 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ004V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at 13 Peck Ave., Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at 13 Peck Ave. were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives

  9. Patient throughput times for orthopedic outpatients in a department of radiology: results of an interdisciplinary quality management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodler, J.; Zanetti, M.; Strehle, J.; Gerber, C.; Schilling, J.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to employ quality management methods in order to decrease throughput times for orthopedic outpatients sent to the department of radiology. The following intervals were measured at the onset of the study and after 6 and 12 months: (a) between arrivals at outpatient clinic and radiology counter; (b) between arrival at radiology counter and time of last radiograph; and (c) between time of last radiograph and radiology report printing time. After the initial measurement, numerous changes were initiated both in radiology and in orthopedic surgery. The mean interval between arrival at the outpatient clinic and in radiology decreased by one third from 60 min during the first measurement to 40 (p < 0.001) and 41 min during the second and third measurement. The proportion of patients with total radiology times of more than 30 min decreased from 41 to 29 % between the first and third measurements (p < 0.001). The corresponding results for radiology times of more than 45 min were 17 and 11 % (p = 0.03). A standard type of quality management program can be employed successfully in order to reduce radiology throughput times for orthopedic outpatients. (orig.)

  10. Implementation of an action plan in radiological protection of the patient in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelin, S.; Perez, M.R.; Dubner, D.

    2006-01-01

    The medical irradiations constitute the main contribution to the human exposure to ionizing radiations of artificial character. The growing quantity of practices, facilities and human resources dedicated to such ends, it has increased the concern of regulator organisms and scientific societies by the radiological protection of the patient (PRP). Besides completing it regulatory function in the domains of the medical practices that its concern it, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of Argentina, decided to install an active discussion in order to promoting an action plan in PRP in the national environment. To such end, the ARN organized the First National Day on PRP in December, 2004, with the attendance of professionals of the fields of the Radiodiagnostic, the Nuclear Medicine and the Radiotherapy as well as of representatives of professional associations and authorities of health. In this day the conclusions of the International Conference on PRP (Malaga, 2001) and the approaches of the Directive 97/43/EURATOM adopted in European countries were presented. It was discussed about: practices justification, responsibility of the prescriber doctor, quality systems, dose optimization, reference levels, dosimetry, training of human resources, especially for certain practices (pregnant woman, pediatric radiology and interventionist, PR/118 tomography for the correct application of diagnostic practices and an expert presented in teleconference form the experience of France for the adoption of these guides. During the Second National Day on PRP organized by the ARN (June 2005), received opinions were debated in the different environments in relation to the PR/118 guide and it potential adaptation to the national conditions. Also it was presented the state of advance of the activities developed in relation to the proposed tasks. As a result of this meeting, it was conformed a national net of PRP to which intended to incorporate academic institutions, in order to

  11. Sensitivity analysis on the priority order of the radiological worker allocation model using goal programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hae Yong; Lee, Kun Jai

    1998-01-01

    In nuclear power plant, it has been the important object to reduce the occupational radiation exposure (ORE). Recently, the optimization concept of management science has been studied to reduce the ORE in nuclear power plant. In optimization of the worker allocation, the collective dose, working time, individual dose, and total number of worker must be considered and their priority orders must be thought because the main constraint is necessary for determining the constraints variable of the radiological worker allocation problem. The ultimate object of this study is to look into the change of the optimal allocation of the radiological worker as priority order changes. In this study, the priority order is the characteristic of goal programming that is a kind of multi-objective linear programming. From a result of study using goal programming, the total number of worker and collective dose of worker have changed as the priority order has changed and the collective dose limit have played an important role in reducing the ORE

  12. Medical intervention in radiological emergencies, formation and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas H, J.

    2006-01-01

    The work exposes the national experience in the development of training programs in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies. Implemented after valuing the existent situation, identified the necessities and the reach of the training, additionally it was elaborated the content of the training program whose purpose is guided to the invigoration of the medical answer capacity in radiological emergencies The content of the modular program it approaches theoretical- practical aspects on preparation and medical answer in radiological emergencies. The program includes an exercise that simulates a radiological accident, to evaluate during the same one, the answer capacity before this situation. The training concludes with the design of a strategy for the preparation and answer in radiological emergencies in correspondence with the potential accidental scenarios that the participants can face. (Author)

  13. Monitoring Activities Review action report for the Environmental Monitoring Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmsen, R.N.; Wright, K.C.

    1990-12-01

    To improve program planning and to provide bases for technical improvement of the monitoring program, the EG ampersand G Environmental Monitoring (EM) organization has regularly used the Monitoring Activities Review (MAR) process since 1982. Each MAR is conducted by a committee of individuals selected for their experience in the various types of monitoring performed by the EM organization. An MAR of the Environmental Monitoring Program was conducted in 1988. This action report identifies and discusses the recommendations of this MAR committee. This action report also identifies the actions already taken by the EM Unit in response to these recommendations, as well as the actions and schedules to be taken. 10 refs

  14. Radiological re-survey results at 130 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ029)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from 1916 to 1959. During the early years of operation, MCW stored wastes and residues in low-lying areas west of the processing facilities and consequently some of the residuals containing radioactive materials migrated offsite to the surrounding area. Subsequently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), designated for remedial action the old MCW property and several vicinity properties. Additionally, in 1984, the property at 130 West Central Ave., Maywood, New Jersey and properties in its vicinity were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. In 1987 and 1988, at the request of DOE, ORNL conducted a radiological survey on this property. A second radiological survey by ORNL was conducted on this property in May, 1993 at the request of DOE after an ad hoc radiological survey, requested by a new property owner and conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), identified some contamination not previously found by ORNL. The purpose of the survey was to determine if residuals from the old MCW were present on the property, and if so, if any radiological elements present were above guidelines. A certified civil survey was requisitioned by ORNL to determine actual property boundaries before beginning the radiological survey. The radiological re-survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of a large number of soil samples for radionuclide analyses

  15. Results of the preliminary radiological survey at the former Diamond Magnesium Company site, Luckey, Ohio (DML001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1990-02-01

    As part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing a radiological survey program to determine the radiological conditions at sites that were used by the department's predecessor agencies. One such site is the former Diamond Magnesium Company facility in Luckey, Ohio. The preliminary radiological survey discussed in this report was conducted at the request of DOE by members of the Measurement Applications and Development group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in December 1988. The former Diamond Magnesium Company site in Luckey, Ohio, was used as a magnesium reduction plant during World War 2. It was closed in 1945 and reopened in 1949 as a beryllium production facility, operated by Brush Wellman for the US Atomic Energy Commission. The preliminary radiological survey included: a surface gamma scan of part of the property outdoors, collection of surface and subsurface soil samples, and collection of water samples. Laboratory analysis of soil samples showed concentrations of 226 Ra in excess of applicable DOE guidelines. A follow-up, detailed survey is recommended. 9 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Web-based system for radiological protection programs: a repository for research, consultation and information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Denise S.; Sordi, Gian Maria A.A., E-mail: gmsordi@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    In order to establish a Radiation Protection Plan or a Radiation Emergency Plan, Brazilian facilities should take into account all procedures based on national and international guidelines and recommendations. This information can be found in several documents published by different organizations over the past decades: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN). Therefore, this project aims the informatization of the radiological protection programs in a single system in order to offer unified programs and inter-related information in Portuguese, providing Brazilian facilities a complete repository for research, consultation and information, combining computer technology and radiological protection in order to enhance the best benefits from information technology. This research work includes programs about: (1) Monitoring of Workplace (Monitoring for External Radiation, Monitoring for Surface Contamination, Monitoring for Air Contamination) and (2) Individual Monitoring (Monitoring of External Exposure and Monitoring of Internal Exposure, Monitoring for Skin and Clothing). WEB platform tools and functionalities were developed according to target public needs, regarding new possibilities of media, mobile access, and information sharing. The servers processing power added to the technology of relational databases allow to integrate information from different sources, enabling complex queries with reduced response time. Moreover, taking into account this is a pioneer project with the prospect of long-term use, the challenge involves the combination of multiple computer technologies that allows a robust, effective and flexible system, which can be easily adapted to future technological innovations. (author)

  17. Web-based system for radiological protection programs: a repository for research, consultation and information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, Denise S.; Sordi, Gian Maria A.A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to establish a Radiation Protection Plan or a Radiation Emergency Plan, Brazilian facilities should take into account all procedures based on national and international guidelines and recommendations. This information can be found in several documents published by different organizations over the past decades: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN). Therefore, this project aims the informatization of the radiological protection programs in a single system in order to offer unified programs and inter-related information in Portuguese, providing Brazilian facilities a complete repository for research, consultation and information, combining computer technology and radiological protection in order to enhance the best benefits from information technology. This research work includes programs about: (1) Monitoring of Workplace (Monitoring for External Radiation, Monitoring for Surface Contamination, Monitoring for Air Contamination) and (2) Individual Monitoring (Monitoring of External Exposure and Monitoring of Internal Exposure, Monitoring for Skin and Clothing). WEB platform tools and functionalities were developed according to target public needs, regarding new possibilities of media, mobile access, and information sharing. The servers processing power added to the technology of relational databases allow to integrate information from different sources, enabling complex queries with reduced response time. Moreover, taking into account this is a pioneer project with the prospect of long-term use, the challenge involves the combination of multiple computer technologies that allows a robust, effective and flexible system, which can be easily adapted to future technological innovations. (author)

  18. Environmental monitoring program for radiological emergencies at the Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Plant, Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Lilia M.J. Belem; Ramos Junior, Anthenor C.; Gomes, Carlos A.; Carvalho, Zenildo L.; Gouveia, Vandir; Estrada, Julio; Ney, Cezar [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1997-12-31

    In order to respond to a major radiological emergency at the Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Plant, located in Angra do Reis, Rio de Janeiro, the Emergency Response Team of the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD/CNEN) established a program of environmental monitoring. A monitoring trend to assess the off-site radiological conditions and give support to decision making for implementing protective measure in case of a radiological accident is presented. For the selection of the monitoring points, the program takes into account atmospheric diffusion, population conglomerates and their habits, water and land use; it includes the entire Emergency Planning Zone of 15 km radius. The program has been organized in the form of a handbook to facilitate handling by field teams 2 refs., 1 fig.; e-mail: lilia at ird.gov.br

  19. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) compliance program guidance manual and updates (FY 86). Section 4. Medical and radiological devices. Irregular report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The FDA Compliance Program Guidance Manual provides a system for issuing and filing program plans and instructions directed to Food and Drug Administration Field operations for project implementation. Section IV provides those chapters of the Compliance Program Guidance Manual which pertain to the areas of medical and radiological devices. Some of the areas of coverage include laser and sunlamp standards inspections, compliance testing of various radiation-emitting products such as television receivers and microwave ovens, emergency response planning and policy, premarket approval and device manufacturers inspections, device problem reporting, sterilization of devices, and consumer education programs on medical and radiological devices

  20. Efficient quality assurance programs in radiology and nuclear medicine in Oestergoetland (Sweden)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandborg, M.; Althen, J. N.; Gustafsson, A.

    2010-01-01

    Owners of imaging modalities using ionising radiation should have a documented quality assurance (QA) program, as well as methods to justify new radiological procedures to ensure safe operation and adequate clinical image quality. This includes having a system for correcting divergences, written imaging protocols, assessment of patient and staff absorbed doses and a documented education and training program. In this work, how some aspects on QA have been implemented in the County of Oestergoetland in Sweden, and efforts to standardise and automate the process as an integrated part of the radiology and nuclear medicine QA programs were reviewed. Some key performance parameters have been identified by a Swedish task group of medical physicists to give guidance on selecting relevant QA methods. These include low-contrast resolution, image homogeneity, automatic exposure control, calibration of air kerma-area product metres and patient-dose data registration in the radiological information system, as well as the quality of reading stations and of the transfer of images to the picture archive and communication system. IT-driven methods to automatically assess patient doses and other data on all examinations are being developed and evaluated as well as routines to assess clinical image quality by use of European quality criteria. By assessing both patient absorbed doses and clinical image quality on a routine basis, the medical physicists in our region aim to be able to spend more time on imaging optimisation and less time on periodic testing of the technical performance of the equipment, particularly on aspects that show very few divergences. The role of the Medical Physics Expert is rapidly developing towards a person doing advanced data-analysis and giving scientific support rather than one performing mainly routine periodic measurements. It is concluded that both the European Council directive and the rapid development towards more complex diagnostic imaging systems

  1. Medical Ethics in Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Won; Park, Jae Hyung; Yoon, Soon Ho

    2010-01-01

    According to the recent developments in radiological techniques, the role of radiology in the clinical management of patients is ever increasing and in turn, so is the importance of radiology in patient management. Thus far, there have been few open discussions about medical ethics related to radiology in Korea. Hence, concern about medical ethics as an essential field of radiology should be part of an improved resident training program and patient management. The categories of medical ethics related with radiology are ethics in the radiological management of patient, the relationship of radiologists with other medical professionals or companies, the hazard level of radiation for patients and radiologists, quality assurance of image products and modalities, research ethics, and other ethics issues related to teleradiology and fusion imaging. In order to achieve the goal of respectful progress in radiology as well as minimizing any adverse reaction from other medical professions or society, we should establish a strong basis of medical ethics through the continuous concern and self education

  2. How the radiological accident of Goiania was initially determined

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, W.M.

    2000-01-01

    Mainly the initial actions adopted to minimise the consequences of radiological accident involving the public are very important for bringing the situation to the normality. In this work the author presents a short history about the radiological accident with a 137 Cs source occurred in the city of Goiania, Brazil in 1987 as well as the actions adopted by him during the first hours after the detection of the accident. (author)

  3. ORNL Remedial Action Program strategy (FY 1987-FY 1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trabalka, J.R.; Myrick, T.E.

    1987-12-01

    Over 40 years of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operations have produced a diverse legacy of contaminated inactive facilities, research areas, and waste disposal areas that are potential candidates for remedial action. The ORNL Remedial Action Program (RAP) represents a comprehensive effort to meet new regulatory requirements and ensure adequate protection of on-site workers, the public, and the environment by providing appropriate corrective measures at over 130 sites contaminated historically with radioactive, hazardous chemical, or mixed wastes. A structured path of program planning, site characterization, alternatives assessment, technology development, engineering design, continued site maintenance and surveillance, interim corrective action, and eventual site closure or decommissioning is required to meet these objectives. This report documents the development of the Remedial Action Program, through its preliminary characterization, regulatory interface, and strategy development activities. It provides recommendations for a comprehensive, long-term strategy consistent with existing technical, institutional, and regulatory information, along with a six-year plan for achieving its initial objectives. 53 refs., 8 figs., 12 tabs

  4. Training on Radiological Protection in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Gironzini, E.

    2004-01-01

    Since they were created in 1973 and 1988 respectively, the Superior Center of Nuclear Studies (CSEN) of the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN), together with the Peruvian Radioprotection Society (SPR) have carried out different training courses on radiological protection so that people can work safely with ionizing radiations in medicine, industry and investigation. Additionally, radiological protection is taught to pre graduate students of Medical Technology in four Universities. These courses are a must since national regulations demand that people working with ionizing radiations have an authorization, which is granted by the Technical Office of the National Authority - the technical organ of IPEN - after the candidate demonstrates that he or she knows the specific use of the technique using radiations, as well as all aspects related to safety and radiological protection. The analysis of the radiological protection programs is presented in this document. These programs were carried out by CSEN, during the last 30 years, and by the SRP, and they allowed the training of more than 2200 and 1500 people in the country, respectively. The content of both courses is aimed at specific work with radiations (diagnostic radiology, dental radiology, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, industrial radiography, nuclear gauges, gamma irradiator, etc..) and fulfill the regulatory requirements. The Universities have different programs on radiological protection for the students of Medical Technology. (Author)

  5. Effects of aging on action-intentional programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoraka, Ali R; Otzel, Dana M; M Zilli, Eduardo; Finney, Glen R; Doty, Leilani; Falchook, Adam D; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2018-03-01

    Action-intentional programs control "when" we initiate, inhibit, continue, and stop motor actions. The purpose of this study was to learn if there are changes in the action-intentional system with healthy aging, and if these changes are asymmetrical (right versus left upper limb) or related to impaired interhemispheric communication. We administered tests of action-intention to 41 middle-aged and older adults (61.9 ± 12.3 years). Regression analyses revealed that older age predicted a decrement in performance for tests of crossed motor response inhibition as well as slower motor initiation with the left hand. Changes in action-intention with aging appear to be related to alterations of interhemispheric communication and/or age-related right hemisphere dysfunction; however, further research is needed to identify the mechanisms for age-related changes in the brain networks that mediate action-intention.

  6. Overview of environmental radiological monitoring program of Institute of Radiation Protection And Dosimetry - IRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Sarah Barreto Oliveira de Christo; Peres, Sueli da Silva, E-mail: suelip@ird.gov.br, E-mail: sarah.barreto1@gmail.com [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Radioproteção

    2017-07-01

    As a branch of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) performs extensive activities in the fields of radiation protection, metrology, and dosimetry, as well as specific education, onto a wide operational scope that includes the technical support to national regulatory authorities in the licensing process for nationwide nuclear and radioactive facilities. IRD has several laboratories where are performed radiometric and radiochemical analyses and others radioactivity evaluation procedures in different types of samples obtained in the inspection activities, production of radioactivity metrological standards and reference material by National Laboratory of Metrology of Ionizing Radiation (LMNRI), besides others research activities. In this laboratories can be used sealed or unsealed radioactive sources and radiation-producing devices and are classified with radioactive installations in accordance to national regulations. This way, radioactive liquid effluents can be eventually produced and released into the environment in the course of such activities and an effluent monitoring program to control and reduce the releases to environment is carried out. Additionally, IRD maintains the Radioactive Waste Management Program and Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program (ERMP) in accordance to national regulations requirements. The primary focus of ERMP comprises the validation of the dose prognostics for the public members due to effluents discharge and the provision of consistent projections of the radiation levels at the monitoring sites. In this study, a long term ERMP data survey is discussed, spanning the last thirteen years of activities. On the basis of such discussions and prognostics, it could be observed that the radiological environmental radiological impact due to operation of IRD installations is negligible. (author)

  7. Overview of environmental radiological monitoring program of Institute of Radiation Protection And Dosimetry - IRD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Sarah Barreto Oliveira de Christo; Peres, Sueli da Silva

    2017-01-01

    As a branch of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) performs extensive activities in the fields of radiation protection, metrology, and dosimetry, as well as specific education, onto a wide operational scope that includes the technical support to national regulatory authorities in the licensing process for nationwide nuclear and radioactive facilities. IRD has several laboratories where are performed radiometric and radiochemical analyses and others radioactivity evaluation procedures in different types of samples obtained in the inspection activities, production of radioactivity metrological standards and reference material by National Laboratory of Metrology of Ionizing Radiation (LMNRI), besides others research activities. In this laboratories can be used sealed or unsealed radioactive sources and radiation-producing devices and are classified with radioactive installations in accordance to national regulations. This way, radioactive liquid effluents can be eventually produced and released into the environment in the course of such activities and an effluent monitoring program to control and reduce the releases to environment is carried out. Additionally, IRD maintains the Radioactive Waste Management Program and Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program (ERMP) in accordance to national regulations requirements. The primary focus of ERMP comprises the validation of the dose prognostics for the public members due to effluents discharge and the provision of consistent projections of the radiation levels at the monitoring sites. In this study, a long term ERMP data survey is discussed, spanning the last thirteen years of activities. On the basis of such discussions and prognostics, it could be observed that the radiological environmental radiological impact due to operation of IRD installations is negligible. (author)

  8. The Emergency Radiological Monitoring and Analysis Division of the United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. The FRERP authorises the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), which is established to co-ordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted States and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division is responsible for co-ordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, and quality assurance. This program includes: 1. Aerial Radiological Monitoring - Fixed-Wing and Helicopter; 2. Field Monitoring and Sampling; 3. Radioanalysis - Mobile and Fixed Laboratories; 4. Radiation Detection Instrumentation - Calibration and Maintenance; 5. Environmental Dosimetry; 6. Integrated program of Quality Assurance. To assure consistency, completeness, and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures manual is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets, and operations of the FRMAC Monitoring and Analysis Division and the content and preparation of the manual. (author)

  9. Quality assurance applied to Radiological Protection Program of CPHR - Centro de Proteccion Y Higiene de las Radiaciones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrero Garcia, M.; Jova Sed, L.; Domenech Nieves, H.; Hernandez Sainz, A.

    2001-01-01

    The quality assurance in establishment that use ionizing radiation sources, is according to international recommendations of radiation protection programs. This work intends to present the experience of the Centro de Proteccion y Higiene de las Radiaciones (CPHR), in the implementation of requirements of quality in their Radiological Protection Program

  10. Quality management in a department of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Vosshenrich, R.; Baum, F.; Schorn, C.; Funke, M.; Grabbe, E.; Strasser, G.; Staudacher, J.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose. To increase the quality of internal and external interactions (patients, clinical colleagues, technicians, radiologists) in a department of radiology.Method. Accompanied by a well-experienced adviser workshops have been performed dealing with different topics like ''contact to patients'', ''performance of the radiological report and interaction with the referring colleague'' or ''research and teaching''. A catalogue of different actions was defined to reduce hindrances within the internal and external work-flow.Results. A total number of 53 actions was defined and related to different persons who were responsible for the realisation of the measures within a time interval. Six months after starting the quality management 46 (86%) of the defined actions were realised successfully, and another 4 (8%) measures were still running. There was a moderate increase of satisfaction of the patients and clinical colleagues considering the waiting time.Conclusions. A quality management in a radiological department allows an optimisation of the internal and external interactions. However, the guidance of a well-experienced adviser is as essential as the continuous control of successful finished measures. (orig.) [de

  11. NCRP Program Area Committee 3: Nuclear and Radiological Security and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tammy P; Buddemeier, Brooke

    2016-02-01

    Program Area Committee (PAC) 3 provides guidance and recommendations for response to nuclear and radiological incidents of both an accidental and deliberate nature. Leadership of PAC 3 was transitioned in March 2015, and the newly composed PAC has been working to delineate and then prioritize the landscape of possible activities for PAC 3. The major activity of PAC 3 during the past year was the establishment of Scientific Committee 3-1 to begin producing a report on Guidance for Emergency Responder Dosimetry.

  12. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) as a radiology reporting tool by using optical character recognition (OCR) and macro program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Han; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2012-12-01

    The objectives are (1) to introduce a new concept of making a quantitative computed tomography (QCT) reporting system by using optical character recognition (OCR) and macro program and (2) to illustrate the practical usages of the QCT reporting system in radiology reading environment. This reporting system was created as a development tool by using an open-source OCR software and an open-source macro program. The main module was designed for OCR to report QCT images in radiology reading process. The principal processes are as follows: (1) to save a QCT report as a graphic file, (2) to recognize the characters from an image as a text, (3) to extract the T scores from the text, (4) to perform error correction, (5) to reformat the values into QCT radiology reporting template, and (6) to paste the reports into the electronic medical record (EMR) or picture archiving and communicating system (PACS). The accuracy test of OCR was performed on randomly selected QCTs. QCT as a radiology reporting tool successfully acted as OCR of QCT. The diagnosis of normal, osteopenia, or osteoporosis is also determined. Error correction of OCR is done with AutoHotkey-coded module. The results of T scores of femoral neck and lumbar vertebrae had an accuracy of 100 and 95.4 %, respectively. A convenient QCT reporting system could be established by utilizing open-source OCR software and open-source macro program. This method can be easily adapted for other QCT applications and PACS/EMR.

  13. Coincidence of needs in radiological and toxicological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    Research needs for radiological protection and research programs that have evolved to meet these needs parallel closely those in the chemical toxicology field. The similarity of these needs is described as perceived from the radiological side. Further, the frame work for radiologically-related research, out lines of the research programs, and the development of the facilities at Chalk River Nuclear Labs were presented

  14. Dosimetric evaluation program for dental radiology practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregori, B.; Milat, J.; Fernandez, J.; Micinquevich, S.; Andrieu, J.

    1992-01-01

    The preliminary results of a program undertaken to estimate the doses to patients associated with dental radiology practices in Argentine, are presented. Information collected from the search demonstrated that the Dieck and coronal techniques are the most commonly used practices, while all the examinations are performed by using a circular collimator. For both practices, the dosimetric studies were carried out on a Rando Alderson phantom. All dose measurements were made using thermoluminescent detectors LiF and Ca 2 F. In addition, a mathematical model was developed by applying the Monte Carlo method to a MIRD-V phantom. Circular and rectangular collimators were used. Absorbed dose distribution on head and neck, as well as surface dose distribution, were estimated. The comparison of the performance of both collimators shows that the use of the rectangular one allows for a dose reduction of 80%. Besides, a good correlation between the physical and mathematical models applied was found. (author)

  15. Using management action plans to integrate program improvement efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meador, S.W.; Kidwell, R.J.; Shangraw, W.R.; Cardamone, E.N. [Project Performance Corporation, Sterling, VA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Environmental Management Program is the country`s largest and most sophisticated environmental program to date. The rapid expansion of the DOE`s environmental restoration efforts has led to increased scrutiny of its management processes and systems. As the program continues to grow and mature, maintaining adequate accountability for resources and clearly communicating progress will be essential to sustaining public confidence. The Office of Environmental Management must ensure that adequate processes and systems are in place at Headquarters, Operation Offices, and contractor organizations. These systems must provide the basis for sound management, cost control, and reporting. To meet this challenge, the Office of Environmental Restoration introduced the Management Action Plan process. This process was designed to serve three primary functions: (1) define the program`s management capabilities at Headquarters and Operations Offices; (2) describe how management initiatives address identified program deficiencies; and (3) identify any duplication of efforts or program deficiencies. The Environmental Restoration Management Action Plan is a tracking, reporting, and statusing tool, used primarily at the Headquarters level, for assessing performance in key areas of project management and control. BY DOE to communicate to oversight agencies and stakeholders a clearer picture of the current status of the environmental restoration project management system. This paper will discuss how Management Action Plans are used to provide a program-wide assessment of management capabilities.

  16. The Data-to-Action Framework: A Rapid Program Improvement Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakocs, Ronda; Hill, Jessica A.; Brown, Pamela; Wheaton, Jocelyn; Freire, Kimberley E.

    2015-01-01

    Although health education programs may benefit from quality improvement methods, scant resources exist to help practitioners apply these methods for program improvement. The purpose of this article is to describe the Data-to-Action framework, a process that guides practitioners through rapid-feedback cycles in order to generate actionable data to…

  17. Radiological accidents, scenarios, planning and answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis Delgado, Alexander.

    2008-01-01

    Radiological accidents, scenarios and the importance of a good planning to prevent and control these types of accidents are presented. The radiation can be only one of the risks in an accident, most of dominant radiological risks are not radiological (fire, toxic gases, etc.). The common causes of radiological accidents, potential risks such as external irradiation, internal contamination and the environment pollution are highlighted. In addition, why accidents happen and how they evolve is explained. It describes some incidents with the radiation occurred in Costa Rica from 1993 to 2007. The coordination of emergency management in Costa Rica in relation to a radiological accident, and some mechanisms of action that have practiced in other places are focuses. Among the final considerations are the need to finalize the national plan for radiological emergencies as a tool of empowerment for the teams of emergency care and the availability of information. Likewise the processes of communication, coordination and cooperation to avoid chaos, confusion and crisis are also highlighted [es

  18. Progress and problems in the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Surplus Facilities Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiore, J.J.; Turi, G.P.

    1988-01-01

    The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established in 1974 to identify, evaluate, and as appropriate, conduct remedial actions at sites used in the early years of nuclear energy development by the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). This program currently has 29 sites and is evaluating 350 other sites for possible inclusion in the program. Another remedial action program in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects is the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). The SFMP involves the safe management, decontamination and disposal of surplus DOE contaminated facilities which were not related to defense activities. There are currently 33 projects at 15 different sites in the program. These two programs have made steady progress over the last 10 or so years in cleaning up sites so that they can be reused or released for unrestricted use. Work has been completed at 8 of the FUSRAP sites and three of the SFMP sites

  19. Revision of the protective action guides manual for nuclear incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeCair, S.; MacKinney, J.

    2007-01-01

    EPA's 1992 Manual of Protective Action Guides and Protective Actions for Nuclear Incidents, referred to as the PAG Manual, is a radiological emergency planning and response tool for emergency management officials at the Federal, state, tribal, and local levels. A Protective Action Guide is defined as, the projected dose to reference man, or other defined individual, from a release of radioactive material at which a specific protective action to reduce or avoid that dose is recommended'. The updated version of the PAG Manual accomplishes these key objectives: applying the existing 1992 protective action guides and protective actions to new radiological and nuclear scenarios of concern; updating the dosimetry basis; lowering the recommended dose for administration of stable iodine; providing new guidance concerning consumption of drinking water during or after a radiological emergency; updating the dosimetry basis for all derived levels, and, adding guidance for dealing with long-term site restoration following a major radiological release. (author)

  20. Using management action plans to integrate program improvement efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meador, S.W.; Kidwell, R.J.; Shangraw, W.R.; Cardamone, E.N.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Management Program is the country's largest and most sophisticated environmental program to date. The rapid expansion of the DOE's environmental restoration efforts has led to increased scrutiny of its management processes and systems. As the program continues to grow and mature, maintaining adequate accountability for resources and clearly communicating progress will be essential to sustaining public confidence. The Office of Environmental Management must ensure that adequate processes and systems are in place at Headquarters, Operation Offices, and contractor organizations. These systems must provide the basis for sound management, cost control, and reporting. To meet this challenge, the Office of Environmental Restoration introduced the Management Action Plan process. This process was designed to serve three primary functions: (1) define the program's management capabilities at Headquarters and Operations Offices; (2) describe how management initiatives address identified program deficiencies; and (3) identify any duplication of efforts or program deficiencies. The Environmental Restoration Management Action Plan is a tracking, reporting, and statusing tool, used primarily at the Headquarters level, for assessing performance in key areas of project management and control. BY DOE to communicate to oversight agencies and stakeholders a clearer picture of the current status of the environmental restoration project management system. This paper will discuss how Management Action Plans are used to provide a program-wide assessment of management capabilities

  1. eLearning-radiology.com. Sustainability for quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketelsen, D.; Talanow, R.; Uder, M.; Grunewald, M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to analyze the availability of published radiological e-learning tools and to establish a solution for quality assurance. Materials and Methods: Substantial pubmed research was performed to identify radiological e-learning tools. 181 e-learning programs were selected. As examples two databases expanding their programs with external links, Compare (n = 435 external links) and TNT-Radiology (n = 1078 external links), were evaluated. A concept for quality assurance was developed by an international taskforce. Results: At the time of assessment, 56.4 % (102/181) of the investigated e-learning tools were accessible at their original URL. A subgroup analysis of programs published 5 to 8 years ago showed significantly inferior availability to programs published 3 to 5 years ago (p < 0.01). The analysis of external links showed 49.2 % and 61.0 % accessible links for the programs Compare (published 2003) and TNT-Radiology (published 2006), respectively. As a consequence, the domain www.eLearning-radiology.com was developed by the taskforce and published online. This tool allows authors to present their programs and users to evaluate the e-learning tools depending on several criteria in order to remove inoperable links and to obtain information about the complexity and quality of the e-learning tools. (orig.)

  2. Course NICER in gastrointestinal and urogenital radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksel Kruse; Nolan, D.J.; Allison, D.J.; Jackson, J.; Gibson, R.

    1998-01-01

    Course of NICER (Nycomed Intercontinental Continuing Education in Radiology) in gastrointestinal and urogenital radiology in the frameworks of NICER program. This program is one of the best educational programs the purpose of which consists in education of maximum good quality, free of marketing and advertisement accessible to roentgenologists of all the countries. The above course was presented in Hua Dong Hospital, Shanghai, China, April 18-21, 1996

  3. [eLearning-radiology.com--sustainability for quality assurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketelsen, D; Talanow, R; Uder, M; Grunewald, M

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the availability of published radiological e-learning tools and to establish a solution for quality assurance. Substantial pubmed research was performed to identify radiological e-learning tools. 181 e-learning programs were selected. As examples two databases expanding their programs with external links, Compare (n = 435 external links) and TNT-Radiology (n = 1078 external links), were evaluated. A concept for quality assurance was developed by an international taskforce. At the time of assessment, 56.4 % (102 / 181) of the investigated e-learning tools were accessible at their original URL. A subgroup analysis of programs published 5 to 8 years ago showed significantly inferior availability to programs published 3 to 5 years ago (p eLearning-radiology.com was developed by the taskforce and published online. This tool allows authors to present their programs and users to evaluate the e-learning tools depending on several criteria in order to remove inoperable links and to obtain information about the complexity and quality of the e-learning tools. More than 50 % of investigated radiological e-learning tools on the Internet were not accessible after a period of 5 to 8 years. As a consequence, an independent, international tool for quality assurance was designed and published online under www.eLearning-radiology.com .

  4. Protecting and improving health through the radiological sciences. A report to the Surgeon General

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1966-04-01

    , the Committee in this report makes a number of recommendations to the Surgeon General and urges that he take appropriate steps for their early implementation. For convenience, these recommendations are summarized as follows: 1. The Public Health Service should take immediate steps to strengthen its programs in the radiological sciences by unifying their administrative direction. Such action is needed to assure an orderly development of the broad spectrum of radiological activities for which the Service is responsible and to give continuous attention to the balance of benefit and risk in all matters pertaining to the human application of ionizing radiation. 2. The Service should undertake the following training and research and development programs to upgrade the quality of the radiological services which have become such a critical part of medical and dental care and to improve radiation protection practices in the health professions: (a) a series of training programs: (i) to strengthen radiological instruction of medical students; (ii) to increase the number of academic radiologists in American medical schools; and (iii) to increase the number of practicing radiologists in the United States. (b) a series of training programs to provide increasing numbers of radiochemists, radiological engineers, radiobiologists, radiological physicists and radiological health specialists. (c) a series of training programs to provide increasing numbers of technologists in the several disciplines of the radiological sciences. (d) a series of applied research and development programs to increase the effectiveness and safety with which radiological procedures are employed in the health professions.

  5. Protecting and improving health through the radiological sciences. A report to the Surgeon General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-04-01

    , the Committee in this report makes a number of recommendations to the Surgeon General and urges that he take appropriate steps for their early implementation. For convenience, these recommendations are summarized as follows: 1. The Public Health Service should take immediate steps to strengthen its programs in the radiological sciences by unifying their administrative direction. Such action is needed to assure an orderly development of the broad spectrum of radiological activities for which the Service is responsible and to give continuous attention to the balance of benefit and risk in all matters pertaining to the human application of ionizing radiation. 2. The Service should undertake the following training and research and development programs to upgrade the quality of the radiological services which have become such a critical part of medical and dental care and to improve radiation protection practices in the health professions: (a) a series of training programs: (i) to strengthen radiological instruction of medical students; (ii) to increase the number of academic radiologists in American medical schools; and (iii) to increase the number of practicing radiologists in the United States. (b) a series of training programs to provide increasing numbers of radiochemists, radiological engineers, radiobiologists, radiological physicists and radiological health specialists. (c) a series of training programs to provide increasing numbers of technologists in the several disciplines of the radiological sciences. (d) a series of applied research and development programs to increase the effectiveness and safety with which radiological procedures are employed in the health professions

  6. American College of Radiology Accreditation Program for mammographic screening sites: Physical evaluation criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrick, R.E.; Haus, A.G.; Hubbard, L.B.; Lasky, H.J.; McCrohan, J.; McLelland, R.; Rothenberg, L.N.; Tanner, R.L.; Zinninger, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    The American College of Radiology has initiated a program for the accreditation of mammographic screening sites, which includes evaluation by mail of image quality and average glandular breast dose. Image quality is evaluated by use of a specially designed phantom (a modified RMI 152D Mammographic Phantom) containing simulated microcalcifications, fibrils and masses. Average glandular dose to a simulated 4.5-cm-thick (50% glandular, 50% fat) compressed breast is evaluated by thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements of entrance exposure and half value layer. Standards for acceptable image quality and patient doses are presented and preliminary results of the accreditation program are discussed

  7. Uranium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH01, Shiprock, NM, August-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-04-01

    A comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH01 was conducted on an intermittent basis from August 23 to November 11, 1982. At the time of the survey, three structures were located on the property - two residential structures and a residential trailer. In addition to the three residences, the frame from a former truck scale was still on the property. The lands surrounding the structures and former truck scale were sparsely covered with vegetation. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels through direct instrument surveys and analysis of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found inside the structures, although elevated levels of radioactivity due to proximity to or shine from contaminated soils were indicated within all. The short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the limit of 0.02 Working Level for average annual concentration including background, as specified in the EPA Standard 40 CFR 192. The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity in the outdoor environs, encompassing about 32,000 ft 2 (2900 m 2 ) of land surrounding, and north of, the former truck scale. Analysis of a surface soil sample collected from the environs indicated a radium concentration considerably in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background specified in the EPA Standard. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Since the surface soil contamination level exceeded the limit specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  8. Environmental Restoration Remedial Actions Program Field Office Work Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    The Environmental Restoration Remedial Actions (ERRA) Program was established by DP to comply with regulations for characterization and cleanup of inactive waste sites. The program specifically includes inactive site identification and characterization, technology development and demonstration, remedial design and cleanup action, and postclosure activities of inactive radioactive, chemically hazardous, and mixed waste sites. It does not include facility decontamination and decommissioning activities; these are included in a parallel program, Environmental Restoration Decontamination and Decommissioning (ERD and D), also managed by DP. The ERRA program was formally established in fiscal year (FY) 1988 at the Hanford Site to characterize and remediate inactive waste sites at Hanford. The objectives, planned implementation activities, and management planning for the ERRA Program are contained in several planning documents. These documents include planning for the national program and for the Hanford Program. This summary describes the major documents and the role and purpose of this Field Office Work Plan (FOWP) within the overall hierarchy of planning documents. 4 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs

  9. Georgia Tech video-based MS program in health physics/radiological engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Kahn, B.

    1991-01-01

    For the past several years, the health physics/radiation protection field has experienced a significant shortage of qualified professionals. The shortage is expected to continue for foreseeable future given the continued demand by both nuclear and medical facilities and the expected growth in the areas of waste management and environmental remediation. In response to such a shortage, beginning in the fall of 1984, Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) established a video-based instruction program that enables professionals in the nuclear field to earn a master of science degree in health physics/radiological engineering while working at a distant nuclear facility. The admission criteria and curricular requirements for the program are identical to those for the resident (on-campus) students (except that weekly attendance at departmental seminars is excused). The program is designed for students with undergraduate degrees in health physics, engineering, or appropriate sciences such as physics, chemistry, or biology. A total of 50 quarter credit hours is required, so that a student who takes one course per quarter can complete the program in four years

  10. Exploring Heuristic Action Selection in Agent Programming (extended abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hindriks, K.V.; Jonker, C.M.; Pasman, W.

    2008-01-01

    Rational agents programmed in agent programming languages derive their choice of action from their beliefs and goals. One of the main benefits of such programming languages is that they facilitate a highlevel and conceptually elegant specification of agent behaviour. Qualitative concepts alone,

  11. Annual status report on the inactive uranium mill tailings sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Assessments of inactive uranium mill tailings sites in the United States led to the designation of 25 processing sites for remedial action under the provisions of Section 102(a) Public Law 95-604. The Department of Energy assessed the potential health effects to the public from the residual radioactive materials on or near the 25 sites; and, with the advice of the Environmental Protection Agency, the Secretary established priorities for performing remedial action. In designating the 25 sites and establishing the priorities for performing remedial action, the Department of Energy consulted with the Environmental Protection Agency, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Department of the Interior, governors of the affected States, Navajo Nation, and appropriate property owners. Public participation in this process was encouraged. During Fiscal Year 1980, Department of Energy will be conducting surveys to verify the radiological characterization at the designated processing sites; developing cooperative agreements with the affected States; and initiating the appropriate National Environmental Policy Act documentation prior to conducting specific remedial actions.

  12. Radiological risk assessment of a radioactively contaminated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    A limited-scope preliminary assessment of radiological risk has been conducted at a radioactively contaminated site under current site use conditions and based on the available preliminary radiological characterization data for the site. The assessment provides useful input to the remedial action planning for the site. 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  13. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 11 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 11 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building

  14. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 29 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailing during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 29 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building

  15. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 19 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 19 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building

  16. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 54 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 54 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated, and can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual release report for each GJO building

  17. L-035: EPR-First Responders: Basic Risk and Protection for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    There are some basic actions and self-protective actions to take in an radiological emergency. Radiation is detected with appropriate instrumentation and measuring the rate of exposure (Sv per hour) in contact with radioactive materials involved. Is important to note: Responsive to a radiological emergency, tool to identify radiological risks, radiation protection, radioactive symbol and instrumentation

  18. Radiological verification survey results at 898 Black Oak Ridge Rd., Wayne, New Jersey (WJ004V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at 898 Black Oak Ridge Road, Wayne, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at one meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at 898 Black Oak Ridge Road were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives

  19. Radiological verification survey results at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur, Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ008V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains railroad spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur, Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at the Pompton Plains railroad spur were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives

  20. Corrective action program at Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaler, F.; Divjak, G.; Kavsek, D.

    2004-01-01

    The Krsko NPP develops software that enables electronic reporting of all kind of deviations and suggestions for improvement at the plant. All the employees and permanent subcontractors have the access to the system and can report deviations. NPP has centralized decision process for the distribution of reported deviation. At this point all direct actions are electronically tracked. The immediate benefits of this new tool were: Reporting threshold has been lowered; Number of reporting people has increased; One computerized form for all processes; Decision, which process will solve the deviation, is centralized; All types of deviation are in the same environment; Our experiences of the processes are incorporated in the program; Control of work that has been done; Archiving is electronic only. Software basic data: Application system Corrective action program is a WEB application. Data is stored in Oracle 8.1.7 i database. Users access application through PL/SQL gateway on Oracle 9i Application Server 1.0.2. using Microsoft Internet Explorer browsers(Version 5 or later). Reports are implemented by Oracle Reports 6i. Menus are designed by Apycom Java Menus and Buttons v4.23. Our Presentation will include: Basic idea; Implementation change management; Demonstration of the program.(author)

  1. Corrective action program at Krsko NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaler, F; Divjak, G; Kavsek, D [NPP Krsko, Krsko (Slovenia)

    2004-07-01

    The Krsko NPP develops software that enables electronic reporting of all kind of deviations and suggestions for improvement at the plant. All the employees and permanent subcontractors have the access to the system and can report deviations. NPP has centralized decision process for the distribution of reported deviation. At this point all direct actions are electronically tracked. The immediate benefits of this new tool were: Reporting threshold has been lowered; Number of reporting people has increased; One computerized form for all processes; Decision, which process will solve the deviation, is centralized; All types of deviation are in the same environment; Our experiences of the processes are incorporated in the program; Control of work that has been done; Archiving is electronic only. Software basic data: Application system Corrective action program is a WEB application. Data is stored in Oracle 8.1.7 i database. Users access application through PL/SQL gateway on Oracle 9i Application Server 1.0.2. using Microsoft Internet Explorer browsers(Version 5 or later). Reports are implemented by Oracle Reports 6i. Menus are designed by Apycom Java Menus and Buttons v4.23. Our Presentation will include: Basic idea; Implementation change management; Demonstration of the program.(author)

  2. Emergency radiological monitoring and analysis: Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The US Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. The FRERP authorizes the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), which is established to coordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted State(s) and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division (M ampersand A) is responsible for coordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, and quality assurance. To assure consistency, completeness, and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures manual is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets, and operations of the FRMAC M ampersand A and the content and preparation of the manual

  3. Management of contaminated territories -- radiological principles and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann-Jensen, P.; Belyaev, S.T.; Demin, V.F.; Rolevich, I.V.; Likhtariov, I.A.; Kovgan, L.N.; Bariakhtar, V.G.

    1996-01-01

    . The numerical values of these action levels are not directly comparable to international numerical guidance, but they seem not to be in direct conflict. Unresolved issues have been identified to be the interaction between radiological and non-radiological actors in decision-making. Both radiological and non-radiological factors will influence the level of protective actions being introduced. Social-psychological countermeasures are a new category of action, in the sense that social protection philosophy has not yet been developed to fully include their application after a nuclear accident. It has been suggested that the inclusion of such countermeasures into the intervention decision making framework should be as a part of the radiation protection framework. It is argued here that optimization of the overall health protection is not a question of developing radiation protection philosophy to fully include socio-psychological factors. It is rather a question of including these factors - in parallel with the radiological responsibility factors - in cooperation between radiation protection experts and psychological specialists under the responsibility of the decision maker. The overall optimization of the total health protection is thus the responsibility of the decision maker(s) with guidance from radiation protection experts as well as experts in the field of social and psychological sciences

  4. Radiological Dispersion Devices: are we prepared?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohier, Alain [Decision Strategy Research Department (Radiation Protection Division), Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)]. E-mail: asohier@sckcen.be; Hardeman, Frank [Decision Strategy Research Department (Radiation Protection Division), Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2006-07-01

    Already before the events of September 11th 2001 concern was raised about the spread of orphan sources and their potential use in Radiological Dispersion Devices by terrorist groups. Although most of the simulated scenarios foresee a rather limited direct health impact on the population, the affected region would suffer from the indirect consequences such as social disruption, cleanup requirements and economic costs. The nature of such a radiological attack would anyway be different compared to conventional radiological accidents, basically because it can happen anywhere at any time. Part of the response resides in a general preparedness scheme incorporating attacks with Radiological Dispersion Devices. Training of different potential intervention teams is essential. The response would consist of a prioritised list of actions adapted to the circumstances. As the psychosocial dimension of the crisis could be worse than the purely radiological one, an adapted communication strategy with the public aspect would be a key issue.

  5. Radiological Dispersion Devices: are we prepared?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohier, Alain; Hardeman, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Already before the events of September 11th 2001 concern was raised about the spread of orphan sources and their potential use in Radiological Dispersion Devices by terrorist groups. Although most of the simulated scenarios foresee a rather limited direct health impact on the population, the affected region would suffer from the indirect consequences such as social disruption, cleanup requirements and economic costs. The nature of such a radiological attack would anyway be different compared to conventional radiological accidents, basically because it can happen anywhere at any time. Part of the response resides in a general preparedness scheme incorporating attacks with Radiological Dispersion Devices. Training of different potential intervention teams is essential. The response would consist of a prioritised list of actions adapted to the circumstances. As the psychosocial dimension of the crisis could be worse than the purely radiological one, an adapted communication strategy with the public aspect would be a key issue

  6. Results of the radiological survey at 200 State Route 17 (MJ035), Maywood, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-02-01

    The property discussed in this report and properties in its vicinity contaminated with residues from the former Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. As part of this project, DOE is conducting radiological surveys in the vicinity of the site to identify properties contaminated with residues derived from the MCW. The principal radionuclide of concern is thorium-232. The radiological survey discussed in this report is part of that effort and was conducted, at the request of DOE, by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A radiological survey of the commercial property at 200 State Route 17, Maywood, New Jersey, was conducted during 1987. The survey and sampling of the ground surface and subsurface were carried out on September 2, 1987. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  7. 49 CFR 26.105 - What enforcement actions apply in FAA programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What enforcement actions apply in FAA programs? 26... Enforcement § 26.105 What enforcement actions apply in FAA programs? (a) Compliance with all requirements of this part by airport sponsors and other recipients of FAA financial assistance is enforced through the...

  8. Management of a radiological emergency. Organization and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubiau, Ph.

    2007-01-01

    After a recall of potential radiological emergency situations and their associated risks, this article describes the organization in France of the crisis management and its operation at the national and international scale: 1 - Nuclear or radiological emergency situations and their associated risks: inventory of ionising radiation sources, accidental situations, hazards; 2 - crisis organization in situation of radiological or nuclear emergency: organization at the local scale, organization at the national scale; 3 - management of emergency situations: accident at a facility, action circle, radiological emergency situations outside nuclear facilities, international management of crisis, situations that do not require the implementation of an emergency plan. (J.S.)

  9. Book Review: Radiological Conditions in the Dnieper River Basin: Assessment by an International Expert Team and Recommendations for an Action Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, Bruce A.

    2007-01-01

    This article is a book review of a report from the International Atomic Energy Agency that was prepared by a team of scientists from Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine as an assessment of radiological contamination of the Dnieper River, which flows through these three countries. The topics covered begin with radioactive sources (actual and potential) including areas affected by the Chernobyl nuclear accident, nuclear power plants along the river and its tributaries, uranium mining and ore processing, radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and non-power sources, such as medicine, industry, and research. The report continues with an assessment of human exposures to radiation from these sources. An additional area of consideration is radiological 'hot spots' in the region. The report finishes with conclusions and recommendations to the regional governments for a strategic action plan and individual government national plans.

  10. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 30B at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauland, P.A.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 30B and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building

  11. Role of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) following a radiological accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, J.F. III.

    1986-01-01

    The Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) calls for the Department of Energy to establish a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) immediately following a major radiological accident to coordinate all federal off-site monitoring efforts in support of the State and the Cognizant Federal Agency (CFA) for the facility or material involved in the accident. Some accidents are potentailly very complex and may require hundreds of radiation specialists to ensure immediate protection of the public and workers in the area, and to identify priorities for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) long-term efforts once the immediate protective actions have been carried out. The FRMAC provides a working environment with today's high technology tools (i.e., communication, computers, management procedures, etc.) to assure that the State and CFA decision makers have the best possible information in a timely manner on which to act. The FRMAC planners also recognize an underlying responsibility to continuously document such operations in order to provide the State, the CFA, and the EPA the technical information they will require for long term assessments. In addition, it is fully recognized that information collected and actions taken by the FRMAC will be subjected to the same scrutiny as other parts of the accident and the overall response

  12. Study of graduate curriculum in the radiological science: problems and suggestions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seong Jin; Kim, Hwa Gon; Kang, Se Sik; Park, Byeong Rae; Kim, Chang Soo

    2006-01-01

    Currently, Educational program of radiological science is developed in enormous growth, our educational environments leading allied health science education program in the number of super high speed medical industry. Radiological science may be the fastest growing technologies in our medical department today. In this way, Medical industry fields converged in the daily quick, the fact that department of radiological science didn't discharged ones duties on current educational environments. The curriculum of radiological technologists that play an important part between skill and occupation's education as major and personality didn't performed one's part most effectively on current medical environments and digital radiological equipment interface. We expect improvement and suggestion to grow natural disposition as studies in the graduate of radiological science. Therefore, in this paper, current curriculum of radiological science are catched hold of trend and problems on digital radiology environments, on fact the present state of problems, for Graduate program of radiological science, graduate courses of MS and ph.D. are suggested a reform measure of major education curriculum introduction

  13. Generic procedures for assessment and response during a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    One of the most important aspects of managing a radiological emergency is the ability to promptly and adequately determine and take actions to protect members of the public and emergency workers. Radiological accident assessment must take account of all critical information available at any time and must be an iterative and dynamic process aimed at reviewing the response as more detailed and complete information becomes available. This manual provides the tools, generic procedures and data needed for an initial response to a non-reactor radiological accident. This manual is one out of a set of IAEA publications on emergency preparedness and response, including Method for the Development of Emergency Response Preparedness for Nuclear or Radiological Accidents (IAEA-TECDOC-953), Generic Assessment Procedures for Determining Protective Actions During a Reactor Accident (IAEA-TECDOC-955) and Intervention Criteria in a Nuclear or Radiation Emergency (Safety Series No. 109)

  14. The Importance of Human-Computer Interaction in Radiology E-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Harder, Annemarie M; Frijlingh, Marissa; Ravesloot, Cécile J; Oosterbaan, Anne E; van der Gijp, Anouk

    2016-04-01

    With the development of cross-sectional imaging techniques and transformation to digital reading of radiological imaging, e-learning might be a promising tool in undergraduate radiology education. In this systematic review of the literature, we evaluate the emergence of image interaction possibilities in radiology e-learning programs and evidence for effects of radiology e-learning on learning outcomes and perspectives of medical students and teachers. A systematic search in PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, ERIC, and PsycInfo was performed. Articles were screened by two authors and included when they concerned the evaluation of radiological e-learning tools for undergraduate medical students. Nineteen articles were included. Seven studies evaluated e-learning programs with image interaction possibilities. Students perceived e-learning with image interaction possibilities to be a useful addition to learning with hard copy images and to be effective for learning 3D anatomy. Both e-learning programs with and without image interaction possibilities were found to improve radiological knowledge and skills. In general, students found e-learning programs easy to use, rated image quality high, and found the difficulty level of the courses appropriate. Furthermore, they felt that their knowledge and understanding of radiology improved by using e-learning. In conclusion, the addition of radiology e-learning in undergraduate medical education can improve radiological knowledge and image interpretation skills. Differences between the effect of e-learning with and without image interpretation possibilities on learning outcomes are unknown and should be subject to future research.

  15. Training for the medical response in radiological emergency experiences and results; Capacitacion para la respuesta medica en emergencias radiologicas experiencias y resultados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas Herrera, J.; Lopez Forteza, Y.

    2003-07-01

    The use of the nuclear techniques in the social practice confers a special imporatnce to the relative aspects to the safety of the practices and radiationsources, for what the implementation of efficient programs of radiation protection constitutes a priority. However in spite of the will before expressed, regrettably radiological situations happen accidental assocaited to multiple causes taht suggest the creation of response capacities to intervention before these fortuitous facts. The experiences accumulated in the last decades related with accidental exposures have evidenced the convenience of having properly qualified human resources for the Medical Response in Radiological Emergencies. The training in the medical aspects of the radiological emergencies acquires a singular character. In such a sense when valuing the national situation put onof manifest deficiences as for the training in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies that advised the development of training programs in such aspects for the different response groups linked to the topic. After identified the training necessities and the scope of the same ones, the contents of the training program were elaborated. The program has as general purpose the invigoration of the capacity of the medical response in front of accidental radiological situations, by means of actions that they bear to prepare groups of medical response in the handling of people accident victims and to the identification of potentials,accidental scenarios, as well as of the necessary resources to confront them. The program content approaches theoretical and paractical aspects to the medical aspect to radiological emergencies. The program include the different topics about fundamental of physical biological to radiation protection, radiation protection during exposure of radiological accidents, medical care for overexposed or contaminated persons, drill, exercises and concludes with designation of a strategy as preparation and

  16. US Department of Energy Radiological Control Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    This manual establishes practices for the conduct of radiological control activities. The Manual states DOE's positions and views on the best courses of action currently available in the area of radiological controls. Accordingly, the provisions in the Manual should be viewed by contractors as an acceptable technique, method or solution for fulfilling their duties and responsibilities. This Manual shall be used by DOE in evaluating the performance of its contractors. (VC)

  17. 78 FR 43091 - Technical Operations Safety Action Program (T-SAP) and Air Traffic Safety Action Program (ATSAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 193 [Docket No.: FAA-2013-0375] Technical Operations Safety Action Program (T-SAP) and... Disclosure. SUMMARY: The FAA is proposing that safety information provided to it under the T-SAP, established... to the FAA under the T-SAP and ATSAP, so the FAA can learn about and address aviation safety hazards...

  18. Preventing radiological threat in the Republic of Azerbaijan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabulov, I.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Azerbaijan is a developing and transit country in the Caucasus, connecting East and West. In addition, Azerbaijan is neighboring countries with pronounced political instability, some of which have extensive nuclear infrastructure or try to develop nuclear infrastructure. Furthermore, in the recent past fundamentalist religious terrorism has taken roots in some of these countries. Therefore, in spite of the fact that the Republic of Azerbaijan has no nuclear facilities or nuclear materials in its own territory, it could be interesting for terrorist groups trying to develop a crude radiological dispersal device using radioactive sources that are widely used in everyday life especially in such areas as oil industry, medicine, agriculture and scientific researches. The issues of reduction and prevention of both radiological and nuclear terrorism threat are one of the main global challenges around the world. The Republic of Azerbaijan is a part of world community and so we are concerned that radioactive sources used for peaceful applications could be stolen by the terrorist groups and used in the development of radiological dispersal devices sometimes referred to as a 'dirty bomb'. It is obvious that using highly radioactive materials in radiological dispersal devices could be very disruptive to society, causing panic, environmental contamination, and large financial losses. One of the ways for reduction and prevention of radiological threat for the countries like Azerbaijan with underdeveloped nuclear security and radiation safety infrastructure is closely participation in the international cooperation programs. As an example of such cooperation, I would like to present the United States Department of Energy's International Radiological Threat Reduction (IRTR) Program. Good progress has made in the field of radiological security within the framework of this program that was started 2003. Actually, in comparison with any IAEA programs, the progress reached by

  19. Radiological protection program in x-ray diagnostic facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melara F, N.E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a basic document to initiate a discussion which will originate a Unified Protocol in Latin America and the Caribbean for radiological protection in the installations of medical radiology. The following principal elements are considered an inherent part of radiology protection: 1. Quality control of equipment. 2. Conditions in the dark room which coincide in the quality of the image. Levels of patient exposure and the processes for the quality control of the processors are not discussed, and it is limited to the installation of radiographic medical x-ray equipment, stationary and mobile. Each point to be put into effect is presented in a diagram, frequency and criteria for acceptance. A detailed explanation of each point along with a clear explanation of the recommended method for each follows in the same order in which they are presented in the diagram. Finally adequate forms for easily acquiring data are presented. (author)

  20. Uranium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH02 Shiprock, New Mexico, August-November 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-04-01

    A comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH02 was conducted on an intermittent basis from August 3 to November 11, 1982. At the time of the survey, seven structures were located on the property - two residential trailers, one institutional building, two institutional trailers, a storage building, and a pump house. The lands surrounding the structures were either sparsely covered with vegetation or gravelled. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels through direct instrument surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analysis of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found inside the structures; background levels of radioactivity were indicated within all seven. The short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the limit of 0.02 Working Level for average annual concentration including background, as specified in the EPA Standard 40 CFR 192. The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at one general area in the outdoor environs, encompassing about 1400 ft 2 (130 m 2 ) of land along the property's northern boundary. Analysis of a surface soil sample collected from this area indicated a radium concentration considerably in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background specified in the EPA Standard. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Since the surface soil contamination level exceeded the limit specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  1. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH16, Shiprock, New Mexico, October-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    At the time of the survey, one residential structure was located on the property. The lands surrounding the structure were landscaped with lawn cover and other vegetation. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found in the residential structure; background levels of radioactivity were indicated throughout. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 μR/h above background limit. Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL limit for average annual concentration including background. The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at several areas in the outside environs. Three localized areas, or discrete hot spots, were found within the backyard. A general area of elevated radioactivity was found at the back alleyway, encompassing about 1200 ft 2 . Radiochemical analyses of the soil sample collected from the backyard indicated a radium concentration of 14 +- 1 pCi/g, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background. Analyses of surface soil samples collected at the alleyway from nearly vicinity property sites also indicated radium concentrations in excess of the limit. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  2. Proceedings of the 3. Regional Meeting on Radiological and Nuclear Safety. Radiological protection in Latin America and the Caribbean. Vol. 1,2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    Two volumes contain more than 183 complete papers presented during the Third Regional Meeting on Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety held on 23-27 October, 1995 in Cusco-Peru. Latin american specialist talk about nuclear safety and radiological protection, radiation natural exposure, biological effect of radiation, radiotherapy and medical radiological safety, radiological safety in industry and research. Also we deal with subjects related to radiological safety of nuclear and radioactive facilities, radioactive waste management, radioactive material transport, environmental radiological monitoring program, radiological emergency and accidents, instruments and dosimetry, basic safety standards of protection against radiation

  3. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 168: Area 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 2 with Errata Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2006-12-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 168: Area 25 and 26, Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each corrective action site (CAS) within CAU 168. The corrective action investigation (CAI) was conducted in accordance with the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 168: Area 25 and 26, Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'', as developed under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 168 is located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada and is comprised of the following 12 CASs: CAS 25-16-01, Construction Waste Pile; CAS 25-16-03, MX Construction Landfill; CAS 25-19-02, Waste Disposal Site; CAS 25-23-02, Radioactive Storage RR Cars; CAS 25-23-13, ETL - Lab Radioactive Contamination; CAS 25-23-18, Radioactive Material Storage; CAS 25-34-01, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; CAS 25-34-02, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; CAS 25-99-16, USW G3; CAS 26-08-01, Waste Dump/Burn Pit; CAS 26-17-01, Pluto Waste Holding Area; and CAS 26-19-02, Contaminated Waste Dump No.2. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against preliminary action levels (PALs) to determine contaminants of concern (COCs) for CASs within CAU 168. Radiological measurements of railroad cars and test equipment were compared to unrestricted (free) release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from the CAI activities revealed the following: (1) Corrective Action Site 25-16-01 contains hydrocarbon-contaminated soil at concentrations exceeding the PAL. The contamination is at discrete locations associated with asphalt debris. (2) No COCs were identified at CAS 25-16-03. Buried construction waste is present in at least two

  4. Development of radiological performance indicators for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.S.; Jung, K.H.; Lee, S.H.; Jang, S.Y.

    2000-01-01

    concentrations in air and water released from a nuclear reactor. For the source, the PIs are the radioactivity in the coolant of the primary and secondary system. Some of the PIs have sub-level indicators to help clarify the individual PIs. The PIs will be evaluated with appropriate frequencies and will be reviewed against the performance criteria that correspond to legal limits, operational restrictions, and design values, reference levels (recording, reporting, investigation and action levels). In conclusion, the radiological performance indicators for NPPs were developed considering the exposure pathway with the goal of assessing the radiation protection program of NPPs with reference to the ICRP recommendations. After the draft PIs are reviewed for comment by NPP operators, then a case study will be conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the assessment program of radiological performance in NPPs. (author)

  5. Department of Energy Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyman, L.D.; Swiger, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the national Department of Energy (DOE) program for managing hazardous waste. An overview of the DOE Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), including its mission, organizational structure, and major program elements, is given. The paper focuses on the contractor support role assigned to Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the establishment of the HAZWRAP Support Contractor Office (SCO). The major SCO programs are described, and the organization for managing the programs is discussed. The HAZWRAP SCO approaches to waste management planning and to technology research, development, and demonstration are presented. The role of the SCO in the DOE Environmental Restoration Program and the development of the DOE Waste Information network are reviewed. Also discussed is the DOE Work for Others Program, where waste management decentralized support, via interagency agreements between DOE and the Department of Defense and DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency, is provided for those sponsors planning remedial response actions. 2 refs

  6. 49 CFR 26.103 - What enforcement actions apply in FHWA and FTA programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What enforcement actions apply in FHWA and FTA... Enforcement § 26.103 What enforcement actions apply in FHWA and FTA programs? The provisions of this section apply to enforcement actions under FHWA and FTA programs: (a) Noncompliance complaints. Any person who...

  7. Worker radiological protection: occupational medical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas Herrera, Juan; Fernandez Gomez, Isis Maria

    2008-01-01

    Radiation exposures experienced by workers are widely explained. The first evidences of biological effects, the implications for human health and the radiological protection have been covered. The conceptual structure that covers the radiological protection and adequate protection without limiting benefits, the scientific basis of radiology, the benefits and risks of the radiological protection are specified. The effective per capita doses are exposed in medical uses both for Latin America and for other regions in the average radiology, dental radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. The manners of occupational exposures in the medicine are presented. Industrial uses have also its average effective dose in the industrial irradiation, industrial radiography and radioisotopes production. Within the natural radiation the natural sources can significantly contribute to occupational exposure and have their average effective dose. Occupational medical surveillance to be taken into industrial sites is detailed. In addition, the plan of international action for the solution of dilemmas of occupational exposures is mentioned and the different dilemmas of radioactive exposure are showed. The external irradiation, the acute diseases by radiations, the cutaneous syndrome of the chronic radiation, the radioactive contamination, the internal radioactive contamination, the combined lesion and accidental exposures are also treated [es

  8. Results of the radiological survey at 136 West Central Avenue (MJ030), Maywood, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-02-01

    As a result of the Energy and Water Appropriations Act of Fiscal Year 1984, the property discussed in this report and properties in its vicinity contaminated with residues from the former Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. As part of this project, DOE is conducting radiological surveys in the vicinity of the site to identify properties contaminated with residues derived from the MCW. The principal radionuclide of concern is thorium-232. The radiological survey discussed in this report is part of that effort and was conducted, at the request of DOE by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A radiological survey of the private, residential property at 136 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey, was conducted during 1987. The survey and sampling of the ground surface and subsurface were carried out on April 29, 1987

  9. Radiological emergency: Malaysian preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusof, M. A. W.; Ali, H. M.

    2011-01-01

    Planning and preparation in advance for radiological emergencies can help to minimise potential public health and environmental threats if and when an actual emergency occurs. During the planning process, emergency response organisations think through how they would respond to each type of incident and the resources that will be needed. In Malaysia, planning, preparation for and response to radiological emergencies involve many parties. In the event of a radiological emergency and if it is considered a disaster, the National Security Council, the Atomic Energy Licensing Board and the Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) will work together with other federal agencies, state and local governments, first responders and international organisations to monitor the situation, contain the release, and clean up the contaminated site. Throughout the response, these agencies use their protective action guidelines. This paper discusses Malaysian preparedness for, and response to, any potential radiological emergency. (authors)

  10. Basic principles for intervention after a nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Per Hedemann Jensen

    1996-01-01

    The current status of internationally agreed principles for intervention after a nuclear accident or radiological emergency and the international development of intervention guidance since the Chernobyl accident are reviewed. The experience gained after the Chernobyl accident indicates that the international advice on intervention existing at the time of the Chernobyl accident was not fully understood by decision makers neither in Western Europe nor in the former USSR and that the guidance failed to address adequately the difficult social problems which can arise after a serious nuclear accident. The radiation protection philosophy of today distinguishes between practices and interventions. The radiological protection system of intervention includes justification of the protective action and optimization of the level of protection achieved by that action. Dose limits do not apply in intervention situations. The inputs to justification and optimization studies include factors that are related to radiological protection, whereas the final decisions on introduction of countermeasures would also depend on other factors. The basic principles for intervention as recommended by international organisations are discussed in detail and the application of the principles on a generic basis is illustrated for long-term protective actions. The concepts of intervention level, operational intervention level and action level are presented and the relation between these quantities is illustrated. The numerical guidance on intervention in a nuclear accident or radiological emergency or a chronic exposure situation given by ICRP, IAEA and in the Basic Safety Standards is presented. (author)

  11. Radiological audit of remedial action activities at the processing site, transfer site, and Cheney disposal site Grand Junction, Colorado: Audit date, August 9--11, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project's Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) performed a radiological audit of the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), MK-Ferguson and CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., at the processing site, transfer site, and Cheney disposal site in Grand Junction, Colorado. Jim Hylko and Bill James of the TAC conducted this audit August 9 through 11, 1993. Bob Cornish and Frank Bosiljevec represented the US Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents one programmatic finding, eleven site-specific observations, one good practice, and four programmatic observations

  12. Radiological emergencies the first response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    This national training course about radiological emergencies first answer include: Targets and preparation for emergency response in case of a nuclear or radiological accident. Operations center, action guide for fire fighting, medical coverage, forensic test, first aid, basic instrumentation for radiation, safety equipment, monitoring radiation, gamma rays, personnel exposed protection , radiation exposure rate, injury and illness for radiation, cancer risk, contamination, decontamination and treatment, markers, personnel dosimetry, training, medical and equipment transportation, shielded and tools. Psychological, physical (health and illness), economical (agriculture and industry) and environment impacts. Terrorist attacks, security belts. Support and international agreements (IAEA)

  13. Operating experience and corrective action program at Ontario Hydro Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collingwood, Barry; Turner, David

    1998-01-01

    This is a slide-based talk given at the COG/IAEA: 5. Technical Committee Meeting on 'Exchange of operating experience of pressurized heavy water reactors'. In the introduction there are presented the operating experience (OPEX) program of OHN, and the OPEX Program Mission, ensuring that the right information gets to the right staff at the right time. The OPEX Processes are analysed. These are: - Internal Corrective Action; - Inter-site Lesson Transfer; - External Lesson Transfer; - External Posting of OHN Events; - Internalizing Operating Experience. Steps in solving the Corrective Action Program are described: - Identify the Problem; - Notify Immediate Supervision/Manager; - Evaluate the Problem; - Correct the Problem; Monitor/Report Status. The Internal Corrective Action is then presented as a flowchart. The internalizing operating experience is presented under three aspects: - Communication; - Interface; - Training. The following items are discussed, respectively: peer meetings, department/section meetings, safety meetings, e-mail folders, newsletters and bulletin boards; work planning, pre-job briefings, supervisors' briefing cards; classroom initial and refresher (case studies), simulator, management courses. A diagram is presented showing the flow and treatment of information within OHN, centered on the weekly screening meetings. Finally, the corrective action processes are depicted in a flowchart and analysed in details

  14. Methodology for establishing of a control and assurance program on a Radiology Department of a university hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Carlos Domingues de; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a proposal of a quality assurance program developed for a typical diagnostic radiology department of a University Hospital. The aim of this program is to reduce the number of films lost due to several kinds of problems, equipment malfunction, incorrect selection of the physical parameters of the X-ray equipment, poor conditions of the film ecrans and chassis, excessive temperature fluctuations on the processor, personnel training and organizational related aspects. The preliminary results shows that the main causes of problems are film overexposure, film under exposure, unexposed films taken back to the dark room, inadequate positioning of the film in the couch, inadequate positioning of the patient and the X-ray processor in addition to others of minor importance. It is very important to emphasize that the data acquisition methodology must contemplate a professional posture of respect for those involved in the procedures and as result of this one would expect their active participation in the program. As result of the first year of study, this program has demonstrated that the annual losses in the department studied are over US$ 125.000,00 and the goal of this program now is to reduce this figure to an acceptable number, US$40.000,00 a reasonable value for a large diagnostic radiology facility. (author). 6 refs., 4 figs

  15. Assessment of radiological referral practice and effect of computer-based guidelines on radiological requests in two emergency departments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carton, Matthieu; Auvert, Bertran; Guerini, Henri; Boulard, Jean-Christophe; Heautot, Jean-Francois; Landre, Marie-France; Beauchet, Alain; Sznajderi, Marc; Brun-Ney, Dominique; Chagnon, Sophie

    2002-02-01

    AIM: To assess medical emergency radiology referral practice compared with a set of French guidelines and to measure the efficiency of computer-based guidelines on unnecessary medical imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All radiological requests were computerized in the medical emergency departments of two French teaching hospitals. During control periods, radiological requests were recorded but no action was taken. During intervention periods, reminder displays on screen indicated the appropriate recommendations. Three control and three intervention periods of 1 month each were conducted. The percentage of requests that did not conform to the guidelines and variation related to periods of control and intervention were measured. RESULTS: The proportion of requests that did not conform to the guidelines was 33{center_dot}2% when the guidelines were inactive and decreased to 26{center_dot}9% when the recommendations were active (P < 0{center_dot}0001). The three imaging examinations (chest radiographs, abdominal plain radiographs and CT of the brain) accounted for more than 80% of all requests; more than 50% of abdominal plain radiographs requests did not conform with recommendations while this percentage was respectively 24{center_dot}9% and 15{center_dot}8% for chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) of the brain. Seven situations accounted for 70% of non-conforming radiological referrals; in these situations, junior practitioners' knowledge was inadequate. CONCLUSION: While the computer provided advice that was tailored to the needs of individual patients, concurrent with care, the effect of our intervention was weak. However, our study identified the few situations that were responsible for the majority of unnecessary radiological requests; we expect that this result could help clinicians and radiologists to develop more specific actions for these situations. Carton, M. et al. (2002). Clinical Radiology (2002)

  16. Assessment of radiological referral practice and effect of computer-based guidelines on radiological requests in two emergency departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carton, Matthieu; Auvert, Bertran; Guerini, Henri; Boulard, Jean-Christophe; Heautot, Jean-Francois; Landre, Marie-France; Beauchet, Alain; Sznajderi, Marc; Brun-Ney, Dominique; Chagnon, Sophie

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To assess medical emergency radiology referral practice compared with a set of French guidelines and to measure the efficiency of computer-based guidelines on unnecessary medical imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All radiological requests were computerized in the medical emergency departments of two French teaching hospitals. During control periods, radiological requests were recorded but no action was taken. During intervention periods, reminder displays on screen indicated the appropriate recommendations. Three control and three intervention periods of 1 month each were conducted. The percentage of requests that did not conform to the guidelines and variation related to periods of control and intervention were measured. RESULTS: The proportion of requests that did not conform to the guidelines was 33·2% when the guidelines were inactive and decreased to 26·9% when the recommendations were active (P < 0·0001). The three imaging examinations (chest radiographs, abdominal plain radiographs and CT of the brain) accounted for more than 80% of all requests; more than 50% of abdominal plain radiographs requests did not conform with recommendations while this percentage was respectively 24·9% and 15·8% for chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) of the brain. Seven situations accounted for 70% of non-conforming radiological referrals; in these situations, junior practitioners' knowledge was inadequate. CONCLUSION: While the computer provided advice that was tailored to the needs of individual patients, concurrent with care, the effect of our intervention was weak. However, our study identified the few situations that were responsible for the majority of unnecessary radiological requests; we expect that this result could help clinicians and radiologists to develop more specific actions for these situations. Carton, M. et al. (2002). Clinical Radiology (2002)

  17. Radiological field survey problems and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deming, E.J.; Boerner, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    Situations often arise during radiological field surveys which require the health physicist to improvise and/or make spot decisions. At times these situations can be humorous, but they can also present hazards more serious than normal radiological considerations. This presentation will depict various problematic situations encountered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Radiological Site Assessment Program in the course of performing field environmental surveys. Detailing these potential hazards can alert other field survey groups to problems they may encounter

  18. Computer program for storage of historical and routine safety data related to radiologically controlled facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, D.A.; Hall, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    A method for tracking and quick retrieval of radiological status of radiation and industrial safety systems in an active or inactive facility has been developed. The system uses a mini computer, a graphics plotter, and mass storage devices. Software has been developed which allows input and storage of architectural details, radiological conditions such as exposure rates, current location of safety systems, and routine and historical information on exposure and contamination levels. A blue print size digitizer is used for input. The computer program retains facility floor plans in three dimensional arrays. The software accesses an eight pen color plotter for output. The plotter generates color plots of the floor plans and safety systems on 8 1/2 x 11 or 20 x 30 paper or on overhead transparencies for reports and presentations

  19. Emergency response during the radiological control of scraps in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos Viltre, Enma O.; Cardenas Herrera, Juan; Dominguez Ley, Orlando; Capote Ferrera, Eduardo; Fernandez Gomez, Isis M.; Caveda Ramos, Celia; Carrazana, Jorge; Barroso Perez, Idelisa

    2008-01-01

    In the last few years, in the international scene, incidents have been reported due to the presence of radioactive materials in the scrap. This reality has motivated the adoption of measures of radiological security, due to the implications that these incidents have for the public and the environment, as well as for the international trade. Among theses actions is the implementation of the radiological control of scrap, with the additional requirement that this control has to be implemented in the framework of a Quality Management Program.Taking into account the international experience, our institution designed and organized in 2002 a national service for the radiological monitoring of scrap, being the clients the main exporting and trading enterprises of this material in the country. During these years, several contaminated materials have been detected, causing incidents that activated the radiological emergency response system. In this sense, since some years ago, our country has been working in the implementation of a national and ministerial system for facing and mitigating the consequences of accidental radiological situations, conjugating efforts and wills from different national institutions with the leadership of the Center of Radiation Protection and Hygiene (CPHR) and the Center of Nuclear Security (CNSN) in correspondence with the social responsibility assigned to the them. These incidents propitiate to have not only a system of capacity and quick response oriented to limit the exposure of people, to control the sources, to mitigate the consequences of the accident and to reestablish the conditions of normality, but also a previous adequate planning that guarantees the speed and effectiveness of it. In these work the experiences reached by the specialists of the CPHR from Cuba during the occurrence of an incident in the execution of the service of radiological monitoring of scraps are exposed. (author)

  20. Lessons of the radiological accident in Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, R.N.; Xavier, A.M.; Heilbron, P.F.L.

    1998-01-01

    On the basis of the lessons teamed from the radiological accident of Goiania, actions are described which a nuclear regulatory body should undertake while responding to an accident of this nature. (author)

  1. Distribution of scholarly publications among academic radiology departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, John N; Bokhari, Danial

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the distribution of publications among academic radiology departments in the United States is Gaussian (ie, the bell curve) or Paretian. The search affiliation feature of the PubMed database was used to search for publications in 3 general radiology journals with high Impact Factors, originating at radiology departments in the United States affiliated with residency training programs. The distribution of the number of publications among departments was examined using χ(2) test statistics to determine whether it followed a Pareto or a Gaussian distribution more closely. A total of 14,219 publications contributed since 1987 by faculty members in 163 departments with residency programs were available for assessment. The data acquired were more consistent with a Pareto (χ(2) = 80.4) than a Gaussian (χ(2) = 659.5) distribution. The mean number of publications for departments was 79.9 ± 146 (range, 0-943). The median number of publications was 16.5. The majority (>50%) of major radiology publications from academic departments with residency programs originated in Pareto rather than a normal distribution. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Student Perceptions of Educational Quality in Radiologic Technology Programs: A Comparative Analysis of Specialized and Institutional Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Hoek, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if students' perceptions of quality differed between Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT) accredited and non JRCERT-accredited radiography programs using the quality dimensions of curriculum, faculty, facilities and equipment, integrity, student outcomes, and overall…

  3. Contrast reaction training in US radiology residencies: a COARDRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBedis, Christina A; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Otero, Hansel J; Decker, Summer J; Ward, Robert J

    To perform a survey-based assessment of current contrast reaction training in US diagnostic radiology residency programs. An electronic survey was distributed to radiology residency program directors from 9/2015-11/2015. 25.7% of programs responded. 95.7% of those who responded provide contrast reaction management training. 89.4% provide didactic lectures (occurring yearly in 71.4%). 37.8% provide hands-on simulation training (occurring yearly in 82.3%; attended by both faculty and trainees in 52.9%). Wide variability in contrast reaction education in US diagnostic radiology residency programs reveals an opportunity to develop and implement a national curriculum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/11718--079, 'NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 5 issued in November 2004. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect the recent changes in compliance requirements with 10 CFR 835, and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  5. From Knowledge to Action: Tips for Encouraging and Measuring Program-Related Behavior Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazdon, Scott; Horntvedt, Jody; Templin, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging to document the behavior changes that result from Extension programming. This article describes an evaluation method we call the "action items method." Unlike other approaches for measuring behavior change, this method requires program participants to define their own action plans as part of a program and then asks them…

  6. Research waste management program - An action proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa Ramos, A.; Esposito, I.

    1997-01-01

    The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission planned prepared and established a Research Waste Management Program, started in 1996, in order to map, to analyze and to solve the common problems in the research field. The specific study done included a large number of academic institutions. The procedures, results and operational methodology used by the Team linked to the Program, in one of the research institutions studied where corrective actions were implemented to avoid unnecessary dose to the public, will be discussed in this article. (author)

  7. Remedial action work plan for the Colonie site. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    The Colonie site is a DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) site located in the Town of Colonie, New York, and consisting of an interim storage site and several vicinity properties. The Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS) is the former National Lead (NL) Industries plant located at 1130 Central Avenue. There are 11 vicinity properties that received remedial action in 1984: 7 located south of the site on Yardboro and Palmer Avenues just across the Colonie-Albany town limits in Albany, and 4 located northwest of the site along Central Avenue in Colonie. Of these properties, nine are residences and two are commercial properties. This document describes the engineering design, construction, and associated plans for remedial action on the vicinity properties and the interim storage site. These plans include both radiological and chemical work. Radiological work includes: excavating the above-guideline radioactive wastes on the vicinity properties; designing required facilities for the interim storage site; preparing the interim storage site to receive these contaminated materials; transporting the contaminated materials to the interim waste storage stockpile; and preparing necessary schedules for accomplishing the remedial actions. Chemical work involves: developing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure plans; neutralizing chemical hazards associated with plating solutions; inventorying on-site chemicals; and disposal of chemicals and/or residues. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  8. Results of the radiological survey at Essex Street and State Route 17 (MJ036), Maywood, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-02-01

    As a result of the Energy and Water Appropriations Act of Fiscal Year 1984, the property discussed in this report and properties in its vicinity contaminated with residues from the former Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. As part of this project, DOE is conducting radiological surveys in the vicinity of the site to identify properties contaminated with residues derived from the MCW. The principal radionuclide of concern is thorium-232. The radiological survey discussed in this report is part of that effort and was conducted, at the request of DOE, by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A radiological survey of the commercial property at Essex Street and State Route 17, Maywood, New Jersey, was conducted during 1987. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Materials management system in interventional radiology - initial experience with a computer-supported program; Materialverwaltung in der interventionellen Radiologie - erste Erfahrungen mit einem computergestuetzten Programm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clevert, D.-A.; Reiser, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Muenchen (Germany). Institut fuer klinische Radiologie; Jung, E.M.; Rupp, N. [Institut fuer diagnostische Radiologie, Passau (Germany)

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To perform a cost analysis for assessing options of reorganizing material supplies and reducing costs of the radiology division through the introduction of a materials management system. Materials and Methods: A materials management system (Piranha, Boston Scientific) was installed on an existing computer system. All consumables were inventoried and entered into the system. An ABC analysis determined further action. On the basis of order frequencies and availability requirements for emergencies, safety levels were agreed with physicians and other medical staff. Inventory costs were computed using these data. The interest rate for the capital tied up in the inventory was 8% per year. Results: The inventory showed that the capital tied up in stocks was Euro 260,000 and 2001 and Euro 190,000 in 2002. A change in supply strategy reduced inventory cost in 2001 and 2002. Annual interest expense was lowered by Euro 18,420. Another saving of Euro 2,700 was achieved by a reduction in storage cost. Annual inventory turnover totaled Euro 298,000. The total cost cut through improved inventory management was Euro 21,120 per year, which is equivalent to 7% of the annual expenses. Adding the decline in the cost of shelf time overruns equal to 5% of the annual expenses, the saving was approximately 12% of total interventional radiology cost in 2001 and some 11% in 2002. Conclusion: Flexible supply strategies and the introduction of a materials management program can help to reduce inventory costs in interventional radiology divisions without any impact on service levels. (orig.)

  10. The practice of radiology education. Challenges and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Deven, Teresa; Hibbert, Kathryn M.; Chhem, Rethy K.; Ulm Univ.

    2010-01-01

    The role of medical imaging is increasingly integral to health care, drug discovery, biology, and other life sciences. The changes that are occurring call for innovation in the training of the medical imaging experts of tomorrow. In their previous book, Radiology Education: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (2008), the editors addressed the philosophical and theoretical underpinnings of scholarship in radiology education. Now, in The Practice of Radiology Education: Challenges and Trends, they focus on the application of these concepts within educational programs for radiology residents and fellows. The book has three sections on Curriculum, Programs and Trainees, and Leadership and Resources. Within this framework, each chapter addresses theory and principles, practical issues, and resources and literature relevant to educational practice. The contributors are educators in radiology from around the world, providing a global perspective on the main challenges facing medical imaging education and the potential strategies required to meet these challenges. It is hoped that the book will assist in attaining the ultimate goal of radiology education: to help patients. (orig.)

  11. Results of the radiological survey at the former ore storage site, Palmerton, Pennsylvania (PP001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Quillen, J.L.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1990-12-01

    As part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing a radiological survey program to determine the radiological conditions at sites that were used by the department's predecessor agencies. The radiological survey discussed in this report for the former ore storage site in Palmerton, Pennsylvania, is part of the FUSRAP effort and was conducted at the request of DOE by members of the Measurement Applications and Development group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 1988. In 1953 and 1954 the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established an ore stockpile on the property of the New Jersey Zinc Corporation in Palmerton, Pennsylvania. Approximately 57 truckloads of ore (about 360 tons) were stored at this site and remained there until 1973, when the AEC initiated a clean-up program. The 1988 ORNL radiological survey included a gamma scan at the ground surface, gamma measurements at discrete locations at the surface and at 1 m above the surface, gamma logging of 80 auger holes, and collection of 161 surface and subsurface soil samples. Of these 161 soil samples, 98% were below DOE guidelines for 226 Ra concentration in soil. Interpretation of the data suggests small, isolated spots of residual ore. The data indicate that it is highly unlikely that an individual living or working on this site could receive a radiation dose approaching the 100 mrem annual limit. However, it is suggested that DOE evaluate potential exposures at this site to ensure compliance with their policy that all exposures to radiation are reduced to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. 4 refs., 88 figs., 4 tabs

  12. Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) program: implementing physical security to protect large radioactive sources worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, Daniel L.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) Program strives to reduce the threat of a Radiological Dispersion Device (RDD) incident that could affect U.S. interests worldwide. Sandia National Laboratories supports the RTR program on many different levels. Sandia works directly with DOE to develop strategies, including the selection of countries to receive support and the identification of radioactive materials to be protected. Sandia also works with DOE in the development of guidelines and in training DOE project managers in physical protection principles. Other support to DOE includes performing rapid assessments and providing guidance for establishing foreign regulatory and knowledge infrastructure. Sandia works directly with foreign governments to establish cooperative agreements necessary to implement the RTR Program efforts to protect radioactive sources. Once necessary agreements are in place, Sandia works with in-country organizations to implement various security related initiatives, such as installing security systems and searching for (and securing) orphaned radioactive sources. The radioactive materials of interest to the RTR program include Cobalt 60, Cesium 137, Strontium 90, Iridium 192, Radium 226, Plutonium 238, Americium 241, Californium 252, and Others. Security systems are implemented using a standardized approach that provides consistency through out the RTR program efforts at Sandia. The approach incorporates a series of major tasks that overlap in order to provide continuity. The major task sequence is to: Establish in-country contacts - integrators, Obtain material characterizations, Perform site assessments and vulnerability assessments, Develop upgrade plans, Procure and install equipment, Conduct acceptance testing and performance testing, Develop procedures, and Conduct training. Other tasks are incorporated as appropriate and commonly include such as support of reconfiguring infrastructure, and developing security

  13. A radiological control implementation guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamley, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    A manual is being developed to explain to line managers how radiological controls are designed and implemented. The manual also fills a gap in the Health Physics literature between textbooks and on-the-floor procedures. It may be helpful to new Health Physicists with little practical experience and to those wishing to improve self-assessment, audit, and appraisal processes. Many audits, appraisals, and evaluations have indicated a need for cultural change, increased vigor and example, and more effective oversight by line management. Inadequate work controls are a frequent and recurring problem identified in occurrence reports and accident investigations. Closer study frequently indicates that many line managers are willing to change and want to achieve excellence, but no effective guidance exists that will enable them to understand and implement a modern radiological control program. The manual is now in draft form and includes information that will be of use to line managers dealing with improving radiological performance and the practical aspects of radiological controls implementation. The manual is expected to be completed by the fall of 1993 and to be used in conjunction with a performance-based self-assessment training program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  14. Radiological survey results at 5 Porter Street, Beverly, Massachusetts (VB019)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

    1992-07-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at 5 Porter Street, Beverly, Massachusetts. The survey was performed in May 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine if uranium from work performed under government contract at the former Ventron facility had migrated off-site to neighboring areas. The survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations or radiation measurements in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program guidelines

  15. Radiological survey results at 2 Porter Street, Beverly, Massachusetts (VB005)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1992-08-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at 2 Porter Street, Beverly, Massachusetts. The survey was performed in May 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine if uranium dust from work performed under government contract at the former Ventron facility had migrated off-site to neighboring areas. The survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of soil samples fore radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations or radiation measurements in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program guidelines

  16. Radiological survey results at 9 Porter Street, Beverly, Massachusetts (VB020)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

    1992-07-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at 9 Porter Street, Beverly, Massachusetts. The survey was performed in May 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine if uranium from work performed under government contract at the former Ventron facility had migrated off-site to neighboring areas. The survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations or radiation measurements in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program guidelines

  17. A prior authorization program of a radiology benefits management company and how it has affected utilization of advanced diagnostic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, David C; Bree, Robert L; Rao, Vijay M; Johnson, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Radiology benefits management companies have evolved in recent years to meet the need to control the rapid growth in advanced diagnostic imaging. The Obama administration and other key policymakers have proposed using them as a cost-control mechanism, but little is known about how they operate or what results they have produced. The main tool they use is prior authorization. The authors describe the inner workings of the call center of one radiology benefits management company and how its prior authorization program seems to have slowed the growth in the utilization of MRI, CT, and PET in the large markets of one commercial payer. Copyright 2010 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH15, Shiprock, New Mexico, October-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    At the time of the survey, one residential structure was located on the property. The lands surrounding the structure were landscaped with lawn cover and other vegetation. The lands in the unlandscaped east section contained a large garden plot and a dirt driveway leading to the back easement. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found in the residential structure; background levels of radioactivity were indicated throughout. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 μR/h above background limit specified in the EPA Standard. Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL limit for average annual concentration including background as specified in the EPA Standard. The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity in the outside environs. General areas of contamination were found in the backyard, along the back easement and encompassing about 1200 ft 2 of land area there, and extending into the unlandscaped east section, encompassing about 2400 ft 2 there. Several discrete hot spots or localized areas were found within these general areas. Radiochemical analysis of the soil samples collected from the areas indicated radium concentrations of 64 +- 6 and 82 +- 8 pCi/g, which are in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is now known. Remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  19. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH11, Shiprock, New Mexico, October-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    At the time of the survey, one residential structure used as a business office was located on the property. The lands surrounding the structure were, for the most part, landscaped with lawn cover and other vegetation. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found in the residential structure; background levels of radioactivity were indicated throughout. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 μR/h above background limit. Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL limit for average annual concentration including background. The assessment did indicate elevated levels of radioactivity at a few areas in the outside environs. Two discrete hot spots or localized areas were found in the frontyard. A general area of elevated radioactivity was found at the back alleyway encompassing about 1100 ft 2 . Radiochemical analyses of the sample collected from one of the localized areas indicated the presence of natural uranium ore and a radium concentration of 165 +- 17 pCi/g, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background. Analyses of surface soil samples collected at the alleyway from nearby vicinity property sites also indicated radium concentrations in excess of the limits. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  20. Action Research: Effective Marketing Strategies for a Blended University Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ruth Gannon; Ley, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    This action research study investigated a marketing plan based on collaboration among a program faculty team and other organizational units for a graduate professional program. From its inception through the second year of operation, program enrollment increased due to the marketing plan based on an effective approach grounded in simple marketing…

  1. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council - Nevada Test Site

    2009-10-01

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/11718--079, “NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 5 issued in November 2004. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect the recent changes in compliance requirements with 10 CFR 835, and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  2. Protection of school children during a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, W.B.; Johnson, F.C.; Goodkind, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    The protection of children during a radiological emergency is a potential concern that clearly transcends national boundaries and is therefore international in scope. Careful planning is needed to prevent independent actions on the part of school officials and parents that, although well intended, may lead to increased risks from radiation exposure, from traffic accidents, or from panic behavior. As part of its overall support for off-site emergency preparedness program, the Commonwealth Edison Company (CECo) has recently expanded the scope of planning for the protection of students in schools near its Quad Cities Nuclear Power Station in Cordova, Illinois. Working with off-site officials and with the assistance of emergency planners from Impell Corp., CECo has developed standard operating procedures (SOPs) to direct the emergency response activities for school administrators. These SOPs establish the chain of command for implementing protective actions and list alternative precautionary actions for a range of site conditions. In addition, during the development of these SOPs, CECo has had to address the following issues: interagency cooperation and consistency in approach; resource identification for transport, reception, registration, and communication; internal school procedures; and emergency preparedness training and exercising

  3. Results of the radiological survey at 266 East Spring Valley Avenue (MJ024), Hackensack, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-02-01

    As a result of the Energy and Water Appropriations Act of Fiscal Year 1984, the property discussed in this report and properties in its vicinity contaminated with residues from the former Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. As part of this project, DOE is conducting radiological surveys in the vicinity of the site to identify properties contaminated with residues derived from the MCW. The principal radionuclide of concern is thorium-232. The radiological survey discussed in this report is part of that effort and was conducted, at the request of DOE, by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A radiological survey of the private, residential property at 266 East Spring Valley Avenue, Hackensack, New Jersey, was conducted during 1987. The survey and sampling of the ground surface and subsurface were carried out on April 23, 1987. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Reevaluation of environmental monitoring program for radiological emergency at Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Plant, Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Lilia M.J. Belem; Ramos Junior, Anthenor C.; Gomes, Carlos A.; Carvalho, Zenildo L.; Gouveia, Vandir; Estrada, Julio; Ney, Cezar

    1996-01-01

    In order to respond to a major radiological emergency at the Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Plant, located in Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro, the Emergency Response Team of the Institute for Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD/CNEN) established a program of environmental monitoring. The purpose of this program is to define a monitoring trend to assess the off-site radiological conditions and give support to decision making for implementing protective measures in case of a radiological accident, taking into account atmospheric diffusion, population conglomerates and their habits, water and land use, contemplating the entire Emergency Planning Zone of 15 km radius. This program has been reevaluated recently, aiming to optimize it and keep it up to date to assure adequacy of environmental surveillance data in support to a prompt response in case of an emergency situation in the nuclear power plant. It has been organized in the form of a handbook to facilitate handling by field teams. Future revisions will be necessary to incorporate additional pertinent information and keep the handbook up to date, since Angra dos Reis is a summer resort region, subject to constant changes. This paper discusses the structure of the environmental monitoring program and describes the content and preparation of this handbook. (author)

  5. Development and maintenance of the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, L.H.; Selby, J.M.; Vargo, G.J.; Clark, D.L.

    1993-04-01

    In June 1992 the US Department of Energy (DOE) issued DOE N5480.6, Radiological Control, which set forth DOE's Radiological Control Program and established the framework for its implementation at sites nationwide. Accompanying the Order was the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE RCM), which provided the detailed requirements for the program. The Order also mandated Field Office issuance of site-specific radiological control manuals by December 1, 1992. This paper presents the approach taken to develop, review, approve, implement, and subsequently maintain the site-specific manual for the DOE Richland Field Office (RL) at Hanford Site

  6. Quality assurance programme in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacovenco, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    One hundred years after the discovery of X-rays, they continue being nowadays part of physicians' daily activities, and the diagnosis through the use of X-ray equipment is one of the most important fields in clinical medicine, thus becoming the most important cause of human exposure to artificial sources. For this reason, in the last twenty years, most of the developed countries did the utmost to establish programs which could warrant the quality of the radiographic image. Aiming the protection of human being against the harmful effects of ionizing radiations, in December 1980, World Health Organization decided to form a group of professionals highly experienced in medical radiology, and initiate an inspection and quality control program. In September 1988, the Group of Studies of the Program Related to Radiological Protection of the Commission in the European Communities, prepared a working paper in which guidelines were set up regarding quality of images, dosage to patient, and associated radiographic factors, necessary to obtain acceptable radiologic performance. In Brazil, efforts driven in this direction, guided by some equipment testing, starting in 1990, began to be more known. When the Director and the Head of Radiology in the Military Police Hospital of the State of Rio de Janeiro (HPM) reamed about these efforts, they decided to contact the Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry (IRD) of Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear and submit the problem of low radiologic performance and increasing rates of rejection. Thus, with the coincidence of interests and needs, along with a proposal from the Commission of the European Communities (CEC), IRD decided to offer the author laboratory support to elaborate a Quality Assurance Program (QAP) to be implemented in HPM. (author)

  7. Surface radiological investigations at the 0816 Site, Waste Area Grouping 13, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiner, P.F.; Uziel, M.S.

    1994-12-01

    A surface radiological investigation was conducted intermittently from July through September 1994 at the 0816 site, located within Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 13. The survey was performed by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group, Health Sciences Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the request of ORNL Site Environmental Restoration Program Facility Management. The purpose of the survey was to ascertain and document the surface radiological condition of the site subsequent to remedial action activities completed in May 1994. The survey was designed to determine whether any residual surface sod contamination in excess of 120 pCi/g 137 Cs (Specified by the Interim Record of Decision) remained at the site

  8. Results of the Radiological Survey at Conviber, Inc., 644 Garfield Street, Springdale, Pennsylvania (CVP001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1991-10-01

    As part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing a radiological survey program to determine the radiological conditions at sites that were used by the department's predecessor agencies. During the mid-1940s, and possibly continuing until 1951, the Conviber site in Springdale, Pennsylvania, was used to machine extruded uranium in support of government efforts. In 1980 a radiological scanning survey of this site was conducted by DOE and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staffs. Their report noted one anomaly: elevated radiation levels over a small area inside the building where uranium had been machined. Because much of the floor was inaccessible, for surveying and because of the lack of definitive records documenting use of this site, a comprehensive radiological assessment was recommended. The radiological survey discussed in this report for the site of Conviber, Inc., Springdale, Pennsylvania, was conducted by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in June of 1989. The survey included a surface gamma scan, collection of concrete and soil samples, and measurement of direct and removable alpha and beta-gamma contamination. One indoor location with a gamma measurement of 20 μR/h was found. In June of 1990 ORNL staff returned to investigate the location with elevated gamma. A hole was drilled through the concrete, gamma measurements were taken, and soil samples were obtained for analyses. In these eight indoor soil samples, concentrations of 238 U ranged from 90 to 20,000 pCi/g. However, under current site use, residual uranium covered by concrete does not pose a health risk

  9. Perspectives on the chemical and radiological hazards of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stansbury, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    Uranium is unique among the elements because it presents chemical and radiological hazards of comparable magnitude. Although the biological effects of a heavy metal damaging the kidneys are vastly different from the actions of an alpha-emitting nuclide in the lung or bone tissues, there are some perceptual and phenomenological similarities of note to health physicists. In a broad sense, the amount of uranium that could cause chemical kidney damage or pose a radiation hazard could go unnoticed in the work place. Once taken into the body, the chemical action or the radiological insult progresses without any warning signals. Ultrasensitive bioassay techniques could detect the presence of uranium in the body and quantify an intake that is known to have occurred. The adverse health effect of either the chemical or radiological mode of action is catastrophic: kidney failure on one hand, cancer on the other. Two other parallelisms should be noted. The natural loss of nephrons is part of the aging process. Similarly 15 to 20% of the population die of naturally caused cancer. Thus, the effects of uranium exposure mimic natural effects in unexposed populations. There are suspected adverse health effects at low levels of exposure to uranium. Even though there may be good reasons for suspecting low-level effects, both chemical and radiological, there is very little definitive evidence that these effects occur in human populations. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  10. Results of the post remedial action survey of areas 4 through 10 at the former Kellex site in Jersey City, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, C.; Berven, B.A.; Cottrell, W.D.; Goldsmith, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    A post remedial action survey was conducted at the former Kellex Corporation Research Facility in Jersey City, New Jersey. The Kellex facility was involved in the Manhattan Project, particularly in the area of engineering research in gaseous diffusion for uranium enrichment. As a result of those operations, this site was included by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in their Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). During comprehensive radiological surveys conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the summer of 1979, ten areas were located with levels of radionuclides in soil in excess of DOE criteria. This report describes the results of radiological surveys conducted in seven of these locations (Areas 4 to 10) following remedial action. Results of these surveys indicate that remedial action was successful in reducing radioactive contamination in these areas to criteria values established by DOE. 7 references, 19 figures, 31 tables

  11. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center: Phase I Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riland, C.; Bowman, D.R.; Lambert, R.; Tighe, R.

    1999-01-01

    A Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is established in response to a Lead Federal Agency (LFA) or State request when a radiological emergency is anticipated or has occurred. The FRMAC coordinates the off-site monitoring, assessment, and analysis activities during such an emergency. The FRMAC response is divided into three phases. FRMAC Phase 1 is a rapid, initial-response capability that can interface with Federal or State officials and is designed for a quick response time and rapid radiological data collection and assessment. FRMAC Phase 1 products provide an initial characterization of the radiological situation and information on early health effects to officials responsible for making and implementing protective action decisions

  12. Making Tracks 1.0: Action Researching an Active Transportation Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daniel; Foran, Andrew; Robinson, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of the first cycle of an action research project. The objective of this action research was to examine the implementation of a school-based active transportation education program (Making Tracks). A two-cycle action research design was employed in which elementary school students' (ages 7-9), middle school…

  13. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified

  14. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  15. Stress Management and Resiliency Training (SMART) program among Department of Radiology faculty: a pilot randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Amit; Sharma, Varun; Schroeder, Darrell R; Gorman, Brian

    2014-01-01

    To test the efficacy of a Stress Management and Resiliency Training (SMART) program for decreasing stress and anxiety and improving resilience and quality of life among Department of Radiology physicians. The study was approved by the institutional review board. A total of 26 Department of Radiology physicians were randomized in a single-blind trial to either the SMART program or a wait-list control arm for 12 weeks. The program involved a single 90-min group session in the SMART training with two follow-up phone calls. Primary outcomes measured at baseline and week 12 included the Perceived Stress Scale, Linear Analog Self-Assessment Scale, Mindful Attention Awareness Scale, and Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. A total of 22 physicians completed the study. A statistically significant improvement in perceived stress, anxiety, quality of life, and mindfulness at 12 weeks was observed in the study arm compared to the wait-list control arm; resilience also improved in the active arm, but the changes were not statistically significant when compared to the control arm. A single session to decrease stress among radiologists using the SMART program is feasible. Furthermore, the intervention afforded statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in anxiety, stress, quality of life, and mindful attention. Further studies including larger sample size and longer follow-up are warranted. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Environmental and emergency response capabilities of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's radiological air sampling program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunderson, T.C.

    1980-05-01

    Environmental and emergency response radiological air sampling capabilities of the Environmental Surveillance Group at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory are described. The air sampling program provides a supplementary check on the adequacy of containment and effluent controls, determines compliance with applicable protection guides and standards, and assesses potential environmental impacts on site environs. It also allows evaluation of potential individual and total population doses from airborne radionuclides that may be inhaled or serve as a source of external radiation. The environmental program is sufficient in scope to detect fluctuations and long-term trends in atmospheric levels of radioactivity originating onsite. The emergency response capabilities are designed to respond to both onsite unplanned releases and atmospheric nuclear tests

  17. DOE radiological calibrations intercomparison program: Results of fiscal year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, F.M.; Roberson, P.L.; McDonald, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    The Department of Energy Radiological Calibration Intercomparison Program was initiated in January 1986, under the research portion of the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program. The program operates via the exchange of transfer standards, consisting of instrument sets and standard secondary beta sources. There are two instrument sets and the scheduled use has been staggered such that one set is available for use during each month. One set of secondary standard beta sources is available for use bimonthly. During the 1986 fiscal year, five laboratories used the instrument sets and three laboratories used the beta source set. Results were reported for all the measurements. The average and one standard deviation of the ratios of participant results to Pacific Northwest Laboratory calibration values were 1.12 +- 0.17 for gamma measurements. Those ratios for the gamma measurements varied from 0.98 to 3.06. The larger differences of results from measurements performed at two facilities were directly attributable to unfamiliarity with the intercomparison instruments. The average and one standard deviation of the ratios of participant results to PNL calibration values obtained using the secondary 90 Sr beta source was 1.02 +- 0.05, which is well within measurement uncertainties. The one participant who performed measurements using 147 Pm and 204 Tl sources obtained ratios of 0.68 and 1.11, respectively. No measurements were performed using neutron or x-ray sources

  18. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

  19. Post-remediation action radiological report for Surface Impoundments C (3539) and D (3540) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    During August and September 1998, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC performed a remedial action within Impoundments 3539 and 3540 (Impoundments C and D, respectively) in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision (ROD) for the Surface Impoundments Operable Unit. The remedial action included removal of sediments and 0.1 ft of subimpoundment soil. A post-remedial action radiological survey was conducted to provide data to support the Bethel Valley ROD. Data was obtained from (1) a walkover survey for residual gamma radiation on the base of the impoundments, (2) smear surveys for transferable contamination on remaining riprap, and (3) representative sampling of subimpoundment soils. Walkover surveys identified no locations outside the impoundments with gamma exposure levels greater than three times background levels. Smear surveys detected no removable contamination above release limits as specified in 10 CFR 835, Appendix D. Subimpoundment soil samples quantified low levels of residual contamination

  20. Program summary for the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    The US Department of Energy is the lead Federal agency responsible for planning and implementing the programs that ensure safe and efficient management of nuclear wastes from both civilian and defense activities. Within the Department, three offices share this responsibility: the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, and the Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management. This document summarizes the programs managed by the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology

  1. Perceived barriers to online education by radiologic science educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Nina K

    2014-01-01

    Radiologic science programs continue to adopt the use of blended online education in their curricula, with an increase in the use of online courses since 2009. However, perceived barriers to the use of online education formats persist in the radiologic science education community. An electronic survey was conducted to explore the current status of online education in the radiologic sciences and to identify barriers to providing online courses. A random sample of 373 educators from radiography, radiation therapy, and nuclear medicine technology educational programs accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology and Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology was chosen to participate in this study. A qualitative analysis of self-identified barriers to online teaching was conducted. Three common themes emerged: information technology (IT) training and support barriers, student-related barriers, and institutional barriers. Online education is not prevalent in the radiologic sciences, in part because of the need for the clinical application of radiologic science course content, but online course activity has increased substantially in radiologic science education, and blended or hybrid course designs can effectively provide opportunities for student-centered learning. Further development is needed to increase faculty IT self-efficacy and to educate faculty regarding pedagogical methods appropriate for online course delivery. To create an excellent online learning environment, educators must move beyond technology issues and focus on providing quality educational experiences for students.

  2. Deliberation nr 2011-DL-0018 of the Nuclear Safety Authority on the 14 June 2011 regarding the improvement of radiation protection in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    After having presented and commented the context of interventional radiology (relatively high doses received by patients and workers, development of a return on experience, assessment of the ASN inspection programs), this report proposes actions in the field of radiation protection, and more particularly in the fields of training, of personnel availability, and of hospital management

  3. Program for the radiological protection of the embryos-fetuses due to the medical exposure of him mother

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez B, G.M.; Martinez G, A.; Cardenas H, J.; Gonzalez R, N.; Valdes R, M.; Zaldivar H, W.

    2006-01-01

    In the last years the organizations in charge of the regulation in matter of radiological protection, its have adopted measures to minimize the risks derived of the medical exposures, paying special attention to those that involve women in age of procreation, gestating and in period of lactation, because the embryo - fetus and the newborn babies ones are very vulnerable to the risks of the ionizing radiations, which can end up producing them multiple effects of variable severity. In Cuba, a Maternal-children program that includes the genetic advice to the pregnant woman from the medical point of view exists but didn't so the evaluation of the radiological risk; which is only carried out by the Medical Surveillance Service of the Protection and Hygiene of the Radiations Center (CPHR), without that mediates an official link among both parts and whose existence is only known by a reduced group of professionals of the health and of specialists in Radiological Protection. On the other hand is not established a strategy at national level for the differentiated information and systematic in these topics that it contributes to the control of the exposures of the embryo fetus and the breast-fed baby. Keeping in mind the above-mentioned the specialists of the CPHR have elaborated a proposal of national program for the radiological protection of the embryo- fetus due to the medical exposure of its progenitor. In the same one it is settles down the interrelation between work groups and multidisciplinary institutions to achieve the detection, communication and consultant ship of the cases of exposure to the fetus or breast-fed baby that happen in the country and at the same time include the training so much of the professionals of the health like of the public in general. Presently work the program and the elements that conform it among those that are, the on-line system developed for the automation of the medical dosimetric evaluation, the technician-methodological documents

  4. Evidence-based radiology: why and how?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Di Leo, Giovanni; Hunink, Myriam G.; Gilbert, Fiona J.; Krestin, Gabriel P.

    2010-01-01

    To provide an overview of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in relation to radiology and to define a policy for adoption of this principle in the European radiological community. Starting from Sackett's definition of EBM we illustrate the top-down and bottom-up approaches to EBM as well as EBM's limitations. Delayed diffusion and peculiar features of evidence-based radiology (EBR) are defined with emphasis on the need to shift from the demonstration of the increasing ability to see more and better, to the demonstration of a significant change in treatment planning or, at best, of a significant gain in patient outcome. The ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principle is thought as a dimension of EBR while EBR is proposed as part of the core curriculum of radiology residency. Moreover, we describe the process of health technology assessment in radiology with reference to the six-level scale of hierarchy of studies on diagnostic tests, the main sources of bias in studies on diagnostic performance, and levels of evidence and degrees of recommendations according to the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (Oxford, UK) as well as the approach proposed by the GRADE working group. Problems and opportunities offered by evidence-based guidelines in radiology are considered. Finally, we suggest nine points to be actioned by the ESR in order to promote EBR. Radiology will benefit greatly from the improvement in practice that will result from adopting this more rigorous approach to all aspects of our work. (orig.)

  5. The Emergency Action Plan of the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council (CSN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvin Cuarteto, M.; Camarma, J. R.; Martin Calvarro, J. M

    2007-01-01

    The Spanish Nuclear safety Council (CSN) has assigned by law among others the function to coordinate the measures of support and answer to nuclear emergency situations for all the aspects related with nuclear safety and radiological protection. Integrating and coordinating the different organisations public and private companies whose aid is necessary for the fulfilment of the functions attributed to the Regulatory Body. In order to suitable perform this function, CSN has equipped itself with an Emergency Action Plan that structures the response organization, establishes responsibility levels, incorporates basic performance procedures and includes capabilities to face the nuclear and radiological emergencies considering the external supports, resulting from the collaboration agreements with public institutions and private companies. To accomplish the above mentioned Emergency Action Plan, CSN has established and implanted a formation and training and re-training program for the organization response for emergencies and has update an operative centre (Emergency Room called Salem), equipped with infrastructures, tools and communication and operative systems that incorporate the more advanced technologies available to date. (Author)

  6. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 1, Site academic training study guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This volume is a study guide for training Radiological Control Technicians. Provided herein are support materials for learning radiological documentation, communication systems, counting errors and statistics, dosimetry, contamination control, airborne sampling program methods, respiratory protection, radiological source control, environmental monitoring, access control and work area setup, radiological work coverage, shipment and receipt for radioactive material, radiological incidents and emergencies, personnel decontamination, first aid, radiation survey instrumentation, contamination monitoring, air sampling, and counting room equipment

  7. Radiological survey results at Porter Street City Park, Beverly, Massachusetts (VB026)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

    1992-08-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the Porter Street City Park, Beverly, Massachusetts. The survey was performed in May 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine if uranium from work performed under government contract at the former Ventron facility had migrated off-site to neighboring areas. The survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations or radiation measurements in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program guidelines

  8. Off-site protective action selection for nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weerakkody, S.D.

    1986-01-01

    A computer program based upon a model using a rational theoretical basis was developed to select appropriate off-site protective actions during nuclear reactor accidents. The special features of this program include (a) introduction of a precursor concept that uses the history of the accident progression to determine the spectrum of potential accident scenarios and estimates of the likelihoods of each accident scenario; (b) use of statistical decision theory and the concept of entropy of a spectrum to select the appropriate protective actions using either the minimax principle or the Bayes action method; and (c) introduction of methods to quantify evacuation travel risks. In order to illustrate the usefulness of the computer program, it was applied at three stages of the Three Mile Island accident scenario. Quantified non-radiological risks of evaluation have been used to establish dose thresholds below which evacuations are not justified. Using the Poisson analysis for evacuation risks and the absolute L-L BEIR model for radiation risk suggests 330 mrems as a reasonable value for this threshold. The usefulness of the program in developing a technical basis to select the size of the plume exposure pathway emergency planning zone (EPZ) is discussed. Quantified evacuation risks, cost, and the current rationale upon which the EPZ is based, justify an EPZ between 5-10 miles for WASH-1400 source-terms

  9. Guidelines for training and qualification of radiological protection technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    These guidelines, used in combination with plant-specific job analysis, provide the framework for a training and qualification program for radiological protection technicians at nuclear power plants. Radiological protection technicians are defined as those individuals, both plant and contractor, who will be engaged in the evaluation of radiological conditions in the nuclear plant and the implementation of the necessary radiological safety measures as they apply to nuclear plant workers and members of the general public. An important aspect of this work is recognizing and handling unusual situations involving radioactivity, including incidents related to degraded core conditions. These guidelines incorporate the results of an industry-wide job analysis and task analysis (JTA) combined with industry operating experience review. However, the industry-wide analyses did not identify all important academic and fundamental knowledge and skills. Further in-depth analysis by subject matter experts produced additional knowledge and skills that were added to these guidelines. All utilities should use these guidelines in conjunction with plant-specific and industry-wide JTA results to develop or validate their radiological protection technician training program. Plant-specific information should be used to establish appropriate training program content. This plant-specific information should reflect unique job duties, equipment, operating experience, and trainee entry-level qualifications. Revisions to these guidelines should be reviewed for applicability and incorporated into the training program using each utility's training system development (TSD) procedures. Plant-specific job analysis and task analysis data is essential to the development of performance-based training programs. These analyses are particularly useful in selecting tasks for training and in developing on-the-job training (OJT), laboratory training, and mock-up training. Qualification programs based on these

  10. US Department of Energy radiological control manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    This manual establishes practices for the conduct of Department of Energy radiological control activities. The Manual states DOE's positions and views on the best courses of action currently available in the area of radiological controls. Accordingly, the provisions in the Manual should be viewed by contractors as an acceptable technique, method or solution for fulfilling their duties and responsibilities. This Manual shall be used by DOE in evaluating the performance of its contractors. This Manual is not a substitute for Regulations; it is intended to be consistent with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements and shall be revised whenever necessary to ensure such consistency. Some of the Manual provisions, however, challenge the user to go well beyond minimum requirements. Following the course of action delineated in the Manual will result in achieving and surpassing related statutory or regulatory requirements

  11. Advance of the National Program of Radiological Protection and Safety for medical diagnostic with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdejo S, M.

    1999-01-01

    The National Program of Radiological Protection and Safety for medical diagnostic with X-ray (Programa Nacional de Proteccion y Seguridad Radiologica para diagnostico medico con rayos X) was initiated in the General Direction of Environmental Health (Direccion General de Salud Ambiental) in 1995. Task coordinated with different dependences of the Public Sector in collaboration between the Secretary of Health (Secretaria de Salud), the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards (Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias) and, the National Institute of Nuclear Research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares). The surveillance to the fulfilment of the standardization in matter of Radiological Protection and Safety in the medical diagnostic with X-rays has been obtained for an important advance in the Public sector and it has been arousing interest in the Private sector. (Author)

  12. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH08, Shiprock, New Mexico, October-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    At the time of the survey, one residential structure was located on the property. The lands surrounding the structure were, for the most part, landscaped with lawn cover and other vegetation. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found in the residential structure; background levels of radioactivity were indicated throughout. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 μR/h above background limit. Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL limit for average annual concentration including background. The assessment did indicate elevated levels of radioactivity at a few areas in the outside environs. A general area of elevated radioactivity was found at the west edge of the property, paralleling the roadway and encompassing an area of about 70 ft 2 ; and another general area of contamination was found in the backyard, encompassing about 960 ft 2 , and extending into the alleyway, encompassing a general area of about 1100 ft 2 there. Radiochemical analyses of the soil sample collected from the general area in the backyard indicated a radium concentration of 6.7 +- 0.7 pCi/g, which cannot be confidently interpreted to be below the limit of 5 pCi/g above background, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface. However, analyses of surface soil samples collected at the alleyway from nearby vicinity property sites indicated radium concentrations in excess of those limits. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered

  13. The US Public Health Service's radioactive materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villforth, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    This review concentrates primarily on the U.S. Public Health Service's radiological health programs that are related to the use of radium in medicine. The history of program development is given, with a focus on legal and regulatory aspects. Federal and state cooperative actions are outlined, including congressional radium hearings, National Advisory Committee on Radiation, and Federal Radiation Council rulings. Problems associated with the medical use of radium, such as contamination and disposal, are also described. 30 refs

  14. Radiological training for tritium facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835

  15. Radiological training for tritium facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  16. Radiological protection in underground uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napolitano, Celia Marina

    1978-01-01

    The radiosanitary hazards that workers of an uranium ore can suffer were studied. The more used control methods for the the evaluation of doses received by the workers was studied too. It was developed a technique using the scintillation chamber method for the detection of radon. Emanation and diffusion methods were used for extraction of radon from water. A program of radiological protection based on ICRP recommendation was analysed for uranium mines. This program includes: ventilation needs calculation methods, a study of radiological protection optimization based on 'cost-benefit' analysis, a monitoring plan and a study about radioactive waste management. (author)

  17. United States Department of Health and Human Services Biodosimetry and radiological/nuclear medical countermeasure programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homer, Mary J.; Raulli, Robert; Esker, John; Moyer, Brian; Wathen, Lynne; DiCarlo-Cohen, Andrea L.; Maidment, Bert W.; Rios, Carmen; Macchiarini, Francesca; Hrdina, Chad; Prasanna, Pataje G.

    2016-01-01

    The United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is fully committed to the development of medical countermeasures to address national security threats from chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear agents. Through the Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise, HHS has launched and managed a multi-agency, comprehensive effort to develop and operationalize medical countermeasures. Within HHS, development of medical countermeasures includes the National Institutes of Health (NIH), (led by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases), the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Preparedness and Response/Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA); with the Division of Medical Countermeasure Strategy and Requirements, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Food and Drug Administration as primary partners in this endeavor. This paper describes various programs and coordinating efforts of BARDA and NIH for the development of medical countermeasures for radiological and nuclear threats. (authors)

  18. NV/YMP RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL MANUAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE; BECHTEL NEVADA

    2004-11-01

    This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and the Yucca Mountain Office of Repository Development (YMORD). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835), Occupational Radiation Protection. Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Pleasanton, California; and at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, field work by NNSA/NSO at other locations is also covered by this manual.

  19. NV/YMP RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL MANUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and the Yucca Mountain Office of Repository Development (YMORD). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835), Occupational Radiation Protection. Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Pleasanton, California; and at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, field work by NNSA/NSO at other locations is also covered by this manual

  20. Information needs for demonstrating compliance with groundwater aspects of 40 CFR 192 for uranium mill tailings remedial action programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logsdon, M.J.; Verma, T.R.; Martin, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    Public Law 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, provides the Department of Energy with authority to perform remedial actions at designated inactive uranium-mill sites. The Environmental Protection Agency promulgated radiological and non-radiological standards (40 CFR 192) for remedial actions at inactive uranium-mill sites. All remedial actions require the concurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Subpart C of 40 CFR 192 addresses the control of pollutants in groundwater at sites for which remedial action is proposed pursuant to P.L 95-604. As the authors interpret the regulation, it is essentially an admonition to carefully evaluate what is useful and practicable to deal with existing contamination and to control potential future contamination. In reviewing groundwater aspects of Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action documents, current NRC experience shows that the reports should address the following information needs: (1) The need to identify the physical and chemical nature of the present groundwater flow system in sufficient detail to provide a reasonable expectation that the extent and value of the groundwater resource to be protected is understood adequately; (2) The need to identify reasonable foreseeable events, both natural and man-made, that could alter the present groundwater flow system and the effects of such changes on the definition of the protected zone; (3) The need to identify current groundwater use within the protected zone; (4) The need to identify site-specific models, boundary conditions, and representative values of system parameters to predict with reasonable assurance that the proposed actions will protect groundwater and surface water resources for the design period of 200 - 1000 years

  1. Recommended radiological controls for tritium operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, G.

    1992-01-01

    This informal report presents recommendations for an adequate radiological protection program for tritium operations. Topics include hazards analysis, facility design, personnel protection equipment, training, operational procedures, radiation monitoring, to include surface and airborne tritium contamination, and program management

  2. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Goldhagen, P.

    1988-07-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generated a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the U.S. Department of Energy. As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the RRL are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. Facilities and services are provided to users, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. RARAF was located at BNL from 1967 until 1980, when it was dismantled and moved to the Nevis Laboratories of Columbia University, where it was then reassembled and put back into operation. Data obtained from experiment using RARAF have been of pragmatic value to radiation protection and to neutron therapy. At a more fundamental level, the research at RARAF has provided insight into the biological action of radiation and especially its relation to energy distribution in the cell. High-LET radiations are an agent of special importance because they can cause measurable cellular effects by single particles, eliminating some of the complexities of multievent action and more clearly disclosing basic features. This applies particularly to radiation carcinogenesis. Facilities are available at RARAF for exposing objects to different radiations having a wide range of linear energy transfers (LETs)

  3. Educational treasures in Radiology: The Radiology Olympics - striving for gold in Radiology education

    OpenAIRE

    Talanow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on Radiology Olympics (www.RadiologyOlympics.com) - a collaboration with the international Radiology community for Radiology education, Radiolopolis (www.Radiolopolis.com). The Radiology Olympics honour the movers and shakers in Radiology education and offer an easy to use platform for educating medical professionals based on Radiology cases.

  4. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, J.M.; Moreau, J.F.; Nahum, H.; Bellet, M.

    1990-01-01

    The 17th International Congress of Radiology was conducted in two separate scientific sessions, one for radiodiagnosis and one for radiation oncology. Topics covered are: Radiobiology -radioprotection; imaging and data processing; contrast media; MRI; nuclear medicine; radiology and disasters; radiology of tropical diseases; cardiovascular radiology; interventional radiology; imaging of trauma; imaging of chest, gastro-intestinal tract, breast and genito-urinary tract; imaging in gynecology;imaging in oncology; bone and joint radiology; head and neck-radiology; neuro-radiology. (H.W.). refs.; fig.; tabs

  5. Recommendations guide in radiological accidents for first respondents, firemen and policemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astudillo, A. J.; Ambriz, J. J.; Paredes, L. C.

    2011-10-01

    The action guides for the primary task forces of the Firemen Corps and the Public Security Elements, before the presence of radiological accidents are presented. The objective of these guides is to give the recommendations for the initial response to the emergency that fulfills the following criterions: to to Apply with readiness all the reasonable measures to protect the victims and the public, in order to minimizing the radiological and non radiological effects to the health; b) to Retrieve the control of the situation and to mitigate the consequences; c) to Protect the emergency personnel during the response operations; d) to Compile and to protect the information that can be useful to treat the effects to the health, of the victims and public in general, and to prevent that emergencies seemed are repeat in the future; e) to Create and to maintain the public's trust in the response; f) to Establish a base for an action of lingering response, and to Suggest evaluation criterions of the radiological emergency, the organization criterions, operation and surrounding of the emergency area. (Author)

  6. Improving patient safety in radiology: a work in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, Raymond W.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to share the experiences, including successes and failures, as well as the ongoing process of developing and implementing a safety program in a large pediatric radiology department. Building a multidisciplinary pediatric radiology safety team requires successful recruitment of team members, selection of a team leader, and proper and ongoing training and tools, and protected time. Challenges, including thorough examples, are presented on improving pediatric radiology safety intradepartmentally, interdepartmentally, and institutionally. Finally, some major challenges to improving safety in pediatric radiology, and healthcare in general, are presented along with strategies to overcome these challenges. Our safety program is a work in progress; this article is a personal account and the reader is asked for tolerance of its occasional subjective tone and contents. (orig.)

  7. Radiological re-survey results at 146 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ034)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1994-05-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from 1916 to 1959. During the early years of operation, MCW stored wastes and residues in low-lying areas west of the processing facilities and consequently some of the residuals containing radioactive materials migrated offsite to the surrounding area. Subsequently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated for remedial action the old MCW property and several vicinity properties. Additionally, in 1984, the property at 146 West Central Ave., Maywood, New Jersey and properties in its vicinity were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. In 1987 and 1988, at the request of DOE, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted a radiological survey on this property. A report describing this survey was published in 1989. A second radiological survey by ORNL was conducted on this property in May 1993 at the request of DOE after an ad hoc radiological survey, requested by the property owner and conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), identified some contamination not previously found by ORNL. The purpose of the second ORNL survey was to determine whether radioactive materials from the old MCW were present on the property, and if so, if radioactive materials present were above guidelines. A certified civil survey was requisitioned by ORNL to determine actual property boundaries before beginning the radiological re-survey. The re-survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of a large number of soil samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of this survey demonstrated that although elevated residual thorium-232 contamination was present in a few isolated spots on the southern end of the backyard, it did not exceed DOE guidelines

  8. Radiological control FY 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.7.2.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The 1995 Site Support Program Plan (SSPP) brings year planning and execution year planning into a single document. The plan presented consists of the following four major sections: Overview and Introduction - Health physics has been renamed Radiological Control (RadCon) with the role of protecting workers, the public and the environment from the harmful effects of radiation resulting from the DOE Hanford Site Operations; Cost Baselines which contains cost, technical and schedule baselines; Execution Year work Plan - cost summaries and detailed descriptions of the work to be done; Appendix - including brief description of other project activities directly coupled to RadCon

  9. Radiological control FY 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.7.2.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The 1995 Site Support Program Plan (SSPP) brings year planning and execution year planning into a single document. The plan presented consists of the following four major sections: Overview and Introduction - Health physics has been renamed Radiological Control (RadCon) with the role of protecting workers, the public and the environment from the harmful effects of radiation resulting from the DOE Hanford Site Operations; Cost Baselines which contains cost, technical and schedule baselines; Execution Year work Plan - cost summaries and detailed descriptions of the work to be done; Appendix - including brief description of other project activities directly coupled to RadCon.

  10. Training program for radiologic technologists for performing chest X-rays at inspiration in uncooperative children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langen, Heinz Jakob; Muras, S.; Kohlhauser-Vollmuth, C.; Stenzel, M.; Beer, M.

    2009-01-01

    A computer program was created to train technologists to perform chest X-rays in crying infants at maximum inspiration. Videos of 4 children were used. Using a computer program, the moment of deepest inspiration was determined in the video in the single frame view. During the normal running video, 14 technologists (3 with significant experience, 3 with little experience and 8 with very little experience in pediatric radiography) simulated a chest radiograph by pushing a button. The computer program stopped the video and the period of time to the optimal moment for a chest x-ray was calculated. Every technologist simulated 10 chest X-rays in each of the 4 video clips. The technologists then trained themselves to perform chest X-rays at optimal inspiration like playing a computer game. After training, the test was repeated. Changes were evaluated by t-test for unpaired samples (level of significance p < 0.05). Although the differences improved in all children, minimal deviation from the optimal moment for taking an X-ray at inspiration occurred in the periodically crying child (0.21 sec before and 0.13 sec after training). In a non-periodically crying infant, the largest differences were shown. The values improved significantly from 0.29 sec to 0.22 sec. The group with substantial experience in pediatric radiology improved significantly from 0.22 sec to 0.15 sec. The group with very little experience in pediatric radiology showed worse results (improvement from 0.29 sec to 0.21 sec). (orig.)

  11. Radiology Aide. Instructor Key [and] Student Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwein, Jon; Dunham, John

    This manual can be used independently by students in secondary health occupations programs or by persons receiving on-the-job training in a radiology department. The manual includes an instructor's key that provides answers to the activity sheets and unit evaluations. The manual consists of the following five units: (1) orientation to radiology;…

  12. The economics of interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    At a time when policy makers and regulators are scheming to reduce the costs and utilization of medical services, interventional radiology is poised for growth. Part of this potential for growth is based on wider acceptance of the procedures performed by interventional radiologists. A second factor in the growth potential is the relative value in cost of these procedures compared with alternative therapies. The author presents a discussion of the differences in the relative value of these procedures when performed by physicians of different specialties. This paper reviews the status of the economic climate in the health care delivery system and the role and potential growth of interventional radiology. This includes a review of current data on the utilization of interventional radiology procedures in the Medicare program. This overview includes a discussion of the initiatives of the federal government which directly impact interventional radiology

  13. Needed improvements in the development of systemic corrective actions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campisi, John A.

    2009-07-01

    There are indications that corrective actions, as implemented at Sandia National Laboratories are not fully adequate. Review of independent audits spanning multiple years provides evidence of recurring issues within the same or similar operations and programs. Several external audits have directly called into question the ability Sandia's assessment and evaluation processes to prevent recurrence. Examples of repeated findings include lockout/tagout programs, local exhaust ventilation controls and radiological controls. Recurrence clearly shows that there are underlying systemic factors that are not being adequately addressed by corrective actions stemming from causal analyses. Information suggests that improvements in the conduct of causal analyses and, more importantly, in the development of subsequent corrective actions are warranted. Current methodolgies include Management Oversight Risk Tree, developed in the early 1970s and Systemic Factors Analysis. Recommendations for improvements include review of other causal analysis systems, training, improved formality of operations, improved documentation, and a corporate method that uses truly systemic solutions. This report was written some years ago and is being published now to form the foundation for current, follow-on reports being developed. Some outdated material is recognized but is retained for report completeness.

  14. Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services Annual Report for 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Timothy P.; Bihl, Donald E.; Johnson, Michelle L.; Maclellan, Jay A.; Piper, Roman K.

    2001-05-07

    During calendar year 2000, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed its customary radiological protection support services in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and the Hanford contractors. These services included: 1) external dosimetry, 2) internal dosimetry, 3) in vivo monitoring, 4) radiological records, 5) instrument calibration and evaluation, and 6) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Each program summary describes the routine operations, program changes and improvements, program assessments, supporting technical studies, and professional activities.

  15. Proceedings of the 3. Regional Meeting on Radiological and Nuclear Safety, Regional Meeting on International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA)and 3. Peruvian Meeting on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    There we show works of the Third Regional Meeting on Radiological and Nuclear Safety held on 23-27 October, 1995 in Cusco-Peru. Latin americans specialists talk about nuclear safety and radiological protection, radiation natural exposure, biological effect of radiation, radiotherapy and medical radiological safety, radiological safety in industry and research. Also we deal with subjects related to radiological safety of nuclear and radioactive facilities, radioactive waste management, radioactive material transport, environmental radiological monitoring program, radiological emergency and accidents, instruments and dosimetry, basic safety standards of protection against radiation. More than 225 works were presented on the meeting

  16. Informatics in radiology: evaluation of an e-learning platform for teaching medical students competency in ordering radiologic examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Nina L; Spooner, Muirne; Galvin, P Leo; Ti, Joanna P; McElvaney, N Gerald; Lee, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    A preliminary audit of orders for computed tomography was performed to evaluate the typical performance of interns ordering radiologic examinations. According to the audit, the interns showed only minimal improvement after 8 months of work experience. The online radiology ordering module (ROM) program included baseline assessment of student performance (part I), online learning with the ROM (part II), and follow-up assessment of performance with simulated ordering with the ROM (part III). A curriculum blueprint determined the content of the ROM program, with an emphasis on practical issues, including provision of logistic information, clinical details, and safety-related information. Appropriate standards were developed by a committee of experts, and detailed scoring systems were devised for assessment. The ROM program was successful in addressing practical issues in a simulated setting. In the part I assessment, the mean score for noting contraindications for contrast media was 24%; this score increased to 59% in the part III assessment (P = .004). Similarly, notification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus status and pregnancy status and provision of referring physician contact information improved significantly. The quality of the clinical notes was stable, with good initial scores. Part III testing showed overall improvement, with the mean score increasing from 61% to 76% (P radiology services, and the experience typically afforded to interns does not address this lack of knowledge. The ROM program was a successful intervention that resulted in statistically significant improvements in the quality of radiologic examination orders, particularly with regard to logistic and radiation safety issues.

  17. National Radiological Fixed Lab Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Radiological Fixed Laboratory Data Asset includes data produced in support of various clients such as other EPA offices, EPA Regional programs, DOE,...

  18. Training in Radiation Protection for Interventional Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vano, E.; Guibelalde, E.

    2002-07-01

    Several potential problems have been detected in the safety aspects for the practice of interventional radiology procedures: a) An important increase in the number cases and their complexity and the corresponding increase of installations and specialists involved; b) New X ray systems more sophisticated, with advanced operational possibilities, requiring special skills in the operators to obtain the expected benefits;c) New medical specialists arriving to the interventional arena to profit the benefits of the interventional techniques without previous experience in radiation protection. For that reason, education and training is one of the basic areas in any optimisation programme in radiation protection (RP). the medical field and especially interventional radiology requires actions to promote and to profit the benefit of the new emerging technologies for training (Internet, electronic books, etc). The EC has recently sponsored the MARTIR programme (Multimedia and Audio-visual Radiation Protection Training in Interventional Radiology) with the production of two videos on basic aspects of RP and quality control and one interactive CD-ROM to allow tailored individual training programmes. those educational tools are being distributed cost free in the main European languages. To go ahead with these actions, the EC has decided to promote during 2002, a forum with the main Medical European Societies involved in these interventional procedures. (Author)

  19. Training in Radiation Protection for Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.; Guibelalde, E.

    2002-01-01

    Several potential problems have been detected in the safety aspects for the practice of interventional radiology procedures: a) An important increase in the number cases and their complexity and the corresponding increase of installations and specialists involved; b) New X ray systems more sophisticated, with advanced operational possibilities, requiring special skills in the operators to obtain the expected benefits;c) New medical specialists arriving to the interventional arena to profit the benefits of the interventional techniques without previous experience in radiation protection. For that reason, education and training is one of the basic areas in any optimisation programme in radiation protection (RP). the medical field and especially interventional radiology requires actions to promote and to profit the benefit of the new emerging technologies for training (Internet, electronic books, etc). The EC has recently sponsored the MARTIR programme (Multimedia and Audio-visual Radiation Protection Training in Interventional Radiology) with the production of two videos on basic aspects of RP and quality control and one interactive CD-ROM to allow tailored individual training programmes. those educational tools are being distributed cost free in the main European languages. To go ahead with these actions, the EC has decided to promote during 2002, a forum with the main Medical European Societies involved in these interventional procedures. (Author)

  20. Difficulties of adaptation to Order 453 by radiology services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilha Filho, L.G.; Chernicharo, C.C.; Montone Junior, V.; Lenine, R.C.; Berquo, F.R.; Koch, H.A.; Costa, V.C.M. da; Rodrigues, I.V.; Duarte, N.S.; Silva, M.O. da

    2001-01-01

    This work has as its objective to present some difficulties of adaptation of a Radiological Service to Order 453, of Health Ministry. The Order 453, gives regulations to use of radiodiagnostic techniques and require the implementation of Quality Assurance Programs in all institution that make use of ionizing radiation. A survey of functioning conditions of General Hospital - Radiological Service of Santa Casa de Misericordia do Rio de Janeiro, was performed with basis on Order 453. After analysis of these conditions, were noticed some needs as, improvement of professional competence about radiation protection and implementation of a Quality Assurance Program in radiological unit of this hospital

  1. Annual Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Three Mile Island, Unit 2, Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Gregory Graham

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of the 2001 Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program conducted in accordance with 10 CFR 72.44 for the Three Mile Island, Unit 2, Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation. A description of the facility and the monitoring program is provided. The results of monitoring the two predominant radiation exposure pathways, potential airborne radioactivity releases and direct radiation exposure, indicate the facility operation has not contributed to any increase in the estimated maximum potential dose commitment to the general public.

  2. Technical support and preparations for the response to radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas H, J.; Ramos V, E.O.; Fernandez G, I.M.; Capote F, E.; Zerquera J, T.; Garcia L, O.; Lopez B, G.; Molina P, D.; Lamdrid B, A.I.; Benitez N, J.C.; Salgado M, M.; Lopez F, Y.; Jerez V, P.

    2006-01-01

    The work picks up the efforts directed to elevate the technical capacity of the answer in front of the radiological emergencies. Expressing them by means of the actions carried out as for teaching, research and development and intervention before accidental radiological events. The same one reflects the leading role of the participant institutions in those marks of the answer system to radiological emergencies that for its technical level it satisfies the national and international demands in the matter. In execution of the mentioned goals research projects guided to endow to the national system of methodologies and procedures for the administration of radiological emergencies have been executed that favor the improvement of its technical and organizational capacities. As well as the postulates of the National Plan of Measures for Case of Catastrophes in the corresponding to radiological accidents. (Author)

  3. Application gives the technique the analytic tree in the evaluation the effectiveness programs to radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Gonzalez, F.; Perez Velazquez, R.S.; Fornet Rodriguez, O.; Mustelier Hechevarria, A.; Miller Clemente, A.

    1998-01-01

    In the work we develop the IAEA recommendations in the application the analytic tree as instrument for the evaluation the effectiveness the occupational radiological protection programs. Is reflected like it has been assimilated and converted that technique in daily work istruments in the evaluation process the security conditions in the institutions that apply the nuclear techniques with a view to its autorization on the part of the regulatory organ

  4. Protecting people against radiation exposure in the event of a radiological attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, J.

    2005-01-01

    This report responds to a widely perceived need for professional advice on radiological protection measures to be undertaken in the event of a radiological attack. The report, which is mainly concerned with possible attacks involving 'radioactive dispersion devices', re-affirms the applicability of existing ICRP recommendations to such situations, should they ever occur. Many aspects of the emergency scenarios expected to arise in the event of a radiological attack may be similar to those that experience has shown can arise from radiological accidents, but there may also be important differences. For instance, a radiological attack would probably be targeted at a public area, possibly in an urban environment, where the presence of radiation is not anticipated and the dispersion conditions commonly assumed for a nuclear or radiological emergency, such as at a nuclear installation, may not be applicable. First responders to a radiological attack and other rescuers need to be adequately trained and to have the proper equipment for identifying radiation and radioactive contamination, and specialists in radiological protection must be available to provide advice. It may be prudent to assume that radiological, chemical, and/or biological agents are involved in an attack until it is proven otherwise. This calls for an 'all-hazard' approach to the response. In the aftermath of an attack, the main aim of radiological protection must be to prevent the occurrence of acute health effects attributable to radiation exposure (termed 'deterministic' effects) and to restrict the likelihood of late health effects (termed 'stochastic' effects) such as cancers and some hereditable diseases. A supplementary aim is to minimise environmental contamination from radioactive residues and the subsequent general disruption of daily life. The report notes that action taken to avert exposures is a much more effective protective measure than protective measure the provision of medical treatment

  5. Planning for spontaneous evacuation during a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.H. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) radiological emergency preparedness program ignores the potential problem of spontaneous evacuation during a nuclear reactor accident. To show the importance of incorporating the emergency spatial behaviors of the population at risk in radiological emergency preparedness and response plans, this article presents empirical evidence that demonstrates the potential magnitude and geographic extent of spontaneous evacuation in the event of an accident at the Long Island Lighting Company's Shoreham Nuclear Power Station. The results indicate that, on the average, 39% of the population of Long Island is likely to evacuate spontaneously and thus to cast an evacuation shadow extending at least 25 miles beyond the plant. On the basis of these findings, necessary revisions to FEMA's radiological emergency preparedness program are outlined

  6. The A.C.R.O. in Belarus point on the actions led for one year; L'ACRO en bielorussie point sur les actions menees depuis un an

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-09-15

    The project aims to set up a radiological surveillance at the population service and to facilitate the access to the measures and information about the local situation at the villages level. Concretely, it is a question of opening posts of measures in the main villages of the district, of launching campaigns of measures of the internal contamination of the schooled children (anthropo-gamma-metry), to set up a observatory of the radiological situation at the villages level, to facilitate the organization of places of exchange (public meetings, meeting circles), and of information (public display of the measures results) and to develop educational actions in schools. This initiative develops within the framework of the international program C.O.R.E. which federates the projects led on the four most contaminated districts in Belarus. (N.C.)

  7. Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program annual progress report, FY 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Programs (HAZWRAP), a unit of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., supports the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office in broadly environmental areas, especially those relating to waste management and environmental restoration. HAZWRAP comprises six program areas, which are supported by central administrative and technical organizations. Existing programs deal with airborne hazardous substances, pollution prevention, remedial actions planning, environmental restoration, technology development, and information and data systems. HAZWRAP's mission to develop, promote, and apply-cost-effective hazardous waste management and environmental technologies to help solve national problems and concerns. HAZWRAP seeks to serve as integrator for hazardous waste and materials management across the federal government. It applies the unique combination of research and development (R D) capabilities, technologies, management expertise, and facilities in the Energy Systems complex to address problems of national importance. 24 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Indicative to evaluate the efficiency of a program of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lescano, R.; Caspani, C.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to find an indicator that permit to evaluate objectively, that is to say through a number, the efficient accomplishment of radiological protection actions that is reflected in an improvement of the safety conditions with which is developed labor. The employed method consists of average evaluation of the individual doses received by the workers pursuing their occupations, measure in a great population, contrasted with the average of environmental dose of located monitors always in the same place. It can be employed film dosimeters, TLD, direct-reading pocket dosimeters with exposure monitor or any combination between them, provided that in the course of the time are compared always the same. Applying this method between the year 1991 to 1997, in part of Santa Fe province (Argentine), is observed that the individual dose average of the workers varies randomly and also rises and decrease unco-ordinately the environmental dose, but relating booth is arrived to a numerical value that has a comparable behavior to the objectively observed. (author)

  9. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Vicinity Property Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, L.E.; Potter, R.F.; Arpke, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    The Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Grand Junction Project Vicinity Property Program is a $165 million program for the removal and disposal of uranium mill tailings that were used in the construction of approximately 4,000 residences, commercial buildings, and institutional facilities in the City of Grand Junction and surrounding Mesa County, Colorado. This paper discusses the UMTRA Vicinity Property Program and the economic benefits of this program for the City of Grand Junction and Mesa County, Colorado. The Bureau of Reclamation Economic Assessment Model (BREAM) was used to estimate the increases in employment and increases in personal income in Mesa County that result from the Vicinity Property Program. The effects of program-related changes in income and taxable expenditures on local and state tax revenue are also presented

  10. Main radiation protection actions for medical personnel as primary responders front of an event with radiological dispersive device; Principais acoes de protecao radiologica para equipe medica como primeiros respondedores frente a um evento com dispositivo de dispersao radiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duque, Hildanielle Ramos

    2015-07-01

    After the terrorist attack in New York, USA, in 2001, there was a worldwide concern about possible attacks using radioactive material in conventional detonators, called as Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) or 'dirty bomb'. Several studies have been and are being made to form a global knowledge about this type of event. As until now, fortunately, there has not been an event with RDD, the Goiania Radiological Accident in Brazil, 1987, is used as a reference for decision-making. Several teams with technical experts should act in an event with RDD, but the medical staffs who respond quickly to the event must be properly protected from the harmful effects of radiation. Based on the radiological protection experts performance during the Goiania accident and the knowledge from lessons learned of many radiological accidents worldwide, this work presents an adaptation of the radiation protection actions for an event with RDD that helps a medical team as primary responders. The following aspects are presented: the problem of radioactive contamination from the explosion of the device in underground environment, the actions of the first responders and evaluation of health radiation effects. This work was based on specialized articles and papers about radiological accidents and RDD; as well as personal communication and academic information of the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry. The radiation protection actions, adapted to a terrorist attack event with RDD, have as a scenario a subway station in the capital. The main results are: the use of the basic radiation protection principle of time because there is no condition to take care of a patient keeping distance or using a shielding; the use of full appropriate protection cloths for contaminating materials ensuring the physical safety of professionals, and the medical team monitoring at the end of a medical procedure, checking for surface contamination. The main conclusion is that all medical actions

  11. Post-Remediation Radiological Dose Assessment, Linde Site, Tonawanda, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamboj, Sunita [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Durham, Lisa A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    A post-remediation radiological dose assessment was conducted for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Linde Site by using the measured residual concentrations of the radionuclides of concern following the completion of the soils remedial action. The site’s FUSRAP-related contaminants of concern (COCs) are radionuclides associated with uranium processing activities conducted by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) in support of the Nation’s early atomic energy and weapons program and include radium-226 (Ra-226), thorium-230 (Th-230), and total uranium (Utotal). Remedial actions to address Linde Site soils and structures were conducted in accordance with the Record of Decision for the Linde Site, Tonawanda, New York (ROD) (USACE 2000a). In the ROD, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) determined that the cleanup standards found in Title 40, Part 192 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR Part 192), the standards for cleanup of uranium mill sites designated under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) standards for decommissioning of licensed uranium and thorium mills, found in 10 CFR Part 40, Appendix A, Criterion 6(6), are Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) for cleanup of MED-related contamination at the Linde Site. The major elements of this remedy will involve excavation of the soils with COCs above soil cleanup levels and placement of clean materials to meet the other criteria of 40 CFR Part 192.

  12. Digital Radiology Image Learning Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenson, R.L.; Greenes, R.; Allman, R.; Swett, H.

    1989-01-01

    The Digital Radiology Image Learning Library (DRILL) is designed as an interactive teaching tool targeted to the radiologic community. The DRILL pilot comprises a comprehensive mammographic information base consisting of factual data in a relational database, an extensive knowledge base in semantic nets and high-resolution images. A flexible query module permits the user to browse and retrieve examination data, case discussions, and related images. Other applications, including expert systems, instructional programs, and skill building exercises, can be accessed through well-defined software constructs

  13. Radiological safety and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Sea Young; Yoo, Y S; Lee, J C; Lee, T Y; Lee, J L; Kim, B W; Lee, B J; Chung, K K; Chung, R I; Kim, J S; Lee, H S; Han, Y D; Lee, J I; Lee, K C; Yoon, J H; Sul, C W; Kim, C K; Yoon, K S; Seo, K W; Yoon, Y C [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the annual results of radiological safety and control program of 1995. This program consists of working area monitoring including HANARO, personnel radiation monitoring, education for radiation protection. As a result, the objectives of radiation protection have been achieved satisfactorily through the activities mentioned above. Also, the calibration services were provided to insure accurate radiation measurement in the radiation working places. 21 figs., 39 tabs., 5 refs. (Author) .new.

  14. Evidence-based Practice of Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Lisa P; Dunne, Ruth M; Carroll, Anne G; Malone, Dermot E

    2015-10-01

    Current health care reform in the United States is producing a shift in radiology practice from the traditional volume-based role of performing and interpreting a large number of examinations to providing a more affordable and higher-quality service centered on patient outcomes, which is described as a value-based approach to the provision of health care services. In the 1990 s, evidence-based medicine was defined as the integration of current best evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. When these methods are applied outside internal medicine, the process is called evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP facilitates understanding, interpretation, and application of the best current evidence into radiology practice, which optimizes patient care. It has been incorporated into "Practice-based Learning and Improvement" and "Systems-based Practice," which are two of the six core resident competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and two of the 12 American Board of Radiology milestones for diagnostic radiology. Noninterpretive skills, such as systems-based practice, are also formally assessed in the "Quality and Safety" section of the American Board of Radiology Core and Certifying examinations. This article describes (a) the EBP framework, with particular focus on its relevance to the American Board of Radiology certification and maintenance of certification curricula; (b) how EBP can be integrated into a residency program; and (c) the current value and likely place of EBP in the radiology information technology infrastructure. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2015.

  15. ICPP radiological and toxicological sabotage analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubiak, V.R.; Mortensen, F.G.

    1995-01-01

    In June of 1993, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued Notice 5630.3A, open-quotes Protection of Departmental Facilities Against Radiological and Toxicological Sabotage,close quotes which states that all significant radiological and toxicological hazards at Department facilities must be examined for potential sabotage. This analysis has been completed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The ICPP radiological and toxicological hazards include spent government and commercial fuels, Special Nuclear Materials (SNM), high-level liquid wastes, high-level solid wastes, and process and decontamination chemicals. The analysis effort included identification and assessment of quantities of hazardous materials present at the facility; identification and ranking of hazardous material targets; development of worst case scenarios detailing possible sabotage actions and hazard releases; performance of vulnerability assessments using table top and computer methodologies on credible threat targets; evaluation of potential risks to the public, workers, and the environment; evaluation of sabotage risk reduction options; and selection of cost effective prevention and mitigation options

  16. American Board of Radiology Maintenance of Certification-Part IV: Practice Quality Improvement for Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, Larry E.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Bosma, Jennifer; Strife, Janet L.; Hattery, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    Maintenance of Certification is a physician-based response to public concerns about the quality of medical care and physician competency in a rapidly evolving, technically demanding specialty. American Board of Radiology (ABR) has previously described the first three components of the Maintenance of Certification. The ABR is currently developing a program in practice performance, completing Part IV of the competencies. The Practice Quality Improvement (PQI) program is meant to critically evaluate meaningful aspects of a physician's practice in a simple manner, using identifiable metrics and self-assessment to include an action plan for quality improvement. Each diplomate will be expected to complete three PQI projects during a full 10-year Maintenance of Certification cycle. Current diplomates with time-limited certificates will find prorated requirements determined by their year of certification on the ABR Website. Diplomates will have the option of completing zero to two Type I PQI projects (assessing factors relevant to clinical practice by peer review and self-reporting) and one to three Type II projects (i.e., at least one Type II projects of the three required, assessing parameters of practice by comparison with evidence-based guidelines, consensus statements, or peer comparisons; Type II projects are initiated and managed by professional societies). Several examples of Type I projects that might be offered by societies or directly through the ABR are provided, as well as highlights of the two Type II projects that have sought ABR qualification: American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology's Performance Assessment for the Advancement of Radiation Oncology Treatment program and American College of Radiology's RO-PEER program. An additional objective of the PQI is to develop national databases for future reference using aggregate data from the PQI projects

  17. Informatics in radiology: evaluation of an e-learning platform for teaching medical students competency in ordering radiologic examinations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marshall, Nina L

    2011-09-01

    A preliminary audit of orders for computed tomography was performed to evaluate the typical performance of interns ordering radiologic examinations. According to the audit, the interns showed only minimal improvement after 8 months of work experience. The online radiology ordering module (ROM) program included baseline assessment of student performance (part I), online learning with the ROM (part II), and follow-up assessment of performance with simulated ordering with the ROM (part III). A curriculum blueprint determined the content of the ROM program, with an emphasis on practical issues, including provision of logistic information, clinical details, and safety-related information. Appropriate standards were developed by a committee of experts, and detailed scoring systems were devised for assessment. The ROM program was successful in addressing practical issues in a simulated setting. In the part I assessment, the mean score for noting contraindications for contrast media was 24%; this score increased to 59% in the part III assessment (P = .004). Similarly, notification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus status and pregnancy status and provision of referring physician contact information improved significantly. The quality of the clinical notes was stable, with good initial scores. Part III testing showed overall improvement, with the mean score increasing from 61% to 76% (P < .0001). In general, medical students lack the core knowledge that is needed for good-quality ordering of radiology services, and the experience typically afforded to interns does not address this lack of knowledge. The ROM program was a successful intervention that resulted in statistically significant improvements in the quality of radiologic examination orders, particularly with regard to logistic and radiation safety issues.

  18. Key Performance Indicators in Radiology: You Can't Manage What You Can't Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H Benjamin; Hassanzadeh, Elmira; Aran, Shima; Rosenthal, Daniel I; Thrall, James H; Abujudeh, Hani H

    2016-01-01

    Quality assurance (QA) is a fundamental component of every successful radiology operation. A radiology QA program must be able to efficiently and effectively monitor and respond to quality problems. However, as radiology QA has expanded into the depths of radiology operations, the task of defining and measuring quality has become more difficult. Key performance indicators (KPIs) are highly valuable data points and measurement tools that can be used to monitor and evaluate the quality of services provided by a radiology operation. As such, KPIs empower a radiology QA program to bridge normative understandings of health care quality with on-the-ground quality management. This review introduces the importance of KPIs in health care QA, a framework for structuring KPIs, a method to identify and tailor KPIs, and strategies to analyze and communicate KPI data that would drive process improvement. Adopting a KPI-driven QA program is both good for patient care and allows a radiology operation to demonstrate measurable value to other health care stakeholders. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Does gender impact upon application rejection rate among Canadian radiology residency applicants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baerlocher, Mark O; Walker, Michelle

    2005-10-01

    To determine if and how gender ratios have changed within Canadian radiology, and to determine if gender discrimination occurs at the level of the radiology resident selection committee. The Canadian Medical Association, Canadian Association of Radiologists, Canadian Institute for Health Information, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, and Canadian Residency Matching Service provided gender-specific data. We compared the proportion of female applicants who ranked a radiology program as their top choice and were rejected from any radiology program with the corresponding proportion for male applicants. The numbers of women and men being awarded an MD from a Canadian university equalized nearly a decade ago. Women continue to be numerically underrepresented among practicing radiologists; however, the proportion of women continues to increase so that there is 1 female radiologist in practice to every 3 male radiologists in practice in 2005. More male medical students ranked a radiology residency training program as their top choice in the residency match; however, of those who did, they were as likely as women to be rejected from a radiology residency training program. Grouping all female and male graduating medical students participating in the residency match and ranking a radiology residency as their top choice between 1993 and 2004, the odds of men being rejected were 1.4 times (95% CI 0.99-1.9, p = 0.07) greater than for women. There continues to be more men than women radiologists in practice; however, the female-to-male ratio continues to increase. Our data suggest that discrimination against female applicants at the level of radiology residency selection does not occur.

  20. Department of Energy Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the hazardous waste remedial actions program (HAZWRAP) which manages approximately 200 hazardous waste projects. These projects include preliminary assessments, site inspections, and remedial investigation/feasibility studies. The author describes the procedures HAZWRAP follows to ensure quality. The discussion covers the quality assurance aspects of project management, project planning, site characterization, document control and technical teamwork

  1. Ethnic and Gender Diversity in Radiology Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Derek L; Nguyen, HaiThuy

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to assess ethnic and gender diversity in US radiology fellowship programs from 2006 to 2013. Data for this study was obtained from Journal of the American Medical Association supplements publications from 2005 to 2006 to 2012-2013 (Gonzalez-Moreno, Innov Manag Policy Pract. 15(2):149, 2013; Nivet, Acad Med. 86(12):1487-9, 2011; Reede, Health Aff. 22(4):91-3, 2003; Chapman et al., Radiology 270(1):232-40, 2014; Getto, 2005; Rivo and Satcher, JAMA 270(9):1074-8, 1993; Schwartz et al., Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 149(1):71-6, 2013; Simon, Clin Orthop Relat Res. 360:253-9, 1999) and the US census 2010. For each year, Fisher's exact test was used to compare the percentage of women and under-represented minorities in each Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-certified radiology fellowship to the percentage of women and under-represented minorities in (1) all ACGME-certified radiology fellowships combined, (2) radiology residents, (3) ACGME-certified fellows in all of medicine combined, (4) ACGME-certified residents in all of medicine combined, and (5) graduating medical students. Chi-Squared test was used to compare the percentage of women and under-represented minorities and the 2010 US census. p gender and ethnic disparities. Outreach efforts, pipeline programs, and mentoring may be helpful in addressing this issue.

  2. 1980 annual radiological environmental report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This report describes the Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program conducted during 1980 in the vicinity of the Beaver Valley Power Station and the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The Radiological Environmental Program consists of on-site sampling of water and gaseous effluents and off-site monitoring of water, air, river sediments, soils, food pathway samples, and radiation levels in the vicinity of the site. This report discusses the results of this monitoring during 1980. The environmental program outlined in the Beaver Valley Power Station Technical Specifications was followed throughout 1980. There were no radioactive liquid effluents released from the Shippingport Atomic Power Station since radioactive liquids are processed and re-cycled within the plant systems. The results of this environmental monitoring program show that Shippingport Atomic Power Station and Beaver Valley Power Station operations have not adversely affected the surrounding environment

  3. Developing GIS based decision-making tools in case of radiological contamination of agricultural soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepka, Pavel; Brom, Jakub; Prochazka, Jan; Vincikova, Hana; Pecharova, Emilie

    2010-01-01

    A set of supporting tools to help take remedial decisions in case of radiological contamination of agricultural produce is being developed within the EURANOS project. The tools are created in the ArcGIS environment in the Python programming language. So far, a simple model to estimate biomass in the contaminated area has been set up. This module will make it possible to estimate additional parameters, such as activity per kg or amount of waste created, which are useful when taking decision regarding premature crops harvesting. Areas where no remedial action is required can be also identified, of course

  4. Manual for first responders to a radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. As stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency', which establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, 'first responders shall take all practicable and appropriate actions to minimize the consequences of a nuclear or radiological emergency'. The IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(49)/RES/9, continues to encourage Member States 'to adopt the relevant Agency standards, procedures and practical tools' and underlines 'the need for first responders to have appropriate training for dealing with ionizing radiation during nuclear and radiological emergencies'. This publication is intended to assist in meeting these requirements and to fulfil Article 5 of the Assistance Convention. Its aim is to provide practical guidance for those who will respond during the first few hours to a radiological emergency (referred to here as 'first responders') and for national officials who would support this early response. It provides guidance in the form of action guides, instructions, and supporting data that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This report, published as part of the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, replaces and builds on IAEA-TECDOC-1162 in the area of early response and first responders' actions. It takes account of the

  5. Radiological terrorism and Australia's response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, D.

    2003-01-01

    A terrorist attack in Australia involving dispersal of radioactive material is different from conventional terrorist attacks involving explosives. The trauma experienced by victims during an explosive incident includes cuts, broken limbs, burns and shock. When an explosive device involving radioactive materials is involved, there are a number of additional characteristics including the contamination of victims and the surrounding area and the potential requirement for ongoing monitoring and decontamination. Response actions may require additional complex emergency response measures including immediate protective actions to protect those potentially exposed to contamination, mass casualty care, and public and mental health. There are concerns that terrorist organizations are showing increasing interest in acquiring radiological material that could be used with explosive. A dirty bomb or technically known as a radiological dispersal device (RDD) is a device designed to spread radioactive contamination over a wide area and pose a health and safety threat to those within the contaminated area. The radioactive material could be in the form of a large chunk of material, fine powder, a liquid mist, or a gas. The material may also be spread in other ways, such as by simply emptying a container over the desired area. As RDD's do not require large amounts of explosives, there is unlikely to be a large numbers of casualties, however the areas contaminated by the radiological material may cause immediate and long term health risks to those exposed. An RDD is a weapon of Mass Disruption rather than destruction. While the likelihood of RDD's being employed by terrorist in Australia is still considered remote, Australia's emergency response organizations are developing plans to ensure a rapid and comprehensive response occurs should such an event occur in this country, The presentation will outline Australia's response arrangements at the local/state level and the type of federal

  6. Medical intervention in radiological emergencies, formation and training; Intervencion medica en emergencias radiologicas, formacion y adiestramiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas H, J. [CPHR, Calle 20 No. 4113, e/41 y 47 Playa, CP 11300, La Habana (Cuba)]. e-mail: cardenas@cphr.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    The work exposes the national experience in the development of training programs in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies. Implemented after valuing the existent situation, identified the necessities and the reach of the training, additionally it was elaborated the content of the training program whose purpose is guided to the invigoration of the medical answer capacity in radiological emergencies The content of the modular program it approaches theoretical- practical aspects on preparation and medical answer in radiological emergencies. The program includes an exercise that simulates a radiological accident, to evaluate during the same one, the answer capacity before this situation. The training concludes with the design of a strategy for the preparation and answer in radiological emergencies in correspondence with the potential accidental scenarios that the participants can face. (Author)

  7. Proposal of inspection methodology for environment radiological control; Proposta de metodologia de inspecao para controle radiologico ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Nadia Soido Falcao

    2005-07-01

    The Radiation Protection and Dosimetry Institute (IRD) of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) is in charge of verifying that the self-monitoring operator is effective to control the radiological quality of environmental around the nuclear facilities and carried out in accordance with the regulatory requirements. While a long time, the verification of compliance was kept by the conduction of large scale monitoring programs around all the authorized installations. The IRD decided to reformulate its performance behavior, starting another kind of control program, due to the number increase of nuclear installations and the diversity of activities conducted by the operators. This program, so-called Monitoring Control Program (PCM) is a regulatory activity developed by the Environmental Impact Assessment Service (SEAIA) of IRD and has the aim of check the effectiveness of authorized self-control. Actually the regulatory control of environmental radiological integrity around the authorized nuclear installation essentially depends on the effectiveness of regulatory inspections fulfilled by the SEAIA/IRD. Due to the implementation of modern practices of management in the IRD, specially the quality management system on regulatory inspection activities, emerged the need of unify these actions. It was also necessary to establish standard procedures required for inspection conduction. This work proposes one methodology for the inspections of environmental radiological control suitable to assure the compliance and effectiveness of environmental and effluent monitoring programs conducted by the operator, through the systematic verification of compliance and data quality assessment. The proposed methodology seeks to attend the appeals for high control standards of environment protection and public health. Here, we presented as products of this work: The inspection handbook and checklists for inspections; one framework for sampling, handling, recording and reporting of

  8. Training in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina G, E.

    2014-08-01

    In the Peru, according to the current regulations, people that work with ionizing radiations should have an authorization (individual license), which is granted by the Technical Office of the National Authority that is the technical body of the Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN) manager of the control of ionizing radiations in the country. The individual license is obtained after the applicant fulfills the requested requirements, as having safety knowledge and radiological protection. Since its founding in 1972, the Centro Superior de Estudios Nucleares (CSEN) of the IPEN has carried out diverse training courses in order to that people can work in a safe way with ionizing radiations in medicine, industry and research, until the year 2013 have been organized 2231 courses that have allowed the training of 26213 people. The courses are organized according to the specific work that is carried out with radiations (medical radio-diagnostic, dental radiology, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, industrial radiography, nuclear meters, logging while drilling, etc.). In their majority the courses are directed to people that will make use of radiations for first time, but refresher courses are also granted in the topic. The CSEN also carries out the Master degree programs highlighting the Second Professional Specialization in Radiological Protection carried out from the year 2004 with the support of the National University of Engineering. To the present has been carried out 2 programs and there is other being developed. In this work is shown the historical evolution of the radiological protection courses as well as the important thing that they are to work in a safe way in the country. (Author)

  9. The association of departmental leadership gender with that of faculty and residents in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anand; Braga, Larissa; Braga-Baiak, Andresa; Jacobs, Danny O; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2007-08-01

    Although the number of women graduating from medical school continues to increase, their representation in radiology residency programs has not increased over the past 10 years. We examined whether the gender of radiology faculty and residents differed according to the gender of the departmental leadership. We issued an anonymous Web-based survey via e-mail to all 188 radiology residency program directors listed in the Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database (FREIDA Online). Data regarding the gender of the department chairperson, residency program director, faculty, and residents were collected. The institutional review board granted a waiver for this study, and all subjects provided informed consent. Of the 84 program directors who responded, 9 (10.7%) were chaired by females and 75 (89.3%) by males; residency program director positions were held by 36 (42.9%) females and 48 (57.1%) males. More programs were located in the northeastern United States (n = 31, 36.9%) than in any other region, and more were self-described as academic (n = 36, 42.9%) than any other practice type. Programs that were led by a male chairperson had a similar proportion of female faculty (25.2% versus 27.3%; P = .322) and residents (26.2% versus 27.4%; P = .065) compared with those led by a female. Similarly, radiology departments with a male residency program director had a similar proportion of female residents (24.8% versus 28.7%; P = .055) compared with programs with a female residency program director. The gender composition of radiology faculty and residents does not differ significantly according to the gender of the departmental chairperson or residency program director. Nevertheless, there continues to be a disparity in the representation of women among radiology faculty and residents.

  10. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2010-02-09

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, “Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 0 issued in October 2009. Brief Description of Revision: A minor revision to correct oversights made during revision to incorporate the 10 CFR 835 Update; and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  11. Radiological monitoring of food in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerez V, S.F.

    1996-01-01

    The appearing of the problem for protecting the environment from radioactive contamination is not an accidental matter. The introduction into the earth crust of radioactive material coming from nuclear weapons, accidents, wastes, etc, has caused, as a consequence, the contamination of the biosphere. The extensive trade of food in our country has made necessary the establishment of radiological monitoring in food, which was organized by the Department of Public Health. The structure, functions, characteristics and aspects related to radiological monitoring of food in Cuba are shown in the present paper. The organization and resources for performing the monitoring program, both for normal conditions and for nuclear and/or radiological emergency cases, are detailed. (author). 12 refs., 2 figs

  12. Remedial action programs annual meeting: Meeting notes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office was pleased to host the 1987 Remedial Action programs Annual Meeting and herein presents notes from that meeting as prepared (on relatively short notice) by participants. These notes are a summary of the information derived from the workshops, case studies, and ad hoc committee reports rather than formal proceedings. The order of the materials in this report follows the actual sequence of presentations during the annual meeting

  13. Quality assurance program on the individual monitory service of the Protection Radiology Laboratory of the Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil): preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonino, Paulo H.D.; Filho, Joao A.; Silveira, Sueldo V.

    1996-01-01

    The current stage of the quality assurance program on the individual monitoring service of the Protection Radiology Laboratory of the Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil) is presented. The program emphasizes the personnel training and its development is focused to meet national and international standards requirements

  14. Environmental monitoring radiological programs for the nuclear centre and the low level radioactive waste facility in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintero, E.; Cervantes, L.; Rojas, V.

    2006-01-01

    The National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico (ININ) has its Laboratory of Environmental Radiological Monitoring, (LVRA), to assure the critical population and the environment they are not exposed to radiation doses greater than the limits established by the national and international legislation, this laboratory carries out environmental monitoring radiological programs the Nuclear Centre and its surroundings and the Low Level Radioactive Waste Facility (CADER) and its around. In order to carry out these programs the LVRA has rooms for evaporation, drying, grinding, ashing of environmental and food samples, and a laboratory for gamma ray spectrometry, liquid scintillation, alpha-beta gross counting and computer room. Since the year 2000 the (ININ) has tried to implant the quality system ISO 9001:2000 including a its (LVRA). This quality system includes: a Plan of Quality, Quality Manual, programs of technical and administrative document elaboration, technical and administrative procedures, technical and administrative qualification programmes for the laboratory staff, maintenance and calibration programs for measurement systems and finally participation in national and international exercises of intercomparison. The ININ counts with the management of quality assurance to verify these programs, in addition, our Nuclear Regulatory Commission (CNSNS) carries out periodic audits to authorize the of use and handling of radioactive and nuclear material licenses of these facilities. In this work we presented the advances and difficulties found in the implantation of the quality system, also we present the benefits obtained with uses of this system, the samples analyses results, and the calculation of the annual dose to the critical population for the last five years. In addition, we presented the calculation the radionuclides concentration tendencies in different sample types, according to our (CNSNS) requirements. In the same way the results of the calibrations

  15. Compilation of historical radiological data collected in the vicinity of the WIPP site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, P.L.; Louderbough, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    The Radiological Baseline Program (RBP) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been implemented to characterize the radiological conditions at the site prior to receipt of radioactive wastes. Because southeastern New Mexico was the site of an underground nuclear test in 1961, various sampling programs have intermittently monitored background and elevated radiation levels in the vicinity of the WIPP. In addition, radiological characterization of the site region was performed during the 1970's in support of the WIPP Environmental Impact Statement. The historical data are drawn primarily from monitoring activities of the US Public Health Service (PHS), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), US Geological Survey (USGS) and Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA). Information on air and water quality, meat, milk, biota and vegetation is included in the report. This survey is intended to provide a source of reference for historical data on radiological conditions in the vicinity of the WIPP site prior to the establishment of a systematic Radiological Baseline Program. 31 refs., 1 fig

  16. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    In 1992, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project experienced several health and safety related incidents at active remediation project sites. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) directed the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to establish a program increasing the DOE`s overall presence at operational remediation sites to identify and minimize risks in operations to the fullest extent possible (Attachments A and B). In response, the TAC, in cooperation with the DOE and the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), developed the Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program.

  17. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    In 1992, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project experienced several health and safety related incidents at active remediation project sites. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) directed the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to establish a program increasing the DOE's overall presence at operational remediation sites to identify and minimize risks in operations to the fullest extent possible (Attachments A and B). In response, the TAC, in cooperation with the DOE and the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), developed the Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program

  18. Transportation radiological emergency preparedness: STAR 95 Exercise final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Emergency response for a transportation accident involving radiological materials, while not inherently difficult, presents a challenge for several reasons. These accidents, although they can occur anywhere, are rare. Also, although the health consequences are usually slight, accidents involving radioactive materials generally cause a great deal of concern, both for the emergency responders and the general public. How can communities be prepared for an event that requires some technical knowledge, but is so rare that it will never occur in most areas, without expending an effort disproportionate to the actual risk? How can one appropriately deal with an event that may cause excessive public concern? These questions are at the heart of the preparedness issues this program addressed. The overall goal of the Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program was to establish the framework for a coordinated response by all levels of government to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. The Program involved both preparedness activities and the development, conduct and evaluation of a field exercise in Saratoga County, New York. This Report concentrates on the functional activities, lessons learned, recommendations, and action plans for improving preparedness and response to a transportation accident involving radioactive materials

  19. Radiological safety training for uranium facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This handbook contains recommended training materials consistent with DOE standardized core radiological training material. These materials consist of a program management guide, instructor`s guide, student guide, and overhead transparencies.

  20. The program director and accreditation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tristan, T.A.; Capp, M.P.; Krabbenhoft, K.L.; Armbruster, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Field Survey is contrasted with the Specialist Site Visitor. The discussion addresses the reasons for different types of surveys and how the surveys and the Hospital Information Form are used in evaluating a graduate residency program in radiology for accreditation. The Residency Review Committee for Radiology (RRC) and the staff of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) of Residencies in Radiology offer a program for program directors and other interested leaders in graduate programs in radiology. The authors explain the review and accreditation process for residencies in radiology with special emphasis on the preparation for inspection by accurate and full completion of the Hospital Information Form on which the program is judged, and the nature of the inspection procedures

  1. US Department of Energy radiological control manual. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This manual establishes practices for the conduct of Department of Energy radiological control activities. The Manual states DOE`s positions and views on the best courses of action currently available in the area of radiological controls. Accordingly, the provisions in the Manual should be viewed by contractors as an acceptable technique, method or solution for fulfilling their duties and responsibilities. This Manual shall be used by DOE in evaluating the performance of its contractors. This Manual is not a substitute for Regulations; it is intended to be consistent with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements and shall be revised whenever necessary to ensure such consistency. Some of the Manual provisions, however, challenge the user to go well beyond minimum requirements. Following the course of action delineated in the Manual will result in achieving and surpassing related statutory or regulatory requirements.

  2. Research Resources Survey: Radiology Junior Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Votaw, John R

    2015-07-01

    To assess resources available to junior faculty in US academic radiology departments for research mentorship and funding opportunities and to determine if certain resources are more common in successful programs. An anonymous survey covering scientific environment and research mentorship and was sent to vice-chairs of research of radiology departments. Results were evaluated to identify practices of research programs with respect to mentorship, resources, and opportunities. Academy of Radiology Research's 2012 National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants and awards list was used to determine if environment and practices correlate with funding. There was a 51% response rate. A greater fraction of clinical faculty gets promoted from assistant to associate professor than research faculty. Research faculty overall submits more funding applications. Most programs support start-up costs and K-awards. Over half of the departments have a vice-chair for faculty development, and most have formal mentorship programs. Faculty members are expected to teach, engage in service, publish, and apply for and get research funding within 3 years of hire. Top-tier programs as judged by NIH awards have a combination of MDs who devote >50% effort to research and PhD faculty. Key factors holding back both clinical and research junior faculty development were motivation, resources, and time, although programs reported high availability of resources and support at the department level. Better marketing of resources for junior faculty, effort devoted to mentoring clinical faculty in research, and explicit milestones/expectations for achievement could enhance junior faculty success, promote interest in the clinician–scientist career path for radiologists, and lead to greater research success.

  3. Radiological emergency: road map for radiation accident victim transport; Emergência radiológica: roadmap para o transporte de radioacidentado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, V.S.G.; Alcantara, Y.P. [Faculdade Casa Branca, SP (Brazil); Lima, C.M.A. [MAXIM Cursos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, F. C. A. da, E-mail: franciscodasilva13uk@gmail.com [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    During a radiological or nuclear emergency, a number of necessary actions are taken, both within the radiation protection of individuals and the environment, involving many institutions and highly specialized personnel. Among them it is possible to emphasize the air transportation of radiation accident victims.The procedures and measures for the safe transport of these radiation accident victims are generally the responsibility of the armed forces, specifically the Aeronautics, with the action denominated 'Aeromedical Military Evacuation of Radiation Accident Victims'. The experience with the Radiological Accident of Goiânia demonstrated the importance of adequate preparation and response during a radiological emergency and the need for procedures and measures with regard to the transport of radiation victims are clearly defined and clearly presented for the effectiveness of the actions. This work presents the necessary actions for the transport of radiation accident victim during a radiological emergency, through the road map technique, which has been widely used in scientific technical area to facilitate understanding and show the way to be followed to reach the proposed objectives.

  4. Designing chemical soil characterization programs for mixed waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, K.A. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project is a remedial action effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. The Weldon Spring Site, a former uranium processing facility, is located in east-central Missouri on a portion of a former ordnance works facility which produced trinitrotoluene during World War II. As a result of both uranium and ordnance production, the soils have become both radiologically and chemically contaminated. As a part of site characterization efforts in support of the environmental documentation process, a chemical soil characterization program was developed. This program consisted of biased and unbiased sampling program which maximized areal coverage, provided a statistically sound data base and maintained cost effectiveness. This paper discusses how the general rationale and processes used at the Weldon Spring Site can be applied to other mixed and hazardous waste sites

  5. Affirmative Action. Module Number 16. Work Experience Program Modules. Coordination Techniques Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawhan, Carl; Morley, Ray

    This self-instructional module, the last in a series of 16 on techniques for coordinating work experience programs, deals with affirmative action. Addressed in the module are the following topics: the nature of affirmative action legislation and regulations, the role of the teacher-coordinator as a resource person for affirmative action…

  6. Implementation of a radiological safety management system in a hospital of Mexico City; Implementacion de un sistema de gestion de seguridad radiologica en un hospital de la Ciudad de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez V, D.; Rivera M, T. [CICATA-IPN, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Velez D, V. [INER, 14000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    Full text: The reflection of this work is based in some radiological accidents that its have happened in some hospital centers or of research. The over exposure of some people is due to the pursuit of the procedures, the lack of quality assurance of the equipment or the inappropriate actions of the technicians. In Mexico one has seen in several hospitals the lack of existence of a Quality Assurance Program to prevent the accidents, the execution of the same ones and those good practices and the lack of Safety Culture makes that the hospital radiological safety it is faulty. The objective of the present work is the implementation of a radiological safety management in a hospital of Mexico City. (Author)

  7. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs

  8. Comparison of the MARC and CRAC2 programs for assessing the radiological consequences of accidental releases of radioactive material

    CERN Document Server

    Hemming, C R; Charles, D; Ostmeyer, R M

    1983-01-01

    This report describes a comparison of the MARC (Methodology for Assessing Radiological Consequences) and CRAC2 (Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences, version 2) computer programs for assessing the radiological consequences of accidental releases of radioactive material. A qualitative comparison has been made of the features of the constituent sub-models of the two codes, and potentially the most important differences identified. The influence of these differences has been investigated quantitatively by comparison of the predictions of the two codes in a wide variety of circumstances. Both intermediate quantities and endpoints used as a measure of risk have been compared in order to separate the variables more clearly. The results indicate that, in general, the predictions of MARC and CRAC2 are in good agreement.

  9. Environmental Tools and Radiological Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation details two tools (SADA and FRAMES) available for use in environmental assessments of chemicals that can also be used for radiological assessments of the environment. Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is a Windows freeware program that incorporate...

  10. Potential Beneficiaries of the Obama Administration’s Executive Action Programs Deeply Embedded in US Society

    OpenAIRE

    Donald Kerwin; Robert Warren

    2016-01-01

    The Obama administration has developed two broad programs to defer immigration enforcement actions against undocumented persons living in the United States: (1) Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA); and (2) Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). The DACA program, which began in August 2012, was expanded on November 20, 2014. DAPA and the DACA expansion (hereinafter referred to as “DACA-plus”) are currently under review by the US Supreme Court ...

  11. Assessment of Safety Parameters for Radiological Explosion Based on Gaussian Dispersion Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Alok [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Hyungjoon; Kim, Hong Suk [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    These sources if used with explosive (called RDD - radiological dispersion device), can cause dispersion of radioactive material resulting in public exposure and contamination of the environment. Radiological explosion devices are not weapons for the mass destruction like atom bombs, but can cause the death of few persons and contamination of large areas. The reduction of the threat of radiological weapon attack by terrorist groups causing dispersion of radioactive material is one of the priority tasks of the IAEA Nuclear Safety and Security Program.Emergency preparedness is an essential part for reducing and mitigating radiological weapon threat. Preliminary assessment of dispersion study followed by radiological explosion and its quantitative effect will be helpful for the emergency preparedness team for an early response. The effect of the radiological dispersion depends on various factors like radioisotope, its activity, physical form, amount of explosive used and meteorological factors at the time of an explosion. This study aim to determine the area affected by the radiological explosion as pre assessment to provide feedback to emergency management teams for handling and mitigation the situation after an explosion. Most practical scenarios of radiological explosion are considered with conservative approach for the assessment of the area under a threat for emergency handling and management purpose. Radioisotopes under weak security controls can be used for a radiological explosion to create terror and socioeconomic threat for the public. Prior assessment of radiological threats is helpful for emergency management teams to take prompt decision about evacuation of the affected area and other emergency handling actions. Comparable activities of Co-60 source used in radiotherapy and Sr-90 source of disused and orphaned RTGs with two different quantities of TNT were used for the scenario development of radiological explosion. In the Basic Safety Standard (BSS

  12. Assessment of Safety Parameters for Radiological Explosion Based on Gaussian Dispersion Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Alok; Yu, Hyungjoon; Kim, Hong Suk

    2014-01-01

    These sources if used with explosive (called RDD - radiological dispersion device), can cause dispersion of radioactive material resulting in public exposure and contamination of the environment. Radiological explosion devices are not weapons for the mass destruction like atom bombs, but can cause the death of few persons and contamination of large areas. The reduction of the threat of radiological weapon attack by terrorist groups causing dispersion of radioactive material is one of the priority tasks of the IAEA Nuclear Safety and Security Program.Emergency preparedness is an essential part for reducing and mitigating radiological weapon threat. Preliminary assessment of dispersion study followed by radiological explosion and its quantitative effect will be helpful for the emergency preparedness team for an early response. The effect of the radiological dispersion depends on various factors like radioisotope, its activity, physical form, amount of explosive used and meteorological factors at the time of an explosion. This study aim to determine the area affected by the radiological explosion as pre assessment to provide feedback to emergency management teams for handling and mitigation the situation after an explosion. Most practical scenarios of radiological explosion are considered with conservative approach for the assessment of the area under a threat for emergency handling and management purpose. Radioisotopes under weak security controls can be used for a radiological explosion to create terror and socioeconomic threat for the public. Prior assessment of radiological threats is helpful for emergency management teams to take prompt decision about evacuation of the affected area and other emergency handling actions. Comparable activities of Co-60 source used in radiotherapy and Sr-90 source of disused and orphaned RTGs with two different quantities of TNT were used for the scenario development of radiological explosion. In the Basic Safety Standard (BSS

  13. A virtual environment for simulation of radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Tadeu Augusto de Almeida; Farias, Oscar Luiz Monteiro de

    2013-01-01

    A virtual environment is a computer environment, representative of a subset of the real world, and where models of the real world entities, process and events are included in a virtual (three-dimensional) space. Virtual environments are ideal tools for simulation of certain critical processes, such as radiological accidents, where human beings or properties can suffer irreversible or long term damages. Radiological accidents are characterized by the significant exposure to radiation of specialized workers and general public. The early detection of a radiological accident and the determination of its possible extension are essential factors for the planning of prompt answers and emergency actions. This paper proposes the integration of georeferenced representation of the three-dimensional space and agent-based models, with the objective to construct virtual environments that have the capacity to simulate radiological accidents. The three-dimensional georeferenced representations of space candidates are: 1) the spatial representation of traditional geographical information systems (GIS); 2) the representation adopted by Google Maps®. Adding agents to these spatial representations allow us to simulate radiological accidents, quantify the doses received by members of the public, obtain a possible spatial distribution of people contaminated, estimate the number of contaminated individuals, estimate the impact on the health-network, estimate environmental impacts, generate exclusion zones, build alternative scenarios and train staff to deal with radiological accidents. (author)

  14. A virtual environment for simulation of radiological accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Tadeu Augusto de Almeida, E-mail: tedsilva@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Farias, Oscar Luiz Monteiro de, E-mail: fariasol@eng.uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    A virtual environment is a computer environment, representative of a subset of the real world, and where models of the real world entities, process and events are included in a virtual (three-dimensional) space. Virtual environments are ideal tools for simulation of certain critical processes, such as radiological accidents, where human beings or properties can suffer irreversible or long term damages. Radiological accidents are characterized by the significant exposure to radiation of specialized workers and general public. The early detection of a radiological accident and the determination of its possible extension are essential factors for the planning of prompt answers and emergency actions. This paper proposes the integration of georeferenced representation of the three-dimensional space and agent-based models, with the objective to construct virtual environments that have the capacity to simulate radiological accidents. The three-dimensional georeferenced representations of space candidates are: 1) the spatial representation of traditional geographical information systems (GIS); 2) the representation adopted by Google Maps®. Adding agents to these spatial representations allow us to simulate radiological accidents, quantify the doses received by members of the public, obtain a possible spatial distribution of people contaminated, estimate the number of contaminated individuals, estimate the impact on the health-network, estimate environmental impacts, generate exclusion zones, build alternative scenarios and train staff to deal with radiological accidents. (author)

  15. Missouri State information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Missouri. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; a description of the organization and structure of local governments affected by remedial action at the St. Louis area sites; a summary of relevant local ordinances and regulations; an identification of relevant public interest groups; a list of radio stations, television stations, and newspapers that provide public information to the St. Louis area or to Jefferson City; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations

  16. Missouri State information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-31

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Missouri. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; a description of the organization and structure of local governments affected by remedial action at the St. Louis area sites; a summary of relevant local ordinances and regulations; an identification of relevant public interest groups; a list of radio stations, television stations, and newspapers that provide public information to the St. Louis area or to Jefferson City; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  17. Radiology today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donner, M.W.; Heuck, F.H.W.

    1981-01-01

    The book encompasses the proceedings of a postgraduate course held in Salzburg in June 1980. 230 radiologists from 17 countries discussed here the important and practical advances of diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and ultrasound as they contribute to gastrointestinal, urologic, skeletal, cardiovascular, pediatric, and neuroradiology. The book contains 55 single contributions of different authors to the following main themes: Cardiovascular, Radiology, pulmonary radiology, gastrointestinal radiology, urinary tract radiology, skeletal radiology, mammography, lymphography, ultrasound, ENT radiology, and neuroradiology. (orig./MG)

  18. Report by the work-group on radiation protection in interventional radiology. Recommendations related to the improvement of radiation protection in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This report aims at proposing recommendations for the improvement of the quality of radiation protection of workers and patients in the field of interventional radiology. These recommendations concern the training of health personnel, the application of the optimization principle to health professionals and patients, dosimetry and the definition of diagnosis reference levels. More particularly, these recommendations concern professions involved in interventional radiology, and take into account the experience of other European Union State members and recommendations made by the IAEA. The authors analyze the equipment, radiological actions, procedures and doses, practitioners, equipment used for radio-guided interventions. They discuss doses received by patients, patient monitoring and radio-induced lesions. Then, they address the role and training of the different interveners in radiation protection, the equipment maintenance issue, and personnel dosimetry and protection

  19. Radiological health training resources, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The Division of Training and Medical Applications is the component of the Bureau of Radiological Health which has the responsibility for providing training assistance to the Nation's radiological health agencies. Recognizing that these agencies are establishing their own user and personnel training programs, the Division offers through the Training Resources Center a variety of educational materials which may be utilized for specific training purposes. This bulletin contains a list of educational materials, including publications, booklets, slides and transparencies, movies, video tapes, training guides, and training seminars for the education of x-ray technicians in radiation protection

  20. Ethical values in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oughton, D.H.

    1996-01-01

    Issues like consent, equity, control and responsibility are important for an ethical evaluation of radiation risks. This paper discusses the incorporation of ethical values in radiological protection policy and compares how ICRP recommendations promote their use in practice and intervention cases. The paper contends that in cases of intervention, where the overall aim is dose reduction, social and ethical factors are often alluded to when evaluating costs of an action. However, possible ethical or social benefits of intervention measures are seldom raised. On the other hand, when assessing a practice, wherein the net effect is an increase in radiation dose, one is more likely to find an appeal to ethical factors on the benefits side of the equation than with the costs. The paper concludes that all decisions concerning radiological protection should consider both positive and negative ethical aspects. (author)

  1. Protecting National Critical Infrastructure against Radiological Threat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaar, I.; Halevy, I.; Berenstein, Z.; Sharon, A.

    2014-01-01

    National Critical Infrastructure (NCI) such as transportation, water, energy etc., are essential elements in a developed country's economy. As learned after the 9/11 attackxx, a terror attack on these complex system may cause thousands of casualties and significant economic damage. The attack can be a conventional one; like the train bombing in Spainxxi or the bus bombing in Londonxxii, or a non-conventional one; like the Sarin attack on the underground train in Tokyo, Japanxxiii. A radiological attack on a NCI is also feasiblexxiv. This type of attack must be taken into consideration due to the vulnerability of ani infrastructure to such an attack, and the severe economic outcome of itxxv. The radioactive materials that might be used by terrorists were recently identified and categorized in one of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series publicationxxvi,xxvii. The most common and therefore reachable radio nuclides are the gamma emitters 60Co, 137Cs and 192Ir, the beta emitter 90Sr and the alpha emitters 241Pu, 238Pu and 241Am. A radiological event can be any of two principle scenarios. In the first scenario, a radiological dispersion device (RDD) or ôdirtyö bomb is used. This device consists of a radiation source which is detonated using conventional or improvised explosivesxxviii. Most of the casualties in this event will be from the explosion blast wave. However, some people might become contaminated with different levels of radiationxxix, some might need to go through some type of medical screening process and the costs of the total actions might be significantxxx. The second scenario involves a silent dispersion of radioactive material in a public site. In this event, there are no immediate known casualties, and the fact that people were exposed to radioactive material will be discovered only in the uncommon event when symptoms of radiation sickness will be identified due to exposure to high radiation dosexxxi, or if the radioactive material is discovered by a first

  2. Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, M.; Fix, J.J.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Leonowich, J.A.; Palmer, H.E.; Sula, M.J.

    1988-08-01

    This report documents the performance of certain radiological protection sitewide services during calendar year (CY) 1987 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory in support of the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and contractor activities on the Hanford Site. The routine program for each service is discussed along with any significant program changes and tasks, investigations, and studies performed in support of each program. Other related activities such as publications, presentations, and memberships on standards or industry committees are also discussed. The programs covered provide services in the areas of: external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, in vivo measurements, instrument calibration and evaluation, calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Bureau of Standards, and radiological records. 21 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs

  3. History, heresy and radiology in scientific discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCredie, J

    2009-10-01

    Nowadays, most drugs reach the market after research has established their pharmacology, safety and efficacy. That was not always the case 50 years ago. Thalidomide was used before its target cell or mode of action were known. Commencing with the thalidomide catastrophe--an epidemic of gross birth defects (1958-1962)--thalidomide's origins are revisited to show how this drug came to be made and sold in the 1950s. Thalidomide intersected with Australian radiology in the 1970s. The site and mode of action of the drug was deduced from X-rays of thalidomide-induced bone defects, which have classical radiological signs of sensory neuropathic osteoarthropathy. The longitudinal reduction deformities follow the distribution of segmental sensory innervation of the limb skeleton, indicating neural crest as the target organ. Injury to one level of neural crest halts normal neurotrophism and deletes the dependent segment--a previously unrecognised embryonic mechanism that explains most non-genetic birth defects. The final common pathway is neural crest injury and failure of normal neurotrophism to result in longitudinal reduction deformities, for example, phocomelia.

  4. Upgrading radiological work practices through employee participation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    Following the shutdown of the Midland Plant in 1984, Consumers Power Company found itself with a need to reorganize its nuclear operations department. The reorganization took place in November 1984. At that time the plant was just completing an intermittent outage that had begun in September 1983. Over the previous 2 yr, the plant had expended 1,500 person-rem and generated 1330 m 3 of radioactive waste. In addition, an overexposure and a shipping violation in early 1984 had contributed to a deteriorating regulatory picture for radiological services. In an attempt to understand the problem confronting the plant, the new organization set up a group of meetings for each department to identify their barriers to becoming a high-performance organization. These meetings, which became known as barrier meetings, were used to identify barriers to performance, such as overly restrictive requirements, excessive paperwork, facility limitations, and improper job assignments. Following the barrier meetings, corrective actions and individuals responsible for completing these actions were identified. Most recent efforts have been in upgrading radiological work practices

  5. Line Program Environmental Management Audit: Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Line Program Environmental Management Audit completed for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). During this Audit, activities and records were reviewed and personnel interviewed at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Additionally, since FUSRAP falls under the responsibility of the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, selected individuals from this office were interviewed in Washington, DC and Germantown, Maryland. The onsite portion of the FUSRAP Audit was conducted from March 16 through 27, 1992, by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (EH-1). The scope of the FUSRAP Line Program Environmental Management Audit was comprehensive and included all areas of environmental management with the exception of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Since the subject of compliance with and implementation of the requirements of NEPA is the responsibility of the DOE Headquarters Office of NEPA Oversight, management issues pertaining to NEPA were not investigated as part of this Audit

  6. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Preparedness for Nuclear and Radiological Threats

    CERN Document Server

    Diamond, David

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear crisis in Fukushima and growing threats of nuclear terrorism must serve as a wake-up call, prompting greater action to prepare ourselves for nuclear and radiological disasters. Our strategy to prepare for these threats is multi-layered and the events of these past years have proved the necessity to re-evaluate the national and international preparedness goals on a scale never before considered. The programme of NATO Advanced Research Workshop on “Preparedness for Nuclear and Radiological Threats” has been focused on science and technology challenges associated with our need to improve the national and international capacity and capability to prevent, protect against, mitigate the effects of, respond to, and recover from the nuclear and radiological disasters, including nuclear and radiological accident, terrorist attack by Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or by “Dirty Bomb”-Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD), that pose the greatest risk to the national and international security and safety...

  7. The quality assurance program data analysis for diagnostic radiology in government hospitals in southern provinces of Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Khedr, M. S.; Wannus, K. M.

    2008-01-01

    This study covered comprehensive evaluation for diagnostic radiography and fluorography equipment used in medicine by applying SAEC quality control rules. The results showed that most of considered x-ray equipment have an acceptable performance but few reached 21.6% in radiography and 36.8% in fluorography need repair and recalibration. Also recommendations and guidance for repair and preventative maintenance are required and quality assurance program should be applied in all diagnostic radiology institutions in Syria.(author)

  8. Pediatric radiology for medical-technical radiology assistants/radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppelt, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    The book on pediatric radiology includes the following chapter: differences between adults and children; psycho-social aspects concerning the patient child in radiology; relevant radiation doses in radiology; help for self-help: simple phantoms for image quality estimation in pediatric radiology; general information; immobilization of the patient; pediatric features for radiological settings; traumatology; contrast agents; biomedical radiography; computerized tomography; NMR imaging; diagnostic ultrasonography; handling of stress practical recommendations; medical displays.

  9. Physics Instruction for Radiologic Technologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Edward L.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the Denver collaborative training program in radiologic technology with emphasis upon identification of core topics, preparation of quality instructional materials, and use of innovative teaching techniques, such as computer-assisted instruction and video tape presentations. Included is a 10-week course outline. (CC)

  10. Iowa state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-02-09

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, By Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of Iowa. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full test of relevant statutes and regulations.

  11. California state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-02-09

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of California. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  12. Pennsylvania state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-31

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and State levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Pennsylvania. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  13. Illinois state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Illinois. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full text of relevant statutes and regulations

  14. Illinois State information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Illinois. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations

  15. Massachusetts state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of Massachusetts. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full text of relevant statutes and regulations

  16. Florida state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with DOE, Office of Nuclear Waste Management, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Florida. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations

  17. Massachusetts state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-02-09

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of Massachusetts. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  18. Oregon state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-31

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Oregon. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  19. Maryland State information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-31

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Handbook Series Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Maryland. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  20. Pennsylvania state information handbook formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Pennsylvania. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations

  1. Maryland State information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Handbook Series Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Maryland. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations

  2. Pennsylvania state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and State levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Pennsylvania. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations

  3. Iowa state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, By Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of Iowa. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full test of relevant statutes and regulations

  4. California state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of California. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full text of relevant statutes and regulations

  5. Florida state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with DOE, Office of Nuclear Waste Management, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Florida. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  6. Maryland state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and State levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Maryland. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations

  7. Oregon state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Oregon. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations

  8. Oregon state information handbook formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administater, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Oregon. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations

  9. Ohio state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by POLITECH CORPORATION to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of Ohio. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full test of relevant statutes and regulations

  10. Ohio state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-02-09

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by POLITECH CORPORATION to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of Ohio. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full test of relevant statutes and regulations.

  11. Oregon state information handbook formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-31

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administater, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Oregon. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  12. Adherence to Radiology Recommendations in a Clinical CT Lung Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshora, Sama; McKee, Brady J; Regis, Shawn M; Borondy Kitts, Andrea K; Bolus, Christopher C; McKee, Andrea B; French, Robert J; Flacke, Sebastian; Wald, Christoph

    2018-02-01

    Assess patient adherence to radiologist recommendations in a clinical CT lung cancer screening program. Patients undergoing CT lung cancer screening between January 12, 2012, and June 12, 2013, were included in this institutional review board-approved retrospective review. Patients referred from outside our institution were excluded. All patients met National Comprehensive Cancer Network Guidelines Lung Cancer Screening high-risk criteria. Full-time program navigators used a CT lung screening program management system to schedule patient appointments, generate patient result notification letters detailing the radiologist follow-up recommendation, and track patient and referring physician notification of missed appointments at 30, 60, and 90 days. To be considered adherent, patients could be no more than 90 days past due for their next recommended examination as of September 12, 2014. Patients who died, were diagnosed with cancer, or otherwise became ineligible for screening were considered adherent. Adherence rates were assessed across multiple variables. During the study interval, 1,162 high-risk patients were screened, and 261 of 1,162 (22.5%) outside referrals were excluded. Of the remaining 901 patients, 503 (55.8%) were male, 414 (45.9%) were active smokers, 377 (41.8%) were aged 65 to 73, and >95% were white. Of the 901 patients, 772 (85.7%) were adherent. Most common reasons for nonadherence were patient refusal of follow-up exam (66.7%), inability to successfully contact the patient (20.9%), and inability to obtain the follow-up order from the referring provider (7.8%); 23 of 901 (2.6%) were discharged for other reasons. High rates of adherence to radiologist recommendations are achievable for in-network patients enrolled in a clinical CT lung screening program. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Department of Energy remedial action program annual conference: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Office of Environmental Restoration manages a number of programs whose purposes are to complete remedial action at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and sites located throughout the United States. This volume contains 18 papers on the topics environmental restoration and hazardous/mixed waste characterization and remediation. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Database

  14. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of the former Watertown arsenal property, Site 34 and Site 41, Watertown, Massachusetts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-10-01

    During the MED/AEC era, work involving radioactive materials was conducted at various sites within the arsenal complex. Building 34 housed a uranium machine shop, and a portion of Building 41 contained a foundry that was used for uranium work. Information provided by site personnel indicated that only depleted uranium was used in these buildings. Results of radiological analyses of contaminated material found at these sites indicated depleted uranium with uranium-236. Both buildings have been razed. The remnants still in place consist of the concrete floor slabs, access drives, and underground utility service trenches. This area is currently under the control of the Watertown Redevelopment Authority of Watertown, Massachusetts. During the period from June 25 through July 1, 1981, the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Occupational Health and Safety Division (OHS) Radiological Survey Group (RSG), conducted a radiological survey of Building Sites 34 and 41 at the direction of the US Department of Energy. Significant levels of contamination were found at 33 locations on the pad of Site 34 and in 5 out of 15 soild corings from the perimeter of the pad. No contamination was found on the pad of Site 41; however, two-thirds of this pad was covered with soil up to 4 ft thick. One of the 14 soil corings taken adjacent to the pad of Site 41 had elevated levels of uranium. Levels of contamination in excess of criteria, as identified in ANSI 13.12 and NRC Guidelines, were found at this site. The analyses of the samples from the sewer access points also revealed uranium and radium-226 anomalies. Therefore, according to NRC guidelines dated July 1982, it must be concluded that they are contaminated

  15. Analysis of corrective action data from trial program on programmatic performance indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, G.T.; Poore, W.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is considering the use of cause codes as performance indicators (PIs) to monitor licensee performance. In conjunction with the cause codes, corrective action codes are also under consideration to describe licensee corrective actions for problems as represented by the cause codes. The set of cause codes and corrective actions employed in a trial program to assess their usefulness included: (1) administrative error -- training; (2) design/installation -- procedure modification; (3) fabrication error -- discipline; (4) random equipment failure -- management change; (5) licensed operator error -- design modification; and (6) other personal error -- equipment replacement/adjustment. These causes were selected to represent a broad range of licensee programs, hence the designation of programmatic PIs, that could be monitored in a systematic manner to identify trends in performance. They should establish a basis and focus for further investigation of a particular programmatic area if undesirable trends are evidence. 2 figs

  16. Safety aspects in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, D.C. da.

    1991-05-01

    The development of a program for the evaluation of the physical installations and operational procedures in diagnostic radiology with respect to radiation-safety is described. In addition, a proposal for the quality analysis of X-ray equipment and film-processing is presented. The purpose is both to ensure quality and safety of the radiology service, as well as to aid in the initial and in-service training of the staff. Interviews with patients, staff practicing radiology at a wide range of levels and the controlling authorities were carried out in the State of Rio de Janeiro in order to investigate the existence and the effective use of personal radioprotection equipment as well as user's and staff's concern for radiation safety. Additionally physical measurements were carried out in University Hospitals in Rio de Janeiro to assess the quality of equipment in day-to-day use. It was found that in the locations which did not have routine maintenance the equipment was generally in a poor state which lead to a high incidence of repetition of examinations and the consequent financial loss. (author)

  17. The American Board of Radiology perspective on maintenance of certification: Part IV: Practice quality improvement in radiologic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, G. Donald; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Morin, Richard L.; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.; Thomas, Stephen R.; Bosma, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Recent initiatives of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) in the area of maintenance of certification (MOC) have been reflective of the response of the medical community to address public concerns regarding quality of care, medical error reduction, and patient safety. In March 2000, the 24 member boards of the ABMS representing all medical subspecialties in the USA agreed to initiate specialty-specific maintenance of certification (MOC) programs. The American Board of Radiology (ABR) MOC program for diagnostic radiology, radiation oncology, and radiologic physics has been developed, approved by the ABMS, and initiated with full implementation for all three disciplines beginning in 2007. The overriding objective of MOC is to improve the quality of health care through diplomate-initiated learning and quality improvement. The four component parts to the MOC process are: Part I: Professional standing, Part II: Evidence of life long learning and periodic self-assessment, Part III: Cognitive expertise, and Part IV: Evaluation of performance in practice (with the latter being the focus of this paper). The key components of Part IV require a physicist-based response to demonstrate commitment to practice quality improvement (PQI) and progress in continuing individual competence in practice. Diplomates of radiologic physics must select a project to be completed over the ten-year cycle that potentially can improve the quality of the diplomate's individual or systems practice and enhance the quality of care. Five categories have been created from which an individual radiologic physics diplomate can select one required PQI project: (1) Safety for patients, employees, and the public, (2) accuracy of analyses and calculations, (3) report turnaround time and communication issues, (4) practice guidelines and technical standards, and (5) surveys (including peer review of self-assessment reports). Each diplomate may select a project appropriate for an individual

  18. Angra nuclear plant - environmental control program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kircher, E.; Cruz, E.S. da

    1989-01-01

    The pre-operational studies, that were elaborated before the beginning of Angra I Power Plant operation, are described in particular the environmental radiological safety area till the fuel loading in the core reactor. Several aspects are included, as socio-economic survey, seismological analysis, Meteorological Program, marine biology, water cooling system, exposure measures of natural radiation, marine sediments characterization in the effluent dispersion area and Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program. The main environmental programs developed for the operational phase of the Angra I Plant are also presented, citing some considerations about the Meteorological Program, Marine Biology Control Program, Temperature and Chlorine Control in Piraquara de Fora Bay, Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program, Sanitary Effluent Control Program and Radiological Emergency Program. (C.G.C.). 2 refs

  19. The regulatory application of authorization in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.; Frullani, S.

    2004-01-01

    Authorization is the process used by governments and regulatory authorities to decide what regulatory controls or conditions, if any, should be applied to radioactive sources or radiation exposure situations in order to protect the public, workers and the environment appropriately. Over the years, governments and regulatory authorities have used various approaches to the authorization process under differing circumstances. Now, with the new draft recommendations from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), there is the prospect of being able to use a single, simple and self-coherent approach for the process of regulatory authorization under all circumstances. Previously, the ICRP recommended the use of various approaches to manage radiological protection situations. For what were called practices, exposures were subject to limits, and optimisation was required below these limits. What were called interventions were subject to intervention levels, above which some action could be considered justified, and which should be optimised based on consideration of how much dose could be averted by the countermeasure considered. Radon in homes was subject to action levels, above which some sort of countermeasure could be recommended. These approaches are all philosophically distinct and logically constructed, but their differences, particularly in the types of numerical criteria used (limits, intervention levels, action levels, etc.) contributed to confusion and misunderstanding. (author)

  20. The A.C.R.O. in Belarus point on the actions led for one year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-09-01

    The project aims to set up a radiological surveillance at the population service and to facilitate the access to the measures and information about the local situation at the villages level. Concretely, it is a question of opening posts of measures in the main villages of the district, of launching campaigns of measures of the internal contamination of the schooled children (anthropo-gamma-metry), to set up a observatory of the radiological situation at the villages level, to facilitate the organization of places of exchange (public meetings, meeting circles), and of information (public display of the measures results) and to develop educational actions in schools. This initiative develops within the framework of the international program C.O.R.E. which federates the projects led on the four most contaminated districts in Belarus. (N.C.)

  1. Teaching the Healthcare Economics Milestones to Radiology Residents: Our Pilot Curriculum Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prober, Allen S; Mehan, William A; Bedi, Harprit S

    2016-07-01

    Since July 2013, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has required radiology residency programs to implement a set of educational milestones to track residents' educational advancement in six core competencies, including Systems-based Practice. The healthcare economics subcompetency of Systems-based Practice has traditionally been relatively neglected, and given the new increased ACGME oversight, will specifically require greater focused attention. A multi-institutional health-care economics pilot curriculum combining didactic and practical components was implemented across five residency programs. The didactic portion included a package of online recorded presentations, reading, and testing materials developed by the American College of Radiology (ACR's) Radiology Leadership Institute. The practical component involved a series of local meetings led by program faculty with the production of a deliverable based on research of local reimbursement for a noncontrast head computed tomography. The capstone entailed the presentation of each program's deliverable during a live teleconference webcast with a Radiology Leadership Institute content expert acting as moderator and discussion leader. The pilot curriculum was well received by residents and faculty moderators, with 100% of survey respondents agreeing that the pilot met its objective of introducing how reimbursement works in American radiology in 2015 and how business terminology applies to their particular institutions. A health-care economics curriculum in the style of a Massive Open Online Course has strong potential to serve as many residency programs' method of choice in meeting the health-care economics milestones. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Missouri state information handbook formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and rgulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Missouri. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; a description of the organization and structure of local governments affected by remedial action at the St. Louis area sites; a summary of relevant local ordinances and regulations; an identification of relevant public interest groups; a list of radio stations, television stations and newspapers that provide public information to the St. Louis area or to Jefferson City; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations

  3. Asian Radiology Forum 2015 for Building an Asian Friendship: A Step toward the Vigorous Intersociety Collaboration in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Jung-Ah

    2016-01-01

    According to the reports presented at the Asian Radiology Forum 2015, organized by the Korean Society of Radiology (KSR) during the Korean Congress of Radiology (KCR) in September 2015 in Seoul, there is an increasing need to promote international exchange and collaboration amongst radiology societies in Asian countries. The Asian Radiology Forum was first held by KSR and the national delegates of Asian radiological partner societies, who attended this meeting with the aim of discussing selected subjects of global relevance in radiology. In 2015, current stands, pros and cons, and future plans for inter-society collaboration between each Asian radiological partner societies were primarily discussed. The Asian radiology societies have international collaborations with each other through various activities, such as joint symposia, exchange programs, social exchange, and international membership. The advantages of continuing inter-society collaboration in most of the Asian radiology societies include international speakers, diverse clinical research, and cutting edge technology; while limited range of financial and human resources, language barrier, differences in goals and expectations are claimed as disadvantages. With regard to the future, most of the Asian radiology societies focus on expanding partner societies and enhancing globalization and collaboration programs through various international meetings and exchange programs. PMID:26957902

  4. Asian radiology forum 2015 for building an Asian friendship: A step toward the vigorous intersociety collaboration in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Jung Ah; Lee, Jong Min

    2016-01-01

    According to the reports presented at the Asian Radiology Forum 2015, organized by the Korean Society of Radiology (KSR) during the Korean Congress of Radiology (KCR) in September 2015 in Seoul, there is an increasing need to promote international exchange and collaboration amongst radiology societies in Asian countries. The Asian Radiology Forum was first held by KSR and the national delegates of Asian radiological partner societies, who attended this meeting with the aim of discussing selected subjects of global relevance in radiology. In 2015, current stands, pros and cons, and future plans for inter-society collaboration between each Asian radiological partner societies were primarily discussed. The Asian radiology societies have international collaborations with each other through various activities, such as joint symposia, exchange programs, social exchange, and international membership. The advantages of continuing inter-society collaboration in most of the Asian radiology societies include international speakers, diverse clinical research, and cutting edge technology; while limited range of financial and human resources, language barrier, differences in goals and expectations are claimed as disadvantages. With regard to the future, most of the Asian radiology societies focus on expanding partner societies and enhancing globalization and collaboration programs through various international meetings and exchange programs

  5. Asian radiology forum 2015 for building an Asian friendship: A step toward the vigorous intersociety collaboration in Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ho Sung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jung Ah [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hallym University Dongtan Sacred Heart Hospital, Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Min [Dept. of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    According to the reports presented at the Asian Radiology Forum 2015, organized by the Korean Society of Radiology (KSR) during the Korean Congress of Radiology (KCR) in September 2015 in Seoul, there is an increasing need to promote international exchange and collaboration amongst radiology societies in Asian countries. The Asian Radiology Forum was first held by KSR and the national delegates of Asian radiological partner societies, who attended this meeting with the aim of discussing selected subjects of global relevance in radiology. In 2015, current stands, pros and cons, and future plans for inter-society collaboration between each Asian radiological partner societies were primarily discussed. The Asian radiology societies have international collaborations with each other through various activities, such as joint symposia, exchange programs, social exchange, and international membership. The advantages of continuing inter-society collaboration in most of the Asian radiology societies include international speakers, diverse clinical research, and cutting edge technology; while limited range of financial and human resources, language barrier, differences in goals and expectations are claimed as disadvantages. With regard to the future, most of the Asian radiology societies focus on expanding partner societies and enhancing globalization and collaboration programs through various international meetings and exchange programs.

  6. Results of the independent verification of radiological remedial action at 496 South Main Street, Monticello, Utah (MS00050)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutcher, J.W.; Smuin, M.W.

    1989-12-01

    In 1980 the site of a vanadium and uranium mill at Monticello, Utah, was accepted into the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Surplus Facilities Management Program, with the objectives of restoring the government-owned mill site to safe levels of radioactivity, disposing of or containing the tailings in an environmentally safe manner, and performing remedial actions on off-site (vicinity) properties that had been contaminated by radioactive material resulting from mill operations. During 1984, UNC Geotech, the remedial action contractor designated by DOE, performed remedial action on the vicinity property at 496 South Main Street, Monticello, Utah. The Pollutant Assessments Group (PAG) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory was assigned the responsibility of verifying the data supporting the adequacy of remedial action and confirming the site's compliance with DOE guidelines. The PAG found that the site successfully meets the DOE remedial action objectives. Procedures used by PAG are described. 3 refs., 2 tabs

  7. Results of the independent verification of radiological remedial action at 416 South Main Street, Monticello, Utah (MS00150)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutcher, J.W.; Wilson, M.J.

    1990-02-01

    In 1980 the site of a vanadium and uranium mill at Monticello, Utah, was accepted into the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Surplus Facilities Management Program, with the objectives of restoring the government-owned mill site to safe levels of radioactivity, disposing of or containing the tailings in an environmentally safe manner, and performing remedial actions on off-site (vicinity) properties that had been contaminated by radioactive material resulting from mill operations. During 1984 and 1985, UNC Geotech, the remedial action contractor designated by DOE, performed remedial action on the vicinity property at 416 South Main Street, Monticello, Utah. The Pollutant Assessments Group (PAG) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory was assigned the responsibility of verifying the data supporting the adequacy of remedial action and confirming the site's compliance with DOE guidelines. The PAG found that the site successfully meets the DOE remedial action objectives. Procedures used by PAG are described. 3 refs., 2 tabs

  8. Results of the independent verification of radiological remedial action at 480 South Main Street, Monticello, Utah (MS00049)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutcher, J.W.; Smuin, M.W.

    1989-05-01

    In 1980 the site of a vanadium and uranium mill at Monticello, Utah, was accepted into the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Surplus Facilities Management Program, with the objectives of restoring the government-owned mill site to safe levels of radioactivity, disposing of or containing the tailings in an environmentally safe manner, and performing remedial actions on off-site (vicinity) properties that has been contaminated by radioactive material resulting from mill operations. During 1984 and 1985, UNC Geotech, the remedial action contractor designated by DOE, performed remedial action on the vicinity property at 480 South Main Street, Monticello, Utah. The Pollutant Assessments Group (PAG) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory was assigned the responsibility of verifying the data supporting the adequacy of remedial action and confirming the site's compliance with DOE guidelines. The PAG found that the site successfully meets the DOE remedial action objectives. Procedures used by PAG are described. 3 refs., 2 tabs

  9. Uranium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH12, Shiprock, NM, October-November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-04-01

    A comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH12 was conducted on an intermittent basis from October 27 to November 22, 1982. At the time of the survey, several exhibition halls and concession stands; an auction yard; a race track and rodeo arena with associated stands, shutes, and corrals; and a hogan were located on the property. The surrounding environs were either sparsely covered with arid vegetation or covered with gravel. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air, soil, and other material samples. The radiological assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity within only one of the structures. Background levels of radioactivity were indicated within all other structures. The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at the rodeo arena and nearby shutes and corrals, encompassing about 49,000 ft 2 of land. Radiochemical analysis of the soil sample collected from this general area indicated 23 +- 2 pCi/g for radium, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface. Elevated levels of radioactivity were also found at the southern end of the west parking lot, encompassing about 7500 ft 2 of land, and at several areas in the southern section of the property, encompassing about 160,000 ft 2 of land. Radiochemical analyses of two of the soil samples collected from the southern section indicated radium concentrations of 43 +- 5 and 42 +- 5 pCi/g of soil, in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background as specified in the EPA Standard. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known

  10. How Young Children Learn to Program with Sensor, Action, and Logic Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyeth, Peta

    2008-01-01

    Electronic Blocks are a new programming environment designed specifically for children aged between 3 and 8 years. These physical, stackable blocks include sensor blocks, action blocks, and logic blocks. By connecting these blocks, children can program a wide variety of structures that interact with one another and the environment. Electronic…

  11. 41 CFR 60-2.10 - General purpose and contents of affirmative action programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... central premise underlying affirmative action is that, absent discrimination, over time a contractor's workforce, generally, will reflect the gender, racial and ethnic profile of the labor pools from which the... include action-oriented programs. If women and minorities are not being employed at a rate to be expected...

  12. Precision Radiology Residency Training: Special Distinction Tracks for Noninterpretative Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Elizabeth; Solnes, Lilja; Horton, Karen M; Johnson, Pamela T

    2018-06-01

    The role of a radiologist has expanded beyond the tripartite mission of patient care, education, and research to include cross-specialty consultation for patient management, innovative solutions to improve health-care quality and safety, device design, and policy advocacy. As such, radiology residency programs should incorporate formalized training to prepare residents for these various professional roles. Since the 2015-2016 academic year, five training tracks focused on noninterpretative skills have been integrated into our residency training program: Clinician Educator, Quality Improvement, Entrepreneurship/Innovation, Health Policy Advocacy, and High-Value Care. Each track is longitudinal, with a set of requirements throughout the residents' training necessary to achieve certification at graduation. To date nine residents have participated in the programs, including two who received distinction in two separate tracks. Residents in each of the tracks have implemented successful initiatives related to the focus area. As such, these tracks enrich training by ensuring that residents make meaningful contributions to the department and institution during their training and disseminate successful initiatives through presentation at national meetings and publications. The duration of a radiology residency and resources available in an academic center provide opportunities for residency program directors to advance residents' skills in important noninterpretative components of radiology practice. Regardless of whether residents pursue academic medicine or private practice, these skills are necessary for graduates to become valuable members of a radiology practice and serve as national leaders in the field of radiology. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ten years after the radiological accident of Goiania, a reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouailhetas, Y.; Xavier, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    This work contains a reflection on the impact of the radiological protection measures taken in the city of Goiania in the aftermath of the accident involving caesium-137, along with a discussion on the biological foundation of these actions. (author)

  14. CDC's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program in Action: Case Studies From State and Local Health Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eatman, Shana; Strosnider, Heather M

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program (Tracking Program) is a multidisciplinary collaboration that involves the ongoing collection, integration, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of data from environmental hazard monitoring, human exposure surveillance, and health effects surveillance. With a renewed focus on data-driven decision-making, the CDC's Tracking Program emphasizes dissemination of actionable data to public health practitioners, policy makers, and communities. The CDC's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking Network), a Web-based system with components at the national, state, and local levels, houses environmental public health data used to inform public health actions (PHAs) to improve community health. This article serves as a detailed landscape on the Tracking Program and Tracking Network and the Tracking Program's leading performance measure, "public health actions." Tracking PHAs are qualitative statements addressing a local problem or situation, the role of the state or local Tracking Program, how the problem or situation was addressed, and the action taken. More than 400 PHAs have been reported by funded state and local health departments since the Tracking Program began collecting PHAs in 2005. Three case studies are provided to illustrate the use of the Tracking Program resources and data on the Tracking Network, and the diversity of actions taken. Through a collaborative network of experts, data, and tools, the Tracking Program and its Tracking Network are actively informing state and local PHAs. In a time of competing priorities and limited funding, PHAs can serve as a powerful tool to advance environmental public health practice.

  15. ActionScript 30 Design Patterns Object Oriented Programming Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, William

    2008-01-01

    If you're an experienced Flash or Flex developer ready to tackle sophisticated programming techniques with ActionScript 3.0, this hands-on introduction to design patterns takes you step by step through the process. You learn about various types of design patterns and construct small abstract examples before trying your hand at building full-fledged working applications outlined in the book.

  16. Data base management for the Remedial Action Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorhees, L.D.; Cushman, R.M.; Faulkner, M.A.; Horwedel, B.M.

    1986-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Remedial Action Program was established to provide appropriate corrective measures at over 140 sites that were contaminated with radioactive and/or hazardous chemical wastes. To achieve this goal, numerous and varied studies are being conducted which will result in the collection of an unprecedented amount of data for the ORNL site. To manage such data effectively and efficiently, a computerized data base is being developed. The data base provides a unified repository for all data generated within the Remedial Action Program, to allow for necessary storage, manipulation, analyses, assessment, display, and report generation. Data base management for the Remedial Action Program is documented in this report by: (1) defining the organization of the data management staff and the services provided; (2) describing the design of the data base, including its management system, organization, and applications; (3) providing examples of the current and anticipated tasks; and (4) discussing quality assurance measures implemented to control the accuracy of the data entries and the security of the data

  17. Radiological Worker Training: Radiological Worker 2 study guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    Upon completion of this training course, the participant will have the knowledge to work safely in areas controlled for radiological purposes using proper radiological practices. Radiological Worker H Training, for the worker whose job assignment involves entry into Radiological Buffer Areas and all types of Radiation Contamination and Airborne Radioactivity Areas. This course is designed to prepare the worker to work safely in and around radiological areas and present methods to use to ensure individual radiation exposure is maintained As Low As Reasonably Achievable

  18. Results of radiological measurements taken in the Niagara Falls, New York, area (NF002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.K.; Berven, B.A.

    1986-11-01

    The results of a radiological survey of 100 elevated gamma radiation anomalies in the Niagara Falls, New York, area are presented. These radiation anomalies were identified by a mobile gamma scanning survey during the period October 3-16, 1984, and were recommended for an onsite survey to determine if the elevated levels of radiation may be related to the transportation of radioactive waste material to the Lake Ontario Ordnance Works for storage. In this survey, radiological measurements included outdoor gamma exposure rates at 1 m above the surface; outdoor gamma exposure rates at the surface, range of gamma exposure rates during scan; and uranium, radium, and thorium concentrations in biased surface soil samples. The results show 38 anomalies (35 located along Pletcher Road and 3 associated with other unreleated locations) were found to exceed Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) remedial action guidelines and were recommended for formal characterization surveys. (Since the time of this survey, remedial actions have been conducted on the 38 anomalies identified as exceeding FUSRAP guidelines, and the radioactive material above guidelines has been removed.) The remaining 62 anomalies are associated with asphalt driveways and parking lots, which used a phosphate slag material (previously identified as cyclowollastonite, synthetic CaSiO 3 ). This rocky-slag waste material was used for bedding under asphalt surfaces and in general gravel applications. Most of the contaminated soil and rock samples collected at the latter anomalies had approximately equal concentrations of 226 Ra and 238 U and, therefore, are not related to materials connected with the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), including material that was transported to the NFSS. 13 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs

  19. Comprehensive Health Care Economics Curriculum and Training in Radiology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiper, Mark; Donovan, Timothy; DeVries, Matthew

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the ability to successfully develop and institute a comprehensive health care economics skills curriculum in radiology residency training utilizing didactic lectures, case scenario exercises, and residency miniretreats. A comprehensive health care economics skills curriculum was developed to significantly expand upon the basic ACGME radiology residency milestone System-Based Practice, SBP2: Health Care Economics requirements and include additional education in business and contract negotiation, radiology sales and marketing, and governmental and private payers' influence in the practice of radiology. A health care economics curriculum for radiology residents incorporating three phases of education was developed and implemented. Phase 1 of the curriculum constituted basic education through didactic lectures covering System-Based Practice, SBP2: Health Care Economics requirements. Phase 2 constituted further, more advanced didactic lectures on radiology sales and marketing techniques as well as government and private insurers' role in the business of radiology. Phase 3 applied knowledge attained from the initial two phases to real-life case scenario exercises and radiology department business miniretreats with the remainder of the radiology department. A health care economics skills curriculum in radiology residency is attainable and essential in the education of future radiology residents in the ever-changing climate of health care economics. Institution of more comprehensive programs will likely maximize the long-term success of radiology as a specialty by identifying and educating future leaders in the field of radiology. Copyright © 2018 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Y-12 Site environmental protection program implementation plan (EPPIP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The Y-12 Plant Environmental Protection Program is conducted to: (1) protect public health and the environment from chemical and radiological releases occurring from current plant operations and past waste management and operational practices; (2) ensure compliance with federal, state, and local environmental regulations and DOE directives; (3) identify potential environmental problems; (4) evaluate existing environmental contamination and determine the need for remedial actions and mitigative measures; (5) monitor the progress of ongoing remedial actions and cleanup measures; and (6) inform the public of environmental issues relating to DOE operations. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, defines the general requirements for environmental protection programs at DOE facilities. This Environmental Protection Program Implementation Plan (EPPIP) defines the methods by which the Y-12 Plant staff will comply with the order by: (1) referencing environmental protection goals and objectives and identifying strategies and timetables for attaining them; (2) providing the overall framework for the design and implementation of the Y-12 Environmental Protection Program; and (3) assigning responsibilities for complying with the requirements of the order. The EPPIP is revised and updated annually.

  1. Y-12 Site environmental protection program implementation plan (EPPIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    The Y-12 Plant Environmental Protection Program is conducted to: (1) protect public health and the environment from chemical and radiological releases occurring from current plant operations and past waste management and operational practices; (2) ensure compliance with federal, state, and local environmental regulations and DOE directives; (3) identify potential environmental problems; (4) evaluate existing environmental contamination and determine the need for remedial actions and mitigative measures; (5) monitor the progress of ongoing remedial actions and cleanup measures; and (6) inform the public of environmental issues relating to DOE operations. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, defines the general requirements for environmental protection programs at DOE facilities. This Environmental Protection Program Implementation Plan (EPPIP) defines the methods by which the Y-12 Plant staff will comply with the order by: (1) referencing environmental protection goals and objectives and identifying strategies and timetables for attaining them; (2) providing the overall framework for the design and implementation of the Y-12 Environmental Protection Program; and (3) assigning responsibilities for complying with the requirements of the order. The EPPIP is revised and updated annually

  2. Radiological clerkships as a critical curriculum component in radiology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V.; Verstraete, Koenraad L.; Valcke, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this research was to explore the perceived value of clinical clerkships in the radiology curriculum as well as the impact of radiology clerkship on students' beliefs about the profession of radiology as a whole and as a career. Methods: This study is a sequel to a previous survey in which student perceptions about radiology curriculum components were investigated. The present study focuses on a further analysis of a subsection in this study, based on 14 statements about radiology clerkship and two statements about radiology as a career. Results: Perceived usefulness of the aspects of radiology clerkship as 'radiology examination', 'skills development' and 'diagnosis focus' were awarded the highest scores. The predict value of the subscale 'radiology examination' on the level of performance was very high (adjusted R 2 = 0.19, p < .001). Conclusion: Students expressed highly favorable evaluation of clerkship as a learning environment to learn to order and to interpret imaging studies as well as an unique possibility to attend various radiological examinations and to access to specific radiology software systems, as well as to get a better view on radiology and to improve image interpretation skills. This positive attitude towards clerkship is closely tied to students' beliefs about the profession of radiology as a whole. These aspects of dedicated radiology clerkship are crucial for effective and high-quality education as well as for the choice of radiology as a career.

  3. Radiological protection and the Fukushima Daiichi accident. Responses of the key international organisations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Christopher

    2017-10-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in March 2011 shook the radiological protection world. All major organisations in the radiological protection field turned their eyes to Japan. Their actions, driven by their mandates, are reflected in their respective landmark reports on the accident. Reports of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, World Health Organisation, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and International Atomic Energy Agency are summarised. Collaboration between key international organisations is strong, based in part on informal interactions which need to be backed up with formal relations to ensure solid long-term collaboration.

  4. Diagnostic radiology 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulis, A.R.; Gooding, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    This is the latest version of the continuing education course on diagnostic radiology given yearly by the Department of Radiology at the University of California, San Francisco. The lectures are grouped into sections on gastrointestinal radiology, mammography, uroradiology, magnetic resonance, hepatobiliary radiology, pediatric radiology, ultrasound, interventional radiology, chest radiology, nuclear medicine, cardiovascular radiology, and skeletal radiology. Each section contains four to eight topics. Each of these consists of text that represents highlights in narrative form, selected illustrations, and a short bibliography. The presentation gives a general idea of what points were made in the lecture

  5. Analyzing the glass ceiling effect among radiologic technologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinsky, Susan B; Blagg, James D

    2011-01-01

    The literature has suggested that advancement within politics, academia and the health professions is influenced by gender. Purpose The authors conducted a survey to determine whether advancement was equal by gender in the radiologic science disciplines of nuclear medicine technology, radiation therapy and radiography. The survey was mailed to 900 subjects, 300 from each discipline. The discipline groups were further stratified by initial year of American Registry of Radiologic Technology certification; the authors selected 100 subjects from each discipline who initially were certified in 1978, 100 in 1988 and 100 in 1998. Approximately 33% of those selected responded. The findings of the study provided no evidence that men are promoted differentially than women. Women perceived that men were paid more for the same work. It appears that gender bias is pervasive outside of promotion decisions and, indeed, that some illegal actions (eg, sexual harassment, inappropriate gender-related interview questions) take place in radiologic science clinical settings. It is hoped that this study will set a baseline for future research on whether there is a glass ceiling effect in radiologic clinical practice and stimulate discussion of the importance of equal opportunity regardless of gender.

  6. ICRP recommendations on 'managing patient dose in digital radiology'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.

    2005-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) approved the publication of a document on 'Managing patient dose in digital radiology' in 2003. The paper describes the content of the report and some of its key points, together with the formal recommendations of the Commission on this topic. With digital techniques exists not only the potential to improve the practice of radiology but also the risk to overuse radiation. The main advantages of digital imaging: wide dynamic range, post-processing, multiple viewing options, electronic transfer and archiving possibilities are clear but overexposures can occur without an adverse impact on image quality. It is expected that the ICRP report helps to profit from the benefits of this important technological advance in medical imaging with the best management of radiation doses to the patients. It is also expected to promote training actions before the digital techniques are introduced in the radiology departments and to foster the industry to offer enough technical and dosimetric information to radiologists, radiographers and medical physicists to help in the optimisation of the imaging. (authors)

  7. www.PedRad.info, the first bilingual case-oriented publication platform for pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, Wolfgang; Paetzel, Martina; Talanow, Roland

    2005-01-01

    On the Internet, there are few pediatric radiology databases. The most important and complete Web site is PediatricRadiology.com, which provides many radiological links but does not have its own database. We present an Internet project called PedRad.info (also known as Kinderradiologie-Online). The open-source, case-oriented publication platform publishes validated pediatric radiology findings on the Internet. A comparable on-line program, even for adult radiology, does not exist, so this tool is a pioneer in the area of Web-based information technology for medical and radiological communities. (orig.)

  8. DOE standard: Radiological control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ''Occupational Radiation Protection''. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835

  9. DOE standard: Radiological control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

  10. Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, M.; Fix, J.J.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Leonowich, J.A.; Palmer, H.E.; Sula, M.J.

    1989-06-01

    The report documents the performance of certain radiological protection sitewide services during calendar year (CY) 1988 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and contractor activities on the Hanford Site. The routine program for each service is discussed along with any significant program changes and tasks, investigations, and studies performed in support of each program. Other related activities such as publications, presentations, and memberships on standard or industry committees are also listed. The programs covered provide services in the areas of (1) internal dosimetry, (2) in vivo measurements, (3) external dosimetry, (4) instrument calibration and evaluation, (5) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) (formerly the National Bureau of Standards), and (6) radiological records. 23 refs., 15 figs., 15 tabs

  11. Modern radiology in oncology and waiting lists for procedures: Breast cancer screening in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimiljan Kadivec

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Good and modern radiology equipment is needed for successful treatment of the oncologic patients. New Department of Radiology of the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana is entirely digital and can compete with the similar radiologic departments all over the world. It si possible to perform all the new modern procedures that the oncologic patients need. Important diagnostic modality is PET CT that fulfill the selection of the diagnostic procedures for cancer patients. The problem of Slovenian radiology is lack of the radiologists. This problem could be solved with telemedicine and properly awarded work that was performed. Waiting lists for procedures like CT, MR, US are short for oncologic patients in comparison with the other radiologic units in Slovenia.Conclusions: At the beginning of the year 2008 we will start the Breast Cancer Screening Program in Slovenia. It is organized by Institute of Oncology Ljubljana (DORA program. Breast cancer screening program will be centralized, in accordance with of the European guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis 2006 (fourth edition and supervision of reference breast screening center. The main goal of the breast cancer screening program in Slovenia is reduction of the breast cancer death for 25 % or more.

  12. Duquesne Light Company 1982 annual radiological environmental report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program conducted during 1982 in the vicinity of the Beaver Valley Power Station and the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The Radiological Environmental Program consists of on-site sampling of water and gaseous effluents and off-site monitoring of water, air, river sediments, soils, food pathway samples, and radiation levels in the vicinity of the site. This report discusses the results of this monitoring during 1982. The results show that Shippingport Atomic Power Station and Beaver Valley Power Station operations have not adversely affected the surrounding environment

  13. Volumetric CT-images improve testing of radiological image interpretation skills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravesloot, Cécile J., E-mail: C.J.Ravesloot@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Schaaf, Marieke F. van der, E-mail: M.F.vanderSchaaf@uu.nl [Department of Pedagogical and Educational Sciences at Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 1, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands); Schaik, Jan P.J. van, E-mail: J.P.J.vanSchaik@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Cate, Olle Th.J. ten, E-mail: T.J.tenCate@umcutrecht.nl [Center for Research and Development of Education at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Gijp, Anouk van der, E-mail: A.vanderGijp-2@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Mol, Christian P., E-mail: C.Mol@umcutrecht.nl [Image Sciences Institute at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Vincken, Koen L., E-mail: K.Vincken@umcutrecht.nl [Image Sciences Institute at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-05-15

    Rationale and objectives: Current radiology practice increasingly involves interpretation of volumetric data sets. In contrast, most radiology tests still contain only 2D images. We introduced a new testing tool that allows for stack viewing of volumetric images in our undergraduate radiology program. We hypothesized that tests with volumetric CT-images enhance test quality, in comparison with traditional completely 2D image-based tests, because they might better reflect required skills for clinical practice. Materials and methods: Two groups of medical students (n = 139; n = 143), trained with 2D and volumetric CT-images, took a digital radiology test in two versions (A and B), each containing both 2D and volumetric CT-image questions. In a questionnaire, they were asked to comment on the representativeness for clinical practice, difficulty and user-friendliness of the test questions and testing program. Students’ test scores and reliabilities, measured with Cronbach's alpha, of 2D and volumetric CT-image tests were compared. Results: Estimated reliabilities (Cronbach's alphas) were higher for volumetric CT-image scores (version A: .51 and version B: .54), than for 2D CT-image scores (version A: .24 and version B: .37). Participants found volumetric CT-image tests more representative of clinical practice, and considered them to be less difficult than volumetric CT-image questions. However, in one version (A), volumetric CT-image scores (M 80.9, SD 14.8) were significantly lower than 2D CT-image scores (M 88.4, SD 10.4) (p < .001). The volumetric CT-image testing program was considered user-friendly. Conclusion: This study shows that volumetric image questions can be successfully integrated in students’ radiology testing. Results suggests that the inclusion of volumetric CT-images might improve the quality of radiology tests by positively impacting perceived representativeness for clinical practice and increasing reliability of the test.

  14. Computerization of radiology departmental management using the personal computer: application in medium sized hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Woo Hyun

    1992-01-01

    The author developed a computer program for use in registration, monthly statistics, printing of reports, data storage and retrieval in the Radiology department. This program has been used in the Department of Radiology, MoonHwa Hospital since November 1990. This program was written in FoxBASE language, consisted of two independent subprograms, one installed in a registration computer without a printer and another in a reporting computer with a printer. The subprograms were designed to link their data by floppy disk. Each computer's hard disk contained permanent files for retrieval and temporary files for data input. All permanent files were indexed on several keywords including the patient's identification data. 1. Registration was performed easily and rapidly. 2. A monthly statistic was obtained simply. 3. Retrieval of the results of previous radiologic studies, printing of report, storage and indexing of data were achieved automatically. This program had merits of simple operation, large storage capacity, rapid retrieval speed, relative low price, easy adjustment for other hospitals. Therefore this program is considered to be an economic substitute for computerization of radiology departmental management in medium sized hospitals

  15. Implementation of a remote system for monitoring of radiological areas of radiological areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez E, Walter; Galuppo G, Emiliano; Gutierrez G, Jorge; Reyes R, Jerson

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: The present work shows the development of a radiation remote monitoring system which control radiological areas in the principal facilities at CCHEN and the development in the last years to use this system called SMARR (Remote Radiological Area Monitoring System). This is an important issue in radiological safety is to know 'on line' and in a 'continuously way' the radiological variables of areas, especially if in these areas people manage radioactive sources or material, the monitoring system are operative on La Reina and Lo Aguirre Nuclear Centers. This 'knowledge' gets a good support to the radiological safety to safeguard the environment and people in the facilities. Nuclear Chilean Commission: Actually, this system is daily operating to register the background radiation and level operation, for example of the facilities research reactor, cyclone, irradiators, in order to probe the behaviors under operational requirements. The system was made using common Geiger Muller and NaI detectors. This signal is received, data by data, for a collector computer which uses a Labview program to do this displayed on a screen computer using graphics to show the activity on a radiological area, and when the lectures pass a setting value automatically the system send by e-mail and text message which also can be received for cell phones enabled for this for the supervisor. Each monitored facility is completely independent of each other and store a data backup, also every installation are monitoring with server computer, it's concentrating the information and allow to view it on line in real time, trough the intranet and internet network. In addition, the information is stored in the special report in the server and available for to do a statistics and identify the operation periods, and control of radioactive sources. The Industry: The radiological protection on industry is necessary today, the typical instrumentation on the industry is growing up in the

  16. RIMS/sup tm/ - radiological information management system: software package EI-029-S86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    RIMS/sup tm/ has been developed for health physics record keeping and reporting. It