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Sample records for actinomycetaceae

  1. A RARE CASE OF THORACIC ACTINOMYCOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Das

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available PRESENTATION OF CASE Actinomycetes are branching gram-positive anaerobic bacteria belonging to Actinomycetaceae family and are commensals in human oropharynx, gastrointestinal tract and female genitalia. Thoracic or pulmonary actinomycosis is an uncommon bacterial infection. The diagnosis of pulmonary or thoracic actinomycosis is often confounding because of its shared clinical features with malignant lung diseases and chronic suppurative lung diseases. However, chest physicians should be aware of actinomycosis being a differential diagnosis in persistent shadows in lung as early diagnosis leads to good prognosis. 1

  2. Genome sequence and description of Actinomyces polynesiensis str. MS2 sp. nov. isolated from the human gut

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    T. Cimmino

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Actinomyces polynesiensis strain MS2 gen. nov., sp. nov. is a newly proposed genus within the family Actinomycetaceae, isolated from the stools of a healthy individual in Raiatea Island (French Polynesia, South Pacific. Actinomyces massiliensis is an anaerobic, Gram-positive organism. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation—2 943 271 bp with a 70.80% G+C content, assembled into 15 scaffolds and containing 2080 genes.

  3. Thoracoabdominal actinomycosis mimicking metastatic disease: case report

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    Ros, L.H.; Villacampa, V.M.; Torres, G.M.; Ros, P.R.

    1999-01-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic suppurative infection with bacteria of the Actinomycetaceae family, characterized by the formation of abundant granular tissue and multiple abscesses. It is a rare entity, and clinical and radiological findings are similar to those in other inflammatory and in neoplastic processes. Actinomycosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis in high-risk patients with predisposing factors, such as alcoholism, poor oral hygiene, maxillofacial trauma, tuberculosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, steroid ingestion or immunodeficiency, and in patients in whom the disease history does not correlate with widespread metastatic involvement. Early diagnosis is important, to prevent disease progression and unnecessary surgery, since the response to drug treatment is very good. We present a case of diffuse actinomycosis involving multiple organs (liver, kidneys, colon, and lungs) that simulated metastatic disease on radiography and computed tomography (CT). (author)

  4. Thoracoabdominal actinomycosis mimicking metastatic disease: case report

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    Ros, L.H.; Villacampa, V.M. [Hospital Miguel Servet, Dept. of Radiology, Zaragoza (Spain); Torres, G.M. [Univ. of Florida, Dept. of Radiology, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Ros, P.R. [Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic suppurative infection with bacteria of the Actinomycetaceae family, characterized by the formation of abundant granular tissue and multiple abscesses. It is a rare entity, and clinical and radiological findings are similar to those in other inflammatory and in neoplastic processes. Actinomycosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis in high-risk patients with predisposing factors, such as alcoholism, poor oral hygiene, maxillofacial trauma, tuberculosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, steroid ingestion or immunodeficiency, and in patients in whom the disease history does not correlate with widespread metastatic involvement. Early diagnosis is important, to prevent disease progression and unnecessary surgery, since the response to drug treatment is very good. We present a case of diffuse actinomycosis involving multiple organs (liver, kidneys, colon, and lungs) that simulated metastatic disease on radiography and computed tomography (CT). (author)

  5. Cecal bacterial communities in wild Japanese rock ptarmigans and captive Svalbard rock ptarmigans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushida, Kazunari; Segawa, Takahiro; Tsuchida, Sayaka; Murata, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Preservation of indigenous gastrointestinal microbiota is deemed to be critical for successful captive breeding of endangered wild animals, yet its biology is poorly understood. Here, we investigated cecal bacterial communities in wild Japanese rock ptarmigans (Lagopus muta japonica) and compared them with those in Svalbard rock ptarmigans (L. m. hyperborea) in captivity. Ultra-deep sequencing of 16S rRNA gene indicated that the community structure of cecal microbiota in wild rock ptarmigans was remarkably different from that in captive Svalbard rock ptarmigans. Fundamental differences between bacterial communities in the two groups of birds were detected at the phylum level. Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Synergistetes were the major phyla detected in wild Japanese rock ptarmigans, whereas Firmicutes alone occupied more than 80% of abundance in captive Svalbard rock ptarmigans. Furthermore, unclassified genera of Coriobacteriaceae, Synergistaceae, Bacteroidaceae, Actinomycetaceae, Veillonellaceae and Clostridiales were the major taxa detected in wild individuals, whereas in zoo-reared birds, major genera were Ruminococcus, Blautia, Faecalibacterium and Akkermansia. Zoo-reared birds seemed to lack almost all rock ptarmigan-specific bacteria in their intestine, which may explain the relatively high rate of pathogenic infections affecting them. We show evidence that preservation and reconstitution of indigenous cecal microflora are critical for successful ex situ conservation and future re-introduction plan for the Japanese rock ptarmigan.

  6. Genome resolved analysis of a premature infant gut microbial community reveals a Varibaculum cambriense genome and a shift towards fermentation-based metabolism during the third week of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher T; Sharon, Itai; Thomas, Brian C; Castelle, Cindy J; Morowitz, Michael J; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-12-17

    The premature infant gut has low individual but high inter-individual microbial diversity compared with adults. Based on prior 16S rRNA gene surveys, many species from this environment are expected to be similar to those previously detected in the human microbiota. However, the level of genomic novelty and metabolic variation of strains found in the infant gut remains relatively unexplored. To study the stability and function of early microbial colonizers of the premature infant gut, nine stool samples were taken during the third week of life of a premature male infant delivered via Caesarean section. Metagenomic sequences were assembled and binned into near-complete and partial genomes, enabling strain-level genomic analysis of the microbial community.We reconstructed eleven near-complete and six partial bacterial genomes representative of the key members of the microbial community. Twelve of these genomes share >90% putative ortholog amino acid identity with reference genomes. Manual curation of the assembly of one particularly novel genome resulted in the first essentially complete genome sequence (in three pieces, the order of which could not be determined due to a repeat) for Varibaculum cambriense (strain Dora), a medically relevant species that has been implicated in abscess formation.During the period studied, the microbial community undergoes a compositional shift, in which obligate anaerobes (fermenters) overtake Escherichia coli as the most abundant species. Other species remain stable, probably due to their ability to either respire anaerobically or grow by fermentation, and their capacity to tolerate fluctuating levels of oxygen. Metabolic predictions for V. cambriense suggest that, like other members of the microbial community, this organism is able to process various sugar substrates and make use of multiple different electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. Genome comparisons within the family Actinomycetaceae reveal important differences