WorldWideScience

Sample records for actin flap dynamics

  1. A dynamical system for interacting flapping swimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, Anand; Ramananarivo, Sophie; Ristroph, Leif; Shelley, Michael

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of a theoretical investigation into the dynamics of interacting flapping swimmers. Our study is motivated by the recent experiments of Becker et al., who studied a one-dimensional array of self-propelled flapping wings that swim within each other's wakes in a water tank. They discovered that the system adopts certain ``schooling modes'' characterized by specific spatial phase relationships between swimmers. To rationalize these phenomena, we develop a discrete dynamical system in which the swimmers are modeled as heaving airfoils that shed point vortices during each flapping cycle. We then apply our model to recent experiments in the Applied Math Lab, in which two tandem flapping airfoils are free to choose both their speed and relative positions. We expect that our model may be used to understand how schooling behavior is influenced by hydrodynamics in more general contexts. Thanks to the NSF for its support.

  2. Cofilin-mediated actin dynamics promotes actin bundle formation during Drosophila bristle development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Heng; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Jiong

    2016-08-15

    The actin bundle is an array of linear actin filaments cross-linked by actin-bundling proteins, but its assembly and dynamics are not as well understood as those of the branched actin network. Here we used the Drosophila bristle as a model system to study actin bundle formation. We found that cofilin, a major actin disassembly factor of the branched actin network, promotes the formation and positioning of actin bundles in the developing bristles. Loss of function of cofilin or AIP1, a cofactor of cofilin, each resulted in increased F-actin levels and severe defects in actin bundle organization, with the defects from cofilin deficiency being more severe. Further analyses revealed that cofilin likely regulates actin bundle formation and positioning by the following means. First, cofilin promotes a large G-actin pool both locally and globally, likely ensuring rapid actin polymerization for bundle initiation and growth. Second, cofilin limits the size of a nonbundled actin-myosin network to regulate the positioning of actin bundles. Third, cofilin prevents incorrect assembly of branched and myosin-associated actin filament into bundles. Together these results demonstrate that the interaction between the dynamic dendritic actin network and the assembling actin bundles is critical for actin bundle formation and needs to be closely regulated.

  3. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced actin glutathionylation controls actin dynamics in neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Jiro; Li, Jingyu; Subramanian, Kulandayan K.; Mondal, Subhanjan; Bajrami, Besnik; Hattori, Hidenori; Jia, Yonghui; Dickinson, Bryan C.; Zhong, Jia; Ye, Keqiang; Chang, Christopher J; Ho, Ye-Shih; Zhou, Jun; Luo, Hongbo R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The regulation of actin dynamics is pivotal for cellular processes such as cell adhesion, migration, and phagocytosis, and thus is crucial for neutrophils to fulfill their roles in innate immunity. Many factors have been implicated in signal-induced actin polymerization, however the essential nature of the potential negative modulators are still poorly understood. Here we report that NADPH oxidase-dependent physiologically generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) negatively regulate actin polymerization in stimulated neutrophils via driving reversible actin glutathionylation. Disruption of glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1), an enzyme that catalyzes actin deglutathionylation, increased actin glutathionylation, attenuated actin polymerization, and consequently impaired neutrophil polarization, chemotaxis, adhesion, and phagocytosis. Consistently, Grx1-deficient murine neutrophils showed impaired in vivo recruitment to sites of inflammation and reduced bactericidal capability. Together, these results present a physiological role for glutaredoxin and ROS- induced reversible actin glutathionylation in regulation of actin dynamics in neutrophils. PMID:23159440

  4. Regulation of Actin Dynamics in Pollen Tubes: Control of Actin Polymer Level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naizhi Chen; Xiaolu Qu; Youjun Wu; Shanjin Huang

    2009-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton undergoes rapid reorganization In response to internal and external cues. How the dynamics of actin cytoskeleton are regulated, and how its dynamics relate to its function are fundamental questions inplant cell biology. The pollen tube is a well characterized actin-based call morphogenesis in plants. One of the striking features of actin cytoskeleton characterized in the pollen tube is its surprisingly low level of actin polymer. This special phenomenon might relate to the function of actin cytoskeleton in pollen tubes. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying this special phenomenon requires careful analysis of actin-binding proteins that modulate actin dynamics directly. Recent biochemical and biophysical analyses of several highly conserved plant actin-binding proteins reveal unusual and un-expected properties, which emphasizes the importance of carefully analyzing their action mechanism and cellular activity. In this review, we highlight an actin monomer sequestering protein, a barbed end capping protein and an F-actin severing and dynamizing protein in plant. We propose that these proteins function in harmony to regulate actin dynamics and maintain the low level of actin polymer in pollen tubes.

  5. The pros and cons of common actin labeling tools for visualizing actin dynamics during Drosophila oogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Spracklen, Andrew J.; Fagan, Tiffany N.; Lovander, Kaylee E.; Tootle, Tina L.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton is required for both development and tissue homeostasis. While fixed image analysis has provided significant insight into such events, a complete understanding of cytoskeletal dynamics requires live imaging. Numerous tools for the live imaging of actin have been generated by fusing the actin-binding domain from an actin-interacting protein to a fluorescent protein. Here we comparatively assess the utility of three such tools – Utrophin, Lifeact, an...

  6. Dynamics of Flapping Flag in Axial Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abderrahmane, Hamid Ait; Fayed, Mohamed; Gunter, Amy-Lee; Paidoussis, Michael P.; Ng, Hoi Dick

    2010-11-01

    We investigate experimentally the phenomenon of the flapping of a flag, placed within a low turbulent axial flow inside a small scale wind tunnel test section. Flags of different sizes and flexural rigidities were used. Image processing technique was used and the time series of a given point on the edge of the flag was analyzed. The stability condition of the flag was obtained and compared to the recent theoretical models and numerical simulations. Afterwards, the nonlinear dynamics of the flapping was investigated using nonlinear time series method. The nonlinear dynamics is depicted in phase space and the correlation dimension of the attractors is determined. On the basis of observations made in this study, some conclusions on the existing models were drawn.

  7. The pros and cons of common actin labeling tools for visualizing actin dynamics during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, Andrew J; Fagan, Tiffany N; Lovander, Kaylee E; Tootle, Tina L

    2014-09-15

    Dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton is required for both development and tissue homeostasis. While fixed image analysis has provided significant insight into such events, a complete understanding of cytoskeletal dynamics requires live imaging. Numerous tools for the live imaging of actin have been generated by fusing the actin-binding domain from an actin-interacting protein to a fluorescent protein. Here we comparatively assess the utility of three such tools--Utrophin, Lifeact, and F-tractin--for characterizing the actin remodeling events occurring within the germline-derived nurse cells during Drosophila mid-oogenesis or follicle development. Specifically, we used the UAS/GAL4 system to express these tools at different levels and in different cells, and analyzed these tools for effects on fertility, alterations in the actin cytoskeleton, and ability to label filamentous actin (F-actin) structures by both fixed and live imaging. While both Utrophin and Lifeact robustly label F-actin structures within the Drosophila germline, when strongly expressed they cause sterility and severe actin defects including cortical actin breakdown resulting in multi-nucleate nurse cells, early F-actin filament and aggregate formation during stage 9 (S9), and disorganized parallel actin filament bundles during stage 10B (S10B). However, by using a weaker germline GAL4 driver in combination with a higher temperature, Utrophin can label F-actin with minimal defects. Additionally, strong Utrophin expression within the germline causes F-actin formation in the nurse cell nuclei and germinal vesicle during mid-oogenesis. Similarly, Lifeact expression results in nuclear F-actin only within the germinal vesicle. F-tractin expresses at a lower level than the other two labeling tools, but labels cytoplasmic F-actin structures well without causing sterility or striking actin defects. Together these studies reveal how critical it is to evaluate the utility of each actin labeling tool

  8. Actin dynamics and the elasticity of cytoskeletal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The structural integrity of a cell depends on its cytoskeleton, which includes an actin network. This network is transient and depends upon the continual polymerization and depolymerization of actin. The degradation of an actin network, and a corresponding reduction in cell stiffness, can indicate the presence of disease. Numerical simulations will be invaluable for understanding the physics of these systems and the correlation between actin dynamics and elasticity. Here we develop a model that is capable of generating actin network structures. In particular, we develop a model of actin dynamics which considers the polymerization, depolymerization, nucleation, severing, and capping of actin filaments. The structures obtained are then fed directly into a mechanical model. This allows us to qualitatively assess the effects of changing various parameters associated with actin dynamics on the elasticity of the material.

  9. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced actin glutathionylation controls actin dynamics in neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Jiro; Li, Jingyu; Subramanian, Kulandayan K.; Mondal, Subhanjan; Bajrami, Besnik; Hattori, Hidenori; Jia, Yonghui; Dickinson, Bryan C; Zhong, Jia; Ye, Keqiang; Chang, Christopher J.; Ho, Ye-Shih; Zhou, Jun; Luo, Hongbo R.

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of actin dynamics is pivotal for cellular processes such as cell adhesion, migration, and phagocytosis, and thus is crucial for neutrophils to fulfill their roles in innate immunity. Many factors have been implicated in signal-induced actin polymerization, however the essential nature of the potential negative modulators are still poorly understood. Here we report that NADPH oxidase-dependent physiologically generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) negatively regulate actin poly...

  10. Effects of primary rotor parameters on flapping dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. T. N.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of flapping dynamics of four main rotor design features that influence the agility, stability, and operational safety of helicopters are studied. The parameters include flapping hinge offset, flapping hinge restraint, pitch-flap coupling, and blade lock number. First, the flapping equations of motion are derived that explicitly contain the design parameters. The dynamic equations are then developed for the tip-path plane, and the influence of individual and combined variations in the design parameters determined. The steady state flapping response is examined with respect to control input and aircraft angular rate which leads to a feedforward control law for control decoupling through cross feed, and a feedback control law to decouple the steady state flapping response. The condition for achieving perfect decoupling of the flapping response due to aircraft pitch and roll rates without using feedback control is also found for the hover case. It is indicated that the frequency of the regressing flapping mode of the rotor system can become low enough to require consideration in the assessment of handling characteristics.

  11. Sensing actin dynamics: Structural basis for G-actin-sensitive nuclear import of MAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Hidemi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: matsuura.yoshiyuki@d.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} MAL has a bipartite NLS that binds to Imp{alpha} in an extended conformation. {yields} Mutational analyses verified the functional significance of MAL-Imp{alpha} interactions. {yields} Induced folding and NLS-masking by G-actins inhibit nuclear import of MAL. -- Abstract: The coordination of cytoskeletal actin dynamics with gene expression reprogramming is emerging as a crucial mechanism to control diverse cellular processes, including cell migration, differentiation and neuronal circuit assembly. The actin-binding transcriptional coactivator MAL (also known as MRTF-A/MKL1/BSAC) senses G-actin concentration and transduces Rho GTPase signals to serum response factor (SRF). MAL rapidly shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus in unstimulated cells but Rho-induced depletion of G-actin leads to MAL nuclear accumulation and activation of transcription of SRF:MAL-target genes. Although the molecular and structural basis of actin-regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of MAL is not understood fully, it is proposed that nuclear import of MAL is mediated by importin {alpha}/{beta} heterodimer, and that G-actin competes with importin {alpha}/{beta} for the binding to MAL. Here we present structural, biochemical and cell biological evidence that MAL has a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the N-terminal 'RPEL' domain containing Arg-Pro-X-X-X-Glu-Leu (RPEL) motifs. The NLS residues of MAL adopt an extended conformation and bind along the surface groove of importin-{alpha}, interacting with the major- and minor-NLS binding sites. We also present a crystal structure of wild-type MAL RPEL domain in complex with five G-actins. Comparison of the importin-{alpha}- and actin-complexes revealed that the binding of G-actins to MAL is associated with folding of NLS residues into a helical conformation that is inappropriate for importin-{alpha} recognition.

  12. Lift Enhancement by Dynamically Changing Wingspan in Forward Flapping Flight

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shizhao; He, Guowei; Liu, Tianshu

    2013-01-01

    Stretching and retracting wingspan has been widely observed in the flight of birds and bats, and its effects on the aerodynamic performance particularly lift generation are intriguing. The rectangular flat-plate flapping wing with a sinusoidally stretching and retracting wingspan is proposed as a simple model of biologically-inspired dynamic morphing wings. Direct numerical simulations of the low-Reynolds-number flows around the flapping morphing wing in a parametric space are conducted by using immersed boundary method. It is found that the instantaneous and time-averaged lift coefficients of the wing can be significantly enhanced by dynamically changing wingspan in a flapping cycle. The lift enhancement is caused not only by changing the lifting surface area, but also manipulating the flow structures that are responsible to the generation of the vortex lift. The physical mechanisms behind the lift enhancement are explored by examining the three-dimensional flow structures around the flapping wing.

  13. Structural Modeling and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Actin Filament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Splettstoesser, Thomas [University of Heidelberg; Holmes, Kenneth [Max Planck Institute, Heidelberg, Germany; Noe, Frank [DFG Research Center Matheon, FU Berlin, Germany; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Actin is a major structural protein of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and enables cell motility. Here, we present a model of the actin filament (F-actin) that not only incorporates the global structure of the recently published model by Oda et al. but also conserves internal stereochemistry. A comparison is made using molecular dynamics simulation of the model with other recent F-actin models. A number of structural determents such as the protomer propeller angle, the number of hydrogen bonds, and the structural variation among the protomers are analyzed. The MD comparison is found to reflect the evolution in quality of actin models over the last 6 years. In addition, simulations of the model are carried out in states with both ADP or ATP bound and local hydrogen-bonding differences characterized.

  14. Force Generation, Polymerization Dynamics and Nucleation of Actin Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruizhe

    We study force generation and actin filament dynamics using stochastic and deterministic methods. First, we treat force generation of bundled actin filaments by polymerization via molecular-level stochastic simulations. In the widely-used Brownian Ratchet model, actin filaments grow freely whenever the tip-obstacle gap created by thermal fluctuation exceeds the monomer size. We name this model the Perfect Brownian Ratchet (PBR) model. In the PBR model, actin monomer diffusion is treated implicitly. We perform a series of simulations based on the PBR, in which obstacle motion is treated explicitly; in most previous studies, obstacle motion has been treated implicitly. We find that the cooperativity of filaments is generally weak in the PBR model, meaning that more filaments would grow more slowly given the same force per filament. Closed-form formulas are also developed, which match the simulation results. These portable and accurate formulas provide guidance for experiments and upper and lower bounds for theoretical analyses. We also studied a variation of the PBR, called the Diffusing Brownian Ratchet (DBR) model, in which both actin monomer and obstacle diffusion are treated explicitly. We find that the growth rate of multiple filaments is even lower, compared with that in PBR. This finding challenges the widely-accepted PBR assumption and suggests that pushing the study of actin dynamics down to the sub-nanometer level yields new insights. We subsequently used a rate equation approach to model the effect of local depletion of actin monomers on the nucleation of actin filaments on biomimetic beads, and how the effect is regulated by capping protein (CP). We find that near the bead surface, a higher CP concentration increases local actin concentration, which leads to an enhanced activities of actin filaments' nucleation. Our model analysis matches the experimental results and lends support to an important but undervalued hypothesis proposed by Carlier and

  15. Flap motion of helicopter rotors with novel, dynamic stall model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a nonlinear flapping equation for large inflow angles and flap angles is established by analyzing the aerodynamics of helicopter blade elements. In order to obtain a generalized flap equation, the Snel stall model was first applied to determine the lift coefficient of the helicopter rotor. A simulation experiment for specific airfoils was then conducted to verify the effectiveness of the Snel stall model as it applies to helicopters. Results show that the model requires no extraneous parameters compared to the traditional stall model and is highly accurate and practically applicable. Based on the model, the relationship between the flapping angle and the angle of attack was analyzed, as well as the advance ratio under the dynamic stall state.

  16. Spontaneous actin dynamics in contractile rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Karsten; Wollrab, Viktoria; Thiagarajan, Raghavan; Wald, Anne; Riveline, Daniel

    Networks of polymerizing actin filaments are known to be capable to self-organize into a variety of structures. For example, spontaneous actin polymerization waves have been observed in living cells in a number of circumstances, notably, in crawling neutrophils and slime molds. During later stages of cell division, they can also spontaneously form a contractile ring that will eventually cleave the cell into two daughter cells. We present a framework for describing networks of polymerizing actin filaments, where assembly is regulated by various proteins. It can also include the effects of molecular motors. We show that the molecular processes driven by these proteins can generate various structures that have been observed in contractile rings of fission yeast and mammalian cells. We discuss a possible functional role of each of these patterns. The work was supported by Agence Nationale de la Recherche, France, (ANR-10-LABX-0030-INRT) and by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft through SFB1027.

  17. Actin-based dynamics during spermatogenesis and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Xiang; YANG Wan-xi

    2007-01-01

    Actin can be found in all kinds ofeukaryotic cells, maintaining their shapes and motilities, while its dynamics in sperm cells is understood less than their nonmuscle somatic cell counterparts. Spermatogenesis is a complicated process, resulting in the production of mature sperm from primordial germ cell. Significant structural and biochemical changes take place in the seminiferous epithelium of the adult testis during spermatogenesis. It was proved that all mammalian sperm contain actin, and that F-actin may play an important role during spermatogenesis, especially in nuclear shaping. Recently a new model for sperm head elongation based on the acrosome-acroplaxome-manchette complex has been proposed. In Drosophila, F-actin assembly is supposed to be very crucial during individualization. In this mini-review, we provide an overview of the structure, function, and regulation characteristics of actin cytoskeleton, and a summary of the current status of research of actin-based structure and movement is also provided, with emphasis on the role of actins in sperm head shaping during spermiogenesis and the cell junction dynamics in the testis. Research of the Sertoli ectoplasmic specialization is in the spotlight, which is a testis-specific actin-based junction very important for the movement of germ cells across the epithelium. Study of the molecular architecture and the regulating mechanism of the Sertoli ectoplasmic specialization has become an intriguing field. All this may lead to a new strategy for male infertility and,at the same time, a novel idea may result in devising much safer contraception with high efficiency. It is hoped that the advances listed in this review would give developmental and morphological researchers a favorable investigating outline and could help to enlarge the view of new strategies and models for actin dynamics during spermatogenesis.

  18. Visualization of Actin Cytoskeletal Dynamics in Fixed and Live Drosophila Egg Chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Christopher M; Tootle, Tina L

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of actin cytoskeletal dynamics is critical for understanding the spatial and temporal regulation of actin remodeling. Drosophila oogenesis provides an excellent model system for visualizing the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we present methods for imaging the actin cytoskeleton in Drosophila egg chambers in both fixed samples by phalloidin staining and in live egg chambers using transgenic actin labeling tools.

  19. Wnt Signalling Promotes Actin Dynamics during Axon Remodelling through the Actin-Binding Protein Eps8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanna Stamatakou

    Full Text Available Upon arrival at their synaptic targets, axons slow down their growth and extensively remodel before the assembly of presynaptic boutons. Wnt proteins are target-derived secreted factors that promote axonal remodelling and synaptic assembly. In the developing spinal cord, Wnts secreted by motor neurons promote axonal remodelling of NT-3 responsive dorsal root ganglia neurons. Axon remodelling induced by Wnts is characterised by growth cone pausing and enlargement, processes that depend on the re-organisation of microtubules. However, the contribution of the actin cytoskeleton has remained unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that Wnt3a regulates the actin cytoskeleton by rapidly inducing F-actin accumulation in growth cones from rodent DRG neurons through the scaffold protein Dishevelled-1 (Dvl1 and the serine-threonine kinase Gsk3β. Importantly, these changes in actin cytoskeleton occurs before enlargement of the growth cones is evident. Time-lapse imaging shows that Wnt3a increases lamellar protrusion and filopodia velocity. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of actin assembly demonstrates that Wnt3a increases actin dynamics. Through a yeast-two hybrid screen, we identified the actin-binding protein Eps8 as a direct interactor of Dvl1, a scaffold protein crucial for the Wnt signalling pathway. Gain of function of Eps8 mimics Wnt-mediated axon remodelling, whereas Eps8 silencing blocks the axon remodelling activity of Wnt3a. Importantly, blockade of the Dvl1-Eps8 interaction completely abolishes Wnt3a-mediated axonal remodelling. These findings demonstrate a novel role for Wnt-Dvl1 signalling through Eps8 in the regulation of axonal remodeling.

  20. INNERVATED RECTUS-ABDOMINIS MYOFASCIAL FLAP FOR DYNAMIC CARDIOMYOPLASTY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIJNBERG, DS; EBELS, T; ROBINSON, PH

    1994-01-01

    This study examined the rectus abdominis myofascial flap as an innervated nap for dynamic cardiomyoplastic purposes. It is common to use the latissimus dorsi to wrap or patch around or in the heart, but there is a need for more innervated skeletal muscle for a variety of reasons. The rectus abdomini

  1. Dynamic buckling of actin within filopodia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leijnse, Natascha; Oddershede, Lene B; Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Filopodia are active tubular structures protruding from the cell surface which allow the cell to sense and interact with the surrounding environment through repetitive elongation-retraction cycles. The mechanical behavior of filopodia has been studied by measuring the traction forces exerted on...... external substrates.(1) These studies have revealed that internal actin flow can transduce a force across the cell surface through transmembrane linkers like integrins. In addition to the elongation-retraction behavior filopodia also exhibit a buckling and rotational behavior. Filopodial buckling in...

  2. Actin-Dynamics in Plant Cells: The Function of Actin Perturbing Substances Jasplakinolide, Chondramides, Phalloidin, Cytochalasins, and Latrunculins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Andreas; Blaas, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    This chapter will give an overview of the most common F-actin perturbing substances, that are used to study actin dynamics in living plant cells in studies on morphogenesis, motility, organelle movement or when apoptosis has to be induced. These substances can be divided into two major subclasses – F-actin stabilizing and polymerizing substances like jasplakinolide, chondramides and F-actin severing compounds like chytochalasins and latrunculins. Jasplakinolide was originally isolated form a marine sponge, and can now be synthesized and has become commercially available, which is responsible for its wide distribution as membrane permeable F-actin stabilizing and polymerizing agent, which may even have anti-cancer activities. Cytochalasins, derived from fungi show an F-actin severing function and many derivatives are commercially available (A, B, C, D, E, H, J), also making it a widely used compound for F-actin disruption. The same can be stated for latrunculins (A, B), derived from red sea sponges, however the mode of action is different by binding to G-actin and inhibiting incorporation into the filament. In the case of swinholide a stable complex with actin dimers is formed resulting also in severing of F-actin. For influencing F-actin dynamics in plant cells only membrane permeable drugs are useful in a broad range. We however introduce also the phallotoxins and synthetic derivatives, as they are widely used to visualize F-actin in fixed cells. A particular uptake mechanism has been shown for hepatocytes, but has also been described in siphonal giant algae. In the present chapter the focus is set on F-actin dynamics in plant cells where alterations in cytoplasmic streaming can be particularly well studied; however methods by fluorescence applications including phalloidin- and antibody staining as well as immunofluorescence-localization of the inhibitor drugs are given. PMID:26498789

  3. Study of external dynamic flap loads on a 6 percent B-1B model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiner, John M.; Manning, James C.; Capone, Francis J.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The origin of dynamic pressure loads on external divergent engine nozzle flaps of the B-1B aircraft was investigated in the NASA/LaRC 16 foot transonic tunnel using a 6 percent full span model with powered engine nacelles. External flap dynamic loads and afterbody drag associated with flap removal were measured using this model. Both dry and max. A/B power nozzles were evaluated in this study. As a result of this study, the principal mechanisms responsible for high dynamic external flap loads were determined along with performance penalty associated with flap removal.

  4. Dynamic Actin Controls Polarity Induction de novo in Protoplasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beatrix Zaban; Jan Maisch; Peter Nick

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarity and axes are central for plant morphogenesis.To study how polarity and axes are induced de novo,we investigated protoplasts of tobacco Nicotiana tabacum cv.BY-2 expressing fluorescentlytagged cytoskeletal markers.We standardized the system to such a degree that we were able to generate quantitative data on the temporal patterns of regeneration stages.The synthesis of a new cell wall marks the transition to the first stage of regeneration,and proceeds after a long preparatory phase within a few minutes.During this preparatory phase,the nucleus migrates actively,and cytoplasmic strands remodel vigorously.We probed this system for the effect of anti-cytoskeletal compounds,inducible bundling of actin,RGD-peptides,and temperature.Suppression of actin dynamics at an early stage leads to aberrant tripolar cells,whereas suppression of microtubule dynamics produces aberrant sausagelike cells with asymmetric cell walls.We integrated these data into a model,where the microtubular cytoskeleton conveys positional information between the nucleus and the membrane controlling the release or activation of components required for cell wall synthesis.Cell wall formation is followed by the induction of a new cell pole requiring dynamic actin filaments,and the new cell axis is manifested as elongation growth perpendicular to the orientation of the aligned cortical microtubules.

  5. Dynamic actin controls polarity induction de novo in protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaban, Beatrix; Maisch, Jan; Nick, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Cell polarity and axes are central for plant morphogenesis. To study how polarity and axes are induced de novo, we investigated protoplasts of tobacco Nicotiana tabacum cv. BY-2 expressing fluorescently-tagged cytoskeletal markers. We standardized the system to such a degree that we were able to generate quantitative data on the temporal patterns of regeneration stages. The synthesis of a new cell wall marks the transition to the first stage of regeneration, and proceeds after a long preparatory phase within a few minutes. During this preparatory phase, the nucleus migrates actively, and cytoplasmic strands remodel vigorously. We probed this system for the effect of anti-cytoskeletal compounds, inducible bundling of actin, RGD-peptides, and temperature. Suppression of actin dynamics at an early stage leads to aberrant tripolar cells, whereas suppression of microtubule dynamics produces aberrant sausage-like cells with asymmetric cell walls. We integrated these data into a model, where the microtubular cytoskeleton conveys positional information between the nucleus and the membrane controlling the release or activation of components required for cell wall synthesis. Cell wall formation is followed by the induction of a new cell pole requiring dynamic actin filaments, and the new cell axis is manifested as elongation growth perpendicular to the orientation of the aligned cortical microtubules.

  6. Effects of morphology on the flapping dynamics of inverted flags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Boyu; Cosse, Julia; Sader, John; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    The behavior of inverted flags has received recent attention in the study of the interaction of flexible bodies with fluid flows. It has implications in a variety of natural phenomena, such as the fluttering of leaves in the wind. As opposed to a conventional flag, defined by a fixed leading edge and a free trailing edge, an inverted flag has a free leading edge and a fixed trailing edge. The reversed flow orientation of inverted flags has led to a surprising observation. Over a narrow range of wind speeds, they exhibit a large-amplitude flapping motion that is not present in their conventional counterparts. Our study experimentally investigates the effects of flag morphology on the flapping behavior of inverted flags. Different flags ranging from rectangles to triangles are studied in a wind tunnel to assess the underlying parameters that govern their dynamics. We observe a significant shift in the limit-cycle flapping mode that is a function of flag shape parameters. This research is supported by the Lester Lees Aeronautics Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

  7. Dynamic organization of actin cytoskeleton during the polarity formation and germination of pollen protoplasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xia; Zl Huijun; SUN Yina; REN Haiyun

    2004-01-01

    The formation of the polarity of pollen protoplast and the dynamics of actin cytoskeleton were observed by non-fixation, Alexa-Phalloidin probing and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Our results showed that the protoplast obtained from stored pollen contained numerous crystalline fusiform bodies to constitute a storage form of actin. When dormant pollen was hydrated, the actin cytoskeleton forms a fine network spreading uniformly in the protoplast. In the process of polarity formation and germination of pollen protoplast, actin filaments marshaled slowly to the brim, and then formed multilayer continuous actin filament bundles surrounding the cortical of the protoplast. When the protoplast was exposed to actin filament-disrupting drugs, such as Latrunculin A and Cytochalasin D, continuously arranged actin bundles were disturbed and in this condition, the protoplast could not germinate. But when exposed to actin filament stabiling drug-phalliodin, the dynamics of actin filaments in the protoplasts behaved normally and the protoplasts could germinate normally. These results were also confirmed by the pharmacology experiments on pollen grains. And when Latrunculin A or Cytochalasin D was washed off, the ratio of pollen germination was resumed partly. All the results above show that the dynamic organization of the actin cytoskeleton are critical in the cell polarity formation and germination of pollen protoplast, and that the reorganization of actin cytoskeleton is mainly due to the rearrangement of actin filament arrays.

  8. Dynamics of actin cables in polarized growth of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eBergs

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Highly polarized growth of filamentous fungi requires a continuous supply of proteins and lipids to the hyphal tip. This transport is managed by vesicle trafficking via the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons and their associated motor proteins. Particularly, actin cables originating from the hyphal tip are essential for hyphal growth. Although specific marker proteins to visualize actin cables have been developed in filamentous fungi, the exact organization and dynamics of actin cables has remained elusive. Here we visualized actin cables using tropomyosin (TpmA and Lifeact fused to fluorescent proteins in Aspergillus nidulans and studied the dynamics and regulation. GFP tagged TpmA visualized dynamic actin cables formed from the hyphal tip with cycles of elongation and shrinkage. The elongation and shrinkage rates of actin cables were similar and approximately 0.6 μm/s. Comparison of actin markers revealed that high concentrations of Lifeact reduced actin dynamics. Simultaneous visualization of actin cables and microtubules suggests temporally and spatially coordinated polymerization and depolymerization between the two cytoskeletons. Our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of ordered polarized growth regulated by actin cables and microtubules.

  9. Coupling of the hydration water dynamics and the internal dynamics of actin detected by quasielastic neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Quasielastic neutron scattering spectra of F-actin and G-actin were measured. ► Analysis of the samples in D2O and H2O provided the spectra of hydration water. ► The first layer hydration water around F-actin is less mobile than around G-actin. ► This difference in hydration water is in concert with the internal dynamics of actin. ► Water outside the first layer behaves bulk-like but influenced by the first layer. -- Abstract: In order to characterize dynamics of water molecules around F-actin and G-actin, quasielastic neutron scattering experiments were performed on powder samples of F-actin and G-actin, hydrated either with D2O or H2O, at hydration ratios of 0.4 and 1.0. By combined analysis of the quasielastic neutron scattering spectra, the parameter values characterizing the dynamics of the water molecules in the first hydration layer and those of the water molecules outside of the first layer were obtained. The translational diffusion coefficients (DT) of the hydration water in the first layer were found to be 1.2 × 10−5 cm2/s and 1.7 × 10−5 cm2/s for F-actin and G-actin, respectively, while that for bulk water was 2.8 × 10−5 cm2/s. The residence times were 6.6 ps and 5.0 ps for F-actin and G-actin, respectively, while that for bulk water was 0.62 ps. These differences between F-actin and G-actin, indicating that the hydration water around G-actin is more mobile than that around F-actin, are in concert with the results of the internal dynamics of F-actin and G-actin, showing that G-actin fluctuates more rapidly than F-actin. This implies that the dynamics of the hydration water is coupled to the internal dynamics of the actin molecules. The DT values of the water molecules outside of the first hydration layer were found to be similar to that of bulk water though the residence times are strongly affected by the first hydration layer. This supports the recent observation on intracellular water that shows bulk-like behavior

  10. Desmosome dynamics in migrating epithelial cells requires the actin cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brett J.; Pashaj, Anjeza; Johnson, Keith R.; Wahl, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Re-modeling of epithelial tissues requires that the cells in the tissue rearrange their adhesive contacts in order to allow cells to migrate relative to neighboring cells. Desmosomes are prominent adhesive structures found in a variety of epithelial tissues that are believed to inhibit cell migration and invasion. Mechanisms regulating desmosome assembly and stability in migrating cells are largely unknown. In this study we established a cell culture model to examine the fate of desmosomal components during scratch wound migration. Desmosomes are rapidly assembled between epithelial cells at the lateral edges of migrating cells and structures are transported in a retrograde fashion while the structures become larger and mature. Desmosome assembly and dynamics in this system are dependent on the actin cytoskeleton prior to being associated with the keratin intermediate filament cytoskeleton. These studies extend our understanding of desmosome assembly and provide a system to examine desmosome assembly and dynamics during epithelial cell migration. PMID:21945137

  11. Dynamics and Regulation of Actin Cytoskeleton in Plant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Haiyun

    2007-01-01

    @@ The actin cytoskeleton constituted of globular actin (G-actin) is a ubiquitous component of eukaryotic cells and plays crucial roles in diverse physiological processes in plant cells, such as cytoplasmic streaming, organelle and nucleus positioning, cell morphogenesis, cell division, tip growth, etc.

  12. When fat is not bad: the regulation of actin dynamics by phospholipid signaling molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman ePleskot

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The actin cytoskeleton plays a key role in the plant morphogenesis and is involved in polar cell growth, movement of subcellular organelles, cell division, and plant defense. Organization of actin cytoskeleton undergoes dynamic remodeling in response to internal developmental cues and diverse environmental signals. This dynamic behavior is regulated by numerous actin-binding proteins that integrate various signaling pathways. Production of the signaling lipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidic acid affects the activity and subcellular distribution of several actin-binding proteins, and typically correlates with increased actin polymerization. Here we review current knowledge of the inter-regulatory dynamics between signaling phospholipids and the actin cytoskeleton in plant cells.

  13. Dynamic Chord-wise Tip Curvature on Flexible Flapping Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nathan; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of long rectangular flapping plates are strongly influenced by the interaction between tip and edge vortices. This has led to the development of many tip actuation mechanisms to independently bend or rotate the tip towards the root of the plate in the span-wise direction. In our current work, the influence of dynamically altering the chord-wise curvature of the tip on the generation of aerodynamic forces is investigated; for this case, the two free corners of the flat plate bend towards each other. The parameters of actuation timing, maximum curvature, Reynolds number, flexibility, and tip speed are independently varied to determine their influence. These results will further the fundamental understanding of unsteady aerodynamics. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and the Gordon and Betty Moore foundation.

  14. On the wake dynamics of flapping inverted flags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmanov, Anvar; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Cosse, Julia; Gharib, Mory

    2014-11-01

    As recently shown experimentally by Kim et al. (JFM, 2013), when a flexible flag with a fixed trailing edge (an inverted flag) is exposed to a uniform inflow it can exhibit complex structural response and rich fluid-structure interaction (FSI) dynamics. We employ a new FSI numerical method to carry out large-eddy simulation (LES) of inverted flags in the range where large-amplitude flapping instabilities have been found experimentally. The numerical method integrates the curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) FSI method of Borazjani et al. (JCP, 2008) with the thin-shell, rotation-free, finite-element (FE) formulation of Stolarski et al. (Int. JNME, 2013) and is able to simulate FSI of flexible thin bodies undergoing oscillations of arbitrarily large amplitude. The dynamic Smagorinsky model is employed for subgrid scale closure and a wall model is employed for reconstructing velocity boundary conditions. Comparisons with the experimental data show that the simulations are able to capture the structural response of the flag with very good accuracy. The computed results are analyzed to elucidate the structure and dynamics of the massively separated, unsteady flow shed off the flag edges. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  15. Mammalian Fat1 cadherin regulates actin dynamics and cell–cell contact

    OpenAIRE

    Tanoue, Takuji; Takeichi, Masatoshi

    2004-01-01

    Fat cadherins form a distinct subfamily of the cadherin gene superfamily, and are featured by their unusually large extracellular domain. In this work, we investigated the function of a mammalian Fat cadherin. Fat1 was localized at filopodial tips, lamellipodial edges, and cell–cell boundaries, overlapping with dynamic actin structures. RNA interference–mediated knockdown of Fat1 resulted in disorganization of cell junction–associated F-actin and other actin fibers/cables, disturbance of cell...

  16. Flapping Dynamics of an Inverted Flexible Foil in a Uniform Axial Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurugubelli Venkata, Pardha Saradhi; Jaiman, Rajeev K.

    2014-11-01

    This work presents a numerical study on self-induced flapping dynamics of an inverted flexible foil in uniform flow. The inverted foil considered in this study is clamped at the trailing edge and the leading edge is allowed to oscillate. A high-order coupled FSI solver based on CFEI formulation has been used to present the flapping response results for a wide range of nondimensional bending rigidity using a fixed Reynolds number of 1000 and a mass-ratio of 0.1. As a function of bending rigidity four flapping regimes have been discovered: fixed point, inverted limit-cycle oscillation, deflected flapping, and flipped flapping. The inverted foil configuration undergoes flapping motion more readily and experiences very large amplitude oscillations than the conventional foil. A wide variety of vortex wakes with a maximum of 14 vortices per oscillation cycle have been observed. The inverted limit-cycle flapping generate novel 4P +6S (14 vortices) and 2P +6S (10 vortices) wakes. On the other hand, the flipped flapping regime is characterized by a von Kármán wake. We also observe that inverted foil can extract 1000 times more energy from the surrounding fluid compared to the conventional foil.

  17. TWISTED DWARF1 Mediates the Action of Auxin Transport Inhibitors on Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinsheng; Bailly, Aurelien; Zwiewka, Marta; Sovero, Valpuri; Di Donato, Martin; Ge, Pei; Oehri, Jacqueline; Aryal, Bibek; Hao, Pengchao; Linnert, Miriam; Burgardt, Noelia Inés; Lücke, Christian; Weiwad, Matthias; Michel, Max; Weiergräber, Oliver H; Pollmann, Stephan; Azzarello, Elisa; Mancuso, Stefano; Ferro, Noel; Fukao, Yoichiro; Hoffmann, Céline; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Friml, Jiří; Thomas, Clément; Geisler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Plant growth and architecture is regulated by the polar distribution of the hormone auxin. Polarity and flexibility of this process is provided by constant cycling of auxin transporter vesicles along actin filaments, coordinated by a positive auxin-actin feedback loop. Both polar auxin transport and vesicle cycling are inhibited by synthetic auxin transport inhibitors, such as 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), counteracting the effect of auxin; however, underlying targets and mechanisms are unclear. Using NMR, we map the NPA binding surface on the Arabidopsis thaliana ABCB chaperone TWISTED DWARF1 (TWD1). We identify ACTIN7 as a relevant, although likely indirect, TWD1 interactor, and show TWD1-dependent regulation of actin filament organization and dynamics and that TWD1 is required for NPA-mediated actin cytoskeleton remodeling. The TWD1-ACTIN7 axis controls plasma membrane presence of efflux transporters, and as a consequence act7 and twd1 share developmental and physiological phenotypes indicative of defects in auxin transport. These can be phenocopied by NPA treatment or by chemical actin (de)stabilization. We provide evidence that TWD1 determines downstream locations of auxin efflux transporters by adjusting actin filament debundling and dynamizing processes and mediating NPA action on the latter. This function appears to be evolutionary conserved since TWD1 expression in budding yeast alters actin polarization and cell polarity and provides NPA sensitivity. PMID:27053424

  18. Calcium influx through CRAC channels controls actin organization and dynamics at the immune synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Catherine A; Jankowska, Katarzyna I; Burkhardt, Janis K; Lewis, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) engagement opens Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels and triggers formation of an immune synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. At the synapse, actin reorganizes into a concentric lamellipod and lamella with retrograde actin flow that helps regulate the intensity and duration of TCR signaling. We find that Ca(2+) influx is required to drive actin organization and dynamics at the synapse. Calcium acts by promoting actin depolymerization and localizing actin polymerization and the actin nucleation promotion factor WAVE2 to the periphery of the lamellipod while suppressing polymerization elsewhere. Ca(2+)-dependent retrograde actin flow corrals ER tubule extensions and STIM1/Orai1 complexes to the synapse center, creating a self-organizing process for CRAC channel localization. Our results demonstrate a new role for Ca(2+) as a critical regulator of actin organization and dynamics at the synapse, and reveal potential feedback loops through which Ca(2+) influx may modulate TCR signaling. PMID:27440222

  19. Calcium influx through CRAC channels controls actin organization and dynamics at the immune synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Catherine A; Jankowska, Katarzyna I; Burkhardt, Janis K; Lewis, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) engagement opens Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels and triggers formation of an immune synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. At the synapse, actin reorganizes into a concentric lamellipod and lamella with retrograde actin flow that helps regulate the intensity and duration of TCR signaling. We find that Ca2+ influx is required to drive actin organization and dynamics at the synapse. Calcium acts by promoting actin depolymerization and localizing actin polymerization and the actin nucleation promotion factor WAVE2 to the periphery of the lamellipod while suppressing polymerization elsewhere. Ca2+-dependent retrograde actin flow corrals ER tubule extensions and STIM1/Orai1 complexes to the synapse center, creating a self-organizing process for CRAC channel localization. Our results demonstrate a new role for Ca2+ as a critical regulator of actin organization and dynamics at the synapse, and reveal potential feedback loops through which Ca2+ influx may modulate TCR signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14850.001 PMID:27440222

  20. Changes in actin dynamics are involved in salicylic acid signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoušková, Jindřiška; Janda, Martin; Fišer, Radovan; Sašek, Vladimír; Kocourková, Daniela; Burketová, Lenka; Dušková, Jiřina; Martinec, Jan; Valentová, Olga

    2014-06-01

    Changes in actin cytoskeleton dynamics are one of the crucial players in many physiological as well as non-physiological processes in plant cells. Positioning of actin filament arrays is necessary for successful establishment of primary lines of defense toward pathogen attack, depolymerization leads very often to the enhanced susceptibility to the invading pathogen. On the other hand it was also shown that the disruption of actin cytoskeleton leads to the induction of defense response leading to the expression of PATHOGENESIS RELATED proteins (PR). In this study we show that pharmacological actin depolymerization leads to the specific induction of genes in salicylic acid pathway but not that involved in jasmonic acid signaling. Life imaging of leafs of Arabidopsis thaliana with GFP-tagged fimbrin (GFP-fABD2) treated with 1 mM salicylic acid revealed rapid disruption of actin filaments resembling the pattern viewed after treatment with 200 nM latrunculin B. The effect of salicylic acid on actin filament fragmentation was prevented by exogenous addition of phosphatidic acid, which binds to the capping protein and thus promotes actin polymerization. The quantitative evaluation of actin filament dynamics is also presented.

  1. Cortactin promotes exosome secretion by controlling branched actin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Seema; Hoshino, Daisuke; Hong, Nan Hyung; Kirkbride, Kellye C; Grega-Larson, Nathan E; Seiki, Motoharu; Tyska, Matthew J; Weaver, Alissa M

    2016-07-18

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that influence cellular behavior and enhance cancer aggressiveness by carrying bioactive molecules. The mechanisms that regulate exosome secretion are poorly understood. Here, we show that the actin cytoskeletal regulatory protein cortactin promotes exosome secretion. Knockdown or overexpression of cortactin in cancer cells leads to a respective decrease or increase in exosome secretion, without altering exosome cargo content. Live-cell imaging revealed that cortactin controls both trafficking and plasma membrane docking of multivesicular late endosomes (MVEs). Regulation of exosome secretion by cortactin requires binding to the branched actin nucleating Arp2/3 complex and to actin filaments. Furthermore, cortactin, Rab27a, and coronin 1b coordinately control stability of cortical actin MVE docking sites and exosome secretion. Functionally, the addition of purified exosomes to cortactin-knockdown cells rescued defects of those cells in serum-independent growth and invasion. These data suggest a model in which cortactin promotes exosome secretion by stabilizing cortical actin-rich MVE docking sites. PMID:27402952

  2. New Insights into Dynamic Actin-Based Chloroplast Photorelocation Movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sam-Geun Kong; Masamitsu Wada

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplast movement is essential for plants to survive under various environmental light conditions.Phototropins-plant-specific blue-light-activated receptor kinases-mediate the response by perceiving light intensity and direction.Recently,novel chloroplast actin (cp-actin) filaments have been identified as playing a pivotal role in the directional chloroplast photorelocation movement.Encouraging progress has recently been made in this field of research through molecular genetics and cell biological analyses.This review describes factors that have been identified as being involved in chloroplast movement and their roles in the regulation of cp-actin filaments,thus providing a basis for reflection on their biochemical activities and functions.

  3. Filament attachment dynamics in actin-based propulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    2005-01-01

    Theory and experiment have established that F-actin filaments are strongly attached to the intracellular parasites (such as Listeria) they propel with ``comet tails''. We consider the implications of these observations for propulsion. By calculating the motion produced in various models of attachment and comparing to experiment we demonstrate that the attachment must be sliding rather than hinged. By modeling experiments on ActA-coated spheres we draw conclusions regarding the interaction between F-actin and their surfaces that may also be applicable to living systems.

  4. Computer Simulations of Mechano-Chemical Networks Choreographing Actin Dynamics in Cell Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, Pavel I.; Hu, Longhua; Papoian, Garegin A.

    In eukaryotic cells, cell motility is largely driven by self-assembly and growth of filamentous networks comprised of actin. Numerous proteins regulate actin network dynamics either biochemically, or through mechanical interactions. This regulation is rather complex, intricately coordinated both spatially and temporally. Although experiments in vivo and in vitro have provided a trove of structural and biochemical information about actin-based cell motility processes, experimental data is not always easy to interpret unambiguously, sometimes various interpretations being in contradiction with each other. Hence, mathematical modeling approaches are necessary for providing a physical foundation for interpreting and guiding experiments. In particular, computer simulations based on physicochemical interactions provide a systems-level description of protrusion dynamics. In this contribution, we review recent progress in modeling actin-based cell motility using detailed computer simulations. We elaborate on the way actin network dynamics is determined by the interplay between chemical reactions, mechanical feedbacks, and transport bottlenecks. We also discuss the role of inherent randomness of elementary chemical reactions in determining the dynamical behavior of the mechano-chemical network controlling actin polymerization and growth.

  5. Quasi-3d aerodynamic code for analyzing dynamic flap response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos García, Néstor

    frequencies and oscillation amplitudes, and generally a good agreement is obtained. The capability of the code to simulate a trailing edge flap under steady or unsteady flow conditions has been proven. A parametric study on rotational effects induced by Coriolis and centrifugal forces in the boundary layer...

  6. A comparative molecular dynamics study on BACE1 and BACE2 flap flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumalo, H M; Soliman, Mahmoud E

    2016-10-01

    Beta-amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme1 (BACE1) and beta-amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme2 (BACE2), members of aspartyl protease family, are close homologs and have high similarity in their protein crystal structures. However, their enzymatic properties are different, which leads to different clinical outcomes. In this study, we performed sequence analysis and all-atom molecular dynamic (MD) simulations for both enzymes in their ligand-free states in order to compare their dynamical flap behaviors. This is to enhance our understanding of the relationship between sequence, structure and the dynamics of this protein family. Sequence analysis shows that in BACE1 and BACE2, most of the ligand-binding sites are conserved, indicative of their enzymatic property as aspartyl protease members. The other conserved residues are more or less unsystematically localized throughout the structure. Herein, we proposed and applied different combined parameters to define the asymmetric flap motion; the distance, d1, between the flap tip and the flexible region; the dihedral angle, φ, to account for the twisting motion and the TriCα angle, θ2 and θ1. All four combined parameters were found to appropriately define the observed "twisting" motion during the flaps different conformational states. Additional analysis of the parameters indicated that the flaps can exist in an ensemble of conformations, i.e. closed, semi-open and open conformations for both systems. However, the behavior of the flap tips during simulations is different between BACE1 and BACE2. The BACE1 active site cavity is more spacious as compared to that of BACE2. The analysis of 10S loop and 113S loop showed a similar trend to that of flaps, with the BACE1 loops being more flexible and less stable than those of BACE2. We believe that the results, methods and perspectives highlighted in this report would assist researchers in the discovery of BACE inhibitors as potential Alzheimer's disease therapies

  7. The interplay between neuronal activity and actin dynamics mimic the setting of an LTD synaptic tag

    OpenAIRE

    Szabó, Eszter C.; Manguinhas, Rita; Fonseca, Rosalina

    2016-01-01

    Persistent forms of plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD), are dependent on the interplay between activity-dependent synaptic tags and the capture of plasticity-related proteins. We propose that the synaptic tag represents a structural alteration that turns synapses permissive to change. We found that modulation of actin dynamics has different roles in the induction and maintenance of LTD. Inhibition of either actin depolymerisation or polymerization blocks LTD induction whereas only...

  8. The interplay between neuronal activity and actin dynamics mimic the setting of an LTD synaptic tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Eszter C; Manguinhas, Rita; Fonseca, Rosalina

    2016-09-21

    Persistent forms of plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD), are dependent on the interplay between activity-dependent synaptic tags and the capture of plasticity-related proteins. We propose that the synaptic tag represents a structural alteration that turns synapses permissive to change. We found that modulation of actin dynamics has different roles in the induction and maintenance of LTD. Inhibition of either actin depolymerisation or polymerization blocks LTD induction whereas only the inhibition of actin depolymerisation blocks LTD maintenance. Interestingly, we found that actin depolymerisation and CaMKII activation are involved in LTD synaptic-tagging and capture. Moreover, inhibition of actin polymerisation mimics the setting of a synaptic tag, in an activity-dependent manner, allowing the expression of LTD in non-stimulated synapses. Suspending synaptic activation also restricts the time window of synaptic capture, which can be restored by inhibiting actin polymerization. Our results support our hypothesis that modulation of the actin cytoskeleton provides an input-specific signal for synaptic protein capture.

  9. AIP1 acts with cofilin to control actin dynamics during epithelial morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Dandan; Pan, Hanshuang; Wan, Ping; Wu, Jing; Luo, Jun; Zhu, Hong; Chen, Jiong

    2012-10-01

    During epithelial morphogenesis, cells not only maintain tight adhesion for epithelial integrity but also allow dynamic intercellular movement to take place within cell sheets. How these seemingly opposing processes are coordinated is not well understood. Here, we report that the actin disassembly factors AIP1 and cofilin are required for remodeling of adherens junctions (AJs) during ommatidial precluster formation in Drosophila eye epithelium, a highly stereotyped cell rearrangement process which we describe in detail in our live imaging study. AIP1 is enriched together with F-actin in the apical region of preclusters, whereas cofilin displays a diffuse and uniform localization pattern. Cofilin overexpression completely rescues AJ remodeling defects caused by AIP1 loss of function, and cofilin physically interacts with AIP1. Pharmacological reduction of actin turnover results in similar AJ remodeling defects and decreased turnover of E-cadherin, which also results from AIP1 deficiency, whereas an F-actin-destabilizing drug affects AJ maintenance and epithelial integrity. Together with other data on actin polymerization, our results suggest that AIP1 enhances cofilin-mediated actin disassembly in the apical region of precluster cells to promote remodeling of AJs and thus intercellular movement, but also that robust actin polymerization promotes AJ general adhesion and integrity during the remodeling process.

  10. Blood flow dynamics and sensitivity in breasts after reconstruction with DIEP-flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasson, Stina; Svensson, Karin; Wollmer, Per; Velander, Patrik; Svensson, Henry

    2014-12-01

    A method of breast reconstruction is based on the Deep Inferior Epigastric Perforator (DIEP) technique. Skin and fat are transplanted from the abdomen to the chest; blood vessels are reconnected through microsurgery. Nerves are, however, left unconnected. This study aims to evaluate the blood flow and reinnervation of blood vessels and skin in breasts reconstructed by DIEP flaps without neural repair. In all, DIEP flaps of 10 patients were tested at an average of 16.3 months postoperatively. Blood flow was assessed by PeriScan PIM II System, both before and after indirect heating. Tactile perception threshold was assessed by Semmes-Weinstein monofilament and thermal sensibility by SENSELab MSA Thermotest. The patients' contralateral breasts were used as controls. The blood flow of the flaps was statistically significantly lower than in the control breasts, both before and after indirect heating. The change in blood flow after indirect heating did, however, not significantly differ when comparing the breasts. All flaps regained deep pressure sensibility in all four quadrants. Five patients regained even better sensibility in one of their quadrants. Seven patients regained perception of cold stimuli, five perceived warmth. This study has shown that skin blood flow regulation is present in DIEP flaps 1 year after reconstruction. Blood flow dynamics are very similar to those in the normal breast. There is also a recovery of tactile and thermal sensibility, but this study has not shown any clear parallels between recovery blood flow, tactile sensibility and thermal sensibility.

  11. Cdc28–Cln3 phosphorylation of Sla1 regulates actin patch dynamics in different modes of fungal growth

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Guisheng; Wang, Yan-Ming; Wang, Yue

    2012-01-01

    A dynamic balance between targeted transport and endocytosis is critical for polarized cell growth. However, how actin-mediated endocytosis is regulated in different growth modes remains unclear. Here we report differential regulation of cortical actin patch dynamics between the yeast and hyphal growth in Candida albicans. The mechanism involves phosphoregulation of the endocytic protein Sla1 by the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) Cdc28–Cln3 and the actin-regulating kinase Prk1. Mutational stud...

  12. Self-assembly of actin monomers into long filaments: Brownian Dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2009-01-01

    Brownian dynamics simulations are used to study the dynamical process of self-assembly of actin monomers into long filaments containing up to 1000 actin protomers. In order to overcome the large separation of time scales between the diffusive motion of the freemonomers and the relatively slow...... to unravel certain relations between thefilament's physical properties and the model parameters such as the attachment rate constant and the size of the capture zone, the detachment rate and the probability of the detached event, as well as the growth rate and waiting times between two successive attachment...

  13. Unconventional myosins, actin dynamics and endocytosis: a ménage à trois?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldati, Thierry

    2003-06-01

    Ever since the discovery of class I myosins, the first nonmuscle myosins, about 30 years ago, the history of unconventional myosins has been linked to the organization and working of actin filaments. It slowly emerged from studies of class I myosins in lower eukaryotes that they are involved in mechanisms of endocytosis. Most interestingly, a flurry of recent findings assign a more active role to class I myosins in regulating the spatial and temporal organization of actin filament nucleation and elongation. The results highlight the multiple links between class I myosins and the major actin nucleator, the Arp2/3 complex, and its newly described activators. Two additional types of unconventional myosins, myosinIX, and Dictyostelium discoideum MyoM, have recently been tied to the signaling pathways controlling actin cytoskeleton remodeling. The present review surveys the links between these three classes of molecular motors and the complex cellular processes of endocytosis and actin dynamics, and concentrates on a working model accounting for the function of class I myosins via recruitment of the machinery responsible for actin nucleation and elongation. PMID:12753645

  14. Lifeact-mEGFP reveals a dynamic apical F-actin network in tip growing plant cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Vidali

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Actin is essential for tip growth in plants. However, imaging actin in live plant cells has heretofore presented challenges. In previous studies, fluorescent probes derived from actin-binding proteins often alter growth, cause actin bundling and fail to resolve actin microfilaments. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report we use Lifeact-mEGFP, an actin probe that does not affect the dynamics of actin, to visualize actin in the moss Physcomitrella patens and pollen tubes from Lilium formosanum and Nicotiana tobaccum. Lifeact-mEGFP robustly labels actin microfilaments, particularly in the apex, in both moss protonemata and pollen tubes. Lifeact-mEGFP also labels filamentous actin structures in other moss cell types, including cells of the gametophore. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Lifeact-mEGFP, when expressed at optimal levels does not alter moss protonemal or pollen tube growth. We suggest that Lifeact-mEGFP represents an exciting new versatile probe for further studies of actin's role in tip growing plant cells.

  15. Arabidopsis Actin-Depolymerizing Factor-4 links pathogen perception, defense activation and transcription to cytoskeletal dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Porter

    Full Text Available The primary role of Actin-Depolymerizing Factors (ADFs is to sever filamentous actin, generating pointed ends, which in turn are incorporated into newly formed filaments, thus supporting stochastic actin dynamics. Arabidopsis ADF4 was recently shown to be required for the activation of resistance in Arabidopsis following infection with the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst expressing the effector protein AvrPphB. Herein, we demonstrate that the expression of RPS5, the cognate resistance protein of AvrPphB, was dramatically reduced in the adf4 mutant, suggesting a link between actin cytoskeletal dynamics and the transcriptional regulation of R-protein activation. By examining the PTI (PAMP Triggered Immunity response in the adf4 mutant when challenged with Pst expressing AvrPphB, we observed a significant reduction in the expression of the PTI-specific target gene FRK1 (Flg22-Induced Receptor Kinase 1. These data are in agreement with recent observations demonstrating a requirement for RPS5 in PTI-signaling in the presence of AvrPphB. Furthermore, MAPK (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-signaling was significantly reduced in the adf4 mutant, while no such reduction was observed in the rps5-1 point mutation under similar conditions. Isoelectric focusing confirmed phosphorylation of ADF4 at serine-6, and additional in planta analyses of ADF4's role in immune signaling demonstrates that nuclear localization is phosphorylation independent, while localization to the actin cytoskeleton is linked to ADF4 phosphorylation. Taken together, these data suggest a novel role for ADF4 in controlling gene-for-gene resistance activation, as well as MAPK-signaling, via the coordinated regulation of actin cytoskeletal dynamics and R-gene transcription.

  16. On the Connection Between Flap Side-Edge Noise and Tip Vortex Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalino, D.; Hazir, A.; Fares, E.; Duda, B.; Khorrami, M. R.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present work is to investigate how the dynamics of the vortical flow about the flap side edge of an aircraft determine the acoustic radiation. A validated lattice- Boltzmann CFD solution of the unsteady flow about a detailed business jet configuration in approach conditions is used for the present analysis. Evidence of the connection between the noise generated by several segments of the inboard flap tip and the aerodynamic forces acting on the same segments is given, proving that the noise generation mechanism has a spatially coherent and acoustically compact character on the scale of the flap chord, and that the edge-scattering effects are of secondary importance. Subsequently, evidence of the connection between the kinematics of the tip vortex system and the aerodynamic force is provided. The kinematics of the dual vortex system are investigated via a core detection technique. Emphasis is placed on the mutual induction effects between the two main vortices rolling up from the pressure and suction sides of the flap edge. A simple heuristic formula that relates the far-field noise spectrum and the cross-spectrum of the unsteady vortical positions is developed.

  17. ATEFlap aerodynamic model, a dynamic stall model including the effects of trailing edge flap deflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergami, L.; Gaunaa, M.

    2012-02-15

    The report presents the ATEFlap aerodynamic model, which computes the unsteady lift, drag and moment on a 2D airfoil section equipped with Adaptive Trailing Edge Flap. The model captures the unsteady response related to the effects of the vorticity shed into the wake, and the dynamics of flow separation a thin-airfoil potential flow model is merged with a dynamic stall model of the Beddoes-Leishmann type. The inputs required by the model are steady data for lift, drag, and moment coefficients as function of angle of attack and flap deflection. Further steady data used by the Beddoes- Leishmann dynamic stall model are computed in an external preprocessor application, which gives the user the possibility to verify, and eventually correct, the steady data passed to the aerodynamic model. The ATEFlap aerodynamic model is integrated in the aeroelastic simulation tool HAWC2, thus al- lowing to simulate the response of a wind turbine with trailing edge flaps on the rotor. The algorithms used by the preprocessor, and by aerodynamic model are presented, and modifications to previous implementations of the aerodynamic model are briefly discussed. The performance and the validity of the model are verified by comparing the dynamic response computed by the ATEFlap with solutions from CFD simulations. (Author)

  18. Signaling and Dynamic Actin Responses of B Cells on Topographical Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchum, Christina; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fourkas, John; Song, Wenxia; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    B cells become activated upon physical contact with antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells. Binding of the B cell receptor with antigen initiates actin-mediated spreading of B cells, signaling cascades and eventually infection fighting antibodies. Lymphocytes, including B cells and T cells, have been shown to be responsive to the physical parameters of the contact surface, such as antigen mobility and substrate stiffness. However the roll of surface topography on lymphocyte function is unknown. Here we investigate the degree to which substrate topography controls actin-mediated spreading and B cell activation using nano-fabricated surfaces and live cell imaging. The model topographical system consists of 600 nanometer tall ridges with spacing varying between 800 nanometers and 5 micrometers. Using TIRF imaging we observe actin dynamics, B cell receptor motion and calcium signaling of B cells as they spread on the ridged substrates. We show that the spacing between ridges had a strong effect on the dynamics of actin and calcium influx on B cells. Our results indicate that B cells are highly sensitive to surface topography during cell spreading and signaling activation.

  19. The F-actin modifier villin regulates insulin granule dynamics and exocytosis downstream of islet cell autoantigen 512

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mziaut

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Our findings show that villin controls the size of the F-actin cages restricting SGs and, thus, regulates their dynamics and availability for exocytosis. Evidence that villin acts downstream of Ica512 also indicates that SGs directly influence the remodeling properties of the cortical actin cytoskeleton for tight control of insulin secretion.

  20. Passive control of a dynamically pitching wind turbine airfoil under aeroelastic conditions using a Gurney flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoueeyan, Pourya; Magstadt, Andrew; Strike, John; Hind, Michael; Naughton, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    To reduce the cost of energy, wind turbine design has moved towards larger blades that are heavier and have lower relative structural stiffness compared to shorter blades. To address the lower blade stiffness, different flow control techniques have been considered. The Gurney flap, a small, low-cost and effective control method, is a promising control actuator. Wind tunnel testing has been performed on a DU97-W-300 10% flatback airfoil undergoing dynamic pitching relevant to flow conditions encountered by wind turbine blades. To mimic blade compliance, the airfoil is actively driven through a torsionally elastic element. Time-resolved surface pressure measurements have been acquired from which lift Cl and moment Cm coefficients were calculated. Changes in Cl and Cm in moderate and deep dynamic stall regimes for different Gurney flap heights were studied for different pitch drive conditions (amplitude and frequency). The results show the significant impact of compliance on the angle of attack (α) range experienced by the airfoil. Shifts in α range result in different hysteresis behavior in both Cl and Cm and demonstrate the effectiveness of the Gurney flap in modifying the aerodynamics of wind turbine blades experiencing dynamic pitching. This work supported by DOE and a gift from BP.

  1. Emergence of large-scale cell morphology and movement from local actin filament growth dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine I Lacayo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Variations in cell migration and morphology are consequences of changes in underlying cytoskeletal organization and dynamics. We investigated how these large-scale cellular events emerge as direct consequences of small-scale cytoskeletal molecular activities. Because the properties of the actin cytoskeleton can be modulated by actin-remodeling proteins, we quantitatively examined how one such family of proteins, enabled/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (Ena/VASP, affects the migration and morphology of epithelial fish keratocytes. Keratocytes generally migrate persistently while exhibiting a characteristic smooth-edged "canoe" shape, but may also exhibit less regular morphologies and less persistent movement. When we observed that the smooth-edged canoe keratocyte morphology correlated with enrichment of Ena/VASP at the leading edge, we mislocalized and overexpressed Ena/VASP proteins and found that this led to changes in the morphology and movement persistence of cells within a population. Thus, local changes in actin filament dynamics due to Ena/VASP activity directly caused changes in cell morphology, which is coupled to the motile behavior of keratocytes. We also characterized the range of natural cell-to-cell variation within a population by using measurable morphological and behavioral features--cell shape, leading-edge shape, filamentous actin (F-actin distribution, cell speed, and directional persistence--that we have found to correlate with each other to describe a spectrum of coordinated phenotypes based on Ena/VASP enrichment at the leading edge. This spectrum stretched from smooth-edged, canoe-shaped keratocytes--which had VASP highly enriched at their leading edges and migrated fast with straight trajectories--to more irregular, rounder cells migrating slower with less directional persistence and low levels of VASP at their leading edges. We developed a mathematical model that accounts for these coordinated cell-shape and

  2. Effects of polymerization and nucleotide identity on the conformational dynamics of the bacterial actin homolog MreB

    OpenAIRE

    Colavin, Alexandre; Hsin, Jen; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2014-01-01

    Cytoskeletal filaments drive many dynamic cellular processes, such as the regulation of shape by actin networks in eukaryotes and by the actin homolog MreB in rod-shaped bacteria. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to demonstrate close parallels between the conformational dynamics of actin and MreB, in which polymerization induces flattening of MreB subunits that restructures the ATP binding pocket to promote hydrolysis. We also find that ATP-bound MreB filaments are substan...

  3. The Dynamic Pollen Tube Cytoskeleton: Live Cell Studies Using Actin-Binding and Microtubule-Binding Reporter Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alice Y. Cheung; Qiao-hong Duan; Silvia Santos Costa; Barend H.J.de Graaf; Veronica S.Di Stilio; Jose Feijo; Hen-Ming Wu

    2008-01-01

    Pollen tubes elongate within the pistil to transport sperm cells to the embryo sac for fertilization.Growth occurs exclusively at the tube apex,rendering pollen tube elongation a most dramatic polar cell growth process.A hall-mark pollen tube feature is its cytoskeleton,which comprises elaborately organized and dynamic actin microfilaments and microtubules.Pollen tube growth is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton;its organization and regulation have been exalined extensively by various approaches.including fluorescent protein labeled actin-binding proteins in live cell studies.Using the previously described GFP-NtADF1 and GFP-LIADF1, and a new actin reporter protein NtPLIM2b-GFP,we re-affirm that the predominant actin structures in elongating tobacco and lily pollen tubes are long,streaming actin cables along the pollen tube shank,and a subapical structure comprising shorter actin cables.The subapical collection of actin microfilaments undergoes dynamic changes,giving rise to the appearance of structures that range from basket-or funnel-shaped,mesh-like to a subtle ring.NtPLIM2b-GFP is used in combination with a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Rho GTPases,AtROP-GEF1,to illustrate the use of these actin reporter proteins to explore the linkage between the polar cell growth process and its actin cytoskeleton.Contrary to the actin cytoskeleton,microtubules appear not to play a direct role in supporting the polar cell growth process in angiosperm pollen tubes.Using a microtubule reporter protein based on the microtubule end-binding protein from Arabidopsis AtEB1,GFP-AtEB1,we show that the extensive microtubule network in elongating pollen tubes displays varying degrees of dynamics.These reporter proteins provide versatile tools to explore the functional connection between major structural and signaling components of the polar pollen tube growth process.

  4. Dynamics of a pneumatic artificial muscle actuation system driving a trailing edge flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Benjamin K. S.; Kothera, Curt S.; Wang, Gang; Wereley, Norman M.

    2014-09-01

    This study presents a time domain dynamic model of an antagonistic pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM) driven trailing edge flap (TEF) system for next generation active helicopter rotors. Active rotor concepts are currently being widely researched in the rotorcraft community as a means to provide a significant leap forward in performance through primary aircraft control, vibration mitigation and noise reduction. Recent work has shown PAMs to be a promising candidate for active rotor actuation due to their combination of high force, large stroke, light weight, and suitable bandwidth. When arranged into biologically inspired agonist/antagonist muscle pairs they can produce bidirectional torques for effectively driving a TEF. However, there are no analytical dynamic models in the literature that can accurately capture the behavior of such systems across the broad range of frequencies required for this demanding application. This work combines mechanical, pneumatic, and aerodynamic component models into a global flap system model developed for the Bell 407 rotor system. This model can accurately predict pressure, force, and flap angle response to pneumatic control valve inputs over a range of operating frequencies from 7 to 35 Hz (1/rev to 5/rev for the Bell 407) and operating pressures from 30 to 90 psi.

  5. Dynamics of a pneumatic artificial muscle actuation system driving a trailing edge flap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents a time domain dynamic model of an antagonistic pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM) driven trailing edge flap (TEF) system for next generation active helicopter rotors. Active rotor concepts are currently being widely researched in the rotorcraft community as a means to provide a significant leap forward in performance through primary aircraft control, vibration mitigation and noise reduction. Recent work has shown PAMs to be a promising candidate for active rotor actuation due to their combination of high force, large stroke, light weight, and suitable bandwidth. When arranged into biologically inspired agonist/antagonist muscle pairs they can produce bidirectional torques for effectively driving a TEF. However, there are no analytical dynamic models in the literature that can accurately capture the behavior of such systems across the broad range of frequencies required for this demanding application. This work combines mechanical, pneumatic, and aerodynamic component models into a global flap system model developed for the Bell 407 rotor system. This model can accurately predict pressure, force, and flap angle response to pneumatic control valve inputs over a range of operating frequencies from 7 to 35 Hz (1/rev to 5/rev for the Bell 407) and operating pressures from 30 to 90 psi. (paper)

  6. Dynamics of actin waves on patterned substrates: a quantitative analysis of circular dorsal ruffles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Bernitt

    Full Text Available Circular Dorsal Ruffles (CDRs have been known for decades, but the mechanism that organizes these actin waves remains unclear. In this article we systematically analyze the dynamics of CDRs on fibroblasts with respect to characteristics of current models of actin waves. We studied CDRs on heterogeneously shaped cells and on cells that we forced into disk-like morphology. We show that CDRs exhibit phenomena such as periodic cycles of formation, spiral patterns, and mutual wave annihilations that are in accord with an active medium description of CDRs. On cells of controlled morphologies, CDRs exhibit extremely regular patterns of repeated wave formation and propagation, whereas on random-shaped cells the dynamics seem to be dominated by the limited availability of a reactive species. We show that theoretical models of reaction-diffusion type incorporating conserved species capture partially the behavior we observe in our data.

  7. Novel regulation of Ski protein stability and endosomal sorting by actin cytoskeleton dynamics in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Caligaris, Cassandre; Del Valle-Espinosa, Eugenio; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; González-Arenas, Nelly R; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Briones-Orta, Marco A; Macías-Silva, Marina

    2015-02-13

    TGF-β-induced antimitotic signals are highly regulated during cell proliferation under normal and pathological conditions, such as liver regeneration and cancer. Up-regulation of the transcriptional cofactors Ski and SnoN during liver regeneration may favor hepatocyte proliferation by inhibiting TGF-β signals. In this study, we found a novel mechanism that regulates Ski protein stability through TGF-β and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Ski protein is distributed between the nucleus and cytoplasm of normal hepatocytes, and the molecular mechanisms controlling Ski protein stability involve the participation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Cytoplasmic Ski is partially associated with actin and localized in cholesterol-rich vesicles. Ski protein stability is decreased by TGF-β/Smads, GPCR/Rho signals, and actin polymerization, whereas GPCR/cAMP signals and actin depolymerization promote Ski protein stability. In conclusion, TGF-β and GPCR signals differentially regulate Ski protein stability and sorting in hepatocytes, and this cross-talk may occur during liver regeneration.

  8. Lamin A/C and emerin regulate MKL1/SRF activity by modulating actin dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chin Yee; Jaalouk, Diana E.; Vartiainen, Maria K.; Lammerding, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Laminopathies, caused by mutations in the LMNA gene encoding the nuclear envelope proteins lamins A and C, represent a diverse group of diseases that include Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy (EDMD), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, and Hutchison-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS).1 The majority of LMNA mutations affect skeletal and cardiac muscle by mechanisms that remain incompletely understood. Loss of structural function and disturbed interaction of mutant lamins with (tissue-specific) transcription factors have been proposed to explain the tissue-specific phenotypes.1 We report here that lamin A/C-deficient (Lmna−/−) and Lmna N195K mutant cells have impaired nuclear translocation and downstream signaling of the mechanosensitive transcription factor megakaryoblastic leukaemia 1 (MKL1), a myocardin family member that is pivotal in cardiac development and function.2 Disturbed nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of MKL1 was caused by altered actin dynamics in Lmna−/− and N195K mutant cells. Ectopic expression of the nuclear envelope protein emerin, which is mislocalized in Lmna mutant cells and also linked to EDMD and DCM, restored MKL1 nuclear translocation and rescued actin dynamics in mutant cells. These findings present a novel mechanism that could provide insight into the disease etiology for the cardiac phenotype in many laminopathies, whereby lamins A/C and emerin regulate gene expression through modulation of nuclear and cytoskeletal actin polymerization. PMID:23644458

  9. Lamin A/C and emerin regulate MKL1-SRF activity by modulating actin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chin Yee; Jaalouk, Diana E; Vartiainen, Maria K; Lammerding, Jan

    2013-05-23

    Laminopathies, caused by mutations in the LMNA gene encoding the nuclear envelope proteins lamins A and C, represent a diverse group of diseases that include Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, and Hutchison-Gilford progeria syndrome. Most LMNA mutations affect skeletal and cardiac muscle by mechanisms that remain incompletely understood. Loss of structural function and altered interaction of mutant lamins with (tissue-specific) transcription factors have been proposed to explain the tissue-specific phenotypes. Here we report in mice that lamin-A/C-deficient (Lmna(-/-)) and Lmna(N195K/N195K) mutant cells have impaired nuclear translocation and downstream signalling of the mechanosensitive transcription factor megakaryoblastic leukaemia 1 (MKL1), a myocardin family member that is pivotal in cardiac development and function. Altered nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of MKL1 was caused by altered actin dynamics in Lmna(-/-) and Lmna(N195K/N195K) mutant cells. Ectopic expression of the nuclear envelope protein emerin, which is mislocalized in Lmna mutant cells and also linked to EDMD and DCM, restored MKL1 nuclear translocation and rescued actin dynamics in mutant cells. These findings present a novel mechanism that could provide insight into the disease aetiology for the cardiac phenotype in many laminopathies, whereby lamin A/C and emerin regulate gene expression through modulation of nuclear and cytoskeletal actin polymerization.

  10. Live imaging provides new insights on dynamic F-actin filopodia and differential endocytosis during myoblast fusion in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralalka, Shruti; Shelton, Claude; Cartwright, Heather N; Guo, Fengli; Trimble, Rhonda; Kumar, Ram P; Abmayr, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    The process of myogenesis includes the recognition, adhesion, and fusion of committed myoblasts into multinucleate syncytia. In the larval body wall muscles of Drosophila, this elaborate process is initiated by Founder Cells and Fusion-Competent Myoblasts (FCMs), and cell adhesion molecules Kin-of-IrreC (Kirre) and Sticks-and-stones (Sns) on their respective surfaces. The FCMs appear to provide the driving force for fusion, via the assembly of protrusions associated with branched F-actin and the WASp, SCAR and Arp2/3 pathways. In the present study, we utilize the dorsal pharyngeal musculature that forms in the Drosophila embryo as a model to explore myoblast fusion and visualize the fusion process in live embryos. These muscles rely on the same cell types and genes as the body wall muscles, but are amenable to live imaging since they do not undergo extensive morphogenetic movement during formation. Time-lapse imaging with F-actin and membrane markers revealed dynamic FCM-associated actin-enriched protrusions that rapidly extend and retract into the myotube from different sites within the actin focus. Ultrastructural analysis of this actin-enriched area showed that they have two morphologically distinct structures: wider invasions and/or narrow filopodia that contain long linear filaments. Consistent with this, formin Diaphanous (Dia) and branched actin nucleator, Arp3, are found decorating the filopodia or enriched at the actin focus, respectively, indicating that linear actin is present along with branched actin at sites of fusion in the FCM. Gain-of-function Dia and loss-of-function Arp3 both lead to fusion defects, a decrease of F-actin foci and prominent filopodia from the FCMs. We also observed differential endocytosis of cell surface components at sites of fusion, with actin reorganizing factors, WASp and SCAR, and Kirre remaining on the myotube surface and Sns preferentially taken up with other membrane proteins into early endosomes and lysosomes in the

  11. Live imaging provides new insights on dynamic F-actin filopodia and differential endocytosis during myoblast fusion in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Haralalka

    Full Text Available The process of myogenesis includes the recognition, adhesion, and fusion of committed myoblasts into multinucleate syncytia. In the larval body wall muscles of Drosophila, this elaborate process is initiated by Founder Cells and Fusion-Competent Myoblasts (FCMs, and cell adhesion molecules Kin-of-IrreC (Kirre and Sticks-and-stones (Sns on their respective surfaces. The FCMs appear to provide the driving force for fusion, via the assembly of protrusions associated with branched F-actin and the WASp, SCAR and Arp2/3 pathways. In the present study, we utilize the dorsal pharyngeal musculature that forms in the Drosophila embryo as a model to explore myoblast fusion and visualize the fusion process in live embryos. These muscles rely on the same cell types and genes as the body wall muscles, but are amenable to live imaging since they do not undergo extensive morphogenetic movement during formation. Time-lapse imaging with F-actin and membrane markers revealed dynamic FCM-associated actin-enriched protrusions that rapidly extend and retract into the myotube from different sites within the actin focus. Ultrastructural analysis of this actin-enriched area showed that they have two morphologically distinct structures: wider invasions and/or narrow filopodia that contain long linear filaments. Consistent with this, formin Diaphanous (Dia and branched actin nucleator, Arp3, are found decorating the filopodia or enriched at the actin focus, respectively, indicating that linear actin is present along with branched actin at sites of fusion in the FCM. Gain-of-function Dia and loss-of-function Arp3 both lead to fusion defects, a decrease of F-actin foci and prominent filopodia from the FCMs. We also observed differential endocytosis of cell surface components at sites of fusion, with actin reorganizing factors, WASp and SCAR, and Kirre remaining on the myotube surface and Sns preferentially taken up with other membrane proteins into early endosomes and

  12. A kinome RNAi screen identified AMPK as promoting poxvirus entry through the control of actin dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa S Moser

    Full Text Available Poxviruses include medically important human pathogens, yet little is known about the specific cellular factors essential for their replication. To identify genes essential for poxvirus infection, we used high-throughput RNA interference to screen the Drosophila kinome for factors required for vaccinia infection. We identified seven genes including the three subunits of AMPK as promoting vaccinia infection. AMPK not only facilitated infection in insect cells, but also in mammalian cells. Moreover, we found that AMPK is required for macropinocytosis, a major endocytic entry pathway for vaccinia. Furthermore, we show that AMPK contributes to other virus-independent actin-dependent processes including lamellipodia formation and wound healing, independent of the known AMPK activators LKB1 and CaMKK. Therefore, AMPK plays a highly conserved role in poxvirus infection and actin dynamics independent of its role as an energy regulator.

  13. Comparative dynamics of retrograde actin flow and focal adhesions: formation of nascent adhesions triggers transition from fast to slow flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonina Y Alexandrova

    Full Text Available Dynamic actin network at the leading edge of the cell is linked to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions (FAs, and at the same time it undergoes retrograde flow with different dynamics in two distinct zones: the lamellipodium (peripheral zone of fast flow, and the lamellum (zone of slow flow located between the lamellipodium and the cell body. Cell migration involves expansion of both the lamellipodium and the lamellum, as well as formation of new FAs, but it is largely unknown how the position of the boundary between the two flow zones is defined, and how FAs and actin flow mutually influence each other. We investigated dynamic relationship between focal adhesions and the boundary between the two flow zones in spreading cells. Nascent FAs first appeared in the lamellipodium. Within seconds after the formation of new FAs, the rate of actin flow decreased locally, and the lamellipodium/lamellum boundary advanced towards the new FAs. Blocking fast actin flow with cytochalasin D resulted in rapid dissolution of nascent FAs. In the absence of FAs (spreading on poly-L-lysine-coated surfaces retrograde flow was uniform and the velocity transition was not observed. We conclude that formation of FAs depends on actin dynamics, and in its turn, affects the dynamics of actin flow by triggering transition from fast to slow flow. Extension of the cell edge thus proceeds through a cycle of lamellipodium protrusion, formation of new FAs, advance of the lamellum, and protrusion of the lamellipodium from the new base.

  14. Comparative dynamics of retrograde actin flow and focal adhesions: formation of nascent adhesions triggers transition from fast to slow flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrova, Antonina Y; Arnold, Katya; Schaub, Sébastien; Vasiliev, Jury M; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Bershadsky, Alexander D; Verkhovsky, Alexander B

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic actin network at the leading edge of the cell is linked to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions (FAs), and at the same time it undergoes retrograde flow with different dynamics in two distinct zones: the lamellipodium (peripheral zone of fast flow), and the lamellum (zone of slow flow located between the lamellipodium and the cell body). Cell migration involves expansion of both the lamellipodium and the lamellum, as well as formation of new FAs, but it is largely unknown how the position of the boundary between the two flow zones is defined, and how FAs and actin flow mutually influence each other. We investigated dynamic relationship between focal adhesions and the boundary between the two flow zones in spreading cells. Nascent FAs first appeared in the lamellipodium. Within seconds after the formation of new FAs, the rate of actin flow decreased locally, and the lamellipodium/lamellum boundary advanced towards the new FAs. Blocking fast actin flow with cytochalasin D resulted in rapid dissolution of nascent FAs. In the absence of FAs (spreading on poly-L-lysine-coated surfaces) retrograde flow was uniform and the velocity transition was not observed. We conclude that formation of FAs depends on actin dynamics, and in its turn, affects the dynamics of actin flow by triggering transition from fast to slow flow. Extension of the cell edge thus proceeds through a cycle of lamellipodium protrusion, formation of new FAs, advance of the lamellum, and protrusion of the lamellipodium from the new base. PMID:18800171

  15. Binding of single walled carbon nanotube to WT and mutant HIV-1 proteases: analysis of flap dynamics and binding mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Wang, Yixuan

    2012-09-01

    Most of the currently treated HIV-1 protease (HIV-PR) inhibitors have been prone to suffer from the mutations associated drug resistance. Therefore, it is necessary to search for potent alternatives against the drug resistance. In the current study we have tested the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as an inhibitor in wild type (WT) as well as in three primary mutants (I50V(PR), V82A(PR) and I84V(PR)) of the HIV-1-PR through docking the SWCNT in the active site region, and then performed all-atom MD simulations for the complexes. The conformational dynamics of HIV-PR with a 20 ns trajectory reveals that the SWCNT can effectively bind to the HIV-1-PR active site and regulate the flap dynamics such as maintaining the flap-flap closed. To gain an insight into the binding affinity, we also performed the MM-PBSA based binding free energy calculations for the four HIV-PR/SWCNT complexes. It was observed that, although the binding between the SWCNT and the HIV-PR decreases due to the mutations, the SWCNTs bind to the HIV-PRs 3-5 folds stronger than the most potent HIV-1-PR inhibitor, TMC114. Remarkably, the significant interactions with binding energy higher than 1kcal/mol focus on the flap and active regions, which favors closing flap-flap and deactivating the active residues of the HIV-PR. The flap dynamics and binding strength information for HIV-PR and SWCNTs can help design SWCNT-based HIV-1-PR inhibitors. PMID:23142620

  16. Shank–cortactin interactions control actin dynamics to maintain flexibility of neuronal spines and synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGillavry, Harold D.; Kerr, Justin M.; Kassner, Josh; Frost, Nicholas A.; Blanpied, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    The family of Shank scaffolding molecules (comprising Shank1, 2 and 3) are core components of the postsynaptic density (PSD) in neuronal synapses. Shanks link surface receptors to other scaffolding molecules within the PSD, as well as to the actin cytoskeleton. However, determining the function of Shank proteins in neurons has been complicated because the different Shank isoforms share a very high degree of sequence and domain homology. Therefore, to control Shank content while minimizing potential compensatory effects, a miRNA-based knockdown strategy was developed to reduce the expression of all synaptically targeted Shank isoforms simultaneously in rat hippocampal neurons. Using this approach, a strong (>75%) reduction in total Shank protein levels was achieved at individual dendritic spines, prompting an approximately 40% decrease in mushroom spine density. Furthermore, Shank knockdown reduced spine actin levels and increased sensitivity to the actin depolymerizing agent Latrunculin A. A SHANK2 mutant lacking the proline-rich cortactin-binding motif (SHANK2-ΔPRO) was unable to rescue these defects. Furthermore, Shank knockdown reduced cortactin levels in spines and increased the mobility of spine cortactin as measured by single-molecule tracking photoactivated localization microscopy, suggesting that Shank proteins recruit and stabilize cortactin at the synapse. Furthermore, it was found that Shank knockdown significantly reduced spontaneous remodelling of synapse morphology that could not be rescued by the SHANK2-ΔPRO mutant. It was concluded that Shank proteins are key intermediates between the synapse and the spine interior that, via cortactin, permit the actin cytoskeleton to dynamically regulate synapse morphology and function. PMID:26547831

  17. Enabled Negatively Regulates Diaphanous-Driven Actin Dynamics In Vitro and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Bilancia, C.G.; Winkelman, J.D.; Tsygankov, D.; Nowotarski, S.H.; Sees, J.A.; Comber, K.; Evans, I.; Lakhani, V.; Wood, W.; Elston, T.C.; Kovar, D.R.; Peifer, M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Actin regulators facilitate cell migration by controlling cell protrusion architecture and dynamics. As the behavior of individual actin regulators becomes clear, we must address why cells require multiple regulators with similar functions and how they cooperate to create diverse protrusions. We characterized Diaphanous (Dia) and Enabled (Ena) as a model, using complementary approaches: cell culture, biophysical analysis, and Drosophila morphogenesis. We found that Dia and Ena have di...

  18. Protocadherin FAT1 binds Ena/VASP proteins and is necessary for actin dynamics and cell polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Moeller, Marcus J.; Soofi, Abdulsalam; Braun, Gerald S; Li, Xiaodong; Watzl, Carsten; Kriz, Wilhelm; Holzman, Lawrence B.

    2004-01-01

    Cell migration requires integration of cellular processes resulting in cell polarization and actin dynamics. Previous work using tools of Drosophila genetics suggested that protocadherin fat serves in a pathway necessary for determining cell polarity in the plane of a tissue. Here we identify mammalian FAT1 as a proximal element of a signaling pathway that determines both cellular polarity in the plane of the monolayer and directed actin-dependent cell motility. FAT1 is localized to the leadi...

  19. Filopodial retraction force is generated by cortical actin dynamics and controlled by reversible tethering at the tip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornschlögl, Thomas; Romero, Stéphane; Vestergaard, Christian L.;

    2013-01-01

    Filopodia are dynamic, finger-like plasma membrane protrusions that sense the mechanical and chemical surroundings of the cell. Here, we show in epithelial cells that the dynamics of filopodial extension and retraction are determined by the difference between the actin polymerization rate at the ...

  20. A variational approach to the growth dynamics of pre-stressed actin filament networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Karin; Stöter, Thomas; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2016-09-01

    In order to model the growth dynamics of elastic bodies with residual stresses a thermodynamically consistent approach is needed such that the cross-coupling between growth and mechanics can be correctly described. In the present work we apply a variational principle to the formulation of the interfacial growth dynamics of dendritic actin filament networks growing from biomimetic beads, an experimentally well studied system, where the buildup of residual stresses governs the network growth. We first introduce the material model for the network via a strain energy density for an isotropic weakly nonlinear elastic material and then derive consistently from this model the dynamic equations for the interfaces, i.e. for a polymerizing internal interface in contact with the bead and a depolymerizing external interface directed towards the solvent. We show that (i) this approach automatically preserves thermodynamic symmetry-properties, which is not the case for the often cited ‘rubber-band-model’ (Sekimoto et al 2004 Eur. Phys. J. E 13 247-59, Plastino et al 2004 Eur. Biophys. J. 33 310-20) and (ii) leads to a robust morphological instability of the treadmilling network interfaces. The nature of the instability depends on the interplay of the two dynamic interfaces. Depending on the biochemical conditions the network envelope evolves into a comet-like shape (i.e. the actin envelope thins out at one side and thickens on the opposite side of the bead) via a varicose instability or it breaks the symmetry via higher order zigzag modes. We conclude that morphological instabilities due to mechano-chemical coupling mechanisms and the presences of mechancial pre-stresses can play a major role in locally organizing the cytoskeleton of living cells.

  1. Fimbrin phosphorylation by metaphase Cdk1 regulates actin cable dynamics in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yansong; Han, Xuemei; Zheng, Liangzhen; Xie, Ying; Mu, Yuguang; Yates, John R; Drubin, David G

    2016-01-01

    Actin cables, composed of actin filament bundles nucleated by formins, mediate intracellular transport for cell polarity establishment and maintenance. We previously observed that metaphase cells preferentially promote actin cable assembly through cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) activity. However, the relevant metaphase Cdk1 targets were not known. Here we show that the highly conserved actin filament crosslinking protein fimbrin is a critical Cdk1 target for actin cable assembly regulation in budding yeast. Fimbrin is specifically phosphorylated on threonine 103 by the metaphase cyclin-Cdk1 complex, in vivo and in vitro. On the basis of conformational simulations, we suggest that this phosphorylation stabilizes fimbrin's N-terminal domain, and modulates actin filament binding to regulate actin cable assembly and stability in cells. Overall, this work identifies fimbrin as a key target for cell cycle regulation of actin cable assembly in budding yeast, and suggests an underlying mechanism.

  2. Immunological responses and actin dynamics in macrophages are controlled by N-cofilin but are independent from ADF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Jönsson

    Full Text Available Dynamic changes in the actin cytoskeleton are essential for immune cell function and a number of immune deficiencies have been linked to mutations, which disturb the actin cytoskeleton. In macrophages and dendritic cells, actin remodelling is critical for motility, phagocytosis and antigen presentation, however the actin binding proteins, which control antigen presentation have been poorly characterized. Here we dissect the specific roles of the family of ADF/cofilin F-actin depolymerizing factors in macrophages and in local immune responses. Macrophage migration, cell polarization and antigen presentation to T-cells require n-cofilin mediated F-actin remodelling. Using a conditional mouse model, we show that n-cofilin also controls MHC class II-dependent antigen presentation. Other cellular processes such as phagocytosis and antigen processing were found to be independent of n-cofilin. Our data identify n-cofilin as a novel regulator of antigen presentation, while ADF on the other hand is dispensable for macrophage motility and antigen presentation.

  3. The actin binding domain of βI-spectrin regulates the morphological and functional dynamics of dendritic spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W Nestor

    Full Text Available Actin microfilaments regulate the size, shape and mobility of dendritic spines and are in turn regulated by actin binding proteins and small GTPases. The βI isoform of spectrin, a protein that links the actin cytoskeleton to membrane proteins, is present in spines. To understand its function, we expressed its actin-binding domain (ABD in CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slice cultures. The ABD of βI-spectrin bundled actin in principal dendrites and was concentrated in dendritic spines, where it significantly increased the size of the spine head. These effects were not observed after expression of homologous ABDs of utrophin, dystrophin, and α-actinin. Treatment of slice cultures with latrunculin-B significantly decreased spine head size and decreased actin-GFP fluorescence in cells expressing the ABD of α-actinin, but not the ABD of βI-spectrin, suggesting that its presence inhibits actin depolymerization. We also observed an increase in the area of GFP-tagged PSD-95 in the spine head and an increase in the amplitude of mEPSCs at spines expressing the ABD of βI-spectrin. The effects of the βI-spectrin ABD on spine size and mEPSC amplitude were mimicked by expressing wild-type Rac3, a small GTPase that co-immunoprecipitates specifically with βI-spectrin in extracts of cultured cortical neurons. Spine size was normal in cells co-expressing a dominant negative Rac3 construct with the βI-spectrin ABD. We suggest that βI-spectrin is a synaptic protein that can modulate both the morphological and functional dynamics of dendritic spines, perhaps via interaction with actin and Rac3.

  4. Regimes of wave type patterning driven by refractory actin feedback: transition from static polarization to dynamic wave behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterns of waves, patches, and peaks of actin are observed experimentally in many living cells. Models of this phenomenon have been based on the interplay between filamentous actin (F-actin) and its nucleation promoting factors (NPFs) that activate the Arp2/3 complex. Here we present an alternative biologically-motivated model for F-actin-NPF interaction based on properties of GTPases acting as NPFs. GTPases (such as Cdc42, Rac) are known to promote actin nucleation, and to have active membrane-bound and inactive cytosolic forms. The model is a natural extension of a previous mathematical mini-model of small GTPases that generates static cell polarization. Like other modellers, we assume that F-actin negative feedback shapes the observed patterns by suppressing the trailing edge of NPF-generated wave-fronts, hence localizing the activity spatially. We find that our NPF-actin model generates a rich set of behaviours, spanning a transition from static polarization to single pulses, reflecting waves, wave trains, and oscillations localized at the cell edge. The model is developed with simplicity in mind to investigate the interaction between nucleation promoting factor kinetics and negative feedback. It explains distinct types of pattern initiation mechanisms, and identifies parameter regimes corresponding to distinct behaviours. We show that weak actin feedback yields static patterning, moderate feedback yields dynamical behaviour such as travelling waves, and strong feedback can lead to wave trains or total suppression of patterning. We use a recently introduced nonlinear bifurcation analysis to explore the parameter space of this model and predict its behaviour with simulations validating those results. (paper)

  5. Exploring the Possible Role of Lysine Acetylation on Entamoeba histolytica Virulence: A Focus on the Dynamics of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. López-Contreras

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytoskeleton remodeling can be regulated, among other mechanisms, by lysine acetylation. The role of acetylation on cytoskeletal and other proteins of Entamoeba histolytica has been poorly studied. Dynamic rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton are crucial for amebic motility and capping formation, processes that may be effective means of evading the host immune response. Here we report the possible effect of acetylation on the actin cytoskeleton dynamics and in vivo virulence of E. histolytica. Using western blot, immunoprecipitation, microscopy assays, and in silico analysis, we show results that strongly suggest that the increase in Aspirin-induced cytoplasm proteins acetylation reduced cell movement and capping formation, likely as a consequence of alterations in the structuration of the actin cytoskeleton. Additionally, intrahepatic inoculation of Aspirin-treated trophozoites in hamsters resulted in severe impairment of the amebic virulence. Taken together, these results suggest an important role for lysine acetylation in amebic invasiveness and virulence.

  6. Exploring the possible role of lysine acetylation on Entamoeba histolytica virulence: a focus on the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Contreras, L; Hernández-Ramírez, V I; Lagunes-Guillén, A E; Montaño, Sarita; Chávez-Munguía, B; Sánchez-Ramírez, B; Talamás-Rohana, P

    2013-01-01

    Cytoskeleton remodeling can be regulated, among other mechanisms, by lysine acetylation. The role of acetylation on cytoskeletal and other proteins of Entamoeba histolytica has been poorly studied. Dynamic rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton are crucial for amebic motility and capping formation, processes that may be effective means of evading the host immune response. Here we report the possible effect of acetylation on the actin cytoskeleton dynamics and in vivo virulence of E. histolytica. Using western blot, immunoprecipitation, microscopy assays, and in silico analysis, we show results that strongly suggest that the increase in Aspirin-induced cytoplasm proteins acetylation reduced cell movement and capping formation, likely as a consequence of alterations in the structuration of the actin cytoskeleton. Additionally, intrahepatic inoculation of Aspirin-treated trophozoites in hamsters resulted in severe impairment of the amebic virulence. Taken together, these results suggest an important role for lysine acetylation in amebic invasiveness and virulence.

  7. Vortex dynamics and flapping patterns of the inverted flag with a bluff body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeonseong; Kim, Junyoung; Kim, Daegyoum

    2015-11-01

    Flow-induced vibration of flexible structures for energy harvesting has drawn attention recently. The inverted flag whose trailing edge is clamped and leading edge is free to move was known to self-excite in a uniform flow of both water and air. In this study, we investigated the effect of an upstream bluff body, a flat plate, on the dynamics of the downstream inverted flag. Periodic vortical structures created by an upstream bluff body make the dynamics of the inverted flag quite different from those of the inverted flag without the bluff body. We examined the motion of the inverted flag by varying the relative displacement of the inverted flag from the bluff body and their relative size. Our results show that the inverted flag can flap with higher frequency and larger amplitude with the upstream bluff body. We also compared the dynamics of the inverted flag with those of the general flag with the upstream bluff body. In order to better understand the dynamics of the flag, the analysis of the flow patterns using particle image velocimetry was also conducted.

  8. The kinesin-like proteins, KAC1/2, regulate actin dynamics underlying chloroplast light-avoidance in Physcomitrella patens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiyuan Shen; Yen-Chen Liu; Jeffrey P Bibeau; Kyle P Lemoi; Erkan Tzel; Luis Vidali

    2015-01-01

    In plants, light determines chloroplast position;these organelles show avoidance and accumulation re-sponses in high and low fluence-rate light, respectively. Chloroplast motility in response to light is driven by cytoskeletal elements. The actin cytoskeleton mediates chloroplast photorelocation responses in Arabidopsis thali-ana. In contrast, in the moss Physcomitrella patens, both, actin filaments and microtubules can transport chloroplasts. Because of the surprising evidence that two kinesin-like proteins (called KACs) are important for actin-dependent chloroplast photorelocation in vascular plants, we wanted to determine the cytoskeletal system responsible for the function of these proteins in moss. We performed gene-specific silencing using RNA interference in P. patens. We confirmed existing reports using gene knockouts, that PpKAC1 and PpKAC2 are required for chloroplast dispersion under uniform white light conditions, and that the two proteins are functionally equivalent. To address the specific cytoskeletal elements responsible for motility, this loss-of-function approach was combined with cytoskeleton-targeted drug studies. We found that, in P. patens, these KACs mediate the chloroplast light-avoidance response in an actin filament-dependent, rather than a microtubule-dependent manner. Using correlation-decay analysis of cytoskeletal dynamics, we found that PpKAC stabilizes cortical actin filaments, but has no effect on microtubule dynamics.

  9. External nozzle flap dynamic load measurements on F-15 S/MTD model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiner, John M.; Ponton, Michael K.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.; Manning, James C.; Mason, Mary L.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic pressure loads were obtained on 1/12 scale models of the F-15B production aircraft and the F-15 S/MTD experimental aircraft with rectangular nozzles and canards. Flight Mach numbers from 0.51 to 1.20 were studied for aircraft angles of attack from 0 to 10 deg and nozzle pressure ratios from 1.00 to 5.09. The results show that dynamic levels are lower in the internozzle region of twin rectangular nozzles than are levels found with twin axisymmetric nozzles. At other locations, the levels associated with both geometries are of the same order of magnitude when normalized by aircraft dynamic Q. At Mach number of 0.51, the loads spectrum is dominated by plume shock noise processes for both geometries. Above Mach 0.51, this mechanism is associated with either vortex bursting from a forward location or turbulent boundary layer separation over the nozzle external flaps. At supersonic speeds both geometries show significantly decreased load levels.

  10. A flight-dynamic helicopter mathematical model with a single flap-lag-torsion main rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Marc D.

    1990-01-01

    A mathematical model of a helicopter system with a single main rotor that includes rigid, hinge-restrained rotor blades with flap, lag, and torsion degrees of freedom is described. The model allows several hinge sequences and two offsets in the hinges. Quasi-steady Greenberg theory is used to calculate the blade-section aerodynamic forces, and inflow effects are accounted for by using three-state nonlinear dynamic inflow model. The motion of the rigid fuselage is defined by six degrees of freedom, and an optional rotor rpm degree of freedom is available. Empennage surfaces and the tail rotor are modeled, and the effect of main-rotor downwash on these elements is included. Model trim linearization, and time-integration operations are described and can be applied to a subset of the model in the rotating or nonrotating coordinate frame. A preliminary validation of the model is made by comparing its results with those of other analytical and experimental studies. This publication presents the results of research compiled in November 1989.

  11. Clathrin is Important for Normal Actin Dynamics and Progression of Sla2p-Containing Patches During Endocytosis in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Newpher, Thomas M.; Lemmon, Sandra K.

    2006-01-01

    Clathrin is a major vesicle coat protein involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis. In yeast and higher eukaryotes, clathrin is recruited to the plasma membrane during the early stage of endocytosis along with clathrin-associated adaptors. As coated pits undergo maturation, a burst of actin polymerization accompanies and helps drive vesicle internalization. Here, we investigate the dynamics of clathrin relative to the early endocytic patch protein Sla2p. We find that clathrin is recruited to ...

  12. Vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase in the Octopus vulgaris brain: a regulatory factor of actin polymerization dynamic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maio, Anna; Natale, Emiliana; Rotondo, Sergio; Di Cosmo, Anna; Faraone-Mennella, Maria Rosaria

    2013-09-01

    Our previous behavioural, biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses conducted in selected regions (supra/sub oesophageal masses) of the Octopus vulgaris brain detected a cytoplasmic poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (more than 90% of total enzyme activity). The protein was identified as the vault-free form of vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. The present research extends and integrates the biochemical characterization of poly-ADP-ribosylation system, namely, reaction product, i.e., poly-ADP-ribose, and acceptor proteins, in the O. vulgaris brain. Immunochemical analyses evidenced that the sole poly-ADP-ribose acceptor was the octopus cytoskeleton 50-kDa actin. It was present in both free, endogenously poly-ADP-ribosylated form (70kDa) and in complex with V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase and poly-ADP-ribose (260kDa). The components of this complex, alkali and high salt sensitive, were purified and characterized. The kind and the length of poly-ADP-ribose corresponded to linear chains of 30-35 ADP-ribose units, in accordance with the features of the polymer synthesized by the known vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. In vitro experiments showed that V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase activity of brain cytoplasmic fraction containing endogenous actin increased upon the addition of commercial actin and was highly reduced by ATP. Anti-actin immunoblot of the mixture in the presence and absence of ATP showed that the poly-ADP-ribosylation of octopus actin is a dynamic process balanced by the ATP-dependent polymerization of the cytoskeleton protein, a fundamental mechanism for synaptic plasticity.

  13. Actinic Cheilitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... actinic cheilitis. Overview Actinic cheilitis, sometimes known as "farmer's lip" or "sailor's lip," is a precancerous condition ... Last Updated: 22 Dec 2008 Information for other ages: Table of Contents: Overview Who's At Risk Signs ...

  14. Actin Dynamics Regulates Voltage-Dependent Calcium-Permeable Channels of the Vicia faba Guard Cell Plasma Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Liu-Min Fan

    2009-01-01

    Free cytosolic Ca~(2+) ([Ca~(2+)]_(cyt)) is an ubiquitous second messenger in plant cell signaling, and [Ca~(2+)]_(cyt) elevation is associated with Ca~(2+)-permeable channels in the plasma membrane and endomembranes regulated by a wide range of stimuli. However, knowledge regarding Ca~(2+) channels and their regulation remains limited in planta. A type of voltage-dependent Ca~(2+)-permeable channel was identified and characterized for the Vicia faba L. guard cell plasma membrane by using patch-clamp techniques. These channels are permeable to both Ba~(2+) and Ca~(2+), and their activities can be inhibited by micromolar Gd~(3+). The unitary conductance and the reversal potential of the channels depend on the Ca~(2+) or Ba~(2+) gradients across the plasma membrane. The inward whole-cell Ca~(2+) (Ba~(2+)) current, as well as the unitary current amplitude and NP. of the single Ca~(2+) channel, increase along with the membrane hyperpolarization. Pharmacological experiments suggest that actin dynamics may serve as an upstream regulator of this type of calcium channel of the guard cell plasma membrane. Cytochalasin D, an actin polymerization blocker, activated the NP_o of these channels at the single channel level and increased the current amplitude at the whole-cell level. But these channel activations and current increments could be restrained by pretreatment with an F-actin stabilizer, phalloidin. The potential physiological significance of this regulatory mechanism is also discussed.

  15. Antiepileptic teratogen valproic acid (VPA) modulates organisation and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmod, P S; Skladchikova, G; Kawa, A;

    1999-01-01

    of control cells and cells treated with VPA, indicating that VPA affected the cytoskeletal determinants of cell morphology. Furthermore, VPA treatment induced an increase of F-actin, and of FAK, paxillin, vinculin, and phosphotyrosine in focal adhesion complexes. These changes were accompanied by increased...

  16. Numerical Simulation of the Dynamic FSI Response and Stability of a Flapping Foil in a Dense Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Eun Jung; Akcabay, Deniz Tolga; Young, Yin Lu

    2012-11-01

    To advance the understanding of fish locomotion, improve the design biological devices or marine propulsions or turbines, or to explore innovative ocean energy harvesting ideas, it is important to be able accurately predict the dynamic fluid structure interaction (FSI) response and stability of flexible structures in a dense fluid. The objectives of this research are to (1) present an efficient and stable algorithm for numerical modeling of the dynamic FSI response and stability of a flapping foil in dense fluid, and (2) investigate the influence of fluid-to-solid density ratio on the FSI response and stability of a flapping foil. The numerical model involves coupling an unsteady RANS solver with a 2DOF structural model using a new hybrid coupling approach. The results show that the new hybrid coupling approach converge much faster than traditional loosely and tightly coupled approaches, and is able to avoid numerical instability issues due to virtual added mass effects for light, flexible structures in incompressible flow. The influence of density ratio on the FSI response, divergence and flutter speeds are presented, along with comparisons between viscous and inviscid FSI computations.

  17. New compliant strain gauges for self-sensing dynamic deformation of flapping wings on miniature air vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past several years there has been an increasing interest in the development of miniature air vehicles (MAVs) with flapping wings. To allow these MAVs to adjust to changes in wind direction and to maximize their efficiency, it is desirable to monitor the deformation of the wing during flight. This paper presents a step in this direction, demonstrating the measurement of strain on the surface of the wing using minimally invasive compliant piezoresistive sensors. The strain gauges consisted of latex mixed with electrically conducting exfoliated graphite, and they were applied by spray coating. To calibrate the gauges, both static and dynamic testing up to 10 Hz were performed using cantilever structures. In tension the static sensitivity was a linear 0.4 Ω με−1 and the gauge factor was 28; in compression, the gauge factor was −5. Although sensitivities in tension and compression differed by a factor of almost six, this was not reflected in the dynamic data, which followed the strain reversibly with little distortion. There was no attenuation with frequency, indicating a sufficiently small time constant for this application. The gauges were thin, compliant, and light enough to measure, without interference, deformations due to shape changes of the flexible wing associated with generating lift and thrust. During flapping the resistance closely tracked the generated thrust, measured on a test stand, with both signals tracing figure-8 loops as a function of wing position throughout each cycle. (paper)

  18. Expression of a dynamin 2 mutant associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease leads to aberrant actin dynamics and lamellipodia formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Kinue; Zhang, Yubai; Takeda, Tetsuya; Takei, Kohji

    2016-08-15

    Specific mutations in dynamin 2 are linked to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), an inherited peripheral neuropathy. However, the effects of these mutations on dynamin function, particularly in relation to the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton remain unclear. Here, selected CMT-associated dynamin mutants were expressed to examine their role in the pathogenesis of CMT in U2OS cells. Ectopic expression of the dynamin CMT mutants 555Δ3 and K562E caused an approximately 50% decrease in serum stimulation-dependent lamellipodia formation; however, only K562E caused aberrations in the actin cytoskeleton. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that the K562E mutation resulted in the disappearance of radially aligned actin bundles and the simultaneous appearance of F-actin clusters. Live-cell imaging analyses showed F-actin polymers of decreased length assembled into immobile clusters in K562E-expressing cells. The K562E dynamin mutant colocalized with the F-actin clusters, whereas its colocalization with clathrin-coated pit marker proteins was decreased. Essentially the same results were obtained using another cell line, HeLa and NG108-15 cells. The present study is the first to show the association of dynamin CMT mutations with aberrant actin dynamics and lamellipodia, which may contribute to defective endocytosis and myelination in Schwann cells in CMT.

  19. Role of cyclic nucleotide-dependent actin cytoskeletal dynamics:Ca(2+](i and force suppression in forskolin-pretreated porcine coronary arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle M Hocking

    Full Text Available Initiation of force generation during vascular smooth muscle contraction involves a rise in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+]i and phosphorylation of myosin light chains (MLC. However, reversal of these two processes alone does not account for the force inhibition that occurs during relaxation or inhibition of contraction, implicating that other mechanisms, such as actin cytoskeletal rearrangement, play a role in the suppression of force. In this study, we hypothesize that forskolin-induced force suppression is dependent upon changes in actin cytoskeletal dynamics. To focus on the actin cytoskeletal changes, a physiological model was developed in which forskolin treatment of intact porcine coronary arteries (PCA prior to treatment with a contractile agonist resulted in complete suppression of force. Pretreatment of PCA with forskolin suppressed histamine-induced force generation but did not abolish [Ca(2+]i rise or MLC phosphorylation. Additionally, forskolin pretreatment reduced filamentous actin in histamine-treated tissues, and prevented histamine-induced changes in the phosphorylation of the actin-regulatory proteins HSP20, VASP, cofilin, and paxillin. Taken together, these results suggest that forskolin-induced complete force suppression is dependent upon the actin cytoskeletal regulation initiated by the phosphorylation changes of the actin regulatory proteins and not on the MLC dephosphorylation. This model of complete force suppression can be employed to further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for smooth muscle tone, and may offer cues to pathological situations, such as hypertension and vasospasm.

  20. Dynamic actin polymerization on endosomes regulates integrin trafficking, cell adhesion and cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Duleh, Steve Niessen

    2012-01-01

    Activators of the Arp2/3 complex, termed nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs), are required for the proper spatial and temporal control of actin assembly in cells. Mammalian cells express several NPFs, each of which serve distinct functions in specific cellular processes, including N-WASP in phagocytosis and endocytosis, WAVE and JMY in cell migration, and WHAMM in ER-to-Golgi transport. Although another NPF termed WASH was recently identified, the cellular function and activity of this prot...

  1. Antiobesity Action of ACAM by Modulating the Dynamics of Cell Adhesion and Actin Polymerization in Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kazutoshi; Eguchi, Jun; Hida, Kazuyuki; Nakatsuka, Atsuko; Katayama, Akihiro; Sakurai, Miwa; Choshi, Haruki; Furutani, Masumi; Ogawa, Daisuke; Takei, Kohji; Otsuka, Fumio; Wada, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor-like membrane protein (CLMP) was identified as the tight junction-associated transmembrane protein of epithelial cells with homophilic binding activities. CLMP is also recognized as adipocyte adhesion molecule (ACAM), and it is upregulated in mature adipocytes in rodents and humans with obesity. Here, we present that aP2 promoter-driven ACAM transgenic mice are protected from obesity and diabetes with the prominent reduction of adipose tissue mass and smaller size of adipocytes. ACAM is abundantly expressed on plasma membrane of mature adipocytes and associated with formation of phalloidin-positive polymerized form of cortical actin (F-actin). By electron microscopy, the structure of zonula adherens with an intercellular space of ∼10-20 nm was observed with strict parallelism of the adjoining cell membranes over distances of 1-20 μm, where ACAM and γ-actin are abundantly expressed. The formation of zonula adherens may increase the mechanical strength, inhibit the adipocyte hypertrophy, and improve the insulin sensitivity. PMID:26956488

  2. Networks Models of Actin Dynamics during Spermatozoa Postejaculatory Life: A Comparison among Human-Made and Text Mining-Based Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabò, Nicola; Ordinelli, Alessandra; Ramal Sanchez, Marina; Mattioli, Mauro; Barboni, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Here we realized a networks-based model representing the process of actin remodelling that occurs during the acquisition of fertilizing ability of human spermatozoa (HumanMade_ActinSpermNetwork, HM_ASN). Then, we compared it with the networks provided by two different text mining tools: Agilent Literature Search (ALS) and PESCADOR. As a reference, we used the data from the online repository Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), referred to the actin dynamics in a more general biological context. We found that HM_ALS and the networks from KEGG data shared the same scale-free topology following the Barabasi-Albert model, thus suggesting that the information is spread within the network quickly and efficiently. On the contrary, the networks obtained by ALS and PESCADOR have a scale-free hierarchical architecture, which implies a different pattern of information transmission. Also, the hubs identified within the networks are different: HM_ALS and KEGG networks contain as hubs several molecules known to be involved in actin signalling; ALS was unable to find other hubs than "actin," whereas PESCADOR gave some nonspecific result. This seems to suggest that the human-made information retrieval in the case of a specific event, such as actin dynamics in human spermatozoa, could be a reliable strategy. PMID:27642606

  3. Actinic keratosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar keratosis; Sun-induced skin changes - keratosis; Keratosis - actinic (solar) ... laser treatment called photodynamic therapy Chemical peels Skin creams such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and imiquimod

  4. Strategies for the stabilization of longitudinal forward flapping flight revealed using a dynamically-scaled robotic fly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzinga, Michael J; van Breugel, Floris; Dickinson, Michael H

    2014-06-01

    The ability to regulate forward speed is an essential requirement for flying animals. Here, we use a dynamically-scaled robot to study how flapping insects adjust their wing kinematics to regulate and stabilize forward flight. The results suggest that the steady-state lift and thrust requirements at different speeds may be accomplished with quite subtle changes in hovering kinematics, and that these adjustments act primarily by altering the pitch moment. This finding is consistent with prior hypotheses regarding the relationship between body pitch and flight speed in fruit flies. Adjusting the mean stroke position of the wings is a likely mechanism for trimming the pitch moment at all speeds, whereas changes in the mean angle of attack may be required at higher speeds. To ensure stability, the flapping system requires additional pitch damping that increases in magnitude with flight speed. A compensatory reflex driven by fast feedback of pitch rate from the halteres could provide such damping, and would automatically exhibit gain scheduling with flight speed if pitch torque was regulated via changes in stroke deviation. Such a control scheme would provide an elegant solution for stabilization across a wide range of forward flight speeds. PMID:24855029

  5. Strategies for the stabilization of longitudinal forward flapping flight revealed using a dynamically-scaled robotic fly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to regulate forward speed is an essential requirement for flying animals. Here, we use a dynamically-scaled robot to study how flapping insects adjust their wing kinematics to regulate and stabilize forward flight. The results suggest that the steady-state lift and thrust requirements at different speeds may be accomplished with quite subtle changes in hovering kinematics, and that these adjustments act primarily by altering the pitch moment. This finding is consistent with prior hypotheses regarding the relationship between body pitch and flight speed in fruit flies. Adjusting the mean stroke position of the wings is a likely mechanism for trimming the pitch moment at all speeds, whereas changes in the mean angle of attack may be required at higher speeds. To ensure stability, the flapping system requires additional pitch damping that increases in magnitude with flight speed. A compensatory reflex driven by fast feedback of pitch rate from the halteres could provide such damping, and would automatically exhibit gain scheduling with flight speed if pitch torque was regulated via changes in stroke deviation. Such a control scheme would provide an elegant solution for stabilization across a wide range of forward flight speeds. (paper)

  6. Control of actin-based motility through localized actin binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide variety of cell biological and biomimetic systems use actin polymerization to drive motility. It has been suggested that an object such as a bacterium can propel itself by self-assembling a high concentration of actin behind it, if it is repelled by actin. However, it is also known that it is essential for the moving object to bind actin. Therefore, a key question is how the actin tail can propel an object when it both binds and repels the object. We present a physically consistent Brownian dynamics model for actin-based motility that includes the minimal components of the dendritic nucleation model and allows for both attractive and repulsive interactions between actin and a moveable disc. We find that the concentration gradient of filamentous actin generated by polymerization is sufficient to propel the object, even with moderately strong binding interactions. Additionally, actin binding can act as a biophysical cap, and may directly control motility through modulation of network growth. Overall, this mechanism is robust in that it can drive motility against a load up to a stall pressure that depends on the Young’s modulus of the actin network and can explain several aspects of actin-based motility. (paper)

  7. Regulation of actin dynamics by WNT-5A: implications for human airway smooth muscle contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmans, Tim; Kumawat, Kuldeep; Halayko, Andrew J; Gosens, Reinoud

    2016-01-01

    A defining feature of asthma is airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), which underlies the exaggerated bronchoconstriction response of asthmatics. The role of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) in AHR has garnered increasing interest over the years, but how asthmatic ASM differs from healthy ASM is still an active topic of debate. WNT-5A is increasingly expressed in asthmatic ASM and has been linked with Th2-high asthma. Due to its link with calcium and cytoskeletal remodelling, we propose that WNT-5A may modulate ASM contractility. We demonstrated that WNT-5A can increase maximum isometric tension in bovine tracheal smooth muscle strips. In addition, we show that WNT-5A is preferentially expressed in contractile human airway myocytes compared to proliferative cells, suggesting an active role in maintaining contractility. Furthermore, WNT-5A treatment drives actin polymerisation, but has no effect on intracellular calcium flux. Next, we demonstrated that WNT-5A directly regulates TGF-β1-induced expression of α-SMA via ROCK-mediated actin polymerization. These findings suggest that WNT-5A modulates fundamental mechanisms that affect ASM contraction and thus may be of relevance for AHR in asthma. PMID:27468699

  8. Effects of F/G-actin ratio and actin turn-over rate on NADPH oxidase activity in microglia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Izabela; Pedersen, Line Hjortshøj; Byg, Luise;

    2010-01-01

    Most in vivo studies that have addressed the role of actin dynamics in NADPH oxidase function in phagocytes have used toxins to modulate the polymerization state of actin and mostly effects on actin has been evaluated by end point measurements of filamentous actin, which says little about actin d...

  9. Energetic modeling and single-molecule verification of dynamic regulation on receptor complexes by actin corrals and lipid raft domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien Y.; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-12-01

    We developed an energetic model by integrating the generalized Langevin equation with the Cahn-Hilliard equation to simulate the diffusive behaviors of receptor proteins in the plasma membrane of a living cell. Simulation results are presented to elaborate the confinement effects from actin corrals and protein-induced lipid domains. Single-molecule tracking data of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) acquired on live HeLa cells agree with the simulation results and the mechanism that controls the diffusion of single-molecule receptors is clarified. We discovered that after ligand binding, EGFR molecules move into lipid nanodomains. The transition rates between different diffusion states of liganded EGFR molecules are regulated by the lipid domains. Our method successfully captures dynamic interactions of receptors at the single-molecule level and provides insight into the functional architecture of both the diffusing EGFR molecules and their local cellular environment.

  10. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  11. Bistability in the Rac1, PAK, and RhoA Signaling Network Drives Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics and Cell Motility Switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Kate M.; Monsefi, Naser; Dawson, John C.; Degasperi, Andrea; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Volinsky, Natalia; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Birtwistle, Marc R.; Tsyganov, Mikhail A.; Kiyatkin, Anatoly; Kida, Katarzyna; Finch, Andrew J.; Carragher, Neil O.; Kolch, Walter; Nguyen, Lan K.; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Dynamic interactions between RhoA and Rac1, members of the Rho small GTPase family, play a vital role in the control of cell migration. Using predictive mathematical modeling, mass spectrometry-based quantitation of network components, and experimental validation in MDA-MB-231 mesenchymal breast cancer cells, we show that a network containing Rac1, RhoA, and PAK family kinases can produce bistable, switch-like responses to a graded PAK inhibition. Using a small chemical inhibitor of PAK, we demonstrate that cellular RhoA and Rac1 activation levels respond in a history-dependent, bistable manner to PAK inhibition. Consequently, we show that downstream signaling, actin dynamics, and cell migration also behave in a bistable fashion, displaying switches and hysteresis in response to PAK inhibition. Our results demonstrate that PAK is a critical component in the Rac1-RhoA inhibitory crosstalk that governs bistable GTPase activity, cell morphology, and cell migration switches. PMID:27136688

  12. Actinic reticuloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, J.L.; Vale, M.; Dermer, P.; Ragaz, A.; Michaelides, P.; Gladstein, A.H.

    1982-09-01

    A 58-year-old man has his condition diagnosed as actinic reticuloid on the basis of clinical and histologic findings and phototesting data. He had clinical features resembling mycosis fungoides in light-exposed areas. Histologic findings disclosed a bandlike infiltrate with atypical mononuclear cells in the dermis and scattered atypical cells in the epidermis. Electron microscopy disclosed mononuclear cells with bizarre, convoluted nuclei, resembling cerebriform cells of Lutzner. Phototesting disclosed a diminished minimal erythemal threshold to UV-B and UV-A. Microscopic changes resembling actinic reticuloid were reproduced in this patient 24 and 72 hours after exposure to 15 minimal erythemal doses of UV-B.

  13. Fasciocutaneous flaps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Tolhurst (David)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractAbout that time the concept of independent myocutaneous vascular territories (Me Craw and Dibbell, 1977) was beginning to take hold but the deep fascia, sandwiched between muscles and the skin, was largely regarded as an isolating layer of dense, avascular fibrous tissue from which flaps

  14. Dynamin-2 regulates fusion pore expansion and quantal release through a mechanism that involves actin dynamics in neuroendocrine chromaffin cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlek M González-Jamett

    Full Text Available Over the past years, dynamin has been implicated in tuning the amount and nature of transmitter released during exocytosis. However, the mechanism involved remains poorly understood. Here, using bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, we investigated whether this mechanism rely on dynamin's ability to remodel actin cytoskeleton. According to this idea, inhibition of dynamin GTPase activity suppressed the calcium-dependent de novo cortical actin and altered the cortical actin network. Similarly, expression of a small interfering RNA directed against dynamin-2, an isoform highly expressed in chromaffin cells, changed the cortical actin network pattern. Disruption of dynamin-2 function, as well as the pharmacological inhibition of actin polymerization with cytochalasine-D, slowed down fusion pore expansion and increased the quantal size of individual exocytotic events. The effects of cytochalasine-D and dynamin-2 disruption were not additive indicating that dynamin-2 and F-actin regulate the late steps of exocytosis by a common mechanism. Together our data support a model in which dynamin-2 directs actin polymerization at the exocytosis site where both, in concert, adjust the hormone quantal release to efficiently respond to physiological demands.

  15. A dynamical systems approach to actin-based motility in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotton, S.

    2010-11-01

    A simple kinematic model for the trajectories of Listeria monocytogenes is generalized to a dynamical system rich enough to exhibit the resonant Hopf bifurcation structure of excitable media and simple enough to be studied geometrically. It is shown how L. monocytogenes trajectories and meandering spiral waves are organized by the same type of attracting set.

  16. Keratin 8/18 Regulation of Cell Stiffness-Extracellular Matrix Interplay through Modulation of Rho-Mediated Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeleau, François; Myrand Lapierre, Marie-Eve; Sheng, Yunlong; Marceau, Normand

    2012-01-01

    Cell mechanical activity generated from the interplay between the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the actin cytoskeleton is essential for the regulation of cell adhesion, spreading and migration during normal and cancer development. Keratins are the intermediate filament (IF) proteins of epithelial cells, expressed as pairs in a lineage/differentiation manner. Hepatic epithelial cell IFs are made solely of keratins 8/18 (K8/K18), hallmarks of all simple epithelia. Notably, our recent work on these epithelial cells has revealed a key regulatory function for K8/K18 IFs in adhesion/migration, through modulation of integrin interactions with ECM, actin adaptors and signaling molecules at focal adhesions. Here, using K8-knockdown rat H4 hepatoma cells and their K8/K18-containing counterparts seeded on fibronectin-coated substrata of different rigidities, we show that the K8/K18 IF-lacking cells lose their ability to spread and exhibit an altered actin fiber organization, upon seeding on a low-rigidity substratum. We also demonstrate a concomitant reduction in local cell stiffness at focal adhesions generated by fibronectin-coated microbeads attached to the dorsal cell surface. In addition, we find that this K8/K18 IF modulation of cell stiffness and actin fiber organization occurs through RhoA-ROCK signaling. Together, the results uncover a K8/K18 IF contribution to the cell stiffness-ECM rigidity interplay through a modulation of Rho-dependent actin organization and dynamics in simple epithelial cells. PMID:22685604

  17. Keratin 8/18 regulation of cell stiffness-extracellular matrix interplay through modulation of Rho-mediated actin cytoskeleton dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Bordeleau

    Full Text Available Cell mechanical activity generated from the interplay between the extracellular matrix (ECM and the actin cytoskeleton is essential for the regulation of cell adhesion, spreading and migration during normal and cancer development. Keratins are the intermediate filament (IF proteins of epithelial cells, expressed as pairs in a lineage/differentiation manner. Hepatic epithelial cell IFs are made solely of keratins 8/18 (K8/K18, hallmarks of all simple epithelia. Notably, our recent work on these epithelial cells has revealed a key regulatory function for K8/K18 IFs in adhesion/migration, through modulation of integrin interactions with ECM, actin adaptors and signaling molecules at focal adhesions. Here, using K8-knockdown rat H4 hepatoma cells and their K8/K18-containing counterparts seeded on fibronectin-coated substrata of different rigidities, we show that the K8/K18 IF-lacking cells lose their ability to spread and exhibit an altered actin fiber organization, upon seeding on a low-rigidity substratum. We also demonstrate a concomitant reduction in local cell stiffness at focal adhesions generated by fibronectin-coated microbeads attached to the dorsal cell surface. In addition, we find that this K8/K18 IF modulation of cell stiffness and actin fiber organization occurs through RhoA-ROCK signaling. Together, the results uncover a K8/K18 IF contribution to the cell stiffness-ECM rigidity interplay through a modulation of Rho-dependent actin organization and dynamics in simple epithelial cells.

  18. Platelet adhesion: structural and functional diversity of short dystrophin and utrophins in the formation of dystrophin-associated-protein complexes related to actin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris; Martínez-Rojas, Dalila; Chávez, Oscar; Martínez-Pérez, Francisco; García-Sierra, Francisco; Rendon, Alvaro; Mornet, Dominique; Mondragón, Ricardo

    2005-12-01

    Platelets are dynamic cell fragments that modify their shape during activation. Utrophin and dystrophins are minor actin-binding proteins present in muscle and non-muscle cytoskeleton. In the present study, we characterised the pattern of Dp71 isoforms and utrophin gene products by immunoblot in human platelets. Two new dystrophin isoforms were found, Dp71f and Dp71 d, as well as the Up71 isoform and the dystrophin-associated proteins, alpha and beta -dystrobrevins. Distribution of Dp71d/Dp71delta110m, Up400/Up71 and dystrophin-associated proteins in relation to the actin cytoskeleton was evaluated by confocal microscopy in both resting and platelets adhered on glass. Formation of two dystrophin-associated protein complexes (Dp71d/Dp71delta110m approximately DAPC and Up400/Up71 approximately DAPC) was demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation and their distribution in relation to the actin cytoskeleton was characterised during platelet adhesion. The Dp71d/Dp71delta100m approximately DAPC is maintained mainly at the granulomere and is associated with dynamic structures during activation by adhesion to thrombin-coated surfaces. Participation of both Dp71d/Dp71delta110m approximately DAPC and Up400/Up71 approximately DAPC in the biological roles of the platelets is discussed.

  19. Prostaglandins temporally regulate cytoplasmic actin bundle formation during Drosophila oogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Spracklen, Andrew J.; Kelpsch, Daniel J.; Chen, Xiang; Spracklen, Cassandra N.; Tootle, Tina L.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs)—lipid signals produced downstream of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes—regulate actin dynamics in cell culture and platelets, but their roles during development are largely unknown. Here we define a new role for Pxt, the Drosophila COX-like enzyme, in regulating the actin cytoskeleton—temporal restriction of actin remodeling during oogenesis. PGs are required for actin filament bundle formation during stage 10B (S10B). In addition, loss of Pxt results in extensive early actin ...

  20. Dynamin2 organizes lamellipodial actin networks to orchestrate lamellar actomyosin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Menon

    Full Text Available Actin networks in migrating cells exist as several interdependent structures: sheet-like networks of branched actin filaments in lamellipodia; arrays of bundled actin filaments co-assembled with myosin II in lamellae; and actin filaments that engage focal adhesions. How these dynamic networks are integrated and coordinated to maintain a coherent actin cytoskeleton in migrating cells is not known. We show that the large GTPase dynamin2 is enriched in the distal lamellipod where it regulates lamellipodial actin networks as they form and flow in U2-OS cells. Within lamellipodia, dynamin2 regulated the spatiotemporal distributions of α-actinin and cortactin, two actin-binding proteins that specify actin network architecture. Dynamin2's action on lamellipodial F-actin influenced the formation and retrograde flow of lamellar actomyosin via direct and indirect interactions with actin filaments and a finely tuned GTP hydrolysis activity. Expression in dynamin2-depleted cells of a mutant dynamin2 protein that restores endocytic activity, but not activities that remodel actin filaments, demonstrated that actin filament remodeling by dynamin2 did not depend of its functions in endocytosis. Thus, dynamin2 acts within lamellipodia to organize actin filaments and regulate assembly and flow of lamellar actomyosin. We hypothesize that through its actions on lamellipodial F-actin, dynamin2 generates F-actin structures that give rise to lamellar actomyosin and for efficient coupling of F-actin at focal adhesions. In this way, dynamin2 orchestrates the global actin cytoskeleton.

  1. Actin-dependent mechanisms in AMPA receptor trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan G Hanley

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The precise regulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR number and subtype at the synapse is crucial for the regulation of excitatory neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity and the consequent formation of appropriate neural circuits during learning and memory. AMPAR trafficking involves the dynamic processes of exocytosis, endocytosis and endosomal recycling, all of which involve the actin cytoskeleton. The actin cytoskeleton is highly dynamic and highly regulated by an abundance of actin-binding proteins and upstream signalling pathways that modulate actin polymerization and depolymerisation. Actin dynamics generate forces that manipulate membranes in the process of vesicle biogenesis, and also for propelling vesicles through the cytoplasm to reach their destination. In addition, trafficking mechanisms exploit more stable aspects of the actin cytoskeleton by using actin-based motor proteins to traffic vesicular cargo along actin filaments. Numerous studies have shown that actin dynamics are critical for AMPAR localization and function. The identification of actin-binding proteins that physically interact with AMPAR subunits, and research into their mode of action is starting to shed light on the mechanisms involved. Such proteins either regulate actin dynamics to modulate mechanical forces exerted on AMPAR-containing membranes, or associate with actin filaments to target or transport AMPAR-containing vesicles to specific subcellular regions. In addition, actin-regulatory proteins that do not physically interact with AMPARs may influence AMPAR trafficking by regulating the local actin environment in the dendritic spine.

  2. Actin turnover is required to prevent axon retraction driven by endogenous actomyosin contractility

    OpenAIRE

    Gallo, Gianluca; Yee, Hal F.; Letourneau, Paul C.

    2002-01-01

    Growth cone motility and guidance depend on the dynamic reorganization of filamentous actin (F-actin). In the growth cone, F-actin undergoes turnover, which is the exchange of actin subunits from existing filaments. However, the function of F-actin turnover is not clear. We used jasplakinolide (jasp), a cell-permeable macrocyclic peptide that inhibits F-actin turnover, to study the role of F-actin turnover in axon extension. Treatment with jasp caused axon retraction, demonstrating that axon ...

  3. Dynamic phosphoregulation of the cortical actin cytoskeleton and endocytic machinery revealed by real-time chemical genetic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sekiya-Kawasaki, Mariko; Groen, Aaron Chris; Cope, M. Jamie T.V.; Kaksonen, Marko; Watson, Hadiya A.; Zhang, Chao; Shokat, Kevan M.; Wendland, Beverly; McDonald, Kent L.; McCaffery, J. Michael; Drubin, David G.

    2003-01-01

    We used chemical genetics to control the activity of budding yeast Prk1p, which is a protein kinase that is related to mammalian GAK and AAK1, and which targets several actin regulatory proteins implicated in endocytosis. In vivo Prk1p inhibition blocked pheromone receptor endocytosis, and caused cortical actin patches to rapidly aggregate into large clumps that contained Abp1p, Sla2p, Pan1p, Sla1p, and Ent1p. Clump formation depended on Arp2p, suggesting that this phenotype might result from...

  4. Exploring the drug resistance of V32I and M46L mutant HIV-1 protease to inhibitor TMC114: flap dynamics and binding mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Wang, Yixuan

    2015-03-01

    Inhibitors of HIV-1 protease (HIV-1-pr) generally only bind to the active site of the protease. However, for some mutants such as V32I and M46L the TMC114 can bind not only to the active cavity but also to the groove of the flexible flaps. Although the second binding site suggests the higher efficiency of the drug against HIV-1-pr, the drug resistance in HIV-1-pr due to mutations cannot be ignored, which prompts us to investigate the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and behavior of double bound TMC114 (2T) to HIV-1-pr. The conformational dynamics of HIV-1-pr and the binding of TMC114 to the WT, V32I and M46L mutants were investigated with all-atom molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. The 20 ns MD simulation shows many fascinating effects of the inhibitor binding to the WT and mutant proteases. MM-PBSA calculations explain the binding free energies unfavorable for the M46L and V32I mutants as compared to the WT. For the single binding (1T) the less binding affinity can be attributed to the entropic loss for both V32I-1T and M46L-1T. Although the second binding of TMC114 with flap does increase binding energy for the mutants (V32I-2T and M46L-2T), the considerable entropy loss results in the lower binding Gibbs free energies. Thus, binding of TMC114 in the flap region does not help much in the total gain in binding affinity of the system, which was verified from this study and thereby validating experiments. PMID:25562662

  5. Yeast RAD2, a homolog of human XPG, plays a key role in the regulation of the cell cycle and actin dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Sun Kang

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in the human XPG gene cause Cockayne syndrome (CS and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP. Transcription defects have been suggested as the fundamental cause of CS; however, defining CS as a transcription syndrome is inconclusive. In particular, the function of XPG in transcription has not been clearly demonstrated. Here, we provide evidence for the involvement of RAD2, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae counterpart of XPG, in cell cycle regulation and efficient actin assembly following ultraviolet irradiation. RAD2 C-terminal deletion, which resembles the XPG mutation found in XPG/CS cells, caused cell growth arrest, the cell cycle stalling, a defective α-factor response, shortened lifespan, cell polarity defect, and misregulated actin-dynamics after DNA damage. Overexpression of the C-terminal 65 amino acids of Rad2p was sufficient to induce hyper-cell polarization. In addition, RAD2 genetically interacts with TPM1 during cell polarization. These results provide insights into the role of RAD2 in post-UV irradiation cell cycle regulation and actin assembly, which may be an underlying cause of XPG/CS.

  6. Mechanics of Flapping Flight: Analytical Formulations of Unsteady Aerodynamics, Kinematic Optimization, Flight Dynamics, and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Jayant Kumar

    Electricity is an indispensable commodity to modern society, yet it is delivered via a grid architecture that remains largely unchanged over the past century. A host of factors are conspiring to topple this dated yet venerated design: developments in renewable electricity generation technology, policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and advances in information technology for managing energy systems. Modern electric grids are emerging as complex distributed systems in which a portfolio of power generation resources, often incorporating fluctuating renewable resources such as wind and solar, must be managed dynamically to meet uncontrolled, time-varying demand. Uncertainty in both supply and demand makes control of modern electric grids fundamentally more challenging, and growing portfolios of renewables exacerbate the challenge. We study three electricity grids: the state of California, the province of Ontario, and the country of Germany. To understand the effects of increasing renewables, we develop a methodology to scale renewables penetration. Analyzing these grids yields key insights about rigid limits to renewables penetration and their implications in meeting long-term emissions targets. We argue that to achieve deep penetration of renewables, the operational model of the grid must be inverted, changing the paradigm from load-following supplies to supply-following loads. To alleviate the challenge of supply-demand matching on deeply renewable grids, we first examine well-known techniques, including altering management of existing supply resources, employing utility-scale energy storage, targeting energy efficiency improvements, and exercising basic demand-side management. Then, we create several instantiations of supply-following loads -- including refrigerators, heating and cooling systems, and laptop computers -- by employing a combination of sensor networks, advanced control techniques, and enhanced energy storage. We examine the capacity of each load

  7. Multiple actin binding domains of Ena/VASP proteins determine actin network stiffening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Brian S; van der Meulen, Stef; Noguera, Philippe; Alonso-Latorre, Baldomero; Plastino, Julie; Koenderink, Gijsje H

    2012-11-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (Ena/VASP) is an actin binding protein, important for actin dynamics in motile cells and developing organisms. Though VASP's main activity is the promotion of barbed end growth, it has an F-actin binding site and can form tetramers, and so could additionally play a role in actin crosslinking and bundling in the cell. To test this activity, we performed rheology of reconstituted actin networks in the presence of wild-type VASP or mutants lacking the ability to tetramerize or to bind G-actin and/or F-actin. We show that increasing amounts of wild-type VASP increase network stiffness up to a certain point, beyond which stiffness actually decreases with increasing VASP concentration. The maximum stiffness is 10-fold higher than for pure actin networks. Confocal microscopy shows that VASP forms clustered actin filament bundles, explaining the reduction in network elasticity at high VASP concentration. Removal of the tetramerization site results in significantly reduced bundling and bundle clustering, indicating that VASP's flexible tetrameric structure causes clustering. Removing either the F-actin or the G-actin binding site diminishes VASP's effect on elasticity, but does not eliminate it. Mutating the F-actin and G-actin binding site together, or mutating the F-actin binding site and saturating the G-actin binding site with monomeric actin, eliminates VASP's ability to increase network stiffness. We propose that, in the cell, VASP crosslinking confers only moderate increases in linear network elasticity, and unlike other crosslinkers, VASP's network stiffening activity may be tuned by the local concentration of monomeric actin.

  8. Piezoelectrically actuated insect scale flapping wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sujoy; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2010-04-01

    An energy method is used in order to derive the non-linear equations of motion of a smart flapping wing. Flapping wing is actuated from the root by a PZT unimorph in the piezofan configuration. Dynamic characteristics of the wing, having the same size as dragonfly Aeshna Multicolor, are analyzed using numerical simulations. It is shown that flapping angle variations of the smart flapping wing are similar to the actual dragonfly wing for a specific feasible voltage. An unsteady aerodynamic model based on modified strip theory is used to obtain the aerodynamic forces. It is found that the smart wing generates sufficient lift to support its own weight and carry a small payload. It is therefore a potential candidate for flapping wing of micro air vehicles.

  9. Dynamic Regulation of Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule–mediated Homotypic Cell Adhesion through the Actin CytoskeletonV⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Nelissen, Judith M. D. T.; Peters, Inge M.; de Grooth, Bart G.; Van Kooyk, Yvette; Figdor, Carl G.

    2000-01-01

    Restricted expression of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) by hematopoietic cells suggests an important role in the immune system and hematopoiesis. To get insight into the mechanisms that control ALCAM-mediated adhesion we have investigated homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions. Here, we demonstrate that the cytoskeleton regulates ALCAM-mediated cell adhesion because inhibition of actin polymerization by cytochalasin D (CytD) strongly induces homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions....

  10. Plekhh2, a novel podocyte protein downregulated in human focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, is involved in matrix adhesion and actin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perisic, Ljubica; Lal, Mark; Hulkko, Jenny; Hultenby, Kjell; Önfelt, Björn; Sun, Ying; Dunér, Fredrik; Patrakka, Jaakko; Betsholtz, Christer; Uhlen, Mathias; Brismar, Hjalmar; Tryggvason, Karl; Wernerson, Annika; Pikkarainen, Timo

    2012-11-01

    Pleckstrin homology domain-containing, family H (with MyTH4 domain), member 2 (Plekhh2) is a 1491-residue intracellular protein highly enriched in renal glomerular podocytes for which no function has been ascribed. Analysis of renal biopsies from patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis revealed a significant reduction in total podocyte Plekhh2 expression compared to controls. Sequence analysis indicated a putative α-helical coiled-coil segment as the only recognizable domain within the N-terminal half of the polypeptide, while the C-terminal half contains two PH, a MyTH4, and a FERM domain. We identified a phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate consensus-binding site in the PH1 domain required for Plekhh2 localization to peripheral regions of cell lamellipodia. The N-terminal half of Plekkh2 is not necessary for lamellipodial targeting but mediates self-association. Yeast two-hybrid screening showed that Plekhh2 directly interacts through its FERM domain with the focal adhesion protein Hic-5 and actin. Plekhh2 and Hic-5 coprecipitated and colocalized at the soles of podocyte foot processes in situ and Hic-5 partially relocated from focal adhesions to lamellipodia in Plekhh2-expressing podocytes. In addition, Plekhh2 stabilizes the cortical actin cytoskeleton by attenuating actin depolymerization. Our findings suggest a structural and functional role for Plekhh2 in the podocyte foot processes. PMID:22832517

  11. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts.

  12. Disrupted dynamics of F-actin and insulin granule fusion in INS-1 832/13 beta-cells exposed to glucotoxicity: partial restoration by glucagon-like peptide 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinault, Aurore; Gausseres, Blandine; Bailbe, Danielle; Chebbah, Nella; Portha, Bernard; Movassat, Jamileh; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cecile

    2016-08-01

    Actin dynamics in pancreatic β-cells is involved in insulin exocytosis but the molecular mechanisms of this dynamics and its role in biphasic insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells is largely unknown. Moreover, the impact of a glucotoxic environment on the sub-cortical actin network dynamics is poorly studied. In this study, we investigate the behavior of insulin granules and the subcortical actin network dynamics in INS-1 832/13 β-cells submitted to a normal or glucotoxic environment. Our results show that glucose stimulation leads to a reorganization of the subcortical actin network with a rupture of its interactions with t-SNARE proteins (Syntaxin 1A and SNAP-25), promoting insulin secretion in INS-1 832/13 β-cells. Prolonged exposure of INS-1 832/13 β-cells to high-glucose levels (glucotoxicity) leads to the densification of the cortical actin network, which prevents its reorganization under acute glucose, and diminishes the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, as shown by the decreased number of fusion events. The most interesting in our results is the partial restoration by GLP-1 of the insulin secretion ability from high-glucose treated INS-1 832/13 cells. This improved insulin exocytosis is associated with partial restored actin dynamics and fusion events during the two phases of the secretion, with a preferential involvement of Epac2 signaling in the first phase and a rather involvement of PKA signaling in the second phase of insulin exocytosis. All these data provide some new insights into the mechanism by which current therapeutics may be improving insulin secretion. PMID:27101990

  13. Characterizing mouse male germ cell-specific actin capping protein α3 (CPα3): dynamic patterns of expression in testicular and epididymal sperm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keizo Tokuhiro; Yasushi Miyagawa; Hiromitsu Tanaka

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To characterize mouse capping protein α3 (CPα3) during spermatogenesis and sperm maturation. Methods: We produced rat anti-CPα3 antiserum and examined the expression of CPα3 in various mouse tissues using Western blot analysis and the localization of CPα3 in testicular and epididymal sperm using immunohistochemical analyses. We also examined how the localization of CPα3 and β-actin (ACTB) in sperm changed after the acrosomal reaction by performing immunohistochemical analyses using anti-CPα3 antiserum and anti-actin antibody. Results: Western blot analysis using specific antiserum revealed that CPα3 was expressed specifically in testes. Interestingly, the molecular weight of CPα3 changed during sperm maturation in the epididymis. Furthermore, the subcellular localization of CPα3 in sperm changed dynamically from the flagellum to the post-acrosomal region of the head during epididymal maturation. The distribution of ACTB was in the post-acrosomal region of the head and the flagellum. After inducing the acrosomal reaction, the CPα3 and ACTB localization was virtually identical to the localization before the acrosomal reaction.Conclusion: CPα3 might play an important role in sperm morphogenesis and/or sperm function.

  14. The actinome of Dictyostelium discoideum in comparison to actins and actin-related proteins from other organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayabalan M Joseph

    Full Text Available Actin belongs to the most abundant proteins in eukaryotic cells which harbor usually many conventional actin isoforms as well as actin-related proteins (Arps. To get an overview over the sometimes confusing multitude of actins and Arps, we analyzed the Dictyostelium discoideum actinome in detail and compared it with the genomes from other model organisms. The D. discoideum actinome comprises 41 actins and actin-related proteins. The genome contains 17 actin genes which most likely arose from consecutive gene duplications, are all active, in some cases developmentally regulated and coding for identical proteins (Act8-group. According to published data, the actin fraction in a D. discoideum cell consists of more than 95% of these Act8-type proteins. The other 16 actin isoforms contain a conventional actin motif profile as well but differ in their protein sequences. Seven actin genes are potential pseudogenes. A homology search of the human genome using the most typical D. discoideum actin (Act8 as query sequence finds the major actin isoforms such as cytoplasmic beta-actin as best hit. This suggests that the Act8-group represents a nearly perfect actin throughout evolution. Interestingly, limited data from D. fasciculatum, a more ancient member among the social amoebae, show different relationships between conventional actins. The Act8-type isoform is most conserved throughout evolution. Modeling of the putative structures suggests that the majority of the actin-related proteins is functionally unrelated to canonical actin. The data suggest that the other actin variants are not necessary for the cytoskeleton itself but rather regulators of its dynamical features or subunits in larger protein complexes.

  15. Enhanced Correlation of SMART Active Flap Rotor Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottapalli, Sesi

    2011-01-01

    This is a follow-on study to a 2010 correlation effort. Measured data from the SMART rotor test in the NASA Ames 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel are compared with CAMRAD II calculations. As background, during the wind tunnel test, unexpectedly high inboard loads were encountered, and it was hypothesized at that time that due to changes in the flexbeams over the years, the flexbeam properties used in the analysis needed updating. Boeing Mesa, recently updated these properties. This correlation study uses the updated flexbeam properties. Compared to earlier studies, the following two enhancements are implemented: i) the inboard loads (pitchcase and flexbeam loads) correlation is included for the first time (reliable prediction of the inboard loads is a prerequisite for any future anticipated flight-testing); ii) the number of blade modes is increased to better capture the flap dynamics and the pitchcase-flexbeam dynamics. Also, aerodynamically, both the rolled-up wake model and the more complex, multiple trailer wake model are used, with the latter slightly improving the blade chordwise moment correlation. This sensitivity to the wake model indicates that CFD is needed. Three high-speed experimental cases, one uncontrolled free flap case and two commanded flap cases, are considered. The two commanded flap cases include a 2o flap deflection at 5P case and a 0o flap deflection case. For the free flap case, selected modifications to the HH-06 section flap airfoil pitching moment table are implemented. For the commanded 2o flap case, the experimental flap variation is approximately matched by increasing the analytical flap hinge stiffness. This increased flap hinge stiffness is retained for the commanded 0o flap case also, which is treated as a free flap case, but with larger flap hinge stiffness. The change in the mid-span and outboard loads correlation due to the updating of the flexbeam properties is not significant. Increasing the number of blade modes results in an

  16. Drosophila pupal macrophages--a versatile tool for combined ex vivo and in vivo imaging of actin dynamics at high resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Moritz; Squarr, Anna Julia; Risse, Benjamin; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Bogdan, Sven

    2013-01-01

    Molecular understanding of actin dynamics requires a genetically traceable model system that allows live cell imaging together with high-resolution microscopy techniques. Here, we used Drosophila pupal macrophages that combine many advantages of cultured cells with a genetic in vivo model system. Using structured illumination microscopy together with advanced spinning disk confocal microscopy we show that these cells provide a powerful system for single gene analysis. It allows forward genetic screens to characterize the regulatory network controlling cell shape and directed cell migration in a physiological context. We knocked down components regulating lamellipodia formation, including WAVE, single subunits of Arp2/3 complex and CPA, one of the two capping protein subunits and demonstrate the advantages of this model system by imaging mutant macrophages ex vivo as well as in vivo upon laser-induced wounding.

  17. Design of Insect-Scale Flapping Wing Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Nabawy, Mostafa Ramadan

    2015-01-01

    This thesis contributes to the state of the art in integrated design of insect-scale piezoelectric actuated flapping wing vehicles through the development of novel theoretical models for flapping wing aerodynamics and piezoelectric actuator dynamics, and integration of these models into a closed form design process.A comprehensive literature review of available engineered designs of miniature rotary and flapping wing vehicles is provided. A novel taxonomy based on wing and actuator kinematics...

  18. Separation of actin-dependent and actin-independent lipid rafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klappe, Karin; Hummel, Ina; Kok, Jan Willem

    2013-01-01

    Lipid rafts have been isolated on the basis of their resistance to various detergents and more recently by using detergent-free procedures. The actin cytoskeleton is now recognized as a dynamic regulator of lipid raft stability. We carefully analyzed the effects of the cortical actin-disrupting agen

  19. Cellular prion protein is required for neuritogenesis: fine-tuning of multiple signaling pathways involved in focal adhesions and actin cytoskeleton dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alleaume-Butaux A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aurélie Alleaume-Butaux,1,2 Caroline Dakowski,1,2 Mathéa Pietri,1,2 Sophie Mouillet-Richard,1,2 Jean-Marie Launay,3,4 Odile Kellermann,1,2 Benoit Schneider1,2 1INSERM, UMR-S 747, 2Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 747, 3Public Hospital of Paris, Department of Biochemistry, INSERM UMR-S 942, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris, France; 4Pharma Research Department, Hoffmann La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland Abstract: Neuritogenesis is a dynamic phenomenon associated with neuronal differentiation that allows a rather spherical neuronal stem cell to develop dendrites and axon, a prerequisite for the integration and transmission of signals. The acquisition of neuronal polarity occurs in three steps: (1 neurite sprouting, which consists of the formation of buds emerging from the postmitotic neuronal soma; (2 neurite outgrowth, which represents the conversion of buds into neurites, their elongation and evolution into axon or dendrites; and (3 the stability and plasticity of neuronal polarity. In neuronal stem cells, remodeling and activation of focal adhesions (FAs associated with deep modifications of the actin cytoskeleton is a prerequisite for neurite sprouting and subsequent neurite outgrowth. A multiple set of growth factors and interactors located in the extracellular matrix and the plasma membrane orchestrate neuritogenesis by acting on intracellular signaling effectors, notably small G proteins such as RhoA, Rac, and Cdc42, which are involved in actin turnover and the dynamics of FAs. The cellular prion protein (PrPC, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored membrane protein mainly known for its role in a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases, has emerged as a central player in neuritogenesis. Here, we review the contribution of PrPC to neuronal polarization and detail the current knowledge on the signaling pathways fine-tuned by PrPC to promote neurite sprouting, outgrowth, and maintenance. We emphasize that Pr

  20. CNS myelin wrapping is driven by actin disassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchero, J Bradley; Fu, Meng-Meng; Sloan, Steven A; Ibrahim, Adiljan; Olson, Andrew; Zaremba, Anita; Dugas, Jason C; Wienbar, Sophia; Caprariello, Andrew V; Kantor, Christopher; Leonoudakis, Dmitri; Leonoudakus, Dmitri; Lariosa-Willingham, Karen; Kronenberg, Golo; Gertz, Karen; Soderling, Scott H; Miller, Robert H; Barres, Ben A

    2015-07-27

    Myelin is essential in vertebrates for the rapid propagation of action potentials, but the molecular mechanisms driving its formation remain largely unknown. Here we show that the initial stage of process extension and axon ensheathment by oligodendrocytes requires dynamic actin filament assembly by the Arp2/3 complex. Unexpectedly, subsequent myelin wrapping coincides with the upregulation of actin disassembly proteins and rapid disassembly of the oligodendrocyte actin cytoskeleton and does not require Arp2/3. Inducing loss of actin filaments drives oligodendrocyte membrane spreading and myelin wrapping in vivo, and the actin disassembly factor gelsolin is required for normal wrapping. We show that myelin basic protein, a protein essential for CNS myelin wrapping whose role has been unclear, is required for actin disassembly, and its loss phenocopies loss of actin disassembly proteins. Together, these findings provide insight into the molecular mechanism of myelin wrapping and identify it as an actin-independent form of mammalian cell motility.

  1. The core and conserved role of MAL is homeostatic regulation of actin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvany, Lara; Muller, Julius; Guccione, Ernesto; Rørth, Pernille

    2014-05-15

    The transcription cofactor MAL is regulated by free actin levels and thus by actin dynamics. MAL, together with its DNA-binding partner, SRF, is required for invasive cell migration and in experimental metastasis. Although MAL/SRF has many targets, we provide genetic evidence in both Drosophila and human cellular models that actin is the key target that must be regulated by MAL/SRF for invasive cell migration. By regulating MAL/SRF activity, actin protein feeds back on production of actin mRNA to ensure sufficient supply of actin. This constitutes a dedicated homeostatic feedback system that provides a foundation for cellular actin dynamics.

  2. The platysma myocutaneous flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Dale A; Williams, Jonathan; Alakaily, Xena

    2014-08-01

    Reconstructing defects of the oral mucosa or skin of the lower one-third of the face can be accomplished by a variety of techniques. This article presents two versions of the platysma myocutaneous flap, which is a reliable, axial pattern, pedicled flap capable of providing excellent one-stage reconstruction of such defects. As discussed herein, the superiorly based and posteriorly based versions of the flap have wide application in the oral and facial region. Also provided is a review of other uses of this flap in head and neck surgery. PMID:24958382

  3. Propeller TAP flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Bille, Camilla; Wamberg, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if a propeller thoracodorsal artery perforator (TAP) flap can be used for breast reconstruction. Fifteen women were reconstructed using a propeller TAP flap, an implant, and an ADM. Preoperative colour Doppler ultrasonography was used for patient selection...... major complications needing additional surgery. One flap was lost due to a vascular problem. Breast reconstruction can be performed by a propeller TAP flap without cutting the descending branch of the thoracodorsal vessels. However, the authors would recommend that a small cuff of muscle is left around...

  4. Prostaglandins temporally regulate cytoplasmic actin bundle formation during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, Andrew J; Kelpsch, Daniel J; Chen, Xiang; Spracklen, Cassandra N; Tootle, Tina L

    2014-02-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs)--lipid signals produced downstream of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes--regulate actin dynamics in cell culture and platelets, but their roles during development are largely unknown. Here we define a new role for Pxt, the Drosophila COX-like enzyme, in regulating the actin cytoskeleton--temporal restriction of actin remodeling during oogenesis. PGs are required for actin filament bundle formation during stage 10B (S10B). In addition, loss of Pxt results in extensive early actin remodeling, including actin filaments and aggregates, within the posterior nurse cells of S9 follicles; wild-type follicles exhibit similar structures at a low frequency. Hu li tai shao (Hts-RC) and Villin (Quail), an actin bundler, localize to all early actin structures, whereas Enabled (Ena), an actin elongation factor, preferentially localizes to those in pxt mutants. Reduced Ena levels strongly suppress early actin remodeling in pxt mutants. Furthermore, loss of Pxt results in reduced Ena localization to the sites of bundle formation during S10B. Together these data lead to a model in which PGs temporally regulate actin remodeling during Drosophila oogenesis by controlling Ena localization/activity, such that in S9, PG signaling inhibits, whereas at S10B, it promotes Ena-dependent actin remodeling.

  5. Cervicofacial flap revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay V. Nakade

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: Cervicofacial flap is simple, easy to operate, consume less operating time as compared to microvascular flap. It is less complicated and especially useful in diabetic, hypertensives and old debilitated patients with high risk of anaesthesia. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(11.000: 4669-4674

  6. Pedicled perforator flaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirtas, Yener; Ozturk, Nuray; Kelahmetoglu, Osman;

    2009-01-01

    Described in this study is a surgical concept that supports the "consider and use a pedicled perforator flap whenever possible and indicated" approach to reconstruct a particular skin defect. The operation is entirely free-style; the only principle is to obtain a pedicled perforator flap to recon......Described in this study is a surgical concept that supports the "consider and use a pedicled perforator flap whenever possible and indicated" approach to reconstruct a particular skin defect. The operation is entirely free-style; the only principle is to obtain a pedicled perforator flap...... more practical and creative to use a free-style manner during pedicled perforator flap surgery, instead of being obliged to predefined templates for this type of procedure....

  7. Computational Study of the Binding Mechanism of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor 1 with Actin in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Wang, Xue; Dong, Chun-Hai; Yang, Jian Ming; Yao, Xiao Jun

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein. It plays important roles in cellular function and exists either in the monomeric (G-actin) or polymeric form (F-actin). Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family bind to both G-actin and F-actin and play vital roles in actin dynamics by manipulating the rates of filament polymerization and depolymerization. It has been reported that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants of actin-depolymerizing factor 1 (ADF1) in Arabidopsis thaliana decreased the binding affinity of ADF for the actin monomer. To investigate the binding mechanism and dynamic behavior of the ADF1-actin complex, we constructed a homology model of the AtADF1-actin complex based on the crystal structure of AtADF1 and the twinfilin C-terminal ADF-H domain in a complex with a mouse actin monomer. The model was then refined for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations. Increased binding energy of the mutated system was observed using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area and Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-GB/PBSA) methods. To determine the residues that make decisive contributions to the ADF1 actin-binding affinity, per-residue decomposition and computational alanine scanning analyses were performed, which provided more detailed information on the binding mechanism. Root-mean-square fluctuation and principal component analyses confirmed that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants induced an increased conformational flexibility. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study is of great importance for understanding the binding mechanism of ADF1 and G-actin. PMID:27414648

  8. Resemblance of actin-binding protein/actin gels to covalently crosslinked networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janmey, Paul A.; Hvidt, Søren; Lamb, Jennifer; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1990-05-01

    THE maintainance of the shape of cells is often due to their surface elasticity, which arises mainly from an actin-rich cytoplasmic cortex1,2. On locomotion, phagocytosis or fission, however, these cells become partially fluid-like. The finding of proteins that can bind to actin and control the assembly of, or crosslink, actin filaments, and of intracellular messages that regulate the activities of some of these actin-binding proteins, indicates that such 'gel sol' transformations result from the rearrangement of cortical actin-rich networks3. Alternatively, on the basis of a study of the mechanical properties of mixtures of actin filaments and an Acanthamoeba actin-binding protein, α-actinin, it has been proposed that these transformations can be accounted for by rapid exchange of crosslinks between actin filaments4: the cortical network would be solid when the deformation rate is greater than the rate of crosslink exchange, but would deform or 'creep' when deformation is slow enough to permit crosslinker molecules to rearrange. Here we report, however, that mixtures of actin filaments and actin-binding protein (ABP), an actin crosslinking protein of many higher eukaryotes, form gels Theologically equivalent to covalently crosslinked networks. These gels do not creep in response to applied stress on a time scale compatible with most cell-surface movements. These findings support a more complex and controlled mechanism underlying the dynamic mechanical properties of cortical cytoplasm, and can explain why cells do not collapse under the constant shear forces that often exist in tissues.

  9. Folding in and out: passive morphing in flapping wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowers, Amanda K; Lentink, David

    2015-04-01

    We present a new mechanism for passive wing morphing of flapping wings inspired by bat and bird wing morphology. The mechanism consists of an unactuated hand wing connected to the arm wing with a wrist joint. Flapping motion generates centrifugal accelerations in the hand wing, forcing it to unfold passively. Using a robotic model in hover, we made kinematic measurements of unfolding kinematics as functions of the non-dimensional wingspan fold ratio (2-2.5) and flapping frequency (5-17 Hz) using stereo high-speed cameras. We find that the wings unfold passively within one to two flaps and remain unfolded with only small amplitude oscillations. To better understand the passive dynamics, we constructed a computer model of the unfolding process based on rigid body dynamics, contact models, and aerodynamic correlations. This model predicts the measured passive unfolding within about one flap and shows that unfolding is driven by centrifugal acceleration induced by flapping. The simulations also predict that relative unfolding time only weakly depends on flapping frequency and can be reduced to less than half a wingbeat by increasing flapping amplitude. Subsequent dimensional analysis shows that the time required to unfold passively is of the same order of magnitude as the flapping period. This suggests that centrifugal acceleration can drive passive unfolding within approximately one wingbeat in small and large wings. Finally, we show experimentally that passive unfolding wings can withstand impact with a branch, by first folding and then unfolding passively. This mechanism enables flapping robots to squeeze through clutter without sophisticated control. Passive unfolding also provides a new avenue in morphing wing design that makes future flapping morphing wings possibly more energy efficient and light-weight. Simultaneously these results point to possible inertia driven, and therefore metabolically efficient, control strategies in bats and birds to morph or recover

  10. Annexin A2 at the Interface of Actin and Membrane Dynamics: A Focus on Its Roles in Endocytosis and Cell Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam G. Grieve

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Annexins are a family of calcium- and phospholipid-binding proteins found in nearly all eukaryotes. They are structurally highly conserved and have been implicated in a wide range of cellular activities. In this paper, we focus on Annexin A2 (AnxA2. Altered expression of this protein has been identified in a wide variety of cancers, has also been found on the HIV particle, and has been implicated in the maturation of the virus. Recently, it has also been shown to have an important role in the establishment of normal apical polarity in epithelial cells. We synthesize here the known biochemical properties of this protein and the extensive literature concerning its involvement in the endocytic pathway. We stress the importance of AnxA2 as a platform for actin remodeling in the vicinity of dynamic cellular membranes, in the hope that this may shed light on the normal functions of the protein and its contribution to disease.

  11. Energetic modeling and single-molecule verification of dynamic regulation on receptor protein diffusion by actin corrals and lipid raft domains receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien Yu; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2015-03-01

    To faithfully estimate a signal that varies in both space and time, the optimization strategy used by a live cell is to organize a collection of distributed and mobile receptors into a mobile active clustering. However, living eukaryotic cells are highly heterogeneous and stochastically dynamic. It is therefore important to develop an energetic model based on fundamental laws to verify that the underlying processes are energetically favorable. We developed an energetic model based on the generalized Langevin equation and the Cahn-Hilliard equation to simulate the diffusive behaviors of receptor proteins in the plasma membrane with a hierarchical structure of actin corrals, lipid domains, and receptor proteins. Single-molecule tracking data of EGFR acquired on live HeLa cells agrees with the simulation results. We discovered that after ligand binding, EGFR molecules move into lipid nanodomains. The transition rates between different diffusion states of liganded EGFR molecules are regulated by the lipid domains. Our method captures both the sensitivity of single-molecule processes, statistic accuracy of data analysis, and the hierarchical structure of plasma membranes.

  12. Online rapid sampling microdialysis (rsMD) using enzyme-based electroanalysis for dynamic detection of ischaemia during free flap reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, M L; Brennan, P A; Leong, C L; Gowers, S A N; Aldridge, T; Mellor, T K; Boutelle, M G

    2013-04-01

    We describe an enzyme-based electroanalysis system for real-time analysis of a clinical microdialysis sampling stream during surgery. Free flap tissue transfer is used widely in reconstructive surgery after resection of tumours or in other situations such as following major trauma. However, there is a risk of flap failure, due to thrombosis in the flap pedicle, leading to tissue ischaemia. Conventional clinical assessment is particularly difficult in such 'buried' flaps where access to the tissue is limited. Rapid sampling microdialysis (rsMD) is an enzyme-based electrochemical detection method, which is particularly suited to monitoring metabolism. This online flow injection system analyses a dialysate flow stream from an implanted microdialysis probe every 30 s for levels of glucose and lactate. Here, we report its first use in the monitoring of free flap reconstructive surgery, from flap detachment to re-vascularisation and overnight in the intensive care unit. The on-set of ischaemia by both arterial clamping and failure of venous drainage was seen as an increase in lactate and decrease in glucose levels. Glucose levels returned to normal within 10 min of successful arterial anastomosis, whilst lactate took longer to clear. The use of the lactate/glucose ratio provides a clear predictor of ischaemia on-set and subsequent recovery, as it is insensitive to changes in blood flow such as those caused by topical vasodilators, like papaverine. The use of storage tubing to preserve the time course of dialysate, when technical difficulties arise, until offline analysis can occur, is also shown. The potential use of rsMD in free flap surgery and tissue monitoring is highly promising.

  13. Flapping of Insectile Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yangyang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Insects use flight muscles attached at the base of the wings to produce impressive wing flapping frequencies. Yet the effects of muscle stiffness on the performance of insect wings remain unclear. Here, we construct an insectile wing model, consisting of two rigid wings connected at their base by an elastic torsional spring and submerged in an oscillatory flow. The wing system is free to rotate and flap. We first explore the extent to which the flyer can withstand roll perturbations, then study its flapping behavior and performance as a function of spring stiffness. We find an optimal range of spring stiffness that results in large flapping amplitudes, high force generation and good storage of elastic energy. We conclude by conjecturing that insects may select and adjust the muscle spring stiffness to achieve desired movement. These findings may have significant implications on the design principles of wings in micro air-vehicles.

  14. Control of Flap Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblatt, David

    2005-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was carried out on a semi-span wing model to assess the feasibility of controlling vortices emanating from outboard flaps and tip-flaps by actively varying the degree of boundary layer separation. Separation was varied by means of perturbations produced from segmented zero-efflux oscillatory blowing slots, while estimates of span loadings and vortex sheet strengths were obtained by integrating wing surface pressures. These estimates were used as input to inviscid rollup relations as a means of predicting changes to the vortex characteristics resulting from the perturbations. Surveys of flow in the wake of the outboard and tip-flaps were made using a seven-hole probe, from which the vortex characteristics were directly deduced. Varying the degree of separation had a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size for both outboard and tip-flaps. Qualitative changes in vortex characteristics were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations, while the failure to account for viscosity was presumed to be the main reason for observed discrepancies. Introducing perturbations near the outboard flap-edges or on the tip-flap exerted significant control over vortices while producing negligible lift excursions.

  15. Distinct functional interactions between actin isoforms and nonsarcomeric myosins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Müller

    Full Text Available Despite their near sequence identity, actin isoforms cannot completely replace each other in vivo and show marked differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular localization. Little is known about isoform-specific differences in their interactions with myosin motors and other actin-binding proteins. Mammalian cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin interact with nonsarcomeric conventional myosins such as the members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 family and myosin-7A. These interactions support a wide range of cellular processes including cytokinesis, maintenance of cell polarity, cell adhesion, migration, and mechano-electrical transduction. To elucidate differences in the ability of isoactins to bind and stimulate the enzymatic activity of individual myosin isoforms, we characterized the interactions of human skeletal muscle α-actin, cytoplasmic β-actin, and cytoplasmic γ-actin with human myosin-7A and nonmuscle myosins-2A, -2B and -2C1. In the case of nonmuscle myosins-2A and -2B, the interaction with either cytoplasmic actin isoform results in 4-fold greater stimulation of myosin ATPase activity than was observed in the presence of α-skeletal muscle actin. Nonmuscle myosin-2C1 is most potently activated by β-actin and myosin-7A by γ-actin. Our results indicate that β- and γ-actin isoforms contribute to the modulation of nonmuscle myosin-2 and myosin-7A activity and thereby to the spatial and temporal regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. FRET-based analyses show efficient copolymerization abilities for the actin isoforms in vitro. Experiments with hybrid actin filaments show that the extent of actomyosin coupling efficiency can be regulated by the isoform composition of actin filaments.

  16. Perforator Flaps for Perineal Reconstructions

    OpenAIRE

    Niranjan, Niri S.

    2006-01-01

    Whenever there is soft tissue loss from the perineum there are many options for reconstruction. These include allowing the wound to heal by secondary intention and the use of local random or axial pattern flaps, regional flaps, or free flaps. The axial skin flap can be defined as a flap based on known constant vessels of the subcutaneous tissue and its vena comitantes. The perforator flap on the other hand is a randomly selected perforator consisting of an artery with vena comitantes, which p...

  17. Blowing Flap Experiment: PIV Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.; Bremmer, David M.

    2004-01-01

    PIV measurements of the flow in the region of a flap side edge are presented for several flap configurations. The test model is a NACA 63(sub 2)-215 Hicks Mod-B main element airfoil with a half-span Fowler flap. Air is blown from small slots located along the flap side edge on either the top, bottom or side surfaces. The test set up is described and flow measurements for a baseline and three blowing flap configurations are presented. The effects that the flap tip jets have on the structure of the flap side edge flow are discussed for each of the flap configurations tested. The results indicate that blowing air from a slot located along the top surface of the flap greatly weakened the top vortex system and pushed it further off the top surface. Blowing from the bottom flap surface kept the strong side vortex further outboard while blowing from the side surface only strengthened the flap vortex system. It is concluded that blowing from the top or bottom surfaces of the flap may lead to a reduction of flap side edge noise.

  18. The neuronal and actin commitment: Why do neurons need rings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Sérgio Carvalho; Sousa, Mónica Mendes

    2016-09-01

    The role of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons has been extensively studied in actin-enriched compartments such as the growth cone and dendritic spines. The recent discovery of actin rings in the axon shaft and in dendrites, together with the identification of axon actin trails, has advanced our understanding on actin organization and dynamics in neurons. However, specifically in the case of actin rings, the mechanisms regulating their nucleation and assembly, and the functions that they may exert in axons and dendrites remain largely unexplored. Here we discuss the possible structural, mechanistic and functional properties of the subcortical neuronal cytoskeleton putting the current knowledge in perspective with the information available on actin rings formed in other biological contexts, and with the organization of actin-spectrin lattices in other cell types. The detailed analysis of these novel neuronal actin ring structures, together with the elucidation of the function of actin-binding proteins in neuron biology, has a large potential to uncover new mechanisms of neuronal function under normal conditions that may have impact in our understanding of axon degeneration and regeneration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Actin is required for IFT regulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasthi, Prachee; Onishi, Masayuki; Karpiak, Joel; Yamamoto, Ryosuke; Mackinder, Luke; Jonikas, Martin C; Sale, Winfield S; Shoichet, Brian; Pringle, John R; Marshall, Wallace F

    2014-09-01

    Assembly of cilia and flagella requires intraflagellar transport (IFT), a highly regulated kinesin-based transport system that moves cargo from the basal body to the tip of flagella [1]. The recruitment of IFT components to basal bodies is a function of flagellar length, with increased recruitment in rapidly growing short flagella [2]. The molecular pathways regulating IFT are largely a mystery. Because actin network disruption leads to changes in ciliary length and number, actin has been proposed to have a role in ciliary assembly. However, the mechanisms involved are unknown. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, conventional actin is found in both the cell body and the inner dynein arm complexes within flagella [3, 4]. Previous work showed that treating Chlamydomonas cells with the actin-depolymerizing compound cytochalasin D resulted in reversible flagellar shortening [5], but how actin is related to flagellar length or assembly remains unknown. Here we utilize small-molecule inhibitors and genetic mutants to analyze the role of actin dynamics in flagellar assembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that actin plays a role in IFT recruitment to basal bodies during flagellar elongation and that when actin is perturbed, the normal dependence of IFT recruitment on flagellar length is lost. We also find that actin is required for sufficient entry of IFT material into flagella during assembly. These same effects are recapitulated with a myosin inhibitor, suggesting that actin may act via myosin in a pathway by which flagellar assembly is regulated by flagellar length.

  20. Analysis of cytoskeleton dynamics and cell migration in drosophila ovaries using GFP-actin and E-cadherin-GFP fusion molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhusha, Vladyslav V.; Tsukita, Shoichiro; Oda, Hiroki

    1999-06-01

    Coordination of cell migration and adhesion is essential for movement of tissues during morphogenesis. During Drosophila oogenesis so called border cells (BCs) break from an anterior epithelium of egg chamber, acquire a mesenchymal-like morphology, and migrate posteriorly between nurse cells to oocyte. The confocal microscopic observation of BCs has revealed well-developed forepart lamellipodium stained with Drosophila E-cadherin (DE-cadherin), PS2 integrin, cytoplasmic myosin and F-actin. To investigate mechanism of BC migration in vivo we have constructed a DE-cadherin-GFP and a GFP-actin fusion proteins and induced their expression BCs utilizing the UAS/GAL4 system. The DE-cadherin-GFP signal as well as immunostaining of PS2 integrin visualized a track of migrating BCs providing an evidence that adhesive molecules are pulled out and left behind on the surface of nurse cells. Our data suggest that two distinct adhesive systems, DE-cadherins and PS2 integrins simultaneously mediate the migration of BCs. Release of adhesive contacts in the tail region is a rate- limited event in BC migration. The spatial-temporal sequence of actin-based events visualized by the GFP-actin suggest a treadmilling model for actin behavior in BC lamellipodium. BC migration can be considered as simultaneous reiterating processes of lamellipodium extension and adhesive attachment, cytoskeletal contraction, and rear detachment.

  1. Loss of cofilin 1 disturbs actin dynamics, adhesion between enveloping and deep cell layers and cell movements during gastrulation in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Wei Lin

    Full Text Available During gastrulation, cohesive migration drives associated cell layers to the completion of epiboly in zebrafish. The association of different layers relies on E-cadherin based cellular junctions, whose stability can be affected by actin turnover. Here, we examined the effect of malfunctioning actin turnover on the epibolic movement by knocking down an actin depolymerizing factor, cofilin 1, using antisense morpholino oligos (MO. Knockdown of cfl1 interfered with epibolic movement of deep cell layer (DEL but not in the enveloping layer (EVL and the defect could be specifically rescued by overexpression of cfl1. It appeared that the uncoordinated movements of DEL and EVL were regulated by the differential expression of cfl1 in the DEL, but not EVL as shown by in situ hybridization. The dissociation of DEL and EVL was further evident by the loss of adhesion between layers by using transmission electronic and confocal microscopy analyses. cfl1 morphants also exhibited abnormal convergent extension, cellular migration and actin filaments, but not involution of hypoblast. The cfl1 MO-induced cell migration defect was found to be cell-autonomous in cell transplantation assays. These results suggest that proper actin turnover mediated by Cfl1 is essential for adhesion between DEL and EVL and cell movements during gastrulation in zebrafish.

  2. Steric effects induce geometric remodeling of actin bundles in filopodia

    CERN Document Server

    Dobramysl, Ulrich; Erban, Radek

    2016-01-01

    Filopodia are ubiquitous fingerlike protrusions, spawned by many eukaryotic cells, to probe and interact with their environments. Polymerization dynamics of actin filaments, comprising the structural core of filopodia, largely determine their instantaneous lengths and overall lifetimes. The polymerization reactions at the filopodial tip require transport of G-actin, which enter the filopodial tube from the filopodial base and diffuse toward the filament barbed ends near the tip. Actin filaments are mechanically coupled into a tight bundle by cross-linker proteins. Interestingly, many of these proteins are relatively short, restricting the free diffusion of cytosolic G-actin throughout the bundle and, in particular, its penetration into the bundle core. To investigate the effect of steric restrictions on G-actin diffusion by the porous structure of filopodial actin filament bundle, we used a particle-based stochastic simulation approach. We discovered that excluded volume interactions result in partial and the...

  3. Wind Tunnel Dynamic Experiments of Flapping -wing MAV%扑翼微型飞行器风洞动态试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱保利; 李强; 邹俊伟; 陈光盛

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the MAV's aerodynamic characteristics, using multi - DOF flapping -wing MAV, the load measurement experiment was done in low - speed wind tunnel. The lift and drag were measured with different flapping frequency, attack angle and free - stream velocity. The influence of the flapping parameters on the MAV's aerodynamic characteristics was reported. The resuits could be helpful for the design of multi - DOF flapping - wing MAV.%文章在低速风洞中进行了多自由度扑翼微型飞行器的吹风试验,实测了扑翼机的升力、阻力随扑动频率、迎角和来流速度等参数的不同而导致的变化情况,测量的扑动参数对扑翼微型飞行器的气动力特性均有较大的影响.

  4. Histamine activates p38 MAP kinase and alters local lamellipodia dynamics, reducing endothelial barrier integrity and eliciting central movement of actin fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adderley, Shaquria P; Lawrence, Curtis; Madonia, Eyong; Olubadewo, Joseph O; Breslin, Jerome W

    2015-07-01

    The role of the actin cytoskeleton in endothelial barrier function has been debated for nearly four decades. Our previous investigation revealed spontaneous local lamellipodia in confluent endothelial monolayers that appear to increase overlap at intercellular junctions. We tested the hypothesis that the barrier-disrupting agent histamine would reduce local lamellipodia protrusions and investigated the potential involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation and actin stress fiber formation. Confluent monolayers of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) expressing green fluorescent protein-actin were studied using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The protrusion and withdrawal characteristics of local lamellipodia were assessed before and after addition of histamine. Changes in barrier function were determined using electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing. Histamine initially decreased barrier function, lamellipodia protrusion frequency, and lamellipodia protrusion distance. A longer time for lamellipodia withdrawal and reduced withdrawal distance and velocity accompanied barrier recovery. After barrier recovery, a significant number of cortical fibers migrated centrally, eventually resembling actin stress fibers. The p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580 attenuated the histamine-induced decreases in barrier function and lamellipodia protrusion frequency. SB203580 also inhibited the histamine-induced decreases in withdrawal distance and velocity, and the subsequent actin fiber migration. These data suggest that histamine can reduce local lamellipodia protrusion activity through activation of p38 MAP kinase. The findings also suggest that local lamellipodia have a role in maintaining endothelial barrier integrity. Furthermore, we provide evidence that actin stress fiber formation may be a reaction to, rather than a cause of, reduced endothelial barrier integrity. PMID:25948734

  5. The Evolution of Perforator Flaps

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Farah N.; Spiegel, Aldona J.

    2006-01-01

    Perforator flaps have recently become ubiquitous in the field of plastic surgery. To understand and appreciate their unique nature, it is necessary to compare and contrast them with the development of other types of flaps. A complete yet abridged version of the history of flap surgery is presented in this article. Beginning with Sushruta's Indian cheek flap method for nasal reconstruction, a trip through time and space is taken to highlight the milestones leading to the evolution of the perfo...

  6. The Versatile Modiolus Perforator Flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur; Thomsen, Jorn Bo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perforator flaps are well established, and their usefulness as freestyle island flaps is recognized. The whereabouts of vascular perforators and classification of perforator flaps in the face are a debated subject, despite several anatomical studies showing similar consistency. In our...

  7. The ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase UCH-L1 promotes bacterial invasion by altering the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basseres, Eugene; Coppotelli, Giuseppe; Pfirrmann, Thorsten;

    2010-01-01

    Invasion of eukaryotic target cells by pathogenic bacteria requires extensive remodelling of the membrane and actin cytoskeleton. Here we show that the remodelling process is regulated by the ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase UCH-L1 that promotes the invasion of epithelial cells by Listeria monocyto...

  8. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Alexander D.; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W.; Shelley, Michael; Ristroph, Leif

    2015-10-01

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing-wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in a group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. These results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups.

  9. Quantifying Blood Flow in the DIEP Flap: An Ultrasonographic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Richard Dusseldorp, BCom, MBBS(Hons

    2014-10-01

    Conclusions: This study confirms that perforator size is a critical factor in optimizing blood flow in perforator-based free tissue transfer. Further research is required to understand the flow dynamics of perforator flaps based on multiple perforators. However, surgeons should be cognizant that a single large perforator may have substantially higher flow rates than multiple small perforators. Routine FVI calculation is recommended to ensure complete flap survival.

  10. Correlative nanoscale imaging of actin filaments and their complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shivani; Zhu, Huanqi; Grintsevich, Elena E; Reisler, Emil; Gimzewski, James K

    2013-07-01

    Actin remodeling is an area of interest in biology in which correlative microscopy can bring a new way to analyze protein complexes at the nanoscale. Advances in EM, X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and single molecule techniques have provided a wealth of information about the modulation of the F-actin structure and its regulation by actin binding proteins (ABPs). Yet, there are technological limitations of these approaches to achieving quantitative molecular level information on the structural and biophysical changes resulting from ABPs interaction with F-actin. Fundamental questions about the actin structure and dynamics and how these determine the function of ABPs remain unanswered. Specifically, how local and long-range structural and conformational changes result in ABPs induced remodeling of F-actin needs to be addressed at the single filament level. Advanced, sensitive and accurate experimental tools for detailed understanding of ABP-actin interactions are much needed. This article discusses the current understanding of nanoscale structural and mechanical modulation of F-actin by ABPs at the single filament level using several correlative microscopic techniques, focusing mainly on results obtained by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis of ABP-actin complexes.

  11. Drosophila Fascin is a novel downstream target of prostaglandin signaling during actin remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Groen, Christopher M.; Spracklen, Andrew J.; Fagan, Tiffany N.; Tootle, Tina L.

    2012-01-01

    Although prostaglandins (PGs)—lipid signals produced downstream of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes—regulate actin cytoskeletal dynamics, their mechanisms of action are unknown. We previously established Drosophila oogenesis, in particular nurse cell dumping, as a new model to determine how PGs regulate actin remodeling. PGs, and thus the Drosophila COX-like enzyme Pxt, are required for both the parallel actin filament bundle formation and the cortical actin strengthening required for dumping. He...

  12. Cooperation between actin-binding proteins of invasive Salmonella: SipA potentiates SipC nucleation and bundling of actin

    OpenAIRE

    Emma J McGhie; Hayward, Richard D.; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2001-01-01

    Pathogen-induced remodelling of the host cell actin cytoskeleton drives internalization of invasive Salmon ella by non-phagocytic intestinal epithelial cells. Two Salmonella actin-binding proteins are involved in internalization: SipC is essential for the process, while SipA enhances its efficiency. Using purified SipC and SipA proteins in in vitro assays of actin dynamics and F-actin bundling, we demonstrate that SipA stimulates substantially SipC-mediated nucleation of actin polymerization....

  13. Yeast RAD2, a homolog of human XPG, plays a key role in the regulation of the cell cycle and actin dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Mi-Sun Kang; Sung-Lim Yu; Ho-Yeol Kim; Choco Michael Gorospe; Byung Hyune Choi; Sung Haeng Lee; Sung-Keun Lee

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mutations in the human XPG gene cause Cockayne syndrome (CS) and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). Transcription defects have been suggested as the fundamental cause of CS; however, defining CS as a transcription syndrome is inconclusive. In particular, the function of XPG in transcription has not been clearly demonstrated. Here, we provide evidence for the involvement of RAD2, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae counterpart of XPG, in cell cycle regulation and efficient actin assembly followin...

  14. Papilla Preservation Flap as Aesthetic Consideration in Periodontal Flap Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Olivia; Natalina Natalina; Felix Hartono

    2013-01-01

    Flap surgery is treatment for periodontal disease with alveolar bone destruction. Surgical periodontal flap with conventional incision will result in gingival recession and loss of interdental papillae after treatment. Dilemma arises in areas required high aesthetic value or regions with a fixed denture. It is challenging to perform periodontal flap with good aesthetic results and minimal gingival recession. This case report aimed to inform and to explain the work procedures, clinical and rad...

  15. Flap Conformations in HIV-1 Protease are Altered by Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanucci, Gail; Blackburn, Mandy; Veloro, Angelo; Galiano, Luis; Fangu, Ding; Simmerling, Carlos

    2009-03-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) is an enzyme that is a major drug target in the treatment of AIDS. Although the structure and function of HIV-1 PR have been studied for over 20 years, questions remain regarding the conformations and dynamics of the β-hairpin turns (flaps) that cover the active site cavity. Distance measurements with pulsed EPR spectroscopy of spin labeled constructs of HIV-1 PR have been used to characterize the flap conformations in the apo and inhibitor bound states. From the most probably distances and the breadth of the distance distribution profiles from analysis of the EPR data, insights regarding the flap conformations and flexibility are gained. The EPR results clearly show how drug pressure selected mutations alter the average conformation of the flaps and the degree of opening of the flaps. Molecular dynamics simulations successfully regenerate the experimentally determined distance distribution profiles, and more importantly, provide structural models for full interpretation of the EPR results. By combining experiment and theory to understand the role that altered flap flexibility/conformations play in the mechanism of drug resistance, key insights are gained toward the rational development of new inhibitors of this important enzyme.

  16. A Miniature Controllable Flapping Wing Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabagi, Veaceslav Gheorghe

    The agility and miniature size of nature's flapping wing fliers has long baffled researchers, inspiring biological studies, aerodynamic simulations, and attempts to engineer their robotic replicas. Flapping wing flight is characterized by complex reciprocating wing kinematics, transient aerodynamic effects, and very small body lengths. These characteristics render robotic flapping wing aerial vehicles ideal for surveillance and defense applications, search and rescue missions, and environment monitoring, where their ability to hover and high maneuverability is immensely beneficial. One of the many difficulties in creating flapping wing based miniature robotic aerial vehicles lies in generating a proper wing trajectory that would result in sufficient lift forces for hovering and maneuvering. Since design of a flapping wing system is a balance between overall weight and the number of actuated inputs, we take the approach of having minimal controlled inputs, allowing passive behavior wherever possible. Hence, we propose a completely passive wing pitch reversal design that relies on wing inertial dynamics, an elastic energy storage mechanism, and low Reynolds number aerodynamic effects. Theoretical models, compiling previous research on piezoelectric actuators, four-bar transmissions, and aerodynamics effects, are developed and used as basis for a complete numerical simulation. Limitations of the model are discussed in comparison to experimental results obtained from a working prototype of the proposed passive pitch reversal flapping wing mechanism. Given that the mechanism is under-actuated, methods to control lift force generation by actively varying system parameters are proposed, discussed, and tested experimentally. A dual wing aerial platform is developed based on the passive pitch reversal wing concept. Design considerations are presented, favoring controllability and structural rigidity of the final platform. Finite element analysis and experimental

  17. Viscoelastic properties of actin-coated membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, E.; Harlepp, S.; Bourdieu, L.; Robert, J.; Mackintosh, F. C.; Chatenay, D.

    2001-02-01

    In living cells, cytoskeletal filaments interact with the plasma membrane to form structures that play a key role in cell shape and mechanical properties. To study the interaction between these basic components, we designed an in vitro self-assembled network of actin filaments attached to the outer surface of giant unilamellar vesicles. Optical tweezers and single-particle tracking experiments are used to study the rich dynamics of these actin-coated membranes (ACM). We show that microrheology studies can be carried out on such an individual microscopic object. The principle of the experiment consists in measuring the thermally excited position fluctuations of a probe bead attached biochemically to the membrane. We propose a model that relates the power spectrum of these thermal fluctuations to the viscoelastic properties of the membrane. The presence of the actin network modifies strongly the membrane dynamics with respect to a fluid, lipid bilayer one. It induces first a finite (ω=0) two-dimensional (2D) shear modulus G02D~0.5 to 5 μN/m in the membrane plane. Moreover, the frequency dependence at high frequency of the shear modulus [G'2D(f )~f0.85+/-0.07] and of the bending modulus (κACM(f)~f0.55+/-0.21) demonstrate the viscoelastic behavior of the composite membrane. These results are consistent with a common exponent of 0.75 for both moduli as expected from our model and from prior measurements on actin solutions.

  18. Interconnection between actin cytoskeleton and plant defense signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, Martin; Matoušková, Jindřiška; Burketová, Lenka; Valentová, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is the fundamental structural component of eukaryotic cells. It has a role in numerous elementary cellular processes such as reproduction, development and also in response to abiotic and biotic stimuli. Remarkably, the role of actin cytoskeleton in plant response to pathogens is getting to be under magnifying glass. Based on microscopic studies, most of the data showed, that actin plays an important role in formation of physiological barrier in the site of infection. Actin dynamics is involved in the transport of antimicrobial compounds and cell wall fortifying components (e.g. callose) to the site of infection. Also the role in PTI (pathogen triggered immunity) and ETI (effector triggered immunity) was recently indicated. On the other hand much less is known about the transcriptome reprogramming upon changes in actin dynamics. Our recently published results showed that drugs inhibiting actin polymerization (latrunculin B, cytochalasin E) cause the induction of genes which are involved in salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway. In this addendum we would like to highlight in more details current state of knowledge concerning the involvement of actin dynamics in plant defense signaling.

  19. Pattern formation in polymerising actin flocks: spirals, spots and waves without nonlinear chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Goff, Thomas Le; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2016-01-01

    We propose a model solely based on actin treadmilling and polymerisation which describes many characteristic states of actin wave formation: spots, spirals and travelling waves. In our model, as in experiments on cell recovering motility following actin depolymerisation, we choose an isotropic low density initial condition; polymerisation of actin filaments then raises the density towards the Onsager threshold where they align. We show that this alignment, in turn, destabilizes the isotropic phase and generically induces transient actin spots or spirals as part of the dynamical pathway towards a polarized phase which can either be uniform or consist of a series of actin-wave trains (flocks). Our results uncover a universal route to actin wave formation in the absence of any system specific nonlinear biochemistry, and it may help understand the mechanism underlying the observation of actin spots and waves in vivo. They also suggest a minimal setup to design similar patterns in vitro.

  20. Smart dynamic rotor control using active flaps on a small-scale wind turbine: aeroelastic modeling and comparison with wind tunnel measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Thanasis K.; van Wingerden, W.; Hulskamp, A.W.;

    2013-01-01

    using the aeroelastic tool, load predictions are compared with the wind tunnel measurements, and similar control concepts are compared and evaluated in the numerical environment. Conclusions regarding evaluation of the performance of smart rotor concepts for wind turbines are drawn from this threefold......In this paper, the proof of concept of a smart rotor is illustrated by aeroelastic simulations on a small-scale rotor and comparison with wind tunnel experiments. The application of advanced feedback controllers using actively deformed flaps in the wind tunnel measurements is shown to alleviate...

  1. Exploring the drug resistance of V32I and M46L mutant HIV-1 protease to inhibitor TMC114: flap dynamics and binding mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Wang, Yixuan

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitors of HIV-1 protease (HIV-1-pr) generally only bind to the active site of the protease. However, for some mutants such as V32I and M46L the TMC114 can bind not only to the active cavity also to the groove of the flexible flaps. Although the second binding site suggests the higher efficiency of the drug against HIV-1-pr, the drug resistance in HIV-1-pr due to mutations cannot be ignored, which prompts us to investigate the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and behavior of double ...

  2. Engineered Vascularized Muscle Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egozi, Dana; Shandalov, Yulia; Freiman, Alina; Rosenfeld, Dekel; Ben-Shimol, David; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2016-01-01

    One of the main factors limiting the thickness of a tissue construct and its consequential viability and applicability in vivo, is the control of oxygen supply to the cell microenvironment, as passive diffusion is limited to a very thin layer. Although various materials have been described to restore the integrity of full-thickness defects of the abdominal wall, no material has yet proved to be optimal, due to low graft vascularization, tissue rejection, infection, or inadequate mechanical properties. This protocol describes a means of engineering a fully vascularized flap, with a thickness relevant for muscle tissue reconstruction. Cell-embedded poly L-lactic acid/poly lactic-co-glycolic acid constructs are implanted around the mouse femoral artery and vein and maintained in vivo for a period of one or two weeks. The vascularized graft is then transferred as a flap towards a full thickness defect made in the abdomen. This technique replaces the need for autologous tissue sacrifications and may enable the use of in vitro engineered vascularized flaps in many surgical applications. PMID:26779840

  3. Flag flapping in a channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alben, Silas; Shoele, Kourosh; Mittal, Rajat; Jha, Sourabh; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    We study the flapping of a flag in an inviscid channel flow. We focus especially on how quantities vary with channel spacing. As the channel walls move inwards towards the flag, heavier flags become more unstable, while light flags' stability is less affected. We use a vortex sheet model to compute large-amplitude flapping, and find that the flag undergoes a series of jumps to higher flapping modes as the channel walls are moved towards the flag. Meanwhile, the drag on the flag and the energy lost to the wake first rise as the walls become closer, then drop sharply as the flag moves to a higher flapping mode.

  4. Preliminarily Investigating the Polymorphism of Self-organized Actin Filament in Vitro by Atomic Force Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun ZHANG; Yuan-Liang WANG; Xin-Yong Chen; Chuang-Long HE; Chao CHENG; Yang CAO

    2004-01-01

    With the atomic force microscope (AFM), we preliminarily investigated the large-scale structure of actin filaments formed in low concentration protein solution (5 μg/ml) via self-organization without the presence of any F-actin dynamic interfering factors (such as phalloidin) in vitro. It was found that the G-actin could be polymerized into ordered filamentous structures with different diameter from the slimmest filament of single F-actin to giant filament in tree-like branched aggregates. The observed polymerized actin filaments, to which our most intense attention was attracted, was discretely distributed and showed obvious polymorphism distinctly different from those in the presence of phalloidin or actin binding proteins (fimbrin, gelsolin, etc.) in previous experiments. Latter structures were mainly composed of single F-actin and/or multifilaments clearly consisting of several single F-actin. The experimental results clearly demonstrated that non-interference with the F-actin intrinsic dynamics in self-organizing could lead to the polymorphism of actin filamentous structures, and further analysis implied that the disturbance of normal F-actin dynamics by many factors could prevent the emergence of structural polymorphism, more often than not, give rise to formation of specific structures instead and different interference would bring about various particular structures under certain conditions.

  5. Managing Flap Vortices via Separation Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblatt, David

    2006-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted on a flapped semi-span model to investigate the concept and viability of near-wake vortex management by means of boundary layer separation control. Passive control was achieved using a simple fairing and active control was achieved via zero mass-flux blowing slots. Vortex sheet strength, estimated by integrating surface pressures, was used to predict vortex characteristics based on inviscid rollup relations and vortices trailing the flaps were mapped using a seven-hole probe. Separation control was found to have a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size over a wide range of angles of attack and control conditions. In general, the vortex trends were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations. Manipulation of the separated flow near the flap edges exerted significant control over either outboard or inboard edge vortices while producing small lift and moment excursions. Unsteady surface pressures indicated that dynamic separation and attachment control can be exploited to perturb vortices at wavelengths shorter than a typical wingspan. In summary, separation control has the potential for application to time-independent or time-dependent wake alleviation schemes, where the latter can be deployed to minimize adverse effects on ride-quality and dynamic structural loading.

  6. Papilla Preservation Flap as Aesthetic Consideration in Periodontal Flap Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Olivia

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Flap surgery is treatment for periodontal disease with alveolar bone destruction. Surgical periodontal flap with conventional incision will result in gingival recession and loss of interdental papillae after treatment. Dilemma arises in areas required high aesthetic value or regions with a fixed denture. It is challenging to perform periodontal flap with good aesthetic results and minimal gingival recession. This case report aimed to inform and to explain the work procedures, clinical and radiographic outcomes of surgical papilla preservation flap in the area that requires aesthetic. Case 1 was a surgical incision flap with preservation of papillae on the anterior region of teeth 11 and 12, with a full veneer crown on tooth 12. Case 2 was a surgical incision flap with preservation of papillae on the posterior region of tooth 46 with inlay restoration. Evaluation for both cases were obtained by incision papilla preservation of primary closure was perfect, good aesthetic results, minimal gingival recession and the interdental papillae can be maintained properly. In conclusion, periodontal flap surgery on the anterior region or regions that require high aesthetic value could be addressed with papilla preservation incision. Incision papilla preservation should be the primary consideration in periodontal flap surgery if possible.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v19i3.144

  7. Pathogenic microbes manipulate cofilin activity to subvert actin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kai; Kitazato, Kaio; Wang, Yifei; He, Zhendan

    2016-09-01

    Actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin proteins are key players in controlling the temporal and spatial extent of actin dynamics, which is crucial for mediating host-pathogen interactions. Pathogenic microbes have evolved molecular mechanisms to manipulate cofilin activity to subvert the actin cytoskeletal system in host cells, promoting their internalization into the target cells, modifying the replication niche and facilitating their intracellular and intercellular dissemination. The study of how these pathogens exploit cofilin pathways is crucial for understanding infectious disease and providing potential targets for drug therapies. PMID:25853495

  8. Molecular cloning of the tomato Hairless gene implicates actin dynamics in trichome-mediated defense and mechanical properties of stem tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin-Ho; Campos, Marcelo L.; Zemelis-Durfee, Starla; Al-Haddad, Jameel M.; Jones, A. Daniel; Telewski, Frank W.; Brandizzi, Federica; Howe, Gregg A.

    2016-01-01

    Trichomes are epidermal structures that provide a first line of defense against arthropod herbivores. The recessive hairless (hl) mutation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) causes severe distortion of trichomes on all aerial tissues, impairs the accumulation of sesquiterpene and polyphenolic compounds in glandular trichomes, and compromises resistance to the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta. Here, we demonstrate that the tomato Hl gene encodes a subunit (SRA1) of the highly conserved WAVE regulatory complex that controls nucleation of actin filaments in a wide range of eukaryotic cells. The tomato SRA1 gene spans a 42-kb region containing both Solyc11g013280 and Solyc11g013290. The hl mutation corresponds to a complex 3-kb deletion that removes the last exon of the gene. Expression of a wild-type SRA1 cDNA in the hl mutant background restored normal trichome development, accumulation of glandular trichome-derived metabolites, and resistance to insect herbivory. These findings establish a role for SRA1 in the development of tomato trichomes and also implicate the actin-cytoskeleton network in cytosolic control of specialized metabolism for plant defense. We also show that the brittleness of hl mutant stems is associated with altered mechanical and cell morphological properties of stem tissue, and demonstrate that this defect is directly linked to the mutation in SRA1. PMID:27481446

  9. Flap-Edge Blowing Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaeta, R. J.; Englar, R. J.; Ahuja, K. K.

    2003-01-01

    This Appendix documents the salient results from an effort to mitigate the so-called flap-edge noise generated at the split between a flap edge that is deployed and the undeployed flap. Utilizing a Coanda surface installed at the flap edge, steady blowing was used in an attempt to diminish the vortex strength resulting from the uneven lift distribution. The strength of this lifting vortex was augmented by steady blowing over the deployed flap. The test article for this study was the same 2D airfoil used in the steady blowing program reported earlier (also used in pulsed blowing tests, see Appendix G), however its trailing edge geometry was modified. An exact duplicate of the airfoil shape was made out of fiberglass with no flap, and in the clean configuration. It was attached to the existing airfoil to make an airfoil that has half of its flap deployed and half un-deployed. Figure 1 shows a schematic of the planform showing the two areas where steady blowing was introduced. The flap-edge blowing or the auxiliary blowing was in the direction normal to the freestream velocity vector. Slot heights for the blowing chambers were on the order of 0.0 14 inches.

  10. Mechanical force-induced polymerization and depolymerization of F-actin at water/solid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueqiang; Hu, Xiuyuan; Lei, Haozhi; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Actin molecules are among the three main cytoskeleton proteins of cells and undergo rapid cycling to regulate critical processes such as endocytosis, cytokinesis, cell polarity, and cell morphogenesis. Although extensive studies have been carried out on the dynamics as well as biological functions of actin polymerization and depolymerization both in vivo and in vitro, the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to mechanical signals are not fully understood. In particular, little attention has been paid to the effect of a physical force that is exerted directly on the actin cytoskeleton. In this paper, we have explored how the mechanical force affects the actin polymerization and depolymerization behaviors at water/solid interfaces using an atomic force microscope (AFM) operated in liquid. By raster scanning an AFM probe on a substrate surface with a certain load, it was found that actin monomers could polymerize into filaments without the help of actin related proteins (ARPs). Further study indicated that actin monomers were inclined to form filaments only under a small scanning load. The polymerized actin filaments would be depolymerized when the mechanical force was stronger. A possible mechanism has been suggested to explain the mechanical force induced actin polymerization.Actin molecules are among the three main cytoskeleton proteins of cells and undergo rapid cycling to regulate critical processes such as endocytosis, cytokinesis, cell polarity, and cell morphogenesis. Although extensive studies have been carried out on the dynamics as well as biological functions of actin polymerization and depolymerization both in vivo and in vitro, the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to mechanical signals are not fully understood. In particular, little attention has been paid to the effect of a physical force that is exerted directly on the actin cytoskeleton. In this paper, we have explored how the mechanical force affects the actin

  11. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap interconnection. 23.701 Section 23.701... Systems § 23.701 Flap interconnection. (a) The main wing flaps and related movable surfaces as a system must— (1) Be synchronized by a mechanical interconnection between the movable flap surfaces that...

  12. Drebrin attenuates the interaction between actin and myosin-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Ryoki; Katoh, Kaoru; Takahashi, Ayumi; Xie, Ce; Oseki, Koushi; Watanabe, Michitoshi; Igarashi, Michihiro; Nakamura, Akio; Kohama, Kazuhiro

    2007-07-27

    Drebrin-A is an actin-binding protein localized in the dendritic spines of mature neurons, and has been suggested to affect spine morphology [K. Hayashi, T. Shirao, Change in the shape of dendritic spines caused by overexpression of drebrin in cultured cortical neurons, J. Neurosci. 19 (1999) 3918-3925]. However, no biochemical analysis of drebrin-A has yet been reported. In this study, we purified drebrin-A using a bacterial expression system, and characterized it in vitro. Drebrin-A bound to actin filaments with a stoichiometry of one drebrin molecule to 5-6 actin molecules. Furthermore, drebrin-A decreased the Mg-ATPase activity of myosin V. In vitro motility assay revealed that the attachment of F-actin to glass surface coated with myosin-V was decreased by drebrin-A, but once F-actin attached to the surface, the sliding speed of F-actin was unaffected by the presence of drebrin A. These findings suggest that drebrin-A may affect spine dynamics, vesicle transport, and other myosin-V-driven motility in neurons through attenuating the interaction between actin and myosin-V.

  13. Endocytosis-dependent coordination of multiple actin regulators is required for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Yutaka; Coulson-Gilmer, Camilla; Millard, Tom H

    2015-08-01

    The ability to heal wounds efficiently is essential for life. After wounding of an epithelium, the cells bordering the wound form dynamic actin protrusions and/or a contractile actomyosin cable, and these actin structures drive wound closure. Despite their importance in wound healing, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the assembly of these actin structures at wound edges are not well understood. In this paper, using Drosophila melanogaster embryos, we demonstrate that Diaphanous, SCAR, and WASp play distinct but overlapping roles in regulating actin assembly during wound healing. Moreover, we show that endocytosis is essential for wound edge actin assembly and wound closure. We identify adherens junctions (AJs) as a key target of endocytosis during wound healing and propose that endocytic remodeling of AJs is required to form "signaling centers" along the wound edge that control actin assembly. We conclude that coordination of actin assembly, AJ remodeling, and membrane traffic is required for the construction of a motile leading edge during wound healing.

  14. Radiated noise from an externally blown flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, N. N.; Yu, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The far field noise from subsonic jet impingement on a wing-flap with a 45 deg bend was experimentally investigated. The test parameters are jet Mach number and flap length. For long flaps, the primary source mechanisms are found to be turbulent mixing and flow impingement. For short flaps, the interaction of turbulent flow with the flap trailing edge appears to strongly influence the radiated noise.

  15. Actin cytoskeleton regulates Hippo signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Reddy

    Full Text Available Hippo pathway controls the organ size by modulating cell proliferation and apoptosis. However, the upstream regulation of hippo signaling by actin cytoskeleton is not clear. To elucidate the role of actin as an upstream regulator of Hippo signaling, the levels of F (filamentous-actin in cells were elevated using jasplakinolide, an actin-stabilizing drug. Induction of F-actin formation in HeLa cells resulted in decreased phosphorylation of YAP, a key effector molecule for Hippo signaling. The activated YAP is localized to the cell nucleus and YAP increase was associated with increased expression of downstream CCN growth factors CCN1/CYR61 and CCN2/CTGF. The effect of the actin-stabilizing drug was blocked when YAP levels were suppressed in YAP "knock-down" cells. In summary, using an actin-stabilizing drug we show that actin cytoskeleton is one of the upstream regulators of Hippo signaling capable of activating YAP and increasing its downstream CCN growth factors.

  16. Antenna mechanism of length control of actin cables

    CERN Document Server

    Mohapatra, Lishibanya; Kondev, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Actin cables are linear cytoskeletal structures that serve as tracks for myosin-based intracellular transport of vesicles and organelles in both yeast and mammalian cells. In a yeast cell undergoing budding, cables are in constant dynamic turnover yet some cables grow from the bud neck toward the back of the mother cell until their length roughly equals the diameter of the mother cell. This raises the question: how is the length of these cables controlled? Here we describe a novel molecular mechanism for cable length control inspired by recent experimental observations in cells. This antenna mechanism involves three key proteins: formins, which polymerize actin, Smy1 proteins, which bind formins and inhibit actin polymerization, and myosin motors, which deliver Smy1 to formins, leading to a length-dependent actin polymerization rate. We compute the probability distribution of cable lengths as a function of several experimentally tuneable parameters such as the formin-binding affinity of Smy1 and the concentra...

  17. Roles of Cortactin, an Actin Polymerization Mediator, in Cell Endocytosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li CHEN; Zhi-Wei WANG; Jian-wei ZHU; Xi ZHAN

    2006-01-01

    Cortactin, an actin-binding protein and a substrate of Src, is encoded by the EMS 1 oncogene.Cortactin is known to activate Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization and interact with dynamin, a large GTPase and proline rich domain-containing protein. Transferrin endocytosis was significantly reduced in cells by knock-down of cortactin expression as well as in vivo introduction of cortactin immunoreagents.Cortactin-dynamin interaction displayed morphologically dynamic co-distribution with a change in the endocytosis level in cells treated with an actin depolymerization reagent, cytochalasin D. In an in vitro beads assay, a branched actin network was recruited onto dynamin-coated beads in a cortactin Src homology domain 3 (SH3)-dependent manner. In addition, cortactin was found to function in the late stage of clathrin coated vesicle formation.Taken together, cortactin is required for optimal clathrin mediated endocytosis in a dynamin directed manner.

  18. Tracing myoblast fusion in Drosophila embryos by fluorescent actin probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralalka, Shruti; Abmayr, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Myoblast fusion in the Drosophila embryo is a highly elaborate process that is initiated by Founder Cells and Fusion-Competent Myoblasts (FCMs). It occurs through an asymmetric event in which actin foci assemble in the FCMs at points of cell-cell contact and direct the formation of membrane protrusions that drive fusion. Herein, we describe the approach that we have used to image in living embryos the highly dynamic actin foci and actin-rich projections that precede myoblast fusion. We discuss resources currently available for imaging actin and myogenesis, and our experience with these resources if available. This technical report is not intended to be comprehensive on providing instruction on standard microscopy practices or software utilization. However, we discuss microscope parameters that we have used in data collection, and our experience with image processing tools in data analysis.

  19. Regulation of T cell receptor signaling by the actin cytoskeleton and poroelastic cytoplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beemiller, Peter; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The actin cytoskeleton plays essential roles in modulating T-cell activation. Most models of T-cell receptor (TCR) triggering, signalosome assembl, y and immune synapse formation invoke actin-dependent mechanisms. As T cells are constitutively motile cells, TCR triggering and signaling occur against a cytoskeletal backdrop that is constantly remodeling. While the interplay between actin dynamics and TCR signaling have been the focus of research for many years, much of the work in T cells has considered actin largely for its ‘scaffolding’ function. We examine the roles of the actin cytoskeleton in TCR signaling and immune synapse formation with an emphasis on how poroelasticity, an ensemble feature of actin dynamics with the cytosol, relates to how T cells respond to stimulation. PMID:24117819

  20. Regulation of T-cell receptor signaling by the actin cytoskeleton and poroelastic cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beemiller, Peter; Krummel, Matthew F

    2013-11-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays essential roles in modulating T-cell activation. Most models of T-cell receptor (TCR) triggering signalosome assembly and immune synapse formation invoke actin-dependent mechanisms. As T cells are constitutively motile cells, TCR triggering and signaling occur against a cytoskeletal backdrop that is constantly remodeling. While the interplay between actin dynamics and TCR signaling have been the focus of research for many years, much of the work in T cells has considered actin largely for its 'scaffolding' function. We examine the roles of the actin cytoskeleton in TCR signaling and immune synapse formation with an emphasis on how poroelasticity, an ensemble feature of actin dynamics with the cytosol, relates to how T cells respond to stimulation. PMID:24117819

  1. Direct Microtubule-Binding by Myosin-10 Orients Centrosomes toward Retraction Fibers and Subcortical Actin Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Mijung; Bagonis, Maria; Danuser, Gaudenz; Pellman, David

    2015-08-10

    Positioning of centrosomes is vital for cell division and development. In metazoan cells, spindle positioning is controlled by a dynamic pool of subcortical actin that organizes in response to the position of retraction fibers. These actin "clouds" are proposed to generate pulling forces on centrosomes and mediate spindle orientation. However, the motors that pull astral microtubules toward these actin structures are not known. Here, we report that the unconventional myosin, Myo10, couples actin-dependent forces from retraction fibers and subcortical actin clouds to centrosomes. Myo10-mediated centrosome positioning requires its direct microtubule binding. Computational image analysis of large microtubule populations reveals a direct effect of Myo10 on microtubule dynamics and microtubule-cortex interactions. Myo10's role in centrosome positioning is distinct from, but overlaps with, that of dynein. Thus, Myo10 plays a key role in integrating the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons to position centrosomes and mitotic spindles. PMID:26235048

  2. Regulation of actin catch-slip bonds with a RhoA-formin module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cho-Yin; Lou, Jizhong; Wen, Kuo-Kuang; McKane, Melissa; Eskin, Suzanne G.; Rubenstein, Peter A.; Chien, Shu; Ono, Shoichiro; Zhu, Cheng; McIntire, Larry V.

    2016-10-01

    The dynamic turnover of the actin cytoskeleton is regulated cooperatively by force and biochemical signaling. We previously demonstrated that actin depolymerization under force is governed by catch-slip bonds mediated by force-induced K113:E195 salt-bridges. Yet, the biochemical regulation as well as the functional significance of actin catch bonds has not been elucidated. Using AFM force-clamp experiments, we show that formin controlled by RhoA switches the actin catch-slip bonds to slip-only bonds. SMD simulations reveal that the force does not induce the K113:E195 interaction when formin binds to actin K118 and E117 residues located at the helical segment extending to K113. Actin catch-slip bonds are suppressed by single residue replacements K113E and E195K that interrupt the force-induced K113:E195 interaction; and this suppression is rescued by a K113E/E195K double mutant (E/K) restoring the interaction in the opposite orientation. These results support the biological significance of actin catch bonds, as they corroborate reported observations that RhoA and formin switch force-induced actin cytoskeleton alignment and that either K113E or E195K induces yeast cell growth defects rescued by E/K. Our study demonstrates how the mechano-regulation of actin dynamics is modulated by biochemical signaling molecules, and suggests that actin catch bonds may be important in cell functions.

  3. The Cannabinoid Receptor CB1 Interacts with the WAVE1 Complex and Plays a Role in Actin Dynamics and Structural Plasticity in Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoo, Christian; Agarwal, Nitin; Lutz, Beat; Kuner, Rohini

    2015-10-01

    The molecular composition of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor complex beyond the classical G-protein signaling components is not known. Using proteomics on mouse cortex in vivo, we pulled down proteins interacting with CB1 in neurons and show that the CB1 receptor assembles with multiple members of the WAVE1 complex and the RhoGTPase Rac1 and modulates their activity. Activation levels of CB1 receptor directly impacted on actin polymerization and stability via WAVE1 in growth cones of developing neurons, leading to their collapse, as well as in synaptic spines of mature neurons, leading to their retraction. In adult mice, CB1 receptor agonists attenuated activity-dependent remodeling of dendritic spines in spinal cord neurons in vivo and suppressed inflammatory pain by regulating the WAVE1 complex. This study reports novel signaling mechanisms for cannabinoidergic modulation of the nervous system and demonstrates a previously unreported role for the WAVE1 complex in therapeutic applications of cannabinoids.

  4. Experimental study of flapping jets in a soap film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Julia; Kim, Ildoo; Mandre, Shreyas

    2015-11-01

    Plateau and Rayleigh's observation and explanation on jet instability have inspired us over the years and there has been a significant advance in understanding the jet dynamics. Here, we present a quasi-two-dimensional experimental study of flapping jets in a soap film. Newtonian and non-Newtonian solutions are injected in a flowing soap film. Thinning, break-ups, and beads-on-a-string of the jets, and axisymmetric vortices shredded from the flapping jets are visualized. We employ PIV of the flow motion around the jets to gain an understanding of the roles of instabilities in the flow.

  5. Regulation of T cell receptor signaling by the actin cytoskeleton and poroelastic cytoplasm

    OpenAIRE

    Beemiller, Peter; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2013-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays essential roles in modulating T-cell activation. Most models of T-cell receptor (TCR) triggering, signalosome assembl, y and immune synapse formation invoke actin-dependent mechanisms. As T cells are constitutively motile cells, TCR triggering and signaling occur against a cytoskeletal backdrop that is constantly remodeling. While the interplay between actin dynamics and TCR signaling have been the focus of research for many years, much of the work in T cells has ...

  6. Characterization of ring-like F-actin structure as a mechanical partner for spindle positioning in mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Lu

    Full Text Available Proper spindle positioning and orientation are essential for accurate mitosis which requires dynamic interactions between microtubule and actin filament (F-actin. Although mounting evidence demonstrates the role of F-actin in cortical cytoskeleton dynamics, it remains elusive as to the structure and function of F-actin-based networks in spindle geometry. Here we showed a ring-like F-actin structure surrounding the mitotic spindle which forms since metaphase and maintains in MG132-arrested metaphase HeLa cells. This cytoplasmic F-actin structure is relatively isotropic and less dynamic. Our computational modeling of spindle position process suggests a possible mechanism by which the ring-like F-actin structure can regulate astral microtubule dynamics and thus mitotic spindle orientation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting Plk1, Mps1 or Myosin, and disruption of microtubules or F-actin polymerization perturbs the formation of the ring-like F-actin structure and alters spindle position and symmetric division. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized but important link between mitotic spindle and ring-like F-actin network in accurate mitosis and enables the development of a method to theoretically illustrate the relationship between mitotic spindle and cytoplasmic F-actin.

  7. Four-winged flapping flyer in forward flight

    CERN Document Server

    Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Centeno, Mariana; Weinreb, Alexis; Thiria, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    We study experimentally a four-winged flapping flyer with chord-wise flexible wings in a self-propelled setup. For a given physical configuration of the flyer (i.e. fixed distance between the forewing and hindwing pairs and fixed wing flexibility), we explore the kinematic parameter space constituted by the flapping frequency and the forewing-hindwing phase lag. Cruising speed and consumed electric power measurements are performed for each point in the $(f,\\varphi)$ parameter space and allow us to discuss the problem of performance and efficiency in four-winged flapping flight. We show that different phase-lags are needed for the system to be optimised for fastest flight or lowest energy consumption. A conjecture of the underlying mechanism is proposed in terms of the coupled dynamics of the forewing-hindwing phase lag and the deformation kinematics of the flexible wings.

  8. Interaction of Two Flapping Flags in Axial Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Amy-Lee; Fayed, Mohamed; Abderrahmane, Hamid Ait; Paidoussis, Michael P.; Ng, Hoi Dick

    2010-11-01

    The flapping of two parallel flags in axial low turbulence flow is investigated experimentally inside a small scale wind tunnel test section. The variables of the problem are the size and flexural rigidity of the flags, and the distance that separates the two flags. The flow velocity represents the control parameter that governs the coupling and flapping mode of the flags. Two flapping modes, in-phase and out-of-phase modes, were observed in the experiment. Image processing technique was used and the time series of a given point on the flag edge was analyzed. The stability condition of the flags was obtained and compared to the recent theoretical models. The dynamics of the coupling between the two flags is also studied.

  9. Chord-wise Tip Actuation on Flexible Flapping Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nathan; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of low aspect ratio flapping plates are strongly influenced by the interaction between tip and edge vortices. This has led to the development of tip actuation mechanisms which bend the tip towards the root of the plate in the span-wise direction during oscillation to investigate its impact. In our current work, a tip actuation mechanism to bend a flat plate's two free corners towards one another in the chord-wise direction is developed using a shape memory alloy. The aerodynamic forces and resulting flow field are investigated from dynamically altering the tip chord-wise curvature while flapping. The frequency of oscillation, stroke angle, flexibility, and tip actuation timing are independently varied to determine their individual effects. These results will further the fundamental understanding of flapping wing aerodynamics. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE 1144469.

  10. Feedback Interactions of Polymerized Actin with the Cell Membrane: Waves, Pulses, and Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Anders

    Polymerized filaments of the protein actin have crucial functions in cell migration, and in bending the cell membrane to drive endocytosis or the formation of protrusions. The nucleation and polymerization of actin filaments are controlled by upstream agents in the cell membrane, including nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) that activate the Arp2/3 complex to form new branches on pre-existing filaments. But polymerized actin (F-actin) also feeds back on the assembly of NPFs. We explore the effects of the resulting feedback loop of F-actin and NPFs on two phenomena: actin pulses that drive endocytosis in yeast, and actin waves traveling along the membrane of several cell types. In our model of endocytosis in yeast, the actin network is grown explicitly in three dimensions, exerts a negative feedback interaction on localized patch of NPFs in the membrane, and bends the membrane by exerting a distribution of forces. This model explains observed actin and NPF pulse dynamics, and the effects of several interventions including i) NPF mutations, ii) inhibition of actin polymerization, and iii) deletion of a protein that allows F-actin to bend the cell membrane. The model predicts that mutation of the active region of an NPF will enhance the accumulation of that NPF, and we confirm this prediction by quantitative fluorescence microscopy. For actin waves, we treat a similar model, with NPFs distributed over a larger region of the cell membrane. This model naturally generates actin waves, and predicts a transition from wave behavior to spatially localized oscillations when NPFs are confined to a small region. We also predict a transition from waves to static polarization as the negative-feedback coupling between F-actin and the NPFs is reduced. Supported by NIGMS Grant R01 GM107667.

  11. The Formin Diaphanous Regulates Myoblast Fusion through Actin Polymerization and Arp2/3 Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Su; Bothe, Ingo; Baylies, Mary K

    2015-08-01

    The formation of multinucleated muscle cells through cell-cell fusion is a conserved process from fruit flies to humans. Numerous studies have shown the importance of Arp2/3, its regulators, and branched actin for the formation of an actin structure, the F-actin focus, at the fusion site. This F-actin focus forms the core of an invasive podosome-like structure that is required for myoblast fusion. In this study, we find that the formin Diaphanous (Dia), which nucleates and facilitates the elongation of actin filaments, is essential for Drosophila myoblast fusion. Following cell recognition and adhesion, Dia is enriched at the myoblast fusion site, concomitant with, and having the same dynamics as, the F-actin focus. Through analysis of Dia loss-of-function conditions using mutant alleles but particularly a dominant negative Dia transgene, we demonstrate that reduction in Dia activity in myoblasts leads to a fusion block. Significantly, no actin focus is detected, and neither branched actin regulators, SCAR or WASp, accumulate at the fusion site when Dia levels are reduced. Expression of constitutively active Dia also causes a fusion block that is associated with an increase in highly dynamic filopodia, altered actin turnover rates and F-actin distribution, and mislocalization of SCAR and WASp at the fusion site. Together our data indicate that Dia plays two roles during invasive podosome formation at the fusion site: it dictates the level of linear F-actin polymerization, and it is required for appropriate branched actin polymerization via localization of SCAR and WASp. These studies provide new insight to the mechanisms of cell-cell fusion, the relationship between different regulators of actin polymerization, and invasive podosome formation that occurs in normal development and in disease.

  12. The Formin Diaphanous Regulates Myoblast Fusion through Actin Polymerization and Arp2/3 Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Deng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The formation of multinucleated muscle cells through cell-cell fusion is a conserved process from fruit flies to humans. Numerous studies have shown the importance of Arp2/3, its regulators, and branched actin for the formation of an actin structure, the F-actin focus, at the fusion site. This F-actin focus forms the core of an invasive podosome-like structure that is required for myoblast fusion. In this study, we find that the formin Diaphanous (Dia, which nucleates and facilitates the elongation of actin filaments, is essential for Drosophila myoblast fusion. Following cell recognition and adhesion, Dia is enriched at the myoblast fusion site, concomitant with, and having the same dynamics as, the F-actin focus. Through analysis of Dia loss-of-function conditions using mutant alleles but particularly a dominant negative Dia transgene, we demonstrate that reduction in Dia activity in myoblasts leads to a fusion block. Significantly, no actin focus is detected, and neither branched actin regulators, SCAR or WASp, accumulate at the fusion site when Dia levels are reduced. Expression of constitutively active Dia also causes a fusion block that is associated with an increase in highly dynamic filopodia, altered actin turnover rates and F-actin distribution, and mislocalization of SCAR and WASp at the fusion site. Together our data indicate that Dia plays two roles during invasive podosome formation at the fusion site: it dictates the level of linear F-actin polymerization, and it is required for appropriate branched actin polymerization via localization of SCAR and WASp. These studies provide new insight to the mechanisms of cell-cell fusion, the relationship between different regulators of actin polymerization, and invasive podosome formation that occurs in normal development and in disease.

  13. Noncontact diffuse optical assessment of blood flow changes in head and neck free tissue transfer flaps (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chong; Radabaugh, Jeffrey P.; Aouad, Rony K.; Lin, Yu; Gal, Thomas J.; Patel, Amit B.; Valentino, Joseph; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2016-02-01

    Head and neck cancer accounts for 3 to 5% of all cancers in the United States. Primary or salvage surgeries are extensive and often lead to major head and neck defects that require complex reconstructions with local, regional, or free tissue transfer flaps. Knowledge of tissue blood flow (BF) changes after free tissue transfer may enable surgeons to predict the failure of flap thrombosis at an early stage. This study used our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation spectroscopy to monitor dynamic BF changes in free flaps without getting in contact with the targeted tissue. Eight free flaps were elevated in patients with head and neck cancer; one of the flaps failed. Multiple BF measurements probing the transferred tissue were performed during and post the surgical operation. Postoperative BF values were normalized to the intraoperative baselines (assigning '1') for the calculation of relative BF change (rBF). The rBF changes over the seven successful flaps were 1.89 +/- 0.15, 2.26 +/- 0.13, and 2.43 +/- 0.13 (mean +/- standard error) respectively on postoperative days 2, 4, and 7. These postoperative values were significantly higher than the intraoperative baseline values (p flap vascularity after the tissue transfer. By contrast, rBF changes observed from the unsuccessful flap were 1.14 and 1.34 respectively on postoperative days 2 and 4, indicating a less flow recovery. Measurement of BF recovery after flap anastomosis holds the potential to act early to salvage ischemic flaps.

  14. Mechanics of Biomimetic Liposomes Encapsulating an Actin Shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Manzi, John; Pontani, Léa-Lætitia; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-12-15

    Cell-shape changes are insured by a thin, dynamic, cortical layer of cytoskeleton underneath the plasma membrane. How this thin cortical structure impacts the mechanical properties of the whole cell is not fully understood. Here, we study the mechanics of liposomes or giant unilamellar vesicles, when a biomimetic actin cortex is grown at the inner layer of the lipid membrane via actin-nucleation-promoting factors. Using a hydrodynamic tube-pulling technique, we show that tube dynamics is clearly affected by the presence of an actin shell anchored to the lipid bilayer. The same force pulls much shorter tubes in the presence of the actin shell compared to bare membranes. However, in both cases, we observe that the dynamics of tube extrusion has two distinct features characteristic of viscoelastic materials: rapid elastic elongation, followed by a slower elongation phase at a constant rate. We interpret the initial elastic regime by an increase of membrane tension due to the loss of lipids into the tube. Tube length is considerably shorter for cortex liposomes at comparable pulling forces, resulting in a higher spring constant. The presence of the actin shell seems to restrict lipid mobility, as is observed in the corral effect in cells. The viscous regime for bare liposomes corresponds to a leakout of the internal liquid at constant membrane tension. The presence of the actin shell leads to a larger friction coefficient. As the tube is pulled from a patchy surface, membrane tension increases locally, leading to a Marangoni flow of lipids. As a conclusion, the presence of an actin shell is revealed by its action that alters membrane mechanics.

  15. Noncontact diffuse optical assessment of blood flow changes in head and neck free tissue transfer flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chong; Radabaugh, Jeffrey P.; Aouad, Rony K.; Lin, Yu; Gal, Thomas J.; Patel, Amit B.; Valentino, Joseph; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of tissue blood flow (BF) changes after free tissue transfer may enable surgeons to predict the failure of flap thrombosis at an early stage. This study used our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation spectroscopy to monitor dynamic BF changes in free flaps without getting in contact with the targeted tissue. Eight free flaps were elevated in patients with head and neck cancer; one of the flaps failed. Multiple BF measurements probing the transferred tissue were performed during and post the surgical operation. Postoperative BF values were normalized to the intraoperative baselines (assigning "1") for the calculation of relative BF change (rBF). The rBF changes over the seven successful flaps were 1.89±0.15, 2.26±0.13, and 2.43±0.13 (mean±standard error), respectively, on postoperative days 2, 4, and 7. These postoperative values were significantly higher than the intraoperative baseline values (pflap vascularity after the tissue transfer. By contrast, rBF changes observed from the unsuccessful flaps were 1.14 and 1.34, respectively, on postoperative days 2 and 4, indicating less flow recovery. Measurement of BF recovery after flap anastomosis holds the potential to act early to salvage ischemic flaps.

  16. State transitions of actin cortices in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tzer Han; Keren, Kinneret; Mackintosh, Fred; Schmidt, Christoph; Fakhri, Nikta

    Most animal cells are enveloped by a thin layer of actin cortex which governs the cell mechanics. A functional cortex must be rigid to provide mechanical support while being flexible to allow for rapid restructuring events such as cell division. To satisfy these requirements, the actin cortex is highly dynamic with fast actin turnover and myosin-driven contractility. The regulatory mechanism responsible for the transition between a mechanically stable state and a restructuring state is not well understood. Here, we develop a technique to map the dynamics of reconstituted actin cortices in emulsion droplets using IR fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). By increasing crosslinker concentration, we find that a homogeneous cortex transitions to an intermediate state with broken rotational symmetry and a globally contractile state which further breaks translational symmetry. We apply this new dynamic mapping technique to cortices of live starfish oocytes in various developmental stages. To identify the regulatory mechanism for steady state transitions, we subject the oocytes to actin and myosin disrupting drugs.

  17. PIV Measurements on a Blowing Flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    PIV measurements of the flow in the region of a flap side edge are presented for several blowing flap configurations. The test model is a NACA 63(sub 2)-215 Hicks Mod-B main-element airfoil with a half-span Fowler flap. Air is blown from small slots located along the flap side edge on either the top, bottom or side surfaces. The test set up is described and flow measurements for a baseline and three blowing flap configurations are presented. The effects that the flap tip jets have on the structure of the flap side edge flow are discussed for each of the flap configurations tested. The results indicate that blowing air from a slot located along the top surface of the flap greatly weakened the top vortex system and pushed it further off the top surface. Blowing from the bottom flap surface kept the strong side vortex further outboard while blowing from the side surface only strengthened the vortex system or accelerated the merging of the side vortex to the flap top surface. It is concluded that blowing from the top or bottom surfaces of the flap may lead to a reduction of flap side edge noise.

  18. High-fidelity linear time-invariant model of a smart rotor with adaptive trailing edge flaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo; Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    2016-01-01

    aero-servo-elastic model support the design, systematic tuning and model synthesis of smart rotor control systems. As an example application, the gains of an individual flap controller are tuned using the Ziegler-Nichols method for the full-order poles. The flap controller is based on feedback......A high-fidelity linear time-invariant model of the aero-servo-elastic response of a wind turbine with trailing-edge flaps is presented and used for systematic tuning of an individual flap controller. The model includes the quasi-steady aerodynamic effects of trailing-edge flaps on wind turbine...... blades and is integrated in the linear aeroelastic code HAWCStab2. The dynamic response predicted by the linear model is validated against non-linear simulations, and the quasi-steady assumption does not cause any significant response bias for flap deflection with frequencies up to 2-3 Hz. The linear...

  19. Progresses in studies of nuclear actin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xiaojuan; ZENG Xianlu; SONG Zhaoxia; HAO Shui

    2004-01-01

    Actin is a protein abundant in cells. Recently, it has been proved to be universally existent in the nuclei of many cell types. Actin and actin-binding proteins, as well as actin-related proteins, are necessary for the mediation of the conformation and function of nuclear actin, including the transformation of actin between unpolymerized and polymerized, chroinatin remodeling, regulation of gene expression and RNA processing as well as RNA transportation. In this paper, we summarized the progresses in the research of nu clear actin.

  20. Flapping propulsion with tip pitch control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huera-Huarte, Francisco; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    The effect of flexibility in the propulsion performance and efficiency of oscillating pitching foils has received a large amount of attention in the past years. Scientists have used simplified robotic models that mimic the kinematics of flying and swimming animals, in order to get inspiration to build more efficient engineering systems. Compliance is one of the aspects that has received more attention, as it seems to be a common feature in nature's flyers and swimmers. Active or passive control elements are also common in nature. We will show how thrust generation in a pitching fin, can be greatly affected by controlling the tip pitch motion dynamically and independently of the fin itself. This is in fact a controlled local change of curvature of the end of the fin. A robotic system has been designed in a way that not only flapping amplitudes and frequencies can be controlled, but also the amplitudes and frequencies of the tip and the phase difference between the tip and the fin. We measured thrust forces and the vortex dynamics in the near wake of the system, by using planar DPIV (Digital Particle Image Velocimetry) in a wide variety of flapping situations with tip control. Funding from Spanish Ministry of Science through Grant DPI2012-37904 is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. Altered Cell Mechanics from the Inside: Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Integrate with and Restructure Actin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad F. Islam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With a range of desirable mechanical and optical properties, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs are a promising material for nanobiotechnologies. SWCNTs also have potential as biomaterials for modulation of cellular structures. Previously, we showed that highly purified, dispersed SWCNTs grossly alter F-actin inside cells. F-actin plays critical roles in the maintenance of cell structure, force transduction, transport and cytokinesis. Thus, quantification of SWCNT-actin interactions ranging from molecular, sub-cellular and cellular levels with both structure and function is critical for developing SWCNT-based biotechnologies. Further, this interaction can be exploited, using SWCNTs as a unique actin-altering material. Here, we utilized molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions of SWCNTs with actin filaments. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that SWCNTs were located within ~5 nm of F-actin in cells but did not interact with G-actin. SWCNTs did not alter myosin II sub-cellular localization, and SWCNT treatment in cells led to significantly shorter actin filaments. Functionally, cells with internalized SWCNTs had greatly reduced cell traction force. Combined, these results demonstrate direct, specific SWCNT alteration of F-actin structures which can be exploited for SWCNT-based biotechnologies and utilized as a new method to probe fundamental actin-related cellular processes and biophysics.

  2. Characterization of engineered actin binding proteins that control filament assembly and structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crista M Brawley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eukaryotic cells strictly regulate the structure and assembly of their actin filament networks in response to various stimuli. The actin binding proteins that control filament assembly are therefore attractive targets for those who wish to reorganize actin filaments and reengineer the cytoskeleton. Unfortunately, the naturally occurring actin binding proteins include only a limited set of pointed-end cappers, or proteins that will block polymerization from the slow-growing end of actin filaments. Of the few that are known, most are part of large multimeric complexes that are challenging to manipulate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe here the use of phage display mutagenesis to generate of a new class of binding protein that can be targeted to the pointed-end of actin. These proteins, called synthetic antigen binders (sABs, are based on an antibody-like scaffold where sequence diversity is introduced into the binding loops using a novel "reduced genetic code" phage display library. We describe effective strategies to select and screen for sABs that ensure the generated sABs bind to the pointed-end surface of actin exclusively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: From our set of pointed-end binders, we identify three sABs with particularly useful properties to systematically probe actin dynamics: one protein that caps the pointed end, a second that crosslinks actin filaments, and a third that severs actin filaments and promotes disassembly.

  3. Genome-wide RNAi screen for nuclear actin reveals a network of cofilin regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopie, Joseph; Rajakylä, Eeva K; Joensuu, Merja S; Huet, Guillaume; Ferrantelli, Evelina; Xie, Tiao; Jäälinoja, Harri; Jokitalo, Eija; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear actin plays an important role in many processes that regulate gene expression. Cytoplasmic actin dynamics are tightly controlled by numerous actin-binding proteins, but regulation of nuclear actin has remained unclear. Here, we performed a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila cells to identify proteins that influence either nuclear polymerization or import of actin. We validate 19 factors as specific hits, and show that Chinmo (known as Bach2 in mammals), SNF4Aγ (Prkag1 in mammals) and Rab18 play a role in nuclear localization of actin in both fly and mammalian cells. We identify several new regulators of cofilin activity, and characterize modulators of both cofilin kinases and phosphatase. For example, Chinmo/Bach2, which regulates nuclear actin levels also in vivo, maintains active cofilin by repressing the expression of the kinase Cdi (Tesk in mammals). Finally, we show that Nup98 and lamin are candidates for regulating nuclear actin polymerization. Our screen therefore reveals new aspects of actin regulation and links nuclear actin to many cellular processes.

  4. Experimental Study of Wake / Flap Interaction Noise and the Reduction of Flap Side Edge Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.; Plassman, Gerald E.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the interaction of a wake with a half-span flap on radiated noise are examined. The incident wake is generated by bars of various widths and lengths or by a simplified landing gear model. Single microphone and phased array measurements are used to isolate the effects of the wake interaction on the noise radiating from the flap side edge and flap cove regions. The effects on noise of the wake generator's geometry and relative placement with respect to the flap are assessed. Placement of the wake generators upstream of the flap side edge is shown to lead to the reduction of flap side edge noise by introducing a velocity deficit and likely altering the instabilities in the flap side edge vortex system. Significant reduction in flap side edge noise is achieved with a bar positioned directly upstream of the flap side edge. The noise reduction benefit is seen to improve with increased bar width, length and proximity to the flap edge. Positioning of the landing gear model upstream of the flap side edge also leads to decreased flap side edge noise. In addition, flap cove noise levels are significantly lower than when the landing gear is positioned upstream of the flap mid-span. The impact of the local flow velocity on the noise radiating directly from the landing gear is discussed. The effects of the landing gear side-braces on flap side edge, flap cove and landing gear noise are shown.

  5. The Actin Binding Protein Adseverin Regulates Osteoclastogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hassanpour, Siavash; Jiang, Hongwei; Wang, Yongqiang; Kuiper, Johannes W. P.; Glogauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Adseverin (Ads), a member of the Gelsolin superfamily of actin binding proteins, regulates the actin cytoskeleton architecture by severing and capping existing filamentous actin (F-actin) strands and nucleating the assembly of new F-actin filaments. Ads has been implicated in cellular secretion, exocytosis and has also been shown to regulate chondrogenesis and megakaryoblastic leukemia cell differentiation. Here we report for the first time that Ads is involved in regulating osteoclastogenesi...

  6. Plant pathogenic bacteria target the actin microfilament network involved in the trafficking of disease defense components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelenska, Joanna; Kang, Yongsung; Greenberg, Jean T

    2014-01-01

    Cells of infected organisms transport disease defense-related molecules along actin filaments to deliver them to their sites of action to combat the pathogen. To accommodate higher demand for intracellular traffic, plant F-actin density increases transiently during infection or treatment of Arabidopsis with pathogen-associated molecules. Many animal and plant pathogens interfere with actin polymerization and depolymerization to avoid immune responses. Pseudomonas syringae, a plant extracellular pathogen, injects HopW1 effector into host cells to disrupt the actin cytoskeleton and reduce vesicle movement in order to elude defense responses. In some Arabidopsis accessions, however, HopW1 is recognized and causes resistance via an actin-independent mechanism. HopW1 targets isoform 7 of vegetative actin (ACT7) that is regulated by phytohormones and environmental factors. We hypothesize that dynamic changes of ACT7 filaments are involved in plant immunity. PMID:25551177

  7. Inhibiting actin depolymerization enhances osteoblast differentiation and bone formation in human stromal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Shi, Kaikai; Frary, Charles Edward;

    2015-01-01

    Remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton through actin dynamics is involved in a number of biological processes, but its role in human stromal (skeletal) stem cells (hMSCs) differentiation is poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrated that stabilizing actin filaments by inhibiting gene...... expression of the two main actin depolymerizing factors (ADFs): Cofilin 1 (CFL1) and Destrin (DSTN) in hMSCs, enhanced cell viability and differentiation into osteoblastic cells (OB) in vitro, as well as heterotopic bone formation in vivo. Similarly, treating hMSC with Phalloidin, which is known to stabilize...... polymerized actin filaments, increased hMSCs viability and OB differentiation. Conversely, Cytocholasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, reduced cell viability and inhibited OB differentiation of hMSC. At a molecular level, preventing Cofilin phosphorylation through inhibition of LIM domain kinase 1...

  8. Differential effects of LifeAct-GFP and actin-GFP on cell mechanics assessed using micropipette aspiration

    OpenAIRE

    Sliogeryte, Kristina; Stephen D Thorpe; Wang, Zhao; Thompson, Clare L.; Gavara, Nuria; Knight, Martin M.

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton forms a dynamic structure involved in many fundamental cellular processes including the control of cell morphology, migration and biomechanics. Recently LifeAct-GFP (green fluorescent protein) has been proposed for visualising actin structure and dynamics in live cells as an alternative to actin-GFP which has been shown to affect cell mechanics. Here we compare the two approaches in terms of their effect on cellular mechanical behaviour. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hM...

  9. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Benadiba, Carine; Goossens, Katty; Kasas, Sandor; Dietler, Giovanni; Willaert, Ronnie; Sahli, Hichem

    2016-08-01

    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput) automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale). Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i) first the input image is decomposed into a 'cartoon' part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii) on the 'cartoon' image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii) quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in osteoblasts grown in

  10. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Benadiba, Carine; Goossens, Katty; Kasas, Sandor; Dietler, Giovanni; Willaert, Ronnie; Sahli, Hichem

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput) automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale). Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i) first the input image is decomposed into a ‘cartoon’ part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii) on the ‘cartoon’ image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii) quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in osteoblasts

  11. Regulation of water flow by actin-binding protein-induced actin gelatin.

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, T.; Suzuki, A.; Stossel, T. P.

    1992-01-01

    Actin filaments inhibit osmotically driven water flow (Ito, T., K.S. Zaner, and T.P. Stossel. 1987. Biophys. J. 51: 745-753). Here we show that the actin gelation protein, actin-binding protein (ABP), impedes both osmotic shrinkage and swelling of an actin filament solution and reduces markedly the concentration of actin filaments required for this inhibition. These effects depend on actin filament immobilization, because the ABP concentration that causes initial impairment of water flow by a...

  12. Effects of leading-edge flap oscillation on unsteady delta wing flow and rock control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Salman, Ahmed A.

    1991-01-01

    The isolated and interdisciplinary problems of unsteady fluid dynamics and rigid-body dynamics and control of delta wings with and without leading-edge flap oscillation are considered. For the fluid dynamics problem, the unsteady, compressible, thin-layer Navier-Stokes (NS) equations, which are written relative to a moving frame of reference, are solved along with the unsteady, linearized, Navier-displacement (ND) equations. The NS equations are solved for the flowfield using an implicit finite-volume scheme. The ND equations are solved for the grid deformation, if the leading-edge flaps oscillate, using an ADI scheme. For the dynamics and control problem, the Euler equation of rigid-body rolling motion for a wing and its flaps are solved interactively with the fluid dynamics equations for the wing-rock motion and subsequently for its control. A four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme is used to explicitly integrate the dynamics equation.

  13. EhCoactosin stabilizes actin filaments in the protist parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitesh Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica is a protist parasite that is the causative agent of amoebiasis, and is a highly motile organism. The motility is essential for its survival and pathogenesis, and a dynamic actin cytoskeleton is required for this process. EhCoactosin, an actin-binding protein of the ADF/cofilin family, participates in actin dynamics, and here we report our studies of this protein using both structural and functional approaches. The X-ray crystal structure of EhCoactosin resembles that of human coactosin-like protein, with major differences in the distribution of surface charges and the orientation of terminal regions. According to in vitro binding assays, full-length EhCoactosin binds both F- and G-actin. Instead of acting to depolymerize or severe F-actin, EhCoactosin directly stabilizes the polymer. When EhCoactosin was visualized in E. histolytica cells using either confocal imaging or total internal reflectance microscopy, it was found to colocalize with F-actin at phagocytic cups. Over-expression of this protein stabilized F-actin and inhibited the phagocytic process. EhCoactosin appears to be an unusual type of coactosin involved in E. histolytica actin dynamics.

  14. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siccardi, Stefano; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications.

  15. Optogenetics to target actin-mediated synaptic loss in Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, Atena; DeFea, Kathryn; Ethell, Iryna

    2013-03-01

    Numerous studies in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) animal models show that overproduction of Aβ peptides and their oligomerization can distort dendrites, damage synapses, and decrease the number of dendritic spines and synapses. Aβ may trigger synapse loss by modulating activity of actin-regulating proteins, such as Rac1 and cofilin. Indeed, Aβ1-42 oligomers can activate actin severing protein cofilin through calcineurin-mediated activation of phosphatase slingshot and inhibit an opposing pathway that suppresses cofilin phosphorylation through Rac-mediated activation of LIMK1. Excessive activation of actin-severing protein cofilin triggers the formation of a non-dynamic actin bundles, called rods that are found in AD brains and cause loss of synapses. Hence, regulation of these actin-regulating proteins in dendritic spines could potentially provide useful tools for preventing the synapse/spine loss associated with earlier stages of AD neuropathology. However, lack of spatiotemporal control over their activity is a key limitation. Recently, optogenetic advancements have provided researchers with convenient light-activating proteins such as photoactivatable Rac (PARac). Here, we transfected cultured primary hippocampal neurons and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells with a PARac/ mCherry-containing plasmid and the mCherry-positive cells were identified and imaged using an inverted fluorescence microscope. Rac1 activation was achieved by irradiation with blue light (480nm) and live changes in dendritic spine morphology were observed using mCherry (587nm). Rac activation was confirmed by immunostaining for phosphorylated form of effector proteinP21 protein-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) and reorganization of actin. Thus, our studies confirm the feasibility of using the PA-Rac construct to trigger actin re-organization in the dendritic spines.

  16. Actin-myosin network is required for proper assembly of influenza virus particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actin filaments are known to play a central role in cellular dynamics. After polymerization of actin, various actin-crosslinking proteins including non-muscle myosin II facilitate the formation of spatially organized actin filament networks. The actin-myosin network is highly expanded beneath plasma membrane. The genome of influenza virus (vRNA) replicates in the cell nucleus. Then, newly synthesized vRNAs are nuclear-exported to the cytoplasm as ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), followed by transport to the beneath plasma membrane where virus particles assemble. Here, we found that, by inhibiting actin-myosin network formation, the virus titer tends to be reduced and HA viral spike protein is aggregated on the plasma membrane. These results indicate that the actin-myosin network plays an important role in the virus formation. - Highlights: • Actin-myosin network is important for the influenza virus production. • HA forms aggregations at the plasma membrane in the presence of blebbistatin. • M1 is recruited to the budding site through the actin-myosin network

  17. Actin-myosin network is required for proper assembly of influenza virus particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumakura, Michiko; Kawaguchi, Atsushi, E-mail: ats-kawaguchi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Nagata, Kyosuke, E-mail: knagata@md.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2015-02-15

    Actin filaments are known to play a central role in cellular dynamics. After polymerization of actin, various actin-crosslinking proteins including non-muscle myosin II facilitate the formation of spatially organized actin filament networks. The actin-myosin network is highly expanded beneath plasma membrane. The genome of influenza virus (vRNA) replicates in the cell nucleus. Then, newly synthesized vRNAs are nuclear-exported to the cytoplasm as ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), followed by transport to the beneath plasma membrane where virus particles assemble. Here, we found that, by inhibiting actin-myosin network formation, the virus titer tends to be reduced and HA viral spike protein is aggregated on the plasma membrane. These results indicate that the actin-myosin network plays an important role in the virus formation. - Highlights: • Actin-myosin network is important for the influenza virus production. • HA forms aggregations at the plasma membrane in the presence of blebbistatin. • M1 is recruited to the budding site through the actin-myosin network.

  18. Fertilization in Torenia fournieri: actin organization and nuclear behavior in the central cell and primary endosperm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN; Ming(袁明); FU; Ying(傅缨); WANG; Feng(王凤); HUANG; Bingquan(黄炳权); Sze-Yong; Zee(徐是雄); Peter; K.Hepler

    2002-01-01

    Studies of the living embryo sacs of Torenia fournieri reveal that the actin cytoskeleton undergoes dramatic changes that correlate with nuclear migration within the central cell and the primary endosperm. Before pollination, actin filaments appear as short bundles randomly distributed in the cortex of the central cell. Two days after anthesis, they become organized into a distinct actin network. At this stage the secondary nucleus, which is located in the central region of the central cell, possesses an associated array of short actin filaments. Soon after pollination, the actin filaments become fragmented in the micropylar end and the secondary nucleus is located next to the egg apparatus. After fertilization, the primary endosperm nucleus moves away from the egg cell and actin filaments reorganize into a prominent network in the cytoplasm of the primary endosperm. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin A and cytochalasin B indicates that actin is involved in the migration of the nucleus in the central cell. Our data also suggest that the dynamics of actin cytoskeleton may be responsible for the reorganization of the central cell and primary endosperm cytoplasm during fertilization.

  19. Retrospective study of reverse dorsal metacarpal flap and compound flap: a review of 122 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Lai-jin; GONG Xu; LIU Zhi-gang; ZHANG Zhi-xin

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the clinical application and discuss the operative indication of the reverse dorsal metacarpal flap and its compound flap on the skin defects of hand.Methods: From 1990 to 2003, we applied the reverse dorsal metacarpal flap and its compound flap to repair soft tissue defects of fingers in 122 cases, which included 90cases of the reverse metacarpal flap and 32 cases of its compound flaps with tendon grafts, nerve grafts or bone grafts. Based on the follow-up observations, we analyzed the indications of the reverse metacarpal flap and its compound flaps, the postoperative contours, flap colors and textures in comparison to contralateral fingers retrospectively.Results: In the series of 122 cases, flaps survived and the donor site defects were closed directly. The follow-up period ranged from 1-12 years. The postoperative contours,colors and textures of the flaps and its compound flaps were similar to those of normal fingers, although linear scar remained. According to standards of sense recovery(British Medical Research Council, BMRC ), the sense function of the flaps resumed S3 after operation for 1 year.In 10 cases with the tendon defects treated by the flap with tendon grafts, function of flexion-extension of fingers resumed 50%-75% in comparison to the contralateral fingers using the method of measurement of total active motion. In 7 cases with the phalangeal nonunion or bone defects treated by the flap with bone grafts, union occurred after operation for 3 months.Conclusions: To soft tissue defects on fingers with bone or tendon exposure, the reverse metacarpal flap and its compound flap are a better choice for repairing. The range of repairing is up to the distal interphalangeal joint of fingers. The second dorsal metacarpal artery is more consistent and larger as the choice of vascular pedicle, in comparison with other dorsal metacarpal arteries.Postoperative flap color and texture are similar to normal fingers.

  20. Cell elasticity is regulated by the tropomyosin isoform composition of the actin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Iman; Heu, Celine; Cheng, Hong; Freittag, Hannah; Desouza, Melissa; Stehn, Justine R; Bryce, Nicole S; Whan, Renee M; Hardeman, Edna C; Fath, Thomas; Schevzov, Galina; Gunning, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is the primary polymer system within cells responsible for regulating cellular stiffness. While various actin binding proteins regulate the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton, the proteins responsible for regulating the mechanical properties of cells are still not fully understood. In the present study, we have addressed the significance of the actin associated protein, tropomyosin (Tpm), in influencing the mechanical properties of cells. Tpms belong to a multi-gene family that form a co-polymer with actin filaments and differentially regulate actin filament stability, function and organization. Tpm isoform expression is highly regulated and together with the ability to sort to specific intracellular sites, result in the generation of distinct Tpm isoform-containing actin filament populations. Nanomechanical measurements conducted with an Atomic Force Microscope using indentation in Peak Force Tapping in indentation/ramping mode, demonstrated that Tpm impacts on cell stiffness and the observed effect occurred in a Tpm isoform-specific manner. Quantitative analysis of the cellular filamentous actin (F-actin) pool conducted both biochemically and with the use of a linear detection algorithm to evaluate actin structures revealed that an altered F-actin pool does not absolutely predict changes in cell stiffness. Inhibition of non-muscle myosin II revealed that intracellular tension generated by myosin II is required for the observed increase in cell stiffness. Lastly, we show that the observed increase in cell stiffness is partially recapitulated in vivo as detected in epididymal fat pads isolated from a Tpm3.1 transgenic mouse line. Together these data are consistent with a role for Tpm in regulating cell stiffness via the generation of specific populations of Tpm isoform-containing actin filaments.

  1. Cell stress promotes the association of phosphorylated HspB1 with F-actin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P Clarke

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that the small heat shock protein, HspB1, has a direct influence on the dynamics of cytoskeletal elements, in particular, filamentous actin (F-actin polymerization. In this study we have assessed the influence of HspB1 phosphorylation on its interaction(s with F-actin. We first determined the distribution of endogenous non-phosphorylated HspB1, phosphorylated HspB1 and F-actin in neuroendocrine PC12 cells by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. We then investigated a potential direct interaction between HspB1 with F-actin by precipitating F-actin directly with biotinylated phalloidin followed by Western analyses; the reverse immunoprecipitation of HspB1 was also carried out. The phosphorylation influence of HspB1 in this interaction was investigated by using pharmacologic inhibition of p38 MAPK. In control cells, HspB1 interacts with F-actin as a predominantly non-phosphorylated protein, but subsequent to stress there is a redistribution of HspB1 to the cytoskeletal fraction and a significantly increased association of pHspB1 with F-actin. Our data demonstrate HspB1 is found in a complex with F-actin both in phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms, with an increased association of pHspB1 with F-actin after heat stress. Overall, our study combines both cellular and biochemical approaches to show cellular localization and direct demonstration of an interaction between endogenous HspB1 and F-actin using methodolgy that specifically isolates F-actin.

  2. Internal Mammary Artery Perforator flap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, P.P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Reconstructive surgery evolved as a result of the enormous numbers of World War I and II victims, long before profound knowledge of the vascularity of flaps was present. Sophisticated imaging techniques have given us at present a thorough understanding of the vascularity of tissues so that randomly

  3. Fascin regulates nuclear actin during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelpsch, Daniel J; Groen, Christopher M; Fagan, Tiffany N; Sudhir, Sweta; Tootle, Tina L

    2016-10-01

    Drosophila oogenesis provides a developmental system with which to study nuclear actin. During Stages 5-9, nuclear actin levels are high in the oocyte and exhibit variation within the nurse cells. Cofilin and Profilin, which regulate the nuclear import and export of actin, also localize to the nuclei. Expression of GFP-tagged Actin results in nuclear actin rod formation. These findings indicate that nuclear actin must be tightly regulated during oogenesis. One factor mediating this regulation is Fascin. Overexpression of Fascin enhances nuclear GFP-Actin rod formation, and Fascin colocalizes with the rods. Loss of Fascin reduces, whereas overexpression of Fascin increases, the frequency of nurse cells with high levels of nuclear actin, but neither alters the overall nuclear level of actin within the ovary. These data suggest that Fascin regulates the ability of specific cells to accumulate nuclear actin. Evidence indicates that Fascin positively regulates nuclear actin through Cofilin. Loss of Fascin results in decreased nuclear Cofilin. In addition, Fascin and Cofilin genetically interact, as double heterozygotes exhibit a reduction in the number of nurse cells with high nuclear actin levels. These findings are likely applicable beyond Drosophila follicle development, as the localization and functions of Fascin and the mechanisms regulating nuclear actin are widely conserved.

  4. Dissecting principles governing actin assembly using yeast extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelot, Alphée; Drubin, David G

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe recent protocols that we have developed to trigger actin assembly and actin-based motility in yeast cell extracts. Our method allows for the fast preparation of yeast extracts that are competent in dynamic assembly of distinct actin filament structures of biologically appropriate protein composition. Compared to previous extract-based systems using other eukaryotic cell types, yeast provides a unique advantage for combining reconstituted assays with the preparation of extracts from genetically modified yeast strains. We present a global strategy for dissecting the functions of individual proteins, where the activities of the proteins are analyzed in systems of variable complexity, ranging from simple mixtures of pure proteins to the full complexity of a cell's cytoplasm.

  5. Cortactin Adopts a Globular Conformation and Bundles Actin into Sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowieson, Nathan P.; King, Gordon; Cookson, David; Ross, Ian; Huber, Thomas; Hume, David A.; Kobe, Bostjan; Martin, Jennifer L. (Queensland); (Aust. Synch.)

    2008-08-21

    Cortactin is a filamentous actin-binding protein that plays a pivotal role in translating environmental signals into coordinated rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. The dynamic reorganization of actin in the cytoskeleton drives processes including changes in cell morphology, cell migration, and phagocytosis. In general, structural proteins of the cytoskeleton bind in the N-terminal region of cortactin and regulatory proteins in the C-terminal region. Previous structural studies have reported an extended conformation for cortactin. It is therefore unclear how cortactin facilitates cross-talk between structural proteins and their regulators. In the study presented here, circular dichroism, chemical cross-linking, and small angle x-ray scattering are used to demonstrate that cortactin adopts a globular conformation, thereby bringing distant parts of the molecule into close proximity. In addition, the actin bundling activity of cortactin is characterized, showing that fully polymerized actin filaments are bundled into sheet-like structures. We present a low resolution structure that suggests how the various domains of cortactin interact to coordinate its array of binding partners at sites of actin branching.

  6. Antenna Mechanism of Length Control of Actin Cables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lishibanya Mohapatra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Actin cables are linear cytoskeletal structures that serve as tracks for myosin-based intracellular transport of vesicles and organelles in both yeast and mammalian cells. In a yeast cell undergoing budding, cables are in constant dynamic turnover yet some cables grow from the bud neck toward the back of the mother cell until their length roughly equals the diameter of the mother cell. This raises the question: how is the length of these cables controlled? Here we describe a novel molecular mechanism for cable length control inspired by recent experimental observations in cells. This "antenna mechanism" involves three key proteins: formins, which polymerize actin, Smy1 proteins, which bind formins and inhibit actin polymerization, and myosin motors, which deliver Smy1 to formins, leading to a length-dependent actin polymerization rate. We compute the probability distribution of cable lengths as a function of several experimentally tuneable parameters such as the formin-binding affinity of Smy1 and the concentration of myosin motors delivering Smy1. These results provide testable predictions of the antenna mechanism of actin-cable length control.

  7. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required

  8. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baytinger, V. F.; Kurochkina, O. S.; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V.; Dzyuman, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  9. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baytinger, V. F., E-mail: baitinger@mail.tomsknet.ru; Kurochkina, O. S., E-mail: kurochkinaos@yandex.ru; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V. [Research Institute of Microsurgery, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Dzyuman, A. N. [Siberian State Medical University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  10. Identification of Actin-Binding Proteins from Maize Pollen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staiger, C.J.

    2004-01-13

    Specific Aims--The goal of this project was to gain an understanding of how actin filament organization and dynamics are controlled in flowering plants. Specifically, we proposed to identify unique proteins with novel functions by investigating biochemical strategies for the isolation and characterization of actin-binding proteins (ABPs). In particular, our hunt was designed to identify capping proteins and nucleation factors. The specific aims included: (1) to use F-actin affinity chromatography (FAAC) as a general strategy to isolate pollen ABPs (2) to produce polyclonal antisera and perform subcellular localization in pollen tubes (3) to isolate cDNA clones for the most promising ABPs (4) to further purify and characterize ABP interactions with actin in vitro. Summary of Progress By employing affinity chromatography on F-actin or DNase I columns, we have identified at least two novel ABPs from pollen, PrABP80 (gelsolin-like) and ZmABP30, We have also cloned and expressed recombinant protein, as well as generated polyclonal antisera, for 6 interesting ABPs from Arabidopsis (fimbrin AtFIM1, capping protein a/b (AtCP), adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (AtCAP), AtCapG & AtVLN1). We performed quantitative analyses of the biochemical properties for two of these previously uncharacterized ABPs (fimbrin and capping protein). Our studies provide the first evidence for fimbrin activity in plants, demonstrate the existence of barbed-end capping factors and a gelsolin-like severing activity, and provide the quantitative data necessary to establish and test models of F-actin organization and dynamics in plant cells.

  11. Formation of a reliable capsular flap in a rat model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuringa, M.C.; Hartman, E.H.M.; Ruhe, P.Q.; Jansen, J.A.; Spauwen, P.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Prefabrication can be used to produce capsular flaps; other researchers have confirmed the feasibility of such flaps. Before the possibilities of capsular flaps can be explored, a reliable method to create these flaps has to be established first. METHODS: To produce capsular flaps in a rat model, th

  12. Effects of torsion frequencies on rotor performance and structural loads with trailing edge flap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of variation of blade torsion frequency on rotor performance and structural loads are investigated for a 1/rev active flap rotor and baseline rotor (no active control). The UH-60A four-bladed articulated main rotor is studied at a high-speed forward flight condition. The torsion frequencies are varied by modifying the spanwise torsional stiffness of the blade and/or the pitch link stiffness. First, a parametric/optimization study on the flap deployment schedule is carried out using lifting-line comprehensive analysis for the soft, baseline, and stiff rotor configurations, and then a higher fidelity coupled computational fluid dynamics–computational structural dynamics analysis is carried out for the optimal flap deployment. It is shown that with the soft rotor there is degradation in performance—of about 6% with respect to the baseline rotor in the case where the flaps are not activated, and of about 1% if flap deflections are applied. On the other hand, for the stiff rotor there is a slight improvement in performance of about 2.3% when the flaps are not activated, and no appreciable change in the case where active flap deflections are applied. It appears that the peak performance achievable with using active flaps on a baseline stiffness rotor cannot be further improved significantly by varying the torsional frequencies. Variation of torsion frequency does not appear to have a significant influence on blade torsion moments and pitch link loads, although the 1/rev flap activation examined has an important role. (paper)

  13. Actin phosphorylation correlates with actin sequestration in ATP-depleted abbit renal proximal tubules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingchun Li; Yingbin Ge; Jun Du; Rong Zhou; Jin Chen; Luo Gu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the relationship between actin phosphorylation and actin sequestration in ATP-depleted rabbit renal proximal tubules. Methods: Using two-dimensional electrophoreses and Western blotting to analyze the phosphorylation state of the sequestered actin in rabbit renal proximal tubules. Results: The analytical result of the sequestered actin indicated that nearly half of the actin was phosphorylated on serine residue(s). Conclusion: Result suggested a close correlation between actin sequestration and actin phosphorylation in ATP-depleted rabbit renal proximal tubules.

  14. Yersinia effector YopO uses actin as bait to phosphorylate proteins that regulate actin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei Lin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2015-03-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species evade host immune systems through the injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into phagocytic cells. One Yop, YopO, also known as YpkA, induces actin-filament disruption, impairing phagocytosis. Here we describe the X-ray structure of Yersinia enterocolitica YopO in complex with actin, which reveals that YopO binds to an actin monomer in a manner that blocks polymerization yet allows the bound actin to interact with host actin-regulating proteins. SILAC-MS and biochemical analyses confirm that actin-polymerization regulators such as VASP, EVL, WASP, gelsolin and the formin diaphanous 1 are directly sequestered and phosphorylated by YopO through formation of ternary complexes with actin. This leads to a model in which YopO at the membrane sequesters actin from polymerization while using the bound actin as bait to recruit, phosphorylate and misregulate host actin-regulating proteins to disrupt phagocytosis.

  15. Management of Vortices Trailing Flapped Wings via Separation Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblatt, David

    2005-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted on a flapped semi-span model to investigate the concept and viability of near-wake vortex management via separation control. Passive control was achieved by means of a simple fairing and active control was achieved via zero mass-flux blowing slots. Vortex sheet strength, estimated by integrating surface pressure ports, was used to predict vortex characteristics by means of inviscid rollup relations. Furthermore, vortices trailing the flaps were mapped using a seven-hole probe. Separation control was found to have a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size over a wide range of angles of attack and control conditions. In general, the vortex trends were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations. Manipulation of the separated flow near the flap edges exerted significant control over both outboard and inboard edge vortices while producing negligible lift excursions. Dynamic separation and attachment control was found to be an effective means for dynamically perturbing the vortex from arbitrarily long wavelengths down to wavelengths less than a typical wingspan. In summary, separation control has the potential for application to time-independent or time-dependent wake alleviation schemes, where the latter can be deployed to minimize adverse effects on ride-quality and dynamic structural loading.

  16. Adjoint-based optimization of flapping plates hinged with a trailing-edge flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand the impact of wing-morphing on aerodynamic performance in the study of flapping-wing flight of birds and insects. We use a flapping plate hinged with a trailing-edge flap as a simplified model for flexible/morphing wings in hovering. The trailing-edge flapping motion is optimized by an adjoint-based approach. The optimized configuration suggests that the trailing-edge flap can substantially enhance the overall lift. Further analysis indicates that the lift enhancement by the trailing-edge flapping is from the change of circulation in two ways: the local circulation change by the rotational motion of the flap, and the modification of vortex shedding process by the relative location between the trailing-edge flap and leading-edge main plate.

  17. Actin-Dependent Alterations of Dendritic Spine Morphology in Shankopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarowar, Tasnuva

    2016-01-01

    Shank proteins (Shank1, Shank2, and Shank3) act as scaffolding molecules in the postsynaptic density of many excitatory neurons. Mutations in SHANK genes, in particular SHANK2 and SHANK3, lead to autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in both human and mouse models. Shank3 proteins are made of several domains—the Shank/ProSAP N-terminal (SPN) domain, ankyrin repeats, SH3 domain, PDZ domain, a proline-rich region, and the sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain. Via various binding partners of these domains, Shank3 is able to bind and interact with a wide range of proteins including modulators of small GTPases such as RICH2, a RhoGAP protein, and βPIX, a RhoGEF protein for Rac1 and Cdc42, actin binding proteins and actin modulators. Dysregulation of all isoforms of Shank proteins, but especially Shank3, leads to alterations in spine morphogenesis, shape, and activity of the synapse via altering actin dynamics. Therefore, here, we highlight the role of Shank proteins as modulators of small GTPases and, ultimately, actin dynamics, as found in multiple in vitro and in vivo models. The failure to mediate this regulatory role might present a shared mechanism in the pathophysiology of autism-associated mutations, which leads to dysregulation of spine morphogenesis and synaptic signaling.

  18. Stability of actin-lysozyme complexes formed in cystic fibrosis disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadinejad, Sarah; Ghamkhari, Behnoush; Abdolmaleki, Sarah

    2016-08-21

    Finding the conditions for destabilizing actin-lysozyme complexes is of biomedical importance in preventing infections in cystic fibrosis. In this manuscript, the effects of different charge-mutants of lysozyme and salt concentration on the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes are studied using Langevin dynamics simulation. A coarse-grained model of F-actin is used in which both its twist and bending rigidities are considered. We observe that the attraction between F-actins is stronger in the presence of wild-type lysozymes relative to the mutated lysozymes of lower charges. By calculating the potential of mean force between F-actins, we conclude that the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes is decreased by reducing the charge of lysozyme mutants. The distributions of different lysozyme charge-mutants show that wild-type (+9e) lysozymes are mostly accumulated in the center of triangles formed by three adjacent F-actins, while lysozyme mutants of charges +7e and +5e occupy the bridging regions between F-actins. Low-charge mutants of lysozyme (+3e) distribute uniformly around F-actins. A rough estimate of the electrostatic energy for these different distributions proves that the distribution in which lysozymes reside in the center of triangles leads to more stable complexes. Also our results in the presence of a salt suggest that at physiological salt concentration of airway, F-actin complexes are not formed by charge-reduced mutants of lysozyme. The findings are interesting because if we can design charge-reduced lysozyme mutants with considerable antibacterial activity, they are not sequestered inside F-actin aggregates and can play their role as antibacterial agents against airway infection. PMID:27436705

  19. Exotic wakes of flapping fins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnipper, Teis

    We present, in 8 chapters, experiments on and numerical simulations of bodies flapping in a fluid. Focus is predominantly on a rigid foil, a model fish, that performs prescribed pitching oscillations where the foil rotates around its leading edge. In a flowing soap film is measured, with unpreced......We present, in 8 chapters, experiments on and numerical simulations of bodies flapping in a fluid. Focus is predominantly on a rigid foil, a model fish, that performs prescribed pitching oscillations where the foil rotates around its leading edge. In a flowing soap film is measured......-speed and the strength ratio of the vortices formed at the foil’s leading and trailing edge. The simulated vortex particles and measured thickness variations in the soap film show similar behaviour which indicates that the soap film provides a good approximation the flow of a two-dimensional incompressible and Newtonian...

  20. Root coverage with bridge flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpendra Kumar Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival recession in anterior teeth is a common concern due to esthetic reasons or root sensitivity. Gingival recession, especially in multiple anterior teeth, is of huge concern due to esthetic reasons. Various mucogingival surgeries are available for root coverage. This case report presents a new bridge flap technique, which allows the dentist not only to cover the previously denuded root surfaces but also to increase the zone of attached gingiva at a single step. In this case, a coronally advanced flap along with vestibular deepening technique was used as root coverage procedure for the treatment of multiple recession-type defect. Here, vestibular deepening technique is used to increase the width of the attached gingiva. The predictability of this procedure results in an esthetically healthy periodontium, along with gain in keratinized tissue and good patient′s acceptance.

  1. Membrane Supply and Demand Regulates F-Actin in a Cell Surface Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figard, Lauren; Wang, Mengyu; Zheng, Liuliu; Golding, Ido; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2016-05-01

    Cells store membrane in surface reservoirs of pits and protrusions. These membrane reservoirs facilitate cell shape change and buffer mechanical stress, but we do not know how reservoir dynamics are regulated. During cellularization, the first cytokinesis in Drosophila embryos, a reservoir of microvilli unfolds to fuel cleavage furrow ingression. We find that regulated exocytosis adds membrane to the reservoir before and during unfolding. Dynamic F-actin deforms exocytosed membrane into microvilli. Single microvilli extend and retract in ∼20 s, while the overall reservoir is depleted in sync with furrow ingression over 60-70 min. Using pharmacological and genetic perturbations, we show that exocytosis promotes microvillar F-actin assembly, while furrow ingression controls microvillar F-actin disassembly. Thus, reservoir F-actin and, consequently, reservoir dynamics are regulated by membrane supply from exocytosis and membrane demand from furrow ingression. PMID:27165556

  2. Inferior Gluteal Perforator Flaps for Breast Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Robert J.; LoTempio, Maria M.; Granzow, Jay W.

    2006-01-01

    Perforator flaps represent the latest in the evolution of soft tissue flaps. They allow the transfer of the patient's own skin and fat in a reliable manner with minimal donor-site morbidity. The powerful perforator flap concept allows transfer of tissue from numerous, well-described donor sites to almost any distant site with suitable recipient vessels. The inferior gluteal artery perforator (I-GAP) flap is one option that allows a large volume of tissue to be used for breast reconstruction w...

  3. Optimal propulsive flapping in Stokes flows

    CERN Document Server

    Was, Loic

    2014-01-01

    Swimming fish and flying insects use the flapping of fins and wings to generate thrust. In contrast, microscopic organisms typically deform their appendages in a wavelike fashion. Since a flapping motion with two degrees of freedom is able, in theory, to produce net forces from a time-periodic actuation at all Reynolds number, we compute in this paper the optimal flapping kinematics of a rigid spheroid in a Stokes flow. The hydrodynamics for the force generation and energetics of the flapping motion is solved exactly. We then compute analytically the gradient of a flapping efficiency in the space of all flapping gaits and employ it to derive numerically the optimal flapping kinematics as a function of the shape of the flapper and the amplitude of the motion. The kinematics of optimal flapping are observed to depend weakly on the flapper shape and are very similar to the figure-eight motion observed in the motion of insect wings. Our results suggest that flapping could be a exploited experimentally as a propul...

  4. Basic Perforator Flap Hemodynamic Mathematical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Youlun; Ding, Maochao; Wang, Aiguo; Zhuang, Yuehong; Chang, Shi-Min; Mei, Jin; Hallock, Geoffrey G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A mathematical model to help explain the hemodynamic characteristics of perforator flaps based on blood flow resistance systems within the flap will serve as a theoretical guide for the future study and clinical applications of these flaps. Methods: There are 3 major blood flow resistance network systems of a perforator flap. These were defined as the blood flow resistance of an anastomosis between artery and artery of adjacent perforasomes, between artery and vein within a perforasome, and then between vein and vein corresponding to the outflow of that perforasome. From this, a calculation could be made of the number of such blood flow resistance network systems that must be crossed for all perforasomes within a perforator flap to predict whether that arrangement would be viable. Results: The summation of blood flow resistance networks from each perforasome in a given perforator flap could predict which portions would likely survive. This mathematical model shows how this is directly dependent on the location of the vascular pedicle to the flap and whether supercharging or superdrainage maneuvers have been added. These configurations will give an estimate of the hemodynamic characteristics for the given flap design. Conclusions: This basic mathematical model can (1) conveniently determine the degree of difficulty for each perforasome within a perforator flap to survive; (2) semiquantitatively allow the calculation of basic hemodynamic parameters; and (3) allow the assessment of the pros and cons expected for each pattern of perforasomes encountered clinically based on predictable hemodynamic observations.

  5. The Actin-Binding Protein α-Adducin Is Required for Maintaining Axon Diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Carvalho Leite

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The actin-binding protein adducin was recently identified as a component of the neuronal subcortical cytoskeleton. Here, we analyzed mice lacking adducin to uncover the function of this protein in actin rings. α-adducin knockout mice presented progressive axon enlargement in the spinal cord and optic and sciatic nerves, followed by axon degeneration and loss. Using stimulated emission depletion super-resolution microscopy, we show that a periodic subcortical actin cytoskeleton is assembled in every neuron type inspected including retinal ganglion cells and dorsal root ganglia neurons. In neurons devoid of adducin, the actin ring diameter increased, although the inter-ring periodicity was maintained. In vitro, the actin ring diameter adjusted as axons grew, suggesting the lattice is dynamic. Our data support a model in which adducin activity is not essential for actin ring assembly and periodicity but is necessary to control the diameter of both actin rings and axons and actin filament growth within rings.

  6. Drosophila Fascin is a novel downstream target of prostaglandin signaling during actin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Christopher M; Spracklen, Andrew J; Fagan, Tiffany N; Tootle, Tina L

    2012-12-01

    Although prostaglandins (PGs)-lipid signals produced downstream of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes-regulate actin cytoskeletal dynamics, their mechanisms of action are unknown. We previously established Drosophila oogenesis, in particular nurse cell dumping, as a new model to determine how PGs regulate actin remodeling. PGs, and thus the Drosophila COX-like enzyme Pxt, are required for both the parallel actin filament bundle formation and the cortical actin strengthening required for dumping. Here we provide the first link between Fascin (Drosophila Singed, Sn), an actin-bundling protein, and PGs. Loss of either pxt or fascin results in similar actin defects. Fascin interacts, both pharmacologically and genetically, with PGs, as reduced Fascin levels enhance the effects of COX inhibition and synergize with reduced Pxt levels to cause both parallel bundle and cortical actin defects. Conversely, overexpression of Fascin in the germline suppresses the effects of COX inhibition and genetic loss of Pxt. These data lead to the conclusion that PGs regulate Fascin to control actin remodeling. This novel interaction has implications beyond Drosophila, as both PGs and Fascin-1, in mammalian systems, contribute to cancer cell migration and invasion.

  7. Actinic Keratoses: A Comprehensive Update

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Sherrif F.; Brown, Marc D.

    2009-01-01

    Actinic keratoses are common intra-epidermal neoplasms that lie on a continuum with squamous cell carcinoma. Tightly linked to ultraviolet irradiation, they occur in areas of chronic sun exposure, and early treatment of these lesions may prevent their progression to invasive disease. A large variety of effective treatment modalities exist, and the optimal therapeutic choice is dependent on a variety of patient- and physician-associated variables. Many established and more recent approaches ar...

  8. Nonlinear flap-lag axial equations of a rotating beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaza, K. R. V.; Kvaternik, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    It is possible to identify essentially four approaches by which analysts have established either the linear or nonlinear governing equations of motion for a particular problem related to the dynamics of rotating elastic bodies. The approaches include the effective applied load artifice in combination with a variational principle and the use of Newton's second law, written as D'Alembert's principle, applied to the deformed configuration. A third approach is a variational method in which nonlinear strain-displacement relations and a first-degree displacement field are used. The method introduced by Vigneron (1975) for deriving the linear flap-lag equations of a rotating beam constitutes the fourth approach. The reported investigation shows that all four approaches make use of the geometric nonlinear theory of elasticity. An alternative method for deriving the nonlinear coupled flap-lag-axial equations of motion is also discussed.

  9. Modelling phagosomal lipid networks that regulate actin assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz Roland

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When purified phagosomes are incubated in the presence of actin under appropriate conditions, microfilaments start growing from the membrane in a process that is affected by ATP and the lipid composition of the membrane. Isolated phagosomes are metabolically active organelles that contain enzymes and metabolites necessary for lipid interconversion. Hence, addition of ATP, lipids, and actin to the system alter the steady-state composition of the phagosomal membrane at the same time that the actin nucleation is initiated. Our aim was to model all these processes in parallel. Results We compiled detailed experimental data on the effects of different lipids and ATP on actin nucleation and we investigated experimentally lipid interconversion and ATP metabolism in phagosomes by using suitable radioactive compounds. In a first step, a complex lipid network interconnected by chemical reactions catalyzed by known enzymes was modelled in COPASI (Complex Pathway Simulator. However, several lines of experimental evidence indicated that only the phosphatidylinositol branch of the network was active, an observation that dramatically reduced the number of parameters in the model. The results also indicated that a lipid network-independent ATP-consuming activity should be included in the model. When this activity was introduced, the set of differential equations satisfactorily reproduced the experimental data. On the other hand, a molecular mechanism connecting membrane lipids, ATP, and the actin nucleation process is still missing. We therefore adopted a phenomenological (black-box approach to represent the empirical observations. We proposed that lipids and ATP influence the dynamic interconversion between active and inactive actin nucleation sites. With this simple model, all the experimental data were satisfactorily fitted with a single positive parameter per lipid and ATP. Conclusion By establishing an active 'dialogue' between an

  10. Flapping current sheet motions in magnetotail excited by non-adiabatic ions: case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, X., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The current sheet is a crucial region of the magnetotail, where energy reserve and release take place. The origin of the up-down motions of the current sheet, referred to as flapping motions, is among the most fundamental issues of magnetotail dynamics. Observational evidences suggest that the flapping motion is a kind of internal excited kink-like waves, but its particular propagating features such as the low phase speeds and the propagating direction from the tail center toward flanks do not match any local generation mechanisms previously established so far. Here we report observations of the current sheet flapping motions induced by non-adiabatic ions in the magnetic field configurations with a finite guiding component, whose population present periodic hemispherical asymmetries. Three type of current sheet flapping event in this paper will be discussed. This current sheet flapping phenomenon implies that the excitation mechanism of the current sheet flapping motions is a self-circulation process between the non-adiabatic ion population and the current sheet equilibrium itself.

  11. The current sheet tiled and non-adiabatic ions effect on the flapping motion in magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, XinHua

    2016-04-01

    The current sheet is a crucial region of the magnetotail, where energy reserve and release take place. The origin of the up-down motions of the current sheet, referred to as flapping motions, is among the most fundamental issues of magnetotail dynamics. Observational evidences suggest that the flapping motion is a kind of internal excited kink-like waves, but its particular propagating features such as the low phase speeds and the propagating direction from the tail center toward flanks do not match any local generation mechanisms previously established so far. Here we report observations of the current sheet flapping motions induced by non-adiabatic ions in the magnetic field configurations with a finite guiding component, whose population present periodic hemispherical asymmetries. These flapping motion current sheet cases often observed tiled. The current sheet flapping phenomenon implies that the excitation mechanism of the current sheet flapping motions is a self-circulation process between the non-adiabatic ion population and the current sheet equilibrium itself.

  12. Actin organization, bristle morphology, and viability are affected by actin capping protein mutations in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Regulation of actin filament length and orientation is important in many actin-based cellular processes. This regulation is postulated to occur through the action of actin-binding proteins. Many actin-binding proteins that modify actin in vitro have been identified, but in many cases, it is not known if this activity is physiologically relevant. Capping protein (CP) is an actin-binding protein that has been demonstrated to control filament length in vitro by binding to the barbed ends and pre...

  13. Mesoscopic model of actin-based propulsion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhu

    Full Text Available Two theoretical models dominate current understanding of actin-based propulsion: microscopic polymerization ratchet model predicts that growing and writhing actin filaments generate forces and movements, while macroscopic elastic propulsion model suggests that deformation and stress of growing actin gel are responsible for the propulsion. We examine both experimentally and computationally the 2D movement of ellipsoidal beads propelled by actin tails and show that neither of the two models can explain the observed bistability of the orientation of the beads. To explain the data, we develop a 2D hybrid mesoscopic model by reconciling these two models such that individual actin filaments undergoing nucleation, elongation, attachment, detachment and capping are embedded into the boundary of a node-spring viscoelastic network representing the macroscopic actin gel. Stochastic simulations of this 'in silico' actin network show that the combined effects of the macroscopic elastic deformation and microscopic ratchets can explain the observed bistable orientation of the actin-propelled ellipsoidal beads. To test the theory further, we analyze observed distribution of the curvatures of the trajectories and show that the hybrid model's predictions fit the data. Finally, we demonstrate that the model can explain both concave-up and concave-down force-velocity relations for growing actin networks depending on the characteristic time scale and network recoil. To summarize, we propose that both microscopic polymerization ratchets and macroscopic stresses of the deformable actin network are responsible for the force and movement generation.

  14. From pollen actin to crop male sterility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Actin plays an important role in the life activity of animal and plant cells. Pollen cells have plenty of actin whose structure and characteristics are very similar to the animal actin. The nucleotide sequence and amino acid sequence of plant actin gene are very similar to those of the animal gene. The content of pollen actin from male sterile plants is much more lower than that from its maintainer plants. The expression of actin gene is organ-specific during the plant development. The expression quantity of actin gene in pollen is much more higher than those from root, stem and leaf. The expression plasmid of the anti-sense actin gene was constructed, transferred to the protoplasts of wheat and tomato to inhibit the expression of actin gene in pollen and thus the male sterile plants of wheat and tomato were obtained. The actin in pollens from the transgenic plants was reduced significantly, whereas the pistil was not affected. This study might pave a new way to breeding male sterile lines for the application of hybrid vigor of wheat and tomato.

  15. [The super extended sub-mental flap or combo sub-mental flap].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D

    2014-08-01

    The author presents a technical variation of the sub-mental flap including in a conventional pedicled flap both sub-mental axes and their anastomoses on the midline. The assessment of the first flaps raised according to this method confirms the improvement of the distal blood supply. It allows the possibility to harvest "super extended" flaps reaching the contralateral auricular lobula. This variation can be considered as an axial flap which only the tip, located beyond the mandibular angle, is at random. The evolution of the sub-mental flap from its original description to this variation called "combo sub-mental flap" is then presented. Its reliability and the technical simplification it provides will have to be assessed in the future. PMID:24840945

  16. Secondary onlay free flap reconstruction of glossectomy defects following initial successful flap restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihani, Jordan; Lee, Thomas; Ducic, Yadranko

    2013-08-01

    Patients who undergo tongue reconstruction over time may develop gradual worsening of dysarthria and dysphagia secondary to flap atrophy. At our institution, these patients undergo a secondary flap onlay procedure for augmentation of the neotongue. We review a total of 11 patients with total glossectomy defect who underwent secondary tongue augmentation with secondary onlay free flap consisting of radial forearm free flap (n = 6) and rectus free flap (n = 5). There was improvement in swallowing in 7 of 11 patients. Five (45.4%) patients achieved gastric tube independence. Seven (63.6%) patients achieved a varying degree of oral intake. All patients achieved tracheostomy independence. Dysarthria was improved in all patients. There were no flap failures. Therefore, a secondary onlay flap technique is feasible and may improve dysphagia and dysarthria to achieve gastric tube and tracheostomy independence in total glossectomy patients with delayed tongue atrophy. PMID:23625797

  17. TIRF microscopy analysis of human Cof1, Cof2, and ADF effects on actin filament severing and turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Samantha M; Jansen, Silvia; Goode, Bruce L

    2016-04-24

    Dynamic remodeling and turnover of cellular actin networks requires actin filament severing by actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/Cofilin proteins. Mammals express three different ADF/Cofilins (Cof1, Cof2, and ADF), and genetic studies suggest that in vivo they perform both overlapping and unique functions. To gain mechanistic insights into their different roles, we directly compared their G-actin and F-actin binding affinities, and quantified the actin filament severing activities of human Cof1, Cof2, and ADF using in vitro total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. All three ADF/Cofilins had similar affinities for G-actin and F-actin. However, Cof2 and ADF severed filaments much more efficiently than Cof1 at both lower and higher concentrations and using either muscle or platelet actin. Furthermore, Cof2 and ADF were more effective than Cof1 in promoting "enhanced disassembly" when combined with actin disassembly co-factors Coronin-1B and actin-interacting protein 1 (AIP1), and these differences were observed on both preformed and actively growing filaments. To probe the mechanism underlying these differences, we used multi-wavelength total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to directly observe Cy3-Cof1 and Cy3-Cof2 interacting with actin filaments in real time during severing. Cof1 and Cof2 each bound to filaments with similar kinetics, yet Cof2 induced severing much more rapidly than Cof1, decreasing the time interval between initial binding on a filament and severing at the same location. These differences in ADF/Cofilin activities and mechanisms may be used in cells to tune filament turnover rates, which can vary widely for different actin structures.

  18. Analysis of tail effects in flapping flight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tay, W.B.; Bijl, H.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed to examine the interference effects between an upstream flapping airfoil and a downstream stationary airfoil in a tandem configuration at a Reynolds number of 1000, which is around the regime of small flapping micro aerial vehicles. The object

  19. Prefabricated flaps for bone reconstructive surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, E.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Tissue engineering of bone could help minimise donor site defects of conventional bone flaps like the fibula, iliac crest, radius and scapula. First a review is given on the literature of donor site morbidity of these flaps. Then the use of MRI is investigated for longitudinal study of ectopic bone

  20. Internal Motility in Stiffening Actin-Myosin Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Uhde, Joerg; Keller, Manfred; Sackmann, Erich; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Frey, Erwin

    2003-01-01

    We present a study on filamentous actin solutions containing heavy meromyosin subfragments of myosin II motor molecules. We focus on the viscoelastic phase behavior and internal dynamics of such networks during ATP depletion. Upon simultaneously using micro-rheology and fluorescence microscopy as complementary experimental tools, we find a sol-gel transition accompanied by a sudden onset of directed filament motion. We interpret the sol-gel transition in terms of myosin II enzymology, and sug...

  1. Fasciocutaneous flap for vaginal and perineal reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A skin and fascia flap from the medial thigh is proposed for vaginal and perineal reconstruction. Dissection, vascular injection, and radiographs of 20 fresh cadaver limbs uniformly demonstrated the presence of a communicating suprafascial vascular plexus in the medial thigh. Three to four nonaxial vessels were consistently found to enter the proximal plexus from within 5 cm of the perineum. Preservation of these vessels permitted reliable elevation of a 9 X 20 cm fasciocutaneous flap without using the gracilis muscle as a vascular carrier. Fifteen flaps in 13 patients were used for vaginal replacement and coverage of vulvectomy, groin, and ischial defects. Depending on the magnitude of the defect, simultaneous and independent elevation of the gracilis muscle provided additional vascularized coverage as needed. Our experience indicates that the medial thigh fasciocutaneous flap is a durable, less bulky, and potentially sensate alternative to the gracilis musculocutaneous flap for vaginal and perineal reconstruction

  2. Fasciocutaneous flap for vaginal and perineal reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, T.N.; Whetzel, T.; Mathes, S.J.; Vasconez, L.O.

    1987-07-01

    A skin and fascia flap from the medial thigh is proposed for vaginal and perineal reconstruction. Dissection, vascular injection, and radiographs of 20 fresh cadaver limbs uniformly demonstrated the presence of a communicating suprafascial vascular plexus in the medial thigh. Three to four nonaxial vessels were consistently found to enter the proximal plexus from within 5 cm of the perineum. Preservation of these vessels permitted reliable elevation of a 9 X 20 cm fasciocutaneous flap without using the gracilis muscle as a vascular carrier. Fifteen flaps in 13 patients were used for vaginal replacement and coverage of vulvectomy, groin, and ischial defects. Depending on the magnitude of the defect, simultaneous and independent elevation of the gracilis muscle provided additional vascularized coverage as needed. Our experience indicates that the medial thigh fasciocutaneous flap is a durable, less bulky, and potentially sensate alternative to the gracilis musculocutaneous flap for vaginal and perineal reconstruction.

  3. Blood flow autoregulation in pedicled flaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Christian T; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Elberg, Jens J

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Clinical work on the blood perfusion in skin and muscle flaps has suggested that some degree of blood flow autoregulation exists in such flaps. An autoregulatory mechanism would enable the flap to protect itself from changes in the perfusion pressure. The purpose of the present study...... was to evaluate if, and to what extent, a tissue flap could compensate a reduction in blood flow due to an acute constriction of the feed artery. Further, we wanted to examine the possible role of smooth muscle L-type calcium channels in the autoregulatory mechanism by pharmacological intervention with the L......-type calcium channel blocker nimodipine and the vasodilator papaverine. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Pedicled flaps were raised in pigs. Flow in the pedicle was reduced by constriction of the feed artery (n=34). A transit time flow probe measured the effect on blood flow continuously. Following this, three different...

  4. Actin gene family in Branchiostoma belched

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved cytoskeletal protein that is found in essentially all eukaryotic cells,which plays a paramount role in several basic functions of the organism, such as the maintenance of cellshape, cell division, cell mobility and muscle contraction. However, little is known about actin gene family inChinese amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri). Here we systemically analyzed the actin genes family inBranchiostoma belched and found that amphioxus contains 33 actin genes. These genes have undergoneextensive expansion through tandem duplications by phylogenetic analysis. In addition, we also providedevidence indicating that actin genes have divergent functions by specializing their EST data in both Bran-chiostoma belched and Branchiostoma florida. Our results provided an alternative explanation for the evolu-tion of actin genes, and gave new insights into their functional roles.

  5. A feedback loop between dynamin and actin recruitment during clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus J Taylor

    Full Text Available Clathrin-mediated endocytosis proceeds by a sequential series of reactions catalyzed by discrete sets of protein machinery. The final reaction in clathrin-mediated endocytosis is membrane scission, which is mediated by the large guanosine triophosphate hydrolase (GTPase dynamin and which may involve the actin-dependent recruitment of N-terminal containing BIN/Amphiphysin/RVS domain containing (N-BAR proteins. Optical microscopy has revealed a detailed picture of when and where particular protein types are recruited in the ∼20-30 s preceding scission. Nevertheless, the regulatory mechanisms and functions that underpin protein recruitment are not well understood. Here we used an optical assay to investigate the coordination and interdependencies between the recruitment of dynamin, the actin cytoskeleton, and N-BAR proteins to individual clathrin-mediated endocytic scission events. These measurements revealed that a feedback loop exists between dynamin and actin at sites of membrane scission. The kinetics of dynamin, actin, and N-BAR protein recruitment were modulated by dynamin GTPase activity. Conversely, acute ablation of actin dynamics using latrunculin-B led to a ∼50% decrease in the incidence of scission, an ∼50% decrease in the amplitude of dynamin recruitment, and abolished actin and N-BAR recruitment to scission events. Collectively these data suggest that dynamin, actin, and N-BAR proteins work cooperatively to efficiently catalyze membrane scission. Dynamin controls its own recruitment to scission events by modulating the kinetics of actin and N-BAR recruitment to sites of scission. Conversely actin serves as a dynamic scaffold that concentrates dynamin and N-BAR proteins at sites of scission.

  6. Filopodia-like actin cables position nuclei in association with perinuclear actin in Drosophila nurse cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelsmann, Sven; Ylänne, Jari; Brown, Nicholas H

    2013-09-30

    Controlling the position of the nucleus is vital for a number of cellular processes from yeast to humans. In Drosophila nurse cells, nuclear positioning is crucial during dumping, when nurse cells contract and expel their contents into the oocyte. We provide evidence that in nurse cells, continuous filopodia-like actin cables, growing from the plasma membrane and extending to the nucleus, achieve nuclear positioning. These actin cables move nuclei away from ring canals. When nurse cells contract, actin cables associate laterally with the nuclei, in some cases inducing nuclear turning so that actin cables become partially wound around the nuclei. Our data suggest that a perinuclear actin meshwork connects actin cables to nuclei via actin-crosslinking proteins such as the filamin Cheerio. We provide a revised model for how actin structures position nuclei in nurse cells, employing evolutionary conserved machinery.

  7. Packaging of actin into Ebola virus VLPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harty Ronald N

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The actin cytoskeleton has been implicated in playing an important role assembly and budding of several RNA virus families including retroviruses and paramyxoviruses. In this report, we sought to determine whether actin is incorporated into Ebola VLPs, and thus may play a role in assembly and/or budding of Ebola virus. Our results indicated that actin and Ebola virus VP40 strongly co-localized in transfected cells as determined by confocal microscopy. In addition, actin was packaged into budding VP40 VLPs as determined by a functional budding assay and protease protection assay. Co-expression of a membrane-anchored form of Ebola virus GP enhanced the release of both VP40 and actin in VLPs. Lastly, disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin-A suggests that actin may play a functional role in budding of VP40/GP VLPs. These data suggest that VP40 may interact with cellular actin, and that actin may play a role in assembly and/or budding of Ebola VLPs.

  8. Pudendal thigh flap for repair of rectovaginal fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathappan, S; Rica, M A I

    2006-08-01

    The pudendal thigh flap or the Singapore flap is a versatile flap that can be used in the repair of recto-vaginal fistulae. Apart from the potential problem of hair growth, this neurovascular flap proves to be surprisingly simple in technique, robust and has a high potential for normal or near-normal function. PMID:17240589

  9. The mechanism of body rotation in the flapping flight of butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Yueh-Han; Yang, Jing-Tang

    2013-11-01

    The aerodynamic effects of the body rotation on the flapping flying of butterflies are experimentally and numerically investigated. We first observe and record the flying motion of a butterfly (Kallima inachus) in free flight, focusing especially on the body rotation, via two high speed video cameras and PIV. The body rotation is found in phase with wing flapping while the abdomen is out of phase with wing flapping. Further, we establish the model of flexible wings of a butterfly and exploit the fluid dynamics analysis via the dynamic mesh technique to study the contribution of body rotation to the lift. The results reveal that the body rotation is capable of strengthening the vortex ring structure and correspondingly enhancing the efficiency of lift production. Our simulation model shows the body rotation contributes 15% of total lift. The results of this study may serve as a useful guide for designing insect-like MAVs in the future.

  10. Propulsive performance of two- and three-dimensional flapping flexible plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The propulsive performance of two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D flapping flexible plates in a fluid at rest is investigated by a finite element method for the plate motion and an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for the fluid flow. We consider a model that as the leading-edge of the plate takes a vertical oscillation, the entire plate moves freely due to the fluid–structure interaction. The effects of flexibility on the dynamics of the 2D and 3D flapping plates are investigated. It is found that a suitable flexibility is benefit for improving the propulsive performance. The results obtained in this study provide physical insight into the understanding of the dynamics of the flapping-based locomotion.

  11. A novel algorithm for OSPF link flap damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Guangyi; Lin, Xiaokang

    2005-02-01

    Open shortest path first (OSPF) is the most widely used routing protocol in today"s IP networks, and its excellent performance has been proved in wired environments. However, when it is executed under bad channel conditions such as in wireless networks or areas with severe signal interference, links may flap frequently and some terrible problems will appear. This paper proposes a novel algorithm called OSPF link flap damping algorithm (OLFDA). The objective of OLFDA is to reduce the events of link state advertisement (LSA) update and damp the link flap with the precondition that the overall network performance is satisfying. To accomplish this, we can define criteria to identify and dynamically suppress the poorly behaved links. Information of the suppressed links won"t be advertised in OSPF domain and used in calculation of the routing tables. In addition, we can control the maximal number of links suppressed simultaneously by a router to ensure the network connectivity. OLFDA are simulated in many scenarios, and the results indicate that the algorithm has an excellent performance.

  12. Effect of flexibility on flapping wing characteristics under forward flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jianyang; Jiang, Lin [School of Machinery and Automation, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430081, People’s Republic of China (China); Zhou, Chaoying; Wang, Chao, E-mail: cyzhou@hit.edu.cn [Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Xili Shenzhen University Town, Shenzhen 518055, People’s Republic of China (China)

    2014-10-01

    Through two-dimensional numerical simulation and by solving the unsteady incompressible Navier–Stokes (NS) equations, coupled with the structural dynamic equation for the motion of the wing, the effect of flexibility on flapping wing characteristics during forward flight is systematically studied. The flapping wing is considered as a cantilever, which performs the translational and rotational motion at its leading edge, and the other part is passively deformed by the aerodynamic force. The frequency ratio ω* and mass ratio m* are defined and used to characterize the flexibility of the flapping wing. It has been found that an optimal range of the frequency ratio exists in which the flexible wing possesses both a larger propulsive efficiency and lifting efficiency than their rigid counterpart. Also, the flexible wing with the smaller mass ratio may be of benefit to generate thrust, while the larger mass ratio may be of benefit to generate lift. In addition, a stronger leading edge vortex and reattachment vortex are observed around the appropriate flexibility wing’s surface, which therefore leads to better aerodynamic characteristics. (paper)

  13. Total endoscopic free flap harvest of a serratus anterior fascia flap for microsurgical lower leg reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdmann, Alfons

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: A tremendous number of free flaps have been developed in the past. As the surgical result depends not only on a successful flap transfer but also on the harvest, this paper details the procedures for undertaking the first total endoscopic harvest of a serratus fascia flap for free flap transplantation to the lower leg. Patient and methods: In September 2012 we performed the first total endoscopic serratus anterior fascia free flap harvest. The incision of 2.5 cm length was made 10 cm in front of anterior muscle border of the latissimus dorsi at level with the midthorax. After insertion of a flexible laparoscopic single port system we started CO gas insufflation. We used this setting to meticulously prepare a neo cavity between atissimus dorsi and M. serratus anterior. The vessels were dissected and the thoraco-dorsal nerve was separated. With a second auxiliary incision we used a clamp to support the raising of the fascia flap from the underlying muscle. Finally we clipped the vessels to the latissimus dorsi muscle and the flap vessels at the Arteria and Vena axillaris. The flap was extracted via the 2.5 cm incision.Results: We were able to perform a total endoscopic harvest of a serratus fascia flap for free flap reconstruction of soft tissues. With this new operative technique we were able to avoid a long skin incision, which in our view lowers the morbidity at the harvest area.Conclusion: We describe a new method for the total endoscopic harvest of the serratus fascia flap for free flap transfer. The flap was harvested within reasonable time and following surgery leaves the patient with minimal donor site morbidity compared to the open technique.

  14. Flow structures around a flapping wing considering ground effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Truong, Tien; Kim, Jihoon; Kim, Min Jun; Park, Hoon Cheol; Yoon, Kwang Joon; Byun, Doyoung

    2013-07-01

    Over the past several decades, there has been great interest in understanding the aerodynamics of flapping flight, namely the two flight modes of hovering and forward flight. However, there has been little focus on the aerodynamic characteristics during takeoff of insects. In a previous study we found that the Rhinoceros Beetle ( Trypoxylusdichotomus) takes off without jumping, which is uncommon for other insects. In this study we built a scaled-up electromechanical model of a flapping wing and investigated fluid flow around the beetle's wing model. In particular, the present dynamically scaled mechanical model has the wing kinematics pattern achieved from the real beetle's wing kinematics during takeoff. In addition, we could systematically change the three-dimensional inclined motion of the flapping model through each stroke. We used digital particle image velocimetry with high spatial resolution, and were able to qualitatively and quantitatively study the flow field around the wing at a Reynolds number of approximately 10,000. The present results provide insight into the aerodynamics and the evolution of vortical structures, as well as the ground effect experienced by a beetle's wing during takeoff. The main unsteady mechanisms of beetles have been identified and intensively analyzed as the stability of the leading edge vortex (LEV) during strokes, the delayed stall during upstroke, the rotational circulation in pronation periods, and wake capture in supination periods. Due to the ground effect, the LEV was enhanced during half downstroke, and the lift force could thus be increased to lift the beetle during takeoff. This is useful for researchers in developing a micro air vehicle that has a beetle-like flapping wing motion.

  15. Hierarchical Cross-linked F-actin Networks: Understanding Structure and Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Linda; Nguyen, Lam

    2009-11-01

    The protein, F-actin provides us with an interesting system in which to investigate the assembly properties of semi-flexible filaments in the presence of cross-linkers. Recently it was observed that F-actin, in the presence of the cross-linker alpha-actinin at high molar ratios will generate a novel hierarchical network of filament bundles. We investigate this system using coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, confocal microscopy and x-ray scattering. We have studied the F-actin/alpha-actinin system in detail with different actin conc. (C) and alpha-actinin/actin molar ratios (gamma). Confocal microscopy and analysis shows that the assembled systems fall into one of 3 phases depending on C and gamma: (1) loosely connected network of F-actin and bundles, (2) loosely connected network of dense domains and (3) uniform network of bundles. This can be explained and replicated using MD simulation. We have also examined different types of cross-linkers to represent the proteins, fascin and filamin. Results show that phase formation is related to the flexibility in binding between F-actin and cross-linkers. This degree of freedom, possible with longer cross-linkers allows the formation of branch points and thus bundle networks.

  16. Actin remodeling confers BRAF inhibitor resistance to melanoma cells through YAP/TAZ activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Hwan; Kim, Jongshin; Hong, Hyowon; Lee, Si-Hyung; Lee, June-Koo; Jung, Eunji; Kim, Joon

    2016-03-01

    The activation of transcriptional coactivators YAP and its paralog TAZ has been shown to promote resistance to anti-cancer therapies. YAP/TAZ activity is tightly coupled to actin cytoskeleton architecture. However, the influence of actin remodeling on cancer drug resistance remains largely unexplored. Here, we report a pivotal role of actin remodeling in YAP/TAZ-dependent BRAF inhibitor resistance in BRAF V600E mutant melanoma cells. Melanoma cells resistant to the BRAF inhibitor PLX4032 exhibit an increase in actin stress fiber formation, which appears to promote the nuclear accumulation of YAP/TAZ. Knockdown of YAP/TAZ reduces the viability of resistant melanoma cells, whereas overexpression of constitutively active YAP induces resistance. Moreover, inhibition of actin polymerization and actomyosin tension in melanoma cells suppresses both YAP/TAZ activation and PLX4032 resistance. Our siRNA library screening identifies actin dynamics regulator TESK1 as a novel vulnerable point of the YAP/TAZ-dependent resistance pathway. These results suggest that inhibition of actin remodeling is a potential strategy to suppress resistance in BRAF inhibitor therapies.

  17. Actin Cytoskeleton Manipulation by Effector Proteins Secreted by Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Pathotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Navarro-Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The actin cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure necessary for cell and tissue organization, including the maintenance of epithelial barriers. Disruption of the epithelial barrier coincides with alterations of the actin cytoskeleton in several disease states. These disruptions primarily affect the paracellular space, which is normally regulated by tight junctions. Thereby, the actin cytoskeleton is a common and recurring target of bacterial virulence factors. In order to manipulate the actin cytoskeleton, bacteria secrete and inject toxins and effectors to hijack the host cell machinery, which interferes with host-cell pathways and with a number of actin binding proteins. An interesting model to study actin manipulation by bacterial effectors is Escherichia coli since due to its genome plasticity it has acquired diverse genetic mobile elements, which allow having different E. coli varieties in one bacterial species. These E. coli pathotypes, including intracellular and extracellular bacteria, interact with epithelial cells, and their interactions depend on a specific combination of virulence factors. In this paper we focus on E. coli effectors that mimic host cell proteins to manipulate the actin cytoskeleton. The study of bacterial effector-cytoskeleton interaction will contribute not only to the comprehension of the molecular causes of infectious diseases but also to increase our knowledge of cell biology.

  18. The Actin Filament-Binding Protein Coronin Regulates Motility in Plasmodium Sporozoites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bane, Kartik S.; Singer, Mirko; Reinig, Miriam; Klug, Dennis; Heiss, Kirsten; Baum, Jake; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Frischknecht, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Parasites causing malaria need to migrate in order to penetrate tissue barriers and enter host cells. Here we show that the actin filament-binding protein coronin regulates gliding motility in Plasmodium berghei sporozoites, the highly motile forms of a rodent malaria-causing parasite transmitted by mosquitoes. Parasites lacking coronin show motility defects that impair colonization of the mosquito salivary glands but not migration in the skin, yet result in decreased transmission efficiency. In non-motile sporozoites low calcium concentrations mediate actin-independent coronin localization to the periphery. Engagement of extracellular ligands triggers an intracellular calcium release followed by the actin-dependent relocalization of coronin to the rear and initiation of motility. Mutational analysis and imaging suggest that coronin organizes actin filaments for productive motility. Using coronin-mCherry as a marker for the presence of actin filaments we found that protein kinase A contributes to actin filament disassembly. We finally speculate that calcium and cAMP-mediated signaling regulate a switch from rapid parasite motility to host cell invasion by differentially influencing actin dynamics. PMID:27409081

  19. Cortical instability drives periodic supracellular actin pattern formation in epithelial tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannezo, Edouard; Dong, Bo; Recho, Pierre; Joanny, Jean-François; Hayashi, Shigeo

    2015-07-14

    An essential question of morphogenesis is how patterns arise without preexisting positional information, as inspired by Turing. In the past few years, cytoskeletal flows in the cell cortex have been identified as a key mechanism of molecular patterning at the subcellular level. Theoretical and in vitro studies have suggested that biological polymers such as actomyosin gels have the property to self-organize, but the applicability of this concept in an in vivo setting remains unclear. Here, we report that the regular spacing pattern of supracellular actin rings in the Drosophila tracheal tubule is governed by a self-organizing principle. We propose a simple biophysical model where pattern formation arises from the interplay of myosin contractility and actin turnover. We validate the hypotheses of the model using photobleaching experiments and report that the formation of actin rings is contractility dependent. Moreover, genetic and pharmacological perturbations of the physical properties of the actomyosin gel modify the spacing of the pattern, as the model predicted. In addition, our model posited a role of cortical friction in stabilizing the spacing pattern of actin rings. Consistently, genetic depletion of apical extracellular matrix caused strikingly dynamic movements of actin rings, mirroring our model prediction of a transition from steady to chaotic actin patterns at low cortical friction. Our results therefore demonstrate quantitatively that a hydrodynamical instability of the actin cortex can trigger regular pattern formation and drive morphogenesis in an in vivo setting.

  20. The Hippo pathway polarizes the actin cytoskeleton during collective migration of Drosophila border cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Eliana P; Khanal, Ichha; Gaspar, Pedro; Fletcher, Georgina C; Polesello, Cedric; Tapon, Nicolas; Thompson, Barry J

    2013-06-10

    Collective migration of Drosophila border cells depends on a dynamic actin cytoskeleton that is highly polarized such that it concentrates around the outer rim of the migrating cluster of cells. How the actin cytoskeleton becomes polarized in these cells to enable collective movement remains unknown. Here we show that the Hippo signaling pathway links determinants of cell polarity to polarization of the actin cytoskeleton in border cells. Upstream Hippo pathway components localize to contacts between border cells inside the cluster and signal through the Hippo and Warts kinases to polarize actin and promote border cell migration. Phosphorylation of the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki)/YAP by Warts does not mediate the function of this pathway in promoting border cell migration, but rather provides negative feedback to limit the speed of migration. Instead, Warts phosphorylates and inhibits the actin regulator Ena to activate F-actin Capping protein activity on inner membranes and thereby restricts F-actin polymerization mainly to the outer rim of the migrating cluster.

  1. Aerodynamic characteristics of a wing with Fowler flaps including flap loads, downwash, and calculated effect on take-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Robert C

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests of a wing in combination with each of three sizes of Fowler flap. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the aerodynamic characteristics as affected by flap chord and position, the air loads on the flaps, and the effect of flaps on the downwash.

  2. Fibrin glue for Gundersen flap surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung HW

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hsi-Wei Chung,1 Jodhbir S Mehta1–31Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore; 2Tissue Engineering and Stem Cell Group, Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore; 3Department of Clinical Sciences, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, SingaporePurpose: To evaluate the feasibility of fibrin glue in Gundersen flap surgery.Design: Prospective case series.Study subjects: Seven eyes of seven subjects who had undergone Gundersen flap surgery from 2009 to 2011 at the Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore.Methods: Review of case records for outcomes after Gundersen flap surgery.Main outcome measures: Surgical success was defined as achieving a stable ocular surface. Complications to be noted included flap retraction or exposure of underlying corneal surface.Results: Surgical success was achieved in all eyes with significant reduction in ocular surface inflammation. No retractions were noted and recovery was uncomplicated.Conclusion: Fibrin glue application is a viable alternative to sutures in Gundersen flap surgery. It reduces surgical downtime, gives faster ocular surface rehabilitation, and offers similar outcomes to conventional conjunctival flap surgery.Keywords: Gundersen, conjunctival flap, fibrin glue

  3. Shape optimisation and performance analysis of flapping wings

    KAUST Repository

    Ghommem, Mehdi

    2012-09-04

    In this paper, shape optimisation of flapping wings in forward flight is considered. This analysis is performed by combining a local gradient-based optimizer with the unsteady vortex lattice method (UVLM). Although the UVLM applies only to incompressible, inviscid flows where the separation lines are known a priori, Persson et al. [1] showed through a detailed comparison between UVLM and higher-fidelity computational fluid dynamics methods for flapping flight that the UVLM schemes produce accurate results for attached flow cases and even remain trend-relevant in the presence of flow separation. As such, they recommended the use of an aerodynamic model based on UVLM to perform preliminary design studies of flapping wing vehicles Unlike standard computational fluid dynamics schemes, this method requires meshing of the wing surface only and not of the whole flow domain [2]. From the design or optimisation perspective taken in our work, it is fairly common (and sometimes entirely necessary, as a result of the excessive computational cost of the highest fidelity tools such as Navier-Stokes solvers) to rely upon such a moderate level of modelling fidelity to traverse the design space in an economical manner. The objective of the work, described in this paper, is to identify a set of optimised shapes that maximise the propulsive efficiency, defined as the ratio of the propulsive power over the aerodynamic power, under lift, thrust, and area constraints. The shape of the wings is modelled using B-splines, a technology used in the computer-aided design (CAD) field for decades. This basis can be used to smoothly discretize wing shapes with few degrees of freedom, referred to as control points. The locations of the control points constitute the design variables. The results suggest that changing the shape yields significant improvement in the performance of the flapping wings. The optimisation pushes the design to "bird-like" shapes with substantial increase in the time

  4. Use of Martius flap in the complex female urethral surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kasyan, George; Tupikina, Nataliya; Pushkar, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Objectives were to evaluate safety and patient reported perception of the Martius fibroadipose flap for complex female urethra reconstruction. Material and methods Patients operated with a Martius flap were contacted again via telephone to rate their self–perception on cosmetic appearance, pain or numbness of the flap harvest site. Results 37 women (mean age of 46.8 yrs.) were operated with Martius flaps. Complications were limited to bleeding from the flap bed in 19% (7/37); hem...

  5. Differential effects of LifeAct-GFP and actin-GFP on cell mechanics assessed using micropipette aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliogeryte, Kristina; Thorpe, Stephen D; Wang, Zhao; Thompson, Clare L; Gavara, Nuria; Knight, Martin M

    2016-01-25

    The actin cytoskeleton forms a dynamic structure involved in many fundamental cellular processes including the control of cell morphology, migration and biomechanics. Recently LifeAct-GFP (green fluorescent protein) has been proposed for visualising actin structure and dynamics in live cells as an alternative to actin-GFP which has been shown to affect cell mechanics. Here we compare the two approaches in terms of their effect on cellular mechanical behaviour. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were analysed using micropipette aspiration and the effective cellular equilibrium and instantaneous moduli calculated using the standard linear solid model. We show that LifeAct-GFP provides clearer visualisation of F-actin organisation and dynamics. Furthermore, LifeAct-GFP does not alter effective cellular mechanical properties whereas actin-GFP expression causes an increase in the cell modulus. Interestingly, LifeAct-GFP expression did produce a small (~10%) increase in the percentage of cells exhibiting aspiration-induced membrane bleb formation, whilst actin-GFP expression reduced blebbing. Further studies examined the influence of LifeAct-GFP in other cell types, namely chondrogenically differentiated hMSCs and murine chondrocytes. LifeAct-GFP also had no effect on the moduli of these non-blebbing cells for which mechanical properties are largely dependent on the actin cortex. In conclusion we show that LifeAct-GFP enables clearer visualisation of actin organisation and dynamics without disruption of the biomechanical properties of either the whole cell or the actin cortex. Thus the study provides new evidence supporting the use of LifeAct-GFP rather than actin-GFP for live cell microscopy and the study of cellular mechanobiology. PMID:26792287

  6. The plane problem of the flapping wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Walter

    1954-01-01

    In connection with an earlier report on the lifting vortex sheet which forms the basis of the following investigations this will show how the methods developed there are also suitable for dealing with the air forces for a wing with a circulation variable with time. The theory of a propulsive wing flapping up and down periodically in the manner of a bird's wing is developed. This study shows how the lift and its moment result as a function of the flapping motion, what thrust is attainable, and how high is the degree of efficiency of this flapping propulsion unit if the air friction is disregarded.

  7. Flap-augmented shrouds for aerogenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seginer, A.

    1976-01-01

    Axisymmetrical shrouds for windmills are augmented by ring-shaped 'flaps' and their performance is studied experimentally. The concept of the shroud as an annular 'wing' is justified, leading to the conclusion that high-lift techniques should be used in shroud design, and that high-lift devices, such as flaps, would increase the power output of the windmill. It is shown experimentally that the ideal power output of a flap-augmented shrouded turbine can be more than 4 times the power of unshrouded turbines of the same diameter.

  8. Neural Anatomy of the Anterolateral Thigh Flap

    OpenAIRE

    Luenam, Suriya; Prugsawan, Krit; Kosiyatrakul, Arkaphat; Chotanaphuti, Thanainit; Sriya, Piyanee

    2015-01-01

    The anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is one of the commonly used sensate flaps for intra-oral, hand, and foot reconstruction. The objective of this study was to describe the anatomic location of the sensory nerves supplying the ALT flap in relation to the surface landmarks and with the vascular pedicles. The dissections were carried out in 28 embalmed specimens. An axial line from the anterior superior iliac spine to the superolateral border of the patella and two circles with radii of 5 and 10...

  9. Actin as deathly switch? How auxin can suppress cell-death related defence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Chang

    Full Text Available Plant innate immunity is composed of two layers--a basal immunity, and a specific effector-triggered immunity, which is often accompanied by hypersensitive cell death. Initiation of cell death depends on a complex network of signalling pathways. The phytohormone auxin as central regulator of plant growth and development represents an important component for the modulation of plant defence. In our previous work, we showed that cell death is heralded by detachment of actin from the membrane. Both, actin response and cell death, are triggered by the bacterial elicitor harpin in grapevine cells. In this study we investigated, whether harpin-triggered actin bundling is necessary for harpin-triggered cell death. Since actin organisation is dependent upon auxin, we used different auxins to suppress actin bundling. Extracellular alkalinisation and transcription of defence genes as the basal immunity were examined as well as cell death. Furthermore, organisation of actin was observed in response to pharmacological manipulation of reactive oxygen species and phospholipase D. We find that induction of defence genes is independent of auxin. However, auxin can suppress harpin-induced cell death and also counteract actin bundling. We integrate our findings into a model, where harpin interferes with an auxin dependent pathway that sustains dynamic cortical actin through the activity of phospholipase D. The antagonism between growth and defence is explained by mutual competition for signal molecules such as superoxide and phosphatidic acid. Perturbations of the auxin-actin pathway might be used to detect disturbed integrity of the plasma membrane and channel defence signalling towards programmed cell death.

  10. Propeller Flap Reconstruction in Post Oncological Thigh Defect: "The Move in Flap".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambi, G I; Salunke, Abhijeet Ashok

    2015-06-01

    Reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the limb after tumor resection is challenging question for oncosurgeons. The management differs from reconstruction of post traumatic defects due to the complexity of the primary surgery and subsequent radiation. The conventional propeller flap is based on a perforator which is located close to the defect; but in present case the perforator was located far away from the defect. So we describe it as "Move in flap" as the flap rotated a large volume of soft tissue lying between the defect and the perforator. We present a case of post oncological thigh defect with reconstruction using a propeller flap based on distal anteromedial perforator. PMID:26405422

  11. A method for rapidly screening functionality of actin mutants and tagged actins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommelaere Heidi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant production and biochemical analysis of actin mutants has been hampered by the fact that actin has an absolute requirement for the eukaryotic chaperone CCT to reach its native state. We therefore have developed a method to rapidly screen the folding capacity and functionality of actin variants, by combining in vitro expression of labelled actin with analysis on native gels, band shift assays or copolymerization tests. Additionally, we monitor, using immuno-fluorescence, incorporation of actin variants in cytoskeletal structures in transfected cells. We illustrate the method by two examples. In one we show that tagged versions of actin do not always behave native-like and in the other we study some of the molecular defects of three &bgr;-actin mutants that have been associated with diseases.

  12. Load fluctuations drive actin network growth

    CERN Document Server

    Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2007-01-01

    The growth of actin filament networks is a fundamental biological process that drives a variety of cellular and intracellular motions. During motility, eukaryotic cells and intracellular pathogens are propelled by actin networks organized by nucleation-promoting factors, which trigger the formation of nascent filaments off the side of existing filaments in the network. A Brownian ratchet (BR) mechanism has been proposed to couple actin polymerization to cellular movements, whereby thermal motions are rectified by the addition of actin monomers at the end of growing filaments. Here, by following actin--propelled microspheres using three--dimensional laser tracking, we find that beads adhered to the growing network move via an object--fluctuating BR. Velocity varies with the amplitude of thermal fluctuation and inversely with viscosity as predicted for a BR. In addition, motion is saltatory with a broad distribution of step sizes that is correlated in time. These data point to a model in which thermal fluctuati...

  13. Two-Photon Correlation Spectroscopy in Single Dendritic Spines Reveals Fast Actin Filament Reorganization during Activity-Dependent Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Hua Chen

    Full Text Available Two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (2P-FCS within single dendritic spines of living hippocampal pyramidal neurons was used to resolve various subpopulations of mobile F-actin during activity-dependent structural changes such as potentiation induced spine head growth. Two major classes of mobile F-actin were discovered: very dynamic and about a hundred times less dynamic F-actin. Spine head enlargement upon application of Tetraethylammonium (TEA, a protocol previously used for the chemical induction of long-term potentiation (cLTP strictly correlated to changes in the dynamics and filament numbers in the different actin filament fractions. Our observations suggest that spine enlargement is governed by a mechanism in which longer filaments are first cut into smaller filaments that cooperate with the second, increasingly dynamic shorter actin filament population to quickly reorganize and expand the actin cytoskeleton within the spine head. This process would allow a fast and efficient spine head enlargement using a major fraction of the actin filament population that was already present before spine head growth.

  14. Dynamin 2 is required for actin assembly in phagocytosis in Sertoli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamin 2 has been reported to be implicated in phagocytosis. However, the mode of action of dynamin is poorly understood. In this study, we examined whether dynamin 2 participates in actin assembly during phagocytosis in Sertoli cells. In the presence of dynasore, a dynamin inhibitor, phagocytosis was reduced by 60-70% in Sertoli cells and macrophages. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that Sertoli cells treated with dynasore were unable to form phagocytic cups. In addition, dysfunction of dynamin 2 reduced both actin polymerization and recruitment of actin and dynamin 2 to phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]-containing liposomes. The formation of dynamin 2-positive ruffles of Sertoli cells was decreased by 60-70% by sequestering PI(4,5)P2 either by expression of PH domain of PLCδ or treatment with neomycin. These results strongly suggest that dynamin 2 is involved in actin dynamics and the formation of dynamin 2-positive ruffles during phagocytosis.

  15. Drosophila Imp iCLIP identifies an RNA assemblage coordinating F-actin formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heidi Theil; Rasmussen, Simon Horskjær; Adolph, Sidsel Kramshøj;

    2015-01-01

    CLIP) technologies in Drosophila cells to identify transcripts associated with cytoplasmic ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) containing the RNA-binding protein Imp. RESULTS: We find extensive binding of Imp to 3'UTRs of transcripts that are involved in F-actin formation. A common denominator of the RNA-protein interface....... This demonstrates a physiological significance of the defined RNA regulon. CONCLUSIONS: Our data imply that Drosophila Imp RNPs may function as cytoplasmic mRNA assemblages that encode proteins which participate in actin cytoskeletal remodeling. Thus, they may facilitate co-ordinated protein expression in sub...... is the presence of multiple motifs with a central UA-rich element flanked by CA-rich elements. Experiments in single cells and intact flies reveal compromised actin cytoskeletal dynamics associated with low Imp levels. The former shows reduced F-actin formation and the latter exhibits abnormal neuronal patterning...

  16. Redundant mechanisms recruit actin into the contractile ring in silkworm spermatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytokinesis is powered by the contraction of actomyosin filaments within the newly assembled contractile ring. Microtubules are a spindle component that is essential for the induction of cytokinesis. This induction could use central spindle and/or astral microtubules to stimulate cortical contraction around the spindle equator (equatorial stimulation. Alternatively, or in addition, induction could rely on astral microtubules to relax the polar cortex (polar relaxation. To investigate the relationship between microtubules, cortical stiffness, and contractile ring assembly, we used different configurations of microtubules to manipulate the distribution of actin in living silkworm spermatocytes. Mechanically repositioned, noninterdigitating microtubules can induce redistribution of actin at any region of the cortex by locally excluding cortical actin filaments. This cortical flow of actin promotes regional relaxation while increasing tension elsewhere (normally at the equatorial cortex. In contrast, repositioned interdigitating microtubule bundles use a novel mechanism to induce local stimulation of contractility anywhere within the cortex; at the antiparallel plus ends of central spindle microtubules, actin aggregates are rapidly assembled de novo and transported laterally to the equatorial cortex. Relaxation depends on microtubule dynamics but not on RhoA activity, whereas stimulation depends on RhoA activity but is largely independent of microtubule dynamics. We conclude that polar relaxation and equatorial stimulation mechanisms redundantly supply actin for contractile ring assembly, thus increasing the fidelity of cleavage.

  17. Crystal structure of an archaeal actin homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeben, Annette; Kofler, Christine; Nagy, István; Nickell, Stephan; Hartl, F Ulrich; Bracher, Andreas

    2006-04-21

    Prokaryotic homologs of the eukaryotic structural protein actin, such as MreB and ParM, have been implicated in determination of bacterial cell shape, and in the segregation of genomic and plasmid DNA. In contrast to these bacterial actin homologs, little is known about the archaeal counterparts. As a first step, we expressed a predicted actin homolog of the thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum, Ta0583, and determined its crystal structure at 2.1A resolution. Ta0583 is expressed as a soluble protein in T.acidophilum and is an active ATPase at physiological temperature. In vitro, Ta0583 forms sheets with spacings resembling the crystal lattice, indicating an inherent propensity to form filamentous structures. The fold of Ta0583 contains the core structure of actin and clearly belongs to the actin/Hsp70 superfamily of ATPases. Ta0583 is approximately equidistant from actin and MreB on the structural level, and combines features from both eubacterial actin homologs, MreB and ParM. The structure of Ta0583 co-crystallized with ADP indicates that the nucleotide binds at the interface between the subdomains of Ta0583 in a manner similar to that of actin. However, the conformation of the nucleotide observed in complex with Ta0583 clearly differs from that in complex with actin, but closely resembles the conformation of ParM-bound nucleotide. On the basis of sequence and structural homology, we suggest that Ta0583 derives from a ParM-like actin homolog that was once encoded by a plasmid and was transferred into a common ancestor of Thermoplasma and Ferroplasma. Intriguingly, both genera are characterized by the lack of a cell wall, and therefore Ta0583 could have a function in cellular organization.

  18. Emerging roles of actin cytoskeleton regulating enzymes in drug addiction: Actin or reactin’?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenfluh, Adrian; Cowan, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons rely on their cytoskeleton to give them shape and stability, and on cytoskeletal dynamics for growth and synaptic plasticity. Because drug addiction is increasingly seen as the inappropriate learning of strongly reinforcing stimuli, the role of the cytoskeleton in shaping drug memories has been of increasing interest in recent years. Does the cytoskeleton have an active role in shaping these memories, and to what extent do alterations in the cytoskeleton reflect the acute actions of drug exposure, or homeostatic reactions to the chronic exposure to drugs of abuse? Here we will review recent advances in understanding the role of the cytoskeleton in the development of drug addiction, with a focus on actin filaments, as they have been studied in greater detail. PMID:23428655

  19. LATS1 tumor suppressor is a novel actin-binding protein and negative regulator of actin polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stacy Visser-Grieve; Zhonghua Zhou; Yi-Min She; He Huang; Terry D Cyr; Tian Xu; Xiaolong Yang

    2011-01-01

    Dear Editor,The LATS tumor suppressor,conserved from Drosophila (dlats) to humans (LATS1,LATS2),plays a vital role in maintaining cellular homeostasis in humans since loss of either LATS1 or LATS2 leads to the development of numerous cancer types such as breast cancer and leukemia [1].Apart from its roles as a Ser/Thr kinase within the emerging Hippo pathway regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis,ultimately leading to the control of organ size and tumorigenesis [2],LATS is also implicated in a broad range of functions including regulation of genetic stability,transcription,and protein stability [1 ].Recently,tumor suppressors have also been shown to affect the later stages of tumorigenesis,including metastasis.Among this group of metastasis regulators are genes that can directly affect actin dynamics by binding to F-actin,such as the tumor suppressors p53 [3],NF2 [4] and APC [5].

  20. Behind the performance of flapping flyers

    CERN Document Server

    Ramananarivo, Sophie; Thiria, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Saving energy and enhancing performance are secular preoccupations shared by both nature and human beings. In animal locomotion, flapping flyers or swimmers rely on the flexibility of their wings or body to passively increase their efficiency using an appropriate cycle of storing and releasing elastic energy. Despite the convergence of many observations pointing out this feature, the underlying mechanisms explaining how the elastic nature of the wings is related to propulsive efficiency remain unclear. Here we use an experiment with a self-propelled simplified insect model allowing to show how wing compliance governs the performance of flapping flyers. Reducing the description of the flapping wing to a forced oscillator model, we pinpoint different nonlinear effects that can account for the observed behavior ---in particular a set of cubic nonlinearities coming from the clamped-free beam equation used to model the wing and a quadratic damping term representing the fluid drag associated to the fast flapping mo...

  1. Periodic and Chaotic Flapping of Insectile Wings

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Yangyang

    2015-01-01

    Insects use flight muscles attached at the base of the wings to produce impressive wing flapping frequencies. The maximum power output of these flight muscles is insufficient to maintain such wing oscillations unless there is good elastic storage of energy in the insect flight system. Here, we explore the intrinsic self-oscillatory behavior of an insectile wing model, consisting of two rigid wings connected at their base by an elastic torsional spring. We study the wings behavior as a function of the total energy and spring stiffness. Three types of behavior are identified: end-over-end rotation, chaotic motion, and periodic flapping. Interestingly, the region of periodic flapping decreases as energy increases but is favored as stiffness increases. These findings are consistent with the fact that insect wings and flight muscles are stiff. They further imply that, by adjusting their muscle stiffness to the desired energy level, insects can maintain periodic flapping mechanically for a range of operating condit...

  2. Interpreting laser Doppler recordings from free flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, H; Holmberg, J; Svedman, P

    1993-01-01

    Although the transfer of free flaps is nowadays accomplished with an increasing degree of safety, thrombosis of the microvascular anastomoses is still a problem. In order to avoid delay in re-operating, various methods for objective blood flow monitoring have been tried, among them Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF). When one reviews the literature, it is apparent that opinions differ about whether or not LDF is a reliable technique for this purpose. To focus on the need to interpret continuous recordings, this paper reports our findings in six latissimus dorsi free flaps chosen from our series of LDF monitoring procedures. One uneventful flap, no. 1, had an immediate postoperative LDF value of 4.5 perfusion units (PU). LDF values improved during the recovery period and the graphic recording showed fluctuations due to normal physiological variations of the blood flow in the flap. Another uneventful flap, no. 4, showed the same pattern, though at an appreciably lower level, 2 PU, on average. Flap no. 2 had an acceptably high value of 3.5 PU despite suffering a venous thrombosis. However, the LDF recording showed no fluctuations and the value declined gradually. Another flap, no. 3, showed fluctuations and blood flow was normal although the value decreased to 2.5 PU. In flap no. 5, any value between 2 and 3.5 PU could be obtained merely by adjusting the position of the probe in the holder. In no. 6, the LDF value suddenly dropped, accompanied by a decrease in the total amount of backscattered light, indicating venous obstruction which was confirmed at re-operation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Erbium laser resurfacing for actinic cheilitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joel L

    2013-11-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a precancerous condition characterized by grayish-whitish area(s) of discoloration on the mucosal lip, often blunting the demarcation between mucosa and cutaneous lip. Actinic cheilitis is considered to be an early part of the spectrum of squamous cell carcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma specifically of the lip has a high rate of recurrence and metastasis through the oral cavity leading to a poor overall survival. Risk factors for the development of actinic cheilitis include chronic solar irradiation, increasing age, male gender, light skin complexion, immunosuppression, and possibly tobacco and alcohol consumption. Treatment options include topical pharmacotherapy (eg, fluorouracil, imiquimod) or procedural interventions (eg, cryotherapy, electrosurgery, surgical vermillionectomy, laser resurfacing), each with their known advantages and disadvantages. There is little consensus as to which treatment options offer the most clinical utility given the paucity of comparative clinical data. In my practice, laser resurfacing has become an important tool for the treatment of actinic cheilitis owing to its ease of use and overall safety, tolerability, and cosmetic acceptability. Herein the use of erbium laser resurfacing is described for three actinic cheilitis presentations for which I find it particularly useful: clinically prominent actinic cheilitis, biopsy-proven actinic cheilitis, and treatment of the entire lip following complete tumor excision of squamous cell carcinoma. All patients were treated with a 2940-nm erbium laser (Sciton Profile Contour Tunable Resurfacing Laser [TRL], Sciton, Inc., Palo Alto, CA). PMID:24196339

  4. The dog-ear flap as an alternative for breast reconstruction in patients who have already undergone a DIEAP flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colebunders, Britt; Depypere, Bernard; Van Landuyt, Koenraad

    2016-05-01

    Breast reconstruction in patients who have previously undergone deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap (DIEAP) reconstruction or abdominoplasty is often challenging. Depending on patients' body habitus, several second-choice flaps have been described such as the transverse upper gracilis (TUG) flap, profundus femoris artery perforator (PFAP) flap, superior gluteal artery perforator (SGAP) flap, and lumbar artery perforator (LAP) flap. Patients who have undergone a DIEAP flap reconstruction or abdominoplasty occasionally present with dog ears on both sides of the abdominal scar. The adipose tissue and skin of these dog ears are supplied by perforators of the deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA). The DCIA flap was first described in 1979 by Taylor. We introduce this abdominal "dog-ear" flap for autologous breast reconstruction. PMID:26951847

  5. Maxillofacial reconstruction with nasolabial and facial artery musculomucosal flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braasch, Daniel Cameron; Lam, Din; Oh, Esther S

    2014-08-01

    The nasolabial and facial artery musculomucosal (FAMM) flaps are predictable methods to reconstruct perioral and intraoral defects with vascularized tissue. The nasolabial flap can be harvested as an axial or random patterned flap, whereas the FAMM flap is truly an axial patterned flap, with either a superior or an inferior base. Both flaps have been widely used to provide predictable results, with low morbidity. Future studies are needed to further prove their use in compromised patients, including patients with a history of head and neck radiation and neck dissections. PMID:25086694

  6. Dorsal hand coverage with free serratus fascia flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotopoulos, Peter; Holmer, Per; Leicht, Pernille;

    2003-01-01

    serratus fascia flap, the connective tissue over the serratus muscle, for dorsal hand coverage. The flap consists of thin and well-vascularized pliable tissue, with gliding properties excellent for covering exposed tendons. It is based on the branches of the thoracodorsal artery, which are raised...... in the flap, leaving the long thoracic nerve intact on the serratus muscle. Coverage of the flap with split-thickness skin graft is done immediately. The free serratus fascia flap is an ideal flap for dorsal hand coverage when the extensor tendons are exposed, especially because of low donor-site morbidity....

  7. Rescue of Primary Incomplete Microkeratome Flap with Secondary Femtosecond Laser Flap in LASIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Razgulyaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK retreatments with a previous unsuccessful mechanical microkeratome-assisted surgery, some surgical protocols have been described as feasible, such as relifting of the flap or the creation of a new flap and even the change to a surface ablation procedure (photorefractive keratectomy (PRK. This case shows the use of femtosecond technology for the creation of a secondary flap to perform LASIK in a cornea with a primary incomplete flap obtained with a mechanical microkeratome. As we were unable to characterize the interface of the first partial lamellar cut, a thick flap was planned and created using a femtosecond laser platform. As the primary cut was very thick in the nasal quadrant, a piece of loose corneal tissue appeared during flap lifting which was fitted in its position and not removed. Despite this condition and considering the regularity of the new femtosecond laser cut, the treatment was uneventful. This case report shows the relevance of a detailed corneal analysis with an advanced imaging technique before performing a secondary flap in a cornea with a primary incomplete flap. The femtosecond laser technology seems to be an excellent tool to manage such cases successfully.

  8. The prepuce free flap in 10 patients : modifications in flap design and surgical technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werker, Paul M N

    2002-01-01

    The prepuce free flap was used in 10 oral and oropharyngeal reconstructions. During the course of this study, various modifications took place. Residual penile skin necrosis and skin island necrosis early in the series led to modification of flap design. This solved the donor-site problem by placing

  9. Actinic Granuloma with Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruedee Phasukthaworn

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Actinic granuloma is an uncommon granulomatous disease, characterized by annular erythematous plaque with central clearing predominately located on sun-damaged skin. The pathogenesis is not well understood, ultraviolet radiation is recognized as precipitating factor. We report a case of a 52-year-old woman who presented with asymptomatic annular erythematous plaques on the forehead and both cheeks persisting for 2 years. The clinical presentation and histopathologic findings support the diagnosis of actinic granuloma. During that period of time, she also developed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. The association between actinic granuloma and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis needs to be clarified by further studies.

  10. Flapping Instability of Two Tandem Flexible Foils in Uniform Axial Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurugubelli, Pardha Saradhi; Jaiman, Rajeev Kumar; Chua, Cassey

    2015-11-01

    We present a numerical analysis on the stability and coupled dynamics of two tandem flexible foils clamped at their leading edges in a uniform axial flow. The flexible foils considered for this study correspond to the fixed-point stable regime of the single flexible foil where the flexible foil aligns itself in the flow direction with no significant trailing edge oscillations. A high-order nonlinear coupled solver based on the variational formulation has been considered for analyzing the effects of gap between the foils on the stability and coupled behaviour of both the upstream and downstream foils. As a function of decreasing gap, it is observed that the tandem foil configuration is more prone to flapping instability than its single flexible foil counterpart. The evolution of the instability for the downstream foil shows two distinct dynamical scenarios: (i) only the downstream foil exhibits flapping motion and (ii) both the upstream and the downstream foils perform flapping. With the aid of a rigid foil in the upstream of a flexible foil, we further present a detailed analysis on the effects of the upstream wake and vortex shedding on the stability and flapping dynamics of the downstream foil.

  11. Design and experimental results for a turbine with jet flap stator and jet flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettner, J. L.; Blessing, J. O.

    1973-01-01

    The overall performance and detailed stator performance of a negative hub reaction turbine design featuring a moderately low solidity jet flap stator and a jet flap rotor were determined. Testing was conducted over a range of turbine expansion ratios at design speed. At each expansion ratio, the stator jet flow and rotor jet flow ranged up to about 7 and 8 percent, respectively, of the turbine inlet flow. The performance of the jet flap stator/jet flap rotor turbine was compared with that of a turbine which used the same jet flap rotor and a conventional, high solidity plan stator. The effect on performance of increased axial spacing between the jet stator and rotor was also investigated.

  12. Actin filaments are involved in the maintenance of Golgi cisternae morphology and intra-Golgi pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Jiménez, Nuria; Barth, Holger; Koster, Abraham J; Renau-Piqueras, Jaime; Llopis, Juan L; Burger, Koert N J; Egea, Gustavo

    2006-12-01

    Here we examine the contribution of actin dynamics to the architecture and pH of the Golgi complex. To this end, we have used toxins that depolymerize (cytochalasin D, latrunculin B, mycalolide B, and Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin) or stabilize (jasplakinolide) filamentous actin. When various clonal cell lines were examined by epifluorescence microscopy, all of these actin toxins induced compaction of the Golgi complex. However, ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography/three-dimensional modelling of the Golgi complex showed that F-actin depolymerization first induces perforation/fragmentation and severe swelling of Golgi cisternae, which leads to a completely disorganized structure. In contrast, F-actin stabilization results only in cisternae perforation/fragmentation. Concomitantly to actin depolymerization-induced cisternae swelling and disorganization, the intra-Golgi pH significantly increased. Similar ultrastructural and Golgi pH alkalinization were observed in cells treated with the vacuolar H+ -ATPases inhibitors bafilomycin A1 and concanamycin A. Overall, these results suggest that actin filaments are implicated in the preservation of the flattened shape of Golgi cisternae. This maintenance seems to be mediated by the regulation of the state of F-actin assembly on the Golgi pH homeostasis.

  13. Correlation between polymerizability and conformation in scallop beta-like actin and rabbit skeletal muscle alpha-actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaitlina, S; Antropova, O; Kuznetsova, I; Turoverov, K; Collins, J H

    1999-08-01

    In order to investigate the structural basis for functional differences among actin isoforms, we have compared the polymerization properties and conformations of scallop adductor muscle beta-like actin and rabbit skeletal muscle alpha-actin. Polymerization of scallop Ca(2+)-actin was slower than that of skeletal muscle Ca(2+)-actin. Cleavage of the actin polypeptide chain between Gly-42 and Val-43 with Escherichia coli protease ECP 32 impaired the polymerization of scallop Mg(2+)-actin to a greater extent than skeletal muscle Mg(2+)-actin. When monomeric scallop and skeletal muscle Ca(2+)-actins were subjected to limited proteolysis with trypsin, subtilisin, or ECP 32, no differences in the conformation of actin subdomain 2 were detected. At the same time, local differences in the conformations of scallop and skeletal muscle actin subdomains 1 were revealed as intrinsic fluorescence differences. Replacement of tightly bound Ca(2+) with Mg(2+) resulted in more extensive proteolysis of segment 61-69 of scallop actin than in the case of skeletal muscle actin. Furthermore, segment 61-69 was more accessible to proteolysis with subtilisin in polymerized scallop Ca(2+)-actin than in polymerized skeletal muscle Ca(2+)-actin, indicating that, in the polymeric form, the nucleotide-containing cleft is in a more open conformation in beta-like scallop actin than in skeletal muscle alpha-actin. We suggest that this difference between scallop and skeletal muscle actins is due to a less efficient shift of scallop actin subdomain 2 to the position it has in the polymer. The possible consequences of amino acid substitutions in actin subdomain 1 in the allosteric regulation of the actin cleft, and hence in the different stabilities of polymers formed by different actins, are discussed. PMID:10415117

  14. Extended thoracodorsal artery perforator flap for breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angrigiani, Claudio; Rancati, Alberto; Escudero, Ezequiel; Artero, Guillermo

    2015-12-01

    A total of 45 patients underwent partial or total autologous breast reconstruction after skin-sparing mastectomy, skin-reducing mastectomy, and quadrantectomy using a thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP) flap. The detailed surgical technique with its variations is explained in this report. The propeller, flip-over, conventional perforator, and muscle-sparing flaps have been described and evaluated. The flaps were partially or completely de-epithelialized. The conventional TDAP can be enlarged or "extended" as the traditional latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous (LD-MC) flap by incorporating the superior and inferior fat compartments. It can be referred to as the "extended TDAP flap". This technique augments the flap volume. In addition, this flap can serve as a scaffold for lipofilling to obtain autologous breast reconstruction in medium to large cases. There were two complete failures due to technical errors during flap elevation. Distal partial tissue suffering was observed in four flaps. These flaps were longer than usual; they reached the midline of the back. It is advisable to discard the distal medial quarter of the flap when it is designed up to the midline to avoid steatonecrosis or fibrosis. A retrospective analysis of the 39 flaps that survived completely revealed a satisfactory result in 82% of the cases. The main disadvantage of this procedure is the final scar. The TDAP flap is a reliable and safe method for partial or total breast autologous reconstruction. PMID:26645006

  15. Short Stop provides an essential link between F-actin and microtubules during axon extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungbok; Kolodziej, Peter A

    2002-03-01

    Coordination of F-actin and microtubule dynamics is important for cellular motility and morphogenesis, but little is known about underlying mechanisms. short stop (shot) encodes an evolutionarily conserved, neuronally expressed family of rod-like proteins required for sensory and motor axon extension in Drosophila melanogaster. We identify Shot isoforms that contain N-terminal F-actin and C-terminal microtubule-binding domains, and that crosslink F-actin and microtubules in cultured cells. The F-actin- and microtubule-binding domains of Shot are required in the same molecule for axon extension, though the length of the connecting rod domain can be dramatically reduced without affecting activity. Shot therefore functions as a cytoskeletal crosslinker in axon extension, rather than mediating independent interactions with F-actin and microtubules. A Ca(2+)-binding motif located adjacent to the microtubule-binding domain is also required for axon extension, suggesting that intracellular Ca(2+) release may regulate Shot activity. These results suggest that Shot coordinates regulated interactions between F-actin and microtubules that are crucial for neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:11874915

  16. The plant actin cytoskeleton responds to signals from microbe-associated molecular patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Henty-Ridilla

    Full Text Available Plants are constantly exposed to a large and diverse array of microbes; however, most plants are immune to the majority of potential invaders and susceptible to only a small subset of pathogens. The cytoskeleton comprises a dynamic intracellular framework that responds rapidly to biotic stresses and supports numerous fundamental cellular processes including vesicle trafficking, endocytosis and the spatial distribution of organelles and protein complexes. For years, the actin cytoskeleton has been assumed to play a role in plant innate immunity against fungi and oomycetes, based largely on static images and pharmacological studies. To date, however, there is little evidence that the host-cell actin cytoskeleton participates in responses to phytopathogenic bacteria. Here, we quantified the spatiotemporal changes in host-cell cytoskeletal architecture during the immune response to pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Two distinct changes to host cytoskeletal arrays were observed that correspond to distinct phases of plant-bacterial interactions i.e. the perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs during pattern-triggered immunity (PTI and perturbations by effector proteins during effector-triggered susceptibility (ETS. We demonstrate that an immediate increase in actin filament abundance is a conserved and novel component of PTI. Notably, treatment of leaves with a MAMP peptide mimic was sufficient to elicit a rapid change in actin organization in epidermal cells, and this actin response required the host-cell MAMP receptor kinase complex, including FLS2, BAK1 and BIK1. Finally, we found that actin polymerization is necessary for the increase in actin filament density and that blocking this increase with the actin-disrupting drug latrunculin B leads to enhanced susceptibility of host plants to pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria.

  17. A low-cost simulation platform for flapping wing MAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, J. M.; Chahl, J. S.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the design of a flight simulator for analysing the systems level performance of a Dragonfly-Inspired Micro Air Vehicle (DIMAV). A quasi-steady blade element model is used to analyse the aerodynamic forces. Aerodynamic and environmental forces are then incorporated into a real world flight dynamics model to determine the dynamics of the DIMAV system. The paper also discusses the implementation of the flight simulator for analysing the manoeuvrability of a DIMAV, specifically several modes of flight commonly found in dragonflies. This includes take-off, roll turns and yaw turns. Our findings with the simulator are consistent with results from wind tunnel studies and slow motion cinematography of dragonflies. In the take-off mode of flight, we see a strong dependence of take-off accelerations with flapping frequency. An increase in wing-beat frequency of 10% causes the maximum vertical acceleration to increase by 2g which is similar to that of dragonflies in nature. For the roll and yaw modes of manoeuvring, asymmetrical inputs are applied between the left and right set of wings. The flapping amplitude is increased on the left pair of wings which causes a time averaged roll rate to the right of 1.76rad/s within two wing beats. In the yaw mode, the stroke plane angle is reduced in the left pair of wings to initiate the yaw manoeuvre. In two wing beats, the time averaged yaw rate is 2.54rad/s.

  18. Actinic review of EUV masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Heiko; Ruoff, Johannes; Harnisch, Wolfgang; Kaiser, Winfried

    2010-04-01

    Management of mask defects is a major challenge for the introduction of EUV for HVM production. Once a defect has been detected, its printing impact needs to be predicted. Potentially the defect requires some repair, the success of which needs to be proven. This defect review has to be done with an actinic inspection system that matches the imaging conditions of an EUV scanner. During recent years, several concepts for such an aerial image metrology system (AIMS™) have been proposed. However, until now no commercial solution exists for EUV. Today, advances in EUV optics technology allow envisioning a solution that has been discarded before as unrealistic. We present this concept and its technical cornerstones.While the power requirement for the EUV source is less demanding than for HVM lithography tools, radiance, floor space, and stability are the main criteria for source selection. The requirement to emulate several generations of EUV scanners demands a large flexibility for the ilumination and imaging systems. New critical specifications to the EUV mirrors in the projection microscope can be satisfied using our expertise from lithographic mirrors. In summary, an EUV AIMS™ meeting production requirements seems to be feasible.

  19. Actin: its cumbersome pilgrimage through cellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Michael; Jockusch, Brigitte M

    2008-06-01

    In this article, we follow the history of one of the most abundant, most intensely studied proteins of the eukaryotic cells: actin. We report on hallmarks of its discovery, its structural and functional characterization and localization over time, and point to present days' knowledge on its position as a member of a large family. We focus on the rather puzzling number of diverse functions as proposed for actin as a dual compartment protein. Finally, we venture on some speculations as to its origin.

  20. Modified cup flap for volar oblique fingertip amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadli, A.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a modified volar “V-Y cup” flap for volar fingertip defects that do not exceed more than half of the distal phalanx for better aesthetic and functional outcome. In seven cases out of eight, the flap was elevated with a subdermal pedicle, whereas in one case, the flap was elevated as an island on the bilateral neurovascular bundle. The fingertips have been evaluated for sensibility using standard tests, hook nail deformity and patient satisfaction. Seven flaps have survived completely. The flap with skeletonized bilateral digital neurovascular bundle has shown signs of venous insufficiency on the 5 postoperative day with consecutive necrosis. Suturing the distal edges of the flap in a “cupping” fashion provided a normal pulp contour. The modified flap can be used for defects as mentioned above. Subdermally dissected pedicle-based flap is safe and easy to elevate. The aesthetic and functional outcomes have been reported to be satisfactory.

  1. Intraoperative flap complications in lasik surgery performed by ophthalmology residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Romero-Diaz-de-Leon

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Flap-related complications are common intraoperative event during LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmologists. Keratometries and surgeon's first procedure represent a higher probability for flap related complications than some other biometric parameters of patient's eye.

  2. Sarcomeric Pattern Formation by Actin Cluster Coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth; Gov, Nir S.; Safran, Samuel A.

    2012-01-01

    Contractile function of striated muscle cells depends crucially on the almost crystalline order of actin and myosin filaments in myofibrils, but the physical mechanisms that lead to myofibril assembly remains ill-defined. Passive diffusive sorting of actin filaments into sarcomeric order is kinetically impossible, suggesting a pivotal role of active processes in sarcomeric pattern formation. Using a one-dimensional computational model of an initially unstriated actin bundle, we show that actin filament treadmilling in the presence of processive plus-end crosslinking provides a simple and robust mechanism for the polarity sorting of actin filaments as well as for the correct localization of myosin filaments. We propose that the coalescence of crosslinked actin clusters could be key for sarcomeric pattern formation. In our simulations, sarcomere spacing is set by filament length prompting tight length control already at early stages of pattern formation. The proposed mechanism could be generic and apply both to premyofibrils and nascent myofibrils in developing muscle cells as well as possibly to striated stress-fibers in non-muscle cells. PMID:22685394

  3. Sarcomeric pattern formation by actin cluster coalescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Friedrich

    Full Text Available Contractile function of striated muscle cells depends crucially on the almost crystalline order of actin and myosin filaments in myofibrils, but the physical mechanisms that lead to myofibril assembly remains ill-defined. Passive diffusive sorting of actin filaments into sarcomeric order is kinetically impossible, suggesting a pivotal role of active processes in sarcomeric pattern formation. Using a one-dimensional computational model of an initially unstriated actin bundle, we show that actin filament treadmilling in the presence of processive plus-end crosslinking provides a simple and robust mechanism for the polarity sorting of actin filaments as well as for the correct localization of myosin filaments. We propose that the coalescence of crosslinked actin clusters could be key for sarcomeric pattern formation. In our simulations, sarcomere spacing is set by filament length prompting tight length control already at early stages of pattern formation. The proposed mechanism could be generic and apply both to premyofibrils and nascent myofibrils in developing muscle cells as well as possibly to striated stress-fibers in non-muscle cells.

  4. Flow field of flexible flapping wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallstrom, Erik

    The agility and maneuverability of natural fliers would be desirable to incorporate into engineered micro air vehicles (MAVs). However, there is still much for engineers to learn about flapping flight in order to understand how such vehicles can be built for efficient flying. The goal of this study is to develop a methodology for capturing high quality flow field data around flexible flapping wings in a hover environment and to interpret it to gain a better understanding of how aerodynamic forces are generated. The flow field data was captured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and required that measurements be taken around a repeatable flapping motion to obtain phase-averaged data that could be studied throughout the flapping cycle. Therefore, the study includes the development of flapping devices with a simple repeatable single degree of freedom flapping motion. The acquired flow field data has been examined qualitatively and quantitatively to investigate the mechanisms behind force production in hovering flight and to relate it to observations in previous research. Specifically, the flow fields have been investigated around a rigid wing and several carbon fiber reinforced flexible membrane wings. Throughout the whole study the wings were actuated with either a sinusoidal or a semi-linear flapping motion. The semi-linear flapping motion holds the commanded angular velocity nearly constant through half of each half-stroke while the sinusoidal motion is always either accelerating or decelerating. The flow fields were investigated by examining vorticity and vortex structures, using the Q criterion as the definition for the latter, in two and three dimensions. The measurements were combined with wing deflection measurements to demonstrate some of the key links in how the fluid-structure interactions generated aerodynamic forces. The flow fields were also used to calculate the forces generated by the flapping wings using momentum balance methods which yielded

  5. Colocalization of synapsin and actin during synaptic vesicle recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloom, Ona; Evergren, Emma; Tomilin, Nikolay;

    2003-01-01

    activity, however, synapsin was detected in the pool of vesicles proximal to the active zone. In addition, actin and synapsin were found colocalized in a dynamic filamentous cytomatrix at the sites of synaptic vesicle recycling, endocytic zones. Synapsin immunolabeling was not associated with clathrin......-coated intermediates but was found on vesicles that appeared to be recycling back to the cluster. Disruption of synapsin function by microinjection of antisynapsin antibodies resulted in a prominent reduction of the cytomatrix at endocytic zones of active synapses. Our data suggest that in addition to its known...

  6. Internal Motility in Stiffening Actin-Myosin Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Uhde, J; Sackmann, E; Parmeggiani, A; Frey, E; Uhde, Joerg; Keller, Manfred; Sackmann, Erich; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Frey, Erwin

    2003-01-01

    We present a study on filamentous actin solutions containing heavy meromyosin subfragments of myosin II motor molecules. We focus on the viscoelastic phase behavior and internal dynamics of such networks during ATP depletion. Upon simultaneously using micro-rheology and fluorescence microscopy as complementary experimental tools, we find a sol-gel transition accompanied by a sudden onset of directed filament motion. We interpret the sol-gel transition in terms of myosin II enzymology, and suggest a "zipping" mechanism to explain the filament motion in the vicinity of the sol-gel transition.

  7. Deltopectoral Flap in the Era of Microsurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. L. Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Our study aimed to review the role of deltopectoral (DP flap as a reconstructive option for defects in the head and neck region in the microvascular era. Methods. All patients who received DP flap reconstruction surgery at the Department of Surgery, Queen Mary Hospital, between 1999 and 2011 were recruited. Demographic data, indications for surgery, defect for reconstruction, and surgical outcomes were analyzed. Results. Fifty-four patients were included. All but two patients were operated for reconstruction after tumour resection. The remaining two patients were operated for necrotizing fasciitis and osteoradionecrosis. The majority of DP flaps were used to cover neck skin defect (63.0%. Other reconstructed defects included posterior pharyngeal wall (22.2%, facial skin defect (11.1%, and tracheal wall (3.7%. All donor sites were covered with partial thickness skin graft. Two patients developed partial flap necrosis at the tip and were managed conservatively. The overall flap survival rate was 96.3%. Conclusions. Albeit the technical advancements in microvascular surgery, DP still possesses multiple advantages (technical simplicity, reliable axial blood supply, large size, thinness, and pliability which allows it to remain as a useful, reliable, and versatile surgical option for head and neck reconstruction.

  8. The forked flap repair for hypospadias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Chadha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Despite the abundance of techniques for the repair of Hypospadias, its problems still persist and a satisfactory design to correct the penile curvature with the formation of neourethra from the native urethral tissue or genital or extragenital tissues, with minimal postoperative complications has yet to evolve. Aim: Persisting with such an endeavor, a new technique for the repair of distal and midpenile hypospadias is described. Materials and Methods: The study has been done in 70 cases over the past 11 years. The "Forked-Flap" repair is a single stage method for the repair of such Hypospadias with chordee. It takes advantage of the rich vascular communication at the corona and capitalizes on the established reliability of the meatal based flip-flap. The repair achieves straightening of the curvature of the penis by complete excision of chordee tissue from the ventral surface of the penis beneath the urethral plate. The urethra is reconstructed using the native plate with forked flap extensions and genital tissue relying on the concept of meatal based flaps. Water proofing by dartos tissue and reinforcement by Nesbit′s prepucial tissue transfer completes the one stage procedure. Statistical Analysis: An analysis of 70 cases of this single stage technique of repair of penile hypospadias with chordee, operated at 3 to 5 years of age over the past 11 years is presented. Results and Conclusion: The Forked Flap gives comparable and replicable results; except for a urethrocutaneous fistula rate of 4% no other complications were observed.

  9. The aerodynamic and structural study of flapping wing vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Liangchen

    2013-01-01

    This thesis reports on the aerodynamic and structural study carried out on flapping wings and flapping vehicles. Theoretical and experimental investigation of aerodynamic forces acting on flapping wings in simple harmonic oscillations is undertaken in order to help conduct and optimize the aerodynamic and structural design of flapping wing vehicles. The research is focused on the large scale ornithopter design of similar size and configuration to a hang glider. By means of Theodorsen’s th...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under §§ 25.335(e) and 25.345, for...

  11. Pharyngo oesophageal strictures and its reconstruction by delto pectoral flaps

    OpenAIRE

    Guha, Goutam; S Gupta; Chakraborty, S

    2005-01-01

    Delto pectoral flap is a thin and pliable cutaneous axial flap suitable for the reconstruction of pharynx and upper oesophagus. Corrosive stricture of the pharyngo oesophageal area can very well be reconstructed by deltopectoral flap. Oesophageal reconstruction by viscera like stomach or colon often produces anastomic stricture at the upper anastomic site with hypopharynx or upper oesophagus. Delto pectoral flap can also be used to reconstruct this anastomotic stricture. Postoperative swallow...

  12. The Use of the Juri Temporo-Parieto-Occipital Flap

    OpenAIRE

    Juri, Jose; Valotta, Marìa Fernanda

    2005-01-01

    The temporo-parieto-occipital flap, introduced in 1969, was the first large monopedicled flap performed in the scalp for reconstructive and aesthetic purposes. Its versatility for correction of many areas of the scalp relies on its wide arch of rotation, based in the flap's pedicle, which is the superficial temporal artery and vein. The axial pattern of the flap is explained by the unique kind of vascularization present in the scalp, based on a profuse intraparietal blood flow with multiple a...

  13. The submental island flap for reconstruction of facial defects.

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhune K; Patni S; Gomes D.; Bhathena H; Kavarana N

    1998-01-01

    The procedure of facial resurfacing dictates that there should be an excellent colour and texture match between the facial and the transposed skin. Cervical flaps e.g. platysma flap are commonly used for reconstruction of facial defects but, with disadvantages like limited mobility, unacceptable donor site and unpredictable outcomes. The submental island flap is a new addition to the armamentorium of the Plastic Surgeon. It is an axial pattern flap based on the submental branch of facial arte...

  14. Perforator plus flaps: Optimizing results while preserving function and esthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrotra Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The tenuous blood supply of traditional flaps for wound cover combined with collateral damage by sacrifice of functional muscle, truncal vessels, or nerves has been the bane of reconstructive procedures. The concept of perforator plus flaps employs dual vascular supply to flaps. By safeguarding perforators along with supply from its base, robust flaps can be raised in diverse situations. This is achieved while limiting collateral damage and preserving nerves, vessels, and functioning muscle with better function and aesthesis. Materials and Methods: The perforator plus concept was applied in seven different clinical situations. Functional muscle and fasciocutaneous flaps were employed in five and adipofascial flaps in two cases, primarily involving lower extremity defects and back. Adipofascial perforator plus flaps were employed to provide cover for tibial fracture in one patients and chronic venous ulcer in another. Results: All flaps survived without any loss and provided long-term stable cover, both over soft tissue and bone. Functional preservation was achieved in all cases where muscle flaps were employed with no clinical evidence of loss of power. There was no sensory loss or significant oedema in or distal to the flap in both cases where neurovascular continuity was preserved during flap elevation. Fracture union and consolidation were satisfactory. One patient had minimal graft loss over fascia which required application of stored grafts with subsequent take. No patient required re-operation. Conclusions: Perforator plus concept is holistic and applicable to most flap types in varied situations. It permits the exercise of many locoregional flap options while limiting collateral functional damage. Aesthetic considerations are also addressed while raising adipofascial flaps because of no appreciable donor defects. With quick operating times and low failure risk, these flaps can be a better substitute to traditional flaps and at

  15. Topology optimization of pressure adaptive honeycomb for a morphing flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Roelof; Scheepstra, Jan; Barrett, Ron

    2011-03-01

    The paper begins with a brief historical overview of pressure adaptive materials and structures. By examining avian anatomy, it is seen that pressure-adaptive structures have been used successfully in the Natural world to hold structural positions for extended periods of time and yet allow for dynamic shape changes from one flight state to the next. More modern pneumatic actuators, including FAA certified autopilot servoactuators are frequently used by aircraft around the world. Pneumatic artificial muscles (PAM) show good promise as aircraft actuators, but follow the traditional model of load concentration and distribution commonly found in aircraft. A new system is proposed which leaves distributed loads distributed and manipulates structures through a distributed actuator. By using Pressure Adaptive Honeycomb (PAH), it is shown that large structural deformations in excess of 50% strains can be achieved while maintaining full structural integrity and enabling secondary flight control mechanisms like flaps. The successful implementation of pressure-adaptive honeycomb in the trailing edge of a wing section sparked the motivation for subsequent research into the optimal topology of the pressure adaptive honeycomb within the trailing edge of a morphing flap. As an input for the optimization two known shapes are required: a desired shape in cruise configuration and a desired shape in landing configuration. In addition, the boundary conditions and load cases (including aerodynamic loads and internal pressure loads) should be specified for each condition. Finally, a set of six design variables is specified relating to the honeycomb and upper skin topology of the morphing flap. A finite-element model of the pressure-adaptive honeycomb structure is developed specifically tailored to generate fast but reliable results for a given combination of external loading, input variables, and boundary conditions. Based on two bench tests it is shown that this model correlates well

  16. Unique Flap Conformation in an HIV-1 Protease with High-Level Darunavir Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Masaaki; Ode, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Koji; Fujino, Masayuki; Maejima, Masami; Kimura, Yuki; Masaoka, Takashi; Hattori, Junko; Matsuda, Masakazu; Hachiya, Atsuko; Yokomaku, Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Atsuo; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Sugiura, Wataru; Iwatani, Yasumasa

    2016-01-01

    Darunavir (DRV) is one of the most powerful protease inhibitors (PIs) for treating human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection and presents a high genetic barrier to the generation of resistant viruses. However, DRV-resistant HIV-1 infrequently emerges from viruses exhibiting resistance to other protease inhibitors. To address this resistance, researchers have gathered genetic information on DRV resistance. In contrast, few structural insights into the mechanism underlying DRV resistance are available. To elucidate this mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of the ligand-free state of a protease with high-level DRV resistance and six DRV resistance-associated mutations (including I47V and I50V), which we generated by in vitro selection. This crystal structure showed a unique curling conformation at the flap regions that was not found in the previously reported ligand-free protease structures. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that the curled flap conformation altered the flap dynamics. These results suggest that the preference for a unique flap conformation influences DRV binding. These results provide new structural insights into elucidating the molecular mechanism of DRV resistance and aid to develop PIs effective against DRV-resistant viruses. PMID:26870021

  17. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information § 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it...

  18. Fibula free flap splitting for mandible reconstruction: A technical note

    OpenAIRE

    López-Arcas, José María; M. Burgueño; Del Castillo, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    Conformation of the fibula flap to passively adapt to the remaining mandible may be indeed challenging. A review of the ‘axial splitting’ technique for fibula free flaps is presented with a novel method of osteosynthesis. Adequate mandibular angle shape is achieved by performing this type of osteotomy with a minimal use of titanium hardware for flap insetting.

  19. Prospective evaluation of outcome measures in free-flap surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, John L

    2004-08-01

    Free-flap failure is usually caused by venous or arterial thrombosis. In many cases, lack of experience and surgical delay also contribute to flap loss. The authors prospectively analyzed the outcome of 57 free flaps over a 28-month period (January, 1999 to April, 2001). The setting was a university hospital tertiary referral center. Anastomotic technique, ischemia time, choice of anticoagulant, and the grade of surgeon were recorded. The type of flap, medications, and co-morbidities, including preoperative radiotherapy, were also documented. Ten flaps were re-explored (17 percent). There were four cases of complete flap failure (6.7 percent) and five cases of partial failure (8.5 percent). In patients who received perioperative systemic heparin or dextran, there was no evidence of flap failure (p = .08). The mean ischemia time was similar in flaps that failed (95 +\\/- 29 min) and in those that survived (92 +\\/- 34 min). Also, the number of anastomoses performed by trainees in flaps that failed (22 percent), was similar to the number in flaps that survived (28 percent). Nine patients received preoperative radiotherapy, and there was complete flap survival in each case. This study reveals that closely supervised anastomoses performed by trainees may have a similar outcome to those performed by more senior surgeons. There was no adverse effect from radiotherapy or increased ischemia time on flap survival.

  20. Posttraumatic eyebrow reconstruction with hair-bearing temporoparietal fascia flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Rafael; Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo; Marques, Frederico Figueiredo; Raposo-Amaral, Cesar Augusto

    2015-01-01

    The temporoparietal fascia flap has been extensively used in craniofacial reconstructions. However, its use for eyebrow reconstruction has been sporadically reported. We describe a successfully repaired hair-bearing temporoparietal fascia flap after traumatic avulsion of eyebrow. Temporoparietal fascia flap is a versatile tool and should be considered as a therapeutic option by all plastic surgeons.

  1. A Structural Design for an Externally Blown Flap (EBF) Medium STOL Research Aircraft. [development of computer program for structural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    A computer program to predict, by reference to structural drawings, the dynamic response of a high lift STOL wing with externally blown flaps was developed. Structural data for the computer program are presented in the form of sketches, weight and dynamic loads information graphs, and tables for an external blown, triple-slotted flap, high lift STOL transport wing. Weight, mass distribution, and moment of inertia data are summarized in table form and presented pictorially by drawing layout. The methods used for obtaining weight data were: (1) actual know, weight of components, (2) preliminary stress sizing, and (3) statistical weight estimating methods.

  2. Cryptococcus neoformans is internalized by receptor-mediated or 'triggered' phagocytosis, dependent on actin recruitment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Rezende Guerra

    Full Text Available Cryptococcosis by the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans affects mostly immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent neurological complication in AIDS patients. Recent studies support the idea that intracellular survival of Cryptococcus yeast cells is important for the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis. However, the initial steps of Cryptococcus internalization by host cells remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the mechanism of Cryptococcus neoformans phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages using confocal and electron microscopy techniques, as well as flow cytometry quantification, evaluating the importance of fungal capsule production and of host cell cytoskeletal elements for fungal phagocytosis. Electron microscopy analyses revealed that capsular and acapsular strains of C. neoformans are internalized by macrophages via both 'zipper' (receptor-mediated and 'trigger' (membrane ruffle-dependent phagocytosis mechanisms. Actin filaments surrounded phagosomes of capsular and acapsular yeasts, and the actin depolymerizing drugs cytochalasin D and latrunculin B inhibited yeast internalization and actin recruitment to the phagosome area. In contrast, nocodazole and paclitaxel, inhibitors of microtubule dynamics decreased internalization but did not prevent actin recruitment to the site of phagocytosis. Our results show that different uptake mechanisms, dependent on both actin and tubulin dynamics occur during yeast internalization by macrophages, and that capsule production does not affect the mode of Cryptococcus uptake by host cells.

  3. Drosophila cyfip regulates synaptic development and endocytosis by suppressing filamentous actin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lu; Wang, Dan; Wang, Qifu; Rodal, Avital A; Zhang, Yong Q

    2013-04-01

    The formation of synapses and the proper construction of neural circuits depend on signaling pathways that regulate cytoskeletal structure and dynamics. After the mutual recognition of a growing axon and its target, multiple signaling pathways are activated that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics to determine the morphology and strength of the connection. By analyzing Drosophila mutations in the cytoplasmic FMRP interacting protein Cyfip, we demonstrate that this component of the WAVE complex inhibits the assembly of filamentous actin (F-actin) and thereby regulates key aspects of synaptogenesis. Cyfip regulates the distribution of F-actin filaments in presynaptic neuromuscular junction (NMJ) terminals. At cyfip mutant NMJs, F-actin assembly was accelerated, resulting in shorter NMJs, more numerous satellite boutons, and reduced quantal content. Increased synaptic vesicle size and failure to maintain excitatory junctional potential amplitudes under high-frequency stimulation in cyfip mutants indicated an endocytic defect. cyfip mutants exhibited upregulated bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, a major growth-promoting pathway known to be attenuated by endocytosis at the Drosophila NMJ. We propose that Cyfip regulates synapse development and endocytosis by inhibiting actin assembly.

  4. Unveiling interactions among mitochondria, caspase-like proteases, and the actin cytoskeleton during plant programmed cell death (PCD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina E N Lord

    Full Text Available Aponogeton madagascariensis produces perforations over its leaf surface via programmed cell death (PCD. PCD begins between longitudinal and transverse veins at the center of spaces regarded as areoles, and continues outward, stopping several cells from these veins. The gradient of PCD that exists within a single areole of leaves in an early stage of development was used as a model to investigate cellular dynamics during PCD. Mitochondria have interactions with a family of proteases known as caspases, and the actin cytoskeleton during metazoan PCD; less is known regarding these interactions during plant PCD. This study employed the actin stain Alexa Fluor 488 phalloidin, the actin depolymerizer Latrunculin B (Lat B, a synthetic caspase peptide substrate and corresponding specific inhibitors, as well as the mitochondrial pore inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA to analyze the role of these cellular constituents during PCD. Results depicted that YVADase (caspase-1 activity is higher during the very early stages of perforation formation, followed by the bundling and subsequent breakdown of actin. Actin depolymerization using Lat B caused no change in YVADase activity. In vivo inhibition of YVADase activity prevented PCD and actin breakdown, therefore substantiating actin as a likely substrate for caspase-like proteases (CLPs. The mitochondrial pore inhibitor CsA significantly decreased YVADase activity, and prevented both PCD and actin breakdown; therefore suggesting the mitochondria as a possible trigger for CLPs during PCD in the lace plant. To our knowledge, this is the first in vivo study using either caspase-1 inhibitor (Ac-YVAD-CMK or CsA, following which the actin cytoskeleton was examined. Overall, our findings suggest the mitochondria as a possible upstream activator of YVADase activity and implicate these proteases as potential initiators of actin breakdown during perforation formation via PCD in the lace plant.

  5. Double papilla flap technique for dual purpose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Mohan Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Marginal tissue recession exposes the anatomic root on the teeth, which gives rise to -common patient complaints. It is associated with sensitivity, tissue irritation, cervical abrasions, and esthetic concerns. Various types of soft tissue grafts may be performed when recession is deep and marginal tissue health cannot be maintained. Double papilla flap is an alternative technique to cover isolated recessions and correct gingival defects in areas of insufficient attached gingiva, not suitable for a lateral sliding flap. This technique offers the advantages of dual blood supply and denudation of interdental bone only, which is less susceptible to permanent damage after surgical exposure. It also offers the advantage of quicker healing in the donor site and reduces the risk of facial bone height loss. This case report presents the advantages of double papilla flap in enhancing esthetic and functional outcome of the patient.

  6. Numerical linearized MHD model of flapping oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korovinskiy, D. B.; Ivanov, I. B.; Semenov, V. S.; Erkaev, N. V.; Kiehas, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Kink-like magnetotail flapping oscillations in a Harris-like current sheet with earthward growing normal magnetic field component Bz are studied by means of time-dependent 2D linearized MHD numerical simulations. The dispersion relation and two-dimensional eigenfunctions are obtained. The results are compared with analytical estimates of the double-gradient model, which are found to be reliable for configurations with small Bz up to values ˜ 0.05 of the lobe magnetic field. Coupled with previous results, present simulations confirm that the earthward/tailward growth direction of the Bz component acts as a switch between stable/unstable regimes of the flapping mode, while the mode dispersion curve is the same in both cases. It is confirmed that flapping oscillations may be triggered by a simple Gaussian initial perturbation of the Vz velocity.

  7. Scalp Free Flap Reconstruction Using Anterolateral Thigh Flap Pedicle for Interposition Artery and Vein Grafts

    OpenAIRE

    Chin Whan Kim; Sung Hee Hong; Jong Hoon Lee; Suk Chan Eun; Kyung Hee Min; Jun Hyung Park

    2012-01-01

    We experienced satisfactory outcomes by synchronously transplanting an artery and vein using an anterolateral thigh flap pedicle between the vascular pedicle and recipient vessel of a flap for scalp reconstruction. A 45-year-old man developed a subdural hemorrhage due to a fall injury. In this patient, the right temporal cranium was missing and the patient had 4×3 cm and 6×5 cm scalp defects. We planned a scalp reconstruction using a latissimus dorsi free flap. Intraoperatively, there was a s...

  8. The Actin-Severing Protein Cofilin Is Downstream of Neuregulin Signaling and Is Essential For Schwann Cell Myelination

    OpenAIRE

    Sparrow, Nicklaus; Manetti, Maria Elisa; Bott, Marga; Fabianac, Tiffany; Petrilli, Alejandra; Bates, Margaret Longest; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Lambert, Stephen; Fernandez-Valle, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Myelination is a complex process requiring coordination of directional motility and an increase in glial cell size to generate a multilamellar myelin sheath. Regulation of actin dynamics during myelination is poorly understood. However, it is known that myelin thickness is related to the abundance of neuregulin-1 (NRG1) expressed on the axon surface. Here we identify cofilin1, an actin depolymerizing and severing protein, as a downstream target of NRG1 signaling in rat Schwann cells (SCs). In...

  9. Simultaneous Tracking of 3D Actin and Microtubule Strains in Individual MLO-Y4 Osteocytes under Oscillatory Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Baik, Andrew D.; Qiu, Jun; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Dong, Cheng; Guo, X. Edward

    2013-01-01

    Osteocytes in vivo experience complex fluid shear flow patterns to activate mechanotransduction pathways. The actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletons have been shown to play an important role in the osteocyte’s biochemical response to fluid shear loading. The dynamic nature of physiologically relevant fluid flow profiles (i.e., 1 Hz oscillatory flow) impedes the ability to image and study both actin and MT cytoskeletons simultaneously in the same cell with high spatiotemporal resolution. To ...

  10. The transversely split gracilis twin free flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upadhyaya Divya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The gracilis muscle is a Class II muscle that is often used in free tissue transfer. The muscle has multiple secondary pedicles, of which the first one is the most consistent in terms of position and calibre. Each pedicle can support a segment of the muscle thus yielding multiple small flaps from a single, long muscle. Although it has often been split longitudinally along the fascicles of its nerve for functional transfer, it has rarely been split transversely to yield multiple muscle flaps that can be used to cover multiple wounds in one patient without subjecting him/her to the morbidity of multiple donor areas .

  11. Lamellipodin promotes actin assembly by clustering Ena/VASP proteins and tethering them to actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott D; Mullins, R Dyche

    2015-01-01

    Enabled/Vasodilator (Ena/VASP) proteins promote actin filament assembly at multiple locations, including: leading edge membranes, focal adhesions, and the surface of intracellular pathogens. One important Ena/VASP regulator is the mig-10/Lamellipodin/RIAM family of adaptors that promote lamellipod formation in fibroblasts and drive neurite outgrowth and axon guidance in neurons. To better understand how MRL proteins promote actin network formation we studied the interactions between Lamellipodin (Lpd), actin, and VASP, both in vivo and in vitro. We find that Lpd binds directly to actin filaments and that this interaction regulates its subcellular localization and enhances its effect on VASP polymerase activity. We propose that Lpd delivers Ena/VASP proteins to growing barbed ends and increases their polymerase activity by tethering them to filaments. This interaction represents one more pathway by which growing actin filaments produce positive feedback to control localization and activity of proteins that regulate their assembly.

  12. Septins promote F-actin ring formation by crosslinking actin filaments into curved bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrakis, Manos; Azou-Gros, Yannick; Tsai, Feng-Ching; Alvarado, José; Bertin, Aurélie; Iv, Francois; Kress, Alla; Brasselet, Sophie; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Lecuit, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Animal cell cytokinesis requires a contractile ring of crosslinked actin filaments and myosin motors. How contractile rings form and are stabilized in dividing cells remains unclear. We address this problem by focusing on septins, highly conserved proteins in eukaryotes whose precise contribution to cytokinesis remains elusive. We use the cleavage of the Drosophila melanogaster embryo as a model system, where contractile actin rings drive constriction of invaginating membranes to produce an epithelium in a manner akin to cell division. In vivo functional studies show that septins are required for generating curved and tightly packed actin filament networks. In vitro reconstitution assays show that septins alone bundle actin filaments into rings, accounting for the defects in actin ring formation in septin mutants. The bundling and bending activities are conserved for human septins, and highlight unique functions of septins in the organization of contractile actomyosin rings.

  13. Green fluorescent protein-mtalin causes defects in actin organization and cell expansion in Arabidopsis and inhibits actin depolymerizing factor's actin depolymerizing activity in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.; Anthony, R.G.; Hussey, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) linked to an actin binding domain is a commonly used method for live cell imaging of the actin cytoskeleton. One of these chimeric proteins is GFP-mTalin (GFP fused to the actin binding domain of mouse talin). Although it has been demonstrated that GFP-m

  14. Structural Basis of Actin Filament Nucleation by Tandem W Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorui Chen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous nucleation of actin is very inefficient in cells. To overcome this barrier, cells have evolved a set of actin filament nucleators to promote rapid nucleation and polymerization in response to specific stimuli. However, the molecular mechanism of actin nucleation remains poorly understood. This is hindered largely by the fact that actin nucleus, once formed, rapidly polymerizes into filament, thus making it impossible to capture stable multisubunit actin nucleus. Here, we report an effective double-mutant strategy to stabilize actin nucleus by preventing further polymerization. Employing this strategy, we solved the crystal structure of AMPPNP-actin in complex with the first two tandem W domains of Cordon-bleu (Cobl, a potent actin filament nucleator. Further sequence comparison and functional studies suggest that the nucleation mechanism of Cobl is probably shared by the p53 cofactor JMY, but not Spire. Moreover, the double-mutant strategy opens the way for atomic mechanistic study of actin nucleation and polymerization.

  15. Glutamyl phosphate is an activated intermediate in actin crosslinking by actin crosslinking domain (ACD toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Kudryashova

    Full Text Available Actin Crosslinking Domain (ACD is produced by several life-threatening Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria as part of larger toxins and delivered into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic host cells via Type I or Type VI secretion systems. Upon delivery, ACD disrupts the actin cytoskeleton by catalyzing intermolecular amide bond formation between E270 and K50 residues of actin, leading to the formation of polymerization-deficient actin oligomers. Ultimately, accumulation of the crosslinked oligomers results in structural and functional failure of the actin cytoskeleton in affected cells. In the present work, we advanced in our understanding of the ACD catalytic mechanism by discovering that the enzyme transfers the gamma-phosphoryl group of ATP to the E270 actin residue, resulting in the formation of an activated acyl phosphate intermediate. This intermediate is further hydrolyzed and the energy of hydrolysis is utilized for the formation of the amide bond between actin subunits. We also determined the pH optimum for the reaction and the kinetic parameters of ACD catalysis for its substrates, ATP and actin. ACD showed sigmoidal, non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics for actin (K(0.5 = 30 µM reflecting involvement of two actin molecules in a single crosslinking event. We established that ACD can also utilize Mg(2+-GTP to support crosslinking, but the kinetic parameters (K(M = 8 µM and 50 µM for ATP and GTP, respectively suggest that ATP is the primary substrate of ACD in vivo. The optimal pH for ACD activity was in the range of 7.0-9.0. The elucidated kinetic mechanism of ACD toxicity adds to understanding of complex network of host-pathogen interactions.

  16. Incorporation of mammalian actin into microfilaments in plant cell nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paves Heiti

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actin is an ancient molecule that shows more than 90% amino acid homology between mammalian and plant actins. The regions of the actin molecule that are involved in F-actin assembly are largely conserved, and it is likely that mammalian actin is able to incorporate into microfilaments in plant cells but there is no experimental evidence until now. Results Visualization of microfilaments in onion bulb scale epidermis cells by different techniques revealed that rhodamine-phalloidin stained F-actin besides cytoplasm also in the nuclei whereas GFP-mouse talin hybrid protein did not enter the nuclei. Microinjection of fluorescently labeled actin was applied to study the presence of nuclear microfilaments in plant cells. Ratio imaging of injected fluorescent rabbit skeletal muscle actin and phalloidin staining of the microinjected cells showed that mammalian actin was able to incorporate into plant F-actin. The incorporation occurred preferentially in the nucleus and in the perinuclear region of plant cells whereas part of plant microfilaments, mostly in the periphery of cytoplasm, did not incorporate mammalian actin. Conclusions Microinjected mammalian actin is able to enter plant cell's nucleus, whereas incorporation of mammalian actin into plant F-actin occurs preferentially in the nucleus and perinuclear area.

  17. [The gracilis muscle as musculocutaneous flap. Evaluation of 20 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholam, D; Trevidic, P; Kleimann, P; Hautefeuille, P; Nicoletis, C

    1991-01-01

    The use of gracilis as muscular or myocutaneous flap is very well-known. The authors report 20 cases of gracilis flap including 13 reconstructions of the vaginal cavity following extended abdomino-perineal resection. Some technical points concerning the localization of the cutaneous part of the flap and the pedicle dissection are discussed. The use of gracilis flap is still limited in surgical teams following extended abdomino-perineal resection, nevertheless it is a very useful flap because of its low morbidity, the shortening of patient hospitalization and the very satisfying aesthetic result of the neo-vaginal cavity. PMID:1726389

  18. Suspension Bridge Flutter for Girder with Separate Control Flaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huynh, T.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Active vibration control of long span suspension bridge flutter using separated control flaps (SFSC) has shown to increase effectively the critical wind speed of bridges. In this paper, an SFSC calculation based on modal equations of the vertical and torsional motions of the bridge girder including...... the flaps is presented. The length of the flaps attached to the girder, the flap configuration and the flap rotational angles are parameters used to increase the critical wind speed of the bridge. To illustrate the theory a numerical example is shown for a suspension bridge of 1000m+2500m+1000m span based...

  19. p95-APP1 links membrane transport to Rac-mediated reorganization of actin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Cesare, A; Paris, S; Albertinazzi, C;

    2000-01-01

    Motility requires protrusive activity at the cellular edge, where Rho family members regulate actin dynamics. Here we show that p95-APP1 (ArfGAP-putative, Pix-interacting, paxillin-interacting protein 1), a member of the GIT1/PKL family, is part of a complex that interacts with Rac. Wild-type and...

  20. Viscoelastic cell mechanics and actin remodelling are dependent on the rate of applied pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Pravincumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Living cells are subjected to external and internal mechanical stresses. The effects of these stresses on the deformation and subsequent biological response of the cells remains unclear. This study tested the hypothesis that the rate at which pressure (or stress is applied influence the viscoelastic properties of the cell associated with differences in the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton. PRINCIPAL FINDING: Micropipette aspiration was used to determine the instantaneous and equilibrium moduli and the viscosity of isolated chondrocytes based on the standard linear solid (SLS model and a variation of this incorporating Boltzmann superposition. Cells were visualised for 180 seconds following aspiration to 7 cmH(2O at 0.35, 0.70 and 5.48 cmH(2O/sec. Cell recovery was then examined for a further 180 seconds once the pressure had been removed. Reducing the rate of application of pressure reduced the levels of cell deformation and recovery associated with a significant increase in modulus and viscosity. Using GFP transfection and confocal microscopy, we show that chondrocyte deformation involves distortion, disassembly and subsequent reassembly of the cortical actin cytoskeleton. At faster pressure rates, cell deformation produced an increase in cell volume associated with membrane bleb formation. GFP-actin transfection inhibited the pressure rate dependent variation in cell mechanics indicating that this behaviour is regulated by GFP-sensitive actin dynamics. CONCLUSION: We suggest that slower rates of aspiration pressure enable greater levels of cortical actin distortion. This is partially inhibited by GFP or faster aspiration rates leading to membrane bleb formation and an increase in cell volume. Thus the rate of application of pressure regulates the viscoelastic mechanical properties of living cells through pressure rate sensitive differences in actin dynamics. Therefore cells appear softer when aspirated at a faster rate in

  1. The study of expanded tri-lobed flap in a rabbit model: possible flap model in ear reconstruction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yüreklý Yakup

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local flaps are widely used in reconstructive surgery. Tri-lobed skin flap is a relatively new flap and there has been no experimental model of this flap. This flap can be used for repair of full thickness defects in the face, ears and alar region. Based on the size of ears in a rabbit, we designed a model of ear reconstruction using expanded tri-lobed flap. Local flaps are more advantageous in that they provide excellent color and texture matching up with those of the face, adequately restore ear contour, place scars in a favorable location and ideally accomplish these goals in a single stage with minimal donor site morbidity. Methods Eight adult New Zealand rabbits were divided into two groups. 50 ml round tissue expander were implanted to four rabbits. After completion of the expansion, a superiorly based tri-lobed flap was elevated and a new ear was created from the superior dorsal skin of each rabbit. Scintigraphy with Technetium-99m pertecnetate was performed to evaluate flap viability. Results Subtotal flap necrosis was seen in all animals in non-expanded group. New ear in dimensions of the original ear was created in expanded group without complication. Perfusion and viability of the flaps were proved by Technetium-99m pertecnetate scintigraphy. Conclusion According to our knowledge this study is the first to demonstrate animal model in tri-lobed flap. Also, our technique is the first application of the trilobed flap to the possible ear reconstruction. We speculated that this flap may be used mastoid based without hair, in human. Also, tri-lobed flap may be an alternative in reconstruction of cylindrical organs such as penis or finger.

  2. Propeller thoracodorsal artery perforator flap for breast reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angrigiani, Claudio; Escudero, Ezequiel; Artero, Guillermo; Gercovich, Gustavo; Deza, Ernesto Gil

    2014-01-01

    Background The thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP) flap has been described for breast reconstruction. This flap requires intramuscular dissection of the pedicle. A modification of the conventional TDAP surgical technique for breast reconstruction is described, utilizing instead a propeller TDAP flap. The authors present their clinical experience with the propeller TDAP flap in breast reconstruction alone or in combination with expanders or permanent implants. Methods From January 2009 to February 2013, sixteen patients had breast reconstruction utilizing a propeller TDAP flap. Retrospective analysis of patient characteristics, clinical indications, procedure and outcomes were performed. The follow-up period ranged from 4 to 48 months. Results Sixteen patients had breast reconstruction using a TDAP flap with or without simultaneous insertion of an expander or implant. All flaps survived, while two cases required minimal resection due to distal flap necrosis, healing by second intention. There were not donor-site seromas, while minimal wound dehiscence was detected in two cases. Conclusions The propeller TDAP flap appears to be safe and effective for breast reconstruction, resulting in minimal donor site morbidity. The use of this propeller flap emerges as a true alternative to the traditional TDAP flap. PMID:25207210

  3. Arterial blood flow and microcirculatory changes in a rat groin flap after thrombosis induced by electrical stimulation of the artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Y; Gazelius, B; Linderoth, B; Lundeberg, T

    2002-03-01

    An experimental model of acute arterial thrombosis was developed in a rat groin flap model. Electrical stimulation was delivered to the flap artery while measuring blood flow in the artery and in the flap microcirculation using a laser Doppler system. Electrical stimulation produced an occlusive thrombosis in 10 rats within 68.1 +/- 19.26 (mean +/- SE) min. Thrombosis formation produced a rapid decrease of the LDF readings in the artery (90%) and in the flap (70%), the decrease being fairly parallel. Following the spontaneous thrombolysis, the artery perfusion recovered to baseline level but the flap blood flow only recovered by 10-20%. During electrical stimulation there was no change of the systemic blood pressure. The dynamic course of thrombus formation was documented on a videotape recorder through a microscope-mounted video camera and monitored on a television screen. Segments of the artery were obtained during and at the end of the experiments. The histological examination revealed arterial thrombosis composed of red blood cells, fibrin, and white blood cells, without any significant architectural and endothelial changes in the vessel walls. The study suggests that this model using electric vessel stimulation is effective for inducing arterial thrombosis and provides a simple method for recording the dynamic course of thrombus formation. PMID:11866541

  4. Assessment of blood and oxygen delivery to flaps of rhesus using near infrared steady-state spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy has been considered as a potentially ideal noninvasive technique for the postoperative monitoring of plastic surgery. In this study, 6 flaps were raised on rhesus monkeys' forearms. Blood and oxygen delivery to these flaps was monitored following vascular occlusions and inhalation of pure oxygen. Optical fibers were adopted in the probe of the oximeter so that the cutaneous detection could be performed in reflectance mode. Different and repeatable patterns of changes were measured following vascular occlusions on flaps. It is clear that the near infrared spectroscopy is capable of postoperatively monitoring vascular problems in flaps, especially the venous problem. Near infrared spectroscopy showed high sensitivity to detect the dynamic changes in flaps induced by inhalation of pure oxygen in this study. The experimental results indicated that it was potential to assess tissue viability utilizing the dynamic changes induced by some noninvasive stimulation (such as inhaling pure oxygen). It may be a new assessing method that is rapid, little influenced by other factors and less inconvenient to patients.

  5. 动力性肺动脉高压犬肺动脉PCNA及α-平滑肌肌动蛋白的表达%Expression of PCNA and α-smooth muscle actin in pulmonary arteries of dogs with dynamic pulmonary hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔勤; 杨景学; 赵建斌; 朱海龙

    2001-01-01

    目的探讨平滑肌细胞增殖在动力性肺动脉高压形成中的作用. 方法利用降主动脉—左下肺动脉分流建立的幼犬动力性肺动脉高压模型,取90 d肺组织病理切片,应用鼠抗人增殖细胞核抗原(PCNA)抗体、α-平滑肌细胞肌动蛋白抗体(α-actin)、及Dako二抗免疫组化检测,图像分析仪对所得结果进行分析,然后计数高倍镜下平滑肌细胞总数及PCNA细胞阳性数,计算细胞增殖指数. 结果分流犬左下肺动脉中膜α-actin免疫组化染色呈强阳性表达,右下肺动脉弱阳性,而对照组均呈阴性;分流犬左下肺动脉PCNA阳性信号表达明显多于右肺动脉,而右肺动脉及左上肺动脉仅有少量表达;增殖指数左下肺动脉内膜为33%,中膜11%,外膜7%,右下肺动脉仅为少量. 结论平滑肌细胞增殖参与实验犬动力性肺动脉高压形成过程并与肺动脉压力增高程度和肺血管重构改变一致.%AIM To explore the action of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation in formation of dynamic pulmonary hypertension. METHODS Using the pulmonary hypertension(PH) model of shunt from descending aorta-to-left lower pulmonary artery, the sample of the lung tissue in shunt dogs was obtained on the 90th day postoperation. The examination of PCNA and a-actin was done by immunohistochemistry method using PCAN and a-actin antibodies. The slices of pulmonary tissue were observed under high power microscope, and the data were analyzed by image pattern analysor. The positive cells of PCNA and a-actin were recorded and the percentage was calculated. RESULTS Expression of a-actin in left lower pulmonary artery was strong positive and right pulmonary artery milder than that in left pulmonary, and control group was negative. The positive expression of PCNA in left lower pulmonary arteries was more than that of right lung and upper left lobe. The index of cell proliferation was 33% in intima, 11

  6. Breast reconstruction by pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozarski Jefta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of the amputated breast in female patients after surgical management of breast carcinoma is possible with the use of autologous tissue, synthetic implants, or by combining autologous tissue and synthetic materials. Autologous tissue provides soft and sufficiently elastic tissue which is usable for breast reconstruction and eventually obtains original characteristics of the surrounding tissue on the chest wall. The use of the TRAM flap for breast reconstruction was introduced in 1982 by Hartrampf Scheflan, and Black. The amount of the TRAM flap tissue allows breast reconstruction in the shape most adequate to the remaining breast. The possibilities of using the TRAM flap as pedicled myocutaneous flap or as free TRAM flap make this flap a superior choice for breast reconstruction in comparison with other flaps.

  7. Control of electrostatic interactions between F-actin and genetically modified lysozyme in aqueous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, Lori K.; Xian, Wujing; Guaqueta, Camilo; Strohman, Michael J.; Vrasich, Chuck R.; Luijten, Erik; Wong, Gerard C.L. (UIUC)

    2008-07-11

    The aim for deterministic control of the interactions between macroions in aqueous media has motivated widespread experimental and theoretical work. Although it has been well established that like-charged macromolecules can aggregate under the influence of oppositely charged condensing agents, the specific conditions for the stability of such aggregates can only be determined empirically. We examine these conditions, which involve an interplay of electrostatic and osmotic effects, by using a well defined model system composed of F-actin, an anionic rod-like polyelectrolyte, and lysozyme, a cationic globular protein with a charge that can be genetically modified. The structure and stability of actin-lysozyme complexes for different lysozyme charge mutants and salt concentrations are examined by using synchrotron x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. We provide evidence that supports a structural transition from columnar arrangements of F-actin held together by arrays of lysozyme at the threefold interstitial sites of the actin sublattice to marginally stable complexes in which lysozyme resides at twofold bridging sites between actin. The reduced stability arises from strongly reduced partitioning of salt between the complex and the surrounding solution. Changes in the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes are of biomedical interest because their formation has been reported to contribute to the persistence of airway infections in cystic fibrosis by sequestering antimicrobials such as lysozyme. We present x-ray microscopy results that argue for the existence of actin-lysozyme complexes in cystic fibrosis sputum and demonstrate that, for a wide range of salt conditions, charge-reduced lysozyme is not sequestered in ordered complexes while retaining its bacterial killing activity.

  8. Control of Electrostatic Interactions Between F-Actin And Genetically Modified Lysozyme in Aqueous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, L.K.; Xian, W.; Guaqueta, C.; Strohman, M.; Vrasich, C.R.; Luijten, E.; Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-06-04

    The aim for deterministic control of the interactions between macroions in aqueous media has motivated widespread experimental and theoretical work. Although it has been well established that like-charged macromolecules can aggregate under the influence of oppositely charged condensing agents, the specific conditions for the stability of such aggregates can only be determined empirically. We examine these conditions, which involve an interplay of electrostatic and osmotic effects, by using a well defined model system composed of F-actin, an anionic rod-like polyelectrolyte, and lysozyme, a cationic globular protein with a charge that can be genetically modified. The structure and stability of actin-lysozyme complexes for different lysozyme charge mutants and salt concentrations are examined by using synchrotron x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. We provide evidence that supports a structural transition from columnar arrangements of F-actin held together by arrays of lysozyme at the threefold interstitial sites of the actin sublattice to marginally stable complexes in which lysozyme resides at twofold bridging sites between actin. The reduced stability arises from strongly reduced partitioning of salt between the complex and the surrounding solution. Changes in the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes are of biomedical interest because their formation has been reported to contribute to the persistence of airway infections in cystic fibrosis by sequestering antimicrobials such as lysozyme. We present x-ray microscopy results that argue for the existence of actin-lysozyme complexes in cystic fibrosis sputum and demonstrate that, for a wide range of salt conditions, charge-reduced lysozyme is not sequestered in ordered complexes while retaining its bacterial killing activity.

  9. Control of electrostatic interactions between F-actin and genetically modified lysozyme in aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim for deterministic control of the interactions between macroions in aqueous media has motivated widespread experimental and theoretical work. Although it has been well established that like-charged macromolecules can aggregate under the influence of oppositely charged condensing agents, the specific conditions for the stability of such aggregates can only be determined empirically. We examine these conditions, which involve an interplay of electrostatic and osmotic effects, by using a well defined model system composed of F-actin, an anionic rod-like polyelectrolyte, and lysozyme, a cationic globular protein with a charge that can be genetically modified. The structure and stability of actin-lysozyme complexes for different lysozyme charge mutants and salt concentrations are examined by using synchrotron x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. We provide evidence that supports a structural transition from columnar arrangements of F-actin held together by arrays of lysozyme at the threefold interstitial sites of the actin sublattice to marginally stable complexes in which lysozyme resides at twofold bridging sites between actin. The reduced stability arises from strongly reduced partitioning of salt between the complex and the surrounding solution. Changes in the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes are of biomedical interest because their formation has been reported to contribute to the persistence of airway infections in cystic fibrosis by sequestering antimicrobials such as lysozyme. We present x-ray microscopy results that argue for the existence of actin-lysozyme complexes in cystic fibrosis sputum and demonstrate that, for a wide range of salt conditions, charge-reduced lysozyme is not sequestered in ordered complexes while retaining its bacterial killing activity.

  10. Control of Electrostatic Interactions Between F-Actin And Genetically Modified Lysozyme in Aqueous Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim for deterministic control of the interactions between macroions in aqueous media has motivated widespread experimental and theoretical work. Although it has been well established that like-charged macromolecules can aggregate under the influence of oppositely charged condensing agents, the specific conditions for the stability of such aggregates can only be determined empirically. We examine these conditions, which involve an interplay of electrostatic and osmotic effects, by using a well defined model system composed of F-actin, an anionic rod-like polyelectrolyte, and lysozyme, a cationic globular protein with a charge that can be genetically modified. The structure and stability of actin-lysozyme complexes for different lysozyme charge mutants and salt concentrations are examined by using synchrotron x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. We provide evidence that supports a structural transition from columnar arrangements of F-actin held together by arrays of lysozyme at the threefold interstitial sites of the actin sublattice to marginally stable complexes in which lysozyme resides at twofold bridging sites between actin. The reduced stability arises from strongly reduced partitioning of salt between the complex and the surrounding solution. Changes in the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes are of biomedical interest because their formation has been reported to contribute to the persistence of airway infections in cystic fibrosis by sequestering antimicrobials such as lysozyme. We present x-ray microscopy results that argue for the existence of actin-lysozyme complexes in cystic fibrosis sputum and demonstrate that, for a wide range of salt conditions, charge-reduced lysozyme is not sequestered in ordered complexes while retaining its bacterial killing activity.

  11. The interaction between actin and FA fragment of diphtheria toxin

    OpenAIRE

    Ünlü, A.; Bektaş, M.; Şener, S.; Nurten, R.

    2012-01-01

    Actin protein has many other cellular functions such as movement, chemotaxis, secretion and cytodiaresis. Besides, it have structural function. Actin is a motor protein that it has an important role in the movement process of toxin in the cell. It is known that F-actin gives carriage support during the endosomal process. Actin is found in globular (G) and filamentous (F) structure in the cell. The helix of actin occurs as a result of polymerisation of monomeric G-actin molecules through seque...

  12. The N-terminal tropomyosin- and actin-binding sites are important for leiomodin 2's function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Thu; Moroz, Natalia; Pappas, Christopher T; Novak, Stefanie M; Tolkatchev, Dmitri; Wooldridge, Dayton; Mayfield, Rachel M; Helms, Gregory; Gregorio, Carol C; Kostyukova, Alla S

    2016-08-15

    Leiomodin is a potent actin nucleator related to tropomodulin, a capping protein localized at the pointed end of the thin filaments. Mutations in leiomodin-3 are associated with lethal nemaline myopathy in humans, and leiomodin-2-knockout mice present with dilated cardiomyopathy. The arrangement of the N-terminal actin- and tropomyosin-binding sites in leiomodin is contradictory and functionally not well understood. Using one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance and the pointed-end actin polymerization assay, we find that leiomodin-2, a major cardiac isoform, has an N-terminal actin-binding site located within residues 43-90. Moreover, for the first time, we obtain evidence that there are additional interactions with actin within residues 124-201. Here we establish that leiomodin interacts with only one tropomyosin molecule, and this is the only site of interaction between leiomodin and tropomyosin. Introduction of mutations in both actin- and tropomyosin-binding sites of leiomodin affected its localization at the pointed ends of the thin filaments in cardiomyocytes. On the basis of our new findings, we propose a model in which leiomodin regulates actin poly-merization dynamics in myocytes by acting as a leaky cap at thin filament pointed ends.

  13. F-actin-like filaments formed by plasmid segregation protein ParM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Ent, Fusinita; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Amos, Linda A.;

    2002-01-01

    It was the general belief that DNA partitioning in prokaryotes is independent of a cytoskeletal structure, which in eukaryotic cells is indispensable for DNA segregation. Recently, however, immunofluorescence microscopy revealed highly dynamic, filamentous structures along the longitudinal axis...... of Escherichia coli formed by ParM, a plasmid-encoded protein required for accurate segregation of low-copy-number plasmid R1. We show here that ParM polymerizes into double helical protofilaments with a longitudinal repeat similar to filamentous actin (F-actin) and MreB filaments that maintain the cell shape...

  14. DNA segregation by the bacterial actin AlfA during Bacillus subtilis growth and development

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Eric; Herrera, Nick C; Gunderson, Felizza Q.; Derman, Alan I.; Dance, Amber L; Sims, Jennifer; Larsen, Rachel A.; Pogliano, Joe

    2006-01-01

    We here identify a protein (AlfA; actin like filament) that defines a new family of actins that are only distantly related to MreB and ParM. AlfA is required for segregation of Bacillus subtilis plasmid pBET131 (a mini pLS32-derivative) during growth and sporulation. A 3-kb DNA fragment encoding alfA and a downstream gene (alfB) is necessary and sufficient for plasmid stability. AlfA-GFP assembles dynamic cytoskeletal filaments that rapidly turn over (t1/2

  15. Numerical Modeling on Hydrodynamic Performance of A Bottom-Hinged Flap Wave Energy Converter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hai-tao; SUN Zhi-lin; HAO Chun-ling; SHEN Jia-fa

    2013-01-01

    The hydrodynamic performance of a bottom-hinged flap wave energy converter (WEC) is investigated through a frequency domain numerical model.The numerical model is verified through a two-dimensional analytic solution,as well as the qualitative analysis on the dynamic response of avibrating system.The concept of "optimum density" of the bottom-hinged flap is proposed,and its analytic expression is derived as well.The frequency interval in which the optimum density exists is also obtained.The analytic expression of the optimum linear damping coefficient is obtained by a bottom-hinged WEC.Some basic dynamic properties involving natural period,excitation moment,pitch amplitude,and optimum damping coefficient are analyzed and discussed in detail.In addition,this paper highlights the analysis of effects on the conversion performance of the device exerted by some important parameters.The results indicate that "the optimum linear damping period of 5.0 s" is the most ideal option in the short wave sea states with the wave period below 6.0 s.Shallow water depth,large flap thickness and low flap density are advised in the practical design of the device in short wave sea states in order to maximize power capture.In the sea state with water depth of 5.0 m and wave period of 5.0 s,the results of parametric optimization suggest a flap with the width of 8.0 m,thickness of 1.6 m,and with the density as little as possible when the optimum power take-off (PTO) damping coefficient is adopted.

  16. Clinical application of free omental flap transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harii, K.

    1978-04-01

    In the field of reconstruction surgery, the greater omentum has been used as a transposed flap for the treatment of chronic lymphedema, radionecrosis, and so forth. Its transferable range was limited by the length of its pedicle. Microvascular anastomosis allows for free transplantation of this organ and has vastly expanded its usefulness.

  17. Neural Anatomy of the Anterolateral Thigh Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luenam, Suriya; Prugsawan, Krit; Kosiyatrakul, Arkaphat; Chotanaphuti, Thanainit; Sriya, Piyanee

    2015-06-01

    The anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is one of the commonly used sensate flaps for intra-oral, hand, and foot reconstruction. The objective of this study was to describe the anatomic location of the sensory nerves supplying the ALT flap in relation to the surface landmarks and with the vascular pedicles. The dissections were carried out in 28 embalmed specimens. An axial line from the anterior superior iliac spine to the superolateral border of the patella and two circles with radii of 5 and 10 cm centered on the midpoint of the former line were used for the surface landmarks. At the intersection point of the axial line and the 10-cm circle, the main lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) and its anterior branch were located within 1 and 2.4 cm, respectively. At the intersection point of the axial line and the 5-cm circle, the anterior branch of the LFCN was located within 2.8 cm. The anterior branch of the LFCN can be detected within 3 cm from the central perforator pedicle in all specimens. The posterior branch of the LFCN, superior perforator nerve, and median perforator nerve were found in more variable locations. The findings from our study provide additional information for clinical use in the planning of sensate ALT flap harvest. PMID:26078503

  18. Individual actin filaments in a microfluidic flow reveal the mechanism of ATP hydrolysis and give insight into the properties of profilin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Jégou

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The hydrolysis of ATP associated with actin and profilin-actin polymerization is pivotal in cell motility. It is at the origin of treadmilling of actin filaments and controls their dynamics and mechanical properties, as well as their interactions with regulatory proteins. The slow release of inorganic phosphate (Pi that follows rapid cleavage of ATP gamma phosphate is linked to an increase in the rate of filament disassembly. The mechanism of Pi release in actin filaments has remained elusive for over 20 years. Here, we developed a microfluidic setup to accurately monitor the depolymerization of individual filaments and determine their local ADP-Pi content. We demonstrate that Pi release in the filament is not a vectorial but a random process with a half-time of 102 seconds, irrespective of whether the filament is assembled from actin or profilin-actin. Pi release from the depolymerizing barbed end is faster (half-time of 0.39 seconds and further accelerated by profilin. Profilin accelerates the depolymerization of both ADP- and ADP-Pi-F-actin. Altogether, our data show that during elongation from profilin-actin, the dissociation of profilin from the growing barbed end is not coupled to Pi release or to ATP cleavage on the terminal subunit. These results emphasize the potential of microfluidics in elucidating actin regulation at the scale of individual filaments.

  19. The actin binding protein adseverin regulates osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpour, Siavash; Jiang, Hongwei; Wang, Yongqiang; Kuiper, Johannes W P; Glogauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Adseverin (Ads), a member of the Gelsolin superfamily of actin binding proteins, regulates the actin cytoskeleton architecture by severing and capping existing filamentous actin (F-actin) strands and nucleating the assembly of new F-actin filaments. Ads has been implicated in cellular secretion, exocytosis and has also been shown to regulate chondrogenesis and megakaryoblastic leukemia cell differentiation. Here we report for the first time that Ads is involved in regulating osteoclastogenesis (OCG). Ads is induced during OCG downstream of RANK-ligand (RANKL) stimulation and is highly expressed in mature osteoclasts. The D5 isoform of Ads is not involved in regulating OCG, as its expression is not induced in response to RANKL. Three clonal Ads knockdown RAW264.7 (RAW) macrophage cell lines with varying degrees of Ads expression and OCG deficiency were generated. The most drastic OCG defect was noted in the clonal cell line with the greatest degree of Ads knockdown as indicated by a lack of TRAcP staining and multinucleation. RNAi mediated knockdown of Ads in osteoclast precursors resulted in distinct morphological changes characterized by altered F-actin distribution and increased filopodia formation. Ads knockdown precursor cells experienced enhanced migration while fusion of knockdown precursors cells was limited. Transient reintroduction of de novo Ads back into the knockdown system was capable of rescuing TRAcP expression but not osteoclast multinucleation most likely due to the transient nature of Ads expression. This preliminary study allows us to conclude that Ads is a RANKL induced early regulator of OCG with a potential role in pre-osteoclast differentiation and fusion. PMID:25275604

  20. The actin binding protein adseverin regulates osteoclastogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavash Hassanpour

    Full Text Available Adseverin (Ads, a member of the Gelsolin superfamily of actin binding proteins, regulates the actin cytoskeleton architecture by severing and capping existing filamentous actin (F-actin strands and nucleating the assembly of new F-actin filaments. Ads has been implicated in cellular secretion, exocytosis and has also been shown to regulate chondrogenesis and megakaryoblastic leukemia cell differentiation. Here we report for the first time that Ads is involved in regulating osteoclastogenesis (OCG. Ads is induced during OCG downstream of RANK-ligand (RANKL stimulation and is highly expressed in mature osteoclasts. The D5 isoform of Ads is not involved in regulating OCG, as its expression is not induced in response to RANKL. Three clonal Ads knockdown RAW264.7 (RAW macrophage cell lines with varying degrees of Ads expression and OCG deficiency were generated. The most drastic OCG defect was noted in the clonal cell line with the greatest degree of Ads knockdown as indicated by a lack of TRAcP staining and multinucleation. RNAi mediated knockdown of Ads in osteoclast precursors resulted in distinct morphological changes characterized by altered F-actin distribution and increased filopodia formation. Ads knockdown precursor cells experienced enhanced migration while fusion of knockdown precursors cells was limited. Transient reintroduction of de novo Ads back into the knockdown system was capable of rescuing TRAcP expression but not osteoclast multinucleation most likely due to the transient nature of Ads expression. This preliminary study allows us to conclude that Ads is a RANKL induced early regulator of OCG with a potential role in pre-osteoclast differentiation and fusion.

  1. Thrust augmentation in tandem flapping foils by foil-wake interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Erik; Lauder, George

    2006-11-01

    Propulsion by pitching and heaving airfoils and hydrofoils has been a focus of much research in the field of biologically inspired propulsion. Organisms that use this sort of propulsion are self-propelled, so it is difficult to use standard experimental metrics such as thrust and drag to characterize performance. We have constructed a flapping foil robot mounted in a flume on air-bearings that allows for the determination of self-propelled speed as a metric of performance. We have used a pair of these robots to examine the impact of an upstream flapping foil on a downstream flapping foil as might apply to tandem fins of a swimming organism or in-line swimming of schooling organisms. Self-propelled speed and a force transducer confirmed significant thrust augmentation for particular foil-to-foil spacings, phase differences, and flapping frequencies. Flow visualization shows the mechanism to be related to the effective angle of attack of the downstream foil due to the structure of the wake of the upstream foil. This confirms recent computational work and the hypotheses by early investigators of fish fluid dynamics.

  2. Self-propulsion of a three-dimensional flapping flexible plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐超; 陆夕云

    2016-01-01

    The self-propulsion of a 3-D flapping flexible plate in a stationary fluid is numerically studied by an immersed boundary- lattice Boltzmann method for the fluid flow and a finite element method for the plate motion. When the leading-edge of the plate is forced to heave sinusoidally, the entire plate starts to move freely as a result of the fluid-structure interaction. Based on our simula- tion and analysis on the dynamical behaviors of the flapping flexible plate, we have found that the effect of plate aspect ratio on its propulsive properties can be divided into three typical regimes which are related to the plate flexibility, i.e. stiff, medium flexible, and more flexible regime. It is also identified that a suitable structure flexibility, corresponding to the medium flexible regime, can improve the propulsive speed and efficiency. The wake behind the flapping plate is investigated for several aspect ratios to demon- strate some typical vortical structures. The results obtained in this study can provide some physical insights into the understanding of the propulsive mechanisms in the flapping-based locomotion.

  3. The roles of aerodynamic and inertial forces on maneuverability in flapping flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vejdani, Hamid; Boerma, David; Swartz, Sharon; Breuer, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the relative contributions of aerodynamic and the whole-body dynamics in generating extreme maneuvers. We developed a 3D dynamical model of a body (trunk) and two rectangular wings using a Lagrangian formulation. The trunk has 6 degrees of freedom and each wing has 4 degrees of actuation (flapping, sweeping, wing pronation/supination and wing extension/flexion) and can be massless (like insect wings) or relatively massive (like bats). To estimate aerodynamic forces, we use a blade element method; drag and lift are calculated using a quasi-steady model. We validated our model using several benchmark tests, including gliding and hovering motion. To understand the roles of aerodynamic and inertial forces, we start the investigation by constraining the wing motion to flapping and wing length extension/flexion motion. This decouples the trunk degrees of freedom and affects only roll motion. For bats' dynamics (massive wings), the model is much more maneuverable than the insect dynamics case, and the effect of inertial forces dominates the behavior of the system. The role of the aerodynamic forces increases when the wings have sweeping and flapping motion, which affects the pitching motion of the body. We also analyzed the effect of all wing motions together on the behavior of the model in the presence and in the absence of aerodynamic forces.

  4. Assessing safety of negative-pressure wound therapy over pedicled muscle flaps: A retrospective review of gastrocnemius muscle flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Samuel; Harrison, Lindsey; Orbay, Hakan; Boudreault, David; Pereira, Gavin; Sahar, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for management of open wounds and immobilization of split-thickness skin grafts (STSGs) over wounds has been well described. However, there is a concern for potential compromise of flap viability when NPWT is used for skin grafts over pedicled muscle flaps. We have used NPWT to immobilize STSGs in eight patients who underwent a pedicled gastrocnemius muscle flap operation in our department. We applied a negative pressure of -75 mmHg on the muscle flaps for 5 days postoperatively. All wounds healed successfully, with a 97.5 ± 5.5% mean STSG uptake. No flap necrosis was observed. In our series, the use of NPWT for fixation of STSGs over pedicled gastrocnemius muscle flap was effective and had no negative impact on flap viability. PMID:26732293

  5. F-actin mechanics control spindle centring in the mouse zygote

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaigne, Agathe; Campillo, Clément; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S.; Sykes, Cécile; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène; Terret, Marie-Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle position relies on interactions between astral microtubules nucleated by centrosomes and a rigid cortex. Some cells, such as mouse oocytes, do not possess centrosomes and astral microtubules. These cells rely only on actin and on a soft cortex to position their spindle off-centre and undergo asymmetric divisions. While the first mouse embryonic division also occurs in the absence of centrosomes, it is symmetric and not much is known on how the spindle is positioned at the exact cell centre. Using interdisciplinary approaches, we demonstrate that zygotic spindle positioning follows a three-step process: (1) coarse centring of pronuclei relying on the dynamics of an F-actin/Myosin-Vb meshwork; (2) fine centring of the metaphase plate depending on a high cortical tension; (3) passive maintenance at the cell centre. Altogether, we show that F-actin-dependent mechanics operate the switch between asymmetric to symmetric division required at the oocyte to embryo transition.

  6. Apical domain polarization localizes actin-myosin activity to drive ratchet-like apical constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Frank M; Tworoger, Michael; Martin, Adam C

    2013-08-01

    Apical constriction promotes epithelia folding, which changes tissue architecture. During Drosophila gastrulation, mesoderm cells exhibit repeated contractile pulses that are stabilized such that cells apically constrict like a ratchet. The transcription factor Twist is required to stabilize cell shape. However, it is unknown how Twist spatially coordinates downstream signals to prevent cell relaxation. We find that during constriction, Rho-associated kinase (Rok) is polarized to the middle of the apical domain (medioapical cortex), separate from adherens junctions. Rok recruits or stabilizes medioapical myosin II (Myo-II), which contracts dynamic medioapical actin cables. The formin Diaphanous mediates apical actin assembly to suppress medioapical E-cadherin localization and form stable connections between the medioapical contractile network and adherens junctions. Twist is not required for apical Rok recruitment, but instead polarizes Rok medioapically. Therefore, Twist establishes radial cell polarity of Rok/Myo-II and E-cadherin and promotes medioapical actin assembly in mesoderm cells to stabilize cell shape fluctuations.

  7. Femtosecond pump-probe studies of actinic-wavelength dependence in aqueous chlorine dioxide photochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The actinic or photolysis-wavelength dependence of aqueous chlorine dioxide (OClO) photochemistry is investigated using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Following photoexcitation at 310, 335, and 410 nm the photoinduced evolution in optical density is measured from the UV to the near IR. Analysis of the optical-density evolution illustrates that the quantum yield for atomic chlorine production (ΦCl) increases with actinic energy, with ΦCl=0.16±0.02 for 410 nm excitation and increasing to 0.25±0.01 and 0.54±0.10 for 335 and 310 nm excitations, respectively. Consistent with previous studies, the production of Cl occurs through two channels, with one channel corresponding to prompt (2A2 surface decrease with an increase in actinic energy suggesting that the excited-state decay dynamics are also actinic energy dependent. The studies presented here provide detailed information on the actinic-wavelength dependence of OClO photochemistry in aqueous solution.

  8. Polymorphism of highly cross-linked F-actin networks: Probing multiple length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lam T.; Hirst, Linda S.

    2011-03-01

    The assembly properties of F-actin filaments in the presence of different biological cross-linker concentrations and types have been investigated using a combined approach of fluorescence confocal microscopy and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation. In particular for highly cross-linked regimes, new network morphologies are observed. Complex network formation and the details of the resulting structure are strongly dependent on the ratio of cross-linkers to actin monomers and cross-linker shape but only weakly dependent on overall actin concentration and filament length. The work presented here may help to provide some fundamental understanding of how excessive cross-linkers interact with the actin filament solution, creating different structures in the cell under high cross-linker concentrations. F-actin is not only of biological importance but also, as an example of a semiflexible polymer, has attracted significant interest in its physical behavior. In combination with different cross-linkers semiflexible filaments may provide new routes to bio-materials development and act as the inspiration for new hierarchical network-based materials.

  9. Cations Stiffen Actin Filaments by Adhering a Key Structural Element to Adjacent Subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocky, Glen M; Baker, Joseph L; Bradley, Michael J; Sinitskiy, Anton V; De La Cruz, Enrique M; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-05-26

    Ions regulate the assembly and mechanical properties of actin filaments. Recent work using structural bioinformatics and site-specific mutagenesis favors the existence of two discrete and specific divalent cation binding sites on actin filaments, positioned in the long axis between actin subunits. Cation binding at one site drives polymerization, while the other modulates filament stiffness and plays a role in filament severing by the regulatory protein, cofilin. Existing structural methods have not been able to resolve filament-associated cations, and so in this work we turn to molecular dynamics simulations to suggest a candidate binding pocket geometry for each site and to elucidate the mechanism by which occupancy of the "stiffness site" affects filament mechanical properties. Incorporating a magnesium ion in the "polymerization site" does not seem to require any large-scale change to an actin subunit's conformation. Binding of a magnesium ion in the "stiffness site" adheres the actin DNase-binding loop (D-loop) to its long-axis neighbor, which increases the filament torsional stiffness and bending persistence length. Our analysis shows that bound D-loops occupy a smaller region of accessible conformational space. Cation occupancy buries key conserved residues of the D-loop, restricting accessibility to regulatory proteins and enzymes that target these amino acids. PMID:27146246

  10. Wave Patterns in Cell Membrane and Actin Cortex Uncoupled from Chemotactic Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerisch, Günther; Ecke, Mary

    2016-01-01

    When cells of Dictyostelium discoideum orientate in a gradient of chemoattractant, they are polarized into a protruding front pointing toward the source of attractant, and into a retracting tail. Under the control of chemotactic signal inputs, Ras is activated and PIP3 is synthesized at the front, while the PIP3-degrading phosphatase PTEN decorates the tail region. As a result of signal transduction, actin filaments assemble at the front into dendritic structures associated with the Arp2/3 complex, in contrast to the tail region where a loose actin meshwork is associated with myosin-II and cortexillin, an antiparallel actin-bundling protein. In axenically growing strains of D. discoideum, wave patterns built by the same components evolve in the absence of any external signal input. Since these autonomously generated patterns are constrained to the plane of the substrate-attached cell surface, they are optimally suited to the optical analysis of state transitions between front-like and tail-like states of the membrane and the actin cortex. Here, we describe imaging techniques using fluorescent proteins to probe for the state of the membrane, the reorganization of the actin network, and the dynamics of wave patterns.

  11. The actin regulators Enabled and Diaphanous direct distinct protrusive behaviors in different tissues during Drosophila development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowotarski, Stephanie H; McKeon, Natalie; Moser, Rachel J; Peifer, Mark

    2014-10-15

    Actin-based protrusions are important for signaling and migration during development and homeostasis. Defining how different tissues in vivo craft diverse protrusive behaviors using the same genomic toolkit of actin regulators is a current challenge. The actin elongation factors Diaphanous and Enabled both promote barbed-end actin polymerization and can stimulate filopodia in cultured cells. However, redundancy in mammals and Diaphanous' role in cytokinesis limited analysis of whether and how they regulate protrusions during development. We used two tissues driving Drosophila dorsal closure--migratory leading-edge (LE) and nonmigratory amnioserosal (AS) cells--as models to define how cells shape distinct protrusions during morphogenesis. We found that nonmigratory AS cells produce filopodia that are morphologically and dynamically distinct from those of LE cells. We hypothesized that differing Enabled and/or Diaphanous activity drives these differences. Combining gain- and loss-of-function with quantitative approaches revealed that Diaphanous and Enabled each regulate filopodial behavior in vivo and defined a quantitative "fingerprint"--the protrusive profile--which our data suggest is characteristic of each actin regulator. Our data suggest that LE protrusiveness is primarily Enabled driven, whereas Diaphanous plays the primary role in the AS, and reveal each has roles in dorsal closure, but its robustness ensures timely completion in their absence.

  12. Actin filaments target the oligomeric maturation of the dynamin GTPase Drp1 to mitochondrial fission sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei-ke; Hatch, Anna L; Merrill, Ronald A; Strack, Stefan; Higgs, Henry N

    2015-01-01

    While the dynamin GTPase Drp1 plays a critical role during mitochondrial fission, mechanisms controlling its recruitment to fission sites are unclear. A current assumption is that cytosolic Drp1 is recruited directly to fission sites immediately prior to fission. Using live-cell microscopy, we find evidence for a different model, progressive maturation of Drp1 oligomers on mitochondria through incorporation of smaller mitochondrially-bound Drp1 units. Maturation of a stable Drp1 oligomer does not forcibly lead to fission. Drp1 oligomers also translocate directionally along mitochondria. Ionomycin, a calcium ionophore, causes rapid mitochondrial accumulation of actin filaments followed by Drp1 accumulation at the fission site, and increases fission rate. Inhibiting actin polymerization, myosin IIA, or the formin INF2 reduces both un-stimulated and ionomycin-induced Drp1 accumulation and mitochondrial fission. Actin filaments bind purified Drp1 and increase GTPase activity in a manner that is synergistic with the mitochondrial protein Mff, suggesting a role for direct Drp1/actin interaction. We propose that Drp1 is in dynamic equilibrium on mitochondria in a fission-independent manner, and that fission factors such as actin filaments target productive oligomerization to fission sites. PMID:26609810

  13. Actin filaments growing against a barrier with fluctuating shape

    CERN Document Server

    Sadhu, Raj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We study force generation by a set of parallel actin filaments growing against a non-rigid obstacle, in presence of an external load. The filaments polymerize by either moving the whole obstacle, with a large energy cost, or by causing local distortion in its shape which costs much less energy. The non-rigid obstacle also has local thermal fluctuations due to which its shape can change with time and we describe this using fluctuations in the height profile of a one dimensional interface with Kardar-Parisi-Zhang dynamics. We find the shape fluctuations of the barrier strongly affects the force generation mechanism. The qualitative nature of the force-velocity curve is crucially determined by the relative time-scale of filament and barrier dynamics. The height profile of the barrier also shows interesting variation with the external load. Our analytical calculation within mean-field theory shows reasonable agreement with our simulation results.

  14. Actin filaments growing against a barrier with fluctuating shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Raj Kumar; Chatterjee, Sakuntala

    2016-06-01

    We study force generation by a set of parallel actin filaments growing against a nonrigid obstacle, in the presence of an external load. The filaments polymerize by either moving the whole obstacle, with a large energy cost, or by causing local distortion in its shape which costs much less energy. The nonrigid obstacle also has local thermal fluctuations due to which its shape can change with time and we describe this using fluctuations in the height profile of a one-dimensional interface with Kardar-Parisi-Zhang dynamics. We find the shape fluctuations of the barrier strongly affect the force generation mechanism. The qualitative nature of the force-velocity curve is crucially determined by the relative time scale of filament and barrier dynamics. The height profile of the barrier also shows interesting variation with the external load. Our analytical calculations within mean-field theory show reasonable agreement with our simulation results.

  15. Percolation mechanism drives actin gels to the critically connected state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chiu Fan; Pruessner, Gunnar

    2016-05-01

    Cell motility and tissue morphogenesis depend crucially on the dynamic remodeling of actomyosin networks. An actomyosin network consists of an actin polymer network connected by cross-linker proteins and motor protein myosins that generate internal stresses on the network. A recent discovery shows that for a range of experimental parameters, actomyosin networks contract to clusters with a power-law size distribution [J. Alvarado, Nat. Phys. 9, 591 (2013), 10.1038/nphys2715]. Here, we argue that actomyosin networks can exhibit a robust critical signature without fine-tuning because the dynamics of the system can be mapped onto a modified version of percolation with trapping (PT), which is known to show critical behavior belonging to the static percolation universality class without the need for fine-tuning of a control parameter. We further employ our PT model to generate experimentally testable predictions.

  16. Continuous-Wave Stimulated Emission Depletion Microscope for Imaging Actin Cytoskeleton in Fixed and Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanu Neupane

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stimulated emission depletion (STED microscopy provides a new opportunity to study fine sub-cellular structures and highly dynamic cellular processes, which are challenging to observe using conventional optical microscopy. Using actin as an example, we explored the feasibility of using a continuous wave (CW-STED microscope to study the fine structure and dynamics in fixed and live cells. Actin plays an important role in cellular processes, whose functioning involves dynamic formation and reorganization of fine structures of actin filaments. Frequently used confocal fluorescence and STED microscopy dyes were employed to image fixed PC-12 cells (dyed with phalloidin- fluorescein isothiocyante and live rat chondrosarcoma cells (RCS transfected with actin-green fluorescent protein (GFP. Compared to conventional confocal fluorescence microscopy, CW-STED microscopy shows improved spatial resolution in both fixed and live cells. We were able to monitor cell morphology changes continuously; however, the number of repetitive analyses were limited primarily by the dyes used in these experiments and could be improved with the use of dyes less susceptible to photobleaching. In conclusion, CW-STED may disclose new information for biological systems with a proper characteristic length scale. The challenges of using CW-STED microscopy to study cell structures are discussed.

  17. Microrheology and micromechanics of actin-coated membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdieu, Laurent

    2002-03-01

    To study the interaction between cytoskeletal filaments and the plasma membrane, we designed composite membranes obtained by self-assembly of actin filaments on the outer leaflet of giant unilamellar fluid vesicles. Their rich dynamics is studied by micromanipulation with optical tweezers and by single particle tracking experiments. We first show that microrheology study can be carried out on such an individual microscopic object by measuring the thermally excited position fluctuations of a probed bead bound biochemically to the membrane. We propose a model that relates the power spectrum of these thermal fluctuations to the viscoelastic properties of the membrane. The presence of the actin filaments network first induces a finite 2D shear modulus of the order of 1 microN/m. Moreover, these membranes exhibit a clear viscoelastic behavior at high frequency: above a few tens of Hz, both the shear and the bending moduli exhibit the same frequency dependence, a power law of exponent 0.75. These results are consistent in the framework of our model with previous measurements on actin solutions. We show moreover that these complexes exhibit typical mechanical features of a solid shell. For example, a buckling instability is observed when a localized force of the order of 0.5 picoNewton is applied perpendicular to the membrane plane. Although predicted for polymerized vesicles, this is the first evidence of such an instability. This instability is a striking example of the coupling between in-plane stretch and shear and out-of-plane bending, which takes place for curves shells when it becomes more favorable energetically to concentrate the in-plane stress due to the bending within a narrow ring, centered on the force application point.

  18. Design and evaluation of Actichip, a thematic microarray for the study of the actin cytoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalmel Frédéric

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in supporting and regulating numerous cellular processes. Mutations or alterations in the expression levels affecting the actin cytoskeleton system or related regulatory mechanisms are often associated with complex diseases such as cancer. Understanding how qualitative or quantitative changes in expression of the set of actin cytoskeleton genes are integrated to control actin dynamics and organisation is currently a challenge and should provide insights in identifying potential targets for drug discovery. Here we report the development of a dedicated microarray, the Actichip, containing 60-mer oligonucleotide probes for 327 genes selected for transcriptome analysis of the human actin cytoskeleton. Results Genomic data and sequence analysis features were retrieved from GenBank and stored in an integrative database called Actinome. From these data, probes were designed using a home-made program (CADO4MI allowing sequence refinement and improved probe specificity by combining the complementary information recovered from the UniGene and RefSeq databases. Actichip performance was analysed by hybridisation with RNAs extracted from epithelial MCF-7 cells and human skeletal muscle. Using thoroughly standardised procedures, we obtained microarray images with excellent quality resulting in high data reproducibility. Actichip displayed a large dynamic range extending over three logs with a limit of sensitivity between one and ten copies of transcript per cell. The array allowed accurate detection of small changes in gene expression and reliable classification of samples based on the expression profiles of tissue-specific genes. When compared to two other oligonucleotide microarray platforms, Actichip showed similar sensitivity and concordant expression ratios. Moreover, Actichip was able to discriminate the highly similar actin isoforms whereas the two other platforms did not. Conclusion Our

  19. The spatial response of nonlinear strain propagation in response to actively driven microspheres through entangled actin networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzone, Tobias; Blair, Savanna; Robertson-Anderson, Rae

    2015-03-01

    The semiflexible biopolymer actin, a ubiquitous component of nearly all biological organisms, plays an important role in many mechanically-driven processes such as muscle contraction, cancer invasion and cell motility. As such, entangled actin networks, which possess unique and complex viscoelastic properties, have been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. However, due to this viscoelastic complexity, much is still unknown regarding the correlation of the applied stress on actin networks to the induced filament strain at the molecular and micro scale. Here, we use simultaneous optical trapping and fluorescence microscopy to characterize the link between applied microscopic forces and strain propagation as a function of strain rate and concentration. Specifically, we track fiduciary markers on entangled actin filaments before, during and after actively driving embedded microspheres through the network. These measurements provide much needed insight into the molecular-level dynamics connecting stress and strain in semiflexible polymer networks.

  20. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in Helicobacter pylori-induced migration and invasive growth of gastric epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rieder Gabriele

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dynamic rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton is a significant hallmark of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infected gastric epithelial cells leading to cell migration and invasive growth. Considering the cellular mechanisms, the type IV secretion system (T4SS and the effector protein cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA of H. pylori are well-studied initiators of distinct signal transduction pathways in host cells targeting kinases, adaptor proteins, GTPases, actin binding and other proteins involved in the regulation of the actin lattice. In this review, we summarize recent findings of how H. pylori functionally interacts with the complex signaling network that controls the actin cytoskeleton of motile and invasive gastric epithelial cells.

  1. Robot-Assisted Free Flap in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Gyeol Song

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background  Robots have allowed head and neck surgeons to extirpate oropharyngealtumors safely without the need for lip-split incision or mandibulotomy. Using robots inoropharyngealreconstruction is newbut essentialfor oropharyngeal defectsthatresultfromrobotic tumor excision. We report our experience with robotic free-flap reconstruction ofhead and neck defectsto exemplify the necessity forrobotic reconstruction.Methods  We investigated head and neck cancer patients who underwent ablation surgeryand free-flap reconstruction by robot. Between July 1, 2011 andMarch 31, 2012, 5 caseswereperformed and patient demographics, location of tumor, pathologic stage, reconstructionmethods, flap size, recipient vessel, necessary pedicle length, and operation time wereinvestigated.Results  Among five free-flap reconstructions, four were radial forearm free flaps and onewas an anterolateral thigh free-flap. Four flaps used the superior thyroid artery and oneflap used a facial artery as the recipient vessel. The average pedicle length was 8.8 cm. Flapinsetting and microanastomosis were achieved using a specially manufactured roboticinstrument. The total operation timewas 1,041.0 minutes(range, 814 to 1,132 minutes, andcomplicationsincluding flap necrosis, hematoma, andwound dehiscence did not occur.Conclusions  Thisstudy demonstratesthe clinically applicable use ofrobotsin oropharyngealreconstruction, especially using a free flap. A robot can assist the operator in insettingthe flap at a deep portion of the oropharynx without the need to perform a traditionalmandibulotomy. Robot-assisted reconstruction may substitute for existing surgical methodsand is accepted asthemost up-to-datemethod.

  2. Pedicle versus free flap reconstruction in patients receiving intraoperative brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Erik J; Basques, Bryce A; Chang, Christopher C; Son, Yung; Sasaki, Clarence T; McGregor, Andrew; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak

    2016-08-01

    Introduction This study compared complication rates between pedicle flaps and free flaps used for resurfacing of intraoperative brachytherapy (IOBT) implants placed following head and neck tumour extirpation to help clarify the ideal reconstructive procedure for this scenario. Patients and methods A retrospective review of reconstructions with IOBT at our institution was conducted. Patient and treatment details were recorded, as were the number and type of flap complications, including re-operations. Logistic regressions compared complications between flap groups. Results Fifty free flaps and 55 pedicle flaps were included. On multivariate analysis, free flap reconstruction with IOBT was significantly associated with both an increased risk of having any flap complication (OR = 2.9, p = 0.037) and with need for operative revision (OR = 3.5, p = 0.048) compared to pedicle flap reconstruction. Conclusions In the setting of IOBT, free flaps are associated with an increased risk of having complications and requiring operative revisions. PMID:26983038

  3. Effect of flapping trajectories on the dragonfly aerodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The effects of translational, figure-eight and double-figure-eight flapping trajectories on the dragonfly aerodynamics were numerically studied by solving the Navier-Stokes equations. There is a common characteristic regarding the lift/drag force coefficients that the downstroke flapping provides the lift forces while the upstroke flapping creates the thrust forces for different flapping trajectories. The maximum lift force coefficient exceeds five for the translational trajectory. It is greater than six for the figure-eight and double-figure-eight flapping trajectories, which is sufficiently larger than unity under the steady state flight condition. The ellipse and double-figure-eight flapping trajectories yield the decrease of the lift force, while the figure-eight flapping trajectory yields higher lift force as well as the thrust force than the translational flapping one. During the insect flight, the wing flapping status should be changed instantaneously to satisfy various requirements. Study of the flapping trajectories on the insect aerodynamics is helpful for the design of the Micro-air-vehicles (MAVs).

  4. STUDY OF VARIOUS MODIFICATIONS OF REVERSE SURAL ARTERY FLAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jainath

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A BS T R ACT : Soft tissue reconstruction of distal third leg, heel and ankle reg ion is a challenging problem because of poor vascularity and limited mobility of skin. The reverse sural artery with ideal flap thickness, minimal donor site morbidity, lack of functional muscle loss, short recovery time, wide arc of rotation and safe vasc ularity makes it a preferable flap for covering such defects. AIMS A N D OBJECTIVES : To study various modifications of distally based reverse sural artery flap to suit the defects and for better survival of flaps. RESULTS : It is a retrospective study conduct ed in our institute to cover the distal leg and foot defects.60 cases of distal leg defects exposing vital structure who underwent reverse sural artery flap coverage were included in the study .5 of the 60 flaps had complete flap necrosis and another11 fla ps had partial necrosis.73.4% of the flaps survived during the follow up period of 1 years with good functional outcome. CONCLUSIONS : Reverse sural artery flap with its modifications is a good flap for the defects of distal leg, heel and ankle defects

  5. Actin protofilament orientation in deformation of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton.

    OpenAIRE

    Picart, C.; Dalhaimer, P.; Discher, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    The red cell's spectrin-actin network is known to sustain local states of shear, dilation, and condensation, and yet the short actin filaments are found to maintain membrane-tangent and near-random azimuthal orientations. When calibrated with polarization results for single actin filaments, imaging of micropipette-deformed red cell ghosts has allowed an assessment of actin orientations and possible reorientations in the network. At the hemispherical cap of the aspirated projection, where the ...

  6. Dendritic Actin Filament Nucleation Causes Traveling Waves and Patches

    CERN Document Server

    Carlsson, Anders E

    2010-01-01

    The polymerization of actin via branching at a cell membrane containing nucleation-promoting factors is simulated using a stochastic-growth methodology. The polymerized-actin distribution displays three types of behavior: a) traveling waves, b) moving patches, and c) random fluctuations. Increasing actin concentration causes a transition from patches to waves. The waves and patches move by a treadmilling mechanism which does not require myosin II. The effects of downregulation of key proteins on actin wave behavior are evaluated.

  7. Dendritic Actin Filament Nucleation Causes Traveling Waves and Patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Anders E.

    2010-06-01

    The polymerization of actin via branching at a cell membrane containing nucleation-promoting factors is simulated using a stochastic-growth methodology. The polymerized-actin distribution displays three types of behavior: (a) traveling waves, (b) moving patches, and (c) random fluctuations. Increasing actin concentration causes a transition from patches to waves. The waves and patches move by a treadmilling mechanism not involving myosin II. The effects of downregulation of key proteins on actin wave behavior are evaluated.

  8. Actin of Beta vulgaris seedlings under the clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozeko, L. Ye.

    We study the influence of altered gravity on actin expression in roots of Beta vulguris seedlings grown on the horizontal clinostat (2 rpm) from seed germination for three days. It is shown that the total actin quantity was not influenced. Three actin isoforms are revealed; a relative protein quantity of these isoforms was similar both in clinorotated seedlings and in ones grown in norm. This point to stable expression of actin under the altered gravity conditions.

  9. Competition of two distinct actin networks for actin defines a bistable switch for cell polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomakin, Alexis J.; Lee, Kun-Chun; Han, Sangyoon J.; Bui, D A.; Davidson, Michael; Mogilner, Alex; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-01-01

    Symmetry-breaking polarization enables functional plasticity of cells and tissues and is yet not well understood. Here we show that epithelial cells, hard-wired to maintain a static morphology and to preserve tissue organization, can spontaneously switch to a migratory polarized phenotype upon relaxation of the actomyosin cytoskeleton. We find that myosin-II engages actin in the formation of cortical actomyosin bundles and thus makes it unavailable for deployment in the process of dendritic growth normally driving cell motility. At low contractility regimes epithelial cells polarize in a front-back manner due to emergence of actin retrograde flows powered by dendritic polymerization of actin. Coupled to cell movement, the flows transport myosin-II from the front to the back of the cell, where the motor locally “locks” actin in contractile bundles. This polarization mechanism could be employed by embryonic and cancer epithelial cells in microenvironments where high contractility-driven cell motion is inefficient. PMID:26414403

  10. Actin-organising properties of the muscular dystrophy protein myotilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Nandelstadh, Pernilla; Grönholm, Mikaela; Moza, Monica; Lamberg, Arja; Savilahti, Harri; Carpén, Olli

    2005-10-15

    Myotilin is a sarcomeric Z-disc protein that binds F-actin directly and bundles actin filaments, although it does not contain a conventional actin-binding domain. Expression of mutant myotilin leads to sarcomeric alterations in the dominantly inherited limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1A and in myofibrillar myopathy/desmin-related myopathy. Together, with previous in vitro studies, this indicates that myotilin has an important function in the assembly and maintenance of Z-discs. This study characterises further the interaction between myotilin and actin. Functionally important regions in myotilin were identified by actin pull-down and yeast two-hybrid assays and with a novel strategy that combines in vitro DNA transposition-based peptide insertion mutagenesis with phenotype analysis in yeast cells. The shortest fragment to bind actin was the second Ig domain together with a short C-terminal sequence. Concerted action of the first and second Ig domain was, however, necessary for the functional activity of myotilin, as verified by analysis of transposon mutants, actin binding and phenotypic effect in mammalian cells. Furthermore, the Ig domains flanked with N- and C-terminal regions were needed for actin-bundling, indicating that the mere actin-binding sequence was insufficient for the actin-regulating activity. None of the four known disease-associated mutations altered the actin-organising ability. These results, together with previous studies in titin and kettin, identify the Ig domain as an actin-binding unit.

  11. Filopodia-like actin cables position nuclei in association with perinuclear actin in Drosophila nurse cells

    OpenAIRE

    Huelsmann, Sven; Ylänne, Jari; Brown, Nicholas H

    2013-01-01

    Summary Controlling the position of the nucleus is vital for a number of cellular processes from yeast to humans. In Drosophila nurse cells, nuclear positioning is crucial during dumping, when nurse cells contract and expel their contents into the oocyte. We provide evidence that in nurse cells, continuous filopodia-like actin cables, growing from the plasma membrane and extending to the nucleus, achieve nuclear positioning. These actin cables move nuclei away from ring canals. When nurse cel...

  12. Freestyle-Like V-Y Flaps of the Eyebrow: A New Outlook and Indication of an Historical Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Alberto Leto Barone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The eyebrow region is of utmost importance for facial movement, symmetry, and the overall cosmetic appearance of the face. Trauma or tumor resection often leave scars that may dislocate the eyebrow producing an alteration both in static symmetry of the face and in the dynamic expressivity. The authors present a technique for eyebrow’s defects repair using the remaining eyebrow advancement by means of a “freestyle-like” V-Y flap. In the past two years a total of eight consecutive patients underwent excision of skin lesions in the superciliary region and immediate reconstruction with this technique. On histology, six patients were affected from basal cell carcinomas, one from squamous cell carcinoma, and one from congenital intradermal melanocytic nevus. The pedicle of the flap included perforators from the supratrochlear, supraorbital, or superficial temporalis artery. Advancement of the entire aesthetic subunit that includes the eyebrow using a V-Y perforator flap was performed successfully in all cases achieving full, tension-free closure of defects up to 3.0 cm. “Freestyle-like” V-Y flaps should be considered as a first-line choice for partial defects of the eyebrow. The greater mobility compared to random subcutaneous flaps allows to reconstruct large defects providing an excellent cosmetic result.

  13. Temporal-based pericranial flaps for orbitofrontal Dural repair: A technical note and Review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Dupépé

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: A temporal-based pericranial flap represents an alternative vascularized pedicle flap to the classic frontal-based pericranial flap used in orbitofrontal dural repair. In certain clinical settings, the temporal-based flap may be preferable.

  14. Tailor-made ezrin actin binding domain to probe its interaction with actin in-vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Shrivastava

    Full Text Available Ezrin, a member of the ERM (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin protein family, is an Actin-plasma membrane linker protein mediating cellular integrity and function. In-vivo study of such interactions is a complex task due to the presence of a large number of endogenous binding partners for both Ezrin and Actin. Further, C-terminal actin binding capacity of the full length Ezrin is naturally shielded by its N-terminal, and only rendered active in the presence of Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2 or phosphorylation at the C-terminal threonine. Here, we demonstrate a strategy for the design, expression and purification of constructs, combining the Ezrin C-terminal actin binding domain, with functional elements such as fusion tags and fluorescence tags to facilitate purification and fluorescence microscopy based studies. For the first time, internal His tag was employed for purification of Ezrin actin binding domain based on in-silico modeling. The functionality (Ezrin-actin interaction of these constructs was successfully demonstrated by using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy. This design can be extended to other members of the ERM family as well.

  15. Aged insulin granules display reduced microtubule-dependent mobility and are disposed within actin-positive multigranular bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoboth, Peter; Müller, Andreas; Ivanova, Anna; Mziaut, Hassan; Dehghany, Jaber; Sönmez, Anke; Lachnit, Martina; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Solimena, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Insulin secretion is key for glucose homeostasis. Insulin secretory granules (SGs) exist in different functional pools, with young SGs being more mobile and preferentially secreted. However, the principles governing the mobility of age-distinct SGs remain undefined. Using the time-reporter insulin-SNAP to track age-distinct SGs we now show that their dynamics can be classified into three components: highly dynamic, restricted, and nearly immobile. Young SGs display all three components, whereas old SGs are either restricted or nearly immobile. Both glucose stimulation and F-actin depolymerization recruit a fraction of nearly immobile young, but not old, SGs for highly dynamic, microtubule-dependent transport. Moreover, F-actin marks multigranular bodies/lysosomes containing aged SGs. These data demonstrate that SGs lose their responsiveness to glucose stimulation and competence for microtubule-mediated transport over time while changing their relationship with F-actin. PMID:25646459

  16. Power performance optimization and loads alleviation with active flaps using individual flap control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettas, Vasilis; Barlas, Thanasis; Gertz, Drew; Madsen, Helge A.

    2016-09-01

    The present article investigates the potential of Active Trailing Edge Flaps (ATEF) in terms of increase in annual energy production (AEP) as well as reduction of fatigue loads. The basis for this study is the DTU 10 MW Reference Wind Turbine (RWT) simulated using the aeroelastic code HAWC2. In an industrial-oriented manner the baseline rotor is upscaled by 5% and the ATEFs are implemented in the outer 30% of the blades. The flap system is kept simple and robust with a single flap section and control with wind speed, rotor azimuth, root bending moments and angle of attack in flap's mid-section being the sensor inputs. The AEP is increased due to the upscaling but also further due to the flap system while the fatigue loads in components of interest (blade, tower, nacelle and main bearing) are reduced close to the level of the original turbine. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a simple and applicable method that can be a technology enabler for rotor upscaling and lowering cost of energy.

  17. Incidence of flap procedures in the management of burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineaweaver, William C; Craft-Coffman, Beretta; Oswald, Tanya M

    2015-03-01

    Increased survival of burn patients presents opportunities for reconstructive strategies to improve outcomes in management of acute and secondary burn injuries. To assess one such strategy, namely flap reconstruction, we reviewed cases performed during the first 4.5 years of the JMS Burn and Reconstruction Center. We found that flap procedures accounted for 0.8% of acute cases (23 of 2723 procedures) and 33% of secondary cases (260 of 790 procedures). This initial finding shows that in this practice flap procedures are applied to a small number of acute problems while flap procedures comprise 33% of secondary procedures. Reconstructive flap surgery plays a measurable role in burn treatment at this center. Further study of outcomes and timing could lead to better understanding of optimal strategies for flap reconstruction in burns.

  18. Capping complex formation at the slow-growing end of the actin filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyukova, A S

    2008-12-01

    Actin filaments are polar; their barbed (fast-growing) and pointed (slow-growing) ends differ in structure and dynamic properties. The slow-growing end is regulated by tropomodulins, a family of capping proteins that require tropomyosins for optimal function. There are four tropomodulin isoforms; their distributions vary depending on tissue type and change during development. The C-terminal half of tropomodulin contains one compact domain represented by alternating alpha-helices and beta-structures. The tropomyosin-independent actin-capping site is located at the C-terminus. The N-terminal half has no regular structure; however, it contains a tropomyosin-dependent actin-capping site and two tropomyosin-binding sites. One tropomodulin molecule can bind two tropomyosin molecules. Effectiveness of tropomodulin binding to tropomyosin depends on the tropomyosin isoform. Regulation of tropomodulin binding at the pointed end as well as capping effectiveness in the presence of specific tropomyosins may affect formation of local cytoskeleton and dynamics of actin filaments in cells. PMID:19216712

  19. Pumping by flapping in a viscoelastic fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Pak, On Shun

    2010-01-01

    In a world without inertia, Purcell's scallop theorem states that in a Newtonian fluid a time-reversible motion cannot produce any net force or net flow. Here we consider the extent to which the nonlinear rheological behavior of viscoelastic fluids can be exploited to break the constraints of the scallop theorem in the context of fluid pumping. By building on previous work focusing on force generation, we consider a simple, biologically-inspired geometrical example of a flapper in a polymeric (Oldroyd-B) fluid, and calculate asymptotically the time-average net fluid flow produced by the reciprocal flapping motion. The net flow occurs at fourth order in the flapping amplitude, and suggests the possibility of transporting polymeric fluids using reciprocal motion in simple geometries even in the absence of inertia. The induced flow field and pumping performance are characterized and optimized analytically. Our results may be useful in the design of micro-pumps handling complex fluids.

  20. CATERPILLAR ADVANCEMENT FOR PARTIALLY NECROSED DELTOPECTORAL FLAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Narayan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Development of electric lamp by Thomas Elva Edison had significant impact on human civilization. With increasing production of electrical energy to meet ongoing demands of increased frequency of electrical injuries. Despite increased awareness of potential dangers, elect ricity is responsible for many fatalities all over the world. Electrical burn accounts for ~3% of all burn related injuries. Estimated 3, 000 annual admittions to burn units. Electrical burn have bimodal distribution ~1/3 children <6 yrs ( E lectric cords & wall outlets ~2/3 miners, construction, & electrical workers. Our case is one that of a 12 year old male child having electrical injury over face and neck with exposed angle of mandible which was covered by Deltopectoral flap with caterpillar advancement of flap.

  1. Self-organization of stress patterns drives state transitions in actin cortices

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Tzer Han; Abu-Shah, Enas; Li, Junang; Sharma, Abhinav; MacKintosh, Fred C; Keren, Kinneret; Schmidt, Christoph F; Fakhri, Nikta

    2016-01-01

    Biological functions rely on ordered structures and intricately controlled collective dynamics. In contrast to systems in thermodynamic equilibrium, order is typically established and sustained in stationary states by continuous dissipation of energy. Non-equilibrium dynamics is a necessary condition to make the systems highly susceptible to signals that cause transitions between different states. How cellular processes self-organize under this general principle is not fully understood. Here, we find that model actomyosin cortices, in the presence of rapid turnover, display distinct steady states, each distinguished by characteristic order and dynamics as a function of network connectivity. The different states arise from a subtle interaction between mechanical percolation of the actin network and myosin-generated stresses. Remarkably, myosin motors generate actin architectures, which in turn, force the emergence of ordered stress patterns. Reminiscent of second order phase transitions, the emergence of order...

  2. Flight test pilot evaluation of a delayed flap approach procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, J. S.; Edwards, F. G.; Foster, J. D.; Hegarty, D. M.; Drinkwater, F. J., III

    1977-01-01

    Using NASA's CV-990 aircraft, a delayed flap approach procedure was demonstrated to nine guest pilots from the air transport industry. Four demonstration flights and 37 approaches were conducted under VFR weather conditions. A limited pilot evaluation of the delayed flap procedure was obtained from pilot comments and from questionaires they completed. Pilot acceptability, pilot workload, and ATC compatibility were quantitatively rated. The delayed flap procedure was shown to be feasible, and suggestions for further development work were obtained.

  3. Medial circumflex femoral artery flap for ischial pressure sore

    OpenAIRE

    Palanivelu S

    2009-01-01

    A new axial pattern flap based on the terminal branches of the medial circumflex femoral artery is described for coverage of ischial pressure sore. Based on the terminal branches of the transverse branch of medial circumflex femoral artery, which exit through the gap between the quadratus femoris muscle above and the upper border of adductor magnus muscle below, this fascio cutaneous flap is much smaller than the posterior thigh flap but extremely useful to cover ischeal pressure sores. The s...

  4. Fenestration of bone flap during decompressive craniotomy for subdural hematoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ha Son Nguyen; Ninh Doan; Christopher Wolfla; Glen Pollock

    2016-01-01

    Background: Persistent/recurrent extra-axial hemorrhage may occur after decompression of a subdural hematoma (SDH) followed by an immediate replacement of bone flap. A fenestration of the bone flap may encourage extra-axial fluid absorption; however, the literature has not explored this technique. Methods: Forty-four consecutive patients who underwent surgical decompression of SDH with immediate replacement of bone flap were divided into two groups: Fenestration (F), n = 33, and no fenest...

  5. USB noise reduction by nozzle and flap modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The development of concepts for reducing upper surface blown flap noise at the source through flap modifications and special nozzles is reviewed. In particular, recent results obtained on the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of flaps with porous surfaces near the trailing edge and multi-slotted nozzles are reviewed. Considerable reduction (6-10 db) of the characteristic low frequency peak is shown. The aerodynamic performance is compared with conventional systems, and prospects for future improvements are discussed.

  6. [Pedicled versus free TRAM flap for breast reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galla, T J; Lukas, B; Feller, A M

    1999-03-01

    In breast reconstruction, the free TRAM-flap offers many advantages over the pedicled TRAM-flap. Due to its superior perfusion, the free flap rarely develops necrosis. Shaping of the flap is easier due to the lack of the thick muscle pedicle. Because the rectus muscle is spared, there is minimal donor site morbidity. However, the necessary microvascular anastomoses reduced the acceptance of the free TRAM-flap. During a 13-months period, 51 breast reconstructions were performed in 41 patients, 31 unilateral and ten bilateral. 45 flaps served for delayed reconstruction and six flaps for immediate reconstruction. The operations were performed by two teams working simultaneously. The average operating time was 3.9 hours for unilateral and 6.9 hours for bilateral delayed reconstruction. For immediate reconstruction, 6.2 and 6.3 hours were required for uni- and bilateral procedures, respectively. In 38 flaps, the thoracodorsal vessels served as recipient vessels; 13 flaps were anastomosed to the internal mammary artery and vein. Postoperative complications were observed in 13 patients. Three vessel anastomoses had to be revised. In one flap, a partial necrosis occurred; in two flaps hematoma evacuation was necessary. Two patients suffered from fat necroses at the abdomen and one umbilicus was lost. Skin irritations and seromas at the abdomen occurred in five patients. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed in one patient three weeks postoperatively. Abdominal hernias or bulging in the epigastric area were not observed up to 15 months after reconstruction. These results reveal a low complication rate for breast reconstruction with the free TRAM-flap. The advantages of this technique as compared to the pedicled technique are discussed.

  7. Propeller Perforator Flaps in Distal Lower Leg:Evolution and Clinical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Georgescu, Alexandru V.

    2012-01-01

    Simple or complex defects in the lower leg, and especially in its distal third, continue to be a challenging task for reconstructive surgeons. A variety of flaps were used in the attempt to achieve excellence in form and function. After a long evolution of the reconstructive methods, including random pattern flaps, axial pattern flaps, musculocutaneous flaps and fasciocutaneous flaps, the reappraisal of the works of Manchot and Salmon by Taylor and Palmer opened the era of perforator flaps. T...

  8. Design and performance prediction of swashplateless helicopter rotors with trailing edge flaps and tabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Jaye

    This work studies the design of trailing edge controls for swashplateless helicopter primary control, and examines the impact of those controls on the performance of the rotor. The objective is to develop a comprehensive aeroelastic analysis for swashplateless rotors in steady level flight. The two key issues to be solved for this swashplateless control concept are actuation of the trailing edge controls and evaluating the performance of the swashplateless rotor compared to conventionally controlled helicopters. Solving the first requires simultaneous minimization of trailing flap control angles and hinge moments to reduce actuation power. The second issue requires not only the accurate assessment of swashplateless rotor power, but also similar or improved performance compared to conventional rotors. The analysis consists of two major parts, the structural model and the aerodynamic model. The inertial contributions of the trailing edge flap and tab are derived and added to the system equations in the structural model. Two different aerodynamic models are used in the analysis, a quasi-steady thin airfoil theory that includes arbitrary hinge positions for the flap and the tab, and an unsteady lifting line model with airfoil table lookup based on wind tunnel test data and computational fluid dynamics simulation. The design aspect of the problem is investigated through parametric studies of the trailing edge flap and tab for a Kaman-type conceptual rotor and a UH-60A swashplateless variant. The UH-60A model is not changed except for the addition of a trailing edge flap to the rotor blade, and the reduction of pitch link stiffness to imitate a soft root spring. Study of the uncoupled blade response identifies torsional stiffness and flap hinge stiffness as important design features of the swashplateless rotor. Important trailing edge flap and tab design features including index angle, aerodynamic overhang, chord and length are identified through examination of coupled

  9. Acetylcysteine in random skin flap in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abla Luiz Eduardo Felipe

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Analyze the ability of Acetylcysteine to reduce distal necrosis in a random skin flap, in the rat. METHODS: The present study utilized 28 adult male Wistar-EPM rats distributed, at random, in two groups of 14 animals. Control group rats (CG received distilled water and Acetylcysteine group animals (NACG received NAC (300 mg/kg by oral infusion, 15 minutes before flap elevation. On the seventh postoperative day, percentage of distal necrosis was determined and skin samples collected in order to allow determination of MDA levels. RESULTS: The mean necrotic area in CG group (control was 66 % and in NACG group (Acetylcysteine 52 %, a statistically significant difference according to the Mann-Whitney test (U calc = 25; U crit = 45. MDA levels were lower in the CG flap skin samples than in the NACG samples (U calc = 24; U crit = 45, the oposite being true in the normal skin samples (U calc = 10; U crit = 45. CONCLUSION: Acetylcysteine was effective, according to the model used, reducing the percentage of distal necrosis in NACG rats.

  10. Design, Fabrication and Testing Of Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Preethi Manohari Sai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flapping flight has the potential to revolutionize micro air vehicles (MAVs due to increased aerodynamic performance, improved maneuverability and hover capabilities. The purpose of this project is to design and fabrication of flapping wing micro air vehicle. The designed MAV will have a wing span of 40cm. The drive mechanism will be a gear mechanism to drive the flapping wing MAV, along with one actuator. Initially, a preliminary design of flapping wing MAV is drawn and necessary calculation for the lift calculation has been done. Later a CAD model is drawn in CATIA V5 software. Finally we tested by Flying.

  11. Rotational flaps in oncologic breast surgery. Anatomical and technical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acea Nebril, Benigno; Builes Ramírez, Sergio; García Novoa, Alejandra; Varela Lamas, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Local flaps are a group of surgical procedures that can solve the thoracic closure of large defects after breast cancer surgery with low morbidity. Its use in skin necrosis complications after conservative surgery or skin sparing mastectomies facilitates the initiation of adjuvant treatments and reduces delays in this patient group. This article describes the anatomical basis for the planning of thoracic and abdominal local flaps. Also, the application of these local flaps for closing large defects in the chest and selective flaps for skin coverage by necrosis in breast conserving surgery.

  12. Thoracodorsal artery perforator flap for upper limb reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoracodorsal artery perforator flap (TAP) is a feasible option to reconstruct defects in upper limb where only skin and subcutaneous tissue is required. Methods: This case series was carried out at department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi. A total of 5 patients with upper limb defects were reconstructed with thoracodorsal artery musculocutaneous perforator flaps. Among them, 3 were pedicled and two free TAP flaps. All flaps except one pedicled flap were raised on a single perforator pedicle. Recipient sites were one axilla, two shoulder regions and two hands. The soft tissue defects in the patients had resulted from burns, trauma, wide local excision of synovial sarcoma and surgery for hidradenitis suppurativa. Preoperative hand held Doppler ultrasound was used to locate and mark the perforator. Results: All flaps survived without significant complications. All flaps were hyperemic in the immediate postoperative period. We designed and raised all the five flaps on eccentrically placed perforators. All the raised perforators originated from the descending branch of the thoracodorsal artery. The donor sites were closed primarily with linear scars in all cases except one, in which partial closure was accomplished with split thickness skin grafting (STSG). Conclusion: The thoracodorsal artery perforator flap has great potential for reconstructing large, relatively shallow, defects of upper limb because of its suitable skin quality, texture and appropriate thickness, as well as hidden donor site, a reliable pedicle and sparing of muscle unit. (author)

  13. Medial circumflex femoral artery flap for ischial pressure sore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palanivelu S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new axial pattern flap based on the terminal branches of the medial circumflex femoral artery is described for coverage of ischial pressure sore. Based on the terminal branches of the transverse branch of medial circumflex femoral artery, which exit through the gap between the quadratus femoris muscle above and the upper border of adductor magnus muscle below, this fascio cutaneous flap is much smaller than the posterior thigh flap but extremely useful to cover ischeal pressure sores. The skin redundancy below the gluteal fold allows a primary closure of the donor defect. It can also be used in combination with biceps femoris muscle flap.

  14. Oropharyngeal reconstruction with a pedicled submandibular gland flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashrah, Mubarak A; Zhou, Shang-Hui; Abdelrehem, Ahmed; Ma, Chunyue; Xu, Liqun; He, Yue; Zhang, Chen-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Locoregional flaps are widely used for reconstruction of small and medium defects in the oral cavity. The submandibular gland flap is a pedicled flap, which derives its blood supply from the facial artery, based on the submandibular gland. We describe the use of the flap in 20 patients who required oropharyngeal reconstruction with a pedicled submandibular gland flap after resection of a tumour between July 2012 and October 2014. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma were excluded. All flaps were pedicled on the facial vessels (inferiorly in 17 patients and superiorly in 3). The indications were: reconstruction of intraoral mucosal defects (n=13), filling the parapharyngeal dead space (n=6), and obliteration of the mastoid (n=1). All the flaps atrophied, but with no clinical effect. One patient developed partial loss of the flap, and one early leakage. There were no cases of xerostomia, and no signs of recurrence during the postoperative follow-up period of 3-26 months. The flap is useful, as it is simple and reliable for reconstruction of small to medium oropharyngeal defects in carefully selected cases, and gives good cosmetic and functional results. PMID:26388070

  15. Cervicopectoral flap in head and neck cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivrioglu Nazan S

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reconstruction of the head and neck after adequate resection of primary tumor and neck dissection is a challenge. It should be performed at one sitting in advanced tumors. Defects caused by the resection should be closed with flaps which match in color, texture and hair bearing characteristics with the face. Cervicopectoral flap is a one such flap from chest and neck skin mainly used to cover the cheek defects. Methods This study included twelve patients presenting with cancer of the head and neck to Izmir Ataturk Training Hospital and Adnan Menderes University Hospital. Tumor resection and neck dissection was performed in one session by the same surgeon. A single incision was made and a medially based cervicopectoral fascio-cutaneous flap was used for surgical exposure in neck dissection and for closure of defects after tumor resection. Results There was no major complication. Two flaps had partial superficial epidermolysis at the suture line. Good aesthetic and functional results were achieved. Conclusion The cervicopectoral flap is an excellent alternative for the reconstruction of head and neck. Harvesting and application of the flap is rapid and safe. Only a single incision is sufficient for dissection and flap elevation. This flap achieves perfect surgical exposure, makes neck dissection easy and allows one to perform both tumor resection and neck dissection in one session.

  16. A novel animal model for skin flap prelamination with biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xianyu; Luo, Xusong; Liu, Fei; Gu, Chuan; Wang, Xi; Yang, Qun; Qian, Yunliang; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Several animal models of skin flap construction were reported using biomaterials in a way similar to prefabrication. However, there are few animal model using biomaterials similar to prelamination, another main way of clinical skin flap construction that has been proved to be reliable. Can biomaterials be added in skin flap prelamination to reduce the use of autogenous tissues? Beside individual clinical attempts, animal model is needed for randomized controlled trial to objectively evaluate the feasibility and further investigation. Combining human Acellular Dermal Matrix (hADM) and autologous skin graft, we prelaminated flaps based on inguinal fascia. One, two, three and four weeks later, hADM exhibited a sound revascularization and host cell infiltration. Prelaminated skin flaps were then raised and microsurgically transplanted back to groin region. Except for flaps after one week of prelamination, flaps from other subgroups successfully reconstructed defects. After six to sixteen weeks of transplantation, hADM was proved to being able to maintain its original structure, having a wealth of host tissue cells and achieving full revascularization.To our knowledge, this is the first animal model of prelaminating skin flap with biomaterials. Success of this animal model indicates that novel flap prelamination with biomaterials is feasible. PMID:27659066

  17. Actin filaments at the leading edge of cancer cells are characterized by a high mobile fraction and turnover regulation by profilin I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Lorente

    Full Text Available Cellular motility is the basis for cancer cell invasion and metastasis. In the case of breast cancer, the most common type of cancer among women, metastasis represents the most devastating stage of the disease. The central role of cellular motility in cancer development emphasizes the importance of understanding the specific mechanisms involved in this process. In this context, tumor development and metastasis would be the consequence of a loss or defect of the mechanisms that control cytoskeletal remodeling. Profilin I belongs to a family of small actin binding proteins that are thought to assist in actin filament elongation at the leading edge of migrating cells. Traditionally, Profilin I has been considered to be an essential control element for actin polymerization and cell migration. Expression of Profilin I is down-regulated in breast and various other cancer cells. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a breast cancer cell line, further inhibition of Profilin I expression promotes hypermotility and metastatic spread, a finding that contrasts with the proposed role of Profilin in enhancing polymerization. In this report, we have taken advantage of the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP of GFP-actin to quantify and compare actin dynamics at the leading edge level in both cancer and non-cancer cell models. Our results suggest that (i a high level of actin dynamics (i.e., a large mobile fraction of actin filaments and a fast turnover is a common characteristic of some cancer cells; (ii actin polymerization shows a high degree of independence from the presence of extracellular growth factors; and (iii our results also corroborate the role of Profilin I in regulating actin polymerization, as raising the intracellular levels of Profilin I decreased the mobile fraction ratio of actin filaments and slowed their polymerization rate; furthermore, increased Profilin levels also led to reduced individual cell velocity and directionality.

  18. The Structural Basis of Actin Organization by Vinculin and Metavinculin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Laura Y; Thompson, Peter M; Lee, Hyunna T; Pershad, Mihir; Campbell, Sharon L; Alushin, Gregory M

    2016-01-16

    Vinculin is an essential adhesion protein that links membrane-bound integrin and cadherin receptors through their intracellular binding partners to filamentous actin, facilitating mechanotransduction. Here we present an 8.5-Å-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction and pseudo-atomic model of the vinculin tail (Vt) domain bound to F-actin. Upon actin engagement, the N-terminal "strap" and helix 1 are displaced from the Vt helical bundle to mediate actin bundling. We find that an analogous conformational change also occurs in the H1' helix of the tail domain of metavinculin (MVt) upon actin binding, a muscle-specific splice isoform that suppresses actin bundling by Vt. These data support a model in which metavinculin tunes the actin bundling activity of vinculin in a tissue-specific manner, providing a mechanistic framework for understanding metavinculin mutations associated with hereditary cardiomyopathies. PMID:26493222

  19. Cdc42 and actin control polarized expression of TI-VAMP vesicles to neuronal growth cones and their fusion with the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Philipp; Rudge, Rachel; Irinopoulou, Theano; Danglot, Lydia; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile; Galli, Thierry

    2006-03-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP)-mediated fusion of intracellular vesicles with the plasma membrane is crucial for neurite outgrowth, a pathway not requiring synaptobrevin-dependent exocytosis. Yet, it is not known how the TI-VAMP membrane trafficking pathway is regulated or how it is coordinated with cytoskeletal dynamics within the growth cone that guide neurite outgrowth. Here, we demonstrate that TI-VAMP, but not synaptobrevin 2, concentrates in the peripheral, F-actin-rich region of the growth cones of hippocampal neurons in primary culture. Its accumulation correlates with and depends upon the presence of F-actin. Moreover, acute stimulation of actin remodeling by homophilic activation of the adhesion molecule L1 induces a site-directed, actin-dependent recruitment of the TI-VAMP compartment. Expression of a dominant-positive mutant of Cdc42, a key regulator of cell polarity, stimulates formation of F-actin- and TI-VAMP-rich filopodia outside the growth cone. Furthermore, we report that Cdc42 activates exocytosis of pHLuorin tagged TI-VAMP in an actin-dependent manner. Collectively, our data suggest that Cdc42 and regulated assembly of the F-actin network control the accumulation and exocytosis of TI-VAMP-containing membrane vesicles in growth cones to coordinate membrane trafficking and actin remodeling during neurite outgrowth.

  20. Cdc42 and Actin Control Polarized Expression of TI-VAMP Vesicles to Neuronal Growth Cones and Their Fusion with the Plasma MembraneV⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Philipp; Rudge, Rachel; Irinopoulou, Theano; Danglot, Lydia; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile; Galli, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP)-mediated fusion of intracellular vesicles with the plasma membrane is crucial for neurite outgrowth, a pathway not requiring synaptobrevin-dependent exocytosis. Yet, it is not known how the TI-VAMP membrane trafficking pathway is regulated or how it is coordinated with cytoskeletal dynamics within the growth cone that guide neurite outgrowth. Here, we demonstrate that TI-VAMP, but not synaptobrevin 2, concentrates in the peripheral, F-actin-rich region of the growth cones of hippocampal neurons in primary culture. Its accumulation correlates with and depends upon the presence of F-actin. Moreover, acute stimulation of actin remodeling by homophilic activation of the adhesion molecule L1 induces a site-directed, actin-dependent recruitment of the TI-VAMP compartment. Expression of a dominant-positive mutant of Cdc42, a key regulator of cell polarity, stimulates formation of F-actin- and TI-VAMP-rich filopodia outside the growth cone. Furthermore, we report that Cdc42 activates exocytosis of pHLuorin tagged TI-VAMP in an actin-dependent manner. Collectively, our data suggest that Cdc42 and regulated assembly of the F-actin network control the accumulation and exocytosis of TI-VAMP-containing membrane vesicles in growth cones to coordinate membrane trafficking and actin remodeling during neurite outgrowth. PMID:16381811

  1. Prokaryotic DNA segregation by an actin-like filament

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus; Löwe, Jan;

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for prokaryotic DNA segregation are largely unknown. The partitioning locus (par) encoded by the Escherichia coli plasmid R1 actively segregates its replicon to daughter cells. We show here that the ParM ATPase encoded by par forms dynamic actin-like filaments...... was ATP dependent, and depolymerization of ParM filaments required nucleotide hydrolysis. Our in vivo and in vitro results indicate that ParM polymerization generates the force required for directional movement of plasmids to opposite cell poles and that the ParR-parC complex functions as a nucleation...... point for ParM polymerization. Hence, we provide evidence for a simple prokaryotic analogue of the eukaryotic mitotic spindle apparatus....

  2. Identification of Flap Motion Parameters for Vibration Reduction in Helicopter Rotors with Multiple Active Trailing Edge Flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğbreve;ur Dalli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An active control method utilizing the multiple trailing edge flap configuration for rotorcraft vibration suppression and blade loads control is presented. A comprehensive model for rotor blade with active trailing edge flaps is used to calculate the vibration characteristics, natural frequencies and mode shapes of any complex composite helicopter rotor blade. A computer program is developed to calculate the system response, rotor blade root forces and moments under aerodynamic forcing conditions. Rotor blade system response is calculated using the proposed solution method and the developed program depending on any structural and aerodynamic properties of rotor blades, structural properties of trailing edge flaps and properties of trailing edge flap actuator inputs. Rotor blade loads are determined first on a nominal rotor blade without multiple active trailing edge flaps and then the effects of the active flap motions on the existing rotor blade loads are investigated. Multiple active trailing edge flaps are controlled by using open loop controllers to identify the effects of the actuator signal output properties such as frequency, amplitude and phase on the system response. Effects of using multiple trailing edge flaps on controlling rotor blade vibrations are investigated and some design criteria are determined for the design of trailing edge flap controller that will provide actuator signal outputs to minimize the rotor blade root loads. It is calculated that using the developed active trailing edge rotor blade model, helicopter rotor blade vibrations can be reduced up to 36% of the nominal rotor blade vibrations.

  3. Comparative study of visual acuity and aberrations after intralase femtosecond LASIK: small corneal flap versus big corneal flap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Li; Zhang; Lei; Liu; Chang-Xia; Cui; Ming; Hu; Zhao-Na; Li; Li-Jun; Cao; Xiu-Hua; Jing; Guo-Ying; Mu

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To study the effects of different flap sizes on visual acuity, refractive outcomes, and aberrations after femtosecond laser for laser keratomileusis (LASIK). ·METHODS: In each of the forty patients enrolled, 1 eye was randomly assigned to receive treatment with a 8.1mm diameter corneal flap, defined as the small flap, while the other eye was treated with a 8.6mm diameter corneal flap, defined as the big flap. Refractive errors, visual acuity, and higher -order aberrations were compared between the two groups at week 1, month 1 and 3 postoperatively. · RESULTS: The postoperative refractive errors and visual acuity all conformed to the intended goal. Postoperative higher -order aberrations were increased, especially in spherical aberration (Z12) and vertical coma (Z7). There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of postoperative refractive errors, visual acuity, root mean square of total HOAs (HO -RMS), trefoil 30° (Z6), vertical coma (Z7), horizontal coma (Z8), trefoil 0° (Z9), and spherical aberration (Z12) at any point during the postoperative follow-up. ·CONCLUSION: Both the small and big flaps are safe and effective procedures to correct myopia, provided the exposure stroma meets the excimer laser ablations. The personalized size corneal flap is feasible, as we can design the size of corneal flap based on the principle that the corneal flap diameter should be equal to or greater than the sum of the maximum ablation diameter and apparatus error.

  4. A propeller flap for single-stage nose reconstruction in selected patients: supratrochlear artery axial propeller flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, Adriana; D'Arpa, Salvatore; Massimiliano, Tripoli; Toia, Francesca; Moschella, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    The paramedian forehead flap is the gold standard technique for nose reconstruction. It requires two different surgical operations which prolonged the postoperative dressing and care. We present our 5-year experience with a propeller flap based on the supratrochlear artery, which allows one-stage transfer of the forehead skin to the nose without the need for pedicle division. This technique is indicated in a selected group of patients who are not suitable for multiple-stage reconstructions because they have concurrent medical conditions, reduced mobility, or live far away from specialized medical centers. We have renamed this procedure as supratrochlear artery axial propeller flap, from the acronym STAAP flap, to stress the axial, well known and constant, vascularization of the flap. In the past 5 years, we have been performing 25 STAAP flaps; full-thickness nasal reconstruction was performed in 11 cases. The patients were 16 males and 9 females, with a mean age of 79.5 years. All patients had multiple comorbidities. Complete flap survival was observed in 23 cases and healing was complete in 7 days. In two cases, there was a partial distal necrosis of the flap treated conservatively. Cosmetic results were good and the patient's satisfaction was significant. These results indicate that the STAAP flap is a reliable and useful technique in selected cases, as old or noncompliant patients who benefit from a one-stage technique of nose reconstruction. PMID:24918712

  5. Navier-Stokes Computations of a Wing-Flap Model With Blowing Normal to the Flap Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    A computational study of a generic wing with a half span flap shows the mean flow effects of several blown flap configurations. The effort compares and contrasts the thin-layer, Reynolds averaged, Navier-Stokes solutions of a baseline wing-flap configuration with configurations that have blowing normal to the flap surface through small slits near the flap side edge. Vorticity contours reveal a dual vortex structure at the flap side edge for all cases. The dual vortex merges into a single vortex at approximately the mid-flap chord location. Upper surface blowing reduces the strength of the merged vortex and moves the vortex away from the upper edge. Lower surface blowing thickens the lower shear layer and weakens the merged vortex, but not as much as upper surface blowing. Side surface blowing forces the lower surface vortex farther outboard of the flap edge by effectively increasing the aerodynamic span of the flap. It is seen that there is no global aerodynamic penalty or benefit from the particular blowing configurations examined.

  6. VISCOELASTIC CONSTITUTIVE MODEL RELATED TO DEFORMATION OF INSECT WING UNDER LOADING IN FLAPPING MOTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Lin; HU Jin-song; YU Yong-liang; CHENG Peng; XU Bo-qing; TONG Bing-gang

    2006-01-01

    Flexible insect wings deform passively under the periodic loading during flapping flight. The wing flexibility is considered as one of the specific mechanisms on improving insect flight performance. The constitutive relation of the insect wing material plays a key role on the wing deformation, but has not been clearly understood yet. A viscoelastic constitutive relation model was established based on the stress relaxation experiment of a dragonfly wing (in vitro). This model was examined by the finite clement analysis of the dynamic deformation response for a model insect wing under the action of the periodical inertial force in flapping. It is revealed that the viscoelastic constitutive relation is rational to characterize the biomaterial property of insect wings in contrast to the elastic one. The amplitude and form of the passive viscoelastic deformation of the wing is evidently dependent on the viscous parameters in the constitutive relation.

  7. A study of a three-dimensional self-propelled flying bird with flapping wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, LinLin; Guan, Hui; Wu, ChuiJie

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a study of a three-dimensional (3D) self-propelled bionic flying bird in a viscous flow is carried out. This bionic bird is propelled and lifted through flapping and rotating wings, and better flying can be achieved by adjusting the flapping and rotation motion of wings. In this study, we found that the bird can fly faster forward and upward with appropriate center of rotation and oscillation without more energy consumption and have perfect flight performance at a certain angle of attack by adjusting the center of oscillation. The study utilizes a 3D computational fluid dynamics package which constitutes combined immersed boundary method and the volume of fluid method. In addition, it includes adaptive multigrid finite volume method and control strategy of swimming and flying.

  8. Quadrilobed superior gluteal artery perforator flap for sacrococcygeal defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAI Heng-lin; SHEN Chuan-an; CHAI Jia-ke; LI Hua-tao; YU Yong-ming; LI Da-wei

    2013-01-01

    Background Perforator flaps are used extensively in repairing soft tissue defects.Superior gluteal artery perforatorflaps are used for repairing sacral defects,but the tension required for direct closure of the donor area after harvesting ofrelatively large flaps carries a risk of postoperative dehiscence.This research was to investigate a modified superiorgluteal artery perforator flap for repairing sacrococcygeal soft tissue defects.Methods From June 2003 to April 2010,we used our newly designed superior gluteal artery perforator flap for repair of sacrococcygeal soft tissue defects in 10 patients (study group).The wound and donor areas were measured,and the flaps were designed accordingly.Wound healing was assessed over a follow-up period of 6-38 months.From January 1998 to February 2003,twelve patients with sacrococcygeal pressure sores were treated with traditional methods,VY advancement flaps or oblong flaps,as control group.Results After debridement,the soft tissue defects ranged from 12 cm × 10 cm to 26 cm × 22 cm (mean 16.3 cm x 13.5cm).Four patients were treated using right-sided flaps ranging from 15 cm × 11 cm to 25 cm × 20 cm (mean 18.2 cm × 14cm).Four patients were treated using left-sided flaps,and two were treated using both right-and left-sided flaps.Suction drains were removed on postoperative Days 3-21 (mean 5.9) and sutures were removed on postoperative Days 12-14.Each flap included 1-2 perforators for each of the donor and recipient sites.Donor sites were closed directly.All flaps survived.In eight patients,the wounds healed after single-stage surgery.After further debridement,the wounds of the remaining two patients were considered healed on postoperative Days 26 and 33,respectively.The rate of first intention in the study group (80%,8/10) significantly increased than that of control group ((25%,3/12),X2=4.583,P=-0.032).Follow-up examinations found that the flaps had a soft texture without ulceration.In the two patients without

  9. Virulent Burkholderia species mimic host actin polymerases to drive actin-based motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benanti, Erin L.; Nguyen, Catherine M.; Welch, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are bacterial pathogens that cause melioidosis and glanders, while their close relative B. thailandensis is nonpathogenic. All use the trimeric autotransporter BimA to facilitate actin-based motility, host cell fusion and dissemination. Here, we show that BimA orthologs mimic different host actin-polymerizing proteins. B. thailandensis BimA activates the host Arp2/3 complex. In contrast, B. pseudomallei and B. mallei BimA mimic host Ena/VASP actin polymerases in their ability to nucleate, elongate and bundle filaments by associating with barbed ends, as well as in their use of WH2 motifs and oligomerization for activity. Mechanistic differences among BimA orthologs resulted in distinct actin filament organization and motility parameters, which affected the efficiency of cell fusion during infection. Our results identify bacterial Ena/VASP mimics and reveal that pathogens imitate the full spectrum of host actin-polymerizing pathways, suggesting that mimicry of different polymerization mechanisms influences key parameters of infection. PMID:25860613

  10. Intraoperative Flap Complications in LASIK Surgery Performed by Ophthalmology Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Diaz-de-Leon, Lorena; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Navas, Alejandro; Graue-Hernández, Enrique O.; Ramirez-Miranda, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the rate of flap-related complications in LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmology residents and to analyze the risk factors for these complications. Methods: We analyzed 273 flap dissections in 145 patients from March 2013 to February 2014. We included all LASIK surgeries performed by 32 ophthalmology residents using a Moria M2 microkeratome. All the flap-related complications were noted. Comparison between both groups with and without complications was performed with an independent Student's t-test and relative risks were calculated. Results: There were 19 flap-related complications out of the 273 flap dissections (6.95%). The most common complication was incomplete flap dissection (n = 10; 3.66%), followed by free-cap (n = 5; 1.83%), and flap-buttonhole (n = 2; 0.73%). There was no significant difference between the complicated and uncomplicated cases in terms of the right versus the left eye, pachymetry results, white-to-white diameter, and spherical equivalent. But this difference was significant for mean keratometry (P = 0.008), K-min (P = 0.01), and K-max (P = 0.03) between these groups. Final visual acuity after rescheduling laser treatment was similar in both groups. Relative risks for flap-related complications were 2.03 for the first LASIK surgery (CI 95% 0.64 to 6.48; P = 0.22) and 1.26 (CI 95% 0.43 to 3.69; P = 0.66) for the surgeon's flap-related complications. Female gender presented an odds ratio of 2.48 (CI 95% 0.68 to 9.00; P = 0.16) for complications. Conclusion: Flap-related complications are common intraoperative event during LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmologists. Keratometries and surgeon's first procedure represent a higher probability for flap related complications than some other biometric parameters of patient's eye. PMID:27621782

  11. The application of island myocutaneous flap for challenging wounds on cervico-thoracic region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Xin; XUE Chun-yu; LI Li; HUAN Jing-ning; GUO En-tan

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To introduce the experiences in the application of island myocutaneous flap for challenging wound on cervico-thoracic region. Methods: Different myocutaneous flaps were selected according to the location, peculiarity and etiological factor of wound. There were 28 cases of island pectoralis major island myocutanuous flaps, 34 cases of latissimus dorsi island myocutaneous flaps, 19 cases of trapizius island myocutaneous flaps and 17 cases of rectus abdominis island myocutaneous flaps in this report. Results: All 98 patients with challenging wound on cervico-thoracic region were successfully treated with this method without complications, and obtained functional and cosmetic effectiveness. Conclusion:Challenging wounds in cervico-nuchal region can be repaired with pertoralis major island myocutaneous flap, latissimus dorsi island myocutaneous flap and trapizius island myocutaneous flap, while challenging wounds in thoracic region can be repaired with latissimus dorsi island myocutaneous flap and rectus abdominis island myocutaneous flap. Satisfactory functional and cosmetic results can be obtained.

  12. Tropomyosin - master regulator of actin filament function in the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2015-08-15

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms are the master regulators of the functions of individual actin filaments in fungi and metazoans. Tpms are coiled-coil parallel dimers that form a head-to-tail polymer along the length of actin filaments. Yeast only has two Tpm isoforms, whereas mammals have over 40. Each cytoskeletal actin filament contains a homopolymer of Tpm homodimers, resulting in a filament of uniform Tpm composition along its length. Evidence for this 'master regulator' role is based on four core sets of observation. First, spatially and functionally distinct actin filaments contain different Tpm isoforms, and recent data suggest that members of the formin family of actin filament nucleators can specify which Tpm isoform is added to the growing actin filament. Second, Tpms regulate whole-organism physiology in terms of morphogenesis, cell proliferation, vesicle trafficking, biomechanics, glucose metabolism and organ size in an isoform-specific manner. Third, Tpms achieve these functional outputs by regulating the interaction of actin filaments with myosin motors and actin-binding proteins in an isoform-specific manner. Last, the assembly of complex structures, such as stress fibers and podosomes involves the collaboration of multiple types of actin filament specified by their Tpm composition. This allows the cell to specify actin filament function in time and space by simply specifying their Tpm isoform composition. PMID:26240174

  13. Gelsolin mediates calcium-dependent disassembly of Listeria actin tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Laura; Arnaudeau, Serge; Gibson, Bruce; Li, Wei; Krause, Ryoko; Hao, Binghua; Bamburg, James R.; Lew, Daniel P.; Demaurex, Nicolas; Southwick, Frederick

    2005-01-01

    The role of intracellular Ca2+ in the regulation of actin filament assembly and disassembly has not been clearly defined. We show that reduction of intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) to <40 nM in Listeria monocytogenes-infected, EGFP–actin-transfected Madin–Darby canine kidney cells results in a 3-fold lengthening of actin filament tails. This increase in tail length is the consequence of marked slowing of the actin filament disassembly rate, without a significant change in assembly rate. The Ca2+-sensitive actin-severing protein gelsolin concentrates in the Listeria rocket tails at normal resting [Ca2+]i and disassociates from the tails when [Ca2+]i is lowered. Reduction in [Ca2+]i also blocks the severing activity of gelsolin, but not actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin microinjected into Listeria-infected cells. In Xenopus extracts, Listeria tail lengths are also calcium-sensitive, markedly shortening on addition of calcium. Immunodepletion of gelsolin, but not Xenopus ADF/cofilin, eliminates calcium-sensitive actin-filament shortening. Listeria tail length is also calcium-insensitive in gelsolin-null mouse embryo fibroblasts. We conclude that gelsolin is the primary Ca2+-sensitive actin filament recycling protein in the cell and is capable of enhancing Listeria actin tail disassembly at normal resting [Ca2+]i (145 nM). These experiments illustrate the unique and complementary functions of gelsolin and ADF/cofilin in the recycling of actin filaments. PMID:15671163

  14. Tropomyosin - master regulator of actin filament function in the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2015-08-15

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms are the master regulators of the functions of individual actin filaments in fungi and metazoans. Tpms are coiled-coil parallel dimers that form a head-to-tail polymer along the length of actin filaments. Yeast only has two Tpm isoforms, whereas mammals have over 40. Each cytoskeletal actin filament contains a homopolymer of Tpm homodimers, resulting in a filament of uniform Tpm composition along its length. Evidence for this 'master regulator' role is based on four core sets of observation. First, spatially and functionally distinct actin filaments contain different Tpm isoforms, and recent data suggest that members of the formin family of actin filament nucleators can specify which Tpm isoform is added to the growing actin filament. Second, Tpms regulate whole-organism physiology in terms of morphogenesis, cell proliferation, vesicle trafficking, biomechanics, glucose metabolism and organ size in an isoform-specific manner. Third, Tpms achieve these functional outputs by regulating the interaction of actin filaments with myosin motors and actin-binding proteins in an isoform-specific manner. Last, the assembly of complex structures, such as stress fibers and podosomes involves the collaboration of multiple types of actin filament specified by their Tpm composition. This allows the cell to specify actin filament function in time and space by simply specifying their Tpm isoform composition.

  15. AN ANALYTIC APPROACH TO THEORETICAL MODELING OF HIGHLY UNSTEADY VISCOUS FLOW EXCITED BY WING FLAPPING IN SMALL INSECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余永亮; 童秉纲; 马晖扬

    2003-01-01

    Numerous studies on the aerodynamics of insect wing flapping were carried out on different approaches of flight investigations, model experiments, and numerical simulations, but the theoretical modeling remains to be explored. In the present paper, an analytic approach is presented to model the flow interactions of wing flapping in air for small insects with the surrounding flow fields being highly unsteady and highly viscous. The model of wing flapping is a 2-D flat plate, which makes plunging and pitching oscillations as well as quick rotations reversing its positions of leading and trailing edges, respectively, during stroke reversals. It contains three simplified aerodynamic assumptions:(i) unsteady potential flow; (ii) discrete vortices shed from both leading and trailing edges of the wing; (iii) Kutta conditions applied at both edges. Then the problem is reduced to the solution of the unsteady Laplace equation, by using distributed singularities, i.e., sources/sinks, and vortices in the field. To validate the present physical model and analytic method proposed via benchmark examples, two elemental motions in wing flapping and a case of whole flapping cycles are analyzed,and the predicted results agree well with available experimental and numerical data. This verifies that the present analytical approach may give qualitatively correct and quantitatively reasonable results.Furthermore, the total fluid-dynamic force in the present method can be decomposed into three parts:one due to the added inertial (or mass) effect, the other and the third due to the induction of vortices shed from the leading- and the trailing-edge and their images respectively, and this helps to reveal the flow control mechanisms in insect wing flapping.

  16. Pectoralis myocutaneous flap for salvage of necrotic wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, J.C.; Davis, R.K.; Koltai, P.J.

    1985-02-01

    The authors have utilized six pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps in attempts to salvage extensive necrotic wounds of the pharynx and neck. The flap was employed in the following situations: massive necrosis of the entire neck skin with both carotid artery systems exposed, radiation necrosis of the neck skin with exposure of carotid artery, dehiscence of gastric pull-up from pharynx with resultant carotid exposure, failed trapezius flap in a radionecrotic oral cavity, and two cases of pharyngocutaneous fistula with extensive soft tissue necrosis. These flaps achieved healing in all cases. One death occurred 3 weeks following complete cutaneous healing secondary to a ruptured carotid pseudoaneurysm. One flap underwent total skin loss but the entirety of the muscle survived and the fistula was successfully closed with the back of the muscle being subsequently skin grafted. One case of dehiscence of the flap from oral mucosa resulted in a minor exposure of mandible with limited osteoradionecrosis controlled by topical means. This flap has performed extremely well in these precarious and difficult situations that previously may not have been salvageable. It has also been effective in abbreviating the required hospitalization and wound care. The authors conclude that the pectoralis myocutaneous flap should be the primary choice for the management of extensive postsurgical wound necrosis.

  17. Fenestration of bone flap during interval autologous cranioplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Son Nguyen

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Presumably, fenestrations augment surface area for extra-axial fluid absorption through the bone flap. Our results, regarding MLS and postoperative volume, provide support for this concept. Accordingly, bone flap fenestration has the potential to reduce extra-axial fluid accumulation.

  18. Breast ptosis managed by mastopexy using the triple flaps procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheita, Alaa; Moftah, Ali

    2011-02-01

    Breast ptosis is a highly unattractive appearance of the breast. In the mind, it is associated with aging, multiple pregnancies, lactation, and senile changes. Its correction by mastopexy presents one of the greatest challenges to the breast surgeon aiming at a pleasant full conical shape and stability of the results. The authors present their mastopexy procedure using a triple-flap method based on the principle of a superior pedicle flap mammaplasty. The technique, presented in detail, basically consists of a superior pedicle dermaglandular flap that carries the nipple-areola complex between outer and inner flaps. The outer flap is rotated inward and upward behind the main superior pedicle to give fullness to the breast and fixed to the chest wall. The inner flap is double-breasted on top or superficial to outer flap, and both are sutured to each other resembling a hammock or a cradle that carries the main superior pedicle middle flap. The results are presented and advantages discussed. This method, besides its simplicity, gives good projection with a pleasant and attractive conical shape to the breast and upper fullness, frequently negating the need for an implant. In addition, the results were stable in the long term, with no need for a mesh or any other foreign material. PMID:20652567

  19. Repair of large palatal fistula using tongue flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fejjal Nawfal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Large palatal fistulas are a challenging problem in cleft surgery. Many techniques are used to close the defect. The tongue flap is an easy and reproductible procedure for managing this complication. The authors report a case of a large palatal fistula closure with anteriorly based tongue flap.

  20. 14 CFR 25.701 - Flap and slat interconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap and slat interconnection. 25.701....701 Flap and slat interconnection. (a) Unless the airplane has safe flight characteristics with the... sides of the plane of symmetry must be synchronized by a mechanical interconnection or...

  1. Pectoralis myocutaneous flap for salvage of necrotic wounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have utilized six pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps in attempts to salvage extensive necrotic wounds of the pharynx and neck. The flap was employed in the following situations: massive necrosis of the entire neck skin with both carotid artery systems exposed, radiation necrosis of the neck skin with exposure of carotid artery, dehiscence of gastric pull-up from pharynx with resultant carotid exposure, failed trapezius flap in a radionecrotic oral cavity, and two cases of pharyngocutaneous fistula with extensive soft tissue necrosis. These flaps achieved healing in all cases. One death occurred 3 weeks following complete cutaneous healing secondary to a ruptured carotid pseudoaneurysm. One flap underwent total skin loss but the entirety of the muscle survived and the fistula was successfully closed with the back of the muscle being subsequently skin grafted. One case of dehiscence of the flap from oral mucosa resulted in a minor exposure of mandible with limited osteoradionecrosis controlled by topical means. This flap has performed extremely well in these precarious and difficult situations that previously may not have been salvageable. It has also been effective in abbreviating the required hospitalization and wound care. The authors conclude that the pectoralis myocutaneous flap should be the primary choice for the management of extensive postsurgical wound necrosis

  2. Oral functional outcome after intraoral reconstruction with nasolabial flaps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, EI; Hofer, SOP; Nauta, JM; Roodenburg, JLN; Lichtendahl, DHE

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the functional and aesthetic outcome of patients with nasolabial flaps in the floor of the mouth was examined. Sixteen patients underwent reconstruction of the floor of the mouth with 19 nasolabial flaps after resection of a squamous cell carcinoma. Eight patients received postoperati

  3. Dorsalis pedis arterialized venous flap for hand and foot reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Guang; LEI Hong-yu; GUO Shuang; HUANG Jian-hua; YU Hao

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To report the results of repair of skin defects in the extremities with arterialized venous flap harvested from the lateral aspect of the dorsum of the foot.Methods:Six cases of skin and soft tissue defects over the foot and hands were resurfaced by free arterialized venous flaps,including five patients with skin defects of the hands,and one with defects at the dorsum of the foot.The flaps were harvested from the lateral aspect of the dorsum of the foot with the sizes ranging from 2 cm×5.5 cm to 6 cm×11 cm.Two veins at the proximal margin of the flap were retained,one of which was anastomosed to a recipient bed artery to provide arterial inflow and the other was anastomosed to a recipient bed vein for venous outflow.Results:All flaps demonstrated mild edema and survived completely.Blisters appeared on four flaps.Using this technique,we achieved good functional and cosmetic results in this series.Conclusions:Dorsalis pedis arterialized venous flap with rich vascular communications could enhance peripheral perfusion and decrease congestion of venous flaps,thereby improves reliability and utility for extremity reconstruction.

  4. The use of free flaps in skull base reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macía, G; Picón, M; Nuñez, J; Almeida, F; Alvarez, I; Acero, J

    2016-02-01

    Skull base tumours are rare, comprising less than 1% of all tumours of the head and neck. Surgical treatment of these tumours involves the approach, the resection, and the reconstruction of the defect, which present a challenge due to the technical difficulty and anatomical complexity. A retrospective study of 17 patients with tumours involving the skull base, treated by resection and immediate reconstruction using microsurgical free flaps, is presented; 11 were men and six were women. The following types of flap were used: osteocutaneous fibula flaps, fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flaps, and myocutaneous latissimus dorsi flaps. The most common histology of the tumours was squamous cell carcinoma. The most frequent point of origin was the paranasal sinuses (58.8%). All of the free flaps used for reconstruction were viable. A cerebrospinal fluid fistula occurred in two patients, and in one of these cases, meningoencephalitis led to death. In conclusion, the reconstruction of large defects of the skull base after ablation requires a viable tissue that in many cases can be obtained only through the use of microvascular free flaps. The type of flap to be selected depends on the anatomical structures and size of the defect to be restored.

  5. Preoperative CT angiography reduces surgery time in perforator flap reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Jeroen M.; Dimopoulou, Angeliki; Liss, Anders G.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Kildal, Morten; Whitaker, Iain S.; Magnusson, Anders; Acosta, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    The use of perforator flaps in breast reconstructions has increased considerably in the past decade. A disadvantage of the perforator flap is difficult dissection, which results in a longer procedure. During spring 2006, we introduced CT angiography (CTA) as part of the diagnostic work-up in perfora

  6. Perforator propeller flaps for sacral and ischial soft tissue reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korambayil Pradeoth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The perforator-based flaps in the sacral and ischial region is designed according to the localization of perforators that penetrate the gluteus maximus muscle, reach the intra-fascial and supra-fascial planes with the overlying skin forming a rich vascular plexus. The perforator-based flaps described in this article are highly vascularized, have minimal donor site morbidity, and do not require the sacrifice of the gluteus maximus muscle. In a period between April 2008 and March 2009, six patients with sacral pressure sore were reconstructed with propeller flap method based on superior gluteal and parasacral artery perforators. One flap loss was noted. Three cases of ischial pressure sore were reconstructed with longitudinal propeller flap cover, based on inferior gluteal artery perforator. One flap suffered wound infection and dehiscence. Two cases of pilonidal sinus were reconstructed with propeller flap based on parasacral perforators. Both the flaps survived without any complications. Donor sites were closed primarily. In the light of this, they can be considered among the first surgical choices to re-surface soft tissue defects of the sacral and ischial regions. In the series of 11 patients, two patients (18% suffered complications.

  7. Perforator propeller flaps for sacral and ischial soft tissue reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korambayil, Pradeoth M.; Allalasundaram, KV; Balakrishnan, TM

    2010-01-01

    The perforator-based flaps in the sacral and ischial region is designed according to the localization of perforators that penetrate the gluteus maximus muscle, reach the intra-fascial and supra-fascial planes with the overlying skin forming a rich vascular plexus. The perforator-based flaps described in this article are highly vascularized, have minimal donor site morbidity, and do not require the sacrifice of the gluteus maximus muscle. In a period between April 2008 and March 2009, six patients with sacral pressure sore were reconstructed with propeller flap method based on superior gluteal and parasacral artery perforators. One flap loss was noted. Three cases of ischial pressure sore were reconstructed with longitudinal propeller flap cover, based on inferior gluteal artery perforator. One flap suffered wound infection and dehiscence. Two cases of pilonidal sinus were reconstructed with propeller flap based on parasacral perforators. Both the flaps survived without any complications. Donor sites were closed primarily. In the light of this, they can be considered among the first surgical choices to re-surface soft tissue defects of the sacral and ischial regions. In the series of 11 patients, two patients (18%) suffered complications. PMID:21217972

  8. Clinical study of dorsal ulnar artery flap in hand reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Manal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue defects of hand with exposed tendons, joints, nerves and bone represent a challenge to plastic surgeons. Such defects necessitate early flap coverage to protect underlying vital structures, preserve hand functions and to allow for early rehabilitation. Becker and Gilbert described flap based on the dorsal branch of the ulnar artery for defects around the wrist. We evaluated the use of a dorsal ulnar artery island flap in patients with soft tissue defects of hand. Twelve patients of soft tissue defects of hand underwent dorsal ulnar artery island flap between August 2006 and May 2008. In 10 male and 2 female patients this flap was used to reconstruct defects of the palm, dorsum of hand and first web space. Ten flaps survived completely. Marginal necrosis occurred in two flaps. In one patient suturing was required after debridement and in other patient wound healed by secondary intention. The final outcome was satisfactory. Donor areas which were skin grafted, healed with acceptable cosmetic results. The dorsal ulnar artery island flap is convenient, reliable, and easy to manage and is a single-stage technique for reconstructing soft tissue defects of the palm, dorsum of hand and first web space. Donor site morbidity is minimal, either closed primarily or covered with split thickness skin graft.

  9. The pathogen-actin connection: A platform for defense signaling in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, B; Henty, Jessica L; Porter, K J; Staiger, Chris J

    2011-09-08

    The cytoskeleton, a dynamic network of cytoplasmic polymers, plays a central role in numerous fundamental processes, such as development, reproduction, and cellular responses to biotic and abiotic stimuli. As a platform for innate immune responses in mammalian cells, the actin cytoskeleton is a central component in the organization and activation of host defenses, including signaling and cellular repair. In plants, our understanding of the genetic and biochemical responses in both pathogen and host that are required for virulence and resistance has grown enormously. Additional advances in live-cell imaging of cytoskeletal dynamics have markedly altered our view of actin turnover in plants. In this review, we outline current knowledge of host resistance following pathogen perception, both in terms of the genetic interactions that mediate defense signaling, as well as the biochemical and cellular processes that are required for defense signaling.

  10. beta-Dystroglycan modulates the interplay between actin and microtubules in human-adhered platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Suárez-Sánchez, Rocío; Hernández-González, Enrique; Galván, Iván

    2008-05-01

    To maintain the continuity of an injured blood vessel, platelets change shape, secrete granule contents, adhere, aggregate, and retract in a haemostatic plug. Ordered arrays of microtubules, microfilaments, and associated proteins are responsible for these platelet responses. In full-spread platelets, microfilament bundles in association with other cytoskeleton proteins are anchored in focal contacts. Recent studies in migrating cells suggest that co-ordination and direct physical interaction of microtubules and actin network modulate adhesion development. In platelets, we have proposed a feasible association between these two cytoskeletal systems, as well as the participation of the dystrophin-associated protein complex, as part of the focal adhesion complex. The present study analysed the participation of microtubules and actin during the platelet adhesion process. Confocal microscopy, fluorescence resonance transfer energy and immunoprecipitation assays were used to provide evidence of a cross-talk between these two cytoskeletal systems. Interestingly, beta-dystroglycan was found to act as an interplay protein between actin and microtubules and an additional communication between these two cytoskeleton networks was maintained through proteins of focal adhesion complex. Altogether our data are indicative of a dynamic co-participation of actin filaments and microtubules in modulating focal contacts to achieve platelet function.

  11. Novel actin filaments from Bacillus thuringiensis form nanotubules for plasmid DNA segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shimin; Narita, Akihiro; Popp, David; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Lee, Lin Jie; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Oda, Toshiro; Koh, Fujiet; Larsson, Mårten; Robinson, Robert C

    2016-03-01

    Here we report the discovery of a bacterial DNA-segregating actin-like protein (BtParM) from Bacillus thuringiensis, which forms novel antiparallel, two-stranded, supercoiled, nonpolar helical filaments, as determined by electron microscopy. The BtParM filament features of supercoiling and forming antiparallel double-strands are unique within the actin fold superfamily, and entirely different to the straight, double-stranded, polar helical filaments of all other known ParMs and of eukaryotic F-actin. The BtParM polymers show dynamic assembly and subsequent disassembly in the presence of ATP. BtParR, the DNA-BtParM linking protein, stimulated ATP hydrolysis/phosphate release by BtParM and paired two supercoiled BtParM filaments to form a cylinder, comprised of four strands with inner and outer diameters of 57 Å and 145 Å, respectively. Thus, in this prokaryote, the actin fold has evolved to produce a filament system with comparable features to the eukaryotic chromosome-segregating microtubule.

  12. Propeller Flaps: A Review of Indications, Technique, and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arpa, Salvatore; Toia, Francesca; Pirrello, Roberto; Moschella, Francesco; Cordova, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    In the last years, propeller flaps have become an appealing option for coverage of a large range of defects. Besides having a more reliable vascular pedicle than traditional flap, propeller flaps allow for great freedom in design and for wide mobilization that extend the possibility of reconstructing difficult wounds with local tissues and minimal donor-site morbidity. They also allow one-stage reconstruction of defects that usually require multiple procedures. Harvesting of a propeller flap requires accurate patient selection, preoperative planning, and dissection technique. Complication rate can be kept low, provided that potential problems are prevented, promptly recognized, and adequately treated. This paper reviews current knowledge on propeller flaps. Definition, classification, and indications in the different body regions are discussed based on a review of the literature and on the authors' experience. Details about surgical technique are provided, together with tips to avoid and manage complications. PMID:24971367

  13. Propeller Flaps: A Review of Indications, Technique, and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore D'Arpa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, propeller flaps have become an appealing option for coverage of a large range of defects. Besides having a more reliable vascular pedicle than traditional flap, propeller flaps allow for great freedom in design and for wide mobilization that extend the possibility of reconstructing difficult wounds with local tissues and minimal donor-site morbidity. They also allow one-stage reconstruction of defects that usually require multiple procedures. Harvesting of a propeller flap requires accurate patient selection, preoperative planning, and dissection technique. Complication rate can be kept low, provided that potential problems are prevented, promptly recognized, and adequately treated. This paper reviews current knowledge on propeller flaps. Definition, classification, and indications in the different body regions are discussed based on a review of the literature and on the authors’ experience. Details about surgical technique are provided, together with tips to avoid and manage complications.

  14. Vaginal reconstruction using perineal-thigh flaps with subcutaneous pedicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Chen, C; Chen, M; Zhang, J; Wu, N; Wang, J

    1991-03-01

    A technique of vaginal reconstruction using bilateral, perineal-thigh flaps with subcutaneous pedicle is described. In this procedure, the flaps were raised bilaterally and introduced into an artificial space between the urinary bladder and rectum. The blood supply for the flaps flows from the perineal artery through anastomotic branches to the external pudendal artery. The authors used the technique on four patients, and all the flaps survived entirely. There was no complication. According to a more than two-year follow-up survey, the reconstructed vaginas are expansible and contract little. No stent is needed. There is good sensitivity in the wall of the artificial vagina because sensory nerves run through the flaps.

  15. Adhesive F-actin waves: a novel integrin-mediated adhesion complex coupled to ventral actin polymerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay B Case

    Full Text Available At the leading lamellipodium of migrating cells, protrusion of an Arp2/3-nucleated actin network is coupled to formation of integrin-based adhesions, suggesting that Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization and integrin-dependent adhesion may be mechanistically linked. Arp2/3 also mediates actin polymerization in structures distinct from the lamellipodium, in "ventral F-actin waves" that propagate as spots and wavefronts along the ventral plasma membrane. Here we show that integrins engage the extracellular matrix downstream of ventral F-actin waves in several mammalian cell lines as well as in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These "adhesive F-actin waves" require a cycle of integrin engagement and disengagement to the extracellular matrix for their formation and propagation, and exhibit morphometry and a hierarchical assembly and disassembly mechanism distinct from other integrin-containing structures. After Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization, zyxin and VASP are co-recruited to adhesive F-actin waves, followed by paxillin and vinculin, and finally talin and integrin. Adhesive F-actin waves thus represent a previously uncharacterized integrin-based adhesion complex associated with Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization.

  16. Experimental investigation of a flapping wing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubel, Tatjana Y.; Tropea, Cameron

    The main objective of this research study was to investigate the aerodynamic forces of an avian flapping wing model system. The model size and the flow conditions were chosen to approximate the flight of a goose. Direct force measurements, using a three-component balance, and PIV flow field measurements parallel and perpendicular to the oncoming flow, were performed in a wind tunnel at Reynolds numbers between 28,000 and 141,000 (3-15 m/s), throughout a range of reduced frequencies between 0.04 and 0.20. The appropriateness of quasi-steady assumptions used to compare 2D, time-averaged particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements in the wake with direct force measurements was evaluated. The vertical force coefficient for flapping wings was typically significantly higher than the maximum coefficient of the fixed wing, implying the influence of unsteady effects, such as delayed stall, even at low reduced frequencies. This puts the validity of the quasi-steady assumption into question. The (local) change in circulation over the wing beat cycle and the circulation distribution along the wingspan were obtained from the measurements in the tip and transverse vortex planes. Flow separation could be observed in the distribution of the circulation, and while the circulation derived from the wake measurements failed to agree exactly with the absolute value of the circulation, the change in circulation over the wing beat cycle was in excellent agreement for low and moderate reduced frequencies. The comparison between the PIV measurements in the two perpendicular planes and the direct force balance measurements, show that within certain limitations the wake visualization is a powerful tool to gain insight into force generation and the flow behavior on flapping wings over the wing beat cycle.

  17. Identification of sucrose synthase as an actin-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, H.; Huber, J. L.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that sucrose synthase (SuSy) binds both G- and F-actin: (i) presence of SuSy in the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction of microsomal membranes (i.e. crude cytoskeleton fraction); (ii) co-immunoprecipitation of actin with anti-SuSy monoclonal antibodies; (iii) association of SuSy with in situ phalloidin-stabilized F-actin filaments; and (iv) direct binding to F-actin, polymerized in vitro. Aldolase, well known to interact with F-actin, interfered with binding of SuSy, suggesting that a common or overlapping binding site may be involved. We postulate that some of the soluble SuSy in the cytosol may be associated with the actin cytoskeleton in vivo.

  18. Reconstructive Surgery for Severe Penile Inadequacy: Phalloplasty with a Free Radial Forearm Flap or a Pedicled Anterolateral Thigh Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lumen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Severe penile inadequacy in adolescents is rare. Phallic reconstruction to treat this devastating condition is a major challenge to the reconstructive surgeon. Phallic reconstruction using the free radial forearm flap (RFF or the pedicled anterolateral thigh flap (ALTF has been routinely used in female-to-male transsexuals. Recently we started to use these techniques in the treatment of severe penile inadequacy. Methods. Eleven males (age 15 to 42 years were treated with a phallic reconstruction. The RFF is our method of choice; the ALTF is an alternative when a free flap is contraindicated or less desired by the patient. The RFF was used in 7 patients, the ALTF in 4 patients. Mean followup was 25 months (range: 4–49 months. Aesthetic and functional results were evaluated. Results. There were no complications related to the flap. Aesthetic results were judged as “good” in 9 patients and “moderate” in 2 patients. Sensitivity in the RFF was superior compared to the ALTF. Four patients developed urinary complications (stricture and/or fistula. Six patients underwent erectile implant surgery. In 2 patients the erectile implant had to be removed due to infection or erosion. Conclusion. In case of severe penile inadequacy due to whatever condition, a phalloplasty is the preferred treatment nowadays. The free radial forearm flap is still the method of choice. The anterolateral thigh flap can be a good alternative, especially when free flaps are contraindicated, but sensitivity is markedly inferior in these flaps.

  19. Progressive hearing loss and gradual deterioration of sensory hair bundles in the ears of mice lacking the actin-binding protein Eps8L2

    OpenAIRE

    Furness, David N.; Johnson, Stuart L.; Manor, Uri; Rüttiger, Lukas; Tocchetti, Arianna; Offenhauser, Nina; Olt, Jennifer; Goodyear, Richard J.; Vijayakumar, Sarath; Dai, Yuhai; Hackney, Carole M.; Franz, Christoph; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Masetto, Sergio; Jones, Sherri M.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanotransduction in the mammalian auditory system depends on mechanosensitive channels in the hair bundles that project from the apical surface of the sensory hair cells. Individual stereocilia within each bundle contain a core of tightly packed actin filaments, whose length is dynamically regulated during development and in the adult. We show that the actin-binding protein epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 (Eps8)L2, a member of the Eps8-like protein family, is a newly i...

  20. Application of skin flaps transplantation in burn surgery in China%皮瓣移植在我国烧伤外科中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晓元

    2008-01-01

    The history and application of surgical flap transplantation in burn wound were briefly reviewed. We outlined skin flap, muscuiocutaneous flap, fascia flap and neurocutaneous vascular flap in this paper and recommended repair deep wounds with flap. All in all, in this review, we hope to provide a meaningful option for clinical application of surgical flap in the future.