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Sample records for acoustically levitated drop

  1. Parametric resonance in acoustically levitated water drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, C.L.; Xie, W.J. [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.c [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2010-05-10

    Liquid drops can be suspended in air with acoustic levitation method. When the sound pressure is periodically modulated, the levitated drop is usually forced into an axisymmetric oscillation. However, a transition from axisymmetric oscillation into sectorial oscillation occurs when the modulation frequency approaches some specific values. The frequency of the sectorial oscillation is almost exactly half of the modulation frequency. It is demonstrated that this transition is induced by the parametric resonance of levitated drop. The natural frequency of sectorial oscillation is found to decrease with the increase of drop distortion extent.

  2. Electrochemistry in an acoustically levitated drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chainani, Edward T; Ngo, Khanh T; Scheeline, Alexander

    2013-02-19

    Levitated drops show potential as microreactors, especially when radicals are present as reactants or products. Solid/liquid interfaces are absent or minimized, avoiding adsorption and interfacial reaction of conventional microfluidics. We report amperometric detection in an acoustically levitated drop with simultaneous ballistic addition of reactant. A gold microelectrode sensor was fabricated with a lithographic process; active electrode area was defined by a photosensitive polyimide mask. The microdisk gold working electrode of radius 19 μm was characterized using ferrocenemethanol in aqueous buffer. Using cyclic voltammetry, the electrochemically active surface area was estimated by combining a recessed microdisk electrode model with the Randles-Sevcik equation. Computer-controlled ballistic introduction of reactant droplets into the levitated drop was developed. Chronoamperometric measurements of ferrocyanide added ballistically demonstrate electrochemical monitoring using the microfabricated electrode in a levitated drop. Although concentration increases with time due to drop evaporation, the extent of concentration is predictable with a linear evaporation model. Comparison of diffusion-limited currents in pendant and levitated drops show that convection arising from acoustic levitation causes an enhancement of diffusion-limited current on the order of 16%. PMID:23351154

  3. Chemical analysis of acoustically levitated drops by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckermann, Rudolf; Puskar, Ljiljana; Zavabeti, Mahta; Sekine, Ryo; McNaughton, Don

    2009-07-01

    An experimental apparatus combining Raman spectroscopy with acoustic levitation, Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopy (RALS), is investigated in the field of physical and chemical analytics. Whereas acoustic levitation enables the contactless handling of microsized samples, Raman spectroscopy offers the advantage of a noninvasive method without complex sample preparation. After carrying out some systematic tests to probe the sensitivity of the technique to drop size, shape, and position, RALS has been successfully applied in monitoring sample dilution and preconcentration, evaporation, crystallization, an acid-base reaction, and analytes in a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy colloidal suspension. PMID:19418043

  4. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2014-09-01

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.

  5. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2014-09-08

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.

  6. Generation and characterization of surface layers on acoustically levitated drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckermann, Rudolf; Bauerecker, Sigurd; Cammenga, Heiko K

    2007-06-15

    Surface layers of natural and technical amphiphiles, e.g., octadecanol, stearic acid and related compounds as well as perfluorinated fatty alcohols (PFA), have been investigated on the surface of acoustically levitated drops. In contrast to Langmuir troughs, traditionally used in the research of surface layers at the air-water interface, acoustic levitation offers the advantages of a minimized and contact-less technique. Although the film pressure cannot be directly adjusted on acoustically levitated drops, it runs through a wide pressure range due to the shrinking surface of an evaporating drop. During this process, different states of the generated surface layer have been identified, in particular the phase transition from the gaseous or liquid-expanded to the liquid-condensed state of surface layers of octadecanol and other related amphiphiles. Characteristic parameters, such as the relative permeation resistance and the area per molecule in a condensed surface layer, have been quantified and were found comparable to results obtained from surface layers generated on Langmuir troughs. PMID:17376468

  7. Shape oscillation of a levitated drop in an acoustic field

    CERN Document Server

    Ran, Weiyu

    2013-01-01

    A `star drop' refers to the patterns created when a drop, flattened by some force, is excited into shape mode oscillations. These patterns are perhaps best understood as the two dimensional analog to the more common three dimensional shape mode oscillations. In this fluid dynamics video an ultrasonic standing wave was used to levitate a liquid drop. The drop was then flattened into a disk by increasing the field strength. This flattened drop was then excited to create star drop patterns by exciting the drop at its resonance frequency. Different oscillatory modes were induced by varying the drop radius, fluid properties, and frequency at which the field strength was modulated.

  8. Design and implementation of an efficient acoustically levitated drop reactor for in stillo measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Christopher R; Scheeline, Alexander

    2007-12-01

    We present the details necessary for building an efficient acoustic drop levitator with reduced electrical power consumption and greater drop stability compared to previous designs. The system is optimized so that the levitated drop may be used as a chemical reactor. By introducing a temperature, pressure, and relative humidity sensor for feedback control of a linear actuator for adjusting resonator length, we have built a completely automated system capable of continuous levitation for extended periods of time. The result is a system capable of portable operation and interfacing with a variety of detection instrumentation for in stillo (in drop) measurements. PMID:18163744

  9. Acoustically levitated dancing drops: Self-excited oscillation to chaotic shedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-Cheng; I, Lin

    2016-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate self-excited oscillation and shedding of millimeter-sized water drops, acoustically levitated in a single-node standing waves cavity, by decreasing the steady acoustic wave intensity below a threshold. The perturbation of the acoustic field by drop motion is a possible source for providing an effective negative damping for sustaining the growing amplitude of the self-excited motion. Its further interplay with surface tension, drop inertia, gravity and acoustic intensities, select various self-excited modes for different size of drops and acoustic intensity. The large drop exhibits quasiperiodic motion from a vertical mode and a zonal mode with growing coupling, as oscillation amplitudes grow, until falling on the floor. For small drops, chaotic oscillations constituted by several broadened sectorial modes and corresponding zonal modes are self-excited. The growing oscillation amplitude leads to droplet shedding from the edges of highly stretched lobes, where surface tension no longer holds the rapid expanding flow.

  10. Thermal diffusivity coefficient of glycerin determined on an acoustically levitated drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsaka, K; Rednikov, A; Sadhal, S S

    2002-10-01

    We present a technique that can be used to determine the thermal diffusivity coefficient of undercooled liquids that exist at temperatures below their freezing points. The technique involves levitation of a small amount of liquid in the shape of a flattened drop using an acoustic levitator and heating it with a CO2 laser. The heated drop is then allowed to cool naturally by heat loss from the surface. Due to acoustic streaming, heat loss is highly non-uniform and appears to mainly occur at the drop circumference (equatorial region). This fact allows us to relate the heat loss rate with a heat transfer model to determine the thermal diffusion coefficient. We demonstrate the feasibility of the technique using glycerin drops as a model liquid. PMID:12446319

  11. Sample Handling and Chemical Kinetics in an Acoustically Levitated Drop Microreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Accurate measurement of enzyme kinetics is an essential part of understanding the mechanisms of biochemical reactions. The typical means of studying such systems use stirred cuvettes, stopped-flow apparatus, microfluidic systems, or other small sample containers. These methods may prove to be problematic if reactants or products adsorb to or react with the container’s surface. As an alternative approach, we have developed an acoustically-levitated drop reactor eventually intended to study enzyme-catalyzed reaction kinetics related to free radical and oxidative stress chemistry. Microliter-scale droplet generation, reactant introduction, maintenance, and fluid removal are all important aspects in conducting reactions in a levitated drop. A three capillary bundle system has been developed to address these needs. We report kinetic measurements for both luminol chemiluminescence and the reaction of pyruvate with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase, to demonstrate the feasibility of using a levitated drop in conjunction with the developed capillary sample handling system as a microreactor. PMID:19769373

  12. Controlling charge on levitating drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilger, Ryan T; Westphall, Michael S; Smith, Lloyd M

    2007-08-01

    Levitation technologies are used in containerless processing of materials, as microscale manipulators and reactors, and in the study of single drops and particles. Presented here is a method for controlling the amount and polarity of charge on a levitating drop. The method uses single-axis acoustic levitation to trap and levitate a single, initially neutral drop with a diameter between 400 microm and 2 mm. This drop is then charged in a controllable manner using discrete packets of charge in the form of charged drops produced by a piezoelectric drop-on-demand dispenser equipped with a charging electrode. The magnitude of the charge on the dispensed drops can be adjusted by varying the voltage applied to the charging electrode. The polarity of the charge on the added drops can be changed allowing removal of charge from the trapped drop (by neutralization) and polarity reversal. The maximum amount of added charge is limited by repulsion of like charges between the drops in the trap. This charging scheme can aid in micromanipulation and the study of charged drops and particles using levitation. PMID:17580951

  13. Digital image processing of sectorial oscillations for acoustically levitated drops and surface tension measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A type of non-axisymmetric oscillations of acoustically levitated drops is excited by modulating the ultrasound field at proper frequencies. These oscillations are recorded by a high speed camera and analyzed with a digital image processing method. They are demonstrated to be the third mode sectorial oscillations, and their frequencies are found to decrease with the increase of equatorial radius of the drops, which can be described by a modified Rayleigh equation. These oscillations decay exponentially after the cessation of ultrasound field modulation. The decaying rates agree reasonably with Lamb’s prediction. The rotating rate of the drops accompanying the shape oscillations is found to be less than 1.5 rounds per second. The surface tension of aqueous ethanol has been measured according to the modified Rayleigh equation. The results agree well with previous reports, which demonstrates the possible application of this kind of sectorial oscillations in noncontact measurement of liquid surface tension.

  14. Mixing in colliding, ultrasonically levitated drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chainani, Edward T; Choi, Woo-Hyuck; Ngo, Khanh T; Scheeline, Alexander

    2014-02-18

    Lab-in-a-drop, using ultrasonic levitation, has been actively investigated for the last two decades. Benefits include lack of contact between solutions and an apparatus and a lack of sample cross-contamination. Understanding and controlling mixing in the levitated drop is necessary for using an acoustically levitated drop as a microreactor, particularly for studying kinetics. A pulsed electrostatic delivery system enables addition and mixing of a desired-volume droplet with the levitated drop. Measurement of mixing kinetics is obtained by high-speed video monitoring of a titration reaction. Drop heterogeneity is visualized as 370 nl of 0.25 M KOH (pH: 13.4) was added to 3.7 μL of 0.058 M HCl (pH: 1.24). Spontaneous mixing time is about 2 s. Following droplet impact, the mixed drop orbits the levitator axis at about 5 Hz during homogenization. The video's green channel (maximum response near 540 nm) shows the color change due to phenolphthalein absorption. While mixing is at least an order of magnitude faster in the levitated drop compared with three-dimensional diffusion, modulation of the acoustic waveform near the surface acoustic wave resonance frequency of the levitated drop does not substantially reduce mixing time. PMID:24460103

  15. Densitometry By Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Eugene H.

    1989-01-01

    "Static" and "dynamic" methods developed for measuring mass density of acoustically levitated solid particle or liquid drop. "Static" method, unknown density of sample found by comparison with another sample of known density. "Dynamic" method practiced with or without gravitational field. Advantages over conventional density-measuring techniques: sample does not have to make contact with container or other solid surface, size and shape of samples do not affect measurement significantly, sound field does not have to be know in detail, and sample can be smaller than microliter. Detailed knowledge of acoustic field not necessary.

  16. Electrostatic Liquid-Drop-Levitation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Won Kyu; Chung, San Kun; Hyson, Michael T.; Elleman, Daniel D.

    1988-01-01

    Electrostatic levitator has levitated drops of liquid up to 4 mm in diameter while maintaining spherical drop shapes. Stable levitation of spherical drops valuable in experiments involving super-cooling, solidification, and crystal growth.

  17. Airborne chemistry: acoustic levitation in chemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santesson, Sabina; Nilsson, Staffan

    2004-04-01

    This review with 60 references describes a unique path to miniaturisation, that is, the use of acoustic levitation in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry applications. Levitation of small volumes of sample by means of a levitation technique can be used as a way to avoid solid walls around the sample, thus circumventing the main problem of miniaturisation, the unfavourable surface-to-volume ratio. Different techniques for sample levitation have been developed and improved. Of the levitation techniques described, acoustic or ultrasonic levitation fulfils all requirements for analytical chemistry applications. This technique has previously been used to study properties of molten materials and the equilibrium shape()and stability of liquid drops. Temperature and mass transfer in levitated drops have also been described, as have crystallisation and microgravity applications. The airborne analytical system described here is equipped with different and exchangeable remote detection systems. The levitated drops are normally in the 100 nL-2 microL volume range and additions to the levitated drop can be made in the pL-volume range. The use of levitated drops in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry offers several benefits. Several remote detection systems are compatible with acoustic levitation, including fluorescence imaging detection, right angle light scattering, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Applications include liquid/liquid extractions, solvent exchange, analyte enrichment, single-cell analysis, cell-cell communication studies, precipitation screening of proteins to establish nucleation conditions, and crystallisation of proteins and pharmaceuticals. PMID:14762640

  18. Particle-area dependence of mineral dust in the immersion mode: investigations with freely suspended drops in an acoustic levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, K.; Debertshäuser, M.; Eppers, O.; Schmithüsen, H.; Mitra, S. K.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-05-01

    The heterogeneous freezing temperatures of supercooled drops were measured by using an acoustic levitator. This technique allows to freely suspending single drops in air without electrical charges thereby avoiding any electrical influences which may affect the freezing process. Heterogeneous nucleation caused by several mineral dust particles (montmorillonite, two types of illite) was investigated in the immersion mode. Drops of 1 \\unit{mm} in radius were monitored by a video camera during cooling down to -28 °C to simulate the tropospheric temperature range. The surface temperature of the drops was remotely determined with an infra-red thermometer so that the onset of freezing was indicated. For comparisons, measurements with one particle type were additionally performed in the Mainz vertical wind tunnel with drops of 340 \\unit{{μ}m} radius freely suspended. The data were interpreted regarding the particle surfaces immersed in the drops. Immersion freezing was observed in a temperature range between -13 and -26 °C in dependence of particle type and surface area per drop. The results were evaluated by applying two descriptions of heterogeneous freezing, the stochastic and the singular model.

  19. Variable-Position Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Stoneburner, J. D.; Jacobi, N.; Wang, T. G.

    1983-01-01

    Method of acoustic levitation supports objects at positions other than acoustic nodes. Acoustic force is varied so it balances gravitational (or other) force, thereby maintaining object at any position within equilibrium range. Levitation method applicable to containerless processing. Such objects as table-tennis balls, hollow plastic spheres, and balsa-wood spheres levitated in laboratory by new method.

  20. Investigations of levitated helium drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Dwight Lawrence

    1999-11-01

    We report on the development of two systems capable of levitating drops of liquid helium. Helium drops of ˜20 mum have been levitated with the radiation pressure from two counter-propagating Nd:YAG laser beams. Drops are produced with a submerged piezoelectric transducer, and could be held for up to three minutes in our optical trap. Calculations show that Brillouin and Raman scattering of the laser light in the liquid helium produces a negligible rate of evaporation of the drop. Evaporation caused by the enhanced vapor pressure of the curved drop surfaces appears to be a significant effect limiting the drop lifetimes. Helium drops as large as 2 cm in diameter have been suspended in the earth's gravitational field with a magnetic field. A commercial superconducting solenoid provides the necessary field, field-gradient product required to levitate the drops. Drops are cooled to 0.5 K with a helium-3 refrigerator, and can be held in the trap indefinitely. We have found that when two or more drops are levitated in the same magnetic trap, the drops often remain in a state of apparent contact without coalescing. This effect is a result of the evaporation of liquid from between the two drops, and is found to occur only for normal fluid drops. We can induce shape oscillations in charged, levitated drops with an applied ac electric field. We have measured the resonance frequencies and damping rates for the l = 2 mode of oscillation as function of temperature. We have also developed a theory to describe the small amplitude shape oscillations of a He II drop surrounded by its saturated vapor. In our theory, we have considered two sets of boundary conditions---one where the drop does not evaporate and another in which the liquid and vapor are in thermodynamic equilibrium. We have found that both solutions give a frequency that agrees well with experiment, but that the data for the damping rate agree better with the solution without evaporation.

  1. Stable And Oscillating Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Sample stability or instability determined by levitating frequency. Degree of oscillation of acoustically levitated object along axis of levitation chamber controlled by varying frequency of acoustic driver for axis above or below frequency of corresponding chamber resonance. Stabilization/oscillation technique applied in normal Earth gravity, or in absence of gravity to bring object quickly to rest at nominal levitation position or make object oscillate in desired range about that position.

  2. Simplified Rotation In Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Gaspar, M. S.; Trinh, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    New technique based on old discovery used to control orientation of object levitated acoustically in axisymmetric chamber. Method does not require expensive equipment like additional acoustic drivers of precisely adjustable amplitude, phase, and frequency. Reflecting object acts as second source of sound. If reflecting object large enough, close enough to levitated object, or focuses reflected sound sufficiently, Rayleigh torque exerted on levitated object by reflected sound controls orientation of object.

  3. Eutectic growth under acoustic levitation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, W J; Cao, C D; Lü, Y J; Wei, B

    2002-12-01

    Samples of Pb-Sn eutectic alloy with a high density of 8.5 x 10(3) kg/m(3) are levitated with a single-axis acoustic levitator, and containerlessly melted and then solidified in argon atmosphere. High undercoolings up to 38 K are obtained, which results in a microstructural transition of "lamellas-broken lamellas-dendrites." This transition is further investigated in the light of the coupled zone for eutectic growth and the effects of ultrasound. The breaking of regular eutectic lamellas and suppression of gravity-induced macrosegregation of (Pb) and (Sn) dendrites are explained by the complicated internal flow inside the levitated drop, which is jointly induced by the shape oscillation, bulk vibration and rotation of the levitated drop. The ultrasonic field is also found to drive forced surface vibration, which subsequently excites capillary ripples and catalyzes nucleation on the sample surface. PMID:12513291

  4. Dynamics of acoustically levitated disk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, W J; Wei, B

    2004-10-01

    The acoustic levitation force on disk samples and the dynamics of large water drops in a planar standing wave are studied by solving the acoustic scattering problem through incorporating the boundary element method. The dependence of levitation force amplitude on the equivalent radius R of disks deviates seriously from the R3 law predicted by King's theory, and a larger force can be obtained for thin disks. When the disk aspect ratio gamma is larger than a critical value gamma(*) ( approximately 1.9 ) and the disk radius a is smaller than the critical value a(*) (gamma) , the levitation force per unit volume of the sample will increase with the enlargement of the disk. The acoustic levitation force on thin-disk samples ( gammaacoustic field for stable levitation of a large water drop is to adjust the reflector-emitter interval H slightly above the resonant interval H(n) . The simulation shows that the drop is flattened and the central parts of its top and bottom surface become concave with the increase of sound pressure level, which agrees with the experimental observation. The main frequencies of the shape oscillation under different sound pressures are slightly larger than the Rayleigh frequency because of the large shape deformation. The simulated translational frequencies of the vertical vibration under normal gravity condition agree with the theoretical analysis. PMID:15600551

  5. 声悬浮条件下环己烷液滴的蒸发凝固%Evaporation induced solidification of cyclohexane drops under acoustic levitation condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜人君; 解文军

    2011-01-01

    采用单轴式声悬浮方法研究了环己烷液滴的蒸发过程,发现环己烷液滴的蒸发可以使自身温度降至熔点以下并发生凝固.高速摄像实时观测表明,环己烷晶核开始形成于液滴赤道附近,并以枝晶方式长大,平均生长速度为12.5—160.4mm/s.进一步研究发现,声悬浮条件下平均Sherwood数与平均Nusselt数的比值Sh/Nu是在自然对流条件下的1.3倍,这表明声流边界层有效提高了环己烷液滴的蒸发速率而对传热的促进作用相对较小,因而可以使液滴降至更低温度,进而发生凝固.据此,提出了挥发性液体在声悬浮条件下发生蒸发凝固的必要条件.%The evaporation process of a cyclohexane drop is investigated by single-axis acoustic levitation method.It is found that the evaporation of the cyclohexane drop results in the decrease of its temperature below the melting point,and leading to solidification.The real-time observation with a high speed camera shows that the cyclohexane nucleates near the equator of the drop surface and grows dendritically with an average velocity ranging from 12.5 to 160.4 mm/s.Further studies indicate that the ratio Sh/Nu of the average Sherwood number to Nusselt number under acoustic levitation condition is 1.3 times of that under natural convection condition.This suggests that the acoustic streaming boundary layer effectively strengthens the evaporation but has less promotion effect on the heat transfer.Therefore,the drop temperature declines to a lower value and the evaporation induced solidification occurs under acoustic levitation condition.Accordingly,a necessary condition for the occurrence of evaporation induced solidification of volatile liquids is proposed.

  6. Particle surface area dependence of mineral dust in immersion freezing mode: investigations with freely suspended drops in an acoustic levitator and a vertical wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, K.; Debertshäuser, M.; Eppers, O.; Schmithüsen, H.; Mitra, S. K.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-11-01

    The heterogeneous freezing temperatures of supercooled drops were measured using an acoustic levitator. This technique allows one to freely suspend single drops in the air without any wall contact. Heterogeneous nucleation by two types of illite (illite IMt1 and illite NX) and a montmorillonite sample was investigated in the immersion mode. Drops of 1 mm in radius were monitored by a video camera while cooled down to -28 °C to simulate freezing within the tropospheric temperature range. The surface temperature of the drops was contact-free, determined with an infrared thermometer; the onset of freezing was indicated by a sudden increase of the drop surface temperature. For comparison, measurements with one particle type (illite NX) were additionally performed in the Mainz vertical wind tunnel with drops of 340 μm radius freely suspended. Immersion freezing was observed in a temperature range between -13 and -26 °C as a function of particle type and particle surface area immersed in the drops. Isothermal experiments in the wind tunnel indicated that after the cooling stage freezing still proceeds, at least during the investigated time period of 30 s. The results were evaluated by applying two descriptions of heterogeneous freezing, the stochastic and the singular model. Although the wind tunnel results do not support the time-independence of the freezing process both models are applicable for comparing the results from the two experimental techniques.

  7. Digital Controller For Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, D. Kent

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic driver digitally controls sound fields along three axes. Allows computerized acoustic levitation and manipulation of small objects for such purposes as containerless processing and nuclear-fusion power experiments. Also used for controlling motion of vibration-testing tables in three dimensions.

  8. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  9. Cylindrical acoustic levitator/concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaduchak, Gregory (Los Alamos, NM); Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow cylindrical piezoelectric crystal which has been modified to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that of the interior cavity of the cylinder. When the resonance frequency of the interior cylindrical cavity is matched to the breathing mode resonance of the cylindrical piezoelectric transducer, the acoustic efficiency for establishing a standing wave pattern in the cavity is high. The cylinder does not require accurate alignment of a resonant cavity. Water droplets having diameters greater than 1 mm have been levitated against the force of gravity using; less than 1 W of input electrical power. Concentration of aerosol particles in air is also demonstrated.

  10. Developments in Analytical Chemistry: Acoustically Levitated Drop Reactors for Enzyme Reaction Kinetics and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Sensors for Detection of Toxic Organic Phosphonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Christopher Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Developments in analytical chemistry were made using acoustically levitated small volumes of liquid to study enzyme reaction kinetics and by detecting volatile organic compounds in the gas phase using single-walled carbon nanotubes. Experience gained in engineering, electronics, automation, and software development from the design and…

  11. Sectorial oscillation of acoustically levitated viscous drops%声悬浮条件下黏性液滴的扇谐振荡规律研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵学鹏; 解文军

    2012-01-01

    The sectorial oscillation of acoustically levitated viscous drops is investigated by applying a series of aqueous glycerol solutions (viscosity μ = 0.94-75.65 mPa.s). It is found that there exists a critical viscosity μc for a definite mode of sectorial oscillation, and that mode can be excited only when μ 〈 μc. The critical viscosities for the l = 2--9th mode sectorial oscillation are experimentally determined with a modulation amplitude to the acoustic field reaching r/= 0.23. It is found that in μc decreases approximately linearly with I. Analysis based on the parametric resonance theory indicates that in order to excite the sectorial oscillation, the equatorial radius of the drop must be perturbed over a threshold he, which is proportional to the viscosity/~ and increases with I. Therefore, the sectorial oscillations can hardly be excited to those drops with high viscosity and large oscillation modes. Both the amplitude and resonant modulating frequency width decrease with the enlargement of viscosity. No obvious effect of viscosity is found on the eigenfrequency of sectorial oscillation.%采用单轴式声悬浮方法研究了黏度μ=0.94—75.65 mPa·s的甘油-水溶液液滴的扇谐振荡规律.发现一定阶数的振荡模式存在一定的临界黏度μ_c,只有当μ〈μ_c时,该阶扇谐振荡才能被激发.实验测定了声场调制幅度η=0.23时,l=2—9阶扇谐振荡的临界黏度,发现lnμ_c与l近似呈线性递减关系.采用参数共振理论分析了黏性液滴的扇谐振荡过程,发现激发扇谐振荡的液滴赤道半径扰动阈值h_c正比于液滴黏度μ,并随l增大而增大,因此扇谐振荡难以在高黏度和高阶模式下发生.实验还发现,各阶扇谐振荡的振幅和共振频率宽度随液滴黏度增大而减小,黏度对液滴本征频率无明显影响.

  12. Manipulation of biomimetic objects in acoustic levitation

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Angelica

    2013-01-01

    This thesis contains 9 chapters making a total of 205 pages including articles. The articles are menctioned throughout the work and are listed as annexes. These articles were produced during the PhD.; Levitation is a promising tool for contactless guiding and non-toxic manipulation. Acoustic levitation by ultrasonic standing waves (USW) allows micron-scale particle manipulation in acoustic resonators. The main goal of this thesis is to explore the possibilities given by the acoustic levitatio...

  13. Acoustical-Levitation Chamber for Metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Trinh, E.; Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Jacobi, N.

    1983-01-01

    Sample moved to different positions for heating and quenching. Acoustical levitation chamber selectively excited in fundamental and second-harmonic longitudinal modes to hold sample at one of three stable postions: A, B, or C. Levitated object quickly moved from one of these positions to another by changing modes. Object rapidly quenched at A or C after heating in furnace region at B.

  14. Acoustic levitator for containerless measurements on low temperature liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benmore, Chris J [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Weber, Richard [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL; Rey, Charles A A [Charles Ray, Inc.

    2009-01-01

    A single-axis acoustic levitator was constructed and used to levitate liquid and solid drops at temperatures from -40 to +40 C. The levitator consisted of: (i) two acoustic transducers mounted on a rigid vertical support that was bolted to an optical breadboard, (ii) a acoustic power supply that controlled acoustic intensity, relative phase of the drive to the transducers, and could modulate the acoustic forces at frequencies up to 1kHz, (iii) a video camera, and (iv) a system for providing a stream of controlled temperature gas flow over the sample. The acoustic transducers were operated at their resonant frequency of ~ 22 kHz and could produce sound pressure levels up to 160 dB. The force applied by the acoustic field could be modulated using a frequency generator to excite oscillations in the sample. Sample temperature was controlled using a modified Cryostream Plus and measured using thermocouples and an infrared thermal imager. The levitator was installed at x-ray beamline 11 ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source and used to investigate the structure of supercooled liquids.

  15. Determining Equilibrium Position For Acoustical Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Aveni, G.; Putterman, S.; Rudnick, J.

    1989-01-01

    Equilibrium position and orientation of acoustically-levitated weightless object determined by calibration technique on Earth. From calibration data, possible to calculate equilibrium position and orientation in presence of Earth gravitation. Sample not levitated acoustically during calibration. Technique relies on Boltzmann-Ehrenfest adiabatic-invariance principle. One converts resonant-frequency-shift data into data on normalized acoustical potential energy. Minimum of energy occurs at equilibrium point. From gradients of acoustical potential energy, one calculates acoustical restoring force or torque on objects as function of deviation from equilibrium position or orientation.

  16. Acoustic levitation in the presence of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collas, P.; Barmatz, M.; Shipley, C.

    1989-01-01

    The method of Gor'kov (1961) has been applied to derive general expressions for the total potential and force on a small spherical object in a resonant chamber in the presence of both acoustic and gravitational force fields. The levitation position is also determined in rectangular resonators for the simultaneous excitation of up to three acoustic modes, and the results are applied to the triple-axis acoustic levitator. The analysis is applied to rectangular, spherical, and cylindrical single-mode levitators that are arbitrarily oriented relative to the gravitational force field. Criteria are determined for isotropic force fields in rectangular and cylindrical resonators. It is demonstrated that an object will be situated within a volume of possible levitation positions at a point determined by the relative strength of the acoustic and gravitational fields and the orientation of the chamber relative to gravity.

  17. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Bernassau, Anne L.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  18. Matrix method for acoustic levitation simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A B; Perez, Nicolas; Buiochi, Flavio; Adamowski, Julio C

    2011-08-01

    A matrix method is presented for simulating acoustic levitators. A typical acoustic levitator consists of an ultrasonic transducer and a reflector. The matrix method is used to determine the potential for acoustic radiation force that acts on a small sphere in the standing wave field produced by the levitator. The method is based on the Rayleigh integral and it takes into account the multiple reflections that occur between the transducer and the reflector. The potential for acoustic radiation force obtained by the matrix method is validated by comparing the matrix method results with those obtained by the finite element method when using an axisymmetric model of a single-axis acoustic levitator. After validation, the method is applied in the simulation of a noncontact manipulation system consisting of two 37.9-kHz Langevin-type transducers and a plane reflector. The manipulation system allows control of the horizontal position of a small levitated sphere from -6 mm to 6 mm, which is done by changing the phase difference between the two transducers. The horizontal position of the sphere predicted by the matrix method agrees with the horizontal positions measured experimentally with a charge-coupled device camera. The main advantage of the matrix method is that it allows simulation of non-symmetric acoustic levitators without requiring much computational effort. PMID:21859587

  19. Acoustic levitation methods for density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.; Hsu, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    The capability of ultrasonic levitators operating in air to perform density measurements has been demonstrated. The remote determination of the density of ordinary liquids as well as low density solid metals can be carried out using levitated samples with size on the order of a few millimeters and at a frequency of 20 kHz. Two basic methods may be used. The first one is derived from a previously known technique developed for acoustic levitation in liquid media, and is based on the static equilibrium position of levitated samples in the earth's gravitational field. The second approach relies on the dynamic interaction between a levitated sample and the acoustic field. The first technique appears more accurate (1 percent uncertainty), but the latter method is directly applicable to a near gravity-free environment such as that found in space.

  20. Inverse Leidenfrost Effect: Levitating Drops on Liquid Nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adda-Bedia, M; Kumar, S; Lechenault, F; Moulinet, S; Schillaci, M; Vella, D

    2016-05-01

    We explore the interaction between a liquid drop (initially at room temperature) and a bath of liquid nitrogen. In this scenario, heat transfer occurs through film-boiling: a nitrogen vapor layer develops that may cause the drop to levitate at the bath surface. We report the phenomenology of this inverse Leidenfrost effect, investigating the effect of the drop size and density by using an aqueous solution of a tungsten salt to vary the drop density. We find that (depending on its size and density) a drop either levitates or instantaneously sinks into the bulk nitrogen. We begin by measuring the duration of the levitation as a function of the radius R and density ρd of the liquid drop. We find that the levitation time increases roughly linearly with drop radius but depends weakly on the drop density. However, for sufficiently large drops, R ≥ Rc(ρd), the drop sinks instantaneously; levitation does not occur. This sinking of a (relatively) hot droplet induces film-boiling, releasing a stream of vapor bubbles for a well-defined length of time. We study the duration of this immersed-drop bubbling finding similar scalings (but with different prefactors) to the levitating drop case. With these observations, we study the physical factors limiting the levitation and immersed-film-boiling times, proposing a simple model that explains the scalings observed for the duration of these phenomena, as well as the boundary of (R,ρd) parameter space that separates them. PMID:27054550

  1. Measurement of Aqueous Foam Rheology by Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, J. Gregory; Holt, R. Glynn; Rogers, Rich (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An experimental technique is demonstrated for acoustically levitating aqueous foam drops and exciting their spheroidal modes. This allows fundamental studies of foam-drop dynamics that provide an alternative means of estimating the viscoelastic properties of the foam. One unique advantage of the technique is the lack of interactions between the foam and container surfaces, which must be accounted for in other techniques. Results are presented in which a foam drop with gas volume fraction phi = 0.77 is levitated at 30 kHz and excited into its first quadrupole resonance at 63 +/- 3 Hz. By modeling the drop as an elastic sphere, the shear modulus of the foam was estimated at 75 +/- 3 Pa.

  2. 声悬浮液滴的表面毛细波及八阶扇谐振荡%Surface capillary wave and the eighth mode sectorial oscillation of acoustically levitated drop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄢振麟; 解文军; 沈昌乐; 魏炳波

    2011-01-01

    采用声悬浮方法研究了自由液滴表面的毛细波形成机理,并利用主动调制声场技术激发了液滴的八阶扇谐振荡.实验结果表明,当声场调制频率接近液滴本征频率的两倍时,液滴将由轴对称受迫振荡向非轴对称扇谐振荡模态转变.实验与理论分析证实,参数共振是毛细波与扇谐振荡的形成原因.扇谐振荡的本征频率随液滴赤道半径的增大而减小,可通过修正的Rayleigh方程来描述.%The suspension of liquid drops provides a preferable boundary condition for investigating various free surface phenomena. Here we report the observation of concentric capillary wave formed on the surface of drastically flattened water drops levitated in ultrasound. The measured wavelength of capillary wave accords well with that from the classic dispersion relation equation. The eighth mode sectorial oscillation of acoustically levitated drop is excited by the active modulation of sound pressure. It is found that these phenomena are due to parametric excitation. The capillary wave is induced when the parametric instability arises and ultrasound pressure exceeds a threshold pressure. The sectorial oscillations take place when the equatorial radius varies at twice the natural sectorial frequency of the levitated drop. The frequency of the eighth mode sectorial oscillation decreases with the increase of equatorial radius and can be well described by modifying the Rayleigh equation. Further analysis reveals the parametric excitation mechanism for this kind of oscillations.

  3. Heterogeneous Nucleation Induced by Capillary Wave During Acoustic Levitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕勇军; 解文军; 魏炳波

    2003-01-01

    The rapid solidification of acoustically levitated drops of Pb-61.9 wt. %Sn eutectic alloy is accomplished. A surface morphology of spreading ripples is observed on a sample undercooled by 15 K. The ripples originate from the centre of sample surface, which is also the heterogeneous nucleation site for eutectic growth. The Faraday instability excited by forced surface vibration has brought about these ripples. They are retained in the solidified sample if the sound pressure level exceeds the threshold pressure required for the appearance of capillary waves.Theoretical calculations indicate that both the pressure and displacement maxima exist in the central part of a levitated drop. The pressure near the sample centre can promote heterogeneous nucleation, which is in agreement qualitatively with the experimental results.

  4. Rapid crystallization from acoustically levitated droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui-Ling; Yin, Da-Chuan; Guo, Yun-Zhu; Ma, Xiao-Liang; He, Jin; Guo, Wei-Hong; Xie, Xu-Zhuo; Zhou, Bo-Ru

    2012-04-01

    This paper reports on an ultrasonic levitation system developed for crystallization from solution in a containerless condition. The system has been proven to be able to levitate droplets stably and grow crystals rapidly and freely from a levitated droplet. Crystals of four samples, including NaCl, NH(4)Cl, lysozyme, and proteinase K, were obtained successfully utilizing the system. The studies showed that the crystals obtained from the acoustically levitated droplets all exhibited higher growth rates, larger sizes, better shapes, fewer crystals, as well as fewer twins and shards, compared with the control on a vessel wall. The results indicated that containerless ultrasonic levitation could play a key role in improving the crystallization of both inorganic salts and proteins. The ultrasonic levitation system could be used as a ground-based microgravity simulation platform, which could swiftly perform crystallization and screening of crystallization conditions for space crystallization and other ground-based containerless techniques. Moreover, the approach could also be conveniently applied to researching the dynamics and mechanism of crystallization. In addition, the device could be used for the preparation of high-purity materials, analysis of minute or poisonous samples, study of living cells, environmental monitoring, and so on. PMID:22501088

  5. Levitation of a drop over a moving surface

    OpenAIRE

    Lhuissier, Henri; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Tran, Tuan; Sun, Chao

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the levitation of a drop gently deposited onto the inner wall of a rotating hollow cylinder. For a sufficient velocity of the wall, the drop steadily levitates over a thin air film and reaches a stable angular position in the cylinder, where the drag and lift balance the weight of the drop. Interferometric measurement yields the three-dimensional (3D) air film thickness under the drop and reveals the asymmetry of the profile along the direction of the wall motion. A two-dimensi...

  6. Velocity and rotation measurements in acoustically levitated droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-10-01

    The velocity scale inside an acoustically levitated droplet depends on the levitator and liquid properties. Using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV), detailed velocity measurements have been made in a levitated droplet of different diameters and viscosity. The maximum velocity and rotation are normalized using frequency and amplitude of acoustic levitator, and droplet viscosity. The non-dimensional data are fitted for micrometer- and millimeter-sized droplets levitated in different levitators for different viscosity fluids. It is also shown that the rotational speed of nanosilica droplets at an advanced stage of vaporization compares well with that predicted by exponentially fitted parameters.

  7. Analysis and experimental study on the effect of a resonant tube on the performance of acoustic levitation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai; Liu, Jianfang; Lv, Qingqing; Gu, Shoudong; Jiao, Xiaoyang; Li, Minjiao; Zhang, Shasha

    2016-09-01

    The influence of a resonant tube on the performance of acoustic standing wave-based levitation device (acoustic levitation device hereinafter) is studied by analyzing the acoustic pressure and levitation force of four types of acoustic levitation devices without a resonance tube and with resonance tubes of different radii R using ANSYS and MATLAB. Introducing a resonance tube either enhances or weakens the levitation strength of acoustic levitation device, depending on the resonance tube radii. Specifically, the levitation force is improved to a maximum degree when the resonance tube radius is slightly larger than the size of the reflector end face. Furthermore, the stability of acoustic levitation device is improved to a maximum degree by introducing a resonance tube of R=1.023λ. The experimental platform and levitation force measurement system of the acoustic levitation device with concave-end-face-type emitter and reflector are developed, and the test of suspended matters and liquid drops is conducted. Results show that the Φ6.5-mm steel ball is suspended easily when the resonance tube radius is 1.023λ, and the Φ5.5-mm steel ball cannot be suspended when the resonance tube radius is 1.251λ. The levitation capability of the original acoustic levitation device without a resonance tube is weakened when a resonance tube of R=1.251λ is applied. These results are consistent with the ANSYS simulation results. The levitation time of the liquid droplet with a resonance tube of R=1.023λ is longer than without a resonance tube. This result is also supported by the MATLAB simulation results. Therefore, the performance of acoustic levitation device can be improved by introducing a resonant tube with an appropriate radius.

  8. Particle manipulation by a non-resonant acoustic levitator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Marco A. B., E-mail: marcobrizzotti@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, CP 66318, 05314-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Pérez, Nicolás [Centro Universitario de Paysandú, Universidad de la República, Ruta 3 km 363, 60000 Paysandú (Uruguay); Adamowski, Julio C. [Department of Mechatronics and Mechanical Systems Engineering, Escola Politécnica, University of São Paulo, Av. Mello Moraes, 2231, 05508-030 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-01-05

    We present the analysis of a non-resonant acoustic levitator, formed by an ultrasonic transducer and a concave reflector. In contrast to traditional levitators, the geometry presented herein does not require the separation distance between the transducer and the reflector to be a multiple of half wavelength. The levitator behavior is numerically predicted by applying a numerical model to calculate the acoustic pressure distribution and the Gor'kov theory to obtain the potential of the acoustic radiation force that acts on a levitated particle. We also demonstrate that levitating particles can be manipulated by controlling the reflector position while maintaining the transducer in a fixed position.

  9. Particle manipulation by a non-resonant acoustic levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Pérez, Nicolás; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2015-01-01

    We present the analysis of a non-resonant acoustic levitator, formed by an ultrasonic transducer and a concave reflector. In contrast to traditional levitators, the geometry presented herein does not require the separation distance between the transducer and the reflector to be a multiple of half wavelength. The levitator behavior is numerically predicted by applying a numerical model to calculate the acoustic pressure distribution and the Gor'kov theory to obtain the potential of the acoustic radiation force that acts on a levitated particle. We also demonstrate that levitating particles can be manipulated by controlling the reflector position while maintaining the transducer in a fixed position.

  10. Internal flow of acoustically levitated water drops during sectorial oscillations%声悬浮条件下扇谐振荡液滴的内部流动规律

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄢振麟; 解文军; 魏炳波

    2011-01-01

    The internal flow of acoustically levitated water drops undergoing the second and third mode sectorial oscillations has been investigated by using laser sheet illumination and high speed video techniques. Polystyrene microspheres are employed as tracer particles for visualizing flow field patterns. A numerical computation based on the Level Set method is accomplished to simulate drop shape evolution and internal flow field by solving incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for two phase flow. The calculated flow fields are in good agreement with experimental observations. The magnitude of fluid velocity is nearly vanishing at the region around drop center, whereas it increases toward the free surface of levitated drop. It is found that the fluid velocity increases as linear and quadratic functions in the radial direction for the second and third mode sectorial oscillations respectively. The calculated fluid velocity distribution is consistent with theoretical prediction.%采用激光片光源照明和高速摄影技术,并使用聚苯乙烯微球作为示踪颗粒,研究了声悬浮条件下二阶和三阶扇谐振荡液滴的内部流场.耦合Level Set方法和标记网格法数值求解了不可压两相流的Navier-Stokes方程,模拟了液滴的扇谐振荡过程中的形态演化及其内部流动状态.数值计算的流场与实验结果吻合很好.对液滴扇谐振荡过程中的内部流速分布进行定量分析,发现流速在液滴中心区域几乎为零并沿液滴自由表面方向逐渐增大.二阶和三阶扇谐振荡的内部流速沿径向分别呈线性和二次函数分布并与理论预测结果相一致.

  11. Non-contact transportation using near-field acoustic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueha; Hashimoto; Koike

    2000-03-01

    Near-field acoustic levitation, where planar objects 10 kg in weight can levitate stably near the vibrating plate, is successfully applied both to non-contact transportation of objects and to a non-contact ultrasonic motor. Transporting apparatuses and an ultrasonic motor have been fabricated and their characteristics measured. The theory of near-field acoustic levitation both for a piston-like sound source and a flexural vibration source is also briefly described. PMID:10829622

  12. Optical measurement of acoustic radiation pressure of the near-field acoustic levitation through transparent object

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Satoshi; Sasao, Yasuhiro; Katsura, Kogure; Naoki, Kondo

    2013-01-01

    It is known that macroscopic objects can be levitated for few to several hundred micrometers by near-field acoustic field and this phenomenon is called near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL). Although there are various experiments conducted to measure integrated acoustic pressure on the object surface, up to now there was no direct method to measure pressure distribution. In this study we measured the acoustic radiation pressure of the near-field acoustic levitation via pressure-sensitive paint.

  13. Levitation of a drop over a moving surface

    CERN Document Server

    Lhuissier, Henri; Tran, Tuan; Sun, Chao

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the levitation of a drop gently deposited onto the inner wall of a rotating hollow cylinder. For a sufficient velocity of the wall, the drop steadily levitates over a thin air film and reaches a stable angular position in the cylinder, where the drag and lift balance the weight of the drop. Interferometric measurement yields the three-dimensional (3D) air film thickness under the drop and reveals the asymmetry of the profile along the direction of the wall motion. A two-dimensional (2D) model is presented which explains the levitation mechanism, captures the main characteristics of the air film shape and predicts two asymptotic regimes for the film thickness $h_0$: For large drops $h_0\\sim\\ca^{2/3}\\kappa_b^{-1}$, as in the Bretherton problem, where $\\ca$ is the capillary number based on the air viscosity and $\\kappa_b$ is the curvature at the bottom of the drop. For small drops $h_0\\sim\\ca^{4/5}(a\\kappa_b)^{4/5}\\kappa_b^{-1}$, where $a$ is the capillary length.

  14. Classifying Particles By Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Stoneburner, James D.

    1983-01-01

    Separation technique well suited to material processing. Apparatus with rectangular-cross-section chamber used to measure equilibrium positions of low-density spheres in gravitational field. Vertical acoustic forces generated by two opposing compression drivers exciting fundamental plane-wave mode at 1.2 kHz. Additional horizontal drivers centered samples along vertical axis. Applications in fusion-target separation, biological separation, and manufacturing processes in liquid or gas media.

  15. On the horizontal wobbling of an object levitated by near-field acoustic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2007-11-01

    A circular planar object can be levitated with several hundreds of microns by ultrasonic near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL). However, when both the sound source and the levitated object are circularly shaped and the center of the levitated object does not coincide with the source center, instability problem often occurs. When this happens, it becomes difficult to pick up or transport the object for the next process. In this study, when the center of the levitated object was offset from the source center, the moving direction of the levitated object was predicted by using the time averaged potential around the levitated object. The wobbling frequency of the levitated object was calculated by analyzing the nonlinear wobbling motion of the object. It was shown that the predicted wobbling frequencies agreed with measured ones well. Finally, a safe zone was suggested to avoid the unstable movement of an object. PMID:17590402

  16. Oscillating and star-shaped drops levitated by an airflow

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwhuis, Wilco; Peters, Ivo R; Brunet, Philippe; van der Meer, Devaraj; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the spontaneous oscillations of drops levitated above an air cushion, eventually inducing a breaking of axisymmetry and the appearance of `star drops'. This is strongly reminiscent of the Leidenfrost stars that are observed for drops floating above a hot substrate. The key advantage of this work is that we inject the airflow at a constant rate below the drop, thus eliminating thermal effects and allowing for a better control of the flow rate. We perform experiments with drops of different viscosities and observe stable states, oscillations and chimney instabilities. We find that for a given drop size the instability appears above a critical flow rate, where the latter is largest for small drops. All these observations are reproduced by numerical simulations, where we treat the drop using potential flow and the gas as a viscous lubrication layer. Qualitatively, the onset of instability agrees with the experimental results, although the typical flow rates are too large by a factor 10. Our results...

  17. Holographic acoustic elements for manipulation of levitated objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzo, Asier; Seah, Sue Ann; Drinkwater, Bruce W.; Sahoo, Deepak Ranjan; Long, Benjamin; Subramanian, Sriram

    2015-10-01

    Sound can levitate objects of different sizes and materials through air, water and tissue. This allows us to manipulate cells, liquids, compounds or living things without touching or contaminating them. However, acoustic levitation has required the targets to be enclosed with acoustic elements or had limited manoeuvrability. Here we optimize the phases used to drive an ultrasonic phased array and show that acoustic levitation can be employed to translate, rotate and manipulate particles using even a single-sided emitter. Furthermore, we introduce the holographic acoustic elements framework that permits the rapid generation of traps and provides a bridge between optical and acoustical trapping. Acoustic structures shaped as tweezers, twisters or bottles emerge as the optimum mechanisms for tractor beams or containerless transportation. Single-beam levitation could manipulate particles inside our body for applications in targeted drug delivery or acoustically controlled micro-machines that do not interfere with magnetic resonance imaging.

  18. Theoretical and experimental examination of near-field acoustic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Hideyuki; Kamakura, Tomoo; Matsuda, Kazuhisa

    2002-04-01

    A planar object can be levitated stably close to a piston sound source by making use of acoustic radiation pressure. This phenomenon is called near-field acoustic levitation [Y. Hashimoto et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100, 2057-2061 (1996)]. In the present article, the levitation distance is predicted theoretically by numerically solving basic equations in a compressible viscous fluid subject to the appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Additionally, experiments are carried out using a 19.5-kHz piston source with a 40-mm aperture and various aluminum disks of different sizes. The measured levitation distance agrees well with the theory, which is different from a conventional theory, and the levitation distance is not inversely proportional to the square root of the surface density of the levitated disk in a strict sense. PMID:12002842

  19. Acoustic levitation for high temperature containerless processing in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, C. A.; Sisler, R.; Merkley, D. R.; Danley, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    New facilities for high-temperature containerless processing in space are described, including the acoustic levitation furnace (ALF), the high-temperature acoustic levitator (HAL), and the high-pressure acoustic levitator (HPAL). In the current ALF development, the maximum temperature capabilities of the levitation furnaces are 1750 C, and in the HAL development with a cold wall furnace they will exceed 2000-2500 C. The HPAL demonstrated feasibility of precursor space flight experiments on the ground in a 1 g pressurized-gas environment. Testing of lower density materials up to 1300 C has also been accomplished. It is suggested that advances in acoustic levitation techniques will result in the production of new materials such as ceramics, alloys, and optical and electronic materials.

  20. Mass spectrometry of acoustically levitated droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphall, Michael S; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M

    2008-08-01

    Containerless sample handling techniques such as acoustic levitation offer potential advantages for mass spectrometry, by eliminating surfaces where undesired adsorption/desorption processes can occur. In addition, they provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental aspects of the ionization process as well as phenomena occurring at the air-droplet interface. Realizing these advantages is contingent, however, upon being able to effectively interface levitated droplets with a mass spectrometer, a challenging task that is addressed in this report. We have employed a newly developed charge and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI) technique to obtain mass spectra from a 5-microL acoustically levitated droplet containing peptides and an ionic matrix. A four-ring electrostatic lens is used in conjunction with a corona needle to produce bursts of corona ions and to direct those ions toward the droplet, resulting in droplet charging. Analyte ions are produced from the droplet by a 337-nm laser pulse and detected by an atmospheric sampling mass spectrometer. The ion generation and extraction cycle is repeated at 20 Hz, the maximum operating frequency of the laser employed. It is shown in delayed ion extraction experiments that both positive and negative ions are produced, behavior similar to that observed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser absorption/ionization. No ion signal is observed in the absence of droplet charging. It is likely, although not yet proven, that the role of the droplet charging is to increase the strength of the electric field at the surface of the droplet, reducing charge recombination after ion desorption. PMID:18582090

  1. High undercooling of bulk water during acoustic levitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕勇军; 曹崇德; 魏炳波

    2003-01-01

    The experiments on undercooling of acoustically levitated water drops with the radius of 5-8 mm are carried out, and the maximum undercooling of 24 K is obtained in such a containerless state. Various factors influencing the undercoolability of water under acoustic levitation are synthetically analyzed. The experimental results indicate that impurities tend to decrease the undercooling level, whereas the dominant factor is the effect of ultrasound. The stirring and cavitation effects of ultrasound tend to stimulate the nucleation of water and prevent further bulk undercooling in experiments. The stirring effect provides some extra energy fluctuation to overcome the thermodynamic barrier for nucleation. The local high pressure caused by cavitation effect increases the local undercooling in water and stimulates nucleation before the achievement of a large bulk undercooling. According to the cooling curves, the dendrite growth velocity of ice is estimated, which is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction at the lower undercooling. The theoretical calculation predicts a dendrite growth velocity of 0.23 m/s corresponding to the maximum undercooling of 24 K, at which the rapid solidification of ice occurs.

  2. Resonance Shift of Single-Axis Acoustic Levitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Jun; WEI Bing-Bo

    2007-01-01

    @@ The resonance shift due to the presence and movement of a rigid spherical sample in a single-axis acoustic levitator is studied with the boundary element method on the basis of a two-cylinder model of the levitator.The introduction of a sample into the sound pressure nodes, where it is usually levitated, reduces the resonant interval Hn (n is the mode number) between the reflector and emitter.

  3. A Novel Acousto-Electric Levitator for Studies of Drop and Particle Clusters and Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuren; Apfel, Robert E.; Zheng, Yibing

    1999-01-01

    A novel and compact instrumentation for studying the behavior of drop sprays and of clusters of drops now permits fundamental research into the behavior of reacting and non-reacting fluid and solid species. The new capability is made possible by simultaneous acousto-electric levitation and charging of "seed" droplets (10-30 microns in diameter) which come together in 2-D clusters (with up to 300 droplets). These clusters are interesting in their own right because of their crystalline and quasi-crystalline forms, which depend on the acoustic and electric field parameters. By varying the electric and acoustic field intensities, one can cause a cluster of droplets to condense into larger drops (e.g. 50-300 microns) which, because of their charge, form uniformly spaced 2-D arrays of monodispersed drops (e.g. 30-40 array drops in preliminary experiments). One or more layers of these 2-D arrays can form in the acoustic standing wave. Such a configuration permits a wide range of fundamental studies of drop evaporation, combustion, and nucleation. The drops can be single or multicomponent. Therefore, fundamental materials studies can also be performed. Using this same Cluster and Array Generation (CAG) instrumentation, it has been also possible in preliminary experiments to demonstrate the clustering and arraying of solid particles, both coated with an electrically conducting layer and uncoated, and both charged and uncharged.

  4. Dependence of acoustic levitation capabilities on geometric parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, W J; Wei, B

    2002-08-01

    A two-cylinder model incorporating boundary element method simulations is developed, which builds up the relationship between the levitation capabilities and the geometric parameters of a single-axis acoustic levitator with reference to wavelength. This model proves to be successful in predicting resonant modes of the acoustic field and explaining axial symmetry deviation of the levitated samples near the reflector and emitter. Concave reflecting surfaces of a spherical cap, a paraboloid, and a hyperboloid of revolution are investigated systematically with regard to the dependence of the levitation force on the section radius R(b) and curvature radius R (or depth D) of the reflector. It is found that the levitation force can be remarkably enhanced by choosing an optimum value of R or D, and the possible degree of this enhancement for spherically curved reflectors is the largest. The degree of levitation force enhancement by this means can also be facilitated by enlarging R(b) and employing a lower resonant mode. The deviation of the sample near the reflector is found likely to occur in case of smaller R(b), larger D, and a higher resonant mode. The calculated dependence of levitation force on R, R(b), and the resonant mode is also verified by experiment and finally demonstrated to be in good agreement with experimental results, in which considerably a strong levitation force is achieved to levitate an iridium sphere which has the largest density of 22.6 g/cm(3). PMID:12241309

  5. Parametric study of single-axis acoustic levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, W. J.; Wei, B.

    2001-08-06

    Remarkable enhancement of the single-axis acoustic levitation force is achieved by properly curving the surface and enlarging the section of the reflector so as to levitate high density material like tungsten ({rho}{sub s}=18.92g/cm{sup 3}). A two-cylinder model incorporating the boundary element method simulations is presented for systematic study of the relationship between levitation capabilities and geometric parameters. The model proves to be successful in predicting resonant modes and explaining deviation of the levitated samples near the reflector and driver. The dependence of levitation force on resonant mode, reflector section radius R{sub b} and curvature radius R is revealed and summarized, which agrees with the experiment in principle and suggests that a reflector with large R{sub b} and small R (when R{sub b}/{lambda}{>=}0.982) working under mode 1 assures better levitation capabilities. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Containerless solidification of acoustically levitated Ni-Sn eutectic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Wei, B.

    2012-10-01

    Containerless solidification of Ni-18.7at%Sn eutectic alloy has been achieved with a single-axis acoustic levitator. The temperature, motion, and oscillation of the sample were monitored by a high speed camera. The temperature of the sample can be determined from its image brightness, although the sample moves vertically and horizontally during levitation. The experimentally observed frequency of vertical motion is in good agreement with theoretical prediction. The sample undergoes shape oscillation before solidification finishes. The solidification microstructure of this alloy consists of a mixture of anomalous eutectic plus regular lamellar eutectic. This indicates the achievement of rapid solidification under acoustic levitation condition.

  7. Containerless solidification of acoustically levitated Ni-Sn eutectic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, D.L.; Xie, W.J.; Wei, B. [Northwestern Polytechnical University, Department of Applied Physics, Xi' an (China)

    2012-10-15

    Containerless solidification of Ni-18.7at%Sn eutectic alloy has been achieved with a single-axis acoustic levitator. The temperature, motion, and oscillation of the sample were monitored by a high speed camera. The temperature of the sample can be determined from its image brightness, although the sample moves vertically and horizontally during levitation. The experimentally observed frequency of vertical motion is in good agreement with theoretical prediction. The sample undergoes shape oscillation before solidification finishes. The solidification microstructure of this alloy consists of a mixture of anomalous eutectic plus regular lamellar eutectic. This indicates the achievement of rapid solidification under acoustic levitation condition. (orig.)

  8. (abstract) Production and Levitation of Free Drops of Liquid Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, C. G.; Petrac, D.; Rhim, W. K.

    1995-01-01

    We are interested in the nucleation and behavior of quantized vorticies and surface excitations in free drops of superfluid helium. We have constructed an apparatus to maintain liquid helium drops isolated from any material container in the Earth's gravitational field, and have investigated two techniques for generating and introducing liquid drops into the region of confinement. The levitation apparatus utilizes the electrostatic force acting upon a charged liquid drop to counteract the gravitational force, with drop position stability provided by a static magnetic field acting upon the helium diamagnetic moment. Electrically neutral superfluid drops have been produced with a miniature thermomechanical pump; for a given configuration the liquid initial velocity has been varied up to several centimeters per second. Liquid drops carrying either net positive or negative charge are produced by an electrode which generates a flow of ionized liquid from the bulk liquid surface. Potentials of less than one thousand volts to several thousand volts are required. The mass flow is controlled by varying duration of the ionizing voltage pulse; drops as small as 30 micrometers diameter, charged to near the Rayleigh limit, have been observed.

  9. Acoustic levitation: recent developments and emerging opportunities in biomaterials research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Richard J K; Benmore, Chris J; Tumber, Sonia K; Tailor, Amit N; Rey, Charles A; Taylor, Lynne S; Byrn, Stephen R

    2012-04-01

    Containerless sample environments (levitation) are useful for study of nucleation, supercooling, and vitrification and for synthesis of new materials, often with non-equilibrium structures. Elimination of extrinsic nucleation by container walls extends access to supercooled and supersaturated liquids under high-purity conditions. Acoustic levitation is well suited to the study of liquids including aqueous solutions, organics, soft materials, polymers, and pharmaceuticals at around room temperature. This article briefly reviews recent developments and applications of acoustic levitation in materials R&D. Examples of experiments yielding amorphous pharmaceutical materials are presented. The implementation and results of experiments on supercooled and supersaturated liquids using an acoustic levitator at a high-energy X-ray beamline are described. PMID:22038123

  10. Green chemistry and nanofabrication in a levitated Leidenfrost drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Ramzy; Disci-Zayed, Duygu; Hedayati, Mehdi Keshavarz; Pöhls, Jan-Hendrik; Zillohu, Ahnaf Usman; Erkartal, Burak; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Duppel, Viola; Kienle, Lorenz; Elbahri, Mady

    2013-10-01

    Green nanotechnology focuses on the development of new and sustainable methods of creating nanoparticles, their localized assembly and integration into useful systems and devices in a cost-effective, simple and eco-friendly manner. Here we present our experimental findings on the use of the Leidenfrost drop as an overheated and charged green chemical reactor. Employing a droplet of aqueous solution on hot substrates, this method is capable of fabricating nanoparticles, creating nanoscale coatings on complex objects and designing porous metal in suspension and foam form, all in a levitated Leidenfrost drop. As examples of the potential applications of the Leidenfrost drop, fabrication of nanoporous black gold as a plasmonic wideband superabsorber, and synthesis of superhydrophilic and thermal resistive metal-polymer hybrid foams are demonstrated. We believe that the presented nanofabrication method may be a promising strategy towards the sustainable production of functional nanomaterials.

  11. Space Environment Simulation for Material Processing by Acoustic Levitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解文军; 魏炳波

    2001-01-01

    Single-axis acoustic levitation of four polymer samples has been realized in air under the ground-based laboratory conditions for the purpose of space environment simulation of containerless processing. The levitation capabilities are investigated by numerical calculations based on a model of the boundary element method corresponding to our levitator and following Gor'kov and Barmatz's method. The calculated results, such as the resonant distance between the reflector and the vibrating source and the positions of levitated samples, agree well with experimental observation, and the effect of gravity on the time-averaged potential for levitation force is also revealed. As an application, the containerless melting and solidification of a liquid crystal, 4-Pentylphenyl-4'-methybenzoate, is successfully accomplished, in which undercooling up to 16 K is obtained and the rotation and oscillation of the sample during solidification may result in fragmentation of the usual radiating surface growth morphology.

  12. Structure analysis using acoustically levitated droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiterer, J; Delissen, F; Emmerling, F; Thünemann, A F; Panne, U

    2008-06-01

    Synchrotron diffraction with a micrometer-sized X-ray beam permits the efficient characterization of micrometer-sized samples, even in time-resolved experiments, which is important because often the amount of sample available is small and/or the sample is expensive. In this context, we will present acoustic levitation as a useful sample handling method for small solid and liquid samples, which are suspended in a gaseous environment (air) by means of a stationary ultrasonic field. A study of agglomeration and crystallization processes in situ was performed by continuously increasing the concentration of the samples by evaporating the solvent. Absorption and contamination processes on the sample container walls were suppressed strongly by this procedure, and parasitic scattering such as that observed when using glass capillaries was also absent. The samples investigated were either dissolved or dispersed in water droplets with diameters in the range of 1 micrometer to 2 millimeters. Initial results from time-resolved synchrotron small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering measurements of ascorbic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, apoferritin, and colloidal gold are presented. PMID:18373085

  13. Experimental determination of the dynamics of an acoustically levitated sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Nicolás; Andrade, Marco A. B.; Canetti, Rafael; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2014-11-01

    Levitation of solids and liquids by ultrasonic standing waves is a promising technique to manipulate materials without contact. When a small particle is introduced in certain areas of a standing wave field, the acoustic radiation force pushes the particle to the pressure node. This movement is followed by oscillations of the levitated particle. Aiming to investigate the particle oscillations in acoustic levitation, this paper presents the experimental and numerical characterization of the dynamic behavior of a levitated sphere. To obtain the experimental response, a small sphere is lifted by the acoustic radiation force. After the sphere lift, it presents a damped oscillatory behavior, which is recorded by a high speed camera. To model this behavior, a mass-spring-damper system is proposed. In this model, the acoustic radiation force that acts on the sphere is theoretically predicted by the Gor'kov theory and the viscous forces are modeled by two damping terms, one term proportional to the square of the velocity and another term proportional to the particle velocity. The proposed model was experimentally verified by using different values of sound pressure amplitude. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the model can accurately describe the oscillatory behavior of the sphere in an acoustic levitator.

  14. Experimental determination of the dynamics of an acoustically levitated sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, Nicolás, E-mail: nico@fisica.edu.uy [Centro Universitario de Paysandú, Universidad de la República, Paysandú (Uruguay); Andrade, Marco A. B. [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Canetti, Rafael [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay); Adamowski, Julio C. [Department of Mechatronics and Mechanical Systems Engineering, Escola Politécnica, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-11-14

    Levitation of solids and liquids by ultrasonic standing waves is a promising technique to manipulate materials without contact. When a small particle is introduced in certain areas of a standing wave field, the acoustic radiation force pushes the particle to the pressure node. This movement is followed by oscillations of the levitated particle. Aiming to investigate the particle oscillations in acoustic levitation, this paper presents the experimental and numerical characterization of the dynamic behavior of a levitated sphere. To obtain the experimental response, a small sphere is lifted by the acoustic radiation force. After the sphere lift, it presents a damped oscillatory behavior, which is recorded by a high speed camera. To model this behavior, a mass-spring-damper system is proposed. In this model, the acoustic radiation force that acts on the sphere is theoretically predicted by the Gor'kov theory and the viscous forces are modeled by two damping terms, one term proportional to the square of the velocity and another term proportional to the particle velocity. The proposed model was experimentally verified by using different values of sound pressure amplitude. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the model can accurately describe the oscillatory behavior of the sphere in an acoustic levitator.

  15. A new, simple electrostatic-acoustic hybrid levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lierke, E. G.; Loeb, H.; Gross, D.

    1990-01-01

    Battelle has developed a hybrid levitator by combining the known single-axis acoustic standing wave levitator with a coaxial DC electric field. The resulting Coulomb forces on the charged liquid or solid sample support its weight and, together with the acoustic force, center the sample. Liquid samples with volumes approximately less than 100 micro-liters are deployed from a syringe reservoir into the acoustic pressure node. The sample is charged using a miniature high voltage power supply (approximately less than 20 kV) connected to the syringe needle. As the electric field, generated by a second miniature power supply, is increased, the acoustic intensity is reduced. The combination of both fields allows stable levitation of samples larger than either single technique could position on the ground. Decreasing the acoustic intensity reduces acoustic convection and sample deformation. Neither the electrostatic nor the acoustic field requires sample position sensing or active control. The levitator, now used for static and dynamic fluid physics investigations on the ground, can be easily modified for space operations.

  16. Study on Transient Properties of Levitated Object in Near-Field Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Bing; Chen, Chao; Zhao, Chun-Sheng

    2011-12-01

    A new approach to the study on the transient properties of the levitated object in near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL) is presented. In this article, the transient response characteristics, including the levitated height of an object with radius of 24 mm and thickness of 5 mm, the radial velocity and pressure difference of gas at the boundary of clearance between the levitated object and radiating surface (squeeze film), is calculated according to several velocity amplitudes of radiating surface. First, the basic equations in fluid areas on Arbitrary Lagrange—Euler (ALE) form are numerically solved by using streamline upwind petrov galerkin (SUPG) finite elements method. Second, the formed algebraic equations and solid control equations are solved by using synchronous alternating method to gain the transient messages of the levitated object and gas in the squeeze film. Through theoretical and numerical analyses, it is found that there is a oscillation time in the transient process and that the response time does not simply increase with the increasing of velocity amplitudes of radiating surface. More investigations in this paper are helpful for the understanding of the transient properties of levitated object in NFAL, which are in favor of enhancing stabilities and responsiveness of levitated object.

  17. Study on Transient Properties of Levitated Object in Near-Field Acoustic Levitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾兵; 陈超; 赵淳生

    2011-01-01

    A new approach to the study on the transient properties of the levitated object in near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL) is presented. In this article, the transient response characteristics, including the levitated height of an object with radius of 24 mm and thickness of 5 mm, the radial velocity and pressure difference of gas at the boundary of clearance between the levitated object and radiating surface (squeeze film), is calculated according to severa/velocity amplitudes of radiating surface. First, the basic equations in fluid areas on Arbitrary Lagrange--Euler (ALE) form are numericaJly solved by using streamline upwind petrov gaJerkin (SUPG) finite elements method. Second, the formed a/gebraic equations and solid control equations are solved by using synchronous alternating method to gain the transient messages of the levitated object and gas in the squeeze film. Through theoretical and numerical analyses, it is found that there is a oscillation time in the transient process and that the response time does not simply increase with the increasing of velocity amplitudes of radiating surface. More investigations in this paper are helpful for the understanding of the transient properties of levitated object in NFAL, which are in favor of enhancing stabilities and responsiveness of levitated object.

  18. Anomalous water drop bouncing on a nanotextured surface by the Leidenfrost levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Doo Jin; Song, Young Seok

    2016-05-01

    We report an anomalous liquid drop bouncing phenomenon that is generated by the Leidenfrost levitation due to a vapor layer reducing energy dissipation during the collision. The Leidenfrost levitation of water drops on both a hydrophobic surface and nanotextured Cassie surface is investigated. When the water drop is positioned onto the hydrophobic surface, a superhydrophobic feature is observed by the levitation effect due to the vapor film, which results in a slow evaporation of the drop due to the low thermal conductivity of the vapor layer that inhibits heat transfer between the heated surface and the water drop. In contrast, for the nanotextured surface, the water drop can bounce off after impact on the surface when it overcomes gravitational and adhesion forces. The spontaneous water drop bouncing on the nanotextured surface is powered by the combination effect of the Leidenfrost levitation and the non-wetting Cassie state.

  19. Acoustic levitation with self-adaptive flexible reflectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Z Y; Xie, W J; Wei, B

    2011-07-01

    Two kinds of flexible reflectors are proposed and examined in this paper to improve the stability of single-axis acoustic levitator, especially in the case of levitating high-density and high-temperature samples. One kind is those with a deformable reflecting surface, and the other kind is those with an elastic support, both of which are self-adaptive to the change of acoustic radiation pressure. High-density materials such as iridium (density 22.6 gcm(-3)) are stably levitated at room temperature with a soft reflector made of colloid as well as a rigid reflector supported by a spring. In addition, the containerless melting and solidification of binary In-Bi eutectic alloy (melting point 345.8 K) and ternary Ag-Cu-Ge eutectic alloy (melting point 812 K) are successfully achieved by applying the elastically supported reflector with the assistance of a laser beam. PMID:21806218

  20. Acoustically levitated droplets: a contactless sampling method for fluorescence studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiterer, Jork; Grabolle, Markus; Rurack, Knut; Resch-Genger, Ute; Ziegler, Jan; Nann, Thomas; Panne, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic levitation is used as a new tool to study concentration-dependent processes in fluorescence spectroscopy. With this technique, small amounts of liquid and solid samples can be measured without the need for sample supports or containers, which often limits signal acquisition and can even alter sample properties due to interactions with the support material. We demonstrate that, because of the small sample volume, fluorescence measurements at high concentrations of an organic dye are possible without the limitation of inner-filter effects, which hamper such experiments in conventional, cuvette-based measurements. Furthermore, we show that acoustic levitation of liquid samples provides an experimentally simple way to study distance-dependent fluorescence modulations in semiconductor nanocrystals. The evaporation of the solvent during levitation leads to a continuous increase of solute concentration and can easily be monitored by laser-induced fluorescence. PMID:18596335

  1. Nonlinear characterization of a single-axis acoustic levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Ramos, Tiago S.; Okina, Fábio T. A.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2014-04-01

    The nonlinear behavior of a 20.3 kHz single-axis acoustic levitator formed by a Langevin transducer with a concave radiating surface and a concave reflector is experimentally investigated. In this study, a laser Doppler vibrometer is applied to measure the nonlinear sound field in the air gap between the transducer and the reflector. Additionally, an electronic balance is used in the measurement of the acoustic radiation force on the reflector as a function of the distance between the transducer and the reflector. The experimental results show some effects that cannot be described by the linear acoustic theory, such as the jump phenomenon, harmonic generation, and the hysteresis effect. The influence of these nonlinear effects on the acoustic levitation of small particles is discussed.

  2. Nonlinear characterization of a single-axis acoustic levitator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Marco A. B. [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Ramos, Tiago S.; Okina, Fábio T. A.; Adamowski, Julio C. [Department of Mechatronics and Mechanical Systems Engineering, Escola Politécnica, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-04-15

    The nonlinear behavior of a 20.3 kHz single-axis acoustic levitator formed by a Langevin transducer with a concave radiating surface and a concave reflector is experimentally investigated. In this study, a laser Doppler vibrometer is applied to measure the nonlinear sound field in the air gap between the transducer and the reflector. Additionally, an electronic balance is used in the measurement of the acoustic radiation force on the reflector as a function of the distance between the transducer and the reflector. The experimental results show some effects that cannot be described by the linear acoustic theory, such as the jump phenomenon, harmonic generation, and the hysteresis effect. The influence of these nonlinear effects on the acoustic levitation of small particles is discussed.

  3. Surface wave patterns on acoustically levitated viscous liquid alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Z. Y.; Yan, N.; Geng, D. L.; Wei, B.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate two different kinds of surface wave patterns on viscous liquid alloys, which are melted and solidified under acoustic levitation condition. These patterns are consistent with the morphologies of standing capillary waves and ensembles of oscillons, respectively. The rapid solidification of two-dimensional liquid alloy surfaces may hold them down.

  4. A wall-free climate unit for acoustic levitators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, M. C.; Wenzel, K.-J.; Sarfraz, A.; Panne, U.; Emmerling, F.

    2012-05-01

    Acoustic levitation represents the physical background of trapping a sample in a standing acoustic wave with no contact to the wave generating device. For the last three decades, sample holders based on this effect have been commonly used for contact free handling of samples coupled with a number of analytical techniques. In this study, a wall-free climate unit is presented, which allows the control of the environmental conditions of suspended samples. The insulation is based on a continuous cold/hot gas flow around the sample and thus does not require any additional isolation material. This provides a direct access to the levitated sample and circumvents any influence of the climate unit material to the running analyses.

  5. Acoustic levitator for contactless motion and merging of large droplets in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelobrk, Nada; Nabavi, Majid; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-09-01

    Large droplet transport in a line-focussed acoustic manipulator in terms of maximum droplet size is achieved by employing a driving voltage control mechanism. The maximum volume of the transported droplets in the order of few microliters is thereby increased by three orders of magnitude compared to the constant voltage case, widening the application field of this method significantly. A drop-on-demand droplet generator is used to supply the liquid droplets into the system. The ejected sequence of picoliter-size droplets is guided along trajectories by the acoustic field and accumulates at the selected pressure node, merging into a single large droplet. Droplet movement is achieved by varying the reflector height. This also changes the intensity of the radiation pressure during droplet movement, which in turn could atomise the droplet. The acoustic force is adjusted by regulating the driving voltage of the actuator to keep the liquid droplet suspended in air and to prevent atomisation. In the herein presented levitation concept, liquids with a wide range of surface tension (water and tetradecane were tested) can be transported over distances of several mm. The aspect ratio of the droplet in the acoustic field is shown to be a good indicator for radiation pressure intensity and is kept between 1.1 and 1.4 during droplet transport. Despite certain limitations with volatile liquids, the presented acoustic levitator concept has the potential to expand the range of analytical characterisation and manipulation methods in applications ranging from chemistry and biology.

  6. Acoustic levitation and the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putterman, S.; Rudnick, Joseph; Barmatz, M.

    1989-01-01

    The Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle of adiabatic invariance relates the acoustic potential acting on a sample positioned in a single-mode cavity to the shift in resonant frequency caused by the presence of this sample. This general and simple relation applies to samples and cavities of arbitrary shape, dimension, and compressibility. Positioning forces and torques can, therefore, be determined from straightforward measurements of frequency shifts. Applications to the Rayleigh disk phenomenon and levitated cylinders are presented.

  7. Sectorial oscillation of acoustically levitated nanoparticle-coated droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Duyang; Chen, Zhen; Geng, Xingguo

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of a third mode sectorial oscillation of nanoparticle-coated droplets using acoustic levitation in combination with active modulation. The presence of nanoparticles at the droplet surface changes its oscillation amplitude and frequency. A model linking the interfacial rheology and oscillation dynamics has been proposed in which the compression modulus ɛ of the particle layer is introduced into the analysis. The ɛ obtained with the model is in good agreement with that obtained by the Wilhelmy plate approach, highlighting the important role of interfacial rheological properties in the sectorial oscillation of droplets.

  8. The liquid phase separation of Bi-Ga hypermonotectic alloy under acoustic levitation condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG ZhenYu; L(U) YongJun; XIE WenJun; WEI BingBo

    2007-01-01

    Containerless treatment of Bi-58.5at%Ga hypermonotectic alloy is successfully performed with acoustic levitation technique. Under acoustic levitation condition, the second phase (Ga) distributes almost homogeneously in solidification sample, opposite to macrosegregation in solidification sample under conventional condition. Stokes motion of the second liquid droplet (Ga) is significantly restrained under acoustic levitation condition. The analyses indicate that the melt vibration in the gravity direction forced by acoustic field can induce steady flow around the second liquid droplet, which influences droplet shape during its moving upward and consequently restrains Stokes motion velocity of the second liquid droplet.

  9. Effects of acoustic levitation on the development of zebrafish, Danio rerio, embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Sundvik; Nieminen, Heikki J.; Ari Salmi; Pertti Panula; Edward Hæggström

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic levitation provides potential to characterize and manipulate material such as solid particles and fluid in a wall-less environment. While attempts to levitate small animals have been made, the biological effects of such levitation have been scarcely documented. Here, our goal was to explore if zebrafish embryos can be levitated (peak pressures at the pressure node and anti-node: 135 dB and 144 dB, respectively) with no effects on early development. We levitated the embryos (n = 94) a...

  10. Holding characteristics of planar objects suspended by near-field acoustic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo; Koike; Nakamura; Ueha; Hashimoto

    2000-03-01

    The authors have found the acoustic levitation phenomenon where planar objects of 10 kg weight can be levitated near a vibration surface. This phenomenon has been studied for non-contact transportation. A circular planar object can be suspended without contacting a circular vibration plate. We have studied the holding force which acts horizontally on the levitated objects. The horizontal position of the object is stabilized by this force. In this paper, we discuss the effect of the radius of a levitated object, levitation distance, displacement amplitude of the vibration plate and the vibration mode on the suspending force. PMID:10829629

  11. Single-droplet evaporation kinetics and particle formation in an acoustic levitator. Part 1: evaporation of water microdroplets assessed using boundary-layer and acoustic levitation theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffter, Heiko; Lee, Geoffrey

    2007-09-01

    The suitability of a single droplet drying acoustic levitator as a model for the spray drying of aqueous, pharmaceutically-relevant solutes used to produce protein-loaded particles has been examined. The acoustic levitator was initially evaluated by measuring the drying rates of droplets of pure water in dependence of drying-air temperature and flow rate. The measured drying rates were higher than those predicted by boundary layer theory because of the effects of primary acoustic streaming. Sherwood numbers of 2.6, 3.6, and 4.4 at drying-air temperatures of 25 degrees C, 40 degrees C, and 60 degrees C were determined, respectively. Acoustic levitation theory could predict the measured drying rates and Sherwood numbers only when a forced-convection drying-air stream was used to neuralize the retarding effect of secondary acoustic streaming on evaporation rate. At still higher drying-air flow rates, the Ranz-Marshall correlation accurately predicts Sherwood number, provided a stable droplet position in the standing acoustic wave is maintained. The measured Sherwood numbers and droplet Reynolds numbers show that experiments performed in the levitator in still air are taking place effectively under conditions of substantial forced convection. The similitude of these values to those occurring in spray dryers is fortuitous for the suitability of the acoustic levitator as a droplet evaporation model for spray drying. PMID:17582811

  12. Spin-Up Instability of a Levitated Molten Drop in MHD-Flow Transition to Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedian, B.; Hyers, R. W.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    When an alternating magnetic field interacts with induced eddy currents in a conducting body, there will be a repulsive force between the body and the driving coil system generating the field. This repulsive force is the basis of electromagnetic levitation, which allows containerless processing of different materials. The eddy currents in the conducting body also generate Joule heating. Axial rotation of electromagnetically levitated objects is a common observation in levitation systems and often an undesirable side effect of such experiments on 1-g and -g. There have been recent efforts to use magnetic damping and suppress this tendency of body rotation. The first report of rotation in EML drops was attributed to a slight asymmetry of the shape and location of the levitation coils could change the axis and speed of rotation. Other theories of sample rotation include a frequency difference in the traveling electromagnetic waves and a phase difference in two different applied fields of the same frequency. All of these different mechanisms share the following characteristics: the torque is small, constant for constant field strength, and very weakly dependent on the sample's temperature and phase (solid or liquid). During experiments on the MSL-1 (First Microgravity Science Laboratory) mission of the Space Shuttle (STS-83 and STS-94, April and July 1997), a droplet of palladium-silicon alloy was electromagnetically levitated for viscosity measurements. For the non-deforming droplet, the resultant MHD flow inside the drop is inferred from motion of impurities on the surface. These observations indicate formation of a pair of co-rotating toroidal flow structures inside the spheroidal levitated drop that undergo secondary flow instabilities. As rise in the fluid temperature rises, the viscosity falls and the internal flow accelerates and becomes oscillatory; and beyond a point in the experiments, the surface impurities exhibit non-coherent chaotic motion signifying

  13. Enzyme kinetics in acoustically levitated droplets of supercooled water: a novel approach to cryoenzymology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, David D; Nardozzi, Jonathan D

    2005-04-15

    The rate of the alkaline phosphatase-catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferone phosphate was measured in acoustically levitated droplets of aqueous tris (50 mM) at pH 8.5 at 22 +/- 2 degrees C and in supercooled solution at -6 +/- 2 degrees C. At 22 degrees C, the rate of product formation was in excellent agreement with the rate observed in bulk solution in a cuvette, indicating that the acoustic levitation process does not alter the enzyme activity. The rate of the reaction decreased 6-fold in supercooled solution at -6 +/- 2 degrees C. The acoustic levitator apparatus is described in detail. PMID:15828793

  14. Use of near field acoustic levitation sliding contact

    OpenAIRE

    Stolarski, TA; Woolliscroft, CI

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation into producing self-levitation effect using piezo-electric actuators (PZT). Self-levitation has been demonstrated and results are presented and discussed. A relationship between the levitation distance and weight of the levitating sample has been found. In addition the orientation and position of the PZTs has been found to affect the levitation distance. Modal shapes of the vibration plates used have been produced through modelling annd found to accurately...

  15. Containerless processing at high temperatures using acoustic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, C. A.; Merkley, D. R.; Hampton, S.; Devos, J.; Mapes-Riordan, D.; Zatarski, M.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced techniques are presented which facilitate the development of inert or reducing atmospheres in excess of 2000 K in order to improve processing of containerless capabilities at higher temperatures and to provide more contamination-free environments. Recent testing, in the laboratory and aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft, of a high-temperature acoustic positioner demonstrated the effectiveness of a specimen motion damping system and of specimen spin control. It is found that stable positioning can be achieved under ambient and heated conditions, including the transient states of heat-up and cool-down. An incorporated high-temperature levitator was found capable of processing specimens of up to 6-mm diameter in a high-purity environment without the contaminating effects of a container at high temperatures and with relative quiescence.

  16. Rapid Growth of Ice Dendrite in Acoustically Levitated and Highly Undercooled Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕勇军; 解文军; 魏炳波

    2002-01-01

    Water drops with diameters ranging from 2.5 to 4 mm are highly undercooled by up to 24 K with the acousticlevitation technique. Compared to the case of water contained in a tube, acoustic levitation has efficientlyavoided the heterogeneous nucleation from container walls and consequently increased the undercooling level.However, the cavitation effect induced by ultrasound may prematurely catalyse nucleation, which hinders thefurther achievement of bulk undercooling. The growth velocity of ice dendrite determined experimentally inhighly undercooled water is characteristic of rapid dendritic growth, which reaches 0.17m/s at the undercoolingof 24 K. The Lipton-Kurz-Trivedi dendritic growth model is used to predict the kinetic characteristics of rapidgrowth of ice dendrite under high undercooling conditions, which shows good agreement with the experimentalresults.

  17. Effects of acoustic levitation on the development of zebrafish, Danio rerio, embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundvik, Maria; Nieminen, Heikki J; Salmi, Ari; Panula, Pertti; Hæggström, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic levitation provides potential to characterize and manipulate material such as solid particles and fluid in a wall-less environment. While attempts to levitate small animals have been made, the biological effects of such levitation have been scarcely documented. Here, our goal was to explore if zebrafish embryos can be levitated (peak pressures at the pressure node and anti-node: 135 dB and 144 dB, respectively) with no effects on early development. We levitated the embryos (n = 94) at 2-14 hours post fertilization (hpf) for 1000 (n = 47) or 2000 seconds (n = 47). We compared the size and number of trunk neuromasts and otoliths in sonicated samples to controls (n = 94), and found no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05). While mortality rate was lower in the control group (22.3%) compared to that in the 1000 s (34.0%) and 2000 s (42.6%) levitation groups, the differences were statistically insignificant (p > 0.05). The results suggest that acoustic levitation for less than 2000 sec does not interfere with the development of zebrafish embryos, but may affect mortality rate. Acoustic levitation could potentially be used as a non-contacting wall-less platform for characterizing and manipulating vertebrae embryos without causing major adverse effects to their development. PMID:26337364

  18. Real Time Monitoring of Containerless Microreactions in Acoustically Levitated Droplets via Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Elizabeth A; Esen, Cemal; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2016-09-01

    Direct in-droplet (in stillo) microreaction monitoring using acoustically levitated micro droplets has been achieved by combining acoustic (ultrasonic) levitation for the first time with real time ambient tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The acoustic levitation and inherent mixing of microliter volumes of reactants (3 μL droplets), yielding total reaction volumes of 6 μL, supported monitoring the acid-catalyzed degradation reaction of erythromycin A. This reaction was chosen to demonstrate the proof-of-principle of directly monitoring in stillo microreactions via hyphenated acoustic levitation and ambient ionization mass spectrometry. The microreactions took place completely in stillo over 30, 60, and 120 s within the containerless stable central pressure node of an acoustic levitator, thus readily promoting reaction miniaturization. For the evaluation of the miniaturized in stillo reactions, the degradation reactions were also carried out in vials (in vitro) with a total reaction volume of 400 μL. The reacted in vitro mixtures (6 μL total) were similarly introduced into the acoustic levitator prior to ambient ionization MS/MS analysis. The in stillo miniaturized reactions provided immediate real-time snap-shots of the degradation process for more accurate reaction monitoring and used a fraction of the reactants, while the larger scale in vitro reactions only yielded general reaction information. PMID:27505037

  19. Characterization of Acousto-Electric Cluster and Array Levitation and its Application to Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Apfel; Zheng, Yibing

    2000-01-01

    An acousto-electric levitator has been developed to study the behavior of liquid drop and solid particle clusters and arrays. Unlike an ordinary acoustic levitator that uses only a standing acoustic wave to levitate a single drop or particle, this device uses an extra electric static field and the acoustic field simultaneously to generate and levitate charged drops in two-dimensional arrays in air without any contact to a solid surface. This cluster and array generation (CAG) instrument enables us to steadily position drops and arrays to study the behavior of multiple drop and particle systems such as spray and aerosol systems relevant to the energy, environmental, and material sciences.

  20. Dependence of oscillational instabilities on the amplitude of the acoustic wave in single-axis levitators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orozco-Santillán, Arturo; Ruiz-Boullosa, Ricardo; Cutanda Henríquez, Vicente;

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that acoustic waves exert forces on a boundary with which they interact; these forces can be so intense that they can compensate for the weight of small objects up to a few grams. In this way, it is possible to maintain solid or liquid samples levitating in a fluid, avoiding...... the use of containers, which may be undesirable for certain applications. Moreover, small samples can be manipulated by means of acoustic waves. In this paper, we report a study on the oscillational instabilities that can appear on a levitated solid sphere in single-axis acoustic devices. A theory...... falls out of the levitating field or strikes a boundary of the device. These theoretical results are consistent with experiments. According to the theory, the instabilities due to oscillations are produced by a phase difference between the position of the levitated object and the variations of the sound...

  1. The near-field acoustic levitation of high-mass rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Z. Y.; Lü, P.; Geng, D. L.; Zhai, W.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2014-10-01

    Here we demonstrate that spherical rotors with 40 mm diameter and 0-1 kg mass can be suspended more than tens of micrometers away from an ultrasonically vibrating concave surface by near-field acoustic radiation force. Their rotating speeds exceed 3000 rpm. An acoustic model has been developed to evaluate the near-field acoustic radiation force and the resonant frequencies of levitation system. This technique has potential application in developing acoustic gyroscope.

  2. The near-field acoustic levitation of high-mass rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Z. Y.; Lü, P.; Geng, D. L.; Zhai, W.; Yan, N.; Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Here we demonstrate that spherical rotors with 40 mm diameter and 0-1 kg mass can be suspended more than tens of micrometers away from an ultrasonically vibrating concave surface by near-field acoustic radiation force. Their rotating speeds exceed 3000 rpm. An acoustic model has been developed to evaluate the near-field acoustic radiation force and the resonant frequencies of levitation system. This technique has potential application in developing acoustic gyroscope.

  3. The near-field acoustic levitation of high-mass rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Z Y; Lü, P; Geng, D L; Zhai, W; Yan, N; Wei, B

    2014-10-01

    Here we demonstrate that spherical rotors with 40 mm diameter and 0-1 kg mass can be suspended more than tens of micrometers away from an ultrasonically vibrating concave surface by near-field acoustic radiation force. Their rotating speeds exceed 3000 rpm. An acoustic model has been developed to evaluate the near-field acoustic radiation force and the resonant frequencies of levitation system. This technique has potential application in developing acoustic gyroscope. PMID:25362441

  4. Modeling and experimental study on near-field acoustic levitation by flexural mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pinkuan; Li, Jin; Ding, Han; Cao, Wenwu

    2009-12-01

    Near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL) has been used in noncontact handling and transportation of small objects to avoid contamination. We have performed a theoretical analysis based on nonuniform vibrating surface to quantify the levitation force produced by the air film and also conducted experimental tests to verify our model. Modal analysis was performed using ANSYS on the flexural plate radiator to obtain its natural frequency of desired mode, which is used to design the measurement system. Then, the levitation force was calculated as a function of levitation distance based on squeeze gas film theory using measured amplitude and phase distributions on the vibrator surface. Compared with previous fluid-structural analyses using a uniform piston motion, our model based on the nonuniform radiating surface of the vibrator is more realistic and fits better with experimentally measured levitation force. PMID:20040404

  5. Axisymmetric analysis of a tube-type acoustic levitator by a finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, H

    1994-01-01

    A finite element approach was taken for the study of the sound field and positioning force in a tube-type acoustic levitator. An axisymmetric model, where a rigid sphere is suspended on the tube axis, was introduced to model a cylindrical chamber of a levitation tube furnace. Distributions of velocity potential, magnitudes of positioning force, and resonance frequency shifts of the chamber due to the presence of the sphere were numerically estimated in relation to the sphere's position and diameter. Experiments were additionally made to compare with the simulation. The finite element method proved to be a useful tool for analyzing and designing the tube-type levitator. PMID:18263265

  6. Schlieren imaging of the standing wave field in an ultrasonic acoustic levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendon, Pablo Luis; Boullosa, Ricardo R.; Echeverria, Carlos; Porta, David

    2015-11-01

    We consider a model of a single axis acoustic levitator consisting of two cylinders immersed in air and directed along the same axis. The first cylinder has a flat termination and functions as a sound emitter, and the second cylinder, which is simply a refector, has the side facing the first cylinder cut out by a spherical surface. By making the first cylinder vibrate at ultrasonic frequencies a standing wave is produced in the air between the cylinders which makes it possible, by means of the acoustic radiation pressure, to levitate one or several small objects of different shapes, such as spheres or disks. We use schlieren imaging to observe the acoustic field resulting from the levitation of one or several objects, and compare these results to previous numerical approximations of the field obtained using a finite element method. The authors acknowledge financial support from DGAPA-UNAM through project PAPIIT IN109214.

  7. Equilibrium shape and location of a liquid drop acoustically positioned in a resonant rectangular chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, H. W.; Barmatz, M.; Shipley, C.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a standing wave field in a rectangular chamber on the shape and location of an acoustically positioned drop or bubble is calculated. The sample deformation and equilibrium position are obtained from an analysis of the spherical harmonic projections of the total surface stress tensor. The method of calculation relies on the assumed condition that the sample is only slightly distorted from a spherical form. The equilibrium location of a levitated drop is combined with a formula introduced by Hasegawa (1979) to calcualte the ka dependence of the radiation force function. The present theory is valid for large as well as small ka values. Calculations in the small ka limit agree with previous theories and experimental results. Examples are presented for nonplane-wave modes as well as plane-wave rectangular modes.

  8. Modelling and closed loop control of near-field acoustically levitated objects

    CERN Document Server

    Ilssar, Dotan; Flashner, Henryk

    2016-01-01

    The present paper introduces a novel approach for modelling the governing, slow dynamics of near-field acoustically levitated objects. This model is sufficiently simple and concise to enable designing a closed-loop controller, capable of accurate vertical positioning of a carried object. The near-field acoustic levitation phenomenon exploits the compressibility, the nonlinearity and the viscosity of the gas trapped between a rapidly oscillating surface and a freely suspended planar object, to elevate its time averaged pressure above the ambient pressure. By these means, the vertical position of loads weighing up to several kilograms can be varied between dozens and hundreds of micrometers. The simplified model developed in this paper is a second order ordinary differential equation where the height-dependent stiffness and damping terms of the gas layer are derived explicitly. This simplified model replaces a traditional model consisting of the equation of motion of the levitated object, coupled to a nonlinear...

  9. Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopy of red blood cells and Plasmodium falciparum trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puskar, Ljiljana; Tuckermann, Rudolf; Frosch, Torsten; Popp, Jürgen; Ly, Vanalysa; McNaughton, Don; Wood, Bayden R

    2007-09-01

    Methods to probe the molecular structure of living cells are of paramount importance in understanding drug interactions and environmental influences in these complex dynamical systems. The coupling of an acoustic levitation device with a micro-Raman spectrometer provides a direct molecular probe of cellular chemistry in a containerless environment minimizing signal attenuation and eliminating the affects of adhesion to walls and interfaces. We show that the Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopic (RALS) approach can be used to monitor the heme dynamics of a levitated 5 microL suspension of red blood cells and to detect hemozoin in malaria infected cells. The spectra obtained have an excellent signal-to-noise ratio and demonstrate for the first time the utility of the technique as a diagnostic and monitoring tool for minute sample volumes of living animal cells. PMID:17713610

  10. On the slow dynamics of near-field acoustically levitated objects under High excitation frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilssar, Dotan; Bucher, Izhak

    2015-10-01

    This paper introduces a simplified analytical model describing the governing dynamics of near-field acoustically levitated objects. The simplification converts the equation of motion coupled with the partial differential equation of a compressible fluid, into a compact, second order ordinary differential equation, where the local stiffness and damping are transparent. The simplified model allows one to more easily analyse and design near-field acoustic levitation based systems, and it also helps to devise closed-loop controller algorithms for such systems. Near-field acoustic levitation employs fast ultrasonic vibrations of a driving surface and exploits the viscosity and the compressibility of a gaseous medium to achieve average, load carrying pressure. It is demonstrated that the slow dynamics dominates the transient behaviour, while the time-scale associated with the fast, ultrasonic excitation has a small presence in the oscillations of the levitated object. Indeed, the present paper formulates the slow dynamics under an ultrasonic excitation without the need to explicitly consider the latter. The simplified model is compared with a numerical scheme based on Reynolds equation and with experiments, both showing reasonably good results.

  11. A novel ultrasonic clutch using near-field acoustic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kuo-Tsi

    2004-10-01

    This paper investigates design, fabrication and drive of an ultrasonic clutch with two transducers. For the two transducers, one serving as a driving element of the clutch is connected to a driving shaft via a coupling, and the other serving as a slave element of the clutch is connected to a slave shaft via another coupling. The principle of ultrasonic levitation is first expressed. Then, a series-resonant inverter is used to generate AC voltages at input terminals of each transducer, and a speed measuring system with optic sensors is used to find the relationship between rotational speed of the slave shaft and applied voltage of each transducer. Moreover, contact surfaces of the two transducers are coupled by the frictional force when both the two transducers are not energized, and separated using the ultrasonic levitation when at least one of the two transducers is energized at high voltages at resonance. PMID:15358528

  12. Levitation, aggregation and separation of micro-sized particles in a Hydrodynamic Acoustic Sorter, HAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos, Mauricio; Castro, Angelica; Bazou, Despina; Separation Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    Levitation, aggregation and separation of micron-sized particulate materials can be generated in a fluidic resonator by an ultrasonic standing wave field force. A piezoelectric transducer generates standing waves between the two walls of a parallel plate channel composing the resonator. The number of pressure nodes n is given by the relationship: w = nλ / 2 with λ the wavelength. The primary radiation force generated by the standing wave generates levitation of micron-sized particles driving them toward the nodal planes. An equilibrium position is reached in the channel thickness where the acoustic force balances the gravity force. The equilibrium position is independent on particle size but it depends on the acoustic properties. Once particles reach the equilibrium position, transversal secondary forces generate aggregation. We shall present the levitation and aggregation process of latex particles and cancer cells in a 2MHz resonator. We demonstrate the possibility of separating particles under flow in a Hydrodynamic Acoustic Sorter HAS, in function of their acoustic impedance and in function of their size using a programming field force.

  13. A portable Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopic system for the identification and environmental monitoring of algal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bayden R; Heraud, Philip; Stojkovic, Slobodanka; Morrison, Danielle; Beardall, John; McNaughton, Don

    2005-08-01

    We report the coupling of a portable Raman spectrometer to an acoustic levitation device to enable environmental monitoring and the potential taxonomic identification of microalgae. Spectra of living cells were recorded at 785 nm using a fiber-optic probe coupled to a portable Raman spectrometer. The spectra exhibit an excellent signal-to-noise ratio and clearly show bands from chlorophyll a and beta-carotene. Spectra of levitated photobleached microalgae clearly show a reduction in chlorophyll a concentration relative to beta-carotene after 10 min of exposure to a quartz halogen lamp. Spectra recorded from levitated nitrogen-limited cells also show a significant reduction in bands associated with chlorophyll a, as compared to nitrogen-replete cells. To investigate the diagnostic capability of the technique, four species of microalgae were analyzed. Good quality spectra of all four species were obtained showing varying ratios of beta-carotene to chlorophyll. The combination of an acoustic levitation device and a portable Raman spectrometer shows potential as a taxonomic and environmental monitoring tool with direct application to field studies in remote environments. PMID:16053309

  14. Acoustic levitation technique for containerless processing at high temperatures in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Charles A.; Merkley, Dennis R.; Hammarlund, Gregory R.; Danley, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    High temperature processing of a small specimen without a container has been demonstrated in a set of experiments using an acoustic levitation furnace in the microgravity of space. This processing technique includes the positioning, heating, melting, cooling, and solidification of a material supported without physical contact with container or other surface. The specimen is supported in a potential energy well, created by an acoustic field, which is sufficiently strong to position the specimen in the microgravity environment of space. This containerless processing apparatus has been successfully tested on the Space Shuttle during the STS-61A mission. In that experiment, three samples wer successfully levitated and processed at temperatures from 600 to 1500 C. Experiment data and results are presented.

  15. Ultrasonic acoustic levitation for fast frame rate X-ray protein crystallography at room temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Soichiro Tsujino; Takashi Tomizaki

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the data acquisition rate of X-ray diffraction images for macromolecular crystals at room temperature at synchrotrons has the potential to significantly accelerate both structural analysis of biomolecules and structure-based drug developments. Using lysozyme model crystals, we demonstrated the rapid acquisition of X-ray diffraction datasets by combining a high frame rate pixel array detector with ultrasonic acoustic levitation of protein crystals in liquid droplets. The rapid spinn...

  16. Experimental and numerical characterization of the sound pressure in standing wave acoustic levitators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stindt, A.; Andrade, M. A. B.; Albrecht, M.; Adamowski, J. C.; Panne, U.; Riedel, J.

    2014-01-01

    A novel method for predictions of the sound pressure distribution in acoustic levitators is based on a matrix representation of the Rayleigh integral. This method allows for a fast calculation of the acoustic field within the resonator. To make sure that the underlying assumptions and simplifications are justified, this approach was tested by a direct comparison to experimental data. The experimental sound pressure distributions were recorded by high spatially resolved frequency selective microphone scanning. To emphasize the general applicability of the two approaches, the comparative studies were conducted for four different resonator geometries. In all cases, the results show an excellent agreement, demonstrating the accuracy of the matrix method.

  17. High-Pressure Transport Properties Of Fluids: Theory And Data From Levitated Drops At Combustion-Relevant Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth; Ohsaka, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    Although the high pressure multicomponent fluid conservation equations have already been derived and approximately validated for binary mixtures by this PI, the validation of the multicomponent theory is hampered by the lack of existing mixing rules for property calculations. Classical gas dynamics theory can provide property mixing-rules at low pressures exclusively. While thermal conductivity and viscosity high-pressure mixing rules have been documented in the literature, there is no such equivalent for the diffusion coefficients and the thermal diffusion factors. The primary goal of this investigation is to extend the low pressure mixing rule theory to high pressures and validate the new theory with experimental data from levitated single drops. The two properties that will be addressed are the diffusion coefficients and the thermal diffusion factors. To validate/determine the property calculations, ground-based experiments from levitated drops are being conducted.

  18. Cavitation-induced fragmentation of an acoustically-levitated droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the initial sequence of events that lead to the fragmentation of a millimetre sized water droplets when interacting with a focused ns-laser pulse. The experimental results show complex processes that result from the reflection of an initial shock wave from plasma generation with the soft boundary of the levitating droplet; furthermore, when the reflected waves from the walls of the droplet refocus they leave behind a trail of microbubbles that later act as cavitation inception regions. Numerical simulations of a shock wave impacting and reflecting from a soft boundary are also reported; the simulated results show that the lowest pressure inside the droplet occurs at the equatorial plane. The results of the numerical model display good agreement with the experimental results both in time and in space.

  19. Deformation pathways and breakup modes in acoustically levitated bicomponent droplets under external heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Binita; Basu, Saptarshi

    2016-03-01

    Controlled breakup of droplets using heat or acoustics is pivotal in applications such as pharmaceutics, nanoparticle production, and combustion. In the current work we have identified distinct thermal acoustics-induced deformation regimes (ligaments and bubbles) and breakup dynamics in externally heated acoustically levitated bicomponent (benzene-dodecane) droplets with a wide variation in volatility of the two components (benzene is significantly more volatile than dodecane). We showcase the physical mechanism and universal behavior of droplet surface caving in leading to the inception and growth of ligaments. The caving of the top surface is governed by a balance between the acoustic pressure field and the restrictive surface tension of the droplet. The universal collapse of caving profiles for different benzene concentration (70 % by volume). The findings are portable to any similar bicomponent systems with differential volatility.

  20. Time-averaged acoustic forces acting on a rigid sphere within a wide range of radii in an axisymmetric levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foresti, Daniele; Nabavi, Majid; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-05-01

    Acoustic levitation is a physical phenomenon that arises when the acoustic radiation pressure is strong enough to overcome gravitational force. It is a nonlinear phenomenon which can be predicted only if higher order terms are included in the acoustic field calculation. The study of acoustic levitation is usually conducted by solving the linear acoustic equation and bridging the gap with an analytical solution. Only recently, the scientific community has shown interest in the full solution of the Navier-Stokes' equation with the aim of deeply investigating the acoustic radiation pressure. We present herein a numerical model based on Finite Volume Method (FVM) and Dynamic Mesh (DM) for the calculation of the acoustic radiation pressure acting on a rigid sphere inside an axisymmetric levitator which is the most widely used and investigated type of levitators. In this work, we focus on the third resonance mode. The use of DM is new in the field of acoustic levitation, allowing a more realistic simulation of the phenomenon, since no standing wave has to be necessarily imposed as boundary condition. The radiating plate is modeled as a rigid cylinder moving sinusoidally along the central axis. The time-averaged acoustic force exerting on the sphere is calculated for different radii Rs of the sphere (0.025 to 0.5 wavelengths). It is shown that the acoustic force increases proportional to Rs3 for small radii, then decreases when the standing wave condition is violated and finally rises again in the travelling wave radiation pressure configuration. The numerical model is validated for the inviscid case with a Finite Element Method model of the linear acoustic model based on King's approximation.

  1. Ultrasonic acoustic levitation for fast frame rate X-ray protein crystallography at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Tomizaki, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the data acquisition rate of X-ray diffraction images for macromolecular crystals at room temperature at synchrotrons has the potential to significantly accelerate both structural analysis of biomolecules and structure-based drug developments. Using lysozyme model crystals, we demonstrated the rapid acquisition of X-ray diffraction datasets by combining a high frame rate pixel array detector with ultrasonic acoustic levitation of protein crystals in liquid droplets. The rapid spinning of the crystal within a levitating droplet ensured an efficient sampling of the reciprocal space. The datasets were processed with a program suite developed for serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX). The structure, which was solved by molecular replacement, was found to be identical to the structure obtained by the conventional oscillation method for up to a 1.8-Å resolution limit. In particular, the absence of protein crystal damage resulting from the acoustic levitation was carefully established. These results represent a key step towards a fully automated sample handling and measurement pipeline, which has promising prospects for a high acquisition rate and high sample efficiency for room temperature X-ray crystallography. PMID:27150272

  2. Particle scavenging in a cylindrical ultrasonic standing wave field using levitated drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrell, Tyler; Saylor, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    A cylindrical ultrasonic standing wave field was generated in a tube containing a flow of particles and fog. Both the particles and fog drops were concentrated in the nodes of the standing wave field where they combined and then grew large enough to fall out of the system. In this way particles were scavenged from the system, cleaning the air. While this approach has been attempted using a standing wave field established between disc-shaped transducers, a cylindrical resonator has not been used for this purpose heretofore. The resonator was constructed by bolting three Langevin transducers to an aluminum tube. The benefit of the cylindrical geometry is that the acoustic energy is focused. Furthermore, the residence time of the particle in the field can be increased by increasing the length of the resonator. An additional benefit of this approach is that tubes located downstream of the resonator were acoustically excited, acting as passive resonators that enhanced the scavenging process. The performance of this system on scavenging particles is presented as a function of particle diameter and volumetric flow rate. It is noted that, when operated without particles, the setup can be used to remove drops and shows promise for liquid aerosol retention from systems where these losses can be financially disadvantageous and/or hazardous.

  3. A Bio-Acoustic Levitational (BAL) Assembly Method for Engineering of Multilayered, 3D Brain-Like Constructs, Using Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Neuro-Progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyer, Charlène; Chen, Pu; Güven, Sinan; Demirtaş, Tuğrul Tolga; Nieland, Thomas J F; Padilla, Frédéric; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-01-01

    A bio-acoustic levitational assembly method for engineering of multilayered, 3D brainlike constructs is presented. Acoustic radiation forces are used to levitate neuroprogenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells in 3D multilayered fibrin tissue constructs. The neuro-progenitor cells are subsequently differentiated in neural cells, resulting in a 3D neuronal construct with inter and intralayer neurite elongations.

  4. Crystal Growth in Al72.9Ge27.1 Alloy Melt under Acoustic Levitation Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Na; DAI Fu-Ping; WANG Wei-Li; WEI Bing-Bo

    2011-01-01

    The nonequilibrium solidification of liquid Al72.9Ge27.1 hypoeutectic alloy is accomplished by using single-axis acoustic levitation.A maximum undercooling of 112K (0.16TL) is obtained for the alloy melt at a coofing rate of 50 K/s. The primary (Al) phase displays a morphological transition from coarse dendrite under a normal conditions to equiaxed grain under acoustic levitation.In the (Al)+(Ge) eutectic,the (Ge) phase exhibits a conspicuous branched growth morphology.Both the primary (Al) dendrites and (Al)+(Ge) eutectics are well refined and the solute content of the primary (Al) phase is extended under acoustic levitation.The calculated and experimental results indicate that the solute trapping effect becomes more intensive with the enhancement of bulk undercooling.

  5. Supercooling of aqueous NaCl and KCl solutions under acoustic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Y J; Wei, B

    2006-10-14

    The supercooling capability of aqueous NaCl and KCl solutions is investigated at containerless state by using acoustic levitation method. The supercooling of water is obviously enhanced by the alkali metal ions and increases linearly with the augmentation of concentrations. Furthermore, the supercooling depends on the nature of ions and is 2-3 K larger for NaCl solution than that for KCl solution in the present concentration range: Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to reveal the intrinsic correlation between supercoolability and microstructure. The translational and orientational order parameters are applied to quantitatively demonstrate the effect of ionic concentration on the hydrogen-bond network and ice melting point. The disrupted hydrogen-bond structure determines essentially the concentration dependence of supercooling. On the other hand, the introduced acoustic pressure suppresses the increase of supercooling by promoting the growth and coalescence of microbubbles, the effective nucleation catalysts, in water. However, the dissolved ions can weaken this effect, and moreover the degree varies with the ion type. This results in the different supercoolability for NaCl and KCl solutions under the acoustic levitation conditions. PMID:17042605

  6. Analysis of oscillational instabilities in acoustic levitation using the finite-difference time-domain method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the work described in this paper has been to investigate the use of the finite-difference time-domain method to describe the interactions between a moving object and a sound field. The main objective was to simulate oscillational instabilities that appear in single-axis acoustic levita...... levitation devices and to describe their evolution in time to further understand the physical mechanism involved. The study shows that the method gives accurate results for steady state conditions, and that it is a promising tool for simulations with a moving object....

  7. Anomalous redispersibility behavior of glycerophosphate deyhydrogenase microparticles dried in an acoustic levitator or bench-top spray dryer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, Elke; Lee, Geoffrey

    2016-02-10

    The enzyme glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) behaves differently when dried either as single droplets in an acoustic levitator or spray dried on a bench-top machine. The GPDH in particles dried in the levitator at a drying gas temperature of 60°C could not be redispersed in water, whereas spray drying at an outlet temperature of 92°C produced denaturation but the particles were redissolvable. One difference between the two processes is that the larger levitated droplets take longer to dry than the small spray dried droplets. The slow drying process of the levitated droplet/particle apparently causes denaturation that is sufficient to make the particles non-redispersible. This does not happen on spray drying. PMID:26707244

  8. Cylindrical acoustic levitator/concentrator having non-circular cross-section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Sinha, Dipen N.

    2003-11-11

    A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow piezoelectric crystal which has been formed with a cylindrical cross-section to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that of the interior cavity of the cylinder. When the resonance frequency of the interior cylindrical cavity is matched to the breathing mode resonance of the cylindrical piezoelectric transducer, the acoustic efficiency for establishing a standing wave pattern in the cavity is high. By deforming the circular cross-section of the transducer, the acoustic force is concentrated along axial regions parallel to the axis of the transducer. The cylinder does not require accurate alignment of a resonant cavity. The concentrated regions of acoustic force cause particles in the fluid to concentrate within the regions of acoustic force for separation from the fluid.

  9. Nanoparticle agglomeration in an evaporating levitated droplet for different acoustic amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijerino, Erick; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2013-01-01

    Radiatively heated levitated functional droplets with nanosilica suspensions exhibit three distinct stages namely pure evaporation, agglomeration, and finally structure formation. The temporal history of the droplet surface temperature shows two inflection points. One inflection point corresponds to a local maximum and demarcates the end of transient heating of the droplet and domination of vaporization. The second inflection point is a local minimum and indicates slowing down of the evaporation rate due to surface accumulation of nanoparticles. Morphology and final precipitation structures of levitated droplets are due to competing mechanisms of particle agglomeration, evaporation, and shape deformation. In this work, we provide a detailed analysis for each process and propose two important timescales for evaporation and agglomeration that determine the final diameter of the structure formed. It is seen that both agglomeration and evaporation timescales are similar functions of acoustic amplitude (sound pressure level), droplet size, viscosity, and density. However, we show that while the agglomeration timescale decreases with initial particle concentration, the evaporation timescale shows the opposite trend. The final normalized diameter can be shown to be dependent solely on the ratio of agglomeration to evaporation timescales for all concentrations and acoustic amplitudes. The structures also exhibit various aspect ratios (bowls, rings, spheroids) which depend on the ratio of the deformation timescale (tdef) and the agglomeration timescale (tg). For tdef

  10. Deformation pathways and breakup modes in acoustically levitated bicomponent droplets under external heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Binita; Basu, Saptarshi

    2016-03-01

    Controlled breakup of droplets using heat or acoustics is pivotal in applications such as pharmaceutics, nanoparticle production, and combustion. In the current work we have identified distinct thermal acoustics-induced deformation regimes (ligaments and bubbles) and breakup dynamics in externally heated acoustically levitated bicomponent (benzene-dodecane) droplets with a wide variation in volatility of the two components (benzene is significantly more volatile than dodecane). We showcase the physical mechanism and universal behavior of droplet surface caving in leading to the inception and growth of ligaments. The caving of the top surface is governed by a balance between the acoustic pressure field and the restrictive surface tension of the droplet. The universal collapse of caving profiles for different benzene concentration (growth. Subsequent ligament breakup is primarily Rayleigh-Plateau type. The breakup mode shifts to diffusional entrapment-induced boiling with an increase in concentration of the volatile component (benzene >70 % by volume). The findings are portable to any similar bicomponent systems with differential volatility.

  11. Raman Spectroscopic Study Of The Dehydration Of Sulfates Using An Acoustic Levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotton, Stephen; Kaiser, R.

    2012-10-01

    The martian orbiters, landers, and rovers identified water-bearing sulfates on the martian surface. Furthermore, the Galileo mission suggests that hydrated salts such as magnesium sulfate are present on the surface of Europa and Ganymede. To understand the hydrologic history of Mars and some of Jupiter’s and Saturn’s moons, future missions need to identify in situ the hydration states of sulfates including magnesium sulfate (MgSO4 • nH2O n = 7, 6, . . ., 0), gypsum (CaSO4 • 2H2O), bassanite (CaSO4 • 0.5H2O) and anhydrite (CaSO4). Raman spectroscopy is ideally suited for this purpose, since the Raman spectrum for each different degree of hydration is unique. To obtain laboratory Raman spectra for comparison with the in situ measurements, we have developed a novel apparatus combining an acoustic levitator and a pressure-compatible process chamber. Particles with diameters between 10 µm and a few mm can be levitated at the pressure nodes of the ultrasonic standing wave. The chamber is interfaced to complimentary FTIR and Raman spectroscopic probes to characterize any chemical and physical modifications of the levitated particles. The particles can be heated to well-defined temperatures between 300 K and 1000 K using a carbon dioxide laser; the temperature of the particle will be probed via its black-body spectrum. The present apparatus enables (i) the production of high particle temperatures, (ii) precise measurement of the temperature, and (iii) accurate control of the environmental conditions (gas pressure and composition) within the chamber. Using this apparatus, we have studied the dehydration of sulfates including gypsum and epsomite (MgSO4 • 7H2O) in an anhydrous nitrogen atmosphere. We will present spectra showing the variation of the Raman spectra as gypsum, for example, is dehydrated to form anhydrite.

  12. A comparison of acoustic levitation with microgravity processing for containerless solidification of ternary Al-Cu-Sn alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, N.; Hong, Z. Y.; Geng, D. L.; Wei, B.

    2015-07-01

    The containerless rapid solidification of liquid ternary Al-5 %Cu-65 %Sn immiscible alloy was accomplished at both ultrasonic levitation and free fall conditions. A maximum undercooling of 185 K (0.22 T L) was obtained for the ultrasonically levitated alloy melt at a cooling rate of about 122 K s-1. Meanwhile, the cooling rate of alloy droplets in drop tube varied from 102 to 104 K s-1. The macrosegregation was effectively suppressed through the complex melt flow under ultrasonic levitation condition. In contrast, macrosegregation became conspicuous and core-shell structures with different layers were formed during free fall. The microstructure formation mechanisms during rapid solidification at containerless states were investigated in comparison with the conventional static solidification process. It was found that the liquid phase separation and structural growth kinetics may be modulated by controlling both alloy undercooling and cooling rate.

  13. Physical characteristics of single-axis acoustic levitation%单轴式声悬浮的物理特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解文军; 魏炳波

    2001-01-01

    Single-axis acoustic levitation was investigated by a BEM model corresponding to our levitator and the levitation characteristics were revealed.The calculated results show that strong vibrating source,low gravitational level and sound medium with large density and small sound speed will enhance the levitation ability.Meanwhile,a concave reflector with suitable curvature radius and large section radius improves the levitation capabilities of the potential well near the reflector under mode 4.%采用边界元方法对单轴式声悬浮过程中的入射声场计算,揭示了样品在声悬浮过程中的受力特性。结果表明,提高声源强度、降低重力水平或者采用密度大声速小的气体介质有利于提高声悬浮能力。另外,采用适当曲率半径和较大截面半径的凹球面反射端能够提高模式4下靠近反射面的一个悬浮位置的悬浮性能。

  14. Surface tension of liquid ternary Fe-Cu-Mo alloys measured by electromagnetic levitation oscillating drop method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H P; Luo, B C; Qin, T; Chang, J; Wei, B

    2008-09-28

    For the liquid Fe-Cu-Mo ternary system, the surface tensions of three selected alloys, i.e., three typical monotectic alloys, were measured by the electromagnetic levitation oscillating drop method over a broad temperature range, including both superheated and undercooled states. The maximum undercooling attained is up to 173 K. The experimental results show a good linear correlation between the surface tension and the temperature. By applying on the Butler equation, the surface tensions were also calculated and they are in good agreement with the measured ones, except that in the undercooled state, the calculated value is slightly larger than the measured results. Interestingly, both the measured and calculated results indicate that the enriched element on the droplet surface is much more conspicuous than other elements in influencing the surface tension. Besides, the viscosity and the density of the liquid Fe-Cu-Mo ternary alloys are also derived on the grounds of the experimentally measured surface tensions. PMID:19045047

  15. The breakup of levitating water drops observed with a high speed camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Emersic

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Collision-induced water drop breakup in a vertical wind tunnel was observed using a high speed camera for interactions between larger drop sizes (up to 7 mm diameter than have previously been experimentally observed. Three distinct collisional breakup types were observed and the drop size distributions from each were analysed for comparison with predictions of fragment distributions from larger drops by two sets of established breakup parameterisations. The observations showed some similarities with both parameterisations but also some marked differences for the breakup types that could be compared, particularly for fragments 1 mm and smaller. Modifications to the parameterisations are suggested and examined. Presented is also currently the largest dataset of bag breakup distributions observed. Differences between this and other experimental research studies and modelling parameterisations, and the associated implications for interpreting results are discussed. Additionally, the stochastic coalescence and breakup equation was solved computationally using a breakup parameterisation, and the evolving drop-size distribution for a range of initial conditions was examined. Initial cloud liquid water content was found to have the greatest influence on the resulting distribution, whereas initial drop number was found to have relatively little influence. This may have implications when considering the effect of aerosol on cloud evolution, raindrop formation and resulting drop size distributions. Calculations presented show that, using an ideal initial cloud drop-size distribution, ~1–3% of the total fragments are contributed from collisional breakup between drops of 4 and 6 mm.

  16. Structural characterization and aging of glassy pharmaceuticals made using acoustic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmore, Chris J; Weber, J K R; Tailor, Amit N; Cherry, Brian R; Yarger, Jeffery L; Mou, Qiushi; Weber, Warner; Neuefeind, Joerg; Byrn, Stephen R

    2013-04-01

    Here, we report the structural characterization of several amorphous drugs made using the method of quenching molten droplets suspended in an acoustic levitator. (13) C NMR, X-ray, and neutron diffraction results are discussed for glassy cinnarizine, carbamazepine, miconazole nitrate, probucol, and clotrimazole. The (13) C NMR results did not find any change in chemical bonding induced by the amorphization process. High-energy X-ray diffraction results were used to characterize the ratio of crystalline to amorphous material present in the glasses over a period of 8 months. All the glasses were stable for at least 6 months except carbamazepine, which has a strong tendency to crystallize within a few months. Neutron and X-ray pair distribution function analyses were applied to the glassy materials, and the results were compared with their crystalline counterparts. The two diffraction techniques yielded similar results in most cases and identified distinct intramolecular and intermolecular correlations. The intramolecular scattering was calculated based on the crystal structure and fit to the measured X-ray structure factor. The resulting intermolecular pair distribution functions revealed broad-nearest and next-nearest neighbor molecule-molecule correlations. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 102:1290-1300, 2013. PMID:23381910

  17. Levitating Drop in a Tilted Rotating Tank - Gallery of Fluid Motion Entry V044

    CERN Document Server

    White, Andrew; Ward, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A cylindrical acrylic tank with inner diameter D = 4 in. is mounted such that its axis of symmetry is at some angle measured from the vertical plane. The mixing tank is identical to that described in [1] The tank is filled with 200 mL of 1000 cSt silicone oil and a 5 mL drop of de-ionized water is placed in the oil volume. The water drop is allowed to come to rest and then a motor rotates the tank about its axis of symmetry at a fixed frequency = 0.3 Hz. Therefore the Reynolds number is ?xed at about Re ~ 5 yielding laminar flow conditions. A CCD camera (PixeLink) is used to capture video of each experiment.

  18. A new method for the estimation of high temperature radiant heat emittance by means of aero-acoustic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greffrath, Fabian; Prieler, Robert; Telle, Rainer

    2014-11-01

    A new method for the experimental estimation of radiant heat emittance at high temperatures has been developed which involves aero-acoustic levitation of samples, laser heating and contactless temperature measurement. Radiant heat emittance values are determined from the time dependent development of the sample temperature which requires analysis of both the radiant and convective heat transfer towards the surroundings by means of fluid dynamics calculations. First results for the emittance of a corundum sample obtained with this method are presented in this article and found in good agreement with literature values.

  19. Three-axis acoustic device for levitation of droplets in an open gas stream and its application to examine sulfur dioxide absorption by water droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Terrance L; Budwig, Ralph S

    2007-01-01

    Two acoustic devices to stabilize a droplet in an open gas stream (single-axis and three-axis levitators) have been designed and tested. The gas stream was provided by a jet apparatus with a 64 mm exit diameter and a uniform velocity profile. The acoustic source used was a Langevin vibrator with a concave reflector. The single-axis levitator relied primarily on the radial force from the acoustic field and was shown to be limited because of significant droplet wandering. The three-axis levitator relied on a combination of the axial and radial forces. The three-axis levitator was applied to examine droplet deformation and circulation and to investigate the uptake of SO(2) from the gas stream to the droplet. Droplets ranging in diameters from 2 to 5 mm were levitated in gas streams with velocities up to 9 ms. Droplet wandering was on the order of a half droplet diameter for a 3 mm diameter droplet. Droplet circulation ranged from the predicted Hadamard-Rybczynski pattern to a rotating droplet pattern. Droplet pH over a central volume of the droplet was measured by planar laser induced fluorescence. The results for the decay of droplet pH versus time are in general agreement with published theory and experiments. PMID:17503939

  20. Single mode levitation and translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Allen, James L. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A single frequency resonance mode is applied by a transducer to acoustically levitate an object within a chamber. This process allows smooth movement of the object and suppression of unwanted levitation modes that would urge the object to a different levitation position. A plunger forms one end of the chamber, and the frequency changes as the plunger moves. Acoustic energy is applied to opposite sides of the chamber, with the acoustic energy on opposite sides being substantially 180 degrees out of phase.

  1. Direct and indirect measurement of rain drop size distributions using an acoustic water tank disdrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several rain drop size distribution (DSD) point measurement technologies exist, but all are unable to sample either short timescales or the large drop tail of the DSD due to inherent instrumental limitations. The development of an acoustic water tank disdrometer (AWTD) is described, which improves the sampling statistics by increasing the catchment area. This is achieved by distinguishing individual drops, locating them on the surface of the tank then converting the impact pressure into a drop size. Wavelet decomposition is used to distinguish the broadband, short duration impact events and a fast multilateration method is used to position the drop. Issues relating to the different types of noise are also investigated and mitigated. Also, further work on inverting the measured acoustic intensity into a DSD, by fitting sampling distributions, is presented. Six months of data were collected in the Eastern UK. The AWTD then converted the data into DSDs and the results were compared to a commercially available co-located laser precipitation monitor. The sampling errors are far lower due to the increased catchment size, and hence the large drop sized tail of the DSD is greatly improved. DSD results compare favourably to other disdrometers for drop diameters greater than 1.8 mm. Below this size individual drops become increasingly difficult to detect and are underestimated. (paper)

  2. Acoustic microfluidics: Capillary waves and vortex currents in a spherical fluid drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev-Stepanov, P. V.; Rudenko, O. V.

    2016-07-01

    We calculate the radiation forces in a spherical drop lying on a solid substrate. The forces form as a result of the action of a capillary wave on a fluid as it propagates along the free spherical surface. We study the structure of acoustic currents excited by the radiation forces.

  3. Investigation of Surface-Potential Controlled Nucleation Using an Acoustic Levitation Apparatus

    OpenAIRE

    Draper, Neil Donald

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this thesis was to investigate the effect that droplet surface potential has upon nucleation of a solute from levitated solution droplets; there being virtually no such investigations thereof in the current literature. An increase in droplet surface potential resulted in significant promotion to solute nucleation, as determined by the number of crystals observed, for sodium chloride, ammonium nitrate, α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, and 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone monohydrate s...

  4. A case study of real-time monitoring of solid-state phase transformations in acoustically levitated particles using near infrared and Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehder, Sönke; Wu, Jian-Xiong; Laackmann, Julian;

    2013-01-01

    . This observation was explained by the high energy density of the Raman laser beam, which might have led to local heating effects of the sample and thus reduced the recrystallisation onset time. It was concluded that acoustic levitation with NIR and Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate curve resolution......The objective of this study was to monitor the amorphous-to-crystalline solid-state phase transformation kinetics of the model drug ibuprofen with spectroscopic methods during acoustic levitation. Chemical and physical information was obtained by real-time near infrared (NIRS) and Raman....... The recrystallisation kinetic parameters were estimated from the recrystallisation profiles. While the empirical recrystallisation rate constant determined by NIR and Raman spectroscopy were comparable, the lag time for recrystallisation was significantly lower with Raman spectroscopy as compared to NIRS...

  5. A case study of real-time monitoring of solid-state phase transformations in acoustically levitated particles using near infrared and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, Sönke; Wu, Jian X; Laackmann, Julian; Moritz, Hans-Ulrich; Rantanen, Jukka; Rades, Thomas; Leopold, Claudia S

    2013-01-23

    The objective of this study was to monitor the amorphous-to-crystalline solid-state phase transformation kinetics of the model drug ibuprofen with spectroscopic methods during acoustic levitation. Chemical and physical information was obtained by real-time near infrared (NIRS) and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The recrystallisation kinetic parameters (overall recrystallisation rate constant β and the time needed to reach 50% of the equilibrated level t(50)), were determined using a multivariate curve resolution approach. The acoustic levitation device coupled with non-invasive spectroscopy enabled monitoring of the recrystallisation process of the difficult-to-handle (adhesive) amorphous sample. The application of multivariate curve resolution enabled isolation of the underlying pure spectra, which corresponded well with the reference spectra of amorphous and crystalline ibuprofen. The recrystallisation kinetic parameters were estimated from the recrystallisation profiles. While the empirical recrystallisation rate constant determined by NIR and Raman spectroscopy were comparable, the lag time for recrystallisation was significantly lower with Raman spectroscopy as compared to NIRS. This observation was explained by the high energy density of the Raman laser beam, which might have led to local heating effects of the sample and thus reduced the recrystallisation onset time. It was concluded that acoustic levitation with NIR and Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate curve resolution allowed direct determination of the recrystallisation kinetics of amorphous drugs and thus is a promising technique for monitoring solid-state phase transformations of adhesive small-sized samples during the early phase of drug development. PMID:23069619

  6. Dynamics of sessile and pendant drop excited by surface acoustic waves: gravity effects and correlation between oscillatory and translational motions

    CERN Document Server

    Bussonière, Adrien; Brunet, Philippe; Matar, Olivier Bou

    2016-01-01

    When sessile droplets are excited by ultrasonic traveling surface acoustic waves (SAWs), they undergo complex dynamics with both oscillations and translational motion. While the nature of the Rayleigh-Lamb quadrupolar drop oscillations has been identified, their origin and their influence on the drop mobility remains unexplained. Indeed the physics behind this peculiar dynamics is complex with nonlinearities involved both at the excitation level (acoustic streaming and radiation pressure) and in the droplet response (nonlinear oscillations and contact line dynamics). In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of sessile and pendant drops excited by SAWs. For pendant drops, so-far unreported dynamics are observed close to the drop detachment threshold with the suppression of the translational motion. Away from this threshold, the comparison between pendant and sessile drop dynamics allows us to identify the role played by gravity or more generally by an initial or dynamically induced stretching of the drop. In...

  7. Numerical analysis of the transportation characteristics of a self-running sliding stage based on near-field acoustic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kai; Liu, Yuanyuan; Cheng, Miaomiao

    2015-12-01

    Owing to its distinct non-contact and oil-free characteristics, a self-running sliding stage based on near-field acoustic levitation can be used in an environment, which demands clean rooms and zero noise. This paper presents a numerical analysis on the lifting and transportation capacity of a non-contact transportation system. Two simplified structure models, namely, free vibration and force vibration models, are proposed for the study of the displacement amplitude distribution of two cases using the finite element method. After coupling the stage displacement into the film thickness, the Reynolds equation is solved by the finite difference method to obtain the lifting and thrusting forces. Parametric analyses of the effects of amplitude, frequency, and standing wave ratio (SWR) on the sliding stage dynamic performance are investigated. Numerical results show good agreement with published experimental values. The predictions also reveal that greater transportation capacity of the self-running sliding stage is generally achieved at less SWR and at higher amplitude. PMID:26723328

  8. 声悬浮及声速测定实验仪的设计%Acoustic levitation and design of sound velocity measurement instrument

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马国利

    2012-01-01

    《声速测定》是大学物理实验中比较普遍的一个综合性实验.在声速测定实验仪的基础上,改进了信号源,并制作了声悬浮配件,使其实现既可以用多种方式测量声速,又可演示声悬浮实验现象.声悬浮及声速测定实验仪悬浮稳定性强,声速测定准确,仪器造价低,使用方便,这样设计节省了实验室资源和空间.%The measurement of sound velocity is a commonly comprehensive experiment among university physics experiments. Our design idea is to, based on the original equipment, improve the signal source and make acoustic levitation parts so as to measure sound velocity in different ways; and demonstrate the experimental phenomena of acoustic levitation. The sound velocity measurement experiment instrument has strong levitation stability, accurate sound velocity measurement, low cost and convenient applications. This design saves laboratory resources and space.

  9. Magnetic Levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Thomas D.; Hull, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the principles of magnetic levitation presented in the physics classroom and applied to transportation systems. Topics discussed include three classroom demonstrations to illustrate magnetic levitation, the concept of eddy currents, lift and drag forces on a moving magnet, magnetic levitation vehicles, levitation with permanent magnets…

  10. Acoustic Levitation Transportation of Small Objects Using a Ring-type Vibrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gilles P. L.; Andrade, Marco A. B.; Adamowski, Julio C.; Silva, Eḿílio C. N.

    A new device for noncontact transportation of small solid objects is presented here. Ultrasonic flexural vibrations are generated along the ring shaped vibrator using two Langevin transducers and by using a reflector parallel to the vibrator, small particles are trapped at the nodal points of the resulting acoustic standing wave. The particles are then moved by generating a traveling wave along the vibrator, which can be done by modulating the vibration amplitude of the transducers. The working principle of the traveling wave along the vibrator has been modeled by the superposition of two orthogonal standing waves, and the position of the particles can be predicted by using finite element analysis of the vibrator and the resulting acoustic field. A prototype consisting of a 3 mm thick, 220 mm long, 50 mm wide and 52 mm radius aluminum ring-type vibrator and a reflector of the same length and width was built and small polystyrene spheres have been successfully transported along the straight parts of the vibrator.

  11. Dynamics of sessile and pendant drops excited by surface acoustic waves: Gravity effects and correlation between oscillatory and translational motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussonnière, A; Baudoin, M; Brunet, P; Matar, O Bou

    2016-05-01

    When sessile droplets are excited by ultrasonic traveling surface acoustic waves (SAWs), they undergo complex dynamics with both oscillations and translational motion. While the nature of the Rayleigh-Lamb quadrupolar drop oscillations has been identified, their origin and their influence on the drop mobility remains unexplained. Indeed, the physics behind this peculiar dynamics is complex with nonlinearities involved both at the excitation level (acoustic streaming and radiation pressure) and in the droplet response (nonlinear oscillations and contact line dynamics). In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of sessile and pendant drops excited by SAWs. For pendant drops, so-far unreported dynamics are observed close to the drop detachment threshold with the suppression of the translational motion. Away from this threshold, the comparison between pendant and sessile drop dynamics allows us to identify the role played by gravity or, more generally, by an initial or dynamically induced stretching of the drop. In turn, we elucidate the origin of the resonance frequency shift, as well as the origin of the strong correlation between oscillatory and translational motion. We show that for sessile drops, the velocity is mainly determined by the amplitude of oscillation and that the saturation observed is due to the nonlinear dependence of the drop response frequency on the dynamically induced stretching. PMID:27300977

  12. Dynamics of sessile and pendant drops excited by surface acoustic waves: Gravity effects and correlation between oscillatory and translational motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussonnière, A.; Baudoin, M.; Brunet, P.; Matar, O. Bou

    2016-05-01

    When sessile droplets are excited by ultrasonic traveling surface acoustic waves (SAWs), they undergo complex dynamics with both oscillations and translational motion. While the nature of the Rayleigh-Lamb quadrupolar drop oscillations has been identified, their origin and their influence on the drop mobility remains unexplained. Indeed, the physics behind this peculiar dynamics is complex with nonlinearities involved both at the excitation level (acoustic streaming and radiation pressure) and in the droplet response (nonlinear oscillations and contact line dynamics). In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of sessile and pendant drops excited by SAWs. For pendant drops, so-far unreported dynamics are observed close to the drop detachment threshold with the suppression of the translational motion. Away from this threshold, the comparison between pendant and sessile drop dynamics allows us to identify the role played by gravity or, more generally, by an initial or dynamically induced stretching of the drop. In turn, we elucidate the origin of the resonance frequency shift, as well as the origin of the strong correlation between oscillatory and translational motion. We show that for sessile drops, the velocity is mainly determined by the amplitude of oscillation and that the saturation observed is due to the nonlinear dependence of the drop response frequency on the dynamically induced stretching.

  13. 声悬浮过程的格子Boltzmann方法研究%Study of acoustic levitation by lattice Boltzmann metho d

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解文军; 滕鹏飞

    2014-01-01

    采用轴对称多弛豫时间格子Boltzmann (LB)方法,研究了圆柱形封闭谐振腔中圆盘形样品的声悬浮过程.模拟结果表明,(001)模式下谐振腔的共振长度L =0.499λ,在谐振腔中心引入样品后共振漂移量δL≈-0.9,这与线性声学理论计算结果基本相符.声悬浮力的LB模拟过程包含了黏滞性效应和共振漂移效应,所获得的模拟结果与理论公式计算值在量值上一致,而且其在细节上更符合实验现象.此外, LB模拟还揭示出了声悬浮过程中的声压波形畸变、声流和声辐射压等非线性声学效应.%The axisymmetric multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is used to study the acoustic levitation of a rigid disk sample in a closed cylindrical resonant chamber. The simulation results show that the resonant cavity length L is equal to 0.499λfor (001) mode, and the resonance shiftδL is approximately equal to-0.9 with a disk sample located in the chamber center, which accord with the analytical results derived from linear acoustics. The LB method naturally includes the viscosity and resonance shift during the simulation of acoustic levitation force on the disk sample, which gives the results not only consistent with the theory in magnitude, but also coherent with the experiments in more details. Some of the nonlinear effects associated with acoustic levitation, such as waveform distortion, acoustic streaming, and radiation pressure, are also revealed by the LB simulation.

  14. Isolation of crystallizing droplets by electrostatic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Chung, Sang K.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of electrostatic levitation where the positioning and stabilization of a sample are accomplished by applying appropriate electrostatic forces to a charged sample are outlined, and attention is focused on a feedback control algorithm, drop-launching method, and four-drop levitator. Drop levitation in 1-g is discussed, and crystal-growth experiments are presented. An experiment in which the protein concentration of a levitated drop is controlled by a feedback system is described. During levitation, the drop evaporation rate is controlled in a programmed way in order to acquire proper protein concentration levels for both nucleation and growth. The containerless approach of protein crystal growth when applied in the space environment is assessed.

  15. A robust calibration technique for acoustic emission systems based on momentum transfer from a ball drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Lockner, David A.; Kilgore, Brian D.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a technique to estimate the seismic moment of acoustic emissions and other extremely small seismic events. Unlike previous calibration techniques, it does not require modeling of the wave propagation, sensor response, or signal conditioning. Rather, this technique calibrates the recording system as a whole and uses a ball impact as a reference source or empirical Green’s function. To correctly apply this technique, we develop mathematical expressions that link the seismic moment $M_{0}$ of internal seismic sources (i.e., earthquakes and acoustic emissions) to the impulse, or change in momentum $\\Delta p $, of externally applied seismic sources (i.e., meteor impacts or, in this case, ball impact). We find that, at low frequencies, moment and impulse are linked by a constant, which we call the force‐moment‐rate scale factor $C_{F\\dot{M}} = M_{0}/\\Delta p$. This constant is equal to twice the speed of sound in the material from which the seismic sources were generated. Next, we demonstrate the calibration technique on two different experimental rock mechanics facilities. The first example is a saw‐cut cylindrical granite sample that is loaded in a triaxial apparatus at 40 MPa confining pressure. The second example is a 2 m long fault cut in a granite sample and deformed in a large biaxial apparatus at lower stress levels. Using the empirical calibration technique, we are able to determine absolute source parameters including the seismic moment, corner frequency, stress drop, and radiated energy of these magnitude −2.5 to −7 seismic events.

  16. Analysis and Experiment Investigation of Ultrasonic Near Field Acoustic Levitation Stiffness%基于超声近场作用的悬浮特性分析与试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宗遐龄; 赵群; 傅星菊; 孙运涛; 贾兵

    2012-01-01

    超声近场的悬浮现象和动力学机理,提出圆形振子薄板与悬浮物之间的耦合数学模型,给定圆盘在特定弯振模态下的边界条件,推导了基于挤压膜模型的悬浮压力近似解析式.同时为了试验研究超声近场的悬浮特性,在兰杰文振子顶端设计了利于产生超声辐射近场效应的圆盘式装置并试制了样机,通过激励出圆盘的弯曲振动模态诱发出声场辐射力,实现了物体在圆盘表面的近距离悬浮.搭建了基于虚拟仪器平台的测试系统,通过试验获得其悬浮特性参数,分析了悬浮的距离随着重物质量的增大而减少的规律,验证了理论分析结果,为采用近声场来悬浮和实现悬浮力的有效控制奠定了基础.%This paper analyzes the special phenomenon and dynamic mechanism of ultrasonic near-field acoustic levitation and presents the mathematical model of coupling the vibration plate with levitation object based on the boundary condition of the special vibration mode. In order to measure the characteristic parameters of ultrasonic near-field acoustic levitation, the annular plate is designed and installed on top of Lanngevin vibrator, which is able to produce ultrasonic radiation effect. The prototype is manufactured, ultrasonic near-field acoustic levitation is observed by inducing flexural vibration mode of annular plate. The virtual instrument technology Is used in the testing system to measure the levitation characteristic parameter It is experimentally found that levitation distance decreases with the heavier object, and the theoretical results are validated. The theoretical and experimental investigations in this paper lay the foundation for the control of ultrasonic near-field acoustic levitation.

  17. Rheological properties, shape oscillations, and coalescence of liquid drops with surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfel, R. E.; Holt, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    A method was developed to deduce dynamic interfacial properties of liquid drops. The method involves measuring the frequency and damping of free quadrupole oscillations of an acoustically levitated drop. Experimental results from pure liquid-liquid systems agree well with theoretical predictions. Additionally, the effects of surfactants is considered. Extension of these results to a proposed microgravity experiment on the drop physics module (DPM) in USML-1 are discussed. Efforts are also underway to model the time history of the thickness of the fluid layer between two pre-coalescence drops, and to measure the film thickness experimentally. Preliminary results will be reported, along with plans for coalescence experiments proposed for USML-1.

  18. Some fundamental aspects of self-levitating sliding contact bearings and their practical implementations

    OpenAIRE

    Atherton, MA; Mares, C; Stolarski, TA

    2014-01-01

    In this study, fundamental aspects and mechanisms of acoustic levitation together with governing equations are presented first. Then, the acoustic levitation phenomenon is considered as a new way to design air suspension systems capable of self-levitation. A particular emphasis is laid on journal bearings and their specific geometrical configuration. A practical feasibility of using acoustic levitation to separate contacting surfaces is supported and illustrated by results of experimental tes...

  19. "Bernoulli" Levitation

    OpenAIRE

    Waltham, Chris; Bendall, Sarah; Kotlicki, Andrzej

    2002-01-01

    "Bernoulli" levitation is the basis of many popular counter-intuitive physics demonstrations. However, few of these lend themselves to a quantitative description without recourse to computational fluid dynamics. Levitation of a flat plate is the exception, and we present here a straightforward analysis which illustrates several principles of fluid mechanics in a pedagogically useful way.

  20. Analysis of the particle stability in a new designed ultrasonic levitation device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Sebastian; Andrade, Marco A B; Esen, Cemal; Adamowski, Julio Cezar; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    The use of acoustic levitation in the fields of analytical chemistry and in the containerless processing of materials requires a good stability of the levitated particle. However, spontaneous oscillations and rotation of the levitated particle have been reported in literature, which can reduce the applicability of the acoustic levitation technique. Aiming to reduce the particle oscillations, this paper presents the analysis of the particle stability in a new acoustic levitator device. The new acoustic levitator consists of a piezoelectric transducer with a concave radiating surface and a concave reflector. The analysis is conducted by determining numerically the axial and lateral forces that act on the levitated object and by measuring the oscillations of a sphere particle by a laser Doppler vibrometer. It is shown that the new levitator design allows to increase the lateral forces and reduce significantly the lateral oscillations of the levitated object. PMID:22047333

  1. Aerodynamic levitator furnace for measuring thermophysical properties of refractory liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langstaff, D.; Gunn, M.; Greaves, G. N.; Marsing, A.; Kargl, F.

    2013-12-01

    The development of novel contactless aerodynamic laser heated levitation techniques is reported that enable thermophysical properties of refractory liquids to be measured in situ in the solid, liquid, and supercooled liquid state and demonstrated here for alumina. Starting with polished crystalline ruby spheres, we show how, by accurately measuring the changing radius, the known density in the solid state can be reproduced from room temperature to the melting point at 2323 K. Once molten, by coupling the floating liquid drop to acoustic oscillations via the levitating gas, the mechanical resonance and damping of the liquid can be measured precisely with high-speed high-resolution shadow cast imaging. The resonance frequency relates to the surface tension, the decay constant to the viscosity, and the ellipsoidal size and shape of the levitating drop to the density. This unique instrumentation enables these related thermophysical properties to be recorded in situ over the entire liquid and supercooled range of alumina, from the boiling point at 3240 K, until spontaneous crystallization occurs around 1860 K, almost 500 below the melting point. We believe that the utility that this unique instrumentation provides will be applicable to studying these important properties in many other high temperature liquids.

  2. Parametrically excited sectorial oscillation of liquid drops floating in ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, C L; Xie, W J; Wei, B

    2010-04-01

    We report experiments in which the nonaxisymmetric sectorial oscillations of water drops have been excited using acoustic levitation and an active modulation method. The observed stable sectorial oscillations are up to the seventh mode. These oscillations are excited by parametric resonance. The oblate initial shape of the water drops is essential to this kind of excitations. The oscillation frequency increases with mode number but decreases with equatorial radius for each mode number. The data can be well described by a modified Rayleigh equation, without the use of additional parameters. PMID:20481825

  3. Evaporation of Binary Sessile Drops: Infrared and Acoustic Methods To Track Alcohol Concentration at the Interface and on the Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pin; Toubal, Malika; Carlier, Julien; Harmand, Souad; Nongaillard, Bertrand; Bigerelle, Maxence

    2016-09-27

    Evaporation of droplets of three pure liquids (water, 1-butanol, and ethanol) and four binary solutions (5 wt % 1-butanol-water-based solution and 5, 25, and 50 wt % ethanol-water-based solutions) deposited on hydrophobic silicon was investigated. A drop shape analyzer was used to measure the contact angle, diameter, and volume of the droplets. An infrared camera was used for infrared thermal mapping of the droplet's surface. An acoustic high-frequency echography technique was, for the first time, applied to track the alcohol concentration in a binary-solution droplet. Evaporation of pure alcohol droplets was executed at different values of relative humidity (RH), among which the behavior of pure ethanol evaporation was notably influenced by the ambient humidity as a result of high hygrometry. Evaporation of droplets of water and binary solutions was performed at a temperature of 22 °C and a mean humidity of approximately 50%. The exhaustion times of alcohol in the droplets estimated by the acoustic method and the visual method were similar for the water-1-butanol mixture; however, the time estimated by the acoustic method was longer when compared with that estimated by the visual method for the water-ethanol mixture due to the residual ethanol at the bottom of the droplet.

  4. Hybrid optical and acoustic force based sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahoney, Paul; Brodie, Graham W.; Wang, Han; Demore, Christine E. M.; Cochran, Sandy; Spalding, Gabriel C.; MacDonald, Michael P.

    2014-09-01

    We report the combined use of optical sorting and acoustic levitation to give particle sorting. Differing sizes of microparticles are sorted optically both with and without the aid of acoustic levitation, and the results compared to show that the use of acoustic trapping can increase sorting efficiency. The use of a transparent ultrasonic transducer is also shown to streamline the integration of optics and acoustics. We also demonstrate the balance of optical radiation pressure and acoustic levitation to achieve vertical sorting.

  5. Improved Position Sensor for Feedback Control of Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyers, Robert; Savage, Larry; Rogers, Jan

    2004-01-01

    An improved optoelectronic apparatus has been developed to provide the position feedback needed for controlling the levitation subsystem of a containerless-processing system. As explained, the advantage of this apparatus over prior optoelectronic apparatuses that have served this purpose stems from the use of an incandescent lamp, instead of a laser, to illuminate the levitated object. In containerless processing, a small object to be processed is levitated (e.g., by use of a microwave, low-frequency electromagnetic, electrostatic, or acoustic field) so that it is not in contact with the wall of the processing chamber or with any other solid object during processing. In the case of electrostatic or low-frequency electromagnetic levitation, real-time measurement of the displacement of the levitated object from its nominal levitation position along the vertical axis (and, in some cases, along one or two horizontal axes) is needed for feedback control of the levitating field.

  6. Inertial levitation

    OpenAIRE

    Ockendon, J. R.; Fitt, A.D.; Kozyreff, G. K.

    2004-01-01

    We consider the steady levitation of a rigid plate on a thin air cushion with prescribed injection velocity. This injection velocity is assumed to be much larger than that in a conventional Prandtl boundary layer, so that inertial effects dominate. After applying the classical 'blowhard' theory of Cole and Aroesty (1968) to the two-dimensional version of the problem, it is shown that in three dimensions the flow may be foliated into streamline surfaces using Lagrangian variables. An example i...

  7. Noncontact surface tension measurement by drop rotation

    OpenAIRE

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Ishikawa, Takehiko

    2001-01-01

    Validity of the surface tension measurement technique that was proposed by Elleman et al. was experimentally verified. The technique was based on Brown and Scriven's work on the shape evolution of rotating drops. Molten tin and aluminum drops were levitated in high vacuum by the electrostatic levitator and rotated by applying a rotating magnetic field. This technique offers an alternative technique for those liquids where the drop oscillation technique cannot be used. As a demonstration, the ...

  8. Manipulation of optically levitated particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Oscar; Karlsteen, Magnus; Rostedt, Mats; Hanstorp, Dag

    2013-09-01

    The development of an experimental system in which optical levitation combined with Millikańs classical oil drop experiment will be presented. The focus of the apparatus is a glass cell (25x72x25 mm3) in which an oil drop is levitated using a vertically aligned laser beam. A laser power of about 0.9 W is needed to capture a drop, whereas typically 0.3 W is sufficient to maintain it in the trap. An alternating electric field is applied vertically across the cell, causing the drop to oscillate in the vertical direction. The amplitude of the oscillations depends on the strength of the electric field and the q/m ratio of the oil drop. The oscillations are observed by imaging scattered laser light onto either a screen or a position sensitive detector. The number of discrete charges on the drop can be reduced by exposing it to either UV-light or a radioactive source. The radius of the drop is measured by detecting the diffraction pattern produced when illuminated with a horizontally aligned He-Ne laser beam. The mass of the drop can then be determined since the density of the oil is known. Hence, absolute measurements of both the mass and the charge of the drop can be obtained. The goal of the experiment is to design a system which can be used to demonstrate several fundamental physical phenomena using the bare eye as the only detector. The experimental set-up will be further developed for studies of light scattering and spectroscopy of liquids and for studies of interactions between liquid drops.

  9. Solution on Near-Field Acoustic Levitation Force in Flexural Mode Based on ALE Methods%弯曲振动模态下近场悬浮力问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾兵; 陈超; 赵淳生

    2013-01-01

    为解决弯曲振动模态下求解近场悬浮力问题时表面振幅不一致的情况及忽略惯性力影响的问题,该文提出对在任意拉格朗日-欧拉法(ALE)坐标描述下求解挤压膜中的流体控制方程的方法.利用该方法得出悬浮高度与辐射压力的关系,之后对不同质量的悬浮重物进行悬浮实验,将数据结果与理论曲线进行对比,验证了该文中理论和数值分析方法的合理性.%In order to solving the question of neglecting inertia force and the inconformity of vibration amplitudes in solving near-field acoustic levitation in the flexural mode, a new method to solve the fluid control equations of squeezing film in Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) coordinate is presented in this paper. Using this method,the relationship between levitatied amplitude and radiation pressure is calculated. After that, the levitation experiment is carried out with several different weights,and a comparison between the obtained data and the theoretic curves has been performed. The result shows that the mathematical formula is reasonable for calculating the force of ultrasonic levitation.

  10. Analysis of a Non-resonant Ultrasonic Levitation Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Pérez, Nicolás; Adamowski, Julio C.

    In this study, a non-resonant configuration of ultrasonic levitation device is presented, which is formed by a small diameter ultrasonic transducer and a concave reflector. The influence of different levitator parameters on the levitation performance is investigated by using a numerical model that combines the Gor'kov theory with a matrix method based on the Rayleigh integral. In contrast with traditional acoustic levitators, the non-resonant ultrasonic levitation device allows the separation distance between the transducer and the reflector to be adjusted continually, without requiring the separation distance to be set to a multiple of half-wavelength. It is also demonstrated, both numerically and experimentally, that the levitating particle can be manipulated by maintaining the transducer in a fixed position in space and moving the reflector in respect to the transducer.

  11. Formation of Y{sub x}Nd{sub 1-x}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (0{<=}x{<=}0.9) superconductors from an undercooled melt via aero-acoustic levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafson, D.E.; Hofmeister, W.H.; Bayuzick, R.J.; Nagashio, K.; Kuribayashi, K

    2003-01-20

    This paper presents the results of rapid solidification experiments performed on the copper oxide superconductors Y{sub x}Nd{sub 1-x}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (0{<=}x{<=}0.9). Spherical rare earth (RE) 123 specimens were levitated in O{sub 2} using aero-acoustic levitation (AAL), melted with a laser, undercooled, and solidified. The peritectic transformation temperature for the reaction RE{sub 2}BaCuO{sub 5}+liquid{yields}REBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} corresponding to the maximum recalescence temperature during solidification was determined. RE123 was formed directly from the melt for Y-Nd binary alloy compositions with Nd concentration greater than 20% (Y concentration less than 80%). A minimum in the peritectic transformation temperature for the Nd/Y123 system corresponding to a composition Y{sub 0.3}Nd{sub 0.7}123 was determined at 66 deg. C below the peritectic of pure Nd123.

  12. A levitation instrument for containerless study of molten materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Merkley, Dennis; Sickel, Jeffrey; Finkelman, Steve; Telle, Rainer; Kaiser, Arno; Prieler, Robert

    2012-12-01

    A new aero-acoustic levitation instrument (AAL) has been installed at the Institute for Mineral Engineering at RWTH University in Aachen, Germany. The AAL employs acoustically stabilized gas jet levitation with laser-beam heating and melting to create a contact-free containerless environment for high temperature materials research. Contamination-free study of liquids is possible at temperatures in excess of 3000 °C and of undercooled liquids at temperatures far below the melting point. Digital control technology advances the art of containerless experiments to obtain long-term levitation stability, allowing new experiments in extreme temperature materials research and to study operation of the levitation instrument itself. Experiments with liquid Al2O3 at temperatures more than 3200 °C, 1200 °C above the melting point, and with liquid Y3Al5O12 far below the melting point are reported. Fast pyrometry and video recording instruments yield crystallization rates in undercooled liquid Al2O3 as a function of temperature. Levitation of dense liquid HfO2 at temperatures above 2900 °C is demonstrated. Capabilities are described for resonant frequency matching in the three-axis acoustic positioning system, acoustic control of sample spin, and position control of standing wave nodes to stabilize levitation under changing experimental conditions. Further development and application of the levitation technology is discussed based on the results of experiments and modeling of instrument operations.

  13. Containerless solidification of Ag-Cu eutectic alloy under acoustic levitation condition%声悬浮条件下Ag-CU共晶合金的无容器凝固研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿德路; 解文军; 洪振宇; 魏炳波

    2011-01-01

    采用声悬浮技术结合激光加热,实现了Ag-Cu共晶合金的无容器熔化与凝固,并通过CMOS图像分析与数值计算,研究了声悬浮过程中合金熔体的温度场分布特性.由于声辐射压作用,合金熔体在声悬浮条件下呈现扁球或圆饼形,表面温度沿赤道点到极点方向升高.凝固样品表面出现涟漪状波纹,统计分析发现,该表面波纹出现在大变形(a/b>2.1)的样品上.波纹中心为共晶形核点,且波纹传播方向与共晶生长方向相同.分析表明,表面形核以及形核后辐射推移的固液界面是形成表面波纹的先决条件.声场的增强能够促进悬浮样品在表面形核.%The containerless melting and solidification of Ag-Cu eutectic alloy were accomplished by acoustic levitation together with laser heating. The temperature field of levitated alloy droplet was investigated through CMOS image processing and numerical calculation. Due to the effect of acoustic radiation pressure, the alloy droplets deform from spherical to oblate or disklike shapes. Their surface temperature rises along the meridian line from the equator to the poles during cooling process. Surface ripples are observed on those samples with greater deformation (a/b>2.1). And it is found that eutectic grains nucleate at the center of these ripples, and grow in the direction parallel to the propagation of ripples. The surface nucleation and the radial advance of solid-liquid interface are revealed to be the two key factors for the formation of surface ripples. The enhancement of sound pressure can induce the surface nucleation of levitated Ag-Cu eutectic alloy.

  14. Apparatus and method for aerodynamic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, John W. (Inventor); al-Darwish, Mohamad M. (Inventor); Cashen, Grant E. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for the levitation of a liquid drop by a fluid flow comprising a profile generator, a fluid flow supply means operatively connected to the profile generator. The profile generator includes an elongate cylindrical shell in which is contained a profiling means for configuring the velocity profile of the fluid flow exiting the profile generator.

  15. The Wonders of Levitation

    OpenAIRE

    French, M M J

    2010-01-01

    I discuss some interesting classroom demonstrations of diamagnetism and how this effect can produce levitation. The possibilities for hands-on demonstrations of diamagnetic and superconducting levitation are discussed. To conclude I discuss some practical uses for levitation in daily life.

  16. The Wonders of Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, M. M. J.

    2010-01-01

    I discuss some interesting classroom demonstrations of diamagnetism and how this effect can produce levitation. The possibilities for hands-on demonstrations of diamagnetic and superconducting levitation are discussed. To conclude I discuss some practical uses for levitation in daily life. (Contains 6 figures.)

  17. Development of a single-axis ultrasonic levitator and the study of the radial particle oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Sebastian; Andrade, Marco A. B.; Esen, Cemal; Adamowski, Julio Cezar; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2012-05-01

    This work describes the development and analysis of a new single-axis acoustic levitator, which consists of a 38 kHz Langevin-type piezoelectric transducer with a concave radiating surface and a concave reflector. The new levitator design allows to significantly reducing the electric power necessary to levitate particles and to stabilize the levitated sample in both radial and axial directions. In this investigation the lateral oscillations of a levitated particle were measured with a single point Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) and an image evaluation technique. The lateral oscillations were measured for different values of particle diameter, particle density and applied electrical power.

  18. Vibrations of a diamagnetically levitated water droplet

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, R J A

    2010-01-01

    We measure the frequencies of small-amplitude shape oscillations of a magnetically-levitated water droplet. The drop levitates in a magnetogravitational potential trap. The restoring forces of the trap, acting on the droplet's surface in addition to the surface tension, increase the frequency of the oscillations. We derive the eigenfrequencies of the normal mode vibrations of a spherical droplet in the trap and compare it with our experimental measurements. We also consider the effect of the shape of the potential trap on the eigenfrequencies.

  19. Electric Levitation Using Epsilon-Near-Zero Metamaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Fortuño, Francisco J.; Vakil, Ashkan; Engheta, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Levitation of objects with action at a distance has always been intriguing to humans. Several ways to achieve this, such as aerodynamic, acoustic, or electromagnetic methods, including radiation pressure, stable potential wells, and quantum Casimir-Lifshitz forces, exist. A fascinating approach for levitation is that of magnets over superconductors based on the Meissner effect -the expulsion of the magnetic field by a superconductor. With the advent of metamaterials -designed structures with ...

  20. Star-shaped Oscillations of Leidenfrost Drops

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Xiaolei; Burton, Justin C

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the self-organized, star-shaped oscillations of Leidenfrost drops. The drops levitate on a cushion of evaporated vapor over a heated, curved surface. We observe modes with $n = 2-13$ lobes around the drop periphery. We find that both the wavelength and frequency of the oscillations depend only on the capillary length of the liquid, and are independent of the drop radius and substrate temperature. However, the number of observed modes depend sensitively on the liquid viscosity. The dominant frequency of pressure variations under the drop is approximately twice that the drop oscillation frequency, consistent with a parametric forcing mechanism. Our results suggest that the star-shaped oscillations are hydrodynamic in origin, and are driven by capillary waves beneath the drop. The exact mechanism by which the vapor flow initiates the capillary waves is likely related to static "brim waves" in levitated, viscous drops.

  1. Leidenfrost levitation: beyond droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Ali; Xu, Yuhao; Coder, Benjamin; Osborne, Paul A; Spafford, Jonathon; Michael, Grant E; Yu, Gan; Xu, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Friction is a major inhibitor in almost every mechanical system. Enlightened by the Leidenfrost effect - a droplet can be levitated by its own vapor layer on a sufficiently hot surface - we demonstrate for the first time that a small cart can also be levitated by Leidenfrost vapor. The levitated cart can carry certain amount of load and move frictionlessly over the hot surface. The maximum load that the cart can carry is experimentally tested over a range of surface temperatures. We show that the levitated cart can be propelled not only by gravitational force over a slanted flat surface, but also self-propelled over a ratchet shaped horizontal surface. In the end, we experimentally tested water consumption rate for sustaining the levitated cart, and compared the results to theoretical calculations. If perfected, this frictionless Leidenfrost cart could be used in numerous engineering applications where relative motion exists between surfaces.

  2. The Tibetan singing bowl : an acoustics and fluid dynamics investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Terwagne, Denis

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the acoustics and fluid dynamics of Tibetan singing bowls. Their acoustic behavior is rationalized in terms of the related dynamics of standing bells and wine glasses. Striking or rubbing a fluid-filled bowl excites wall vibrations, and concomitant waves at the fluid surface. Acoustic excitation of the bowl's natural vibrational modes allows for a controlled study in which the evolution of the surface waves with increasing forcing amplitude is detailed. Particular attention is given to rationalizing the observed criteria for the onset of edge-induced Faraday waves and droplet generation via surface fracture. Our study indicates that drops may be levitated on the fluid surface, induced to bounce on or skip across the vibrating fluid surface.

  3. Paramagnetic Leidenfrost Drops

    CERN Document Server

    Piroird, Keyvan; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2010-01-01

    We present a fluid dynamics video showing the behavior of drops of liquid oxygen, at room temperature. Due to their low boiling point, these drops levitate on a cushion of their own vapour. This property gives them a high mobility, as known more generally in such Leidenfrost situations. But liquid oxygen is also paramagnetic, and thus likely to be manipulated using a magnet. It is first shown that the shape of the drop can be modified by changing the drop/magnet distance; approaching the magnet acts as reinforcing gravity, so that the drops get flattened by this action. The transformation is of course reversible: as the magnet is withdrawn, the liquid recovers its quasi-spherical shape. Magnets can also be used to trap the oxygen drops. As they pass above a magnet, they slow down significantly, a consequence of their deformation: despite a very low friction, the vibrations induced by the drop deformations represent an important source of dissipation: below a well-defined velocity, drops can even be stopped in...

  4. Aerodynamic levitation and laser heating: Applications at synchrotron and neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennet, L.; Pozdnyakova, I.; Drewitt, J.W.E.; Leydier, M.; Brassamin, S.; Zanghi, D.; Magazu, S.; Price, D.L. [CEMHTI and University of Orleans, 45071 Orleans Cedex 02 (France); Cristiglio, V.; Kozaily, J.; Fischer, H.E.; Cuello, G.J.; Koza, M. [ILL, BP. 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Bytchkov, A. [ESRF, BP. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Thiaudiere, D. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Gruner, S. [Institute of Physics, Chemnitz UT, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Greaves, G.N. [IMAPS, University of Wales, Aberystwyth, SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Aerodynamic levitation is an effective way to suspend samples which can be heated with CO{sub 2} lasers. The advantages of this container-less technique are the simplicity and compactness of the device, making it possible to integrate it easily in different kinds of experiments. In addition, all types of materials can be used, including metals and oxides. The integration of aerodynamic levitation at synchrotron and neutron sources provides powerful tools to study the structure and dynamics of molten materials. We present here an overview of the existing techniques (electromagnetic levitation, electrostatic levitation, single-axis acoustic levitation, and aerodynamic levitation) and of the developments made at the CEMHTI in Orleans, as well as a few examples of experimental results already obtained. (authors)

  5. ORNL Levitated Toroidal Multipole Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are studying confinement of gun-injected and microwave-produced plasmas in a levitated toroidal quadrupole in which internal hoop supports are not present to limit plasma confinement. Electromagnetic levitation is made possible by reducing the 60 Hz skin depth in the copper walls with liquid nitrogen cooling. The cooling also increases the magnetic field lifetime so that an e-folding time of 17 ms was measured after crowbarring. Computations indicate that in a properly designed, larger device, an e-folding time of 100 ms can be reached. Washer-gun hydrogen plasmas and Bostick-type lithium gun plasmas were injected into the levitated quadrupole with typical parameters: B ≥ 3 kG, Te ≈ 3 eV, ni ≈ 109 cm-3, and 1 i i ≈ 1010 cm-3, Te ≈ 30 eV, and τ/τBohm ≈ 30. Density fluctuations (Δn/n) in the region of good field curvature were less than 0.05 and in the region of bad curvature 0.10-0.25. With the removal of the magnetic well (by removing the inner hoop), τ/τBohm and ni each dropped a factor of 4 and Δn/n became greater than 0.25. Recent experiments using 200 W at λ = 3 cm have produced plasmas with higher densities (n > 1011 cm-3 assuming Te ≈ 100 eV), higher temperatures (Te ≈ 100 eV) and longer lifetimes (τ ≈ 80 μs ≈ 40 τBohm) than in the λ = 12 cm experiments. Detailed probe measurements of density and temperature are consistent with models for plasma behaviour based on computed magnetic field plots. Probe data show clear evidence of the changes in heating zones during the variation of the sinusoidal magnetic field and a large obstacle intercepting all flux lines effectively prevents the formation of the plasma. We are also studying a levitated helical hexapole, whose advantages over the quadrupole are a better ratio of connection length to radius of bad curvature and more confinement volume. (author)

  6. Dexterous ultrasonic levitation of millimeter-sized objects in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Sue Ann; Drinkwater, Bruce W; Carter, Tom; Malkin, Rob; Subramanian, Sriram

    2014-07-01

    Acoustic levitation in air has applications in contactless handling and processing. Here a first-order Bessel function-shaped acoustic field, generated using an 8-element circular array operating at 40 kHz, traps millimeter-sized objects against gravity. The device can manipulate objects in a vertical plane over a few millimeters with an accuracy of ± 0.09 mm. PMID:24960712

  7. Magnetic levitation of single cells

    OpenAIRE

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tekin, H. Cumhur; Guven, Sinan; Sridhar, Kaushik; Arslan Yildiz, Ahu; Calibasi, Gizem; Ghiran, Ionita; Davis, Ronald W; Steinmetz, Lars M; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-01-01

    Cells consist of micro- and nanoscale components and materials that contribute to their fundamental magnetic and density signatures. Previous studies have claimed that magnetic levitation can only be used to measure density signatures of nonliving materials. Here, we demonstrate that both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells can be levitated and that each cell has a unique levitation profile. Furthermore, our levitation platform uniquely enables ultrasensitive density measurements, imaging, and p...

  8. High-Temperature Electrostatic Levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Chung, Sang K.

    1994-01-01

    High-temperature electrostatic levitator provides independent control of levitation and heating of sample in vacuum. Does not cause electromagnetic stirring in molten sample (such stirring causes early nucleation in undercooling). Maintenance of levitating force entails control of electrostatic field and electrical charge on sample.

  9. Particle-size dependence of immersion freezing: Investigation of INUIT test aerosol particles with freely suspended water drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Karoline; Debertshäuser, Michael; Eppers, Oliver; Jantsch, Evelyn; Mitra, Subir K.

    2014-05-01

    One goal of the research group INUIT (Ice Nuclei research UnIT) is to investigate the efficiencies of several test ice nuclei under comparable conditions but with different experimental techniques. In the present studies, two methods are used: the Mainz vertical wind tunnel and an acoustic levitator placed inside a cold chamber. In both cases drops are freely levitated, either at their terminal velocity in the wind tunnel updraft or around the nodes of a standing ultrasonic wave in the acoustic levitator. Thus, heat transfer conditions are well approximated, and wall contact effects on freezing as well as electrical charges of the drops are avoided. Drop radii are 370 μm and 1 mm, respectively. In the wind tunnel, drops are investigated at constant temperatures within a certain time period and the onset of freezing is observed directly. In the acoustic levitator, the drop temperature decreases during the experiments and is measured by an in-situ calibrated Infrared thermometer. The onset of freezing is indicated by a rapid rise of the drop surface temperature because of the release of latent heat. Investigated test ice nuclei are Snomax® as a proxy of biological particles and illite NX as well as K-feldspar as represents of mineral dust. The particle concentrations are 1 × 10-12 to 3 × 10-6 g Snomax® per drop and 5 × 10-9 to 5 × 10-5 g mineral dust per drop. Freezing temperatures are between -2 and -18° C in case of Snomax® and between -14 and -26° C in case of mineral dust. The lower the particle masses per drop the lower are the freezing temperatures. For similar particle concentrations in the drops, the median freezing temperatures determined by the two techniques agree well within the measurement errors. With the knowledge of the specific particle surface area of the mineral dusts, the results are interpreted also in terms of particle surface area per drop. Results from the wind tunnel experiments which are performed at constant temperatures indicate

  10. Research on levitation coupled with standing wave levitation and electromagnetic levitation

    OpenAIRE

    Jiao, Xiao Yang; Liu, Guojun; Liu, Jianfang; Li, Xinbo; Liu, XiaoLun; Lu, Song

    2015-01-01

    In order to solve the problem caused by metal materials' inability to be cooled without contact with other materials after being heated by electromagnetic levitation, a new method is proposed: using a standing wave levitator to levitate the melted metal. The standing wave levitator adopts a concave spherical surface on the emitter and the reflector. Using ANSYS software, the transducer and the standing wave fields were simulated. Based on the simulation, the distribution and the maximum acous...

  11. Acoustical radiation torque and force for spheres and Bessel beam extinction efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Philip L.; Zhang, Likun

    2014-11-01

    The scattering of optical and acoustical beams is relevant to the levitation and manipulation of drops. Here we examine theoretical developments in the acoustical case. We previously showed how the optical theorem for extinction can be extended to invariant beams. The example of a sphere in a Bessel beam facilitates the direct comparison with a circular disc computed using Babinet's principle and the Kirchhoff approximation. In related work, by considering traveling or standing wave first-order vortex beams we previously showed that the radiation torque is the ratio of the absorbed power and the radian acoustic frequency. By modifying the scattering to account for the viscosity of the surrounding fluid in the analysis of the absorbed power, approximations for radiation torque and force are obtained at long wavelengths in special cases and these can be compared with results published elsewhere.

  12. MSFC Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Rapid Quench System

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Craven, Paul D.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Laboratory is a unique facility for investigators studying high-temperature materials. The laboratory boasts two levitators in which samples can be levitated, heated, melted, undercooled, and resolidified, all without the interference of a container or data-gathering instrument. The ESL main chamber has been upgraded with the addition of a rapid quench system. This system allows samples to be dropped into a quench vessel that can be filled with a low melting point material, such as a gallium or indium alloy. Thereby allowing rapid quenching of undercooled liquid metals. Up to 8 quench vessels can be loaded into the quench wheel, which is indexed with LabVIEW control software. This allows up to 8 samples to be rapidly quenched before having to open the chamber. The system has been tested successfully on several zirconium samples. Future work will be done with other materials using different quench mediums. Microstructural analysis will also be done on successfully quench samples.

  13. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  14. Levitation of superconducting composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, C. K.; Turchinskaya, M.; Swartzendruber, L. J.; Shull, R. D.; Bennett, L. H.

    1991-01-01

    The inverse levitation of a high temperature superconductor polymer composite consisting of powdered quench melt growth Ba2YCu3O(7-delta) and cyanoacrylate is reported. Magnetic hysteresis loop measurements for the composite are compared to those measured for the bulk material prior to powdering. Differences in the flux pining capability between the two material forms are small but significant.

  15. Foot Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Foot Drop Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... research is being done? Clinical Trials What is Foot Drop? Foot drop describes the inability to raise ...

  16. Structure formation by nanosilica particles suspended in levitated droplet

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Abhishek; Kumar, Ranganathan; Basu, Saptarshi

    2010-01-01

    Vaporization of liquid droplets containing particles has been studied extensively for its applications in combustion, thermal coating, ink-jet printing, spray cooling, drug delivery, and surface patterning. Droplets containing solid particles show a preferential solute-migration during drying process. Recently we carried out experiments with vaporizing droplet suspended in an acoustic levitator. In this work, we present detailed study of a laser irradiated droplet containing nanosilica particles. Infrared and High speed imaging of the heating process for different concentrations of nanosilica revealed an interesting solute migration pattern. Further investigation with Particle Image Velocimetry shows presence of strong recirculation within the levitated droplet. It also reveals that with increasing viscosity of the liquid the strength of this recirculation decreases. Due to the droplets rotation about the levitator axis, a centrifugal force also dominated the flow field within the droplet. High speed imaging ...

  17. Advanced Measurement Devices for the Microgravity Electromagnetic Levitation Facility EML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillo, Jurgen; Fritze, Holger; Lohofer, Georg; Schulz, Michal; Stenzel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on two advanced measurement devices for the microgravity electromagnetic levitation facility (EML), which is currently under construction for the use onboard the "International Space Station (ISS)": the "Sample Coupling Electronics (SCE)" and the "Oxygen Sensing and Control Unit (OSC)". The SCE measures by a contactless, inductive method the electrical resistivity and the diameter of a spherical levitated metallic droplet by evaluating the voltage and electrical current applied to the levitation coil. The necessity of the OSC comes from the insight that properties like surface tension or, eventually, viscosity cannot seriously be determined by the oscillating drop method in the EML facility without knowing the conditions of the surrounding atmosphere. In the following both measurement devices are explained and laboratory test results are presented.

  18. Non-Contact Temperature Requirements (NCTM) for drop and bubble physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmelo, Anthony B.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1989-01-01

    Many of the materials research experiments to be conducted in the Space Processing program require a non-contaminating method of manipulating and controlling weightless molten materials. In these experiments, the melt is positioned and formed within a container without physically contacting the container's wall. An acoustic method, which was developed by Professor Taylor G. Wang before coming to Vanderbilt University from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, has demonstrated the capability of positioning and manipulating room temperature samples. This was accomplished in an earth-based laboratory with a zero-gravity environment of short duration. However, many important facets of high temperature containerless processing technology have not been established yet, nor can they be established from the room temperature studies, because the details of the interaction between an acoustic field an a molten sample are largely unknown. Drop dynamics, bubble dynamics, coalescence behavior of drops and bubbles, electromagnetic and acoustic levitation methods applied to molten metals, and thermal streaming are among the topics discussed.

  19. Study on interfacial stability and internal flow of a droplet levitated by ultrasonic wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Yuji; Hyuga, Daisuke; Awazu, Shigeru; Aoki, Kazuyoshi

    2009-04-01

    For a microgravity environment, new and high-quality material is expected to be manufactured. However, the effect of surface instability and the internal flow become significant when the droplet becomes large. Elucidation of internal flow and surface instability on a levitated droplet is required for the quality improvement of new material manufacturing in a microgravity environment. The objectives of this study are to clarify the interfacial stability and internal flow of a levitated droplet. Surface instability and internal flow are investigated with a large droplet levitated by the ultrasonic acoustic standing wave. The experiment with a large droplet is conducted both under normal gravity and microgravity environments. In the experiment, at first, the characteristics of the levitated droplet are investigated; that is, the relationships among the levitated droplet diameter, the droplet aspect ratio, the displacement of the antinode of the standing wave, and the sound pressure are experimentally measured. As a result, it is clarified that the levitated droplet tends to be located at an optimal position with an optimal shape and diameter. Second, the border condition between the stable and the unstable levitation of the droplet is evaluated by using the existing stability theory. The experimental results qualitatively agree with the theory. It is suggested that the stability of the droplet can be evaluated with the stability theory. Finally, multidimensional visual measurement is conducted to investigate the internal flow structure in a levitated droplet. It is suggested that complex flow with the vortex is generated in the levitated droplet. Moreover, the effect of physical properties of the test fluid on the internal flow structure of the levitated droplet is investigated. As a result, the internal flow structure of the levitated droplet is affected by the surface tension and viscosity. PMID:19426319

  20. Differential force balances during levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Paul

    The simplest arithmetic of inertial, buoyant, magnetic and electrokinetic levitation is explored in the context of a model living system with “acceleration-sensitive structures” in which motion, if allowed, produces a biological effect. The simple model is a finite-sized object enclosed within another finite-sized object suspended in an outer fluid (liquid or vapor) medium. The inner object has density and electrical and magnetic properties quantitatively different from those of the outer object and the medium. In inertial levitation (“weightlessness”) inertial accelerations are balanced, and the forces due to them are canceled in accordance with Newton’s third law. In the presence of inertial acceleration (gravity, centrifugal) motionlessness depends on a balance between the levitating force and the inertial force. If the inner and outer objects differ in density one or the other will be subjected to an unbalanced force when one object is levitated by any other force (buoyant, magnetic, electrokinetic). The requirements for motionlessness of the internal object in the presence of a levitating force are equality of density in the case of buoyant levitation, equality of magnetic susceptibility in the case of magnetic levitation, and equality of zeta potential and dielectric constant in the case of electrokinetic levitation. Examples of internal “acceleration-sensitive structures” are cellular organelles and the organs of advanced plants and animals. For these structures fundamental physical data are important in the interpretation of the effects of forces used for levitation.

  1. Quantum levitation using metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappakrishnan, Venkatesh K.

    The emergence of an attractive vacuum force (Casimir force) between two purely dielectric materials can lead to an increase in the friction and the stiction effects in nanoscale devices, resulting in degradation or decreased performance. Thus, it is of high practical importance that the conditions for the reversal of the Casimir force from attractive to repulsive are identified. Although the repulsive Casimir force has been considered for high dielectric materials as an intermediate (between the plates) medium, so far no realistic system has been proposed that can demonstrate quantum levitation with air/vacuum as a host medium. Since air is the natural environment for almost all nano- and microscopic devices, it is therefore imperative to seek a better understanding of the nature of the Casimir force under such ambient conditions. In this thesis, the conditions for achieving quantum levitation at an arbitrary temperature are investigated by considering a simple configuration consisting of two parallel plates separated by air. The proposed parallel-plate designs are based on artificial nano-engineered electromagnetic materials commonly referred to as the electromagnetic metamaterials. In the case of an ideal system consisting of non-dispersive plates, we have uncovered the existence of six universal Casimir force types. We have also derived an explicit necessary condition for Casimir force reversal as a function of the non-retarded specular functions of the plates. By introducing a modification of the Lifshitz theory, we have performed an extensive investigation of the Casimir force for general dispersive magneto-dielectric plates. Simple necessary and sufficient conditions for force reversal have been derived that can serve as a useful tool in designing quantum levitation systems. Based on the sufficient condition, the complete parametric domain for the Casimir force repulsion has been identified. A strongly magnetic response for at least one of the plates is

  2. Control of Nanomaterial Self-Assembly in Ultrasonically Levitated Droplets

    OpenAIRE

    Seddon, Annela M.; Richardson, Sam J.; Rastogi, Kunal; Plivelic, Tomás S.; Squires, Adam M.; Pfrang, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic trapping can be used to levitate andmanipulate droplets of soft matter, in particular, lyotropic mesophases formed from selfassembly of different surfactants and lipids, which can be analyzed in a contact-less manner by X-ray scattering in a controlled gas-phase environment. On the macroscopic length scale, the dimensions and the orientation of the particle are shaped by the ultrasonic field, while on the microscopic length scale the nanostructure can be controlle...

  3. Electromagnetic Levitation of a Disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, R.; Neves, F.; de Andrade, R., Jr.; Stephan, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a teaching experiment that explores the levitation of a disc of ferromagnetic material in the presence of the magnetic field produced by a single electromagnet. In comparison to the classical experiment of the levitation of a sphere, the main advantage of the proposed laboratory bench is that the uniform magnetic field…

  4. Pool impacts of Leidenfrost drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Maquet, Laurent; Dorbolo, Stephane; Dehandschoewercker, Eline; Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-11-01

    This work concerns the impact of a droplet made of a volatile liquid (typically HFE) on a pool of an other liquid (typically silicone oil) which temperature is above the boiling point of the drop. Depending on the properties of the two liquids and the impacting conditions, four different regimes are observed. For low impacting speeds, the droplet bounces on the surface of the bath and finally levitates above it in a Leidenfrost state. Such a regime occurs as soon as the pool temperature exceeds the boiling point of the drop. This observation means that there is no threshold in temperature for a Leidenfrost effect on a liquid surface contrary to the case of a solid substrate. For intermediate impacting velocities, the pinch-off of the surface of the pool entraps the drop in the liquid bulk. The entrapped drop is separated from the pool by a layer of its own vapour in a similar way of antibulles. For increasing impacting speeds, the vapour layer between the drop and the pool does not hold during the pinch-off event. The contact of the drop with the hot liquid provokes a sudden and intense evaporation. At very large impacting speeds, the drop rapidely contacts the pool, spreads and finally induces a hemi-spherical cavity. In the end, these four different regimes are summarized in a Froud-Weber diagram which boundaries are discussed.

  5. Magnetic levitation of single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tekin, H Cumhur; Guven, Sinan; Sridhar, Kaushik; Arslan Yildiz, Ahu; Calibasi, Gizem; Ghiran, Ionita; Davis, Ronald W; Steinmetz, Lars M; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-07-14

    Several cellular events cause permanent or transient changes in inherent magnetic and density properties of cells. Characterizing these changes in cell populations is crucial to understand cellular heterogeneity in cancer, immune response, infectious diseases, drug resistance, and evolution. Although magnetic levitation has previously been used for macroscale objects, its use in life sciences has been hindered by the inability to levitate microscale objects and by the toxicity of metal salts previously applied for levitation. Here, we use magnetic levitation principles for biological characterization and monitoring of cells and cellular events. We demonstrate that each cell type (i.e., cancer, blood, bacteria, and yeast) has a characteristic levitation profile, which we distinguish at an unprecedented resolution of 1 × 10(-4) g ⋅ mL(-1). We have identified unique differences in levitation and density blueprints between breast, esophageal, colorectal, and nonsmall cell lung cancer cell lines, as well as heterogeneity within these seemingly homogenous cell populations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that changes in cellular density and levitation profiles can be monitored in real time at single-cell resolution, allowing quantification of heterogeneous temporal responses of each cell to environmental stressors. These data establish density as a powerful biomarker for investigating living systems and their responses. Thereby, our method enables rapid, density-based imaging and profiling of single cells with intriguing applications, such as label-free identification and monitoring of heterogeneous biological changes under various physiological conditions, including antibiotic or cancer treatment in personalized medicine. PMID:26124131

  6. NASA MSFC Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Rapid Quench System

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Craven, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Electrostatic levitation, a form of containerless processing, is an important tool in materials research. Levitated specimens are free from contact with a container; therefore, heterogeneous nucleation on container walls is not possible. This allows studies of deeply undercooled melts. Furthermore, studies of high-temperature, highly reactive materials are also possible. Studies of the solidification and crystallization of undercooled melts is vital to the understanding of microstructure development, particularly the formation of alloys with unique properties by rapid solidification. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) lab has recently been upgraded to allow for rapid quenching of levitated materials. The ESL Rapid Quench System uses a small crucible-like vessel that can be partially filled with a low melting point material, such as a Gallium alloy, as a quench medium. An undercooled sample can be dropped into the vessel to rapidly quench the sample. A carousel with nine vessels sits below the bottom electrode assembly. This system allows up to nine rapid quenches before having to break vacuum and remove the vessels. This new Rapid Quench System will allow materials science studies of undercooled materials and new materials development. In this presentation, the system is described and initial results are presented.

  7. A self-running standing wave-type bidirectional slider for the ultrasonically levitated thin linear stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Daisuke; Takei, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Kentaro; Ueha, Sadayuki

    2008-08-01

    A slider for a self-running standing wave-type, ultrasonically levitated, thin linear stage is discussed. The slider can be levitated and moved using acoustic radiation force and acoustic streaming. The slider has a simple configuration and consists of an aluminum vibrating plate and a piezoelectric zirconate titanate (PZT) element. The large asymmetric vibration distribution for the high thrust and levitation performance was obtained by adjusting the configuration determined by finite elemental analysis (FEA). As a preliminary step, the computed results of the sound pressure distribution in the 1-mm air gap by FEA was com pared with experimental results obtained using a fiber optic probe. The direction of the total driving force for the acoustic streaming in the small air gap was estimated by the sound pressure distribution calculated by FEA, and it was found that the direction of the acoustic streaming could be altered by controlling the vibration mode of the slider. The flexural standing wave could be generated along the vibrating plate near the frequencies predicted based on the FEA results. The slider could be levitated by the acoustic radiation force radiated from its own vibrating plate at several frequencies. The slider could be moved in the negative and positive directions at 68 kHz and 69 kHz, which correspond to the results computed by FEA, with the asymmetric vibration distribution of the slider's vibrating plate. Larger thrust could be obtained with the smaller levitation distance, and the maximum thrust was 19 mN. PMID:18986924

  8. Rapid Quench in an Electrostatic Levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Matson, Douglas M.

    2016-01-01

    The Electrostatic Levitation (ESL) Laboratory at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is a unique facility for investigators studying high-temperature materials. The ESL laboratory's main chamber has been upgraded with the addition of a rapid quench system. This system allows samples to be dropped into a quench vessel that can be filled with a low melting point material, such as a gallium or indium alloy, as a quench medium. Thereby allowing rapid quenching of undercooled liquid metals. Up to eight quench vessels can be loaded into a wheel inside the chamber that is indexed with control software. The system has been tested successfully with samples of zirconium, iron-cobalt alloys, titanium-zirconium-nickel alloys, and a silicon-cobalt alloy. This new rapid quench system will allow materials science studies of undercooled materials and new materials development. In this presentation, the system is described and some initial results are presented.

  9. The performance of induction levitators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, J. F.; Rodger, D.

    1984-09-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the performance of induction levitators, which are employed in vehicles for contactless transport systems, utilizing magnetic levitation (Maglev). A small model (38 cm long) of an induction levitator is shown. The armature consists of a laminated 'u' shaped iron yoke. Around the limbs of the yoke are wound two primary excitation coils carrying single phase 50 Hz current. Eddy currents, induced in the conducting secondary, produce a force of repulsion between secondary and yoke. A lateral stabilizing force can also be obtained. A description is presented of a study of the characteristics of these forces. Attention is given of a finite element model and the application of the Galerkin weighted residual technique, experimental and calculated results, and a design study of two single phase levitators for a 50 tonne Maglev vehicle.

  10. Microwave Dielectrophoretic Levitation In Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, John L.; Jackson, Henry W.; Barmatz, Martin B.

    1993-01-01

    Two reports propose use of dielectrophoresis in microwave resonant cavities to levitate samples of materials for containerless processing in microgravity in vacuum or in any suitable atmosphere. Also describe experiments undertaken to verify feasibility of proposal.

  11. Electric Levitation Using Epsilon-Near-Zero Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Fortuño, Francisco J Rodríguez; Engheta, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Levitation of objects with action at a distance has always been intriguing to humans. Several ways to achieve this, such as aerodynamic, acoustic, or electromagnetic methods, including radiation pressure, stable potential wells, and quantum Casimir-Lifshitz forces, exist. A fascinating approach for levitation is that of magnets over superconductors based on the Meissner effect -the expulsion of the magnetic field by a superconductor. With the advent of metamaterials -designed structures with electromagnetic properties that may not be found in nature- we ask whether a material may be conceived exhibiting similar field expulsion, but involving the electric field. We show how a special subcategory of metamaterials, called epsilon-near-zero materials, exhibits such electric classic analog to the Meissner effect, exerting a repulsion on nearby sources. Repulsive forces using anisotropic and chiral metamaterials have been investigated, but our proposal uses a different mechanism based on field expulsion, and is ver...

  12. Control of Nanomaterial Self-Assembly in Ultrasonically Levitated Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Annela M; Richardson, Sam J; Rastogi, Kunal; Plivelic, Tomás S; Squires, Adam M; Pfrang, Christian

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic trapping can be used to levitate and manipulate droplets of soft matter, in particular, lyotropic mesophases formed from self-assembly of different surfactants and lipids, which can be analyzed in a contact-less manner by X-ray scattering in a controlled gas-phase environment. On the macroscopic length scale, the dimensions and the orientation of the particle are shaped by the ultrasonic field, while on the microscopic length scale the nanostructure can be controlled by varying the humidity of the atmosphere around the droplet. We demonstrate levitation and in situ phase transitions of micellar, hexagonal, bicontinuous cubic, and lamellar phases. The technique opens up a wide range of new experimental approaches of fundamental importance for environmental, biological, and chemical research.

  13. Control of Nanomaterial Self-Assembly in Ultrasonically Levitated Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Annela M; Richardson, Sam J; Rastogi, Kunal; Plivelic, Tomás S; Squires, Adam M; Pfrang, Christian

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic trapping can be used to levitate and manipulate droplets of soft matter, in particular, lyotropic mesophases formed from self-assembly of different surfactants and lipids, which can be analyzed in a contact-less manner by X-ray scattering in a controlled gas-phase environment. On the macroscopic length scale, the dimensions and the orientation of the particle are shaped by the ultrasonic field, while on the microscopic length scale the nanostructure can be controlled by varying the humidity of the atmosphere around the droplet. We demonstrate levitation and in situ phase transitions of micellar, hexagonal, bicontinuous cubic, and lamellar phases. The technique opens up a wide range of new experimental approaches of fundamental importance for environmental, biological, and chemical research. PMID:26979408

  14. Soft Drop

    CERN Document Server

    Larkoski, Andrew J; Soyez, Gregory; Thaler, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new jet substructure technique called "soft drop declustering", which recursively removes soft wide-angle radiation from a jet. The soft drop algorithm depends on two parameters--a soft threshold $z_\\text{cut}$ and an angular exponent $\\beta$--with the $\\beta = 0$ limit corresponding roughly to the (modified) mass drop procedure. To gain an analytic understanding of soft drop and highlight the $\\beta$ dependence, we perform resummed calculations for three observables on soft-dropped jets: the energy correlation functions, the groomed jet radius, and the energy loss due to soft drop. The $\\beta = 0$ limit of the energy loss is particularly interesting, since it is not only "Sudakov safe" but also largely insensitive to the value of the strong coupling constant. While our calculations are strictly accurate only to modified leading-logarithmic order, we also include a discussion of higher-order effects such as multiple emissions and (the absence of) non-global logarithms. We compare our analytic r...

  15. An ultrasonically levitated noncontact stage using traveling vibrations on precision ceramic guide rails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Daisuke; Ide, Takeshi; Friend, James R; Nakamura, Kentaro; Ueha, Sadayuki

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a noncontact sliding table design and measurements of its performance via ultrasonic levitation. A slider placed atop two vibrating guide rails is levitated by an acoustic radiation force emitted from the rails. A flexural traveling wave propagating along the guide rails allows noncontact transportation of the slider. Permitting a transport mechanism that reduces abrasion and dust generation with an inexpensive and simple structure. The profile of the sliding table was designed using the finite-element analysis (FEA) for high levitation and transportation efficiency. The prototype sliding table was made of alumina ceramic (Al2O3) to increase machining accuracy and rigidity using a structure composed of a pair of guide rails with a triangular cross section and piezoelectric transducers. Two types of transducers were used: bolt-clamped Langevin transducers and bimorph transducers. A 40-mm long slider was designed to fit atop the two rail guides. Flexural standing waves and torsional standing waves were observed along the guide rails at resonance, and the levitation of the slider was obtained using the flexural mode even while the levitation distance was less than 10 microm. The levitation distance of the slider was measured while increasing the slider's weight. The levitation pressure, rigidity, and vertical displacement amplitude of the levitating slider thus were measured to be 6.7 kN/m2, 3.0 kN/microm/m2, and less than 1 microm, respectively. Noncontact transport of the slider was achieved using phased drive of the two transducers at either end of the vibrating guide rail. By controlling the phase difference, the slider transportation direction could be switched, and a maximum thrust of 13 mN was obtained. PMID:17375828

  16. Dynamics of Vapor Layer Under a Leidenfrost Drop

    CERN Document Server

    Caswell, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    In the Leidenfrost effect a small drop of fluid is levitated above a sufficiently hot surface, on a persistent vapor layer generated by evaporation from the drop. The vapor layer thermally insulates the drop from the surface leading to extraordinarily long drop lifetimes. The top-view shape of the levitated drops can exhibit persistent star-like vibrations. I extend recent work [Burton et al. PRL 2012] to study the bottom surface of the drop using interference-imaging. In this work I use a high-speed camera and automated image analysis to image, locate and classify the interference fringes. From the interference fringes I reconstruct the shape and height profile of the rim where the drop is closest to the surface. I measure the drop-size dependence of the planar vibrational mode frequencies, which agree well with previous work. I observe a distinct breathing mode in the average radius of the drop, the frequency of which scales differently with drop size than the other modes. This breathing mode can be tightly...

  17. Magnetic levitation configuration incorporating levitation, guidance and linear synchronous motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, H.T.

    1993-10-19

    A propulsion and suspension system for an inductive repulsion type magnetically levitated vehicle which is propelled and suspended by a system which includes propulsion windings which form a linear synchronous motor and conductive guideways, adjacent to the propulsion windings, where both combine to partially encircling the vehicle-borne superconducting magnets. A three phase power source is used with the linear synchronous motor to produce a traveling magnetic wave which in conjunction with the magnets propel the vehicle. The conductive guideway combines with the superconducting magnets to provide for vehicle levitation. 3 figures.

  18. Switchable Opening and Closing of a Liquid Marble via Ultrasonic Levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Duyang; Li, Jun; Chen, Zhen; Zhai, Zhicong; Geng, Xingguo; Binks, Bernard P

    2015-10-27

    Liquid marbles have promising applications in the field of microreactors, where the opening and closing of their surfaces plays a central role. We have levitated liquid water marbles using an acoustic levitator and, thereby, achieved the manipulation of the particle shell in a controlled manner. Upon increasing the sound intensity, the stable levitated liquid marble changes from a quasi-sphere to a flattened ellipsoid. Interestingly, a cavity on the particle shell can be produced on the polar areas, which can be completely healed when decreasing the sound intensity, allowing it to serve as a microreactor. The integral of the acoustic radiation pressure on the part of the particle surface protruding into air is responsible for particle migration from the center of the liquid marble to the edge. Our results demonstrate that the opening and closing of the liquid marble particle shell can be conveniently achieved via acoustic levitation, opening up a new possibility to manipulate liquid marbles coated with non-ferromagnetic particles. PMID:26439701

  19. Gene expression analysis of mouse embryonic stem cells following levitation in an ultrasound standing wave trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazou, Despina; Kearney, Roisin; Mansergh, Fiona; Bourdon, Celine; Farrar, Jane; Wride, Michael

    2011-02-01

    In the present paper, gene expression analysis of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells levitated in a novel ultrasound standing wave trap (USWT) (Bazou et al. 2005a) at variable acoustic pressures (0.08-0.85 MPa) and times (5-60 min) was performed. Our results showed that levitation of ES cells at the highest employed acoustic pressure for 60 min does not modify gene expression and cells maintain their pluripotency. Embryoid bodies (EBs) also expressed the early and late neural differentiation markers, which were also unaffected by the acoustic field. Our results suggest that the ultrasound trap microenvironment is minimally invasive as the biologic consequences of ES cell replication and EB differentiation proceed without significantly affecting gene expression. The technique holds great promise in safe cell manipulation techniques for a variety of applications including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:21208732

  20. A rotational traveling wave based levitation device - Modeling, design, and control

    CERN Document Server

    Gabai, Ran; Shaham, Ran; Cohen, Nadav; Bucher, Izhak

    2016-01-01

    Described is a device acting on an acoustically levitated object by manipulating the pressure and flow of a thin layer of air such that its rotation can be precisely controlled without mechanical contact. Virtual work analysis assists in simplifying the multi-actuator control problem into a problem governed by a controllable parameter. Actuation is done with a vibrating ring capable of producing ultrasonic standing and traveling waves, creating the acoustic excitation that affects the pressure in a thin, intermediate layer of gas. A distinctive vibration pattern is required to generate the temporal and spatial pressure field of the squeezed air layer that gives rise to both acoustic levitation force and rotational torque. Described are the physical and design development stages leading to an optimized structure, all followed by verifying and dynamics-calibration experiments. Moreover, by precisely controlling the ratio of standing and traveling waves in a closed-loop, one can affect the shear forces applied b...

  1. Containerless processing using electromagnetic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, A. B.; Abbaschian, R.

    1990-01-01

    The theory and practice of containerless processing via electromagnetic (EM) levitation is reviewed briefly. The use of EM levitation for the processing of alloys is described with particular emphasis on the bulk melt supercooling phenomenon in a containerless environment. The various effects associated with rapid solidification via bulk melt supercooling are discussed with examples of Nb-Si alloys. It is suggested that a detailed analysis of such effects can be utilized to select the potentially most promising alloys for future space-based processing.

  2. Magnetic levitation of condensed hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, C. G.; Seidel, G. M.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid and solid molecular hydrogen has been levitated using a pair of small superconducting solenoids. The hydrogen samples, up to 3 mm in dimension, were trapped in a magnetic potential having either a discrete minimum or a minimum in the form of a ring 1 cm in diameter. The hydrogen could be moved about in the magnetic trap by applying an electric field.

  3. Microwave Levitation Of Small Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, John L.; Jackson, Henry W.

    1991-01-01

    Microwave radiation in resonant cavities used to levitate small objects, according to proposal. Feedback control and atmosphere not needed. Technique conceived for use in experiments on processing of materials in low gravitation of outer space, also used in normal Earth gravitation, albeit under some limitations.

  4. Settling of copper drops in molten slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warczok, A.; Utigard, T. A.

    1995-02-01

    The settling of suspended metal and sulfide droplets in liquid metallurgical, slags can be affected by electric fields. The migration of droplets due to electrocapillary motion phenomena may be used to enhance the recovery of suspended matte/metal droplets and thereby to increase the recovery of pay metals. An experimental technique was developed for the purpose of measuring the effect of electric fields on the settling rate of metallic drops in liquid slags. Copper drops suspended in CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-Cu2O slags were found to migrate toward the cathode. Electric fields can increase the settling rate of 5-mm-diameter copper drops 3 times or decrease the settling until levitation by reversal of the electric field. The enhanced settling due to electric fields decreases with increasing Cu2O contents in the slag.

  5. Dust levitation about Itokawa's equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, C.; Zimmerman, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Electrostatic dust motion has been hypothesized to occur on the asteroids, due to the observations of the Eros dust ponds [1] and the potential presence of such a phenomenon on the Moon [2]. There are two phases of electrostatic dust motion: lofting and the subsequent trajectories. The feasibility of electrostatic dust lofting can be assessed by comparing the strength of the electrostatic force to the gravity and cohesion which hold the grain on to the surface [3--5]. The motion of the dust grains after they detach from the surface can be described as either ballistic, escaping, or levitating. We are interested in dust levitation because it could potentially redistribute grains on the surface of an asteroid (for instance, producing the Eros dust ponds) and it could also be hazardous to spacecraft. Specifically, levitating dust could obscure the observations of surface-based spacecraft or possibly trigger obstacle avoidance routines during landing. Dust Levitation: Dust levitation is defined as the altitude oscillation of grains prior to their redeposition on the surface of an asteroid. Levitation occurs about equilibria where the electrostatic and gravity forces on the grain are equal and opposite. An equilibrium state is defined as a position and charge for a specific grain size. We have previously identified equilibria using a 1D plasma model and a simple gravity model for Itokawa [6]. In this simple model, the largest grain that was capable of stable levitation above Itokawa was 3 microns (in radius) [6]. Additionally, we have shown that levitating dust grains follow the variation in the equilibria for a rotating asteroid (i.e., the grain continues to oscillate about an equilibrium state that approaches the surface) [7]. Due to the nonspherical shape of Itokawa, both the gravity and plasma environments are much more complicated than the 1D approximations made in our previous work. Thus, in order to accurately assess the feasibility of dust

  6. How can acoustic resonance reduce the average velocity in a falling body?

    OpenAIRE

    V. Torres-Zúñiga

    2011-01-01

    In this article, a simple experiment is described to overcome the misconception that acoustic pressure and levitation effects are difficult to observe in school laboratories. Analysis of the free fall velocity of a toy parachute inside a vertical tube, driven by sound in a range of frequencies around the resonant condition, exhibits the resonance frequency, the node pressure zones, and the optimal conditions to obtain acoustical levitation of a light body.

  7. Dropped Ceiling

    OpenAIRE

    Tabet, Rayyane

    2012-01-01

    On December 2nd 1950 the first drop of Saudi oil arrived to Lebanon via the newly constructed Trans-Arabian Pipeline, the world's longest pipeline and the largest American private investment in a foreign land. The 30inch wide structure which spanned 1213 kilometers passing through Saudi Arabia, Jordan, and Syria to end in Lebanon had required 3 years of planning and surveying, 2 years of installation, the fabrication of 256,000 tons of steel tubes, the employment of 30,000 workers, the ratifi...

  8. Levitation in an "almost" electrostatic field

    CERN Document Server

    Miranda, E N

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that a charged particle cannot be in stable equilibrium in a purely electrostatic field. The situation is different in a magnetostatic field; consequently, magnetic levitation is possible while electrostatic levitation is not. In this paper, motivated by an analogy with a mechanical system, we show that the addition of a small oscillating electrical field to an otherwise electrostatic configuration leads to the stabilisation of unstable equilibrium points. Therefore, levitation becomes possible in an "almost electrostatic" field.

  9. Noncontact thermophysical property measurement by levitation of a thin liquid disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungho; Ohsaka, Kenichi; Rednikov, Alexei; Sadhal, Satwindar Singh

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of the current research program is to develop techniques for noncontact measurement of thermophysical properties of highly viscous liquids. The application would be for undercooled liquids that remain liquid even below the freezing point when suspended without a container. The approach being used here consists of carrying out thermocapillary flow and temperature measurements in a horizontally levitated, laser-heated thin glycerin disk. In a levitated state, the disk is flattened by an intense acoustic field. Such a disk has the advantage of a relatively low gravitational potential over the thickness, thus mitigating the buoyancy effects, and helping isolate the thermocapillary-driven flows. For the purpose of predicting the thermal properties from these measurements, it is necessary to develop a theoretical model of the thermal processes. Such a model has been developed, and, on the basis of the observed shape, the thickness is taken to be a minimum at the center with a gentle parabolic profile at both the top and the bottom surfaces. This minimum thickness is much smaller than the radius of disk drop and the ratio of thickness to radius becomes much less than unity. It is heated by laser beam in normal direction to the edge. A general three-dimensional momentum equation is transformed into a two-variable vorticity equation. For the highly viscous liquid, a few millimeters in size, Stokes equations adequately describe the flow. Additional approximations are made by considering average flow properties over the disk thickness in a manner similar to lubrication theory. In the same way, the three-dimensional energy equation is averaged over the disk thickness. With convection boundary condition at the surfaces, we integrate a general three-dimensional energy equation to get an averaged two-dimensional energy equation that has convection terms, conduction terms, and additional source terms corresponding to a Biot number. A finite-difference numerical

  10. Final Report: Levitated Dipole Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesner, Jay [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Mauel, Michael [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2013-03-10

    Since the very first experiments with the LDX, research progress was rapid and significant. Initial experiments were conducted with the high-field superconducting coil suspended by three thin rods. These experiments produced long-pulse, quasi-steady-state microwave discharges, lasting more than 10 s, having peak beta values of 20% [Garnier et al., Physics of Plasmas, 13 (2006) 056111]. High- beta, near steady-state discharges have been maintained in LDX for more than 20 seconds, and this capability made LDX the longest pulse fusion confinement experiment operating in the U.S. fusion program. A significant measure of progress in the LDX research program was the routine investigation of plasma confinement with a magnetically-levitated dipole and the resulting observations of confinement improvement. In both supported and levitated configurations, detailed measurements were made of discharge evolution, plasma dynamics and instability, and the roles of gas fueling, microwave power deposition profiles, and plasma boundary shape. High-temperature plasma was created by multi frequency electron cyclotron resonance heating at 2.45 GHz, 6.4 GHz, 10.5 GHz and 28 GHz allowing control of heating profiles. Depending upon neutral fueling rates, the LDX discharges contain a fraction of energetic electrons, with mean energies above 50 keV. Depending on whether or not the superconducting dipole was levitated or supported, the peak thermal electron temperature was estimated to exceed 500 eV and peak densities to approach 1e18 m-3. We have found that levitation causes a strong inwards density pinch [Boxer et al., Nature Physics, 6 (2010) 207] and we have observed the central plasma density increase dramatically indicating a significant improvement in the confinement of a thermal plasma species.

  11. Magnet levitation at your fingertips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geim, A. K.; Simon, M. D.; Boamfa, M. I.; Heflinger, L. O.

    1999-07-01

    The stable levitation of magnets is forbidden by Earnshaw's theorem, which states that no stationary object made of magnets in a fixed configuration can be held in stable equilibrium by any combination of static magnetic or gravitational forces. Earnshaw's theorem can be viewed as a consequence of the Maxwell equations, which do not allow the magnitude of a magnetic field in a free space to possess a maximum, as required for stable equilibrium. Diamagnets (which respond to magnetic fields with mild repulsion) are known to flout the theorem, as their negative susceptibility results in the requirement of a minimum rather than a maximum in the field's magnitude. Nevertheless, levitation of a magnet without using superconductors is widely thought to be impossible. We find that the stable levitation of a magnet can be achieved using the feeble diamagnetism of materials that are normally perceived as being non-magnetic, so that even human fingers can keep a magnet hovering in mid-air without touching it.

  12. Leidenfrost drops on liquid baths: theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobac, Benjamin; Rednikov, Alexei; Maquet, Laurent; Darbois-Texier, Baptiste; Duchesne, Alexis; Brandenbourger, Martin; Dorbolo, Stéphane; Colinet, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that a liquid drop released over a very hot surface generally does not contact the surface nor boils but rather levitates over a thin vapor film generated by its own evaporation (Leidenfrost effect). In particular, the case of a hot (and flat) solid substrate has been extensively studied in recent years. In contrast, we here focus on Leidenfrost drops over a superheated liquid bath, addressing the problem theoretically and comparing our predictions with experimental results, detailed in a separate talk. We predict the geometry of the drop and of the liquid bath, based on the hydrostatic Young-Laplace and lubrication equations. A good agreement is observed with the available experimental data concerning the deformation of the liquid bath. The modeling also yields a rather complete insight into the shape of the drop. As in the case of a solid substrate, the vapor layer generally appears to be composed of a vapor pocket surrounded by a circular neck. The influences of the superheat and of the drop size are parametrically investigated. A number of scaling laws are established. Unlike the case of a solid substrate, no chimney instability was found in the range of drop size studied.

  13. Final Report: Levitated Dipole Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesner, Jay; Mauel, Michael

    2013-03-10

    Since the very first experiments with the LDX, research progress was rapid and significant. Initial experiments were conducted with the high-field superconducting coil suspended by three thin rods. These experiments produced long-pulse, quasi-steady-state microwave discharges, lasting more than 10 s, having peak beta values of 20% [Garnier, Phys. Plasmas, v13, p. 056111, 2006]. High-beta, near steady-state discharges have been maintained in LDX for more than 20 seconds, and this capability makes LDX the longest pulse fusion confinement experiment now operating in the U.S. fusion program. In both supported and levitated configurations, detailed measurements are made of discharge evolution, plasma dynamics and instability, and the roles of gas fueling, microwave power deposition profiles, and plasma boundary shape. High-temperature plasma is created by multifrequency electron cyclotron resonance heating allowing control of heating profiles. Depending upon neutral fueling rates, the LDX discharges contain a fraction of energetic electrons, with mean energies above 50 keV. Depending on whether or not the superconducting dipole is levitated or supported, the peak thermal electron temperature is estimated to exceed 500 eV and peak densities reach 1.0E18 (1/m3). Several significant discoveries resulted from the routine investigation of plasma confinement with a magnetically-levitated dipole. For the first time, toroidal plasma with pressure approaching the pressure of the confining magnetic field was well-confined in steady-state without a toroidal magnetic field. Magnetic levitation proved to be reliable and is now routine. The dipole's cryostat allows up to three hours of "float time" between re-cooling with liquid helium and providing scientists unprecedented access to the physics of magnetizd plasma. Levitation eliminates field-aligned particle sources and sinks and results in a toroidal, magnetically-confined plasma where profiles are determined by cross

  14. An ionization chamber with magnetic levitated electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Kawaguchi, T

    1999-01-01

    A new type of ionization chamber which has magnetically levitated electrodes has been developed. The electrodes are supplied voltages for the repelling of ions by a battery which is also levitated with the electrodes. The characteristics of this ionization chamber are investigated in this paper.

  15. Magnetic levitation induced by negative permeability

    OpenAIRE

    Rangelov, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the interaction between a point magnetic dipole and a semi-infinite metamaterial using the method of images. We obtain analytical expressions for the levitation force for an arbitrarily oriented dipole. Surprisingly the maximal levitation force for negative permeability is found to be stronger compared to the case when the dipole is above a superconductor.

  16. Passive levitation in alternating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Louis; Christenson, Todd; Aronson, Eugene A.

    2009-06-16

    Stable levitation of an object in an alternating magnetic field can be achieved by eliminating coupling between the rotational and translational forces acting on the object. Stable levitation can also be achieved by varying the coupling between the rotational and translational forces acting on the object, while maintaining one or more of the rotational and translational forces steady in time.

  17. Dielectrophoretic levitation of droplets and bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, T. B.

    1982-01-01

    Uncharged droplets and bubbles can be levitated dielectrophoretically in liquids using strong, nonuniform electric fields. The general equations of motion for a droplet or bubble in an axisymmetric, divergence-free electrostatic field allow determination of the conditions necessary and sufficient for stable levitation. The design of dielectrophoretic (DEP) levitation electrode structures is simplified by a Taylor-series expansion of cusped axisymmetric electrostatic fields. Extensive experimental measurements on bubbles in insulating liquids verify the simple dielectrophoretic model. Other have extended dielectrophoretic levitation to very small particles in aqueous media. Applications of DEP levitation to the study of gas bubbles, liquid droplets, and solid particles are discussed. Some of these applications are of special interest in the reduced gravitational field of a spacecraft.

  18. Viscosity measurements of metallic melts using the oscillating drop technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintzmann, P.; Yang, F.; Schneider, S.; Lohöfer, G.; Meyer, A.

    2016-06-01

    By means of benchmarking reduced gravity experiments, we have verified the measured viscosity of binary Zr-Ni glass forming liquids utilizing the oscillating drop technique combined with ground-based electrostatic levitation (ESL). Reliable viscosity data can be obtained as long as internal viscous damping of a single oscillation mode of a levitated drop dominates external perturbations. This can be verified by the absence of a sample mass dependence of the results. Hence, ESL is an excellent tool for studying the viscosity of metallic glass forming melts in the range of about 10-250 mPa s, with sample masses below 100 mg. To this end, we show that, for binary Zr-Ni melts, the viscosity is qualitatively controlled by the packing density.

  19. Solidification Dynamics of Silver Drops in a Free Fall Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Brush, Lucien N.

    1999-01-01

    Silver drops (99.9%, 4, 5, 7, and 9 mm diameter) were levitated, melted, and released to fall through Marshall Space Flight Center's 105m drop tube in helium - 6% hydrogen and pure argon atmospheres. By systematically varying the initial superheat condition of the drop the extent of solidification prior to impact ranged from complete to none during the approximately 4.6s of free fall time. Comparison of the experimental observations is made with numerical solutions to a model of the heat transfer and solidification kinetics associated with cooling of the drop during free fall, particularly with regard to the fraction of liquid transformed. Analysis reveals the relative importance of the initial parameters affecting the cooling and solidification rates within the drop. A discussion of the conditions under which the actual observations deviate from the assumptions used in the model is presented.

  20. Solidification Dynamics of Metal Drops in a Free Fall Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, R. N.; Brush, L. N.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Comparison of experimental observations were made with numerical solutions to a model of the heat transfer and solidification kinetics associated with the cooling of a molten drop during free fall, particularly with regard to the fraction of liquid transformed. Experimentally, silver drops (99.9%, 4-9 mm diameter) were levitated, melted, and released to fall through Marshall Space Flight Center's 105m drop tube in helium - 6% hydrogen and argon atmospheres. By systematically varying the drops initial superheat the extent of solidification prior to impact ranged from complete to none during the approximately 4.6s of free fall time. Analysis reveals the relative importance of the initial parameters affecting the cooling and solidification rates within the drop. A discussion of the conditions under which the actual observations deviate from the assumptions used in the model is presented.

  1. Solidification Dynamics of Spherical Drops in a Free Fall Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Brush, Lucien N.

    2006-01-01

    Silver drops (99.9%, 4, 5, 7, and 9 mm diameter) were levitated, melted, and released to fall through Marshall Space Flight Center's 105 meter drop tube in helium - 6% hydrogen and pure argon atmospheres. By varying a drop s initial superheat the extent of solidification prior to impact ranged from complete to none during the approx. 4.6s of free fall time. Comparison of the experimental observations is made with numerical solutions to a model of the heat transfer and solidification kinetics associated with cooling of the drop during free fall, particularly with regard to the fraction of liquid transformed. Analysis reveals the relative importance ,of the initial parameters affecting the cooling and solidification rates within the drop. A discussion of the conditions under which the actual observations deviate from the assumptions used in the model is presented.

  2. New directions for gravitational wave physics via "Millikan oil drops"

    CERN Document Server

    Chiao, Raymond Y

    2009-01-01

    "Millikan oil drops" are drops of superfluid helium coated with electrons, and levitated in a strong, inhomogeneous magnetic field. When the temperature of the system becomes very low compared to the cyclotron gap energy, the system remains in its quantum ground state. Two such levitated charged drops can have their charge-to-mass ratio critically adjusted so that the forces of gravity and electricity between the drops are in balance. Then it is predicted that the amount of scattered electromagnetic and gravitational radiation from the drops are equalized, along with these two kinds of forces. The cross sections for the scattering of the two kinds of radiation can become large, hard-sphere cross-sections at the first Mie resonance, due to the hard-wall boundary conditions on the surfaces of the spheres for both kinds of radiations. An efficient quantum transduction process between electromagnetic and gravitational radiation by such a pair of drops is predicted at microwave frequencies, and a Hertz-like experi...

  3. Contactless Calorimetry for Levitated Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. C.; Dokko, W.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature and specific heat of hot sample measured with pyrometer in proposed experimental technique. Technique intended expecially for contactless calorimetry of such materials as undercooled molten alloys, samples of which must be levitated to prevent contamination and premature crystallization. Contactless calorimetry technique enables data to be taken over entire undercooling temperature range with only one sample. Technique proves valuable in study of undercooling because difference in specific heat between undercooled-liquid and crystalline phases at same temperature provides driving force to convert metastable undercooled phase to stable crystalline phase.

  4. Formation and Levitation of Unconfined Droplet Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Ruff, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    Combustion experiments using arrays of droplets seek to provide a link between single droplet combustion phenomena and the behavior of complex spray combustion systems. Both single droplet and droplet array studies have been conducted in microgravity to better isolate the droplet interaction phenomena and eliminate or reduce the confounding effects of buoyancy-induced convection. In most experiments involving droplet arrays, the droplets are supported on fibers to keep them stationary and close together before the combustion event. The presence of the fiber, however, disturbs the combustion process by introducing a source of heat transfer and asymmetry into the configuration. As the number of drops in a droplet array increases, supporting the drops on fibers becomes less practical because of the cumulative effect of the fibers on the combustion process. The overall objective of this research is to study the combustion of well-characterized drop clusters in a microgravity environment. Direct experimental observations and measurements of the combustion of droplet clusters would fill a large gap in our current understanding of droplet and spray combustion and provide unique experimental data for the verification and improvement of spray combustion models. This paper describes current work on the design and performance of an apparatus to generate and stabilize droplet clusters using acoustic and electrostatic forces.

  5. Levitated Optomechanics for Fundamental Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Muddassar; Bateman, James; Vovrosh, Jamie; Hempston, David; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2015-05-01

    Optomechanics with levitated nano- and microparticles is believed to form a platform for testing fundamental principles of quantum physics, as well as find applications in sensing. We will report on a new scheme to trap nanoparticles, which is based on a parabolic mirror with a numerical aperture of 1. Combined with achromatic focussing, the setup is a cheap and readily straightforward solution to trapping nanoparticles for further study. Here, we report on the latest progress made in experimentation with levitated nanoparticles; these include the trapping of 100 nm nanodiamonds (with NV-centres) down to 1 mbar as well as the trapping of 50 nm Silica spheres down to 10?4 mbar without any form of feedback cooling. We will also report on the progress to implement feedback stabilisation of the centre of mass motion of the trapped particle using digital electronics. Finally, we argue that such a stabilised particle trap can be the particle source for a nanoparticle matterwave interferometer. We will present our Talbot interferometer scheme, which holds promise to test the quantum superposition principle in the new mass range of 106 amu. EPSRC, John Templeton Foundation.

  6. Effect of sample radius on stability of electromagnetic levitation melting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马伟增; 郑红星; 季诚昌; 李建国

    2004-01-01

    Based on the power dissipating model of spherical sample in free convection gas medium and the expression of input power, the model of temperature calculation for electromagnetic levitation melting sample was established. Considering the limitation of levitation force and levitation sample temperature,the principle of stability levitation zone computation was determined. A spherical sample (ThDy)Fe2 under the protection of argon gas was examined, and the effect of radius of levitation sample and perturbation on the stable levitation zone was investigated.The results show that longitudinal perturbation and transverse perturbation can shorten the length of stable levitation zone and the range of levitation sample radius. By increasing the sample radius and weakening the perturbation the electromagnetic levitation melting stability of sample can be improved.

  7. Titanium-Zirconium-Nickel Alloy Inside Marshall's Electrostatic Levitator (ESL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This Photo, which appeared on the July cover of `Physics Today', is of the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 3-4 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber allowing scientists to record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contracting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. Once inside the chamber, a laser heats the sample until it melts. The laser is then turned off and the sample cools, changing from a liquid drop to a solid sphere. In this particular shot, the ESL contains a solid metal sample of titanium-zirconium-nickel alloy. Since 1977, the ESL has been used at MSFC to study the characteristics of new metals, ceramics, and glass compounds. Materials created as a result of these tests include new optical materials, special metallic glasses, and spacecraft components.

  8. Prominence condensation and magnetic levitation in a coronal loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoven, G.; Mok, Y.; Drake, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a model dynamic simulation of the formation and support of a narrow prominence at the apex of a coronal magnetic loop or arcade are described. The condensation process proceeds via an initial radiative cooling and pressure drop, and a secondary siphon flow from the dense chromospheric ends. The antibuoyancy effect as the prominence forms causes a bending of the confining magnetic field, which propagates toward the semirigid ends of the magnetic loop. Thus, a wide magnetic 'hammock' or well (of the normal-polarity Kippenhahn-Schlueter-type) is formed, which supports the prominence at or near the field apex. The simplicity of this 1.5-dimensional model, with its accompanying diagnostics, elucidates the various contributions to the nonlinear dynamics of prominence condensation and levitation.

  9. Dilating Eye Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dilating Eye Drops En Español Read in Chinese What are dilating eye drops? Dilating eye drops contain medication to enlarge ( ...

  10. Novel high-temperature and pressure-compatible ultrasonic levitator apparatus coupled to Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotton, Stephen J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2013-05-01

    We describe an original apparatus comprising of an acoustic levitator enclosed within a pressure-compatible process chamber. To characterize any chemical and physical modifications of the levitated particle, the chamber is interfaced to complimentary, high-sensitivity Raman (4390-170 cm-1), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) (10 000-500 cm-1) spectroscopic probes. The temperature of the levitated particle can be accurately controlled by heating using a carbon dioxide laser emitting at 10.6 μm. The advantages of levitating a small particle combined with the two spectroscopic probes, process chamber, and infrared laser heating makes novel experiments possible relevant to the fields of, for example, planetary science, astrobiology, and combustion chemistry. We demonstrate that this apparatus is well suited to study the dehydration of a variety of particles including minerals and biological samples; and offers the possibility of investigating combustion processes involving micrometer-sized particles such as graphite. Furthermore, we show that the FTIR spectrometer enables the study of chemical reactions on the surfaces of porous samples and scientifically and technologically relevant, micrometer-thick levitated sheets. The FTIR spectrometer can also be used to investigate non-resonant and resonant scattering from small, irregularly-shaped particles across the mid-infrared range from 2.5 μm to 25 μm, which is relevant to scattering from interplanetary dust and biological, micrometer-sized samples but cannot be accurately modelled using Mie theory.

  11. Magnetic Levitation Technique for Active Vibration Control

    OpenAIRE

    Hoque, Emdadul; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    A zero-power controlled magnetic levitation system has been presented in this chapter. The unique characteristic of the zero-power control system is that it can generate negative stiffness with zero control current in the steady-state which is realized in this chapter. The detail characteristics of the levitation system are investigated. Moreover, two major contributions, the stiffness adjustment and nonlinear compensation of the suspension system have been introduced elaborately. Often, ther...

  12. Torsional optomechanics of a levitated nonspherical nanoparticle

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, Thai M.; Ma, Yue; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon; Robicheaux, F.; Yin, Zhang-qi; Li, Tongcang

    2016-01-01

    An optically levitated nanoparticle in vacuum is a paradigm optomechanical system for sensing and studying macroscopic quantum mechanics. While its center-of-mass motion has been investigated intensively, its torsional vibration has only been studied theoretically in limited cases. Here we report the first experimental observation of the torsional vibration of an optically levitated nonspherical nanoparticle in vacuum. We achieve this by utilizing the coupling between the spin angular momentu...

  13. Plate actuator vibration modes for levitation

    OpenAIRE

    Almurshedi, A; Atherton, M; C. Mares; Stolarski, T; Wei, B.; Wang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The design of an aluminium or steel plate of various thicknesses for achieving levitation of a small aluminum disk is investigated by simulation using ANSYS. Each plate design is excited by an arrangement of four hard piezoelectric actuators driven with an AC voltage, which produces a centre displacement for generating a squeeze-film in the gap between the vibrating plate and the disk. Physical experiments show levitation conditions for one of the designs.

  14. Levitation in an "almost" electrostatic field

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda, E. N.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that a charged particle cannot be in stable equilibrium in a purely electrostatic field. The situation is different in a magnetostatic field; consequently, magnetic levitation is possible while electrostatic levitation is not. In this paper, motivated by an analogy with a mechanical system, we show that the addition of a small oscillating electrical field to an otherwise electrostatic configuration leads to the stabilisation of unstable equilibrium points. Therefore, levitati...

  15. SWISSMETRO: Combined Propulsion with Levitation and Guidance

    OpenAIRE

    Cassat, A.; Espanet, C.

    2004-01-01

    Swissmetro is a MAGLEV Project between the main cities of Switzerland, designed for a speed up to 500 [km/h] in two tunnels under partial vacuum. Two propulsion variants are considered: - the short stators of the linear homopolar motors are fixed with the tunnel tracks; - the stator of the motors is on board of the vehicles. The levitation, the guidance and the transfer of energy are independent. The authors investigate the possibilities to combine the propulsion with the levitation and the g...

  16. Vibration converter with magnetic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladilin, A. V.; Pirogov, V. A.; Golyamina, I. P.; Kulaev, U. V.; Kurbatov, P. A.; Kurbatova, E. P.

    2015-05-01

    The paper presents a mathematical model, the results of computational and theoretical research, and the feasibility of creating a vibration converter with full magnetic levitation in the suspension of a high-temperature superconductor (HTSC). The axial and radial stability of the active part of the converter is provided by the interaction of the magnetic field of ring-shaped permanent magnets and a hollow cylinder made of the ceramic HTSC material. The force is created by a system of current-carrying coils whose magnetic field is polarized by permanent magnets and interacts with induced currents in the superconducting cylinder. The case of transition to the superconducting state of HTSC material in the field of the permanent magnets (FC mode) is considered. The data confirm the outlook for the proposed technical solutions.

  17. Levitation characteristics of HTS tape stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrovskiy, S. V.; Ermolaev, Y. S.; Rudnev, I. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Due to the considerable development of the technology of second generation high-temperature superconductors and a significant improvement in their mechanical and transport properties in the last few years it is possible to use HTS tapes in the magnetic levitation systems. The advantages of tapes on a metal substrate as compared with bulk YBCO material primarily in the strength, and the possibility of optimizing the convenience of manufacturing elements of levitation systems. In the present report presents the results of the magnetic levitation force measurements between the stack of HTS tapes containing of tapes and NdFeB permanent magnet in the FC and ZFC regimes. It was found a non- linear dependence of the levitation force from the height of the array of stack in both modes: linear growth at small thickness gives way to flattening and constant at large number of tapes in the stack. Established that the levitation force of stacks comparable to that of bulk samples. The numerical calculations using finite element method showed that without the screening of the applied field the levitation force of the bulk superconductor and the layered superconductor stack with a critical current of tapes increased by the filling factor is exactly the same, and taking into account the screening force slightly different.

  18. Magnetically levitated micro-robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelrine, Ronald Edward

    The use of magnetic levitation (maglev) as a microrobot drive is examined theoretically and experimentally. Microrobots are small, programmable, multi-degree of freedom mechanical devices. Maglev drive appears capable of addressing a number of important microrobotics issues, including friction, wear, material transport, and ability to tolerate adverse environments. These issues, often involving problems beyond the technical feasibility of single microrobots, must be dealt with effectively in order to realize the goal of low cost, integrated, multi-manipulator systems operating on small scales. Maglev microrobot drive is compared with other possible microrobot drives, particularly electrostatic drive. Various magnetic levitation systems are examined next, showing the rich variety of possible maglev microrobots. Out of 48 physically distinct maglev drive systems, the focus is narrowed using the requirements of an integrated micro-factory (IMF). These requirements suggest that at the present level of technical development the maglev system of primary interest is one which uses air core electromagnets driving a permanent magnet manipulator. Various air core electromagnets are discussed, including planar electromagnets suitable for a high level of silicon integration. Several force/torque environments are considered, such as solid and liquid surfaces. These different environments primarily affect the control strategy's performance and requirements, such as the ability to operate in open loop modes. The analysis was used to build a number of experimental prototypes, including a planar type, 1-D manipulator transport path, and 4. degree of freedom microrobots capable of 0.5 micron resolutions. Finally, future trends in the field such as superconductive systems are discussed.

  19. Effective method to control the levitation force and levitation height in a superconducting maglev system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨芃焘; 杨万民; 王妙; 李佳伟; 郭玉霞

    2015-01-01

    The influence of the width of the middle magnet in the permanent magnet guideways (PMGs) on the levitation force and the levitation height of single-domain yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) bulks has been investigated at 77 K under the zero field cooled (ZFC) state. It is found that the largest levitation force can be obtained in the system with the width of the middle magnet of the PMG equal to the size of the YBCO bulk when the gap between the YBCO bulk and PMG is small. Both larger levitation force and higher levitation height can be obtained in the system with the width of the middle magnet of the PMG larger than the size of the YBCO bulk. The stiffness of the levitation force between the PMG and the YBCO bulk is higher in the system with a smaller width of the middle magnet in the PMG. These results provide an effective way to control the levitation force and the levitation height for the superconducting maglev design and applications.

  20. A stator for a self-running, ultrasonically-levitated sliding stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Daisuke; Nakamura, Kentaro; Ueha, Sadayuki

    2007-11-01

    Here we propose a self-running, ultrasonically-levitated sliding stage and investigate the levitation and propulsion characteristics of its stator. The stator consists of two aluminum beams and four PZT plates, which have two-paired bimorph configurations. A flexural standing wave was generated along the beam by applying an input voltage to the PZTs, and the stator could be levitated from a flat substrate by the acoustic radiation force generated by its own vibrating beam. The size of the stator was optimized using finite-element analysis (FEA) to maximize the vibration displacement amplitude of the beam. The flexural vibration modes at 24.3 and 102 kHz were the most prominent vibration modes having large displacement amplitudes. The stator was levitated at 23.2 and 96.1 kHz, which are close to the frequencies predicted by the FEA results. A standing wave was observed along the beam. The experimental and the simulated results showed good agreement. The levitation distance h was measured by varying the vibration displacement amplitude of the beam u, and was found to be proportional to u. When a traveling wave was excited along the beam by controlling the temporal phase difference of the two transducers, the stator could be made to hover and to move in the opposite direction to the traveling wave. The stator moved in the positive direction when the phase difference was in the ranges 0 degrees to 200 degrees and 310 degrees to 360 degrees, and in the negative direction when the phase difference was between 220 degrees and 260 degrees. PMID:18051168

  1. Temperature dependence of levitation force and its relaxation in a HTS levitation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Jun; Zhang Xingyi [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Western Disaster and Environment, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); Zhou Youhe, E-mail: zhouyh@lzu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Western Disaster and Environment, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China)

    2010-03-01

    Using a modified Gifford-McMahon refrigerator to cool the cylindrical bulk YBaCuO superconductor within the region of 100-10 K, and using an updated high-temperature superconductor (HTS) maglev measurement system, the levitation force and its time relaxation at different temperatures between a YBaCuO bulk superconductor and a permanent magnet (PM) have been measured under zero-field cooling. It is found that decrease the cooling temperature of HTS can decrease the hysteresis of magnetization and increase the maximum levitation force of each hysteresis loop. For the relaxation of levitation force, if the temperature is continually lowered to 10 K after the relaxation measurement at given cooling temperature is performed for 600 s, the levitation force will continue to decrease sharply with the lowering of temperature even though it will get stable if the temperature is not lowered. Our results shown in this work are a benefit to the understanding of levitation systems.

  2. How to simply demonstrate diamagnetic levitation with pencil lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudelkova, Vera

    2016-01-01

    A new simple arrangement how to demonstrate diamagnetic levitation is presented. It uses pencil lead levitating in a track built from neodymium magnets. This arrangement can also be used as a classroom experiment.

  3. Electrostatic levitation under the single-axis feedback control condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    An electrostatic levitator with a single-axis feedback control system was developed on the basis of electric field analysis and optimum design for levitation electrodes. In order to realize the stable levitation of various types of materials such as metals, inorganic materials and polymers, we made both experimental and theoretical investigations to solve the four key problems of electric field optimization, sample position detecting, sample charging control and levitation voltage minimization. Under the capacitive induction charging condition, a sample with the size of 2.6–4.5 mm usually bears positive charges amounting to 10-9 Coulomb. Because the single-axis feedback control system responds quickly, it takes the levitated sample only 0.1 s from leaving the bottom electrode until attaining a stable levitation in the upright direction. The levitated sample displays satisfactory levitation stability in both the upright and the horizontal directions owing to the constraining force produced by spherical electrodes.

  4. How to Simply Demonstrate Diamagnetic Levitation with Pencil Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudelkova, Vera

    2016-01-01

    A new simple arrangement how to demonstrate diamagnetic levitation is presented. It uses pencil lead levitating in a track built from neodymium magnets. This arrangement can also be used as a classroom experiment.

  5. Repulsive Magnetic Levitation Systems Using Motion Control of Magnets

    OpenAIRE

    水野, 毅; 石野, 裕二; 荒木, 獻次; 大内, 泰平

    1995-01-01

    Repulsive magnetic levitation systems with magnets driven by actuators were studied in this paper. In one system, a levitation magnet was driven in the direction of repulsive force to control the position and vibration of the levitated object. In another, a levitation magnet was moved in the lateral directions to stabilize the system in the manner of an inverted pendulum. The first type was studied experimentally with an experimental setup using a magnetostrictive actuator. The damping charac...

  6. DIAMAGNETIC LEVITATION ABOVE MICROMAGNETS: APPLICATIONS TO DIGITAL MICROFLUIDICS AND BIOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Kauffmann, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Diamagnetic levitation is one of the rare way to compensate action of gravity. This kind of repulsion is negligible at our scale. However, at microscale, this effect becomes significant and can achieve levitation of diamagnetic objects. Through the development of micromagnets, analytical and numerical models, and experiments, applications of diamagnetic levitation of microdroplets and trapping of cells in paramagnetic media is explored. It is shown that diamagnetic levitation allows quantifyi...

  7. Laser Induced Rotation of a Levitated Sample in Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, W. K.; Paradis, P. F.

    1999-01-01

    A method of systematically controlling the rotational state of a sample levitated in a high vacuum using the photon pressure is described. A zirconium sphere was levitated in the high-temperature electrostatic levitator and it was rotated by irradiating it with a narrow beam of a high power laser on a spot off the center of mass.

  8. Levitation Technology in International Space Station Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinart-Ramirez, Y.; Cooley, V. M.; Love, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is a unique multidisciplinary orbiting laboratory for science and technology research, enabling discoveries that benefit life on Earth and exploration of the universe. ISS facilities for containerless sample processing in Materials Science experiments include levitation devices with specimen positioning control while reducing containment vessel contamination. For example, ESA's EML (ElectroMagnetic Levitator), is used for melting and solidification of conductive metals, alloys, or semiconductors in ultra-high vacuum, or in high-purity gaseous atmospheres. Sample heating and positioning are accomplished through electromagnetic fields generated by a coil system. EML applications cover investigation of solidification and microstructural formation, evaluation of thermophysical properties of highly reactive metals (whose properties can be very sensitive to contamination), and examination of undercooled liquid metals to understand metastable phase convection and influence convection on structural changes. MSL utilization includes development of novel light-weight, high-performance materials. Another facility, JAXA's ELF (Electrostatic Levitation Furnace), is used to perform high temperature melting while avoiding chemical reactions with crucibles by levitating a sample through Coulomb force. ELF is capable of measuring density, surface tension, and viscosity of samples at high temperatures. One of the initial ELF investigations, Interfacial Energy-1, is aimed at clarification of interfacial phenomena between molten steels and oxide melts with industrial applications in control processes for liquid mixing. In addition to these Materials Science facilities, other ISS investigations that involve levitation employ it for biological research. For example, NASA's "Magnetic 3D Culturing and Bioprinting" investigation uses magnetic levitation for three-dimensional culturing and positioning of magnetized cells to generate spheroid assemblies

  9. Self-arraying of charged levitating droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, Paul; Nussbaumer, Jérémie; Masse, Alain; Jeandey, Christian; Grateau, Henri; Pham, Pascale; Reyne, Gilbert; Haguet, Vincent

    2011-06-01

    Diamagnetic levitation of water droplets in air is a promising phenomenon to achieve contactless manipulation of chemical or biochemical samples. This noncontact handling technique prevents contaminations of samples as well as provides measurements of interaction forces between levitating reactors. Under a nonuniform magnetic field, diamagnetic bodies such as water droplets experience a repulsive force which may lead to diamagnetic levitation of a single or few micro-objects. The levitation of several repulsively charged picoliter droplets was successfully performed in a ~1 mm(2) adjustable flat magnetic well provided by a centimeter-sized cylindrical permanent magnet structure. Each droplet position results from the balance between the centripetal diamagnetic force and the repulsive Coulombian forces. Levitating water droplets self-organize into satellite patterns or thin clouds, according to their charge and size. Small triangular lattices of identical droplets reproduce magneto-Wigner crystals. Repulsive forces and inner charges can be measured in the piconewton and the femtocoulomb ranges, respectively. Evolution of interaction forces is accurately followed up over time during droplet evaporation.

  10. AB Levitator and Electricity Storage

    CERN Document Server

    Bolonkin, A

    2007-01-01

    The author researched this new idea - support of flight by any aerial vehicles at significant altitude solely by the magnetic field of the planet. It is shown that current technology allows humans to create a light propulsion (AB engine) which does not depend on air, water or ground terrain. Simultaniosly, this revolutionary thruster is a device for the storage of electricity which is extracted and is replenished (during braking) from/into the storage with 100 percent efficiency. The relative weight ratio of this engine is 0.01 - 0.1 (from thrust). For some types of AB engine (toroidal form) the thrust easily may be changed in any direction without turning of engine. The author computed many projects using different versions of offered AB engine: small device for levitation-flight of a human (including flight from Earth to Outer Space), fly VTOL car (track), big VTOL aircrat, suspended low altitude stationary satellite, powerful Space Shuttle-like booster for travel to the Moon and Mars without spending energ...

  11. The dynamics of free liquid drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. G.; Trinh, E. H.; Croonquist, A. P.; Elleman, D. D.

    1988-01-01

    The behavior of rotating and oscillating free liquid drops was studied by many investigators theoretically for many years. More recent numerical treatments have yielded predictions which are yet to be verified experimentally. The purpose is to report the results of laboratory work as well as that of the experiments carried out in space during the flight of Spacelab 3, and to compare it with the existing theoretical studies. Ground-based experiments were attempted as a first approximation to the ideal boundary conditions used by the theoretical treatments by neutralizing the overwhelming effects of the Earth's gravitational field with an outside supporting liquid and with the use of levitation technology. The viscous and inertial loading of such a suspending fluid was found to profoundly effect the results, but the information thus gathered has emphasized the uniqueness of the experimental data obtained in the low-gravity environment of space.

  12. Particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography in a levitated droplet with nanosilica suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-03-01

    Preferential accumulation and agglomeration kinetics of nanoparticles suspended in an acoustically levitated water droplet under radiative heating has been studied. Particle image velocimetry performed to map the internal flow field shows a single cell recirculation with increasing strength for decreasing viscosities. Infrared thermography and high speed imaging show details of the heating process for various concentrations of nanosilica droplets. Initial stage of heating is marked by fast vaporization of liquid and sharp temperature rise. Following this stage, aggregation of nanoparticles is seen resulting in various structure formations. At low concentrations, a bowl structure of the droplet is dominant, maintained at a constant temperature. At high concentrations, viscosity of the solution increases, leading to rotation about the levitator axis due to the dominance of centrifugal motion. Such complex fluid motion inside the droplet due to acoustic streaming eventually results in the formation of a ring structure. This horizontal ring eventually reorients itself due to an imbalance of acoustic forces on the ring, exposing larger area for laser absorption and subsequent sharp temperature rise.

  13. Vibrations in Magnet/Superconductor Levitation Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F. Y. Alzoubi; H. M. Al-khateeb; M. K. Alqadi; N. Y. Ayoub

    2006-01-01

    The problem of a small magnet levitating above a very thin superconducting disc in the Meissner state is analysed. The dipole-dipole interaction model is employed to derive analytical expressions for the interaction energy, levitation force, magnetic stiffness and frequency of small vibrations about the equilibrium position in two different configurations, i.e. with the magnetic moment parallel and perpendicular to the superconductor. The results show that the frequency of small vibrations decreases with the increasing levitation height for a particular radius of the superconducting disc, which is in good agreement with the experimental results. However, the frequency increases monotomcally up to saturation by increasing the radius of the disc for a particular height of the magnet. In addition, the frequency of vibrations is higher when the system is in the vertical configuration than that when the system is in the horizontal configuration.

  14. Torsional optomechanics of a levitated nonspherical nanoparticle

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thai M; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon; Robicheaux, F; Yin, Zhang-Qi; Li, Tongcang

    2016-01-01

    An optically levitated nanoparticle in vacuum is a paradigm optomechanical system for sensing and studying macroscopic quantum mechanics. While its center-of-mass motion has been investigated intensively, its torsional vibration has only been studied theoretically in limited cases. Here we report the first experimental observation of the torsional vibration of an optically levitated nonspherical nanoparticle in vacuum. We achieve this by utilizing the coupling between the spin angular momentum of photons and the torsional vibration of a nonspherical nanoparticle whose polarizability is a tensor. The torsional vibration frequency can be one order of magnitude higher than its center-of-mass motion frequency, which is promising for ground state cooling. With an ellipsoidal model, we propose a simple yet novel scheme to achieve ground state cooling of its torsional vibration with a linearly-polarized Gaussian cavity mode. A levitated nonspherical nanoparticle in vacuum will also be an ultrasensitive nanoscale tor...

  15. Acoustic Radiation Force on a Finite-Sized Particle due to an Acoustic Field in a Viscous Compressible Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Subramanian; Parmar, Manoj; Balachandar, S.

    2013-11-01

    Particles when subjected to acoustic waves experience a time-averaged second-order force known as the acoustic radiation force, which is of prime importance in the fields of microfluidics and acoustic levitation. Here, the acoustic radiation force on a rigid spherical particle in a viscous compressible medium due to progressive and standing waves is considered. The relevant length scales include: particle radius (a), acoustic wavelength (λ) and viscous penetration depth (δ). While a / λ and a / δ are arbitrary, δ acoustic radiation force. Subsequently, the monopole and dipole strengths are represented in terms of the particle surface and volume averages of the incoming velocity. This generalization allows one to evaluate the radiation force for an incoming wave of any functional form. However acoustic streaming effects are neglected.

  16. Low Complex System for Levitating Ferromagnetic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahiru Sani Shu'aibu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper primarily presents detailed design and implementation of a low complex magnetic levitation system which can be used in laboratory for levitation experiments. The system transfer function was derived from the coenergy and the mathematical model of the state space representation was obtained. The mathematical model showed that, the system is highly non-linear and inherently unstable. Based on simulation, a low complex circuit was designed and implemented to stabilize the system, using MATLAB control tool-box. The developed controller was simple, cheap and effective, capable of controlling weights of different masses at various distances as compared to some controllers in literature.

  17. Levitation, coating, and transport of particulate materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1981-10-12

    Several processes in various fields require uniformly thick coatings and layers on small particles. The particles may be used as carriers of catalytic materials (platinum or other coatings), as laser fusion targets (various polymer or metallic coatings), or for biological or other tracer or interactive processes. We have devised both molecular beam and electro-dynamic techniques for levitation of the particles during coating and electrodynamic methods of controlling and transporting the particles between coating steps and to final use locations. Both molecular beam and electrodynamic techniques are described and several advantages and limitations of each will be discussed. A short movie of an operating electrodynamic levitation and transport apparatus will be shown.

  18. Physical Properties of Liquid Terbium Measured by Levitation Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To understand the nature and behavior of rare earth metals in their liquid phases, accurate values of their physical properties are essential.However, to measure their physical properties, the samples should be maintained in liquid phases for prolonged time, and this raises a formidable challenge.This is mainly explained by their high melting temperatures (e.g., 1629 K for Tb), high vapor pressure, and the risk of melt contamination with a crucible or support.An electrostatic levitation furnace alleviated these difficulties and allowed the determination of density, surface tension, and viscosity of several metals above their melting temperature.Here, first, the levitation furnace facility and the noncontact diagnostic procedures were briefly discussed, followed by the explanation of their thermophysical property measurements over wide temperature ranges.The density was obtained using an ultraviolet-based imaging technique that allowed excellent illumination, even at elevated temperatures.Over the 1615 to 1880 K temperature span, the density measurements could be expressed as ρ(T)=7.84×103-0.47 (T-Tm) (kg·m-3) with Tm=1629 K, yielding a volume expansion coefficient α(T) =6.0×10-5 (K-1).In addition, the surface tension and the viscosity could be determined by inducing a drop oscillation to a molten sample.Using this technique, the surface tension data could be expressed as σ(T)=8.93×102-0.10 (T-Tm)(mN·m-1) and those for viscosity as η(T) =0.583 exp [4.1×104/(RT)] (MPa·s) over the 1690 to 1980 K temperature range.

  19. Levitation force relaxation under reloading in a HTS Maglev system

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qingyong; Wang, Jiasu; Wang, Suyu; Wang, Jiansi; Dong, Hao; Wang, Yuxin; Shao, Senhao

    2009-02-01

    The loading capacity of the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) Maglev vehicle is an important parameter in the practical application. It is closely related to the levitation force of the HTS bulk. Many papers reported that the levitation force showed the relaxation characteristic. Because different loads cause different levitation gaps and different applied magnetic fields, the levitation force relaxations under the different loads are not the same. In terms of cylindrical YBCO bulk levitated over the permanent magnetic guideway, the relationship between the levitation force relaxation and the reloading is investigated experimentally in this paper. The decrement, the decrement rate and the relaxation rate of the levitation force are calculated, respectively. This work might be helpful for studying the loading capacity of the HTS Maglev vehicle.

  20. Proposed observations of gravity waves from the early Universe via "Millikan oil drops"

    CERN Document Server

    Chiao, R Y

    2006-01-01

    Pairs of Planck-mass drops of superfluid helium coated by electrons (i.e., ``Millikan oil drops''), when levitated in a superconducting magnetic trap, can be efficient quantum transducers between electromagnetic (EM) and gravitational (GR) radiation. This leads to the possibility of a Hertz-like experiment, in which EM waves are converted at the source into GR waves, and then back-converted at the receiver from GR waves back into EM waves. Detection of the gravity-wave analog of the cosmic microwave background using these drops can discriminate between various theories of the early Universe.

  1. Effective method to control the levitation force and levitation height in a superconducting maglev system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng-Tao; Yang, Wan-Min; Wang, Miao; Li, Jia-Wei; Guo, Yu-Xia

    2015-11-01

    The influence of the width of the middle magnet in the permanent magnet guideways (PMGs) on the levitation force and the levitation height of single-domain yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) bulks has been investigated at 77 K under the zero field cooled (ZFC) state. It is found that the largest levitation force can be obtained in the system with the width of the middle magnet of the PMG equal to the size of the YBCO bulk when the gap between the YBCO bulk and PMG is small. Both larger levitation force and higher levitation height can be obtained in the system with the width of the middle magnet of the PMG larger than the size of the YBCO bulk. The stiffness of the levitation force between the PMG and the YBCO bulk is higher in the system with a smaller width of the middle magnet in the PMG. These results provide an effective way to control the levitation force and the levitation height for the superconducting maglev design and applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51342001 and 50872079), the Key-grant Project of Chinese Ministry of Education (Grant No. 311033), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120202110003), the Innovation Team in Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014KTC-18), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. GK201101001 and GK201305014), and the Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Foundation Project of Shaanxi Normal University, China (Grant Nos. X2011YB08 and X2012YB05).

  2. Hiding levitating objects above a ground plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu; Mortensen, Asger

    2010-01-01

    An approach to hiding objects levitating above a conducting sheet is suggested in this paper. The proposed device makes use of isotropic negative-refractive-index materials without extreme material parameters, and creates an illusion of a remote conducting sheet. Numerical simulations are performed...

  3. Magnetic Levitational Assembly for Living Material Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasoglu, Savas; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Liaudanskaya, Volha; Guven, Sinan; Migliaresi, Claudio; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-07-15

    Functional living materials with microscale compositional topographies are prevalent in nature. However, the creation of biomaterials composed of living micro building blocks, each programmed by composition, functionality, and shape, is still a challenge. A powerful yet simple approach to create living materials using a levitation-based magnetic method is presented. PMID:25872008

  4. Levitating a Magnet Using a Superconductive Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juergens, Frederick H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Presented are the materials and a procedure for demonstrating the levitation of a magnet above a superconducting material. The demonstration can be projected with an overhead projector for a large group of students. Kits to simplify the demonstration can be purchased from the Institute for Chemical Education of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.…

  5. Levitated crystals and quasicrystals of metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goree, John A [Dept Phys and Astron., University of Iowa

    2012-07-25

    New scientific and technological opportunities exist by marrying dusty plasma research with metamaterials. Specifically, by balancing control and self-assembly, certain laboratory plasmas can become a generic levitation platform for novel structure formation and nanomaterial synthesis. We propose to experimentally investigate two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) levitated structures of metamaterials and their properties. Such structures can self assemble in laboratory plasmas, similar to levitated dust crystals which were discovered in the mid 1990's. Laboratory plasma platform for metamaterial formation eliminates substrates upon which most metamaterials have to be supported. Three types of experiments, with similar setups, are discussed here. Levitated crystal structures of metamaterials using anisotropic microparticles are the most basic of the three. The second experiment examines whether quasicrystals of metamaterials are possible. Quasicrystals, discovered in the 1980's, possess so-called forbidden symmetries according to the conventional crystallography. The proposed experiment could answer many fundamental questions about structural, thermal and dynamical properties of quasicrystals. And finally, how to use nanoparticle coated microparticles to synthesize very long carbon nanotubes is also described. All of the experiments can fit inside a standard International Space Station locker with dimensions of 8-inch x 17-inch X 18-inch. Microgravity environment is deemed essential in particular for large 3D structures and very long carbon nanotube synthesis.

  6. The Inductrack Approach to Magnetic Levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, R.F.; Ryutov, D.D.

    2000-04-19

    Concepts developed during research on passive magnetic bearing systems at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory gave rise to a new approach to magnetic levitation, the Inductrack. A passive induced-current system employing permanent magnets on the moving vehicle, the Inductrack maximizes levitation forces by a combination of two elements. First, the permanent magnets on the vehicle are arranged in a ''Halbach array,'' a magnet configuration that optimally produces a periodic magnetic field below the array, while canceling the field above the array. Second, the track is made up of close-packed shorted electrical circuits. These circuits couple optimally to the magnetic field of the Halbach array. As a result, levitating forces of order 40 metric tonnes per square meter of Halbach array can be generated, using NdFeB magnets whose weight is a few percent of the levitated weight. Being an induced-current system, the levitation requires motion of the vehicle above a low transition speed. For maglev applications this speed is a few kilometers per hour, walking speed. At rest or in the station auxiliary wheels are needed. The Inductrack is thus fail-safe, that is, drive system failure would only result in the vehicle slowing down and finally settling on its auxiliary wheels. On the basis of theoretical analyses a small model vehicle and a 20-meter-long track was built and tested at speeds of order 12 meters per second. A second model, designed to achieve 10-g acceleration levels and much higher speeds, is under construction under NASA sponsorship, en route to the design of maglev-based launchers for rockets. Some of the presently perceived practical problems of implementing full-scale maglev systems based on the Inductrack concept will be discussed.

  7. Radiative Levitation in Hot White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chayer, P.; Fontaine, G.; Wesemael, F.

    1994-12-01

    We present the results of detailed calculations of radiative levitation in hot white dwarfs using the extensive and homogeneous atomic data given in TOPBASE. Radiative accelerations and equilibrium abundances have been computed for C, N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe on grids of pure hydrogen and pure helium stellar envelope models. The DA model grid has log g = 7.0, 7.5, 8.0, and 8.5, and spans the range of effective temperature 100,000 >= Teff >= 20,000 K in steps of 2,500 K. The DO/DB grid is similar but extends to Teff = 130,000 K. We discuss at some length the input physics used in order to provide a good physical understanding of radiative levitation under white dwarf conditions. We also discuss the depth dependence and the morphology of the reservoirs of levitating elements created by an equilibrium between the radiative acceleration and the local effective gravity in various stellar envelopes. The important role played in the morphology of the reservoirs by dominant ionization states in closed-shell electronic configurations is emphasized. Our central results are presented in the form of figures showing the behavior of the expected photospheric abundance of each element as a function of effective temperature and surface gravity. While only a handful of abundances are available from the few analyses of observations that have been carried out, we are nevertheless able to infer through a detailed comparison that equilibrium radiative levitation theory fails to explain the observed abundance patterns of heavy elements in hot white dwarfs. At least one other mechanism must be competing with radiative levitation and gravitational settling in the atmospheres/envelopes of hot white dwarfs. Finally, we indicate promising avenues for further progress in spectral evolution theory for white dwarfs. This work has been supported by NASA contract NAS5-30180.

  8. Vapor layer evolution during drop impact on a heated surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sanghyeon; Lee, Sangjun; Lee, Jisan; Fezzaa, Kamel; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-11-01

    When a liquid drop impacts on a sufficiently hot surface above the boiling point, a vapor layer is formed between the drop and the surface, preventing direct contact between them and as a result levitating the drop, known as the Leidenfrost effect. Understanding the evolution of the vapor layer is largely unexplored despite its importance in estimating heat transfer in cooling systems of thermal or nuclear power plants. The side-profile visualization of the vapor layer, as absolutely required for investigating its evolution, has been however unavailable by conventional optical microscopy. In this study, by employing ultrafast X-ray phase contrast imaging, we directly visualize the profiles of the vapor layers during liquid drop impact on a hot surface and elucidate the evolution of the vapor layers during spreading and retraction of the drop as functions of impact height and surface temperature. We reveal that the evolution is governed by the propagation of capillary waves generated in retraction and the wavelength of capillary waves λ is inversely proportional to the impact height h with a relation ~σ/ρh ~We-1 where We is weber number. Capillary waves that converge at the center of the vapor layers are linked to the bouncing behavior of the drop.

  9. Contactless transport of matter in the first five resonance modes of a line-focused acoustic manipulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foresti, Daniele; Nabavi, Majid; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-02-01

    The first five resonance modes for transport of matter in a line-focused acoustic levitation system are investigated. Contactless transport was achieved by varying the height between the radiating plate and the reflector. Transport and levitation of droplets in particular involve two limits of the acoustic forces. The lower limit corresponds to the minimum force required to overcome the gravitational force. The upper limit corresponds to the maximum acoustic pressure beyond which atomization of the droplet occurs. As the droplet size increases, the lower limit increases and the upper limit decreases. Therefore to have large droplets levitated, relatively flat radiation pressure amplitude during the translation is needed. In this study, using a finite element model, the Gor'kov potential was calculated for different heights between the reflector and the radiating plate. The application of the Gor'kov potential was extended to study the range of droplet sizes for which the droplets can be levitated and transported without atomization. It was found that the third resonant mode (H(3)-mode) represents the best compromise between high levitation force and smooth pattern transition, and water droplets of millimeter radius can be levitated and transported. The H(3)-mode also allows for three translation lines in parallel.

  10. Contactless transport of matter in the first five resonance modes of a line-focused acoustic manipulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foresti, Daniele; Nabavi, Majid; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-02-01

    The first five resonance modes for transport of matter in a line-focused acoustic levitation system are investigated. Contactless transport was achieved by varying the height between the radiating plate and the reflector. Transport and levitation of droplets in particular involve two limits of the acoustic forces. The lower limit corresponds to the minimum force required to overcome the gravitational force. The upper limit corresponds to the maximum acoustic pressure beyond which atomization of the droplet occurs. As the droplet size increases, the lower limit increases and the upper limit decreases. Therefore to have large droplets levitated, relatively flat radiation pressure amplitude during the translation is needed. In this study, using a finite element model, the Gor'kov potential was calculated for different heights between the reflector and the radiating plate. The application of the Gor'kov potential was extended to study the range of droplet sizes for which the droplets can be levitated and transported without atomization. It was found that the third resonant mode (H(3)-mode) represents the best compromise between high levitation force and smooth pattern transition, and water droplets of millimeter radius can be levitated and transported. The H(3)-mode also allows for three translation lines in parallel. PMID:22352478

  11. Improvement of levitation force characteristics in magnetic levitation type seismic isolation device composed of HTS bulk and permanent magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, M.; Kawasaki, T.; Yagai, T.; Hamajima, T.

    2008-02-01

    Magnetic levitation type seismic isolation device composed of HTS bulks and permanent magnets can theoretically remove horizontal vibration completely. It is, however, not easy to generate the large levitation force by using only the levitation system composed of HTS bulk and permanent magnet (HTS-PM system). We focused on a hybrid levitation system composed of the HTS-PM system and the PM-PM system composed of only permanent magnets and investigated the suitable arranging method of the hybrid system for improving levitation force and obtaining stable levitation. In order to clarify the most suitable permanent magnet arrangement in the PM-PM system for the levitation force improvement, repulsive force between permanent magnets was measured in various kinds of the PM-PM system. The maximum repulsive force per unit area in the PM-PM system was at least three times larger than the levitation force per unit area in the HTS-PM system, so that the levitation force in the hybrid system was larger than that of the HTS-PM system. Stable levitation was also achieved in the hybrid system. This is because repulsive force in the PM-PM system against horizontal displacement was much smaller than restoring force in the HTS-PM system.

  12. Simulation and optimization of single-axis ultrasonic levitator%单轴式声悬浮器的仿真与优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 于浩洋; 谢忠玉

    2016-01-01

    A finite element analysis and a parametric optimization of the single‐axis acoustic levitators are presented .The finite element method is used to simulate an acoustic levitator consisting of a Langevin ultrasonic transducer and a plane reflector .The acoustic radiation potential and the acoustic levitation force that acts on small spheres are determined by using the finite element method . T he validity of the simulation result is verified experimentally by placing small spheres in the levitator .The same procedure is used to optimize a levitator consisting of a spherical reflector and the optimized height of the resonant cavity and the radius of the spherical reflector are determined . T he experimental and simulation results show that the performance of the levitator consisting of an optimized spherical reflector is 2.51 times compared with the levitator consisting of a plane reflector .%介绍一种单轴式声悬浮器的分析和优化方法,应用有限元分析方法对由平面反射面和单轴式郎之万超声换能器组成的单轴式声悬浮器进行仿真分析,确定作用在被悬浮小球上的声辐射势以及悬浮力,并通过在悬浮器中放置小球的方法对仿真结果的正确性进行验证。文中还使用相同的方法对由凹球面反射面组成的悬浮器进行优化设计,确定最优谐振腔高度以及凹球反射面的最优曲面半径。仿真和实验结果表明,经过优化设计的凹球反射面声悬浮器的悬浮性能是平面反射面声悬浮器性能的2.51倍。

  13. Thermal levitation of 10 um size particles in low vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Long Fung Frankie; Kowalski, Nicholas; Parker, Colin; Chin, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    We report on experimental methods for trapping 10 micron-sized ice, glass, ceramic and polyethylene particles with thermophoresis in medium vacuum, at pressures between 5 Torr and 25 Torr. Under appropriate conditions particles can launch and levitate robustly for up to an hour. We describe the experimental setup used to produce the temperature gradient necessary for the levitation, as well as our procedure for generating and introducing ice into the experimental setup. In addition to analyzing the conditions necessary for levitation, and the dependence of levitation on the experimental parameters, we report on the behavior of particles during levitation and ejection, including position and stability, under different pressures and temperatures. We also note a significant discrepancy between theory and data, suggesting the presence of other levitating forces.

  14. The role of tactile support in arm levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Burkhard; Piesbergen, Christoph; Lucic, Kristina; Staudacher, Melina; Hagl, Maria

    2013-10-01

    How many persons need tactile support à la Milton H. Erickson to achieve arm levitation during hypnosis? How do these differ from those who do not need it? Hypnotic arm levitation was suggested three times consecutively to 30 medium suggestible students. Sixteen succeeded without any tactile support; 7 needed it one or two times; 5 needed it every time; and 2 achieved no arm levitation at all. Participants without any tactile support went more quickly into deeper hypnosis, experienced more involuntariness, less effort, and had higher electrodermal activity. This greater physiological activity seems necessary for hypnotic arm levitation as a form of "attentive hypnosis" in contrast to "relaxation hypnosis." A change in verbal suggestion from "imagine a helium balloon" to "leave levitation to your unconscious mind" revealed no differences. Several issues resulting from this exploratory arm levitation study are discussed. The idea of different proprioceptive-kinesthetic abilities is introduced and the profound need of co-creating an individual suggestion is emphasized.

  15. Bubble and drop interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Miller

    2011-01-01

    The book aims at describing the most important experimental methods for characterizing liquid interfaces, such as drop profile analysis, bubble pressure and drop volume tensiometry, capillary pressure technique, and oscillating drops and bubbles. Besides the details of experimental set ups, also the underlying theoretical basis is presented in detail. In addition, a number of applications based on drops and bubbles is discussed, such as rising bubbles and the very complex process of flotation. Also wetting, characterized by the dynamics of advancing contact angles is discussed critically. Spec

  16. Optical levitation of a microdroplet containing a single quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minowa, Yosuke; Kawai, Ryoichi; Ashida, Masaaki

    2015-03-15

    We demonstrate the optical levitation or trapping in helium gas of a single quantum dot (QD) within a liquid droplet. Bright single photon emission from the levitated QD in the droplet was observed for more than 200 s. The observed photon count rates are consistent with the value theoretically estimated from the two-photon-action cross section. This Letter presents the realization of an optically levitated solid-state quantum emitter. PMID:25768143

  17. Electrostatic levitation and transport of laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several levitation concepts have been evaluated resulting in the electrostatic quadrupole being chosen as the most universal. A levitator has been constructed to handle laser fusion targets during and between the processing steps. The levitator is based on a quadrupole rail which is segmented to provide electrically controlled transport and confinement along the rail. This device has demonstrated transport both vertical and horizontal of targets with appropriate mass to size ratios and exhibits remarkably stable confinement at atmospheric pressure

  18. Dynamic analysis of ultrasonically levitated droplet with moving particle semi-implicit and distributed point source method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yuji; Yuge, Kohei; Nakamura, Ryohei; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2015-07-01

    Numerical analysis of an ultrasonically levitated droplet with a free surface boundary is discussed. The droplet is known to change its shape from sphere to spheroid when it is suspended in a standing wave owing to the acoustic radiation force. However, few studies on numerical simulation have been reported in association with this phenomenon including fluid dynamics inside the droplet. In this paper, coupled analysis using the distributed point source method (DPSM) and the moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method, both of which do not require grids or meshes to handle the moving boundary with ease, is suggested. A droplet levitated in a plane standing wave field between a piston-vibrating ultrasonic transducer and a reflector is simulated with the DPSM-MPS coupled method. The dynamic change in the spheroidal shape of the droplet is successfully reproduced numerically, and the gravitational center and the change in the spheroidal aspect ratio are discussed and compared with the previous literature.

  19. Nonlinear dynamics of drops and bubbles and chaotic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Eugene H.; Leal, L. G.; Feng, Z. C.; Holt, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    Nonlinear phenomena associated with the dynamics of free drops and bubbles are investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally. Although newly developed levitation and measurement techniques have been implemented, the full experimental validation of theoretical predictions has been hindered by interfering artifacts associated with levitation in the Earth gravitational field. The low gravity environment of orbital space flight has been shown to provide a more quiescent environment which can be utilized to better match the idealized theoretical conditions. The research effort described in this paper is a closely coupled collaboration between predictive and guiding theoretical activities and a unique experimental program involving the ultrasonic and electrostatic levitation of single droplets and bubbles. The goal is to develop and to validate methods based on nonlinear dynamics for the understanding of the large amplitude oscillatory response of single drops and bubbles to both isotropic and asymmetric pressure stimuli. The first specific area on interest has been the resonant coupling between volume and shape oscillatory modes isolated gas or vapor bubbles in a liquid host. The result of multiple time-scale asymptotic treatment, combined with domain perturbation and bifurcation methods, has been the prediction of resonant and near-resonant coupling between volume and shape modes leading to stable as well as chaotic oscillations. Experimental investigations of the large amplitude shape oscillation modes of centimeter-size single bubbles trapped in water at 1 G and under reduced hydrostatic pressure, have suggested the possibility of a low gravity experiment to study the direct coupling between these low frequency shape modes and the volume pulsation, sound-radiating mode. The second subject of interest has involved numerical modeling, using the boundary integral method, of the large amplitude shape oscillations of charged and uncharged drops in the presence

  20. Effects of Magnet Size and Geometry on Magnetic Levitation Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. K. Alqadi; H. M. Al-khateeb; F. Y. Alzoubi; N. Y. Ayoub

    2007-01-01

    We obtain analytical relations for the levitation force as a function of dimensions of the superconductor-magnet system. The force has been calculated on the basis of the dipole-dipole interaction model.The effect of thickness of the superconductor on the levitation force is investigated. The results show that the influence of geometry and thickness of the magnet becomes significantly large at small levitation distances. Furthermore, approximating the permanent magnet as a point dipole results in an inaccurate estimation of the levitation force.

  1. Levitation properties of maglev systems using soft ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Guang; Zhou, You-He

    2015-03-01

    Soft ferromagnets are widely used as flux-concentration materials in the design of guideways for superconducting magnetic levitation transport systems. In order to fully understand the influence of soft ferromagnets on the levitation performance, in this work we apply a numerical model based on the functional minimization method and the Bean’s critical state model to study the levitation properties of an infinitely long superconductor immersed in the magnetic field created by a guideway of different sets of infinitely long parallel permanent magnets with soft ferromagnets between them. The levitation force, guidance force, magnetic stiffness and magnetic pole density are calculated considering the coupling between the superconductor and soft ferromagnets. The results show that the levitation performance is closely associated with the permanent magnet configuration and with the location and dimension of the soft ferromagnets. Introducing the soft ferromagnet with a certain width in a few configurations always decreases the levitation force. However, for most configurations, the soft ferromagnets contribute to improve the levitation performance only when they have particular locations and dimensions in which the optimized location and thickness exist to increase the levitation force the most. Moreover, if the superconductor is laterally disturbed, the presence of soft ferromagnets can effectively improve the lateral stability for small lateral displacement and reduce the degradation of levitation force.

  2. Turbulence, bubbles and drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der Roeland Cornelis Adriaan

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, several questions related to drop impact and Taylor-Couette turbulence are answered. The deformation of a drop just before impact can cause a bubble to be entrapped. For many applications, such as inkjet printing, it is crucial to control the size of this entrapped bubble. To study t

  3. Magnetic levitation from negative permeability materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, Mark W., E-mail: mcoffey@mines.edu [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2012-09-03

    As left-handed materials and metamaterials are becoming more prevalent, we examine the effect of negative permeability upon levitation force. We first consider two half spaces of differing permeability and a point magnetic source, so that the method of images may be employed. We determine that the resulting force may be larger than for conventional magnetic materials. We then illustrate the inclusion of a finite sample thickness. -- Highlights: ► The effect of negative permeability upon levitation force is considered. ► Such an effect could be realized with metamaterials. ► The resulting force may be larger than with conventional materials. ► The analysis is extended to allow for a finite sample thickness. ► Representative numerical values are given.

  4. Aerodynamics of magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schetz, Joseph A.; Marchman, James F., III

    1996-01-01

    High-speed (500 kph) trains using magnetic forces for levitation, propulsion and control offer many advantages for the nation and a good opportunity for the aerospace community to apply 'high tech' methods to the domestic sector. One area of many that will need advanced research is the aerodynamics of such MAGLEV (Magnetic Levitation) vehicles. There are important issues with regard to wind tunnel testing and the application of CFD to these devices. This talk will deal with the aerodynamic design of MAGLEV vehicles with emphasis on wind tunnel testing. The moving track facility designed and constructed in the 6 ft. Stability Wind Tunnel at Virginia Tech will be described. Test results for a variety of MAGLEV vehicle configurations will be presented. The last topic to be discussed is a Multi-disciplinary Design approach that is being applied to MAGLEV vehicle configuration design including aerodynamics, structures, manufacturability and life-cycle cost.

  5. Aerodynamic levitation : an approach to microgravity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glorieux, B.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Millot, F.; Enderby, J.; Rifflet, J.-C.

    2000-12-05

    Measurements of the thermophysical and structural properties of liquid materials at high temperature have undergone considerable development in the past few years. Following improvements in electromagnetic levitation, aerodynamic levitation associated with laser heating has shown promise for assessing properties of different molten materials (metals, oxides, and semiconductors), preserving sample purity over a wide range of temperatures and under different gas environments. The density, surface tension and viscosity are measured with a high-speed video camera and an image analysis system. Results on nickel and alumina show that small droplets can be considered in the first approximation to be under microgravity conditions. Using a non-invasive contactless technique recently developed to measure electrical conductivity, results have been extended to variety of materials ranging from liquid metals and liquid semiconductors to ionically conducting materials. The advantage of this technique is the feasibility of monitoring changes in transport occurring during phase transitions and in deeply undercooled states.

  6. Magnetic levitation system for moving objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard F.

    1998-01-01

    Repelling magnetic forces are produced by the interaction of a flux-concentrated magnetic field (produced by permanent magnets or electromagnets) with an inductively loaded closed electric circuit. When one such element moves with respect to the other, a current is induced in the circuit. This current then interacts back on the field to produce a repelling force. These repelling magnetic forces are applied to magnetically levitate a moving object such as a train car. The power required to levitate a train of such cars is drawn from the motional energy of the train itself, and typically represents only a percent or two of the several megawatts of power required to overcome aerodynamic drag at high speeds.

  7. Magnetic Levitation Experiments with the Electrodynamic Wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordrey, Vincent; Gutarra-Leon, Angel; Gaul, Nathan; Majewski, Walerian

    Our experiments explored inductive magnetic levitation using circular Halbach arrays with the strong variable magnetic field on the outer rim of the ring. Such a system is usually called an Electrodynamic Wheel (EDW). Rotating this wheel around a horizontal axis above a flat conducting surface should induce eddy currents in said surface through the variable magnetic flux. The eddy currents produce, in turn, their own magnetic fields which interact with the magnets of the EDW. We constructed two Electrodynamic Wheels with different diameters and demonstrated that the magnetic interactions produce both lift and drag forces on the EDW which can be used for levitation and propulsion of the EDW. The focus of our experiments is the direct measurement of lift and drag forces to compare with theoretical models using wheels of two different radii. Supported by Grants from the Virginia Academy of Science, Society of Physics Students, Virginia Community College System, and the NVCC Educational Foundation.

  8. Cavity cooling a single charged levitated nanosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, J; Fonseca, P Z G; Mavrogordatos, T; Monteiro, T S; Barker, P F

    2015-03-27

    Optomechanical cavity cooling of levitated objects offers the possibility for laboratory investigation of the macroscopic quantum behavior of systems that are largely decoupled from their environment. However, experimental progress has been hindered by particle loss mechanisms, which have prevented levitation and cavity cooling in a vacuum. We overcome this problem with a new type of hybrid electro-optical trap formed from a Paul trap within a single-mode optical cavity. We demonstrate a factor of 100 cavity cooling of 400 nm diameter silica spheres trapped in vacuum. This paves the way for ground-state cooling in a smaller, higher finesse cavity, as we show that a novel feature of the hybrid trap is that the optomechanical cooling becomes actively driven by the Paul trap, even for singly charged nanospheres. PMID:25860743

  9. Dependence of Levitation Force on Frequency of an Oscillating Magnetic Levitation Field in a Bulk YBCO Superconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Hamilton; Pate, Stephen; Goedecke, George

    2012-01-01

    The dependence of the magnetic field strength required for levitation of a melt textured, single domain YBCO superconductor disc on the frequency of the current generating the levitating magnetic field has been investigated. The magnetic field strength is found to be independent of frequency between 10 and 300 Hz. This required field strength is found to be in good experimental and theoretical[1] agreement with the field strength required to levitate the same superconductor with a non-oscilla...

  10. Beamline electrostatic levitator for in situ high energy x-ray diffraction studies of levitated solids and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangopadhyay, A.K.; Lee, G.W.; Kelto, K.F.; Rogers, J.R.; Goldman, A.I.; Robinson, D.S.; Rathz, T.J.; Hyers, R.W. (WU); (UAB); (NASA); (UMASS, Amherst)

    2010-07-19

    Determinations of the phase formation sequence, crystal structures and the thermo-physical properties of materials at high temperatures are hampered by contamination from the sample container and environment. Containerless processing techniques, such as electrostatic (ESL), electromagnetic, aerodynamic, and acoustic levitation, are most suitable for these studies. An adaptation of ESL for in situ structural studies of a wide range of materials using high energy (30-130 keV) x rays at a synchrotron source is described here. This beamline ESL (BESL) allows the in situ determination of the atomic structures of equilibrium solid and liquid phases, undercooled liquids and time-resolved studies of solid-solid and liquid-solid phase transformations. The use of area detectors enables the rapid acquisition of complete diffraction patterns over a wide range (0.5-14 {angstrom}{sup -1}) of reciprocal space. The wide temperature range (300-2500 K), containerless processing environment under high vacuum (10{sup -7}-10{sup -8} Torr), and fast data acquisition capability, make BESL particularly well suited for phase stability studies of high temperature solids and liquids. An additional, but important, feature of BESL is the capability for simultaneous measurements of a host of thermo-physical properties including the specific heat, enthalpy of transformation, solidus and liquidus temperatures, density, viscosity, and surface tension, all on the same sample during the structural measurements.

  11. Sessile Rayleigh drop instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Paul; Bostwick, Josh

    2012-11-01

    Rayleigh (1879) determined the mode shapes and frequencies of the inviscid motion of a free drop held by surface tension. We study the inviscid motions of a sessile Rayleigh drop - a drop which rests on a planar solid and whose contact-line is free to move. Linear stability analysis gives the modes and frequencies of the droplet motions. In this talk, we focus on the ``walking instability,'' an unstable mode wherein the drop moves across a planar substrate in an inviscid rocking-like motion. The mode shape is non-axisymmetric. Although the experimental literature has hinted at such a mode, this is the first prediction from linear stability analysis, as far as we are aware. The ``walking instability'' of the drop converts energy stored in the liquid shape into the energy of liquid motion - which represents a heretofore unknown pathway of energy conversion of potentially wide significance for a broad range of applications.

  12. Experimenting with a Superconducting Levitation Train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miryala, Santosh; Koblischka, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    The construction and operation of a prototype high-"Tc" superconducting train model is presented. The train is levitated by a melt-processed GdBa[subscript 2]Cu[subscript 3]O[subscript x] (Gd-123) superconducting material over a magnetic rail (track). The oval shaped track is constructed in S-N-S or PM3N configuration arranged on an iron…

  13. Knolle Magnetrans: A magnetically levitated train system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knolle, Ernst G.

    1992-05-01

    The Knolle Magnetrans is a continuous transportation system featuring small cars traveling in rapid succession, levitated by permanent magnets in repulsion, and propelled by stationary linear induction motors. The vehicles' headway, speed, acceleration, and deceleration are designed into the system and mechanically enforced. Passengers board dynamically and controls consist of a simple on-off relay. This paper summarizes the system design goals, describes the system components and discusses related environmental issues.

  14. Internal magnetic relaxation in levitation superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyak, B M; Ermakov, G V

    2001-01-01

    Effect of arresting levitation relaxation, appearing during reverse magnetization of YBaCuO superconducting ceramics, was detected. At bipolar magnetization magnetic moment of a sample remains invariable. Internal magnetic relaxation occurs, in the course of which magnetic flux is redistributed inside the sample. As a result the state of filed at the sample boundary does not change and full force acting on the system of closed currents remains constant. A formula for calculating the time of internal relaxation is provided

  15. Sputter coating of microspherical substrates by levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, A.T.; Hosford, C.D.

    Microspheres are substantially uniformly coated with metals or nonmetals by simltaneously levitating them and sputter coating them at total chamber pressures less than 1 torr. A collimated hole structure comprising a parallel array of upwardly projecting individual gas outlets is machined out to form a dimple. Glass microballoons,, which are particularly useful in laser fusion applications, can be substantially uniformly coated using the coating method and apparatus.

  16. Electrostatic Levitation Furnace for the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Keiji; Koshikawa, Naokiyo; Shibasaki, Kohichi; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Okada, Junpei; Takada, Tetsuya; Arai, Tatsuya; Fujino, Naoki; Yamaura, Yukiko

    2012-01-01

    JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) has just started the development of Electrostatic Levitation Furnace to be launched in 2014 for the ISS. This furnace can control the sample position with electrostatic force and heat it above 2000 degree Celsius using semiconductor laser from four different directions. The announcement of Opportunity will be issued soon for this furnace. In this paper, we will show the specifications of this furnace and also the development schedule

  17. Experiments for electromagnetic levitation in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willnecker, R.; Egry, I.

    1990-01-01

    Containerless processing is a promising research tool for investigating the properties of undercooled melts and their solidification. For conducting samples RF-electromagnetic levitation offers the possibility to obtain large undercoolings by avoiding heterogeneous nucleation at container walls. On earth, however, strong magnetic fields are needed to compensate the gravitational force which imposes a lower limit on the available temperatures and on the accessible undercooling range. Under microgravity conditions the magnetic positioning fields can be minimized and hence, undercooling becomes feasible under ultra-high vacuum conditions and lower temperatures become accessible. In contrast to other undercooling and solidification techniques, electromagnetic levitation allows for diagnostic measurements during the early steps of nucleation and phase selection. Experiments cover a wide field of research topics: nucleation, directional solidification at high velocities, generation of metastable phases, evolution of microstructures, properties of undercooled liquids. Examples from these classes including experiments selected for the IML-2 mission are discussed with emphasis on technical requirements. An overview is given on the German TEMPUS (electromagnetic levitation facility) program.

  18. Analysis of Vertical Oscillations of a Permanent Magnet Freely Levitated above an YBCO Bulk in an AC External Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Zhang; Ya-Li Zhang; Cui-Hua Cheng; Yong Zhao

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the moving speed of perma- nent magnet (PM) on levitation force between PM and high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk is analyzed and described in the PM-HTS levitation system. The PM vibration characteristic in the PM-HTS system is investigated. The PM may collide with the HTS in vibration if the amplitude and frequency of driving force satisfy the relationship Pmin = A f n. When the load of the system is below a threshold, the minimal collision amplitude of the driving force increases with the load increasing, however, it sharply drops to zero when the load exceeds the threshold. With the increase of the initial height of the PM, the threshold load increases, but the minimal driving force which causes a collision between PM and HTS decreases.

  19. Three-dimensional Mid-air Acoustic Manipulation by Ultrasonic Phased Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Ochiai, Yoichi; Rekimoto, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The essence of levitation technology is the countervailing of gravity. It is known that an ultrasound standing wave is capable of suspending small particles at its sound pressure nodes. The acoustic axis of the ultrasound beam in conventional studies was parallel to the gravitational force, and the levitated objects were manipulated along the fixed axis (i.e. one-dimensionally) by controlling the phases or frequencies of bolted Langevin-type transducers. In the present study, we considered extended acoustic manipulation whereby millimetre-sized particles were levitated and moved three-dimensionally by localised ultrasonic standing waves, which were generated by ultrasonic phased arrays. Our manipulation system has two original features. One is the direction of the ultrasound beam, which is arbitrary because the force acting toward its centre is also utilised. The other is the manipulation principle by which a localised standing wave is generated at an arbitrary position and moved three-dimensionally by oppose...

  20. Effects of magnetic history on the levitation characteristics in a superconducting levitation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xingyi [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Western Disaster and Environment and Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); Zhou Youhe [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Western Disaster and Environment and Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China)], E-mail: zhouyh@lzu.edu.cn; Zhou Jun [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Western Disaster and Environment and Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China)

    2008-07-15

    Using an updated high-temperature superconductor maglev measurement system, influences of the motion mode in which both the superconductor and the magnet are placed close to each other on the magnetic forces and their relaxation are measured. It is found that Method 1, in which the magnet coaxially approaches the superconductor which is subsequently displaced laterally, leads to reduce the relaxation both in the levitation force and in the lateral force in comparison to Method 2, where lateral displacement of superconductor occurs before vertical motion of the magnet. The results are relevant for the practical levitation systems.

  1. Airy acoustical-sheet spinner tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2016-09-01

    acoustic levitation, long-distance particle transport and manipulation, as well as acousto-fluidics directly benefit from the results of this analysis.

  2. Acoustic Resonator Optimisation for Airborne Particle Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendran, Citsabehsan; Billson, Duncan R.; Hutchins, David A.; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    Advances in micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology and biomedical research necessitate micro-machined manipulators to capture, handle and position delicate micron-sized particles. To this end, a parallel plate acoustic resonator system has been investigated for the purposes of manipulation and entrapment of micron sized particles in air. Numerical and finite element modelling was performed to optimise the design of the layered acoustic resonator. To obtain an optimised resonator design, careful considerations of the effect of thickness and material properties are required. Furthermore, the effect of acoustic attenuation which is dependent on frequency is also considered within this study, leading to an optimum operational frequency range. Finally, experimental results demonstrated good particle levitation and capture of various particle properties and sizes ranging to as small as 14.8 μm.

  3. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  4. Numerical derivation of forces on particles and agglomerates in a resonant acoustic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2013-10-01

    Particles and agglomerates are investigated in gaseous acoustic flow fields. Acoustic fields exert forces on solid objects, which can influence the shape of the exposed bodies, even to the point of breakage of the structures. Motivated by experimentally observed breakage of agglomerates in an acoustic levitator (f = 20 kHz), a numerical study is presented that derives the acoustic forces on a complex model agglomerate from the pressure and velocity fields of a resonant standing ultrasound wave, calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is distinguished between the drag and lift/lateral forces on the overall agglomerate and on the different primary particles of the model.

  5. Rotating Molten Metallic Drops and Related Phenomena: A New Approach to the Surface Tension Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Ishikawa, Takehiko

    2000-01-01

    Molten aluminum and tin drops were levitated in a high vacuum by controlled electric fields, and they were systematically rotated by applying by a rotating magnetic field. When the evolution of the drop shape was measured as a function of rotation frequency, it agreed quantitatively well with the Brown and Scriven's theoretical prediction. The normalized rotation frequencies at the bifurcation point agreed with the predicted value 0.559, within 2%. An anomalous phenomenon which totally deviated from the prediction was observed in rotating molten tin drops when they were kept in a high rotation rate for several hours. No anomaly was observed in aluminum drops when they underwent similar condition. It was speculated that under the strong centrifugal force in the drop the tin isotopes must be separating. Since Al-27 is essentially the only naturally abundant isotope in the aluminum drops, the same anomaly is not expected. Based on the shape deformation of a rotating drop, an alternate approach to the surface tension measurement was verified. This new surface tension measurement technique was applied to a glassforming alloy, Zr(41.2)Ti(13.8)Cu(12.5)Ni(10.0)Be(22.5) in its highly viscous states. Also demonstrated in the paper was a use of a molten aluminum drop to verify the Busse's prediction of the influence of the drop rotation on the drop oscillation frequency.

  6. "Millikan oil drops" as quantum transducers between electromagnetic and gravitational radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Chiao, R Y

    2007-01-01

    Pairs of Planck-mass-scale drops of superfluid helium coated by electrons (i.e., "Millikan oil drops"), when levitated in the presence of strong magnetic fields and at low temperatures, can be efficient quantum transducers between electromagnetic (EM) and gravitational (GR) radiation. A Hertz-like experiment, in which EM waves are converted at the source into GR waves, and then back-converted at the receiver from GR waves back into EM waves, should be practical to perform. This would open up observations of the gravity-wave analog of the Cosmic Microwave Background from the extremely early Big Bang, and also communications directly through the interior of the Earth.

  7. Potential Development of Vehicle Traction Levitation Systems with Magnetic Suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Kireev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Below is given the brief analysis of development trend for vehicle traction levitation systems with magnetic suspension. It is presented the assessment of potential development of traction levitation systems in terms of their simplicity. The examples are considered of technical solutions focused on reducing the complexity of transport systems. It is proposed the forecast of their further development.

  8. Development and Control of a Non Linear Magnetic Levitation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sanjeevi Gandhi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, studies to develop and control non linear systems is of great significance. Magnetic Levitation System has gained considerable interests due to its great practical importance in different engineering fields In this paper an electromagnetic levitation system was developed and mathematical model for the system was derived. The developed system was controlled manually.

  9. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap.

  10. Characteristics on electodynamic suspension simulator with HTS levitation magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Bae, D. K.; Sim, K.; Chung, Y. D.; Lee, Y.-S.

    2009-10-01

    High- Tc superconducting (HTSC) electrodynamic suspension (EDS) system basically consists of the HTSC levitation magnet and the ground conductor. The levitation force of EDS system is forms by the interaction between the moving magnetic field produced by the onboard levitation magnet and the induced magnetic field produced by eddy current in the ground conductor. This paper deals with the characteristics of the EDS simulators with high- Tc superconducting (HTS) levitation magnet. Two EDS simulator systems, rotating type EDS simulator and static type EDS simulator, were studied in this paper. The rotating type EDS simulator consists of a HTS levitation magnet and a 1.5 m diameter rotating ground conductor, a motor, the supporting structure and force measuring devices. In the static type EDS simulator, instead of moving magnetic field, AC current was applied to the fixed HTS levitation magnet to induce the eddy current. The static type EDS simulator consists of a HTS levitation magnet, a ground conductor, force measuring devices and supporting structure. The double-pancake type HTSC levitation magnet was designed, manufactured and tested in the EDS simulator.

  11. Spin-stabilized magnetic levitation without vertical axis of rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Louis; Christenson, Todd; Aaronson, Gene

    2009-06-09

    The symmetry properties of a magnetic levitation arrangement are exploited to produce spin-stabilized magnetic levitation without aligning the rotational axis of the rotor with the direction of the force of gravity. The rotation of the rotor stabilizes perturbations directed parallel to the rotational axis.

  12. Potential Development of Vehicle Traction Levitation Systems with Magnetic Suspension

    OpenAIRE

    A.V. Kireev; N.M. Kozhemyaka; G.N. Kononov

    2015-01-01

    Below is given the brief analysis of development trend for vehicle traction levitation systems with magnetic suspension. It is presented the assessment of potential development of traction levitation systems in terms of their simplicity. The examples are considered of technical solutions focused on reducing the complexity of transport systems. It is proposed the forecast of their further development.

  13. Development and Control of a Non Linear Magnetic Levitation System

    OpenAIRE

    A Sanjeevi Gandhi; Reshma Angelene Jose

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, studies to develop and control non linear systems is of great significance. Magnetic Levitation System has gained considerable interests due to its great practical importance in different engineering fields In this paper an electromagnetic levitation system was developed and mathematical model for the system was derived. The developed system was controlled manually.

  14. Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  15. Drop Tower Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, David

    2013-01-01

    Ground based microgravity facilities are an important proving ground for space experiments, ground-based research and space hardware risk mitigation. An overview of existing platforms will be discussed with an emphasis on drop tower capabilities. The potential for extension to partial gravity conditions will be discussed. Input will be solicited from attendees for their potential to use drop towers in the future and the need for enhanced capabilities (e.g. partial gravity)

  16. Trial Application of Pulse-Field Magnetization to Magnetically Levitated Conveyor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihito Miyatake

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically levitated conveyor system using superconductors is discussed. The system is composed of a levitated conveyor, magnetic rails, a linear induction motor, and some power supplies. In the paper, pulse-field magnetization is applied to the system. Then, the levitation height and the dynamics of the conveyor are controlled. The static and dynamic characteristics of the levitated conveyor are discussed.

  17. Polygonal excitations of spinning and levitating droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, R J A

    2008-01-01

    The shape of a weightless spinning liquid droplet is governed by the balance between the surface tension and centrifugal forces. The axisymmetric shape for slow rotation becomes unstable to a non-axisymmetric distortion above a critical angular velocity, beyond which the droplet progresses through a series of 2-lobed shapes. Theory predicts the existence of a family of 3- and 4-lobed equilibrium shapes at higher angular velocity. We investigate the formation of a triangular-shaped magnetically levitated water droplet, driven to rotate by the Lorentz force on an ionic current within the droplet. We also study equatorial traveling waves which give the droplet 3, 4 and 5-fold symmetry.

  18. Experimenting with a superconducting levitation train

    OpenAIRE

    Koblischka, Michael Rudolf; Miryala, Santosh

    2014-01-01

    The construction and operation of a prototype high-Tc superconducting train model is presented. The train is levitated by a melt-processed GdBa2Cu3Ox (Gd-123) superconducting material over a magnetic rail (track). The oval shaped track is constructed in S-N-S or PM3N configuration arranged on an iron plate. The train bodies are constructed with FRP sheets forming a vessel to maintain the temperature of liquid nitrogen. The superconductors are field-cooled on the magnetic track, which provides...

  19. Pattern-formation under acoustic driving forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Jose Manuel

    2015-07-01

    Chemical and metallurgical processes enhanced by high intensity acoustic waves, thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, fuel rods in nuclear reactors, heat exchanger tubes, offshore and vibrating structures, solar thermal collectors, acoustic levitators, microfluidic devices, cycling, musical acoustics, blood flow through veins/arteries, hearing in the mammalian ear, carbon nanotube loudspeakers, etc. The evolution of a myriad of processes involving the oscillation of viscous fluids in the presence of solid boundaries is up to a certain extent influenced by acoustic streaming. In addition to the sound field, viscous energy dissipation at the fluid-solid boundary causes a time-independent fluid circulation, which can lead to a significant enhancement of heat, mass and momentum transfer at large oscillation amplitudes. A particularly relevant phenomenon that can be notably affected by acoustic streaming is the promotion of sound waves by temperature gradients or viceversa (thermoacoustics), which is at the basis of potentially efficient and environmental friendly engines and refrigerators that have attracted a renewed interest in the last years. In the present manuscript, historical developments and the underlying basic physics behind acoustic streaming and thermoacoustics are reviewed from an unifying perspective.

  20. Drying drops of blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutin, David; Sobac, Benjamin; Loquet, Boris; Sampol, José.

    2010-11-01

    The drying of a drop of human blood is fascinating by the complexity of the physical mechanisms that occur as well as the beauty of the phenomenon which has never been previously evidenced in the literature. The final stage of full blood evaporation reveals for a healthy person the same regular pattern with a good reproducibility. Other tests on anemia and hyperlipidemic persons were performed and presented different patterns. By means of digital camera, the influence of the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) which represent about 50% of the blood volume, is revealed as well as its consequences on the final stages of drying. The mechanisms which lead to the final pattern of dried blood drops are presented and explained on the basis of fluid and solid mechanics in conjunction with the principles of hematology. Our group is the first to evidence that the specific regular patterns characteristic of a healthy individual do not appear in a dried drop of blood from a person with blood disease. Blood is a complex colloidal suspension for which the flow motion is clearly non-Newtonian. When drops of blood evaporate, all the colloids are carried by the flow motion inside the drop and interact.

  1. Trehalose and sorbitol alter the kinetic pattern of inactivation of glutamate dehydrogenase during drying in levitated microdroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, Elke; Lee, Geoffrey

    2013-12-01

    A single-droplet acoustic levitator was used to determine the drying rate and the kinetics of inactivation of glutamate dehydrogenase in the presence of added trehalose or sorbitol. The solution was also spray dried under the same process condition of drying gas temperature on a bench-top machine. Both trehalose and sorbitol delay the point of onset of enzyme inactivation which lies after the critical point of drying. Both carbohydrates also reduce the apparent rate constant of inactivation calculated during the subsequent inactivation phase. The carbohydrates stabilise, therefore, the enzyme during droplet drying and particle formation mainly during the falling rate drying period. There is no difference between the stabilising effects of the two carbohydrates when examined as levitated single droplets. This suggests the importance of water replacement as a stabilising mechanism in the levitated droplets/particles. On spray drying, the trehalose stabilises the enzyme better than does the sorbitol at a drying gas (outlet) temperature of 60°C. This suggests glass formation with the trehalose but not the sorbitol during the very rapid drying process of small-atomised droplets in the spray dryer.

  2. Lambda-dropping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    1997-01-01

    ;rbæk's case study presented at PEPM '95, most polyvariant specializers for procedural programs operate on recursive equations. To this end, in a pre-processing phase, they lambda-lift source programs into recursive equations, As a result, residual programs are also expressed as recursive equations, often......Lambda-lifting a functional program transforms it into a set of recursive equations. We present the symmetric transformation: lambda-dropping. Lambda-dropping a set of recursive equations restores block structure and lexical scope.For lack of scope, recursive equations must carry around all...... with dozens of parameters, which most compilers do not handle efficiently. Lambda-dropping in a post-processing phase restores their block structure and lexical scope thereby significantly reducing both the compile time and the run time of residual programs....

  3. Smart-Phone Based Magnetic Levitation for Measuring Densities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Knowlton

    Full Text Available Magnetic levitation, which uses a magnetic field to suspend objects in a fluid, is a powerful and versatile technology. We develop a compact magnetic levitation platform compatible with a smart-phone to separate micro-objects and estimate the density of the sample based on its levitation height. A 3D printed attachment is mechanically installed over the existing camera unit of a smart-phone. Micro-objects, which may be either spherical or irregular in shape, are suspended in a paramagnetic medium and loaded in a microcapillary tube which is then inserted between two permanent magnets. The micro-objects are levitated and confined in the microcapillary at an equilibrium height dependent on their volumetric mass densities (causing a buoyancy force toward the edge of the microcapillary and magnetic susceptibilities (causing a magnetic force toward the center of the microcapillary relative to the suspending medium. The smart-phone camera captures magnified images of the levitating micro-objects through an additional lens positioned between the sample and the camera lens cover. A custom-developed Android application then analyzes these images to determine the levitation height and estimate the density. Using this platform, we were able to separate microspheres with varying densities and calibrate their levitation heights to known densities to develop a technique for precise and accurate density estimation. We have also characterized the magnetic field, the optical imaging capabilities, and the thermal state over time of this platform.

  4. Magnetically levitated space elevator to low-earth orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of currently available NbTi superconductor and carbon-fiber structural materials enable the possibility of constructing a magnetically levitated space elevator from the earth's surface up to an altitude of(approx) 200 km. The magnetic part of the elevator consists of a long loop of current-carrying NbTi, composed of one length that is attached to the earth's surface in an east-west direction and a levitated-arch portion. The critical current density of NbTi is sufficiently high that these conductors will stably levitate in the earth's magnetic field. The magnetic self-field from the loop increases the levitational force and for some geometries assists levitational stability. The 200-km maximum height of the levitated arch is limited by the allowable stresses of the structural material. The loop is cryogenically cooled with helium, and the system utilizes intermediate pumping and cooling stations along both the ground and the levitated portion of the loop, similar to other large terrestrial cryogenic systems. Mechanically suspended from the basic loop is an elevator structure, upon which mass can be moved between the earth's surface and the top of the loop by a linear electric motor or other mechanical or electrical means. At the top of the loop, vehicles may be accelerated to orbital velocity or higher by rocket motors, electromagnetic propulsion, or hybrid methods

  5. Smart-Phone Based Magnetic Levitation for Measuring Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Jain, Nupur; Ghiran, Ionita Calin; Tasoglu, Savas

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic levitation, which uses a magnetic field to suspend objects in a fluid, is a powerful and versatile technology. We develop a compact magnetic levitation platform compatible with a smart-phone to separate micro-objects and estimate the density of the sample based on its levitation height. A 3D printed attachment is mechanically installed over the existing camera unit of a smart-phone. Micro-objects, which may be either spherical or irregular in shape, are suspended in a paramagnetic medium and loaded in a microcapillary tube which is then inserted between two permanent magnets. The micro-objects are levitated and confined in the microcapillary at an equilibrium height dependent on their volumetric mass densities (causing a buoyancy force toward the edge of the microcapillary) and magnetic susceptibilities (causing a magnetic force toward the center of the microcapillary) relative to the suspending medium. The smart-phone camera captures magnified images of the levitating micro-objects through an additional lens positioned between the sample and the camera lens cover. A custom-developed Android application then analyzes these images to determine the levitation height and estimate the density. Using this platform, we were able to separate microspheres with varying densities and calibrate their levitation heights to known densities to develop a technique for precise and accurate density estimation. We have also characterized the magnetic field, the optical imaging capabilities, and the thermal state over time of this platform. PMID:26308615

  6. Impact of granular drops

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2013-07-15

    We investigate the spreading and splashing of granular drops during impact with a solid target. The granular drops are formed from roughly spherical balls of sand mixed with water, which is used as a binder to hold the ball together during free-fall. We measure the instantaneous spread diameter for different impact speeds and find that the normalized spread diameter d/D grows as (tV/D)1/2. The speeds of the grains ejected during the “splash” are measured and they rarely exceed twice that of the impact speed.

  7. Laser-induced rotation of a levitated sample in vacuum

    OpenAIRE

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Paradis, Paul-François

    1999-01-01

    A method of systematically controlling the rotational state of a sample levitated in a high vacuum using the photon pressure is described. A zirconium sphere was levitated in the high-temperature electrostatic levitator and it was rotated by irradiating it with a narrow beam of a high-power laser on a spot off the center of mass. While the laser beam heated the sample, it also rotated the sample with a torque that was proportional both to the laser power and the length of the torque arm. A si...

  8. Smart-Phone Based Magnetic Levitation for Measuring Densities

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie Knowlton; Chu Hsiang Yu; Nupur Jain; Ionita Calin Ghiran; Savas Tasoglu

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic levitation, which uses a magnetic field to suspend objects in a fluid, is a powerful and versatile technology. We develop a compact magnetic levitation platform compatible with a smart-phone to separate micro-objects and estimate the density of the sample based on its levitation height. A 3D printed attachment is mechanically installed over the existing camera unit of a smart-phone. Micro-objects, which may be either spherical or irregular in shape, are suspended in a paramagnetic me...

  9. Tunable Stable Levitation Based on Casimir Interaction between Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianglei; Zhang, Zhuomin M.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum levitation enabled by repulsive Casimir force has been desirable due to the potential exciting applications in passive-suspension devices and frictionless bearings. In this paper, dynamically tunable stable levitation is theoretically demonstrated based on the configuration of dissimilar gratings separated by an intervening fluid using exact scattering theory. The levitation position is insensitive to temperature variations and can be actively tuned by adjusting the lateral displacement between the two gratings. This work investigates the possibility of applying quantum Casimir interactions into macroscopic mechanical devices working in a noncontact and low-friction environment for controlling the position or transducing lateral movement into vertical displacement at the nanoscale.

  10. In Situ Raman Spectroscopic Study of Gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) and Epsomite (MgSO4·7H2O) Dehydration Utilizing an Ultrasonic Levitator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotton, Stephen J; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2013-02-21

    We present an original apparatus combining an acoustic levitator and a pressure-compatible process chamber. To characterize in situ the chemical and physical modifications of a levitated, single particle while heated to well-defined temperatures using a carbon dioxide laser, the chamber is interfaced to a Raman spectroscopic probe. As a proof-of-concept study, by gradually increasing the heating temperature, we observed the variations in the Raman spectra as 150 μg of crystals of gypsum and epsomite were dehydrated in anhydrous nitrogen gas. We display spectra showing the decreasing intensities of the ν1 symmetric and ν3 asymmetric stretching modes of water with time and the simultaneous shift of the ν1(SO4(2-)) symmetric stretch mode to higher wavenumbers. Our results demonstrate that the new apparatus is well suited to study the dehydration of levitated species such as minerals and offers potential advantages compared with previous experiments on bulk samples. PMID:26281883

  11. Coalescence of sessile drops

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolayev, Vadim; Pomeau, Yves; Andrieu, Claire

    2016-01-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical description of the kinetics of coalescence of two water drops on a plane solid surface. The case of partial wetting is considered. The drops are in an atmosphere of nitrogen saturated with water where they grow by condensation and eventually touch each other and coalesce. A new convex composite drop is rapidly formed that then exponentially and slowly relaxes to an equilibrium hemispherical cap. The characteristic relaxation time is proportional to the drop radius R * at final equilibrium. This relaxation time appears to be nearly 10 7 times larger than the bulk capillary relaxation time t b = R * $\\eta$/$\\sigma$, where $\\sigma$ is the gas--liquid surface tension and $\\eta$ is the liquid shear viscosity. In order to explain this extremely large relaxation time, we consider a model that involves an Arrhenius kinetic factor resulting from a liquid--vapour phase change in the vicinity of the contact line. The model results in a large relaxation time of order t b exp(L/R...

  12. An order drop theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Turinici

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A drop theorem on ordered metric spaces is established from the (pre order version of Ekeland’s variational principle in Turinici [An St UAIC Ia (Math, 36 (1990, 329-352]. The logical equivalence between these results is also discussed.

  13. An order drop theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Mihai Turinici

    2006-01-01

    A drop theorem on ordered metric spaces is established from the (pre) order version of Ekeland’s variational principle in Turinici [An St UAIC Ia (Math), 36 (1990), 329-352]. The logical equivalence between these results is also discussed.

  14. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  15. The NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center drop tube user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathz, Thomas J.; Robinson, Michael B.

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive description of the structural and instrumentation hardware and the experimental capabilities of the 105-meter Marshall Space Flight Center Drop Tube Facility is given. This document is to serve as a guide to the investigator who wishes to perform materials processing experiments in the Drop Tube. Particular attention is given to the Tube's hardware to which an investigator must interface to perform experiments. This hardware consists of the permanent structural hardware (with such items as vacuum flanges), and the experimental hardware (with the furnaces and the sample insertion devices). Two furnaces, an electron-beam and an electromagnetic levitator, are currently used to melt metallic samples in a process environment that can range from 10(exp -6) Torr to 1 atmosphere. Details of these furnaces, the processing environment gases/vacuum, the electrical power, and data acquisition capabilities are specified to allow an investigator to design his/her experiment to maximize successful results and to reduce experimental setup time on the Tube. Various devices used to catch samples while inflicting minimum damage and to enhance turnaround time between experiments are described. Enough information is provided to allow an investigator who wishes to build his/her own furnace or sample catch devices to easily interface it to the Tube. The experimental instrumentation and data acquisition systems used to perform pre-drop and in-flight measurements of the melting and solidification process are also detailed. Typical experimental results are presented as an indicator of the type of data that is provided by the Drop Tube Facility. A summary bibliography of past Drop Tube experiments is provided, and an appendix explaining the noncontact temperature determination of free-falling drops is provided. This document is to be revised occasionally as improvements to the Facility are made and as the summary bibliography grows.

  16. Acoustic textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  17. Effects of Bi-2212 addition on the levitation force properties of bulk MgB{sub 2} superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylan Koparan, E. [Bulent Ecevit University, Department of Science Education, Eregli Faculty of Education, Zonguldak (Turkey); Savaskan, B. [Karadeniz Technical University, Energy Systems Engineering, Faculty of Technology, Trabzon (Turkey); Guner, S.B. [Recep Tayyip Erdogan University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Rize (Turkey); Celik, S. [Sinop University, Energy Systems Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Sinop (Turkey)

    2016-02-15

    We present a detailed investigation of the effects of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 1}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 8+κ} (Bi-2212) adding on the levitation force and magnetic properties of bulk MgB{sub 2} obtained by hot press method. The amount of Bi-2212 was varied between 0 and 10 wt% (0, 2, 4, 6, 10 wt%) of the total MgB{sub 2}. Moreover, we present MgB{sub 2} bulk samples fabricated by using different production methods including hot pressing method to our knowledge. All samples were prepared by using elemental magnesium (Mg) powder, amorphous nano-boron (B) powder and Bi-2212 powder which are produced by hot press method. As a result of hot press process, compact pellet samples were manufactured. The vertical and lateral levitation force measurements were executed at the temperatures of 20, 24 and 28 K under zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) regimes for samples with various adding levels. At 24 K and 28 K under ZFC regime, the 2 wt% Bi-2212 added sample exhibits a higher vertical levitation force than the pure sample. Bi-2212 added MgB{sub 2} samples compared to the pure sample have lower attractive force values in FC regime. The magnetic field dependence of the critical current density J{sub c} was calculated from the M-H loops for Bi-2212 added MgB{sub 2} samples. The 2 wt% Bi-2212 added sample has the best levitation and critical current density performance compared to other samples. The critical temperature (T{sub c}) has slightly dropped from 37.8 K for the pure MgB{sub 2} sample to 36.7 K for the 10 wt% of Bi-2212 added sample. The transition temperature slightly decreases when Bi-2212 adding level is increased. (orig.)

  18. Effects of Bi-2212 addition on the levitation force properties of bulk MgB2 superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylan Koparan, E.; Savaskan, B.; Guner, S. B.; Celik, S.

    2016-02-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the effects of Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8+κ (Bi-2212) adding on the levitation force and magnetic properties of bulk MgB2 obtained by hot press method. The amount of Bi-2212 was varied between 0 and 10 wt% (0, 2, 4, 6, 10 wt%) of the total MgB2. Moreover, we present MgB2 bulk samples fabricated by using different production methods including hot pressing method to our knowledge. All samples were prepared by using elemental magnesium (Mg) powder, amorphous nano-boron (B) powder and Bi-2212 powder which are produced by hot press method. As a result of hot press process, compact pellet samples were manufactured. The vertical and lateral levitation force measurements were executed at the temperatures of 20, 24 and 28 K under zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) regimes for samples with various adding levels. At 24 K and 28 K under ZFC regime, the 2 wt% Bi-2212 added sample exhibits a higher vertical levitation force than the pure sample. Bi-2212 added MgB2 samples compared to the pure sample have lower attractive force values in FC regime. The magnetic field dependence of the critical current density J c was calculated from the M-H loops for Bi-2212 added MgB2 samples. The 2 wt% Bi-2212 added sample has the best levitation and critical current density performance compared to other samples. The critical temperature ( T c ) has slightly dropped from 37.8 K for the pure MgB2 sample to 36.7 K for the 10 wt% of Bi-2212 added sample. The transition temperature slightly decreases when Bi-2212 adding level is increased.

  19. The NASA MSFC Electrostatic Levitation (ESL) Laboratory: Summary of Capabilities, Recent Upgrades, and Future Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Vermilion, David J.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory has a long history of providing materials research and thermophysical property data. A summary of the labs capabilities, recent upgrades, and ongoing and future work will be provided. The laboratory has recently added two new capabilities to its main levitation chamber: a rapid quench system and an oxygen control system. The rapid quench system allows samples to be dropped into a quench vessel that can be filled with a low melting point material, such as a gallium or indium alloy. Thereby allowing rapid quenching of undercooled liquid metals. The oxygen control system consists of an oxygen sensor, oxygen pump, and a control unit. The sensor is a potentiometric device that determines the difference in oxygen activity between two gas compartments separated by an electrolyte, which is yttria-stabilized zirconia. The pump utilizes coulometric titration to either add or remove oxygen. The system is controlled by a desktop control unit, which can also be accessed via a computer. This system allows the oxygen partial pressure within the vacuum chamber to be measured and controlled, theoretically in the range from 10-36 to 100 bar. The ESL laboratory also has an emissometer, called the High-Temperature Emissivity Measurement System (HiTEMS). This system measures the spectral emissivity of materials from 600degC to 3,000degC. The system consists of a vacuum chamber, a black body source, and a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR). The system utilizes optics to swap the signal between the sample and the black body. The system was originally designed to measure the hemispherical spectral emissivity of levitated samples, which are typically 2.5mm spheres. Levitation allows emissivity measurements of molten samples, but more work is required to develop this capability. The system is currently setup measure the near-normal spectral emissivity of stationary samples, which has been used

  20. Study of levitating nanoparticles using ultracold neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Voronin, A. Yu; Lambrecht, A.; Reynaud, S.

    2012-09-01

    Physical adsorption of atoms, molecules and clusters on the surface is well known. It is linked to many other phenomena in physics, chemistry and biology and has numerous practical applications. Due to limitations of the analytical tools usually used, studies of adsorption are limited to the particle sizes of up to ˜102-103 atoms. Following a general formalism developed in this field, we apply it to even larger objects and discover qualitatively new phenomena. A large particle is bound to the surface in a deep and broad potential well formed by van der Waals/Casimir-Polder forces appearing due to the particle and surface electric polarization. The well depth is significantly larger than the characteristic energy \\frac{3}{2}k_{\\rm{B}} T of a particle's thermal motion; thus such a nanoparticle is settled in long-living states. Nanoparticles in high-excited states form a two-dimensional gas of objects bound to the surface but quasi-freely traveling along the surface under certain conditions. A particularly interesting feature of this model consists in the prediction of small-energy-transfer inelastic scattering of ultracold neutrons (UCN) on solid/liquid surfaces covered by such levitating nanoparticles/nano-droplets. The change in UCN energy is due to the Doppler shift induced by UCN collisions with nanoparticles/nano-droplets; the energy change is almost as small as the UCN initial energy. We compared theoretical estimations of our model to all existing data on inelastic scattering of UCN with small energy transfers and found that they agree quite well. As our theoretical formalism provides robust predictions of some data and the experimental data are rather detailed and precise, we conclude that the recently discovered intriguing phenomenon of small heating of UCN in traps is due to their collisions with such levitating nanoparticles. Moreover, this new phenomenon might be relevant to the striking contradiction between the results of the neutron lifetime

  1. Drops in Space: Super Oscillations and Surfactant Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfel, Robert E.; Tian, Yuren; Jankovsky, Joseph; Shi, Tao; Chen, X.; Holt, R. Glynn; Trinh, Eugene; Croonquist, Arvid; Thornton, Kathyrn C.; Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Coleman, Catherine; Leslie, Fred W.; Matthiesen, David H.

    1996-01-01

    An unprecedented microgravity observation of maximal shape oscillations of a surfactant-bearing water drop the size of a ping pong ball was observed during a mission of Space Shuttle Columbia as part of the second United States Microgravity Laboratory-USML-2 (STS-73, October 20-November 5, 1995). The observation was precipitated by the action of an intense sound field which produced a deforming force on the drop. When this deforming force was suddenly reduced, the drop executed nearly free and axisymmetric oscillations for several cycles, demonstrating a remarkable amplitude of nonlinear motion. Whether arising from the discussion of modes of oscillation of the atomic nucleus, or the explosion of stars, or how rain forms, the complex processes influencing the motion, fission, and coalescence of drops have fascinated scientists for centuries. Therefore, the axisymmetric oscillations of a maximally deformed liquid drop are noteworthy, not only for their scientific value but also for their aesthetic character. Scientists from Yale University, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Vanderbilt University conducted liquid drop experiments in microgravity using the acoustic positioning/manipulation environment of the Drop Physics Module (DPM). The Yale/JPL group's objectives were to study the rheological properties of liquid drop surfaces on which are adsorbed surfactant molecules, and to infer surface properties such as surface tension, Gibb's elasticity, and surface dilatational viscosity by using a theory which relies on spherical symmetry to solve the momentum and mass transport equations.

  2. Nanometer-scale dynamics of high-temperature levitated liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.L.Price

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We review recent measurements of the microscopic dynamics of high-temperature liquids made with inelastic x-ray scattering and aerodynamic levitation of the samples. Phenomenological and theoretical interpretations are also discussed.

  3. Dimensionless Analysis and Numerical Modeling of Rebalancing Phenomena During Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Shi, Zhe; Li, Donghui; McLean, Alexander; Chattopadhyay, Kinnor

    2016-06-01

    Electromagnetic levitation (EML) has proved to be a powerful tool for research activities in areas pertaining to materials physics and engineering. The customized EML setups in various fields, ranging from solidification to nanomaterial manufacturing, require the designing of stable levitation systems. Since the elevated droplet is opaque, the most effective way to research on EML is mathematical modeling. In the present study, a 3D model was built to investigate the rebalancing phenomenon causing instabilities during droplet melting. A mathematical model modified based on Hooke's law (spring) was proposed to describe the levitation system. This was combined with dimensionless analysis to investigate the generation of levitation forces as it will significantly affect the behavior of the spring model.

  4. Near-field levitated quantum optomechanics with nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, M. L.; Molina-Terriza, G.; Volz, T.; Romero-Isart, O.

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically show that the dipole force of an ensemble of quantum emitters embedded in a dielectric nanosphere can be exploited to achieve near-field optical levitation. The key ingredient is that the polarizability from the ensemble of embedded quantum emitters can be larger than the bulk polarizability of the sphere, thereby enabling the use of repulsive optical potentials and consequently the levitation using optical near fields. In levitated cavity quantum optomechanics, this could be used to boost the single-photon coupling by combining larger polarizability to mass ratio, larger field gradients, and smaller cavity volumes while remaining in the resolved sideband regime and at room temperature. A case study is done with a nanodiamond containing a high density of silicon-vacancy color centers that is optically levitated in the evanescent field of a tapered nanofiber and coupled to a high-finesse microsphere cavity.

  5. Coarse-fine residual gravity cancellation system with magnetic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcudean, S. E.; Davis, H.; Chen, C. T.; Goertz, D. E.; Tryggvason, B. V.

    1992-01-01

    Aircraft flight along parabolic trajectories have been proposed and executed in order to achieve low cost, near free fall conditions of moderate duration. This paper describes a six degree of freedom experiment isolation system designed to cancel out residual accelerations due to mechanical vibrations and errors in aircraft trajectory. The isolation system consists of a fine motion magnetic levitator whose stator is transported by a conventional coarse motion stage. The levitator uses wide gap voice coil actuators and has the dual purpose of isolating the experiment platform from aircraft vibrations and actively cancelling residual accelerations through feedback control. The course motion stage tracks the levitated platform in order to keep the levitator's coils centered within their matching magnetic gaps. Aspects of system design, an analysis of the proposed control strategy and simulation results are presented. Feasibility experiments are also discussed.

  6. Nanometer-scale dynamics of high-temperature levitated liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Price, D. L.; Hennet, L.; I. Pozdnyakova; M.-L. Saboungi

    2008-01-01

    We review recent measurements of the microscopic dynamics of high-temperature liquids made with inelastic x-ray scattering and aerodynamic levitation of the samples. Phenomenological and theoretical interpretations are also discussed.

  7. Electron spin control of optically levitated nanodiamonds in vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thai M; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon; Li, Tongcang

    2016-01-01

    Electron spins of diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres are important quantum resources for nanoscale sensing and quantum information. Combining NV spins with levitated optomechanical resonators will provide a hybrid quantum system for novel applications. Here we optically levitate a nanodiamond and demonstrate electron spin control of its built-in NV centres in low vacuum. We observe that the strength of electron spin resonance (ESR) is enhanced when the air pressure is reduced. To better understand this system, we investigate the effects of trap power and measure the absolute internal temperature of levitated nanodiamonds with ESR after calibration of the strain effect. We also observe that oxygen and helium gases have different effects on both the photoluminescence and the ESR contrast of nanodiamond NV centres, indicating potential applications of NV centres in oxygen gas sensing. Our results pave the way towards a levitated spin-optomechanical system for studying macroscopic quantum mechanics. PMID:27432560

  8. Aerodynamic levitator for large-sized glassy material production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Shinichi; Cho, Won-Seung; Imai, Ryoji

    2015-09-01

    Containerless aerodynamic levitation processing is a unique technology for the fabrication of bulk non-crystalline materials. Using conventional aerodynamic levitation, a high reflective index (RI) material (BaTi2O5 and LaO3/2-TiO2-ZrO2 system) was developed with a RI greater than approximately 2.2, which is similar to that of diamond. However, the glass size was small, approximately 3 mm in diameter. Therefore, it is essential to produce large sized materials for future optical materials applications, such as camera lenses. In this study, a new aerodynamic levitator was designed to produce non-crystalline materials with diameters larger than 6 mm. The concept of this new levitator was to set up a reduced pressure at the top of the molten samples without generating turbulent flow. A numerical simulation was also performed to verify the concept. PMID:26429456

  9. Levitation effects involving high Tc thallium based superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, William G.; Hermann, A. M.; Sheng, Z. Z.

    1988-09-01

    The thallium based superconductor Tl2Ca2Ba2Cu3O(10 + y) has been shown to exhibit very stable and unusual levitation equilibria in various arrangements involving this material and permanent magnets. Attractive and repulsive forces are evident in experiments in which samples are levitated above and below magnets. Photographs of these experiments and approximate quantitative discussions of the results are given.

  10. Adaptive Inverse Optimal Control of a Magnetic Levitation System

    OpenAIRE

    Satoh, Yasuyuki; Nakamura, Hisakazu; Katayama, Hitoshi; Nishitani, Hirokazu

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we proposed an adaptive inverse optimal controller for the magnetic levitation system. First, we designed an inverse optimal controller with a pre-feedback gravity compensator and applied it to the magnetic levitation system. However, this controller cannot guarantee any stability margin. We demonstrated that the controller did not work well (offset error remained) in the experiment. Hence, we proposed an improved controller via an adaptive control technique to guarantee the ...

  11. Control and dynamics of an anti-friction levitation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ih, C.-H. C.; Vivian, H.; Ahmed, A.; Wang, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    A novel anti-friction levitator concept has been devised and analytically evaluated to overcome support bearing friction and thereby minimize the structural damping of the Large Spacecraft Control Laboratory (LSCL) experiment structure at JPL. A dynamic model and controller design have been developed for the new levitation system. Simulation results show excellent system performance even when the system is subjected to significant measurement noise and hardware saturation effects.

  12. Quantifying the levitation picture of extended states in lattice models

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Ana L. C.; Schulz, P. A.

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of extended states is quantitatively analyzed for two dimensional lattice models. A levitation picture is established for both white-noise and correlated disorder potentials. In a continuum limit window of the lattice models we find simple quantitative expressions for the extended states levitation, suggesting an underlying universal behavior. On the other hand, these results point out that the Quantum Hall phase diagrams may be disorder dependent.

  13. SWISSMETRO - Polarized Linear Motor Combined With Levitation Actuators

    OpenAIRE

    Cassat, A.; Espanet, C.; Bourquin, V.; Hagmann, P.; Jufer, M.

    2005-01-01

    SWISSMETRO is a MAGLEV Project, designed for a speed up to 500 km/h in two tunnels under partial vacuum. The authors investigate new possibilities to combine the propulsion and levitation. Polarized inductors for the levitation are studied, implying a polarized (permanent magnet) synchronous linear motor. The thermal behavior is investigated using a numerical platform of the complete vehicle-tunnel system and computational fluid dynamic analysis.

  14. Bearing gap adjustment for improvement of levitation performance in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yoshida, Fumihiko; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate a bearing gap adjustment for improvement of levitation performance in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump to realize a blood pump with a low hemolysis level. The impeller levitates axially by balancing a gravitational force, buoyancy, a magnetic force, and hydrodynamic forces on the top and bottom sides of the impeller. To adjust the levitation position of the impeller, the balance of acting forces on the impeller was adjusted by changing the shroud area on the bottom impeller. Three pumps having various shroud area were prepared as tested models: 817 mm(2) (HH-S), 875 mm(2) (HH-M) and 931 mm(2) (HH-L). First, for evaluating the bearing gap adjustment, the bearing gap was estimated by calculating a balancing position of the acting forces on the impeller. We actually measured the gravitational force, buoyancy and the magnetic force, and numerically analyzed hydrodynamic forces on the top and bottom sides of the impeller. Second, to verify accuracy of the estimated bearing gap, the measurement test of the bearing gap was performed. Finally, an in-vitro hemolysis test was performed to evaluate a hemolysis level of the pump. As a result, bottom bearing gaps were estimated as 40 μm (HH-S), 60 μm (HH-M) and 238 μm (HH-L). In the measurement test, bottom bearing gaps were measured as 63 μm (HH-S), 219 μm (HH-M), and 231 μm (HH-L). The estimated bearing gaps had positively correlated with the measured bearing gaps in relation to the shroud area on the impeller. In the hemolysis test, hemolysis level in every model was almost equivalent to that of BPX-80, when the bearing gap was adjusted greater than 60 μm. We could adjust the bearing gap by changing the shroud area on the impeller for improvement of levitation performance to realize a blood pump with a low hemolysis level.

  15. Bearing gap adjustment for improvement of levitation performance in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yoshida, Fumihiko; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate a bearing gap adjustment for improvement of levitation performance in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump to realize a blood pump with a low hemolysis level. The impeller levitates axially by balancing a gravitational force, buoyancy, a magnetic force, and hydrodynamic forces on the top and bottom sides of the impeller. To adjust the levitation position of the impeller, the balance of acting forces on the impeller was adjusted by changing the shroud area on the bottom impeller. Three pumps having various shroud area were prepared as tested models: 817 mm(2) (HH-S), 875 mm(2) (HH-M) and 931 mm(2) (HH-L). First, for evaluating the bearing gap adjustment, the bearing gap was estimated by calculating a balancing position of the acting forces on the impeller. We actually measured the gravitational force, buoyancy and the magnetic force, and numerically analyzed hydrodynamic forces on the top and bottom sides of the impeller. Second, to verify accuracy of the estimated bearing gap, the measurement test of the bearing gap was performed. Finally, an in-vitro hemolysis test was performed to evaluate a hemolysis level of the pump. As a result, bottom bearing gaps were estimated as 40 μm (HH-S), 60 μm (HH-M) and 238 μm (HH-L). In the measurement test, bottom bearing gaps were measured as 63 μm (HH-S), 219 μm (HH-M), and 231 μm (HH-L). The estimated bearing gaps had positively correlated with the measured bearing gaps in relation to the shroud area on the impeller. In the hemolysis test, hemolysis level in every model was almost equivalent to that of BPX-80, when the bearing gap was adjusted greater than 60 μm. We could adjust the bearing gap by changing the shroud area on the impeller for improvement of levitation performance to realize a blood pump with a low hemolysis level. PMID:26736996

  16. Full Rotational Control of Levitated Silicon Nanorods

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhn, Stefan; Stickler, Benjamin A; Patolsky, Fernando; Hornberger, Klaus; Arndt, Markus; Millen, James

    2016-01-01

    We study a nanofabricated silicon rod levitated in an optical trap. By manipulating the polarization of the light we gain full control over the ro-translational dynamics of the rod. We are able to trap both its centre-of-mass and align it along the linear polarization of the laser field. The rod can be set into rotation at a tuned frequency by exploiting the radiation pressure exerted by elliptically polarized light. The rotational motion of the rod dynamically modifies the optical potential, which allows tuning of the rotational frequency over hundreds of Kilohertz. This ability to trap and control the motion and alignment of nanoparticles opens up the field of rotational optomechanics, rotational ground state cooling and the study of rotational thermodynamics in the underdamped regime.

  17. Photophoretic levitation of engineered aerosols for geoengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, David W

    2010-09-21

    Aerosols could be injected into the upper atmosphere to engineer the climate by scattering incident sunlight so as to produce a cooling tendency that may mitigate the risks posed by the accumulation of greenhouse gases. Analysis of climate engineering has focused on sulfate aerosols. Here I examine the possibility that engineered nanoparticles could exploit photophoretic forces, enabling more control over particle distribution and lifetime than is possible with sulfates, perhaps allowing climate engineering to be accomplished with fewer side effects. The use of electrostatic or magnetic materials enables a class of photophoretic forces not found in nature. Photophoretic levitation could loft particles above the stratosphere, reducing their capacity to interfere with ozone chemistry; and, by increasing particle lifetimes, it would reduce the need for continual replenishment of the aerosol. Moreover, particles might be engineered to drift poleward enabling albedo modification to be tailored to counter polar warming while minimizing the impact on equatorial climates.

  18. Capillary solitons on a levitated medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrard, S; Deike, L; Duchêne, C; Pham, C-T

    2015-07-01

    A water cylinder deposited on a heated channel levitates on its own generated vapor film owing to the Leidenfrost effect. This experimental setup permits the study of the one-dimensional propagation of surface waves in a free-to-move liquid system. We report the observation of gravity-capillary waves under a dramatic reduction of gravity (up to a factor 30), leading to capillary waves at the centimeter scale. The generated nonlinear structures propagate without deformation and undergo mutual collisions and reflections at the boundaries of the domain. They are identified as Korteweg-de Vries solitons with negative amplitude and subsonic velocity. The typical width and amplitude-dependent velocities are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions based on a generalized Korteweg-de Vries equation adapted to any substrate geometry. When multiple solitons are present, they interact and form a soliton turbulencelike spectrum. PMID:26274114

  19. Nano-optomechanics with optically levitated nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukirch, Levi P.; Vamivakas, A. Nick

    2015-01-01

    Nano-optomechanics is a vibrant area of research that continues to push the boundary of quantum science and measurement technology. Recently, it has been realised that the optical forces experienced by polarisable nanoparticles can provide a novel platform for nano-optomechanics with untethered mechanical oscillators. Remarkably, these oscillators are expected to exhibit quality factors approaching ?. The pronounced quality factors are a direct result of the mechanical oscillator being freed from a supporting substrate. This review provides an overview of the basic optical physics underpinning optical trapping and optical levitation experiments, it discusses a number of experimental approaches to optical trapping and finally outlines possible applications of this nano-optomechanics modality in hybrid quantum systems and nanoscale optical metrology.

  20. Magnetic levitation Maglev technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Hyung-Suk

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of magnetic levitation (Maglev) technologies, from fundamental principles through to the state-of-the-art, and describes applications both realised and under development. It includes a history of Maglev science and technology showing the various milestones in its advancement. The core concepts, operating principles and main challenges of Maglev applications attempted across various fields are introduced and discussed. The principle difficulties encountered when applying Maglev technology to different systems, namely air gap control and stabilization, are addressed in detail. The book describes how major advancements in linear motor and magnet technologies have enabled the development of the linear-motor-powered Maglev train, which has a high speed advantage over conventional wheeled trains and has the potential to reach speed levels achieved by aircraft. However, many expect that Maglev technology to be a green technology that is applied not only in rail transportat...

  1. Eddy damping effect of additional conductors in superconducting levitation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhao-Fei; Gou, Xiao-Fan

    2015-12-01

    Passive superconducting levitation systems consisting of a high temperature superconductor (HTSC) and a permanent magnet (PM) have demonstrated several fascinating applications such as the maglev system, flywheel energy storage. Generally, for the HTSC-PM levitation system, the HTSC with higher critical current density Jc can obtain larger magnetic force to make the PM levitate over the HTSC (or suspended below the HTSC), however, the process of the vibration of the levitated PM, provides very limited inherent damping (essentially hysteresis). To improve the dynamic stability of the levitated PM, eddy damping of additional conductors can be considered as the most simple and effective approach. In this article, for the HTSC-PM levitation system with an additional copper damper attached to the HTSC, we numerically and comprehensively investigated the damping coefficient c, damping ratio, Joule heating of the copper damper, and the vibration frequency of the PM as well. Furthermore, we comparatively studied four different arrangements of the copper damper, on the comprehensive analyzed the damping effect, efficiency (defined by c/VCu, in which VCu is the volume of the damper) and Joule heating, and finally presented the most advisable arrangement.

  2. Optical Levitation of Micro-Scale Particles in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    2004-01-01

    Success has been achieved using a radiation pressure gradient to levitate microscale particles in air for as long as four hours. This work is performed as a precursor to the development of a vacuum based optical tweezers interrogation tool for nanotechnology research. It was decided to first proceed with solving the problem of achieving optical levitation of a micro-scale particle in air before trying the same in a vacuum environment. This successful optical levitation in air confirms the work of Ashkin and Dziedzic. Levitation of 10 and 13.8 microns diameter polystyrene spheres was achieved, as well as the levitation of 10 and 100 microns diameter glass spheres. Particles were raised and lowered. A modicum of success was achieved translating particles horizontally. Trapping of multiple particles in one laser beam has been photographed. Also, it has been observed that particles, that may be conglomerates or irregular in shape, can also be trapped by a focused laser beam. Levitated glass beads were photographed using laser light scattered from the beads. The fact that there is evidence of optical traps in air containing irregular and conglomerate particles provides hope that future tool particles need not be perfect spheres.

  3. Magnetic characterization of YBCO superconductors for levitation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulk cylindrical blocks of YBCO High Temperature Superconductors are prepared by a melt-texturing process. The integral magnetic and levitation properties of a melt textured block are determined by the interactions in an ensemble of large single oriented grains. The anisotropic intragrain properties have been measured on mechanically extracted single grains by vibration magnetometry. In order to correlate intragrain magnetization data, grain size, and grain orientation with the macroscopic levitation properties a special measurement system was developed. Radial and axial levitation forces are detected by permanent magnet sensors coupled with piezo force sensors and moved by a position robot system over the superconductor. Different sizes of permanent magnets enable integral and local detection of levitation forces respectively. Measurements are made in the zero field cooled state as well as in the field cooled state. Minor hysteresis loops are used to determine the magnetic stiffness at different points on the major hysteresis loop. The minor loops have a finite width indicating losses by flux lattice motion. These losses are important for the damping properties in levitation applications. Instead of the force sensor a Hall probe can be used for the detection of frozen remanent fields. To demonstrate principal levitation properties a hybrid superconducting magnetic bearing has been constructed. (orig.)

  4. Encapsulating Ellipsoids in Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Michael; Brugarolas, Teresa; Chou, Jonathan; Bau, Haim; Lee, Daeyeon

    2012-11-01

    Large aspect ratio particles were produced by embedding spherical polystyrene particles within a polymer film and subsequently heating and stretching the film. Particles were released by dissolving the film. Using a flow-focusing device, the elongated particles were partially encapsulated within droplets of fluid A, such as water, surrounded by an immiscible fluid B, such as oil. Drop volumes were controlled by adjusting the flow rates of fluids A and B. The contact angle was adjusted indirectly by varying the amount of surfactant adsorbed to the particle surface. The encapsulation process was visualized with a high-speed video camera. We observed cases ranging from partial to complete encapsulation and examined experimentally and theoretically the shape of the interface between fluid A and fluid B as a function of the drop volume. The numerically predicted position of the pinning line and the shape of the drop were compared to experimentally produced conformations and agreed favorably. This work was supported by ITMAT (UL1RR024134 from the NCRR) and the Penn MRSEC (NSF DMR-1120901).

  5. Coalescence of Liquid Drops

    CERN Document Server

    Eggers, J; Stone, H A; Eggers, Jens; Lister, John R.; Stone, Howard A.

    1999-01-01

    When two drops of radius $R$ touch, surface tension drives an initially singular motion which joins them into a bigger drop with smaller surface area. This motion is always viscously dominated at early times. We focus on the early-time behavior of the radius $\\rmn$ of the small bridge between the two drops. The flow is driven by a highly curved meniscus of length $2\\pi \\rmn$ and width $\\Delta\\ll\\rmn$ around the bridge, from which we conclude that the leading-order problem is asymptotically equivalent to its two-dimensional counterpart. An exact two-dimensional solution for the case of inviscid surroundings [Hopper, J. Fluid Mech. ${\\bf 213}$, 349 (1990)] shows that R)]$; and thus the same is true in three dimensions. The case of coalescence with an external viscous fluid is also studied in detail both analytically and numerically. A significantly different structure is found in which the outer fluid forms a toroidal bubble of radius $\\Delta \\propto \\rmn^{3/2}$ at the meniscus and $\\rmn \\sim (t\\gamma/4\\pi\\eta)...

  6. Dependence of levitation force on frequency of an oscillating magnetic levitation field in a bulk YBCO superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Hamilton; Pate, Stephen; Goedecke, George

    2013-02-01

    The dependence of the magnetic field strength required for levitation of a melt textured, single domain YBCO superconductor disk on the frequency of the current generating the levitating magnetic field has been investigated. The magnetic field strength is found to be independent of frequency between 10 and 300 Hz. This required field strength is found to be in good experimental and theoretical agreement with the field strength required to levitate the same superconductor with a non-oscillating magnetic field. Hysteretic losses within the superconductor predicted by Bean’s critical-state model were also calculated. The measured data rules out any significant Bean’s model effects on the required levitation field strength within the measured frequency range.

  7. Radiation acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  8. Dependence of levitation force on frequency of an oscillating magnetic levitation field in a bulk YBCO superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Hamilton, E-mail: hcarter3@nmsu.edu [Department of Physics, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Pate, Stephen, E-mail: pate@nmsu.edu [Department of Physics, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Goedecke, George, E-mail: ggoedeck@nmsu.edu [Department of Physics, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2013-02-14

    Highlights: ► AC magnetic field strength required for levitation is independent of frequency. ► RMS magnetic field strength is in good agreement with DC magnetic field strength. ► Dependence of YBCO levitation force on AC magnetic field frequency is investigated. -- Abstract: The dependence of the magnetic field strength required for levitation of a melt textured, single domain YBCO superconductor disk on the frequency of the current generating the levitating magnetic field has been investigated. The magnetic field strength is found to be independent of frequency between 10 and 300 Hz. This required field strength is found to be in good experimental and theoretical agreement with the field strength required to levitate the same superconductor with a non-oscillating magnetic field. Hysteretic losses within the superconductor predicted by Bean’s critical-state model were also calculated. The measured data rules out any significant Bean’s model effects on the required levitation field strength within the measured frequency range.

  9. New directions for gravity-wave physics via "Millikan oil drops"

    CERN Document Server

    Chiao, R Y

    2006-01-01

    Pairs of Planck-mass--scale drops of superfluid helium coated by electrons (i.e., "Millikan oil drops"), when levitated in a superconducting magnetic trap in the presence of strong magnetic fields and at low temperatures, can be efficient quantum transducers between electromagnetic (EM) and gravitational (GR) radiation. A Hertz-like experiment, in which EM waves are converted at the source into GR waves, and then back-converted at the receiver from GR waves back into EM waves, should be practical to perform. As a step in this direction, an experiment to measure the quadrupolar electromagnetic scattering cross-section of a pair of "Millikan oil drops" will be performed first.

  10. Room Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  11. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  12. Battlefield acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  13. Acoustics Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  14. Mechanically-Excited Sessile Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Bostwick, Joshua; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2010-11-01

    The volume and contact-line mobility of a sessile drop determine the frequency response of the drop to mechanical excitation. A useful signature of the drop is its response to a sweep of frequency. At particular frequencies the drop exhibits standing wave patterns of different mode numbers and/or azimuthal, spinning motion. We report observations of the spectrum of standing wave patterns and compare to predictions of a linear stability theory. On the side of application, the results suggest how to tune the pinning-unpinning of a sessile drop in order to maximize its translation.

  15. Acoustic rainbow trapping by coiling up space

    KAUST Repository

    Ni, Xu

    2014-11-13

    We numerically realize the acoustic rainbow trapping effect by tapping an air waveguide with space-coiling metamaterials. Due to the high refractive-index of the space-coiling metamaterials, our device is more compact compared to the reported trapped-rainbow devices. A numerical model utilizing effective parameters is also calculated, whose results are consistent well with the direct numerical simulation of space-coiling structure. Moreover, such device with the capability of dropping different frequency components of a broadband incident temporal acoustic signal into different channels can function as an acoustic wavelength division de-multiplexer. These results may have potential applications in acoustic device design such as an acoustic filter and an artificial cochlea.

  16. Stable levitation of steel rotors using permanent magnets and high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, J. R.; Passmore, J. L.; Mulcahy, T. M.; Rossing, T. D.

    1994-07-01

    Individual freely spinning magnetic steel rotors were levitated by combining the attractive force between permanent magnets and the rotor with the repulsive force between high-temperature superconductors and the steel. The levitation force and stiffness of several configurations are presented, and the application of this levitation method to high-speed bearings is discussed.

  17. Predictions for Electrostatic Dust Levitation about Bennu's Equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, C. M.; Zimmerman, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    Electrostatic dust levitation was first hypothesized to occur on the Moon due to observations of Lunar Horizon Glow and results from the Apollo 17 LEAM instrument. Due to their weaker gravitational acceleration and similar plasma environment, electrostatic dust motion was also hypothesized to occur on asteroids. There is still no conclusive evidence, however, that electrostatic levitation occurs on either asteroids or the Moon. The OSIRIS-REx mission will visit the asteroid Bennu in 2018-2019. We have numerically modeled the plasma environment around the equator of Bennu, with the asteroid assumed to have a circular equatorial cross section. Our plasma model presents a significant improvement over previous semi-analytical models as it can seamlessly capture the transition from day-side plasma sheath to night-side plasma wake. Using the plasma model and assuming a uniform density for gravity calculations, we identify the altitudes, longitudinal locations, and the associated grain sizes at which electrostatic levitation is expected to occur. Our predictions of dust levitation at Bennu will enable assessments of the observability of levitating dust during the OSIRIS-REx mission and guide any observations.

  18. The Lunar dusty plasmas -levitation and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamaniuk, Barbara; Rothkaehl, Hanna

    Lunar dust can exhibit unusual behavior -due to electron photoemission via solar-UV radiation the lunar surface represents a complex plasma -"dusty plasma". The dust grains and lunar surface are electrostatically charged by the Moon's interaction with the local plasma environ-ment and the photoemission of electrons due to solar UV and X-rays. This effect causes the like-charged surface and dust particles to repel each other, and creates a near-surface electric field. Lunar dust must be treated as a dusty plasma. Using analytic (kinetic (Vlasov) and magnetohydrodynamic theory ) and numerical modeling we show physical processes related to levitation and transport dusty plasma on the Moon. These dust grains could affect the lunar environment for radio wave and plasma diagnostics and interfere with exploration activities. References: 1. Wilson T.L. (1992), in Analysis of Interplanetary Dust, M. Zolensky et al. AIP Conf.Proc. 310, 33-44 (AIP, NY), 2.Wilson T.L."LUNAR DUST AND DUSTY PLASMA PHYSICS".40th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (2009), 3. Grün E., et al.(1993),Nature 363, 144. 4. Morfill G. and Grün E.(1979), Planet. Space Sci.. 27, 1269, 1283, 5. Manka R. and Michel F. (1971), Proc. 2nd Lun. Sci. Conf. 2, 1717 (MIT Press, Cambridge). 6. Manka R. et al.(1973), Lun. Sci.-III, 504. 7. Barbara Atamaniuk "Kinetic Description of Localized Plasma Structure in Dusty Plasmas". Czechoslovak Journal of Physics Vol.54 C 2004

  19. Partial squeeze film levitation modulates fingertip friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiertlewski, Michaël; Fenton Friesen, Rebecca; Colgate, J Edward

    2016-08-16

    When touched, a glass plate excited with ultrasonic transverse waves feels notably more slippery than it does at rest. To study this phenomenon, we use frustrated total internal reflection to image the asperities of the skin that are in intimate contact with a glass plate. We observed that the load at the interface is shared between the elastic compression of the asperities of the skin and a squeeze film of air. Stroboscopic investigation reveals that the time evolution of the interfacial gap is partially out of phase with the plate vibration. Taken together, these results suggest that the skin bounces against the vibrating plate but that the bounces are cushioned by a squeeze film of air that does not have time to escape the interfacial separation. This behavior results in dynamic levitation, in which the average number of asperities in intimate contact is reduced, thereby reducing friction. This improved understanding of the physics of friction reduction provides key guidelines for designing interfaces that can dynamically modulate friction with soft materials and biological tissues, such as human fingertips. PMID:27482117

  20. Cavity cooling of an optically levitated nanoparticle

    CERN Document Server

    Kiesel, Nikolai; Delic, Uros; Grass, David; Kaltenbaek, Rainer; Aspelmeyer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The ability to trap and to manipulate individual atoms is at the heart of current implementations of quantum simulations, quantum computing, and long-distance quantum communication. Controlling the motion of larger particles opens up yet new avenues for quantum science, both for the study of fundamental quantum phenomena in the context of matter wave interference, and for new sensing and transduction applications in the context of quantum optomechanics. Specifically, it has been suggested that cavity cooling of a single nanoparticle in high vacuum allows for the generation of quantum states of motion in a room-temperature environment as well as for unprecedented force sensitivity. Here, we take the first steps into this regime. We demonstrate cavity cooling of an optically levitated nanoparticle consisting of approximately 10e9 atoms. The particle is trapped at modest vacuum levels of a few millibar in the standing-wave field of an optical cavity and is cooled through coherent scattering into the modes of the...

  1. Polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide under magnetic levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Y [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8526 (Japan); Katsumoto, Y [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8526 (Japan); Ohishi, Y [Faculty of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8526 (Japan); Koyama, M [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8526 (Japan); Ohno, K [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8526 (Japan); Akita, M [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8526 (Japan); Inoue, K [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8526 (Japan); Tanimoto, Y [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8526 (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    A study of an effect of the magnetic levitation on polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide at room temperature was carried out. The magnetic levitation environment, which is created by strong and upward magnetic force counterbalanced with the downward gravitational force, is multiple environment consisting of both the microgravity and the strong magnetic field which is lacking in a space vehicle orbiting around the earth. In this work, the effect was evaluated from the viewpoint of the number-average molecular weight (M{sub n}) and the polydispersity (the index of the molecular weight distribution) of the synthesized polymer. A small extent ({approx}10 %) of the effect was observed on both the parameters. When the polymer was synthesized under the magnetic levitation environment, M{sub n}increased while the polydispersity decreased as compared with those of the polymer synthesized under the gravity.

  2. Electrostatic Levitation: A Tool to Support Materials Research in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jan; SanSoucie, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Containerless processing represents an important topic for materials research in microgravity. Levitated specimens are free from contact with a container, which permits studies of deeply undercooled melts, and high-temperature, highly reactive materials. Containerless processing provides data for studies of thermophysical properties, phase equilibria, metastable state formation, microstructure formation, undercooling, and nucleation. The European Space Agency (ESA) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) jointly developed an electromagnetic levitator facility (MSL-EML) for containerless materials processing in space. The electrostatic levitator (ESL) facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center provides support for the development of containerless processing studies for the ISS. Apparatus and techniques have been developed to use the ESL to provide data for phase diagram determination, creep resistance, emissivity, specific heat, density/thermal expansion, viscosity, surface tension and triggered nucleation of melts. The capabilities and results from selected ESL-based characterization studies performed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center will be presented.

  3. Damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.

    2009-12-15

    Methods and apparatuses for improved damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. A superconducting element (e.g., a stator) generating a magnetic field and a magnet (e.g. a rotor) supported by the magnetic field are provided such that the superconducting element is supported relative to a ground state with damped motion substantially perpendicular to the support of the magnetic field on the magnet. Applying this, a cryostat housing the superconducting bearing may be coupled to the ground state with high damping but low radial stiffness, such that its resonant frequency is less than that of the superconducting bearing. The damping of the cryostat may be substantially transferred to the levitated magnetic rotor, thus, providing damping without affecting the rotational loss, as can be derived applying coupled harmonic oscillator theory in rotor dynamics. Thus, damping can be provided to a levitated object, without substantially affecting the rotational loss.

  4. Diamagnetically-stabilized levitation control of an intraluminal magnetic capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Michael; Mintchev, Martin P

    2008-01-01

    Controlled navigation promotes full utilization of capsule endoscopy for reliable real-time diagnosis in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, but intermittent natural peristalsis can disturb the navigational control, destabilize the capsule and take it out of levitation. A real-size magnetic navigation system that can handle peristaltic forces of up to 1.5 N was designed utilizing the computer-aided design (CAD) system Maxwell 3D (Ansoft, Pittsburg, PA), and was verified using a small-size physical experimental setup. The proposed system contains a pair of 50-cm in diameter, 10,000-turns copper electromagnets with a 10-cm by 10-cm ferrous core driven by currents of up to 300 Amperes and can successfully maintain position control over the levitating capsule during peristalsis. The addition of Bismuth diamagnetic casing for stabilizing the levitating capsule was also studied. PMID:19163990

  5. Optically Levitated Microspheres as a Probe for New Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Alexander; Moore, David; Blakemore, Charles; Lu, Marie; Gratta, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    We are developing novel techniques to probe new interactions at micron distances using optically levitated dielectric microspheres. Levitated microspheres are an ideal probe for short-range interactions because they are suspended using the radiation pressure at the focus of a laser beam, which means that the microspheres can be precisely manipulated and isolated from the surrounding environment at high vacuum. We have performed a search for unknown charged particles bound within the bulk of the microspheres. Currently, we are searching for the presence of a Chameleon field postulated to explain the presence of dark energy in the universe. In the future we plan to use optically levitated microspheres to search for micron length-scale gravity like interactions that could couple between a microsphere and another mass. We will present resent results from these experiments and plans for future searches for new interactions.

  6. Acoustic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  7. On the force relaxation in the magnetic levitation system with a high-Tc superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of magnetic flux creep on the lift force in a magnet/superconductor system was studied. It was shown experimentally that in the case of real levitation (when a levitating object bears only on a magnetic field) the suspension height and consequently the lift force did not change over a long period of time. When the levitating object is fixed for some time (i.e. a rigid constraint is imposed on it), the levitation height decreases after removal of the external constraint. It is assumed that free oscillations of the levitating object slow down the flux creep process, which is activated when these oscillations are suppressed. (paper)

  8. Dimensionless Analysis and Mathematical Modeling of Electromagnetic Levitation (EML) of Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Shi, Zhe; Li, Donghui; Yang, Yindong; Zhang, Guifang; McLean, Alexander; Chattopadhyay, Kinnor

    2016-02-01

    Electromagnetic levitation (EML), a contactless metal melting method, can be used to produce ultra-pure metals and alloys. In the EML process, the levitation force exerted on the droplet is of paramount importance and is affected by many parameters. In this paper, the relationship between levitation force and parameters affecting the levitation process were investigated by dimensionless analysis. The general formula developed by dimensionless analysis was tested and evaluated by numerical modeling. This technique can be employed to design levitation systems for a variety of materials.

  9. Toward Quantum-Limited Position Measurements Using Optically Levitated Microspheres

    CERN Document Server

    Libbrecht, K G; Libbrecht, Kenneth G.; Black, Eric D

    2003-01-01

    We describe the use of optically levitated microspheres as test masses in experiments aimed at reaching and potentially exceeding the standard quantum limit for position measurements. Optically levitated microspheres have low mass and are essentially free of suspension thermal noise, making them well suited for reaching the quantum regime. Table-top experiments using microspheres can bridge the gap between quantum-limited position measurements of single atoms and measurements with multi-kg test masses like those being used in interferometric gravitational wave detectors.

  10. Statics of levitated vehicle model with hybrid magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Desheng LI; Zhiyuan LU; Tianwu DONG

    2009-01-01

    By studying the special characteristics of permanent and electronic magnets, a levitated vehicle model with hybrid magnets is established. The mathematical model of the vehicle is built based on its dynamics equation by studying its machine structure and working principle. Based on the model, the basic characteristics and the effect between the excluding forces from permanent magnets in three different spatial directions are analyzed, statics characteristics of the interference forces in three different spatial directions are studied, and self-adjusting equilibrium characteristics and stabilization are analyzed. Based on the structure above, the vehicle can levitate steadily by control system adjustment.

  11. Cascade Control of Magnetic Levitation with Sliding Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eroğlu Yakup

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness and applicability of magnetic levitation systems need precise feedback control designs. A cascade control approach consisting of sliding mode control plus sliding mode control (SMC plus SMC is designed to solve position control problem and to provide a high control performance and robustness to the magnetic levitation plant. It is shown that the SMC plus SMC cascade controller is able to eliminate the effects of the inductance related uncertainties of the electromagnetic coil of the plant and achieve a robust and precise position control. Experimental and numerical results are provided to validate the effectiveness and feasibility of the method.

  12. Simulation Model of Magnetic Levitation Based on NARX Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Antić

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present analysis of different training types for nonlinear autoregressive neural network, used for simulation of magnetic levitation system. First, the model of this highly nonlinear system is described and after that the Nonlinear Auto Regressive eXogenous (NARX of neural network model is given. Also, numerical optimization techniques for improved network training are described. It is verified that NARX neural network can be successfully used to simulate real magnetic levitation system if suitable training procedure is chosen, and the best two training types, obtained from experimental results, are described in details.

  13. FPGA Fuzzy Controller Design for Magnetic Ball Levitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basil Hamed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available this paper presents a fuzzy controller design for nonlinear system using FPGA. A magnetic levitation system is considered as a case study and the fuzzy controller is designed to keep a magnetic object suspended in the air counteracting the weight of the object. Fuzzy controller will be implemented using FPGA chip. The design will use a high-level programming language HDL for implementing the fuzzy logic controller using the Xfuzzy tools to implement the fuzzy logic controller into HDL code. This paper, advocates a novel approach to implement the fuzzy logic controller for magnetic ball levitation system by using FPGA.

  14. Search for Millicharged Particles Using Optically Levitated Microspheres

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, David C; Gratta, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    We report results from a search for stable particles with charge > $10^{-5}$ e in bulk matter using levitated dielectric microspheres in high vacuum. No evidence for such particles was found in a total sample of 1.4 ng, providing an upper limit on the abundance per nucleon of 2.5 x $10^{-14}$ at the 95% confidence level for the material tested. These results provide the first direct search for single particles with charge < 0.1 e bound in macroscopic quantities of matter and demonstrate the ability to perform sensitive force measurements using optically levitated microspheres in vacuum.

  15. Optical sample-position sensing for electrostatic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, G.; Chung, S.; Elleman, D.; Whim, W. K.

    1989-01-01

    A comparative study is conducted for optical position-sensing techniques applicable to micro-G conditions sample-levitation systems. CCD sensors are compared with one- and two-dimensional position detectors used in electrostatic particle levitation. In principle, the CCD camera method can be improved from current resolution levels of 200 microns through the incorporation of a higher-pixel device and more complex digital signal processor interface. Nevertheless, the one-dimensional position detectors exhibited superior, better-than-one-micron resolution.

  16. Electromagnetic Levitation: A Useful Tool in Microgravity Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, Julian; Schwartz, Elliot; Hyers, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Electromagnetic levitation is one area of the electromagnetic processing of materials that has uses for both fundamental research and practical applications. This technique was successfully used on the Space Shuttle Columbia during the Spacelab IML-2 mission in July 1994 as a platform for accurately measuring the surface tensions of liquid metals and alloys. In this article, we discuss the key transport phenomena associated with electromagnetic levitation, the fundamental relationships associated with thermophysical property measurement that can be made using this technique, reasons for working in microgravity, and some of the results obtained from the microgravity experiments.

  17. Stabilised electromagnetic levitation at 2-13 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danley, T. J.; Schiffman, R. A.; Weber, J. K. R.; Krishnan, S.; Rey, C. A.; Bruno, P. A.; Nordine, P. C.

    1991-01-01

    SEL, the Stabilised Electromagnetic Levitator, has been developed to exploit the unique design opportunities available in containerless microgravity experiments. Efficiency and versatility are obtained with multiple coils driven by individual broadband amplifiers whose phase and frequency are controlled. The heating and positioning fields are decoupled. Specimen translation, spin, and for liquids, shape may be adjusted. An open coil structure provides access for optical and diagnostic probes. Results of experiments with a prototype device are discussed. Levitating and heating materials on earth were demonstrated at frequencies up to 13 MHz.

  18. Electrostatic levitation technology for thermophysical properties of molten materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of thermophysical properties of undercooled liquids often require some kind of levitator which isolates samples from container walls. We introduce in this presentation a high temperature/high vacuum electrostatic levitator (HTHVESL) which promises some unique capabilities for the studies of thermophysical properties of molten materials. Although substantial progress has been made in the past several months, this technology is still in the development stage, therefore, in this presentation we only focus on the present state of the HTHVESL(1) and point out other capabilities which might be realized in the near future.

  19. Effect of permanent-magnet irregularities in levitation force measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, J. R.

    1999-10-14

    In the measurement of the levitation force between a vertically magnetized permanent magnet (PM) and a bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS), PM domains with horizontal components of magnetization are shown to produce a nonnegligible contribution to the levitation force in most systems. Such domains are typically found in all PMs, even in those that exhibit zero net horizontal magnetic moment. Extension of this analysis leads to an HTS analog of Earnshaw's theorem, in which at the field-cooling position the vertical stiffness is equal to the sum of the horizontal stiffnesses, independent of angular distribution of magnetic moments within the PM.

  20. Excited Sessile Drops Dance Harmonically

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul H.

    2013-01-01

    In our fluid dynamics video, we demonstrate our method of visualizing and identifying various mode shapes of mechanically oscillated sessile drops. By placing metal mesh under an oscillating drop and projecting light from below, the drop's shape is visualized by the visually deformed mesh pattern seen in the top view. The observed modes are subsequently identified by their number of layers and sectors. An alternative identification associates them with spherical harmonics, as demonstrated in ...

  1. Levitation of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductor in a variable magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terentiev, Alexander N.; Kuznetsov, Anatoliy A.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of both a linear alternating and rotational magnetic field component on the levitation behavior of a YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductor was examined. The transition from a plastic regime of levitation to an elastic one, induced by an alternating field component, was observed. An elastic regime in contrast to a plastic one is characterized by the unique position of stable levitation and field frequency dependence of relaxation time to this position. It was concluded that the vibrations of a magnet levitated above the superconductor can induce a transition from a plastic regime of levitation to an elastic one. It was found that a rotational magnetic field component induced rotations of a levitated superconductor. Rotational frictional motion of flux lines is likely to be an origin of torque developed. A prototype of a motor based on a levitated superconductor rotor is proposed.

  2. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  3. Formation of Y(x)Nd(1-x) Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) (0 = or Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, D. E.; Hofmeister, W. H.; Bayuzick, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Melt processing of RE123 superconductors has gained importance in recent years. While the first high temperature superconductors (HTSCs) were made using traditional ceramic press and sinter technology, recent fabrication efforts have employed alternate processing techniques including laser ablation and ion beam assisted deposition for thin film fabrication of tapes and wires and melt growth for bulk materials. To optimize these techniques and identify other potential processing strategies, phase relation studies on HTSCs have been conducted on a wide variety of superconducting compounds using numerous processing strategies. This data has enhanced the understanding of these complex systems and allowed more accurate modeling of phase interactions. All of this research has proved useful in identifying processing capabilities for HTSCs but has failed to achieve a breakthrough for wide spread application of these materials. This study examines the role of full to partial substitution of Nd in the Y123 structure under rapid solidification conditions. Aero-acoustic levitation (AAL) was used to levitate and undercool RE123 in pure oxygen binary alloys with RE = Nd an Y along a range of compositions corresponding to Y(x)Nd(1-x) Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) (0 = or < x < or = 0.7) which were melted by a CO2 laser. Higher Y content spheres could not be melted in the AAL and were excluded from this report. Solidification structures were examined using scanning electron microscopy, electron dispersive spectroscopy, and powder x-ray diffraction to characterize microstructures and identify phases.

  4. Noncontact measurement of high-temperature surface tension and viscosity of bulk metallic glass-forming alloys using the drop oscillation technique

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, S.; Johnson, W. L.; Rhim, W. K.

    2005-01-01

    High-temperature surface tension and viscosities for five bulk metallic glass-forming alloys with widely different glass-forming abilities are measured. The measurements are carried out in a high-vacuum electrostatic levitator using the drop oscillation technique. The surface tension follows proportional mathematical addition of pure components' surface tension except when some of the constituent elements have much lower surface tension. In such cases, there is surface segregation of the low ...

  5. Gas Pressure-Drop Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical engineering undergraduate laboratories have fluid mechanics experiments in which pressure drops through pipes are measured over a range of Reynolds numbers. The standard fluid is liquid water, which is essentially incompressible. Since density is constant, pressure drop does not depend on the pressure in the pipe. In addition, flow…

  6. Breakup of molten aluminum drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To clarify the entrapment of water and the breakup mechanism in molten Al drops, a series of experiments was carried out by pouring molten Al of 10 to 20 g (up to 1,000degC) into a highly subcooled-water pool (room temperature) through the air. A single large-scale water jet, which is capable of penetrating a molten Al drop, was found to appear above the molten Al drop immediately after an air column which the molten drop is dragging from the water surface, is detached. It was observed with a high frequency that a molten Al drop begins swelling first, and is then broken up during falling through the water pool or after hitting the basement. It was also found that the breakup always occurs in the course of solid crust formation, and the molten drop solidified without breakup forms a large cavity inside. Based on the experimental observations, it is concluded that the swelling and the breakup of a molten Al drop should be caused by the water entrapped inside and the hydrogen remaining super-saturated. It is reasonable to consider that an intensive breakup should be caused when some quantity of water is injected into a molten Al drop with a capability that a high-pressure vapor is generated due to a rapid release of latent heat just after brittle cracks occur during swelling. (author)

  7. Thermally induced secondary atomization of droplet in an acoustic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Saptarshi; Saha, Abhishek; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-01-01

    We study the thermal effects that lead to instability and break up in acoustically levitated vaporizing fuel droplets. For selective liquids, atomization occurs at the droplet equator under external heating. Short wavelength [Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH)] instability for diesel and bio-diesel droplets triggers this secondary atomization. Vapor pressure, latent heat, and specific heat govern the vaporization rate and temperature history, which affect the surface tension gradient and gas phase density, ultimately dictating the onset of KH instability. We develop a criterion based on Weber number to define a condition for the inception of secondary atomization.

  8. Measuring Viscosity with a Levitating Magnet: Application to Complex Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, C.; Bouquet, F.; Remond, J.; Deloche, B.

    2009-01-01

    As an experimental project proposed to students in fourth year of university, a viscometer was developed, consisting of a small magnet levitating in a viscous fluid. The viscous force acting on the magnet is directly measured: viscosities in the range 10-10[superscript 6] mPa s are obtained. This experiment is used as an introduction to complex…

  9. Two-dimensional inverted pendulum using repulsive magnetic levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eirich, Max; Ishino, Yuji; Takasaki, Masaya; Mizuno, Takeshi [Saitama Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    The active control of two-degree-of-freedom motion of the repulsive levitated object (floator) is studied. In this system of permanent magnets, the vertical motions of the rotor are passively supported by repulsive forces between the permanent magnets. The inclination angle is actively stabilized using the motion control of additional magnets. (orig.)

  10. Burning and graphitization of optically levitated nanodiamonds in vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, A T M A; Kim, M S; Bose, S; Morley, G W; Barker, P F

    2015-01-01

    A nitrogen-vacancy (NV$^-$) center in a nanodiamond, levitated in high vacuum, has recently been proposed as a probe for demonstrating mesoscopic center-of-mass superpositions \\cite{Scala2013, Zhang2013} and for testing quantum gravity \\cite{Albrecht2014}. Here, we study the behavior of optically levitated nanodiamonds containing NV$^-$ centers at sub-atmospheric pressures and show that while they burn in air, this can be prevented by replacing the air with nitrogen. However, in nitrogen the nanodiamonds graphitize below $\\approx 10$ mB. Exploiting the Brownian motion of a levitated nanodiamond, we extract its internal temperature ($T_i$) and find that it would be detrimental to the NV$^-$ center's spin coherence time \\cite{Toyli2012}. These values of $T_i$ make it clear that the diamond is not melting, contradicting a recent suggestion \\cite{Neukirch2015}. Additionally, using the measured damping rate of a levitated nanoparticle at a given pressure, we propose a new way of determining its size.

  11. Annoyance caused by the sounds of a magnetic levitation train

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.

    2004-01-01

    In a laboratory study, the annoyance caused by the passby sounds from a magnetic levitation (maglev) train was investigated. The listeners were presented with various sound fragments. The task of the listeners was to respond after each presentation to the question: "How annoying would you find the s

  12. Levitation of Superconductive Cable in Earth Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Karban

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents an introductory study about a superconductive cable levitating in Earth’s magnetic field. Built are two mathematical models of the problem providing both the shape of the arc of the cable and forces acting along it. The theoretical analysis is supplemented with an illustrative example.

  13. Technical background for a demonstration magnetic levitation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britcher, Colin P.

    1987-01-01

    A preliminary technical assessment of the feasibility of a demonstration Magnetic Levitation system, required to support aerodynamic models with a specified clear air volume around them, is presented. Preliminary calculations of required sizes of electromagnets and power supplies are made, indicating that the system is practical. Other aspects, including model position sensing and controller design, are briefly addressed.

  14. Levitation of Dust at the Surface of Protoplanetary Disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wurm, Gerhard; Haack, Henning

    that photophoresis by the thermal radiation is sufficient to levitate dust particles at several pressure scale heights. Under certain conditions these particles can constitute the surface layer. In this case only the particles which are most susceptible to photophoresis are observed at the surface of protoplanetary...

  15. Diamagnetically stabilized levitation control of an intraluminal magnetic capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Michael; Mintchev, Martin

    2009-08-01

    Controlled navigation promotes full utilization of capsule endoscopy for reliable real-time diagnosis in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, but intermittent natural peristalsis can disturb the navigational control, destabilize the capsule and take it out of levitation. The focus of the present work was to develop an economical and effective real-time magnetic capsule-guiding system that can operate in the presence of naturally existing peristalsis while retaining navigational control. A real-size magnetic navigation system that can handle peristaltic forces of up to 1.5 N was designed utilizing the computer-aided design (CAD) system Maxwell 3D (Ansoft, Pittsburg, PA) and was verified using a small-size physical experimental setup. The proposed system contains a pair of 50 cm diameter, 10,000-turn copper electromagnets with a 10 cm x 10 cm ferrous core driven by currents of up to 300 A and can successfully maintain position control over the levitating capsule during peristalsis. The addition of bismuth diamagnetic casing for stabilizing the levitating capsule was also studied. A modeled magnetic field around the diamagnetically cased permanent magnet was shown to be redistributed aligning its interaction with the external electromagnets, thus stabilizing the levitating capsule. In summary, a custom-designed diamagnetically facilitated capsule navigation system can successfully steer an intraluminal magnet-carrying capsule. PMID:19550023

  16. Contact-free handling using actively controlled electrostatic levitating fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woo, S.J.

    2012-01-01

    In general electric field forces have the distinctive property of being able to mediate forces to virtually any material in a fully non-invasive and contact-free fashion. Based on this property, electrostatic levitation holds great promise for the semiconductor, solar panel, and flat-panel display i

  17. Levitation of superconductive cable in earth magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Karban; Ivo Dolezel; Bohus Ulrych

    2006-01-01

    The paper represents an introductory study about a superconductive cable levitating in Earth’s magnetic field. Built are two mathematical models of the problem providing both the shape of the arc of the cable and forces acting along it. The theoretical analysis is supplemented with an illustrative example.

  18. MediaEval 2014: A Multimodal Approach to Drop Detection in Electronic Dance Music

    OpenAIRE

    Aljanaki, Anna; Soleymani, Mohammad; Wiering, Frans; Veltkamp, Remco

    2014-01-01

    We predict drops in electronic dance music (EDM), employing different multimodal approaches. We combine three sources of data: noisy labels collected through crowdsourcing, timed comments from SoundCloud and audio content analysis. We predict the correct labels from the noisy labels using the majority vote and Dawid-Skene methods. We also employ timed comments from SoundCloud users to count the occurrence of specific terms near the potential drop event, and, finally, we conduct an acoustic an...

  19. Acoustic cloaking and mirages with flying carpets

    CERN Document Server

    Diatta, Andre; Guenneau, Sebastien; Enoch, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Carpets under consideration here, in the context of pressure acoustic waves propagating in a compressible fluid, do not touch the ground: they levitate in mid-air (or float in mid-water), which leads to approximate cloaking for an object hidden underneath, or touching either sides of a square cylinder on, or over, the ground. The tentlike carpets attached to the sides of a square cylinder illustrate how the notion of a carpet on a wall naturally generalizes to sides of other small compact objects. We then extend the concept of flying carpets to circular cylinders. However, instead of reducing its scattering cross-section like in acoustic cloaks, we rather mimic that of another obstacle, say a square rigid cylinder. For instance, show that one can hide any type of defects under such circular carpets, and yet they still scatter waves just like a smaller cylinder on its own. Interestingly, all these carpets are described by non-singular acoustic parameters. To exemplify this important aspect, we propose a multi-...

  20. Regolith Levitation on Small Fast Rotating Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo Bagatin, Adriano; Moreno, Fernando; Molina, Antonio

    2014-11-01

    A number of NEAs larger than few hundred meters are found with relatively high spin rates (from ~2.2 to less than 4 hr, depending on composition). On those bodies, local acceleration near their equator may be directed outwards, as in the case of the primaries of binary asteroids Didymos and 1996 FG3. They both are potential targets of future space missions. What are the effects of high spin states on regolith material at low asteroidal latitudes?NEAs come from the asteroid belt and are believed to be mostly gravitational aggregates at D > 0.5 - 1 km due to their former collisional evolution history (Campo Bagatin et al, 2001). Once in the inner Solar System, NEAs may undergo spin up evolution through YORP causing their components to disperse, shed mass or fission and eventually form binary, multiple systems or asteroid pairs (Walsh et al, 2008, Jacobson and Scheers, 2010, Pravec et al, 2009 and 2010). The end state of those events is often an object spinning above any Chandrasekhar stability limit, kept together by friction (Holsapple, 2007) and sometimes characterized by an equatorial “bulge”, as shown by radar images (Ostro et al, 2006).The centrifugal force acting on surface particles at equatorial latitudes may overcome the gravitational pull of the asteroid itself, and particles may leave its suface. Centrifugal is an apparent contact force, and as soon as particles lift off they mainly move under the gravitational field of the asteroid and the satellite, they may levitate for some time, land on the surface and repeat this cycle over and over. We are studying the motion of particles in the 1 μm to 10 cm range in the non-inertial reference frame of the rotating primary, accounting for centrifugal and Coriolis apparent forces as well as the gravitational fields of the primary, the secondary, the Sun and the radiation forces by the Sun itself. The main features of this effect are presented in the case of Didymos and 1996 FG3.

  1. Internal resonance of an elastic body levitated above high-Tc superconducting bulks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokuzawa, T; Toshihiko, S; Yoshizawa, M, E-mail: sugiura@mech.keio.ac.j [Mechanical Engineering, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama (Japan)

    2010-06-01

    In high-Tc superconducting magnetic levitation systems, levitated bodies can keep stable levitation with no contact and no control and thus their damping is very small. Thanks to these features, their applications to various apparatus are expected. However, on account of their small damping, the nonlinearity of electromagnetic levitation force can give notable effects upon motion of the levitated bodies. Therefore this nonlinearity must be taken into account to accurately analyze the dynamical behavior of the levitated bodies. Structures of such a levitated body can show elastic deformation if the large electromagnetic force acts on it. Therefore, we need to deal with the model as an elastic body. As mentioned above, nonlinear characteristics easily appear in this elastic vibration on account of the small damping. Especially when the ratio of the natural frequencies of the eigenmodes is integer, internal resonance can occur. This nonlinear resonance is derived from nonlinear interactions among the eigenmodes of the elastic levitated body. This kind of internal resonance of an elastic body appearing in high-Tc superconducting levitation systems has not been studied so far. This research especially deals with internal resonance of a beam supported at both its ends by electromagnetic forces acting on permanent magnets. The governing equation with the nonlinear boundary conditions for the dynamics of a levitated beam has been derived. Numerical results show internal resonance of the 1st mode and the 3rd mode. Experimental results are qualitatively in good agreement with numerical ones.

  2. Instant freezing of impacting wax drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarenko, Alexandre; Virot, Emmanuel; Rubinstein, Shmuel

    2015-11-01

    We present the impact of hot liquid drops of wax on surfaces whose temperature is below the solidifying temperature of the drops. During the fall the drops remain mostly liquid, but upon impact, their temperature quickly decreases resulting in the solidification of the drop. Depending on the impact energy, drops size and the temperature difference between the drop and the surface this results in plethora of solid shapes: simple lenses, triangular drops, spherical caps and popped popcorn shapes.

  3. Effect of holed reflector on acoustic radiation force in noncontact ultrasonic dispensing of small droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Wada, Yuji; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the fundamental aspects of droplet dispensing, which is an important procedure in the noncontact ultrasonic manipulation of droplets in air. A holed reflector was used to dispense a droplet from a 27.4 kHz standing-wave acoustic field to a well. First, the relationship between the hole diameter of the reflector and the acoustic radiation force acting on a levitated droplet was clarified by calculating the acoustic impedance of the point just above the hole. When the hole diameter was half of (or equal to) the acoustic wavelength λ, the acoustic radiation force was ∼80% (or 50%) of that without a hole. The maximal diameters of droplets levitated above the holes through flat and half-cylindrical reflectors were then experimentally investigated. For instance, with the half-cylindrical reflector, the maximal diameter was 5.0 mm for a hole diameter of 6.0 mm, and droplets were levitatable up to a hole diameter of 12 mm (∼λ).

  4. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid's viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop's motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop's effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated v...

  5. Study on Characteristics of Ultrasonic Levitation with Piezo-ceramics Exciting%压电陶瓷激励下的超声悬浮特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏彬; 马希直; 唐伟坤

    2011-01-01

    声悬浮现象已被众多实验所证实,但复杂的结构及压电-固体-流体耦合问题很难再利用解析法来模拟声场.通过Ansys数值模拟和实验验证2方面证实了超声悬浮具有承载能力.建立的数学模型中.使用2维轴对称模型来进行电-固-气的耦合不仅能减少运算时间,提高运算精度,还能忽略掉激振盘的非轴对称模态,给超声悬浮的研究带来了方便.%The acoustic levitation has been verified by many experiments. However, some complex structures coupled with the piezo-solid-fluid are difficult to get the analytical solution. The carrying capacity has been calculated by Ansys and has been tested by the experiment. The mathematical mode with 2D axi-symmetric which is coupled with piezo-solid-fluid could reduce the caculating time,improve the accuracy of results and ignore some mode shpe of non-axisymmetric. It is helpful to investgate the phenomenon of acoustic levitation.

  6. Experimental verification of theoretical equations for acoustic radiation force on compressible spherical particles in traveling waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kennita A.; Vormohr, Hannah R.; Doinikov, Alexander A.; Bouakaz, Ayache; Shields, C. Wyatt; López, Gabriel P.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    Acoustophoresis uses acoustic radiation force to remotely manipulate particles suspended in a host fluid for many scientific, technological, and medical applications, such as acoustic levitation, acoustic coagulation, contrast ultrasound imaging, ultrasound-assisted drug delivery, etc. To estimate the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, equations derived for an inviscid host fluid are commonly used. However, there are theoretical predictions that, in the case of a traveling wave, viscous effects can dramatically change the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, which make the equations obtained for an inviscid host fluid invalid for proper estimation of acoustic radiation forces. To date, experimental verification of these predictions has not been published. Experimental measurements of viscous effects on acoustic radiation forces in a traveling wave were conducted using a confocal optical and acoustic system and values were compared with available theories. Our results show that, even in a low-viscosity fluid such as water, the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces is increased manyfold by viscous effects in comparison with what follows from the equations derived for an inviscid fluid.

  7. On the Feasibility of Steering Swallowable Microsystem Capsules Using Computer-Aided Magnetic Levitation

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Billy; Mintchev, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Swallowable capsule endoscopy is used for non-invasive diagnosis of some gastrointestinal (GI) organs. However, control over the position of the capsule is a major unresolved issue. This study presents a design for steering the capsule based on magnetic levitation. The levitation is stabilized with the aid of a computer-aided feedback control system and diamagnetism. Peristaltic and gravitational forces to be overcome were calculated. A levitation setup was built to analyze the fe...

  8. A Classroom Demonstration of Levitation and Suspension of a Superconductor over a Magnetic Track

    OpenAIRE

    Strehlow, Charles P.; Sullivan, M. C.

    2008-01-01

    The suspension and levitation of superconductors by permanent magnets is one of the most fascinating consequences of superconductivity, and a wonderful instrument for generating interest in low temperature physics and electrodynamics. We present a novel classroom demonstration of the levitation/suspension of a superconductor over a magnetic track that maximizes levitation/suspension time, separation distance between the magnetic track and superconductor and also insulator aesthetics. The demo...

  9. Description of an aerodynamic levitation apparatus with applications in Earth sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Klaus; Albrecht Nina; Kremer Katrina; Pack Andreas; Kronz Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background In aerodynamic levitation, solids and liquids are floated in a vertical gas stream. In combination with CO2-laser heating, containerless melting at high temperature of oxides and silicates is possible. We apply aerodynamic levitation to bulk rocks in preparation for microchemical analyses, and for evaporation and reduction experiments. Results Liquid silicate droplets (~2 mm) were maintained stable in levitation using a nozzle with a 0.8 mm bore and an opening angle of 60°...

  10. Effect of magnetization process on levitation force between a superconducting disk and a permanent magnet

    OpenAIRE

    L. Liu; Hou, Y; C. Y. He; Gao, Z X; Xiao, L.; Ren, H. T.; Jiao, Y. L.; Zheng, M.H.

    2003-01-01

    The levitation forces between a permanent magnet and a coaxial superconducting disk after different magnetization processes are measured. Significant effect of the magnetization process on the levitation force is observed. Theoretical calculations of levitation force based on the critical state model with temperature and field-dependent critical current density, and the heat dissipation due to the flux motion are in perfect agreement with the experimental data.

  11. The effects of magnetization process on levitation characteristics of a superconducting bulk magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J.; Gong, Y. M.; Li, Y. H.; Liang, G.; Yang, X. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Zhao, Y.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a bulk YBCO superconductor was magnetized in a chosen magnetic field generated from a superconducting magnet (SM) after field cooling process. The effects of magnetization process with different magnetization intensities on levitation forces and relaxation characteristics were investigated. From the results, it can be confirmed that the superconducting bulk magnet (SBM) magnetized with proper magnetization intensity was beneficial to improve the levitation characteristics of the magnetic levitation system. Nevertheless, when the magnetization intensity exceeded 0.85T, the levitation forces and the relaxation characteristics of the SBM attained saturation.

  12. Low Frequency Vibration Energy Harvesting using Diamagnetically Stabilized Magnet Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palagummi, Sri Vikram

    Over the last decade, vibration-based energy harvesting has provided a technology push on the feasibility of self-powered portable small electronic devices and wireless sensor nodes. Vibration energy harvesters in general transduce energy by damping out the environmentally induced relative emotion through either a cantilever beam or an equivalent suspension mechanism with one of the transduction mechanisms, like, piezoelectric, electrostatic, electromagnetic or magnetostrictive. Two major challenges face the present harvesters in literature, one, they suffer from the unavoidable mechanical damping due to internal friction present in the systems, second, they cannot operate efficiently in the low frequency range (magnet levitation mechanisms which can work efficiently as a vibration energy harvester in the low frequency range are discussed in this work. First, a mono-stable vertical diamagnetic levitation (VDL) based vibration energy harvester (VEH) is discussed. The harvester consists of a lifting magnet (LM), a floating magnet (FM) and two diamagnetic plates (DPs). The LM balances out the weight of the FM and stability is brought about by the repulsive effect of the DPs, made of pyrolytic graphite. Two thick cylindrical coils, placed in grooves which are engraved in the DPs, are used to convert the mechanical energy into electrical energy. Experimental frequency response of the system is validated by the theoretical analysis which showed that the VEH works in a low frequency range but sufficient levitation gap was not achieved and the frequency response characteristic of the system was effectively linear. To overcome these challenges, the influence of the geometry of the FM, the LM, and the DP were parametrically studied to assess their effects on the levitation gap, size of the system and the natural frequency. For efficient vibration energy harvesting using the VDL system, ways to mitigate eddy current damping and a coil geometry for transduction were critically

  13. Turbine flowmeter for liquid helium with the rotor magnetically levitated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivetti, A.; Martini, G.; Goria, R.; Lorefice, S.

    A turbine flowmeter with no mechanical contact between rotor and body is described, to be used as a reference standard in our liquid helium flow rate calibration facility. The absence of contact, zeroing the bearings friction factor, ensures a good measurement repeatability, even at very low liquid helium flow rate values. The rotor is magnetically suspended by the Meissner effect: at liquid helium temperatures two magnetic fields generate sustaining forces against the surface of the two rotor ends, which are made of niobium. Due to the repulsive nature of the acting forces, the rotor equilibrium is intrinsically stable and no external electronics are required for its levitation. A particular configuration of the superconducting windings and of the rotor ends allow the rotor to levitate and hold good axial and radial stability. A detailed description of the solutions adopted for the realization of the prototype and the operation conditions are reported. The first results, made with the absolute liquid helium calibration facility, are shown.

  14. Three-dimensional cell culturing by magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisler, William L; Timm, David M; Gage, Jacob A; Tseng, Hubert; Killian, T C; Souza, Glauco R

    2013-10-01

    Recently, biomedical research has moved toward cell culture in three dimensions to better recapitulate native cellular environments. This protocol describes one method for 3D culture, the magnetic levitation method (MLM), in which cells bind with a magnetic nanoparticle assembly overnight to render them magnetic. When resuspended in medium, an external magnetic field levitates and concentrates cells at the air-liquid interface, where they aggregate to form larger 3D cultures. The resulting cultures are dense, can synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) and can be analyzed similarly to the other culture systems using techniques such as immunohistochemical analysis (IHC), western blotting and other biochemical assays. This protocol details the MLM and other associated techniques (cell culture, imaging and IHC) adapted for the MLM. The MLM requires 45 min of working time over 2 d to create 3D cultures that can be cultured in the long term (>7 d). PMID:24030442

  15. Ceramic high temperature superconductor levitating motor with laser commutator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a magnetically levitating motor using a ceramic high temperature superconductor with laser commutator is discussed. A YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-δ high temperature superconductor with 25 mm diameter and 6 mm thickness is used to levitate a Nd-Fe-B magnet (19.0 mm diameter and 4.8 mm thickness) which is attached symmetrically to a 150 mm long graphite rod. A smaller magnet (5.5 mm diameter and 2.0 mm thickness) is attached at each end of the rod with the appropriate poles arrangements. A suitable laser beam chopper is used to optically drive a solenoid which repels the smaller magnets thus driving the motor. A simple and efficient liquid nitrogen supply system is designed to cool the superconductor. The stability of the bearing is provided by the flux pinning in this type-II superconductor. Some characteristics of the motor are discussed

  16. Experimental Realisation of a Thermal Squeezed State of Levitated Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rashid, Muddassar; Bateman, James; Vovrosh, Jamie; Hempston, David; Kim, M S; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally squeeze the thermal motional state of an optically levitated nanosphere, by fast switching between two trapping frequencies. The measured phase space distribution of our particle shows the typical shape of a squeezed thermal state, from which we infer up to 2.7dB of squeezing along one motional direction. The experiment features a large number of thermal excitations, therefore remaining in the classical regime. Nevertheless, we argue that the manipulation scheme described here could be used to achieve squeezing below the zero-point level, if preceded by ground state cooling of the levitated mechanical oscillator. Additionally, a higher degree of squeezing could in principle be achieved by repeating the frequency-switching protocol multiple times.

  17. Nonlinear dynamics and millikelvin cavity-cooling of levitated nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca, P Z G; Millen, J; Monteiro, T S; Barker, P F

    2015-01-01

    Optomechanical systems explore and exploit the coupling between light and the mechanical motion of matter. A nonlinear coupling offers access to rich new physics, in both the quantum and classical regimes. We investigate a dynamic, as opposed to the usually studied static, nonlinear optomechanical system, comprising of a nanosphere levitated and cooled in a hybrid electro-optical trap. An optical cavity offers readout of both linear-in-position and quadratic-in-position (nonlinear) light-matter coupling, whilst simultaneously cooling the nanosphere to millikelvin temperatures for indefinite periods of time in high vacuum. We observe cooling of the linear and non-linear motion, leading to a $10^5$ fold reduction in phonon number $n_p$, attaining final occupancies of $n_p = 100-1000$. This work puts cavity cooling of a levitated object to the quantum ground-state firmly within reach.

  18. Levitating atmospheres of Eddington-luminosity neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Wielgus, Maciek; Kluzniak, Wlodek; Abramowicz, Marek; Narayan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    We construct models of static, spherically symmetric shells supported by the radiation flux of a luminous neutron star in the Schwarzschild metric. The atmospheres are disconnected from the star and levitate above its surface. Gas pressure and density inversion appear in the inner region of these atmospheres, which is a purely relativistic phenomenon. We account for the scattering opacity dependence on temperature and utilize the relativistic M1 closure scheme for the radiation tensor, hence allowing for a fully GR-consistent treatment of the photon flux and radiation tensor anisotropy. In this way we are able to address atmospheres of both large and moderate/low optical depths with the same set of equations. We discuss properties of the levitating atmospheres and find that they may indeed be optically thick, with the distance between star surface and the photosphere expanding as luminosity increases. These results may be relevant for the photosphereric radius expansion X-ray bursts.

  19. Levitating atmospheres of Eddington-luminosity neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielgus, Maciek; Sądowski, Aleksander; Kluźniak, Włodek; Abramowicz, Marek; Narayan, Ramesh

    2016-06-01

    We construct models of static, spherically symmetric shells supported by the radiation flux of a luminous neutron star in the Schwarzschild metric. The atmospheres are disconnected from the star and levitate above its surface. Gas pressure and density inversion appear in the inner region of these atmospheres, which is a purely relativistic phenomenon. We account for the scattering opacity dependence on temperature green by using the Klein-Nishina formula. The relativistic M1 closure scheme for the radiation tensor provides a general relativity-consistent treatment of the photon flux and radiation tensor anisotropy. In this way, we are able to address atmospheres of both large and moderate/low optical depths with the same set of equations. We discuss properties of the levitating atmospheres and find that they may indeed be optically thick, with the distance between star surface and the photosphere expanding as luminosity increases. These results may be relevant for the photosphereric radius expansion X-ray bursts.

  20. Levitation performance of YBCO bulk in different applied magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W. [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)], E-mail: asclab@asclab.cn; Wang, S.Y.; Jing, H.; Zheng, J.; Jiang, M.; Wang, J.S. [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2008-07-01

    The maglev performance of bulk high-T{sub c} superconductor (HTS) is investigated above three different types of permanent magnet guideways (PMGs). The main difference among these PMGs is the method used to concentrate the magnetic flux. The experimental results indicate that the levitation force depends only in part on the peak value of the magnetic field. The variation of the vertical component of the magnetic field (B{sub z}), and the structure of the magnetic field are also responsible for the levitation force. These results imply that the permanent magnet with high coercive force is better at concentrating flux th an iron. The conclusions contribute in a very helpful way to the design and optimization of PMGs for HTS maglev systems.

  1. Lateral restoring force on a magnet levitated above a superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, L. C.

    1990-01-01

    The lateral restoring force on a magnet levitated above a superconductor is calculated as a function of displacement from its original position at rest using Bean's critical-state model to describe flux pinning. The force is linear for small displacements and saturates at large displacements. In the absence of edge effects the force always attracts the magnet to its original position. Thus it is a restoring force that contributes to the stability of the levitated magnet. In the case of a thick superconductor slab, the origin of the force is a magnetic dipole layer consisting of positive and negative supercurrents induced on the trailing side of the magnet. The qualitative behavior is consistent with experiments reported to date. Effects due to the finite thickness of the superconductor slab and the granular nature of high-Tc materials are also considered.

  2. Optical Levitation of Nanodiamonds by Doughnut Beams in Vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Lei-Ming; Chen, Jun; Zhao, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Optically levitated nanodiamonds with nitrogen-vacancy centers promise a high-quality hybrid spin-optomechanical system. However, the trapped nanodiamond absorbs energy form laser beams and causes thermal damage in vacuum. We propose to solve the problem by trapping a composite particle (a nanodiamond core coated with a less absorptive silica shell) at the center of strongly focused doughnut-shaped laser beams. Systematical study on the trapping stability, heat absorption, and oscillation frequency concludes that the azimuthally polarized Gaussian beam and the linearly polarized Laguerre-Gaussian beam ${\\rm LG}_{03}$ are the optimal choices. With our proposal, particles with strong absorption coefficients can be trapped without obvious heating and, thus, the spin-optomechanical system based on levitated nanodiamonds are made possible in high vacuum with the present experimental techniques.

  3. Electrostatic Levitation for Studies of Additive Manufactured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Tramel, Terri

    2014-01-01

    The electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is a unique facility for investigators studying high temperature materials. The laboratory boasts two levitators in which samples can be levitated, heated, melted, undercooled, and resolidified. Electrostatic levitation minimizes gravitational effects and allows materials to be studied without contact with a container or instrumentation. The lab also has a high temperature emissivity measurement system, which provides normal spectral and normal total emissivity measurements at use temperature. The ESL lab has been instrumental in many pioneering materials investigations of thermophysical properties, e.g., creep measurements, solidification, triggered nucleation, and emissivity at high temperatures. Research in the ESL lab has already led to the development of advanced high temperature materials for aerospace applications, coatings for rocket nozzles, improved medical and industrial optics, metallic glasses, ablatives for reentry vehicles, and materials with memory. Modeling of additive manufacturing materials processing is necessary for the study of their resulting materials properties. In addition, the modeling of the selective laser melting processes and its materials property predictions are also underway. Unfortunately, there is very little data for the properties of these materials, especially of the materials in the liquid state. Some method to measure thermophysical properties of additive manufacturing materials is necessary. The ESL lab is ideal for these studies. The lab can provide surface tension and viscosity of molten materials, density measurements, emissivity measurements, and even creep strength measurements. The ESL lab can also determine melting temperature, surface temperatures, and phase transition temperatures of additive manufactured materials. This presentation will provide background on the ESL lab and its capabilities, provide an approach to using the ESL

  4. Sliding mode control of a magnetic levitation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Al-Muthairi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sliding mode control schemes of the static and dynamic types are proposed for the control of a magnetic levitation system. The proposed controllers guarantee the asymptotic regulation of the statesof the system to their desired values. Simulation results of the proposed controllers are given to illustrate the effectiveness of them. Robustness of the control schemes to changes in the parameters of the system is also investigated.

  5. Elastic Coulomb-levitation: why is ice so slippery?

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Chang Q.

    2015-01-01

    The elastic, less dense, polarized, and thermally stable supersolid skin lubricates ice. Molecular undercoordination shortens the H-O bond and lengthens the O:H nonbond through O-O repulsion, which is associated with low-frequency and high-magnitude of O:H vibration and a dual O-O polarization. The softer O:H springs attached with stronger molecular dipoles provide forces levitating objects sliding on ice, like Maglev or Hovercraft.

  6. Comparison of Systems for Levitation Heating of Electrically Conductive Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Dolezel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Levitation heating of nonmagnetic electrically conductive bodies can be realized in various systems consisting of one of more inductors. The paper deals with compassion of the resultant. Lorentz lifts force acting on such a body (cylinder, sphere and velocity of its heating for different shapes of coils and parameters of the field currents (amplitudes, frequency. The tack is solved in quasi-coupled formulation. Theoretical considerations are supplemented with an illustrative example whose results are discussed.

  7. Ultrathin Metallic Coatings Can Induce Quantum Levitation between Nanosurfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Bostrom, Mathias; Ninham, Barry W.; Brevik, Iver; Persson, Clas; Parsons, Drew F.; Sernelius, Bo

    2012-01-01

    There is an attractive Casimir-Lifshitz force between two silica surfaces in a liquid (bromobenze or toluene). We demonstrate that adding an ultrathin (5-50 angstrom) metallic nanocoating to one of the surfaces results in repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz forces above a critical separation. The onset of such quantum levitation comes at decreasing separations as the film thickness decreases. Remarkably, the effect of retardation can turn attraction into repulsion. From that we explain how an ultrathi...

  8. Oscillation and levitation of balls in continuously stratified fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Biro, I.; Gyure, B.; I. M. Janosi; Szabo, K. G.; Tel, T.

    2007-01-01

    The free motion of balls is investigated experimentally in continously stratified fluid in a finite container. The oscillation frequency is found to be very close to the local Brunt-Vaisala frequency. The effect of added mass proves to be practically negligible. The evolution of rear jets is demonstrated, and a kind of long term levitation is found. We show that the classical viscous drag would lead to a much stronger damping than observed in the experiment. This is interpreted as a consequen...

  9. Direct Measurement of Photon Recoil from a Levitated Nanoparticle

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Vijay; Gieseler, Jan; Moritz, Clemens; Dellago, Christoph; Quidant, Romain; Novotny, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    The momentum transfer between a photon and an object defines a fundamental limit for the precision with which the object can be measured. If the object oscillates at a frequency $\\Omega_0$, this measurement back-action adds quanta $\\hbar\\Omega_0$ to the oscillator's energy at a rate $\\Gamma_{\\rm recoil}$, a process called photon recoil heating, and sets bounds to quantum coherence times in cavity optomechanical systems. Here, we use an optically levitated nanoparticle in ultrahigh vacuum to d...

  10. Arbitrary Finite-time Tracking Control for Magnetic Levitation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Xuan-Toa Tran; Hee-Jun Kang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an arbitrary finite-time tracking control (AFTC) method is developed for magnetic levitation systems with uncertain dynamics and external disturbances. By introducing a novel augmented sliding- mode manifold function, the proposed method can eliminate the singular problem in traditional terminal sliding-mode control, as well as the reaching-phase problem. Moreover, the tracking errors can reach the reference value with faster convergence and better tracking precision in arbitra...

  11. Static Magnetowetting of Ferrofluid Drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoni, Carlo; Pierno, Matteo; Mistura, Giampaolo; Talbot, Delphine; Massart, René; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Abou-Hassan, Ali

    2016-08-01

    We report results of a comprehensive study of the wetting properties of sessile drops of ferrofluid water solutions at various concentrations deposited on flat substrates and subjected to the action of permanent magnets of different sizes and strengths. The amplitude and the gradient of the magnetic field experienced by the ferrofluid are changed by varying the magnets and their distance to the surface. Magnetic forces up to 100 times the gravitational one and magnetic gradients up to 1 T/cm are achieved. A rich phenomenology is observed, ranging from flattened drops caused by the magnetic attraction to drops extended normally to the substrate because of the normal traction of the magnetic field. We find that the former effect can be conveniently described in terms of an effective Bond number that compares the effective drop attraction with the capillary force, whereas the drop's vertical elongation is effectively expressed by a dimensionless number S, which compares the pressure jump at the ferrofluid interface because of the magnetization with the capillary pressure. PMID:27385506

  12. Interfacial wave dynamics of a drop with an embedded bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, S.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes how an embedded bubble changes the surface wave of a suspended liquid drop, and how such modifications, if recorded experimentally, can be used to detect voids in typically opaque interior of the fluid. The analysis uses a matrix formalism to predict the frequencies for natural oscillation and the deformation for acoustically induced forced vibration. The theory shows that the embedded cavity causes major shifts in the frequency and amplitude values as well as twofold increase in number of natural modes, indicating multifacetted utility of the results in process diagnostics, material characterizations, and combustion technology.

  13. The Japanese magnetic levitation train is on the rails; Le train a levitation magnetique japonais est sur les rails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, Henry

    2003-09-01

    In December 2002 was inaugurated in Shanghai (China) the very first magnetic levitation train. This train, named Maglev, reaches the cruise speed of 430 km/h and is the result of a Chinese-German cooperation between Transrapid International and SMTDC companies. The Maglev technology should be used for the project of very high speed train between Tokyo and Osaka (Japan). The test railways and trains of Yamanashi are today at the validation stage (technically and economically) with the aim of reducing costs and managing the noise problems due to the high number of tunnels along the line. This paper describes the specific infrastructures of the magnetic levitation train, the propulsion system (superconducting magnets) and the different kinds of switching required. (J.S.)

  14. Three-dimensional mid-air acoustic manipulation by ultrasonic phased arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Yoichi; Hoshi, Takayuki; Rekimoto, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The essence of levitation technology is the countervailing of gravity. It is known that an ultrasound standing wave is capable of suspending small particles at its sound pressure nodes. The acoustic axis of the ultrasound beam in conventional studies was parallel to the gravitational force, and the levitated objects were manipulated along the fixed axis (i.e. one-dimensionally) by controlling the phases or frequencies of bolted Langevin-type transducers. In the present study, we considered extended acoustic manipulation whereby millimetre-sized particles were levitated and moved three-dimensionally by localised ultrasonic standing waves, which were generated by ultrasonic phased arrays. Our manipulation system has two original features. One is the direction of the ultrasound beam, which is arbitrary because the force acting toward its centre is also utilised. The other is the manipulation principle by which a localised standing wave is generated at an arbitrary position and moved three-dimensionally by opposed and ultrasonic phased arrays. We experimentally confirmed that expanded-polystyrene particles of 0.6 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm in diameter could be manipulated by our proposed method.

  15. Three-dimensional mid-air acoustic manipulation by ultrasonic phased arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichi Ochiai

    Full Text Available The essence of levitation technology is the countervailing of gravity. It is known that an ultrasound standing wave is capable of suspending small particles at its sound pressure nodes. The acoustic axis of the ultrasound beam in conventional studies was parallel to the gravitational force, and the levitated objects were manipulated along the fixed axis (i.e. one-dimensionally by controlling the phases or frequencies of bolted Langevin-type transducers. In the present study, we considered extended acoustic manipulation whereby millimetre-sized particles were levitated and moved three-dimensionally by localised ultrasonic standing waves, which were generated by ultrasonic phased arrays. Our manipulation system has two original features. One is the direction of the ultrasound beam, which is arbitrary because the force acting toward its centre is also utilised. The other is the manipulation principle by which a localised standing wave is generated at an arbitrary position and moved three-dimensionally by opposed and ultrasonic phased arrays. We experimentally confirmed that expanded-polystyrene particles of 0.6 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm in diameter could be manipulated by our proposed method.

  16. Three-dimensional mid-air acoustic manipulation by ultrasonic phased arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Yoichi; Hoshi, Takayuki; Rekimoto, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The essence of levitation technology is the countervailing of gravity. It is known that an ultrasound standing wave is capable of suspending small particles at its sound pressure nodes. The acoustic axis of the ultrasound beam in conventional studies was parallel to the gravitational force, and the levitated objects were manipulated along the fixed axis (i.e. one-dimensionally) by controlling the phases or frequencies of bolted Langevin-type transducers. In the present study, we considered extended acoustic manipulation whereby millimetre-sized particles were levitated and moved three-dimensionally by localised ultrasonic standing waves, which were generated by ultrasonic phased arrays. Our manipulation system has two original features. One is the direction of the ultrasound beam, which is arbitrary because the force acting toward its centre is also utilised. The other is the manipulation principle by which a localised standing wave is generated at an arbitrary position and moved three-dimensionally by opposed and ultrasonic phased arrays. We experimentally confirmed that expanded-polystyrene particles of 0.6 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm in diameter could be manipulated by our proposed method. PMID:24849371

  17. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Educational Video Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Identifying an AN Symptoms Acoustic Neuroma Keywords Educational Video ... for pre- and post-treatment acoustic neuroma patients. Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic ...

  18. Acoustic cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  19. Acoustic telemetry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  20. ``Quantum'' interference with bouncing drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Tomas; Andersen, Anders; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian; Lautrup, Benny; Ellegaard, Clive; Levinsen, Mogens

    2013-11-01

    In a series of recent papers (most recently) Yves Couder and collaborators have explored the dynamics of walking drops on the surface of a vibrated bath of silicon oil and have demonstrated a close analogy to quantum phenomena. The bouncing drop together with the surface wave that it excites seems to be very similar to the pilot wave envisaged by de Broglie for quantum particles. In particular, have studied a double slit experiment with walking drops, where an interference pattern identical to the quantum version is found even though it is possible to follow the orbits of the drops and unambigously determine which slit it goes through, something which in quantum mechanics would be ruled out by the Heisenberg uncertainly relations. We have repeated the experiment and present a somewhat more complicated picture. Theoretically, we study a Schrödinger equation with a source term originating from a localised ``particle'' being simultaneously guided by the wave. We present simple solutions to such a field theory and discuss the fundamental difficulties met by such a theory in order to comply with quantum mechanics.

  1. Fluid flow in drying drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelderblom, H.

    2013-01-01

    When a suspension drop evaporates, it leaves behind a drying stain. Examples of these drying stains encountered in daily life are coffee or tea stains on a table top, mineral rings on glassware that comes out of the dishwasher, or the salt deposits on the streets in winter. Drying stains are also pr

  2. Evaporating Drops of Alkane Mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Gu'ena, G; Poulard, C; Cazabat, Anne-Marie; Gu\\'{e}na, Geoffroy; Poulard, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    Alkane mixtures are model systems where the influence of surface tension gradients during the spreading and the evaporation of wetting drops can be easily studied. The surface tension gradients are mainly induced by concentration gradients, mass diffusion being a stabilising process. Depending on the relative concentration of the mixture, a rich pattern of behaviours is obtained.

  3. Stable diamagnetic self-levitation of a micro-magnet by improvement of its magnetic gradients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Profijt, H.B.; Pigot, C.; Reyne, G.; Grechishkin, R.M.; Cugat, O.

    2009-01-01

    A disc-shaped SmCo magnet with a diameter of 0.85 mm is levitated above a graphite diamagnetic plate at a height of about 14 μm. The magnet is magnetised into a double dipole. The levitation of multipolar magnets above a diamagnetic material was suggested in 1956 by Boerdijk and patented in 1995 by

  4. Design, manufacture and performance evaluation of HTS electromagnets for the hybrid magnetic levitation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, S.Y.; Hwang, Y.J.; Choi, S.; Na, J.B.; Kim, Y.J.; Chang, K.S. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, D.K. [Chungju National University, Chungju 380-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, C.Y. [Ultra High-Speed Train Research Department, Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang-Si 437-757 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, T.K., E-mail: tkko@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    A high speed electromagnetic suspension (EMS) maglev has emerged as the solution to speed limit problem that conventional high-speed railroad has. In the EMS maglev, small levitation gap needs uniform guide-way which leads to increase the construction cost. The large levitation gap can reduce the construction cost. However it is hard for normal conducting electromagnet to produce larger magneto-motive force (MMF) for generating levitation force as increased levitation gap. This is because normal conductors have limited rating current to their specific volume. Therefore, the superconducting electromagnet can be one of the solutions for producing both large levitation gap and sufficient MMF. The superconducting electromagnets have incomparably high allowable current density than what normal conductors have. In this paper, the prototype of high temperature superconducting (HTS) electromagnets were designed and manufactured applicable to hybrid electromagnetic suspension system (H-EMS). The H-EMS consists of control coils for levitation control and superconducting coils for producing MMF for levitation. The required MMF for generating given levitation force was calculated by both equations of ideal U-core magnet and magnetic field analysis using the finite element method (FEM). The HTS electromagnets were designed as double pancakes with Bi-2223/Ag tapes. Experiments to confirm its operating performance were performed in liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}).

  5. Influence of Brownian Diffusion on Levitation of Bodies in Magnetic Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bashtovoi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with experimental investigation of the levitation of magnetic and non-magnetic bodies in a magnetic fluid when essentially influenced by Brownian diffusion of magnetic particles in it. It is established that the point of levitation of bodies in a magnetic fluid varies with time.

  6. Observation of the Field, Current and Force Distributions in an Optimized Superconducting Levitation with Translational Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang-Qing; Ma, Guang-Tong; Liu, Kun; Wang, Jia-Su

    2016-08-01

    The superconducting levitation realized by immersing the high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) into nonuniform magnetic field is deemed promising in a wide range of industrial applications such as maglev transportation and kinetic energy storage. Using a well-established electromagnetic model to mathematically describe the HTS, we have developed an efficient scheme that is capable of intelligently and globally optimizing the permanent magnet guideway (PMG) with single or multiple HTSs levitated above for the maglev transportation applications. With maximizing the levitation force as the principal objective, we optimized the dimensions of a Halbach-derived PMG to observe how the field, current and force distribute inside the HTSs when the optimized situation is achieved. Using a pristine PMG as a reference, we have analyzed the critical issues for enhancing the levitation force through comparing the field, current and force distributions between the optimized and pristine PMGs. It was also found that the optimized dimensions of the PMG are highly dependent upon the levitated HTS. Moreover, the guidance force is not always contradictory to the levitation force and may also be enhanced when the levitation force is prescribed to be the principle objective, depending on the configuration of levitation system and lateral displacement.

  7. Influence of Brownian Diffusion on Levitation of Bodies in Magnetic Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    V. Bashtovoi; A. Reks; S. Klimovich; А. Motsar; P. Ryapolov; A. Storozhenko; I. Shabanova

    2013-01-01

    The present work deals with experimental investigation of the levitation of magnetic and non-magnetic bodies in a magnetic fluid when essentially influenced by Brownian diffusion of magnetic particles in it. It is established that the point of levitation of bodies in a magnetic fluid varies with time.

  8. Measurement of Levitation Forces of High-"T[subscript c] Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, M.; Koblischka, M. R.; Hartmann, U.

    2010-01-01

    We show the construction of a so-called levitation balance which is capable of measuring the levitation forces between a permanent magnet and a superconducting high-T[subscript c] thin film sample. The underlying theoretical basis is discussed in detail. The experiment is performed as an introductory physics experiment for school students as well…

  9. Calculating levitation forces in the magnet-high-temperature superconductor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ermolaev, YS; Rudnev, IA

    2005-01-01

    A new method of calculation of the magnetic levitation force in the permanent magnet-high-temperature superconductor systems is proposed based on the Maxwell equations and the Bean model. The dependences of the levitation force on the gap width calculated for various regimes of superconductor coolin

  10. Levitation and Oscillation of Dust Grains in Plasma Sheath with Wake Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    练海俊; 谢柏松; 周宏余

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the equilibrium and levitation of dust grains in a plasma sheath with various forces, in particular the wake potential force. The vertical oscillation frequency of dust chains is also obtained by including the wake potential term. It is found that the wake potential has a significant role for the levitation and oscillation of dust grains.

  11. An electrostatic levitator for high-temperature containerless materials processing in 1-g

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Chung, Sang K.; Barber, Daniel; Man, Kin F.; Gutt, Gary; Rulison, Aaron; Spjut, R. Erik

    1993-10-01

    This article discusses recent developments in high-temperature electrostatic levitation technology for containerless processing of metals and alloys. Presented is the first demonstration of an electrostatic levitation technology which can levitate metals and alloys (2-4 mm diam spheres) in vacuum and of superheating-undercooling-recalescence cycles which can be repeated while maintaining good positioning stability. The electrostatic levitator (ESL) has several important advantages over the electromagnetic levitator. Most important is the wide range of sample temperature which can be achieved without affecting levitation. This article also describes the general architecture of the levitator, electrode design, position control hardware and software, sample heating, charging, and preparation methods, and operational procedures. Particular emphasis is given to sample charging by photoelectric and thermionic emission. While this ESL is more oriented toward ground-based operation, an extension to microgravity applications is also addressed briefly. The system performance was demonstrated by showing multiple superheating-undercooling-recalescence cycles in a zirconium sample (Tm=2128 K). This levitator, when fully matured, will be a valuable tool both in Earth-based and space-based laboratories for the study of thermophysical properties of undercooled liquids, nucleation kinetics, the creation of metastable phases, and access to a wide range of materials with novel properties.

  12. 驻波与声悬浮%Stationary Wave and Acoustic Levitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑好望; 任文辉; 肖胜利

    2010-01-01

    @@ 1886年,德国科学家孔特(Kundt)发现,谐振管中的声波能够让灰尘颗粒悬浮起来,这一发现引发了悬浮技术的大革命,而今,声悬浮的威力已经足以让所有人感到惊讶.科学家利用声悬浮技术不仅可使小动物悬浮起来(图1),而且还可将金属钨饼(密度18.9×103kg/m3)悬浮在空中.

  13. 声悬浮研究新进展%LATEST PROGRESS IN ACOUSTIC LEVITATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解文军; 魏炳波

    2002-01-01

    建立了单轴式声悬浮的参数化模型和边界元算法,对单轴式声悬浮进行了优化设计,可以悬浮起密度高达18 9g/cm\\+3的金属钨.研究了声悬浮条件下非金属材料和低熔点金属的无容器处理.

  14. Development of device for trapping a superheated liquid drop and life-time measurements of the drop by radiation-induced evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawamura, Teruko; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Homma, Akira; Narita, Masakuni [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-08-01

    In this study a detection sensitivity evaluation was made by measuring the life time of a single liquid drop. A device trapping a superheated drop was developed, where a single drop of test liquid was trapped at a specified position and then irradiated. Therefore, the volume of the drop can be measured before the irradiation. Wakeshima originally developed the device, in which a test liquid drop was injected and superheated in a supporting liquid, to measure the limit of superheat of the liquid. Apfel modified Wakeshima's device by applying an acoustic field to be able to trap and decompress a superheated liquid drop. The device in the present study is similar to Apfel's. But the inlet part is cooled because the boiling point of the test liquid is lower than room temperature. In this device the superheated drop of trans-2-butene (C{sub 4}H{sub 8}, boiling point=0.8degC) was exposed to Am-Be neutrons and {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays and its life time was measured. (author)

  15. Acoustic dispersive prism

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein Esfahlani; Sami Karkar; Herve Lissek; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic ...

  16. A nonlinear model for the layer between plates in acoustic noncontact transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Cao, Wenwu; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-12-01

    To more accurately describe the noncontact transport behavior of traveling acoustic waves, a nonlinear model is presented in this paper for the squeeze gas film with consideration of gas inertia in the case of a large amplitude motion and low viscosity of the gas. A closed form solution is derived for the vertical and horizontal forces of the film from this model. Our results have shown that the gas inertia has a significant influence on the pressure distribution in the squeeze film, and the inertial force is higher than the viscous force. The predicted levitation and horizontal driving forces are found to be in good agreement with our experimental measurements. Our inertia model provides a powerful tool for the force estimation and its potential benefits could be far reaching. The accurate prediction of these forces is useful to design the system for levitating and transporting planar objects, such as MEMS devices, glass substrates, and IC chips

  17. Magnetic levitation on a type-I superconductor as a practical demonstration experiment for students

    CERN Document Server

    Osorio, M R; Suderow, H

    2012-01-01

    We describe and discuss an experimental set-up which allows undergraduate and graduate students to view and study magnetic levitation on a type-I superconductor. The demonstration can be repeated many times using one readily available 25 liter liquid helium dewar. We study the equilibrium position of a magnet that levitates over a lead bowl immersed in a liquid hand-held helium cryostat. We combine the measurement of the position of the magnet with simple analytical calculations. This provides a vivid visualization of magnetic levitation from the balance between pure flux expulsion and gravitation. The experiment contrasts and illustrates the case of magnetic levitation with high temperature type-II superconductors using liquid nitrogen, where levitation results from partial flux expulsion and vortex physics.

  18. Vertical Magnetic Levitation Force Measurement on Single Crystal YBaCuO Bulk at Different Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Sukru; Guner, Sait Baris; Ozturk, Kemal; Ozturk, Ozgur

    Magnetic levitation force measurements of HTS samples are performed with the use of liquid nitrogen. It is both convenient and cheap. However, the temperature of the sample cannot be changed (77 K) and there is problem of frost. So, it is necessary to build another type of system to measure the levitation force high Tc superconductor at different temperatures. In this study, we fabricated YBaCuO superconducting by top-seeding-melting-growth (TSMG) technique and measured vertical forces of them at FC (Field Cooling) and ZFC (Zero Field Cooling) regimes by using our new designed magnetic levitation force measurement system. It was used to investigate the three-dimensional levitation force and lateral force in the levitation system consisting of a cylindrical magnet and a permanent cylindrical superconductor at different temperatures (37, 47, 57, 67 and 77 K).

  19. System and Method for Obtaining Simultaneous Levitation and Rotation of a Ferromagnetic Object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Subrata; Sarkar, Mrinal Kanti; Ghosh, Arnab

    2016-06-01

    In this work a practical demonstration for simultaneous levitation and rotation for a ferromagnetic cylindrical object is presented. A hollow steel cylinder has been arranged to remain suspended stably under I-core electromagnet utilizing dc attraction type levitation principle and then arranged to rotate the levitated object around 1000 rpm speed based on eddy current based energy meter principle. Since the object is to be rotating during levitated condition the device will be frictionless, energy-efficient and robust. This technology may be applied to frictionless energy meter, wind turbine, machine tool applications, precision instruments and many other devices where easy energy-efficient stable rotation will be required. The cascade lead compensation control scheme has been applied for stabilization of unstable levitation system. The proposed device is successfully tested in the laboratory and experimental results have been produced.

  20. A theoretical study for temperature dependence of levitation force of high-T{sub c} superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inanir, F. [Department of Physics, Recep Tayyip Erdogan University, 53100 Rize (Turkey); Yildiz, Ş., E-mail: sukru.yildiz@gop.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Gaziosmanpasa University, Tasliciftlik Campus, 60240 Tokat (Turkey); Okutan, M. [Department of Physics, Recep Tayyip Erdogan University, 53100 Rize (Turkey); Kolemen, U. [Department of Physics, Gaziosmanpasa University, Tasliciftlik Campus, 60240 Tokat (Turkey)

    2013-02-14

    Highlights: ► Temperature dependence of the levitation force is investigated. ► All calculations have been made in the framework of the critical state model. ► Some published data have been reproduced by the model. -- Abstract: The temperature effect on the levitation force of a cylindrical type-II superconductor was investigated theoretically by solving the critical state equation. Analytical expressions are obtained for the levitation force versus increasing temperature for zero-field-cooled (ZFC). Examining the behavior of levitation force–temperature curves the critical parameters are the critical current density, lower critical field and the pinning strength. The calculation qualitatively agrees with the experimental results for high-T{sub c} superconductors. Employing exponential decay of the critical current density we have reproduced temperature–levitation measurements published in the literature. Some important macroscopic parameters may be obtained by fitting the expressions introduced in this paper with the experimental data.