WorldWideScience

Sample records for actinide isotope content

  1. Actinide isotopic analysis systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, Z.M.; Ruhter, W.D.; Gunnink, R.

    1990-01-01

    This manual provides instructions and procedures for using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's two-detector actinide isotope analysis system to measure plutonium samples with other possible actinides (including uranium, americium, and neptunium) by gamma-ray spectrometry. The computer program that controls the system and analyzes the gamma-ray spectral data is driven by a menu of one-, two-, or three-letter options chosen by the operator. Provided in this manual are descriptions of these options and their functions, plus detailed instructions (operator dialog) for choosing among the options. Also provided are general instructions for calibrating the actinide isotropic analysis system and for monitoring its performance. The inventory measurement of a sample's total plutonium and other actinides content is determined by two nondestructive measurements. One is a calorimetry measurement of the sample's heat or power output, and the other is a gamma-ray spectrometry measurement of its relative isotopic abundances. The isotopic measurements needed to interpret the observed calorimetric power measurement are the relative abundances of various plutonium and uranium isotopes and americium-241. The actinide analysis system carries out these measurements. 8 figs

  2. Actinide isotopes in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, E.; Fukai, R.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of actinide isotopes in the environment are important not only from the viewpoint of their radiological effects on human life, but also from the fact that they act as excellent biochemical and geochemical tracers especially in the marine environment. For several of the actinide isotopes there is still a lack of basic data on concentration levels and further investigations on their chemical and physical speciation are required to understand their behaviour in the marine environment. The measured and estimated activity concentration levels of artificial actinides are at present in general a few orders of magnitude lower than those of the natural ones and their concentration factors in biota are relatively low, except in a few species of macroalgae and phytoplankton. The contribution from seafood to total ingestion of actinides by the world population is a few per cent and, therefore, the dose to man from these long-lived radionuclides caused by seafood ingestion is usually low. (orig.)

  3. Production of actinide isotopes in simulated PWR fuel and their influence on inherent neutron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosler, G.E.; Phillips, J.R.; Wilson, W.B.; LaBauve, R.J.; England, T.R.

    1982-07-01

    This report describes calculations that examine the sensitivity of actinide isotopes to various reactor parameters. The impact of actinide isotope build-up, depletion, and decay on the neutron source rate in a spent-fuel assembly is determined, and correlations between neutron source rates and spent-fuel characteristics such as exposure, fissile content, and plutonium content are established. The application of calculations for evaluating experimental results is discussed

  4. Radiochemical studies of neutron deficient actinide isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, K.E.

    1978-04-01

    The production of neutron deficient actinide isotopes in heavy ion reactions was studied using alpha, gamma, x-ray, and spontaneous fission detection systems. A new isotope of berkelium, 242 Bk, was produced with a cross-section of approximately 10 μb in reactions of boron on uranium and nitrogen on thorium. It decays by electron capture with a half-life of 7.0 +- 1.3 minutes. The alpha-branching ratio for this isotope is less than 1% and the spontaneous fission ratio is less than 0.03%. Studies of (Heavy Ion, pxn) and (Heavy Ion, αxn) transfer reactions in comparison with (Heavy ion, xn) compound nucleus reactions revealed transfer reaction cross-sections equal to or greater than the compound nucleus yields. The data show that in some cases the yield of an isotope produced via a (H.I.,pxn) or (H.I.,αxn) reaction may be higher than its production via an xn compound nucleus reaction. These results have dire consequences for proponents of the ''Z 1 + Z 2 = Z/sub 1+2/'' philosophy. It is no longer acceptable to assume that (H.I.,pxn) and (H.I.,αxn) product yields are of no consequence when studying compound nucleus reactions. No evidence for spontaneous fission decay of 228 Pu, 230 Pu, 232 Cm, or 238 Cf was observed indicating that strictly empirical extrapolations of spontaneous fission half-life data is inadequate for predictions of half-lives for unknown neutron deficient actinide isotopes

  5. Radiochemical studies of neutron deficient actinide isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, K.E.

    1978-04-01

    The production of neutron deficient actinide isotopes in heavy ion reactions was studied using alpha, gamma, x-ray, and spontaneous fission detection systems. A new isotope of berkelium, /sup 242/Bk, was produced with a cross-section of approximately 10 ..mu..b in reactions of boron on uranium and nitrogen on thorium. It decays by electron capture with a half-life of 7.0 +- 1.3 minutes. The alpha-branching ratio for this isotope is less than 1% and the spontaneous fission ratio is less than 0.03%. Studies of (Heavy Ion, pxn) and (Heavy Ion, ..cap alpha..xn) transfer reactions in comparison with (Heavy ion, xn) compound nucleus reactions revealed transfer reaction cross-sections equal to or greater than the compound nucleus yields. The data show that in some cases the yield of an isotope produced via a (H.I.,pxn) or (H.I.,..cap alpha..xn) reaction may be higher than its production via an xn compound nucleus reaction. These results have dire consequences for proponents of the ''Z/sub 1/ + Z/sub 2/ = Z/sub 1+2/'' philosophy. It is no longer acceptable to assume that (H.I.,pxn) and (H.I.,..cap alpha..xn) product yields are of no consequence when studying compound nucleus reactions. No evidence for spontaneous fission decay of /sup 228/Pu, /sup 230/Pu, /sup 232/Cm, or /sup 238/Cf was observed indicating that strictly empirical extrapolations of spontaneous fission half-life data is inadequate for predictions of half-lives for unknown neutron deficient actinide isotopes.

  6. Method for adding additional isotopes to actinide-only burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancaster, D.B.; Fuentes, E.; Kang, C.

    1998-01-01

    The Topical Report on Actinide-Only Burnup Credit for Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Packages requires computer code validation to be performed against a benchmark set of chemical assays for isotopic concentration and against a benchmark set of critical experiments for package criticality. Both sets contain all the isotopes included in the methodology. The chemical assays used include the uranium and plutonium isotopes, while the critical experiments were composed of UO 2 or MOX rods, covering the isotopes in the actinide only approach. Since other isotopes are not included in the validation benchmark sets, it would be necessary to justify both the content and worth of any additional isotope for which burnup credit is to be taken (i.e., both the concentration and criticality effect of each particular isotope must be validated). A method is proposed here that can be used for any number of additional isotopes. As does the actinide-only burnup credit methodology, this method makes use of chemical assay data to establish the conservatism in the prediction of each isotope's concentration. Criticality validation is also performed using a benchmark set of UO 2 and MOX critical experiments, where the additional isotopes are validated using worth experiments to conservatively account for any uncertainty in their cross sections. The remaining requirements (analysis and modeling parameters, loading criteria generation, and physical implementation and controls) are performed exactly as described in the actinide-only burnup credit methodology. This report provides insight into each particular requirement in the new methodology

  7. Identification of new neutron-rich actinide isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oura, Yasuji; Sakama, Minoru; Ohyama, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1999-10-01

    To advance research on new neutron-deficient actinide isotopes using an on-line isotope separator combined with a gas-jet injector installed in the JAERI Tandem accelerator, Tokai, performance test of the equipment was carried out. Efficiency of the product isotopes being transported from the target chamber to the measuring system was greatly improved by employing lead iodides (PbI{sub 2}) as the aerosol carrier. With the help of this technique, the authors succeeded in synthesizing and identifying actinide isotopes, {sup 235}Am and {sup 236}Am, and measured their alpha-decay half-life. (S. Ohno)

  8. Isotopic and criticality validation for actinide-only burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, E.; Lancaster, D.; Rahimi, M.

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used for actinide-only burnup credit isotopic validation and criticality validation are presented and discussed. Trending analyses have been incorporated into both methodologies, requiring biases and uncertainties to be treated as a function of the trending parameters. The isotopic validation is demonstrated using the SAS2H module of SCALE 4.2, with the 27BURNUPLIB cross section library; correction factors are presented for each of the actinides in the burnup credit methodology. For the criticality validation, the demonstration is performed with the CSAS module of SCALE 4.2 and the 27BURNUPLIB, resulting in a validated upper safety limit

  9. Isotopic biases for actinide-only burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimi, M.; Lancaster, D.; Hoeffer, B.; Nichols, M.

    1997-01-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to present the new methodology for establishing bias and uncertainty associated with isotopic prediction in spent fuel assemblies for burnup credit analysis. The analysis applies to the design of criticality control systems for spent fuel casks. A total of 54 spent fuel samples were modeled and analyzed using the Shielding Analyses Sequence (SAS2H). Multiple regression analysis and a trending test were performed to develop isotopic correction factors for 10 actinide burnup credit isotopes. 5 refs., 1 tab

  10. Isotopic validation for PWR actinide-only burnup credit using Yankee Rowe data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    Safety analyses of criticality control systems for transportation packages include an assumption that the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) loaded into the package is fresh or unirradiated. In other words, the spent fuel is assumed to have its original, as-manufactured U-235 isotopic content. The ''fresh fuel'' assumption is very conservative since the potential reactivity of the nuclear fuel is substantially reduced after being irradiated in the reactor core. The concept of taking credit for this reduction in nuclear fuel reactivity due to burnup of the fuel, instead of using the fresh fuel assumption in the criticality safety analysis, is referred to as ''Burnup Credit.'' Burnup credit uses the actual physical composition of the fuel and accounts for the net reduction of fissile material and the buildup of neutron absorbers in the fuel as it is irradiated. Neutron absorbers include actinides and other isotopes generated as a result of the fission process. Using only the change in actinide isotopes in the burnup credit criticality analysis is referred to as ''Actinide-Only Burnup Credit.'' The use of burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems enables more spent fuel to be placed in a package. Increased package capacity results in a reduced number of storage, shipping and disposal containers for a given number of SNF assemblies. Fewer shipments result in a lower risk of accidents associated with the handling and transportation of spent fuel, thus reducing both radiological and nonradiological risk to the public. This paper describes the modeling and the results of comparison between measured and calculated isotopic inventories for a selected number of samples taken from a Yankee Rowe spent fuel assembly

  11. Actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinot, L.; Fuger, J.

    1985-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of the actinides is explained on the basis of their electronic structure. The actinide elements, actinium, thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium, berkelium, californium, einsteinium, fermium, mendelevium, nobelium, and laurencium are included. For all except the last three elements, the points of discussion are oxidation states, Gibbs energies and potentials, and potential diagram for the element in acid solution; and thermodynamic properties of these same elements are tabulated. References are cited following discussion of each element with a total of 97 references being cited. 13 tables

  12. OSMOSE experiment: high minor actinides contents pellets and pins fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankowiak, A.; Leorier, C.; Desmouliere, F.; Donnet, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA/DEN/VRH/DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France); Antony, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA/DEN/CAD/DER/SPEX/LPE, 13108 St Paul Lez Durance cedex (France); Bernard, D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA/DEN/ CAD/DER /SPRC/LEPh, 13108 St Paul Lez Durance cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    The OSMOSE program aims to provide accurate experimental data on integral neutron cross-sections of isotopes (i.e.: Th{sup 232}, U{sup 233}, U{sup 234}, U{sup 235}, U{sup 236}, U{sup 238}, Np{sup 237}, Pu{sup 238}, Pu{sup 239}, Pu{sup 240}, Pu{sup 241}, Pu{sup 242}, Am{sup 241}, Am{sup 243}, Cm{sup 244} and Cm{sup 245}). The study of these nuclides is performed on a large range of neutron spectra corresponding to specific experimental conditions (thermal, epithermal, moderated/fast, and fast spectra). This program will be used to provide guidance to all nuclear data programs in the world. This program has led to an optimized fabrication process for OSMOSE pellets and pins which were fabricated by the LEMA (Actinide based Materials Study Laboratory) in the ATALANTE facility both in glove box and shielded cell. The fabrication process made possible to obtain the required material characteristics including a high density, a good distribution of the isotopes in the uranium oxide matrices. A particular attention was paid to reduce chemical pollution of the samples. The program has been successfully achieved in July 2007 with the fabrication of the last two Cm doped samples. (authors)

  13. LSDS Development for Isotopic Fissile Content Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Deok; Park, Chang Je; Park, Geun Il; Lee, Jung Won; Song, Kee Chan

    2010-01-01

    Concerning the sustainable energy supply and green house effect, nuclear energy became the most feasible option to meet the energy demand in Korea. However, the production of the spent nuclear fuel is the inevitable situation. Since the first nuclear power plant started to produce the electricity in Korea, the accumulated amount of spent fuels exceeded 10k tomes recently. The accumulation of the spent fuels is the big issue in the society. Therefore, as an option which strengthens the nuclear proliferation resistance and reduces the amount of spent fuels, sodium fast reactor (SFR) program linked with pyro-processing is under development to re-use the PWR spent fuel and produce the energy. In the process, the produced metallic material involves uranium and TRU (transuranic; neptunium, plutonium, and americium). The uranium-TRU is used to fabricate SFR fuel. The burning the recycled fuel in the reactor is to solve the current spent fuel storage problem and to minimize the actinides accumulation having long half-life. Generally, the spent fuel from PWR has unburned ∼1 % U235, produced ∼0.5 % plutonium from decay chain, ∼3 % fission products, ∼ 0.1 % minor actinides (MA) and uranium remainder. About 1.5 % fissile materials still exist in the spent fuel. Therefore, spent fuel is not only waste but energy resource. The direct and isotopic fissile content assay is the crucial technology for the spent fuel reuse. Additionally, the fissile content analysis will contribute to the optimum storage design and safe spent fuel management. Several nondestructive technologies have been developed for the spent fuel assay; gamma ray measurement, passive and active neutron measurements. Spent fuel emits intense gamma rays and neutrons by (a, n) and spontaneous fission. This intense background has the limitation on the direct analysis of fissile materials. Recently, to analyze the individual fissile content, leadslowing down spectrometer (LSDS) has been being developed in Korea

  14. Microcalorimeter Q-spectroscopy for rapid isotopic analysis of trace actinide samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croce, M.P., E-mail: mpcroce@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bond, E.M.; Hoover, A.S.; Kunde, G.J.; Mocko, V.; Rabin, M.W.; Weisse-Bernstein, N.R.; Wolfsberg, L.E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bennett, D.A.; Hays-Wehle, J.; Schmidt, D.R.; Ullom, J.N. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-06-01

    We are developing superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters that are optimized for rapid isotopic analysis of trace actinide samples by Q-spectroscopy. By designing mechanically robust TESs and simplified detector assembly methods, we have developed a detector for Q-spectroscopy of actinides that can be assembled in minutes. We have characterized the effects of each simplification and present the results. Finally, we show results of isotopic analysis of plutonium samples with Q-spectroscopy detectors and compare the results to mass spectrometry.

  15. Microcalorimeter Q-spectroscopy for rapid isotopic analysis of trace actinide samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croce, M.P.; Bond, E.M.; Hoover, A.S.; Kunde, G.J.; Mocko, V.; Rabin, M.W.; Weisse-Bernstein, N.R.; Wolfsberg, L.E.; Bennett, D.A.; Hays-Wehle, J.; Schmidt, D.R.; Ullom, J.N.

    2015-01-01

    We are developing superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters that are optimized for rapid isotopic analysis of trace actinide samples by Q-spectroscopy. By designing mechanically robust TESs and simplified detector assembly methods, we have developed a detector for Q-spectroscopy of actinides that can be assembled in minutes. We have characterized the effects of each simplification and present the results. Finally, we show results of isotopic analysis of plutonium samples with Q-spectroscopy detectors and compare the results to mass spectrometry

  16. An easy method for the determination of Ra isotopes and actinide alpha emitters from the same water sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moron, M.C.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Garcia-Montano, E.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Madurga, G.

    1986-01-01

    Radium isotopes and actinide α emitters are easily determined from the same water sample. The Ra fraction is obtained by coprecipitation with Ba, while a Fe coprecipitation is used for the actinides. Both fractions are measured with a gas-flow proportional counter. Additionally the isotopic Ra composition is obtained by measuring at two or three different times the α activity from the Ra-fraction. The method is applied to rain water and drinking water samples. (author)

  17. U/Th-isotopes as natural analogues for the mobility of actinides in granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengel, K.; Gerdes, A.

    2001-01-01

    The short-lived decay products of 238 U ( 234 U and 230 Th) can be used as natural analogues for actinides in a hard rock repository. Their mobility in the past may serve as a key for understanding actinide migration in the future. For generally old calcites of the HRL Aespoethe age of disturbance of 238 U/ 234 U and 234 U/ 230 Th activity ratios ranges from 30 000 to 436 000 years at degrees of disturbance ranging from 0.5 to 6.7. The results obtained imply that during the past 440 000 years U was mobile throughout the tunnel sections of the HRL Aespoeinvestigated here. For the FL Grimsel, the disequilibrium states of the 234 U/ 238 U and 230 Th/ 234 U activity ratios in fracture minerals (calcites silicates) also imply that the reactions causing isotopic disturbances have occurred within the past 500 000 years. The U/Th-isotope data of both the samples from the HRL Aespoeand the FL Grimsel have in common the mobilization of U in secondary fracture minerals by migrating solutions within the past 500 000 years. As for the question of a final disposal of radioactive waste in granite host rocks, the transport of U - and thus of similarly behaving actinides - in migrating underground solutions can therefore not be ruled out, if suitable hydraulic systems are considered. (orig.)

  18. Actinide separation by electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusselman, S.P.; Gay, R.L.; Grantham, L.F.; Grimmett, D.L.; Roy, J.J.; Inoue, T.; Hijikata, T.; Krueger, C.L.; Storvick, T.S.; Takahashi, N.

    1995-01-01

    TRUMP-S is a pyrochemical process being developed for the recovery of actinides from PUREX wastes. This paper describes development of the electrochemical partitioning step for recovery of actinides in the TRUMP-S process. The objectives are to remove 99 % of each actinide from PUREX wastes, with a product that is > 90 % actinides. Laboratory tests indicate that > 99 % of actinides can be removed in the electrochemical partitioning step. A dynamic (not equilibrium) process model predicts that 90 wt % product actinide content can be achieved through 99 % actinide removal. Accuracy of model simulation results were confirmed in tests with rare earths. (authors)

  19. Development and testing of metallic fuels with high minor actinide content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, M.K.; Hayes, S.L.; Kennedy, J.R.; Keiser, D.D.; Hilton, B.A.; Frank, S.M.; Kim, Y.-S.; Chang, G.; Ambrosek, R.G.

    2003-01-01

    Metallic alloys are promising candidates for use as fuels for transmutation and in advanced closed nuclear cycles. Metallic alloys have high heavy metal atom density, relatively high thermal conductivity, favorable gas release behavior, and lend themselves to remote recycle processes. Both non-fertile and uranium-bearing metal fuels containing minor actinide are under consideration for use as transmutation fuels by the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC) program, however, little irradiation performance data exists for fuel forms containing significant fractions of minor actinides. The first irradiation tests of non-fertile high-actinide-content fuels are scheduled to begin in early 2003 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The irradiation test matrix was designed to provide basic information on the irradiation behavior of binary Pu-Zr alloy fuel and the effect of the minor actinides americium and neptunium on alloy fuel behavior, together and separately. Five variants of transuranic containing zirconium-based alloy fuels are included in the AFC-1 irradiation test matrix. These are (in wt.%) Pu-40Zr, Pu-60Zr, Pu-12Am-40Zr, Pu-10Np-40Zr and Pu-10Np-10Am-40Zr. PuN-ZrN based fuels containing Am and Np are also included. All five of the fuel alloys have been fabricated in the form of cylindrical fuel slugs by arc-casting. Short melt times, on the order or 5-20 seconds, prevent the volatilization of significant quantities of americium metal, despite the high melt temperatures characteristic of the arc-melting process. Alloy microstructure have been characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Thermal analysis has also been performed. The AFC-1 irradiation experiment configuration consists of twenty-four sodium bonded fuel specimens sealed in helium filled secondary capsules. The first capsule has a design burnup to 7 at.% 239 Pu; goal peak burnup of the second capsule is ∼18 at%. Capsule assemblies are placed within an aluminum flow-through basket

  20. Preliminary minimum detectable limit measurements in 208-L drums for selected actinide isotopes in mock-waste matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, D.C.; Wang, Tzu-Fang; Martz, H.E.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary minimum detectable levels (MDLS) of selected actinide isotopes have been determined in full-scale, 55-gallon drums filled with a range of mock-waste materials from combustibles (0.14 g/CM 3 ) to sand (1.7 g/CM 3 ). Measurements were recorded from 100 to 10,000 seconds with selected actinide sources located in these drums at an edge position, on the center axis of a drum and midway between these two positions. Measurements were also made with a 166 Ho source to evaluate the attenuation of these mock-matrix materials as a function of energy. By knowing where the source activity is located within a drum, our preliminary results show that a simply collimated 90% HPGE detector can differentiate between TRU (>100 nCi/g) and LLW amounts of 239 Pu in only 100s of measurement time and with sufficient accuracy in both low and medium density, low Z materials. Other actinides measured so far include 235 U, 241 Am, and 244 Cm. These measurements begin to establish the probable MDLs achievable in the nondestructive assays of real waste drums when using active and passive CT. How future measurements may differ from these preliminary measurements is also discussed

  1. Search for EC-decayed neutron-deficient actinide isotopes using gas-jet coupled JAERI-ISOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Kazuaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-07-01

    To study the nuclear properties of unknown neutron deficient actinide isotopes which decay mainly via orbital electron capture (EC), we have developed a composite system consisting of a gas-jet transport apparatus and a thermal ion-source at the JAERI-ISOL. With this system, search for {sup 236}Am produced in the {sup 235}U({sup 6}Li, 5n) reaction has been performed. Pu KX-rays associated with the EC decay of {sup 236}Am are observed at the mass-236 fraction. The half-life of {sup 236}Am is evaluated to be 4.4min. The outline of the gas-jet coupled JAERI-ISOL system and typical performance are given. (author)

  2. On the influence of the americium isotopic vector on the cooling time of minor actinides bearing blankets in fast reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kooyman Timothée

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the heterogeneous minor actinides transmutation approach, the nuclei to be transmuted are loaded in dedicated targets often located at the core periphery, so that long-lived heavy nuclides are turned into shorter-lived fission products by fission. To compensate for low flux level at the core periphery, the minor actinides content in the targets is set relatively high (around 20 at.%, which has a negative impact on the reprocessing of the targets due to their important decay heat level. After a complete analysis of the main contributors to the heat load of the irradiated targets, it is shown here that the choice of the reprocessing order of the various feeds of americium from the fuel cycle depends on the actual limit for fuel reprocessing. If reprocessing of hot targets is possible, it is more interesting to reprocess first the americium feed with a high 243Am content in order to limit the total cooling time of the targets, while if reprocessing of targets is limited by their decay heat, it is more interesting to wait for an increase in the 241Am content before loading the americium in the core. An optimization of the reprocessing order appears to lead to a decrease of the total cooling time by 15 years compared to a situation where all the americium feeds are mixed together when two feeds from SFR are considered with a high reprocessing limit.

  3. Actinides record, power calculations and activity for present isotopes in the spent fuel of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enriquez C, P.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Lucatero, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    The administration of spent fuel is one of the more important stages of the nuclear fuel cycle, and this has become a problem of supreme importance in countries that possess nuclear reactors. Due to this in this work, the study on the actinides record and present fission products to the discharge of the irradiated fuel in a light water reactor type BWR is shown, to quantify the power and activity that emit to the discharge and during the cooling time. The analysis was realized on a fuel assembly type 10 x 10 with an enrichment average of 3.69 wt % in U-235 and the assembly simulation assumes four cycles of operation of 18 months each one and presents an exposition of 47 G Wd/Tm to the discharge. The module OrigenArp of the Scale 6 code is the computation tool used for the assembly simulation and to obtain the results on the actinides record presents to the fuel discharge. The study covers the following points: a) Obtaining of the plutonium vector used in the fuel production of mixed oxides, and b) Power calculation and activity for present actinides to the discharge. The results presented in this work, correspond at the same time immediate of discharge (0 years) and to a cooling stage in the irradiated fuel pool (5 years). (Author)

  4. The application of scanning electron microscopy to the determination of elemental and isotopic composition in individual actinide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatter, I.; Cattle, G.; Tushingham, J.

    2000-01-01

    Techniques for the determination of both elemental and isotopic composition of actinides within single particles are required by the IAEA in support of their environmental safeguards programme. SEM and SIMS are valuable techniques for the measurement of elemental and isotopic composition, respectively, on the particle scale. The potential for effective combination of SEM and SIMS has been investigated at Harwell Laboratory. In trials, copper finder grids have been successfully used to enable re-identification of particles between SEM and SIMS instruments. Use of the grids enables rapid relocation of particles pre-selected by SEM for SIMS measurement. The work has highlighted a possible matrix effect in plutonium measurement that results in variable sensitivity dependent on the presence of other elements (including uranium). This effect would limit the use of SIMS to obtain elemental ratios, and highlights the requirement to use both SEM and SIMS to gain full and accurate information. The possible use of autoradiography as an adjunct to SEM has been investigated. In principle, autoradiography could be used to identify higher enrichments of uranium and enable pre-selection of particles for SIMS measurement. During trials, practical problems have been encountered which have demonstrated this particular approach to be unsuitable. (author)

  5. Applications of the nuclear theory to the computation of neutron cross sections for actinide isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konshin, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    Neutron cross section calculational methods for actinides in the unresolved resonance energy range (1-150 kev) are discussed, with a special emphasis on calculation of width fluctuation factors for the generalized distribution, as well as for a sub-threshold fission. It is shown that the energy dependence of sub(J), the (n,n') -process competition and the structure in neutron cross section has to be taken into account in the energy range considered. Analysis of different approaches in the statistical theory for heavy nuclei neutron cross-section calculation is given, and it is shown to be important to allow for the (n,γf)-reaction in neutron cross section calculations for fissile nuclei. The use of the non-spherical potential, the Lorentzian spectral factor and the Fermi-gas model involving the collective modes enables to obtain the self-consistent data for all neutron cross sections, including σnγ. (author)

  6. AMS of actinides in ground- and seawater: a new procedure for simultaneous analysis of U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm isotopes below ppq levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinto, Francesca; Lagos, Markus; Plaschke, Markus; Schaefer, Thorsten; Geckeis, Horst [Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung, KIT, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Steier, Peter [VERA Laboratory, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-07-01

    U-236, Np-237, Pu isotopes and Am-243 were determined in ground- and seawater samples at levels below ppq with a maximum sample size of 0.250 l. Such high sensitivity measurement was possible by using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) with an improved gas stripping and an additional high resolving magnet. The use of non-isotopic tracers was investigated in order to allow the determination of those nuclides, namely Np-237 and Am-243, for which isotopic tracers for mass spectrometry are rarely available. The actinides were concentrated from the sample matrix via iron hydroxide co-precipitation and measured sequentially without previous chemical separation from each other. The analytical method was validated with the analysis of IAEA 443 seawater Reference Material and applied to background samples from the Colloid Formation and Migration project at the Grimsel Test Site and to sea- and freshwater samples affected solely by global fallout. The sensitivity of the presented analytical method provides the capability to study the long-term release of actinide tracers in field experiments as well as the transport of actinides in a variety of environmental systems.

  7. Diets of introduced predators using stable isotopes and stomach contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckstroth, A.M.; Miles, A.K.; Chandra, S.

    2007-01-01

    In a study of predation on ground-nesting birds at South San Francisco Bay (South Bay), California, USA, we analyzed stomach contents and stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen to identify commonly consumed prey. We obtained the stomach contents from 206 nonnative red foxes (Vulpes vulpes regalis) collected in the South Bay area and Monterey County during 1995-2001 and from 68 feral cats (Felis silvestris) from the South Bay area during 2001-2002. We determined prey identity, biomass, and frequency, described seasonal diet trends, and derived an Index of Relative Importance. Avian species were the most frequent prey we found in the stomachs of red foxes from South Bay (61%), whereas small rodents were most frequent for red foxes from Monterey County (62%). Small rodents were the most frequent prey we found in feral cats (63%). Carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures for foxes supported stomach content findings. However, isotope results indicated that cats received a majority of their energy from a source other than rodents and outside the natural system, which differed from the stomach content analysis. We demonstrated the utility of both stable isotope and stomach content analyses to establish a more complete understanding of predators' diets. This information aids natural resource managers in planning and evaluating future predator-removal programs and increases our understanding of the impacts of nonnative foxes and cats on native species.

  8. Determination of fission products and actinides by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry using isotope dilution analysis. A study of random and systematic errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignacio Garcia Alonso, Jose

    1995-01-01

    The theory of the propagation of errors (random and systematic) for isotope dilution analysis (IDA) has been applied to the analysis of fission products and actinide elements by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Systematic errors in ID-ICP-MS arising from mass-discrimination (mass bias), detector non-linearity and isobaric interferences in the measured isotopes have to be corrected for in order to achieve accurate results. The mass bias factor and the detector dead-time can be determined by using natural elements with well-defined isotope abundances. A combined method for the simultaneous determination of both factors is proposed. On the other hand, isobaric interferences for some fission products and actinides cannot be eliminated using mathematical corrections (due to the unknown isotope abundances in the sample) and a chemical separation is necessary. The theory for random error propagation in IDA has been applied to the determination of non-natural elements by ICP-MS taking into account all possible sources of uncertainty with pulse counting detection. For the analysis of fission products, the selection of the right spike isotope composition and spike to sample ratio can be performed by applying conventional random propagation theory. However, it has been observed that, in the experimental determination of the isotope abundances of the fission product elements to be determined, the correction for mass-discrimination and the correction for detector dead-time losses contribute to the total random uncertainty. For the instrument used in the experimental part of this study, it was found that the random uncertainty on the measured isotope ratios followed Poisson statistics for low counting rates whereas, for high counting rates, source instability was the main source of error

  9. Stable isotope content of South African river water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talma, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    Variations of the isotopic ratios 18 O/ 16 O and D/H in natural waters reflect the variety of processes to which the water was subjected within the hydrological cycle. Time series of the 18 O content of the major South African rivers over a few years have been obtained in order to characterise the main features of these variations in both time and space. Regionally the average '1 8 O content of river water reflects that of the prevailing rains within the catchment. 18 O variations with time are mainly correlated with river flow rates. Impoundments upstream and management of river flows reduce this correlation. Isotope variations along the course of a river show the effects of inflow from smaller streams and evaporation in the river or its impoundments. These observations indicate the use of isotopic methods to study the evaporation and mixing of river water and its interaction with the surrounding environment

  10. Stable isotope compositions of organic carbon and contents of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The stable isotope compositions of organic carbon (OC), and contents of OC and nitrogen for four sediment cores recovered from lakes Makat (located in the Ngorongoro Crater), Ndutu and Masek (located in the Serengeti Plains) are used to document sources of organic matter (OM) and climatic changes in sub-arid ...

  11. Study of five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces for actinide isotopes by the macroscopic-microscopic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, T. S.; Wang, Z. M.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, W. J.; Zhong, C. L.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, the nuclear potential-energy of the deformed nuclei as a function of shape coordinates is calculated in a five-dimensional (5D) parameter space of the axially symmetric generalized Lawrence shapes, on the basis of the macroscopic-microscopic method. The liquid-drop part of the nuclear energy is calculated according to the Myers-Swiatecki model and the Lublin-Strasbourg-drop (LSD) formula. The Woods-Saxon and the folded-Yukawa potentials for deformed nuclei are used for the shell and pairing corrections of the Strutinsky-type. The pairing corrections are calculated at zero temperature, T, related to the excitation energy. The eigenvalues of Hamiltonians for protons and neutrons are found by expanding the eigen-functions in terms of harmonic-oscillator wave functions of a spheroid. Then the BCS pair is applied on the smeared-out single-particle spectrum. By comparing the results obtained by different models, the most favorable combination of the macroscopic-microscopic model is known as the LSD formula with the folded-Yukawa potential. Potential-energy landscapes for actinide isotopes are investigated based on a grid of more than 4,000,000 deformation points and the heights of static fission barriers are obtained in terms of a double-humped structure on the full 5D parameter space. In order to locate the ground state shapes, saddle points, scission points and optimal fission path on the calculated 5D potential-energy surface, the falling rain algorithm and immersion method are designed and implemented. The comparison of our results with available experimental data and others' theoretical results confirms the reliability of our calculations.

  12. Consistent Data Assimilation of Actinide Isotopes: 235U and 239Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmiottti, G.; Hiruta, H.; Salvatores, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this annual report we illustrate the methodology of the consistent data assimilation that allows to use the information coming from integral experiments for improving the basic nuclear parameters used in cross section evaluation. A series of integral experiments were analyzed using the EMPIRE evaluated files for 235 U, 238 U, and 239 Pu. Inmost cases the results have shown quite large worse results with respect to the corresponding existing evaluations available for ENDF/B-VII. The observed discrepancies between calculated and experimental results were used in conjunction with the computed sensitivity coefficients and covariance matrix for nuclear parameters in a consistent data assimilation. Only the GODIVA and JEZEBEL experimental results were used, in order to exploit information relative to the isotope of interest that are, in this particular case: 235 U and 239 Pu. The results obtained by the consistent data assimilation indicate that with reasonable modifications (mostly within the initial standard deviation) it is possible to eliminate the original large discrepancies on the K eff of the two critical configurations. However, some residual discrepancy remains for a few fission spectral indices that are, most likely, to be attributed to the detector cross sections.

  13. Stable isotope methods: The effect of gut contents on isotopic ratios of zooplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J. M.; McQuaid, C. D.

    2011-05-01

    In the past decade there has been an increased awareness of the potential for methodological bias resulting from multiple pre-analytical procedures in foodweb interpretations based on stable isotope techniques. In the case of small organisms, this includes the effect of gut contents on whole body signatures. Although gut contents may not reflect actual assimilation, their carbon and nitrogen values will be isotopically lighter than after the same material has been assimilated. The potential skewing of isotopic ratios in whole organism samples is especially important for aquatic environments as many studies involve trophic relationships among small zooplankton. This is particularly important in pelagic waters, where herbivorous zooplankton comprise small taxa. Hence this study investigated the effect of gut contents on the δ13C and δ15N ratios of three size classes of zooplankton (1.0-2.0, 2.0-4.0 and >4.0 mm) collected using bongo net tows in the tropical waters of the south-west Indian Ocean. Animals were collected at night, when they were likely to be feeding, sieved into size classes and separated into genera. We focused on Euphausia spp which dominated zooplankton biomass. Three treatment types were processed: bulk animals, bulk animals without guts and tail muscle from each size class at 10 bongo stations. The δ15N ratios were influenced by zooplankton size class, presumably reflecting ontogenetic changes in diet. ANOVA post hoc results and correlations in δ15N signatures among treatments suggest that gut contents may not affect overall nitrogen signatures of Euphausia spp., but that δ13C signatures may be significantly altered by their presence. Carbon interpretations however, were complicated by potential effects of variation in chitin, lipids and metabolism among tissues and the possibility of opportunistic omnivory. Consequently we advocate gut evacuation before sacrifice in euphausiids if specific tissue dissection is impractical and recommend

  14. Minor actinide transmutation in accelerator driven systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friess, Friederike [IANUS, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Transmutation of radioactive waste, the legacy of nuclear energy use, gains rising interest. This includes the development of facilities able to transmute minor actinides (MA) into stable or short-lived isotopes before final disposal. The most common proposal is to use a double-strata approach with accelerator-driven-systems (ADS) for the efficient transmutation of MA and power reactors to dispose plutonium. An ADS consists of a sub-critical core that reaches criticality with neutrons supplied by a spallation target. An MCNP model of the ADS system Multi Purpose Research Reactor for Hightech Applications will be presented. Depletion calculations have been performed for both standard MOX fuel and transmutation fuel with an increased content of minor actinides. The resulting transmutation rates for MAs are compared to published values. Special attention is given to selected fission products such as Tc-99 and I-129, which impact the radiation from the spent fuel significantly.

  15. Actinide metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Paul L. [Geochem Australia, Kiama, NSW (Australia); Ekberg, Christian [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Nuclear Chemistry/Industrial Materials Recycling

    2016-07-01

    All isotopes of actinium are radioactive and exist in aqueous solution only in the trivalent state. There have been very few studies on the hydrolytic reactions of actinium(III). The hydrolysis reactions for uranium would only be important in alkaline pH conditions. Thermodynamic parameters for the hydrolysis species of uranium(VI) and its oxide and hydroxide phases can be determined from the stability and solubility constants. The hydrolytic behaviour of neptunium(VI) is quite similar to that of uranium(VI). The solubility constant of NpO{sub 2}OH(am) has been reported a number of times for both zero ionic strength and in fixed ionic strength media. Americium can form four oxidation states in aqueous solution, namely trivalent, tetravalent, pentavalent and hexavalent. Desire, Hussonnois and Guillaumont determined stability constants for the species AmOH{sup 2+} for the actinides, plutonium(III), americium(III), curium(III), berkelium(III) and californium(III) using a solvent extraction technique.

  16. Actinide metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Paul L.; Ekberg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    All isotopes of actinium are radioactive and exist in aqueous solution only in the trivalent state. There have been very few studies on the hydrolytic reactions of actinium(III). The hydrolysis reactions for uranium would only be important in alkaline pH conditions. Thermodynamic parameters for the hydrolysis species of uranium(VI) and its oxide and hydroxide phases can be determined from the stability and solubility constants. The hydrolytic behaviour of neptunium(VI) is quite similar to that of uranium(VI). The solubility constant of NpO 2 OH(am) has been reported a number of times for both zero ionic strength and in fixed ionic strength media. Americium can form four oxidation states in aqueous solution, namely trivalent, tetravalent, pentavalent and hexavalent. Desire, Hussonnois and Guillaumont determined stability constants for the species AmOH 2+ for the actinides, plutonium(III), americium(III), curium(III), berkelium(III) and californium(III) using a solvent extraction technique.

  17. Safe actinide disposition in molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gat, U.

    1997-01-01

    Safe molten salt reactors (MSR) can readily accommodate the burning of all fissile actinides. Only minor compromises associated with plutonium are required. The MSRs can dispose safely of actinides and long lived isotopes to result in safer and simpler waste. Disposing of actinides in MSRs does increase the source term of a safety optimized MSR. It is concluded that the burning and transmutation of actinides in MSRs can be done in a safe manner. Development is needed for the processing to handle and separate the actinides. Calculations are needed to establish the neutron economy and the fuel management. 9 refs

  18. Variation in the isotopic content of precipitation with altitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stowhas, L.; Silva, C.; Moser, H.; Stichler, W.

    1975-03-01

    Monthly precipitation and single storms have been collected during three years at 12 stations along a W-E profile in Chile, going from Juan Fernandez Islands to Valparaiso, Santiago and Infiernillo in the Andes, and analysed for their deuterium content. The deltaD values are correlated with the altitude of the station, the mean temperature - which also largely depends on the altitude - and the distance from the sea. The correlation parameters show however important variations from year to year and even more from month to month. For instance, in the stretch Santiago (520 m a.s.l.) - La Parva (2680 m) the mean isotopic gradient with altitude were: -1.84 deltaD per mil/100 m in 1970, -1.09 in 1971 and -2.0 in 1972. The low value observed in 1971 could be a consequence of the peculiar weather characteristics of this unusually dry year. In the stretch from the coast to Santiago the trend of the isotopic composition of precipitation is more complicated, because the so-called continental effect is superimposed to the altitude effect. The deuterium content variations have been also determined in snowpack profiles at La Parva station. The results show that snow melting occurs slowly at the bottom during the whole winter, at the expenses of the heat stored during summer in the soil. The melting of the surface snow layers only starts at the end of the winter and then proceeds very fast

  19. Actinides-1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry

  20. Actinides-1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry.

  1. On the use of moderating material to enhance the feedback coefficients in SFR cores with high minor actinide content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merk, B.; Weiss, F. P.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fine distributed moderating material to enhance the feedback effects and to reduce the sodium void effecting sodium cooled fast reactor cores is described. The influence of the moderating material on the neutron spectrum, the power distribution, and the burnup distribution is shown. The consequences of the use of fine distributed moderating material into fuel assemblies with fuel configurations foreseen for minor actinide transmutation is analyzed and the transmutation efficiency is compared. The degradation of the feedback effects due to the insertion of minor actinides and the compensation by the use of moderating materials is discussed. (authors)

  2. On the use of moderating material to enhance the feedback coefficients in SFR cores with high minor actinide content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merk, B. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institut fuer Sicherheitsforschung, Postfach 51 01 19, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Weiss, F. P. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit GRS MbH Forschungszentrum, Boltzmannstr. 14, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The use of fine distributed moderating material to enhance the feedback effects and to reduce the sodium void effecting sodium cooled fast reactor cores is described. The influence of the moderating material on the neutron spectrum, the power distribution, and the burnup distribution is shown. The consequences of the use of fine distributed moderating material into fuel assemblies with fuel configurations foreseen for minor actinide transmutation is analyzed and the transmutation efficiency is compared. The degradation of the feedback effects due to the insertion of minor actinides and the compensation by the use of moderating materials is discussed. (authors)

  3. Research needs in metabolism and dosimetry of the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, C.R.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: uranium mine and mill tailings; environmental standards; recommendations of NCRP and ICRP; metabolic models and health effects; life-time exposures to actinides and other alpha emitters; high-specific-activity actinide isotopes versus naturally occurring isotopic mixtures of uranium isotopes; adequacy of the n factor; and metabolism and dosimetry;

  4. Comparative determination of sucrose content in sugar beet by polarimetric and isotope dilution methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malec, K; Szuchnik, A [Institute of Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland); Rydel, S; Walerianaczyk, E [Instytut Przemyslu Cukrowniczego, Warsaw (Poland)

    1976-01-01

    The comparative determination of sucrose content in sugar beets has been investigated by following methods: polarimetric, direct isotope dilution and double carrier-isotope dilution analysis. Basing upon the obtained results it has been ascertained, that in the case of worse quality beets the polarimetric determinations differ greatly from isotopic data.

  5. Nuclear data needs for the analysis of generation and burn-up of actinide isotopes in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuesters, H.

    1980-04-01

    A reliable prediction of the in-pile and out-of-pile physics characteristics of nuclear fuel is one of the objectives of present-day reactor physics. The paper describes the main production paths of important actinides for light water and fast breeder reactors. The accuracy of recent nuclear data is examined by comparisons of theoretical predictions with the results from post-irradiation analysis of nuclear fuel from power reactors, and partly with results obtained in zero-power facilities. A world-wide comparison of nuclear data to be used in large fast power reactor burn-up and long term considerations is presented. The needs for further improvement of nuclear data are discussed. (orig.) [de

  6. Research on the chemical speciation of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Euo Chang; Park, K. K.; Cho, H. R.

    2010-04-01

    A demand for the safe and effective management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste generated from nuclear power plant draws increasing attention with the growth of nuclear power industry. The objective of this project is to establish the basis of research on the actinide chemistry by using advanced laser-based highly sensitive spectroscopic systems. Researches on the chemical speciation of actinides are prerequisite for the development of technologies related to nuclear fuel cycles, especially, such as the safe management of high level radioactive wastes and the chemical examination of irradiated nuclear fuels. For supporting these technologies, laser-based spectroscopies have been performed for the chemical speciation of actinide in an aqueous solutions and the quantitative analysis of actinide isotopes in spent nuclear fuels. In this report, results on the following subjects have been summarized. (1) Development of TRLFS technology for chemical speciation of actinides, (2) Development of LIBD technology for measuring solubility of actinides, (3) Chemical speciation of plutonium complexes by using a LWCC system, (4) Development of LIBS technology for the quantitative analysis of actinides, (5) Development of technology for the chemical speciation of actinides by CE, (6) Evaluation on the chemical reactions between actinides and humic substances, (7) Chemical speciation of actinides adsorbed on metal oxides surfaces, (8) Determination of actinide source terms of spent nuclear fuel

  7. Evaluation of the plasma hydrogen isotope content by residual gas analysis at JET and AUG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenik, A.; Alegre, D.; Brezinsek, S.; De Castro, A.; Kruezi, U.; Oberkofler, M.; Panjan, M.; Primc, G.; Reichbauer, T.; Resnik, M.; Rohde, V.; Seibt, M.; Schneider, P. A.; Wauters, T.; Zaplotnik, R.; ASDEX-Upgrade, the; EUROfusion MST1 Teams; contributors, JET

    2017-12-01

    The isotope content of the plasma reflects on the dynamics of isotope changeover experiments, efficiency of wall conditioning and the performance of a fusion device in the active phase of operation. The assessment of the isotope ratio of hydrogen and methane molecules is used as a novel method of assessing the plasma isotope ratios at JET and ASDEX-Upgrade (AUG). The isotope ratios of both molecules in general shows similar trends as the isotope ratio detected by other diagnostics. At JET, the absolute values of RGA signals are in relatively good agreement with each other and with spectroscopy data, while at AUG the deviation from neutral particle analyser data are larger, and the results show a consistent spatial distribution of the isotope ratio. It is further shown that the isotope ratio of the hydrogen molecule can be used to study the degree of dissociation of the injected gas during changeover experiments.

  8. Photochemistry of the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, L.M.; Bell, J.T.; Friedman, H.A.

    1979-01-01

    It has been found that all three major actinides have a useful variety of photochemical reactions which could be used to achieve a separations process that requires fewer reagents. Several features merit enumerating: (1) Laser photochemistry is not now as uniquely important in fuel reprocessing as it is in isotopic enrichment. The photochemistry can be successfully accomplished with conventional light sources. (2) The easiest place to apply photo-reprocessing is on the three actinides U, Pu, and Np. The solutions are potentially cleaner and more amenable to photoreactions. (3) Organic-phase photoreactions are probably not worth much attention because of the troublesome solvent redox chemistry associated with the photochemical reaction. (4) Upstream process treatment on the raffinate (dissolver solution) may never be too attractive since the radiation intensity precludes the usage of many optical materials and the nature of the solution is such that light transmission into it might be totally impossible

  9. Actinide recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, C; Chang, Y [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    1990-07-01

    A multitude of studies and assessments of actinide partitioning and transmutation were carried out in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Probably the most comprehensive of these was a study coordinated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conclusions of this study were that only rather weak economic and safety incentives existed for partitioning and transmuting the actinides for waste management purposes, due to the facts that (1) partitioning processes were complicated and expensive, and (2) the geologic repository was assumed to contain actinides for hundreds of thousands of years. Much has changed in the few years since then. A variety of developments now combine to warrant a renewed assessment of the actinide recycle. First of all, it has become increasingly difficult to provide to all parties the necessary assurance that the repository will contain essentially all radioactive materials until they have decayed. Assurance can almost certainly be provided to regulatory agencies by sound technical arguments, but it is difficult to convince the general public that the behavior of wastes stored in the ground can be modeled and predicted for even a few thousand years. From this point of view alone there would seem to be a clear benefit in reducing the long-term toxicity of the high-level wastes placed in the repository.

  10. Actinide recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.; Chang, Y.

    1990-01-01

    A multitude of studies and assessments of actinide partitioning and transmutation were carried out in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Probably the most comprehensive of these was a study coordinated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conclusions of this study were that only rather weak economic and safety incentives existed for partitioning and transmuting the actinides for waste management purposes, due to the facts that (1) partitioning processes were complicated and expensive, and (2) the geologic repository was assumed to contain actinides for hundreds of thousands of years. Much has changed in the few years since then. A variety of developments now combine to warrant a renewed assessment of the actinide recycle. First of all, it has become increasingly difficult to provide to all parties the necessary assurance that the repository will contain essentially all radioactive materials until they have decayed. Assurance can almost certainly be provided to regulatory agencies by sound technical arguments, but it is difficult to convince the general public that the behavior of wastes stored in the ground can be modeled and predicted for even a few thousand years. From this point of view alone there would seem to be a clear benefit in reducing the long-term toxicity of the high-level wastes placed in the repository

  11. Research on the chemical speciation of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Euo Chang; Park, K. K.; Cho, H. R.

    2012-04-01

    A demand for the safe and effective management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste generated from nuclear power plant draws increasing attention with the growth of nuclear power industry. The objective of this project is to establish the basis of research on the actinide chemistry by using highly sensitive and advanced laser-based spectroscopic systems. Researches on the chemical speciation of actinides are prerequisite for the development of technologies related to nuclear fuel cycles, especially, such as the safe management of high level radioactive wastes and the chemical examination of irradiated nuclear fuels. For supporting these technologies, laser-based spectroscopies have been applied for the chemical speciation of actinide in aqueous solutions and the quantitative analysis of actinide isotopes in spent nuclear fuels. In this report, results on the following subjects have been summarized. Development of TRLFS technology for the chemical speciation of actinides, Development of laser-induced photo-acoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) system, Application of LIBD technology to investigate dynamic behaviors of actinides dissolution reactions, Development of nanoparticle analysis technology in groundwater using LIBD, Chemical speciation of plutonium complexes by using a LWCC system, Development of LIBS technology for the quantitative analysis of actinides, Evaluation on the chemical reactions between actinides and humic substances, Spectroscopic speciation of uranium-ligand complexes in aqueous solution, Chemical speciation of actinides adsorbed on metal oxides surfaces

  12. Analysis of Stable Isotope Contents of Surface and Underground ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sam Eshun

    (2H/1H) ratios relative to a standard called Standard Mean Ocean Water (SMOW) ..... Hence, higher forest cover has greater influence on heavy isotope ... Accra Plains is influenced by the Atlantic Ocean where the relative humidity is higher ...

  13. 61 stable isotope compositions of organic carbon and contents of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    isotope record from Lake Ndutu shows a general downcore decrease in δ. 13C values ... in bulk δ13C of the terrestrial biomass in the tropics may ... CO2, temperature, moisture conditions and ... A map showing location of sampling sites of Ngorongoro Crater, Lake Ndutu and .... the Lakes Makat and Masek records cannot.

  14. The actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnall, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter of coordination compound chemistry is devoted to the actinides and starts with a general survey. Most of the chapter relates to thorium and uranium but protactinium, neptunium and plutonium are included. There are sections on nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, selenium, tellurium and halogen ligands of the metals in their +3, +4, +5 and +6 oxidation states and of the transplutonium elements in their +2, +3, +4, and +5 oxidation states. (UK)

  15. Rapid determination of actinides in seawater samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, S.L.; Culligan, B.K.; Hutchison, J.B.; Utsey, R.C.; McAlister, D.R.

    2014-01-01

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in seawater samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory. The actinides can be measured by alpha spectrometry or inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The new method employs novel pre-concentration steps to collect the actinide isotopes quickly from 80 L or more of seawater. Actinides are co-precipitated using an iron hydroxide co-precipitation step enhanced with Ti +3 reductant, followed by lanthanum fluoride co-precipitation. Stacked TEVA Resin and TRU Resin cartridges are used to rapidly separate Pu, U, and Np isotopes from seawater samples. TEVA Resin and DGA Resin were used to separate and measure Pu, Am and Cm isotopes in seawater volumes up to 80 L. This robust method is ideal for emergency seawater samples following a radiological incident. It can also be used, however, for the routine analysis of seawater samples for oceanographic studies to enhance efficiency and productivity. In contrast, many current methods to determine actinides in seawater can take 1-2 weeks and provide chemical yields of ∼30-60 %. This new sample preparation method can be performed in 4-8 h with tracer yields of ∼85-95 %. By employing a rapid, robust sample preparation method with high chemical yields, less seawater is needed to achieve lower or comparable detection limits for actinide isotopes with less time and effort. (author)

  16. Extending FEAST-METAL for analysis of low content minor actinide bearing and zirconium rich metallic fuels for sodium fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karahan, Aydin, E-mail: karahan@mit.edu [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge MA 24-204 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Computational models in FEAST-METAL fuel behaviour code have been upgraded to simulate minor actinide bearing zirconium rich metallic fuels for use in sodium fast reactors. Increasing the zirconium content to 20-40 wt.% causes significant changes in fuel slug microstructure affecting thermal, mechanical, chemical, and fission gas behaviour. Inclusion of zirconium rich phase reduces the fission gas swelling rate significantly in early irradiation. Above the threshold fission gas swelling, formation of micro-cracks, and open pores increase material compliancy enhance diffusivity, leading to rapid fuel gas swelling, interconnected porosity development and release of the fission gases and helium. Production and release of helium was modelled empirically as a function of americium content and fission gas production, consistent with previous Idaho National Laboratory studies. Predicted fuel constituent redistribution is much smaller compared to typical U-Pu-10Zr fuel operated at EBR-II. Material properties such as fuel thermal conductivity, modulus of elasticity, and thermal expansion coefficient have been approximated using the available database. Creep rate and fission gas diffusivity of high zirconium fuel is lowered by an order of magnitude with respect to the reference low zirconium fuel based on limited database and in order to match experimental observations. The new code is benchmarked against the AFC-1F fuel assembly post irradiation examination results. Satisfactory match was obtained for fission gas release and swelling behaviour. Finally, the study considers a comparison of fuel behaviour between high zirconium content minor actinide bearing fuel and typical U-15Pu-6Zr fuel pins with 75% smear density. The new fuel has much higher fissile content, allowing for operating at lower neutron flux level compared to fuel with lower fissile density. This feature allows the designer to reach a much higher burnup before reaching the cladding dose limit. On the other

  17. Extending FEAST-METAL for analysis of low content minor actinide bearing and zirconium rich metallic fuels for sodium fast reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Aydın

    2011-07-01

    Computational models in FEAST-METAL fuel behaviour code have been upgraded to simulate minor actinide bearing zirconium rich metallic fuels for use in sodium fast reactors. Increasing the zirconium content to 20-40 wt.% causes significant changes in fuel slug microstructure affecting thermal, mechanical, chemical, and fission gas behaviour. Inclusion of zirconium rich phase reduces the fission gas swelling rate significantly in early irradiation. Above the threshold fission gas swelling, formation of micro-cracks, and open pores increase material compliancy enhance diffusivity, leading to rapid fuel gas swelling, interconnected porosity development and release of the fission gases and helium. Production and release of helium was modelled empirically as a function of americium content and fission gas production, consistent with previous Idaho National Laboratory studies. Predicted fuel constituent redistribution is much smaller compared to typical U-Pu-10Zr fuel operated at EBR-II. Material properties such as fuel thermal conductivity, modulus of elasticity, and thermal expansion coefficient have been approximated using the available database. Creep rate and fission gas diffusivity of high zirconium fuel is lowered by an order of magnitude with respect to the reference low zirconium fuel based on limited database and in order to match experimental observations. The new code is benchmarked against the AFC-1F fuel assembly post irradiation examination results. Satisfactory match was obtained for fission gas release and swelling behaviour. Finally, the study considers a comparison of fuel behaviour between high zirconium content minor actinide bearing fuel and typical U-15Pu-6Zr fuel pins with 75% smear density. The new fuel has much higher fissile content, allowing for operating at lower neutron flux level compared to fuel with lower fissile density. This feature allows the designer to reach a much higher burnup before reaching the cladding dose limit. On the other

  18. Extending FEAST-METAL for analysis of low content minor actinide bearing and zirconium rich metallic fuels for sodium fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karahan, Aydin

    2011-01-01

    Computational models in FEAST-METAL fuel behaviour code have been upgraded to simulate minor actinide bearing zirconium rich metallic fuels for use in sodium fast reactors. Increasing the zirconium content to 20-40 wt.% causes significant changes in fuel slug microstructure affecting thermal, mechanical, chemical, and fission gas behaviour. Inclusion of zirconium rich phase reduces the fission gas swelling rate significantly in early irradiation. Above the threshold fission gas swelling, formation of micro-cracks, and open pores increase material compliancy enhance diffusivity, leading to rapid fuel gas swelling, interconnected porosity development and release of the fission gases and helium. Production and release of helium was modelled empirically as a function of americium content and fission gas production, consistent with previous Idaho National Laboratory studies. Predicted fuel constituent redistribution is much smaller compared to typical U-Pu-10Zr fuel operated at EBR-II. Material properties such as fuel thermal conductivity, modulus of elasticity, and thermal expansion coefficient have been approximated using the available database. Creep rate and fission gas diffusivity of high zirconium fuel is lowered by an order of magnitude with respect to the reference low zirconium fuel based on limited database and in order to match experimental observations. The new code is benchmarked against the AFC-1F fuel assembly post irradiation examination results. Satisfactory match was obtained for fission gas release and swelling behaviour. Finally, the study considers a comparison of fuel behaviour between high zirconium content minor actinide bearing fuel and typical U-15Pu-6Zr fuel pins with 75% smear density. The new fuel has much higher fissile content, allowing for operating at lower neutron flux level compared to fuel with lower fissile density. This feature allows the designer to reach a much higher burnup before reaching the cladding dose limit. On the other

  19. Proposal for experiments with actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted in which critical masses for some actinide isotopes were calculated with the Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP) Transport computer code. Different spherical computer models were used for even- and odd-neutron nuclides. Critical masses obtained are tabulated for Np-237, Pu-242, Am-241, Am-243, Pu-241, and Am-242m, together with indirect experimental data. Experimental data are needed for actinides with odd number of neutrons

  20. Actinides burnup in a sodium fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Pineda A, R.; Martinez C, E.; Alonso, G., E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2017-09-15

    The burnup of actinides in a nuclear reactor is been proposed as part of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle, this process would close the fuel cycle recycling some of the radioactive material produced in the open nuclear fuel cycle. These actinides are found in the spent nuclear fuel from nuclear power reactors at the end of their burnup in the reactor. Previous studies of actinides recycling in thermal reactors show that would be possible reduce the amounts of actinides at least in 50% of the recycled amounts. in this work, the amounts of actinides that can be burned in a fast reactor is calculated, very interesting results surge from the calculations, first, the amounts of actinides generated by the fuel is higher than for thermal fuel and the composition of the actinides vector is different as in fuel for thermal reactor the main isotope is the {sup 237}Np in the fuel for fast reactor the main isotope is the {sup 241}Am, finally it is concluded that the fast reactor, also generates important amounts of waste. (Author)

  1. Automated complex spectra processing of actinide α-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anichenkov, S.V.; Popov, Yu.S.; Tselishchev, I.V.; Mishenev, V.B.; Timofeev, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    Earlier described algorithms of automated processing of complex α - spectra of actinides with the use of Ehlektronika D3-28 computer line, connected with ICA-070 multichannel amplitude pulse analyzer, were realized. The developed program enables to calculated peak intensity and the relative isotope content, to conduct energy calibration of spectra, to calculate peak center of gravity and energy resolution, to perform integral counting in particular part of the spectrum. Error of the method of automated processing depens on the degree of spectrum complication and lies within the limits of 1-12%. 8 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  2. Sensitivity of DF-ICP-MS, PERALS and alpha-spectrometry for the determination of actinides. A comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayranov, M.; Kraehenbuehl, U.

    2009-01-01

    We applied three techniques (DF-ICP-MS, PERALS and alpha-spectrometry) for the determination of minor actinides at environmental levels. For each method the limit of detection and the resolution were estimated in order to study the content and isotopic composition of the actinides. Two international reference materials, IAEA-135 (Irish Sea Sediment) and IAEA-300 (Baltic Sea sediment) were analyzed for activity concentrations of 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 240 Pu, 241 Pu and 241 Am. The sensitivities of the three determination techniques were compared. (author)

  3. Analytical evaluation of actinide sensitivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sola, A.

    1977-01-01

    The analytical evaluation of the sensitivities of actinides to various parameters such as cross sections, decay constants, flux and time is presented. The formulae are applied to isotopes of the Uranium, Neptunium, Plutonium and Americium series. The agreement between analytically obtained and computer evaluated sensitivities being always good, it is throught that the formulation includes all the important parameters entering in the evaluation of sensitivities. A study of the published data is made

  4. Integrating stomach content and stable isotope analyses to quantify the diets of pygoscelid penguins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Polito

    Full Text Available Stomach content analysis (SCA and more recently stable isotope analysis (SIA integrated with isotopic mixing models have become common methods for dietary studies and provide insight into the foraging ecology of seabirds. However, both methods have drawbacks and biases that may result in difficulties in quantifying inter-annual and species-specific differences in diets. We used these two methods to simultaneously quantify the chick-rearing diet of Chinstrap (Pygoscelis antarctica and Gentoo (P. papua penguins and highlight methods of integrating SCA data to increase accuracy of diet composition estimates using SIA. SCA biomass estimates were highly variable and underestimated the importance of soft-bodied prey such as fish. Two-source, isotopic mixing model predictions were less variable and identified inter-annual and species-specific differences in the relative amounts of fish and krill in penguin diets not readily apparent using SCA. In contrast, multi-source isotopic mixing models had difficulty estimating the dietary contribution of fish species occupying similar trophic levels without refinement using SCA-derived otolith data. Overall, our ability to track inter-annual and species-specific differences in penguin diets using SIA was enhanced by integrating SCA data to isotopic mixing modes in three ways: 1 selecting appropriate prey sources, 2 weighting combinations of isotopically similar prey in two-source mixing models and 3 refining predicted contributions of isotopically similar prey in multi-source models.

  5. Isotopic incorporation and the effects of fasting and dietary lipid content on isotopic discrimination in large carnivorous mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Karyn D.; Stricker, Craig A.; Erlenbach, Joy; Robbins, Charles T.; Cherry, Seth; Newsome, Seth D.; Cutting, Amy; Jensen, Shannon; Stenhouse, Gordon; Brooks, Matt; Hash, Amy; Nicassio, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable emphasis on understanding isotopic discrimination for diet estimation in omnivores. However, discrimination may differ for carnivores, particularly species that consume lipid-rich diets. Here, we examined the potential implications of several factors when using stable isotopes to estimate the diets of bears, which can consume lipid-rich diets and, alternatively, fast for weeks to months. We conducted feeding trials with captive brown bears (Ursus arctos) and polar bears (Ursus maritimus). As dietary lipid content increased to ∼90%, we observed increasing differences between blood plasma and diets that had not been lipid extracted (∆13Ctissue-bulk diet) and slightly decreasing differences between plasma δ13C and lipid-extracted diet. Plasma Δ15Ntissue-bulk diet increased with increasing protein content for the four polar bears in this study and data for other mammals from previous studies that were fed purely carnivorous diets. Four adult and four yearling brown bears that fasted 120 d had plasma δ15N values that changed by <±2‰. Fasting bears exhibited no trend in plasma δ13C. Isotopic incorporation in red blood cells and whole blood was ≥6 mo in subadult and adult bears, which is considerably longer than previously measured in younger and smaller black bears (Ursus americanus). Our results suggest that short-term fasting in carnivores has minimal effects on δ13C and δ15N discrimination between predators and their prey but that dietary lipid content is an important factor directly affecting δ13C discrimination and indirectly affecting δ15N discrimination via the inverse relationship with dietary protein content.

  6. Absolute measurement of the isotopic ratio of a water sample with very low deuterium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, R.; Nief, G.; Roth, E.

    1968-01-01

    The presence of H 3+ ions which are indistinguishable from HD + ions presents the principal difficulty encountered in the measurement of isotopic ratios of water samples with very low deuterium contents using a mass spectrometer. Thus, when the sample contains no deuterium, the mass spectrometer does not indicate zero. By producing, in situ, from the sample to be measured, water vapor with an isotopic ratio very close to zero using a small distilling column, this difficulty is overcome. This column, its operating parameters, as well as the way in which the measurements are made are described. An arrangement is employed in which the isotopic ratios can be measured with a sensitivity better than 0.01 x 10 -6 . The method is applied to the determination of the isotopic ratios of three low deuterium content water samples. The results obtained permit one to assign to the sample with the lowest deuterium content an absolute value equal to 1.71 ± 0.03 ppm. This water sample is a primary standard from which is determined the isotopic ratio of a natural water sample which serves as the laboratory standard. (author) [fr

  7. Comparison of different methods of determining plutonium content and isotopic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowell, M.R.W.

    1985-05-01

    At Rockwell Hanford Operations, several different methods are used to determine plutonium content and isotopic composition. These include alpha particle energy analysis, calorimetry/gamma-ray analysis, mass spectrometry, and low energy ray assay. Each is used in a process control environment and has its advantages and disadvantages in terms of sample matrix, sample preparation, concentration, error ranges, detection limits, and turn around time. Of the methods discussed, special attention is paid to the Plutonium Isotopics Solution Counter, a low energy gamma ray assay system designed to provide plutonium and americium content and isotopic composition of Pu-238 through Pu-241 and Am-241. It is qualitatively and quantitatively compared to the other methods. A brief description of sample types which the Solution Counter analyzes is presented. 4 refs., 4 tabs

  8. Comparison of different methods of determining plutonium content and isotopic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    At Rockwell Hanford Operations, several different methods are used to determine plutonium content and isotopic composition. These include alpha particle energy analysis, calorimetry/gamma-ray analysis, mass spectrometry, and low energy gamma-ray assay. Each is used in a process control environment and has its advantages and disadvantages in terms of sample matrix, sample preparation, concentration, error ranges, detection limits, and turn around time. Of the methods discussed, special attention is paid to the Plutonium Isotopics Solution Counter, a low energy gamma-ray assay system designed to provide plutonium and americium content and isotopic composition of Pu-238 through Pu-241 and Am-241. It is qualitatively and quantitatively compared to the other methods. A brief description of sample types which the Solution Counter analyzes is presented

  9. ENDF/B-V actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocherov, N.; Lemmel, H.D.

    1981-01-01

    This document summarizes the contents of the actinides part of the ENDF/B-V nuclear data library released by the US National Nuclear Data Center. This library or selective retrievals of it, are available from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author)

  10. Actinide metal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage

  11. Burning minor actinides in a HTR energy spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, Christoph; Rütten, H. Jochem

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Burn-up analysis for varying plutonium/minor actinide fuel compositions. ► The influence of varying heavy metal fuel element loads is investigated. ► Significant burn-up via radiative capture and subsequently fission is observed. ► Difference observed between fuel element burn-up and total actinide burning rate. - Abstract: The generation of nuclear energy by means of the existing nuclear reactor systems is based mainly on the fission of U-235. But this comes along with the capture of neutrons by the U-238 faction and results in a build-up of plutonium isotopes and minor actinides as neptunium, americium and curium. These actinides are dominant for the long time assessment of the radiological risk of a final disposal therefore a minimization of the long living isotopes is aspired. Burning the actinides in a high temperature helium cooled graphite moderated reactor (HTR) is one of these options. The use of plutonium isotopes to sustain the criticality of the system is intended to avoid on the one hand highly enriched uranium because of international regulations and on the other hand low enriched uranium because of the build up of new actinides from neutron capture in the U-238 fraction. Because initial minor actinide isotopes are typically not fissionable by thermal neutrons the idea is to fission instead the intermediate isotopes generated by the first neutron capture. This paper comprises calculations for plutonium/minor actinides/thorium fuel compositions and their correlated final burn-up for a generic pebble bed HTR based on the reference design of the 400 MW PBMR. In particular the cross sections and the neutron balance of the different minor actinide isotopes in the higher thermal energy spectrum of a HTR will be discussed. For a fuel mixture of plutonium and minor actinides a significant burn-up of these actinides up to 20% can be achieved but at the expense of a higher residual fraction of plutonium in the burned fuel. Combining

  12. A numerical cloud model to interpret the isotope content of hailstones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouzel, J.; Brichet, N.; Thalmann, B.; Federer, B.

    1980-07-01

    Measurements of the isotope content of hailstones are frequently used to deduce their trajectories and updraft speeds within severe storms. The interpretation was made in the past on the basis of an adiabatic equilibrium model in which the stones grew exclusively by interaction with droplets and vapor. Using the 1D steady-state model of Hirsch with parametrized cloud physics these unrealistic assumptions were dropped and the effects of interactions between droplets, drops, ice crystals and graupel on the concentrations of stable isotopes in hydrometeors were taken into account. The construction of the model is briefly discussed. The resulting height profiles of D and O 18 in hailstones deviate substantially from the equilibrium case, rendering most earlier trajectory calculations invalid. It is also seen that in the lower cloud layers the ice of the stones is richer due to relaxation effects, but at higher cloud layers (T(a) 0 C) the ice is much poorer in isotopes. This yields a broader spread of the isotope values in the interval 0>T(a)>-35 0 C or alternatively, it means that hailstones with a very large range of measured isotope concentrations grow in a smaller and therefore more realistic temperature interval. The use of the model in practice will be demonstrated

  13. Diet of invasive lionfish on hard bottom reefs of the Southeast USA: insights from stomach contents and stable isotopes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stomach contents and stable isotope analyses were used to determine the diet of lionfish in the warm-temperate hard bottom reef community in theSoutheast US Atlantic...

  14. Performance comparison of metallic, actinide burning fuel in lead-bismuth and sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, K.D.; Herring, J.S.; Macdonald, P.E.

    2001-01-01

    Various methods have been proposed to ''incinerate'' or ''transmute'' the current inventory of transuranic waste (TRU) that exits in spent light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel, and weapons plutonium. These methods include both critical (e.g., fast reactors) and non-critical (e.g., accelerator transmutation) systems. The work discussed here is part of a larger effort at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to investigate the suitability of lead and lead-alloy cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The neutronics of non fertile fuel loaded with 20 or 30-wt% light water reactor (LWR) plutonium plus minor actinides for use in a lead-bismuth cooled fast reactor are discussed in this paper, with an emphasis on the fuel cycle life and isotopic content. Calculations show that the average actinide burn rate is similar for both the sodium and lead-bismuth cooled cases ranging from -1.02 to -1.16 g/MWd, compared to a typical LWR actinide generation rate of 0.303 g/MWd. However, when using the same parameters, the sodium-cooled case went subcritical after 0.2 to 0.8 effective full power years, and the lead-bismuth cooled case ranged from 1.5 to 4.5 effective full power years. (author)

  15. Synthesis of tetravalent actinide chlorides. Versatile compounds for actinide chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maerz, Juliane [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Chemistry of the F-Elements

    2016-07-01

    Anhydrous actinide tetrachlorides (AnCl{sub 4}) were synthesized under mild conditions to provide versatile compounds for actinide chemistry. They enable a direct access to actinide complexes with organic and inorganic ligands.

  16. 99 Tc NMR determination of the oxygen isotope content in 18 O-enriched water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Valerii P; Kirakosyan, Gayana А; German, Konstantin E

    2018-03-01

    99 Tc NMR has been suggested as an original method of evaluating the content of oxygen isotopes in oxygen-18-enriched water, a precursor for the production of radioisotope fluorine-18 used in positron emission tomography. To this end, solutions of NH 4 TcO 4 or NaTcO 4 (up to 0.28 mol/L) with natural abundance of oxygen isotopes in virgin or recycled 18 O-enriched water have been studied by 99 Tc NMR. The method is based on 16 O/ 17 O/ 18 O intrinsic isotope effects in the 99 Tc NMR chemical shifts, and the statistical distribution of oxygen isotopes in the coordination sphere of TcO 4 - and makes it possible to quantify the composition of enriched water by measuring the relative intensities of the 99 Tc NMR signals of the Tc 16 O 4-n 18 O n - isotopologues. Because the oxygen exchange between TcO 4 - and enriched water in neutral and alkaline solutions is characterized by slow kinetics, gaseous HCl was bubbled through a solution for a few seconds to achieve the equilibrium distribution of oxygen isotopes in the Tc coordination sphere without distortion of the oxygen composition of the water. Pertechnetate ion was selected as a probe due to its high stability in solutions and the significant 99 Tc NMR shift induced by a single 16 O→ 18 O substitution (-0.43 ± 0.01 ppm) in TcO 4 - and spin coupling constant 1 J( 99 Tc- 17 O) (131.46 Hz) favourable for the observation of individual signals of Tc 16 O 4-n 18 O n - isotopologues. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Section of Uranium, Americium and Curium Isotopes. Progress report - Research Contract 14485, Coordinated Research Project on Minor Actinide Neutron Reaction Data (MANREAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, A.A.; Bergman, A.A.; Berlev, A.I.; Koptelov, E.A.; Samylin, B.F.; Trufanov, A.M.; Fursov, B.I.; Shorin, V.S.

    2009-12-01

    This report contains brief description of the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer and results of measurements of neutron-induced fission cross sections for 236 U, 242m Am, 243 Cm, 244 Cm, 245 Cm and 246 Cm done at this spectrometer. The work was partially supported through the IAEA research contract RC-14485-RD in the framework of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project 'Minor Actinide Neutron Reaction Data (MANREAD)'. The detailed description of the experimental set up, measurements procedure and data treatment can be found in the JIA-1182 (2007) and JIA-1212 (2009) reports from the Institute of Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Science published in Russian. Part 1 contains the first year report of the research contract and part 2 the second year report. (author)

  18. Special actinide nuclides: Fuel or waste?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.; Rao, K.S.; Dingankar, M.V.

    1989-01-01

    The special actinide nuclides such as Np, Cm, etc. which are produced as byproducts during the operation of fission reactors are presently looked upon as 'nuclear waste' and are proposed to be disposed of as part of high level waste in deep geological repositories. The potential hazard posed to future generations over periods of thousands of years by these long lived nuclides has been a persistent source of concern to critics of nuclear power. However, the authors have recently shown that each and every one of the special actinide nuclides is a better nuclear fuel than the isotopes of plutonium. This finding suggests that one does not have to resort to exotic neutron sources for transmuting/incinerating them as proposed by some researchers. Recovery of the special actinide elements from the waste stream and recycling them back into conventional fission reactors would eliminate one of the stigmas attached to nuclear energy

  19. Nuclear Facility Isotopic Content (NFIC) Waste Management System to provide input for safety envelope definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genser, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is aggressively applying environmental remediation and radioactive waste management activities at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) to ensure compliance with today's challenging governmental laws and regulatory requirements. This report discusses a computer-based Nuclear Facility Isotopic Content (NFIC) Waste Management System developed to provide input for the safety envelope definition and assessment of site-wide facilities. Information was formulated describing the SRS ''Nuclear Facilities'' and their respective bounding inventories of nuclear materials and radioactive waste using the NFIC Waste Management System

  20. Performance of the multiple target He/PbI sub 2 aerosol jet system for mass separation of neutron-deficient actinide isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Ichikawa, S; Asai, M; Haba, H; Sakama, M; Kojima, Y; Shibata, M; Nagame, Y; Oura, Y; Kawade, K

    2002-01-01

    A multiple target He/PbI sub 2 aerosol jet system coupled with a thermal ion source was installed in the isotope separator on line (JAERI-ISOL) at the JAERI tandem accelerator facility. The neutron-deficient americium and curium isotopes produced in the sup 2 sup 3 sup 3 sup , sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U( sup 6 Li, xn) and sup 2 sup 3 sup 7 Np( sup 6 Li, xn) reactions were successfully mass-separated and the overall efficiency including the ionization of Am atoms was evaluated to be 0.3-0.4%. The identification of a new isotope sup 2 sup 3 sup 7 Cm with the present system is reported.

  1. Reconstruction of the isotope activity content of heterogeneous nuclear waste drums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krings, Thomas; Mauerhofer, Eric

    2012-07-01

    Radioactive waste must be characterized in order to verify its conformance with national regulations for intermediate storage or its disposal. Segmented gamma scanning (SGS) is a most widely applied non-destructive analytical technique for the characterization of radioactive waste drums. The isotope specific activity content is generally calculated assuming a homogeneous matrix and activity distribution for each measured drum segment. However, real radioactive waste drums exhibit non-uniform isotope and density distributions most affecting the reliability and accuracy of activities reconstruction in SGS. The presence of internal shielding structures in the waste drum contributes generally to a strong underestimation of the activity and this in particular for radioactive sources emitting low energy gamma-rays independently of their spatial distribution. In this work we present an improved method to quantify the activity of spatially concentrated gamma-emitting isotopes (point sources or hot spots) in heterogeneous waste drums with internal shielding structures. The isotope activity is reconstructed by numerical simulations and fits of the angular dependent count rate distribution recorded during the drum rotation in SGS using an analytical expression derived from a geometric model. First results of the improved method and enhancements of this method are shown and are compared to each other as well as to the conventional method which assumes a homogeneous matrix and activity distribution. It is shown that the new model improves the accuracy and the reliability of the activity reconstruction in SGS and that the presented algorithm is suitable with respect to the framework requirement of industrial application. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of fast reactors for actinide transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The management of radioactive waste is one of the key issues in today's discussions on nuclear energy, especially the long term disposal of high level radioactive wastes. The recycling of plutonium in liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) would allow 'burning' of the associated extremely long life transuranic waste, particularly actinides, thus reducing the required isolation time for high level waste from tens of thousands of years to hundreds of years for fission products only. The International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) decided to include the topic of actinide transmutation in liquid metal fast breeder reactors in its programme. The IAEA organized the Specialists Meeting on Use of Fast Breeder Reactors for Actinide Transmutation in Obninsk, Russian Federation, from 22 to 24 September 1992. The specialists agree that future progress in solving transmutation problems could be achieved by improvements in: Radiochemical partitioning and extraction of the actinides from the spent fuel (at least 98% for Np and Cm and 99.9% for Pu and Am isotopes); technological research and development on the design, fabrication and irradiation of the minor actinides (MAs) containing fuels; nuclear constants measurement and evaluation (selective cross-sections, fission fragments yields, delayed neutron parameters) especially for MA burners; demonstration of the feasibility of the safe and economic MA burner cores; knowledge of the impact of maximum tolerable amount of rare earths in americium containing fuels. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Models for the runoff from a glaciated catchment area using measurements of environmental isotope contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, H.; Moser, H.; Oerter, H.; Rauert, W.; Stichler, W.; Ambach, W.; Kirchlechner, P.

    1979-01-01

    For several years, in the glaciated catchment area of the Rofenache (Oetztal Alps, Austria), measurements have been made of the environmental isotopes 2 H, 18 O and 3 H in precipitation, snow and ice samples and in the runoff. Furthermore, the electrolytic conductivity of runoff samples was measured and tracing experiments were made with fluorescent dyes. From core samples drilled in the accumulation area of the Vernagtferner, the gross beta activity was investigated and compared with the data from 2 H, 3 H and 18 O analyses and the data from mass balance studies. It is shown that the annual net balance from previous years can be recovered on temperate glaciers using environmental isotope techniques. From the diurnal variations of the 2 H and 3 H contents and the electrolytic conductivity, the following proportions in the runoff of the Vernagtferner catchment area were obtained during a 24-hour interval at a time of strong ablation (August 1976): about 50% ice meltwater, 25% direct runoff of firn and snow meltwater, and 7% of mineralized groundwater. The rest of the runoff consists of non-mineralized meltwater seeping from the glacier body. The annual variations of the 2 H and 3 H contents in the runoff of the glaciated catchment area permit conclusions on the time sequence of the individual ablation periods, and on the residence time, on the basis of model concepts. The residence times of approximately 100 days or four years, respectively, are obtained from the decrease in the 2 H content at the end of the ablation period and from the variation of the 3 H content in the winter discharge. (author)

  4. Models for the runoff from a glacierized catchment area using measurements of environmental isotope contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, H.; Moser, H.; Oerter, H.; Rauert, W.; Stichler, W.; Ambach, W.; Kirchlechner, P.

    1978-01-01

    In the glacierized catchment area of the Rofenache (Oetztal Alps, Austria) during several years measurements have been made of the environmental isotopes 2 H, 18 O and 3 H in the precipitation, in snow and ice samples and in the runoff. Furthermore the electrolytic conductivity of runoff samples was measured and tracing experiments were made with fluorescent dyes. From core samples drilled in the accumulation area of the Vernagtferner, the gross beta activity was investigated and compared with both, the data from 2 H, 3 H und 18 O analyses and the data from mass balance studies. It is shown that the annual net balance from previous years can be recovered on temperate glaciers using environmental isotope techniques. From the diurnal variations of the 2 H and 3 H contents and the electrolytic conductivity the following proportions in the runoff of the Vernagtferner catchment area were obtained during a 24-hour interval at a time of strong ablation (August 1976): about 50% of ice melt water, 25% of direct runoff fo firn- and snow melt water, and 7% of mineralized groundwater. The rest of the runoff consists of not mineralized melt water seeping from the glacier body. The annual variations of the 2 H and 3 H contents in the runoff of the glacierized catchment area permit conclusions on the time sequence of the individual ablation periods and on the residence time on the basis of model concepts. The residence times of approximately 100 days or 4 years, respectively, are obtained from the decrease in the 2 H content at the end of the ablation period and from the variation of the 3 H content in the winter discharge. (orig.) [de

  5. Metal Content and Stable Isotope Determination in Some Commercial Beers from Romanian Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezara Voica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of beer samples is of interest because their compositions affect the taste and stability of beer and, also, consumer health. In this work, the characterizations of 20 Romanian beers were performed by mean of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS and Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS in order to trace heavy metals and isotopic content of them. Major, minor, and trace metals are important in beer fermentation since they supply the appropriate environment for yeast growth and influence yeast metabolism. Beside this, the presence of the C4 plants in the brewing process was followed. Our study has shown that the analyzed beers indicated the presence of different plant types used in brewing: C3, C3-C4 mixtures, and also C4, depending on producers. Also the trace metal content of each sample is presented and discussed in this study. A comparison of the beers quality manufactured by the same producer but bottled in different type of packaging like glass, dose, or PET was made; our results show that no compositional differences among the same beer type exist.

  6. General survey of applications which require actinide nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, S.

    1976-01-01

    This review paper discusses the actinide waste problem, the buildup of toxic isotopes in the fuel, the neutron activity associated with irradiated fuel, the 252 Cf buildup problem, and the production of radioisotope power sources as broad areas that require actinide cross-section data. Decay data enter into the area of radiological safety and health physics. This paper also discusses a few cross-section measurements in progress at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. The availability of actinide samples through the Transuranium Program at Oak Ridge is discussed in considerable detail. The present data status with respect to the various applications is reviewed along with recommendations for improving the data base

  7. Report of the panel on practical problems in actinide biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Practical problems are classified as the need to make operational decisions, the need for regulatory assessment either of individual facilities or of generic actions, and the overt appearance of radiobiological effects in man or radioactivity in man or the environment. Topics discussed are as follows: simulated reactor accident; long term effects of low doses; effects of repeated exposures to actinides; inhaled uranium mine air contaminants; metabolism and dosimetry; environmental equilibrium models; patterns of alpha dosimetry; internal dose calculations; interfaces between actinide biology and environmental studies; removal of actinides deposited in the body; and research needs related to uranium isotopes

  8. Thermodynamic Properties of Actinides and Actinide Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konings, Rudy J. M.; Morss, Lester R.; Fuger, Jean

    The necessity of obtaining accurate thermodynamic quantities for the actinide elements and their compounds was recognized at the outset of the Manhattan Project, when a dedicated team of scientists and engineers initiated the program to exploit nuclear energy for military purposes. Since the end of World War II, both fundamental and applied objectives have motivated a great deal of further study of actinide thermodynamics. This chapter brings together many research papers and critical reviews on this subject. It also seeks to assess, to systematize, and to predict important properties of the actinide elements, ions, and compounds, especially for species in which there is significant interest and for which there is an experimental basis for the prediction.

  9. Research in actinide chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    This research studies the behavior of the actinide elements in aqueous solution. The high radioactivity of the transuranium actinides limits the concentrations which can be studied and, consequently, limits the experimental techniques. However, oxidation state analogs (trivalent lanthanides, tetravalent thorium, and hexavalent uranium) do not suffer from these limitations. Behavior of actinides in the environment are a major USDOE concern, whether in connection with long-term releases from a repository, releases from stored defense wastes or accidental releases in reprocessing, etc. Principal goal of our research was expand the thermodynamic data base on complexation of actinides by natural ligands (e.g., OH - , CO 3 2- , PO 4 3- , humates). The research undertakes fundamental studies of actinide complexes which can increase understanding of the environmental behavior of these elements

  10. Actinide distribution in the human skeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathren, R.L.; McInroy, J.F.; Swint, M.J.

    1985-05-01

    Radiochemical analysis of two half skeletons donated to the United States Transuranium Registry, one from an individual with an occupationally incurred deposition of 241 Am and the other with a deposition of 239 Pu, revealed an inverse linear relationship between the concentration of actinide in the bone ash and the fraction of ash. Two distinct relationships were noted, one for the cranium and the other for the remainder of the skeleton. The results suggest that the actinide content of the skeleton as a whole, Q, can be obtained with an uncertainty of +-50% from analysis of a single sample of any bone (except the cranium) by Q = [(830 C/sub sample/)/(0.61 - f/sub sample/)], in which C/sub sample/ refers to the actinide content per g of ash and f/sub sample/ the fraction of ash (i.e., ratio of dry to wet weight) in the sample. 5 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Feasibility studies of actinide recycle in LMFBRs as a waste management alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaman, S.L.; Aitken, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    A strategy of actinide burnup in LMFBRs is being investigated as a waste management alternative to long term storage of high level nuclear waste. This strategy is being evaluated because many of the actinides in the waste from spent-fuel reprocessing have half-lives of thousands of years and an alternative to geological storage may be desired. From a radiological viewpoint, the actinides and their daughters dominate the waste hazard for decay times beyond about 400 years. Actinide burnup in LMFBRs may be an attractive alternative to geological storage because the actinides can be effectively transmuted to fission products which have significantly shorter half-lives. Actinide burnup in LMFBRs rather than LWRs is preferred because the ratio of fission reaction rate to capture reaction rate for the actinides is higher in an LMFBR, and an LMFBR is not so sensitive to the addition of the actinide isotopes. An actinide target assembly recycle scheme is evaluated to determine the effects of the actinides on the LMFBR performance, including local power peaking, breeding ratio, and fissile material requirements. Several schemes are evaluated to identify any major problems associated with reprocessing and fabrication of recycle actinide-containing assemblies. The overall efficiency of actinide burnout in LMFBRs is evaluated, and equilibrium cycle conditions are determined. It is concluded that actinide recycle in LMFBRs offers an attractive alternative to long term storage of the actinides, and does not significantly affect the performance of the host LMFBR. Assuming a 0.1 percent or less actinide loss during reprocessing, a 0.1 percent loss of less during fabrication, and proper recycle schemes, virtually all of the actinides produced by a fission reactor economy could be transmuted in fast reactors

  12. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Intelligent Actinide Analysis System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, W.M.; Carlson, J.B.; Koenig, Z.M.

    1993-07-01

    The authors have developed an Intelligent Actinide Analysis System (IAAS) for Materials Management to use in the Plutonium Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The IAAS will measure isotopic ratios for plutonium and other actinides non-destructively by high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. This system will measure samples in a variety of matrices and containers. It will provide automated control of many aspects of the instrument that previously required manual intervention and/or control. The IAAS is a second-generation instrument, based on the authors' experience in fielding gamma isotopic systems, that is intended to advance non-destructive actinide analysis for nuclear safeguards in performance, automation, ease of use, adaptability, systems integration and extensibility to robotics. It uses a client-server distributed monitoring and control architecture. The IAAS uses MGA 3 as the isotopic analysis code. The design of the IAAS reduces the need for operator intervention, operator training, and operator exposure

  13. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Intelligent Actinide Analysis System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, W.M.; Carlson, J.B.; Koenig, Z.M.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have developed an Intelligent Actinide Analysis System (IAAS) for Materials Management to use in the Plutonium Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The IAAS will measure isotopic ratios for plutonium and other actinides non-destructively by high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. This system will measure samples in a variety of matrices and containers. It will provide automated control of many aspects of the instrument that previously required manual intervention and/or control. The IAAS is a second-generation instrument, based on experience in fielding gamma isotopic systems, that is intended to advance non-destructive actinide analysis for nuclear safeguards in performance, automation, ease of use, adaptability, systems integration and extensibility to robotics. It uses a client-server distributed monitoring and control architecture. The IAAS uses MGA as the isotopic analysis code. The design of the IAAS reduces the need for operator intervention, operator training, and operator exposure

  14. Design of unique pins for irradiation of higher actinides in a fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basmajian, J.A.; Birney, K.R.; Weber, E.T.; Adair, H.L.; Quinby, T.C.; Raman, S.; Butler, J.K.; Bateman, B.C.; Swanson, K.M.

    1982-03-01

    The actinides produced by transmutation reactions in nuclear reactor fuels are a significant factor in nuclear fuel burnup, transportation and reprocessing. Irradiation testing is a primary source of data of this type. A segmented pin design was developed which provides for incorporation of multiple specimens of actinide oxides for irradiation in the UK's Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) at Dounreay Scotland. Results from irradiation of these pins will extend the basic neutronic and material irradiation behavior data for key actinide isotopes

  15. On the hazard accumulation of actinide waste in a Pu-fueled LMFBR power economy with and without by-product actinide recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmi, L.; Caruso, K.; Hage, W.; Schmidt, E.

    1979-01-01

    The actinide waste arisings in terms of hazard potential for ingestion and inhalation are given for a Pu-fueled LMFBR Power Economy as function of decay time. The data were assessed for two simplified fuel cycles, one considering the recycling of by-product actinides and the other their complete discharge to the high-level waste. Two durations of nuclear power and several loss fractions of actinides to the waste were considered. The major contributors in form of chemical elements or isotopes to the actinide waste hazard built up during the nuclear power duration were identified for various decay intervals

  16. Minor Actinides Recycling in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpech, M.; Golfier, H.; Vasile, A.; Varaine, F.; Boucher, L.; Greneche, D.

    2006-01-01

    Recycling of minor actinides in current and near future PWR is considered as one of the options of the general waste management strategy. This paper presents the analysis of this option both from the core physics and fuel cycle point of view. A first indicator of the efficiency of different neutron spectra for transmutation purposes is the capture to fission cross sections ratio which is less favourable by a factor between 5 to 10 in PWRs compared to fast reactors. Another indicator presented is the production of high ranking isotopes like Curium, Berkelium or Californium in the thermal or epithermal spectrum conditions of PWR cores by successive neutron captures. The impact of the accumulation of this elements on the fabrication process of such PWR fuels strongly penalizes this option. The main constraint on minor actinides loadings in PWR (or fast reactors) fuels are related to their direct impact (or the impact of their transmutation products) on the reactivity coefficients, the reactivity control means and the core kinetics parameters. The main fuel cycle physical parameters like the neutron source, the alpha decay power, the gamma and neutrons dose rate and the criticality aspects are also affected. Recent neutronic calculations based on a reference core of the Evolutionary Pressurized Reactor (EPR), indicates typical maximum values of 1 % loadings. Different fuel design options for minor actinides transmutation purposes in PWRs are presented: UOX and MOX, homogeneous and heterogeneous assemblies. In this later case, Americium loading is concentrated in specific pins of a standard UOX assembly. Recycling of Neptunium in UOX and MOX fuels was also studied to improve the proliferation resistance of the fuel. The impact on the core physics and penalties on Uranium enrichment were underlined in this case. (authors)

  17. Isotope composition and uranium content in the rivers Naryn and Mailuu-Suu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, I. A.; Alekhina, V. M.; Orozobakov, T.; Mamatibraimov, S.

    2002-01-01

    To solve the atomic problem, including the creation of an atomic weapon, one must embark on an intensive exploration and mining of radioactive raw materials, first among which uranium, together with other materials and metals. The acquisition of all these materials has thus been accompanied by the creation of a great deal of production and storage wastes and other refuse from plants, leading to many problems of protecting the environment from radioactive and other hazardous metals and materials. And so, as a result of the extensive mining and processing of radioactive and other raw materials that had been necessary for the atomic industry, in locations like Kara-Balty, Mailuu-Suu, Kavak, Kadamzhay and other places, a series of radioactive and hazardous tailings and dumps has been generated in the Kyrgyz Republic. The toxic ingredients from the dumps migrate and mix together with the ground waters that leach the tailings. However, how these waters migrate both in space and time have not been sufficiently studied; and, so, in general, we cannot forecast the propagation of these hazards. In the usual estimation of the scale of migration from uranium plants, only the total uranium content in the ground water is used. But this does not show natural or technogenic components; and it is obvious that the danger from the plants need only be characterized by the technogenic components. To solve this problem, one can employ the phenomenon where there is a natural separation in the fraction of 234 U and 238 U present in nature and as a result of technological processes. The essence of this understanding is that, as uranium transitions from solid form into a liquid, such as its dissolution in ground water, it undergoes isotope enrichment, i.e. hydrogenic uranium is enriched with 234 U compared to 238 U.The essence of this understanding is that, as uranium transitions from solid form into a liquid, such as its dissolution in ground water, it undergoes isotope enrichment, i

  18. Helium and fission gas behaviour in magnesium aluminate spinel and zirconia for actinide transmutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, P.M.G.

    2003-01-01

    In order to reduce the long-term radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel, many studies are performed on partitioning and transmutation of actinides. In such a scenario, the long-lived radio-isotopes (mostly actinides) are partitioned from the nuclear waste, and subsequently transmuted or fissioned in a

  19. ENDF/B-5 Actinides (Rev. 86)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1986-05-01

    This document summarizes the contents of the Actinides part of the ENDF/B-5 nuclear data library released by the US National Nuclear Data Center. This library or selective retrievals of it, are available costfree from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section upon request. The present version of the library is the Revision of 1986. (author). Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Application of the mass spectrometry-isotope dilution technique for the determination of uranium contents in rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakazu, M.H.; Iyer, S.S.

    1980-01-01

    Application of the spectrometric isotope dilution technique for the accurate determination of parts per million range of uranium in rock samples is described. The various aspects of the method like sample dissolution, ion exchange separation, mass spectrometric procedures are discussed. A single filament ionization source was employed for the isotope analysis. A carbon reduction method was used to reduce uranium oxide ions to uranium metal ions. The tracer solution for isotope dilution was prepared from National Bureau of Standards uranium isotopic Standard NBS U-970. Uranium contents are meassured for nine rock samples and the values obtained are compared with the uranium values measured by others workers. Errors caused in the uranium determination due to sample splitting problems as well as the incomplete acid digestion of the samples are discussed. (Author) [pt

  1. PRODUCTION OF ACTINIDE METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knighton, J.B.

    1963-11-01

    A process of reducing actinide oxide to the metal with magnesium-zinc alloy in a flux of 5 mole% of magnesium fluoride and 95 mole% of magnesium chloride plus lithium, sodium, potassium, calcium, strontium, or barium chloride is presented. The flux contains at least 14 mole% of magnesium cation at 600-- 900 deg C in air. The formed magnesium-zinc-actinide alloy is separated from the magnesium-oxide-containing flux. (AEC)

  2. Superconductivity in the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L.; Lawson, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The trends in the occurrence of superconductivity in actinide materials are discussed. Most of them seem to show simple transition metal behavior. However, the superconductivity of americium proves that the f electrons are localized in that element and that ''actinides'' is the correct name for this row of elements. Recently the superconductivity of UBe 13 and UPt 3 has been shown to be extremely unusual, and these compounds fall in the new class of compounds now known as heavy fermion materials

  3. Minor actinide transmutation using minor actinide burner reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaiyama, T.; Yoshida, H.; Gunji, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of minor actinide burner reactor is proposed as an efficient way to transmute long-lived minor actinides in order to ease the burden of high-level radioactive waste disposal problem. Conceptual design study of minor actinide burner reactors was performed to obtain a reactor model with very hard neutron spectrum and very high neutron flux in which minor actinides can be fissioned efficiently. Two models of burner reactors were obtained, one with metal fuel core and the other with particle fuel core. Minor actinide transmutation by the actinide burner reactors is compared with that by power reactors from both the reactor physics and fuel cycle facilities view point. (author)

  4. Subsurface Biogeochemistry of Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, Annie B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Univ. Relations and Science Education; Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst.

    2016-06-29

    A major scientific challenge in environmental sciences is to identify the dominant processes controlling actinide transport in the environment. It is estimated that currently, over 2200 metric tons of plutonium (Pu) have been deposited in the subsurface worldwide, a number that increases yearly with additional spent nuclear fuel (Ewing et al., 2010). Plutonium has been shown to migrate on the scale of kilometers, giving way to a critical concern that the fundamental biogeochemical processes that control its behavior in the subsurface are not well understood (Kersting et al., 1999; Novikov et al., 2006; Santschi et al., 2002). Neptunium (Np) is less prevalent in the environment; however, it is predicted to be a significant long-term dose contributor in high-level nuclear waste. Our focus on Np chemistry in this Science Plan is intended to help formulate a better understanding of Pu redox transformations in the environment and clarify the differences between the two long-lived actinides. The research approach of our Science Plan combines (1) Fundamental Mechanistic Studies that identify and quantify biogeochemical processes that control actinide behavior in solution and on solids, (2) Field Integration Studies that investigate the transport characteristics of Pu and test our conceptual understanding of actinide transport, and (3) Actinide Research Capabilities that allow us to achieve the objectives of this Scientific Focus Area (SFA and provide new opportunities for advancing actinide environmental chemistry. These three Research Thrusts form the basis of our SFA Science Program (Figure 1).

  5. Determination of actinides using ICP-SFMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, Ulrika

    2006-01-01

    Interest in the determination of the actinides using ICP-MS has steadily increased with the development of systems capable of more sensitive and precise measurements. However, the analysis of less abundant actinides such as Pu and Am is not straightforward due to the need for chemical separation of these elements prior to determination. In many applications of mass-spectrometric actinide analysis, isotope ratio measurements are important, either for the analysis of the isotopic composition of, e.g., U or Pu in the sample, or for quantitative determinations using isotope dilution mass spectrometry. In order to achieve high precision and accuracy in an isotope ratio measurement, corrections for instrumentally induced systematic errors, e.g., due to dead-time and mass bias, need to be considered. In this thesis, different aspects of actinide analysis using ICP-SFMS have been addressed. In Papers I and III, separation procedures based on solid phase extraction for Pu, Am and U were developed and evaluated with respect to chemical yield and separation from elements causing spectral interferences. Applications of the analytical procedures developed comprised measurement of the 240 Pu/ 2 3 9Pu ratio in environmental reference materials, and age determination of Pu based on the 241 Pu/ 241 Am and 240 Pu/ 236 U ratios. In the application of different separation procedures for Pu, previously unidentified spectral interferences were discovered. In Paper II, these interferences were identified as lanthanide phosphate ions and the composition and formation of these species with respect to different instrumental parameters were further examined. Due to the importance of precise and accurate isotope ratio determination, a thorough investigation of the instrumental dead time of an ICP-SFMS system was performed. The dead time was evaluated via both isotope ratio and electronic measurements of the output from the detector amplifier. It was found that the overall uncertainty in ratio

  6. Sulfur contents and sulfur-isotope compositions of thiotrophic symbioses in bivalve molluscs and vestimentiferan worms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, R.D.; Fry, B.

    1998-01-01

    Total sulfur (S(TOT)), elemental sulfur (S??) and sulfur-isotope compositions (??34S) of marine animals were analyzed to determine whether these chemical characteristics could help distinguish animals with a sulfur-based, thiotrophic nutrition from animals whose nutrition is based on methanotrophy or on more normal consumption of phytoplankton-derived organic matter. The presence of S??was almost entirely confined to the symbiont-containing tissues of thiotrophs, but was sometimes undetectable in thiotrophic species where sulfide availability was probably low. When S??contents were subtracted, the remaining tissue-sulfur concentrations were similar for all nutritional groups. ??34S values were typically lower for thiotrophs than for other groups, although there was overlap in methanotroph and thiotroph values at some sites. Field evidence supported the existence of small to moderate (1 to 10???)34S fractionations in the uptake of sulfides and metabolism of thiosulfate. In general, a total sulfur content of >3% dry weight, the presence of elemental sulfur, and ??34S values less than + 5??? can be used to infer a thiotrophic mode of nutrition.

  7. Actinide separations by supported liquid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danesi, P.R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Rickert, P.; Chiarizia, R.

    1984-01-01

    The work has demonstrated that actinide removal from synthetic waste solutions using both flat-sheet and hollow-fiber SLM's is a feasible chemical process at the laboratory scale level. The process is characterized by the typical features of SLM's processes: very small quantities of extractant required; the potential for operations with high feed/strip volume ratios, resulting in a corresponding concentration factor of the actinides; and simplicity of operation. Major obstacles to the implementation of the SLM technology to the decontamination of liquid nuclear wastes are the probable low resistance of polypropylene supports to high radiation fields, which may prevent the application to high-level nuclear wastes; the unknown lifetime of the SLM; and the high Na content of the separated actinide solution

  8. Actinide colloid generation in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.

    1990-05-01

    The progress made in the investigation of actinide colloid generation in groundwaters is summarized and discussed with particular examples relevant to an understanding of the migration behaviour of actinides in natural aquifer systems. The first part deals with the characterization of colloids: groundwater colloids, actinide real-colloids and actinide pseudocolloids. The second part concentrates on the generation processes and migration behaviour of actinide pseudocolloids, which are discussed with some notable experimental examples. Importance is stressed more on the chemical aspects of the actinide colloid generation in groundwater. This work is a contribution to the CEC project MIRAGE II, particularly, to research area: complexation and colloids. (orig.)

  9. Iron absorption from beans with different contents of iron, evaluated by stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira-Franco, Márcia Varella Morandi; Dutra de Oliveira, José Eduardo; Nutti, Marilia Regini; Pereira, Helton Santos; Carvalho, José Luiz Vianna de; Abrams, Steven A; Brandão, Camila Fernanda Cunha; Marchini, Júlio Sérgio

    2018-06-01

    The introduction of biofortified foods such as beans with higher iron content may be a useful tool in preventing iron deficiency. The biofortification aims to reach the root of the problem of malnutrition, targets the neediest population, uses embedded distribution mechanisms, is scientifically feasible and effective in terms of cost, and complements other ongoing interventions to control micronutrient deficiency. However, to ensure effectiveness, measurement of the absorption of minerals is essential. The objective of this study was to evaluate the iron bioavailability of common bean BRS Pontal (PO), targeted for biofortification, compared with common bean BRS Estilo in man through reliable techniques that have not been previously used in Brazil. The study included 29 young adult volunteers divided into 2 groups: Group CB (13 subjects) received 100 g of common beans (BRS-Estilo) cooked labeled with iron-58 ( 58 Fe) and Group TBB (16 patients) received 100 g common bean target for iron biofortification (BRS-Pontal), cooked and labeled with iron58 ( 58 Fe). The next day they received the reference dose of ferrous sulfate enriched iron-57 ( 57 Fe). Isotopic evaluation of iron for measurement of iron incorporation into erythrocytes was performed 14 days after consumption. The beans used, were produced, through conventional breeding program, by EMBRAPA/Rice and Beans. The iron absorption was evaluated by assessing the isotopic enrichment of the stable isotope. Mean iron absorption from the meal with common beans was 0.409% (±0.040%) and mean iron incorporation from the meal with target beans for biofortification 0.407% (±0.038%) and did not differ between the groups. This study tested the iron absorption from a single bean meal in healthy volunteers or non anemics, In the present study the iron absorption ratio from common bean Pontal (PO), targeted for biofortification and compared with common bean BRS Estilo was not significantly different. The iron concentration

  10. The carbon isotope ratios and contents of mineral elements in leaves of Chinese medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Zhifang; Sun Guchou; Wang Wei

    1989-01-01

    Leaf carbon isotope ratios and 13 kinds of mineral elements were measured on 36 species of common Chinese medicinal plants in a subtropical monsoon forest of Ding Hu Shan in Guangdong Province. The .delta.13C value were from -26.4 to -32.6%, indicating that all of the species belonged the photosynthetic C3 types. The relative lower value of δ13C was observed in the life form of shrubs. The contents of 7 elements (N, P, K, Ca, Na Mg, Si) were dependent upon the species, life form, medicinal function and medicinal part. Herb type medicine and the used medicinal part of leaves or whole plant showed higher levels of above elements than the others. Among the nine groups with different medicinal functions, it was found that more nitrogen was in the leaves of medicinal plants for hemophthisis, hypertension and stomachic troubles, more phosphorus and potassium were in the leaves for cancer and snake bite medicines, but more calcium and magnesium were in the leaves for curing rheumatics. Ferric, aluminium and manganese were the main composition of microelements in leaves. There were higher content of ferric in leaves for hemophthisis medicine, higher zinc in leaves for cold and hypertension medicine, and higher Cup in leaves of stomachic medicine. It was suggested that the pattern of mineral elements in leaves of Chinese medicinal plants reflected the different properties of absorption and accumulation. Some additional effect due to the high content of certain element might be associated with the main function of that medicine

  11. A Summary of Actinide Enrichment Technologies and Capability Gaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patton, Bradley D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robinson, Sharon M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The evaluation performed in this study indicates that a new program is needed to efficiently provide a national actinide radioisotope enrichment capability to produce milligram-to-gram quantities of unique materials for user communities. This program should leverage past actinide enrichment, the recent advances in stable isotope enrichment, and assessments of the future requirements to cost effectively develop this capability while establishing an experience base for a new generation of researchers in this vital area. Preliminary evaluations indicate that an electromagnetic isotope separation (EMIS) device would have the capability to meet the future needs of the user community for enriched actinides. The EMIS technology could be potentially coupled with other enrichment technologies, such as irradiation, as pre-enrichment and/or post-enrichment systems to increase the throughput, reduce losses of material, and/or reduce operational costs of the base EMIS system. Past actinide enrichment experience and advances in the EMIS technology applied in stable isotope separations should be leveraged with this new evaluation information to assist in the establishment of a domestic actinide radioisotope enrichment capability.

  12. From carbon to actinides: A new universal 1MV accelerator mass spectrometer at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcken, K.M., E-mail: klaus.wilcken@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organisation, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Hotchkis, M.; Levchenko, V.; Fink, D. [Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organisation, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Hauser, T.; Kitchen, R. [National Electrostatics Corporation, 7540 Graber Road, Middleton, WI 53562-0310 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    A new 1 MV NEC pelletron AMS system at ANSTO is presented. The spectrometer comprises large radius magnets for actinide measurements. A novel feature of the system is fast switching between isotopes both at low and high energy sections allowing measurements of up to 8 isotopes within a single sequence. Technical details and layout of the spectrometer is presented. Performance data for {sup 14}C, {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and actinides demonstrate the system is ready for routine AMS measurements.

  13. From carbon to actinides: A new universal 1MV accelerator mass spectrometer at ANSTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcken, K. M.; Hotchkis, M.; Levchenko, V.; Fink, D.; Hauser, T.; Kitchen, R.

    2015-10-01

    A new 1 MV NEC pelletron AMS system at ANSTO is presented. The spectrometer comprises large radius magnets for actinide measurements. A novel feature of the system is fast switching between isotopes both at low and high energy sections allowing measurements of up to 8 isotopes within a single sequence. Technical details and layout of the spectrometer is presented. Performance data for 14C, 10Be, 26Al and actinides demonstrate the system is ready for routine AMS measurements.

  14. Biological pathways and chemical behavior of plutonium and other actinides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlman, R.C.; Bondietti, E.A.; Eyman, L.D.

    1976-01-01

    The principal long-lived actinide elements that may enter the environment from either U or Pu fuel cycles are Pu, Am, Cm, and Np. Approximately 25% of the alpha activity estimated to be released to the atmosphere from the LMFBR fuel cycle will be contributed by 241 Am, 242 Cm, and 244 Cm. The balance of the alpha activity will come from Pu isotopes. Activities of 242 Cm, 244 Cm, 241 Am, 243 Am, and 237 Np in waste may exceed concentrations of Pu isotopes in waste after various periods of decay. Thorium and uranium isotopes may also be released by operations of the thorium fuel cycle. Environmental actinides are discussed under the following headings: sources of man-made actinide elements; pathways of exposure; environmental chemistry of actinides; uptake of actinides by plants; distribution of actinides in components of White Oak Lake; entry of actinides into terrestrial food chains; relationship between chemical behavior and uptake of actinides by organisms; and behavior of Pu in freshwater and marine food chains

  15. Internal dose evaluation from actinide intakes during nuclear power reactor spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawar, S.K.; Kumar, Ranjeet; Gamre, Rupali; Purohit, R.G.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Indian PHWR reactors are using natural uranium as fuel. After use they are discharged from the core and send for fuel reprocessing to extract the unused uranium and plutonium. Plutonium and other actinides are formed by activation of 238 U with neutrons and subsequent decay. During reprocessing of the spent fuel, major long lived actinides (Pu, Am and U) may become radiological safety hazard. Actinides intakes are more probable during declading and chopping of spent fuel. During routine plant operation in reprocessing, exposure to Pu is a major concern along with Am and U in working environment due to its higher radiological hazard and occupational workers are likely to get exposed to plutonium, Americium and Uranium mostly through inhalation. Internally deposited Pu-isotopes, Am-isotope and U-isotopes are estimated using techniques such as lung counting (in-vivo) and urine and faecal bioassay (in-vitro). Evaluation of internal dose of actinides is dependent upon urinary excreted activity. To estimate the internally deposited Pu, U and Am at an intake level of about one ALI (ICRP-78, 1997) of occupational workers, urine bioassay is the preferred technique due to high detection sensitivity, ease of sample handling and economical method. A small and measurable fraction of internally deposited Pu, Am and U are excreted through urine whose content is dependent on time of inhalation, quantity and type of chemical form of inhaled material (S and M class). A standardized radiochemical analysis method for separation and estimation of Pu, Am and U is used to evaluate the urinary excreted activity and internal dose. Several measurements techniques are employed for the estimation of plutonium, Americium and Uranium for example, Alpha Spectrometry, Gamma Spectrometry, Neutron Activation Analysis, Mass Spectrometry and Fission Track Analysis. The radiochemical separation followed by alpha counting and/or spectrometry is chosen due to its ease of handling and

  16. Graphite content and isotopic fractionation between calcite-graphite pairs in metasediments from the Mgama Hills, Southern Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arneth, J.D.; Schidlowski, M.; Sarbas, B.; Goerg, U.; Amstutz, G.C.

    1985-01-01

    Amphibolite-grade metasediments from the Mgama Hills region, Kenya, contain conspicuous quantities of graphite, most probably derived from organic progenitor materials,. The highest graphite contents are found in schists whereas calcite marbles intercalated in the sequence contain relatively low amounts. The graphitic constituents are consistently enriched in 13 C relative to common sedimentary organic material, with the highest isotopic ratios in graphite from the marbles. Carbon isotope fractionations between calcite and graphite mostly vary between 3.3 and 7.1 per mille, which comes close to both empirically recorded and thermodynamically calculated fractionations in the temperature range of the upper amphibolite facies. However, larger values occasionally encountered in the marbles suggest that complete isotopic equilibrium is not always attained in amphibolite-facies metamorphism. (author)

  17. Extraction chromatography of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, W.

    1978-01-01

    Extraction chromatography of actinides in the oxidation state from 2 to 6 is reviewed. Data on using neutral (tbp), basic (substituted ammonium salts) and acidic [di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid (D2EHPA)] extracting agents ketones, esters, alcohols and β-diketones in this method are given. Using the example of actinide separation using D2EHPA, discussed are factors influencing the efficiency of their chromatography separation (nature and particle size of the carrier materials, extracting agents amount on the carrier, temperature and elution rate)

  18. Actinide nanoparticle research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalmykov, Stepan N.; Denecke, Melissa A.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first book to cover actinide nano research. It is of interest both for fundamental research into the chemistry and physics of f-block elements as well as for applied researchers such as those studying the long-term safety of nuclear waste disposal and developing remediation strategies. The authors cover important issues of the formation of actinide nano-particles, their properties and structure, environmental behavior of colloids and nanoparticles related to the safe disposal of nuclear wastes, modeling and advanced methods of characterization at the nano-scale. (orig.)

  19. Radiochemistry and actinide chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaumont, R.; Peneloux, A.

    1989-01-01

    The analysis of trace amounts of actinide elements by means of radiochemistry, is discussed. The similarities between radiochemistry and actinide chemistry, in the case of species amount by cubic cm below 10 12 , are explained. The parameters which allow to define what are the observable chemical reactions, are given. The classification of radionuclides in micro or macrocomponents is considered. The validity of the mass action law and the partition function in the definition of the average number of species for trace amounts, is investigated. Examples illustrating the results are given

  20. Fission properties of very heavy actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1979-01-01

    The existing data on neutron-emission, kinetic-energy and mass distributions, and half-lives for spontaneous fission of the heavy actinides are reviewed. A comparison of the data for the Fm isotopes with heavier and lighter nuclides suggests that the properties of the heavy Fm isotopes may be unique and can qualitatively be explained on the basis of fragment shell effects, i.e., symmetric fission results in two fragments with configurations close to the doubly magic 132 Sn nucleus. The effect of excitation energy and the use of systematics and theoretical predictions of fission properties and half-lives in the identification of new heavy element isotopes is discussed. 54 references

  1. Impact of minor actinide recycling on sustainable fuel cycle options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidet, F.; Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.

    2017-11-01

    The recent Evaluation and Screening study chartered by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, has identified four fuel cycle options as being the most promising. Among these four options, the two single-stage fuel cycles rely on a fast reactor and are differing in the fact that in one case only uranium and plutonium are recycled while in the other case minor actinides are also recycled. The two other fuel cycles are two-stage and rely on both fast and thermal reactors. They also differ in the fact that in one case only uranium and plutonium are recycled while in the other case minor actinides are also recycled. The current study assesses the impact of recycling minor actinides on the reactor core design, its performance characteristics, and the characteristics of the recycled material and waste material. The recycling of minor actinides is found not to affect the reactor core performance, as long as the same cycle length, core layout and specific power are being used. One notable difference is that the required transuranics (TRU) content is slightly increased when minor actinides are recycled. The mass flows are mostly unchanged given a same specific power and cycle length. Although the material mass flows and reactor performance characteristics are hardly affected by recycling minor actinides, some differences are observed in the waste characteristics between the two fuel cycles considered. The absence of minor actinides in the waste results in a different buildup of decay products, and in somewhat different behaviors depending on the characteristic and time frame considered. Recycling of minor actinides is found to result in a reduction of the waste characteristics ranging from 10% to 90%. These results are consistent with previous studies in this domain and depending on the time frame considered, packaging conditions, repository site, repository strategy, the differences observed in the waste characteristics could be beneficial and help improve

  2. Minor Actinide Laboratory at JRC-ITU: Fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, A.; McGinley, J.; Somers, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Minor Actinide Laboratory (MA-lab) of the Institute for Transuranium Elements is a unique facility for the fabrication of fuels and targets containing minor actinides (MA). It is of key importance for research on Partitioning and Transmutation in Europe, as it is one of the only dedicated facilities for the fabrication of MA containing materials, either for property measurements or for the production of test pins for irradiation experiments. In this paper a detailed description of the MA-Lab facility and the fabrication processes developed to fabricate fuels and samples containing high content of minor actinides is given. In addition, experience gained and improvements are also outlined. (authors)

  3. Casting of metallic fuel containing minor actinide additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trybus, C.L.; Henslee, S.P.; Sanecki, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    A significant attribute of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept is the transmutation of long-lived minor actinide fission products. These isotopes require isolation for thousands of years, and if they could be removed from the waste, disposal problems would be reduced. The IFR utilizes pyroprocessing of metallic fuel to separate auranium, plutonium, and the minor actinides from nonfissionable constituents. These materials are reintroduced into the fuel and reirradiated. Spent IFR fuel is expected to contain low levels of americium, neptunium, and curium because the hard neutron spectrum should transmute these isotopes as they are produced. This opens the possibility of using an IFR to trnasmute minor actinide waste from conventional light water reactors (LWRs). A standard IFR fuel is based on the alloy U-20% Pu-10% Zr (in weight percent). A metallic fuel system eases the requirements for reprocessing methods and enables the minor actinide metals to be incorporated into the fuel with simple modifications to the basic fuel casting process. In this paper, the authors report the initial casting experience with minor actinide element addition to an IFR U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel

  4. Actinides, the narrowwest bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L.; Riseborough, P.S.

    1984-01-01

    A table of elements is shown that demonstrates the crossover from superconductivity to magnetism as well as regions of mixed valence. In particular, the actinides must eventually show 4f-electron like mixed valence, after the 5f-electrons become localized. There also seems to be an adiabatic continuation between heavy fermion and mixed valence behavior

  5. Radionuclide content and state of isotopic disequilibrium in some utilized smoking pastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabana, El-Said Ibrahim; Yahya, Ahmad Abu Bakre [King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia). Faculty of Engineering, Radiation Protection and Training Centre; Kinsara, Abdulraheem Abdulrahman [King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia). Faculty of Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Dept.

    2014-10-01

    {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po were measured in some jurak and mehassel samples collected from the local market. Jurak is a paste mixture composed of 30% tobacco, 50% molasses and 20% spices and minced fruits. Mehassel is a local trade-name of a paste mixture of unknown ratios of tobacco to spices and minced fruits. Both jurak and mehassel are used for smoking by Shisha (a pipe used for smoking and has a water filter). Just for comparison, these radionuclides were measured in some cigarette tobacco samples. In cigarette tobacco samples, the average activity concentrations were 0.32 ± 0.10, 0.51 ± 0.11, 3.6 ± 1.0, 16.1 ± 2.4 and 15.8 ± 2.2 Bq/kg for {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po, respectively. These values for the same isotopes were 1.01 ± 0.25, 1.04 ± 0.27, 1.2 ± 0.4, 4.4 ± 1.0 and 4.2 ± 0.9 Bq/kg in jurak samples and 0.17 ± 0.07, 0.24 ± 0.08, 1.8 ± 0.7, 7.5 ± 1.7 and 7.0 ± 1.6 Bq/kg in mehassel samples, respectively. Generally, the mean values of the results indicated that, except for uranium in jurak, the activity concentration for all the analyzed radionuclides in the different samples followed the sequence: {sup 210}Po ∼ {sup 210}Pb > {sup 226}Ra >> {sup 234}U > {sup 238}U, whereas for each radionuclide, its activity concentration followed the sequence: cigarette tobacco > mehassel > jurak. Molasses contributed to the enhanced uranium content in jurak samples. The obtained results are discussed in detail.

  6. Actinide separative chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boullis, B.

    2004-01-01

    Actinide separative chemistry has focused very heavy work during the last decades. The main was nuclear spent fuel reprocessing: solvent extraction processes appeared quickly a suitable, an efficient way to recover major actinides (uranium and plutonium), and an extensive research, concerning both process chemistry and chemical engineering technologies, allowed the industrial development in this field. We can observe for about half a century a succession of Purex plants which, if based on the same initial discovery (i.e. the outstanding properties of a molecule, the famous TBP), present huge improvements at each step, for a large part due to an increased mastery of the mechanisms involved. And actinide separation should still focus R and D in the near future: there is a real, an important need for this, even if reprocessing may appear as a mature industry. We can present three main reasons for this. First, actinide recycling appear as a key-issue for future nuclear fuel cycles, both for waste management optimization and for conservation of natural resource; and the need concerns not only major actinide but also so-called minor ones, thus enlarging the scope of the investigation. Second, extraction processes are not well mastered at microscopic scale: there is a real, great lack in fundamental knowledge, useful or even necessary for process optimization (for instance, how to design the best extracting molecule, taken into account the several notifications and constraints, from selectivity to radiolytic resistivity?); and such a need for a real optimization is to be more accurate with the search of always cheaper, cleaner processes. And then, there is room too for exploratory research, on new concepts-perhaps for processing quite new fuels- which could appear attractive and justify further developments to be properly assessed: pyro-processes first, but also others, like chemistry in 'extreme' or 'unusual' conditions (supercritical solvents, sono-chemistry, could be

  7. Near-IR laser-based spectrophotometer for comparative analysis of isotope content of CO2 in exhale air samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, E V; Glushko, A N; Kasoev, S G; Koval', A V; Lapshin, D A

    2011-01-01

    We present a laser spectrophotometer aimed at high-accuracy comparative analysis of content of 12 CO 2 and 13 CO 2 isotope modifications in the exhale air samples and based on a tunable near-IR diode laser (2.05 μm). The two-channel optical scheme of the spectrophotometer and the special digital system for its control are described. An algorithm of spectral data processing aimed at determining the difference in the isotope composition of gas mixtures is proposed. A few spectral regions (near 4880 cm -1 ) are determined to be optimal for analysis of relative content of 12 CO 2 and 13 CO 2 in the exhale air. The use of the proposed spectrophotometer scheme and the developed algorithm makes the results of the analysis less susceptible to the influence of the interference in optical elements, to the absorption in the open atmosphere, to the slow drift of the laser pulse envelope, and to the offset of optical channels. The sensitivity of the comparative analysis of the isotope content of CO 2 in exhale air samples, achieved using the proposed scheme, is estimated to be nearly 0.1‰.

  8. Ten years of experience in extraction chromatographic processes for the recovery, separation and purification of actinides elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.; Bourges, J.; Koehly, G.

    1984-06-01

    Ten years ago the extraction chromatographic technique was developed for preparative purposes and is now applied for all chemicals separations needed for the production of actinides isotopes. That technique appears to be simple and flexible. It can be used for the production of microgram to kilogram amounts of actinide isotopes. This paper focuses on the experience gained and describes some peculiar production of actinide isotopes solved by using extraction chromatographic technique. After a review of extracting molecules and equipment, treatment of irradiated targets (preparation of Pu 238 and removal of neptunium, production of Am 243 and Cm 244), recovery of actinides from alpha aqueous wastes (preparation of Am 241) and recovery of decay products from aged actinide stocks (recovery of Am 241 from Pu stocks, of U 234 from Pu 238 stocks) are described

  9. Status of nuclear data for actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzhovskii, B.Y.; Gorelov, V.P.; Grebennikov, A.N. [Russia Federal Nuclear Centre, Arzamas (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Nuclear data required for transmutation problem include many actinide nuclei. In present paper the analysis of neutron fission, capture, (n,2n) and (n,3n) reaction cross sections at energy region from thermal point to 14 MeV was carried out for Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm isotops using modern evaluated nuclear data libraries and handbooks of recommended nuclear data. Comparison of these data indicates on substantial discrepancies in different versions of files, that connect with quality and completeness of original experimental data.

  10. Compilation of actinide neutron nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The Swedish nuclear data committee has compiled a selected set of neutron cross section data for the 16 most important actinide isotopes. The aim of the report is to present available data in a comprehensible way to allow a comparison between different evaluated libraries and to judge about the reliability of these libraries from the experimental data. The data are given in graphical form below about 1 ev and above about 10 keV shile the 2200 m/s cross sections and resonance integrals are given in numerical form. (G.B.)

  11. Actinide oxide photodiode and nuclear battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sykora, Milan; Usov, Igor

    2017-12-05

    Photodiodes and nuclear batteries may utilize actinide oxides, such a uranium oxide. An actinide oxide photodiode may include a first actinide oxide layer and a second actinide oxide layer deposited on the first actinide oxide layer. The first actinide oxide layer may be n-doped or p-doped. The second actinide oxide layer may be p-doped when the first actinide oxide layer is n-doped, and the second actinide oxide layer may be n-doped when the first actinide oxide layer is p-doped. The first actinide oxide layer and the second actinide oxide layer may form a p/n junction therebetween. Photodiodes including actinide oxides are better light absorbers, can be used in thinner films, and are more thermally stable than silicon, germanium, and gallium arsenide.

  12. Measurement of actinide neutron cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firestone, Richard B.; Nitsche, Heino; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Perry, DaleL.; English, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    The maintenance of strong scientific expertise is critical to the U.S. nuclear attribution community. It is particularly important to train students in actinide chemistry and physics. Neutron cross-section data are vital components to strategies for detecting explosives and fissile materials, and these measurements require expertise in chemical separations, actinide target preparation, nuclear spectroscopy, and analytical chemistry. At the University of California, Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory we have trained students in actinide chemistry for many years. LBNL is a leader in nuclear data and has published the Table of Isotopes for over 60 years. Recently, LBNL led an international collaboration to measure thermal neutron capture radiative cross sections and prepared the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF) in collaboration with the IAEA. This file of 35, 000 prompt and delayed gamma ray cross-sections for all elements from Z=1-92 is essential for the neutron interrogation of nuclear materials. LBNL has also developed new, high flux neutron generators and recently opened a 1010 n/s D+D neutron generator experimental facility

  13. Value of burnup credit beyond actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancaster, D.; Fuentes, E.; Kang, Chi.

    1997-01-01

    DOE has submitted a topical report to the NRC justifying burnup credit based only on actinide isotopes (U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241). When this topical report is approved, it will allow a great deal of the commercial spent nuclear fuel to be transported in significantly higher capacity casks. A cost savings estimate for shipping fuel in 32 assembly (burnup credit) casks as opposed to 24 assembly (non-burnup credit) casks was previously presented. Since that time, more detailed calculations have been performed using the methodology presented in the Actinide-Only Burnup Credit Topical Report. Loading curves for derated casks have been generated using actinide-only burnup credit and are presented in this paper. The estimates of cost savings due to burnup credit for shipping fuel utilizing 32, 30, 28, and 24 assembly casks where only the 24 assembly cask does not burnup credit have been created and are discussed. 4 refs., 2 figs

  14. Physics studies of higher actinide consumption in an LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.N.; Wade, D.C.; Fujita, E.K.; Khalil, H.

    1990-01-01

    The core physics aspects of the transuranic burning potential of the integral Fast Reactor (IFR) are assessed. The actinide behavior in fissile self-sufficient IFR closed cycles of 1200 MWt size is characterized, and the transuranic isotopics and risk potential of the working inventory are compared to those from a once-through LWR. The core neutronic performance effects of rare-earth impurities present in the recycled fuel are addressed. Fuel cycle strategies for burning transuranics from an external source are discussed, and specialized actinide burner designs are described

  15. Physics studies of higher actinide consumption in an LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.N.; Wade, D.C.; Fujita, E.K.; Khalil, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    The core physics aspects of the transuranic burning potential of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) are assessed. The actinide behavior in fissile self-sufficient IFR closed cycles of 1200 MWt size is characterized, and the transuranic isotopics and risk potential of the working inventory are compared to those from a once-through LWR. The core neutronic performance effects of rare-earth impurities present in the recycled fuel are addressed. Fuel cycle strategies for burning transuranics from an external source are discussed, and specialized actinide burner designs are described. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  16. CANDU - a versatile reactor for plutonium disposition or actinide burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, P.S.W.; Gagnon, M.J.N.; Boczar, P.G.; Ellis, R.J.; Verrall, R.A.

    1997-10-01

    High neutron economy, on-line refuelling, and a simple fuel-bundle design result in a high degree of versatility in the use of the CANDU reactor for the disposition of weapons-derived plutonium and for the annihilation of long-lived radioactive actinides, such as plutonium, neptunium, and americium isotopes, created in civilian nuclear power reactors. Inherent safety features are incorporated into the design of the bundles carrying the plutonium and actinide fuels. This approach enables existing CANDU reactors to operate with various plutonium-based fuel cycles without requiring major changes to the current reactor design. (author)

  17. Process for denitrating waste solutions containing nitrates and actinides with simultaneous separation of the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gompper, K.

    1986-01-01

    The invention is intended to reduce the acid and nitrate content of nitrate waste solutions, to reduce the total salt content of the waste solution, to remove the actinides contained in it by precipitation, without any danger of violent reactions or an increase in the volume of the waste solution. The invention achieves this by mixing the waste solution with diethyl oxalate at room temperature and heating the mixture to at least 80 0 C. (orig./PW) [de

  18. [Determination of deuterium concentration in foods and influence of water with modified isotopic composition on oxidation parameters and heavy hydrogen isotopes content in experimental animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basov, A A; Bykov, I M; Baryshev, M G; Dzhimak, S S; Bykov, M I

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the results of the study of the deuterium (D) content in food products as well as the influence of deuterium depleted water (DDW) on the concentration of heavy hydrogen isotopes in the blood and lyophilized tissues of rats. The most significant difference in the content of D was found between potato and pork fat, which indexes the standard delta notation (δ) D in promille, related to the international standard SMOW (Standard Mean Ocean of Water) amounted to -83,2 per thousand and -250,7 per thousand, respectively (phydrogen atoms in the body. The data obtained in the experimental modeling of the diet of male Wistar rats in the age of 5-6 mo (weight 235 ± 16 g) using DDW (δD = -743,2 per thousand) instead of drinking water (δD = -37,0 per thousand) with identical mineral composition showed that after 2 weeks significant (p tissue") is due to different rates ofisotopic exchange reactions in plasma and tissues (liver, kidney, heart), which can be explained by entering into the composition of a modified diet of organic substrates with more than DDW concentration D, which are involved in the construction of cellular structures and eventually lead to a redistribution of D and change direction of D/H gradient "plasmaisotopic composition, aimed at reducing the level of heavy non-radioactive atoms will allow the targeted nutritional correction of prooxidant-antioxidant status of the population in areas with adverse environmental conditions, stimulating by created isotopic D/H gradient cytoprotective mechanisms influencing the various components of nonspecific protection, including free radical oxidation processes. And then again, periodic assessment of the isotopic composition of nutrients will monitor the quality of food consumed by the population, and if

  19. Winter diets of immature green turtles (Chelonia mydas) on a northern feeding ground: integrating stomach contents and stable isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Natalie C.; Bjorndal, Karen A.; Lamont, Margaret M.; Carthy, Raymond R.

    2015-01-01

    The foraging ecology and diet of the green turtle, Chelonia mydas, remain understudied, particularly in peripheral areas of its distribution. We assessed the diet of an aggregation of juvenile green turtles at the northern edge of its range during winter months using two approaches. Stomach content analyses provide a single time sample, and stable isotope analyses integrate diet over a several-month period. We evaluated diet consistency in prey choice over time by comparing the results of these two approaches. We examined stomach contents from 43 juvenile green turtles that died during cold stunning events in St. Joseph Bay, Florida, in 2008 and 2011. Stomach contents were evaluated for volume, dry mass, percent frequency of occurrence, and index of relative importance of individual diet items. Juvenile green turtles were omnivorous, feeding primarily on seagrasses and tunicates. Diet characterizations from stomach contents differed from those based on stable isotope analyses, indicating the turtles are not feeding consistently during winter months. Evaluation of diets during warm months is needed.

  20. Actinide recycling in reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuesters, H.; Wiese, H.W.; Krieg, B.

    1995-01-01

    The objective is an assessment of the transmutation of long-lived actinides and fission products and the incineration of plutonium for reducing the risk potential of radioactive waste from reactors in comparison to direct waste disposal. The contribution gives an interim account on homogeneous and heterogeneous recycling of 'risk nuclides' in thermal and fast reactors. Important results: - A homogeneous 5 percent admixture of minor actinides (MA) from N4-PWRs to EFR fuel would allow a transmutation not only of the EFR MA, but in addition of the MA from 5 or 6 PWRs of equal power. However, the incineration is restricted by safety considerations. - LWR have only a very low MA incineration potential, due to their disadvantageous neutron capture/fission ratio. - In order to keep the Cm inventory at a low level, it is advantageous to concentrate the Am heterogeneously in particular fuel elements or rods. (orig./HP)

  1. Analytical chemistry of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chollet, H.; Marty, P.

    2001-01-01

    Different characterization methods specifically applied to the actinides are presented in this review such as ICP/OES (inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry), ICP/MS (inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy-mass spectrometry), TIMS (thermal ionization-mass spectrometry) and GD/OES (flow discharge optical emission). Molecular absorption spectrometry and capillary electrophoresis are also available to complete the excellent range of analytical tools at our disposal. (authors)

  2. Production and measurement of minor actinides in the commercial fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanbro, W.D.

    1997-03-01

    The minor actinide elements, particularly neptunium and americium, are produced as a normal byproduct of the operation of thermal power reactors. Because of the existence of long-lived isotopes of these elements, they constitute the major sources of the residual radiation in spent fuel or in wastes resulting from reprocessing. This has led to examinations by some countries of the possibility of separating the minor actinides from waste products. The papers found in this report address the production of minor actinides in common thermal power reactors as well as approaches to measure these materials in various media. The first paper in this volume, open-quotes Production of Minor Actinides in the Commercial Fuel Cycle,close quotes uses calculations with the ORIGEN2 reactor and decay code to estimate the amounts of minor actinides in spent fuel and separated plutonium as a function of reactor irradiation and the time after discharge. The second paper, open-quotes Destructive Assay of Minor Actinides,close quotes describes a number of promising approaches for the chemical analysis of minor actinides in the various forms in which they are found at reprocessing plants. The next paper, open-quotes Hybrid KED/XRF Measurement of Minor Actinides in Reprocessing Plants,close quotes uses the results of a simulation model to examine the possible applications of the hybrid KED/XRF instrument to the determination of minor actinides in some of the solutions found in reprocessing plants. In open-quotes Calorimetric Assay of Minor Actinides,close quotes the authors show some possible extensions of this powerful technique beyond the normal plutonium assays to include the minor actinides. Finally, the last paper in this volume, open-quotes Environment Measurements of Transuranic Nuclides,close quotes discusses what is known about the levels of the minor actinides in the environment and ways to analyze for these materials in environmental matrices

  3. Comparison between isotope dilution and activation analysis as a method for determining the macro content of mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soedyartomo; Sunoko, S.R.

    1975-01-01

    It is true that the mercury content in the environment should be measured accurately because of its toxicity even at levels of microgram order. The assessment of hazards due to environmental contamination with mercury is based on the results of the metal analysis in a number of different samples. Consequently, the study of the character of analytical methods used, i.e. their accuracy, precision, sensitivity, etc. is essential. A brief description on the microanalysis methods of mercury as given. The discussion of the results obtained from analysing some sludge and water by means of isotope dilution and destructive thermal neutron activation analysis is also presented. It is found that both methods are suitable for routine work. It can be concluded that the isotope dilution method has some advantages. It is more simple, more sensitive, more rapid, and has lower radiation hazard. (author)

  4. Stable isotope compositions and water contents of boninite series volcanic rocks from Chichi-jima, Bonin Islands, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, P.F.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of stable isotope compositions and water contents of boninite series volcanic rocks from the island of Chichi-jima, Bonin Islands, Japan, confirm that a large amount (1.6-2.4 wt.%) of primary water was present in these unusual magmas. An enrichment of 0.6??? in 18O during differentiation is explained by crystallization of 18O-depleted mafic phases. Silicic glasses have elevated ??18O values and relatively low ??D values indicating that they were modified by low-temperature alteration and hydration processes. Mafic glasses, on the other hand, have for the most part retained their primary isotopic signatures since Eocene time. Primary ??D values of -53 for boninite glasses are higher than those of MORB and suggest that the water was derived from subducted oceanic lithosphere. ?? 1987.

  5. Hydrogeological investigations in the Harwell region: the use of environmental isotopes, inert gas contents, and the uranium decay series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.; Andrews, J.N.

    1984-12-01

    A comprehensive range of environmental isotopes, radioelement and dissolved gas contents have been measured in groundwaters from the high permeability formations of the Harwell area. These analyses were undertaken as part of a hydrochemical validation of groundwater circulation patterns derived from potentiometric data. These investigations have focused upon the Corallian and Great Oolite formations since these sandwich the Oxford Clay. Geochemical, isotopic, radioelement and inert gas studies have demonstrated consistent trends which substantiate fluid migration patterns derived from hydraulic considerations. Groundwaters at downdip localities in both the Corallian and Great Oolite formations are the oldest waters sampled from the region. Variations in trends in parameters can be attributed to cross-formational flow and subsequent mixing of groundwaters. Individually these techniques can only provide limited information, but the combination of methods used have provided corroborative evidence concerning the direction of fluid circulation in the Harwell region. (author)

  6. Actinides: why are they important biologically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durbin, P.W.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: actinide elements in energy systems; biological hazards of the actinides; radiation protection standards; and purposes of actinide biological research with regard to toxicity, metabolism, and therapeutic regimens

  7. Preparation of higher-actinide burnup and cross section samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adair, H.L.; Kobisk, E.H.; Quinby, T.C.; Thomas, D.K.; Dailey, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    A joint research program involving the United States and the United Kingdom was instigated about four years ago for the purpose of studying burnup of higher actinides using in-core irradiation in the fast reactor at Dounreay, Scotland. Simultaneously, determination of cross sections of a wide variety of higher actinide isotopes was proposed. Coincidental neutron flux and energy spectral measurements were to be made using vanadium encapsulated dosimetry materials in the immediate region of the burnup and cross section samples. The higher actinide samples chosen for the burnup study were 241 Am and 244 Cm in the forms of Am 2 O 3 , Cm 2 O 3 , and Am 6 Cm(RE) 7 O 21 , where (RE) represents a mixture of lanthanide sesquioxides. It is the purpose of this paper to describe technology development and its application in the preparation of the fuel specimens and the cross section specimens that are being used in this cooperative program

  8. A review of volatile compounds in tektites, and carbon content and isotopic composition of moldavite glass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žák, Karel; Skála, Roman; Řanda, Zdeněk; Mizera, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 6 (2012), s. 1010-1028 ISSN 1086-9379 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/0991 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516; CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : moldavites * geochemistry * ries * carbon stable isotopes * moldavites (Germany) Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.800, year: 2012

  9. Actinides in irradiated graphite of RBMK-1500 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plukienė, R., E-mail: rita@ar.fi.lt; Plukis, A.; Barkauskas, V.; Gudelis, A.; Gvozdaitė, R.; Duškesas, G.; Remeikis, V.

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Activation of actinides in the graphite of the RBMK-1500 reactor was analyzed. • Numerical modeling using SCALE 6.1 and MCNPX was used for actinide calculation. • Measurements of the irradiated graphite sample were used for model validation. • Results are important for further decommissioning process of the RBMK type reactors. - Abstract: The activation of graphite in the nuclear power plants is the problem of high importance related with later graphite reprocessing or disposal. The activation of actinide impurities in graphite due to their toxicity determines a particular long term risk to waste management. In this work the activation of actinides in the graphite constructions of the RBMK-1500 reactor is determined by nuclear spectrometry measurements of the irradiated graphite sample from the Ignalina NPP Unit I and by means of numerical modeling using two independent codes SCALE 6.1 (using TRITON-VI sequence) and MCNPX (v2.7 with CINDER). Both models take into account the 3D RBMK-1500 reactor core fragment with explicit graphite construction including a stack and a sleeve but with a different simplification level concerning surrounding graphite and construction of control roads. The verification of the model has been performed by comparing calculated and measured isotope ratios of actinides. Also good prediction capabilities of the actinide activation in the irradiated graphite have been found for both calculation approaches. The initial U impurity concentration in the graphite model has been adjusted taking into account the experimental results. The specific activities of actinides in the irradiated RBMK-1500 graphite constructions have been obtained and differences between numerical simulation results, different structural parts (sleeve and stack) as well as comparison with previous results (Ancius et al., 2005) have been discussed. The obtained results are important for further decommissioning process of the Ignalina NPP and other RBMK

  10. Thermal neutron actinide data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellier, H.

    1992-01-01

    During the 70's, the physicists involved in the cross section measurements for the low energy neutrons were almost exclusively interested in the resonance energy range. The thermal range was considered as sufficiently known. In the beginning of the 80's, reactor physicists had again to deal with the delicate problem of the power reactor temperature coefficient, essentially for the light water reactors. The measured value of the reactivity temperature coefficient does not agree with the computed one. The later is too negative. For obvious safety reasons, it is an important problem which must be solved. Several causes were suggested to explain this discrepancy. Among all these causes, the spectral shift in the thermal energy range seems to be very important. Sensibility calculations shown that this spectral shift is very sensitive to the shape of the neutron cross sections of the actinides for energies below one electron-volt. Consequently, reactor physicists require new and accurate measurements in the thermal and subthermal energy ranges. A part of these new measurement results were recently released and reviewed. The purpose of this study is to complete the preceding review with the new informations which are now available. In reactor physics the major actinides are the fertile nuclei, uranium 238, thorium 232 and plutonium 240 and the fissile nuclei, uranium 233, uranium 235 and plutonium 239. For the fertile nuclei the main datum is the capture cross section, for the fissile nuclei the data of interest are nu-bar, the fission and capture cross sections or a combination of these data such as η or α. In the following sections, we will review the neutron data of the major actinides for the energy below 1 eV

  11. Improved Sensitivity of Spectroscopic Quantification of Stable Isotope Content Using Capillary Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, J.; Wilcox Freeburg, E.; Kriesel, J.; Linley, T. J.; Kelly, J.; Coleman, M. L.; Christensen, L. E.; Vance, S.

    2016-12-01

    Spectroscopy-based platforms have recently risen to the forefront for making stable isotope measurements of methane, carbon dioxide, water, or other analytes. These spectroscopy systems can be relatively straightforward to operate (versus a mass spectrometry platform), largely relieve the analyst of mass interference artifacts, and many can be used in the field. Despite these significant advantages, however, existing spectroscopy techniques suffer from a lack of measurement sensitivity that can ultimately limit select applications including spatially resolved and compound-specific measurements. Here we present a capillary absorption spectroscopy (CAS) system that is designed to mitigate sensitivity issues in spectroscopy-based stable isotope evaluation. The system uses mid-wave infrared excitation generated from a continuous wave quantum cascade laser. Importantly, the sample `chamber' is a flexible capillary with a total volume of less than one cc. Proprietary coatings on the internal surface of the fiber improve optical performance, guiding the light to a detector and facilitating high levels of interaction between the laser beam and gaseous analytes. We present data demonstrating that a tapered hollow fiber cell, with an internal diameter that broadens toward the detector, reduces optical feedback to further improve measurement sensitivity. Sensitivity of current hollow fiber / CAS systems enable measurements of only 10's of picomoles CO2 while theoretical improvements should enable measurements of as little as 10's of femtomoles. Continued optimization of sample introduction and improvements to optical feedback are being explored. Software is being designed to provide rapid integration of data and generation of processed isotope measurements using a graphical user interface. Taken together, the sensitivity improvements of the CAS system under development could, when coupled to a laser ablation sampling device, enable up to 2 µm spatial resolution (roughly the

  12. Actinide Separation Demonstration Facility, Tarapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishwaraj, I.

    2017-01-01

    Partitioning of minor actinide from high level waste could have a substantial impact in lowering the radio toxicity associated with high level waste as well as it will reduce the burden on geological repository. In Indian context, the partitioned minor actinide could be routed into the fast breeder reactor systems scheduled for commissioning in the near period. The technological breakthrough in solvent development has catalyzed the partitioning programme in India, leading to the setting up and hot commissioning of the Actinide Separation Demonstration Facility (ASDF) at BARC, Tarapur. The engineering scale Actinide Separation Demonstration Facility (ASDF) has been retrofitted in an available radiological hot cell situated adjacent to the Advanced Vitrification Facility (AVS). This location advantage ensures an uninterrupted supply of high-level waste and facilitates the vitrification of the high-level waste after separation of minor actinides

  13. [Study on the content and carbon isotopic composition of water dissolved inorganic carbon from rivers around Xi'an City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Li, Xiang-Zhong; Liu, Wei-Guo

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the content and isotopic compositions of water dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) from four typical rivers (Chanhe, Bahe, Laohe and Heihe) around Xi'an City were studied to trace the possible sources of DIC. The results of this study showed that the content of DIC in the four rivers varied from 0.34 to 5.66 mmol x L(-1) with an average value of 1.23 mmol x L(-1). In general, the content of DIC increased from the headstream to the river mouth. The delta13C(DIC) of four rivers ranged from -13.3 per thousand to -7.2 per thousand, with an average value of -10.1 per thousand. The delta13C(DIC) values of river water were all negative (average value of -12.6 per thousand) at the headstream of four rivers, but the delta13C(DIC) values of downstream water were more positive (with an average value of -9.4 per thousand). In addition, delta13C(DIC) of river water showed relatively negative values (the average value of delta13C(DIC) was -10.5 per thousand) near the estuary of the rivers. The variation of the DIC content and its carbon isotope suggested that the DIC sources of the rivers varied from the headstream to the river mouth. The negative delta13C(DIC) value indicated that the DIC may originate from the soil CO2 at the headstream of the rivers. On the other hand, the delta13C(DIC) values of river water at the middle and lower reaches of rivers were more positive, and it showed that soil CO2 produced by respiration of the C4 plants (like corn) and soil carbonates with positive delta13C values may be imported into river water. Meanwhile, the input of pollutants with low delta13C(DIC) values may result in a decrease of delta13C(DIC) values in the rivers. The study indicated that the DIC content and carbon isotope may be used to trace the sources of DIC in rivers around Xi'an City. Our study may provide some basic information for tracing the sources of DIC of rivers in the small watershed area in the Loess Plateau of China.

  14. Partitioning and transmutation of actinides and fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baetsle, L.H.

    1993-01-01

    The world's nuclear power plants have a total installed capacity of approximately 340 GWe. They give rise to an annual volume of approximately 9000 t of radioactive waste, which is reprocessed, separated from its plutonium content, contained, and stored in repositories to close the nuclear fuel cycle. Direct disposal is being discussed as an alternative to this procedure. As repositories in suitable types of host rock are not operational, the only viable solution is long-term interim storage above ground. If the volumes of radioactive waste are to be reduced, the longlived actinides and fission products must be partitioned. Isotope partitioning in accelerators, though still sounding like science fiction, may soon be indispensable as the third way of treating radioactive waste. The use of mixed oxide fuel in light water reactors and fast breeder reactors both help to limit waste arisings and protect the long-term continuity of raw materials supply. However, both require public acceptance if they are to succeed. (orig.) [de

  15. Utilization of plutonium in HTGR and its actinide production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karin, S.; Brogli, R.; Lefler, W.; Nordheim, L.

    1976-01-01

    The HTGR is a potential plutonium consumer. In this function it would burn plutonium, produce electricity and the valuable fissile isotope U-233. The advantages of this concept are discussed but particular attention is given to the production and the destruction of the higher actinides due to the high burnup achievable in such a system. The presence of the strong resonances in the plutonium isotopes demanded an extension of the methods for evaluation of self-shielding factors, a different structure for broad groups, and the adaptation of the reactor codes to these changes. Specifications for coated plutonium particles were developed. Also procedures were determined to evaluate the alpha ray and neutron emission rates of the actinide nuclides. First cycle calculations were carried out to establish in detail the characteristics of the plutonium reactors and their results are given

  16. Development of ion beam sputtering techniques for actinide target preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, W.S.; Zevenbergen, L.A.; Adair, H.L.

    1985-01-01

    Ion beam sputtering is a routine method for the preparation of thin films used as targets because it allows the use of minimum quantity of starting material, and losses are much lower than most other vacuum deposition techniques. Work is underway in the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory (IRML) at ORNL to develop the techniques that will make the preparation of actinide targets up to 100 μg/cm 2 by ion beam sputtering a routinely available service from IRML. The preparation of the actinide material in a form suitable for sputtering is a key to this technique, as is designing a sputtering system that allows the flexibility required for custom-ordered target production. At present, development work is being conducted on low-activity in a bench-top system. The system will then be installed in a hood or glove box approved for radioactive materials handling where processing of radium, actinium, and plutonium isotopes among others will be performed. (orig.)

  17. Reflections on the criticality of special actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, E.D.

    1987-04-01

    During recent years, the list of nuclides known to be capable of supporting a chain reaction has substantially increased. Since the criticality aspects for some of these nuclides differ in important respects from those of the most common fissile nuclides, 235 92 U, and 239 94 Pu, a new term, ''fissible'' was recently proposed in nuclear engineering to help distinguish differences. Activation energies for fission have been calculated for 41 of the actinide isotopes which are grouped according to four types of nuclides, those with even-Z, even-N, odd-Z, odd-N, odd-Z, even-N, and even-Z, odd-N. With the possible exception of 237 92 U, all fissible isotopes listed have even N. The activation energy for fission is less in the case of the even-Z, even-N isotopes, but almost without eception it is the odd-N isotopes that undergo fission with thermal neutrons and which constitute the principal criticality problem. This paper reviews the criticality and fissionability aspects of the fissile and fissible actinide isotopes. The criticality of aqueous mixtures of fissile and fissible isotopes also is briefly discussed, including limits for criticality control

  18. Reflections on the criticality of special actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, E.D.

    1987-01-01

    During recent years, the list of nuclides known to be capable of supporting a chain reaction has substantially increased. Since the criticality aspects for some of these nuclides differ in important respects from those of the most common fissile nuclides, 92 235 U, and 94 239 Pu, a new term, ''fissible'' was recently proposed in nuclear engineering to help distinguish differences. Activation energies for fission have been calculated for 41 of the actinide isotopes which are grouped according to four types of nuclides, those with even-Z and even-N, odd-Z and odd-N, odd-Z and even-N, or even-Z and odd-N. With the possible exception of 92 237 U, all fissible isotopes listed have even N. The activation energy for fission is less in the case of the even-Z and even-N isotopes, but almost without exception it is the odd-N isotopes that undergo fission with thermal neutrons and which constitute the principal criticality problem. This paper reviews the criticality and fissionability aspects of the fissile and fissible actinide isotopes. The criticality of aqueous mixtures of fissile and fissible isotopes also is briefly discussed, including limits for criticality control. (author)

  19. Recovery actinide values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Delphin, W.H.; Mason, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for partitioning and recovering actinide values from acidic waste solutions resulting from reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels by adding hydroxylammonium nitrate and hydrazine to the waste solution to adjust the valence of the neptunium and plutonium values in the solution to the +4 oxidation state, thus forming a feed solution and contacting the feed solution with an extractant of di-hexoxyethyl phosphoric acid in an organic diluent whereby the actinide values, most of the rare earth values and some fission product values are taken up by the extractant. Separation is achieved by contacting the loaded extractant with two aqueous strip solutions, a nitric acid solution to selectively strip the americium, curium and rare earth values and an oxalate solution of tetramethylammonium hydrogen oxalate and oxalic acid or trimethylammonium hydrogen oxalate to selectively strip the neptunium, plutonium and fission product values. Uranium values remain in the extractant and may be recovered with a phosphoric acid strip. The neptunium and plutonium values are recovered from the oxalate by adding sufficient nitric acid to destroy the complexing ability of the oxalate, forming a second feed, and contacting the second feed with a second extractant of tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate in an inert diluent whereby the neptunium and plutonium values are selectively extracted. The values are recovered from the extractant with formic acid. (author)

  20. Actinide AMS at DREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khojasteh, Nasrin B.; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg; Scharf, Andreas; Ziegenruecker, Rene [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); Pavetich, Stefan [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); ANU, Canberra (Australia)

    2016-07-01

    Radionuclides such as {sup 236}U and {sup 239}Pu were introduced into the environment by atmospheric nuclear weapon tests, reactor accidents (Chernobyl, Fukushima), releases from nuclear reprocessing facilities (Sellafield, La Hague), radioactive waste disposal, and accidents with nuclear devices (Palomares, Thule) [1]. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the most sensitive method to measure these actinides. The DREsden AMS (DREAMS) facility is located at a 6 MV accelerator, which is shared with ion beam analytics and implantation users, preventing major modifications of the accelerator and magnetic analyzers. DREAMS was originally designed for {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca, and {sup 129}I. To modify the system for actinide AMS, a Time-of-Flight (TOF) beamline at the high-energy side has been installed and performance tests are on-going. Ion beam and detector simulations are carried out to design a moveable ionization chamber. Especially, the detector window and anode dimensions have to be optimized. This ionization chamber will act as an energy detector of the system and its installation is planned as closely as possible to the stop detector of the TOF beamline for highest detection efficiency.

  1. Rare earths and actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coqblin, B.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the different properties of rare-earths and actinides, either as pure metals or as in alloys or compounds. Three different cases are considered: (i) First, in the case of 'normal' rare-earths which are characterized by a valence of 3, we discuss essentially the magnetic ordering, the coexistence between superconductivity and magnetism and the properties of amorphous rare-earth systems. (ii) Second, in the case of 'anomalous' rare-earths, we distinguish between either 'intermediate-valence' systems or 'Kondo' systems. Special emphasis is given to the problems of the 'Kondo lattice' (for compounds such as CeAl 2 ,CeAl 3 or CeB 6 ) or the 'Anderson lattice' (for compounds such as TmSe). The problem of neutron diffraction in these systems is also discussed. (iii) Third, in the case of actinides, we can separate between the d-f hybridized and almost magnetic metals at the beginning of the series and the rare-earth like the metals after americium. (orig.)

  2. Nuclear data of the major actinide fuel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenitz, W.P.; Saussure, G. De

    1984-01-01

    The effect of nuclear data of the major actinide fuel materials on the design accuracy, economics and safety of nuclear power systems is discussed. Since most of the data are measured relative to measurement standards, in particular the fission cross-section of /sup 235/U, data must be examined to ensure that absolute measurements and relative measurements are correctly handled. Nuclear data of fissile materials, fertile materials and minor plutonium isotopes are discussed.

  3. Advanced concepts for gamma-ray isotopic analysis and instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, W.M.; Carlson, J.B.

    1994-07-01

    The Safeguards Technology Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing actinide isotopic analysis technologies in response to needs that address issues of flexibility of analysis, robustness of analysis, ease-of-use, automation and portability. Recent developments such as the Intelligent Actinide Analysis System (IAAS), begin to address these issues. We are continuing to develop enhancements on this and other instruments that improve ease-of-use, automation and portability. Requests to analyze samples with unusual isotopics, contamination, or containers have made us aware of the need for more flexible and robust analysis. We have modified the MGA program to extend its plutonium isotopic analysis capability to samples with greater 241 Am content or U isotopics. We are looking at methods for dealing with tantalum or lead contamination and contamination with high-energy gamma emitters, such as 233 U. We are looking at ways to allow the program to use additional information about the sample to further extend the domain of analyzable samples. These unusual analyses will come from the domain of samples that need to be measured because of complex reconfiguration or environmental cleanup

  4. Using trace element content and lead isotopic composition to assess sources of PM in Tijuana, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo, D.; Castro, T.; Bernal, J. P.; Almanza-Veloz, V.; Zavala, M.; González-Castillo, E.; Saavedra, M. I.; Perez-Arvízu, O.; Díaz-Trujillo, G. C.; Molina, L. T.

    2016-05-01

    PM2.5 samples were collected at two urban sites (Parque Morelos (PQM) and CECyTE (CEC)) in Tijuana during the Cal-Mex campaign from May 24 to June 5, 2010. Concentration of trace elements (Mg, Al, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Cu, Ga, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba, La, Ce, and Pb), and Pb isotopic composition were determined in order to study the sources of PM impacting each site. Other chemical analysis (gravimetric, elemental and organic carbon (EC/OC), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)), were also performed. Finally, back-trajectories were calculated to facilitate the interpretation of the chemical data. Trace elements results show that CEC is a receptor site affected by mixed regional sources: sea salt, mineral, urban, and industrial. On the other hand, PQM seems to be impacted mainly by local sources. In particular, Pb at CEC is of anthropogenic, as well as crustal origin. This conclusion is supported by the lead isotopic composition, whose values are consistent with a combination of lead extracted from US mines, and lead from bedrocks in the Mexican Sierras. Some of the time variability observed can be explained using the back-trajectories.

  5. Concentration of actinides in the food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulman, R.A.

    1976-06-01

    Considerable concern is now being expressed over the discharge of actinides into the environment. This report presents a brief review of the chemistry of the actinides and examines the evidence for interaction of the actinides with some naturally-occurring chelating agents and other factors which might stimulate actinide concentration in the food chain of man. This report also reviews the evidence for concentration of actinides in plants and for uptake through the gastrointestinal tract. (author)

  6. Lanthanide/Actinide Opacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungerford, Aimee; Fontes, Christopher J.

    2018-06-01

    Gravitational wave observations benefit from accompanying electromagnetic signals in order to accurately determine the sky positions of the sources. The ejecta of neutron star mergers are expected to produce such electromagnetic transients, called macronovae (e.g. the recent and unprecedented observation of GW170817). Characteristics of the ejecta include large velocity gradients and the presence of heavy r-process elements, which pose significant challenges to the accurate calculation of radiative opacities and radiation transport. Opacities include a dense forest of bound-bound features arising from near-neutral lanthanide and actinide elements. Here we present an overview of current theoretical opacity determinations that are used by neutron star merger light curve modelers. We will touch on atomic physics and plasma modeling codes that are used to generate these opacities, as well as the limited body of laboratory experiments that may serve as points of validation for these complex atomic physics calculations.

  7. Relativistic studies in actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberger, P.; Gonis, A.

    1987-01-01

    In this review the theoretical background is given for a relativistic description for actinide systems. A short introduction is given of the density functional theory which forms the basis for a fully relativistic single-particle theory. A section on the Dirac Hamiltonian is followed by a brief summary on group theoretical concepts. Single site scattering is presented such that formal extensions to the case of the presence of an internal (external) magnetic field and/or anisotropic scattering are evident. Multiple scattering is discussed such that it can readily be applied also to the problem of dislocations. In connection with the problem of selfconsistency particular attention is drawn to the use of complex energies. Finally the various theoretical aspects discussed are illustrated through the results of numerical calculations. 101 refs.; 37 figs.; 5 tabs

  8. Alternatives to isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the measurement of deuterium content of body water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluck, L.J.C.

    2000-01-01

    The measurement of breast milk intake using the isotope dilution techniques is now well established. The methodology involves the administration of a bolus of tracer followed by observation of the kinetics of its passage though the system. For example in the popular 'dose to the mother' method a dose of labeled water is administered to the mother, and over the following days samples of body fluids are taken and the concentration of tracer determined in order to establish the rate of loss of tracer from her body. Likewise samples are taken from the breast fed infant in order to determine the rates of tracer intake and subsequent loss. Deuterium is the tracer of choice for these experiments since it is non-radioactive, and therefore suitable for use in these vulnerable subject groups, and also because of its relative cheapness. Conventionally isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been used for the determination of the amount of deuterium in the body fluids. However this methodology is expensive (an instrument might typically cost US$ 150,000), and it requires a considerable amount of dedicated technical expertise for its operation. Consequently such instrumentation is not widely available, and this has limited the number and scope of studies using this technique. Recently there have been reports of possible alternative technologies for the determination of deuterium in body water which appear attractive because of the wider general availability of the equipment required. It is the purpose of this report to assess these reported methods for their suitability for breast milk intake measurements

  9. Subcritical limits for special fissile actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, H.K.

    1980-01-01

    Critical masses and subcritical mass limits in oxide-water mixtures were calculated for actinide nuclides other than 233 U, 235 U, and 239 Pu that have an odd number of neutrons in the nucleus: S/sub n/ transport theory was used together with cross sections, drawn from the GLASS multigroup library, developed to provide accurate forecasts of actinide production at Savannah River. The subcritical limits are 201 g for 241 Pu, 13 g for 242 /sup m/Am, 90 g for 243 Cm, 30 g for 245 Cm, 900 g for 247 Cm, 10 g for 249 Cf, and 5 g for 251 Cf. Association of 241 Pu with an equal mass of 240 Pu increases the 241 Pu limit to a value greater than that for pure 239 Pu. Association of 242 /sup m/Am with 241 Am increases the limit for the mixture to that for dry, theoretical density AmO 2 at isotopic concentrations of 242 /sup m/Am less than approx. 6%. Association of 245 Cm with 244 Cm increases the limit according to the formula 30 + 0.3 244 Cm/ 245 Cm up to the limit for dry CmO 2 . A limiting mass of 8.15 kg for plutonium containing at least 67% 238 Pu as oxide was calculated that applies (provided 240 Pu exceeds 241 Pu) with no limit on moderation. 1 figure, 5 tables

  10. The dose from actinides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harley, Naomi H.; Pasternack, Bernard S.

    1978-01-01

    We attempt to evaluate the health effects on local populations from the nuclear power industry. The nuclides which are thought to be most hazardous are the long-lived, alpha-emitting isotopes of plutonium, americium and curium. These long-lived alpha emitters will almost certainly be dispersed in the environment during fuel reprocessing. Their effect is local, not global and at worst a single community could be affected. The most important pathway for exposure to the actinides is through inhalation following resuspension of contaminated soil particles. The most important alpha dose estimates are to cells in bronchial epithelium and cells on bone surfaces. These alpha dose estimates are calculated for a dispersal which contaminates soil with 1 pCi/g of each of the nuclides Pu 238,239 , Am 241 , Cm 242,244 . These bronchial and bone cell dose estimates are compared with those from the naturally occurring actinide 232 Th (and daughters) which are normally found in soil at a level of about 1 pCi/g. (author)

  11. Diet of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus from the Gulf of Cadiz: Insights from stomach content and stable isotope analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Giménez

    Full Text Available The ecological role of species can vary among populations depending on local and regional differences in diet. This is particularly true for top predators such as the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus, which exhibits a highly varied diet throughout its distribution range. Local dietary assessments are therefore critical to fully understand the role of this species within marine ecosystems, as well as its interaction with important ecosystem services such as fisheries. Here, we combined stomach content analyses (SCA and stable isotope analyses (SIA to describe bottlenose dolphins diet in the Gulf of Cadiz (North Atlantic Ocean. Prey items identified using SCA included European conger (Conger conger and European hake (Merluccius merluccius as the most important ingested prey. However, mass-balance isotopic mixing model (MixSIAR, using δ13C and δ15N, indicated that the assimilated diet consisted mainly on Sparidae species (e.g. seabream, Diplodus annularis and D. bellottii, rubberlip grunt, Plectorhinchus mediterraneus, and common pandora, Pagellus erythrinus and a mixture of other species including European hake, mackerels (Scomber colias, S. japonicus and S. scombrus, European conger, red bandfish (Cepola macrophthalma and European pilchard (Sardina pilchardus. These contrasting results highlight differences in the temporal and taxonomic resolution of each approach, but also point to potential differences between ingested (SCA and assimilated (SIA diets. Both approaches provide different insights, e.g. determination of consumed fish biomass for the management of fish stocks (SCA or identification of important assimilated prey species to the consumer (SIA.

  12. The effect of soll water conditions on carbon isotope discrimination and minerals contents in spring-planted wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Lin; Liang Zongsuo; Xu Xing; Li Shuhua

    2008-01-01

    Carbon isotope discrimination (triangle open 13 C) has been proposed as indirect selection criterion for transpiration efficiency and grain yield in wheat. However, because of high cost for triangle open 13 C analysis, attempts have been made to identify alternative screening criteria. Ash content (m a ) has been proposed as an alternative criterion for triangle open 13 C in wheat and barley. A pot experiment with three water treatments (45% ± 5% FC, 55% ± 5% FC and 75% ± 5%FC) was conducted and flag leaf triangle open 13 C (triangle openL a ), contents of ash, potassium (K), magnesium (Mg) and calcium (Ca) were measured to study the relationships between triangle open, mineral composition in spring planted bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). In the light of the results obtained in this research, the traits measured showed significant differences among the three water treatments. There were variations in triangle openL a between the genotypes derived from contrasting environments. The improved varieties or advanced lines bred in irrigated areas displayed higher triangle open 13 C values, while the improved and local varieties bred in rain-fed areas exhibited lower triangle open 13 C values Significant positive correlations were found between triangle open 13 C and m a in seedlings and second fully developed leaves at elongation stage and in flag leaves at anthesis stage in severe drought treatment (T 1 ) (r=0.790, P 13 C was negatively associated with potassium (K) content in flag leaves in T 2 (r=0.813, P 2 and T 3 (r=0.725, P 13 C and calcium (Ca) content in flag leaves in T 3 (r=0.708, P a is a possible alternative criterion of triangle open 13 C in vegetative organs especially in stressed environments. K, Mg and Ca contents in flag leaf under moderate water stress or feasible water conditions might be new predictive criteria of triangle openL a . (authors)

  13. Projected benefits of actinide partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, C.; Goldstein, M.

    1976-05-01

    Possible benefits that could accrue from actinide separation and transmutations are presented. The time frame for implementing these processes is discussed and the expected benefits are qualitatively described. These benefits are provisionally quantified in a sample computation

  14. Environmental research on actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1987-08-01

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers

  15. Trophic structure of mesopelagic fishes in the Gulf of Mexico revealed by gut content and stable isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain-Counts, Jennifer P.; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Ross, Steve W.

    2017-01-01

    Mesopelagic fishes represent an important component of the marine food web due to their global distributions, high abundances and ability to transport organic material throughout a large part of the water column. This study combined stable isotope (SIAs) and gut content analyses (GCAs) to characterize the trophic structure of mesopelagic fishes in the North-Central Gulf of Mexico. Additionally, this study examined whether mesopelagic fishes utilized chemosynthetic energy from cold seeps. Specimens were collected (9–25 August 2007) over three deep (>1,000 m) cold seeps at discrete depths (surface to 1,503 m) over the diurnal cycle. GCA classified 31 species (five families) of mesopelagic fishes into five feeding guilds: piscivores, large crustacean consumers, copepod consumers, generalists and mixed zooplanktivores. However, these guilds were less clearly defined based on stable isotope mixing model (MixSIAR) results, suggesting diets may be more mixed over longer time periods (weeks–months) and across co-occurring species. Copepods were likely important for the majority of mesopelagic fishes, consistent with GCA (this study) and previous literature. MixSIAR results also identified non-crustacean prey items, including salps and pteropods, as potentially important prey items for mesopelagic fishes, including those fishes not analysed in GCA (Sternoptyx spp. and Melamphaidae). Salps and other soft-bodied species are often missed in GCAs. Mesopelagic fishes had δ13C results consistent with particulate organic matter serving as the baseline organic carbon source, fueling up to three trophic levels. Fishes that undergo diel vertical migration were depleted in 15N relative to weak migrators, consistent with depth-specific isotope trends in sources and consumers, and assimilation of 15N-depleted organic matter in surface waters. Linear correlations between fish size and δ15N values suggested ontogenetic changes in fish diets for several species. While there was

  16. Analysis of the minority actinides transmutation in a sodium fast reactor with uniform load pattern by the MCNPX-CINDER code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa Valero, R.; Garcia-Herranz, N.; Aragones, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the minority actinides transmutation in sodium fast reactors (SFR) assuming a uniform load pattern. It is determined the isotopic evolution of the actinides along burn, and the evolution of the reactivity and the reactivity coefficients. For that, it is used the MCNPX neutron transport code coupled with the inventory code CINDER90.

  17. Inhaled actinides: some safety issues and some research problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, W.J.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: limited research funds; risk coefficients for inhaled particles; the hot particle hypothesis; the Gofman-Martell contention; critical tissues for inhaled actinides inhalation hazards associated with future nuclear fuel cycles; and approach to be used by the inhalation panel

  18. Properties of minor actinide nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Masahide; Itoh, Akinori; Akabori, Mitsuo; Arai, Yasuo; Minato, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The present status of the research on properties of minor actinide nitrides for the development of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle based on nitride fuel and pyrochemical reprocessing is described. Some thermal stabilities of Am-based nitrides such as AmN and (Am, Zr)N were mainly investigated. Stabilization effect of ZrN was cleary confirmed for the vaporization and hydrolytic behaviors. New experimental equipments for measuring thermal properties of minor actinide nitrides were also introduced. (author)

  19. In vivo measurement of actinides in the human lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.L.; Campbell, G.W.; Griffith, R.V.

    1979-01-01

    The problems associated with the in vivo detection and measurement of actinides in the human lung are discussed together with various measurement systems currently in use. In particular, the methods and calibration procedures employed at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, namely, the use of twin Phoswich detectors and a new, more realistic, tissue-equivalent phantom, are described. Methods for the measurement of chest-wall thickness, fat content, and normal human background counts are also discussed. Detection-efficiency values and minimum detectable activity estimates are given for three common actinides, 238 Pu, 239 Pu, and 241 Am

  20. Fission product and actinide data evaluations for ENDF/B--V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenter, R.E.

    1978-05-01

    The planned content and performance of fission product and actinide nuclide evaluations for the ENDF/B-V collection of data are reviewed. Representative values of parameters for a few nuclides are shown. 10 figures, 5 tables

  1. Certification measurement of the cadmium, copper and lead contents in rice using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassileva, Emilia; Quetel, Christophe R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the certification of the Cd, Cu and Pb amount contents in a rice material, that were used as reference values for round 19 of the international measurement evaluation programme (IMEP). The protocol developed in this study was based on isotope dilution associated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS). A multiple spiking approach was applied to reduce significantly the number of analytical steps. For the decomposition of the sample, three different microwave assisted digestion procedures were tested and compared. The use of hydrofluoric acid was found necessary to ensure full solubilisation and complete isotopic equilibration. Estimation of the combined uncertainty attached to the measurement results was performed according to the ISO guidelines. Contributions from the correction for moisture content, sample homogeneity, procedural blank, spike impurities, spectral interferences, instrumental background and dead-time effects were evaluated. SI-traceable values with less than 2% combined uncertainty (k = 2) were obtained for Cd, Cu and Pb, respectively, (14.39 ± 0.21) x 10 -6 mol kg -1 , (44.31 ± 0.42) x 10 -6 mol kg -1 and (2.034 ± 0.034) x 10 -6 mol kg -1 . The rice powder was observed to be highly hygroscopic and a second series of isotope dilution mass spectrometry measurements was carried out on samples in equilibrium with the ambient moisture conditions ('saturated' samples). The Comite Consultatif pour la Quantite de Matiere (CCQM) requested this approach for the participation to the key comparison 24 on the same rice test material. The excellent agreement for Cd between the IMEP-19 reference value, the value submitted by the institute for reference materials and measurements (IRMM) to CCQM-K24 and the corresponding reference value obtained as the arithmetic mean from the results of the 11 participating National Measurement Institutes (less than 0.27% difference) further validated this work. Eventually, this series

  2. Process for denitrating waste solutions containing nitric acid actinides simultaneously separating the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gompper, K.

    1984-01-01

    The invention should reduce the acid and nitrate content of waste solutions containing nitric acid as much as possible, should reduce the total salt content of the waste solution, remove the actinides contained in it by precipitation and reduce the α radio-activity in the remaining solution, without having to worry about strong reactions or an increase in the volume of the waste solution. The invention achieves this by mixing the waste solution with diethyl oxalate at room temperature and heating the mixture to at least 80 0 C. (orig.) [de

  3. Synthesis of selective extractor for minor actinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Seung [Konyang University, Nonsan (Korea); Cho, Moon Hwan [Kangwon National University, Chunchon (Korea)

    1998-04-01

    To selectively co-separate the lanthanide and actinide elements (MA) such as Am or Cm ion from radioactive waste, synthesis of diamide derivatives has been accomplished. In addition, picoline amide derivatives were also synthesized for selectively separate the minor actinide elements from lanthanide elements. The content of research has don are as follows: (1) synthesis of diamide as co-extractant (2) introduction of n-tetradecyl to increase the lipophilicity (3) Picolyl chloride, intermediate of the final product, was synthesized by improved method rather than reported method. (4) The length of alkyl side chain was adjusted to increase the lipophilicity of free ligand and its derivatives able to selectively separate the actinide metal from lanthanide metal ions was successfully synthesized and determined their purity by analytical instruments. (author). 12 refs., 28 figs.

  4. Review of the treatment of actinides-bearing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, H.

    1983-01-01

    Actinides bearing wastes are produced above all in the course of irradiated nuclear fuel reprocessing and during fabrication of mixed oxide fuel elements. Particular attention in research and development work must be paid to this type of waste, mainly on account of its longevity. In practical application, the specific character of the actinides bearing wastes has been largely recognized. Nevertheless, definitions and methods of treatment generally accepted worldwide are still missing today. This has no bearing as yet on present day treatment of radioactive wastes. But by the time of application of the breeder technology at the latest a special treatment concept should be available which complies with the high actinide contents and short precooling periods of the wastes

  5. Effects of soil water content on the external exposure of fauna to radioactive isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaugelin-Seiller, K

    2016-01-01

    Within a recent model intercomparison about radiological risk assessment for contaminated wetlands, the influence of soil saturation conditions on external dose rates was evidenced. This issue joined concerns of assessors regarding the choice of the soil moisture value to input in radiological assessment tools such as the ERICA Tool. Does it really influence the assessment results and how? This question was investigated under IAEA's Modelling and Data for Radiological Impacts Assessments (MODARIA) programme via 42 scenarios for which the soil water content varied from 0 (dry soil) to 100% (saturated soil), in combination with other parameters that may influence the values of the external dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) calculated for terrestrial organisms exposed in soil. A set of α, β, and γ emitters was selected in order to cover the range of possible emission energies. The values of their external DCCs varied generally within a factor 1 to 1.5 with the soil water content, excepted for β emitters that appeared more sensitive (DCCs within a factor of about 3). This may be of importance for some specific cases or for upper tiers of radiological assessments, when refinement is required. But for the general purpose of screening assessment of radiological impact on fauna and flora, current approaches regarding the soil water content are relevant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Actinide colloid generation in groundwater. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    The progress made in the investigation of actinide colloid generation in groundwater is summarized and discussed with particular examples relevant to an understanding of the migration behaviour of actinides in natural aquifer systems. The first part deals with the characterization of colloids: groundwater colloids, actinide real-colloids and actinide pseudocolloids. The second part concentrates on the generation processes and migration behaviour of actinide pseudo colloids, which are discussed with some notable experimental examples. Importance is stressed more on the chemical aspects of the actinide colloid generation in groundwater. This work is a contribution to the CEC Mirage II project, in particular the complexation and colloids research area

  7. Actinides and heavy fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L.; Fisk, Z.; Ott, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    The actinide series of elements begins with f-shell electrons forming energy bands, contributing to the bonding, and possessing no magnetic moments. At americium the series switches over to localized f electrons with magnetic moments. In metallic compounds this crossover of behavior can be modified and studied. In this continuum of behavior a few compounds on the very edge of localized f-electron behavior exhibit enormous electronic heat capacities at low temperatures. This is associated with an enhanced thermal mass of the conduction electrons, which is well over a hundred times the free electron mass, and is what led to the label heavy fermion for such compounds. A few of these become superconducting at even lower temperatures. The excitement in this field comes from attempting to understand how this heaviness arises and from the likelihood that the superconductivity is different from that of previously known superconductors. The effects of thorium impurities in UBe 13 were studied as a representative system for studying the nature of the superconductivity

  8. Development of ion beam sputtering techniques for actinide target preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, W. S.; Zevenbergen, L. A.; Adair, H. L.

    1985-06-01

    Ion beam sputtering is a routine method for the preparation of thin films used as targets because it allows the use of a minimum quantity of starting material, and losses are much lower than most other vacuum deposition techniques. Work is underway in the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory (IRML) at ORNL to develop the techniques that will make the preparation of actinide targets up to 100 μg/cm 2 by ion beam sputtering a routinely available service from IRML. The preparation of the actinide material in a form suitable for sputtering is a key to this technique, as is designing a sputtering system that allows the flexibility required for custom-ordered target production. At present, development work is being conducted on low-activity actinides in a bench-top system. The system will then be installed in a hood or glove box approved for radioactive materials handling where processing of radium, actinium, and plutonium isotopes among others will be performed.

  9. The actinide beamline - A new AMS facility at ANTARES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotchkis, M.A.C.; Lee, P.J.; Mino, N.

    1998-01-01

    At the ANTARES accelerator a new beamline has been commissioned, incorporating new magnetic and electrostatic analysers, to optimise the efficiency for Actinides detection by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. The detection of Actinides, particularly the isotopic ratios of uranium and plutonium, provide unique signatures for nuclear safeguards purposes. We are currently engaged in a project to evaluate the application of AMS to the measurement of Actinides in environmental samples for nuclear safeguards. Measurement of 236 U is of particular interest as a means of tracing the anthropogenic component of uranium. 236 U is expected to be present in natural samples at an extremely low level ( 236 U: 238 U ratio ∼10 -10 ). It has recently been demonstrated that AMS has sufficient sensitivity to detect 236 U at this level. The principal components of the new beamline include: an electrostatic quadrupole, a 12 deg electrostatic deflector, a 90 deg electrostatic analyser, a multi-isotope detection system including ion counters and Faraday cups. The beamline was completed in September 1998 and initial tests have been performed with iodine samples

  10. The isotopic composition and content of sulphur in soils of Kansk-Achinsk fuel power generation complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinenko, L.N.; Grinenko, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    In the 1970s the first phase of a large coal-burning power complex was brought into operation in the Kansk-Achinsk region of the Soviet Union. The target consumption for this complex is 50 x 10 6 tonnes yr -1 and most of this is supplied from local open-pit mines. The emission of SO 2 from this plant caused concern as to its impact on the local environment and prompted a study of the sulphurous depositions. Monitoring the areal extent and distribution of the deposited S and its fate in the environment can be a mammoth task involving continual measurement of many biological and physical factors including atmospheric concentrations, wind speed, emission rates, and forms of S in soil, plants, and animals. A possible alternative for evaluating the amount, distribution, and fate of the emitted S in the ecosystem is stable sulphur isotope analyses since different coals and SO 2 from their combustion often have δ 34 S values differing from those of soils and plants in the region. The study reported here was initiated to see if the δ 34 S values for emissions differed significantly from the natural environment. Assuming that the difference was sufficient, a second objective was to document changes that have occurred in the sulphur isotope compositions of the environmental receptors over time. Soil samples from 23 sites were collected and analysed for S content and δ 34 S values. Coal, cinder and ash collected from furnaces and SO 2 from the combustion products were similarly analysed. Figs and tabs

  11. Characterization and evaluation of a modified local lymph node assay using ATP content as a non-radio isotopic endpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idehara, Kenji; Yamagishi, Gaku; Yamashita, Kunihiko; Ito, Michio

    2008-01-01

    The murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) is an accepted and widely used method for assessing the skin-sensitizing potential of chemicals. Here, we describe a non-radio isotopic modified LLNA in which adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content is used as an endpoint instead of radioisotope (RI); the method is termed LLNA modified by Daicel based on ATP content (LLNA-DA). Groups of female CBA/JNCrlj mice were treated topically on the dorsum of both ears with test chemicals or a vehicle control on days 1, 2, and 3; an additional fourth application was conducted on day 7. Pretreatment with 1% sodium lauryl sulfate solution was performed 1 h before each application. On day 8, the amount of ATP in the draining auricular lymph nodes was measured as an alternative endpoint by the luciferin-luciferase assay in terms of bioluminescence (relative light units, RLU). A stimulation index (SI) relative to the concurrent vehicle control was derived based on the RLU value, and an SI of 3 was set as the cut-off value. Using the LLNA-DA method, 31 chemicals were tested and the results were compared with those of other test methods. The accuracy of LLNA-DA vs LLNA, guinea pig tests, and human tests was 93% (28/30), 80% (20/25), and 79% (15/19), respectively. The estimated concentration (EC) 3 value was calculated and compared with that of the original LLNA. It was found that the EC3 values obtained by LLNA-DA were almost equal to those obtained by the original LLNA. The SI value based on ATP content is similar to that of the original LLNA as a result of the modifications in the chemical treatment procedure, which contribute to improving the SI value. It is concluded that LLNA-DA is a promising non-RI alternative method for evaluating the skin-sensitizing potential of chemicals.

  12. Actinide burning and waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigford, T H [University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1990-07-01

    Here we review technical and economic features of a new proposal for a synergistic waste-management system involving reprocessing the spent fuel otherwise destined for a U.S. high-level waste repository and transmuting the recovered actinides in a fast reactor. The proposal would require a U.S. fuel reprocessing plant, capable of recovering and recycling all actinides, including neptunium americium, and curium, from LWR spent fuel, at recoveries of 99.9% to 99.999%. The recovered transuranics would fuel the annual introduction of 14 GWe of actinide-burning liquid-metal fast reactors (ALMRs), beginning in the period 2005 to 2012. The new ALMRs would be accompanied by pyrochemical reprocessing facilities to recover and recycle all actinides from discharged ALMR fuel. By the year 2045 all of the LWR spent fuel now destined f a geologic repository would be reprocessed. Costs of constructing and operating these new reprocessing and reactor facilities would be borne by U.S. industry, from the sale of electrical energy produced. The ALMR program expects that ALMRs that burn actinides from LWR spent fuel will be more economical power producers than LWRs as early as 2005 to 2012, so that they can be prudently selected by electric utility companies for new construction of nuclear power plants in that era. Some leaders of DOE and its contractors argue that recovering actinides from spent fuel waste and burning them in fast reactors would reduce the life of the remaining waste to about 200-300 years, instead of 00,000 years. The waste could then be stored above ground until it dies out. Some argue that no geologic repositories would be needed. The current view expressed within the ALMR program is that actinide recycle technology would not replace the need for a geologic repository, but that removing actinides from the waste for even the first repository would simplify design and licensing of that repository. A second geologic repository would not be needed. Waste now planned

  13. Actinide speciation in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear test explosions and nuclear reactor wastes and accidents have released large amounts of radioactivity into the environment. Actinide ions in waters often are not in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium and their solubility and migration behavior is related to the form in which the nuclides are introduced into the aquatic system. Chemical speciation, oxidation state, redox reactions, and sorption characteristics are necessary in predicting solubility of the different actinides, their migration behaviors and their potential effects on marine biota. The most significant of these variables is the oxidation state of the metal ion as the simultaneous presence of more than one oxidation state for some actinides in a solution complicates actinide environmental behavior. Both Np(V)O 2 + and Pu(V)O 2 + , the most significant soluble states in natural oxic waters, are relatively noncomplexing and resistant to hydrolysis and subsequent precipitation. The solubility of NpO 2 + can be as high as 10 -4 M while that of PuO 2 + is much more limited by reduction to the insoluble tetravalent species, Pu(OH) 4 , (pK sp ≥56) but which can be present in the pentavalent form in aqautic phases as colloidal material. The solubility of hexavalent UO 2 2+ in sea water is relatively high due to formation of carbonate complexes. The insoluble trivalent americium hydroxocarbonate, Am(OH)(CO 3 ) is the limiting species for the solubility of Am(III) in sea water. Thorium(IV) is present as Th(OH) 4 , in colloidal form. The chemistry of actinide ions in the environment is reviewed to show the spectrum of reactions that can occur in natural waters which must be considered in assessing the environmental behavior of actinides. Much is understood about sorption of actinides on surfaces, the mode of migration of actinides in such waters and the potential effects of these radioactive species on marine biota, but much more understanding of the behavior of the actinides in the environment is

  14. Actinide burning and waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigford, T.H.

    1990-01-01

    Here we review technical and economic features of a new proposal for a synergistic waste-management system involving reprocessing the spent fuel otherwise destined for a U.S. high-level waste repository and transmuting the recovered actinides in a fast reactor. The proposal would require a U.S. fuel reprocessing plant, capable of recovering and recycling all actinides, including neptunium americium, and curium, from LWR spent fuel, at recoveries of 99.9% to 99.999%. The recovered transuranics would fuel the annual introduction of 14 GWe of actinide-burning liquid-metal fast reactors (ALMRs), beginning in the period 2005 to 2012. The new ALMRs would be accompanied by pyrochemical reprocessing facilities to recover and recycle all actinides from discharged ALMR fuel. By the year 2045 all of the LWR spent fuel now destined f a geologic repository would be reprocessed. Costs of constructing and operating these new reprocessing and reactor facilities would be borne by U.S. industry, from the sale of electrical energy produced. The ALMR program expects that ALMRs that burn actinides from LWR spent fuel will be more economical power producers than LWRs as early as 2005 to 2012, so that they can be prudently selected by electric utility companies for new construction of nuclear power plants in that era. Some leaders of DOE and its contractors argue that recovering actinides from spent fuel waste and burning them in fast reactors would reduce the life of the remaining waste to about 200-300 years, instead of 00,000 years. The waste could then be stored above ground until it dies out. Some argue that no geologic repositories would be needed. The current view expressed within the ALMR program is that actinide recycle technology would not replace the need for a geologic repository, but that removing actinides from the waste for even the first repository would simplify design and licensing of that repository. A second geologic repository would not be needed. Waste now planned

  15. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

    2009-05-04

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  16. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, L.M.; Wilk, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  17. Actinide analytical program for characterization of Hanford waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.J.; Winters, W.I.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of this program has been to develop faster, more accurate methods for the concentration and determination of actinides at their maximum permissible concentration (MPC) levels in a controlled zone. These analyses are needed to characterize various forms of Hanford high rad waste and to support characterization of products and effluents from new waste management processes. The most acceptable methods developed for the determination of 239 Pu, 238 Pu, 237 Np, 241 Am, and 243 Cm employ solvent extraction with the addition of tracer isotopes. Plutonium and neptunium are extracted from acidified waste solutions into Aliquat-336. Americium and curium are then extracted from the waste solution at the same acidity into dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamylmethylenephosphonate (DHDECMP). After back extraction into an aqueous matrix, these actinides are electrodeposited on steel disks for alpha energy analysis. Total uranium and total thorium are also isolated by solvent extraction and determined spectrophotometrically

  18. 1982 Annual Status Report Plutonium Fuels and Actinide Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, R.

    1983-01-01

    The programme of the Transuranium Institute has long included work on advanced fuels for fast breeder reactors. Study of the swelling of carbide and nitride fuels is now nearing completion, the retention of fission gases in bubbles of different sizes in the fuel having been quantified as function of burn-up and temperature. An important step forward has been achieved in the studies of the Equation of State of Nuclear Fuels up to 5000 K. Formation of some of the less abundant isotopes in PWR fuel has been determined experimentally. Aerosol formation during the fabrication of plutonium containing fuels, part of the activity Safe Handling of Plutonium Fuel has been studied. Head-End Processing of carbide fuels has continued experiments with high burn up mixed carbides. In the field of actinide research the preparation and characterisation of pure specimens is carried out. Effect of actinides on the properties of waste glasses is investigated

  19. Thermal-hydraulics of actinide burner reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizuka, Takakazu; Mukaiyama, Takehiko; Takano, Hideki; Ogawa, Toru; Osakabe, Masahiro.

    1989-07-01

    As a part of conceptual study of actinide burner reactors, core thermal-hydraulic analyses were conducted for two types of reactor concepts, namely (1) sodium-cooled actinide alloy fuel reactor, and (2) helium-cooled particle-bed reactor, to examine the feasibility of high power-density cores for efficient transmutation of actinides within the maximum allowable temperature limits of fuel and cladding. In addition, calculations were made on cooling of actinide fuel assembly. (author)

  20. Fusion barrier characteristics of actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, H. C.; Sridhar, K. N.

    2018-03-01

    We have studied fusion barrier characteristics of actinide compound nuclei with atomic number range 89 ≤ Z ≤ 103 for all projectile target combinations. After the calculation of fusion barrier heights and positions, we have searched for their parameterization. We have achieved the empirical formula for fusion barrier heights (VB), positions (RB), curvature of the inverted parabola (ħω) of actinide compound nuclei with atomic number range 89 ≤ Z ≤ 103 for all projectile target combinations (6 projectile target combinations. The values produced by the present formula are also compared with experiments. The present pocket formula produces fusion barrier characteristics of actinides with the simple inputs of mass number (A) and atomic number (Z) of projectile-targets.

  1. ALMR potential for actinide consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockey, C.L.; Thompson, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored fast reactor design based on the Power Reactor, Innovative Small Module (PRISM) concept originated by General Electric. This reactor combines a high degree of passive safety characteristics with a high level of modularity and factory fabrication to achieve attractive economics. The current reference design is a 471 MWt modular reactor fueled with ternary metal fuel. This paper discusses actinide transmutation core designs that fit the design envelope of the ALMR and utilize spent LWR fuel as startup material and for makeup. Actinide transmutation may be accomplished in the ALMR core by using either a breeding or burning configuration. Lifetime actinide mass consumption is calculated as well as changes in consumption behavior throughout the lifetime of the reactor. Impacts on system operational and safety performance are evaluated in a preliminary fashion. Waste disposal impacts are discussed. (author)

  2. Thin layers in actinide research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouder, T.

    1998-01-01

    Surface science research at the ITU is focused on the synthesis and surface spectroscopy studies of thin films of actinides and actinide compounds. The surface spectroscopies used are X-ray and ultra violet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS, respectively), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Thin films of actinide elements and compounds are prepared by sputter deposition from elemental targets. Alloy films are deposited from corresponding alloy targets and could be used, in principle, as replicates of these targets. However, there are deviations between alloy film and target composition, which depend on the deposition conditions, such as pressure and target voltage. Mastering of these effects may allow us to study stoichiometric film replicates instead of thick bulk compounds. As an example, we discuss the composition of U-Ni films prepared from a UNi 5 target. (orig.)

  3. Nuclear waste forms for actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Rodney C.

    1999-01-01

    The disposition of actinides, most recently 239Pu from dismantled nuclear weapons, requires effective containment of waste generated by the nuclear fuel cycle. Because actinides (e.g., 239Pu and 237Np) are long-lived, they have a major impact on risk assessments of geologic repositories. Thus, demonstrable, long-term chemical and mechanical durability are essential properties of waste forms for the immobilization of actinides. Mineralogic and geologic studies provide excellent candidate phases for immobilization and a unique database that cannot be duplicated by a purely materials science approach. The “mineralogic approach” is illustrated by a discussion of zircon as a phase for the immobilization of excess weapons plutonium. PMID:10097054

  4. Extraction chromatogrpahy of actinides, ch. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.

    1975-01-01

    This review on extraction chromatography of actinides emphasizes the important usage of neutral (Tributylphosphate), basic (substituted ammonium salts), and acidic (HDEHP) extractants, and their application to separations of actinides in the di-to hexavalent oxidation state. Furthermore, the actinide extraction by ketones, ethers, alcohols and β-diketones is discussed

  5. Actinides integral measurements on FCA assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaiyama, Takehiko; Okajima, Shigeaki

    1984-01-01

    Actinide integral measurements were performed on eight assemblies of FCA where neutron energy spectra were shifted systematically from soft to hard in order to evaluate and modify the nuclear cross section data of major actinides. Experimental values on actinide fission rates and sample reactivity worths are compared with the calculated values using JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-V (or IV) data sets. (author)

  6. Criticality and thermal analyses of separated actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, E.

    2004-01-01

    Curium and americium pose special problems in the chemical preparation of spent fuel for transmutation. Once separated from the other actinides, the isotopes can lead to nuclear fission with the subsequent release of a large amount of radiation. A neutron criticality code was used to determine k eff for varying quantities of Cm 2 O 3 and Am 2 O 3 held within spherical or cylindrical containers. These geometries were investigated both in air and in water. Recommendations are made on the maximum amount of Cm 2 O 3 and Am 2 O 3 that can be safely stored or handled before encountering criticality. Several isotopes of curium and americium also generate a significant amount of heat by radioactive decay. If kilogram quantities are stored in a container, for example, the material may heat to an equilibrium temperature that exceeds its melting temperature. The heat generation of curium and americium present even more restriction on the mass of that can safely be contained in one location. (author)

  7. Moessbauer effect studies with actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, J.A.

    1966-01-01

    Moessbauer resonance studies in the actinide elements offer a new technique for measuring solid-state properties to a region of the periodic chart where such information is relatively sparse. It is well known that the actinides, the elements with atomic numbers from 90 to 103, form a transition series due to filling of the 5f electron shell, analogous to the rare-earth series in which the 4f shell is filled. Like the rare earths, the actinide metals and compounds are expected to exhibit a variety of interesting magnetic properties, but, unlike the rare earths, there have been few studies of the magnetic behaviour of actinides, and these properties are largely unknown. The chemical properties of the actinides have been studied somewhat more extensively, and, in contrast to the rare earths, form a multiplicity of stable valence states, especially in the lighter members of the series. It is just these properties, magnetic and chemical, for which the Moessbauer effect is a valuable probe, sensitive to the magnetic and electric environment of an atom. The rare-earth series has been a particularly fruitful region in terms of the number of elements which have been shown to exhibit the Moessbauer effect, and for this reason the exploitation of the Moessbauer effect to yield new solid-state and chemical information on the rare earths is a highly active field of research today. There is every reason to believe that the actinides can be similarly studied by the Moessbauer effect. 43 refs, 6 figs, 4 tabs

  8. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyer, N.J.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO 2 + ) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO 2 + ; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO 2 + cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO 2 + species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO 2 + have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO 2 + cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe 3+ and Cr 3+ and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , NpO 2 + ·Th 4+ , PuO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , and PuO 2 + ·Th 4+ at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 ± 0.2, 1.8 ± 0.9, 2.2 ± 1.5, and ∼0.8 M -1

  9. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented

  10. Orbital effects in actinide systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lander, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    Actinide magnetism presents a number of important challenges; in particular, the proximity of 5f band to the Fermi energy gives rise to strong interaction with both d and s like conduction electrons, and the extended nature of the 5f electrons means that they can interact with electron orbitals from neighboring atoms. Theory has recently addressed these problems. Often neglected, however, is the overwhelming evidence for large orbital contributions to the magnetic properties of actinides. Some experimental evidence for these effects are presented briefly in this paper. They point, clearly incorrectly, to a very localized picture for the 5f electrons. This dichotomy only enhances the nature of the challenge

  11. The efficacy of denaturing actinide elements as a means of decreasing materials attractiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hase, K.R.; Bathke, C.G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory: P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Sleaford, B.W.; Robel, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Collins, B.A.; Prichard, A.W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This study considers the concept of denaturing as applied to the actinide elements present in spent fuel as a means to reduce materials attractiveness. Highly attractive materials generally have low values of bare critical mass, heat content, and dose. To denature an attractive element, its spent-fuel isotopic composition (isotopic vector) is intentionally modified by introducing sufficient quantities of a significantly less attractive isotope to dilute the concentration of a highly attractive isotope so that the overall attractiveness of the element is reduced. The authors used FOM (Figure of Merit) formula as the material attractiveness metric for their parametric determination of the attractiveness of the Pu and U. Materials attractiveness needs to be considered in three distinct phases in the process to construct a nuclear explosive device (NED): the acquisition phase, processing phase, and utilization phase. The results show that denaturing uranium with {sup 238}U is actually an effective means of reducing the attractiveness. For uranium with a large minority of {sup 235}U, a mixture of 80% {sup 238}U to 20% {sup 235}U is required to reduce the attractiveness to low. For uranium with a large concentration of {sup 233}U, a mixture of 88% {sup 238}U to 12% {sup 233}U is required to reduce the attractiveness to low. The results also show that denaturing plutonium with {sup 238}Pu is less effective than denaturing uranium with {sup 238}U. Using {sup 238}Pu as the denaturing agent would require 80% or more by mass in order to reduce the attractiveness to low. No amount of {sup 240}Pu is enough to reduce the plutonium attractiveness below medium. The combination of {sup 238}Pu and {sup 240}Pu would require approximately 70% {sup 238}Pu and 25% {sup 240}Pu by mass to reduce the plutonium attractiveness to low.

  12. The efficacy of denaturing actinide elements as a means of decreasing materials attractiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hase, K.R.; Bathke, C.G.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Sleaford, B.W.; Robel, M.; Collins, B.A.; Prichard, A.W.

    2013-01-01

    This study considers the concept of denaturing as applied to the actinide elements present in spent fuel as a means to reduce materials attractiveness. Highly attractive materials generally have low values of bare critical mass, heat content, and dose. To denature an attractive element, its spent-fuel isotopic composition (isotopic vector) is intentionally modified by introducing sufficient quantities of a significantly less attractive isotope to dilute the concentration of a highly attractive isotope so that the overall attractiveness of the element is reduced. The authors used FOM (Figure of Merit) formula as the material attractiveness metric for their parametric determination of the attractiveness of the Pu and U. Materials attractiveness needs to be considered in three distinct phases in the process to construct a nuclear explosive device (NED): the acquisition phase, processing phase, and utilization phase. The results show that denaturing uranium with 238 U is actually an effective means of reducing the attractiveness. For uranium with a large minority of 235 U, a mixture of 80% 238 U to 20% 235 U is required to reduce the attractiveness to low. For uranium with a large concentration of 233 U, a mixture of 88% 238 U to 12% 233 U is required to reduce the attractiveness to low. The results also show that denaturing plutonium with 238 Pu is less effective than denaturing uranium with 238 U. Using 238 Pu as the denaturing agent would require 80% or more by mass in order to reduce the attractiveness to low. No amount of 240 Pu is enough to reduce the plutonium attractiveness below medium. The combination of 238 Pu and 240 Pu would require approximately 70% 238 Pu and 25% 240 Pu by mass to reduce the plutonium attractiveness to low

  13. Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    secondary levels. In subject matter didactics, the question of content is more developed, but it is still mostly confined to teaching on lower levels. As for higher education didactics, discussions on selection of content are almost non-existent on the programmatic level. Nevertheless, teachers are forced...... curriculum, in higher education, and to generate analytical categories and criteria for selection of content, which can be used for systematic didactical reflection. The larger project also concerns reflection on and clarification of the concept of content, including the relation between content at the level......Aim, content and methods are fundamental categories of both theoretical and practical general didactics. A quick glance in recent pedagogical literature on higher education, however, reveals a strong preoccupation with methods, i.e. how teaching should be organized socially (Biggs & Tang, 2007...

  14. Burning actinides in very hard spectrum reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.H.; Shirley, G.W.; Prichard, A.W.; Trapp, T.J.

    1978-01-01

    The major unresolved problem in the nuclear industry is the ultimate disposition of the waste products of light water reactors. The study demonstrates the feasibility of designing a very hard spectrum actinide burner reactor (ABR). A 1100 MW/sub t/ ABR design fueled entirely with actinides reprocessed from light water reactor (LWR) wastes is proposed as both an ultimate disposal mechanism for actinides and a means of concurrently producing usable power. Actinides from discharged ABR fuel are recycled to the ABR while fission products are routed to a permanent repository. As an integral part of a large energy park, each such ABR would dispose of the waste actinides from 2 LWRs

  15. The stable isotope composition of nitrogen and carbon and elemental contents in modern and fossil seabird guano from Northern Chile - Marine sources and diagenetic effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Lucassen

    Full Text Available Seabird excrements (guano have been preserved in the arid climate of Northern Chile since at least the Pliocene. The deposits of marine organic material in coastal areas potentially open a window into the present and past composition of the coastal ocean and its food web. We use the stable isotope composition of nitrogen and carbon as well as element contents to compare the principal prey of the birds, the Peruvian anchovy, with the composition of modern guano. We also investigate the impact of diagenetic changes on the isotopic composition and elemental contents of the pure ornithogenic sediments, starting with modern stratified deposits and extending to fossil guano. Where possible, 14C systematics is used for age information. The nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition of the marine prey (Peruvian anchovy of the birds is complex as it shows strong systematic variations with latitude. The detailed study of a modern profile that represents a few years of guano deposition up to present reveals systematic changes in nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition towards heavier values that increase with age, i.e. depth. Only the uppermost, youngest layers of modern guano show compositional affinity to the prey of the birds. In the profile, the simultaneous loss of nitrogen and carbon occurs by degassing, and non-volatile elements like phosphorous and calcium are passively enriched in the residual guano. Fossil guano deposits are very low in nitrogen and low in carbon contents, and show very heavy nitrogen isotopic compositions. One result of the study is that the use of guano for tracing nitrogen and carbon isotopic and elemental composition in the marine food web of the birds is restricted to fresh material. Despite systematic changes during diagenesis, there is little promise to retrieve reliable values of marine nitrogen and carbon signatures from older guano. However, the changes in isotopic composition from primary marine nitrogen isotopic

  16. Chemistry of tetravalent actinides phosphates. The thorium phosphate-diphosphate as immobilisation matrix of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dacheux, N.

    2002-01-01

    The author presents in this document its scientific works from 1992 to 2001, in order to obtain the enabling to manage scientific and chemical researches at the university Paris Sud Orsay. The first part gives an abstract of the thesis on the characterizations, lixiviation and synthesis of uranium and thorium based phosphate matrix in the framework of the search for a ceramic material usable in the radioactive waste storage. The second part presents briefly the researches realized at the CEA, devoted to a reliable, independent and accurate measure of some isotopes activity. The last part presents the abstracts of researches activities from 1996 to 2001 on the tetravalent actinides phosphates chemistry, the sintering of PDT and solid solutions of PDTU and the kinetic and thermodynamical studies of the PDT dissolution. Many references and some publication in full text are provided. (A.L.B.)

  17. Stable isotope enrichment: Current and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, J.G.; Aaron, W.S.

    1992-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operates the Isotope Enrichment Facility for the purpose of providing enriched stable isotopes, selected radioactive isotopes (including the actinides), and isotope-related materials and services for use in various research applications. ORNL is responsible for isotope enrichment and the distribution of approximately 225 nongaseous stable isotopes from 50 multi-isotopic elements. Many enriched isotope products are of prime importance in the fabrication of nuclear targets and the subsequent production of special radionuclides. State-of-the-art techniques to achieve special isotopic, chemical, and physical requirements are performed at ORNL This report describes the status and capabilities of the Isotope Enrichment Facility and the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory as well as emphasizing potential advancements in enrichment capabilities

  18. Stable isotope enrichment - current and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, J.G.; Aaron, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operates the Isotope Enrichment Facility for the purpose of providing enriched stable isotopes, selected radioactive isotopes (including the actinides), and isotope-related materials and services for use in various research applications. ORNL is responsible for isotope enrichment and the distribution of approximately 225 nongaseous stable isotopes from 50 multi-isotopic elements. Many enriched isotope products are of prime importance in the fabrication of nuclear targets and the subsequent production of special radionuclides. State-of-the-art techniques to achieve special isotopic, chemical, and physical requirements are performed at ORNL. This report describes the status and capabilities of the Isotope Enrichment Facility and the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory as well as emphasizing potential advancements in enrichment capabilities. (orig.)

  19. Environmental research on actinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G. (eds.)

    1987-08-01

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

  20. Photochemical reactions of actinide ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomiyasu, Hiroshi

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the results of photochemical studies of actinide ions, which have been performed in our research group for past several years as follows: I) behavior of the excited uranyl(VI) ion; II) photo-reductions of the uranyl ion with organic and inorganic compounds; III) photo-oxidations of uranium(IV) and plutonium(III) in nitric acid solutions. (author)

  1. Angular overlap model in actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajek, Z.; Mulak, J.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative foundations of the Angular Overlap Model in actinides based on ab initio calculations of the crystal field effect in the uranium (III) (IV) and (V) ions in various crystals are presented. The calculations justify some common simplifications of the model and fix up the relations between the AOM parameters. Traps and limitations of the AOM phenomenology are discussed

  2. Angular overlap model in actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajek, Z.; Mulak, J. (Polska Akademia Nauk, Wroclaw (PL). Inst. Niskich Temperatur i Badan Strukturalnych)

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative foundations of the Angular Overlap Model in actinides based on ab initio calculations of the crystal field effect in the uranium (III) (IV) and (V) ions in various crystals are presented. The calculations justify some common simplifications of the model and fix up the relations between the AOM parameters. Traps and limitations of the AOM phenomenology are discussed.

  3. Homogeneous Minor Actinide Transmutation in SFR: Neutronic Uncertainties Propagation with Depletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buiron, L.; Plisson-Rieunier, D.

    2015-01-01

    In the frame of next generation fast reactor design, the minimisation of nuclear waste production is one of the key objectives for current R and D. Among the possibilities studied at CEA, minor actinides multi-recycling is the most promising industrial way achievable in the near-term. Two main management options are considered: - Multi-recycling in a homogeneous way (minor actinides diluted in the driver fuel). If this solution can help achieving high transmutation rates, the negative impact of minor actinides on safety coefficients allows only a small fraction of the total heavy mass to be loaded in the core (∼ few %). - Multi-recycling in heterogeneous way by means of Minor Actinide Bearing Blanket (MABB) located at the core periphery. This solution offers more flexibility than the previous one, allowing a total minor actinides decoupled management from the core fuel. As the impact on feedback coefficient is small larger initial minor actinide mass can be loaded in this configuration. Starting from a breakeven Sodium Fast Reactor designed jointly by CEA, Areva and EdF teams, the so called SFR V2B, transmutation performances have been studied in frame on the French fleet for both options and various specific isotopic management (all minor actinides, americium only, etc.). Using these results, a sensitivity study has been performed to assess neutronic uncertainties (i.e coming from cross section) on mass balance on the most attractive configurations. This work in based on a new implementation of sensitivity on concentration with depletion in the ERANOS code package. Uncertainties on isotopes masses at the end of irradiation using various variance-covariance is discussed. (authors)

  4. Detection of the actinides and cesium from environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Mathew Spencer

    Detection of the actinides and cesium in the environment is important for a variety of applications ranging from environmental remediation to safeguards and nuclear forensics. The utilization of multiple different elemental concentrations and isotopic ratios together can significantly improve the ability to attribute contamination to a unique source term and/or generation process; however, the utilization of multiple elemental "signatures" together from environmental samples requires knowledge of the impact of chemical fractionation for various elements under a variety of environmental conditions (including predominantly aqueous versus arid conditions). The research reported in this dissertation focuses on three major areas: 1. Improving the understanding of actinide-mineral interactions at ultra-low concentrations. Chapter 2 reports a batch sorption and modeling study of Np(V) sorption to the mineral goethite from attomolar to micromolar concentrations. 2. Improving the detection capabilities for Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) analyses of ultra-trace cesium from environmental samples. Chapter 4 reports a new method which significantly improves the chemical yields, purification, sample processing time, and ultimately, the detection limits for TIMS analyses of femtogram quantities of cesium from a variety of environmental sample matrices. 3. Demonstrating how actinide and cesium concentrations and isotopic ratios from environmental samples can be utilized together to determine a wealth of information including environmental transport mechanisms (e.g. aqueous versus arid transport) and information on the processes which generated the original material. Chapters1, 3 and 5 demonstrate these principles using Pu, Am, Np, and Cs concentrations and isotopic ratios from contaminated soils taken near the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) (a low level radioactive waste disposal site in southeastern Idaho).

  5. Innovative SANEX process for trivalent actinides separation from PUREX raffinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sypula, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Recycling of nuclear spent fuel and reduction of its radiotoxicity by separation of long-lived radionuclides would definitely help to close the nuclear fuel cycle ensuring sustainability of the nuclear energy. Partitioning of the main radiotoxicity contributors followed by their conversion into short-lived radioisotopes is known as partitioning and transmutation strategy. To ensure efficient transmutation of the separated elements (minor actinides) the content of lanthanides in the irradiation targets has to be minimised. This objective can be attained by solvent extraction using highly selective ligands that are able to separate these two groups of elements from each other. The objective of this study was to develop a novel process allowing co-separation of minor actinides and lanthanides from a high active acidic feed solution with subsequent actinide recovery using just one cycle, so-called innovative SANEX process. The conditions of each step of the process were optimised to ensure high actinide separation efficiency. Additionally, screening tests of several novel lipophilic and hydrophilic ligands provided by University of Twente were performed. These tests were aiming in better understanding the influence of the extractant structural modifications onto An(III)/Ln(III) selectivity and complexation properties. Optimal conditions for minor actinides separation were found and a flow-sheet of a new innovative SANEX process was proposed. Tests using a single centrifugal contactor confirmed high Eu(III)/Am(III) separation factor of 15 while the lowest SF Ln/Am obtained was 6,5 (for neodymium). In addition, a new masking agent for zirconium was found as a substitution for oxalic acid. This new masking agent (CDTA) was also able to mask palladium without any negative influence on An(III)/Ln(III). Additional tests showed no influence of CDTA on plutonium present in the feed solution unlike oxalic acid which causes Pu precipitation. Therefore, CDTA was proposed as a Zr

  6. Innovative SANEX process for trivalent actinides separation from PUREX raffinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sypula, Michal

    2013-07-01

    Recycling of nuclear spent fuel and reduction of its radiotoxicity by separation of long-lived radionuclides would definitely help to close the nuclear fuel cycle ensuring sustainability of the nuclear energy. Partitioning of the main radiotoxicity contributors followed by their conversion into short-lived radioisotopes is known as partitioning and transmutation strategy. To ensure efficient transmutation of the separated elements (minor actinides) the content of lanthanides in the irradiation targets has to be minimised. This objective can be attained by solvent extraction using highly selective ligands that are able to separate these two groups of elements from each other. The objective of this study was to develop a novel process allowing co-separation of minor actinides and lanthanides from a high active acidic feed solution with subsequent actinide recovery using just one cycle, so-called innovative SANEX process. The conditions of each step of the process were optimised to ensure high actinide separation efficiency. Additionally, screening tests of several novel lipophilic and hydrophilic ligands provided by University of Twente were performed. These tests were aiming in better understanding the influence of the extractant structural modifications onto An(III)/Ln(III) selectivity and complexation properties. Optimal conditions for minor actinides separation were found and a flow-sheet of a new innovative SANEX process was proposed. Tests using a single centrifugal contactor confirmed high Eu(III)/Am(III) separation factor of 15 while the lowest SF{sub Ln/Am} obtained was 6,5 (for neodymium). In addition, a new masking agent for zirconium was found as a substitution for oxalic acid. This new masking agent (CDTA) was also able to mask palladium without any negative influence on An(III)/Ln(III). Additional tests showed no influence of CDTA on plutonium present in the feed solution unlike oxalic acid which causes Pu precipitation. Therefore, CDTA was proposed as

  7. Calculated investigation of actinide transmutation in the BOR-60 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhemkov, I.Yu.; Ishunina, O.V.; Yakovleva, I.V.

    2001-01-01

    In the course of reactor operation the formation of fission products and accumulation of minor-actinides and plutonium take place in the nuclear fuel. These materials define the radiation hazard to a great extent. Of one possible ways lowering the activity of irradiated nuclear fuel is transmutation of long-lived radioactive isotopes in the stable or short-lived ones, that allows to facilitate the problem of the high-level waste and to improve the efficiency of nuclear fuel use at the expense of its recycling and burnup increasing. (authors)

  8. Study of Factors Influencing Oxygen-18 Isotopic Contents of Dissolved Sulphate in the Shallow Groundwater In Karawang Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristin Pujiindiyati, E.; Bungkus Pratikno

    2010-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the factors influencing oxygen-18 isotopic contents of dissolved sulphate in shallow groundwater from Karawang area. The δ 18 O is a relative abundance of O-18 compared to O-16 in CO 2 gas. CO 2 gas was released from the equilibrium between water samples and CO 2 gas, and from the reduction of sulphate samples with graphite. From this investigation, the δ 18 O (H 2 O) values were in the range of -3.21 0 / 00 to 6.25 0 / 00 whereas the δ 18 O (SO 4 2- ) values were 9.64 0 / 00 to 20.72 0 / 00 . The wide variation of δ 18 O (SO 4 2- ) values might be result due to inhomogeneity of sulphate sources in groundwater where the groundwater sulphates were generally derived from the dissolution of marine evaporites rocks. The groundwaters and Citarum River near waters to Johar site showed lowering of δ 18 O (SO 4 2- ) values. It might be related to the present of the traditional market in this location. The lowering of these values might be due to the increase of the sulphate reduction process caused by anaerobic bacteria growth in organic garbage deposition. Plotting between δ 18 O (SO 4 2- ) and δ 18 O (H 2 O) exhibited that the oxygen contribution from H 2 O to form sulphate was less than 25%. This indicated that the shallow groundwater in Karawang is located in a non-saturated zone and had a biotic condition. (author)

  9. Stable isotope compositions of organic carbon and contents of organic carbon and nitrogen of lacustrine sediments from sub-arid northern Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzuka, A.N.N.

    2006-01-01

    The stable isotope compositions of organic carbon (OC), and contents of OC and nitrogen for four sediment cores recovered from lakes Makat (located in the Ngorongoro Crater), Ndutu and Masek (located in the Serengeti Plains) are used to document sources of organic matter (OM) and climatic changes in sub-arid northern Tanzania during the late Pleistocene-Holocene period. Accelerate mass spectrometer (AMS) 14 C ages on total OM for sediments collected from the Ngorongoro Crater Lake indicate that the sedimentation rate is approximately 17 cm/ka. The δ 13 C values from the 20 cm long core (short core) show a downcore increase, whereas that of 500 cm long core (long core), show two peaks enriched in 13 C and three peaks depleted in 13 C. A general downcore increase in the δ 13 C values for the short core suggests changes in the relative proportion of C 3 and C 4 fraction increasing downcore. Similarly, low and high peaks in the long core suggest changes in the relative proportion of C 3 and C 4 with low values having high proportion of C 3 type of material, probably indicating changes in precipitation and lake levels in the area. Deposition of OM depleted in 13 C took place during periods of high precipitation and high lake levels. Although high content of OC and nitrogen in some core sections are associated with elevated C/N ratio values, diagenetic alteration of isotope signature is unlikely to have caused OC and isotope enrichment in sections having high contents of OC and nitrogen. The OC isotope record from Lake Ndutu shows a general downcore decrease in δ 13 C values and contents of OC and nitrogen. (author)

  10. Thermal neutrons core concepts for minor actinides inventory reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shio-Ling

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to propose a solution to the problem of reducing the inventory of Minor Actinides, discharged from PWR spent fuel, in the framework of a Separation/ Transmutation strategy. The solution envisaged is based on the utilisation of Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR), of the same type as those used to produce energy. The suggested solution is original and based on a special Assembly ANDIAMO dedicated to transmutation, where Actinide incineration is performed with the help of a fissile support in a once-through strategy. During this study, we have also tackled the impact of some parameters which so far have been less carefully studied (like the unavoidable presence of Lanthanides in fuel containing Am and Cm and the consequences on the cycle parameters with Actinide recycle). Moreover, we have carried out a sensitivity study in order to analysis the impact of nuclear data uncertainties on some important parameters of the reactor (reactivity coefficients) and on the isotopic concentration. This original study allows us to assess the accuracy of the results, of the presented tendencies and of the propositions made in the present thesis. (author) [fr

  11. Behavior of actinides in the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, J.C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Nuclear Science Center; Lineberry, M.J. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Technology Development Div.

    1994-06-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides ({sup 237}Np, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for ten day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction-rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors` confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs.

  12. Actinide behavior in the Integral Fast Reactor. Final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, J.C.

    1994-11-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides ({sup 237}Np, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and weapons grade plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for seven day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs.

  13. Actinide behavior in the Integral Fast Reactor. Final project report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, J.C.

    1994-11-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides ( 237 Np, 240 Pu, 241 Am, and 243 Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and weapons grade plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for seven day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs

  14. Behavior of actinides in the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, J.C.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides ( 237 Np, 240 Pu, 241 Am, and 243 Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for ten day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction-rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors' confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs

  15. Recent development in computational actinide chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jun

    2008-01-01

    Ever since the Manhattan project in World War II, actinide chemistry has been essential for nuclear science and technology. Yet scientists still seek the ability to interpret and predict chemical and physical properties of actinide compounds and materials using first-principle theory and computational modeling. Actinide compounds are challenging to computational chemistry because of their complicated electron correlation effects and relativistic effects, including spin-orbit coupling effects. There have been significant developments in theoretical studies on actinide compounds in the past several years. The theoretical capabilities coupled with new experimental characterization techniques now offer a powerful combination for unraveling the complexities of actinide chemistry. In this talk, we will provide an overview of our own research in this field, with particular emphasis on applications of relativistic density functional and ab initio quantum chemical methods to the geometries, electronic structures, spectroscopy and excited-state properties of small actinide molecules such as CUO and UO 2 and some large actinide compounds relevant to separation and environment science. The performance of various density functional approaches and wavefunction theory-based electron correlation methods will be compared. The results of computational modeling on the vibrational, electronic, and NMR spectra of actinide compounds will be briefly discussed as well [1-4]. We will show that progress in relativistic quantum chemistry, computer hardware and computational chemistry software has enabled computational actinide chemistry to emerge as a powerful and predictive tool for research in actinide chemistry. (authors)

  16. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wexler, Sol; Young, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    Description is given of method for separating a specific isotope from a mixture of isotopes of an actinide element present as MF 6 , wherein M is the actinide element. It comprises: preparing a feed gas mixture of MF 6 in a propellant gas; passing the feed gas mixture under pressure through an expansion nozzle while heating the mixture to about 600 0 C; releasing the heated gas mixture from the nozzle into an exhaust chamber having a reduced pressure, whereby a gas jet of MF 6 molecules, MF 6 molecular clusters and propellant gas molecules is formed, the MF 6 molecules having a translational energy of about 3 eV; converting the MF 6 molecules to MF 6 ions by passing the jet through a cross jet of electron donor atoms so that an electron transfer takes place between the MF 6 - molecules and the electron donor atoms whereby the jet is now quasi-neutral, containing negative MF 6 - ions and positive donor ions; passing the quasi-neutral jet through a radiofrequency mass filter tuned to separate the MF 6 ions containing the specific isotope from the MF 6 - ions of the other isotopes and neutralizing and collecting the MF 6 molecules of the specific isotope [fr

  17. Optimization of SFR Reactor design with recycling or minor actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Fuertes, F.; Vazquez, M.; Alvarez, F.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we show results of the design features and ESFR optimized in three configurations: the reference, load the minority actinides homogeneous throughout the reactor and the high content of AM on a radial mantle. Was calculated reactivity evolution in five cycles burned (2050 days) to recharge One approach. To do this, we have employed EVOLCODE2 a development tool of CIEMAT own coupling MCNPX and ORIGEN.

  18. A history of violence: Insights into post-accretionary heating in carbonaceous chondrites from volatile element abundances, Zn isotopes and water contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Brandon; Moynier, Frédéric; Beck, Pierre; Pringle, Emily A.; Siebert, Julien

    2018-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites (CCs) may have been the carriers of water, volatile and moderately volatile elements to Earth. Investigating the abundances of these elements, their relative volatility, and isotopes of state-change tracer elements such as Zn, and linking these observations to water contents, provide vital information on the processes that govern the abundances and isotopic signatures of these species in CCs and other planetary bodies. Here we report Zn isotopic data for 28 CCs (20 CM, 6 CR, 1 C2-ung, and 1 CV3), as well as trace element data for Zn, In, Sn, Tl, Pb, and Bi in 16 samples (8 CM, 6 CR, 1 C2-ung, and 1 CV3), that display a range of elemental abundances from case-normative to intensely depleted. We use these data, water content data from literature and Zn isotopes to investigate volatile depletions and to discern between closed and open system heating. Trace element data have been used to construct relative volatility scales among the elements for the CM and CR chondrites. From least volatile to most, the scale in CM chondrites is Pb-Sn-Bi-In-Zn-Tl, and for CR chondrites it is Tl-Zn-Sn-Pb-Bi-In. These observations suggest that heated CM and CR chondrites underwent volatile loss under different conditions to one another and to that of the solar nebula, e.g. differing oxygen fugacities. Furthermore, the most water and volatile depleted samples are highly enriched in the heavy isotopes of Zn. Taken together, these lines of evidence strongly indicate that heated CM and CR chondrites incurred open system heating, stripping them of water and volatiles concomitantly, during post-accretionary shock impact(s).

  19. Chemical interaction of tetravalent actinides simulators and the engineering barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chain, Pablo; Alba, Maria D.; Castro, Miguel A.; Pavon, Esperanza; Mar Orta, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Deep Geological Repository (DGR) is the most internationally accepted option for the storage of high radioactive wastes. This confinement is based on the Multi-barrier Concept where the engineered barrier is a crucial safety wise. Nowadays, bentonite is accepted as the best argillaceous material in the engineered barrier of DGR. Additionally to its well-known physical role, a chemical interaction between lutetium, as actinide simulator, and the smectite has been demonstrated. The existence of a reaction mechanism, which was not previously described, based on the chemical interaction between the lanthanide cations and the orthosilicate anions of the lamellar structure has been identified. This finding has aroused the interest of the scientific community because lanthanides are used as simulators of high activity radionuclide (HAR) in agreement with the guidelines established in the bibliography. It has been observed that in conditions of moderate temperature and pressure a chemical interaction exists between smectites and rare earth elements (RE) and phases of insoluble di-silicate, RE 2 Si 2 O 7 , which would immobilize RE, are generated. It is remarkable that the reaction extends to all the set of the smectites, although they do not display the same reactivity, the saponite being the most reactive. The main isotopes present in the HLW belong to the actinide elements Np, Pu, Am and Cm, in addition to uranium generated by neutron capture during the fuel combustion process. The study of the mobilization of actinide (IV) thorough the bentonite barrier is limited because of their radioactivity. However, U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(IV) and Th(IV) can be simulated by the stable isotopes of the Zr(IV) and Hf(IV), because they exhibit ionic radius and physicochemical properties very similar to those of the actinide elements. It is the main objective of this research to investigate the chemical interaction of Zr(IV) as actinide

  20. An optimization methodology for heterogeneous minor actinides transmutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooyman, Timothée; Buiron, Laurent; Rimpault, Gérald

    2018-04-01

    In the case of a closed fuel cycle, minor actinides transmutation can lead to a strong reduction in spent fuel radiotoxicity and decay heat. In the heterogeneous approach, minor actinides are loaded in dedicated targets located at the core periphery so that long-lived minor actinides undergo fission and are turned in shorter-lived fission products. However, such targets require a specific design process due to high helium production in the fuel, high flux gradient at the core periphery and low power production. Additionally, the targets are generally manufactured with a high content in minor actinides in order to compensate for the low flux level at the core periphery. This leads to negative impacts on the fuel cycle in terms of neutron source and decay heat of the irradiated targets, which penalize their handling and reprocessing. In this paper, a simplified methodology for the design of targets is coupled with a method for the optimization of transmutation which takes into account both transmutation performances and fuel cycle impacts. The uncertainties and performances of this methodology are evaluated and shown to be sufficient to carry out scoping studies. An illustration is then made by considering the use of moderating material in the targets, which has a positive impact on the minor actinides consumption but a negative impact both on fuel cycle constraints (higher decay heat and neutron) and on assembly design (higher helium production and lower fuel volume fraction). It is shown that the use of moderating material is an optimal solution of the transmutation problem with regards to consumption and fuel cycle impacts, even when taking geometrical design considerations into account.

  1. Removal of actinides from high-level wastes generated in the reprocessing of commercial fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, W.D.; Leuze, R.E.

    1975-09-01

    Progress is reported on a technical feasibility study of removing the very long-lived actinides (uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium) from high-level wastes generated in the commercial reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. The study was directed primarily at wastes from the reprocessing of light water reactor (LWR) fuels and specifically to developing satisfactory methods for reducing the actinide content of these wastes to values that would make 1000-year-decayed waste comparable in radiological toxicity to natural uranium ore deposits. Although studies are not complete, results thus far indicate the most promising concept for actinide removal includes both improved recovery of actinides in conventional fuel reprocessing and secondary processing of the high-level wastes. Secondary processing will be necessary for the removal of americium and curium and perhaps some residual plutonium. Laboratory-scale studies of separations methods that appear most promising are reported and conceptual flowsheets are discussed. (U.S.)

  2. Actinide recovery techniques utilizing electromechanical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphal, B.R.; Benedict, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Under certain conditions, the separation of actinides using electromechanical techniques may be an effective means of residue processing. The separation of granular mixtures of actinides and other materials is based on appreciable differences in the magnetic and electrical properties of the actinide elements. In addition, the high density of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium, may render a simultaneous separation based on mutually complementary parameters. Both high intensity magnetic separation and electrostatic separation have been investigated for the concentration of an actinide waste stream. Waste stream constituents include an actinide metal alloy and broken quartz shards. The investigation of these techniques is in support of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept currently being developed at Argonne National Laboratory under the auspices of the Department of Energy

  3. Actinide recovery techniques utilizing electromechanical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphal, B.R.; Benedict, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Under certain conditions, the separation of actinides using electromechanical techniques may be an effective means of residue processing. The separation of granular mixtures of actinides and other materials discussed in this report is based on appreciable differences in the magnetic and electrical properties of the actinide elements. In addition, the high density of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium, may render a simultaneous separation based on mutually complementary parameters. Both high intensity magnetic separation and electrostatic separation have been investigated for the concentration of an actinide waste stream. Waste stream constituents include an actinide metal alloy and broken quartz shards. The investigation of these techniques is in support of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept currently being developed at Argonne National Laboratory under the auspices of the Department of Energy

  4. Oxygen isotopes and volatile contents of the Gorgona komatiites, Colombia: A confirmation of the deep mantle origin of H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurenko, Andrey A.; Kamenetsky, Vadim S.; Kerr, Andrew C.

    2016-11-01

    We report O isotopes in olivine grains (Fo89-93) and volatile contents (CO2, H2O, F, S, Cl) in olivine-hosted melt inclusions from one Gorgona picrite and five komatiites with the aim of constraining the origin of H2O in these magmas. These samples have previously been analysed for major and trace elements and volatile concentrations (H2O, S, Cl) and B isotopes in melt inclusions. A distinctive feature of the included melts is relatively high contents of volatile components and boron, which show positive anomalies in, otherwise depleted, primitive mantle normalised trace and rare earth element patterns and range in δ11 B from -11.5 to 15.6‰. In this study, the olivines were systematically analysed for O isotopes (1) in the centre of grains, (2) near the grain boundaries and, (3) as close as possible to the studied melt inclusions. The majority of olivines (∼66%) are ;mantle;-like, 4.8 ‰ ≤δ18 O ≤ 5.5 ‰, with a subordinate but still significant number (∼33%) above, and only 2 grains below, this range. There is no systematic difference between the central and marginal parts of the grains. Higher than ;mantle; δ18OOl values are ascribed to low-T (Gorgona mafic and ultramafic magmas.

  5. Calibration and correction of LA-ICP-MS and LA-MC-ICP-MS analyses for element contents and isotopic ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Lin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available LA-ICP-MS and LA-MC-ICP-MS have been the techniques of choice for achieving accurate and precise element content and isotopic ratio, the state-of-the-art technique combines the advantages of low detection limits with high spatial resolution, however, the analysis accuracy and precision are restricted by many factors, such as sensitivity drift, elemental/isotopic fractionation, matrix effects, interferences and the lack of sufficiently matrix-matched reference materials. Thus, rigorous and suitable calibration and correction methods are needed to obtain quantitative data. This review systematically summarized and evaluated the interference correction, quantitative calculation and sensitivity correction strategies in order to provide the analysts with suitable calibration and correction strategies according to the sample types and the analyzed elements. The functions and features of data reduction software ICPMSDataCal were also outlined, which can provide real-time and on-line data reduction of element content and isotopic ratios analyzed by LA-ICP-MS and LA-MC-ICP-MS.

  6. The uncertainty analysis of a liquid metal reactor for burning minor actinides from light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    The neutronics analysis of a liquid metal reactor for burning minor actinides has shown that uncertainties in the nuclear data of several key minor actinide isotopes can introduce large uncertainties in the predicted performance of the core. A comprehensive sensitivity and uncertainty analysis was performed on a 1200 MWth actinide burner designed for a low burnup reactivity swing, negative doppler coefficient, and low sodium void worth. Sensitivities were generated using depletion perturbation methods for the equilibrium cycle of the reactor and covariance data was taken ENDF-B/V and other published sources. The relative uncertainties in the burnup swing, doppler coefficient, and void worth were conservatively estimated to be 180%, 97%, and 46%, respectively. 5 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs. (Author)

  7. The uncertainty analysis of a liquid metal reactor for burning minor actinides from light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-31

    The neutronics analysis of a liquid metal reactor for burning minor actinides has shown that uncertainties in the nuclear data of several key minor actinide isotopes can introduce large uncertainties in the predicted performance of the core. A comprehensive sensitivity and uncertainty analysis was performed on a 1200 MWth actinide burner designed for a low burnup reactivity swing, negative doppler coefficient, and low sodium void worth. Sensitivities were generated using depletion perturbation methods for the equilibrium cycle of the reactor and covariance data was taken ENDF-B/V and other published sources. The relative uncertainties in the burnup swing, doppler coefficient, and void worth were conservatively estimated to be 180%, 97%, and 46%, respectively. 5 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs. (Author)

  8. Standard practice for alternate actinide calibration for inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides guidance for an alternate linear calibration for the determination of selected actinide isotopes in appropriately prepared aqueous solutions by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). This alternate calibration is mass bias adjusted using thorium-232 (232Th) and uranium-238 (238U) standards. One of the benefits of this standard practice is the ability to calibrate for the analysis of highly radioactive actinides using calibration standards at much lower specific activities. Environmental laboratories may find this standard practice useful if facilities are not available to handle the highly radioactive standards of the individual actinides of interest. 1.2 The instrument response for a series of determinations of known concentration of 232Th and 238U defines the mass versus response relationship. For each standard concentration, the slope of the line defined by 232Th and 238U is used to derive linear calibration curves for each mass of interest using interference equ...

  9. Determination of long-lived actinides in soil leachates by inductively coupled plasma: Mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crain, J.S.; Smith, L.L.; Yaeger, J.S.; Alvarado, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma -- mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to concurrently determine multiple long-lived (t 1/2 > 10 4 y) actinide isotopes in soil samples. Ultrasonic nebulization was found to maximize instrument sensitivity. Instrument detection limits for actinides in solution ranged from 50 mBq L -1 ( 239 Pu) to 2 μBq L -1 ( 235 U) Hydride adducts of 232 Th and 238 U interfered with the determinations of 233 U and 239 Pu; thus, extraction chromatography was, used to eliminate the sample matrix, concentrate the analytes, and separate uranium from the other actinides. Alpha spectrometric determinations of 230 Th, 239 Pu, and the 234 U/ 238 U activity ratio in soil leachates compared well with ICP-MS determinations; however, there were some small systematic differences (ca. 10%) between ICP-MS and a-spectrometric determinations of 234 U and 238 U activities

  10. Chemistry of actinides and fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruett, D.J.; Sherrow, S.A.; Toth, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    This task is concerned primarily with the fundamental chemistry of the actinide and fission product elements. Special efforts are made to develop research programs in collaboration with researchers at universities and in industry who have need of national laboratory facilities. Specific areas currently under investigation include: (1) spectroscopy and photochemistry of actinides in low-temperature matrices; (2) small-angle scattering studies of hydrous actinide and fission product polymers in aqueous and nonaqueous solvents; (3) kinetic and thermodynamic studies of complexation reactions in aqueous and nonaqueous solutions; and (4) the development of inorganic ion exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide separations. Recent results from work in these areas are summarized here

  11. Determination of actinides by alpha spectrometric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galanda, D.

    2011-01-01

    The submitted thesis in its first part concern with content determination of plutonium, americium, uranium, thorium radionuclides, like the most significant representatives of actinides in environmental patterns, where by the primary consideration is a focusing on content of these actinides in samples of superior mycotic organisms - mushrooms. Following the published studies the mushrooms were monitored as organisms that could verify most of attributes putted on bioindicators in term of observation of substantial radionuclides in living environment. There were analyzed two groups of samples that came from two chosen locations, one of them is situated in Eastern Slovakia and the second one in West Slovakia. Except for mushrooms samples the examined radionuclides volumes were determined even in specimens of soil sub-base and some plants from chosen localities. The liquid - liquid extraction methods were used for determination of mass activities of actinides in samples for radiochemical separation of monitored radionuclides. The obtained results of plutonium and americium mass activities determination's lead us to carry out experiments that proved abilities of superior mycotic organisms to absorb and accumulate alpha radionuclides in their textures. We choose the oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) species as an experimental object. Sporocarps of this mushroom were cultivated on substratum which is commercially exploited to cultivate it whereby this substratum was purposely contaminated by known activities of 239 Pu and 241 Am. We prepared five autonomous samples together. The values of mass activities of 239 Pu and 241 Am obtained by following analysis of prepared samples showed the ability of mushrooms to absorb observed actinides in their texture structures. On the basis of obtained mass activities it was possible to evaluate and numerically determine a transmitting factor's attributes of monitored radionuclides in sporocarps and in sub-base. Accordingly we

  12. Nuclear transmutation of actinides other than fuel as a radioactive waste management scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecille, L.; Hage, W.; Hettinger, H.; Mannone, F.; Mousty, F.; Schmidt, E.; Sola, A.; Huber, B.; Koch, L.

    1977-01-01

    The bulk of fission products in the high-level waste (HLW) decays to innocuous hazard levels within about 600 years. Actinide waste and a few fission products however represent a potential risk up to some hundreds of thousand of years. An alternative to the disposal of the whole HLW in geological formations is its fractionation, a nuclear transmutation of long-lived isotopes in fission reactors and a geological disposal of the other components. This solution would decrease the potential long-term risks of the geological waste disposal and would also accomodate to the demand of public opinion. The results of studies related to this management scheme are outlined with special reference to areas, where additional effort is required for realistic cost/benefit evaluations. Reactor physics calculations demonstrated the feasibility of actinide incineration in thermal and fast reactors. Obtained transmutation rates are sufficiently high to garantee acceptably small actinide inventories in the reactor in the case of self-generated actinide recycling. It appears that fast breeders could be used as transmutation devices without major additional reactor devlopment work. The thermal power rating of actinide fuel elements and the contribution of actinides and of minor amounts of lanthanide impurities to the neutron economy of the reactor has been evaluated. Sensitivity studies indicated that the results are dependent on the reactor operation mode and on the accuracy of the nuclear data. These calculations permitted the identification of isotopes for which cross section masurements and improved theoretical methods are required. The chemical separation of actinides from the HLW with the envisaged decontamination factors is being studied by solvent extraction and precipitation techniques using waste simulates and samples of high activity waste from European reprocessing plants. Up to now, the obtained results do not yet allow a definitive judgement on the feasibility of actinides

  13. Conservative axial burnup distributions for actinide-only burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, C.; Lancaster, D.

    1997-11-01

    Unlike the fresh fuel approach, which assumes the initial isotopic compositions for criticality analyses, any burnup credit methodology must address the proper treatment of axial burnup distributions. A straightforward way of treating a given axial burnup distribution is to segment the fuel assembly into multiple meshes and to model each burnup mesh with the corresponding isotopic compositions. Although this approach represents a significant increase in modeling efforts compared to the uniform average burnup approach, it can adequately determine the reactivity effect of the axial burnup distribution. A major consideration is what axial burnup distributions are appropriate for use in light of many possible distributions depending on core operating conditions and histories. This paper summarizes criticality analyses performed to determine conservative axial burnup distributions. The conservative axial burnup distributions presented in this paper are included in the Topical Report on Actinide-Only Burnup Credit for Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Packages, Revision 1 submitted in May 1997 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). When approved by NRC, the conservative axial burnup distributions may be used to model PWR spent nuclear fuel for the purpose of gaining actinide only burnup credit

  14. Optimisation and application of ICP-MS and alpha-spectrometry for determination of isotopic ratios of depleted uranium and plutonium in samples collected in Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Boulyga, S. F.; Testa, C.; Desideri, D.; Becker, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    The determination of environmental contamination with natural and artificial actinide isotopes and evaluation of their source requires precise isotopic determination of actinides, above all uranium and plutonium. This can be achieved by alpha spectrometry or by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after chemical separation of actinides. The performance of a sector-field ICP-MS (ICP-SFMS) coupled to a low-flow micronebulizer with a membrane desolvation unit, "Aridus'', was stu...

  15. Testing of an automated online EA-IRMS method for fast and simultaneous carbon content and stable isotope measurement of aerosol samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, István; Gyökös, Brigitta; Túri, Marianna; Futó, István; Filep, Ágnes; Hoffer, András; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Comprehensive atmospheric studies have demonstrated that carbonaceous aerosol is one of the main components of atmospheric particulate matter over Europe. Various methods, considering optical or thermal properties, have been developed for quantification of the accurate amount of both organic and elemental carbon constituents of atmospheric aerosol. The aim of our work was to develop an alternative fast and easy method for determination of the total carbon content of individual aerosol samples collected on prebaked quartz filters whereby the mass and surface concentration becomes simply computable. We applied the conventional "elemental analyzer (EA) coupled online with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS)" technique which is ubiquitously used in mass spectrometry. Using this technique we are able to measure simultaneously the carbon stable isotope ratio of the samples, as well. During the developing process, we compared the EA-IRMS technique with an off-line catalytic combustion method worked out previously at Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies (HEKAL). We tested the combined online total carbon content and stable isotope ratio measurement both on standard materials and real aerosol samples. Regarding the test results the novel method assures, on the one hand, at least 95% of carbon recovery yield in a broad total carbon mass range (between 100 and 3000 ug) and, on the other hand, a good reproducibility of stable isotope measurements with an uncertainty of ± 0.2 per mill. Comparing the total carbon results obtained by the EA-IRMS and the off-line catalytic combustion method we found a very good correlation (R2=0.94) that proves the applicability of both preparation method. Advantages of the novel method are the fast and simplified sample preparation steps and the fully automated, simultaneous carbon stable isotope ratio measurement processes. Furthermore stable isotope ratio results can effectively be applied in the source apportionment

  16. A reexamination of the incentives for actinide burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croff, A.G.; Forsberg, C.W.; Ludwig, S.B.

    1990-01-01

    The incentives for actinide burning (AB), also known as partitioning and transmutation, were extensively evaluated over a decade ago by US and foreign investigators. The conclusion was that the cost and short-term risk increases resulting from AB substantially outweighed the long-term reduction in repository risk. However, during the intervening years, many factors relevant to this evaluation have changed, such as (a) expectations concerning the ease with which a repository could be sited and licensed, (b) issuance by regulators of a repository licensing standard and supporting criteria, (c) the scenario to which AB is compared, and (d) new technologies for fuel and waste processing. This paper reexamines the incentives for undertaking actinide burning the content of these new factors. 10 refs., 3 figs

  17. Trace analysis of actinides in the environment using resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raeder, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    In this work the resonant ionization of neutral atoms using laser radiation was applied and optimized for ultra-trace analysis of the actinides thorium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium. The sensitive detection of these actinides is a challange for the monitoring and quantification of radioactive releases from nuclear facilities. Using resonance ionization spectroscopy combined with a newly developed quadrupole-mass-spectrometer, numerous energy levels in the atomic structure of these actinides could be identified. With this knowledge efficient excitation schemes for the mentioned actinides could be identified and characterised. The applied in-source-ionization ensures for a high detection efficiency due to the good overlap of laser radiation with the atomic beam and allows therefore for a low sample consumption which is required for the analysis of radio nuclides. The selective excitation processes in the resonant ionization method supresses unwanted contaminations and was optimized for analytical detection of ultra-trace amounts in environmental samples as well as for determination of isotopic compositions. The efficient in-source-ionization combined with high power pulsed laser radiation allows for detections efficiency up to 1%. For plutonium detection limits in the range of 10 4 -10 5 atoms could be demonstrated for synthetic samples as well as for first environmental samples. The usage of narrow bandwidth continuous wave lasers in combination with a transversal overlap of the laser radiation and the free propagating atomic beam enable for resolving individual isotopic shifts of the resonant transitions. This results in a high selectivity against dominant neighboring isotopes but with a significant loss in detection efficiency. For the ultra-trace isotope 236 U a detection limit down to 10 -9 for the isotope ratio N ( 236 U)/N ( 238 U) could be determined.

  18. Gas core reactors for actinide transmutation and breeder applications. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, J.D.; Rust, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    This work consists of design power plant studies for four types of reactor systems: uranium plasma core breeder, uranium plasma core actinide transmuter, UF6 breeder and UF6 actinide transmuter. The plasma core systems can be coupled to MHD generators to obtain high efficiency electrical power generation. A 1074 MWt UF6 breeder reactor was designed with a breeding ratio of 1.002 to guard against diversion of fuel. Using molten salt technology and a superheated steam cycle, an efficiency of 39.2% was obtained for the plant and the U233 inventory in the core and heat exchangers was limited to 105 Kg. It was found that the UF6 reactor can produce high fluxes (10 to the 14th power n/sq cm-sec) necessary for efficient burnup of actinide. However, the buildup of fissile isotopes posed severe heat transfer problems. Therefore, the flux in the actinide region must be decreased with time. Consequently, only beginning-of-life conditions were considered for the power plant design. A 577 MWt UF6 actinide transmutation reactor power plant was designed to operate with 39.3% efficiency and 102 Kg of U233 in the core and heat exchanger for beginning-of-life conditions

  19. Development of Metallic Fuels for Actinide Transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, Steven Lowe [Idaho National Laboratory; Fielding, Randall Sidney [Idaho National Laboratory; Benson, Michael Timothy [Idaho National Laboratory; Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean [Idaho National Laboratory; Carmack, William Jonathan [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-09-01

    and 60%. In general, the performance of all of these substantially disparate metallic fuel alloys has been observed to be excellent, and their irradiation behaviors are generally consistent with historic norms for metallic fuels without minor actinide additions and having lower Pu or Zr contents. Future work is being undertaken with a view toward increasing the burnup potential of metallic fuels even more. Design innovations under investigation include: 1) lowering the fuel smear density in order to accommodate more swelling, 2) annular fuel geometry to eliminate the need for a sodium bond, 3) minor alloy additions to stabilize lanthanide fission products inside the fuel and prevent their transport to the cladding where they can participate in fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI), and 4) coatings/liners on the cladding inner surface to mitigate FCCI and enable higher temperature operation. This paper will present the current state of development of metallic fuels for actinide transmutation in the US. Highlights will include recent results from metallic fuel casting experiments, experiments to identify alloy additions to immobilize lanthanide fission products, and postirradiation examinations of annular metallic fuels at low burnup.

  20. NEW METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF ACTINIDES AND STRONTIUM IN ANIMAL TISSUE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S; Jay Hutchison, J; Don Faison, D

    2007-05-07

    The analysis of actinides in animal tissue samples is very important for environmental monitoring. There is a need to measure actinide isotopes with very low detection limits in animal tissue samples, including fish, deer, hogs, beef and shellfish. A new, rapid actinide separation method has been developed and implemented that allows the measurement of plutonium, neptunium, uranium, americium, curium and strontium isotopes in large animal tissue samples (100-200 g) with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of matrix interferences. This method uses stacked TEVA Resin{reg_sign}, TRU Resin{reg_sign} and DGA-Resin{reg_sign} cartridges from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) that allows the rapid separation of plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), uranium (U), americium (Am), and curium (Cm) using a single multi-stage column combined with alpha spectrometry. Sr-90 is collected on Sr Resin{reg_sign} from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA). After acid digestion and furnace heating of the animal tissue samples, the actinides and Sr-89/90 are separated using column extraction chromatography. This method has been shown to be effective over a wide range of animal tissue matrices. By using vacuum box cartridge technology with rapid flow rates, sample preparation time is minimized.

  1. Analysis of large soil samples for actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, III; Sherrod, L [Aiken, SC

    2009-03-24

    A method of analyzing relatively large soil samples for actinides by employing a separation process that includes cerium fluoride precipitation for removing the soil matrix and precipitates plutonium, americium, and curium with cerium and hydrofluoric acid followed by separating these actinides using chromatography cartridges.

  2. Burn of actinides in MOX fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez C, E.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G.

    2017-09-01

    The spent fuel from nuclear reactors is stored temporarily in dry repositories in many countries of the world. However, the main problem of spent fuel, which is its high radio-toxicity in the long term, is not solved. A new strategy is required to close the nuclear fuel cycle and for the sustain ability of nuclear power generation, this strategy could be the recycling of plutonium to obtain more energy and recycle the actinides generated during the irradiation of the fuel to transmute them in less radioactive radionuclides. In this work we evaluate the quantities of actinides generated in different fuels and the quantities of actinides that are generated after their recycling in a thermal reactor. First, we make a reference calculation with a regular enriched uranium fuel, and then is changed to a MOX fuel, varying the plutonium concentrations and determining the quantities of actinides generated. Finally, different amounts of actinides are introduced into a new fuel and the amount of actinides generated at the end of the fuel burn is calculated, in order to determine the reduction of minor actinides obtained. The results show that if the concentration of plutonium in the fuel is high, then the production of minor actinides is also high. The calculations were made using the cell code CASMO-4 and the results obtained are shown in section 6 of this work. (Author)

  3. Environmental chemistry of the actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Linfeng

    1986-01-01

    The environmental chemistry of the actinide elements is a new branch of science developing with the application of nuclear energy on a larger and larger scale. Various aspects of the environmental chemistry of the actinide elements are briefly reviewed in this paper, such as its significance in the nuclear waste disposal, its coverage of research fields and possible directions for future study

  4. Calculated Atomic Volumes of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, H.; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1979-01-01

    The equilibrium atomic volume is calculated for the actinide metals. It is possible to account for the localization of the 5f electrons taking place in americium.......The equilibrium atomic volume is calculated for the actinide metals. It is possible to account for the localization of the 5f electrons taking place in americium....

  5. C-14 and Ar-39 content in a ground water aquifer in the Saarland - comparison of two ground water isotope dating methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, M.

    1984-01-01

    For the Ar-39 groundwater ages found an age comparison is made with ground waters investigated for C-14, Kr-85 and H-3 contents. The location of investigation is a sandstone aquifer of Southern Saarland. The underground production of Ar-39 the hydrological applicability. In granite, the average concentration of U, Th, K, and Cl with an average porosity of 1% and complete diffusion of the isotopes Ar-39 and Cl-36 produced underground can be as high as 10 5 % for Ar-39 moderated and 16% Cl-36 moderated in the interstitial water. (DG) [de

  6. PIE analysis for minor actinide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Kenya

    2005-01-01

    Minor actinide (MA) is generated in nuclear fuel during the operation of power reactor. For fuel design, reactivity decrease due to it should be considered. Out of reactors, MA plays key role to define the property of spent fuel (SF) such as α-radioactivity, neutron emission rate, and criticality of SF. In order to evaluate the calculation codes and libraries for predicting the amount of MA, comparison between calculation results and experimentally obtained data has been conducted. In this report, we will present the status of PIE data of MA taken by post irradiation examinations (PIE) and several calculation results. (author)

  7. Review of actinide decorporation with chelating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansoborlo, E. [CEA Valrho, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN/DRCP/CETAMA), 30 - Marcoule (France); Amekraz, B.; Moulin, Ch. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DEN/DPC/SECR), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Moulin, V. [CEA Saclay, Dir. du Developpement et de l' Innovation Nucleares (DEN/DDIN/MR), 91 - Gif Sur Yvette (France); Taran, F. [CEA Saclay (DSV/DBJC/SMMCB), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bailly, Th.; Burgada, R. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS/LCSB/UMR 7033), 93 - Bobigny (France); Henge-Napoli, M.H. [CEA Valrho, Site de Marcoule (INSTN), 30 (France); Jeanson, A.; Den Auwer, Ch.; Bonin, L.; Moisy, Ph. [CEA Valrho, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN/DRCP/SCPS), 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2007-10-15

    In case of accidental release of radionuclides in a nuclear facility or in the environment, internal contamination (inhalation, ingestion or wound) with actinides represents a severe health risk to human beings. It is therefore important to provide effective chelation therapy or decorporation to reduce acute radiation damage, chemical toxicity, and late radiation effects. Speciation governs bioavailability and toxicity of elements and it is a prerequisite tool for the design and success of new ligands or chelating agents. The purpose of this review is to present the state-of-the-art of actinide decorporation within biological media, to recall briefly actinide metabolism, to list the basic constraints of actinide-ligand for development, to describe main tools developed and used for decorporation studies, to review mainly the chelating agents tested for actinides, and finally to conclude on the future trends in this field. (authors)

  8. Catalytic Organic Transformations Mediated by Actinide Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell S. R. Karmel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review article presents the development of organoactinides and actinide coordination complexes as catalysts for homogeneous organic transformations. This chapter introduces the basic principles of actinide catalysis and deals with the historic development of actinide complexes in catalytic processes. The application of organoactinides in homogeneous catalysis is exemplified in the hydroelementation reactions, such as the hydroamination, hydrosilylation, hydroalkoxylation and hydrothiolation of alkynes. Additionally, the use of actinide coordination complexes for the catalytic polymerization of α-olefins and the ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters is presented. The last part of this review article highlights novel catalytic transformations mediated by actinide compounds and gives an outlook to the further potential of this field.

  9. Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor IJRED

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available International Journal of Renewable Energy Development www.ijred.com Volume 1             Number 3            October 2012                ISSN 2252- 4940   CONTENTS OF ARTICLES page Design and Economic Analysis of a Photovoltaic System: A Case Study 65-73 C.O.C. Oko , E.O. Diemuodeke, N.F. Omunakwe, and E. Nnamdi     Development of Formaldehyde Adsorption using Modified Activated Carbon – A Review 75-80 W.D.P Rengga , M. Sudibandriyo and M. Nasikin     Process Optimization for Ethyl Ester Production in Fixed Bed Reactor Using Calcium Oxide Impregnated Palm Shell Activated Carbon (CaO/PSAC 81-86 A. Buasri , B. Ksapabutr, M. Panapoy and N. Chaiyut     Wind Resource Assessment in Abadan Airport in Iran 87-97 Mojtaba Nedaei       The Energy Processing by Power Electronics and its Impact on Power Quality 99-105 J. E. Rocha and B. W. D. C. Sanchez       First Aspect of Conventional Power System Assessment for High Wind Power Plants Penetration 107-113 A. Merzic , M. Music, and M. Rascic   Experimental Study on the Production of Karanja Oil Methyl Ester and Its Effect on Diesel Engine 115-122 N. Shrivastava,  , S.N. Varma and M. Pandey  

  10. Protected plutonium breeding by transmutation of minor actinides in fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiliza, Yoshitalia; Saito, Masaki; Sagara, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    The improvement of proliferation resistance properties of Pu and the burnup characteristics of fast breeder reactor (FBR) had been studied by utilizing minor actinides (MAs) to produce more 238 Pu from 237 Np and 241 Am through neutron capture reaction. The higher the 238 Pu content in the fuel, the higher the proliferation resistance of the fuel would be owing to the natural characteristics of 238 Pu with high decay heat and high neutron production. The present paper deals with the assessment of passive measure against nuclear material proliferation by focusing on improving the inherent proliferation barrier of discharged Pu from an FBR. Results showed that 5% MA doping to the blanket of an FBR gives as high as 17-19% 238 Pu, which could be seen as a significant improvement of the proliferation properties of Pu. Moreover, additional 5% ZrH 2 , together with 5% MA doping to the blanket, could enhance the 238 Pu fraction much more (22-24%). With an assumption of protected Pu whose 238 Pu isotopic fraction is more than 12%, the present paper revealed that protected Pu could be produced more than the Pu consumed (protected Pu breeding) through incineration in an FBR with doping of a minimum 3% MAs or (2% MAs+5% ZrH 2 ) to the blanket. (author)

  11. Site-specific 13C content by quantitative isotopic 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectrometry: A pilot inter-laboratory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaintreau, Alain; Fieber, Wolfgang; Sommer, Horst; Gilbert, Alexis; Yamada, Keita; Yoshida, Naohiro; Pagelot, Alain; Moskau, Detlef; Moreno, Aitor; Schleucher, Jürgen; Reniero, Fabiano; Holland, Margaret; Guillou, Claude; Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge; Remaud, Gérald S.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •First ring test on isotopic 13 C NMR spectrometry. •Evaluation of the intra- and inter-variability of the NMR spectrometers used. •Definition of a protocol for qualification of the performance of the spectrometer. -- Abstract: Isotopic 13 C NMR spectrometry, which is able to measure intra-molecular 13 C composition, is of emerging demand because of the new information provided by the 13 C site-specific content of a given molecule. A systematic evaluation of instrumental behaviour is of importance to envisage isotopic 13 C NMR as a routine tool. This paper describes the first collaborative study of intra-molecular 13 C composition by NMR. The main goals of the ring test were to establish intra- and inter-variability of the spectrometer response. Eight instruments with different configuration were retained for the exercise on the basis of a qualification test. Reproducibility at the natural abundance of isotopic 13 C NMR was then assessed on vanillin from three different origins associated with specific δ 13 C i profiles. The standard deviation was, on average, between 0.9 and 1.2‰ for intra-variability. The highest standard deviation for inter-variability was 2.1‰. This is significantly higher than the internal precision but could be considered good in respect of a first ring test on a new analytical method. The standard deviation of δ 13 C i in vanillin was not homogeneous over the eight carbons, with no trend either for the carbon position or for the configuration of the spectrometer. However, since the repeatability for each instrument was satisfactory, correction factors for each carbon in vanillin could be calculated to harmonize the results

  12. Site-specific {sup 13}C content by quantitative isotopic {sup 13}C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectrometry: A pilot inter-laboratory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaintreau, Alain; Fieber, Wolfgang; Sommer, Horst [Firmenich SA, Corporate R and D Division, P.O. Box 239, 1211 Geneva 8 (Switzerland); Gilbert, Alexis; Yamada, Keita [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Yoshida, Naohiro [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Pagelot, Alain [Bruker Biospin SAS, 34 rue de l‘Industrie, 67166 Wissembourg Cedex (France); Moskau, Detlef; Moreno, Aitor [Bruker Biospin AG, Industriestrasse 26, 8117 Fällanden (Switzerland); Schleucher, Jürgen [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Umeå University, S-90187 Umeå (Sweden); Reniero, Fabiano; Holland, Margaret; Guillou, Claude [European Commission, Joint Research Centre – Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, via E. Fermi 2749, I-21027 Ispra (Italy); Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge [EBSI team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Remaud, Gérald S., E-mail: gerald.remaud@univ-nantes.fr [EBSI team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France)

    2013-07-25

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •First ring test on isotopic {sup 13}C NMR spectrometry. •Evaluation of the intra- and inter-variability of the NMR spectrometers used. •Definition of a protocol for qualification of the performance of the spectrometer. -- Abstract: Isotopic {sup 13}C NMR spectrometry, which is able to measure intra-molecular {sup 13}C composition, is of emerging demand because of the new information provided by the {sup 13}C site-specific content of a given molecule. A systematic evaluation of instrumental behaviour is of importance to envisage isotopic {sup 13}C NMR as a routine tool. This paper describes the first collaborative study of intra-molecular {sup 13}C composition by NMR. The main goals of the ring test were to establish intra- and inter-variability of the spectrometer response. Eight instruments with different configuration were retained for the exercise on the basis of a qualification test. Reproducibility at the natural abundance of isotopic {sup 13}C NMR was then assessed on vanillin from three different origins associated with specific δ{sup 13}C{sub i} profiles. The standard deviation was, on average, between 0.9 and 1.2‰ for intra-variability. The highest standard deviation for inter-variability was 2.1‰. This is significantly higher than the internal precision but could be considered good in respect of a first ring test on a new analytical method. The standard deviation of δ{sup 13}C{sub i} in vanillin was not homogeneous over the eight carbons, with no trend either for the carbon position or for the configuration of the spectrometer. However, since the repeatability for each instrument was satisfactory, correction factors for each carbon in vanillin could be calculated to harmonize the results.

  13. Breeding and plutonium characterization analysis on actinides closed water-cooled thorium reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2009-01-01

    Higher difficulties (barrier) or more complex design of nuclear weapon, material fabrication and handling and isotopic enrichment can be achieved by a higher isotopic barrier. The isotopic material barrier includes critical mass, heat-generation rate, spontaneous neutron generation and radiation. Those isotopic barriers in case of plutonium isotope is strongly depend on the even mass number of plutonium isotope such as 238 Pu, 240 Pu and 242 Pu and for 233 U of thorium cycle depends on 232 U. In this present study, fuel sustainability as fuel breeding capability and plutonium characterization as main focus of proliferation resistance analysis have been analyzed. Minor actinide (MA) is used as doping material to be loaded into the reactors with thorium fuel. Basic design parameters are based on actinide closed-cycle reactor cooled by heavy water. The evaluation use equilibrium burnup analysis coupled with cell calculation of SRAC and nuclear data library is JENDL.32. Parametrical survey has been done to analyze the effect of MA doping rate, different moderation ratio for several equilibrium burnup cases. Plutonium characterization which based on plutonium isotope composition is strongly depending on MA doping concentration and different moderation conditions. Breeding condition can be achieved and high proliferation resistance level can be obtained by the present reactor systems. Higher isotopic plutonium composition of Pu-238 (more than 40%) can be obtained compared with other plutonium isotopes. In addition, higher moderation ratio gives the isotope composition of 238 Pu increases, however, it obtains lower composition when MA doping is increased and it slightly lower composition for higher burnup. Meanwhile, higher 240 Pu composition can be achieved by higher MA doping rate as well as for obtaining higher breeding capability. (author)

  14. Characterization of actinide physics specimens for the US/UK joint experiment in the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, R.L.; Botts, J.L.; Cooper, J.H.; Adair, H.L.; Bigelow, J.E.; Raman, S.

    1983-10-01

    The United States and the United Kingdom are engaged in a joint research program in which samples of the higher actinides are irradiated in the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor in Scotland. The purpose of the porogram is (1) to study the materials behavior of selected higher actinide fuels and (2) to determine the integral cross sections of a wide variety of the higher actinide isotopes. Samples of the actinides are incorporated in fuel pins inserted in the core. For the fuel study, the actinides selected are 241 Am and 244 Cm in the form of Am 2 O 3 , Cm 2 O 3 , and Am 6 Cm(RE) 7 O 21 , where (RE) represents a mixture of lanthanides. For the cross-section determinations, the samples are milligram quantities of actinide oxides of 248 Cm, 246 Cm, 244 Cm, 243 Cm, 243 Am, 241 Am, 244 Pu, 242 Pu, 241 Pu, 240 Pu, 239 Pu, 238 Pu, 237 Np, 238 U, 236 U, 235 U, 234 U, 233 U, 232 Th, 230 Th, and 231 Pa encapsulated in vanadium. Coincident with the irradiations, neutron flux and energy spectral measurements are made with vanadium-encapsulated dosimeter materials located within the same fuel pins

  15. Fission theory and actinide fission data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaudon, A.

    1975-06-01

    The understanding of the fission process has made great progress recently, as a result of the calculation of fission barriers, using the Strutinsky prescription. Double-humped shapes were obtained for nuclei in the actinide region. Such shapes could explain, in a coherent manner, many different phenomena: fission isomers, structure in near-threshold fission cross sections, intermediate structure in subthreshold fission cross sections and anisotropy in the emission of the fission fragments. A brief review of fission barrier calculations and relevant experimental data is presented. Calculations of fission cross sections, using double-humped barrier shapes and fission channel properties, as obtained from the data discussed previously, are given for some U and Pu isotopes. The fission channel theory of A. Bohr has greatly influenced the study of low-energy fission. However, recent investigation of the yields of prompt neutrons and γ rays emitted in the resonances of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu, together with the spin determination for many resonances of these two nuclei cannot be explained purely in terms of the Bohr theory. Variation in the prompt neutron and γ-ray yields from resonance to resonance does not seem to be due to such fission channels, as was thought previously, but to the effect of the (n,γf) reaction. The number of prompt fission neutrons and the kinetic energy of the fission fragments are affected by the energy balance and damping or viscosity effects in the last stage of the fission process, from saddle point to scission. These effects are discussed for some nuclei, especially for {sup 240}Pu.

  16. Minor actinide transmutation - a waste management option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, L.

    1986-01-01

    The incentive to recycle minor actinides results from the reduction of the long-term α-radiological risk rather than from a better utilization of the uranium resources. Nevertheless, the gain in generated electricity by minor actinide transmutation in a fast breeder reactor can compensate for the costs of their recovery and make-up into fuel elements. Different recycling options of minor actinides are discussed: transmutation in liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) is possible as long as plutonium is not recycled in light water reactors (LWRs). In this case a minor actinide burner with fuel of different composition has to be introduced. The development of appropriate minor actinide fuels and their properties are described. The irradiation experiments underway or planned are summarized. A review of minor actinide partitioning from the PUREX waste stream is given. From the present constraints of LMFBR technology a reduction of the long-term α-radiological risk by a factor of 200 is deduced relative to that from the direct storage of spent LWR fuel. Though the present accumulation of minor actinides is low, nuclear transmutation may be needed when nuclear energy production has grown. (orig.)

  17. Criteria for achieving actinide reduction goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljenzin, J.O.

    1996-01-01

    In order to discuss various criteria for achieving actinide reduction goals, the goals for actinide reduction must be defined themselves. In this context the term actinides is interpreted to mean plutonium and the so called ''minor actinides'' neptunium, americium and curium, but also protactinium. Some possible goals and the reasons behind these will be presented. On the basis of the suggested goals it is possible to analyze various types of devices for production of nuclear energy from uranium or thorium, such as thermal or fast reactors and accelerator driven system, with their associated fuel cycles with regard to their ability to reach the actinide reduction goals. The relation between necessary single cycle burn-up values, fuel cycle processing losses and losses to waste will be defined and discussed. Finally, an attempt is made to arrange the possible systems on order of performance with regard to their potential to reduce the actinide inventory and the actinide losses to wastes. (author). 3 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  18. Use of high gradient magnetic separation for actinide application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; Padilla, D.D.

    1996-01-01

    Decontamination of materials such as soils or waste water that contain radioactive isotopes, heavy metals, or hazardous components is a subject of great interest. Magnetic separation is a physical separation process that segregates materials on the basis of magnetic susceptibility. Because the process relies on physical properties, separations can be achieved while producing a minimum of secondary waste. Most traditional physical separation processes effectively treat particles larger than 70 microns. In many situations, the radioactive contaminants are found concentrated in the fine particle size fraction of less than 20 microns. For effective decontamination of the fine particle size fraction most current operations resort to chemical dissolution methods for treatment. High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is able to effectively treat particles from 90 to ∼0.1 micron in diameter. The technology is currently used on the 60 ton per hour scale in the kaolin clay industry. When the field gradient is of sufficiently high intensity, paramagnetic particles can be physically captured and separated from extraneous nonmagnetic material. Because all actinide compounds are paramagnetic, magnetic separation of actinide containing mixtures is feasible. The advent of reliable superconducting magnets also makes magnetic separation of weakly paramagnetic species attractive. HGMS work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is being developed for soil remediation, waste water treatment and treatment of actinide chemical processing residues. LANL and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Company (LESAT) have worked on a co-operative research and development agreement (CRADA) to develop HGMS for radioactive soil decontamination. The program is designed to transfer HGMS from the laboratory and other industries for the commercial treatment of radioactive contaminated materials. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reavis, J.G.

    1985-06-01

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reavis, J.G.

    1985-06-01

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Neutron nuclear data evaluation for actinide nucleic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guochang; Yu Baosheng; Duan Junfeng; Ge Zhigang; Cao Wentian; Tang Guoyou; Shi Zhaomin; Zou Yubin

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear data with high accuracy for minor actinides are playing an important role in nuclear technology applications, including reactor design and operation, fuel cycle concepts, estimation of the amount of minor actinides in high burn-up reactors and the minor actinides transmutation. Through describe the class of nuclear data and nuclear date library, and introduce the procedure of neutron nuclear data evaluation. 234 U(n, f) and 237 Np(n, 2n) reaction experimental data evaluation was evaluated. The fission nuclear data are updated and improved. (authors)

  2. Actinide chemistry in the far field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livens, F.R.; Morris, K.; Parkman, R.; Moyes, L.

    1996-01-01

    The environmental chemistry of the actinides is complicated due both to the extensive redox and coordination chemistry of the elements and also to the complexity of the reactive phases encountered in natural environments. In the far field, interactions with reactive surfaces, coatings and colloidal particles will play a crucial role in controlling actinide mobility. By virtue of both their abundance and reactivity; clays and other layer aluminosilicate minerals, hydrous oxides and organic matter (humic substances) are all identified as having the potential to react with actinide ions and some possible modes of interaction are described, together with experimental evidence for their occurrence. (author)

  3. Spin and orbital moments in actinide compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, B.; Wulff, M.; Lander, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    The extended spatial distribution of both the transition-metal 3d electrons and the actinide 5f electrons results in a strong interaction between these electron states when the relevant elements are alloyed. A particular interesting feature of this hybridization, which is predicted by single...... experiments designed to determine the magnetic moments at the actinide and transition-metal sublattice sites in compounds such as UFe2, NpCo2, and PuFe2 and to separate the spin and orbital components at the actinide sites. The results show, indeed, that the ratio of the orbital to spin moment is reduced...

  4. Mass spectrometric method for the determination of the stable isotopic content of nitrous oxide by the technique of direct injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahn, T.; Wahlen, M.

    2002-01-01

    A method for the direct isotopic analysis of N 2 O has been developed for VG-Prism H dynamic dual inlet stable isotope mass spectrometer. Tests have shown extreme sensitivity to contamination by carbon dioxide with a dependence of 6.8 per mille per % CO 2 for δ 15 N and 12.4 per mille per % CO 2 for δ 18 O. Trace amounts of CO 2 have proven difficult to eliminate, particularly for small sample sizes. In order to ensure accurate analyses an indicator of CO 2 contamination must be monitored and corrections applied when necessary. We have found that ions with mass to charge ratios of 12 and 22 are excellent proxies for CO 2 contamination. Empirical relationships between these indicator species and CO 2 contamination are documented which allow for corrections to be applied to raw data. Additional corrections required due to the presence of isobaric molecules containing 17 O are described. Issues of standardization are discussed and sample handling procedures described. Finally, these methods and corrections are applied to a suite of stratospheric air samples. (author)

  5. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Clifton, D.G.; Vigil, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    A new process for recovery of plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste has been demonstrated. It is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, which eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flowsheet concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 6 = from high chloride-low acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with 1N HNO 3 -4.8M NaCl. The plutonium is recovered, after elution, via hydroxide precipitation, while the americium is recovered via NaHCO 3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process are discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are now in progress for MSE residues. Flow sheets for actinide recovery from electrorefining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  6. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Clifton, D.G.; Vigil, A.R.

    1985-05-01

    We demonstrated a new process for recovering plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste. The method is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, or acidity that eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flow chart concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 6 2- from high-chloride low-acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with lN HNO 3 -4.8M NaCl. After elution, plutonium is recovered by hydroxide precipitation, and americium is recovered by NaHCO 3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process can be discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are in progress for MSE residues. Flow charts for actinide recovery from electro-refining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  7. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms. Implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banaszak, J.E.; Rittmann, B.E.; Reed, D.T.

    1999-01-01

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, the way how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides is assessed. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. The way how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility is described. Why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions is explained. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. Development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions is described. Throughout, the key research needs are identified. (author)

  8. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banaszak, J.E.; Reed, D.T.; Rittmann, B.E.

    1999-01-01

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs

  9. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banaszak, J.E.; Reed, D.T.; Rittmann, B.E.

    1999-02-12

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs.

  10. Actinides transmutation - a comparison of results for PWR benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claro, Luiz H.

    2009-01-01

    The physical aspects involved in the Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) of minor actinides (MA) and fission products (FP) generated by reactors PWR are of great interest in the nuclear industry. Besides these the reduction in the storage of radioactive wastes are related with the acceptability of the nuclear electric power. From the several concepts for partitioning and transmutation suggested in literature, one of them involves PWR reactors to burn the fuel containing plutonium and minor actinides reprocessed of UO 2 used in previous stages. In this work are presented the results of the calculations of a benchmark in P and T carried with WIMSD5B program using its new cross sections library generated from the ENDF-B-VII and the comparison with the results published in literature by other calculations. For comparison, was used the benchmark transmutation concept based in a typical PWR cell and the analyzed results were the k∞ and the atomic density of the isotopes Np-239, Pu-241, Pu-242 and Am-242m, as function of burnup considering discharge of 50 GWd/tHM. (author)

  11. A study on the feasibility of minor actinides in BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Waris; Budiono

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary study on the feasibility of actinides minor (MA) recycling without mixing them with plutonium in boiling water reactor (BWR) has been carried out. The results show that increasing of fissile MA content in mixed oxide fuel (MOX) and/or reducing void fraction can enlarge the effective multiplication factor at the beginning of cycle, but the reactor still can not obtain its criticality condition. Furthermore, dropping the void fraction results in higher reactivity swing and therefore plummeting the safety factor of the reactor. (author)

  12. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Kenneth L.; Clark, Sue; Meier, G Patrick; Alexandratos, Spiro; Paine, Robert; Hancock, Robert; Ensor, Dale

    2012-03-21

    One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of spent nuclear fuel is the need to isolate transuranium elements from fission product lanthanides. This project expanded the scope of earlier investigations of americium (Am) partitioning from the lanthanides with the synthesis of new separations materials and a centralized focus on radiochemical characterization of the separation systems that could be developed based on these new materials. The primary objective of this program was to explore alternative materials for actinide separations and to link the design of new reagents for actinide separations to characterizations based on actinide chemistry. In the predominant trivalent oxidation state, the chemistry of lanthanides overlaps substantially with that of the trivalent actinides and their mutual separation is quite challenging.

  13. Electronic structure and correlation effects in actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albers, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    This report consists of the vugraphs given at a conference on electronic structure. Topics discussed are electronic structure, f-bonding, crystal structure, and crystal structure stability of the actinides and how they are inter-related

  14. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  15. Research for actinides extractants from various wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musikas, C.; Cuillerdier, C.; Condamines, N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is an overview of the actinides solvent extraction research undertaken in Fontenay-aux-Roses. Two kinds of extractants are investigated; those usable for the improvement of the nowadays nuclear fuels reprocessing and those necessary for advanced fuels cycles which include the minor actinides (Np, Am) recovery for a further elimination through nuclear reactions. In the first class the mono and diamides, alternative to the organophosphorus extractants, TBP and polyfunctional phosphonates, showed promising properties. The main results are discussed. For the future efficient extractants for trivalent actinides-lanthanides group separations are suitable. The point about the actinides (III) - lanthanides (III) group separation chemistry and the development of some of these extractants are given

  16. Robust membrane systems for actinide separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvinen, Gordon D.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Bluhm, Elizabeth A.; Abney, Kent D.; Ehler, Deborah S.; Bauer, Eve; Le, Quyen T.; Young, Jennifer S.; Ford, Doris K.; Pesiri, David R.; Dye, Robert C.; Robison, Thomas W.; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Redondo, Antonio; Pratt, Lawrence R.; Rempe, Susan L.

    2000-01-01

    Our objective in this project is to develop very stable thin membrane structures containing ionic recognition sites that facilitate the selective transport of target metal ions, especially the actinides

  17. The reprocessing-recycling of spent nuclear fuel. Actinides separation - Application to wastes management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    After its use in the reactor, the spent fuel still contains lot of recoverable material for an energetic use (uranium, plutonium), but also fission products and minor actinides which represent the residues of nuclear reactions. The reprocessing-recycling of the spent fuel, as it is performed in France, implies the chemical separation of these materials. The development and the industrial implementation of this separation process represent a major contribution of the French science and technology. The reprocessing-recycling allows a good management of nuclear wastes and a significant saving of fissile materials. With the recent spectacular rise of uranium prices, this process will become indispensable with the development of the next generation of fast neutron reactors. This book takes stock of the present and future variants of the chemical process used for the reprocessing of spent fuels. It describes the researches in progress and presents the stakes and recent results obtained by the CEA. content: the separation of actinides, a key factor for a sustainable nuclear energy; the actinides, a discovery of the 20. century; the radionuclides in nuclear fuels; the aquo ions of actinides; some redox properties of actinides; some complexing properties of actinide cations; general considerations about treatment processes; some characteristics of nuclear fuels in relation with their reprocessing; technical goals and specific constraints of the PUREX process; front-end operations of the PUREX process; separation and purification operations of the PUREX process; elaboration of finite products in the framework of the PUREX process; management and treatment of liquid effluents; solid wastes of the PUREX process; towards a joint management of uranium and plutonium: the COEX TM process; technical options of treatment and recycling techniques; the fuels of generation IV reactors; front-end treatment processes of advanced fuels; hydrometallurgical processes for future fuel cycles

  18. Systematics of criticality properties of actinide nuclides and its bearing on the long lived fission waste problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.; Rao, K.S.; Garg, S.B.; Iyengar, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a systematic analysis of the criticality parameters of over twenty fissile and fertile isotopes of eight transthorium actinide elements that has been carried out by us. It is observed that K ∞ increases and critical mass decreases monotonically with the fissility parameter (Z 2 /A) of the nuclides. This implies that each and every isotope of transuranic elements such as Np, Am, Cm etc. which are produced as by-products during reactor operation is a more valuable nuclear fuel than the corresponding fissile/fissible isotopes of plutonium. This finding has a profound bearing on the long lived fission waste problem and supports the view that the byproduct actinide elements should be separated from the high level waste stream and recycled back into fission reactors, thereby eliminating one of the commonly voiced concerns regarding the acceptability of nuclear fission power

  19. Chemistry of tetravalent actinides phosphates. The thorium phosphate-diphosphate as immobilisation matrix of actinides; Chimie des phosphates d'actinides tetravalents. Le phosphate-diphosphate de thorium en tant que matrice d'imobilisation des actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacheux, N

    2002-07-01

    The author presents in this document its scientific works from 1992 to 2001, in order to obtain the enabling to manage scientific and chemical researches at the university Paris Sud Orsay. The first part gives an abstract of the thesis on the characterizations, lixiviation and synthesis of uranium and thorium based phosphate matrix in the framework of the search for a ceramic material usable in the radioactive waste storage. The second part presents briefly the researches realized at the CEA, devoted to a reliable, independent and accurate measure of some isotopes activity. The last part presents the abstracts of researches activities from 1996 to 2001 on the tetravalent actinides phosphates chemistry, the sintering of PDT and solid solutions of PDTU and the kinetic and thermodynamical studies of the PDT dissolution. Many references and some publication in full text are provided. (A.L.B.)

  20. Influence of FIMA burnup on actinides concentrations in PWR reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oettingen Mikołaj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we present the study on the dependence of actinides concentrations in the spent nuclear fuel on FIMA burnup. The concentrations of uranium, plutonium, americium and curium isotopes obtained in numerical simulation are compared with the result of the post irradiation assay of two spent fuel samples. The samples were cut from the fuel rod irradiated during two reactor cycles in the Japanese Ohi-2 Pressurized Water Reactor. The performed comparative analysis assesses the reliability of the developed numerical set-up, especially in terms of the system normalization to the measured FIMA burnup. The numerical simulations were preformed using the burnup and radiation transport mode of the Monte Carlo Continuous Energy Burnup Code – MCB, developed at the Department of Nuclear Energy, Faculty of Energy and Fuels of AGH University of Science and Technology.

  1. Flammability Analysis For Actinide Oxides Packaged In 9975 Shipping Containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurinat, James E.; Askew, Neal M.; Hensel, Steve J.

    2013-03-21

    Packaging options are evaluated for compliance with safety requirements for shipment of mixed actinide oxides packaged in a 9975 Primary Containment Vessel (PCV). Radiolytic gas generation rates, PCV internal gas pressures, and shipping windows (times to reach unacceptable gas compositions or pressures after closure of the PCV) are calculated for shipment of a 9975 PCV containing a plastic bottle filled with plutonium and uranium oxides with a selected isotopic composition. G-values for radiolytic hydrogen generation from adsorbed moisture are estimated from the results of gas generation tests for plutonium oxide and uranium oxide doped with curium-244. The radiolytic generation of hydrogen from the plastic bottle is calculated using a geometric model for alpha particle deposition in the bottle wall. The temperature of the PCV during shipment is estimated from the results of finite element heat transfer analyses.

  2. Possible existence of backbending in actinide nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudek, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Szymanski, Z.

    1982-01-01

    The possibilities for the backbending effect to occur in actinide nuclei are studied using the pairing-self-consistent independent quasiparticle method. The Hamiltonian used is that of the deformed Woods-Saxon potential plus monopole pairing term. The results of the calculations explain why there is no backbending in most actinide nuclei and simultaneously suggest that in some light neutron deficient nuclei around Th and 22 Ra a backbending effect may occur

  3. Lattice effects in the light actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, A.C.; Cort, B.; Roberts, J.A.; Bennett, B.I.; Brun, T.O.; Dreele, R.B. von; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The light actinides show a variety of lattice effects that do not normally appear in other regions of the periodic table. The article will cover the crystal structures of the light actinides, their atomic volumes, their thermal expansion behavior, and their elastic behavior as reflected in recent thermal vibration measurements made by neutron diffraction. A discussion of the melting points will be given in terms of the thermal vibration measurements. Pressure effects will be only briefly indicated

  4. Transmutation of actinides in power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergelson, B R; Gerasimov, A S; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Power reactors can be used for partial short-term transmutation of radwaste. This transmutation is beneficial in terms of subsequent storage conditions for spent fuel in long-term storage facilities. CANDU-type reactors can transmute the main minor actinides from two or three reactors of the VVER-1000 type. A VVER-1000-type reactor can operate in a self-service mode with transmutation of its own actinides.

  5. Predictive Modeling in Actinide Chemistry and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    These are slides from a presentation on predictive modeling in actinide chemistry and catalysis. The following topics are covered in these slides: Structures, bonding, and reactivity (bonding can be quantified by optical probes and theory, and electronic structures and reaction mechanisms of actinide complexes); Magnetic resonance properties (transition metal catalysts with multi-nuclear centers, and NMR/EPR parameters); Moving to more complex systems (surface chemistry of nanomaterials, and interactions of ligands with nanoparticles); Path forward and conclusions.

  6. Subcritical limits for special fissile actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, H.K.

    1980-01-01

    Critical masses and subcritical mass limits in oxide-water mixtures were calculated for actinide nuclides other than /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U, and /sup 239/Pu that have an odd number of neutrons in the nucleus; S/sub n/ transport theory was used together with cross sections, drawn from the GLASS multigroup library, developed to provide accurate forecasts of actinide production at Savannah River

  7. Interaction between actinides and protein: the calmodulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brulfert, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Considering the environmental impact of the Fukushima nuclear accident, it is fundamental to study the mechanisms governing the effects of the released radionuclides on the biosphere and thus identify the molecular processes generating the transport and deposition of actinides, such as neptunium and uranium. However, the information about the microscopic aspect of the interaction between actinides and biological molecules (peptides, proteins...) is scarce. The data being mostly reported from a physiological point of view, the structure of the coordination sites remains largely unknown. These microscopic data are indeed essential for the understanding of the interdependency between structural aspect, function and affinity.The Calmodulin (CaM) (abbreviation for Calcium-Modulated protein), also known for its affinity towards actinides, acts as a metabolic regulator of calcium. This protein is a Ca carrier, which is present ubiquitously in the human body, may also bind other metals such as actinides. Thus, in case of a contamination, actinides that bind to CaM could avoid the protein to perform properly and lead to repercussions on a large range of vital functions.The complexation of Np and U was studied by EXAFS spectroscopy which showed that actinides were incorporated in a calcium coordination site. Once the thermodynamical and structural aspects studied, the impact of the coordination site distortion on the biological efficiency was analyzed. In order to evaluate these consequences, a calorimetric method based on enzyme kinetics was developed. This experiment, which was conducted with both uranium (50 - 500 nM) and neptunium (30 - 250 nM) showed a decrease of the heat produced by the enzymatic reaction with an increasing concentration of actinides in the medium. Our findings showed that the Calmodulin actinide complex works as an enzymatic inhibitor. Furthermore, at higher neptunium (250 nM) and uranium (500 nM) concentration the metals seem to have a poison

  8. Positron Spectroscopy of Hydrothermally Grown Actinide Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    actinide oxides . The work described here is an attempt to characterize the quality of crystals using positron annihilation spectroscopy (PALS). The...Upadhyaya, R. V. Muraleedharan, B. D. Sharma and K. G. Prasad, " Positron lifetime studies on thorium oxide powders," Philosohical Magazine A, vol. 45... crystals . A strong foundation for actinide PALS studies was laid, but further work is required to build a more effective system. Positron Spectroscopy

  9. Separation of actinides and their transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, M.; Bathelier, M.; Cousin, M.

    1978-08-01

    Neutron irradiation of long-half-life actinides for transmutation into elements with shorter half-life is investigated as a means to reduce the long-term hazards of these actinides. The effectiveness of the method is analysed by applying it to fission product solutions from the first extraction cycle of fuel reprocessing plants. Basic principles, separation techniques and transmutation efficiencies are studied and discussed in detail

  10. The removal of actinide metals from solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, R.D.; Howell, I.V.

    1980-01-01

    A process is specified for removing actinide metals (e.g. uranium) from solutions. The solution is contacted with a substrate comprising the product obtained by reacting an inorganic solid containing surface hydroxyl groups (e.g. silica gel) with a compound containing a silane grouping, a nitrogen-containing group (e.g. an amine) and other specified radicals. After treatment, the actinide metal is recovered from the substrate. (U.K.)

  11. PREPARATION OF ACTINIDE-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    BS>A process is given for preparing alloys of aluminum with plutonium, uranium, and/or thorium by chlorinating actinide oxide dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride with hydrochloric acid, chlorine, and/or phosgene, adding aluminum metal, and passing air and/or water vapor through the mass. Actinide metal is formed and alloyed with the aluminum. After cooling to solidification, the alloy is separated from the salt. (AEC)

  12. Evaluation of actinide partitioning and transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    After a few centuries of radioactive decay the long-lived actinides, the elements of atomic numbers 89-103, may constitute the main potential radiological health hazard in nuclear wastes. This is because all but a very few fission products (principally technetium-99 and iodine-129) have by then undergone radioactive decay to insignificant levels, leaving the actinides as the principal radionuclides remaining. It was therefore at first sight an attractive concept to recycle the actinides to nuclear reactors, so as to eliminate them by nuclear fission. Thus, investigations of the feasibility and potential benefits and hazards of the concept of 'actinide partitioning and transmutation' were started in numerous countries in the mid-1970s. This final report summarizes the results and conclusions of technical studies performed in connection with a four-year IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme, started in 1976, on the ''Environmental Evaluation and Hazard Assessment of the Separation of Actinides from Nuclear Wastes followed by either Transmutation or Separate Disposal''. Although many related studies are still continuing, e.g. on waste disposal, long-term safety assessments, and waste actinide management (particularly for low and intermediate-level wastes), some firm conclusions on the overall concept were drawn by the programme participants, which are reflected in this report

  13. Advances in computational actinide chemistry in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dongqi; Wu, Jingyi; Chai, Zhifang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Multidisciplinary Initiative Center; Su, Jing [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China). Div. of Nuclear Materials Science and Engineering; Li, Jun [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Chemistry and Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering

    2014-04-01

    The advances in computational actinide chemistry made in China are reviewed. Several areas relevant to chemistry of actinides in gas, liquid, and solid phases have been explored. However, we limit the scope to selected contributions in the chemistry of molecular actinide systems in gas and liquid phases. These studies may be classified into two categories: treatment of relativistic effects, which cover the development of two- and four-component Hamiltonians and the optimization of relativistic pseudopotentials, and the applications of theoretical methods in actinide chemistry. The applications include (1) the electronic structures of actinocene, noble gas complexes, An-C multiple bonding compounds, uranyl and its isoelectronic species, fluorides and oxides, molecular systems with metal-metal bonding in their isolated forms (U{sub 2}, Pu{sub 2}) and in fullerene (U{sub 2} rate at C{sub 60}), and the excited states of actinide complexes; (2) chemical reactions, including oxidation, hydrolysis of UF{sub 6}, ligand exchange, reactivities of thorium oxo and sulfido metallocenes, CO{sub 2}/CS{sub 2} functionalization promoted by trivalent uranium complex; and (3) migration of actinides in the environment. A future outlook is discussed. (orig.)

  14. Colloidal products and actinide species in leachate from spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Hafenrichter, L.D.; Bates, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    Two well-characterized types of spent nuclear fuel (ATM-103 and ATM-106) were subjected to unsaturated leach tests with simulated groundwater at 90 degrees C. The actinides present in the leachate were determined at the end of two successive periods of ∼60 days and after an acid strip done at the end of the second period. Both colloidal and soluble actinide species were detected in the leachates which had pHs ranging from 4 to 7. The uranium phases identified in the colloids were schoepite and soddyite. In addition, the actinide release behavior of the two fuels appeared to be different for both the total amount of material released and the relative amount of each isotope released. This paper will focus on the detection and identification of the colloidal species observed in the leachate that was collected after each of the first two successive testing periods of approximately 60 days each. In addition, preliminary values for the total actinide release for these two periods are reported

  15. Gastrointestinal absorption of actinides: a review with special reference to primate data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkart, W.

    1984-01-01

    Large scale geological burial of transuranic wastes from fission power production may expose segments of future generations to trace amounts of actinides in water and food, which, via gastrointestinal absorption, could result in internal doses of alpha radiation. Gastrointestinal absorption of actinide elements is a poorly understood process. Experimental studies, primarily using rodents, often produce ambiguous results with order of magnitude fluctuations in estimates of GI absorption. Since experimental conditions like the chemical form of the fed actinides or reducing and complexing capacity of the stomach content, influence the GI transfer factor in seemingly unpredictable ways, only a better understanding of events at the molecular level will enable more reliable predictions to be made of the organ burdens resulting from actinides passing through the digestive tract. From a review of the existing literature it is apparent that in vitro research data in the area of GI uptake mechanisms (i.e. transport mediated by ion carriers in body fluids and across cell membranes) are virtually non-existant. In view of the uncertainties linked to in vivo uptake experiment, models which approximate man, i.e. derived from non-human primate studies, should be the best choice of experimental systems in which to determine reliable estimates for gastrointestinal transfer factors of actinide elements. (Auth.)

  16. Actinide solubility in deep groundwaters - estimates for upper limits based on chemical equilibrium calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweingruber, M.

    1983-12-01

    A chemical equilibrium model is used to estimate maximum upper concentration limits for some actinides (Th, U, Np, Pu, Am) in groundwaters. Eh/pH diagrams for solubility isopleths, dominant dissolved species and limiting solids are constructed for fixed parameter sets including temperature, thermodynamic database, ionic strength and total concentrations of most important inorganic ligands (carbonate, fluoride, phosphate, sulphate, chloride). In order to assess conservative conditions, a reference water is defined with high ligand content and ionic strength, but without competing cations. In addition, actinide oxides and hydroxides are the only solid phases considered. Recommendations for 'safe' upper actinide solubility limits for deep groundwaters are derived from such diagrams, based on the predicted Eh/pH domain. The model results are validated as far as the scarce experimental data permit. (Auth.)

  17. The application of CANDU neutron economy for the annihilation of the minor actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dastur, Adi; Gagnon, Nathalie

    1995-01-01

    A strategically indispensable role, comparable to the one of operating with natural uranium, is proposed for CANDU as an incentive to ensure future CANDU sales in an environment where enrichment and reprocessing technology are globally available. Because of their high neutron economy, CANDU reactors can operate with minimal fissile content and consequently at high neutron flux. This is especially so in the absence of uranium, i.e. when transuranic actinides are used as fuel. The low fissile requirement and the on-power refuelling capability of CANDU can be exploited to achieve a once-through cycle for actinide annihilation. This avoids recycling and refabrication costs and provides relatively high annihilation rates. In addition, CANDUs ability to operate without uranium and extract energy from the minor actinides makes it the ultimate resource conserver and gives it a unique role in sustainable energy growth. (author)

  18. Recovery of Actinides from Actinide-Aluminium Alloys: Chlorination Route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, E.; Malmbeck, R.; Soucek, P.; Jardin, R.; Glatz, J.P.; Cassayre, L.

    2008-01-01

    A method for recovery of actinides (An) from An-Al alloys formed by electrochemical separation of metallic spent nuclear fuel on solid aluminium electrodes in molten chloride salts is described. The proposed route consists of three main steps: -) vacuum distillation of salt adhered on the electrodes, -) chlorination of An-Al alloy by pure chlorine gas and -) sublimation of formed AlCl 3 . A thermochemical study of the route was performed to determine important chemical reactions and to find optimum experimental conditions for all process steps. Vacuum distillation of the electrode is efficient for complete removal of remaining salt and most fission products, full chlorination of the An-Al alloys is possible at any working temperature and evaporation of AlCl 3 is achieved by heating under argon. Experiments have been carried out using U-Al alloy in order to define parameters providing full alloy chlorination without formation of volatile UCl 5 and UCl 6 . It was shown that full chlorination of An-Al alloys without An losses should be possible at a temperature approx. 150 deg. C. (authors)

  19. Recovery of Actinides from Actinide-Aluminium Alloys: Chlorination Route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, E.; Malmbeck, R.; Soucek, P.; Jardin, R.; Glatz, J.P. [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Cassayre, L. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique (LGC), Universite Paul Sabatier, UMR CNRS 5503, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France)

    2008-07-01

    A method for recovery of actinides (An) from An-Al alloys formed by electrochemical separation of metallic spent nuclear fuel on solid aluminium electrodes in molten chloride salts is described. The proposed route consists of three main steps: -) vacuum distillation of salt adhered on the electrodes, -) chlorination of An-Al alloy by pure chlorine gas and -) sublimation of formed AlCl{sub 3}. A thermochemical study of the route was performed to determine important chemical reactions and to find optimum experimental conditions for all process steps. Vacuum distillation of the electrode is efficient for complete removal of remaining salt and most fission products, full chlorination of the An-Al alloys is possible at any working temperature and evaporation of AlCl{sub 3} is achieved by heating under argon. Experiments have been carried out using U-Al alloy in order to define parameters providing full alloy chlorination without formation of volatile UCl{sub 5} and UCl{sub 6}. It was shown that full chlorination of An-Al alloys without An losses should be possible at a temperature approx. 150 deg. C. (authors)

  20. FY2011 Annual Report for the Actinide Isomer Detection Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Glen A.; Francy, Christopher J.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Erikson, Luke E.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Hatarik, R.

    2011-01-01

    This project seeks to identify a new signature for actinide element detection in active interrogation. This technique works by exciting and identifying long-lived nuclear excited states (isomers) in the actinide isotopes and/or primary fission products. Observation of isomers in the fission products will provide a signature for fissile material. For the actinide isomers, the decay time and energy of the isomeric state is unique to a particular isotope, providing an unambiguous signature for SNM. This project entails isomer identification and characterization and neutron population studies. This document summarizes activities from its third year - completion of the isomer identification characterization experiments and initialization of the neutron population experiments. The population and decay of the isomeric state in 235U remain elusive, although a number of candidate gamma rays have been identified. In the course of the experiments, a number of fission fragment isomers were populated and measured (Ressler 2010). The decays from these isomers may also provide a suitable signature for the presence of fissile material. Several measurements were conducted throughout this project. This report focuses on the results of an experiment conducted collaboratively by PNNL, LLNL and LBNL in December 2010 at LBNL. The measurement involved measuring the gamma-rays emitted from an HEU target when bombarded with 11 MeV neutrons. This report discussed the analysis and resulting conclusions from those measurements. There was one strong candidate, at 1204 keV, of an isomeric signature of 235U. The half-life of the state is estimated to be 9.3 μs. The measured time dependence fits the decay time structure very well. Other possible explanations for the 1204-keV state were investigated, but they could not explain the gamma ray. Unfortunately, the relatively limited statistics of the measurement limit, and the lack of understanding of some of the systematic of the experiment, limit

  1. Reactor physics aspects of burning actinides in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hage, W.; Schmidt, E.

    1978-01-01

    A short review of the different recycling strategies of actinides other than fuel treated in the literature, is given along with nuclear data requirements for actinide build-up and transmutation studies. The effects of recycling actinides in a nuclear reactor on the flux distribution, the infinite neutron multiplication factor, the reactivity control system, the reactivity coefficients and the delayed neutron fraction are discussed considering a notional LWR or LMFBR as an Actinide Trasmutaton Reactor. Some operational problems of Actinide Transmutation reactors are mentioned, which are caused by the α-decay heat and the neutron sources of Actinide Target Elements

  2. Americium-241: the most useful isotope of the actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    Used extensively in nuclear gauges and in many other areas, this man-made element (Atomic Number 95) was first isolated in weighable amounts during World War II. Americium is now a very useful by-product of the nuclear industry and is produced in kilogram amounts by appropriate recovery, separation and purification processes. A review will be presented of its discovery, nuclear and chemical properties, and uses, with emphasis on its production process and separations chemistry

  3. Fast neutron capture in actinide isotopes: recent results from Karlsruhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisshak, K.; Kaeppeler, F.; Reffo, G.; Fabbri, F.

    1982-01-01

    Capture gamma-ray spectra of 241 Am, 240 Pu, 242 Pu 238 U and 197 Au were calculated in the framework of the spherical optical model and the statistical model. These spectra were used to correct experimental data for the capture cross sections of 240 242 Pu and 241 Am from relative measurements using a Moxon Rae-detector with graphite converter and 197 Au as well as 238 U as standards. This correction is required to take into account that the detector efficiency is not exactly proportional to gamma-ray energy. The resulting correction factors proved to be negligible for measurements relative to 238 U, whereas they are approx. 3% if gold is used as a standard. The capture cross section of 243 Am has been measured in the energy range 10 to 250 keV using kinematically collimated neutrons from the 7 Li(p,n) and T(p,n) reaction. The samples are positioned at flight paths of 5 to 7 cm and gold was used as a standard. Capture events were detected by two Moxon-Rae detectors with graphite and bismuth-graphite converters shielded by 0.5 to 2 cm of lead. Fission events were detected by a NE213 liquid scintillator. The present status of the experiment and some preliminary results will be presented

  4. Actinide transmutation in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bultman, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    An optimization method is developed to maximize the burning capability of the ALMR while complying with all constraints imposed on the design for reliability and safety. This method leads to a maximal transuranics enrichment, which is being limited by constraints on reactivity. The enrichment can be raised by using the neutrons less efficiently by increasing leakage from the fuel. With the developed optimization method, a metallic and an oxide fueled ALMR were optimized. Both reactors perform equally well considering the burning of transuranics. However, metallic fuel has a much higher heat conductivity coefficient, which in general leads to better safety characteristics. In search of a more effective waste transmuter, a modified Molten Salt Reactor was designed. A MSR operates on a liquid fuel salt which makes continuous refueling possible, eliminating the issue of the burnup reactivity loss. Also, a prompt negative reactivity feedback is possible for an overmoderated reactor design, even when the Doppler coefficient is positive, due to the fuel expansion with fuel temperature increase. Furthermore, the molten salt fuel can be reprocessed based on a reduction process which is not sensitive to the short-lived spontaneously fissioning actinides. (orig./HP)

  5. Actinide/crown ether chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benning, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    A structural survey of actinide/crown ether compounds was conducted in order to investigate the solid state chemistry of these complexes. Several parameters - the metal size, crown type, counterion, solvent systems and reaction and crystallization conditions - were varied to correlate their importance in complexation. Under atmospheric conditions, two types of complexes were isolated, those containing only hydrogen-bonded crown interactions and instances where the crown interacts directly with the metal center. In both cases, water seems to play a very important role. When coordinated to the metal, water molecules exhibit the necessary donor properties required for the formation of hydrogen-bonded contacts. The water molecules also provide fierce competition with the crown ethers for metal-binding sites and in most cases prohibit the formation of complexes in which direct metal-ligand association exists. The results of this study indicate that direct interaction between the metal atoms and the crown ethers, in the presence of water, can only occur with polyether conformations which limit the steric replusions within the metal coordination sphere

  6. Actinide transmutation in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bultman, J H

    1995-01-17

    An optimization method is developed to maximize the burning capability of the ALMR while complying with all constraints imposed on the design for reliability and safety. This method leads to a maximal transuranics enrichment, which is being limited by constraints on reactivity. The enrichment can be raised by using the neutrons less efficiently by increasing leakage from the fuel. With the developed optimization method, a metallic and an oxide fueled ALMR were optimized. Both reactors perform equally well considering the burning of transuranics. However, metallic fuel has a much higher heat conductivity coefficient, which in general leads to better safety characteristics. In search of a more effective waste transmuter, a modified Molten Salt Reactor was designed. A MSR operates on a liquid fuel salt which makes continuous refueling possible, eliminating the issue of the burnup reactivity loss. Also, a prompt negative reactivity feedback is possible for an overmoderated reactor design, even when the Doppler coefficient is positive, due to the fuel expansion with fuel temperature increase. Furthermore, the molten salt fuel can be reprocessed based on a reduction process which is not sensitive to the short-lived spontaneously fissioning actinides. (orig./HP).

  7. Lithium actinide recycle process demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.K.; Pierce, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Several pyrochemical processes have been developed in the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne Laboratory for recovery of actinide elements from LWR spent fuel. The lithium process was selected as the reference process from among the options. In this process the LWR oxide spent fuel is reduced by lithium at 650{degrees}C in the presence of molten LiCl. The Li{sub 2}O formed during the reduction process is soluble in the salt. The spent salt and lithium are recycled after the Li{sub 2}O is electrochemically reduced. The oxygen is liberated as CO{sub 2} at a carbon anode or oxygen at an inert anode. The reduced metal components of the LWR spent fuel are separated from the LiCL salt phase and introduced into an electrorefiner. The electrorefining step separates the uranium and transuranium (TRU) elements into two product streams. The uranium product, which comprises about 96% of the LWR spent fuel mass, may be enriched for recycle into the LWR fuel cycle, stored for future use in breeder reactors, or converted to a suitable form for disposal as waste. The TRU product can be recycled as fast reactor fuel or can be alloyed with constituents of the LWR cladding material to produce a stable waste form.

  8. Benchmark Evaluation of Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor Minor Actinide Depletion Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, J. D.; Gauld, I. C.; Gulliford, J.; Hill, I.; Okajima, S.

    2017-01-01

    Historic measurements of actinide samples in the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) are of interest for modern nuclear data and simulation validation. Samples of various higher-actinide isotopes were irradiated for 492 effective full-power days and radiochemically assayed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Limited data were available regarding the PFR irradiation; a six-group neutron spectra was available with some power history data to support a burnup depletion analysis validation study. Under the guidance of the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD NEA), the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) and Spent Fuel Isotopic Composition (SFCOMPO) Project are collaborating to recover all measurement data pertaining to these measurements, including collaboration with the United Kingdom to obtain pertinent reactor physics design and operational history data. These activities will produce internationally peer-reviewed benchmark data to support validation of minor actinide cross section data and modern neutronic simulation of fast reactors with accompanying fuel cycle activities such as transportation, recycling, storage, and criticality safety.

  9. Rapid column extraction method for actinides and strontium in fish and other animal tissue samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell III, S.L.; Faison, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of actinides and radiostrontium in animal tissue samples is very important for environmental monitoring. There is a need to measure actinide isotopes and strontium with very low detection limits in animal tissue samples, including fish, deer, hogs, beef and shellfish. A new, rapid separation method has been developed that allows the measurement of plutonium, neptunium, uranium, americium, curium and strontium isotopes in large animal tissue samples (100-200 g) with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of matrix interferences. This method uses stacked TEVA Resin R , TRU Resin R and DGA Resin R cartridges from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) that allows the rapid separation of plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), uranium (U), americium (Am), and curium (Cm) using a single multi-stage column combined with alphaspectrometry. Strontium is collected on Sr Resin R from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA). After acid digestion and furnace heating of the animal tissue samples, the actinides and 89/90 Sr are separated using column extraction chromatography. This method has been shown to be effective over a wide range of animal tissue matrices. Vacuum box cartridge technology with rapid flow rates is used to minimize sample preparation time. (author)

  10. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's isotope enrichment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, J.G.; Aaron, W.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Isotope Enrichment Program (IEP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for the production and distribution of ∼225 enriched stable isotopes from 50 multi-isotopic elements. In addition, ORNL distributes enriched actinide isotopes and provides extensive physical- and chemical-form processing of enriched isotopes to meet customer requirements. For more than 50 yr, ORNL has been a major provider of enriched isotopes and isotope-related services to research, medical, and industrial institutions throughout the world. Consolidation of the Isotope Distribution Office (IDO), the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory (IRML), and the stable isotope inventories in the Isotope Enrichment Facility (IEF) have improved operational efficiencies and customer services. Recent changes in the IEP have included adopting policies for long-term contracts, which offer program stability and pricing advantages for the customer, and prorated service charges, which greatly improve pricing to the small research users. The former U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Loan Program has been converted to a lease program, which makes large-quantity or very expensive isotopes available for nondestructive research at a nominal cost. Current efforts are being pursued to improve and expand the isotope separation capabilities as well as the extensive chemical- and physical-form processing that now exists. The IEF's quality management system is ISO 9002 registered and accredited in the United States, Canada, and Europe

  11. Study of actinide paramagnetism in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autillo, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    The physiochemical properties of actinide (An) solutions are still difficult to explain, particularly the behavioral differences between An(III) and Ln(III). The study of actinide paramagnetic behavior may be a 'simple' method to analyze the electronic properties of actinide elements and to obtain information on the ligand-actinide interaction. The objective of this PhD thesis is to understand the paramagnetic properties of these elements by magnetic susceptibility measurements and chemical shift studies. Studies on actinide electronic properties at various oxidation states in solution were carried out by magnetic susceptibility measurements in solution according to the Evans method. Unlike Ln(III) elements, there is no specific theory describing the magnetic properties of these ions in solution. To obtain accurate data, the influence of experimental measurement technique and radioactivity of these elements was analyzed. Then, to describe the electronic structure of their low energy states, the experimental results were complemented with quantum chemical calculations from which the influence of the ligand field was studied. Finally, these interpretations were applied to better understand the variations in the magnetic properties of actinide cations in chloride and nitrate media. Information about ligand-actinide interactions may be determined from an NMR chemical shift study of actinide complexes. Indeed, modifications induced by a paramagnetic complex can be separated into two components. The first component, a Fermi contact contribution (δ_c) is related to the degree of covalency in coordination bonds with the actinide ions and the second, a dipolar contribution (δ_p_c) is related to the structure of the complex. The paramagnetic induced shift can be used only if we can isolate these two terms. To achieve this study on actinide elements, we chose to work with the complexes of dipicolinic acid (DPA). Firstly, to characterize the geometrical parameters, a

  12. Application of tritium content isotopic measurements to the investigation of underground water circulations and mixing in different porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leguy, C.

    1979-06-01

    This research thesis aims at investigating actual and potential mixing of underground waters in different soil types, and more particularly different porous media. Tritium content measurements of these waters have been performed by liquid scintillation after enrichment. The first part of this report addresses the physical aspect of these measurements. The second one deals with the interpretation of the acquired data, of circulation or mixing schemes which can be deduced with respect to the concerned soils. It highlights the importance of geo-morphological factors for the studied flows

  13. Actinide science. Fundamental and environmental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, Gregory R.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear test explosions and reactor wastes have deposited an estimated 16x10 15 Bq of plutonium into the world's aquatic systems. However, plutonium concentration in open ocean waters is orders of magnitude less, indicating that most of the plutonium is quite insolvable in marine waters and has been incorporated into sediments. Actinide ions in waters often are not in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium and their solubility and migration behavior is related to the form in which the nuclides were introduced into the aquatic system. Actinide solubility depends on such factors as pH(hydrolysis), E H (oxidation state), reaction with complexants (e.g. carbonate, phosphate, humic acid, etc.) sorption to surfaces of minerals and/or colloids, etc., in the water. The most significant of these variables is the oxidation sate of the metal ion. The simultaneous presence of more than one oxidation state for some actinides (e.g. plutonium) in a solution complicates actinide environmental behavior. Both Np(V)O 2 + and Pu(V)O 2 + , the most significant soluble states in natural oxic waters are relatively noncomplexing and resistant to hydrolysis and subsequent precipitation but can undergo reduction to the Pu(IV) oxidation state with its different elemental behavior. The solubility of NpO 2 + can be as high as 10 -4 M while that of PuO 2 + is more limited by reduction to the insoluble tetravalent species, Pu(OH) 4 , (pK SP - 56). The net solubility of hexavalent UO 2 2+ in sea water is also limited by hydrolysis; however, it has a relatively high concentration due to formation of carbonate complexes. The insoluble trivalent americium hydroxocarbonate, Am(CO) 3 (OH), is the limiting species for the solubility of Am(III) in sea water. Thorium is found exclusively as the tetravalent species and its solubility is limited by the formation of quite insoluble Th(OH) 4 . The chemistry of actinide ions in the environment is reviewed to show the spectrum of reactions that can occur in

  14. TUCS/phosphate mineralization of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This program has as its objective the development of a new technology that combines cation exchange and mineralization to reduce the concentration of heavy metals (in particular actinides) in groundwaters. The treatment regimen must be compatible with the groundwater and soil, potentially using groundwater/soil components to aid in the immobilization process. The delivery system (probably a water-soluble chelating agent) should first concentrate the radionuclides then release the precipitating anion, which forms thermodynamically stable mineral phases, either with the target metal ions alone or in combination with matrix cations. This approach should generate thermodynamically stable mineral phases resistant to weathering. The chelating agent should decompose spontaneously with time, release the mineralizing agent, and leave a residue that does not interfere with mineral formation. For the actinides, the ideal compound probably will release phosphate, as actinide phosphate mineral phases are among the least soluble species for these metals. The most promising means of delivering the precipitant would be to use a water-soluble, hydrolytically unstable complexant that functions in the initial stages as a cation exchanger to concentrate the metal ions. As it decomposes, the chelating agent releases phosphate to foster formation of crystalline mineral phases. Because it involves only the application of inexpensive reagents, the method of phosphate mineralization promises to be an economical alternative for in situ immobilization of radionuclides (actinides in particular). The method relies on the inherent (thermodynamic) stability of actinide mineral phases.

  15. Band structure studies of actinide systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelling, D.D.

    1976-01-01

    The nature of the f-orbitals in an actinide system plays a crucial role in determining the electronic properties. It has long been realized that when the actinide separation is small enough for the f-orbitals to interact directly, the system will exhibit itinerant electron properties: an absence of local moment due to the f-orbitals and sometimes even superconductivity. However, a number of systems with the larger actinide separation that should imply local moment behavior also exhibit intinerant properties. Such systems (URh 3 , UIr 3 , UGe 3 , UC) were examined to learn something about the other f-interactions. A preliminary observation made is that there is apparently a very large and ansiotropic mass enhancement in these systems. There is very good reason to believe that this is not solely due to large electron--electron correlations but to a large electron--phonon interaction as well. These features of the ''non-magnetic'', large actinide separation systems are discussed in light of our results to date. Finally, the results of some recent molecular calculations on actinide hexafluorides are used to illustrate the shielding effects on the intra-atomic Coulomb term U/sub f-f/ which would appear in any attempt to study the formation of local moments. As one becomes interested in materials for which a band structure is no longer an adequate model, this screened U/sub ff/ is the significant parameter and efforts must be made to evaluate it in solid state systems

  16. A review of the demonstration of innovative solvent extraction processes for the recovery of trivalent minor actinides from PUREX raffinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modolo, G.; Wilden, A.; Geist, A.; Magnusson, D.; Malmbeck, R.

    2012-01-01

    The selective partitioning (P) of long-lived minor actinides from highly active waste solutions and their transmutation (T) to short-lived or stable isotopes by nuclear reactions will reduce the long-term hazard of the high-level waste and significantly shorten the time needed to ensure their safe confinement in a repository. The present paper summarizes the on-going research activities at Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ), Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT) and Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) in the field of actinide partitioning using innovative solvent extraction processes. European research over the last few decades, i.e. in the NEWPART, PARTNEW and EUROPART programmes, has resulted in the development of multi-cycle processes for minor actinide partitioning. These multi-cycle processes are based on the co-separation of trivalent actinides and lanthanides (e.g. by the DIAMEX process), followed by the subsequent actinide(III)/lanthanide(III) group separation in the SANEX process. The current direction of research for the development of innovative processes within the recent European ACSEPT project is discussed additionally. This paper is focused on the development of flow-sheets for recovery of americium and curium from highly active waste solutions. The flow-sheets are verified by demonstration processes, in centrifugal contactors, using synthetic or genuine fuel solutions. The feasibility of the processes is also discussed. (orig.)

  17. The cross section sensitivity of the minor actinides on a lead-bismuth cooled accelerator-driven burner system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Choong-Sup; Kim, Jung-Do; Chang, Jonghwa

    2002-01-01

    In order to validate the detailed sensitivity of each minor actinide datum in ENDF/B-VI Release 6, JEF-2.2 and JENDL-3.2 on an accelerator-driven minor actinide burner benchmark system, a lead-bismuth cooled sub-critical system was analyzed. The impacts on the system by the ten minor actinides were compared. The k eff values and reaction rates were calculated by exchanging the data sets of each minor actinide from ENDF/B-VI.6 to JEF-2.2 or JENDL-3.2. At the equilibrium core, the k eff differences from ENDF/B-VI.6 by the ten minor actinides can cause more than 5,500 pcm for JEF-2.2 and 3,500 pcm for JENDL-3.2. The fission reaction rates of 242m Am and 243 Cm with ENDF/B-VI.6 show differences of more than 15% from those with JEF-2.2 and JENDL-3.2. 241 Am, 243 Am and 245 Cm in JEF-2.2 and americium isotope data and 245 Cm in JENDL-3.2 are sensitive to the fission spectrum. (author)

  18. Nonaqueous method for dissolving lanthanide and actinide metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisler, L.R.

    1975-01-01

    Lanthanide and actinide beta-diketonate complex molecular compounds are produced by reacting a beta-diketone compound with a lanthanide or actinide element in the elemental metallic state in a mixture of carbon tetrachloride and methanol

  19. Strategies for minority actinides transmutation in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Martin, S.; Martin-Fuertes, F.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.

    2010-01-01

    Presentation of the strategies that can be followed in fast reactors designed for the fourth generation to reduce the inventory of minority actinides generated in current light water reactors, as the actinides generation in fast reactor.

  20. Fabrication and Pre-irradiation Characterization of a Minor Actinide and Rare Earth Containing Fast Reactor Fuel Experiment for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy A. Hyde

    2012-06-01

    The United States Department of Energy, seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter lived fission products, thereby decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and reducing the long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. This transmutation of the long lived actinides plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium can be accomplished by first separating them from spent Light Water Reactor fuel using a pyro-metalurgical process, then reprocessing them into new fuel with fresh uranium additions, and then transmuted to short lived nuclides in a liquid metal cooled fast reactor. An important component of the technology is developing actinide-bearing fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium isotopes that meet the stringent requirements of reactor fuels and materials.

  1. Transmutation of minor actinides in a spherical torus tokamak fusion reactor, FDTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, K.M.; Zhang, G.S.; Deng, M.G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a concept for the transmutation of minor actinide (MA) nuclear wastes based on a spherical torus (ST) tokamak reactor, FDTR, is put forward. A set of plasma parameters suitable for the transmutation blanket was chosen. The 2-D neutron transport code TWODANT, the 3-D Monte Carlo code MCNP/4B, the 1-D neutron transport and burn-up calculation code BISON3.0 and their associated data libraries were used to calculate the transmutation rate, the energy multiplication factor and the tritium breeding ratio of the transmutation blanket. The calculation results for the system parameters and the actinide series isotopes for different operation times are presented. The engineering feasibility of the center-post (CP) of FDTR has been investigated and the results are also given. A preliminary neutronics calculation based on an ST transmutation blanket shows that the proposed system has a high transmutation capability for MA wastes. (author)

  2. Separation of gallium and actinides in plutonium nuclear materials by extraction chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eitrheim, E.S.; Knight, A.W.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of stable gallium in nuclear materials has applications in nuclear fuel characterization and nuclear forensics. The use of positron-emitting gallium isotope 68 Ga as a tracer for Ga recoveries for analyses in materials containing actinides was explored. A radiochemical method for the separation of Ga, Pu, U, Th, and Am using commercially-available extraction chromatography resins was developed and evaluated. The method effectively allows precise determination of Ga yield (97 ± 3 %) in the analysis of stable Ga (spike recovery 101 ± 1 %) and radioactive Pu (radiochemical yield, 82 ± 10 %; spike recovery, 96 ± 3 %), while also providing pure elemental fractions of other actinides relevant to materials encountered in the analysis Pu-containing materials. (author)

  3. Denaturing of plutonium by transmutation of minor-actinides for enhancement of proliferation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagara, Hiroshi; Saito, Masaki; Peryoga, Yoga; Ezoubtchenko, Alexey; Takivayev, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Feasibility study for the plutonium denaturing by utilizing minor-actinide transmutation in light water reactors has been performed. And the intrinsic feature of proliferation resistance of plutonium has been discussed based on IAEA's publication and Kessler's proposal. The analytical results show that not only 238 Pu but also other plutonium isotopes with even-mass-number have very important role for denaturing of plutonium due to their relatively large critical mass and noticeably high spontaneous fission neutron generation. With the change of the minor-actinide doping ratio in U-Pu mix oxide fuel and moderator to fuel ratio, it is found that the reactor-grade plutonium from conventional light water reactors can be denatured to satisfy the proliferation resistance criterion based on the Kessler's proposal but not to be sufficient for the criterion based on IAEA's publication. It has been also confirmed that all the safety coefficients take negative value throughout the irradiation. (author)

  4. 1981 Annual Status Report. Plutonium fuels and actinide programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    In this 1981 report the work carried out by the European Institute for Transuranium elements is reviewed. Main topics are: operation limits of plutonium fuels: swelling of advanced fuels, oxide fuel transients, equation of state of nuclear materials; actinide cycle safety: formation of actinides (FACT), safe handling of plutonium fuel (SHAPE), aspects of the head-end processing of carbide fuel (RECARB); actinide research: crystal chemistry, solid state studies, applied actinide research

  5. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S.M.

    1983-10-31

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  6. Measurement of electro-sprayed 238 and 239+240 plutonium isotopes using 4{pi}-alpha spectrometry. Application to environmental samples; Spectrometrie alpha 4{pi} de sources d'actinides realisees par electronebulisation. Developpement et optimisation d'un protocole applique au mesurage des isotopes 238 et 239+240 du plutonium dans l'environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charmoille-Roblot, M. [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Dept. de Protection de l' Environnement (DPRE), 92 (France)]|[Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-07-01

    A new protocol for plutonium deposition using the electro-spray technique coupled with 4{pi}-{alpha} spectrometry is proposed to improve the detection limit, shorten the counting time. In order to increase the detection efficiency, it was proposed to measure 238 and 239+240 plutonium isotopes electro-sprayed deposit simultaneously on both sides of the source support, that must be as transparent as possible to alpha-emissions, in a two-alpha detectors chamber. A radiochemical protocol was adapted to electro-spray constraints and a very thin carbon foil was selected for 4{pi} -alpha spectrometry. The method was applied to a batch of sediment samples and gave the same results as an electrodeposited source measured using conventional alpha spectrometry with a 25 % gain on counting time and 10 % on plutonium 238 detection limit. Validation and application of the technique have been made on reference samples. (author)

  7. Determination of artifactual formation of monomethylmercury (CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +}) in environmental samples using stable Hg{sup 2+} isotopes with ICP-MS detection: Calculation of contents applying species specific isotope addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hintelmann, H. [Trent University, Environmental Science Centre, Peterborough ON K9J 7B8 (Canada); Falter, R. [Bayreuth Institute for Terrestrial Ecosystem Research (BITOEK), Central Analytics, POB 101251, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Ilgen, G. [Bayreuth Institute for Terrestrial Ecosystem Research (BITOEK), Central Analytics, POB 101251, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Evans, R.D. [Trent University, Environmental Science Centre, Peterborough ON K9J 7B8 (Canada)

    1997-06-01

    Various extraction techniques, as distillation, acid and alkaline extraction, have been tested with regard to their potential to form a monomethylmercury (CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +}) artifact from inorganic Hg during sample preparation. Hg{sup 2+} has been added to different reference materials in the form of enriched stable tracers and the formation of new methylmercury from that tracer has been analyzed by HPLC/ICP-MS and GC/ICP-MS. Both techniques gave comparable results. In particular, the distillation technique was prone to artifact formation. The resulting overestimation of methylmercury in sediments was as high as 80%. Artifact formation in hair, liver and algae samples was less significant, though still observable. Fish muscle tissue showed no artifact formation upon distillation, but some of the inorganic tracer was converted to methylmercury during alkaline extraction. Acid extraction of sediments resulted in low artifact formation rates. Fractionated measurements of sediment distillates revealed high methylmercury formation rates towards the end of the distillation process when acid concentrations in the solution are highest. A technique for correction of the measured apparent methylmercury content applying species specific isotope addition (SSIA) is proposed and the calculation scheme is presented. (orig.). With 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Interaction of actinides with natural microporous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misaelides, P.; Godelirsas, A.

    1998-01-01

    The existing studies mainly concern the sorption of thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium from aqueous media by clay minerals and zeolites as well as the determination of the corresponding chemical processes taking place at the mineral-water interface. The investigation techniques applied for this purpose include, except the conventional wet-chemical and radiochemical methods, advanced spectroscopic methods such as extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS), Rutherford Backscattered Spectroscopy (RBS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman Spectroscopy. These techniques significantly contribute to the characterization of the reacted mineral waters and to the explanation of the structural and compositional characteristics of the sorbed actinide species. Theoretical models regarding the aqueous chemistry and speciation of the actinides have also been developed aiming the elucidation of the complex actinide sorption mechanisms. This contribution will critically review of the existing literature, present recently obtained unpublished results and discuss the necessity of future work in the field. (authors)

  9. Neutron scattering studies of the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lander, G.H.

    1979-01-01

    The electronic structure of actinide materials presents a unique example of the interplay between localized and band electrons. Together with a variety of other techniques, especially magnetization and the Mossbauer effect, neutron studies have helped us to understand the systematics of many actinide compounds that order magnetically. A direct consequence of the localization of 5f electrons is the spin-orbit coupling and subsequent spin-lattice interaction that often leads to strongly anisotropic behavior. The unusual phase transition in UO 2 , for example, arises from interactions between quadrupole moments. On the other hand, in the monopnictides and monochalcogenides, the anisotropy is more difficult to understand, but probably involves an interaction between actinide and anion wave functions. A variety of neutron experiments, including form-factor studies, critical scattering and measurements of the elementary excitations have now been performed, and the conceptual picture emerging from these studies will be discussed

  10. Monazite as a suitable actinide waste form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlenz, Hartmut; Heuser, Julia; Schmitz, Stephan; Bosbach, Dirk [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie und Klimaforschung (IEK), Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6); Neumann, Andreas [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie und Klimaforschung (IEK), Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6); RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Crystallography

    2013-03-01

    The conditioning of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants and in some countries even of weapons plutonium is an important issue for science and society. Therefore the research on appropriate matrices for the immobilization of fission products and actinides is of great interest. Beyond the widely used borosilicate glasses, ceramics are promising materials for the conditioning of actinides like U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm. Monazite-type ceramics with general composition LnPO{sub 4} (Ln = La to Gd) and solid solutions of monazite with cheralite or huttonite represent important materials in this field. Monazite appears to be a promising candidate material, especially because of its outstanding properties regarding radiation resistance and chemical durability. This article summarizes the most recent results concerning the characterization of monazite and respective solid solutions and the study of their chemical, thermal, physical and structural properties. The aim is to demonstrate the suitability of monazite as a secure and reliable waste form for actinides. (orig.)

  11. Research on Actinides in Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kyu Seok; Park, Yong Joon; Cho, Young Hwan

    2010-04-01

    The electrochemical/spectroscopic integrated measurement system was designed and set up for spectro-electrochemical measurements of lanthanide and actinide ions in high temperature molten salt media. A compact electrochemical cell and electrode system was also developed for the minimization of reactants, and consequently minimization of radioactive waste generation. By applying these equipment, oxidation and reduction behavior of lanthanide and actinide ions in molten salt media have been made. Also, thermodynamic parameter values are determined by interpreting the results obtained from electrochemical measurements. Several lanthanide ions exhibited fluorescence properties in molten salt. Also, UV-VIS measurement provided the detailed information regarding the oxidation states of lanthanide and actinide ions in high temperature molten salt media

  12. Research on Actinides in Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kyu Seok; Park, Yong Joon; Cho, Young Hwan

    2010-04-15

    The electrochemical/spectroscopic integrated measurement system was designed and set up for spectro-electrochemical measurements of lanthanide and actinide ions in high temperature molten salt media. A compact electrochemical cell and electrode system was also developed for the minimization of reactants, and consequently minimization of radioactive waste generation. By applying these equipment, oxidation and reduction behavior of lanthanide and actinide ions in molten salt media have been made. Also, thermodynamic parameter values are determined by interpreting the results obtained from electrochemical measurements. Several lanthanide ions exhibited fluorescence properties in molten salt. Also, UV-VIS measurement provided the detailed information regarding the oxidation states of lanthanide and actinide ions in high temperature molten salt media

  13. Ground-state electronic structure of actinide monocarbides and mononitrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation is used to investigate the ground-state valency configuration of the actinide ions in the actinide monocarbides, AC (A=U,Np,Pu,Am,Cm), and the actinide mononitrides, AN. The electronic structure is characterized by a gradually increa...

  14. AMS detection of actinides at high mass separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steier, Peter; Lachner, Johannes; Priller, Alfred; Winkler, Stephan; Golser, Robin [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna (Austria); Eigl, Rosmarie [Hiroshima University, Earth and Planetary Systems Science, Hiroshima (Japan); Quinto, Francesca [Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung, KIT, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sakaguchi, Aya [University of Tsukuba, Center for Research in Isotopes and Environmental Dynamics, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2015-07-01

    AMS is the mass spectrometric method with the highest abundance sensitivity, which is a prerequisite for measurement of the long-lived radioisotope {sup 236}U (t{sub 1/2}=23.4 million years). The most successful application so far is oceanography, since anthropogenic {sup 236}U is present in the world oceans at {sup 236}U:{sup 238}U from 10{sup -11} to 10{sup -8}. We have explored methods to increase the sensitivity and thus to reduce the water volume required to 1 L or less, which significantly reduces the sampling effort. High sensitivity is also necessary to address the expected typical natural isotopic ratios on the order {sup 236}U:{sup 238}U = 10{sup -13}, with potential applications in geology. With a second 90 analyzer magnet and a new Time-of-Flight beam line, VERA is robust against chemical impurities in the background, which e.g. allows measuring Pu isotopes directly in a uranium matrix. This simplifies chemical sample preparation for actinide detection, and may illustrate why AMS reaches lower detection limits than other mass spectrometric methods with nominally higher detection efficiency.

  15. The Interrelationship of pCO2, Soil Moisture Content, and Biomass Fertilization Expressed in the Carbon Isotope Signature of C3 Plant Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, B.; Jahren, A. H.

    2017-12-01

    Hundreds of chamber and field experiments have shown an increase in C3 plant biomass in response to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO2); however, secondary water and nutrient deficits are thought to limit this response. Some have hypothesized that secondary limitation might be self-alleviating under elevated pCO2 as greater root biomass imparts enhanced access to water and nutrients. Here we present results of growth chamber experiments designed to test this hypothesis: we grew 206 Arabidopsis thaliana plants within 5 growth chambers, each set at a different level of pCO2: 390, 685, 1075, 1585, and 2175 ppmv. Within each growth chamber, soil moisture content (θm) was maintained across a spectrum: 1.50, 0.83, 0.44, and 0.38 g g-1. After 3 weeks of total growth, tissues were analyzed for both biomass and net carbon isotope discrimination (Δ13C) value. From these values, we calculated Δresidual, which represents the residual effect of water stress after subtraction of the effect of pCO2 due to photorespiration. Across the full range of moisture content, Δresidual displayed a significant 2.5‰ increase with increasing pCO2. This further implies a 0.1 unit increase in ci/ca, consistent with decreased water stress at elevated pCO2. The influence of CO2 fertilization on the alleviation of water stress was further evidenced in a positive correlation between percent biomass change and Δresidual, such that a doubling of plant biomass yielded a 1.85‰ increase in carbon isotope discrimination. In addition to providing new insight into water uptake in plants growing under elevated carbon dioxide, these data underscore the importance of separating the effects of increased pCO2 (via photorespiration) and altered ci/ca (via stomatal conductance) when considering changes in the Δ13C value of C3 land plants during the Anthropocene, or across any geological period that includes a marked change in global carbon cycling.

  16. Sequential analysis of selected actinides in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, G.H.

    1980-07-01

    The monitoring of personnel by urinalysis for suspected contamination by actinides necessitated the development and implementation of an analytical scheme that will separate and identify alpha emitting radionuclides of these elements. The present work deals with Pu, Am, and Th. These elements are separated from an ashed urine sample by means of coprecipitation and ion exchange techniques. The final analysis is carried out by electroplating the actinides and counting in a α-spectrometer. Mean recoveries of these elements from urine are: Pu 64%, Am 74% and Th 69%. (auth)

  17. Aqueous actinide complexes: A thermochemical assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuger, J.; Khodakovsky, I.L.; Medvedev, V.A.; Navratil, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    The scope and purpose of an assessment of the thermodynamic properties of the aqueous actinide complexes are presented. This work which, at present, is limited to inorganic ligands and three selected organic ligands (formate, acetate and oxalate), is part of an effort established by the International Atomic Energy Agency to assess the thermodynamic properties of the actinides and their compounds. The problems involved in this work are illustrated by discussing the present status of the assessment as related to a few complex species, (hydroxyl-, fluoride-, carbonate complexes). (orig.) [de

  18. Actinide elements in aquatic and terrestrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondietti, E.A.; Bogle, M.A.; Brantley, J.N.

    1979-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: water-sediment interactions of U, Pu, Am, and Cm; relative availability of actinide elements from abiotic to aquatic biota; comparative uptake of transuranic elements by biota bordering Pond 3513; metabolic reduction of 239 Np from Np(V) to Np(IV) in cotton rats; evaluation of hazards associated with transuranium releases to the biosphere; predicting Pu in bone; adsorption--solubility--complexation phenomena in actinide partitioning between sorbents and solution; comparative soil extraction data; and comparative plant uptake data

  19. Hydrothermal processing of actinide contaminated organic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worl, A.; Buelow, S.J.; Le, L.A.; Padilla, D.D.; Roberts, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrothermal oxidation is an innovative process for the destruction of organic wastes, that occurs above the critical temperature and pressure of water. The process provides high destruction and removal efficiencies for a wide variety of organic and hazardous substances. For aqueous/organic mixtures, organic materials, and pure organic liquids hydrothermal processing removes most of the organic and nitrate components (>99.999%) and facilitates the collection and separation of the actinides. We have designed, built and tested a hydrothermal processing unit for the removal of the organic and hazardous substances from actinide contaminated liquids and solids. Here we present results for the organic generated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility

  20. Actinide phosphonate complexes in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    Complexes formed by actinides with carboxylic acids, polycarboxylic acids, and aminopolycarboxylic acids play a central role in both the basic and process chemistry of the actinides. Recent studies of f-element complexes with phosphonic acid ligands indicate that new ligands incorporating doubly ionizable phosphonate groups (-PO 3 H 2 ) have many properties which are unique chemically, and promise more efficient separation processes for waste cleanup and environmental restoration. Simple diphosphonate ligands form much stronger complexes than isostructural carboxylates, often exhibiting higher solubility as well. In this manuscript recent studies of the thermodynamics and kinetics of f-element complexation by 1,1 and 1,2 diphosphonic acid ligands are described

  1. A worldwide perspective on actinide burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    Worldwide interest has been evident over the past few years in reexamining the merits of recovering the actinides from spent light-water reactor (LWR) fuel and transmuting them in fast reactors to reduce hazards in geologic repositories. This paper will summarize some of the recent activities in this field. Several countries are embarked on programs of reprocessing and vitrification of present wastes, from which removal of the actinides is largely precluded. The United States is assessing the ideas related to the fast reactor program and the potential application to defense wastes. 18 refs., 2 figs

  2. Molecular dynamics studies of actinide nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Ken; Uno, Masayoshi; Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Minato, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) calculation was performed for actinide nitrides (UN, NpN, and PuN) in the temperature range from 300 to 2800 K to evaluate the physical properties viz., the lattice parameter, thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility, and heat capacity. The Morse-type potential function added to the Busing-Ida type potential was employed for the ionic interactions. The interatomic potential parameters were determined by fitting to the experimental data of the lattice parameter. The usefulness and applicability of the MD method to evaluate the physical properties of actinide nitrides were studied. (author)

  3. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-07-01

    The second international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois United States, on 11-13 November 1992. The proceedings are presented in four sessions: Current strategic system of actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, progress in R and D on partitioning processes wet and dry, progress in R and D on transmutation and refinements of neutronic and other data, development of the fuel cycle processes fuel types and targets. (A.L.B.)

  4. Static and dynamic deformations of actinide nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozmej, P.

    1985-09-01

    The zero-point quadrupole-hexadecapole vibrations have been taken into account to calculate dynamical deformations for even-even actinide nuclei. The collective and intrinsic motions are separated according to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The collective Hamiltonian is constructed using the macroscopic-microscopic method in the potential energy part and the cranking model in the kinetic energy part. The BCS theory with a modified oscillator potential is applied to describe the intrinsic motion of nucleons. A new set of Nilsson potential parameters, which produces a much better description of the properties of light actinide nuclei, has also been found. (orig.)

  5. Spin–orbit coupling in actinide cations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Martin, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The limiting case of Russell–Saunders coupling, which leads to a maximum spin alignment for the open shell electrons, usually explains the properties of high spin ionic crystals with transition metals. For actinide compounds, the spin–orbit splitting is large enough to cause a significantly reduced...... spin alignment. Novel concepts are used to explain the dependence of the spin alignment on the 5f shell occupation. We present evidence that the XPS of ionic actinide materials may provide direct information about the angular momentum coupling within the 5f shell....

  6. In-beam study of the rotational states in actinides after alpha-induced nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardt, K.

    1983-01-01

    In the experiments described in this thesis the ground state rotational bands of a whole series of actinide isotopes has been studied by means of α-induced nuclear reactions. The rotational bands studied in the even isotopes could be identified up to a spin of about 16 (h/2π). With this data it was now possible to establish a broad systematic of the rotational energies up to relatively high angular momenta. Also in the odd isotopes 233 U and 239 Pu it was possible to follow the ground state rotational bands up to higher spins and to compare them with predictions of the rotational model. By means of the (α,α'2n) reaction the nuclei 230 Th and especially 228 Th could by populated. (orig./HSI) [de

  7. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) of actinides: Pushing the limits of accuracy and detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerger, Stefan; Boulyga, Sergei; Cunningham, Alan; Klose, Dilani; Koepf, Andreas; Poths, Jane [Safeguards Analytical Laboratory, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Richter, Stephan [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, JRC-EU, Geel (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    New method developments in multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS) for actinide isotope ratio analysis to improve accuracy and limits of detection will be presented. With respect to limits of detection, results on improving work function using various carbon additives will be reviewed and presented as well as developments in cavity ion source (as compared to standard flat ribbon filament ion source) for femto- and attogram levels of uranium, plutonium, and americium. With respect to accuracy, results on isotope ratio measurements of isotopes of uranium (relative accuracy of 0.3% to 0.01%) are presented with an example being U-234-Th-230 age-dating (NBL CRM 112-A). In this context, the importance of traceability (to the S.I. units) and the use of (certified) reference materials are emphasized. The focus of this presentation is on applications to nuclear safeguards / forensics.

  8. Selective Separation of Trivalent Actinides from Lanthanides by Aqueous Processing with Introduction of Soft Donor Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, Kenneth L.; Clark, Sue B.; Lumetta, Gregg

    2009-01-01

    With increased application of MOX fuels and longer burnup times for conventional fuels, higher concentrations of the transplutonium actinides Am and Cm (and even heavier species like Bk and Cf) will be produced. The half-lives of the Am isotopes are significantly longer than those of the most important long-lived, high specific activity lanthanides or the most common Cm, Bk and Cf isotopes, thus the greatest concern as regards long-term radiotoxicity. With the removal and transmutation of Am isotopes, radiation levels of high level wastes are reduced to near uranium mineral levels within less than 1000 years as opposed to the time-fram if they remain in the wastes.

  9. Build-up of actinides in irradiated fuel rods of the ET-RR-1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adib, M.; Naguib, K.; Morcos, H.N

    2001-09-01

    The content concentrations of actinides are calculated as a function of operating reactor regime and cooling time at different percentage of fuel burn-up. The build-up transmutation equations of actinides content in an irradiated fuel are solved numerically .A computer code BAC was written to operate on a PC computer to provide the required calculations. The fuel element of 10% {sup 235}U enrichment of ET-RR-1 reactor was taken as an example for calculations using the BAC code. The results are compared with other calculations for the ET-RR-1 fuel rod. An estimation of fissile build-up content of a proposed new fuel of 20% {sup 235}U enrichment for ET-RR-1 reactor is given. The sensitivity coefficients of build-up plutonium concentrations as a function of cross-section data uncertainties are also calculated.

  10. Transmutation of waste actinides in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorrell, T.C.

    1979-04-01

    Actinide recycle and transmutation calculations were made for three irradiation options of a light water reactor (LWR). The cases considered were: all actinides recycled in regular uranium fuel assemblies; transuranic actinides recycled in separate MOX assemblies with 235 U enrichment of uranium; and transuranic actinides recycled in separate MOX assemblies with plutonium enrichment of natural uranium. When all actinides were recycled in a uniform lattice, the transuranic inventory after ten recycles was 38% of the inventory accumulated without recycle. When the transuranics from two regular uranium assemblies were combined with those recycled from a MOX assembly, the transuranic inventory was reduced 50% after five recycles

  11. Chemical compatibility of HLW borosilicate glasses with actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, C.T.; Scheffler, K.; Riege, U.

    1978-11-01

    During liquid storage of HLLW the formation of actinide enriched sludges is being expected. Also during melting of HLW glasses an increase of top-to-bottom actinide concentrations can take place. Both effects have been studied. Besides, the vitrification of plutonium enriched wastes from Pu fuel element fabrication plants has been investigated with respect to an isolated vitrification process or a combined one with the HLLW. It is shown that the solidification of actinides from HLLW and actinide waste concentrates will set no principal problems. The leaching of actinides has been measured in salt brine at 23 0 C and 115 0 C. (orig.) [de

  12. Actinide recycle in LMFBRs as a waste management alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaman, S.L.

    1979-01-01

    A strategy of actinide burnup in fast reactor systems has been investigated as an approach for reducing the long term hazards and storage requirements of the actinide waste elements and their decay daughters. The actinide recycle studies also included plutonium burnup studies in the event that plutonium is no longer required as a fuel. Particular emphasis was placed upon the timing of the recycle program, the requirements for separability of the waste materials, and the impact of the actinides on the reactor operations and performance. It is concluded that actinide recycle and plutonium burnout are attractive alternative waste management concepts. 25 refs., 14 figs., 34 tabs

  13. Transmutation of LWR waste actinides in thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorrell, T.C.

    1979-01-01

    Recycle of actinides to a reactor for transmutation to fission products is being considered as a possible means of waste disposal. Actinide transmutation calculations were made for two irradiation options in a thermal (LWR) reactor. The cases considered were: all actinides recycled in regular uranium fuel assemblies, and transuranic actinides recycled in separate mixed oxide (MOX) assemblies. When all actinides were recycled in a uranium lattice, a reduction of 62% in the transuranic inventory was achieved after 10 recycles, compared to the inventory accumulated without recycle. When the transuranics from 2 regular uranium assemblies were combined with those recycled from a MOX assembly, the transuranic inventory was reduced 50% after 5 recycles

  14. Report on the IAEA coordinated research programme on the intercomparison of evaluations of actinide neutron nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiftah, S.

    1979-03-01

    Following discussions and Consultants Meeting in 1976, the IAEA, in response to recommendations made formed two coordinated research projects (CRP): one on the Intercomparison of Evaluations of Actinide Neutron Nuclear Data, the other on the Measurement and Evaluation of Transactinium Isotope Nuclear Decay Data. This report covers work done, and to be done, in the framework of the first CRP, as well as some of the practical problems for future work. (B.G.)

  15. Heterogeneous all actinide recycling in LWR all actinide cycle closure concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tondinelli, Luciano

    1980-01-01

    A project for the elimination of transuranium elements (Waste Actinides, WA) by neutron transmutation is developed in a commercial BWR with U-Pu (Fuel Actinides, FA) recycle. The project is based on the All Actinide Cycle Closure concept: 1) closure of the 'back end' of the fuel cycle, U-Pu coprocessing, 2) waste actinide disposal by neutron transmutation. The reactor core consists of Pu-island fuel assemblies containing WAs in target pins. Two parallel reprocessing lines for FAs and WAs are provided. Mass balance, hazard measure, spontaneous activity during 10 recycles are calculated. Conclusions are: the reduction in All Actinide inventory achieved by Heterogeneous All Actinide Recycling is on the order of 83% after 10 recycles. The U235 enrichment needed for a constant end of cycle reactivity decreases for increasing number of recycles after the 4th recycle. A diffusion-burnup calculation of the pin power peak factors in the fuel assembly shows that design limits can be satisfied. A strong effort should be devoted to the solution of the problems related to high values of spontaneous emission by the target pins

  16. Calculated investigation of actinide transmutation in the BOR-60 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhemkov, I.Yu.; Ishunina, O.V.; Yakovleva, I.V.

    2000-01-01

    One of the prospective actinide burner reactor type is the fast reactor with a 'hard' spectrum and small breeding factor, which is the BOR-60. The calculated investigations demonstrate that Loading up to 40% of minor-actinides to the BOR-60 reactor did not lead to the considerable change of neutron-physical characteristics. The performed calculations show that the BOR- 60 reactor possesses a high efficiency of the minor-actinide and plutonium bum-up (up to 37 kg/(TW · h)) hat is comparable with properties of the actinide burner-reactors under design. The BOR-60 reactor can provide a homogeneous minor-actinide Loading (minor-actinide addition to the standard fuel) to the core and heterogeneous Loading (as separate assemblies-targets with a high minor-actinide fraction) to the first rows of a radial blanket that allows the optimum usage of the reactor and its characteristics. (authors)

  17. Trends in actinide processing at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, H.D.

    1993-09-01

    In 1989, the mission at the Hanford Site began a dramatic and sometimes painful transition. The days of production--as we used to know it--are over. Our mission officially has become waste management and environmental cleanup. This mission change didn't eliminate many jobs--in fact, budgets have grown dramatically to support the new mission. Most all of the same skilled crafts, engineers, and scientists are still required for the new mission. This change has not eliminated the need for actinide processing, but it has certainly changed the focus that our actinide chemists and process engineers have. The focus used to be on such things as increasing capacity, improving separations efficiency, and product purity. Minimizing waste had become a more important theme in recent years and it is still a very important concept in the waste management and environmental cleanup arena. However, at Hanford, a new set of words dominates the actinide process scene as we work to deal with actinides that still reside in a variety of forms at the Hanford Site. These words are repackage, stabilize, remove, store and dispose. Some key activities in each of these areas are described in this report

  18. Report of the panel on inhaled actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: assessment of risks to man of inhaling actinides; use of estimates for developing protection standards; epidemiology of lung cancer in exposed human populations; development of respiratory tract models; and effects in animals: dose- and effect-modifying factors

  19. Actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The third international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation, took place in Cadarache France, on 12-14 December 1994. The proceedings are presented in six sessions : an introduction session, the major programmes and international cooperation, the systems studies, the reactors fuels and targets, the chemistry and a last discussions session. (A.L.B.)

  20. Placental transfer of plutonium and other actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griessl, I.; Stieve, F.E.

    1988-10-01

    The report is based on an extensive literature search. All data available from studies on placental transfer of plutonium and other actinides in man and animals have been collected and analysed, and the report presents the significant results as well as unresolved questions and knowledge gaps which may serve as a waypost to future research work. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Partitioning and Transmutation of minor actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, L.; Wellum, R.

    1991-01-01

    The partitioning of minor actinides from spent fuels and their transmutation into short-lived fission products has been the topic of two dedicated meetings organized jointly by the European Commission and the OECD. The conclusion of the last meeting in 1980, in short, was that partitioning and transmutation of minor actinides, especially in fast reactors, seemed possible. However, the incentive, which would be a reduction of the radiological hazard to the public, was too small if long-lived fission products were not included. Furthermore this meeting showed that minor actinide targets or possible nuclear fuels containing minor actinides for transmutation had not yet been developed. The European Institute for Transuranium Elements took up this task and has carried it out as a small activity for several years. Interests expressed recently by an expert meeting of the OECD/NEA (Paris, 25 April 1989), which was initiated by the proposed Japanese project Omega, led us to the conclusion that the present state of knowledge should be looked at in a workshop environment. Since the Japanese proposal within the project Omega is based on a broader approach we needed this evaluation to assess the relevance of our present activity and wanted to identifiy additional studies which might be needed to cover possible future demands from the public. This workshop was therefore organized, and participants active in the field from EC countries, the USA and Japan were invited

  2. Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Ankita; Tomar, B.S.

    2016-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is a process akin to liquid-liquid or solvent extraction where a Supercritical fluid (SCF) is contacted with a solid/ liquid matrix for the purpose of separating the component of interest from the original matrix. Carbon dioxide is a preferred choice as supercritical fluid (SCF) owing to its moderate critical parameter (P c = 7.38 MPa and T c = 304.1K) coupled with radiation and chemical stability, non toxic nature and low cost. Despite widespread applications for extraction of organic compounds and associated advantages especially liquid waste minimization, the SFE of metal ions was left unexplored for quite some time, as direct metal ion extraction is inefficient due charge neutralization requirement and weak solute-solvent interaction. Neutral SCF soluble metal-ligand complexation is imperative and SFE of actinides was reported only in 1994. Several studies have been carried out on SFE of uranium, thorium and plutonium from nitric acid medium employing different sets of ligands (organophosphorus, diketones, amides). Especially attractive is the possibility of direct dissolution and extraction of actinides employing ligand-acid adducts (like TBP.HNO 3 adduct) from solid matrices of different stages of nuclear fuel cycle viz. ores, spent nuclear fuels and radioactive wastes. Also, partitioning of actinides from fission products has been explored in spent nuclear fuel. These studies on supercritical fluid extraction of actinides indicate a more efficient and environmentally sustainable technology. (author)

  3. Possibilities of production of neutron-rich Md isotopes in multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Myeong-Hwan; Lee, Young-Ouk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institue, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Adamian, G.G.; Antonenko, N.V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The possibilities of production of yet unknown neutron-rich isotopes of Md are explored in several multi-nucleon transfer reactions with actinide targets and stable and radioactive beams. The projectile-target combinations and bombarding energies are suggested to produce new neutron-rich isotopes of Md in future experiments. (orig.)

  4. ACTINET: a European Network for Actinide Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard Boullis; Pascal Chaix

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The research in Actinide sciences appear as a strategic issue for the future of nuclear systems. Sustainability issues are clearly in connection with the way actinide elements are managed (either addressing saving natural resource, or decreasing the radiotoxicity of the waste). The recent developments in the field of minor actinide P and T offer convincing indications of what could be possible options, possible future processes for the selective recovery of minor actinides. But they point out, too, some lacks in the basic understanding of key-issues (such as for instance the control An versus Ln selectivity, or solvation phenomena in organic phases). Such lacks could be real obstacles for an optimization of future processes, with new fuel compounds and facing new recycling strategies. This is why a large and sustainable work appears necessary, here in the field of basic actinide separative chemistry. And similar examples could be taken from other aspects of An science, for various applications (nuclear fuel or transmutation targets design, or migration issues,): future developments need a strong, enlarged, scientific basis. The Network ACTINET, established with the support of the European Commission, has the following objectives: - significantly improve the accessibility of the major actinide facilities to the European scientific community, and form a set of pooled facilities, as the corner-stone of a progressive integration process, - improve mobility between the member organisations, in particular between Academic Institutions and National Laboratories holding the pooled facilities, - merge part of the research programs conducted by the member institutions, and optimise the research programs and infrastructure policy via joint management procedures, - strengthen European excellence through a selection process of joint proposals, and reduce the fragmentation of the community by putting critical mass of resources and expertise on

  5. Citrate-based open-quotes Talspeakclose quotes actinide-lanthanide separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Cul, G.D.; Toth, L.M.; Bond, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    Lanthanide elements are produced in relatively high yield by fission of 235 U. Almost all the lanthanide isotopes decay to stable nonradioactive lanthanide isotopes in a relatively short time. Consequently, it is highly advantageous to separate the relatively small actinide fraction from the relatively large quantities of lanthanide isotopes. The TALSPEAK process (Trivalent Actinide Lanthanide Separations by Phosphorus-reagent Extraction from Aqueous Complexes) is one of the few means available to separate the trivalent actinides from the lanthanides. Previous work based on the use of lactic or glycolic acid has shown deleterious effects of some impurity ions such as zirconium(IV), even at concentrations on the order of 10 -4 M. Other perceived problems were the need to maintain the pH and reagent concentrations within a narrow range and a significant solubility of the organic phase at high carboxylic acid concentrations. The authors' cold experiments showed that replacing the traditional extractants glycolic or lactic acid with citric acid eliminates or greatly reduces the deleterious effects produced by impurities such as zirconium. An extensive series of batch tests was done using a wide range of reagent concentrations at different pH values, temperatures, and contact times. The results demonstrated that the citrate-based TALSPEAK can tolerate appreciable changes in pH and reagent concentrations while maintaining an adequate lanthanide extraction. Experiments using a three-stage glass mixer-settler showed a good lanthanide extraction, appropriate phase disengagement, no appreciable deleterious effects due to the presence of impurities such as zirconium, excellent pH buffering, and no significant loss of organic phase

  6. Herbivory of Omnivorous Fish Shapes the Food Web Structure of a Chinese Tropical Eutrophic Lake: Evidence from Stable Isotope and Fish Gut Content Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies suggest that, unlike the situation in temperate lakes, high biomasses of omnivorous fish are maintained in subtropical and tropical lakes when they shift from a turbid phytoplankton-dominated state to a clear water macrophyte-dominated state, and the predation pressure on large-bodied zooplankton therefore remains high. Whether this reflects a higher degree of herbivory in warm lakes than in temperate lakes is debatable. We combined food web studies using stable isotopes with gut content analyses of the most dominant fish species to elucidate similarities and differences in food web structure between a clear water macrophyte-dominated basin (MDB and a turbid phytoplankton-dominated basin (PDB of Huizhou West Lake, a shallow tropical Chinese lake. The δ13C–δ15N biplot of fish and invertebrates revealed community-wide differences in isotope-based metrics of the food webs between MDB and PDB. The range of consumer δ15N (NR was lower in MDB than in PDB, indicating shorter food web length in MDB. The mean nearest neighbor distance (MNND and standard deviation around MNND (SDNND were higher in MDB than in PDB, showing a markedly low fish trophic overlap and a more uneven packing of species in niches in MDB than in PDB. The range of fish δ13C (CR of consumers was more extensive in MDB than in PDB, indicating a wider feeding range for fish in MDB. Mixing model results showed that macrophytes and associated periphyton constituted a large fraction of basal production sources for the fish in MDB, while particulate organic matter (POM contributed a large fraction in PDB. In MDB, the diet of the dominant fish species, crucian carp (Carassius carassius, consisted mainly of vegetal matter (macrophytes and periphyton and zooplankton, while detritus was the most important food item in PDB. Our results suggest that carbon from macrophytes with associated periphyton may constitute an important food resource for omnivorous fish, and this may strongly

  7. European Europart integrated project on actinide partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.; Hudson, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    This poster presents the objectives of EUROPART, a scientific integrated project between 24 European partners, mostly funded by the European Community within the FP6. EUROPART aims at developing chemical partitioning processes for the so-called minor actinides (MA) contained in nuclear wastes, i.e. from Am to Cf. In the case of dedicated spent fuels or targets, the actinides to be separated also include U, Pu and Np. The techniques considered for the separation of these radionuclides belong to the fields of hydrometallurgy and pyrometallurgy, as in the previous FP5 programs named PARTNEW and PYROREP. The two main axes of research within EUROPART will be: The partitioning of MA (from Am to Cf) from high burn-up UO x fuels and multi-recycled MOx fuels; the partitioning of the whole actinide family for recycling, as an option for advanced dedicated fuel cycles (and in connection with the studies to be performed in the EUROTRANS integrated project). In hydrometallurgy, the research is organised into five Work Packages (WP). Four WP are dedicated to the study of partitioning methods mainly based on the use of solvent extraction methods, one WP is dedicated to the development of actinide co-conversion methods for fuel or target preparation. The research in pyrometallurgy is organized into four WP, listed hereafter: development of actinide partitioning methods, study of the basic chemistry of trans-curium elements in molten salts, study of the conditioning of the wastes, some system studies. Moreover, a strong management team will be concerned not only with the technical and financial issues arising from EUROPART, but also with information, communication and benefits for Europe. Training and education of young researchers will also pertain to the project. EUROPART has also established collaboration with US DOE and Japanese CRIEPI. (authors)

  8. A new look at actinide recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, W.D.; Croff, A.G.; Rawlins, J.A.; Schulz, W.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will address the justification for reexamination of the value of recovering the minor actinides and certain fission products from spent light-water reactor fuels and describe some of the technical progress that has been made since the major studies of a decade ago. During this time, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have begun establishing detailed criteria and regulations for geologic repositories. An examination of the hazards of waste disposal relative to the EPA release standards reveals that removal of 99.9% of the actinides (Pu, Am, and Np) reduces these hazards quite close to the EPA standards after 300 years' decay of the strontium and cesium. It may be also useful to remove and separately manage and dispose of certain of the long-lived fission products, such as 99 Tc and 129 I. Much additional work is required to fully assess the appropriate target recoveries as the hazards and risks are more closely examined and as the standards are reworked and refined. The two decades before the projected start of the US repository may present a window of opportunity to introduce several better management practices that act to simplify the repository safety issues. From a technical standpoint, significant progress has been made on recovery of the actinides from aqueous wastes though use of the TRUEX process. Additional work is required to demonstrate the application of the process to spent LWR fuels, but it appears straightforward. In addition, work at the Argonne National Laboratory on the liquid-metal reactor metal fuel cycle shows the relative simplicity of recycle of the actinides in that fast reactor cycle. Much work remains to fully demonstrate that actinides from all secondary waste streams can be removed to the target levels from both the aqueous reprocessing of LWR fuel and the pyro processes for the metal-fueled fast reactor. 9 refs., 2 figs

  9. Synroc tailored waste forms for actinide immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregg, Daniel J.; Vance, Eric R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Kirrawee (Australia). ANSTOsynroc, Inst. of Materials Engineering

    2017-07-01

    Since the end of the 1970s, Synroc at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has evolved from a focus on titanate ceramics directed at PUREX waste to a platform waste treatment technology to fabricate tailored glass-ceramic and ceramic waste forms for different types of actinide, high- and intermediate level wastes. The particular emphasis for Synroc is on wastes which are problematic for glass matrices or existing vitrification process technologies. In particular, nuclear wastes containing actinides, notably plutonium, pose a unique set of requirements for a waste form, which Synroc ceramic and glass-ceramic waste forms can be tailored to meet. Key aspects to waste form design include maximising the waste loading, producing a chemically durable product, maintaining flexibility to accommodate waste variations, a proliferation resistance to prevent theft and diversion, and appropriate process technology to produce waste forms that meet requirements for actinide waste streams. Synroc waste forms incorporate the actinides within mineral phases, producing products which are much more durable in water than baseline borosilicate glasses. Further, Synroc waste forms can incorporate neutron absorbers and {sup 238}U which provide criticality control both during processing and whilst within the repository. Synroc waste forms offer proliferation resistance advantages over baseline borosilicate glasses as it is much more difficult to retrieve the actinide and they can reduce the radiation dose to workers compared to borosilicate glasses. Major research and development into Synroc at ANSTO over the past 40 years has included the development of waste forms for excess weapons plutonium immobilization in collaboration with the US and for impure plutonium residues in collaboration with the UK, as examples. With a waste loading of 40-50 wt.%, Synroc would also be considered a strong candidate as an engineered waste form for used nuclear fuel and highly

  10. Overall assessment of actinide partitioning and transmutation for waste management purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomeke, J.O.; Croff, A.G.; Finney, B.C.; Tedder, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    A program to establish the technical feasibility and incentives for partitioning (i.e., recovering) actinides from fuel cycle wastes and then transmuting them in power reactors to shorter-lived or stable nuclides has recently been concluded at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The feasibility was established by experimentally investigating the reduction that can be practicably achieved in the actinide content of the wastes sent to a geologic repository, and the incentives for implementing this concept were defined by determining the incremental costs, risks, and benefits. Eight US Department of Energy laboratories and three private companies participated in the program over its 3-year duration. A reference fuel cycle was chosen based on a self-generated plutonium recycle PWR, and chemical flowsheets based on solvent extraction and ion-exchange techniques were generated that have the potential to reduce actinides in fuel fabrication and reprocessing plant wastes to less than 0.25% of those in the spent fuel. Waste treatment facilities utilizing these flowsheets were designed conceptually, and their costs were estimated. Finally, the short-term (contemporary) risks from fuel cycle operations and long-term (future) risks from deep geologic disposal of the wastes were estimated for cases with and without partitioning and transmutation. It was concluded that, while both actinide partitioning from wastes and transmutation in power reactors appear to be feasible using currently identified and studied technology, implementation of this concept cannot be justified because of the small long-term benefits and substantially increased costs of the concept

  11. Effect of spectral characterization of gaseous fuel reactors on transmutation and burning of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, C.; Anghaie, S. [Florida Univ., Wilmington, NC (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Gaseous Core Reactors (GCR) are fueled with stable uranium compounds in a reflected cavity. The spectral characteristics of neutrons in GCR systems could shift from one end of the spectrum to the other end by changing design parameters such as reflector material and thickness, uranium enrichment, and the average operational temperature and pressure. The rate of actinide generation, transmutation, and burnup is highly influenced by the average neutron energy in reactor core. In particular, the production rate and isotopic mix of plutonium are highly dependent on the neutron spectrum in the reactor. Other actinides of primary interest to this work are neptunium-237 and americium-241 due to their pivotal impact on high-level nuclear waste disposal. In all cavity reactors including GCR's, the reflector material and thickness are the most important design parameters in determining the core spectrum. The increase in the gaseous fuel pressure and enrichment results in relative shift of neutron population toward energies greater than 2 eV. Reflector materials considered in this study are beryllium oxide, lithium hydride, lithium deuteride, zirconium carbide, graphite, lead, and tungsten. Results of the study suggest that the beryllium oxide and tungsten reflected GCR systems set the lower (softest) and upper (hardest) limits of neutron spectra, respectively. The inventory of actinides with half-lives greater than 1000 years can be minimized by increasing neutron flux level in the reactor core. The higher the neutron flux, the lower the inventory of these actinides. The majority of the GCR designs maintained a flux level on the order of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}*s{sup -1} while the PWR flux is one order of magnitude lower. The inventory of the feeder isotopes to Np{sup 237} including U{sup 237}, Pu{sup 241}, and Am{sup 241} decreases with relative shift of neutron spectrum toward higher energies. This is due to increased resonance absorption in these isotopes due to higher

  12. Characterization and development of an active scintillating target for nuclear reaction studies on actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belier, Gilbert, E-mail: gilbert.belier@cea.fr [CEA, DAM, DIF, DPTA, Centre du Grand Rue, 91297 Arpajon (France); Aupiais, Jean; Varignon, Cyril; Vayre, Sylvain [CEA, DAM, DIF, DPTA, Centre du Grand Rue, 91297 Arpajon (France)

    2012-02-01

    This article presents the development of a new kind of active actinide target, based on organic liquid scintillators containing the dissolved isotope. Amongst many advantages one can mention the very high detection efficiency, the Pulse Shape Discrimination capability, the fast response allowing high count rates and good time resolution and the ease of fabrication. The response of this target to fission fragments has been studied. The discrimination of alpha, fission and proton recoil events is demonstrated. The alpha decay and fission detection efficiencies are simulated and compared to measurements. Finally the use of such a target in the context of fast neutron induced reactions is discussed.

  13. Characterization and development of an active scintillating target for nuclear reaction studies on actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belier, Gilbert; Aupiais, Jean; Varignon, Cyril; Vayre, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the development of a new kind of active actinide target, based on organic liquid scintillators containing the dissolved isotope. Amongst many advantages one can mention the very high detection efficiency, the Pulse Shape Discrimination capability, the fast response allowing high count rates and good time resolution and the ease of fabrication. The response of this target to fission fragments has been studied. The discrimination of alpha, fission and proton recoil events is demonstrated. The alpha decay and fission detection efficiencies are simulated and compared to measurements. Finally the use of such a target in the context of fast neutron induced reactions is discussed.

  14. Enhancing VVER annular proliferation resistance fuel with minor actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, G. S.

    2007-01-01

    Key aspects of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to significantly advance the science and technology of nuclear energy systems and the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC) program. It consists of both innovative nuclear reactors and innovative research in separation and transmutation. To accomplish these goals, international cooperation is very important and public acceptance is crucial. The merits of nuclear energy are high-density energy, with low environmental impacts (i.e. almost zero greenhouse gas emission). Planned efforts involve near term and intermediate-term improvements in fuel utilization and recycling in current light water reactors (LWRs) as well as the longer-term development of new nuclear energy systems that offer much improved fuel utilization and proliferation resistance, along with continued advances in operational safety. The challenges are solving the energy needs of the world, protection against nuclear proliferation, the problem of nuclear waste, and the global environmental problem. To reduce spent fuel for storage and enhance the proliferation resistance for the intermediate-term, there are two major approaches (a) increase the discharged spent fuel burnup in the advanced LWR (Gen-III Plus), which not only can reduce the spent fuel for storage, but also increase the 2 38Pu and 2 40Pu isotopes ratio to enhance the proliferation resistance, and (b) use of transuranic nuclides ( 2 37Np and 2 41Am) in the high burnup fuel, which can drastically increase the proliferation resistance isotope ratio of 2 38Pu /Pu. For future advanced nuclear systems, the minor actinides (MA) are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, or transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply as a waste stream to be disposed of in expensive repository facilities. As a result, MAs play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors

  15. Enhancing BWR proliferation resistance fuel with minor actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Gray S.

    2009-03-01

    To reduce spent fuel for storage and enhance the proliferation resistance for the intermediate-term, there are two major approaches (a) increase the discharged spent fuel burnup in the advanced light water reactor- LWR (Gen-III Plus), which not only can reduce the spent fuel for storage, but also increase the 238Pu isotopes ratio to enhance the proliferation resistance, and (b) use of transuranic nuclides ( 237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel, which can drastically increase the proliferation resistance isotope ratio of 238Pu/Pu. For future advanced nuclear systems, minor actinides (MA) are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, and transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply disposed of as a waste stream in an expensive repository facility. As a result, MAs play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the reactivity control of the systems into which they are incorporated. In the study, a typical boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel unit lattice cell model with UO 2 fuel pins will be used to investigate the effectiveness of minor actinide reduction approach (MARA) for enhancing proliferation resistance and improving the fuel cycle performance in the intermediate-term goal for future nuclear energy systems. To account for the water coolant density variation from the bottom (0.76 g/cm 3) to the top (0.35 g/cm 3) of the core, the axial coolant channel and fuel pin were divided to 24 nodes. The MA transmutation characteristics at different elevations were compared and their impact on neutronics criticality discussed. The concept of MARA, which involves the use of transuranic nuclides ( 237Np and/or 241Am), significantly increases the 238Pu/Pu ratio for proliferation resistance, as well as serves as a burnable absorber to hold-down the initial excess reactivity. It is believed that MARA can play an important role in

  16. The reprocessing-recycling of spent nuclear fuel. Actinides separation - Application to wastes management; Le traitement-recyclage du combustible nucleaire use. La separation des actinides - Application a la gestion des dechets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    After its use in the reactor, the spent fuel still contains lot of recoverable material for an energetic use (uranium, plutonium), but also fission products and minor actinides which represent the residues of nuclear reactions. The reprocessing-recycling of the spent fuel, as it is performed in France, implies the chemical separation of these materials. The development and the industrial implementation of this separation process represent a major contribution of the French science and technology. The reprocessing-recycling allows a good management of nuclear wastes and a significant saving of fissile materials. With the recent spectacular rise of uranium prices, this process will become indispensable with the development of the next generation of fast neutron reactors. This book takes stock of the present and future variants of the chemical process used for the reprocessing of spent fuels. It describes the researches in progress and presents the stakes and recent results obtained by the CEA. content: the separation of actinides, a key factor for a sustainable nuclear energy; the actinides, a discovery of the 20. century; the radionuclides in nuclear fuels; the aquo ions of actinides; some redox properties of actinides; some complexing properties of actinide cations; general considerations about treatment processes; some characteristics of nuclear fuels in relation with their reprocessing; technical goals and specific constraints of the PUREX process; front-end operations of the PUREX process; separation and purification operations of the PUREX process; elaboration of finite products in the framework of the PUREX process; management and treatment of liquid effluents; solid wastes of the PUREX process; towards a joint management of uranium and plutonium: the COEX{sup TM} process; technical options of treatment and recycling techniques; the fuels of generation IV reactors; front-end treatment processes of advanced fuels; hydrometallurgical processes for future fuel

  17. Migration study of actinides and lanthanides in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastrowardoyo, P.B.; Susilowati, D.; Suganda, D.

    1998-01-01

    Migration study of actinide and lanthanide elements in compacted bentonite has been conducted. Data of these elements mobilities have been shown, and it is showed that the diffusion coefficient was varied as the function of solution phase condition as well as the origin/composition of bentonite. It is showed that the diffusion coefficient decreased by the increasing of density, as well as the increasing of montmorillonite content in bentonite. The ratio of bentonite/silica-sand used was related to the increasing of elements mobility. In many case the difference of diffusion coefficient was related to the variation of pH and redox condition, as well as the presence of complexant in solution phase. The Lower diffusion coefficient could give the higher retardation factor, which is a favourable factor to retard the radionuclides release from a disposal facility to geosphere. (author)

  18. Adventures in Actinide Chemistry: A Year of Exploring Uranium and Thorium in Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagano, Justin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-08

    The first part of this collection of slides is concerned with considerations when working with actinides. The topics discussed in the document as a whole are the following: Actinide chemistry vs. transition metal chemistry--tools we can use; New synthetic methods to obtain actinide hydrides; Actinide metallacycles: synthesis, structure, and properties; and Reactivity of actinide metallacycles.

  19. Electrorecovery of actinides at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoll, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oldham, Warren J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costa, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    There are a large number of purification and processing operations involving actinide species that rely on high-temperature molten salts as the solvent medium. One such application is the electrorefining of impure actinide metals to provide high purity material for subsequent applications. There are some drawbacks to the electrodeposition of actinides in molten salts including relatively low yields, lack of accurate potential control, maintaining efficiency in a highly corrosive environment, and failed runs. With these issues in mind we have been investigating the electrodeposition of actinide metals, mainly uranium, from room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and relatively high-boiling organic solvents. The RTILs we have focused on are comprised of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and mainly the {sup -}N(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} anion [bis(trif1uoromethylsulfonyl)imide {equivalent_to} {sup -}NTf{sub 2}]. These materials represent a class of solvents that possess great potential for use in applications employing electrochemical procedures. In order to ascertain the feasibility of using RTILs for bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals our research team has been exploring the electron transfer behavior of simple coordination complexes of uranium dissolved in the RTIL solutions. More recently we have begun some fundamental electrochemical studies on the behavior of uranium and plutonium complexes in the organic solvents N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Our most recent results concerning electrodeposition will be presented in this account. The electrochemical behavior of U(IV) and U(III) species in RTILs and the relatively low vapor pressure solvents NMP and DMSO is described. These studies have been ongoing in our laboratory to uncover conditions that will lead to the successful bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals at a working electrode surface at room temperature or slightly elevated temperatures. The RTILs we

  20. Recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorination: Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassayre, L., E-mail: cassayre@chimie.ups-tlse.fr [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique (LGC), Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, CNRS-UMR 5503, Universite de Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse (France); Soucek, P.; Mendes, E.; Malmbeck, R.; Nourry, C.; Eloirdi, R.; Glatz, J.-P. [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Pyrochemical processes in molten LiCl-KCl are being developed in ITU for recovery of actinides from spent nuclear fuel. The fuel is anodically dissolved to the molten salt electrolyte and actinides are electrochemically reduced on solid aluminium cathodes forming solid actinide-aluminium alloys. A chlorination route is being investigated for recovery of actinides from the alloys. This route consists in three steps: Vacuum distillation for removal of the salt adhered on the electrode, chlorination of the actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorine gas and sublimation of the formed AlCl{sub 3}. A thermochemical study showed thermodynamic feasibility of all three steps. On the basis of the conditions identified by the calculations, experiments using pure UAl{sub 3} alloy were carried out to evaluate and optimise the chlorination step. The work was focused on determination of the optimal temperature and Cl{sub 2}/UAl{sub 3} molar ratio, providing complete chlorination of the alloy without formation of volatile UCl{sub 5} and UCl{sub 6}. The results showed high efficient chlorination at a temperature of 150 deg. C.

  1. Recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorination: Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassayre, L.; Soucek, P.; Mendes, E.; Malmbeck, R.; Nourry, C.; Eloirdi, R.; Glatz, J.-P.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrochemical processes in molten LiCl-KCl are being developed in ITU for recovery of actinides from spent nuclear fuel. The fuel is anodically dissolved to the molten salt electrolyte and actinides are electrochemically reduced on solid aluminium cathodes forming solid actinide-aluminium alloys. A chlorination route is being investigated for recovery of actinides from the alloys. This route consists in three steps: Vacuum distillation for removal of the salt adhered on the electrode, chlorination of the actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorine gas and sublimation of the formed AlCl 3 . A thermochemical study showed thermodynamic feasibility of all three steps. On the basis of the conditions identified by the calculations, experiments using pure UAl 3 alloy were carried out to evaluate and optimise the chlorination step. The work was focused on determination of the optimal temperature and Cl 2 /UAl 3 molar ratio, providing complete chlorination of the alloy without formation of volatile UCl 5 and UCl 6 . The results showed high efficient chlorination at a temperature of 150 deg. C.

  2. Minor actinide transmutation on PWR burnable poison rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Wenchao; Liu, Bin; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Tu, Jing; Liu, Fang; Huang, Liming; Fu, Juan; Meng, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Key issues associated with MA transmutation are the appropriate loading pattern. • Commercial PWRs are the only choice to transmute MAs in large scale currently. • Considerable amount of MA can be loaded to PWR without disturbing k eff markedly. • Loading MA to PWR burnable poison rods for transmutation is an optimal loading pattern. - Abstract: Minor actinides are the primary contributors to long term radiotoxicity in spent fuel. The majority of commercial reactors in operation in the world are PWRs, so to study the minor actinide transmutation characteristics in the PWRs and ultimately realize the successful minor actinide transmutation in PWRs are crucial problem in the area of the nuclear waste disposal. The key issues associated with the minor actinide transmutation are the appropriate loading patterns when introducing minor actinides to the PWR core. We study two different minor actinide transmutation materials loading patterns on the PWR burnable poison rods, one is to coat a thin layer of minor actinide in the water gap between the zircaloy cladding and the stainless steel which is filled with water, another one is that minor actinides substitute for burnable poison directly within burnable poison rods. Simulation calculation indicates that the two loading patterns can load approximately equivalent to 5–6 PWR annual minor actinide yields without disturbing the PWR k eff markedly. The PWR k eff can return criticality again by slightly reducing the boric acid concentration in the coolant of PWR or removing some burnable poison rods without coating the minor actinide transmutation materials from PWR core. In other words, loading minor actinide transmutation material to PWR does not consume extra neutron, minor actinide just consumes the neutrons which absorbed by the removed control poisons. Both minor actinide loading patterns are technically feasible; most importantly do not need to modify the configuration of the PWR core and

  3. Crystallo-chemistry of actinide nitrides (U1-yPuy)N and effect of impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Coulon-Picard, E.; Pelletier, M.

    2004-01-01

    Investigations on actinide nitrides has been done in our Laboratories for Fast Breeder Reactors since the seventies and some properties are reported to show the interest for these fuels. Today, the actinide nitrides are reconsidered as possible fuels for the future fission reactors (GFR and LMFR selected by the international forum Generation IV). The results of new investigations on crystal structure of mixed mono-nitrides (U,Pu)N, and the effects of oxygen and carbon contaminations on this structure are presented. The cubic 'NaCl-fcc' type structure of actinide nitrides AnN with space group O5/h-Fm3m does not respect the 'Vegard law' model for the mixed nitrides (U 1-y Pu y )N. These nitrides are usually considered with strong metallic character associated with partial ionic bonding, but the ionic contribution in the An-N bonding determined in this work is very important and near 41.6% for UN and PuN. From results published on resistivity of mixed nitrides, the data on bonding must be also modified for partial covalence. This is in good agreement with the experimental lattice parameters which are not compatible with dominant metallic bonding. The numbers of bonding electrons in the nitrides (U 1-y Pu y )N are reevaluated and the low values proposed comparatively with those previously published confirm the strong ionic character with high concentration of An 3+ ions. The solubility of oxygen and carbon in actinide nitrides (U 1-y Pu y )N are discussed from measurements on volume concentration of actinide oxide phase, total oxygen and carbon contents, and lattice parameter of nitrides. The oxygen solubility limit in UN is near 1000 ppm, with a lightly higher value of 1200 ppm for the mixed nitride (U 0.8 Pu 0.2 )N. The effects of oxygen or carbon atoms in the lattice of (U 1-y Pu y )N are analysed

  4. On the solvation of actinide ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagberg, D.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Simulation of the universal ions in water solution is a standardized tool commonly used today. The route to simulation of actinide ions is normally tough because the evaluation of the simulation parameters are normally not given empirically and standard Hartree-Fock calculations are not accurate enough. We use multiconfigurational quantum chemical calculations when deriving the parameters for actinide ion-water potential [1]. The parameters are then simulated using classical molecular dynamics. A case study of the Cm 3+ ion will be presented on the poster. Results from the simulations will be also be discussed, e.g. the radial distribution functions and the coordination number. [1] D. Hagberg, G. Karlstrom, B.O. Roos and L. Gagliardi The coordination of uranyl in water: a combined quantum chemical and molecular simulation study J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 14250-14256 (2005)

  5. Rapid ion-exchange separations of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usuda, Shigekazu

    1988-01-01

    For the purpose of studying short-lived actinide nuclides, three methods for rapid ion exchange separation of actinide elements with mineral acid-alcohol mixed media were developed: anion exchange with nitric acid-methyl alcohol mixed media to separate the transplutonium and rare earth elements from target material, U or Pu and Al catcher foils; anion exchange with hydrochloric acid-methyl alcohol media to separate Am+Cm, Bk and Cf+Fm from the target, catcher foils and major fission products; and cation exchange with hydrochloric acid-methyl alcohol media and with concentrated hydrochloric acid to separate the transplutonium elements as a group from the rare earths after eliminating the large amounts of U, Al, Cu, Fe etc. The methods enable one to perform rapid and effective separation at elevated temperature (90 deg C) and immediate source preparation for alpha-ray spectrometry. (author) 47 refs.; 10 figs

  6. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-07-01

    The first international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Mito in Japan, on 6-8 November 1990. It starts with a number of general overview papers to give us some broad perspectives. Following that it takes a look at some basic facts about physics and about the quantities of materials it is talking about. Then it proceeds to some specific aspects of partitioning, starting with evolution from today commercially applied processes and going on to other possibilities. At the end of the third session it takes a look at the significance of partitioning and transmutation of actinides before it embarks on two sessions on transmutation, first in reactors and second in accelerators. The last session is designed to throw back into the discussion the main points which need to be looked at when considering future work in this area. (A.L.B.)

  7. Chemistry of the actinide elements. Second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, J.J.; Seaborg, G.T.; Morss, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    This is an exhaustive, updated discourse on the chemistry of Actinides, Volume 1 contains a systematic coverage of the elements Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, and Pu, which constitutes Part 1 of the work. The characterization of each element is discussed in terms of its nuclear properties, occurrence, preparation, atomic and metallic properties, chemistry of specific compounds, and solution chemistry. The first part of Volume 2 follows the same format as Volume 1 but is confined to the elements Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, and Es, plus a more condensed coverage of the Transeinsteinium elements (Fm, Md, No, Lw, and 104-109). Part 2 of this volume is devoted to a discussion of the actinide elements in general, with a specific focus on electronic spectra, thermodynamic and magnetic properties, the metallic state, structural chemistry, solution kinetics, organometallic chemistry for σ- and π-bonded compounds, and some concluding remarks on the superheavy elements

  8. The thermodynamic functions of gaseous actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, M.H.

    1979-01-01

    The actinide gases have large number of unobserved energy states - up to 3 x 10 6 for Pu(g) - which could contribute to the partition function and its derivatives, from which the thermal functions of these gases are calculated. Existing compilations have simply ignored these levels. By making reasonable assumptions as to the distribution of these energy states, their effect on the functions can be calculated. It is concluded that the existing compilations will be inadequate above approximately 2000K. The effect is particularly marked on the heat capacity. For example, when unobserved levels for Pu(g) are included, the heat capacity of Pu(g) reaches a maximum value of more than 12R at 3200K. Similar considerations will apply to the gaseous actinide ions. (orig.) [de

  9. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The first international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Mito in Japan, on 6-8 November 1990. It starts with a number of general overview papers to give us some broad perspectives. Following that it takes a look at some basic facts about physics and about the quantities of materials it is talking about. Then it proceeds to some specific aspects of partitioning, starting with evolution from today commercially applied processes and going on to other possibilities. At the end of the third session it takes a look at the significance of partitioning and transmutation of actinides before it embarks on two sessions on transmutation, first in reactors and second in accelerators. The last session is designed to throw back into the discussion the main points which need to be looked at when considering future work in this area. (A.L.B.)

  10. Seventeen-coordinate actinide helium complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-12

    The geometries and electronic structures of molecular ions featuring He atoms complexed to actinide cations are explored computationally using density functional and coupled cluster theories. A new record coordination number is established, as AcHe{sub 17}{sup 3+}, ThHe{sub 17}{sup 4+}, and PaHe{sub 17}{sup 4+} are all found to be true geometric minima, with the He atoms clearly located in the first shell around the actinide. Analysis of AcHe{sub n}{sup 3+} (n=1-17) using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) confirms these systems as having closed shell, charge-induced dipole bonding. Excellent correlations (R{sup 2}>0.95) are found between QTAIM metrics (bond critical point electron densities and delocalization indices) and the average Ac-He distances, and also with the incremental He binding energies. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Actinide uptake by transferrin and ferritin metalloproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Auwer, C.; Llorens, I.; Moisy, Ph.; Vidaud, C.; Goudard, F.; Barbot, C.; Solari, P.L.; Funke, H.

    2005-01-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms of actinide uptake by specific biomolecules, it is essential to explore the intramolecular interactions between the cation and the protein binding site. Although this has long been done for widely investigated transition metals, very few studies have been devoted to complexation mechanisms of actinides by active chelation sites of metalloproteins. In this field, X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been extensively used as a structural and electronic metal cation probe. The two examples that are presented here are related to two metalloproteins in charge of iron transport and storage in eukaryote cells: transferrin and ferritin. U(VI)O 2 2+ , Np(IV) and Pu(IV) have been selected because of their possible role as contaminant from the geosphere. (orig.)

  12. Actinides: from heavy fermions to plutonium metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L.; Fisk, Z.; Hecker, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    The actinide elements mark the emergence of 5f electrons. The f electrons possess sufficiently unusual characteristics that their participation in atomic binding often result in dramatic changes in properties. This provides an excellent opportunity to study the question of localization of electrons; a question that is paramount in predicting the physical and chemical properties of d and f electron transition metals. The transition region between localized (magnetic) and itinerant (often superconducting) behavior provides for many interesting phenomena such as structural instabilities (polymorphism), spin fluctuations, mixed valences, charge density waves, exceptional catalytic activity and hydrogen storage. This region offers most interesting behavior such as that exhibited by the actinide compounds UBe 13 and UPt 3 . Both compounds are heavy-fermion superconductors in which both magnetic and superconducting behavior exist in the same electrons. The consequences of f-electron bonding (which appears greatest at Plutonium) show dramatic effects on phase stability, alloying behavior, phase transformations and mechanical behavior

  13. Comparison of actinides and fission products recycling scheme with the normal plutonium recycling scheme in fast reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salahuddin Asif

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple recycling of actinides and non-volatile fission products in fast reactors through the dry re-fabrication/reprocessing atomics international reduction oxidation process has been studied as a possible way to reduce the long-term potential hazard of nuclear waste compared to that resulting from reprocessing in a wet PUREX process. Calculations have been made to compare the actinides and fission products recycling scheme with the normal plutonium recycling scheme in a fast reactor. For this purpose, the Karlsruhe version of isotope generation and depletion code, KORIGEN, has been modified accordingly. An entirely novel fission product yields library for fast reactors has been created which has replaced the old KORIGEN fission products library. For the purposes of this study, the standard 26 groups data set, KFKINR, developed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany, has been extended by the addition of the cross-sections of 13 important actinides and 68 most important fission products. It has been confirmed that these 68 fission products constitute about 95% of the total fission products yield and about 99.5% of the total absorption due to fission products in fast reactors. The amount of fissile material required to guarantee the criticality of the reactor during recycling schemes has also been investigated. Cumulative high active waste per ton of initial heavy metal is also calculated. Results show that the recycling of actinides and fission products in fast reactors through the atomics international reduction oxidation process results in a reduction of the potential hazard of radioactive waste.

  14. Selection of exception limits for all actinide nuclides based on revised criteria for safe international transport and including storage delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavarenne, C.; Rouyer, V.; Mennerdahl, D.; Dean, C.; Barton, N.; Jean, F.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1998, there have been some speculations about future transport of significant quantities and concentrations of other actinide nuclides than the four currently listed in the regulation for the safe transport of the radioactive material. Therefore, it raised a need to specify exception limits for such actinides. In order to define credible exception limits, it was necessary to have reasonably accurate data for all actinide nuclides. Then the DGTREN/participants decided to perform calculations with different codes (MONK, MCNP, CRISTAL and SCALE) and different cross-section libraries (JEF2.2, ENDFB, etc.). The parameters of interest (such as k-infinite, critical masses) were determined. This article presents the work achieved and the questions raised, e.g. related to the effect of the radioactive decay of the isotopes on the criticality risks. It also points out the need for an evolution of the regulation of the safe transport of radioactive materials and gives a proposition of modification for the IAEA requirements related to, firstly, the list of the fissile materials, secondly, the rule to determine the quantities of actinide nuclides that can be excepted from the requirements for the packages containing fissile materials

  15. Actinide Source Term Program, position paper. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, C.F.; Papenguth, H.W.; Crafts, C.C.; Dhooge, N.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Actinide Source Term represents the quantity of actinides that could be mobilized within WIPP brines and could migrate with the brines away from the disposal room vicinity. This document presents the various proposed methods for estimating this source term, with a particular focus on defining these methods and evaluating the defensibility of the models for mobile actinide concentrations. The conclusions reached in this document are: the 92 PA open-quotes expert panelclose quotes model for mobile actinide concentrations is not defensible; and, although it is extremely conservative, the open-quotes inventory limitsclose quotes model is the only existing defensible model for the actinide source term. The model effort in progress, open-quotes chemical modeling of mobile actinide concentrationsclose quotes, supported by a laboratory effort that is also in progress, is designed to provide a reasonable description of the system and be scientifically realistic and supplant the open-quotes Inventory limitsclose quotes model

  16. Actinides reduction by recycling in a thermal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Martinez C, E.; Balboa L, H.

    2014-10-01

    This work is directed towards the evaluation of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle in which radioactive actinides could be recycled to remove most of the radioactive material; firstly a production reference of actinides in standard nuclear fuel of uranium at the end of its burning in a BWR reactor is established, after a fuel containing plutonium is modeled to also calculate the actinides production in MOX fuel type. Also it proposes a design of fuel rod containing 6% of actinides in a matrix of uranium from the tails of enrichment, then four standard uranium fuel rods are replaced by actinides rods to evaluate the production and transmutation thereof, the same procedure was performed in the fuel type MOX and the end actinide reduction in the fuel was evaluated. (Author)

  17. Strength of Coriolis Coupling in actinide nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peker, L.K.; Rasmussen, J.O.; Hamilton, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Coriolis Coupling V/sub cor/ plays an important role in deformed nuclei. V/sub cor/ is proportional to h 2 /J[j (j + 1) -Ω (Ω + 1)]/sup 1/2/ and therefore is particularly significant in the nuclei with large j and low Ω Nilsson levels close to Fermi surface: n(i/sub 13/2/) in A = 150 to 170 rare-earth nuclei and p(i/sub 13/2/) and n(j/sub 15/2/) in A greater than or equal to 224 actinide nuclei. Because of larger j (n(j/sub 15/2/) versus n(i/sub 13/2/)) and smaller deformations (β approx. = 0.22 versus β 0.28) it was reasonable to expect that in actinide nuclei Coriolis effects are stronger than in the rare earth nuclei. Recently it was realized that the strength of observed Coriolis effects depends not only on the genuine Coriolis Coupling but also on the interplay between Coriolis ad pairing forces which leads to an interference between the wave functions of two mixing rotational bands. As a consequence the effective interaction V/sub eff/ of both bands is an oscillating function of the degree of shell filling (or chemical potential lambda F). It was shown that in the rare earth nuclei this interference strongly influenced conclusions about the trends in the Coriolis coupling strength and explained many of the observed band-mixing features (the sharpness of back banding curves, details of the blocking effect etc.). From theoretical analysis it was concluded that in the majority of actinide nuclei the effective interaction V/sub eff/ is strong, and therefore the Coriolis band-mixing have to be very strong. In this paper we would like to demonstrate that contrary to these predictions experimental data suggest that Coriolis band mixing in studied actinide nuclei is relatively weak and possibly significantly weaker than in rare earth nuclei

  18. Actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The fourth international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation, took place in Mito City in Japan, on 111-13 September 1996. The proceedings are presented in six sessions: the major programmes and international cooperation, the partitioning and transmutation programs, feasibility studies, particular separation processes, the accelerator driven transmutation, and the chemistry of the fuel cycle. (A.L.B.)

  19. Actinide burning in the integral fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1993-01-01

    During the past few years, Argonne National Laboratory has been developing the integral fast reactor (IFR), an advanced liquid-metal reactor concept. In the IFR, the inherent properties of liquid-metal cooling are combined with a new metallic fuel and a radically different refining process to allow breakthroughs in passive safety, fuel cycle economics, and waste management. A key feature of the IFR concept is its unique pyroprocessing. Pyroprocessing has the potential to radically improve long-term waste management strategies by exploiting the following attributes: 1. Minor actinides accompany plutonium product stream; therefore, actinide recycling occurs naturally. Actinides, the primary source of long-term radiological toxicity, are removed from the waste stream and returned to the reactor for in situ burning, generating useful energy. 2. High-level waste volume from pyroprocessing call be reduced substantially as compared with direct disposal of spent fuel. 3. Decay heat loading in the repository can be reduced by a large factor, especially for the long-term burden. 4. Low-level waste generation is minimal. 5. Troublesome fission products, such as 99 Tc, 129 I, and 14 C, are contained and immobilized. Singly or in combination, the foregoing attributes provide important improvements in long-term waste management in terms of the ease in meeting technical performance requirements (perhaps even the feasibility of demonstrating that technical performance requirements can be met) and perhaps also in ultimate public acceptance. Actinide recycling, if successfully developed, could well help the current repository program by providing an opportunity to enhance capacity utilization and by deferring the need for future repositories. It also represents a viable technical backup option in the event unforeseen difficulties arise in the repository licensing process

  20. The analysis and handling concept of minor actinides of NPP’s waste by using Ads technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silakhuddin

    2008-01-01

    The contents of minor actinide elements (americium, neptunium and curium) on the spent fuel inventory from PWR operation of NPP have been calculated using Vista program. The calculation used parameters: enrichment 3.968%, power 1000 M We and burn-up is 60 M Wd/kg. The result of calculation showed that the arising of minor actinide elements on the spent fuel is 16.205 kg/year and 43.471 kg/year for PWR-UOX and PWR-MOX respectively. It is also discussed a concept of the use of ADS technology for transmuting the minor actinide elements contained in spent fuels. The result of the discussion showed that an ADS of 400 M Wth will serve 7 PWRs-UOX, and on the PWR system using UOX and MOX fuels an ADS will serve 3 PWRs. (author)

  1. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado, G. Ivan; Christenson, John M.; Renier, J.P.; Marcille, T.F.; Casal, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs). A top-level objective of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Analysis program element of the DOE NERI program is to investigate spent fuel treatment and recycling options for current light water reactors (LWRs). Accordingly, this project targets to expand the traditional scope of nuclear fuel management optimization into the following two complementary specific objectives: (1) To develop a direct coupling between the pin-by-pin within-bundle loading control variables and core-wide (bundle-by-bundle) optimization objectives, (2) to extend the methodology developed to explicitly encompass control variables, objectives, and constraints designed to maximize minor actinide incineration in BWR bundles and cycles. The first specific objective is projected to 'uncover' dormant thermal margin made available by employing additional degrees of freedom within the optimization process, while the addition of minor actinides is expected to 'consume' some of the uncovered thermal margin. Therefore, a key underlying goal of this project is to effectively invest some of the uncovered thermal margin into achieving the primary objective.

  2. Multi-element isotope dilution analyses using ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpe, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Presently, 37 elements ranging from light (Li,B) through transition metals, noble, rare earth and heavy elements, to actinides and transuranics (Pu, Am, Cm) are measured by isotope dilution at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Projects range from geological and hydrological to biological. The research goal is to measure accurately many elements present in diverse matrices at trace (ppb) levels using isotope dilution methods. Major advantages of isotope dilution methods are accuracy, elimination of ion intensity calibration, and quantitation for samples that require chemical separation. Accuracy depends on tracer isotope calibration, tracer-sample isotopic equilibration, and appropriate background, isobaric and mass bias corrections. Propagation of isotope ratio error due to improper tracer isotope addition is a major concern with multi-element analyses when abundances vary widely. 11 refs., 3 figs

  3. Study on remain actinides recovery in pyro reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suharto, Bambang

    1996-01-01

    The spent fuel reprocessing by dry process called pyro reprocessing have been studied. Most of U, Pu and MA (minor actinides) from the spent fuel will be recovered and be fed back to the reactor as new fuel. Accumulation of remain actinides will be separated by extraction process with liquid cadmium solvent. The research was conducted by computer simulation to calculate the stage number required. The calculation's results showed on the 20 stages extractor more than 99% actinides can be separated. (author)

  4. Successive change regularity of actinide properties with atomic number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xuexian

    1990-08-01

    The development and achievements on chemistry of actinide elements are summarised. The relations of properties of actinides to their electronic configurations of valence electronic shells are discussed. Some anomalies of solid properties, the radius contraction, the stable state effect of f 7n -orbits (n = 0, 1, 2) and the tetrad effect of oxidation states, etc., with atomic number (Z) are described. 31 figures appended show directly the successive change regularity of actinide properties with Z

  5. Actinide recycle potential in the integral fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1993-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle holds promise for substantial improvements in economics, diversion-resistance, and waste management. In the IFR pyroprocessing, minor actinides accompany plutonium product stream, and therefore, actinide recycle occurs naturally. The fast neutron spectrum of the IFR makes it an ideal actinide burner, as well. This paper discusses technical features of the IFR fuel cycle, its technical progress, the development status, and potential implications on long-term waste management

  6. Preparation, properties, and some recent studies of the actinide metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The actinide elements form a unique series of metals. The variation in their physial properties combined with the varying availability of the different elements offers a challenge to the preparative scientist. This article provides a brief review of selected methods used for preparing μg to kg amounts of the actinide metals and the properties of these metals. In addition, some recent studies on selected actinide metals are discussed. 62 refs

  7. Examination of minor actinide annihilation by BWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hida, Kazuki

    1995-01-01

    From the viewpoint of reducing burden for disposing high level waste generated from spent fuel, the examination of recycling minor actinide (MA) to reactors and reducing its accumulation has been advanced. In this study, the possibility of annihilation in the case of recycling it to a BWR was examined. The main MAs are 237 Np, 241 Am, 243 Am, 242 Cm, and 244 Cm. However, as for Cm isotopes, the half life is short, the amount of generation is small, and the rate of neutron emission is high, therefore, those are disposed as waste, and 237 Np, 241 Am and 243 Am were taken as the objects of recycling. In order to grasp the basic characteristics in the case of recycling MAs to a BWR, MAs were added to UO 2 fuel, MOX fuel and HCR fuel and burned, and the nuclear conversion characteristics were examined. As the result, it was found that they were converted to short half life nuclides, and as the neutron spectra were softer, the rate of annihilation was higher. In the case of recycling MAs by concentrating to a specific reactor, reactivity loss, the degree of uranium enrichment required for compensating reactivity, and the rate of MA annihilation were calculated. Based on these data, the MA recycling system was set up, and the rate of MA annihilation was evaluated. This is reported. (K.I.)

  8. Actinide removal from wastewater applying waste minimization techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covey, J.R.; Midkiff, W.S.; Cadena, F.

    1992-01-01

    A major concern at LANL is the large volume of low level radioactive sludge that is generated by the current treatment technology. The plant meets current discharge limits but annually produces 200 55-gallon drums of sludge (approximately 60 tons) during the process of removing only few grants of radioactive isotopes. Most of the sludge results from the coagulants, iron and lime, added at the plant at a concentration of 10,000 parts-per-million (ppm). If the principal actinides in the influent could be separated and reduced to pure metallic form, the annual volume of plutonium would be about the size of a marble and the americium would be about the size of a BB. Waste minimization will be a key design criteria for the new facility. Records of total suspended solids (TSS) in the influent average about 1000 Kg per year (approximately 1 ton). Therefore, the theoretical sludge volume reduction is near 98%. Research is underway to develop and evaluate technologies that achieve the desired removal efficiency with a minimum of produced waste volume

  9. Determination of difficult to measure actinides in radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabova, V.; Galanda, D.; Dulanska, S.; Remenec, B.; Kuruc, J.

    2014-01-01

    In decommissioning of a nuclear facilities and radioactive waste treatment the activity of various radionuclides need to be measured for the waste characterization. Radiochemical separation of 241 Am, 237 Np and isotopes of plutonium was tested on model solution of evaporator concentrate sample for isolation of each of them for alpha-spectrometry analysis. This paper describes use of the molecular recognition technology product AnaLig(R)Pu-01 gel from IBC Advanced technologies, Inc. to effectively and selectively pre-concentrate, separate and recover difficult-to-measure actinides from model solution of evaporator concentrate samples which belong to the most difficult matrices to analyse. The method is suitable for analysing highly contaminated samples of radioactive waste in a relatively short time. For counting the alpha activity of 241 Am, 239,240 Pu, 238 Pu and 237 Np ORTEC 576A alpha-spectrometer equipped with ULTRA TM ion implanted silicon detectors (600 mm 2 active area) was used. The spectra were processed by using the Alpha-vision TM 32-bit emulation software from the EG and G ORTEC company. (authors)

  10. Hydrothermal decomposition of actinide(IV oxalates: a new aqueous route towards reactive actinide oxide nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrothermal decomposition of actinide(IV oxalates (An= Th, U, Pu at temperatures between 95 and 250 °C is shown to lead to the production of highly crystalline, reactive actinide oxide nanocrystals (NCs. This aqueous process proved to be quantitative, reproducible and fast (depending on temperature. The NCs obtained were characterised by X-ray diffraction and TEM showing their size to be smaller than 15 nm. Attempts to extend this general approach towards transition metal or lanthanide oxalates failed in the 95–250 °C temperature range. The hydrothermal decomposition of actinide oxalates is therefore a clean, flexible and powerful approach towards NCs of AnO2 with possible scale-up potential.

  11. Isotope and nuclear chemistry division. Annual report, FY 1987. Progress report, October 1986-September 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, D.W.; Heiken, J.H.

    1988-05-01

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1987 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. The report includes articles on radiochemical weapons diagnostics and research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production and separation; chemical biology and nuclear medicine; element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced concepts and technology; and atmospheric chemistry

  12. Recent progress in actinide and lanthanide solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musikas, C.; Hubert, H.; Benjelloun, N.; Vitorge, P.; Bonnin, M.; Forchioni, A.; Chachaty, C.

    1983-04-01

    Work in progress on actinide solvent extraction is briefly reviewed in this paper. 1 H and 31 P NMR are used to elucidate several fundamental unsolved problems concerning organophosphorous extractants often used in actinides extraction: determination of site of dialkylthiophosphate protonation and addition of basic phosphine oxide to dibutylthiophosphoric acid dimer. Extraction of Am III and Eu from high radioactivity level wastes by tetrasubsituted methylene diamides is investigated. Trivalent actinide-lanthanide group are separated by solvent extraction using soft donor ligand complexes which are more stable. The synergism of dinonylnaphtalene sulfonic acid (HDNNS) associated with several neutral donors like TBP, TOPO, amides are examined in the trivalent and tetravalent actinide extraction

  13. Biotransformation of uranium and other actinides in radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.

    1998-01-01

    Microorganisms affect the solubility, bioavailability, and mobility of actinides in radioactive wastes. Under appropriate conditions, actinides are solubilized or stabilized by the direct enzymatic or indirect nonenzymatic actions of microorganisms. Biotransformation of various forms of uranium (ionic, inorganic, and organic complexes) by aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms has been extensively studied, whereas limited information is available on other important actinides (Th, Np, Pu, and Am). Fundamental information on the mechanisms of biotransformation of actinides by microbes under various environmental conditions will be useful in predicting the long-term performance of waste repositories and in developing strategies for waste management and remediation of contaminated sites. (orig.)

  14. Preparations and mechanism of hydrolysis of ([8]annulene)actinide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.M. Jr.

    1985-07-01

    The mechanism of hydrolysis for bis[8]annulene actinide and lanthanide complexes has been studied in detail. The uranium complex, uranocene, decomposes with good pseudo-first order kinetics (in uranocene) in 1 M degassed solutions of H 2 O in THF. Decomposition of a series of aryl-substituted uranocenes demonstrates that the hydrolysis rate is dependent on the electronic nature of the substituent (Hammett rho value = 2.1, r 2 = 0.999), with electron-withdrawing groups increasing the rate. When D 2 O is substituted for H 2 O, kinetic isotope effects of 8 to 14 are found for a variety of substituted uranocenes. These results suggest a pre-equilibrium involving approach of a water molecule to the central metal, followed by rate determining proton transfer to the eight membered ring and rapid decomposition to products. Each of the four protonations of the complex has a significant isotope effect. The product ratio of cyclooctatriene isomers formed in the hydrolysis varies, depending on the central metal of the complex. However, the general mechanism of hydrolysis, established for uranocene, can be extended to the hydrolysis and alcoholysis of all the [8]annulene complexes of the lanthanides and actinides

  15. Rapid Separation Methods to Characterize Actinides and Metallic Impurities in Plutonium Scrap Materials at SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, S.L. III; Jones, V.D.

    1998-07-01

    The Nuclear Materials Stabilization and Storage Division at SRS plans to stabilize selected plutonium scrap residue materials for long term storage by dissolution processing and plans to stabilize other plutonium vault materials via high-temperature furnace processing. To support these nuclear material stabilization activities, the SRS Analytical Laboratories Department (ALD) will provide characterization of materials required prior to the dissolution or the high-firing of these materials. Lab renovations to install new analytical instrumentation are underway to support these activities that include glove boxes with simulated-process dissolution and high- pressure microwave dissolution capability. Inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), inductively- coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) will be used to measure actinide isotopics and metallic impurities. New high-speed actinide separation methods have been developed that will be applied to isotopic characterization of nuclear materials by TIMS and ICP-MS to eliminate isobaric interferences between Pu-238 /U- 238 and Pu-241/Am-241. TEVA Resin, UTEVA Resin, and TRU Resin columns will be used with vacuum-assisted flow rates to minimize TIMS and ICP-MS sample turnaround times. For metallic impurity analysis, rapid column removal methods using UTEVA Resin, AGMP-1 anion resin and AG MP-50 cation resin have also been developed to remove plutonium and uranium matrix interferences prior to ICP-AES and ICP- MS measurements

  16. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Ken [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Martin, Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lumetta, Gregg [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-02

    One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of used nuclear fuel is the separation of transplutonium actinides from fission product lanthanides. This separation is essential if actinide transmutation options are to be pursued in advanced fuel cycles, as lanthanides compete with actinides for neutrons in both thermal and fast reactors, thus limiting efficiency. The separation is difficult because the chemistry of Am3+ and Cm3+ is nearly identical to that of the trivalent lanthanides (Ln3+). The prior literature teaches that two approaches offer the greatest probability of devising a successful group separation process based on aqueous processes: 1) the application of complexing agents containing ligand donor atoms that are softer than oxygen (N, S, Cl-) or 2) changing the oxidation state of Am to the IV, V, or VI state to increase the essential differences between Am and lanthanide chemistry (an approach utilized in the PUREX process to selectively remove Pu4+ and UO22+ from fission products). The latter approach offers the additional benefit of enabling a separation of Am from Cm, as Cm(III) is resistant to oxidation and so can easily be made to follow the lanthanides. The fundamental limitations of these approaches are that 1) the soft(er) donor atoms that interact more strongly with actinide cations than lanthanides form substantially weaker bonds than oxygen atoms, thus necessitating modification of extraction conditions for adequate phase transfer efficiency, 2) soft donor reagents have been seen to suffer slow phase transfer kinetics and hydro-/radiolytic stability limitations and 3) the upper oxidation states of Am are all moderately strong oxidants, hence of only transient stability in media representative of conventional aqueous separations systems. There are examples in the literature of both approaches having been described. However, it is not clear at present that any extant process is sufficiently robust for application at the scale

  17. Fabrication and characterisation of composite targets for the transmutation of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naestren, C.; Haas, D.; Fernandez, A.; Somers, J.

    2006-01-01

    Transmutation of transuranic elements separated from spent fuel is a way to reduce the toxicity of long-lived nuclides in the waste before disposal. Plutonium and the minor actinides (MA) are reintroduced into the fuel cycle for further irradiation and incineration. Currently CERMET fuel forms, in which a ceramic actinide is dispersed in a matrix, are considered for MA transmutation. In a first step, PuO 2 beads are produced by a sol gel method in which a Pu nitrate solution is converted to solid, dust-free, particles. These porous beads are then infiltrated with an americium nitrate solution to the incipient wetness point and calcined to give the (PuAm)O 2 beads, which are blended with a metal matrix and compacted and sintered to form the final fuel pellet. The matrix used is molybdenum due to its high thermal conductivity and low neutron capture cross section, if it is enriched in 92 Mo. In this work, optimization of the bead porosity is investigated to achieve a higher Am content by infiltration. Addition of carbon to the mother solution in the sol gel step increases the bead porosity but it also changes both bead and final fuel pellet microstructure. A surrogate fuel, with cerium simulating the actinides has been fabricated and its mechanical stability and bead characteristics investigated as a function of carbon content and thermal treatment. The characterization of the surrogate fuel by ceramography, density, porosity, bead-quality, etc., is a necessary step in the process optimization, to be transferred to the production of the actinide samples. This process is now at an advanced stage and is being used for the production of fuels for irradiation tests in the Phenix (Futurix) and HFR-Petten (HELIOS) reactors. In parallel, studies on the dissolution of the fuel pellets, with the aim of dissolving the Mo-matrix while keeping the CeO 2 beads intact, have been initiated. Thus, Mo can be recycled for further fuel fabrication either from production scraps or from

  18. Programme and Abstracts. 38. Journees des Actinides together with the 7. School on the Physics and Chemistry of the Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Journees des Actinides (JdA) is a traditional informal actinide forum, including physics, chemistry, and materials research. It regularly brings together experts from fields involved, taking place in a very informal way, emphasizing exchanges and discussions on current issues in actinide science. At the 38{sup th} JdA (10-15 April 2008; Wroclaw, Poland) scientific communications on the following topics on physics and chemistry of the actinides were presented: (a) inorganic and organometallic chemistry; (b) strongly correlated behaviour, superconductivity, quantum criticality; (c) materials science; (d) theory, electronic structure; (e) nuclear fuel cycle, environment.

  19. Programme and Abstracts. 38. Journees des Actinides together with the 7. School on the Physics and Chemistry of the Actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Journees des Actinides (JdA) is a traditional informal actinide forum, including physics, chemistry, and materials research. It regularly brings together experts from fields involved, taking place in a very informal way, emphasizing exchanges and discussions on current issues in actinide science. At the 38 th JdA (10-15 April 2008; Wroclaw, Poland) scientific communications on the following topics on physics and chemistry of the actinides were presented: (a) inorganic and organometallic chemistry; (b) strongly correlated behaviour, superconductivity, quantum criticality; (c) materials science; (d) theory, electronic structure; (e) nuclear fuel cycle, environment

  20. Neodymium partitioning in zirconolite-based glass-ceramics designed for minor actinides immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loiseau, P.; Caurant, D.; Baffier, N.; Fillet, C.

    2000-01-01

    This study deals with glass-ceramic matrices designed for the conditioning of minor actinides, in which zirconolite crystals (CaZrTi 2 O 7 ) are homogeneously dispersed in a residual glassy matrix. Good immobilization performances require a high enrichment of actinides in the crystalline phase (double containment principle). Glass-ceramics are obtained by controlled devitrification of an aluminosilicate parent glass containing large amounts of TiO 2 and ZrO 2 . Neodymium was selected to simulate the trivalent minor actinides. Crystallization was performed at 1200 deg. C for various Nd 2 O 3 contents (0 - 10 wt. %). In all cases, zirconolite crystallization is obtained in the bulk of glass-ceramics. The evolution of Nd 3+ location between the crystals and the residual glass was followed by electron spin resonance and optical absorption. Both techniques demonstrate that neodymium is partly incorporated in zirconolite crystals. Moreover, total Nd 2 O 3 content in parent glass has a strong effect on Nd 3+ ions distribution. (authors)

  1. Minor actinides transmutation potential: state of art for GEN IV sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buiron, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the frame of the R and D program relative to the 1991 French act on nuclear waste management, fast neutron systems have shown relevant characteristics that meet both requirements on sustainable resources management and waste minimization. They also offer flexibility by mean of burner or breeder configurations allowing mastering plutonium inventory without significant impact on core safety. From the technological point of view, sodium cooled fast reactor are considered in order to achieve mean term industrial deployment. The present document summaries the main results of R and D program on minor actinides transmutation in sodium fast reactor since 2006 following recommendation of the first part of the 1991 French act. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous management achievable performances are presented for 'evolutionary' SFR V2B core as well as low void worth CFV core for industrial scale configurations (1500 MWe). Minor actinides transmutation could be demonstrated in the ASTRID reactor with the following configurations: - a 2%vol Americium content for the homogeneous mode, - a 10%vol Americium content for the heterogeneous mode, without any substantial modification of the main core safety parameters and only limited impacts on the associated fuel cycle (manufacturing issues are not considered here). In order to achieve such goal, a wide range of experimental irradiations driven by transmutation scenarios have to be performed for both homogeneous and heterogeneous minor actinides management. (author) [fr

  2. The effects of actinide separation on the radiological consequences of disposal of high-level radioactive waste on the ocean bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camplin, W.C.; Grimwood, P.D.; White, I.F.

    1980-01-01

    One option in the management of high-level radioactive wastes is to separate the actinides prior to vitrification and disposal. This option is examined in the context of disposal of high-level wastes on the deep ocean bed. The initial quantity of waste corresponds to the generation of 1000 GW(e)y of nuclear energy, and the actinide-separation process is assumed to remove 99% of all elements of atomic number greater than that of actinium. The models used to describe the dispersion of activity from a single disposal site on the bed of the Atlantic Ocean represent both local dispersion and long-term mixing. Collective doses and doses to individuals are calculated for six potential pathways: ingestion of fish, crustacea, molluscs, plankton and seaweed, and external irradiation from contaminated beach sediments. The period from 400 to 1,000,000 years after disposal is considered. The potential radiological impact from disposal of high-level waste without separation of actinides on the ocean bed arises from the actinides; isotopes of americium, neptunium and plutonium give the highest doses. Actinide separation would reduce these doses in proportion to the effectiveness of the separation process, until doses become determined by fission products rather than actinides: the achievable dose reduction would be a factor of approximately a hundred, or less for certain pathways. This reduction applies only to doses to the public from waste disposal: no account was taken of doses arising from the separation process itself or from the management of the separated actinides. The results of the assessment are contrasted with those of similar studies based on toxicity indices. Major deficiencies are identified in the use of toxicity indices as a basis for decision-making. (author)

  3. High-performance separation and supercritical extraction of lanthanides and actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, Arpita; Sujatha, K.; Kumar, R.; Sivaraman, N.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2010-01-01

    Extensive studies were carried out at Chemistry Group, IGCAR for the rapid separation of individual lanthanides and actinides using dynamic ion-exchange chromatographic technique. The atom percent fission was determined from the concentrations of the lanthanide fission products, uranium and plutonium contents of dissolver solution. These advantages were exploited to significantly reduce analysis time, liquid waste generation as well as dose to operator. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of actinides from waste matrices was studied in detail at our laboratory using modified supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc-CO 2 ). Complete extraction and recovery of uranium, plutonium and americium from various matrices was achieved using Sc-CO 2 modified with suitable ligands. The technique was demonstrated for the recovery of plutonium from actual waste received from different laboratories. (author)

  4. Structural characterization of the Actinides (III) and (IV) - DOTA complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audras, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    The polyamino-carboxylate anions have been identified as compounds of interest in the operations of actinide separation, in actinide migration in the environment and in human radio-toxicology. The structural characterization of complexes formed between actinides and polyamino-carboxylates ligands is essential for a better understanding of actinide-ligands interactions. Among the polyamino-carboxylate anions, the DOTA ligand (1,4,7,10-tetraaza-cyclododecane tetraacetic acid) is described as a very strong complexing agent of the lanthanides(III), but has been little studied with actinides. The objective of this thesis is to describe the complexes formed between the actinides (III) and (IV) and the DOTA ligand, and compare them with the lanthanide complexes. For this, an approach has been introduced to characterize the complexes by complementary analytical techniques (spectrophotometry, electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry, NMR, EXAFS, electrochemistry), but also by calculations of theoretical chemistry to help the interpretation of the experimental data. The formation of a 1:1 complex is observed with the actinides(III) (plutonium and americium) as for lanthanides(III): rapid formation of intermediate species which evolves slowly towards the formation of a limit complex. Within this complex, the cation is located inside the cavity formed by the ligand. Four nitrogen atoms and four oxygen atoms from the carboxylate functions are involved in the coordination sphere of the cation. However, differences were observed in the bond lengths formed between the cation and the nitrogen atoms (the bonds are somewhat shorter in the case of actinide complexes) as well as the complexation kinetics, which is slightly faster for the actinides(III) than for lanthanide(III) ions of equivalent radius. The same behavior was observed in solution upon complexation of actinides(IV) (uranium, plutonium and neptunium): slow formation of a 1:1 complex (actinide(IV):ligand) in wherein the

  5. Trace analysis of actinides in the environment using resonance ionization mass spectrometry; Spurenanalyse von Aktiniden in der Umwelt mittels Resonanzionisations-Massenspektrometrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeder, Sebastian

    2011-04-12

    In this work the resonant ionization of neutral atoms using laser radiation was applied and optimized for ultra-trace analysis of the actinides thorium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium. The sensitive detection of these actinides is a challange for the monitoring and quantification of radioactive releases from nuclear facilities. Using resonance ionization spectroscopy combined with a newly developed quadrupole-mass-spectrometer, numerous energy levels in the atomic structure of these actinides could be identified. With this knowledge efficient excitation schemes for the mentioned actinides could be identified and characterised. The applied in-source-ionization ensures for a high detection efficiency due to the good overlap of laser radiation with the atomic beam and allows therefore for a low sample consumption which is required for the analysis of radio nuclides. The selective excitation processes in the resonant ionization method supresses unwanted contaminations and was optimized for analytical detection of ultra-trace amounts in environmental samples as well as for determination of isotopic compositions. The efficient in-source-ionization combined with high power pulsed laser radiation allows for detections efficiency up to 1%. For plutonium detection limits in the range of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} atoms could be demonstrated for synthetic samples as well as for first environmental samples. The usage of narrow bandwidth continuous wave lasers in combination with a transversal overlap of the laser radiation and the free propagating atomic beam enable for resolving individual isotopic shifts of the resonant transitions. This results in a high selectivity against dominant neighboring isotopes but with a significant loss in detection efficiency. For the ultra-trace isotope {sup 236}U a detection limit down to 10{sup -9} for the isotope ratio N ({sup 236}U)/N ({sup 238}U) could be determined.

  6. Use of fast reactors for actinide transmutation. Proceedings of a specialists meeting held in Obninsk, Russian Federation, 22-24 September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-15

    The management of radioactive waste is one of the key issues in today`s discussions on nuclear energy, especially the long term disposal of high level radioactive wastes. The recycling of plutonium in liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) would allow `burning` of the associated extremely long life transuranic waste, particularly actinides, thus reducing the required isolation time for high level waste from tens of thousands of years to hundreds of years for fission products only. The International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) decided to include the topic of actinide transmutation in liquid metal fast breeder reactors in its programme. The IAEA organized the Specialists Meeting on Use of Fast Breeder Reactors for Actinide Transmutation in Obninsk, Russian Federation, from 22 to 24 September 1992. The specialists agree that future progress in solving transmutation problems could be achieved by improvements in: Radiochemical partitioning and extraction of the actinides from the spent fuel (at least 98% for Np and Cm and 99.9% for Pu and Am isotopes); technological research and development on the design, fabrication and irradiation of the minor actinides (MAs) containing fuels; nuclear constants measurement and evaluation (selective cross-sections, fission fragments yields, delayed neutron parameters) especially for MA burners; demonstration of the feasibility of the safe and economic MA burner cores; knowledge of the impact of maximum tolerable amount of rare earths in americium containing fuels. Refs, figs and tabs.

  7. Comparative study of accelerator driven system (ADS) of different transmutation scenarios for actinides in advanced nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embid-Segura, M.; Gonzalez Romero, M.E.; Perez Parra, A.

    2001-01-01

    The full text follows. In recent years transmutation has raised as a complementary option to solve the problem of the long-lived radioactive waste produced in nuclear power plants. The main advantages expected from transmutation are the reduction in volume of the high level waste and a significant decrease in the long-term radiotoxicity inventory, with a probable impact in the final costs and potential risks of the geological repository. This paper will describe the evaluation of different systems proposed for actinide transmutation, their integration in the waste management process, their viability, performances and limitations. Particular attention is taking of comparing transmutation scenarios where the actinides are transmuted inside fertile (U, Th) or inert matrix. This study has been supported by ENRESA inside the CIEMAT-ENRESA collaboration for the study of long-lived isotope transmutation. (authors)

  8. Non-compound nucleus fission in actinide and pre-actinide regions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Data on the evaporation residue cross-sections, in addition to those on mass and angular distributions, are necessary for better understanding of the contribution from non-compound nucleus fission in the pre-actinide region. Measurement of mass-resolved angular distribution of fission products in 20Ne+232Th reaction ...

  9. Synergistic extraction of actinides : Part I. Hexa-and pentavalent actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.K.; Ramakrishna, V.V.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed discussion on the reported literature on the synergistic extraction of hexa- and pentavalent actinide ions, by different combinations of extractants and from different aqueous media, is presented. Structural aspects of the various complexes involved in synergism also are reviewed. A short account of the applications based on synergistic extraction is also given. (author)

  10. ACTINET - EU network of excellence for actinide sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gompper, K.

    2006-01-01

    ACTINET, the Network of Excellence for Actinide Sciences within the 6th EU Framework Program, was launched in March 2004 for an initial period of four years. A number of tools are available in ACTINET to serve the purposes of the project, i.e. stimulate and coordinate actinide research in Europe, promote integration, train young scientists and, in this way, ensure and enhance European competence. The large European actinide laboratories with their unique experimental and analytical equipment are available to scientists from Europe as so-called 'pool facilities' within the framework of joint research projects. Setting up a 'theoretical user lab' has turned out to be a promising way of exploiting the synergies of theory and experiment in various fields of actinide science. Joint research projects are supported within the network, working with actinides being made possible in the pool facilities. Training and instruction are ensured by seminars, workshops, and schools organized annually. In familiarizing young scientists with actinide work, ACTINET exercises training functions and contributes to ensuring and enhancing European competence in the field on the medium and long term. Even after only half of its term, ACTINET is developing into a live network, thus decisively contributing towards promoting, coordinating and integrating European actinide research. As actinides play a key role in the use of nuclear power, this benefits European industries, research centers, operators of nuclear power plants and nuclear facilities as well as licensing and regulatory authorities. (orig.)

  11. Transmutation of minor actinide using thorium fueled BWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susilo, Jati

    2002-01-01

    One of the methods to conduct transmutation of minor actinide is the use of BWR with thorium fuel. Thorium fuel has a specific behaviour of producing a little secondary minor actinides. Transmutation of minor actinide is done by loading it in the BWR with thorium fuel through two methods, namely close recycle and accumulation recycle. The calculation of minor actinide composition produced, weigh of minor actinide transmuted, and percentage of reminder transmutation was carried SRAC. The calculations were done to equivalent cell modeling from one fuel rod of BWR. The results show that minor actinide transmutation is more effective using thorium fuel than uranium fuel, through both close recycle and accumulation recycle. Minor actinide transmutation weight show that the same value for those recycle for 5th recycle. And most of all minor actinide produced from 5 unit BWR uranium fuel can transmuted in the 6 t h of close recycle. And, the minimal value of excess reactivity of the core is 12,15 % Δk/k, that is possible value for core operation

  12. Actinide extractants for the nuclear industry of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musikas, C.; Morisseau, J.C.; Hoel, P.; Guillaume, B.

    1987-06-01

    Non organo-phosphorus extractants properties regarding the extractions of actinides in nuclear fuels reprocessing are presented. N,N-dialkylamides are proposed as alternatives to TBP.N,N'-tetraalkylamides or pentaalkyl propane diamides properties are reported. They show that those bidentate extractants are alternatives to bidentate organophosphorus extractants for actinides (III) extraction from concentrated nitric acid. 11 figs, 15 refs

  13. Separations chemistry for actinide elements: Recent developments and historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, K.L.; Choppin, G.R.

    1997-01-01

    With the end of the cold war, the principal mission in actinide separations has changed from production of plutonium to cleanup of the immense volume of moderately radioactive mixed wastes which resulted from fifty years of processing activities. In order to approach the cleanup task from a proper perspective, it is necessary to understand how the wastes were generated. Most of the key separations techniques central to actinide production were developed in the 40's and 50's for the identification and production of actinide elements. Total actinide recovery, lanthanide/actinide separations, and selective partitioning of actinides from inert constituents are currently of primary concern. To respond to the modern world of actinide separations, new techniques are being developed for separations ranging from analytical methods to detect ultra-trace concentrations (for bioassay and environmental monitoring) to large-scale waste treatment procedures. In this report, the history of actinide separations, both the basic science and production aspects, is examined and evaluated in terms of contemporary priorities

  14. Potential carcinogenic effects of actinides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harley, N.H.; Pasternack, B.S.

    1979-01-01

    Inhalation of alpha emitting actinides delivers a dose to critical cancer sites in the human body. These sites are the bronchial epithelium and cells near bone surfaces. Inhalation of the naturally occurring actinides uranium and thorium in resuspended soil in the air results in a continuous exposure for the global population of about 0.1 fCi/m 3 for each of these actinides. The highest dose is from the natural actinide 230 Th. Over 50 yr, the dose to bronchial epithelium is 0.05 mrad and to bone surfaces 0.4 mrad. In the case of accidental environmental contamination (e.g. near a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant) the man-made actinides plutonium, americium and curium could deliver about the same alpha dose to these sites if the soil is contaminated to the same level as the natural actinides (approximately 1 pCi/g). Two nuclear accidents have already produced contamination of about this level. Exposures in this case, however, are to small local populations compared with global exposure for the natural actinides. Significant enhancement of the natural radioactive actinide pollution by combustion of all types of fossil fuel is suspected but not enough data are available to estimate total population doses. (author)

  15. Solubility of actinides and surrogates in nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Ch.

    2003-01-01

    The nuclear wastes are currently incorporated in borosilicate glass matrices. The resulting glass must be perfectly homogeneous. The work discussed here is a study of actinide (thorium and plutonium) solubility in borosilicate glass, undertaken to assess the extent of actinide solubility in the glass and to understand the mechanisms controlling actinide solubilization. Glass specimens containing; actinide surrogates were used to prepare and optimize the fabrication of radioactive glass samples. These preliminary studies revealed that actinide Surrogates solubility in the glass was enhanced by controlling the processing temperature, the dissolution kinetic of the surrogate precursors, the glass composition and the oxidizing versus reducing conditions. The actinide solubility was investigated in the borosilicate glass. The evolution of thorium solubility in borosilicate glass was determined for temperatures ranging from 1200 deg C to 1400 deg C.Borosilicate glass specimens containing plutonium were fabricated. The experimental result showed that the plutonium solubility limit ranged from 1 to 2.5 wt% PuO 2 at 1200 deg C. A structural approach based on the determination of the local structure around actinides and their surrogates by EXAFS spectroscopy was used to determine their structural role in the glass and the nature of their bonding with the vitreous network. This approach revealed a correlation between the length of these bonds and the solubility of the actinides and their surrogates. (author)

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of light-actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosh, Eli; Makov, Guy; Shneck, Roni Z.

    2005-01-01

    The thermophysical properties of the alpha phases of the light actinide elements Th, U, Np and Pu were analysed. For each of the analysed elements, the Gibbs free-energy was modelled by an explicit function of temperature T and pressure P over the whole relevant T-P range, in a manner compatible with the CALPHAD (Calculation of Alloy Phase Diagrams) method. Several adjustable model-parameters were fitted to available experimental results. The model is based on a new semi-empirical equation of state, which interpolates with Thomas-Fermi type models for the volume and with the Dulong-Petit value for the heat capacity, at extreme pressures

  17. Photofissility of actinide nuclei at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deppman, A.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Duarte, S.B.; Oliveira, E.C. de; Arruda-Neto, J.D.T.; Pina, S.R. de; Likhachev, V.P.; Mesa, J.; Goncalves, M.

    2001-08-01

    We analyze the recent experimental data on photofissility for 237 Np, 238 U, and 232 Th at incident photon energies above 200 MeV. For this analysis, we developed a Monte carlo algorithm for the nuclear evaporation process in photonuclear reactions. This code is used in association with the multi-collisional model for the photon-induced intranuclear cascade process. Our results show a good quantitative and qualitative agreement with the experimental data. It is shown that the emission of protons and alpha particles at the evaporation stage is an important component for the non-saturation of the actinides photofissility up to, at least, 1GeV. (author)

  18. Thermal decomposition of lanthanide and actinide tetrafluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, J.K.; Haire, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal stabilities of several lanthanide/actinide tetrafluorides have been studied using mass spectrometry to monitor the gaseous decomposition products, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) to identify solid products. The tetrafluorides, TbF 4 , CmF 4 , and AmF 4 , have been found to thermally decompose to their respective solid trifluorides with accompanying release of fluorine, while cerium tetrafluoride has been found to be significantly more thermally stable and to congruently sublime as CeF 4 prior to appreciable decomposition. The results of these studies are discussed in relation to other relevant experimental studies and the thermodynamics of the decomposition processes. 9 refs., 3 figs

  19. Electronic structure of the light actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlap, B.D.

    1976-01-01

    In the last few years, considerable advances have been made in our understanding of the properties of the light actinides. Although these are 5f transition elements formally equivalent to the lanthanide (4f) elements, these materials show a much more varied behavior due to the larger spatial extent and ionizability of the 5f electrons. A review is given of some areas of current interest, especially where hyperfine measurements have played an active role. These include studies of a variety of magnetic phenomena, systematics of isomer shift measurements, and studies of paramagnetic relaxation

  20. Fission cross section measurements for minor actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fursov, B. [IPPE, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The main task of this work is the measurement of fast neutron induced fission cross section for minor actinides of {sup 238}Pu, {sup 242m}Am, {sup 243,244,245,246,247,248}Cm. The task of the work is to increase the accuracy of data in MeV energy region. Basic experimental method, fissile samples, fission detectors and electronics, track detectors, alpha counting, neutron generation, fission rate measurement, corrections to the data and error analysis are presented in this paper. (author)

  1. Thermodynamics of carbothermic synthesis of actinide mononitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, T.; Shirasu, Y.; Minato, K.; Serizawa, H.

    1997-01-01

    Carbothermic synthesis will be further applied to the fabrication of nitride fuels containing minor actinides (MA) such as neptunium, americium and curium. A thorough understanding of the carbothermic synthesis of UN will be beneficial in the development of the MA-containing fuels. Thermodynamic analysis was carried out for conditions of practical interest in order to better understand the recent fabrication experiences. Two types of solution phases, oxynitride and carbonitride phases, were taken into account. The Pu-N-O ternary isotherm was assessed for the modelling of M(C, N, O). With the understanding of the UN synthesis, the fabrication problems of Am-containing nitrides are discussed. (orig.)

  2. Calculated Bulk Properties of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Self-consistent relativistic calculations of the electronic properties for seven actinides (Ac-Am) have been performed using the linear muffin-tin orbitals method within the atomic-sphere approximation. Exchange and correlation were included in the local spin-density scheme. The theory explains...... the variation of the atomic volume and the bulk modulus through the 5f series in terms of an increasing 5f binding up to plutonium followed by a sudden localisation (through complete spin polarisation) in americium...

  3. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, J.H.; Lindberg, H.A. (eds.)

    1984-05-01

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1983 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes.

  4. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiken, J.H.; Lindberg, H.A.

    1984-05-01

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1983 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes

  5. Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiken, J.H.

    1985-04-01

    This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1984 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques: development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes. 287 refs

  6. The electronic structure of the lanthanides and actinides, a comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelstein, N.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Optical spectra of the two f-element series (the lanthanides and actinides) are comparable in many respects. For the trivalent ions isolated in single crystals, both series exhibit rich, narrow line spectra. These data can be analysed in terms of a parametric model based on a free-ion Hamiltonian plus the addition of a crystal field Hamiltonian. For most systems the agreement between the calculated and experimental energy levels is quite good. In the actinide series there appears to be a correlation between the magnitude of the crystal field and the inadequacy of the fits. The early actinides exhibit multiple oxidation states for which there is no precedent in the lanthanide series. The parametric model mentioned earlier has been utilized for some tetravalent actinide systems with reasonably good results. A selective survey of results describing the similarities and differences of various lanthanide and actinide systems will be given

  7. Actinide recovery from waste and low-grade sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, J.D.; Schulz, W.W.

    1982-01-01

    Actinide and nuclear fuel cycle operations generate a variety of process waste streams. New methods are needed to remove and recover actinides. More interest is also being expressed in recovering uranium from oceans, phosphoric acid, and other low grade sources. To meet the need for an up-to-date status report in the area of actinide recovery from waste and low grade sources, these papers were brought together. The papers provide an authoritative, in-depth coverage of an important area of nuclear and industrial and engineering chemistry which cover the following topics: uranium recovery from oceans and phosphoric acid; recovery of actinides from solids and liquid wastes; plutonium scrap recovery technology; and other new developments in actinide recovery processes

  8. Actinide-Aluminate Speciation in Alkaline Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, David L.; Fedosseev, Alexander M.

    2001-01-01

    Investigation of behavior of actinides in alkaline media containing AL(III) showed that no aluminate complexes of actinides in oxidation states (IIII-VIII) were formed in alkaline solutions. At alkaline precipitation IPH (10-14) of actinides in presence of AL(III) formation of aluminate compounds is not observed. However, in precipitates contained actinides (IIV)<(VI), and to a lesser degree actinides (III), some interference of components takes place that is reflected in change of solid phase properties in comparison with pure components or their mechanical mixture. The interference decreases with rise of precipitation PH and at PH 14 is exhibited very feebly. In the case of NP(VII) the individual compound with AL(III) is obtained, however it is not aluminate of neptunium(VII), but neptunate of aluminium(III) similar to neptunates of other metals obtained earlier

  9. Comprehensive analysis for major, minor and trace element contents and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotope ratios in sediment reference materials, JSd-1 and MAG-1

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Makishima, A.; Noordmann, J.; Tanaka, R.; Nakamura, E.

    (TFE) bomb at 245 degrees C for 96 hrs with Mg addition. The elemental concentration was measured by quadrupole type inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) and sector field type ICP-MS (ICP-SFMS) using isotope dilution...

  10. Baleen as a biomonitor of mercury content and dietary history of North Atlantic Minke Whales (Balaenopetra acutorostrata): combining elemental and stable isotope approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobson, K.A.; Riget, F.F.; Outridge, P.M.; Dietz, R.; Born, E

    2004-09-20

    Baleen is an incrementally-growing tissue of balaenopteran whales which preserves relatively well over time in museums and some archeological sites, and, therefore might be useful for studies examining long-term changes of metal levels in whales. This study examined Hg and stable C and N isotopic composition of baleen plates of the North Atlantic minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata), which continues to be a food source for people in Greenland and elsewhere. We compared the Hg levels and stable isotopes of major tissues (kidney, liver and muscle) with those of baleen plates to see whether baleen could be used as a biomonitor of variations of Hg intake and diet both between individuals and within individuals over time. Mercury was significantly correlated with concentrations in all tissues (kidney, liver and muscle). Stable C and N isotopes in baleen were generally similar to those of muscle, which reflects the recent (approximately one month) feeding of the whale, but in some individuals there were significant differences between baleen and muscle. Sectioning of baleen into 1 cm longitudinal increments showed that these differences were due to marked dietary shifts by some individuals over time that had been recorded in the baleen but were lost from the muscle record. Whole baleen C and N isotopes were better correlated with tissue Hg levels, suggesting that baleen may provide a more reliable indicator of long-term average diet, which in turn may be better related to Hg accumulation in tissues than the shorter-term diet record contained in muscle.

  11. Baleen as a biomonitor of mercury content and dietary history of North Atlantic Minke Whales (Balaenopetra acutorostrata): combining elemental and stable isotope approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, K.A.; Riget, F.F.; Outridge, P.M.; Dietz, R.; Born, E.

    2004-01-01

    Baleen is an incrementally-growing tissue of balaenopteran whales which preserves relatively well over time in museums and some archeological sites, and, therefore might be useful for studies examining long-term changes of metal levels in whales. This study examined Hg and stable C and N isotopic composition of baleen plates of the North Atlantic minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata), which continues to be a food source for people in Greenland and elsewhere. We compared the Hg levels and stable isotopes of major tissues (kidney, liver and muscle) with those of baleen plates to see whether baleen could be used as a biomonitor of variations of Hg intake and diet both between individuals and within individuals over time. Mercury was significantly correlated with concentrations in all tissues (kidney, liver and muscle). Stable C and N isotopes in baleen were generally similar to those of muscle, which reflects the recent (approximately one month) feeding of the whale, but in some individuals there were significant differences between baleen and muscle. Sectioning of baleen into 1 cm longitudinal increments showed that these differences were due to marked dietary shifts by some individuals over time that had been recorded in the baleen but were lost from the muscle record. Whole baleen C and N isotopes were better correlated with tissue Hg levels, suggesting that baleen may provide a more reliable indicator of long-term average diet, which in turn may be better related to Hg accumulation in tissues than the shorter-term diet record contained in muscle

  12. Determination of boron content and isotopic composition in gypsum by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and positive thermal ionization mass spectrometry using phase transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yun-Qi; Peng, Zhang-Kuang; Yang, Jian; Xiao, Ying-Kai; Zhang, Yan-Ling

    2017-12-01

    As a stable isotope, boron plays an important role in hydrogeology, environmental geochemistry, ore deposit geochemistry and marine paleoclimatology. However, there is no report of boron isotopic composition in gypsum. This is mainly confined to complete dissolution of Gypsum by water or acid. In this study, gypsum was converted to calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) with ammonium bicarbonate(NH 4 HCO 3 ) by two steps at 50°C. In every step, the mass ratio of NH 4 HCO 3 /CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O was twice, and conversion rate reached more than 98%. Converted CaCO 3 was totally dissolved with hydrochloric acid (the dissolution rate was over 99%). In order to overcome the difficulties of the matrix interference and the detection limit of Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES), we use Amberlite IRA 743 resin to purify and enrichment the boron at first, then eluting boron from the resin with 10mL 0.1mol/L hydrochloric acid at 75°C. The boron isotopic composition of natural gypsum samples was determined using positive thermal ionization mass spectrometry (P-TIMS). The boron isotopic composition of gypsum may be an excellent indicator for the formation environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Determination of uranium isotopic composition and 236U content of soil samples and hot particles using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, S F; Becker, J S

    2001-07-01

    As a result of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) the environment was contaminated with spent nuclear fuel. The 236U isotope was used in this study to monitor the spent uranium from nuclear fallout in soil samples collected in the vicinity of the Chernobyl NPP. Nuclear track radiography was applied for the identification and extraction of hot radioactive particles from soil samples. A rapid and sensitive analytical procedure was developed for uranium isotopic ratio measurement in environmental samples based on double-focusing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DF-ICP-MS) with a MicroMist nebulizer and a direct injection high-efficiency nebulizer (DIHEN). The performance of the DF-ICP-MS with a quartz DIHEN and plasma shielded torch was studied. Overall detection efficiencies of 4 x 10(-4) and 10(-3) counts per atom were achieved for 238U in DF-ICP-QMS with the MicroMist nebulizer and DIHEN, respectively. The rate of formation of uranium hydride ions UH+/U+ was 1.2 x 10(-4) and 1.4 x 10(-4), respectively. The precision of short-term measurements of uranium isotopic ratios (n = 5) in 1 microg L(-1) NBS U-020 standard solution was 0.11% (238U/235U) and 1.4% (236U/238U) using a MicroMist nebulizer and 0.25% (235U/238U) and 1.9% (236U/P38U) using a DIHEN. The isotopic composition of all investigated Chernobyl soil samples differed from those of natural uranium; i.e. in these samples the 236U/238U ratio ranged from 10(-5) to 10(-3). Results obtained with ICP-MS, alpha- and gamma-spectrometry showed differences in the migration properties of spent uranium, plutonium, and americium. The isotopic ratio of uranium was also measured in hot particles extracted from soil samples.

  14. Determination of uranium isotopic composition and 236U content of soil samples and hot particles using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulyga, S.F.; Becker, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    As a result of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) the environment was contaminated with spent nuclear fuel. The 236 U isotope was used in this study to monitor the spent uranium from nuclear fallout in soil samples collected in the vicinity of the Chernobyl NPP. Nuclear track radiography was applied for the identification and extraction of hot radioactive particles from soil samples. A rapid and sensitive analytical procedure was developed for uranium isotopic ratio measurement in environmental samples based on double-focusing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DF-ICP-MS) with a MicroMist nebulizer and a direct injection high-efficiency nebulizer (DIHEN). The performance of the DF-ICP-MS with a quartz DIHEN and plasma shielded torch was studied. Overall detection efficiencies of 4 x 10 -4 and 10 -3 counts per atom were achieved for 238 U in DF-ICP-QMS with the MicroMist nebulizer and DIHEN, respectively. The rate of formation of uranium hydride ions UH + /U + was 1.2 x 10 -4 and 1.4 x 10 -4 , respectively. The precision of short-term measurements of uranium isotopic ratios (n = 5) in 1 μg L -1 NBS U-020 standard solution was 0.11% ( 238 U/ 235 U) and 1.4% ( 236 U/ 238 U) using a MicroMist nebulizer and 0.25% ( 235 U/ 238 U) and 1.9% ( 236 U/ 238 U) using a DIHEN. The isotopic composition of all investigated Chernobyl soil samples differed from those of natural uranium; i.e. in these samples the 236 U/ 238 U ratio ranged from 10 -5 to 10 -3 . Results obtained with ICP-MS, α- and γ-spectrometry showed differences in the migration properties of spent uranium, plutonium, and americium. The isotopic ratio of uranium was also measured in hot particles extracted from soil samples. (orig.)

  15. The radiological impact of actinides discharged to the Irish Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, G.J.; Smith, B.D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the radiological effects of releases of actinides to the Irish Sea from Sellafield, the major source. Exposure pathways to man since the commencement of discharges in 1952 are reviewed; the importance of actinides began to increase with increased discharges in the 1970s. With the demise of the porphyra/laverbread pathway due to transport difficulties, the pathway due to fish and shellfish consumption became critical, particularly for actinides through molluscan shellfish. A reassessment on the current basis of effective dose shows that peak exposures to the critical group of about 2 mSv yr -1 were received in the mid-1970s, about 30% of which was due to actinides. Effective doses have since reduced but the relative importance of actinides is greater, due to the interplay of discharges of radionuclides from Sellafield and their behaviour in the environment. Additive doses through sea food due to releases of natural radionuclides from the Marchon phosphate plant at Whitehaven are also considered, although the actinide component from this source has been small. Exposures due to actinides from Sellafield via other pathways are shown to be much lower than those involving sea food. Collective doses are also considered; these peaked at about 300 man-Sv to the European population (including the UK) in 1979, with only a few percent due to actinides. As in the case of critical group doses, the relative importance of actinides has increased in recent years within the decreasing total collective dose. For both critical group and collective doses, therefore, the actinide component needs to be kept under review. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  16. A systematic study of actinide production from the interactions of heavy ions with sup 248 Cm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyba, J.D.

    1990-09-07

    Production cross sections for heavy actinides produced from the interactions of {sup 12}C, {sup 31}P, {sup 40}Ar, and {sup 44}Ca ions with {sup 248}Cm were measured at energies ranging from 0.98 to 1.35 X Coulomb barrier. The recoiling reaction products were collected in copper or gold catcher foils located near the {sup 248}Cm target. Separate fractions of Bk, Cf, Es, Fm, and Md were obtained from a radiochemical separation procedure. For the {sup 12}C system, a He/KCl jet was used to transport the recoiling No activities of interest to a rotating wheel system. The isotopic distributions of the actinide products were found to be essentially symmetric about the maximum with full-widths-at-half-maximum of approximately 2.5 mass units. Isotopic distributions of the {sup 12}C, {sup 31}P, {sup 40}Ar, and {sup 44}Ca systems were found to be very similar to the {sup 40,48}Ca systems studied previously. The maxima of the isotopic distributions generally occurred for those reaction channels which involved the exchange of the fewest number of nucleons between the target and projectile for which the calculated excitation energy was a positive quantity. Additionally, the maxima of the excitation functions occurred at those projectile energies which were consistent with the calculated reaction barriers based upon a binary reaction mechanism. The experimental data from the four systems investigated were compared to several models of heavy ion interactions including a damped reaction mechanism, compound nucleus formation and subsequent particle evaporation, and classical partial wave calculations for binary systems.

  17. Transmutation of minor actinides in a Candu thorium borner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, S.; Sahin, H. M.; Acir, A.; Yalcin, S.; Yildiz, K.; Sahin, N.; Altinok, T.; Alkan, M.

    2007-01-01

    best fuel compositions with respect to power flattening as well as long term reactivity have been found by mixing thoria with 14% minor actinides in form of MAO 2 in the central fuel bundle and decreasing radially MAO 2 content at discrete levels down to 2% at the periphery. Furthermore, as alternative fuel, 5% UO 2 has been added to the mixed fuel for the sake of a higher degree of nuclear safeguarding through denaturing the 2 33U component with 2 38U. The temporal variation of the criticality k ∞ and the burn-up values of the reactor have been calculated for a period of 10 years, operated at full power. The criticality starts at time zero near to k ∞ = ∼ 1.24 for both fuel compositions. A sharp decrease of the criticality has been observed during the first year as a consequence of rapid plutonium burnout in the actinide fuel. The criticality becomes quasi constant after the 2nd year after sufficient 2 33U is accumulated and remains close to k ∞ ,end ∼1.06 over ∼ 10 years. Quasi-uniform power generation density has been realized in the fuel bundle throughout the reactor operation

  18. Recycle of LWR actinides to an IFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, G.K.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Poa, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Large quantities of actinide elements are present in irradiated light water reactor fuel that is stored throughout the world. Because of the high fission to capture ratio for the transuranium (TRU) elements with the high energy neutrons in metal-fueled integral fast reactors (IFR), that reactor can consume these elements effectively. The stored fuel may represent valuable resource for the expanding application of fast power reactors. In addition, the removal of TRU elements from spent LWR fuel has the potential for increasing the capacity of high level waste facilities by reducing the heat load and may increase the margin of safety in meeting licensing requirement. Argonne National Laboratory is developing a pyrochemical process, which is compatible with the IFR fuel cycle for the recovery of TRU elements from LWR fuel. The proposed product is a metallic actinide ingot, which can be introduced into the electrorefining step of the IFR process. Two pyrochemical processes, that is, salt transport process and blanket processing study, are discussed in this paper. Also the experimental studies are reported. (K.I.)

  19. Consistent biokinetic models for the actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    The biokinetic models for Th, Np, Pu, Am and Cm currently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were developed within a generic framework that depicts gradual burial of skeletal activity in bone volume, depicts recycling of activity released to blood and links excretion to retention and translocation of activity. For other actinide elements such as Ac, Pa, Bk, Cf and Es, the ICRP still uses simplistic retention models that assign all skeletal activity to bone surface and depicts one-directional flow of activity from blood to long-term depositories to excreta. This mixture of updated and older models in ICRP documents has led to inconsistencies in dose estimates and interpretation of bioassay for radionuclides with reasonably similar biokinetics. This paper proposes new biokinetic models for Ac, Pa, Bk, Cf and Es that are consistent with the updated models for Th, Np, Pu, Am and Cm. The proposed models are developed within the ICRP's generic model framework for bone-surface-seeking radionuclides, and an effort has been made to develop parameter values that are consistent with results of comparative biokinetic data on the different actinide elements. (author)

  20. Isotopic Generation and Confirmation of the PWR Application Model?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L.B. Wimmer

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to establish an isotopic database to represent commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) from pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in criticality analyses performed for the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Confirmation of the conservatism with respect to criticality in the isotopic concentration values represented by this isotopic database is performed as described in Section 3.5.3.1.2 of the ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2000). The isotopic database consists of the set of 14 actinides and 15 fission products presented in Section 3.5.2.1.1 of YMP 2000 for use in CSNF burnup credit. This set of 29 isotopes is referred to as the principal isotopes. The oxygen isotope from the UO 2 fuel is also included in the database. The isotopic database covers enrichments of 235 U ranging from 1.5 to 5.5 weight percent (wt%) and burnups ranging from approximately zero to 75 GWd per metric ton of uranium (mtU). The choice of fuel assembly and operating history values used in generating the isotopic database are provided is Section 5. Tables of isotopic concentrations for the 29 principal isotopes (plus oxygen) as a function of enrichment and burnup are provided in Section 6.1. Results of the confirmation of the conservatism with respect to criticality in the isotopic concentration values are provided in Section 6.2

  1. Progress on the Application of Metallic Fuels for Actinide Transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J. Rory; Fielding, Randall; Janney, Dawn; Mariani, Robert; Teague, Melissa; Egeland, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is developing actinide bearing alloy metallic fuels intended for effecting the transmutation of long-lived isotopes in fast reactor application as part of a partitioning and transmutation strategy. This presentation will report on progress in three areas of this effort: demonstration of the fabrication of fuels under remote (hot cell) conditions directly coupled to the product from the Pyro-processing of spent fuel as part of the Joint Fuel Cycle Studies (JFCS) collaboration with the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI); the chemical sequestration of lanthanide fission products to mitigate fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction (FCCI); and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) studies on the as-cast microstructure of the metallic fuel alloy. For the JFCS efforts, we report on the implementation of the Glove-box Advanced Casting System (GACS) as a prototype casting furnace for eventual installation into the INL Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) where the recycled fuel will be cast. Results from optimising process parameters with respect to fuel characteristics, americium volatility, materials interaction, and lanthanide fission product carry over distribution will be discussed. With respect to the lanthanide carry over from the Pyro-processing product, encouraging studies on concepts to chemically sequester the FCCI promoting lanthanides within the fuel matrix thus inhibiting migration and interaction with the cladding will be presented. Finally, in relation to advanced modelling and simulation efforts, detailed investigations and interpretation on the nano-scale as cast microstructure of possible recycle fuel composition containing U, Pu, Am, Np as well as carry-over lanthanide species will be discussed. These studies are important for establishing the initial conditions from which advanced physics based fuel performance codes will run. (authors)

  2. Minor actinides transmutation performance in a fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A method for calculating MA transmutation for individual nuclides has been proposed by introducing two formulas of the MA transmutation. One corresponds to the difference of MA amounts, and the other corresponds to the sum of the fission amounts and the plutonium production amounts. • Using the method the MA transmutation was calculated for Np-237 and Am-241 in a fast reactor. The burnup period was changed from 1 year to 12 year. • For the 1 year burnup a large amount of Am-242m, Cm-242 are produced from Am-241. The total MA transmutation amount increases with burnup time, but its gradient with respect to burnup time decreases after 9 years, and the transmutation amount by overall fission increases almost linearly with burnup time. • However, after the 6 year burnup the fission contribution became large because of the large production of Pu isotopes from the original Am-241. • In addition to the homogeneous loading of the MA nuclides into the cores, a heterogeneous loading of Am-241 to the blanket region was considered. - Abstract: Results obtained in the project named “Study on Minor Actinides Transmutation using Monju Data”, which has been sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan (MEXT) are described. In order to physically understand transmutation of individual MA nuclides in fast reactors, a new method was developed in which the MAs transmutation is interpreted by two formulas. One corresponds to the difference of individual MA nuclides amounts before and after a burnup period, and the other is the sum of amount of fission of a relevant MA nuclide and the net plutonium production from the MA nuclide during a burnup period. The method has been applied to two fast reactors with MA fuels loaded in cores homogeneously and in a blanket region heterogeneously. Numerical results of MA transmutation for the two reactors are shown.

  3. Multi-actinide analysis with AMS for ultra-trace determination and small sample sizes: advantages and drawbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinto, Francesca; Lagos, Markus; Plaschke, Markus; Schaefer, Thorsten; Geckeis, Horst [Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Steier, Peter; Golser, Robin [VERA Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna (Austria)

    2016-07-01

    With the abundance sensitivities of AMS for U-236, Np-237 and Pu-239 relative to U-238 at levels lower than 1E-15, a simultaneous determination of several actinides without previous chemical separation from each other is possible. The actinides are extracted from the matrix elements via an iron hydroxide co-precipitation and the nuclides sequentially measured from the same sputter target. This simplified method allows for the use of non-isotopic tracers and consequently the determination of Np-237 and Am-243 for which isotopic tracers with the degree of purity required by ultra-trace mass-spectrometric analysis are not available. With detection limits of circa 1E+4 atoms in a sample, 1E+8 atoms are determined with circa 1 % relative uncertainty due to counting statistics. This allows for an unprecedented reduction of the sample size down to 100 ml of natural water. However, the use of non-isotopic tracers introduces a dominating uncertainty of up to 30 % related to the reproducibility of the results. The advantages and drawbacks of the novel method will be presented with the aid of recent results from the CFM Project at the Grimsel Test Site and from the investigation of global fallout in environmental samples.

  4. End point control of an actinide precipitation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muske, K.R.

    1997-01-01

    The actinide precipitation reactors in the nuclear materials processing facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory are used to remove actinides and other heavy metals from the effluent streams generated during the purification of plutonium. These effluent streams consist of hydrochloric acid solutions, ranging from one to five molar in concentration, in which actinides and other metals are dissolved. The actinides present are plutonium and americium. Typical actinide loadings range from one to five grams per liter. The most prevalent heavy metals are iron, chromium, and nickel that are due to stainless steel. Removal of these metals from solution is accomplished by hydroxide precipitation during the neutralization of the effluent. An end point control algorithm for the semi-batch actinide precipitation reactors at Los Alamos National Laboratory is described. The algorithm is based on an equilibrium solubility model of the chemical species in solution. This model is used to predict the amount of base hydroxide necessary to reach the end point of the actinide precipitation reaction. The model parameters are updated by on-line pH measurements

  5. On the suitability of lanthanides as actinide analogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, Kenneth; Szigethy, Geza

    2008-01-01

    With the current level of actinide materials used in civilian power generation and the need for safe and efficient methods for the chemical separation of these species from their daughter products and for long-term storage requirements, a detailed understanding of actinide chemistry is of great importance. Due to the unique bonding properties of the f-elements, the lanthanides are commonly used as structural and chemical models for the actinides, but differences in the bonding between these 4f and 5f elements has become a question of immediate applicability to separations technology. This brief overview of actinide coordination chemistry in the Raymond group at UC Berkeley/LBNL examines the validity of using lanthanide analogs as structural models for the actinides, with particular attention paid to single crystal X-ray diffraction structures. Although lanthanides are commonly accepted as reasonable analogs for the actinides, these comparisons suggest the careful study of actinide materials independent of their lanthanide analogs to be of utmost importance to present and future efforts in nuclear industries. (authors)

  6. Determination of uranium isotopic composition and {sup 236}U content of soil samples and hot particles using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulyga, S.F. [Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Inst., Minsk (Belarus); Becker, J.S. [Central Department for Analytical Chemistry, Research Centre Juelich (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    As a result of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) the environment was contaminated with spent nuclear fuel. The {sup 236}U isotope was used in this study to monitor the spent uranium from nuclear fallout in soil samples collected in the vicinity of the Chernobyl NPP. Nuclear track radiography was applied for the identification and extraction of hot radioactive particles from soil samples. A rapid and sensitive analytical procedure was developed for uranium isotopic ratio measurement in environmental samples based on double-focusing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DF-ICP-MS) with a MicroMist nebulizer and a direct injection high-efficiency nebulizer (DIHEN). The performance of the DF-ICP-MS with a quartz DIHEN and plasma shielded torch was studied. Overall detection efficiencies of 4 x 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -3} counts per atom were achieved for {sup 238}U in DF-ICP-QMS with the MicroMist nebulizer and DIHEN, respectively. The rate of formation of uranium hydride ions UH{sup +}/U{sup +} was 1.2 x 10{sup -4} and 1.4 x 10{sup -4}, respectively. The precision of short-term measurements of uranium isotopic ratios (n = 5) in 1 {mu}g L{sup -1} NBS U-020 standard solution was 0.11% ({sup 238}U/{sup 235}U) and 1.4% ({sup 236}U/{sup 238}U) using a MicroMist nebulizer and 0.25% ({sup 235}U/{sup 238}U) and 1.9% ({sup 236}U/{sup 238}U) using a DIHEN. The isotopic composition of all investigated Chernobyl soil samples differed from those of natural uranium; i.e. in these samples the {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U ratio ranged from 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -3}. Results obtained with ICP-MS, {alpha}- and {gamma}-spectrometry showed differences in the migration properties of spent uranium, plutonium, and americium. The isotopic ratio of uranium was also measured in hot particles extracted from soil samples. (orig.)

  7. Actinide separation chemistry in nuclear waste streams and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    The separation of actinide elements from various waste materials, produced either in nuclear fuel cycles or in past nuclear weapons production, represents a significant issue facing developed countries. Improvements in the efficiencies of the separation processes can be expected to occur as a result of better knowledge of the elements in these complex matrices. The Nuclear Science Committee of the OECD/NEA has established a task force of experts in actinide separation chemistry to review current and developing separation techniques and chemical processes. The report consist of eight chapters. In Chapter 1 the importance of actinide separation chemistry in the fields of waste management and its background are summarized.In Chapter 2 the types of waste streams are classified according to their relative importance, by physical form and by source of actinides. The basic data of actinide chemical thermodynamics, such as oxidation states, hydrolysis, complexation, sorption, Gibbs energies of formation, and volatility, were collected and are presented in Chapter 3. Actinide analyses related to separation processes are also mentioned in this chapter. The state of the art of actinide separation chemistry is classified in three groups, including hydrometallurgy, pyrochemical process and process based on fields, and is described in Chapter 4 along with the relationship of kinetics to separations. In Chapter 5 basic chemistry research needs and the inherent limitation on separation processes are discussed. Prioritization of research and development is discussed in Chapter 6 in the context of several attributes of waste management problems. These attributes include: mass or volume of waste; concentration of the actinide in the waste; expected difficulty of treating the wastes; short-term hazard of the waste; long-term hazard of the waste; projected cost of treatment; amount of secondary waste. Based on the priority, recommendations were made for the direction of future research

  8. Actinide separation chemistry in nuclear waste streams and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The separation of actinide elements from various waste materials, produced either in nuclear fuel cycles or in past nuclear weapons production, represents a significant issue facing developed countries. Improvements in the efficiencies of the separation processes can be expected to occur as a result of better knowledge of the elements in these complex matrices. The Nuclear Science Committee of the OECD/NEA has established a task force of experts in actinide separation chemistry to review current and developing separation techniques and chemical processes. The report consist of eight chapters. In Chapter 1 the importance of actinide separation chemistry in the fields of waste management and its background are summarized.In Chapter 2 the types of waste streams are classified according to their relative importance, by physical form and by source of actinides. The basic data of actinide chemical thermodynamics, such as oxidation states, hydrolysis, complexation, sorption, Gibbs energies of formation, and volatility, were collected and are presented in Chapter 3. Actinide analyses related to separation processes are also mentioned in this chapter. The state of the art of actinide separation chemistry is classified in three groups, including hydrometallurgy, pyrochemical process and process based on fields, and is described in Chapter 4 along with the relationship of kinetics to separations. In Chapter 5 basic chemistry research needs and the inherent limitation on separation processes are discussed. Prioritization of research and development is discussed in Chapter 6 in the context of several attributes of waste management problems. These attributes include: mass or volume of waste; concentration of the actinide in the waste; expected difficulty of treating the wastes; short-term hazard of the waste; long-term hazard of the waste; projected cost of treatment; amount of secondary waste. Based on the priority, recommendations were made for the direction of future research

  9. New Developments in Actinides Burning with Symbiotic LWR-HTR-GCFR Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomboni, Eleonora

    2008-01-01

    The long-term radiotoxicity of the final waste is currently the main drawback of nuclear power production. Particularly, isotopes of Neptunium and Plutonium along with some long-lived fission products are dangerous for more than 100000 years. 96% of spent Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel consists of actinides, hence it is able to produce a lot of energy by fission if recycled. Goals of Generation IV Initiative are reduction of long-term radiotoxicity of waste to be stored in geological repositories, a better exploitation of nuclear fuel resources and proliferation resistance. Actually, all these issues are intrinsically connected with each other. It is quite clear that these goals can be achieved only by combining different concepts of Gen. IV nuclear cores in a 'symbiotic' way. Light-Water Reactor - (Very) High Temperature Reactor ((V)HTR) - Fast Reactor (FR) symbiotic cycles have good capabilities from the viewpoints mentioned above. Particularly, HTR fuelled by Plutonium oxide is able to reach an ultra-high burn-up and to burn Neptunium and Plutonium effectively. In contrast, not negligible amounts of Americium and Curium build up in this core, although the total mass of Heavy Metals (HM) is reduced. Americium and Curium are characterised by an high radiological hazard as well. Nevertheless, at least Plutonium from HTR (rich in non-fissile nuclides) and, if appropriate, Americium can be used as fuel for Fast Reactors. If necessary, dedicated assemblies for Minor Actinides (MA) burning can be inserted in Fast Reactors cores. This presentation focuses on combining HTR and Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) concepts, fuelled by spent LWR fuel and depleted uranium if need be, to obtain a net reduction of total mass and radiotoxicity of final waste. The intrinsic proliferation resistance of this cycle is highlighted as well. Additionally, some hints about possible Curium management strategies are supplied. Besides, a preliminary assessment of different chemical forms of

  10. Isotopic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraedts, J.M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra of isotopically mixed clusters (dimers of SF 6 ) are calculated as well as transition frequencies. The result leads to speculations about the suitability of the laser-cluster fragmentation process for isotope separation. (Auth.)

  11. Certification of the Cu and Cd amount contents in artificial food digest using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for Pilot Study 13 of the Comite Consultatif pour la Quantite de Matiere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassileva, E.; Quetel, C.R.; Petrov, I.

    2003-01-01

    The Comite Consultatif pour la Quantite de Matiere (CCQM) launched the Pilot Study 13, an interlaboratory comparison between the metrological organizations worldwide on the determination of Ca, Cu and Cd in artificial food digests. These samples (available in 7% HNO 3 and with a salinity evaluated around 370 mg kg -1 , including approx. 30 mg Na kg -1 ) were prepared by gravimetrical mixing, and thus reference values traceable to the Kg for the three elements were available eventually. This paper describes the contribution of IRMM for the certification of the Cu and the Cd amount contents. The analytical protocol developed was based on isotope dilution associated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS). The Cu measurements required 125-fold dilution of the initial sample solution. An interference of 23 Na 40 Ar + on 63 Cu + was identified but, since the ratio between both species was over 1000, it was successfully overcome by the calculation of a correction factor for its effect on the Cu amount content directly. Dilution of the sample was not possible for Cd only present at the low ng g -1 level. Up to 1% difference was observed on Cd isotope ratio results between measurements performed directly or after matrix separation. This is rarely shown. As similar results could be obtained either way after the necessary corrections, the direct measurements approach associated to a correction for mass discrimination effects using the CCQM-P13 sample itself (and the IUPAC table values as reference for the natural Cd isotopic composition) was preferred as it was the easiest. SI traceable values were obtained for Cu and Cd with less than 1 and 1.5% combined uncertainty, respectively (6 995±55 (k=2) nmol kg -1 and 45.53±0.64 (k=2) nmol kg -1 ). The excellent agreement between these results and the reference values (less than 0.6 and 0.08% difference) further validated the analytical protocols developed

  12. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  13. Review of actinide nitride properties with focus on safety aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albiol, Thierry [CEA Cadarache, St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Arai, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    This report provides a review of the potential advantages of using actinide nitrides as fuels and/or targets for nuclear waste transmutation. Then a summary of available properties of actinide nitrides is given. Results from irradiation experiments are reviewed and safety relevant aspects of nitride fuels are discussed, including design basis accidents (transients) and severe (core disruptive) accidents. Anyway, as rather few safety studies are currently available and as many basic physical data are still missing for some actinide nitrides, complementary studies are proposed. (author)

  14. Status report on actinide and fission product transmutation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    The management of radioactive waste is one of the key issues in today's political and public discussions on nuclear energy. One of the fields that looks into the future possibilities of nuclear technology is the neutronic transmutation of actinides and of some most important fission products. Studies on transmutation of actinides are carried out in various countries and at an international level. This status report which gives an up-to-date general overview of current and planned research on transmutation of actinides and fission products in non-OECD countries, has been prepared by a Technical Committee meeting organized by the IAEA in September 1995. 168 refs, 16 figs, 34 tabs

  15. Critical masses for the even-neutron-numbered transuranium actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westfall, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    As part of a standards effort of the American Nuclear Society to establish subcritical mass limits for the transuranium actinides, critical masses were calculated for seven actinides, critical masses were calculated for seven actinide elements in bare, water-reflected, and steel-reflected metal systems. For the nuclides /sup 242/Pu and /sup 241/Am, values obtained with ENDF/B-V cross-section data were in much better agreement with values inferred from experimental measurement than were initial values calculated with ENDF/B-IV data. A brief description of the analytical methods employed is followed by a presentation of the results. 10 refs

  16. Actinide and Xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, M.; Olson, K.; Henderson, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides

  17. Actinide and xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, M.; Olson, K.; Henderson, D. L.; Sailor, W. C.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides

  18. Self-interaction corrected local spin density calculations of actinides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Z

    2010-01-01

    We use the self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation in order to describe localization-delocalization phenomena in the strongly correlated actinide materials. Based on total energy considerations, the methodology enables us to predict the ground-state valency configuration...... of the actinide ions in these compounds from first principles. Here we review a number of applications, ranging from electronic structure calculations of actinide metals, nitrides and carbides to the behaviour under pressure of intermetallics, and O vacancies in PuO2....

  19. Actinide and Xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, M. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Olson, K.; Henderson, D.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides.

  20. Partitioning and Leaching Behavior of Actinides and Rare Earth Elements in a Zirconolite- Bearing Hydrothermal Vein System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, Timothy E.; Hart, Kaye P.; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; McGlinn, Peter J.; Giere, Reto

    2007-01-01

    Chemical extraction techniques and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the distribution and behavior of actinides and rare earth elements (REE) in hydrothermal veins at Adamello (Italy). The six samples discussed in this paper were from the phlogopite zone, which is one of the major vein zones. The samples were similar in their bulk chemical composition, mineralogy, and leaching behavior of major elements (determined by extraction with 9 M HCl). However, there were major differences in the extractability of REE and actinides. The most significant influence on the leaching characteristics appears to be the amounts of U, Th and REE incorporated in resistant host phases (zirconolite and titanite) rather than readily leached phases (such as apatite). Uranium and Th are very highly enriched in zirconolite grains. Actinides were more readily leached from samples with a higher content of U and Th, relative to the amount of zirconium. The results show that REE and actinides present in chemically resistant host minerals can be retained under aggressive leaching conditions. (authors)