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Sample records for acoustic droplet vaporization

  1. Bioeffects due to acoustic droplet vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulated micro- and nano-droplets can be vaporized via ultrasound, a process termed acoustic droplet vaporization. Our interest is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular microdroplets. Additionally, the microdroplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Early timescale vaporization events, including phase change, are directly visualized using ultra-high speed imaging, and the influence of acoustic parameters on droplet/bubble dynamics is discussed. Acoustic and fluid mechanics parameters affecting the severity of endothelial cell bioeffects are explored. These findings suggest parameter spaces for which bioeffects may be reduced or enhanced, depending on the objective of the therapy. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  2. On the Acoustic Properties of Vaporized Submicron Perfluorocarbon Droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reznik, Nikita; Lajoinie, Guillaume; Shpak, Oleksandr; Gelderblom, Erik C.; Williams, Ross; Jong, de Nico; Versluis, Michel; Burns, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic characteristics of microbubbles created from vaporized submicron perfluorocarbon droplets with fluorosurfactant coating are examined. Utilizing ultra-high-speed optical imaging, the acoustic response of individual microbubbles to low-intensity diagnostic ultrasound was observed on clini

  3. On the acoustic properties of vaporized submicron perfluorocarbon droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, Nikita; Lajoinie, Guillaume; Shpak, Oleksandr; Gelderblom, Erik C; Williams, Ross; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel; Burns, Peter N

    2014-06-01

    The acoustic characteristics of microbubbles created from vaporized submicron perfluorocarbon droplets with fluorosurfactant coating are examined. Utilizing ultra-high-speed optical imaging, the acoustic response of individual microbubbles to low-intensity diagnostic ultrasound was observed on clinically relevant time scales of hundreds of milliseconds after vaporization. It was found that the vaporized droplets oscillate non-linearly and exhibit a resonant bubble size shift and increased damping relative to uncoated gas bubbles due to the presence of coating material. Unlike the commercially available lipid-coated ultrasound contrast agents, which may exhibit compression-only behavior, vaporized droplets may exhibit expansion-dominated oscillations. It was further observed that the non-linearity of the acoustic response of the bubbles was comparable to that of SonoVue microbubbles. These results suggest that vaporized submicron perfluorocarbon droplets possess the acoustic characteristics necessary for their potential use as ultrasound contrast agents in clinical practice.

  4. Acoustic Droplet Vaporization in Biology and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yin Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the literature regarding the use of acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV in clinical applications of imaging, embolic therapy, and therapeutic delivery. ADV is a physical process in which the pressure waves of ultrasound induce a phase transition that causes superheated liquid nanodroplets to form gas bubbles. The bubbles provide ultrasonic imaging contrast and other functions. ADV of perfluoropentane was used extensively in imaging for preclinical trials in the 1990s, but its use declined rapidly with the advent of other imaging agents. In the last decade, ADV was proposed and explored for embolic occlusion therapy, drug delivery, aberration correction, and high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU sensitization. Vessel occlusion via ADV has been explored in rodents and dogs and may be approaching clinical use. ADV for drug delivery is still in preclinical stages with initial applications to treat tumors in mice. Other techniques are still in preclinical studies but have potential for clinical use in specialty applications. Overall, ADV has a bright future in clinical application because the small size of nanodroplets greatly reduces the rate of clearance compared to larger contrast agent bubbles and yet provides the advantages of ultrasonographic contrast, acoustic cavitation, and nontoxicity of conventional perfluorocarbon contrast agent bubbles.

  5. Characterization of Bioeffects on Endothelial Cells under Acoustic Droplet Vaporization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Robinson; Li, David S; Fowlkes, J Brian; Bull, Joseph L

    2015-12-01

    Gas embolotherapy is achieved by locally vaporizing microdroplets through acoustic droplet vaporization, which results in bubbles that are large enough to occlude blood flow directed to tumors. Endothelial cells, lining blood vessels, can be affected by these vaporization events, resulting in cell injury and cell death. An idealized monolayer of endothelial cells was subjected to acoustic droplet vaporization using a 3.5-MHz transducer and dodecafluoropentane droplets. Treatments included insonation pressures that varied from 2 to 8 MPa (rarefactional) and pulse lengths that varied from 4 to 16 input cycles. The bubble cloud generated was directly dependent on pressure, but not on pulse length. Cellular damage increased with increasing bubble cloud size, but was limited to the bubble cloud area. These results suggest that vaporization near the endothelium may impact the vessel wall, an effect that could be either deleterious or beneficial depending on the intended overall therapeutic application.

  6. Linear Stability Analysis of an Acoustically Vaporized Droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Junaid; Qamar, Adnan; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is a phase transition phenomena of a superheat liquid (Dodecafluoropentane, C5F12) droplet to a gaseous bubble, instigated by a high-intensity acoustic pulse. This approach was first studied in imaging applications, and applicable in several therapeutic areas such as gas embolotherapy, thrombus dissolution, and drug delivery. High-speed imaging and theoretical modeling of ADV has elucidated several physical aspects, ranging from bubble nucleation to its subsequent growth. Surface instabilities are known to exist and considered responsible for evolving bubble shapes (non-spherical growth, bubble splitting and bubble droplet encapsulation). We present a linear stability analysis of the dynamically evolving interfaces of an acoustically vaporized micro-droplet (liquid A) in an infinite pool of a second liquid (liquid B). We propose a thermal ADV model for the base state. The linear analysis utilizes spherical harmonics (Ynm, of degree m and order n) and under various physical assumptions results in a time-dependent ODE of the perturbed interface amplitudes (one at the vapor/liquid A interface and the other at the liquid A/liquid B interface). The perturbation amplitudes are found to grow exponentially and do not depend on m. Supported by KAUST Baseline Research Funds.

  7. Are endothelial cell bioeffects from acoustic droplet vaporization proximity dependent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Robinson; Li, David; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) produces gas microbubbles that provide a means of selective occlusion in gas embolotherapy. Vaporization and subsequent occlusion occur inside blood vessels supplying the targeted tissue, such as tumors. Theoretical and computational studies showed that ADV within a vessel can impart high fluid mechanical stresses on the vessel wall. Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that vaporization at an endothelial layer may affect cell attachment and viability. The current study is aimed at investigating the role of vaporization distance away from the endothelial layer. HUVECs were cultured in OptiCell™ chambers until reaching confluence. Dodecafluoropentane microdroplets were added, attaining a 10:1 droplet to cell ratio. A single ultrasound pulse (7.5 MHz) consisting of 16 cycles (~ 2 μs) and a 5 MPa peak rarefactional pressure was used to produce ADV while varying the vaporization distance from the endothelial layer (0 μm, 500 μm, 1000 μm). Results indicated that cell attachment and viability was significantly different if the distance was 0 μm (at the endothelial layer). Other distances were not significantly different from the control. ADV will significantly affect the endothelium if droplets are in direct contact with the cells. Droplet concentration and flow conditions inside blood vessels may play an important role. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  8. Droplets Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Dahan, Raphael; Carmon, Tal

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to their capillary resonances (Rayleigh, 1879) and their optical resonances (Ashkin, 1977), droplets acoustical resonances were rarely considered. Here we experimentally excite, for the first time, the acoustical resonances of a droplet that relies on sound instead of capillary waves. Droplets vibrations at 37 MHz rates and 100 quality factor are optically excited and interrogated at an optical threshold of 68 microWatt. Our vibrations span a spectral band that is 1000 times higher when compared with drops previously-studied capillary vibration.

  9. Characterization of acoustic droplet vaporization for control of bubble generation under flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Shih-Tsung; Huang, Yi-Luan; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the manipulation of bubbles generated by acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) under clinically relevant flow conditions. Optical microscopy and high-frequency ultrasound imaging were used to observe bubbles generated by 2-MHz ultrasound pulses at different time points after the onset of ADV. The dependence of the bubble population on droplet concentration, flow velocity, fluid viscosity and acoustic parameters, including acoustic pressure, pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency, was investigated. The results indicated that post-ADV bubble growth spontaneously driven by air permeation markedly affected the bubble population after insonation. The bubbles can grow to a stable equilibrium diameter as great as twice the original diameter in 0.5-1 s, as predicted by the theoretical calculation. The growth trend is independent of flow velocity, but dependent on fluid viscosity and droplet concentration, which directly influence the rate of gas uptake by bubbles and the rate of gas exchange across the wall of the semipermeable tube containing the bubbles and, hence, the gas content of the host medium. Varying the acoustic pressure does not markedly change the formation of bubbles as long as the ADV thresholds of most droplets are reached. Varying pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency markedly reduces the number of bubbles. Lengthening pulse duration favors the production of large bubbles, but reduces the total number of bubbles. Increasing the PRF interestingly provides superior performance in bubble disruption. These results also suggest that an ADV bubble population cannot be assessed simply on the basis of initial droplet size or enhancement of imaging contrast by the bubbles. Determining the optimal acoustic parameters requires careful consideration of their impact on the bubble population produced for different application scenarios.

  10. Effects of viscosity on endothelial cell damage under acoustic droplet vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Robinson; Singh, Rahul; Li, David; Pitre, John; Putnam, Andrew; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is a process by which stabilized superheated microdroplets are able to undergo phase transition with the aid of focused ultrasound. Gas bubbles resulting from ADV can provide local occlusion of the blood vessels supplying diseased tissue, such as tumors. The ADV process can also induce bioeffects that increase vessel permeability, which is beneficial for localized drug delivery. Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that vaporization at the endothelial layer will affect cell attachment and viability. Several hypotheses have been proposed to elucidate the mechanism of damage including the generation of normal and shear stresses during bubble expansion. A single 3.5 MHz ultrasound pulse consisting of 8 cycles (~2.3 μs) and a 6 MPa peak rarefactional pressure was used to induce ADV on endothelial cells in media of different viscosities. Carboxylmethyl cellulose was added to the cell media to increase the viscosity up to 300 cP to and aid in the reduction of stresses during bubble expansion. The likelihood of cell damage was decreased when compared to our control (~1 cP), but it was still present in some cases indicating that the mechanism of damage does not depend entirely on viscous stresses associated with bubble expansion. This work was supported by NIH Grant R01EB006476.

  11. The efficiency and stability of bubble formation by acoustic vaporization of submicron perfluorocarbon droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, Nikita; Shpak, Oleksandr; Gelderblom, Erik C; Williams, Ross; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel; Burns, Peter N

    2013-09-01

    Submicron droplets of liquid perfluorocarbon converted into microbubbles with applied ultrasound have been studied, for a number of years, as potential next generation extravascular ultrasound contrast agents. In this work, we conduct an initial ultra-high-speed optical imaging study to examine the vaporization of submicron droplets and observe the newly created microbubbles in the first microseconds after vaporization. It was estimated that single pulses of ultrasound at 10 MHz with pressures within the diagnostic range are able to vaporize on the order of at least 10% of the exposed droplets. However, only part of the newly created microbubbles survives immediately following vaporization - the bubbles may recondense back into the liquid droplet state within microseconds of nucleation. The probability of bubble survival within the first microseconds of vaporization was shown to depend on ultrasound excitation pressure as well as on bubble coalescence during vaporization, a behavior influenced by the presence of coating material on the newly created bubbles. The results of this study show for the first time that although initial vaporization of droplets is necessary to create echogenic bubbles, additional factors, such as coalescence and bubble shell properties, are important and should be carefully considered for the production of microbubbles for use in medical imaging.

  12. The efficiency and stability of bubble formation by acoustic vaporization of submicron perfluorocarbon droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reznik, Nikita; Shpak, Oleksandr; Gelderblom, Erik C.; Williams, Ross; Jong, de Nico; Versluis, Michel; Burns, Peter N.

    2013-01-01

    Submicron droplets of liquid perfluorocarbon converted into microbubbles with applied ultrasound have been studied, for a number of years, as potential next generation extravascular ultrasound contrast agents. In this work, we conduct an initial ultra-high-speed optical imaging study to examine the

  13. Acoustic droplet vaporization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shpak, O.

    2014-01-01

    Current tumor chemotherapy is associated with severe side effects caused by adverse effects of the drugs on healthy tissue. A local delivery of the drug has the advantage of a more controlled biodistribution of the therapeutic agent, which will reduce the side-effects, and offers the potential to us

  14. Optical droplet vaporization of micron-sized perfluorocarbon droplets and their photoacoustic detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric; Rui, Min; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael

    2011-03-01

    An acoustic and photoacoustic characterization of micron-sized perfluorocarbon (PFC) droplets is presented. PFC droplets are currently being investigated as acoustic and photoacoustic contrast agents and as cancer therapy agents. Pulse echo measurements at 375 MHz were used to determine the diameter, ranging from 3.2 to 6.5 μm, and the sound velocity, ranging from 311 to 406 m/s of nine droplets. An average sound velocity of 379 +/- 18 m/s was calculated for droplets larger than the ultrasound beam width of 4.0 μm. Optical droplet vaporization, where vaporization of a single droplet occurred upon laser irradiation of sufficient intensity, was verified using pulse echo acoustic methods. The ultrasonic backscatter amplitude, acoustic impedance and attenuation increased after vaporization, consistent with a phase change from a liquid to gas core. Photoacoustic measurements were used to compare the spectra of three droplets ranging in diameter from 3.0 to 6.2 μm to a theoretical model. Good agreement in the spectral features was observed over the bandwidth of the 375 MHz transducer.

  15. Low-intensity focused ultrasound (LIFU-induced acoustic droplet vaporization in phase-transition perfluoropentane nanodroplets modified by folate for ultrasound molecular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu J

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Jianxin Liu,1,* Tingting Shang,1,* Fengjuan Wang,1 Yang Cao,1 Lan Hao,1 JianLi Ren,1,2 Haitao Ran,1,2 Zhigang Wang,1,2 Pan Li,1,2 Zhiyu Du3 1Chongqing Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Molecular Imaging, 2Department of Ultrasound, 3Postgraduate Department, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The commonly used ultrasound (US molecular probes, such as targeted microbubbles and perfluorocarbon emulsions, present a number of inherent problems including the conflict between US visualization and particle penetration. This study describes the successful fabrication of phase changeable folate-targeted perfluoropentane nanodroplets (termed FA-NDs, a novel US molecular probe for tumor molecular imaging with US. Notably, these FA-NDs can be triggered by low-intensity focused US (LIFU sonication, providing excellent US enhancement in B-mode and contrast-enhanced US mode in vitro. After intravenous administration into nude mice bearing SKOV3 ovarian carcinomas, 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3' -tetramethylindotricarbocyanine iodide-labeled FA-NDs were found to accumulate in the tumor region. FA-NDs injection followed by LIFU sonication exhibited remarkable US contrast enhancement in the tumor region. In conclusion, combining our elaborately developed FA-NDs with LIFU sonication provides a potential protocol for US molecular imaging in folate receptor-overexpressing tumors. Keywords: low-intensity focused ultrasound, perfluoropentane nanodroplets, acoustic droplet vaporization, ultrasound molecular imaging, targeting

  16. Pulse sequences for uniform perfluorocarbon droplet vaporization and ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puett, C; Sheeran, P S; Rojas, J D; Dayton, P A

    2014-09-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) consist of liquid perfluorocarbon droplets that can be vaporized into gas-filled microbubbles by pulsed ultrasound waves at diagnostic pressures and frequencies. These activatable contrast agents provide benefits of longer circulating times and smaller sizes relative to conventional microbubble contrast agents. However, optimizing ultrasound-induced activation of these agents requires coordinated pulse sequences not found on current clinical systems, in order to both initiate droplet vaporization and image the resulting microbubble population. Specifically, the activation process must provide a spatially uniform distribution of microbubbles and needs to occur quickly enough to image the vaporized agents before they migrate out of the imaging field of view. The development and evaluation of protocols for PCCA-enhanced ultrasound imaging using a commercial array transducer are described. The developed pulse sequences consist of three states: (1) initial imaging at sub-activation pressures, (2) activating droplets within a selected region of interest, and (3) imaging the resulting microbubbles. Bubble clouds produced by the vaporization of decafluorobutane and octafluoropropane droplets were characterized as a function of focused pulse parameters and acoustic field location. Pulse sequences were designed to manipulate the geometries of discrete microbubble clouds using electronic steering, and cloud spacing was tailored to build a uniform vaporization field. The complete pulse sequence was demonstrated in the water bath and then in vivo in a rodent kidney. The resulting contrast provided a significant increase (>15 dB) in signal intensity.

  17. Experimental Study of Water Droplet Vaporization on Nanostructured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Jorge, Jr.

    -99. Heat transfer coefficients were determined from thermal measurements in the test apparatus. All experiments were conducted inside an ISO Class 5 clean room enclosure. It was observed that when a liquid water droplet impinged upon the ZnO nanostructured at surface temperatures less than 140 degrees C, the nominally spherical droplet spread into a thin film over the surface. The film thickness depended on many parameters but in general it measured approximately 100-400 micrometers. As a result, it was found that the droplet evaporated by film evaporation without initiating nucleate boiling. At wall superheat levels of 10-20 degrees C, it was found in some cases that the heat transfer coefficients were nearly 4 times greater than for those of nucleate boiling at the same superheat level. For these conditions, no bubble nucleation was observed visually, and, nevertheless, extremely high heat transfer coefficients resulting from rapid evaporation of the thin liquid film formed by the spreading droplet were observed. At high wall superheat levels, the vaporization process exhibited Leidenfrost droplet vaporization. The extreme wetting of the nanostructured surfaces resulted in high Leidenfrost transition temperatures in the range of 310-376 degrees C, among the highest in the literature, exceeding those exhibited by bare metal surfaces by 100 degrees C or more. The Leidenfrost transition was detected from a recording of the acoustic signal generated from each experiment during the deposition and subsequent evaporation process. It was defined as the first point for which there is no disturbance to the acoustical signal in the form of a sizzling sound beyond the initial violent popping generated during the droplet deposition. The results document a trend of increasing Leidenfrost temperature with decreasing contact angle, which is consistent with earlier studies. The results of this study are compared with earlier work in this area and the implications for applications are

  18. Dynamic response of vaporizing droplet to pressure oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Shen, Chibing; Zhang, Xinqiao

    2017-02-01

    Combustion instability is a major challenge in the development of the liquid propellant engines, and droplet vaporization is viewed as a potential mechanism for driving instabilities. Based on the previous work, an unsteady droplet heating and vaporization model was developed. The model and numerical method are validated by experimental data available in literature, and then the oscillatory vaporization of n-Heptane droplet exposed to unsteady harmonic nitrogen atmosphere was numerically investigated over a wide range of amplitudes and frequencies. Also, temperature variations inside the droplet were demonstrated under oscillation environments. It was found that the thermal wave is attenuated with significantly reduced wave intensities as it penetrates deep into droplet from the ambient gas. Droplet surface temperature exhibits smaller fluctuation than that of the ambient gas, and it exhibits a time lag with regard to the pressure variation. Furthermore, the mechanism leading to phase lag of vaporization rate with respect to pressure oscillation was unraveled. Results show that this phase lag varies during the droplet lifetime and it is strongly influenced by oscillation frequency, indicating droplet vaporization is only capable of driving combustion instability in some certain frequency domains. Instead, the amplitude of the oscillation does not have very significant effects. It is noteworthy that thermal inertia of the droplet also plays a considerable role in determining the phase lag.

  19. Vaporization dynamics of volatile perfluorocarbon droplets: A theoretical model and in vitro validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doinikov, Alexander A., E-mail: doinikov@bsu.by; Bouakaz, Ayache [Inserm U930, Université François Rabelais, Tours 37044 (France); Sheeran, Paul S.; Dayton, Paul A. [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Perfluorocarbon (PFC) microdroplets, called phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs), are a promising tool in ultrasound imaging and therapy. Interest in PCCAs is motivated by the fact that they can be triggered to transition from the liquid state to the gas state by an externally applied acoustic pulse. This property opens up new approaches to applications in ultrasound medicine. Insight into the physics of vaporization of PFC droplets is vital for effective use of PCCAs and for anticipating bioeffects. PCCAs composed of volatile PFCs (with low boiling point) exhibit complex dynamic behavior: after vaporization by a short acoustic pulse, a PFC droplet turns into a vapor bubble which undergoes overexpansion and damped radial oscillation until settling to a final diameter. This behavior has not been well described theoretically so far. The purpose of our study is to develop an improved theoretical model that describes the vaporization dynamics of volatile PFC droplets and to validate this model by comparison with in vitro experimental data. Methods: The derivation of the model is based on applying the mathematical methods of fluid dynamics and thermodynamics to the process of the acoustic vaporization of PFC droplets. The used approach corrects shortcomings of the existing models. The validation of the model is carried out by comparing simulated results with in vitro experimental data acquired by ultrahigh speed video microscopy for octafluoropropane (OFP) and decafluorobutane (DFB) microdroplets of different sizes. Results: The developed theory allows one to simulate the growth of a vapor bubble inside a PFC droplet until the liquid PFC is completely converted into vapor, and the subsequent overexpansion and damped oscillations of the vapor bubble, including the influence of an externally applied acoustic pulse. To evaluate quantitatively the difference between simulated and experimental results, the L2-norm errors were calculated for all cases where the

  20. Vaporization and recondensation dynamics of indocyanine green-loaded perfluoropentane droplets irradiated by a short pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jaesok; Chen, Xucai; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.; Kim, Kang

    2016-12-01

    Phase-transition droplets have been proposed as promising contrast agents for ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging. Short pulse laser activated perfluorocarbon-based droplets, especially when in a medium with a temperature below their boiling point, undergo phase changes of vaporization and recondensation in response to pulsed laser irradiation. Here, we report and discuss the vaporization and recondensation dynamics of perfluoropentane droplets containing indocyanine green in response to a short pulsed laser with optical and acoustic measurements. To investigate the effect of temperature on the vaporization process, an imaging chamber was mounted on a temperature-controlled water reservoir and then the vaporization event was recorded at 5 million frames per second via a high-speed camera. The high-speed movies show that most of the droplets within the laser beam area expanded rapidly as soon as they were exposed to the laser pulse and immediately recondensed within 1-2 μs. The vaporization/recondensation process was consistently reproduced in six consecutive laser pulses to the same area. As the temperature of the media was increased above the boiling point of the perfluoropentane, the droplets were less likely to recondense and remained in a gas phase after the first vaporization. These observations will help to clarify the underlying processes and eventually guide the design of repeatable phase-transition droplets as a photoacoustic imaging contrast agent.

  1. Evolution of acoustically vaporized microdroplets in gas embolotherapy

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic vaporization dynamics of a superheated dodecafluoropentane (DDFP) microdroplet inside a microtube and the resulting bubble evolution is investigated in the present work. This work is motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique that is intended to treat cancers by infarcting tumors using gas bubbles. A combined theoretical and computational approach is utilized and compared with the experiments to understand the evolution process and to estimate the resulting stress distribution associated with vaporization event. The transient bubble growth is first studied by ultra-high speed imaging and then theoretical and computational modeling is used to predict the entire bubble evolution process. The evolution process consists of three regimes: an initial linear rapid spherical growth followed by a linear compressed oval shaped growth and finally a slow asymptotic nonlinear spherical bubble growth. Although the droplets are small compared to the tube diameter, the bubble evolution is influenced by the tube wall. The final bubble radius is found to scale linearly with the initial droplet radius and is approximately five times the initial droplet radius. A short pressure pulse with amplitude almost twice as that of ambient conditions is observed. The width of this pressure pulse increases with increasing droplet size whereas the amplitude is weakly dependent. Although the rise in shear stress along the tube wall is found to be under peak physiological limits, the shear stress amplitude is found to be more prominently influenced by the initial droplet size. The role of viscous dissipation along the tube wall and ambient bulk fluid pressure is found to be significant in bubble evolution dynamics. © 2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  2. Evolution of acoustically vaporized microdroplets in gas embolotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Adnan; Wong, Zheng Z; Fowlkes, J Brian; Bull, Joseph L

    2012-03-01

    Acoustic vaporization dynamics of a superheated dodecafluoropentane (DDFP) microdroplet inside a microtube and the resulting bubble evolution is investigated in the present work. This work is motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique that is intended to treat cancers by infarcting tumors using gas bubbles. A combined theoretical and computational approach is utilized and compared with the experiments to understand the evolution process and to estimate the resulting stress distribution associated with vaporization event. The transient bubble growth is first studied by ultra-high speed imaging and then theoretical and computational modeling is used to predict the entire bubble evolution process. The evolution process consists of three regimes: an initial linear rapid spherical growth followed by a linear compressed oval shaped growth and finally a slow asymptotic nonlinear spherical bubble growth. Although the droplets are small compared to the tube diameter, the bubble evolution is influenced by the tube wall. The final bubble radius is found to scale linearly with the initial droplet radius and is approximately five times the initial droplet radius. A short pressure pulse with amplitude almost twice as that of ambient conditions is observed. The width of this pressure pulse increases with increasing droplet size whereas the amplitude is weakly dependent. Although the rise in shear stress along the tube wall is found to be under peak physiological limits, the shear stress amplitude is found to be more prominently influenced by the initial droplet size. The role of viscous dissipation along the tube wall and ambient bulk fluid pressure is found to be significant in bubble evolution dynamics.

  3. Low power sessile droplet actuation via modulated surface acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Baudoin, Michael; Matar, Olivier Bou; Herth, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Low power actuation of sessile droplets is of primary interest for portable or hybrid lab-on-a-chip and harmless manipulation of biofluids. In this paper, we show that the acoustic power required to move or deform droplets via surface acoustic waves can be substantially reduced through the forcing of the drops inertio-capillary modes of vibrations. Indeed, harmonic, superharmonic and subharmonic (parametric) excitation of these modes are observed when the high frequency acoustic signal (19.5 MHz) is modulated around Rayleigh-Lamb inertio-capillary frequencies. This resonant behavior results in larger oscillations and quicker motion of the drops than in the non-modulated case.

  4. Droplet actuation by surface acoustic waves: an interplay between acoustic streaming and radiation pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Philippe; Baudoin, Michael; Matar, Olivier Bou; Zoueshtiagh, Farzam

    2010-11-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAW) are known to be a versatile technique for the actuation of sessile drops. Droplet displacement, internal mixing or drop splitting, are amongst the elementary operations that SAW can achieve, which are useful on lab-on-chip microfluidics benches. On the purpose to understand the underlying physical mechanisms involved during these operations, we study experimentally the droplet dynamics varying different physical parameters. Here in particular, the influence of liquid viscosity and acoustic frequency is investigated: it is indeed predicted that both quantities should play a role in the acoustic-hydrodynamic coupling involved in the dynamics. The key point is to compare the relative magnitude of the attenuation length, i.e. the scale within which the acoustic wave decays in the fluid, and the size of the drop. This relative magnitude governs the relative importance of acoustic streaming and acoustic radiation pressure, which are both involved in the droplet dynamics.

  5. Study of low frequency acoustic signals from superheated droplet detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, P K; Das, M; Bhattacharjee, P

    2013-01-01

    The bubble nucleation process in superheated droplet detector (SDD) is associated with the emission of an acoustic pulse that can be detected by an acoustic sensor. We have studied the neutron and gamma-ray induced nucleation events in a SDD with the active liquid R-12 (CCl2F2, b.p. -29.8oC) using a condenser microphone sensor. A comparative study in the low frequency region (~ 0-10kHz) for the neutron and gamma-ray induced nucleation is presented here. From the analysis of the waveforms we observe a significant difference between the neutron and gamma-ray induced acoustic events.

  6. Acoustic response of superheated droplet detectors to neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Size; Zhang, Guiying; Ni, Bangfa; Zhao, Changjun; Zhang, Huanqiao; Guan, Yongjing; Chen, Zhe; Xiao, Caijin; Liu, Chao; Liu, Cunxiong

    2012-03-01

    The search for dark matter (DM) is a hot field nowadays, a number of innovative techniques have emerged. The superheated droplet technique is relatively mature; however, it is recently revitalized in a number of frontier fields including the search for DM. In this work, the acoustic response of Superheated Droplet Detectors (SDDs) to neutrons was studied by using a 252Cf neutron source, SDDs developed by the China Institute of Atomic Energy, a sound sensor, a sound card and a PC. Sound signals were filtered. The characteristics of FFT spectra, power spectra and time constants were used to determine the authenticity of the bubbles analyzed.

  7. Droplet Manipulation Using Acoustic Streaming Induced by a Vibrating Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Hoang Van; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    2016-06-01

    We present a simple method for on-demand manipulation of aqueous droplets in oil. With numerical simulations and experiments, we show that a vibrating membrane can produce acoustic streaming. By making use of this vortical flow, we manage to repulse the droplets away from the membrane edges. Then, by simply aligning the membrane at 45° to the flow, the droplets can be forced to follow the membrane's boundaries, thus steering them across streamlines and even between different oil types. We also characterize the repulsion and steering effect with various excitation voltages at different water and oil flow rates. The maximum steering frequency we have achieved is 165 Hz. The system is extremely robust and reliable: the same membrane can be reused after many days and with different oils and/or surfactants at the same operating frequency.

  8. Periodic Partial Extinction Regime in Acoustically Coupled Fuel Droplet Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia Quiroz, Miguel; Bennewitz, John; Vargas, Andres; Sim, Hyung Sub; Smith, Owen; Karagozian, Ann

    2016-11-01

    This experimental study investigates the response of burning liquid fuel droplets exposed to standing acoustic waves, extending prior studies quantifying mean and temporal flame response to moderate acoustic excitation. This investigation explores alternative fuels exposed to a range of acoustic forcing conditions (frequencies and amplitudes), with a focus on ethanol and JP-8. Three fundamental flame regimes are observed: sustained oscillatory combustion, periodic partial extinction and reignition (PPER), and full extinction. Phase-locked OH* chemiluminescence imaging and local temporal pressure measurements allow quantification of the combustion-acoustic coupling through the local Rayleigh index G. As expected, PPER produces negative G values, despite having clear flame oscillations. PPER is observed to occur at low-frequency, high amplitude excitation, where the acoustic time scales are large compared with kinetic/reaction times scales for diffusion-limited combustion processes. These quantitative differences in behavior are determined to depend on localized fluid mechanical strain created by the acoustic excitation as well as reaction kinetics. Supported by AFOSR Grant FA9550-15-1-0339.

  9. Optical studies of vaporization and stability of fluorescently labelled perfluorocarbon droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, Nikita; Seo, Minseok; Williams, Ross; Bolewska-Pedyczak, Eleonora; Lee, Mike; Matsuura, Naomi; Gariepy, Jean; Foster, F. Stuart; Burns, Peter N.

    2012-11-01

    Droplets of liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) are under study as the next generation of contrast agents for ultrasound (US). These droplets can be selectively vaporized into echogenic gas bubbles in situ by externally applied US, with numerous applications to diagnosis and therapy. However, little is known about the mechanisms of droplet vaporization and the stability of the bubbles so produced. Here we observe optically the vaporization of fluorescent PFC droplets and the stability of the newly created bubbles. Fluorescent markers were used to label selectively either the liquid PFC core or the shell of the droplets. It was found that, following vaporization, the fluorescent marker is quickly expelled from the core of the newly created bubble and is retained on the gas-liquid interface. At the same time, it was shown that bubbles retain the original shells encapsulating their droplet precursors. The efficiency of encapsulation was found to depend strongly on the nature of the stabilizing material itself. These results provide direct evidence of droplet encapsulation post-vaporization, and suggest that the behaviour of the vaporized droplets is strongly dependent on the choice of the stabilizing material for the emulsion.

  10. Effect of Vapor Flow on Jumping Droplets during Condensation on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Daniel J.; Miljkovic, Nenad; Enright, Ryan; Limia, Alexander; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2013-11-01

    Upon coalescence of droplets on a superhydrophobic surface, the net reduction in droplet surface area results in a release of surface energy that can cause the coalesced droplet to ``jump'' away from the surface. Jumping condensing surfaces have been shown to enhance condensation heat transfer by up to 30% compared to state-of-the-art dropwise condensing surfaces. While the heat transfer enhancement of jumping condensation is well documented, droplet behavior after departure from the surface has not been considered. Vapor flows to the condensing surface due to mass conservation. This flow can increase drag on departing droplets, resulting in complete droplet reversal and return to the surface. Upon return, these larger droplets impede heat transfer until they jump again or finally shed due to gravity. By characterizing individual droplet trajectories during condensation on hydrophobic nanostructured copper oxide surfaces for a variety of heat fluxes (q'' = 0.1 - 2 W/cm2), we showed that vapor flow entrainment dominates droplet motion for droplets smaller than R ~ 30 um at high heat fluxes (q'' >2 W/cm2). Furthermore, we developed an analytical model of droplet motion based on first principles and the Reynolds drag equation which agreed well with the experimental data. We considered condensation on both flat and tubular geometries with our model, and we suggest avenues to further enhance heat transfer which minimize droplet return due to entrainment.

  11. Vapor Transport of a Volatile Solvent for a Multicomponent Aerosol Droplet

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, James Q

    2015-01-01

    This work presents analytical formulas derived for evaluating vapor transport of a volatile solvent for an isolated multicomponent droplet in a quiescent environment, based on quasi-steady-state approximation. Among multiple solvent components, only one component is considered to be much more volatile than the rest such that other components are assumed to be nonvolatile remaining unchanged in the droplet during the process of (single-component) volatile solvent evaporation or condensation. For evaporating droplet, the droplet size often initially decreases following the familiar "d^2 law" at an accelerated rate. But toward the end, the rate of droplet size change diminishes due to the presence of nonvolatile cosolvent. Such an acceleration-deceleration reversal behavior is unique for evaporating multicomponent droplet, while the droplet of pure solvent has an accelerated rate of size change all the way through the end. This reversal behavior is also reflected in the droplet surface temperature evolution as "...

  12. Developments in the Implementation of Acoustic Droplet Ejection for Protein Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ping; Noland, Cameron; Ultsch, Mark; Edwards, Bonnie; Harris, David; Mayer, Robert; Harris, Seth F

    2016-02-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) enables crystallization experiments at the low-nanoliter scale, resulting in rapid vapor diffusion equilibration dynamics and efficient reagent usage in the empirical discovery of structure-enabling protein crystallization conditions. We extend our validation of this technology applied to the diverse physicochemical property space of aqueous crystallization reagents where dynamic fluid analysis coupled to ADE aids in accurate and precise dispensations. Addition of crystallization seed stocks, chemical additives, or small-molecule ligands effectively modulates crystallization, and we here provide examples in optimization of crystal morphology and diffraction quality by the acoustic delivery of ultra-small volumes of these cofactors. Additional applications are discussed, including set up of in situ proteolysis and alternate geometries of crystallization that leverage the small scale afforded by acoustic delivery. Finally, we describe parameters of a system of automation in which the acoustic liquid handler is integrated with a robotic arm, plate centrifuge, peeler, sealer, and stacks, which allows unattended high-throughput crystallization experimentation.

  13. On the formation of nitrogen oxides during the combustion of partially pre-vaporized droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moesl, Klaus Georg

    2012-12-12

    This study contributes to the topic of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) formation at the level of single droplet and droplet array combustion. The influence of the degree of droplet vaporization and the influence of ambient conditions on NO{sub x} emissions are studied in detail by experiments as well as by numerical simulations. Consequently, this study illustrates correlations and dependencies of the most relevant parameters with respect to the formation of NO{sub x}. It merges the fields of droplet pre-vaporization, ignition, combustion, and exhaust gas formation, including a sophisticated approach to NO{sub x} determination. Even though the study was conducted in order to help understand the fundamental process of burning idealized droplets, the processes in spray combustion have also been taken into consideration within its scope. The portability of results obtained from those idealized droplet burning regimes is evaluated for real applications. Thus, this study may also help to derive design recommendations for liquid-fueled combustion devices. While the experimental part focuses on droplet array combustion, the numerical part highlights spherically symmetric single droplet combustion. By performing experiments in a microgravity environment, quasi-spherical conditions were facilitated for droplet burning, and comparability was provided for the experimental and numerical results. A novelty of the numerical part is the investigation of mechanisms of NO{sub x} formation under technically relevant conditions. This includes partial pre-vaporization of the droplets as well as droplet combustion in a hot exhaust gas environment, such as an aero-engine. The results show that the trade-off between ambient temperature and available oxygen determines the NO{sub x} formation of droplets burning in hot exhaust gas. If the ambient temperature is high and there is still sufficient oxygen for full oxidation of the fuel provided by the droplet, the maximum of NOx formation is

  14. Reduction in the Vapor Pressure in Condensation on Cold Droplets of a Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkareva, E. M.; Nemtsev, V. A.; Sorokin, V. V.; Terekhov, V. V.; Terekhov, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    A physicomathematical model of the process of depressurization in a pure saturated and superheated vapor due to the injection of monodisperse cold droplets of a liquid has been developed. A cellular model has been developed that is based on solving the equation of heat conduction in a liquid phase and on the integral method for a gas phase in a spherically symmetric one-dimensional formulation. Numerical investigation has been carried out of the influence of the size and concentration of the droplets and of the initial parameters of the steam on the dynamics of depressurization during the vapor condensation on the droplets.

  15. Modeling of fuel vapor jet eruption induced by local droplet heating

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2014-01-10

    The evaporation of a droplet by non-uniform heating is numerically investigated in order to understand the mechanism of the fuel-vapor jet eruption observed in the flame spread of a droplet array under microgravity condition. The phenomenon was believed to be mainly responsible for the enhanced flame spread rate through a droplet cloud at microgravity conditions. A modified Eulerian-Lagrangian method with a local phase change model is utilized to describe the interfacial dynamics between liquid droplet and surrounding air. It is found that the localized heating creates a temperature gradient along the droplet surface, induces the corresponding surface tension gradient, and thus develops an inner flow circulation commonly referred to as the Marangoni convection. Furthermore, the effect also produces a strong shear flow around the droplet surface, thereby pushing the fuel vapor toward the wake region of the droplet to form a vapor jet eruption. A parametric study clearly demonstrated that at realistic droplet combustion conditions the Marangoni effect is indeed responsible for the observed phenomena, in contrast to the results based on constant surface tension approximation

  16. Sound Propagation in Gas-Vapor-Droplet Suspensions with Evaporation and Nonlinear Particle Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixture in the presence of evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson to accommodate the effects of nonlinear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer on sound attenuation and dispersion. The results indicate the existence of a spectral broadening effect in the attenuation coefficient (scaled with respect to the peak value) with a decrease in droplet mass concentration. It is further shown that for large values of the droplet concentration the scaled attenuation coefficient is characterized by a universal spectrum independent of droplet mass concentration.

  17. Surface acoustic wave vapor sensors based on resonator devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grate, Jay W.; Klusty, Mark

    1991-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices fabricated in the resonator configuration have been used as organic vapor sensors and compared with delay line devices more commonly used. The experimentally determined mass sensitivities of 200, 300, and 400 MHz resonators and 158 MHz delay lines coated with Langmuir-Blodgett films of poly(vinyl tetradecanal) are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. The response of LB- and spray-coated sensors to various organic vapors were determined, and scaling laws for mass sensitivities, vapor sensitivities, and detection limits are discussed. The 200 MHz resonators provide the lowest noise levels and detection limits of all the devices examined.

  18. Sound Propagation in Saturated Gas-Vapor-Droplet Suspensions Considering the Effect of Transpiration on Droplet Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixtures with evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson (1975) to accommodate the effects of transpiration on the linear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer. It is shown that the inclusion of transpiration in the presence of mass transfer improves the agreement between the theory and the experimental data of Cole and Dobbins (1971) for sound attenuation in air-water fogs at low droplet mass concentrations. The results suggest that transpiration has an appreciable effect on both sound absorption and dispersion for both low and high droplet mass concentrations.

  19. Vapor film collapse triggered by external pressure pulse and the fragmentation of melt droplet in FCIs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Qian; TONG Lili; CAO Xuewu; KRIVENTSEV Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    The fragmentation process of high-temperature molten drop is a key factor to determine the ratio heat transferred to power in FCIs,which estimates the possible damage degree during the hypothetical severe accident in the nuclear reactors.In this paper,the fragmentation process of melt droplet in FCIs is investigated by theoretic analysis.The fragmentation mechanism is studied when an external pressure pulse applied to a melt droplet,which is surrounded by vapor film.The vapor film collapse which induces fragmentation of melt droplet is analyzed and modeled.And then the generated pressure is calculated.The vapor film collapse model is introduced to fragmentation correlation,and the predicted fragment size is calculated and compared with experimental data.The result shows that the developed model can predict the diameter of fragments and can be used to calculate the fragmentation process appreciatively.

  20. Concurrent anti-vascular therapy and chemotherapy in solid tumors using drug-loaded acoustic nanodroplet vaporization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yi-Ju; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2017-02-01

    Drug-loaded nanodroplets (NDs) can be converted into gas bubbles through ultrasound (US) stimulation, termed acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV), which provides a potential strategy to simultaneously induce vascular disruption and release drugs for combined physical anti-vascular therapy and chemotherapy. Doxorubicin-loaded NDs (DOX-NDs) with a mean size of 214nm containing 2.48mg DOX/mL were used in this study. High-speed images displayed bubble formation and cell debris, demonstrating the reduction in cell viability after ADV. Intravital imaging provided direct visualization of disrupted tumor vessels (vessel size chemotherapy with DOX-NDs vaporization promotes uniform treatment to improve therapeutic efficacy.

  1. A laser extinction based sensor for simultaneous droplet size and vapor measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueqiang Sun; David J. Ewing; Lin Ma

    2012-01-01

    Multiphase flows involving liquid droplets in association with gas flow occur in many industrial and scientific applications.Recent work has demonstrated the feasibility of using optical techniques based on laser extinction to simultaneously measure vapor concentration and temperature and droplet size and loading.This work introduces the theoretical background for the optimal design of such laser extinction techniques,termed WMLE (wavelength-multiplexed laser extinction).This paper focuses on the development of WMLE and presents a systematic methodology to guide the selection of suitable wavelengths and optimize the performance of WMLE for specific applications.WMLE utilizing wavelengths from 0.5to 10 μm is illustrated for droplet size and vapor concentration measurements in an example of water spray,and is found to enable unique and sensitive Sauter mean diameter measurement in the range of ~1-15μm along with accurate vapor detection.A vapor detection strategy based on differential absorption is developed to extend accurate measurement to a significantly wider range of droplet loading and vapor concentration as compared to strategies based on direct fixed-wavelength absorption.Expected performance of the sensor is modeled for an evaporating spray.This work is expected to lay the groundwork for implementing optical sensors based on WMLE in a variety of research and industrial applications involving multi-phase flows.

  2. Three-axis acoustic device for levitation of droplets in an open gas stream and its application to examine sulfur dioxide absorption by water droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Terrance L; Budwig, Ralph S

    2007-01-01

    Two acoustic devices to stabilize a droplet in an open gas stream (single-axis and three-axis levitators) have been designed and tested. The gas stream was provided by a jet apparatus with a 64 mm exit diameter and a uniform velocity profile. The acoustic source used was a Langevin vibrator with a concave reflector. The single-axis levitator relied primarily on the radial force from the acoustic field and was shown to be limited because of significant droplet wandering. The three-axis levitator relied on a combination of the axial and radial forces. The three-axis levitator was applied to examine droplet deformation and circulation and to investigate the uptake of SO(2) from the gas stream to the droplet. Droplets ranging in diameters from 2 to 5 mm were levitated in gas streams with velocities up to 9 ms. Droplet wandering was on the order of a half droplet diameter for a 3 mm diameter droplet. Droplet circulation ranged from the predicted Hadamard-Rybczynski pattern to a rotating droplet pattern. Droplet pH over a central volume of the droplet was measured by planar laser induced fluorescence. The results for the decay of droplet pH versus time are in general agreement with published theory and experiments.

  3. High Frequency Acoustic Reflectometry for Solid/Liquid Interface Characterization: Application to Droplet Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Julien; Toubal, Malika; Li, Sizhe; Campistron, Pierre; Callens, Dorothée; Thomy, Vincent; Senez, Vincent; Nongaillard, Bertrand

    Evolution of the local concentration in a 1 μL droplet of ethanol/water mixture during an evaporation process has been followed using high frequency acoustic reflectometry. This method has been developed for wetting characterization on micro/nanostructures and makes it possible to follow concentration evolution in a droplet deposited on a solid surface. This information gives the opportunity to predict wetting depending on surface tension linked to alcohol concentration evolution. The calibration of the method and concentration evolution in 50% and 30% ethanol droplets are presented. The evolution of a pure ethanol droplet composition is tracked so as to follow hydration process.

  4. Spontaneous assembly of chemically encoded two-dimensional coacervate droplet arrays by acoustic wave patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Liangfei; Martin, Nicolas; Bassindale, Philip G.; Patil, Avinash J.; Li, Mei; Barnes, Adrian; Drinkwater, Bruce W.; Mann, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    The spontaneous assembly of chemically encoded, molecularly crowded, water-rich micro-droplets into periodic defect-free two-dimensional arrays is achieved in aqueous media by a combination of an acoustic standing wave pressure field and in situ complex coacervation. Acoustically mediated coalescence of primary droplets generates single-droplet per node micro-arrays that exhibit variable surface-attachment properties, spontaneously uptake dyes, enzymes and particles, and display spatial and time-dependent fluorescence outputs when exposed to a reactant diffusion gradient. In addition, coacervate droplet arrays exhibiting dynamical behaviour and exchange of matter are prepared by inhibiting coalescence to produce acoustically trapped lattices of droplet clusters that display fast and reversible changes in shape and spatial configuration in direct response to modulations in the acoustic frequencies and fields. Our results offer a novel route to the design and construction of `water-in-water' micro-droplet arrays with controllable spatial organization, programmable signalling pathways and higher order collective behaviour.

  5. Particle Separation inside a Sessile Droplet with Variable Contact Angle Using Surface Acoustic Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Jung, Jin Ho; Park, Jinsoo; Ahmed, Husnain; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2017-01-03

    A sessile droplet of water carrying polystyrene microparticles of different diameters was uniformly exposed to high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) produced by an interdigitated transducer (IDT). We investigated the concentration behavior of the microparticles as the SAWs generated a strong acoustic streaming flow (ASF) inside the water droplet and exerted a direct acoustic radiation force (ARF) on the suspended particles, the magnitude of which depended upon the particle diameter. As a result of the ARF, the microparticles were concentrated according to their diameters at different positions inside the sessile droplet placed in the path of the SAW, right in front of the IDT. The microparticle concentration behavior changed as the sessile droplet contact angle with the substrate was varied by adding surfactant to the water or by gradually evaporating the water. The positions at which the smaller and larger microparticles were concentrated remained distinguishable, even at very different experimental conditions. The long-term exposure of the droplets to the SAWs was accompanied by the gradual evaporation of the carrier fluid, which dynamically changed the droplet contact angle as well as the concentration of particles. Complete evaporation of the fluid left behind several concentrated yet separated clusters of particles on the substrate surface. The effect of the droplet contact angle on particles' concentration behavior and consequent separation of particles has been uniquely studied in this SAW-based report.

  6. The Influence of Acoustic Field Induced by HRT on Oscillation Behavior of a Single Droplet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Ruan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental and theoretical study on the effects of an acoustic field induced by Hartmann Resonance Tube (HRT on droplet deformation behavior. The characteristics of the acoustic field generated by HRT are investigated. Results show that the acoustic frequency decreases with the increase of the resonator length, the sound pressure level (SPL increases with the increase of nozzle pressure ratio (NPR, and it is also noted that increasing resonator length can cause SPL to decrease, which has rarely been reported in published literature. Further theoretical analysis reveals that the resonance frequency of a droplet has several modes, and when the acoustic frequency equals the droplet’s frequency, heightened droplet responses are observed with the maximum amplitude of the shape oscillation. The experimental results for different resonator cavity lengths, nozzle pressure ratios and droplet diameters confirm the non-linear nature of this problem, and this conclusion is in good agreement with theoretical analysis. Measurements by high speed camera have shown that the introduction of an acoustic field can greatly enhance droplet oscillation, which means with the use of an ultrasonic atomizer based on HRT, the quality of atomization and combustion can be highly improved.

  7. Energy balance in laser-irradiated vaporizing droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zardecki, A.; Armstrong, R.L.

    1987-09-08

    We analyze the interactions of atmospheric aerosols with a high-energy laser beam. The energy balance equation allows us to compute the conversion of the pulse energy into temperature increase, vaporization, conduction, and convection. We also include the shrinkage term whose significance has recently been discussed by Davies and Brock.

  8. A computational study of droplet evaporation with fuel vapor jet ejection induced by localized heat sources

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2015-05-12

    Droplet evaporation by a localized heat source under microgravity conditions was numerically investigated in an attempt to understand the mechanism of the fuel vapor jet ejection, which was observed experimentally during the flame spread through a droplet array. An Eulerian-Lagrangian method was implemented with a temperature-dependent surface tension model and a local phase change model in order to effectively capture the interfacial dynamics between liquid droplet and surrounding air. It was found that the surface tension gradient caused by the temperature variation within the droplet creates a thermo-capillary effect, known as the Marangoni effect, creating an internal flow circulation and outer shear flow which drives the fuel vapor into a tail jet. A parametric study demonstrated that the Marangoni effect is indeed significant at realistic droplet combustion conditions, resulting in a higher evaporation constant. A modified Marangoni number was derived in order to represent the surface force characteristics. The results at different pressure conditions indicated that the nonmonotonic response of the evaporation rate to pressure may also be attributed to the Marangoni effect.

  9. An analytical study of the effects of vaporization of twodimensional laminar droplets on a triple flame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidabadi Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of triple flame propagation in combustion systems, containing uniformly distributed volatile fuel droplet was analyzed. The analysis was established for a one-step irreversible reaction with an asymptotic limit, where the value of the Zeldovich Number is large. Here, using unit Lewis number, the analytical results for the triple flame temperature were obtained considering two sections. In the first section, a non-vaporizing fuel stream was studied and in the second section, a volatile droplet fuel stream was taken into account. It is presumed that the fuel droplets vaporize to yield a gaseous fuel of known chemical structure, which is subsequently oxidized in the gaseous phase. Here two different cases are studied. In the first case, only the velocity parallel to the reactant flow was considered; while for the latter one, the vertical velocity was considered in addition. The energy equations were solved and the temperature field equations are presented. The results are first presented for a non-vaporizing fuel and compared to the experiment results. In addition, some other results of the temperature field for a vaporizing fuel stream are demonstrated within the comparison between the abovementioned cases which revealed the effect of the considering the vertical velocity component on the flame temperature field.

  10. The Stefan outflow in a multicomponent vapor-gas atmosphere around a droplet and its role for cloud expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchma, A E; Martyukova, D S

    2016-01-01

    A new comprehensive analysis of Stefan's flow caused by a free growing droplet in vapor-gas atmosphere with several condensing components is presented. This analysis, based on the nonstationary heat and material balance and diffusion transport equations, shows the appearance of the Stefan inflow in the vicinity of the growing droplet and the outflow at large distances from the droplet as a consequence of nonisothermal condensation. For an ensemble of droplets in the atmospheric cloud, this flow provides an increase of the total volume of the cloud, which can be treated as cloud thermal expansion and leads to floating the cloud as a whole due to buoyancy. We have formulated the self-similar solutions of the nonstationary diffusion and heat conduction equations for a growing multicomponent droplet and have derived analytical expressions for the nonstationary velocity profile of Stefan's flow and the expansion volume of the vapor-gas mixture around the growing droplet. To illustrate the approach, we computed the...

  11. An analytical study of the effects of vaporization of twodimensional laminar droplets on a triple flame

    OpenAIRE

    Bidabadi Mehdi; Barari Ghazal; Azimi Milad

    2011-01-01

    The structure of triple flame propagation in combustion systems, containing uniformly distributed volatile fuel droplet was analyzed. The analysis was established for a one-step irreversible reaction with an asymptotic limit, where the value of the Zeldovich Number is large. Here, using unit Lewis number, the analytical results for the triple flame temperature were obtained considering two sections. In the first section, a non-vaporizing fuel stream was studied and in the second section...

  12. Modeling droplet vaporization and combustion with the volume of fluid method at a small Reynolds number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-bin ZHANG; Wei ZHANG; Xue-jun ZHANG

    2012-01-01

    The volume of fluid (VOF) formulation is applied to model the combustion process of a single droplet in a hightemperature convective air free stream environment.The calculations solve the flow field for both phases,and consider the droplet deformation based on an axisymmetrical model.The chemical reaction is modeled with one-step finite-rate mechanism and the thcrmo-physica1 properties for the gas mixture are species and temperature dependence.A mass transfer model applicable to the VOF calculations due to vaporization of the liquid phases is developed in consideration with the fluctuation of the liquid surface.The model is validated by examining the burning rate constants at different convective air temperatures,which accord well with experimental data of previous studies.Other phenomena from the simulations,such as the transient history of droplet deformation and flame structure,are also qualitatively accordant with the descriptions of other numerical results.However,a different droplet deformation mechanism for the low Reynolds number is explained compared with that for the high Reynolds number.The calculations verified the feasibility of the VOF computational fluid dynamics (CFD) formulation as well as the mass transfer model due to vaporization.

  13. Deformation pathways and breakup modes in acoustically levitated bicomponent droplets under external heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Binita; Basu, Saptarshi

    2016-03-01

    Controlled breakup of droplets using heat or acoustics is pivotal in applications such as pharmaceutics, nanoparticle production, and combustion. In the current work we have identified distinct thermal acoustics-induced deformation regimes (ligaments and bubbles) and breakup dynamics in externally heated acoustically levitated bicomponent (benzene-dodecane) droplets with a wide variation in volatility of the two components (benzene is significantly more volatile than dodecane). We showcase the physical mechanism and universal behavior of droplet surface caving in leading to the inception and growth of ligaments. The caving of the top surface is governed by a balance between the acoustic pressure field and the restrictive surface tension of the droplet. The universal collapse of caving profiles for different benzene concentration (growth. Subsequent ligament breakup is primarily Rayleigh-Plateau type. The breakup mode shifts to diffusional entrapment-induced boiling with an increase in concentration of the volatile component (benzene >70 % by volume). The findings are portable to any similar bicomponent systems with differential volatility.

  14. Electrospray droplet exposure to organic vapors: metal ion removal from proteins and protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMuth, J Corinne; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-01-20

    The exposure of aqueous nanoelectrospray droplets to various organic vapors can dramatically reduce sodium adduction on protein ions in positive ion mass spectra. Volatile alcohols, such as methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol lead to a significant reduction in sodium ion adduction but are not as effective as acetonitrile, acetone, and ethyl acetate. Organic vapor exposure in the negative ion mode, on the other hand, has essentially no effect on alkali ion adduction. Evidence is presented to suggest that the mechanism by which organic vapor exposure reduces alkali ion adduction in the positive mode involves the depletion of alkali metal ions via ion evaporation of metal ions solvated with organic molecules. The early generation of metal/organic cluster ions during the droplet desolvation process results in fewer metal ions available to condense on the protein ions formed via the charged residue mechanism. These effects are demonstrated with holomyoglobin ions to illustrate that the metal ion reduction takes place without detectable protein denaturation, which might be revealed by heme loss or an increase in charge state distribution. No evidence is observed for denaturation with exposure to any of the organic vapors evaluated in this work.

  15. Enhanced water removal in a fuel cell stack by droplet atomization using structural and acoustic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palan, Vikrant; Shepard, W. Steve

    This work examines new methods for enhancing product water removal in fuel cell stacks. Vibration and acoustic based methods are proposed to atomize condensed water droplets in the channels of a bipolar plate or on a membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The vibration levels required to atomize water droplets of different sizes are first examined using two different approaches: (1) exciting the droplet at the same energy level required to form that droplet; and (2) by using a method called 'vibration induced droplet atomization', or VIDA. It is shown analytically that a 2 mm radius droplet resting on a bipolar-like plate can be atomized by inducing acceleration levels as low as 250 g at a certain frequency. By modeling the direct structural excitation of a simplified bipolar plate using a realistic source, the response levels that can be achieved are then compared with those required levels. Furthermore, a two-cell fuel cell finite element model and a boundary element model of the MEA were developed to demonstrate that the acceleration levels required for droplet atomization may be achieved in both the bipolar plate as well as the MEA through proper choice of excitation frequency and source strength.

  16. Enhanced water removal in a fuel cell stack by droplet atomization using structural and acoustic excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palan, Vikrant; Shepard, W. Steve [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Alabama, 290 Hardaway Hall, Box 870276, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2006-09-22

    This work examines new methods for enhancing product water removal in fuel cell stacks. Vibration and acoustic based methods are proposed to atomize condensed water droplets in the channels of a bipolar plate or on a membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The vibration levels required to atomize water droplets of different sizes are first examined using two different approaches: (1) exciting the droplet at the same energy level required to form that droplet; and (2) by using a method called 'vibration induced droplet atomization', or VIDA. It is shown analytically that a 2mm radius droplet resting on a bipolar-like plate can be atomized by inducing acceleration levels as low as 250g at a certain frequency. By modeling the direct structural excitation of a simplified bipolar plate using a realistic source, the response levels that can be achieved are then compared with those required levels. Furthermore, a two-cell fuel cell finite element model and a boundary element model of the MEA were developed to demonstrate that the acceleration levels required for droplet atomization may be achieved in both the bipolar plate as well as the MEA through proper choice of excitation frequency and source strength. (author)

  17. An Experimental Study on the Dynamics of a Single Droplet Vapor Explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concilio Hansson, Roberta

    2010-07-01

    The present study aims to develop a mechanistic understanding of the thermal-hydraulic processes in a vapor explosion, which may occur in nuclear power plants during a hypothetical severe accident involving interactions of high-temperature corium melt and volatile coolant. Over the past several decades, a large body of literature has been accumulated on vapor explosion phenomenology and methods for assessment of the related risk. Vapor explosion is driven by a rapid fragmentation of high temperature melt droplets, leading to a substantial increase of heat transfer areas and subsequent explosive evaporation of the volatile coolant. Constrained by the liquid-phase coolant, the rapid vapor production in the interaction zone causes pressurization and dynamic loading on surrounding structures. While such a general understanding has been established, the triggering mechanism and subsequent dynamic fine fragmentation have yet not been clearly understood. A few mechanistic fragmentation models have been proposed, however, computational efforts to simulate the phenomena generated a large scatter of results. Dynamics of the hot liquid (melt) droplet and the volatile liquid (coolant) are investigated in the MISTEE (Micro-Interactions in Steam Explosion Experiments) facility by performing well-controlled, externally triggered, single-droplet experiments, using a high-speed visualization system with synchronized digital cinematography and continuous X-ray radiography, called SHARP (Simultaneous High-speed Acquisition of X-ray Radiography and Photography). After an elaborate image processing, the SHARP images depict the evolution of both melt material (dispersal) and coolant (bubble dynamics), and their microscale interactions, i.e. the triggering phenomenology. The images point to coolant entrainment into the droplet surface as the mechanism for direct contact/mixing ultimately responsible for energetic interactions. Most importantly, the MISTEE data reveals an inverse

  18. Precision manufacture of phase-change perfluorocarbon droplets using microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martz, Thomas D; Sheeran, Paul S; Bardin, David; Lee, Abraham P; Dayton, Paul A

    2011-11-01

    Liquid perfluorocarbon droplets have been of interest in the medical acoustics community for use as acoustically activated particles for tissue occlusion, imaging and therapeutics. To date, methods to produce liquid perfluorocarbon droplets typically result in a polydisperse size distribution. Because the threshold of acoustic activation is a function of diameter, there would be benefit from a monodisperse population to preserve uniformity in acoustic activation parameters. Through use of a microfluidic device with flow-focusing technology, the production of droplets of perfluoropentane with a uniform size distribution is demonstrated. Stability studies indicate that these droplets are stable in storage for at least two weeks. Acoustic studies illustrate the thresholds of vaporization as a function of droplet diameter, and a logarithmic relationship is observed between acoustic pressure and vaporization threshold within the size ranges studied. Droplets of uniform size have very little variability in acoustic vaporization threshold. Results indicate that microfluidic technology can enable greater manufacturing control of phase-change perfluorocarbons for acoustic droplet vaporization applications.

  19. Optical droplet vaporization of nanoparticle-loaded stimuli-responsive microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Ting; Li, Guangbin; Wu, Qiang; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Luo, Xisheng; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-03-01

    A capillary co-flow focusing process is developed to generate stimuli-responsive microbubbles (SRMs) that comprise perfluorocarbon (PFC) suspension of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) in a lipid shell. Upon continuous laser irradiation at around their surface plasmon resonance band, the SNPs effectively absorb electromagnetic energy, induce heat accumulation in SRMs, trigger PFC vaporization, and eventually lead to thermal expansion and fragmentation of the SRMs. This optical droplet vaporization (ODV) process is further simulated by a theoretical model that combines heat generation of SNPs, phase change of PFC, and thermal expansion of SRMs. The model is validated by benchtop experiments, where the ODV process is monitored by microscopic imaging. The effects of primary process parameters on behaviors of ODV are predicted by the theoretical model, indicating the technical feasibility for process control and optimization in future drug delivery applications.

  20. Acoustic separation of oil droplets, colloidal particles and their mixtures in a microfluidic cell

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2016-06-15

    Here we report direct macroscopic and microscopic observations of acoustic driven separation of dodecane oil droplets in water in the presence and absence of colloidal silica particles suspended in the water phase. The experiments were conducted in a simple rectangular channel glass microfluidic cell in which an ultrasound standing wave pattern was generated at 300 KHz frequency. The separation process of both oil droplets and colloidal particles inside the cell was recorded using a high-speed video camera equipped with a macro-objective lens for macroscopic observation or with a high-speed camera attached to an inverted optical microscope for a higher resolution microscopic observation. We characterize the clustering process in the case of emulsion droplets or solid colloidal particles and ultimately demonstrate the emulsion droplets separation from the solid particles in the mixtures based on their different acoustic contrast factors. Finally, we conduct proof of concept experiment to show that the same approach can be used in a continuous fluid flow process.

  1. A study of the effect of binary oxide materials in a single droplet vapor explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, R.C., E-mail: rch@kth.se [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Dinh, T.N.; Manickam, L.T. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-11-15

    In an effort to explore fundamental mechanisms that may govern the effect of melt material on vapor explosion's triggering, fine fragmentation and energetics, a series of experiments using a binary-oxide mixture with eutectic and non-eutectic compositions were performed. Interactions of a hot liquid (WO{sub 3}–CaO) droplet and a volatile liquid (water) were investigated in well-controlled, externally triggered, single-droplet experiments conducted in the Micro-interactions in steam explosion experiments (MISTEE) facility. The tests were visualized by means of a synchronized digital cinematography and continuous X-ray radiography system, called simultaneous high-speed acquisition of X-ray radiography and photography (SHARP). The acquired images followed by further analysis indicate milder interactions for the droplet with non-eutectic melt composition in the tests with low melt superheat, whereas no evident differences between eutectic and non-eutectic melt compositions regarding bubble dynamics, energetics and melt preconditioning was observed in the tests with higher melt superheat.

  2. Elemental diffusion during the droplet epitaxy growth of In(Ga)As/GaAs(001) quantum dots by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z. B.; Chen, B.; Wang, Y. B.; Liao, X. Z., E-mail: xiaozhou.liao@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Lei, W. [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Tan, H. H.; Jagadish, C. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Zou, J. [Materials Engineering and Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Ringer, S. P. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-01-13

    Droplet epitaxy is an important method to produce epitaxial semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). Droplet epitaxy of III-V QDs comprises group III elemental droplet deposition and the droplet crystallization through the introduction of group V elements. Here, we report that, in the droplet epitaxy of InAs/GaAs(001) QDs using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, significant elemental diffusion from the substrate to In droplets occurs, resulting in the formation of In(Ga)As crystals, before As flux is provided. The supply of As flux suppresses the further elemental diffusion from the substrate and promotes surface migration, leading to large island formation with a low island density.

  3. Nucleation and droplet growth from supersaturated vapor at temperatures below the triple point temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Toxvaerd, Søren

    2016-01-01

    In 1897 Ostwald formulated his step rule for formation of the most stable crystal state for a system with crystal polymorphism. The rule describes the irreversible way a system converts to the crystal with lowest free energy. But in fact the irreversible way a supercooled gas below the triple point temperature $T_{tr.p.}$ crystallizes via a liquid droplet is an example of Ostwald's step rule. The homogeneous nucleation in the supersaturated gas is not to a crystal, but to a liquid-like critical nucleus. We have for the first time performed constant energy (NVE) Molecular Dynamics (MD) of homogeneous nucleation without the use of a thermostat. The simulations of homogeneous nucleation in a Lennard-Jones system from supersaturated vapor at temperatures below $T_{tr.p.}$ reveals that the nucleation to a liquid-like critical nucleus is initiated by a small cold cluster [S. Toxvaerd, J. Chem. Phys. \\textbf{143} 154705 (2015)]. The release of latent heat at the subsequent droplet growth increases the temperature in...

  4. The effect of binary oxide materials on a single droplet vapor explosion triggering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, R.C.; Manickam, L.T.; Dinh, T.N. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-07-01

    In order to explore the fundamental mechanism dictated by the material influence on triggering, fine fragmentation and subsequent vapor explosion energetics, a series of experiments using a mixture of eutectic and non-eutectic binary oxide were initiated. Dynamics of the hot liquid (WO{sub 3}-CaO) droplet and the volatile liquid (water) were investigated in the MISTEE (Micro-Interactions in Steam Explosion Experiments) facility by performing well-controlled, externally triggered, single-droplet experiments, using a high-speed visualization system with synchronized digital cinematography and continuous X-ray radiography, called SHARP (Simultaneous High-speed Acquisition of X-ray Radiography and Photography). The acquired images followed by further analysis showed a milder interaction for the non-eutectic melt composition for the tests with low melt superheat, whether no evident differences between eutectic and non-eutectic melt compositions regarding bubble dynamics, energetics and melt preconditioning was perceived for the high melt superheat tests. (author)

  5. Splitting a droplet with oil encapsulation using surface acoustic wave excited by electric signal with low power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anliang Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A new method for splitting a droplet with oil encapsulation is presented. An interdigital transducer and a reflector are fabricated on a 128° yx-LiNbO3 piezoelectric substrate using microelectric technology. An electric signal with the power of 12.3 dBm is applied to the interdigital transducer to generate surface acoustic wave, which is radiated into a droplet with oil encapsulation, leading to surface acoustic wave streaming force. When the electric signal is suddenly moved off, the breakup of the droplet occurs due to inertial force. Color dye solution droplets encapsulated by oil droplets are demonstrated. The effects of electric power, the volume ratio of color dye solution to oil, and the volume of mother droplet on the breakup of droplets are studied. As applications, the presented method is successfully applied to mixture operation and color development reaction of two droplets. The method provides a new sample preparation technique, which is helpful for microfluidic biochemical analysis in a piezoelectric microfluidic system.

  6. Isolating Protein Charge State Reduction in Electrospray Droplets Using Femtosecond Laser Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Santosh; Sistani, Habiballah; Archer, Jieutonne J.; Shi, Fengjian; Levis, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Charge state distributions are measured using mass spectrometry for both native and denatured cytochrome c and myoglobin after laser vaporization from the solution state into an electrospray (ES) plume consisting of a series of solution additives differing in gas-phase basicity. The charge distribution depends on both the pH of the protein solution prior to laser vaporization and the gas-phase basicity of the solution additive employed in the ES solvent. Cytochrome c (myoglobin) prepared in solutions with pH of 7.0, 2.6, and 2.3 resulted in the average charge state distribution (Zavg) of 7.0 ± 0.1 (8.2 ± 0.1), 9.7 ± 0.2 (14.5 ± 0.3), and 11.6 ± 0.3 (16.4 ± 0.1), respectively, in ammonium formate ES solvent. The charge distribution shifted from higher charge states to lower charge states when the ES solvent contained amines additives with higher gas-phase basicity. In the case of triethyl ammonium formate, Zavg of cytochrome c (myoglobin) prepared in solutions with pH of 7.0, 2.6, and 2.3 decreased to 4.9 (5.7), 7.4 ± 0.2 (9.6 ± 0.3), and 7.9 ± 0.3 (9.8 ± 0.2), respectively. The detection of a charge state distribution corresponding to folded protein after laser vaporized, acid-denatured protein interacts with the ES solvent containing ammonium formate, ammonium acetate, triethyl ammonium formate, and triethyl ammonium acetate suggests that at least a part of protein population folds within the electrospray droplet on a millisecond timescale.

  7. Lamb Wave-Based Acoustic Radiation Force-Driven Particle Ring Formation Inside a Sessile Droplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Ha, Byunghang; Park, Jinsoo; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-04-05

    We demonstrate an acoustofluidic device using Lamb waves (LWs) to manipulate polystyrene (PS) microparticles suspended in a sessile droplet of water. The LW-based acoustofluidic platform used in this study is advantageous in that the device is actuated over a range of frequencies without changing the device structure or electrode pattern. In addition, the device is simple to operate and cheap to fabricate. The LWs, produced on a piezoelectric substrate, attenuate inside the fluid and create acoustic streaming flow (ASF) in the form of a poloidal flow with toroidal vortices. The PS particles experience direct acoustic radiation force (ARF) in addition to being influenced by the ASF, which drive the concentration of particles to form a ring. This phenomenon was previously attributed to the ASF alone, but the present experimental results confirm that the ARF plays an important role in forming the particle ring, which would not be possible in the presence of only the ASF. We used a range of actuation frequencies (45-280 MHz), PS particle diameters (1-10 μm), and droplet volumes (5, 7.5, and 10 μL) to experimentally demonstrate this phenomenon.

  8. Moving Liquids with Sound: The Physics of Acoustic Droplet Ejection for Robust Laboratory Automation in Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadimioglu, Babur; Stearns, Richard; Ellson, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Liquid handling instruments for life science applications based on droplet formation with focused acoustic energy or acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) were introduced commercially more than a decade ago. While the idea of "moving liquids with sound" was known in the 20th century, the development of precise methods for acoustic dispensing to aliquot life science materials in the laboratory began in earnest in the 21st century with the adaptation of the controlled "drop on demand" acoustic transfer of droplets from high-density microplates for high-throughput screening (HTS) applications. Robust ADE implementations for life science applications achieve excellent accuracy and precision by using acoustics first to sense the liquid characteristics relevant for its transfer, and then to actuate transfer of the liquid with customized application of sound energy to the given well and well fluid in the microplate. This article provides an overview of the physics behind ADE and its central role in both acoustical and rheological aspects of robust implementation of ADE in the life science laboratory and its broad range of ejectable materials.

  9. Acoustic cavitation as a mechanism of fragmentation of hot molten droplets in in cool liquids. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazimi, M.; Watson, C.; Lanning, D.; Rohsenow, W.; Todreas, N.

    1976-11-01

    A mechanism that explains several of the observations of fragmentation of hot molten drops in coolants is presented. The mechanism relates the fragmentation to the development of acoustic cavitation and subsequent bubble growth within the molten material. The cavitation is assumed due to the severe pressure excursions calculated within the hot material as a result of the pressure pulses accompanying coolant vaporization at the sphere surface. The growth of the cavitation vapor nuclei inside the hot drop is shown to be influenced by the subsequent long duration surface pressure pulses. The variation of the amplitude of these surface pulses with experimental variables is shown to exhibit the same trends with these variables as does the variation in extent of fragmentation.

  10. A Numerical Analysis Research on Earlier Behavior of Molten Droplet Covered with Vapor Film at the Stage of Triggering and Propagation in Steam Explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjun Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When the molten fuel with high temperature falls into the cavity water, it will be dispersed into droplets which are covered with vapor films due to the rapid heat transfer with phase transition. This situation cannot be simply described by liquid-liquid or gas-liquid systems. And there are no sufficient experimental studies on the behavior of droplet covered with vapor film because of the rapid reaction and the difficulty in capture of the film configuration. In this paper, a multiphase code with the volume of fluid (VOF method is used to simulate the earlier behavior of droplet when vapor film exits. The earlier behavior is defined as behavior of the droplet before its disintegration. Thermal effect and pure hydrodynamic effect are, respectively, considered. The simulation results indicate that the film thickness and material density have significant effect on the earlier behavior of droplet. The situation assumed in Ciccarelli and Frost’s model (1994 is observed in current simulation of earlier thermal droplet behavior. The effect of triggering pressure pulse on earlier hydrodynamic behavior is also discussed and it indicates that vapor film has little effect on the hydrodynamic droplet deformation when the intensity of the pressure pulse is very high.

  11. Cell detachment and label-free cell sorting using modulated surface acoustic waves (SAW) in droplet-based microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Bussonnière, Adrien; Baudoin, Michael; Bou-Matar, Olivier; Grandbois, Michel; Charette, Paul; Renaudin, Alan

    2014-01-01

    We present a droplet-based surface acoustic wave (SAW) system designed to viably detach biological cells from a surface and sort cell types based on differences in adhesion strength (adhesion contrast), without the need to label cells with molecular markers. The system uses modulated SAW to generate pulsatile flows in the droplets and efficiently detach the cells, thereby minimizing SAW excitation power and exposure time. As a proof-of-principle, the system is shown to efficiently sort HEK 293 from A7r5 cells based on adhesion contrast. Results are obtained in minutes with sorting purity and efficiency reaching 97 % and 95 %, respectively.

  12. Structure formation by nanosilica particles suspended in levitated droplet

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Abhishek; Kumar, Ranganathan; Basu, Saptarshi

    2010-01-01

    Vaporization of liquid droplets containing particles has been studied extensively for its applications in combustion, thermal coating, ink-jet printing, spray cooling, drug delivery, and surface patterning. Droplets containing solid particles show a preferential solute-migration during drying process. Recently we carried out experiments with vaporizing droplet suspended in an acoustic levitator. In this work, we present detailed study of a laser irradiated droplet containing nanosilica particles. Infrared and High speed imaging of the heating process for different concentrations of nanosilica revealed an interesting solute migration pattern. Further investigation with Particle Image Velocimetry shows presence of strong recirculation within the levitated droplet. It also reveals that with increasing viscosity of the liquid the strength of this recirculation decreases. Due to the droplets rotation about the levitator axis, a centrifugal force also dominated the flow field within the droplet. High speed imaging ...

  13. Vapor sensing by means of a ZnO-on-Si surface acoustic wave resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S. J.; Schweizer, K. S.; Schwartz, S. S.; Gunshor, R. L.

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices can function as sensitive detectors of vapors. The high surface acoustic energy density of the device makes it extremely sensitive to the presence of molecules adsorbed from the gas phase. Mass loading by the adsorbate is the primary mechanism for the surface wave velocity perturbation. If the device is used as the frequency control element of an oscillator, perturbations in wave velocity on the order of 10 parts per billion may be resolved by means of a frequency counter. Zno-on-Si SAW resonators have been examined as vapor sensors. The piezoelectric ZnO layer permits transduction between electrical and acoustic energies, as well as endowing the surface with particular adsorptive properties. These devices exhibit C-values up to 12,000 at a resonant frequency of 109 MHZ. The resonant frequency of the device shifts upon exposure to a vapor-air mixture, with a transient response which is distinct for each of the organic vapors tested. Due to the permeability of the polycrystalline ZnO layer, the instantaneous reversibility of the resonant frequency shift is found to depend on the type of adsorbed molecule.

  14. Recent advances in particle and droplet manipulation for lab-on-a-chip devices based on surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuochen; Zhe, Jiang

    2011-04-07

    Manipulation of microscale particles and fluid liquid droplets is an important task for lab-on-a-chip devices for numerous biological researches and applications, such as cell detection and tissue engineering. Particle manipulation techniques based on surface acoustic waves (SAWs) appear effective for lab-on-a-chip devices because they are non-invasive, compatible with soft lithography micromachining, have high energy density, and work for nearly any type of microscale particles. Here we review the most recent research and development of the past two years in SAW based particle and liquid droplet manipulation for lab-on-a-chip devices including particle focusing and separation, particle alignment and patterning, particle directing, and liquid droplet delivery.

  15. Delivering an Automated and Integrated Approach to Combination Screening Using Acoustic-Droplet Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Kevin; Craggs, Richard; Swift, Denise; Sitaram, Anesh; Daya, Sandeep; Roberts, Mark; Hawley, Shaun; Owen, Paul; Isherwood, Bev

    2016-02-01

    Drug combination testing in the pharmaceutical industry has typically been driven by late-stage opportunistic strategies rather than by early testing to identify drug combinations for clinical investigation that may deliver improved efficacy. A rationale for combinations exists across a number of diseases in which pathway redundancy or resistance to therapeutics are evident. However, early assays are complicated by the absence of both assay formats representative of disease biology and robust infrastructure to screen drug combinations in a medium-throughput capacity. When applying drug combination testing studies, it may be difficult to translate a study design into the required well contents for assay plates because of the number of compounds and concentrations involved. Dispensing these plates increases in difficulty as the number of compounds and concentration points increase and compounds are subsequently rolled onto additional labware. We describe the development of a software tool, in conjunction with the use of acoustic droplet technology, as part of a compound management platform, which allows the design of an assay incorporating combinations of compounds. These enhancements to infrastructure facilitate the design and ordering of assay-ready compound combination plates and the processing of combinations data from high-content organotypic assays.

  16. Acoustic Droplet Ejection Applications for High-Throughput Screening of Infectious Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile; Bostwick, James R

    2016-02-01

    When acoustic droplet ejection technology was first introduced for high-throughput applications, it was used primarily for dispensing compounds dissolved in DMSO. The high precision and accuracy achieved for low-volume transfers in this application were noted by those working outside of the compound management area, and interest was generated in expanding the scope of the technology to include other liquid types. Later-generation instruments included calibrations for several aqueous buffers that were applicable to the life sciences. The High Throughput Screening Center at Southern Research has made use of this range of liquid calibrations for the Infectious Disease Program. The original calibration for DMSO has allowed the preparation of assay-ready plates that can be sent to remote locations. This process was used as part of the collaboration between Southern Research and Galveston National Laboratory, University of Texas Medical Branch, to develop high-throughput screening for biological safety level 4 containment and to provide compounds for two pilot screens that were run there with BSL-4-level pathogens. The aqueous calibrations have been instrumental in miniaturizing assays used for infectious disease, such as qPCR, tissue culture infectious dose 50, and bacterial motility, to make them compatible with HTS operations.

  17. Large scale generation of micro-droplet array by vapor condensation on mesh screen piece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jian; Xu, Jinliang; He, Xiaotian; Liu, Qi

    2017-01-01

    We developed a novel micro-droplet array system, which is based on the distinct three dimensional mesh screen structure and sintering and oxidation induced thermal-fluid performance. Mesh screen was sintered on a copper substrate by bonding the two components. Non-uniform residue stress is generated along weft wires, with larger stress on weft wire top location than elsewhere. Oxidation of the sintered package forms micro pits with few nanograsses on weft wire top location, due to the stress corrosion mechanism. Nanograsses grow elsewhere to show hydrophobic behavior. Thus, surface-energy-gradient weft wires are formed. Cooling the structure in a wet air environment nucleates water droplets on weft wire top location, which is more “hydrophilic” than elsewhere. Droplet size is well controlled by substrate temperature, air humidity and cooling time. Because warp wires do not contact copper substrate and there is a larger conductive thermal resistance between warp wire and weft wire, warp wires contribute less to condensation but function as supporting structure. The surface energy analysis of drops along weft wires explains why droplet array can be generated on the mesh screen piece. Because the commercial material is used, the droplet system is cost effective and can be used for large scale utilization.

  18. Advanced vapor recognition materials for selective and fast responsive surface acoustic wave sensors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Adeel; Iqbal, Naseer; Mujahid, Adnan; Schirhagl, Romana

    2013-07-17

    The necessity of selectively detecting various organic vapors is primitive not only with respect to regular environmental and industrial hazard monitoring, but also in detecting explosives to combat terrorism and for defense applications. Today, the huge arsenal of micro-sensors has revolutionized the traditional methods of analysis by, e.g. replacing expensive laboratory equipment, and has made the remote screening of atmospheric threats possible. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors - based on piezoelectric crystal resonators - are extremely sensitive to even very small perturbations in the external atmosphere, because the energy associated with the acoustic waves is confined to the crystal surface. Combined with suitably designed molecular recognition materials SAW devices could develop into highly selective and fast responsive miniaturized sensors, which are capable of continuously monitoring a specific organic gas, preferably in the sub-ppm regime. For this purpose, different types of recognition layers ranging from nanostructured metal oxides and carbons to pristine or molecularly imprinted polymers and self-assembled monolayers have been applied in the past decade. We present a critical review of the recent developments in nano- and micro-engineered synthetic recognition materials predominantly used for SAW-based organic vapor sensors. Besides highlighting their potential to realize real-time vapor sensing, their limitations and future perspectives are also discussed.

  19. Influence of viscosity on acoustic streaming in sessile droplets: an experimental and a numerical study with a Streaming Source Spatial Filtering (SSSF) method

    CERN Document Server

    Riaud, Antoine; Matar, Oliver Bou; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Brunet, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    When an acoustic wave travels in a lossy medium such as a liquid, it progressively transfers its pseudo-momentum to the fluid, which results in a steady acoustic streaming. Remarkably, the phenomenon involves a balance between sound attenuation and shear, such that viscosity vanishes in the final expression of the velocity field. For this reason, the effect of viscosity has long been ignored in acoustic streaming experiments. Here, we show experimentally that the viscosity plays a major role in cavities such as the streaming induced by surface acoustic waves in sessile droplets. We develop a numerical model based on the spatial filtering of the streaming source term to compute the induced flow motion with dramatically reduced computational requirements. We evidence that acoustic fields in droplets are a superposition of a chaotic field and a few powerful caustics. It appears that the caustics drive the flow, which allows a qualitative prediction of the flow structure. Finally, we reduce the problem to two dim...

  20. Effects of Liquid Superheat on Droplet Disruption and Vaporization in Supersonic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    studies.’ .- 3 Model Structure The limiting approximation of model is that the droplets are modeled as non - evaporating , rigid spheres. The reason for...of the test fluids vary only slightly, and ethanol has the median density of the three fluids . The Newtonian equation for change in velocity due to... Evaporation at the Superheat Limit," International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, Vol. 31, No. 8, 1988, pp. 1687-1988. 14Ried, Robert C

  1. Fragment structure from vapor explosions during the impact of molten metal droplets into a liquid pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouraytem, Nadia; Li, Er Qiang; Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2015-11-01

    High-speed video imaging is used in order to look at the impact of a molten metal drop falling into a liquid pool. The interaction regimes are three: film boiling, nucleate boiling or vapor explosion. Following the vapor explosion, the metal fragments and different textures are observed. It was seen that, using a tin alloy, a porous structure results whereas using a distinctive eutectic metal, Field's metal, micro beads are formed. Different parameters such as the metal type, molten metal temperature, pool surface tension and pool boiling temperature have been altered in order to assess the role they play on the explosion dynamics and the molten metal's by product.

  2. Experimental determination of the retention time of reduced temperature of gas-vapor mixture in trace of water droplets moving in counterflow of combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, R. S.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2016-06-01

    We have experimentally studied temporal variation of the temperature of gas-vapor mixture in the trace of water droplets moving in the counterflow of high-temperature combustion products. The initial gas temperature was within 500-950 K. The water droplet radius in the aerosol flow varied from 40 to 400 μm. The motion of water droplets in the counterflow of combustion products in a 1-m-high hollow quartz cylinder with an internal diameter of 20 cm was visualized by optical flow imaging techniques (interferometric particle imaging, shadow photography, particle tracking velocimetry, and particle image velocimetry) with the aid of a cross-correlation complex setup. The scale of temperature decrease in the mixture of combustion products and water droplets was determined for a pulsed (within 1 s) and continuous supply of aerosol with various droplet sizes. Retention times of reduced temperature (relative to the initial level) in trace of water droplets (aerosol temperature trace) are determined. A hypothesis concerning factors responsible for the variation of temperature in the trace of droplets moving in the counterflow of combustion products is experimentally verified.

  3. Dancing Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2013-11-01

    Inspired by the observation of intricate and beautifully dynamic patterns generated by food coloring on corona treated glass slides, we have investigated the behavior of propylene glycol and water droplets on clean glass surfaces. These droplets exhibit a range of interesting behaviors including long distance attraction or repulsion, and chasing/fleeing upon contact. We present explanations for each of these behaviors, and propose a detailed model for the long distance interactions based on vapor facilitated coupling. Finally we use our understanding to create several novel devices which: passively sort droplets by surface tension, spontaneously align droplets, drive droplets in circles, and cause droplets to bounce on a vertical surface. The simplicity of this system lends it particularly well to application as a toy model for physical systems with force fields and biological systems such as chemotaxis and motility.

  4. Inverse least-squares modeling of vapor descriptors using polymer-coated surface acoustic wave sensor array responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grate, J W; Patrash, S J; Kaganovet, S N; Abraham, M H; Wise, B M; Gallagher, N B

    2001-11-01

    In previous work, it was shown that, in principle, vapor descriptors could be derived from the responses of an array of polymer-coated acoustic wave devices. This new chemometric classification approach was based on polymer/vapor interactions following the well-established linear solvation energy relationships (LSERs) and the surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducers being mass sensitive. Mathematical derivations were included and were supported by simulations. In this work, an experimental data set of polymer-coated SAW vapor sensors is investigated. The data set includes 20 diverse polymers tested against 18 diverse organic vapors. It is shown that interfacial adsorption can influence the response behavior of sensors with nonpolar polymers in response to hydrogen-bonding vapors; however, in general, most sensor responses are related to vapor interactions with the polymers. It is also shown that polymer-coated SAW sensor responses can be empirically modeled with LSERs, deriving an LSER for each individual sensor based on its responses to the 18 vapors. Inverse least-squares methods are used to develop models that correlate and predict vapor descriptors from sensor array responses. Successful correlations can be developed by multiple linear regression (MLR), principal components regression (PCR), and partial least-squares (PLS) regression. MLR yields the best fits to the training data, however cross-validation shows that prediction of vapor descriptors for vapors not in the training set is significantly more successful using PCR or PLS. In addition, the optimal dimension of the PCR and PLS models supports the dimensionality of the LSER formulation and SAW response models.

  5. Dancing Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Cira, Nate J

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by the observation of intricate and beautifully dynamic patterns generated by food coloring on clean glass slides, we have investigated the behavior of propylene glycol and water droplets on high energy surfaces. In this fluid dynamics video we show a range of interesting behaviors including long distance attraction, and chasing/fleeing upon contact. We present explanations for each of these behaviors including a mechanism for the long distance interactions based on vapor facilitated coupling. Finally we use our understanding to create several novel devices which: spontaneously align droplets, drive droplets in circles, cause droplets to bounce on a vertical surface, and passively sort droplets by surface tension. The simplicity of this system lends it particularly well to application as a toy model for physical systems with force fields and biological systems such as chemotaxis and motility.

  6. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium of Carbon Dioxide + Ethanol: Experimental Measurements with Acoustic Method and Thermodynamic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mehl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase behavior of systems composed by supercritical carbon dioxide and ethanol is of great interest, especially in the processes involving supercritical extraction in which ethanol is used as a cosolvent. The development of an apparatus, which is able to perform the measurements of vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE at high pressure using a combination of the visual and the acoustic methods, was successful and was proven to be suited for determining the isothermal VLE data of this system. The acoustic method, based on the variation of the amplitude of an ultra-sound signal passing through a mixture during a phase transition, was applied to investigate the phase equilibria of the system carbon dioxide + ethanol at temperatures ranging from 298.2 K to 323.2 K and pressures from 3.0 MPa to 9.0 MPa. The VLE data were correlated with Peng-Robinson equation of state combined with two different mixing rules and the SAFT equations of state as well. The compositions calculated with the models are in good agreement with the experimental data for the isotherms evaluated.

  7. Mechanism of operation and design considerations for surface acoustic wave device vapor sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohltjen, H.

    1984-04-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices offer many attractive features for application as vapor phase chemical microsensors. This paper describes the characteristics of SAW devices and techniques by which they can be employed as vapor sensors. The perturbation of SAW amplitude and velocity by polymeric coating films was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High sensitivity can be achieved when the device is used as the resonating element in a delay line oscillator circuit. A simple equation has been developed from theoretical considerations which offers reasonably accurate quantitative predictions of SAW Device frequency shifts when subjected to a given mass loading. In this mode the SAW device behaves in a fashion very similar to conventional bulk wave quartz crystal microbalance except that the sensitivity can be several orders of magnitude higher and the device size can be several orders of magnitude smaller. Detection of mass changes of less than 1 femtogram by a SAW device having a surface area of 0.0001 square cm. is theoretically possible.

  8. Slow motion picture of protein inactivation during single-droplet drying: a study of inactivation kinetics of L-glutamate dehydrogenase dried in an acoustic levitator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, Elke; Lee, Geoffrey

    2012-06-01

    A novel technique is presented to allow measurement of the kinetics of protein inactivation during drying of an acoustically levitated single droplet. Droplets/particles are removed from the acoustic field after various times during drying, and the state of the protein within them is analyzed. The influence of drying air temperature, relative humidity, buffer concentration, and the presence of a substrate on the inactivation of glutamate dehydrogenase is described. The kinetics of inactivation showed three distinct phases. The first phase of constant drying rate demonstrated little protein inactivation in the solution droplet. After the critical point of drying, a second phase was distinguishable when the surface temperature has risen sharply, but there is still only little inactivation of the protein in the solid particle. An onset point of rapid inactivation of the protein marked the start of the third phase that proceeded with approximately first-order rate kinetics. In the case of L-glutamate dehydrogenase, the evidence suggests that the residual moisture content of the solid and not the temperature alone determines the point of onset of protein inactivation.

  9. High-intensity focused ultrasound sonothrombolysis: the use of perfluorocarbon droplets to achieve clot lysis at reduced acoustic power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajek, Daniel; Burgess, Alison; Huang, Yuexi; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate use of intravascular perfluorocarbon droplets to reduce the sonication power required to achieve clot lysis with high-intensity focused ultrasound. High-intensity focused ultrasound with droplets was initially applied to blood clots in an in vitro flow apparatus, and inertial cavitation thresholds were determined. An embolic model for ischemic stroke was used to illustrate the feasibility of this technique in vivo. Recanalization with intravascular droplets was achieved in vivo at 24 ± 5% of the sonication power without droplets. Recanalization occurred in 71% of rabbits that received 1-ms pulsed sonications during continuous intravascular droplet infusion (p = 0.041 vs controls). Preliminary experiments indicated that damage was confined to the ultrasonic focus, suggesting that tolerable treatments would be possible with a more tightly focused hemispheric array that allows the whole focus to be placed inside of the main arteries in the human brain.

  10. Sphere to ring morphological transformation in drying nanofluid droplets in a contact-free environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglani, Ankur; Basu, Saptarshi

    2015-03-21

    Understanding the transients of buckling in drying colloidal suspensions is pivotal for producing new functional microstructures with tunable morphologies. Here, we report first observations and elucidate the buckling instability induced morphological transition (sphere to ring structure) in an acoustically levitated, heated nanosuspension droplet using dynamic energy balance. Droplet deformation featuring the formation of symmetric cavities is initiated by capillary pressure that is two to three orders of magnitude greater than the acoustic radiation pressure, thus indicating that the standing pressure field has no influence on the buckling front kinetics. With an increase in heat flux, the growth rate of surface cavities and their post-buckled volume increase while the buckling time period reduces, thereby altering the buckling pathway and resulting in distinct precipitate structures. However, irrespective of the heating rate, the volumetric droplet deformation exhibits a linear time dependence and the droplet vaporization is observed to deviate from the classical D(2)-law.

  11. Experimental evidence supporting the insensitivity of cloud droplet formation to the mass accommodation coefficient for condensation of water vapor to liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langridge, Justin M.; Richardson, Mathews S.; Lack, Daniel A.; Murphy, Daniel M.

    2016-06-01

    The mass accommodation coefficient for uptake of water vapor to liquid water, αM, has been constrained using photoacoustic measurements of aqueous absorbing aerosol. Measurements performed over a range of relative humidities and pressures were compared to detailed model calculations treating coupled heat and mass transfer occurring during photoacoustic laser heating cycles. The strengths and weaknesses of this technique are very different to those for droplet growth/evaporation experiments that have typically been applied to these measurements, making this a useful complement to existing studies. Our measurements provide robust evidence that αM is greater than 0.1 for all humidities tested and greater than 0.3 for data obtained at relative humidities greater than 88% where the aerosol surface was most like pure water. These values of αM are above the threshold at which kinetic limitations are expected to impact the activation and growth of aerosol particles in warm cloud formation.

  12. Experimental study of the vaporization of a droplets injection in a fluidized gas-solid media; Etude experimentale de la vaporisation d'un jet de goutelettes au contact d'un milieu gaz-solide fluidise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclere, K.

    2002-09-01

    The quality of feedstock injection in the Fluid Catalytic Process (FCC) is essential to ensure a good vaporization. The vaporization should be fast so that the cracking reaction in the gaseous phase can happen within the short residence time in the riser (a few seconds). Vaporization is helped by a uniform injection of droplets as small as possible as well as a good mixing with the catalyst particles that represent the main heat source. Several models were developed to predict the droplet vaporization in a gas-solid media. However, no experimental validation exists for these models, whose predictions vary (from 1 to several hundreds of milliseconds). The objective of this study was to get a better understanding of the physical phenomena taking place during droplet vaporization. This was done in two steps. First, operating limits had to be defined to ensure an optimal vaporization and to avoid local saturation and agglomerate formation. These limits were precisely determined under laboratory conditions to validate a model that showed that agglomeration does not occur under industrial conditions. Then, a kinematic study of vaporization under operating conditions without agglomerate formation was performed. An original measurement technique was developed to get samples at very short times (tens of milliseconds). Experiments showed that heat transfer was not limiting and that mass transfer was the limiting process during vaporization. The developed model was thus based on mass transfer through a boundary layer. The validation of this model in a dense fluidized bed justified its application to operating conditions were the bed voidance is higher. A detailed study of operating parameters will help determine how to improve vaporization. (author)

  13. Phenomenology of break-up modes in contact free externally heated nanoparticle laden fuel droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Binita; Basu, Saptarshi

    2016-12-01

    We study thermally induced atomization modes in contact free (acoustically levitated) nanoparticle laden fuel droplets. The initial droplet size, external heat supplied, and suspended particle concentration (wt. %) in droplets govern the stability criterion which ultimately determines the dominant mode of atomization. Pure fuel droplets exhibit two dominant modes of breakup namely primary and secondary. Primary modes are rather sporadic and normally do not involve shape oscillations. Secondary atomization however leads to severe shape deformations and catastrophic intense breakup of the droplets. The dominance of these modes has been quantified based on the external heat flux, dynamic variation of surface tension, acoustic pressure, and droplet size. Addition of particles alters the regimes of the primary and secondary atomization and introduces bubble induced boiling and bursting. We analyze this new mode of atomization and estimate the time scale of bubble growth up to the point of bursting using energy balance to determine the criterion suitable for parent droplet rupture. All the three different modes of breakup have been well identified in a regime map determined in terms of Weber number and the heat utilization rate which is defined as the energy utilized for transient heating, vaporization, and boiling in droplets.

  14. Droplet turbulence interactions under subcritical and supercritical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, E. B.; Greenfield, S. C.; Ondas, M. S.; Song, Y.-H.; Spegar, T. D.; Santavicca, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this research is to experimentally characterize the behavior of droplets in vaporizing liquid sprays under conditions typical of those encountered in high pressure combustion systems such as liquid fueled rocket engines. Of particular interest are measurements of droplet drag, droplet heating, droplet vaporization, droplet distortion, and secondary droplet breakup, under both subcritical and supercritical conditions. The paper presents a brief description of the specific accomplishments which have been made over the past year.

  15. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K., E-mail: tan.ming.kwang@monash.edu [School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor (Malaysia); Yeo, Leslie Y. [Micro/Nanophysics Research Laboratory, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia); Friend, James R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  16. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Kar M.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ˜ 106 Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ˜ 10-9 m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ˜ 10-8 m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10-8 m with 106 Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  17. Effect of liquid subcooling on acoustic characteristics during the condensation process of vapor bubbles in a subcooled pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jiguo, E-mail: tangjiguo@sina.cn [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Yan, Changqi, E-mail: Changqi_yan@163.com [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Sun, Licheng, E-mail: leechengsun@sohu.com [State Key Laboratory of Hydraulics and Mountain River Engineering, College of Water Resource & Hydropower, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Li, Ya; Wang, Kaiyuan [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Deviations of signals increase first and then decrease with increase in subcooling. • Two typical waveforms are observed and correspond to bubble split-up and collapse. • Dominant frequency in low frequency region is found for all condensation regimes. • Peaks in high frequency region were only found in capillary wave regime. • Bubble collapse frequency is close to frequency of first peak in amplitude spectra. - Abstract: Sound characteristics of direct contact condensation of vapor bubbles in a subcooled pool were investigated experimentally with a hydrophone and a high-speed video camera. Three different condensation modes were observed, which were referred to as shape oscillation regime, transition regime and capillary wave regime in the paper. Time domain analysis indicated that the acoustic signals were boosted in their maximum amplitude with increase in subcooling, while their standard and average absolute deviations shifted to decrease after reaching a peak value. In addition, two different waveforms were found, possible sources of which were split-up and collapse of bubbles, respectively. From the amplitude spectra obtained by FFT, the first dominant frequency was found at frequency of 150–300 Hz for all condensation regimes, whereas some peaks in high frequency region were observed only for the capillary wave regime. The first dominant frequency was the result of the periodic variation in the vapor bubble volume, and the peaks in high frequency region were due to the high-frequency oscillation of water in pressure caused by sudden bubble collapse. The frequency of first peak was considered to be resulted from the periodic bubble collapse or split-up and thus was close to the bubble collapse frequency obtained from snapshots of bubble condensation. Moreover, according to results of short-time Fourier transform (STFT), the time intervals in which a certain process of bubble condensing occurred could be well known.

  18. A linear relationship between crystal size and fragment binding time observed crystallographically: implications for fragment library screening using acoustic droplet ejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Krystal; Roessler, Christian G; Mulé, Elizabeth A; Benson-Xu, Emma J; Mullen, Jeffrey D; Le, Benjamin A; Tieman, Alanna M; Birone, Claire; Brown, Maria; Hernandez, Jesus; Neff, Sherry; Williams, Daniel; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2014-01-01

    High throughput screening technologies such as acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) greatly increase the rate at which X-ray diffraction data can be acquired from crystals. One promising high throughput screening application of ADE is to rapidly combine protein crystals with fragment libraries. In this approach, each fragment soaks into a protein crystal either directly on data collection media or on a moving conveyor belt which then delivers the crystals to the X-ray beam. By simultaneously handling multiple crystals combined with fragment specimens, these techniques relax the automounter duty-cycle bottleneck that currently prevents optimal exploitation of third generation synchrotrons. Two factors limit the speed and scope of projects that are suitable for fragment screening using techniques such as ADE. Firstly, in applications where the high throughput screening apparatus is located inside the X-ray station (such as the conveyor belt system described above), the speed of data acquisition is limited by the time required for each fragment to soak into its protein crystal. Secondly, in applications where crystals are combined with fragments directly on data acquisition media (including both of the ADE methods described above), the maximum time that fragments have to soak into crystals is limited by evaporative dehydration of the protein crystals during the fragment soak. Here we demonstrate that both of these problems can be minimized by using small crystals, because the soak time required for a fragment hit to attain high occupancy depends approximately linearly on crystal size.

  19. A linear relationship between crystal size and fragment binding time observed crystallographically: implications for fragment library screening using acoustic droplet ejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal Cole

    Full Text Available High throughput screening technologies such as acoustic droplet ejection (ADE greatly increase the rate at which X-ray diffraction data can be acquired from crystals. One promising high throughput screening application of ADE is to rapidly combine protein crystals with fragment libraries. In this approach, each fragment soaks into a protein crystal either directly on data collection media or on a moving conveyor belt which then delivers the crystals to the X-ray beam. By simultaneously handling multiple crystals combined with fragment specimens, these techniques relax the automounter duty-cycle bottleneck that currently prevents optimal exploitation of third generation synchrotrons. Two factors limit the speed and scope of projects that are suitable for fragment screening using techniques such as ADE. Firstly, in applications where the high throughput screening apparatus is located inside the X-ray station (such as the conveyor belt system described above, the speed of data acquisition is limited by the time required for each fragment to soak into its protein crystal. Secondly, in applications where crystals are combined with fragments directly on data acquisition media (including both of the ADE methods described above, the maximum time that fragments have to soak into crystals is limited by evaporative dehydration of the protein crystals during the fragment soak. Here we demonstrate that both of these problems can be minimized by using small crystals, because the soak time required for a fragment hit to attain high occupancy depends approximately linearly on crystal size.

  20. Current status of droplet evaporation in turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birouk, Madjid [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Goekalp, Iskender [Laboratoire de Combustion et Systemes Reactifs, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2006-07-01

    This article reviews the available literature results concerning the effects of turbulence on the transport (heat and mass transfer) rates from a droplet. The survey emphasizes recent findings related specifically to physical models and correlations for predicting turbulence effects on the vaporization rate of a droplet. In addition, several research challenges on the vaporization of fuel droplets in turbulent flow environments are outlined. (author)

  1. Significance of droplet-droplet interactions in droplet streams: Atmospheric to supercritical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connon, Corinne Shirley

    In an effort to optimize liquid fuel combustion a considerable amount of research has been directed towards the atomization of large liquid masses into small droplets to increase the surface area available for vaporization. The current work uses a single linear array of moving droplets of uniform size and spacing to investigate the behavior of interacting droplets. A series of experiments, over a range of ambient conditions, demonstrate how a lead droplet alters the environment experienced by its trailing neighbor. This behavior is of particular interest for droplet groups under high pressure and temperature, where experimental data has been limited. Gas phase velocity and vapor concentration measurements show that as the space between adjacent droplets decreases entrainment of fluid towards the axis of motion is reduced. Trapped gases create a gaseous cylinder, composed of ambient gas and fuel vapor, which surrounds and moves with the droplet stream. As ambient pressure increase, the oscillatory behavior of the lead droplet wake begins to interfere with its trailing neighbor. Loss of stream stability and enhanced droplet stripping in part result from these oscillating wakes. However, acceleration of droplet stripping is mainly produced by liquid and gas density similarity, which increases the centrifugal stress and the growth rate of capillary waves. Further, injection of subcritical droplets into an ambient environment at temperatures and pressures above the liquid droplet critical point shows behavior not greatly different from the results obtained at high ambient pressures. The similarity results from thermal heatup times exceeding the breakup times generated from the severe aerodynamics encountered at high ambient density and high liquid-gas relative velocities.

  2. Particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography in a levitated droplet with nanosilica suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Abhishek; Kumar, Ranganathan [University of Central Florida, Department of Mechanical Materials and Aerospace Engineering, Orlando, FL (United States); Basu, Saptarshi [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bangalore (India)

    2012-03-15

    Preferential accumulation and agglomeration kinetics of nanoparticles suspended in an acoustically levitated water droplet under radiative heating has been studied. Particle image velocimetry performed to map the internal flow field shows a single cell recirculation with increasing strength for decreasing viscosities. Infrared thermography and high speed imaging show details of the heating process for various concentrations of nanosilica droplets. Initial stage of heating is marked by fast vaporization of liquid and sharp temperature rise. Following this stage, aggregation of nanoparticles is seen resulting in various structure formations. At low concentrations, a bowl structure of the droplet is dominant, maintained at a constant temperature. At high concentrations, viscosity of the solution increases, leading to rotation about the levitator axis due to the dominance of centrifugal motion. Such complex fluid motion inside the droplet due to acoustic streaming eventually results in the formation of a ring structure. This horizontal ring eventually reorients itself due to an imbalance of acoustic forces on the ring, exposing larger area for laser absorption and subsequent sharp temperature rise. (orig.)

  3. Leidenfrost droplets in an electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildeman, Sander; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-11-01

    In a recent video broadcast dubbed the ``Knitting Needle Experiment,'' astronaut Don Petit aboard the ISS demonstrated how weightless water droplets can be made to orbit a statically charged Teflon rod. We study the earthly analogue of mobile droplets in an electric field, whereby the mobility is ensured by a thin vapor film sustained between the droplet and a hot plate (the Leidenfrost effect). We find that in a strong vertical electric field the droplet starts to bounce progressively higher, defying gravitational attraction. From its trajectory we can deduce the temporal evolution of the charge on the droplet. The measurements show that the charge starts high and then decreases in a step-like manner as the droplet evaporates. The discharge trend is predicted well by treating the droplet as a dielectric sphere in electrical contact with the hot plate, but the mechanism by which definite lumps of charge are transferred through the vapor film is still an open question.

  4. Boiler for generating high quality vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, V. H.; Marto, P. J.; Joslyn, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Boiler supplies vapor for use in turbines by imparting a high angular velocity to the liquid annulus in heated rotating drum. Drum boiler provides a sharp interface between boiling liquid and vapor, thereby, inhibiting the formation of unwanted liquid droplets.

  5. The effects of turbulence on droplet drag and secondary droplet breakup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y.-H.; Coy, E.; Greenfield, S.; Ondas, M.; Prevish, T.; Spegar, T.; Santavicca, D.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research is to obtain an improved understanding of the behavior of droplets in vaporizing sprays, particularly under conditions typical of those in high pressure rocket sprays. Experiments are conducted in a variety of high pressure, high temperature, optically-accessible flow systems, including one which is capable of operation at pressures up to 70 atm, temperatures up to 600 K, gas velocities up to 30 m/sec and turbulence intensities up to 40 percent. Single droplets, 50 to 500 micron in diameter, are produced by an aerodynamic droplet generator and transversely injected into the flow. Measurements are made of the droplet position, size, velocity and temperature and of the droplet's vapor wake from which droplet drag, dispersion, heating, vaporization and breakup are characterized.

  6. Swimming Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, Corinna C.; Krüger, Carsten; Herminghaus, Stephan; Bahr, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Swimming droplets are artificial microswimmers based on liquid droplets that show self-propelled motion when immersed in a second liquid. These systems are of tremendous interest as experimental models for the study of collective dynamics far from thermal equilibrium. For biological systems, such as bacterial colonies, plankton, or fish swarms, swimming droplets can provide a vital link between simulations and real life. We review the experimental systems and discuss the mechanisms of self-propulsion. Most systems are based on surfactant-stabilized droplets, the surfactant layer of which is modified in a way that leads to a steady Marangoni stress resulting in an autonomous motion of the droplet. The modification of the surfactant layer is caused either by the advection of a chemical reactant or by a solubilization process. Some types of swimming droplets possess a very simple design and long active periods, rendering them promising model systems for future studies of collective behavior.

  7. Supercritical droplet combustion and related transport phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Vigor; Hsieh, K. C.; Shuen, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of recent advances in theoretical analyses of supercritical droplet vaporization and combustion is conducted. Both hydrocarbon and cryogenic liquid droplets over a wide range of thermodynamic states are considered. Various important high-pressure effects on droplet behavior, such as thermodynamic non-ideality, transport anomaly, and property variation, are reviewed. Results indicate that the ambient gas pressure exerts significant control of droplet gasification and burning processes through its influence on fluid transport, gas-liquid interfacial thermodynamics, and chemical reactions. The droplet gasification rate increases progressively with pressure. However, the data for the overall burnout time exhibit a considerable change in the combustion mechanism at the criticl pressure, mainly as a result of reduced mass diffusivity and latent heat of vaporization with increased pressure. The influence of droplet size on the burning characteristics is also noted.

  8. Black Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    Black droplets and black funnels are gravitational duals to states of a large N, strongly coupled CFT on a fixed black hole background. We numerically construct black droplets corresponding to a CFT on a Schwarzchild background with finite asymptotic temperature. We find two branches of such droplet solutions which meet at a turning point. Our results suggest that the equilibrium black droplet solution does not exist, which would imply that the Hartle-Hawking state in this system is dual to the black funnel constructed in \\cite{Santos:2012he}. We also compute the holographic stress energy tensor and match its asymptotic behaviour to perturbation theory.

  9. Fluoropolymer surface coatings to control droplets in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riche, Carson T; Zhang, Chuchu; Gupta, Malancha; Malmstadt, Noah

    2014-06-07

    We have demonstrated the application of low surface energy fluoropolymer coatings onto poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices for droplet formation and extraction-induced merger of droplets. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was used to pattern fluoropolymer coatings within microchannels based on geometrical constraints. In a two-phase flow system, the range of accessible flow rates for droplet formation was greatly enhanced in the coated devices. The ability to controllably apply the coating only at the inlet facilitated a method for merging droplets. An organic spacer droplet was extracted from between a pair of aqueous droplets. The size of the organic droplet and the flow rate controlled the time to merge the aqueous droplets; the process of merging was independent of the droplet sizes. Extraction-induced droplet merging is a robust method for manipulating droplets that could be applied in translating multi-step reactions to microfluidic platforms.

  10. On The Validity of the Assumed PDF Method for Modeling Binary Mixing/Reaction of Evaporated Vapor in GAS/Liquid-Droplet Turbulent Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. S.; Bellan, J.

    1997-01-01

    An Investigation of the statistical description of binary mixing and/or reaction between a carrier gas and an evaporated vapor species in two-phase gas-liquid turbulent flows is perfomed through both theroetical analysis and comparisons with results from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a two-phase mixing layer.

  11. Software for the design of acoustical steam silencers of the reaction-absorption type; Software para el diseno de silenciadores acusticos de vapor del tipo reaccion-absorcion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buendia Dominguez, Eduardo H.; Alvarez Chavez, Jose M. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1989-12-31

    This paper describes the computer program named SILRA, that determines the outline dimensions of an acoustic steam silencer of the reaction-absorption type. These silencers are employed in the geothermoelectric power plants to lower the high levels of pressure and sound caused by the steam discharge to the surrounding atmosphere. The program has the capacity of predicting the noise level generated by the discharge without silencer depending on the emitting source. On SIRLA was successfully coupled the theory described in specialized literature with optimization techniques and experiences acquired in former designs. SIRLA is a powerful tool that allows the designer to optimize the equipment as well as the design time. [Espanol] En este trabajo se describe el programa de computo SILRA, que determina las dimensiones generales de un silenciador acustico de vapor tipo reaccion-absorcion, estos silenciadores se emplean en las centrales geotermoelectricas para abatir los altos niveles de presion de sonido provocados por la descarga del vapor a la atmosfera. El programa tiene la capacidad de predecir el nivel de ruido que genera la descarga sin silenciador, dependiendo de la fuente emisora. En SILRA se acoplaron con exito la teoria descrita en la literatura especializada con tecnicas de optimacion y experiencias adquiridas en disenos anteriores. SILRA es una poderosa herramienta que permite al disenador optimar tanto el equipo como el tiempo de diseno.

  12. Droplets Fusion in a Microchannel on a Piezoelectric Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Xiang-ting

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Fusion droplets is a key operation in a microfluidic device for microfluidic analysis. A new fusion method for droplets was presented. An interditigal transducer and a reflector were fabricated on 1280-yx LiNbO3 piezoelectric substrate using microelectric technology. A poly-dimethyl silicone micro-channel was made by soft lithography technology and mounted on the piezoelectric substrate. Droplets in the microchannel were actuated by surface acoustic wave and fussed each other. Coloured dye solution droplets were used to fusion experiments. Results show that the two droplets in the microchannel can be fused by help of surface acoustic wave, and size of droplets, distance of droplets and RF signal power can affect successful fusion of the droplets. The fusion method is valuable for microlfuidic biological and chemical analysis in a microfluidic device.

  13. Acoustophoresis in Variously Shaped Liquid Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Gan; Xu, Jie; 10.1039/c1sm05871a

    2012-01-01

    The ability to precisely trap, transport and manipulate micrometer-sized objects, including biological cells, DNA-coated microspheres and microorganisms, is very important in life science studies and biomedical applications. In this study, acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave field is used for micro-objects manipulation, a technique termed as acoustophoresis. Free surfaces of liquid droplets are used as sound reflectors to confine sound waves inside the droplets. Two techniques were developed for precise control of droplet shapes: edge pinning and hydrophilic/hydrophobic interface pinning. For all tested droplet shapes, including circular, annular and rectangular, our experiments show that polymer micro particles can be manipulated by ultrasound and form into a variety of patterns, for example, concentric rings and radial lines in an annular droplet. The complexity of the pattern increases with increasing frequency, and the observations are in line with simulation results. The acoustic mani...

  14. In vitro characterization of perfluorocarbon droplets for focused ultrasound therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schad, Kelly C; Hynynen, Kullervo, E-mail: khynynen@sri.utoronto.c [Imaging Research, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Ave, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto (Canada)

    2010-09-07

    Focused ultrasound therapy can be enhanced with microbubbles by thermal and cavitation effects. However, localization of treatment is difficult as bioeffects can occur outside of the target region. Spatial control of bubbles can be achieved by ultrasound-induced conversion of liquid perfluorocarbon droplets to gas bubbles. This study was undertaken to determine the acoustic parameters for bubble production by droplet conversion and how it depends on the acoustic conditions and droplet physical parameters. Lipid-encapsulated droplets containing dodecafluoropentane were manufactured with sizes ranging from 1.9 to 7.2 {mu}m in diameter and diluted to a concentration of 8 x 10{sup 6} droplets mL{sup -1}. The droplets were sonicated in vitro with a focused ultrasound transducer and varying frequency and exposure under flow conditions through an acoustically transparent vessel. The sonications were 10 ms in duration at frequencies of 0.578, 1.736 and 2.855 MHz. The pressure threshold for droplet conversion was measured with an active transducer operating in pulse-echo mode and simultaneous measurements of broadband acoustic emissions were performed with passive acoustic detection. The results show that droplets cannot be converted at low frequency without broadband emissions occurring. However, the pressure threshold for droplet conversion decreased with increasing frequency, exposure and droplet size. The pressure threshold for broadband emissions was independent of the droplet size and was 2.9, 4.4 and 5.3 MPa for 0.578, 1736 and 2.855 MHz, respectively. In summary, we have demonstrated that droplet conversion is feasible for clinically relevant sized droplets and acoustic exposures.

  15. In vitro characterization of perfluorocarbon droplets for focused ultrasound therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Kelly C.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-09-01

    Focused ultrasound therapy can be enhanced with microbubbles by thermal and cavitation effects. However, localization of treatment is difficult as bioeffects can occur outside of the target region. Spatial control of bubbles can be achieved by ultrasound-induced conversion of liquid perfluorocarbon droplets to gas bubbles. This study was undertaken to determine the acoustic parameters for bubble production by droplet conversion and how it depends on the acoustic conditions and droplet physical parameters. Lipid-encapsulated droplets containing dodecafluoropentane were manufactured with sizes ranging from 1.9 to 7.2 µm in diameter and diluted to a concentration of 8 × 106 droplets mL-1. The droplets were sonicated in vitro with a focused ultrasound transducer and varying frequency and exposure under flow conditions through an acoustically transparent vessel. The sonications were 10 ms in duration at frequencies of 0.578, 1.736 and 2.855 MHz. The pressure threshold for droplet conversion was measured with an active transducer operating in pulse-echo mode and simultaneous measurements of broadband acoustic emissions were performed with passive acoustic detection. The results show that droplets cannot be converted at low frequency without broadband emissions occurring. However, the pressure threshold for droplet conversion decreased with increasing frequency, exposure and droplet size. The pressure threshold for broadband emissions was independent of the droplet size and was 2.9, 4.4 and 5.3 MPa for 0.578, 1736 and 2.855 MHz, respectively. In summary, we have demonstrated that droplet conversion is feasible for clinically relevant sized droplets and acoustic exposures.

  16. Possible transmission experiments with low-velocity helium droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynveen, A.; Lidke, K. A.; Lutsyshyn, Y.; Halley, J. W.

    2007-02-01

    We show that very low velocity droplets can be used to carry out an experiment to test whether condensate mediated transmission processes can occur in a superfluid droplet of He4 . By appropriately choosing the droplet radius and temperature, we can eliminate the competing roton, phonon, and ripplon mediated elastic transmission events. Then a calculation shows that if a few percent or more of the incident atoms experience anomalous condensate mediated transmission, the effects should be detectable in the droplet trajectories. We consider two forms of the experiment, involving a freely falling droplet in ambient vapor in the first instance and an oscillating droplet in a magnetic trap in the second.

  17. Temperature-stabilized silicon-based surface-acoustic-wave gas sensors for the detection of solvent vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Stefan; Mokwa, W.

    1998-12-01

    In the current paper a dual-delay-line- and a resonator- device based on CMOS-silicon-technology is presented. As a piezoelectric layer ZnO is used. The layer was deposited at room temperature in a RF magnetron sputter process. Using x- ray diffraction it could be shown that the crystals are mostly oriented with the c-axis (hexagonal structure) perpendicular to the surface which is necessary to conduct surface acoustic waves. Pt electrodes were designed for frequencies between 140 and 600 MHz and were deposited on top using a lift-off-process. A poly-silicon heating resistor was integrated as a sublayer for controlling and changing of the temperature of the SAW-device for studying the influence of temperature on the mass sensitive layer. A Pt thin film resistance served for temperature measurement. The performance of the devices were compared to standard quartz based SAWs.

  18. An experimental study on the coalescence process of binary droplets in oil under ultrasonic standing waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaoming; Cao, Juhang; He, Limin; Wang, Hongping; Yan, Haipeng; Qin, Yahua

    2017-01-01

    The coalescence process of binary droplets in oil under ultrasonic standing waves was investigated with high-speed photography. Three motion models of binary droplets in coalescence process were illustrated: (1) slight translational oscillation; (2) sinusoidal translational oscillation; (3) migration along with acoustic streaming. To reveal the droplets coalescence mechanisms, the influence of main factors (such as acoustic intensity, droplet size, viscosity and interfacial tension, etc) on the motion and coalescence of binary droplets was studied under ultrasonic standing waves. Results indicate that the shortest coalescence time is achieved when binary droplets show sinusoidal translational oscillation. The corresponding acoustic intensity in this case is the optimum acoustic intensity. Under the optimum acoustic intensity, drop size decrease will bring about coalescence time decrease by enhancing the binary droplets oscillation. Moreover, there is an optimum interfacial tension to achieve the shortest coalescence time.

  19. Generalized Faxén's theorem: Evaluating first-order (hydrodynamic drag) and second-order (acoustic radiation) forces on finite-sized rigid particles, bubbles and droplets in arbitrary complex flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S.

    2016-11-01

    In recent times, study of complex disperse multiphase problems involving several million particles (e.g. volcanic eruptions, spray control etc.) is garnering momentum. The objective of this work is to present an accurate model (termed generalized Faxén's theorem) to predict the hydrodynamic forces on such inclusions (particles/bubbles/droplets) without having to solve for the details of flow around them. The model is developed using acoustic theory and the force obtained as a summation of infinite series (monopole, dipole and higher sources). The first-order force is the time-dependent hydrodynamic drag force arising from the dipole component due to interaction between the gas and the inclusion at the microscale level. The second-order force however is a time-averaged differential force (contributions arise both from monopole and dipole), also known as the acoustic radiation force primarily used to levitate particles. In this work, the monopole and dipole strengths are represented in terms of particle surface and volume averages of the incoming flow properties and therefore applicable to particle sizes of the order of fluid length scale and subjected to any arbitrary flow. Moreover, this model can also be used to account for inter-particle coupling due to neighboring particles. U.S. DoE, NNSA, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, Cooperative Agreement under PSAAP-II, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  20. Leidenfrost levitation: beyond droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Ali; Xu, Yuhao; Coder, Benjamin; Osborne, Paul A; Spafford, Jonathon; Michael, Grant E; Yu, Gan; Xu, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Friction is a major inhibitor in almost every mechanical system. Enlightened by the Leidenfrost effect - a droplet can be levitated by its own vapor layer on a sufficiently hot surface - we demonstrate for the first time that a small cart can also be levitated by Leidenfrost vapor. The levitated cart can carry certain amount of load and move frictionlessly over the hot surface. The maximum load that the cart can carry is experimentally tested over a range of surface temperatures. We show that the levitated cart can be propelled not only by gravitational force over a slanted flat surface, but also self-propelled over a ratchet shaped horizontal surface. In the end, we experimentally tested water consumption rate for sustaining the levitated cart, and compared the results to theoretical calculations. If perfected, this frictionless Leidenfrost cart could be used in numerous engineering applications where relative motion exists between surfaces.

  1. Film boiling of mercury droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Vaporization times of mercury droplets in Leidenfrost film boiling on a flat horizontal plate are measured in an air atmosphere. Extreme care was used to prevent large amplitude droplet vibrations and surface wetting; therefore, these data can be compared to film boiling theory. For these data, diffusion from the upper surface of the drop is a dominant mode of mass transfer from the drop. A closed-form analytical film boiling theory is developed to account for the diffusive evaporation. Reasonable agreement between data and theory is seen.

  2. Design and Characterization of Fibrin-Based Acoustically Responsive Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncion, Alexander; Arlotta, Keith J; Kripfgans, Oliver D; Fowlkes, J Brian; Carson, Paul L; Putnam, Andrew J; Franceschi, Renny T; Fabiilli, Mario L

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogel scaffolds are used in tissue engineering as a delivery vehicle for regenerative growth factors. Spatiotemporal patterns of growth factor signaling are critical for tissue regeneration, yet most scaffolds afford limited control of growth factor release, especially after implantation. We previously found that acoustic droplet vaporization can control growth factor release from a fibrin scaffold doped with a perfluorocarbon emulsion. This study investigates properties of the acoustically responsive scaffold (ARS) critical for further translation. At 2.5 MHz, acoustic droplet vaporization and inertial cavitation thresholds ranged from 1.5 to 3.0 MPa and from 2.0 to 7.0 MPa peak rarefactional pressure, respectively, for ARSs of varying composition. Viability of C3H/10T1/2 cells, encapsulated in the ARS, did not decrease significantly for pressures below 4 MPa. ARSs with perfluorohexane emulsions displayed higher stability versus those with perfluoropentane emulsions, while surrogate payload release was minimal without ultrasound. These results enable the selection of ARS compositions and acoustic parameters needed for optimized spatiotemporally controlled release.

  3. Ionic association and solvation of the ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride in molecular solvents revealed by vapor pressure osmometry, conductometry, volumetry, and acoustic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Rahmat; Ebrahimi, Nosaibah

    2011-11-17

    A systematic study of osmotic coefficient, conductivity, volumetric and acoustic properties of solutions of ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C(6)mim][Cl]) in various molecular solvents has been made at different temperatures in order to study of ionic association and solvation behavior of [C(6)mim][Cl] in different solutions. Precise measurements on electrical conductances of solutions of [C(6)mim][Cl] in water, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, and acetonitrile at 293.15, 298.15, and 303.15 K are reported and analyzed with Barthel's low-concentration chemical model (lcCM) to obtain the limiting molar conductivities and association constants of this ionic liquid in the investigated solvents. Strong ion pairing was found for the ionic liquid in 2-propanol, 1-butanol, and 1-propanol, whereas ion association in acetonitrile, methanol and ethanol is rather weak and in water the ionic liquid is fully dissociated. In the second part of this work, the apparent molar volumes and isentropic compressibilities of [C(6)mim][Cl] in water, methanol, ethanol, acetonitrile, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, and 1-butanol are obtained at the 288.15-313.15 K temperature range at 5 K intervals at atmospheric pressure from the precise measurements of density and sound velocity. The infinite dilution apparent molar volume and isentropic compressibility values of the free ions and ion pairs of [C(6)mim][Cl] in the investigated solvents as well as the excess molar volume of the investigated solutions are determined and their variations with temperature and type of solvents are also studied. Finally, the experimental measurements of osmotic coefficient at 318.15 K for binary solutions of [C(6)mim][Cl] in water, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and acetonitrile are taken using the vapor pressure osmometry (VPO) method and from which the values of the solvent activity, vapor pressure, activity coefficients, and Gibbs free energies are calculated. The results are

  4. Uranium droplet nuclear reactor core with MHD generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghaie, Samim; Kumar, Ratan

    An innovative concept employing liquid uranium droplets as fuel in an ultrahigh-temperature vapor core reactor (UTVR) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator power system for space power generation has been studied. Metallic vapor in superheated form acts as a working fluid for a closed-Rankine-type thermodynamic cycle. Usage of fuel and working fluid in this form assures certain advantages. The major technical issues emerging as a result involve a method for droplet generation, droplet transport in the reactor core, heat generation in the fuel and transport to the metallic vapor, and materials compatibility. A qualitative and quantitative attempt to resolve these issues has indicated the promise and tentative feasibility of the system.

  5. Droplet organelles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courchaine, Edward M; Lu, Alice; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2016-08-01

    Cells contain numerous, molecularly distinct cellular compartments that are not enclosed by lipid bilayers. These compartments are implicated in a wide range of cellular activities, and they have been variously described as bodies, granules, or organelles. Recent evidence suggests that a liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) process may drive their formation, possibly justifying the unifying term "droplet organelle". A veritable deluge of recent publications points to the importance of low-complexity proteins and RNA in determining the physical properties of phase-separated structures. Many of the proteins linked to such structures are implicated in human diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We provide an overview of the organizational principles that characterize putative "droplet organelles" in healthy and diseased cells, connecting protein biochemistry with cell physiology.

  6. Droplets Fusion in a Microchannel on a Piezoelectric Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Fu Xiang-ting; Zha Yan; Zhang An-liang

    2013-01-01

    Fusion droplets is a key operation in a microfluidic device for microfluidic analysis. A new fusion method for droplets was presented. An interditigal transducer and a reflector were fabricated on 1280-yx LiNbO3 piezoelectric substrate using microelectric technology. A poly-dimethyl silicone micro-channel was made by soft lithography technology and mounted on the piezoelectric substrate. Droplets in the microchannel were actuated by surface acoustic wave and fussed each other. Coloured dye so...

  7. Plasma Propulsion of a Metallic Micro-droplet and its Deformation upon Laser Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Kurilovich, Dmitry; Torretti, Francesco; Lassise, Adam; Hoekstra, Ronnie; Ubachs, Wim; Gelderblom, Hanneke; Versolato, Oscar O

    2016-01-01

    The propulsion of a liquid indium-tin micro-droplet by nanosecond-pulse laser impact is experimentally investigated. We capture the physics of the droplet propulsion in a scaling law that accurately describes the plasma-imparted momentum transfer, enabling the optimization of the laser-droplet coupling. The subsequent deformation of the droplet is described by an analytical model that accounts for the droplet's propulsion velocity and the liquid properties. Comparing our findings to those from vaporization-accelerated mm-sized water droplets, we demonstrate that the hydrodynamic response of laser-impacted droplets is scalable and independent of the propulsion mechanism.

  8. Vaporization of synthetic fuels. Final report. [Thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirignano, W.A.; Yao, S.C.; Tong, A.Y.; Talley, D.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of transient droplet vaporization in a hot convective environment is examined. The main objective of the present study is to develop an algorithm for the droplet vaporization which is simple enough to be feasibly incorporated into a complete spray combustion analysis and yet will also account for the important physics such as liquid-phase internal circulation, unsteady droplet heating and axisymmetric gas-phase convection. A simplified liquid-phase model has been obtained based on the assumption of the existence of a Hill's spherical vortex inside the droplet together with some approximations made in the governing diffusion equation. The use of the simplified model in a spray situation has also been examined. It has been found that droplet heating and vaporization are essentially unsteady and droplet temperature is nonuniform for a significant portion of its lifetime. It has also been found that the droplet vaporization characteristic can be quite sensitive to the particular liquid-phase and gas-phase models. The results of the various models are compared with the existing experimental data. Due to large scattering in the experimental measurements, particularly the droplet diameter, no definite conclusion can be drawn based on the experimental data. Finally, certain research problems which are related to the present study are suggested for future studies.

  9. Droplet impact on superheated micro-structured surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, A.T.; Staat, H.J.J.; Susarrey-Arce, A.; Foertsch, T.C.; Houselt, van A.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Prosperetti, A.; Lohse, D.; Sun, C.

    2013-01-01

    When a droplet impacts upon a surface heated above the liquid's boiling point, the droplet either comes into contact with the surface and boils immediately (contact boiling), or is supported by a developing vapor layer and bounces back (film boiling, or Leidenfrost state). We study the transition be

  10. Phase change events of volatile liquid perfluorocarbon contrast agents produce unique acoustic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeran, Paul S.; Matsunaga, Terry O.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) provide a dynamic platform to approach problems in medical ultrasound (US). Upon US-mediated activation, the liquid core vaporizes and expands to produce a gas bubble ideal for US imaging and therapy. In this study, we demonstrate through high-speed video microscopy and US interrogation that PCCAs composed of highly volatile perfluorocarbons (PFCs) exhibit unique acoustic behavior that can be detected and differentiated from standard microbubble contrast agents. Experimental results show that when activated with short pulses PCCAs will over-expand and undergo unforced radial oscillation while settling to a final bubble diameter. The size-dependent oscillation phenomenon generates a unique acoustic signal that can be passively detected in both time and frequency domain using confocal piston transducers with an ‘activate high’ (8 MHz, 2 cycles), ‘listen low’ (1 MHz) scheme. Results show that the magnitude of the acoustic ‘signature’ increases as PFC boiling point decreases. By using a band-limited spectral processing technique, the droplet signals can be isolated from controls and used to build experimental relationships between concentration and vaporization pressure. The techniques shown here may be useful for physical studies as well as development of droplet-specific imaging techniques.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann Simulations of Evaporating Droplets with Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingfei; Yong, Xin

    2016-11-01

    Elucidating the nanoparticle dynamics in drying droplets provides fundamental hydrodynamic insight into the evaporation-induced self-assembly, which is of great importance to materials printing and thin film processing. We develop a free-energy-based multiphase lattice Boltzmann model coupled with Lagrangian particle tracking to simulate evaporating particle-laden droplets on a solid substrate with specified wetting behavior. This work focuses on the interplay between the evaporation-driven advection and the self-organization of nanoparticles inside the droplet and at the droplet surface. For static droplets, the different parameters, fluid-particle interaction strength and particle number, governing the nanoparticle-droplet dynamics are systematically investigated, such as particle radial and circumferential distribution. We clarify the effect of nanoparticle presence on the droplet surface tension and wetting behavior. For evaporating droplets, we observe how droplet evaporation modulates the self-assembly of nanoparticles when the droplet has different static contact angles and hysteresis windows. We also confirm that the number of nanoparticles at the liquid-vapor interface influences the evaporation flux at the liquid-vapor interface.

  12. A Computational Study of Internal Flows in a Heated Water-Oil Emulsion Droplet

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2015-01-05

    The vaporization characteristics of water-oil emulsion droplets are investigated by high fidelity computational simulations. One of the key objectives is to identify the physical mechanism for the experimentally observed behavior that the component in the dispersed micro-droplets always vaporizes first, for both oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsion droplets. The mechanism of this phenomenon has not been clearly understood. In this study, an Eulerian-Lagrangian method was implemented with a temperature-dependent surface tension model and a dynamic adaptive mesh refinement in order to effectively capture the thermo-capillary effect of a micro-droplet in an emulsion droplet efficiently. It is found that the temperature difference in an emulsion droplet creates a surface tension gradient along the micro-droplet surface, inducing surface movement. Subsequently, the outer shear flow and internal flow circulation inside the droplet, referred to as the Marangoni convection, are created. The present study confirms that the Marangoni effect can be sufficiently large to drive the micro-droplets to the emulsion droplet surface at higher temperature, for both water-in-oil and oil-and-water emulsion droplets. A further parametric study with different micro-droplet sizes and temperature gradients demonstrates that larger micro-droplets move faster with larger temperature gradient. The oil micro-droplet in oil-in-water emulsion droplets moves faster due to large temperature gradients by smaller thermal conductivity.

  13. Dispensing nano-pico droplets of ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irajizad, Peyman; Farokhnia, Nazanin; Ghasemi, Hadi

    2015-11-01

    Dispensing miniature volumes of a ferrofluid is of fundamental and practical importance for diverse applications ranging from biomedical devices, optics, and self-assembly of materials. Current dispensing systems are based on microfluidics flow-focusing approaches or acoustic actuation requiring complicated structures. A simple method is presented to continuously dispense the miniature droplets from a ferrofluid reservoir. Once a jet of the ferrofluid is subjected to a constrained flux through a membrane and an inhomogeneous magnetic field, the jet experiences a curvature-driven instability and transforms to a droplet. Ferrofluid droplets in the range of 0.1-1000 nl are dispensed with tunable dispensing frequencies. A model is developed that predicts the dispensed volume of the ferrofluid droplets with an excellent agreement with the measurements.

  14. Electrowetting Actuation of Polydisperse Nanofluid Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crismar Patacsil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present results of electrowetting experiments employing droplets formed from aqueous suspensions of Au nanoparticles. A planar electrowetting system, consisting of a Pt wire electrode and a bottom Cu electrode with an insulating silicone layer, is used to observe changes in droplet contact angle when an external electric field is applied. The equilibrium contact angle at 0 V decreases with increasing nanoparticle concentration, dropping from 100.4° for pure deionized water to 94.7° for a 0.5 μM nanofluid. Increasing the nanoparticle content also lowers the required voltage for effective actuation. With actuation at 15 V, contact angle decreases by 9% and 35% for droplets formed from pure water and a 0.5 μM nanoparticle suspension, respectively. Contact angle saturation is observed with nanofluid droplets, with the threshold voltage decreasing as nanoparticle concentration rises. Maximum droplet actuation before contact angle saturation is achieved at only 10 V for a concentration of 0.5 μM. A proposed mechanism for the enhanced electrowetting response of a nanofluid droplet involves a reduction in surface tension of the droplet as nanoparticles accumulate at the liquid-vapor interface.

  15. Three dimensional force balance of asymmetric droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Cho, Kun; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-11-01

    An equilibrium contact angle of a droplet is determined by a horizontal force balance among vapor, liquid, and solid, which is known as Young's law. Conventional wetting law is valid only for axis-symmetric droplets, whereas real droplets are often asymmetric. Here we show that three-dimensional geometry must be considered for a force balance for asymmetric droplets. By visualizing asymmetric droplets placed on a free-standing membrane in air with X-ray microscopy, we are able to identify that force balances in one side and in other side control pinning behaviors during evaporation of droplets. We find that X-ray microscopy is powerful for realizing the three-dimensional force balance, which would be essential in interpretation and manipulation of wetting, spreading, and drying dynamics for asymmetric droplets. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2016R1D1A1B01007133).

  16. Difference Of Evaporation and Boiling for Heterogeneous Water Droplets in a High-Temperature Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legros Jean Claude

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigation of vapor formation was carried out on water droplets on fixed graphite substrate and heterogeneous droplets (containing solid single inclusions when heating in high-temperature gas. High-speed video shooting (up to 105 frames per second, optical method (Particle Image Velocimetry and TEMA Automotive software were used. We revealed two phase change mechanisms of heterogeneous liquid droplets. Effect of evaporation and boiling on evaporation times of water droplets was determined.

  17. Electric-Field-Enhanced Jumping-Droplet Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Preston, Daniel; Enright, Ryan; Limia, Alexander; Wang, Evelyn

    2013-11-01

    When condensed droplets coalesce on a superhydrophobic surface, the resulting droplet can jump due to the conversion of surface energy into kinetic energy. This frequent out-of-plane droplet jumping has the potential to enhance condensation heat and mass transfer. In this work, we demonstrated that these jumping droplets accumulate positive charge that can be used to further increase condensation heat transfer via electric fields. We studied droplet jumping dynamics on silanized nanostructured copper oxide surfaces. By characterizing the droplet trajectories under various applied external electric fields (0 - 50 V/cm), we show that condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces results in a buildup of negative surface charge (OH-) due to dissociated water ion adsorption on the superhydrophobic coating. Consequently, the opposite charge (H3O +) accumulates on the coalesced jumping droplet. Using this knowledge, we demonstrate electric-field-enhanced jumping droplet condensation whereby an external electric field opposes the droplet vapor flow entrainment towards the condensing surface to increase the droplet removal rate and overall surface heat transfer by 100% when compared to state-of-the-art dropwise condensing surfaces. This work not only shows significant condensation heat transfer enhancement through the passive charging of condensed droplets, but promises a low cost approach to increase efficiency for applications such as atmospheric water harvesting and dehumidification.

  18. Hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets in one-component fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng

    2013-04-24

    Using the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)], we numerically investigate the hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets under gravity in two dimensions. Some recent theoretical predictions and experimental observations are confirmed in our simulations. A Leidenfrost droplet larger than a critical size is shown to be unstable and break up into smaller droplets due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the bottom surface of the droplet. Our simulations demonstrate that an evaporating Leidenfrost droplet changes continuously from a puddle to a circular droplet, with the droplet shape controlled by its size in comparison with a few characteristic length scales. The geometry of the vapor layer under the droplet is found to mainly depend on the droplet size and is nearly independent of the substrate temperature, as reported in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 074301 (2012)]. Finally, our simulations demonstrate that a Leidenfrost droplet smaller than a characteristic size takes off from the hot substrate because the levitating force due to evaporation can no longer be balanced by the weight of the droplet, as observed in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 034501 (2012)].

  19. Evaporation of polydispersed droplets in a highly turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochet, M.; Bazile, Rudy; Ferret, B.; Cazin, S.

    2009-09-01

    A model experiment for the study of evaporating turbulent two-phase flows is presented here. The study focuses on a situation where pre-atomized and dispersed droplets vaporize and mix in a heated turbulent flow. The test bench consists in a channel flow with characteristics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence where fluctuations levels reach very high values (25% in the established zone). An ultrasonic atomizer allows the injection of a mist of small droplets of acetone in the carrier flow. The large range diameters ensure that every kind of droplet behavior with regards to turbulence is possible. Instantaneous concentration fields of the vaporized phase are extracted from fluorescent images (PLIF) of the two phase flow. The evolution of the mixing of the acetone vapor is analyzed for two different liquid mass loadings. Despite the high turbulence levels, concentration fluctuations remain significant, indicating that air and acetone vapor are not fully mixed far from the injector.

  20. Evaporation of polydispersed droplets in a highly turbulent channel flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochet, M.; Bazile, Rudy; Ferret, B.; Cazin, S. [INPT, UPS, IMFT (Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse), Universite de Toulouse (France)

    2009-09-15

    A model experiment for the study of evaporating turbulent two-phase flows is presented here. The study focuses on a situation where pre-atomized and dispersed droplets vaporize and mix in a heated turbulent flow. The test bench consists in a channel flow with characteristics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence where fluctuations levels reach very high values (25% in the established zone). An ultrasonic atomizer allows the injection of a mist of small droplets of acetone in the carrier flow. The large range diameters ensure that every kind of droplet behavior with regards to turbulence is possible. Instantaneous concentration fields of the vaporized phase are extracted from fluorescent images (PLIF) of the two phase flow. The evolution of the mixing of the acetone vapor is analyzed for two different liquid mass loadings. Despite the high turbulence levels, concentration fluctuations remain significant, indicating that air and acetone vapor are not fully mixed far from the injector. (orig.)

  1. An experimental study on the motion of water droplets in oil under ultrasonic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaoming; He, Limin; Wang, Hongping; Yan, Haipeng; Qin, Yahua

    2016-01-01

    The motion of a single water droplet in oil under ultrasonic irradiation is investigated with high-speed photography in this paper. First, we described the trajectory of water droplet in oil under ultrasonic irradiation. Results indicate that in acoustic field the motion of water droplet subjected to intermittent positive and negative ultrasonic pressure shows obvious quasi-sinusoidal oscillation. Afterwards, the influence of major parameters on the motion characteristics of water droplet was studied, such as acoustic intensity, ultrasonic frequency, continuous phase viscosity, interfacial tension, and droplet diameter, etc. It is found that when the acoustic intensity and frequency are 4.89 W cm(-2) and 20 kHz respectively, which are the critical conditions, the droplet varying from 250 to 300 μm in lower viscous oil has the largest oscillation amplitude and highest oscillation frequency.

  2. Photoacoustic spectral characterization of perfluorocarbon droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Perfluorocarbon droplets containing optical absorbing nanoparticles have been developed for use as theranostic agents (for both imaging and therapy) and as dual-mode contrast agents. Droplets can be used as photoacoustic contrast agents, vaporized via optical irradiation, then the resulting bubbles can be used as ultrasound imaging and therapeutic agents. The photoacoustic signals from micron-sized droplets containing silica coated gold nanospheres were measured using ultra-high frequencies (100-1000 MHz). The spectra of droplets embedded in a gelatin phantom were compared to a theoretical model which calculates the pressure wave from a spherical homogenous liquid undergoing thermoelastic expansion resulting from laser absorption. The location of the spectral features of the theoretical model and experimental spectra were in agreement after accounting for increases in the droplet sound speed with frequency. The agreement between experiment and model indicate that droplets (which have negligible optical absorption in the visible and infrared spectra by themselves) emitted pressure waves related to the droplet composition and size, and was independent of the physical characteristics of the optical absorbing nanoparticles. The diameter of individual droplets was calculated using three independent methods: the time domain photoacoustic signal, the time domain pulse echo ultrasound signal, and a fit to the photoacoustic model, then compared to the diameter as measured by optical microscopy. It was found the photoacoustic and ultrasound methods calculated diameters an average of 2.6% of each other, and 8.8% lower than that measured using optical microscopy. The discrepancy between the calculated diameters and the optical measurements may be due to the difficulty in resolving the droplet edges after being embedded in the translucent gelatin medium.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of self-propelled Leidenfrost droplets on ratchet surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Q; Francois, M M; Hu, A J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the self-propelled motion of Leidenfrost droplets on ratchet surfaces is numerically investigated with a thermal multiphase lattice Boltzmann model with liquid-vapor phase change. The capability of the model for simulating evaporation is validated via the D2 law. Using the model, we first study the performances of Leidenfrost droplets on horizontal ratchet surfaces. It is numerically shown that the motion of self-propelled Leidenfrost droplets on ratchet surfaces is owing to the asymmetry of the ratchets and the vapor flows beneath the droplets. It is found that the Leidenfrost droplets move in the direction toward the slowly inclined side from the ratchet peaks, which agrees with the direction of droplet motion in experiments [Linke et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2006, 96, 154502]. Moreover, the influences of the ratchet aspect ratio are investigated. For the considered ratchet surfaces, a critical value of the ratchet aspect ratio is approximately found, which corresponds to the maximum droplet mo...

  4. The liquid phase separation of Bi-Ga hypermonotectic alloy under acoustic levitation condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG ZhenYu; L(U) YongJun; XIE WenJun; WEI BingBo

    2007-01-01

    Containerless treatment of Bi-58.5at%Ga hypermonotectic alloy is successfully performed with acoustic levitation technique. Under acoustic levitation condition, the second phase (Ga) distributes almost homogeneously in solidification sample, opposite to macrosegregation in solidification sample under conventional condition. Stokes motion of the second liquid droplet (Ga) is significantly restrained under acoustic levitation condition. The analyses indicate that the melt vibration in the gravity direction forced by acoustic field can induce steady flow around the second liquid droplet, which influences droplet shape during its moving upward and consequently restrains Stokes motion velocity of the second liquid droplet.

  5. Droplet Manipulations in Two Phase Flow Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen M. Pit

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Even though droplet microfluidics has been developed since the early 1980s, the number of applications that have resulted in commercial products is still relatively small. This is partly due to an ongoing maturation and integration of existing methods, but possibly also because of the emergence of new techniques, whose potential has not been fully realized. This review summarizes the currently existing techniques for manipulating droplets in two-phase flow microfluidics. Specifically, very recent developments like the use of acoustic waves, magnetic fields, surface energy wells, and electrostatic traps and rails are discussed. The physical principles are explained, and (potential advantages and drawbacks of different methods in the sense of versatility, flexibility, tunability and durability are discussed, where possible, per technique and per droplet operation: generation, transport, sorting, coalescence and splitting.

  6. Size-isolation of ultrasound-mediated phase change perfluorocarbon droplets using differential centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Karla P; Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Stewart, Kyle; Snider, Lindsay; Ryan, Devin; Haworth, Kevin J

    2016-05-01

    Perfluorocarbon droplets that are capable of an ultrasound-mediated phase transition have applications in diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound. Techniques to modify the droplet size distribution are of interest because of the size-dependent acoustic response of the droplets. Differential centrifugation has been used to isolate specific sizes of microbubbles. In this work, differential centrifugation was employed to isolate droplets with diameters between 1 and 3 μm and 2 and 5 μm from an initially polydisperse distribution. Further, an empirical model was developed for predicting the droplet size distribution following differential centrifugation and to facilitate the selection of centrifugation parameters for obtaining desired size distributions.

  7. Nanospiral Formation by Droplet Drying: One Molecule at a Time

    OpenAIRE

    Wan Lei; Li Li; Mao Guangzhao

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We have created nanospirals by self-assembly during droplet evaporation. The nanospirals, 60–70 nm in diameter, formed when solvent mixtures of methanol and m-cresol were used. In contrast, spin coating using only methanol as the solvent produced epitaxial films of stripe nanopatterns and using only m-cresol disordered structure. Due to the disparity in vapor pressure between the two solvents, droplets of m-cresol solution remaining on the substrate serve as templates for the s...

  8. Excitation and dynamics of liquid tin micrometer droplet generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollinger, B.; Abhari, R. S.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of capillary breakup-based droplet generation are studied for an excitation system based on a tunable piezoelectrically actuated oscillating piston, which generates acoustic pressure waves at the dispenser nozzle. First, the non-ideal pressure boundary conditions of droplet breakup are measured using a fast response pressure probe. A structural analysis shows that the axial modes of the excitation system are the main reasons for the resonance peaks in the pressure response. Second, a correlation between the nozzle inlet pressure and the droplet timing jitter is established with the help of experiments and a droplet formation model. With decreasing wave number, the growth rate of the main excitation decreases, while noise contributions with wave numbers with higher growth rates lead to a non-deterministic structure of the droplet train. A highly coherent and monodisperse droplet stream is obtained when the excitation system is tuned to generate high acoustic pressures at the desired operation frequency and when the noise level on the jet is limited. The jet velocity, hence droplet spacing for a set frequency is then adjusted by varying the reservoir pressure, according to the trade-off between lowest wave number and acceptable timing jitter.

  9. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  10. SIMULATION OF THE TWO PHASE FLOW OF DROPLET IMPINGEMENT ON LIQUID FILM BY THE LATTICE BOLTZMANN METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jia-hong; WANG Xiao-yong

    2012-01-01

    A Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) with two-distribution functions is employed for simulating the two-phase flow induced by a liquid droplet impinging onto the film of the same liquid on solid surface.The model is suitable for solution of twophase flow problem at high density and viscosity ratios of liquid to vapor and phase transition between liquid and its vapor.The roles of the vapor flow,the density ratio of liquid to vapor and the surface tension of the droplet in the splashing formation are discussed.It is concluded that the vapour flow induced by the droplet fall and splash in the whole impinging process may affect remarkably the splash behaviour.For the case of large density ratio of liquid to vapor a crown may engender after the droplet collides with the film.However,for the case of small density ratio of liquid to vapor a “bell” like splash may be observed.

  11. Response of two-phase droplets to intense electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, James F.; Maloney, Daniel J.; Lawson, William F.; Casleton, Kent H.

    1993-01-01

    The response of two-phase droplets to intense radiant heating is studied to determine the incident power that is required for causing explosive boiling in the liquid phase. The droplets studied consist of strongly absorbing coal particles dispersed in a weakly absorbing water medium. Experiments are performed by confining droplets (radii of 37, 55, and 80 microns) electrodynamically and irradiating them from two sides with pulsed laser beams. Emphasis is placed on the transition region from accelerated droplet vaporization to droplet superheating and explosive boiling. The time scale observed for explosive boiling is more than 2 orders of magnitude longer than published values for pure liquids. The delayed response is the result of energy transfer limitations between the absorbing solid phase and the surrounding liquid.

  12. Evaporation of an inkjet droplet on a flat substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Takashi; Shimoda, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the evaporation behavior of inkjet droplets has become increasingly important as printed electronic technology develops. In this study, the evaporation phenomena of a 5-6-pL droplet were studied. Four types of non-polar liquid droplets were prepared via the inkjet method and placed on substrates with small contact-angle hystereses. The observed contact radius and contact angle during evaporation were in good agreement with the theoretical model. This model, that of diffusion-controlled evaporation, was obtained based on a microliter droplet or bulk liquid wherein the evaporation was considered to be a quasi-steady state. The square of contact radius R decreased linearly with the evaporation time t, and the gradient of the R 2 vs t plot provided the diffusivity of vapor in the air. The experimentally obtained diffusivity values were helpful for estimating the evaporation speeds and times of droplets at any contact angle.

  13. Nanospiral Formation by Droplet Drying: One Molecule at a Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Lei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have created nanospirals by self-assembly during droplet evaporation. The nanospirals, 60–70 nm in diameter, formed when solvent mixtures of methanol and m-cresol were used. In contrast, spin coating using only methanol as the solvent produced epitaxial films of stripe nanopatterns and using only m-cresol disordered structure. Due to the disparity in vapor pressure between the two solvents, droplets of m-cresol solution remaining on the substrate serve as templates for the self-assembly of carboxylic acid molecules, which in turn allows the visualization of solution droplet evaporation one molecule at a time.

  14. Nanospiral Formation by Droplet Drying: One Molecule at a Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Lei; Li, Li; Mao, Guangzhao

    2011-12-01

    We have created nanospirals by self-assembly during droplet evaporation. The nanospirals, 60-70 nm in diameter, formed when solvent mixtures of methanol and m-cresol were used. In contrast, spin coating using only methanol as the solvent produced epitaxial films of stripe nanopatterns and using only m-cresol disordered structure. Due to the disparity in vapor pressure between the two solvents, droplets of m-cresol solution remaining on the substrate serve as templates for the self-assembly of carboxylic acid molecules, which in turn allows the visualization of solution droplet evaporation one molecule at a time.

  15. Liquid droplet movement on horizontal surface with gradient surface energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Qiang; WANG Hong; ZHU Xun; LI Mingwei

    2006-01-01

    A surface with gradient surface energy was fabricated on a silicon wafer by using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology with the dodecyltrichlorosilane (C12H25Cl3Si) vapor which was adsorbed chemically on the surface of the silicon wafer to form a self-assemble monolayer (ASM) and thus a gradient profile of wettability. The microscopic contours of the gradient surface were measured with Seiko SPA400 atom force microscope (AFM). And the surface wettability profile was characterized by the sessile drop method, measuring the contact angle of fine water droplets that lay on the gradient surface, to represent the distribution of the surface energy on the surface. Using a high-speed video imaging system, the motion of water droplet on the horizontal gradient surface was visualized and the transient velocity was measured under ambient condition. The experimental results show that the liquid droplets can be driven to move from hydrophobic side to hydrophilic side on the horizontal gradient surface and the velocity of droplet can reach up to 40 mm/s. In addition, the motion of the water droplet can be generally divided into two stages: an acceleration stage and a deceleration stage. The droplet presents a squirming movement on the surface with a lower peak velocity and a larger extent of deceleration motion. And the static advancing contact angle of the droplet is obviously larger than the dynamic advancing contact angle on the gradient energy surface.

  16. Dynamics of droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frohn, A.; Roth, N. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Thermodynamik der Luft- und Raumfahrt

    2000-07-01

    Intended to privide an up-to-date overview of the field, this book is also likely to become a standard work of reference on the science of droplets. Beginning with the theoretical background important for droplet dynamics, it continues with a presentation of the various methods for generating single droplets and regular droplet systems. Also included is a detailed description of the experimental methods employed in droplet research. A special chapter is devoted to the various types of droplet interactions without phase transition. A separate chapter then treats many examples of the possible phase transition processes. The final part of the book gives a summary of important applications. With its comprehensive content, this book will be of interest to all scientists and lecturers concerned with two-phase flow, spray technology, heterogeneous combustion, and aerosol science. (orig.)

  17. Insight into the Evaporation Dynamics of a Pair of Sessile Droplets on a Hydrophobic Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikeea, Angkur Jyoti Dipanka; Basu, Saptarshi

    2016-02-09

    In this work, we have demonstrated three unique regimes in the evaporation lifecycle of a pair of sessile droplets placed in variable proximity on a hydrophobic substrate. For small separation distance, the droplets undergo asymmetric spatiotemporal evaporation leading to contact angle hysteresis and suppressed vaporization. The reduced evaporation has been attributed quantitatively to the existence of a constrained vapor-rich dome between the two droplets. However, a dynamic decrease in the droplet radius due to solvent removal marks a return to symmetry in terms of evaporation and contact angle. We have described the variation in evaporation flux using a universal correction factor. We have also demonstrated the existence of a critical separation distance beyond which the droplets in the droplet pair do not affect each other. The results are crucial to a plethora of applications ranging from surface patterning to lab-on-a-chip devices.

  18. a Theoretical Model of a Superheated Liquid Droplet Neutron Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Mark Joseph

    Neutrons can interact with the atoms in superheated liquid droplets which are suspended in a viscous matrix material, resulting in the formation of charged recoil ions. These ions transfer energy to the liquid, sometimes resulting in the droplets vaporizing and producing observable bubbles. Devices employing this mechanism are known as superheated liquid droplet detectors, or bubble detectors. The basis of bubble detector operation is identical to that of bubble chambers, which have been well characterized by researchers such as Wilson, Glaser, Seitz, and others since the 1950's. Each of the microscopic superheated liquid droplets behaves like an independent bubble chamber. This dissertation presents a theoretical model which considers the three principal aspects of detector operation: nuclear reactions, charged particle energy deposition, and thermodynamic bubble formation. All possible nuclear reactions were examined and those which could reasonably result in recoil ions sufficiently energetic to vaporize a droplet were analyzed in detail. Feasible interactions having adequate cross sections include elastic and inelastic scattering, n-proton, and n-alpha reactions. Ziegler's TRansport of Ions in Matter (TRIM) code was used to calculate the ions' stopping powers in various compounds based on the ionic energies predicted by standard scattering distributions. If the ions deposit enough energy in a small enough volume then the entire droplet will vaporize without further energy input. Various theories as to the vaporization of droplets by ionizing radiation were studied and a novel method of predicting the critical (minimum) energy was developed. This method can be used to calculate the minimum required stopping power for the ion, from which the threshold neutron energy is obtainable. Experimental verification of the model was accomplished by measuring the response of two different types of bubble detectors to monoenergetic thermal neutrons, as well as to neutrons

  19. Investigation of Regularities of Heat and Mass Transfer and Phase Transitions during Water Droplets Motion through High-Temperature Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman S. Volkov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The macroscopic regularities of heat and mass transfer and phase transitions during water droplets motion through high-temperature (more than 1000 K gases have been investigated numerically and experimentally. Water droplet evaporation rates have been established. Gas and water vapors concentrations and also temperature values of gas-vapor mixture in small neighborhood and water droplet trace have been singled out. Possible mechanisms of droplet coagulation in high-temperature gas area have been determined. Experiments have been carried out with the optical methods of two-phase gas-vapor-droplet mixtures diagnostics (“Particle Image Velocimetry” and “Interferometric Particle Imaging” usage to assess the adequateness of developed heat and mass transfer models and the results of numerical investigations. The good agreement of numerical and experimental investigation results due to integral characteristics of water droplet evaporation has been received.

  20. Levitated droplet dye laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azzouz, H.; Alkafadiji, L.; Balslev, Søren

    2006-01-01

    a high quality optical resonator. Our 750 nL lasing droplets consist of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethylene glycol, at a concentration of 0.02 M. The droplets are optically pumped at 532 nm light from a pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, and the dye laser emission is analyzed by a fixed grating...

  1. Droplet collisions in turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenziel, G.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid droplets occur in many natural phenomena and play an important role in a large number of industrial applications. One of the distinct properties of droplets as opposed to solid particles is their ability to merge, or coalesce upon collision. Coalescence of liquid drops is of importance in for

  2. Spreading and atomization dynamics of ultrasonically excited droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ranganathan; Deepu, P.; Basu, Saptarshi

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of a sessile droplet under the combined influence of standing pressure wave and a constant substrate acceleration is investigated experimentally. The asymmetric acoustic force field results in radial spreading of the droplet. The spreading rate varies inversely with viscosity which is explained using an analytical model. In low viscosity droplets, towards the end of droplet spreading capillary waves grow to form ligaments of varying length and time scales, ultimately leading to droplet disintegration. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition of high speed images from the droplet spreading phase predicts the likelihood of atomization. The different regimes in the life of surface ligaments are identified. Viscous dissipation plays a crucial role in determining the initial ligament momentum and thus the frequency of ligament breakup. However in the current experimental conditions the growth of a typical ligament is governed by inertial and capillary forces and the influence of viscosity in the ligament growth phase is rather negligible. By including the effect of acoustic pressure, a characteristic timescale is deduced which collapses the ligament growth profiles for different fluids on a straight line.

  3. Self-propelled droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Ralf; Fleury, Jean-Baptiste; Maass, Corinna C.

    2016-11-01

    Self-propelled droplets are a special kind of self-propelled matter that are easily fabricated by standard microfluidic tools and locomote for a certain time without external sources of energy. The typical driving mechanism is a Marangoni flow due to gradients in the interfacial energy on the droplet interface. In this article we review the hydrodynamic prerequisites for self-sustained locomotion and present two examples to realize those conditions for emulsion droplets, i.e. droplets stabilized by a surfactant layer in a surrounding immiscible liquid. One possibility to achieve self-propelled motion relies on chemical reactions affecting the surface active properties of the surfactant molecules. The other relies on micellar solubilization of the droplet phase into the surrounding liquid phase. Remarkable cruising ranges can be achieved in both cases and the relative insensitivity to their own `exhausts' allows to additionally study collective phenomena.

  4. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe [FEMTO-ST, CNRS, UFC, 26 chemin de l’Epitaphe 25030 Besançon Cedex (France)

    2015-11-15

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10{sup −9} at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10{sup −11} τ{sup −1/2} up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  5. Source of temperature and pressure pulsations during sessile droplet evaporation into multicomponent atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, Aaron H; Sefiane, Khellil; Ward, Charles A

    2013-10-29

    During sessile droplet evaporation, studies with IR thermography and shadowgraphs have indicated temperature pulsations. We confirm those observations with microthermocouples, but microthermocouples also indicate temperature pulsations in the atmosphere of the droplet. The pressure in this atmosphere pulsated as well and was correlated with the temperature pulsations in the droplet. Also, we find that if a droplet evaporates into its own vapor, there are no temperature or pressure pulsations. The pulsations occur only if the droplet evaporates into an atmosphere with a component having a heat of solution with the droplet when it adsorbs-absorbs. None of the currently proposed mechanisms for the temperature pulsations provide an explanation for the coupling between the temperature pulsations in the droplet and the vapor-phase pressure pulsations, and for the absence of the pulsations when the system is single-component. As a mechanism for the pulsations, we propose that when a droplet is exposed to an atmosphere containing a component that has a heat of solution with the droplet, energy will be released from adsorption-absorption. This energy will cause pulsations in the evaporation flux, and these pulsations could cause the observed temperature and pressure pulsations. We examine this mechanism by showing that, if the measured temperature pulsations in a water droplet exposed to a methanol atmosphere are used as the input to a theory of evaporation kinetics (statistical rate theory), the pressure pulsations of the water vapor in the methanol atmosphere are predicted and agree with those measured with a quadrupole mass analyzer. When the inputs and outputs are reversed in the theory, we find that the temperature pulsations in the droplet are correctly predicted from the measured water vapor pulsations in the atmosphere.

  6. Analysis of ultrasonically rotating droplet using moving particle semi-implicit and distributed point source methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yuji; Yuge, Kohei; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-07-01

    Numerical analysis of the rotation of an ultrasonically levitated droplet with a free surface boundary is discussed. The ultrasonically levitated droplet is often reported to rotate owing to the surface tangential component of acoustic radiation force. To observe the torque from an acoustic wave and clarify the mechanism underlying the phenomena, it is effective to take advantage of numerical simulation using the distributed point source method (DPSM) and moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method, both of which do not require a calculation grid or mesh. In this paper, the numerical treatment of the viscoacoustic torque, which emerges from the viscous boundary layer and governs the acoustical droplet rotation, is discussed. The Reynolds stress traction force is calculated from the DPSM result using the idea of effective normal particle velocity through the boundary layer and input to the MPS surface particles. A droplet levitated in an acoustic chamber is simulated using the proposed calculation method. The droplet is vertically supported by a plane standing wave from an ultrasonic driver and subjected to a rotating sound field excited by two acoustic sources on the side wall with different phases. The rotation of the droplet is successfully reproduced numerically and its acceleration is discussed and compared with those in the literature.

  7. Method for using magnetic particles in droplet microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Gaurav Jitendra (Inventor); Kim, Chang-Jin (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Methods of utilizing magnetic particles or beads (MBs) in droplet-based (or digital) microfluidics are disclosed. The methods may be used in enrichment or separation processes. A first method employs the droplet meniscus to assist in the magnetic collection and positioning of MBs during droplet microfluidic operations. The sweeping movement of the meniscus lifts the MBs off the solid surface and frees them from various surface forces acting on the MBs. A second method uses chemical additives to reduce the adhesion of MBs to surfaces. Both methods allow the MBs on a solid surface to be effectively moved by magnetic force. Droplets may be driven by various methods or techniques including, for example, electrowetting, electrostatic, electromechanical, electrophoretic, dielectrophoretic, electroosmotic, thermocapillary, surface acoustic, and pressure.

  8. Thermophoresis in nanoliter droplets to quantify aptamer binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Susanne A I; Markwardt, Niklas A; Lanzmich, Simon A; Braun, Dieter

    2014-07-21

    Biomolecule interactions are central to pharmacology and diagnostics. These interactions can be quantified by thermophoresis, the directed molecule movement along a temperature gradient. It is sensitive to binding induced changes in size, charge, or conformation. Established capillary measurements require at least 0.5 μL per sample. We cut down sample consumption by a factor of 50, using 10 nL droplets produced with acoustic droplet robotics (Labcyte). Droplets were stabilized in an oil-surfactant mix and locally heated with an IR laser. Temperature increase, Marangoni flow, and concentration distribution were analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and numerical simulation. In 10 nL droplets, we quantified AMP-aptamer affinity, cooperativity, and buffer dependence. Miniaturization and the 1536-well plate format make the method high-throughput and automation friendly. This promotes innovative applications for diagnostic assays in human serum or label-free drug discovery screening.

  9. Fundamental thermal noise in droplet microresonators

    CERN Document Server

    Giorgini, Antonio; Malara, Pietro; De Natale, Paolo; Gagliardi, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Liquid droplet whispering-gallery-mode microresonators open a new research frontier for optomechanics and photonic devices. At visible wavelengths, where most liquids are transparent, a major contribution to a droplet optical quality factor is expected theoretically from thermal surface distortions and capillary waves. Here, we investigate experimentally these predictions using transient cavity ring-down spectroscopy. In this way, the optical out-coupling and intrinsic loss are measured independently while any perturbation induced by thermal, acoustic and laser-frequency noise is avoided thanks to the ultra-short light-cavity interaction time. The measurements reveal a photon lifetime ten times longer than the thermal limit and suggest that capillary fluctuations activate surface scattering effects responsible for light coupling.

  10. Vortex formation in coalescence of droplets with a reservoir using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherian, Fereshte; Marcon, Valentina; Bonaccurso, Elmar; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2016-10-01

    The flow patterns generated by the coalescence of aqueous ethanol droplets with a water reservoir are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The influence of surface tension gradient, which leads to the spreading of the droplet along the liquid-vapor interface of the reservoir, is studied by changing the ethanol concentration of the droplet. The internal circulation (vortex strength) of the droplet and the reservoir are analyzed separately. Simulation results reveal the formation of swirling flows within the droplet at early times when the radius of the coalescence neck due to the capillary forces increases rapidly with time. The vortex strength is found to be higher at lower concentrations of ethanol (higher liquid-vapor surface tension of the droplet), where the driving force for the contact line movement (capillary force) is stronger. The circulation diminishes by moving the center of mass of the droplet toward the reservoir. The lower surface tension of the droplet compared to the reservoir leads to surface tension gradient driven flow, which transports the droplet molecules along the liquid-vapor interface of the reservoir. Such a flow motion results in the generation of convective flows in the underlying water, which forms swirling flows within the reservoir. Therefore, the vortex strength of the reservoir is higher at higher ethanol concentrations of the droplet. The reservoir circulation decays to zero as soon as the ethanol concentration becomes homogeneous along the interface of the pool. The time evolution of circulation within the droplet and the reservoir are correlated with the center of mass motion of the droplet toward the surface, the time variation of the precursor film radius and the dynamic surface tension of the reservoir.

  11. Waveguides for walking droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Filoux, Boris; Schlagheck, Peter; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    When gently placing a droplet onto a vertically vibrated bath, a drop can bounce permanently. Upon increasing the forcing acceleration, the droplet is propelled by the wave it generates and becomes a walker with a well defined speed. We investigate the confinement of a walker in different rectangular cavities, used as waveguides for the Faraday waves emitted by successive droplet bounces. By studying the walker velocities, we discover that 1d confinement is optimal for narrow channels. We also propose an analogy with waveguide models based on the observation of the Faraday instability within the channels.

  12. Spreading and atomization of droplets on a vibrating surface in a standing pressure field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepu, P.; Basu, Saptarshi; Saha, Abhishek; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-10-01

    We report the first observation and analytical model of deformation and spreading of droplets on a vibrating surface under the influence of an ultrasonic standing pressure field. The standing wave allows the droplet to spread, and the spreading rate varies inversely with viscosity. In low viscosity droplets, the synergistic effect of radial acoustic force and the transducer surface acceleration also leads to capillary waves. These unstable capillary modes grow to cause ultimate disintegration into daughter droplets. We find that using nanosuspensions, spreading and disintegration can be prevented by suppressing the development of capillary modes and subsequent break-up.

  13. Numerical simulation of droplet evaporation between two circular plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bam, Hang Jin; Son, Gi Hun [Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Numerical simulation is performed for droplet evaporation between two circular plates. The flow and thermal characteristics of the droplet evaporation are numerically investigated by solving the conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy and mass fraction in the liquid and gas phases. The liquid-gas interface is tracked by a sharp-interface level-set method which is modified to include the effects of evaporation at the liquid-gas interface and contact angle hysteresis at the liquid-gas-solid contact line. An analytical model to predict the droplet evaporation is also developed by simplifying the mass and vapor fraction equations in the gas phase. The numerical results demonstrate that the 1-D analytical prediction is not applicable to the high rate evaporation process. The effects of plate gap and receding contact angle on the droplet evaporation are also quantified.

  14. Dancing droplets: Chemical space, substrates, and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cira, Nate; Benusiglio, Adrien; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    Previously we showed that droplets of propylene glycol and water display remarkable properties when placed on clean glass due to an interplay between surface tension and evaporation. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). We showed that these mechanisms apply to a range of two-component mixtures of miscible liquids where one component has both higher surface tension and higher vapor pressure on a variety of high energy surfaces. We now show how this rule can be cheated using a simple trick. We go on to demonstrate applications for cleaning, and show how this system works on substrates prepared only with sunlight. We finish by demonstrating active control of droplets, allowing access to a host of new possibilities.

  15. Evaporation of bi-component droplets in a heated, highly turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, F.; Bazile, R. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT, Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, Toulouse (France)

    2012-08-15

    This work aims to understand the phenomena that occur in a combustion chamber where multi-component fuel droplets are injected. Many evaporation models exist but the influence of turbulence on spray vaporization is not yet well understood. This study gives a useful database to improve these models. The objective of the work is to measure the dispersion and the evaporation of bi-component (octane/3-pentanone) droplets and the resulting vapor mixing in a well-known, heated, highly turbulent channel flow. The carrier flow shows high turbulence levels, flat profiles for the mean velocity and the velocity fluctuations. The injected droplets have a large variety of behaviors due to the large polydispersion and to the turbulence. The evolution of 3-pentanone liquid concentration, mass flux, and droplet clusters are described. Mean concentration, fluctuations of concentration, and mixing of the vapor phase are characterized. (orig.)

  16. Droplet condensation and growth on nanotextured surfaces impregnated with an immiscible liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sushant; Paxson, Adam; Smith, Jonathan; Dhiman, Rajeev; Varanasi, Kripa

    2012-02-01

    For effective dropwise condensation, a surface that sheds droplets easily is desirable due to the enhancement in accompanying heat transfer. Incorporating nano-textures on the surface can enhance the droplet shedding or spreading. We demonstrate that droplet shedding can be further influenced by impregnating the nano-textured surface with a liquid which is immiscible with respect to the droplet. In this study, the dynamics of dropwise condensation on such immiscible liquid impregnated nano-textured surfaces have been investigated in pure quiescent water vapor conditions. Condensation experiments were conducted using an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope by controlling the chamber water vapor pressure and substrate temperature. We show preferential sites for condensation and different modes under which droplets grow, depending upon the surface chemistry, surface texture, and the impregnating liquid properties. Concurrently, we show an evolution of apparent contact angles during the condensation process on the impregnated surfaces.

  17. On the effects of isotropic turbulence on the evaporation rate of a liquid droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Michael; Ferrante, Antonino

    2016-11-01

    Our objective is to explain the effects of isotropic turbulence on the vaporization rate of a liquid droplet in conditions that are relevant to spray combustion applications. To this end, we have performed direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a single droplet in homogeneous isotropic turbulence using the volume-of-fluid method for resolving fully the process of momentum, heat, and mass transfer between the liquid droplet and the gas. The simulations were performed using 10243 grid points. The effect of turbulence on the droplet vaporization rate is investigated by varying the gas-phase Reynolds number based on the Taylor microscale, Reλ. Reλ is increased from 0 to 75 by increasing the r.m.s. velocity of the gas phase while keeping all other physical properties constant. We will present the droplet evaporation rate as a function of turbulence Reynolds number and investigate the physical mechanisms.

  18. Distillation-Based Droplet Modeling of Non-Ideal Oxygenated Gasoline Blends: Investigating the Role of Droplet Evaporation on PM Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Stephen C.; Ratcliff, Matthew; McCormick, Robert; Rhoads, Robert; Windom, Bret

    2017-03-28

    In some studies, a relationship has been observed between increasing ethanol content in gasoline and increased particulate matter (PM) emissions from vehicles equipped with spark ignition engines. The fundamental cause of the PM increase seen for moderate ethanol concentrations is not well understood. Ethanol features a greater heat of vaporization (HOV) than gasoline and also influences vaporization by altering the liquid and vapor composition throughout the distillation process. A droplet vaporization model was developed to explore ethanol's effect on the evaporation of aromatic compounds known to be PM precursors. The evolving droplet composition is modeled as a distillation process, with non-ideal interactions between oxygenates and hydrocarbons accounted for using UNIFAC group contribution theory. Predicted composition and distillation curves were validated by experiments. Detailed hydrocarbon analysis was applied to fuel samples and to distillate fractions, and used as input for the initial droplet composition. With composition calculated throughout the distillation, the changing HOV and other physical properties can be found using reference data. The droplet can thus be modeled in terms of energy transfer, which in turn provides the transient mass transfer, droplet temperature, and droplet diameter. Model predictions suggest that non-ideal vapor-liquid equilibrium along with an increase in HOV can alter the droplet composition evolution. Results predict that the presence of ethanol causes enrichment of the higher boiling fractions (T90+) in the aromatic components as well as lengthens the droplet lifetime. A simulation of the evaporation process in a transient environment as experienced within an engine cylinder predicts a decrease in mixing time of the heaviest fractions of the fuel prior to spark initiation, possibly explaining observations linking ethanol to PM.

  19. Electrostatic charging of jumping droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Preston, Daniel J.; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2013-09-01

    With the broad interest in and development of superhydrophobic surfaces for self-cleaning, condensation heat transfer enhancement and anti-icing applications, more detailed insights on droplet interactions on these surfaces have emerged. Specifically, when two droplets coalesce, they can spontaneously jump away from a superhydrophobic surface due to the release of excess surface energy. Here we show that jumping droplets gain a net positive charge that causes them to repel each other mid-flight. We used electric fields to quantify the charge on the droplets and identified the mechanism for the charge accumulation, which is associated with the formation of the electric double layer at the droplet-surface interface. The observation of droplet charge accumulation provides insight into jumping droplet physics as well as processes involving charged liquid droplets. Furthermore, this work is a starting point for more advanced approaches for enhancing jumping droplet surface performance by using external electric fields to control droplet jumping.

  20. Resonant and rolling droplet

    CERN Document Server

    Dorbolo, S; Vandewalle, N; Gilet, T

    2008-01-01

    When an oil droplet is placed on a quiescent oil bath, it eventually collapses into the bath due to gravity. The resulting coalescence may be eliminated when the bath is vertically vibrated. The droplet bounces periodically on the bath, and the air layer between the droplet and the bath is replenished at each bounce. This sustained bouncing motion is achieved when the forcing acceleration is higher than a threshold value. When the droplet has a sufficiently low viscosity, it significantly deforms : spherical harmonic \\boldmath{$Y_{\\ell}^m$} modes are excited, resulting in resonant effects on the threshold acceleration curve. Indeed, a lower acceleration is needed when $\\ell$ modes with $m=0$ are excited. Modes $m \

  1. Butschli Dynamic Droplet System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armstrong, R.; Hanczyc, M.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical oil-water systems such as droplets display lifelike properties and may lend themselves to chemical programming to perform useful work, specifically with respect to the built environment. We present Butschli water-in-oil droplets as a model for further investigation into the development...... of a technology with living properties. Otto Butschli first described the system in 1898, when he used alkaline water droplets in olive oil to initiate a saponification reaction. This simple recipe produced structures that moved and exhibited characteristics that resembled, at least superficially, the amoeba. We...... temporal and spatial order in the system with the potential for chemical programmability. The authors propose that the discrete formation of dynamic droplets, characterized by their lifelike behavior patterns, during a variable window of time (from 30 s to 30 min after the addition of alkaline water...

  2. Bioprinting: Functional droplet networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-06-01

    Tissue-mimicking printed networks of droplets separated by lipid bilayers that can be functionalized with membrane proteins are able to spontaneously fold and transmit electrical currents along predefined paths.

  3. The evaporation behavior of sessile droplets from aqueous saline solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulié, Virginie; Karpitschka, Stefan; Lequien, Florence; Prené, Philippe; Zemb, Thomas; Moehwald, Helmuth; Riegler, Hans

    2015-09-14

    Quantitative experiments on the evaporation from sessile droplets of aqueous saline (NaCl) solutions show a strong dependence on salt concentration and droplet shape. The experiments were performed with seven decades of initial NaCl concentrations, with various droplet sizes and with different contact angles. The evaporation rate is significantly lower for high salt concentrations and small contact angles than what is expected from the well-accepted diffusion-controlled evaporation scenario for sessile droplets, even if the change of the vapor pressure due to the salt is taken into account. Particle tracking velocimetry reveals that this modification of the evaporation behavior is caused by marangoni flows that are induced by surface tension gradients originating from the local evaporative peripheral salt enrichment. In addition it is found that already very low salt concentrations lead to a pinning of the three phase contact line. Whereas droplets with concentration ≥10(-6) M NaCl are pinned as soon as evaporation starts, droplets with lower salt concentration do evaporate in a constant contact angle mode. Aside from new, fundamental insights the findings are also relevant for a better understanding of the widespread phenomenon of corrosion initiated by sessile droplets.

  4. Low-frequency acoustic atomization with oscillatory flow around micropillars in a microfluidic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Yin Nee, E-mail: mailccheung@gmail.com, E-mail: mtnwong@ntu.edu.sg; Wong, Teck Neng, E-mail: mailccheung@gmail.com, E-mail: mtnwong@ntu.edu.sg [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Nguyen, Nam Trung, E-mail: nam-trung.nguyen@griffith.edu.au [Queensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University, Brisbane QLD 4111 (Australia)

    2014-10-06

    This letter reports a low frequency acoustic atomization technique with oscillatory extensional flow around micropillars. Large droplets passing through two micropillars are elongated. Small droplets are then produced through the pinch-off process at the spindle-shape ends. As the actuation frequency increases, the droplet size decreases with increasing monodispersity. This method is suitable for in-situ mass production of fine droplets in a multi-phase environment without external pumping. Small particles encapsulation was demonstrated with the current technique.

  5. Functions of the Coacervate Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okihana, Hiroyuki; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1982-12-01

    Functions of coacervate droplets as protocells are studied by using synthetic polymers. The coacervate droplets were made from PVA-A and PVA-S. When glycine or diglycine were in the surrounding medium, the coacervate droplets concentrated them. The concentration of glycine in the coacervate droplets was higher than that of diglycine. When this mixture was irradiated by UV light, the coacervate droplets protected them from the photochemical decomposition.

  6. Droplet impacts upon liquid surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, B.; Golay, M.W.; Johnson, T.J.

    1984-11-02

    The absorption and rebounding of single droplets and streams of droplets (of diameter less than 1200 micrometers) impacting upon the surface of a deep liquid were examined experimentally. Conservation of mechanical energy and momentum were used to explain rebounding droplet interactions, and impaction criteria have been established regarding the absorption of droplet streams. Surface tension is the dominant mechanism governing the observed behavior. Single droplets were never observed to rebound.

  7. Droplet based microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Ralf; Brinkmann, Martin; Pfohl, Thomas; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Droplet based microfluidics is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of research combining soft matter physics, biochemistry and microsystems engineering. Its applications range from fast analytical systems or the synthesis of advanced materials to protein crystallization and biological assays for living cells. Precise control of droplet volumes and reliable manipulation of individual droplets such as coalescence, mixing of their contents, and sorting in combination with fast analysis tools allow us to perform chemical reactions inside the droplets under defined conditions. In this paper, we will review available drop generation and manipulation techniques. The main focus of this review is not to be comprehensive and explain all techniques in great detail but to identify and shed light on similarities and underlying physical principles. Since geometry and wetting properties of the microfluidic channels are crucial factors for droplet generation, we also briefly describe typical device fabrication methods in droplet based microfluidics. Examples of applications and reaction schemes which rely on the discussed manipulation techniques are also presented, such as the fabrication of special materials and biophysical experiments.

  8. Droplet based microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Ralf; Brinkmann, Martin; Pfohl, Thomas; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Droplet based microfluidics is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of research combining soft matter physics, biochemistry and microsystems engineering. Its applications range from fast analytical systems or the synthesis of advanced materials to protein crystallization and biological assays for living cells. Precise control of droplet volumes and reliable manipulation of individual droplets such as coalescence, mixing of their contents, and sorting in combination with fast analysis tools allow us to perform chemical reactions inside the droplets under defined conditions. In this paper, we will review available drop generation and manipulation techniques. The main focus of this review is not to be comprehensive and explain all techniques in great detail but to identify and shed light on similarities and underlying physical principles. Since geometry and wetting properties of the microfluidic channels are crucial factors for droplet generation, we also briefly describe typical device fabrication methods in droplet based microfluidics. Examples of applications and reaction schemes which rely on the discussed manipulation techniques are also presented, such as the fabrication of special materials and biophysical experiments.

  9. Archimedes Mass Filter Vaporizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putvinski, S.; Agnew, A. F.; Cluggish, B. P.; Ohkawa, T.; Sevier, L.; Umstadter, K. R.; Dresvin, S. V.; Kuteev, B. V.; Feygenson, O. N.; Ivanov, D. V.; Zverev, S. G.; Miroshnikov, I. V.; Egorov, S. M.; Kiesewetter, D. V.; Maliugin, V. I.

    2001-10-01

    Archimedes Technology Group, Inc., is developing a plasma mass separator called the Archimedes Filter that separates waste oxide mixtures ion by ion into two mass groups: light and heavy. Since high-level waste at Hanford has 99.9its radioactivity associated with heavy elements, the Archimedes Filter can effectively decontaminate over three-quarters of that waste. The Filter process involves some preprocessing followed by volatilization and separation by the magnetic and electric fields of the main plasma. This presentation describes the approach to volatilization of the waste oxy-hydroxide mixture by means of a very high heat flux (q > 10 MW/m2). Such a high heat flux is required to ensure congruent evaporation of the complex oxy-hydroxide mixture and is achieved by injection of small droplets of molten waste into an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) torch. This presentation further addresses different issues related to evaporation of the waste including modeling of droplet evaporation, estimates of parameters of plasma torch, and 2D modeling of the plasma. The experimental test bed for oxide vaporization and results of the initial experiments on oxide evaporation in 60 kW ICP torch will also be described.

  10. Droplet formation and growth inside a polymer network: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jiyun; Jang, Eunseon; Shoaib, Mahbubul Alam; Jo, Kyubong; Kim, Jun Soo

    2016-04-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation study that focuses on the formation and growth of nanoscale droplets inside polymer networks. Droplet formation and growth are investigated by the liquid-vapor phase separation of a dilute Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid inside regularly crosslinked, polymer networks with varying mesh sizes. In a polymer network with small mesh sizes, droplet formation can be suppressed, the extent of which is dependent on the attraction strength between the LJ particles. When droplets form in a polymer network with intermediate mesh sizes, subsequent growth is significantly slower when compared with that in bulk without a polymer network. Interestingly, droplet growth beyond the initial nucleation stage occurs by different mechanisms depending on the mesh size: droplets grow mainly by diffusion and coalescence inside polymer networks with large mesh sizes (as observed in bulk), whereas Ostwald ripening becomes a more dominant mechanism for droplet growth for small mesh sizes. The analysis of droplet trajectories clearly reveals the obstruction effect of the polymer network on the movement of growing droplets, which leads to Ostwald ripening of droplets. This study suggests how polymer networks can be used to control the growth of nanoscale droplets.

  11. Vapor Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews the fundamental physics of vapor bubbles in liquids. Work on bubble growth and condensation for stationary and translating bubbles is summarized and the differences with bubbles containing a permanent gas stressed. In particular, it is shown that the natural frequency of a vapor bubble is proportional not to the inverse radius, as for a gas bubble, but to the inverse radius raised to the power 2/3. Permanent gas dissolved in the liquid diffuses into the bubble with strong effects on its dynamics. The effects of the diffusion of heat and mass on the propagation of pressure waves in a vaporous bubbly liquid are discussed. Other topics briefly touched on include thermocapillary flow, plasmonic nanobubbles, and vapor bubbles in an immiscible liquid.

  12. Microfluidic devices for droplet injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, Donald; Akartuna, Ilke; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    As picoliter-scale reaction vessels, microfluidic water-in-oil emulsions have found application for high-throughput, large-sample number analyses. Often, the biological or chemical system under investigation needs to be encapsulated into droplets to prevent cross contamination prior to the introduction of reaction reagents. Previous techniques of picoinjection or droplet synchronization and merging enable the addition of reagents to individual droplets, but present limitations on what can be added to each droplet. We present microfluidic devices that couple the strengths of picoinjection and droplet merging, allowing us to selectively add precise volume to our droplet reactions.

  13. Acoustic interaction forces between small particles in an ideal fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Glauber T.; Bruus, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    from the other particles. The particles, either compressible liquid droplets or elastic microspheres, are considered to be much smaller than the acoustic wavelength. In this so-called Rayleigh limit, the acoustic interaction forces between the particles are well approximated by gradients of pair...

  14. DNS of turbulent droplet-laden heated channel flow with phase transition at different initial relative humiditiesbh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukhvostova, A.; Russo, E.; Kuerten, J.G.M.; Geurts, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a turbulent channel flow of a mixture of dry air and water vapor with water droplets is examined. Direct numerical simulation is used to quantify the importance of variations in the initial relative humidity. We focus on the droplet behavior along with the thermal properties of the sys

  15. Evaporation of Liquid Droplet in Nano and Micro Scales from Statistical Rate Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Fei; He, Bin; Wei, Tao

    2015-04-01

    The statistical rate theory (SRT) is applied to predict the average evaporation flux of liquid droplet after the approach is validated in the sessile droplet experiments of the water and heavy water. The steady-state experiments show a temperature discontinuity at the evaporating interface. The average evaporation flux is evaluated by individually changing the measurement at a liquid-vapor interface, including the interfacial liquid temperature, the interfacial vapor temperature, the vapor-phase pressure, and the droplet size. The parameter study shows that a higher temperature jump would reduce the average evaporation flux. The average evaporation flux can significantly be influenced by the interfacial liquid temperature and the vapor-phase pressure. The variation can switch the evaporation into condensation. The evaporation flux is found to remain relative constant if the droplet is larger than a micro scale, while the smaller diameters in nano scale can produce a much higher evaporation flux. In addition, a smaller diameter of droplets with the same liquid volume has a larger surface area. It is suggested that the evaporation rate increases dramatically as the droplet shrinks into nano size.

  16. Sharp Interface Level Set Method based Study for Evaporation of a Sessile Droplet on Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Javed; Sharma, Atul; Bhardwaj, Rajneesh

    2016-11-01

    The evaporation of a sessile droplet is important in many applications like hot-spot cooling, surface patterning etc. An understanding of the droplet dynamics in terms of evaporation rate, evaporative cooling and substrate wettability is important for designing the droplet based devices. Extensive theoretical and experimental research has been conducted on evaporating droplets in recent years; however, the effect of surrounding vapors on the evaporation dynamics of a sessile droplet is not found in the literature. In this work, an in-house sharp-interface level set code based on the Ghost Fluid Method (GFM) is used. Energy, species, and momentum equations are coupled for studying the sessile droplet evaporation phenomenon on hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates. Different modes of droplet evaporation i.e. constant contact radius (CCR), constant contact angle (CCA) are observed for the two types of substrates. The coupling of energy and species equations is used for capturing the evaporating cooling induced dip in the droplet surface temperature. The effect of surrounding vapors like fluorocarbon vapors, on the evaporative cooling, is presented for water droplet on the hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates. Research Scholar.

  17. Decreasing luminescence lifetime of evaporating phosphorescent droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, D. D.; Dam, N. J.; Sweep, A. M.; Kunnen, R. P. J.; van Heijst, G. J. F.; Clercx, H. J. H.; van de Water, W.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced phosphorescence has been used extensively to study spray dynamics. It is important to understand the influence of droplet evaporation in the interpretation of such measurements, as it increases luminescence quenching. By suspending a single evaporating n-heptane droplet in an acoustic levitator, the properties of lanthanide-complex europium-thenoyltrifluoroacetone-trioctylphosphine oxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) phosphorescence are determined through high-speed imaging. A decrease was found in the measured phosphorescence decay coefficient (780 → 200 μs) with decreasing droplet volumes (10-9 → 10-11 m3) corresponding to increasing concentrations (10-4 → 10-2 M). This decrease continues up to the point of shell-formation at supersaturated concentrations. The diminished luminescence is shown not to be attributable to triplet-triplet annihilation, quenching between excited triplet-state molecules. Instead, the pure exponential decays found in the measurements show that a non-phosphorescent quencher, such as free TTA/TOPO, can be attributable to this decay. The concentration dependence of the phosphorescence lifetime can therefore be used as a diagnostic of evaporation in sprays.

  18. Ultrasonic estimation of the contact angle of a sessile droplet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintero, R.; Simonetti, F. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Radiation of energy by large amplitude leaky Rayleigh waves is regarded as one of the key physical mechanisms regulating the actuation and manipulation of droplets in surface acoustic wave (SAW) microfluidic devices. The interaction between a SAW and a droplet is highly complex and is presently the subject of extensive research. This paper investigates the existence of an additional interaction mechanism based on the propagation of quasi-Stoneley waves inside sessile droplets deposited on a solid substrate. In contrast with the leaky Rayleigh wave, the energy of the Stoneley wave is confined within a thin fluid layer in contact with the substrate. The hypothesis is confirmed by three-dimensional finite element simulations and ultrasonic scattering experiments measuring the reflection of Rayleigh waves from droplets of different diameters. Moreover, real-time monitoring of the droplet evaporation process reveals a clear correlation between the droplet contact angle and the spectral information of the reflected Rayleigh signal, thus paving the way for ultrasonic measurements of surface tension.

  19. High pressure droplet burning experiments in reduced gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauveau, Christian; Goekalp, Iskender

    1995-01-01

    A parametric investigation of single droplet gasification regimes is helpful in providing the necessary physical ideas for sub-grid models used in spray combustion numerical prediction codes. A research program has been initiated at the LCSR to explore the vaporization regimes of single and interacting hydrocarbon and liquid oxygen droplets under high pressure conditions. This paper summarizes the status of the LCSR program on the high pressure burning of single fuel droplets; recent results obtained under normal and reduced gravity conditions with suspended droplets are presented. In the work described here, parabolic flights of the CNES Caravelle is used to create a reduced gravity environment of the order of 10(exp -2) g(sub O). For all the droplet burning experiments reported here, the suspended droplet initial diameters are scattered around 1.5 mm; and the ambient air temperature is 300 K. The ambient pressure is varied between 0.1 MPa and 12 MPa. Four fuels are investigated: methanol (Pc = 7.9 MPa), n-heptane (Pc = 2.74 MPa), n-hexane (Pc = 3.01 MPa) and n-octane (Pc = 2.48 MPa).

  20. Chip-based droplet sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham; Hatch, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A non-contact system for sorting monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a microfluidic device based on the droplet's contents and their interaction with an applied electromagnetic field or by identification and sorting.

  1. Chip-based droplet sorting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham; Hatch, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A non-contact system for sorting monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a microfluidic device based on the droplet's contents and their interaction with an applied electromagnetic field or by identification and sorting.

  2. Digital holographic measurement of the Lagrangian evaporation rate of droplets dispersing in a homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marié, J. L.; Tronchin, T.; Grosjean, N.; Méès, L.; Öztürk, O. Can; Fournier, C.; Barbier, B.; Lance, M.

    2017-02-01

    The evaporation rate of diethyl ether droplets dispersing in a homogeneous, nearly isotropic turbulence is measured by following droplets along their trajectory. Measurements are performed at ambient temperature and pressure by using in-line digital holography. The holograms of droplets are recorded with a single high-speed camera (3 kHz), and droplets trajectories are reconstructed with an "inverse problem approach" (IPA) algorithm previously used in Chareyron et al. (New J Phys 14:043039, 2012) and Marié et al. (Exp Fluid 55(4):1708, 2014. doi: 10.1007/s00348-014-1708-6). The thermal/vapor concentration wakes developing around the droplets are visible behind each hologram. A standard reconstruction process is applied, showing that these wakes are aligned with the relative Lagrangian velocity seen by droplets at each instant. This relative velocity is that obtained from the dynamic equation of droplets motion and the positions and diameter of the droplets measured by holography and the IPA reconstruction. Sequences of time evolution of droplets 3D positions, diameter and 3D relative velocity are presented. In a number of cases, the evaporation rate of droplets changes along the trajectory and deviates from the value estimated with a standard film model of evaporation. This shows that turbulence may significantly influence the phase change process.

  3. Cloud droplet activation: solubility revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. Padró

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Soluble compounds present in atmospheric aerosol facilitate their transformation into cloud droplets by depressing the equilibrium vapor pressure required for activation. Their impact depends on the amount of dissolved substance in the aerosol aqueous phase, which in turn is controlled by its solubility. This study explores the impact of particle curvature on solubility, expressed in terms of a Kelvin enhancement. The augmented solubility, termed "Curvature Enhanced Solubility" (CES, is then introduced into Köhler theory for assessment of its impact on CCN activity for several organic compounds with a wide range of aqueous solubility. The interfacial energy between solute and aqueous phase required for quantification of CES is determined from existing correlations based on bulk solubility, and concurrent measurements of contact angle and surface tension. A number of important findings arise from this study: i CES can substantially increase solubility and impact CCN activity but only if the aerosol is initially wet, ii CES can stabilize highly supersaturated solutions, and provide a mechanism for retention of an aerosol aqueous phase even at very low relative humidity (RH, and, iii trace amounts of surfactant impurities can magnify the impact of CES.

  4. Enhancing Throughput of Combinatorial Droplet Devices via Droplet Bifurcation, Parallelized Droplet Fusion, and Parallelized Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuangwen Hsieh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Combinatorial droplet microfluidic devices with programmable microfluidic valves have recently emerged as a viable approach for performing multiplexed experiments in microfluidic droplets. However, the serial operation in these devices restricts their throughput. To address this limitation, we present a parallelized combinatorial droplet device that enhances device throughput via droplet bifurcation, parallelized droplet fusion, and parallelized droplet detection. In this device, sample droplets split evenly at bifurcating Y-junctions before multiple independent reagent droplets are injected directly into the split sample droplets for robust droplet fusion. Finally, the fused sample and reagent droplets can be imaged in parallel via microscopy. The combination of these approaches enabled us to improve the throughput over traditional, serially-operated combinatorial droplet devices by 16-fold—with ready potential for further enhancement. Given its current performance and prospect for future improvements, we believe the parallelized combinatorial droplet device has the potential to meet the demand as a flexible and cost-effective tool that can perform high throughput screening applications.

  5. The liquid to vapor phase transition in excited nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, J B; Phair, L; Wozniak, G J; Lefort, T; Beaulieu, L; Kwiatkowski, K K; Hsi, W C; Pienkowski, L; Breuer, H; Korteling, R G; Laforest, R; Martin, E; Ramakrishnan, E; Rowland, D; Ruangma, A; Viola, V E; Winchester, E M; Yennello, S J

    2002-01-01

    For many years it has been speculated that excited nuclei would undergo a liquid to vapor phase transition. For even longer, it has been known that clusterization in a vapor carries direct information on the liquid- vapor equilibrium according to Fisher's droplet model. Now the thermal component of the 8 GeV/c pion + 197Au multifragmentation data of the ISiS Collaboration is shown to follow the scaling predicted by Fisher's model, thus providing the strongest evidence yet of the liquid to vapor phase transition.

  6. The liquid to vapor phase transition in excited nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, J.B.; Moretto, L.G.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.; Beaulieu, L.; Breuer, H.; Korteling, R.G.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Lefort, T.; Pienkowski, L.; Ruangma, A.; Viola, V.E.; Yennello, S.J.

    2001-05-08

    For many years it has been speculated that excited nuclei would undergo a liquid to vapor phase transition. For even longer, it has been known that clusterization in a vapor carries direct information on the liquid-vapor equilibrium according to Fisher's droplet model. Now the thermal component of the 8 GeV/c pion + 197 Au multifragmentation data of the ISiS Collaboration is shown to follow the scaling predicted by Fisher's model, thus providing the strongest evidence yet of the liquid to vapor phase transition.

  7. Impact of blood droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Laan

    2015-01-01

    Within Bloodstain Pattern Analysis, forensic experts commonly use the stringing method, based on a straight line approximation of the blood droplets trajectories to determine where the source of a bloodstain pattern was. However, by ignoring gravity, large errors may arise when inferring the 3D-loca

  8. Sessile nanofluid droplet drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xin; Crivoi, Alexandru; Duan, Fei

    2015-03-01

    Nanofluid droplet evaporation has gained much audience nowadays due to its wide applications in painting, coating, surface patterning, particle deposition, etc. This paper reviews the drying progress and deposition formation from the evaporative sessile droplets with the suspended insoluble solutes, especially nanoparticles. The main content covers the evaporation fundamental, the particle self-assembly, and deposition patterns in sessile nanofluid droplet. Both experimental and theoretical studies are presented. The effects of the type, concentration and size of nanoparticles on the spreading and evaporative dynamics are elucidated at first, serving the basis for the understanding of particle motion and deposition process which are introduced afterward. Stressing on particle assembly and production of desirable residue patterns, we express abundant experimental interventions, various types of deposits, and the effects on nanoparticle deposition. The review ends with the introduction of theoretical investigations, including the Navier-Stokes equations in terms of solutions, the Diffusion Limited Aggregation approach, the Kinetic Monte Carlo method, and the Dynamical Density Functional Theory. Nanoparticles have shown great influences in spreading, evaporation rate, evaporation regime, fluid flow and pattern formation of sessile droplets. Under different experimental conditions, various deposition patterns can be formed. The existing theoretical approaches are able to predict fluid dynamics, particle motion and deposition patterns in the particular cases. On the basis of further understanding of the effects of fluid dynamics and particle motion, the desirable patterns can be obtained with appropriate experimental regulations.

  9. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  10. Method And Apparatus For Atomizing And Vaporizing Liquid

    KAUST Repository

    Lal, Amit

    2014-09-18

    A method and apparatus for atomizing and vaporizing liquid is described. An apparatus having an ejector configured to eject one or more droplets of liquid may be inserted into a reservoir containing liquid. The ejector may have a vibrating device that vibrates the ejector and causes liquid to move from the reservoir up through the ejector and out through an orifice located on the top of the ejector. The one or more droplets of liquid ejected from the ejector may be heated and vaporized into the air.

  11. Acoustic and photoacoustic characterization of micron-sized perfluorocarbon emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael C.

    2012-09-01

    Perfluorocarbon droplets containing nanoparticles (NPs) have recently been investigated as theranostic and dual-mode contrast agents. These droplets can be vaporized via laser irradiation or used as photoacoustic contrast agents below the vaporization threshold. This study investigates the photoacoustic mechanism of NP-loaded droplets using photoacoustic frequencies between 100 and 1000 MHz, where distinct spectral features are observed that are related to the droplet composition. The measured photoacoustic spectrum from NP-loaded perfluorocarbon droplets was compared to a theoretical model that assumes a homogenous liquid. Good agreement in the location of the spectral features was observed, which suggests the NPs act primarily as optical absorbers to induce thermal expansion of the droplet as a single homogenous object. The NP size and composition do not affect the photoacoustic spectrum; therefore, the photoacoustic signal can be maximized by optimizing the NP optical absorbing properties. To confirm the theoretical parameters in the model, photoacoustic, ultrasonic, and optical methods were used to estimate the droplet diameter. Photoacoustic and ultrasonic methods agreed to within 1.4%, while the optical measurement was 8.5% higher; this difference decreased with increasing droplet size. The small discrepancy may be attributed to the difficulty in observing the small droplets through the partially translucent phantom.

  12. Acoustic and photoacoustic characterization of micron-sized perfluorocarbon emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael C

    2012-09-01

    Perfluorocarbon droplets containing nanoparticles (NPs) have recently been investigated as theranostic and dual-mode contrast agents. These droplets can be vaporized via laser irradiation or used as photoacoustic contrast agents below the vaporization threshold. This study investigates the photoacoustic mechanism of NP-loaded droplets using photoacoustic frequencies between 100 and 1000 MHz, where distinct spectral features are observed that are related to the droplet composition. The measured photoacoustic spectrum from NP-loaded perfluorocarbon droplets was compared to a theoretical model that assumes a homogenous liquid. Good agreement in the location of the spectral features was observed, which suggests the NPs act primarily as optical absorbers to induce thermal expansion of the droplet as a single homogenous object. The NP size and composition do not affect the photoacoustic spectrum; therefore, the photoacoustic signal can be maximized by optimizing the NP optical absorbing properties. To confirm the theoretical parameters in the model, photoacoustic, ultrasonic, and optical methods were used to estimate the droplet diameter. Photoacoustic and ultrasonic methods agreed to within 1.4%, while the optical measurement was 8.5% higher; this difference decreased with increasing droplet size. The small discrepancy may be attributed to the difficulty in observing the small droplets through the partially translucent phantom.

  13. Droplet creator based on electrowetting-on-dielectric for lab on a chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) is to directly control the wettability of liquids on the solid surface by applying the electric potential to the microelectrode array under the dielectric layer. The prototype of the EWOD droplet creator with the sandwiched structure is used: the droplet is sandwiched between the top and bottom plates; the bottom plate consists of silicon used as the substrate of the microelectrode array, nitride silicon film deposited by low pressure chemical vapor deposition as the dielectric layer and the fluorocarbon polymer film deposited by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition as the hydrophobic layer; and the top plate is the transparent electrode covered with the hydrophobic layer. To obtain the required minimum voltage, the process and the criterion of creating droplets are analyzed. At the voltage of 35 V the deionized water droplet surrounded in silicone oil is successfully created.

  14. Stability of thin liquid films and sessile droplets under confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörfler, Fabian; Rauscher, Markus; Dietrich, S

    2013-07-01

    The stability of nonvolatile thin liquid films and of sessile droplets is strongly affected by finite size effects. We analyze their stability within the framework of density functional theory using the sharp kink approximation, i.e., on the basis of an effective interface Hamiltonian. We show that finite size effects suppress spinodal dewetting of films because it is driven by a long-wavelength instability. Therefore nonvolatile films are stable if the substrate area is too small. Similarly, nonvolatile droplets connected to a wetting film become unstable if the substrate area is too large. This instability of a nonvolatile sessile droplet turns out to be equivalent to the instability of a volatile drop which can attain chemical equilibrium with its vapor.

  15. High-speed camera observation of multi-component droplet coagulation in an ultrasonic standing wave field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reißenweber, Marina; Krempel, Sandro; Lindner, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    With an acoustic levitator small particles can be aggregated near the nodes of a standing pressure field. Furthermore it is possible to atomize liquids on a vibrating surface. We used a combination of both mechanisms and atomized several liquids simultaneously, consecutively and emulsified in the ultrasonic field. Using a high-speed camera we observed the coagulation of the spray droplets into single large levitated droplets resolved in space and time. In case of subsequent atomization of two components the spray droplets of the second component were deposited on the surface of the previously coagulated droplet of the first component without mixing.

  16. Acoustic telemetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To determine movements of green turtles in the nearshore foraging areas, we deployed acoustic tags and determined their movements through active and passive acoustic...

  17. Buckling instability of squeezed droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Elfring, Gwynn J

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments, we consider theoretically the compression of droplets pinned at the bottom on a surface of finite area. We show that if the droplet is sufficiently compressed at the top by a surface, it will always develop a shape instability at a critical compression. When the top surface is flat, the shape instability occurs precisely when the apparent contact angle of the droplet at the pinned surface is pi, regardless of the contact angle of the upper surface, reminiscent of past work on liquid bridges and sessile droplets as first observed by Plateau. After the critical compression, the droplet transitions from a symmetric to an asymmetric shape. The force required to deform the droplet peaks at the critical point then progressively decreases indicative of catastrophic buckling. We characterize the transition in droplet shape using illustrative examples in two dimensions followed by perturbative analysis as well as numerical simulation in three dimensions. When the upper surface is not f...

  18. Parameterization of cloud droplet formation for global and regional models: including adsorption activation from insoluble CCN

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, P.; I. N. Sokolik; Nenes, A.

    2009-01-01

    Dust and black carbon aerosol have long been known to exert potentially important and diverse impacts on cloud droplet formation. Most studies to date focus on the soluble fraction of these particles, and overlook interactions of the insoluble fraction with water vapor (even if known to be hydrophilic). To address this gap, we developed a new parameterization that considers cloud droplet formation within an ascending air parcel containing insoluble (but wettable) particles externally mixed wi...

  19. Noncontact atomization of droplets using an aerial ultrasonic source with two vibrating plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Arisa; Yanagimoto, Miduki; Asami, Takuya; Miura, Hikaru

    2015-07-01

    For use in mass spectrometry, we investigated the noncontact atomization of droplets using a rectangular transverse vibrating plate ultrasonic source. To determine the atomization properties of the ultrasonic source, we examined the sound pressure distribution of the standing wave acoustic field formed and observed the behavior of the atomized particles in the acoustic field. We determined the relationship between sound pressure and the conditions and location where atomization occurs with the variations in droplet surface tension and viscosity using three different compounds: water, ethanol, and glycerin. Furthermore, we clarifies the distribution of particle diameters in atomized water.

  20. Explosive Breakup of a Water Droplet with a Nontransparent Solid Inclusion Heated in a High-Temperature Gaseous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrienko Margarita A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the evaporation of a water droplet with a comparably sized solid nontransparent inclusion in a high-temperature (500–800 K gas medium. Water evaporates from the free surface of the inclusion. During this process, intensive vapor formation occurs on the inner interface “water droplet – solid inclusion” with the subsequent explosive decay of the droplet. Experiments have been conducted using high-speed (up to 105 fps video cameras “Phantom” and software “Phantom Camera Control”. The conditions of the explosive vapor formation of the heterogeneous water droplet were found. The typical phase change mechanisms of the heterogeneous water droplet under the conditions of intensive heat exchange were determined.

  1. Droplets and sprays

    CERN Document Server

    Sazhin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Providing a clear and systematic description of droplets and spray dynamic models, this book maximises reader insight into the underlying physics of the processes involved, outlines the development of new physical and mathematical models, and broadens understanding of interactions between the complex physical processes which take place in sprays. Complementing approaches based on the direct application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), Droplets and Sprays treats both theoretical and practical aspects of internal combustion engine process such as the direct injection of liquid fuel, subcritical heating and evaporation. Includes case studies that illustrate the approaches relevance to automotive applications,  it is also anticipated that the described models can find use in other areas such as in medicine and environmental science.

  2. Numerical Investigation of the Water Droplet Transport in a PEM Fuel Cell with Serpentine Flow Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bittagopal Mondal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The serpentine flow channel can be considered as one of the most common and practical channel layouts for a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC since it ensures an effective and efficient removal of water produced in a cell with acceptable parasitic load. Water management is one of the key issues to improve the cell performance since at low operating temperatures in PEMFC, water vapor condensation starts easily and accumulates the liquid water droplet within the flow channels, thus affecting the chemical reactions and reducing the fuel cell performance. In this article, a comprehensive three dimensional numerical simulation is carried out to understand the water droplet mobility in a serpentine gas flow channel for a wide range of surface properties, inlet air velocities, droplet positions (center or off-center, bottom or top and droplet sizes by deploying a finite volume based methodology. The liquid-gas interface is tracked following the volume-of-fluid (VOF method. The droplet transport is found to be greatly influenced by the surface wettability properties, inlet velocities, number of droplets emerged and initial droplet positions. Super hydrophobic surface property is not always preferable for designing the gas flow channels. It depends upon the inlet velocity conditions, droplet positions, number of droplets and surface properties.

  3. Confinement-induced alterations in the evaporation dynamics of sessile droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Lalit; Chakraborty, Suman; Basu, Saptarshi

    2017-02-07

    Evaporation of sessile droplets has been a topic of extensive research. However, the effect of confinement on the underlying dynamics has not been well explored. Here, we report the evaporation dynamics of a sessile droplet in a confined fluidic environment. Our findings reveal that an increase in the channel length delays the completion of the evaporation process and leads to unique spatio-temporal evaporation flux and internal flow. The evaporation modes (constant contact angle and constant contact radius) during the droplet lifetime however exhibit global similarity when normalized by appropriate length and timescales. These results are explained in light of an increase in vapor concentration inside the channel due to greater accumulation of water vapor on account of increased channel length. We have formulated a theoretical framework which introduces two key parameters namely an enhanced concentration of the vapor field in the vicinity of the confined droplet and a corresponding accumulation lengthscale over which the accumulated vapor relaxes to the ambient concentration. Using these two parameters and modified diffusion based evaporation we are able to show that confined droplets exhibit a universal behavior in terms of the temporal evolution of each evaporation mode irrespective of the channel length. These results may turn out to be of profound importance in a wide variety of applications, ranging from surface patterning to microfluidic technology.

  4. Hovering UFO Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Anand, Sushant; Dhiman, Rajeev; Smith, J David; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2012-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video is an entry for the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 65th Annual Meeting of the APS-DFD. This video shows behavior of condensing droplets on a lubricant impregnated surface and a comparison with a superhydrophobic surface. On impregnated surfaces, drops appear like UFOs hovering over a surface. The videos were recorded in an Environmental SEM and a specially built condensation rig.

  5. Three-dimensional simulation of impingement of a liquid droplet on a flat surface in the Leidenfrost regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yang; Fan, L.-S.

    2005-02-01

    The hydrodynamics and heat transfer phenomena of a liquid droplet impacting upon a hot flat surface are analyzed based on three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulation considering film-boiling behavior. The 3D level-set method is employed to portray the droplet surface variation during its deformation. The governing equations for the droplet and the surrounding gas phase are solved utilizing the finite-volume method with the arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian technique. To account for the lubrication resistant effects of the vapor cushion formed by the film-boiling evaporation, a separate vapor flow model is developed to simulate the pressure and velocity distribution along the vapor layer between the droplet and the surface. The temperature fields in all phases and the local evaporation rate on the droplet surface are determined by using a full field heat transfer model. Both the water and n-heptane droplets impacting on the solid wall with different Weber numbers are investigated. The comparisons of the simulation results with the experimental results reported in the literatures are made to substantiate the model presented in this study. Specially, the spreading and recoiling motions of the impacting droplets are reproduced accurately for a wide range of the Weber number. The oscillation of the thickness of the vapor layer and the temperature distribution across the interface are also calculated and compared favorably with the experimental results. As the Weber number increases, the extent of the droplet spreading increases, but the residence time of the droplet on the surface is almost unchanged. Compared to the saturated impacts, the subcooled impact yields a thinner vapor layer and a higher heat transfer rate.

  6. Evaporating droplet hologram simulation for digital in-line holography setup with divergent beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méès, Loïc; Grosjean, Nathalie; Chareyron, Delphine; Marié, Jean-Louis; Seifi, Mozhdeh; Fournier, Corinne

    2013-10-01

    Generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT) for a multilayered sphere is used to simulate holograms produced by evaporating spherical droplets with refractive index gradient in the surrounding air/vapor mixture. Simulated holograms provide a physical interpretation of experimental holograms produced by evaporating Diethyl Ether droplets with diameter in the order of 50 μm and recorded in a digital in-line holography configuration with a divergent beam. Refractive index gradients in the surrounding medium lead to a modification of the center part of the droplet holograms, where the first fringe is unusually bright. GLMT simulations reproduce this modification well, assuming an exponential decay of the refractive index from the droplet surface to infinity. The diverging beam effect is also considered. In both evaporating and nonevaporating cases, an equivalence is found between Gaussian beam and plane wave illuminations, simply based on a magnification ratio to be applied to the droplets' parameters.

  7. Dueling Mechanisms for Dry Zones around Frozen Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisbano, Caitlin; Nath, Saurabh; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    Ice acts as a local humidity sink, due to its depressed saturation pressure relative to that of supercooled water. Hygroscopic chemicals typically exhibit annular dry zones of inhibited condensation; however, dry zones do not tend to form around ice because of inter-droplet frost growth to nearby liquid droplets that have already condensed on the chilled surface. Here, we use a humidity chamber with an embedded Peltier stage to initially suppress the growth of condensation on a chilled surface containing a single frozen droplet, in order to characterize the dry zone around ice for the first time. The length of the dry zone was observed to vary by at least two orders of magnitude as a function of surface temperature, ambient humidity, and the size of the frozen droplet. The surface temperature and ambient humidity govern the magnitudes of the in-plane and out-of-plane gradients in vapor pressure, while the size of the frozen droplet effects the local thickness of the concentration boundary layer. We develop an analytical model that reveals two different types of dry zones are possible: one in which nucleation is inhibited and one where the net growth of condensate is inhibited. Finally, a phase map was developed to predict the parameter space in which nucleation dry zones versus flux dry zones are dominant.

  8. Sagging of evaporating droplets of colloidal suspensions on inclined substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espín, Leonardo; Kumar, Satish

    2014-10-14

    A droplet of a colloidal suspension placed on an inclined substrate may sag under the action of gravity. Solvent evaporation raises the concentration of the colloidal particles, and the resulting viscosity changes may influence the sag of the droplet. To investigate this phenomenon, we have developed a mathematical model for perfectly wetting droplets based on lubrication theory and the rapid-vertical-diffusion approximation. Precursor films are assumed to be present, the colloidal particles are taken to be hard spheres, and particle and liquid dynamics are coupled through a concentration-dependent viscosity and diffusivity. Evaporation is assumed to be limited by how rapidly solvent molecules can transfer from the liquid to the vapor phase. The resulting one-dimensional system of nonlinear partial differential equations describing the evolution of the droplet height and particle concentration is solved numerically for a range of initial particle concentrations and substrate temperatures. The solutions reveal that the interaction between evaporation and non-Newtonian suspension rheology gives rise to several distinct regimes of droplet shapes and particle concentration distributions. The results provide insight into how evaporation and suspension rheology can be tuned to minimize sagging as well as the well-known coffee-ring effect, an outcome which is important for industrial coating processes.

  9. Assessment of water droplet evaporation mechanisms on hydrophobic and superhydrophobic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhenhai; Dash, Susmita; Weibel, Justin A; Garimella, Suresh V

    2013-12-23

    Evaporation rates are predicted and important transport mechanisms identified for evaporation of water droplets on hydrophobic (contact angle ~110°) and superhydrophobic (contact angle ~160°) substrates. Analytical models for droplet evaporation in the literature are usually simplified to include only vapor diffusion in the gas domain, and the system is assumed to be isothermal. In the comprehensive model developed in this study, evaporative cooling of the interface is accounted for, and vapor concentration is coupled to local temperature at the interface. Conjugate heat and mass transfer are solved in the solid substrate, liquid droplet, and surrounding gas. Buoyancy-driven convective flows in the droplet and vapor domains are also simulated. The influences of evaporative cooling and convection on the evaporation characteristics are determined quantitatively. The liquid-vapor interface temperature drop induced by evaporative cooling suppresses evaporation, while gas-phase natural convection acts to enhance evaporation. While the effects of these competing transport mechanisms are observed to counterbalance for evaporation on a hydrophobic surface, the stronger influence of evaporative cooling on a superhydrophobic surface accounts for an overprediction of experimental evaporation rates by ~20% with vapor diffusion-based models. The local evaporation fluxes along the liquid-vapor interface for both hydrophobic and superhydrophobic substrates are investigated. The highest local evaporation flux occurs at the three-phase contact line region due to proximity to the higher temperature substrate, rather than at the relatively colder droplet top; vapor diffusion-based models predict the opposite. The numerically calculated evaporation rates agree with experimental results to within 2% for superhydrophobic substrates and 3% for hydrophobic substrates. The large deviations between past analytical models and the experimental data are therefore reconciled with the

  10. Rapidly pulsed helium droplet source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentlehner, Dominik; Riechers, Ricarda; Dick, Bernhard; Slenczka, Alkwin [Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, University of Regensburg, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Even, Uzi; Lavie, Nachum; Brown, Raviv; Luria, Kfir [Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2009-04-15

    A pulsed valve connected to a closed-cycle cryostat was optimized for producing helium droplets. The pulsed droplet beam appeared with a bimodal size distribution. The leading part of the pulse consists of droplets suitable for doping with molecules. The average size of this part can be varied between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 6} helium atoms, and the width of the distribution is smaller as compared to a continuous-flow droplet source. The system has been tested in a single pulse mode and at repetition rates of up to 500 Hz with almost constant intensity. The droplet density was found to be increased by more than an order of magnitude as compared to a continuous-flow droplet source.

  11. Evaporation of inclined water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-02-01

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets.

  12. Droplet microfluidics based microseparation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiliang; Niu, Menglei; Zhang, Bo

    2012-06-01

    Lab on a chip (LOC) technology is a promising miniaturization approach. The feature that it significantly reduced sample consumption makes great sense in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry. Since the start of LOC technology, much attention has been focused on continuous flow microfluidic systems. At the turn of the century, droplet microfluidics, which was also termed segmented flow microfluidics, was introduced. Droplet microfluidics employs two immiscible phases to form discrete droplets, which are ideal vessels with confined volume, restricted dispersion, limited cross-contamination, and high surface area. Due to these unique features, droplet microfluidics proves to be a versatile tool in microscale sample handling. This article reviews the utility of droplet microfluidics in microanalytical systems with an emphasize on separation science, including sample encapsulation at ultra-small volume, compartmentalization of separation bands, isolation of droplet contents, and related detection techniques.

  13. Evaporation of inclined water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-01-01

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets. PMID:28205642

  14. Droplets Evaporation on Heated Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misyura S. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various modes of evaporation in a wide range of droplet sizes and wall temperatures have been investigated in the present work. For any initial drop size there are three typical boiling regime: 1 the nucleate boiling; 2 the transitional regime; 3 the film boiling. The width of the transition region of boiling crisis increases with increasing the initial volume V0. Evaporation of large droplets at high superheat depends on the initial droplet shape.

  15. Small droplets on superhydrophobic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Markus; Varnik, Fathollah; Raabe, Dierk; Steinbach, Ingo

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the wetting behavior of liquid droplets on rough hydrophobic substrates for the case of droplets that are of comparable size to the surface asperities. Using a simple three-dimensional analytical free-energy model, we have shown in a recent letter [M. Gross, F. Varnik, and D. Raabe, EPL 88, 26002 (2009)] that, in addition to the well-known Cassie-Baxter and Wenzel states, there exists a further metastable wetting state where the droplet is immersed into the texture to a finite depth, yet not touching the bottom of the substrate. Due to this new state, a quasistatically evaporating droplet can be saved from going over to the Wenzel state and instead remains close to the top of the surface. In the present paper, we give an in-depth account of the droplet behavior based on the results of extensive computer simulations and an improved theoretical model. In particular, we show that releasing the assumption that the droplet is pinned at the outer edges of the pillars improves the analytical results for larger droplets. Interestingly, all qualitative aspects, such as the existence of an intermediate minimum and the "reentrant transition," remain unchanged. We also give a detailed description of the evaporation process for droplets of varying sizes. Our results point out the role of droplet size for superhydrophobicity and give hints for achieving the desired wetting properties of technically produced materials.

  16. Effects of nanoparticles on nanofluid droplet evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ruey-Hung [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering; Phuoc, Tran X. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Martello, Donald [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Laponite, Fe2O3 and Ag nanoparticles were added to deionized water to study their effect of evaporation rates. The results show that these nanofluid droplets evaporate at different rates (as indicated by the evaporation rate constant K in the well known D2-law) from the base fluid. Different particles lead to different values of K. As the particle concentration increases due to evaporation. K values of various Ag and Fe2O3 nanofluids go through a transition from one value to another, further demonstrating the effect of increasing nanoparticle concentration. The implication for the heat of vaporization (hfg) is discussed.

  17. Measurement and Modeling of High Energy Laser (HEL)-Droplet Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-11

    a film of reduced thickness. In reality, there will be water vapor present after the water has begun to vaporize. IR measurements will show the...dissipation is lessened because more of the beam passes unimpeded. Table 8: Summary of Results for Initial Diameter d=1.125mm Measurement Value Units...transfer of energy between the droplet and the surroundings. Table 9: Summary of Results for Initial Diameter d=1.25mm Measurement Value Units

  18. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations for the motion of evaporative droplets driven by thermal gradients along nanochannels

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Congmin

    2013-04-04

    For a one-component fluid on a solid substrate, a thermal singularity may occur at the contact line where the liquid-vapor interface intersects the solid surface. Physically, the liquid-vapor interface is almost isothermal at the liquid-vapor coexistence temperature in one-component fluids while the solid surface is almost isothermal for solids of high thermal conductivity. Therefore, a temperature discontinuity is formed if the two isothermal interfaces are of different temperatures and intersect at the contact line. This leads to the so-called thermal singularity. The localized hydrodynamics involving evaporation/condensation near the contact line leads to a contact angle depending on the underlying substrate temperature. This dependence has been shown to lead to the motion of liquid droplets on solid substrates with thermal gradients (Xu and Qian 2012 Phys. Rev. E 85 061603). In the present work, we carry out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations as numerical experiments to further confirm the predictions made from our previous continuum hydrodynamic modeling and simulations, which are actually semi-quantitatively accurate down to the small length scales in the problem. Using MD simulations, we investigate the motion of evaporative droplets in one-component Lennard-Jones fluids confined in nanochannels with thermal gradients. The droplet is found to migrate in the direction of decreasing temperature of solid walls, with a migration velocity linearly proportional to the temperature gradient. This agrees with the prediction of our continuum model. We then measure the effect of droplet size on the droplet motion. It is found that the droplet mobility is inversely proportional to a dimensionless coefficient associated with the total rate of dissipation due to droplet movement. Our results show that this coefficient is of order unity and increases with the droplet size for the small droplets (∼10 nm) simulated in the present work. These findings are in semi

  20. Acoustic interaction forces between small particles in an ideal fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Glauber T

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical expression for the acoustic interaction force between small spherical particles suspended in an ideal fluid exposed to an external acoustic wave. The acoustic interaction force is the part of the acoustic radiation force on one given particle involving the scattered waves from the other particles. The particles, either compressible liquid droplets or elastic microspheres, are considered to be much smaller than the acoustic wavelength. In this so-called Rayleigh limit, the acoustic interaction forces between the particles are well approximated by gradients of pair-interaction potentials with no restriction on the inter-particle distance. The theory is applied to studies of the acoustic interaction force on a particle suspension in either standing or traveling plane waves. The results show aggregation regions along the wave propagation direction, while particles may attract or repel each other in the transverse direction. In addition, a mean-field approximation is developed to describe ...

  1. Acoustic textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  2. Acoustic biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of ...

  3. Numerical Simulation of Vapor Bubble Growth and Heat Transfer in a Thin Liquid Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Yu-Jia; HUAI Xiu-Lan; LI Zhi-Gang

    2009-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to investigate the dynamics of vapor bubble growth in a thin liquid film,movement of the interface between two fluids and the surface heat transfer characteristics. The model takes into account the effects of phase change between the vapor and liquid, gravity, surface tension and viscosity. The details of the multiphase flow and heat transfer are discussed for two cases: (1) when a water micro-droplet impacts a thin liquid fihn with a vapor bubble growing and (2) when the vapor bubble grows and merges with the vapor layer above the liquid film without the droplet impacting. The development trend of the interface between the vapor and liquid is coincident qualitatively with the available literature, mostly at the first stage. We also provide an important method to better understand the mechanism of nucleate spray cooling.

  4. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttitta, Christina M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); The City University of New York, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Ericson, Daniel L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); University at Buffalo, SUNY, 12 Capen Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Scalia, Alexander [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Roessler, Christian G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Teplitsky, Ella [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5215 (United States); Joshi, Karan [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Campos, Olven [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33414 (United States); Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Orville, Allen M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S., E-mail: soares@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup −1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  5. Evaporation and ignition of droplets in combustion chambers modeling and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betelin, V. B.; Smirnov, N. N.; Nikitin, V. F.; Dushin, V. R.; Kushnirenko, A. G.; Nerchenko, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulation of liquid fuel jet injection into heated atmosphere of combustion chamber, mixture formation, ignition and combustion need adequate modeling of evaporation, which is extremely important for the curved surfaces in the presence of strong heat and mass diffusion fluxes. Combustion of most widely spread hydrocarbon fuels takes place in a gas-phase regime. Thus, evaporation of fuel from the surface of droplets turns to be one of the limiting factors of the process as well. The problems of fuel droplets atomization, evaporation being the key factors for heterogeneous reacting mixtures, the non-equilibrium effects in droplets atomization and phase transitions will be taken into account in describing thermal and mechanical interaction of droplets with streaming flows. In the present paper processes of non-equilibrium evaporation of small droplets will be discussed. As it was shown before, accounting for non-equilibrium effects in evaporation for many types of widely used liquids is crucial for droplet diameters less than 100 μm, while the surface tension effects essentially manifest only for droplets below 0.1 μm. Investigating the behavior of individual droplets in a heated air flow allowed to distinguish two scenarios for droplet heating and evaporation. Small droplets undergo successively heating, then cooling due to heat losses for evaporation, and then rapid heating till the end of their lifetime. Larger droplets could directly be heated up to a critical temperature and then evaporate rapidly. Droplet atomization interferes the heating, evaporation and combustion scenario. The scenario of fuel spray injection and self-ignition in a heated air inside combustion chamber has three characteristic stages. At first stage of jet injection droplets evaporate very rapidly thus cooling the gas at injection point, the liquid jet is very short and changes for a vapor jet. At second stage liquid jet is becoming longer, because evaporation rate decreases due

  6. Sub-micrometer dropwise condensation under superheated and rarefied vapor condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sushant; Son, Sang Young

    2010-11-16

    Phase change accompanying conversion of a saturated or superheated vapor in the presence of subcooled surfaces is one of the most common occurring phenomena in nature. The mode of phase change that follows such a transformation is dependent upon surface properties such as contact angle and thermodynamic conditions of the system. In present studies, an experimental approach is used to study the physics behind droplet growth on a partially wet surface. Superheated vapor at low pressures of 4-5 Torr was condensed on subcooled silicon surface with a static contact angle of 60° in the absence of noncondensable gases, and the condensation process was monitored using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) with sub-microscopic spatial resolution. The condensation process was analyzed in the form of size growth of isolated droplets before a coalescence event ended the regime of single droplet growth. Droplet growth obtained as a function of time reveals that the rate of growth decreases as the droplet increases in size. This behavior is indicative of an overall droplet growth law existing over larger time scales for which the current observations in their brief time intervals could be fitted. A theoretical model based on kinetic theory further support the experimental observations indicating a mechanism where growth occurs by interfacial mass transport directly on condensing droplet surface. Evidence was also found that establishes the presence of sub-microscopic droplets nucleating and growing between microscopic droplets for the partially wetting case.

  7. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF NEAR-WALL FLOWS OF TWO-PHASE MIXTURE WITH EVAPORATING DROPLETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bo-yi(王柏懿); A.N.Osiptsov

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of the two-continuum approach, using the matched asymptotic expansion method, the equations of a laminar boundary layer in mist flows with evaporating droplets were derived and solved. The similarity criteria controlling the mist flows were determined. For the flow along a curvilinear surface, the forms of the boundary layer equations differ from the regimes of presence and absence of the droplet inertia deposition.The numerical results were presented for the vapor-droplet boundary layer in the neighborhood of a stagnation point of a hot blunt body. It is demonstrated that, due to evaporation, a droplet-free region develops near the wall inside the boundary layer. On the upper edge of this region, the droplet radius tends to zero and the droplet number density becomes much higher than that in the free stream. The combined effect of the droplet evaporation and accumulation results in a significant enhancement of the heat transfer on the surface even for small mass concentration of the droplets in the free stream.

  8. Spatiotemporal infrared measurement of interface temperatures during water droplet evaporation on a nonwetting substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramohan, Aditya; Weibel, Justin A.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2017-01-01

    High-fidelity experimental characterization of sessile droplet evaporation is required to understand the interdependent physical mechanisms that drive the evaporation. In particular, cooling of the interface due to release of the latent heat of evaporation, which is not accounted for in simplified vapor-diffusion-based models of droplet evaporation, may significantly suppress the evaporation rate on nonwetting substrates, which support tall droplet shapes. This suppression is counteracted by convective mass transfer from the droplet to the air. While prior numerical modeling studies have identified the importance of these mechanisms, there is no direct experimental evidence of their influence on the interfacial temperature distribution. Infrared thermography is used here to simultaneously measure the droplet volume, contact angle, and spatially resolved interface temperatures for water droplets on a nonwetting substrate. The technique is calibrated and validated to quantify the temperature measurement accuracy; a correction is employed to account for reflections from the surroundings when imaging the evaporating droplets. Spatiotemporally resolved interface temperature data, obtained via infrared thermography measurements, allow for an improved prediction of the evaporation rate and can be utilized to monitor temperature-controlled processes in droplets for various lab-on-a-chip applications.

  9. Cool-flame Extinction During N-Alkane Droplet Combustion in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent droplet combustion experiments onboard the International Space Station (ISS) have revealed that large n-alkane droplets can continue to burn quasi-steadily following radiative extinction in a low-temperature regime, characterized by negative-temperaturecoefficient (NTC) chemistry. In this study we report experimental observations of n-heptane, n-octane, and n-decane droplets of varying initial sizes burning in oxygen/nitrogen/carbon dioxide and oxygen/helium/nitrogen environments at 1.0, 0.7, and 0.5 atmospheric pressures. The oxygen concentration in these tests varied in the range of 14% to 25% by volume. Large n-alkane droplets exhibited quasi-steady low-temperature burning and extinction following radiative extinction of the visible flame while smaller droplets burned to completion or disruptively extinguished. A vapor-cloud formed in most cases slightly prior to or following the "cool flame" extinction. Results for droplet burning rates in both the hot-flame and cool-flame regimes as well as droplet extinction diameters at the end of each stage are presented. Time histories of radiant emission from the droplet captured using broadband radiometers are also presented. Remarkably the "cool flame" extinction diameters for all the three n-alkanes follow a trend reminiscent of the ignition delay times observed in previous studies. The similarities and differences among the n-alkanes during "cool flame" combustion are discussed using simplified theoretical models of the phenomenon

  10. Photoacoustic cell using elliptical acoustic focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritier, J.-M.; Fouquet, J. E.; Siegman, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    A photoacoustic cell has been developed in the form of an elliptical cylinder in which essentially all the acoustic energy generated by a laser beam passing down one axis is focused onto a cylindrical acoustic tranducer located along the other axis. Preliminary measurements on a liquid-filled cell of this design show high sensitivity and a notably clean impulse response. A similar design may be useful for photoacoustic measurements in vapors as well.

  11. Hydrodynamics of a quark droplet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, Johan J.; Mishustin, Igor N.; Døssing, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    model. We have considered evolution of baryon-free droplets which have different initial temperatures and expansion rates. As a typical trend we observe an oscillating behavior of the droplet radius superimposed with a gradual shrinkage due to the hadron emission. The characteristic life time...

  12. Coalescence-induced droplet actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellier, Mathieu; Verdier, Claude; Nock, Volker

    2011-11-01

    This work investigates a little explored driving mechanism to actuate droplets: the surface tension gradient which arises during the coalescence of two droplets of liquid having different compositions and therefore surface tensions. The resulting surface tension gradient gives rise to a Marangoni flow which, if sufficiently large, can displace the droplet. In order to understand, the flow dynamics arising during the coalescence of droplets of different fluids, a model has been developed in the lubrication framework. The numerical results confirm the existence of a self-propulsion window which depends on two dimensionless groups representing competing effects during the coalescence: the surface tension contrast between the droplets which promotes actuation and species diffusion which tends to make the mixture uniform thereby anihilating Marangoni flow and droplet motion. In parallel, experiments have been conducted to confirm this self-propulsion behaviour. The experiment consists in depositing a droplet of distilled water on a ``hydrophilic highway.'' This stripe was obtained by plasma-treating a piece of PDMS shielded in some parts by glass coverslips. This surface functionalization was found to be the most convenient way to control the coalescence. When a droplet of ethanol is deposited near the ``water slug,'' coalescence occurs and a rapid motion of the resulting mixture is observed. The support of the Dumont d'Urville NZ-France Science & Technology program is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Evaluation of evaporation coefficient for micro-droplets exposed to low pressure: A semi-analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Prodyut R.; Hiremath, Kirankumar R.; Sharma, Manvendra

    2017-02-01

    Evaporation rate of water is strongly influenced by energy barrier due to molecular collision and heat transfer limitations. The evaporation coefficient, defined as the ratio of experimentally measured evaporation rate to that maximum possible theoretical limit, varies over a conflicting three orders of magnitude. In the present work, a semi-analytical transient heat diffusion model of droplet evaporation is developed considering the effect of change in droplet size due to evaporation from its surface, when the droplet is injected into vacuum. Negligible effect of droplet size reduction due to evaporation on cooling rate is found to be true. However, the evaporation coefficient is found to approach theoretical limit of unity, when the droplet radius is less than that of mean free path of vapor molecules on droplet surface contrary to the reported theoretical predictions. Evaporation coefficient was found to reduce rapidly when the droplet under consideration has a radius larger than the mean free path of evaporating molecules, confirming the molecular collision barrier to evaporation rate. The trend of change in evaporation coefficient with increasing droplet size predicted by the proposed model will facilitate obtaining functional relation of evaporation coefficient with droplet size, and can be used for benchmarking the interaction between multiple droplets during evaporation in vacuum.

  14. DROPLET COLLISION AND COALESCENCE MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qiang; CAI Ti-min; HE Guo-qiang; HU Chun-bo

    2006-01-01

    A new droplet collision and coalescence model was presented, a quick-sort method for locating collision partners was also devised and based on theoretical and experimental results, further advancement was made to the droplet collision outcome.The advantages of the two implementations of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH)method were used to limit the collision of droplets to a given number of nearest droplets and define the probability of coalescence, numerical simulations were carried out for model validation. Results show that the model presented is mesh-independent and less time consuming, it can not only maintains the system momentum conservation perfectly, but not susceptible to initial droplet size distribution as well.

  15. Hydrodynamic and acoustic analysis in 3-D of a section of main steam line to EPU conditions; Analisis hidrodinamico y acustico en 3D de una seccion de linea de vapor principal a condiciones de EPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Centeno P, J.; Castillo J, V.; Espinosa P, G. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Nunez C, A.; Polo L, M. A., E-mail: baldepeor21@hotmail.com [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Jose Ma. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The objective of this word is to study the hydrodynamic and acoustic phenomenon in the main steam lines (MSLs). For this study was considered the specific case of a pipe section of the MSL, where is located the standpipe of the pressure and/or safety relief valve (SRV). In the SRV cavities originates a phenomenon known as whistling that generates a hydrodynamic disturbance of acoustic pressure waves with different tones depending of the reactor operation conditions. In the SRV cavities the propagation velocity of the wave can originate mechanical damage in the structure of the steam dryer and on free parts. The importance of studying this phenomenon resides in the safety of the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel. To dissipate the energy of the pressure wave, acoustic side branches (ASBs) are used on the standpipe of the SRVs. The ASBs are arrangements of compacted lattices similar to a porous medium, where the energy of the whistling phenomenon is dissipate and therefore the acoustic pressure load that impacts in particular to the steam dryers, and in general to the interns of the vessel, diminishes. For the analysis of the whistling phenomenon two three-dimensional (3-D) models were built, one hydrodynamic in stationary state and other acoustic for the harmonic times in transitory regimen, in which were applied techniques of Computational Fluid Dynamics. The study includes the reactor operation analysis under conditions of extended power up rate (EPU) with ASB and without ASB. The obtained results of the gauges simulated in the MSL without ASB and with ASB, show that tones with values of acoustic pressure are presented in frequency ranges between 160 and 200 Hz around 12 MPa and of 7 MPa, respectively. This attenuation of tones implies the decrease of the acoustic loads in the steam dryer and in the interns of the vessel that are designed to support pressures not more to 7.5 MPa approximately. With the above-mentioned is possible to protect the steam dryer

  16. Determination of stresses caused by fluctuation of acoustic load in the steam dryers of a BWR; Determinacion de esfuerzos originados por fluctuacion de carga acustica en los secadores de vapor de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Centeno P, J.; Quezada G, S.; Prieto G, A.; Vazquez R, A.; Espinosa P, G. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Nunez C, A., E-mail: javcuami26@hotmail.com [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Jose Ma. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The extended power up-rate (EPU) in a nuclear power plant cause various problems in BWR components also in the steam system. This due to increased steam flow generated in the reactor and is conveyed to the turbine by the four main steam lines (MSL). One of the most serious problems is the generation of acoustic pressure loads in the metal structure of the steam dryer which eventually leads to fatigue failure and even the appearance of cracks, and in turn it causes loose parts that are entrained by the steam and transported in the MSL. This problem is due to the fluctuation of load acoustics caused by the union of the safety or relief valves (SRV) with the MSL, spreading through these to reach the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) where the effect of resonance of the acoustic wave is amplified and impacts directly in the supporting structure of the steam dryer, skirt and the panels where the mixture liquid-steam is dried, by centrifugation effect and runoff of liquid water. Efforts in the steam dryer operating conditions of EPU for two cases will be analyzed in this work, the first is before the installation of Acoustic Side Branch (ASB), and in the second case we consider the installation of said ASB in the standpipes of SRV. The analysis was performed with numerical experiments on a platform for computational fluid dynamics with virtual geometries previously designed based on the actual components of the reactor and steam system. The model to study is delimited by the top of the RPV, the steam dryer and a section of each of the four MSL with ten standpipes of SRV. With the obtained data and considering the mechanical-structural properties of the steam dryer material, we can evaluate the mechanical resistance to impacts by acoustic pressure load and its possible deformation or cracking. (Author)

  17. Droplet pattern and condensation gradient around a humidity sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadarrama-Cetina, J; Narhe, R D; Beysens, D A; González-Viñas, W

    2014-01-01

    We describe the evolution of a water drop saturated with NaCl and the growth of pure water droplets in a breath figure pattern (BF) condensing around it. This salty drop acts as a humidity sink, inhibiting the BF inside a ring at a distance r=δ from the sink center and slowing down BF growth outside the ring. The initial salty drop is taken either from a salt-saturated solution (type I experiment) or by placing an NaCl crystal on the substrate (type II experiment). The results are similar, provided that the initial time for type II evolution is taken at the end of the crystal dissolution. The evolution of the salty drop radius R is deduced from the establishment of a three-dimensional hyperbolic concentration profile around the salty drop. This profile scales with r/δ. Accounting for the salt concentration decrease with salty drop growth, R is seen to grow as t5. In the region r>δ, water droplets nucleate and grow. The rate of evolution of the water droplets at constant r/δ can be used to determine the local water pressure. The corresponding data reasonably agree with a hyperbolic water vapor profile around the salty drop. These results can be applied to the growth of BF patterns to determine whether hyperbolic or linear water vapor profiles apply.

  18. Radiation acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  19. Correlation of Cloud Droplet Growth with the Scalar Fluctuations in a Turbulent Moist Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrakar, Kamal Kant; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond; Yang, Fan

    2016-11-01

    Cloud droplet growth in a turbulent environment is studied by creating turbulent moist Rayleigh-Bénard convection in the Michigan Tech Pi Chamber. Cloud formation is achieved by injecting aerosols into the water-supersaturated environment created by the isobaric mixing of saturated air at different temperatures. A range of steady-state cloud droplet number concentration is achieved by supplying aerosols at different rates. As steady-state droplet number concentration is decreased the mean droplet size increases as expected, but also the width of the size distribution increases. This increase in the width is associated with larger supersaturation fluctuations due to the slow droplet microphysical response (sink of the water vapor) compared to the fast turbulent mixing (source of the water vapor). The observed standard deviation of the squared droplet radius is a linear function of the combined time scale of the system τs- 1 =τc- 1 +τt- 1 ; here, τc is the phase relaxation time and τt is the turbulence correlation time. A stochastic differential equation approach for supersaturation also predicts the same linear response. This finding has significance for cloud-radiation budgets and precipitation formation. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant AGS-1623429.

  20. Water circulation in non-isothermal droplet-laden turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E.; Kuerten, J.G.M.; Geld, van der C.W.M.; Geurts, B.J.; Simos, T.; Psihoyios, G.; Tsitouras, Ch.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a point-particle model for two-way coupling of water droplets dispersed in turbulent flow of a carrier gas consisting of air and water vapor. An incompressible flow formulation is applied for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flow with a warm and a cold wall. Compared

  1. Fragmentation dynamics of liquid-metal droplets under ultra-short laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basko, M. M.; Krivokorytov, M. S.; Vinokhodov, A. Yu; Sidelnikov, Yu V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Medvedev, V. V.; Kim, D. A.; Kompanets, V. O.; Lash, A. A.; Koshelev, K. N.

    2017-03-01

    We present the measurements and theoretical analysis of the deformation and fragmentation of spherical liquid-metal drops by picosecond and subpicosecond laser pulses. In the experiments, 60 μm droplets of Sn-In alloy were irradiated by Ti:Sa laser pulses with a peak energy fluence of  ˜100 J cm-2. The observed evolution of the droplet shape dramatically differs from that previously reported for nanosecond pulses. Invoking 2D hydrodynamic simulations, we explain how, due to the specifics of matter dynamics in the liquid-vapor phase coexistence region, a liquid droplet is transformed into a characteristic acorn-like expanding shell with two inner cavities. High sensitivity of the measured shell parameters to the details of the equation of state and metastable dynamics suggests that such experiments offer new possibilities in exploration of thermophysical properties of metals in the region of liquid-vapor phase transition.

  2. Fourier-Transform Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy in Binary Hydrocarbon-Alcohol Single Droplet Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane R. Daly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Broadband absorption spectroscopy, by way of FTIR, was used to investigate the vapor cloud of a single millimeter sized liquid droplet suspended by a syringe as it evaporates at standard conditions. Single beam data were collected every 8 seconds resulting in a time-resolved record. Species concentrations were tracked using their resonant absorption peaks and correlated with a multidimensional numerical model. The numerical model combined a Gaussian beam transmission through a temporally changing spherical vapor cloud with radial concentration gradients, informed by the D2 law and interpreted using the Abel transform. There was fair agreement with temporal evaporation trends for single component runs. Multicomponent experiments of ethanol and isooctane showed synergistic blending effects and preferential evaporation of ethanol. Droplets were also suspended by a thermocouple to track the droplet temperature over time as they were subject to evaporative cooling. This work is the foundation of a basic technique for collecting useful data to inform a complex transport problem.

  3. Cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius, and number density measurements using a Raman lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteman, David N. [Laser Remote Sensing Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States); Melfi, S. Harvey [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore (United States)

    1999-12-27

    A new technique for measuring cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius, and droplet number density is outlined. The technique is based on simultaneously measuring Raman and Mie scattering from cloud liquid droplets using a Raman lidar. Laboratory experiments on liquid microspheres have shown that the intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the amount of liquid present in the spheres. This fact is used as a constraint on calculated Mie intensity assuming a gamma function particle size distribution. The resulting retrieval technique is shown to give stable solutions with no false minima. It is tested using Raman lidar data where the liquid water signal was seen as an enhancement to the water vapor signal. The general relationship of retrieved average radius and number density is consistent with traditional cloud physics models. Sensitivity to the assumed maximum cloud liquid water amount and the water vapor mixing ratio calibration are tested. Improvements to the technique are suggested. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union.

  4. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics.

  5. Liquid Droplet Detachment and Entrainment in Microscale Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidrovo, Carlos

    2005-11-01

    In this talk we will present a first order study of liquid water detachment and entrainment into air flows in hydrophobic microchannels. Silicon based microstructures consisting of 23 mm long U-shaped channels of different geometry were used for this purpose. The structures are treated with a Molecular Vapor Deposition (MVD) process that renders them hydrophobic. Liquid water is injected through a side slot located 2/3 of the way downstream from the air channel inlet. The water entering the air channel beads up into slugs or droplets that grow in size at this injection location until they fill and flood the channel or are carried away by the air flow. The slugs/droplets dimensions at detachment are correlated against superficial gas velocity and proper dimensionless parameters are postulated and examined to compare hydrodynamic forces against surface tension. It is found that slug/droplet detachment is dominated by two main forces: pressure gradient drag, arising from confinement of a viscous flow in the channel, and inertial drag, arising from the stagnation of the air due to obstruction by the slugs/droplets. A detachment regime map is postulated based on the relative importance of these forces under different flow conditions.

  6. Control of Nanomaterial Self-Assembly in Ultrasonically Levitated Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Annela M; Richardson, Sam J; Rastogi, Kunal; Plivelic, Tomás S; Squires, Adam M; Pfrang, Christian

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic trapping can be used to levitate and manipulate droplets of soft matter, in particular, lyotropic mesophases formed from self-assembly of different surfactants and lipids, which can be analyzed in a contact-less manner by X-ray scattering in a controlled gas-phase environment. On the macroscopic length scale, the dimensions and the orientation of the particle are shaped by the ultrasonic field, while on the microscopic length scale the nanostructure can be controlled by varying the humidity of the atmosphere around the droplet. We demonstrate levitation and in situ phase transitions of micellar, hexagonal, bicontinuous cubic, and lamellar phases. The technique opens up a wide range of new experimental approaches of fundamental importance for environmental, biological, and chemical research.

  7. Heat Transfer through a Condensate Droplet on Hydrophobic and Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Shreyas; Cha, Hyeongyun; Orejon, Daniel; Nawaz, Kashif; Singla, Nitish; Yeung, Yip Fun; Park, Deokgeun; Kang, Dong Hoon; Chang, Yujin; Takata, Yasuyuki; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2016-08-09

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms governing vapor condensation on nonwetting surfaces is crucial to a wide range of energy and water applications. In this paper, we reconcile classical droplet growth modeling barriers by utilizing two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical simulations to study individual droplet heat transfer on nonwetting surfaces (90° distribution theory is incorporated to show that previous modeling approaches underpredict the overall heat transfer by as much as 300% for dropwise and jumping-droplet condensation. To verify our simulation results, we study condensed water droplet growth using optical and environmental scanning electron microscopy on biphilic samples consisting of hydrophobic and nanostructured superhydrophobic regions, showing excellent agreement with the simulations for both constant base area and constant contact angle growth regimes. Our results demonstrate the importance of resolving local heat transfer effects for the fundamental understanding and high fidelity modeling of phase change heat transfer on nonwetting surfaces.

  8. High effectiveness liquid droplet/gas heat exchanger for space power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Mattick, A. T.

    1983-01-01

    A high-effectiveness liquid droplet/gas heat exchanger (LDHX) concept for thermal management in space is described. Heat is transferred by direct contact between fine droplets (approximately 100-300 microns in diameter) of a suitable low vapor pressure liquid and an inert working gas. Complete separation of the droplet and gas media in the zero-g environment is accomplished by configuring the LDHX as a vortex chamber.The large heat transfer area presented by the small droplets permits heat exchanger effectiveness of 0.9-0.95 in a compact, lightweight geometry which avoids many of the limitations of conventional plate and fin or tube and shell heat exchangers, such as their tendency toward single point failure. The application of the LDHX in a high temperature Brayton cycle is discussed to illustrate the performance and operational characteristics of this new heat exchanger concept.

  9. Composition measurement of bicomponent droplets using laser-induced fluorescence of acetone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqua, C.; Depredurand, V.; Castanet, G.; Wolff, M.; Lemoine, F.

    2007-12-01

    Commercial fuels are complex mixtures, the evaporation of which remains particularly difficult to model. Experimental characterization of the differential vaporization of the components is a problem that is seldom addressed. In this paper, the evaporation of binary droplets made of ethyl-alcohol and acetone is investigated using a technique of measurement of the droplet composition developed in purpose. This technique exploits the laser induced fluorescence of acetone which acts as a fluorescent tracer as well as the more volatile component of the fuel associated with an accurate measurement of the droplet diameter by forward scattering interferometry. A model of the fluorescence intensity of the binary mixture, taking into account the absorption of the acetone molecules, is proposed and validated. The sensitivity of the technique is discussed. Finally, the reliability of the technique is demonstrated on binary combusting droplets in linear stream.

  10. High effectiveness liquid droplet/gas heat exchanger for space power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Mattick, A. T.

    A high-effectiveness liquid droplet/gas heat exchanger (LDHX) concept for thermal management in space is described. Heat is transferred by direct contact between fine droplets (≈ 100-300 μm dia.) of a suitable low vapor pressure liquid and an inert working gas. Complete separation of the droplet and gas media in the zero-g environment is accomplished by configuring the LDHX as a vortex chamber. The large heat transfer area presented by the small droplets permits heat exchanger effectiveness of 0.9-0.95 in a compact, lightweight geometry which avoids many of the limitations of conventional plate and fin or tube and shell heat exchangers, such as their tendency toward single point failure. The application of the LDHX in a high temperature Brayton cycle is discussed to illustrate the performance and operational characteristics of this new heat exchanger concept.

  11. Acoustic interaction forces and torques acting on suspended spheres in an ideal fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Lopes, J Henrique; Silva, G T

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the acoustic interaction forces and torques exerted by an arbitrary time-harmonic wave on a set of N spheres suspended in an inviscid fluid are theoretically analyzed. In so doing, we utilize the partial-wave expansion method to solve the related multiple scattering problem. The acoustic interaction force and torque are computed for a sphere using the farfield radiation force and torque formulas. To exemplify the method, we calculate the interaction forces exerted by an external traveling and standing plane wave on an arrangement of two and three olive-oil droplets in water. The droplets radii are comparable to the wavelength (i.e. Mie scattering regime). The results show that the radiation force may considerably deviates from that exerted solely by the external incident wave. In addition, we find that acoustic interaction torques arise on the droplets when a nonsymmetric effective incident wave interacts with the droplets.

  12. Suppression in droplet growth kinetics by the addition of organics to sulfate particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jenny P. S.; Liggio, John; Li, Shao-Meng; Nenes, Athanasios; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2014-11-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions are affected by the rate at which water vapor condenses onto particles during cloud droplet growth. Changes in droplet growth rates can impact cloud droplet number and size distribution. The current study investigated droplet growth kinetics of acidic and neutral sulfate particles which contained various amounts and types of organic compounds, from model compounds (carbonyls) to complex mixtures (α-pinene secondary organic aerosol and diesel engine exhaust). In most cases, the formed droplet size distributions were shifted to smaller sizes relative to control experiments (pure sulfate particles), due to suppression in droplet growth rates in the cloud condensation nuclei counter. The shift to smaller droplets correlated with increasing amounts of organic material, with the largest effect observed for acidic seed particles at low relative humidity. For all organics incorporated onto acidic particles, formation of high molecular weight compounds was observed, probably by acid-catalyzed Aldol condensation reactions in the case of carbonyls. To test the reversibility of this process, carbonyl experiments were conducted with acidic particles exposed to higher relative humidity. High molecular weight compounds were not measured in this case and no shift in droplet sizes was observed, suggesting that high molecular weight compounds are the species affecting the rate of water uptake. While these results provide laboratory evidence that organic compounds can slow droplet growth rates, the modeled mass accommodation coefficient of water on these particles (α > 0.1) indicates that this effect is unlikely to significantly affect cloud properties, consistent with infrequent field observations of slower droplet growth rates.

  13. Impact of acoustic cavitation on food emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasulya, Olga; Bogush, Vladimir; Trishina, Victoria; Potoroko, Irina; Khmelev, Sergey; Sivashanmugam, Palani; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-05-01

    The work explores the experimental and theoretical aspects of emulsification capability of ultrasound to deliver stable emulsions of sunflower oil in water and meat sausages. In order to determine optimal parameters for direct ultrasonic emulsification of food emulsions, a model was developed based on the stability of emulsion droplets in acoustic cavitation field. The study is further extended to investigate the ultrasound induced changes to the inherent properties of raw materials under the experimental conditions of sono-emulsification.

  14. Experiments on Nitrogen Oxide Production of Droplet Arrays Burning under Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moesl, Klaus; Sattelmayer, Thomas; Kikuchi, Masao; Yamamoto, Shin; Yoda, Shinichi

    The optimization of the combustion process is top priority in current aero-engine and aircraft development, particularly from the perspectives of high efficiency, minimized fuel consumption, and a sustainable exhaust gas production. Aero-engines are exclusively liquid-fueled with a strong correlation between the combustion temperature and the emissions of nitric oxide (NOX ). Due to safety concerns, the progress in NOX reduction has been much slower than in stationary gas turbines. In the past, the mixing intensity in the primary zone of aero-engine combustors was improved and air staging implemented. An important question for future aero-engine combustors, consequently, is how partial vaporization influences the NOX emissions of spray flames? In order to address this question, the combustion of partially vaporized, linear droplet arrays was studied experimentally under microgravity conditions. The influence of fuel pre-vaporization on the NOX emissions was assessed in a wide range. The experiments were performed in a drop tower and a sounding rocket campaign. The microgravity environment provided ideal experiment conditions without the disturbing ef-fect of natural convection. This allowed the study of the interacting phenomena of multi-phase flow, thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. This way the understanding of the physical and chemical processes related to droplet and spray combustion could be improved. The Bremen drop tower (ZARM) was utilized for the precursor campaign in July 2008, which was com-prised of 30 drops. The sounding rocket experiments, which totaled a microgravity duration of 6 minutes, were finally performed on the flight of TEXUS-46 in November 2009. On both campaigns the "Japanese Combustion Module" (JCM) was used. It is a cooperative experi-ment on droplet array combustion between the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and ESA's (European Space Agency) research team, working on the combustion properties of partially premixed sprays

  15. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  16. Battlefield acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  17. Acoustics Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  18. Room Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  19. Droplet depinning in a wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshanginejad, Alireza; Lee, Sungyon

    2017-03-01

    Pinning and depinning of a windswept droplet on a surface is familiar yet deceptively complex for it depends on the interaction of the contact line with the microscopic features of the solid substrate. This physical picture is further compounded when wind of the Reynolds number greater than 100 blows over pinned drops, leading to the boundary layer separation and wake generation. In this Rapid Communication, we incorporate the well-developed ideas of the classical boundary layer to study partially wetting droplets in a wake created by a leader object. Depending on its distance from the leader, the droplet is observed to exhibit drafting, upstream motion, and splitting, due to the wake-induced hydrodynamic coupling that is analogous to drafting of moving bodies. We successfully rationalize the onset of the upstream motion regime using a reduced model that computes the droplet shape governed by the pressure field inside the wake.

  20. Evaporation of sessile droplets affected by graphite nanoparticles and binary base fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xin; Duan, Fei

    2014-11-26

    The effects of ethanol component and nanoparticle concentration on evaporation dynamics of graphite-water nanofluid droplets have been studied experimentally. The results show that the formed deposition patterns vary greatly with an increase in ethanol concentration from 0 to 50 vol %. Nanoparticles have been observed to be carried to the droplet surface and form a large piece of aggregate. The volume evaporation rate on average increases as the ethanol concentration increases from 0 to 50 vol % in the binary mixture nanofluid droplets. The evaporation rate at the initial stage is more rapid than that at the late stage to dry, revealing a deviation from a linear fitting line, standing for a constant evaporation rate. The deviation is more intense with a higher ethanol concentration. The ethanol-induced smaller liquid-vapor surface tension leads to higher wettability of the nanofluid droplets. The graphite nanoparticles in ethanol-water droplets reinforce the pinning effect in the drying process, and the droplets with more ethanol demonstrate the depinning behavior only at the late stage. The addition of graphite nanoparticles in water enhances a droplet baseline spreading at the beginning of evaporation, a pinning effect during evaporation, and the evaporation rate. However, with a relatively high nanoparticle concentration, the enhancement is attenuated.

  1. Experimental Study on the Combustion and Microexplosion of Freely Falling Gelled Unsymmetrical Dimethylhydrazine (UDMH Fuel Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Wu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for high energy density fuels and the concern for their safety have propelled research in the field of gelled propellants, where understanding the combustion of single gelled fuel droplets is the first stage to predict the spray combustion characteristics. The experiments utilized single-isolated freely falling gelled unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH droplets instead of the conventional suspended droplet approach, in order to eliminate the perturbation associated with the suspension mechanism. Morphological transformations of the gelled droplet involved in the combustion processes were monitored by employing a high-speed digital camera, while the effects of ambient pressure and oxygen concentration on burning rate constants were also studied. The experimental results show that four main phenomena (droplet deformation, bubble formation and growth, vapor jetting and luminous jetting flame with “horn” shape and three distinct phases were identified in the droplet combustion process; the high yield stress and polymer chain structure of polymer gellant are responsible for the appearance of bubbles with almost the same order of magnitude as the droplets. Increasing the ambient pressure can increase the burning rate, postpone the appearance of microexplosions, and weaken microexplosion intensity; while increasing the ambient oxygen concentration can promote the appearance of microexplosions, strengthen microexplosion intensity and increase the burning rate.

  2. The energetics of bouncing droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, Sam; Molacek, Jan; Bush, John

    2016-11-01

    We present the results of a theoretical investigation of the energetics of droplets bouncing on the surface of a vertically vibrating bath. We first assess the relative magnitudes of the kinetic, surface and gravitational potential energies of both the droplet and its wave field. We then seek to rationalize the transitions between the various bouncing and walking states that arise as the vibrational forcing is increased. Our results are compared with prior theoretical and experimental work.

  3. Magnetic droplets and dynamical skyrmions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerman, Johan

    2015-03-01

    Nanocontact spin-torque oscillators (NC-STOs) provide an excellent environment for studying nano-magnetic phenomena such as localized and propagating auto-oscillatory spin wave (SW) modes. The recent experimental observation of magnetic droplet solitons in NC-STOs with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) free layers, and the numerical and experimental demonstrations of spin transfer torque (STT) nucleated skyrmions in similar magnetic thin films add two interesting and useful nanoscale magnetic objects. Due to the competition between exchange, anisotropy, and, in the case of skyrmions, the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI), the droplet and the skyrmion are extremely compact, on the order of 10-100 nm. One of the main differences between a magnetic dissipative droplet soliton and a skyrmion is that the former is a dynamical object with all its spins precessing around an effective field and stabilized by STT, exchange, and PMA, while the latter has static spins and an internal structure stabilized by DMI, exchange, and PMA. The dissipative droplet is furthermore a non-topological soliton, while the skyrmion is topologically protected. In this work I will report on our most recent droplet experiments, including droplet collapse at very high fields, droplets excited in nano-wire based NC-STOs, and studies of the field-current droplet nucleation boundary. I will also demonstrate numerically and analytically that STT driven precession can stabilize so-called dynamical skyrmions even in the absence of DMI, and I will describe their very promising properties in detail. From a more fundamental perspective, precession is hence a third independent possibility to stabilize a skyrmion, without the need for the conventional stabilization from either dipolar energy or DMI.

  4. Applications of adaptive focused acoustics to compound management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Elizabeth; Holland-Crimmin, Sue; Lupotsky, Brian; Chan, James; Curtis, Jon; Dobbs, Karen; Blaxill, Zoe

    2009-06-01

    Since the introduction of lithotripsy kidney stone therapy, Focused Acoustics and its properties have been thoroughly utilized in medicine and exploration. More recently, Compound Management is exploring its applications and benefits to sample integrity. There are 2 forms of Focused Acoustics: Acoustic Droplet Ejection and Adaptive Focused Acoustics, which work by emitting high-powered acoustic waves through water toward a focused point. This focused power results in noncontact plate-to-plate sample transfer or sample dissolution, respectively. For the purposes of this article, only Adaptive Focused Acoustics will be addressed. Adaptive Focused Acoustics uses high-powered acoustic waves to mix, homogenize, dissolve, and thaw samples. It facilitates transferable samples through noncontact, closed-container, isothermal mixing. Experimental results show significantly reduced mixing times, limited degradation, and ideal use for heat-sensitive compounds. Upon implementation, acoustic dissolution has reduced the number of samples requiring longer mixing times as well as reducing the number impacted by incomplete compound dissolution. It has also helped in increasing the overall sample concentration from 6 to 8 mM to 8 to 10 mM by ensuring complete compound solubilization. The application of Adaptive Focused Acoustics, however, cannot be applied to all Compound Management processes, such as sample thawing and low-volume sample reconstitution. This article will go on to describe the areas where Adaptive Focused Acoustics adds value as well as areas in which it has shown no clear benefit.

  5. Ice and water droplets on graphite: A comparison of quantum and classical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez, Rafael, E-mail: ramirez@icmm.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Singh, Jayant K. [Eduard-Zintl-Institut für Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie and Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 4, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Müller-Plathe, Florian; Böhm, Michael C. [Eduard-Zintl-Institut für Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie and Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 4, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-11-28

    Ice and water droplets on graphite have been studied by quantum path integral and classical molecular dynamics simulations. The point-charge q-TIP4P/F potential was used to model the interaction between flexible water molecules, while the water-graphite interaction was described by a Lennard-Jones potential previously used to reproduce the macroscopic contact angle of water droplets on graphite. Several energetic and structural properties of water droplets with sizes between 10{sup 2} and 10{sup 3} molecules were analyzed in a temperature interval of 50–350 K. The vibrational density of states of crystalline and amorphous ice drops was correlated to the one of ice Ih to assess the influence of the droplet interface and molecular disorder on the vibrational properties. The average distance of covalent OH bonds is found 0.01 Å larger in the quantum limit than in the classical one. The OO distances are elongated by 0.03 Å in the quantum simulations at 50 K. Bond distance fluctuations are large as a consequence of the zero-point vibrations. The analysis of the H-bond network shows that the liquid droplet is more structured in the classical limit than in the quantum case. The average kinetic and potential energy of the ice and water droplets on graphite has been compared with the values of ice Ih and liquid water as a function of temperature. The droplet kinetic energy shows a temperature dependence similar to the one of liquid water, without apparent discontinuity at temperatures where the droplet is solid. However, the droplet potential energy becomes significantly larger than the one of ice or water at the same temperature. In the quantum limit, the ice droplet is more expanded than in a classical description. Liquid droplets display identical density profiles and liquid-vapor interfaces in the quantum and classical limits. The value of the contact angle is not influenced by quantum effects. Contact angles of droplets decrease as the size of the water droplet

  6. Multi-phase Combustion and Transport Processes Under the Influence of Acoustic Excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Wegener, Jeffrey Lewis

    2014-01-01

    This experimental study examined the coupling of acoustics with reactive multiphase transport processes and shear flows. The first portion of this dissertation deals with combustion of various liquid fuels when under the influence of externally applied acoustic excitation. For this study, an apparatus at the Energy and Propulsion ResearchLaboratory, UCLA, used a horizontal waveguide to create a standing acoustic wave, wherein burning fuel droplets were positioned near pressure nodes within th...

  7. Nanoparticles Formed by Acoustic Destruction of Microbubbles and Their Utilization for Imaging and Effects on Therapy by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Nicholas T.; Yildirim, Adem; Chattaraj, Rajarshi; Goodwin, Andrew P.

    2017-01-01

    This work reports that when PEG-lipid-shelled microbubbles with fluorocarbon interior (C4F10, C5F12, or C6F14) are subjected to ultrasound pulses, they produce metastable, fluid-filled nanoparticles that can be re-imaged upon administration of HIFU. The nanoparticles produced by destruction of the microbubbles (MBNPs) are of 150 nm average diameter and can be re-imaged for up to an hour after creation for C 4F10, and for at least one day for C5F12. The active species were found to be fluid (gas or liquid) filled nanoparticles rather than lipid debris. The acoustic droplet vaporization threshold of the nanoparticles was found to vary with the vapor pressure of the encapsulated fluorocarbon, and integrated image brightness was found to increase dramatically when the temperature was raised above the normal boiling point of the fluorocarbon. Finally, the vaporization threshold decreases in serum as compared to buffer, and administration of HIFU to the nanoparticles caused breast cancer cells to completely detach from their culture substrate. This work demonstrates a new functionality of microbubbles that could serve as a platform technology for ultrasound-based theranostics. PMID:28255360

  8. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttitta, Christina M; Ericson, Daniel L; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s(-1)) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  9. Uniform-droplet spray forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, C.A.; Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chun, Jung-Hoon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ando, T. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The uniform-droplet process is a new method of liquid-metal atomization that results in single droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on to substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructure. The mono-sized powder-production capability of the uniform-droplet process also has the potential of permitting engineered powder blends to produce components of controlled porosity. Metal and alloy powders are commercially produced by at least three different methods: gas atomization, water atomization, and rotating disk. All three methods produce powders of a broad range in size with a very small yield of fine powders with single-sized droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructures. The economical analysis has shown the process to have the potential of reducing capital cost by 50% and operating cost by 37.5% when applied to powder making. For the spray-forming process, a 25% savings is expected in both the capital and operating costs. The project is jointly carried out at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Tuffs University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Preliminary interactions with both finished parts and powder producers have shown a strong interest in the uniform-droplet process. Systematic studies are being conducted to optimize the process parameters, understand the solidification of droplets and spray deposits, and develop a uniform-droplet-system (UDS) apparatus appropriate for processing engineering alloys.

  10. Numerical simulation of convective evaporation of a droplet on a porous surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Moonhyeok; Son, Gihun

    2016-11-01

    Numerical simulation is performed for droplet evaporation on a porous surface under an external flow condition. The droplet interface is tracked by a level-set (LS) method, which is modified to include the effects of porosity and evaporation coupled to heat and mass transfer. The conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy and vapor fraction for the external fluid region are combined with the local volume averaged conservation equations for the porous region through the matching conditions of velocity, pressure, temperature and vapor fraction at the fluid-solid interface. The temperature and the vapor fraction at the liquid-gas interface and the evaporation mass flux are simultaneously determined from the coupled equations for the mass and energy balances at the interface and the thermodynamic relation. The numerical simulation demonstrates the droplet penetration into the porous region and the evaporation to the porous and external flow regions. The effects of external flow velocity, porosity and porous particle size on the droplet deformation and evaporation are investigated. This research was supported by the Agency for Defense Development.

  11. Acoustic biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  12. A Comprehensive Model of Electric-Field-Enhanced Jumping-Droplet Condensation on Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbarah, Patrick; Li, Zhaoer; Pauls, Alexander; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2015-07-21

    Superhydrophobic micro/nanostructured surfaces for dropwise condensation have recently received significant attention due to their potential to enhance heat transfer performance by shedding positively charged water droplets via coalescence-induced droplet jumping at length scales below the capillary length and allowing the use of external electric fields to enhance droplet removal and heat transfer, in what has been termed electric-field-enhanced (EFE) jumping-droplet condensation. However, achieving optimal EFE conditions for enhanced heat transfer requires capturing the details of transport processes that is currently lacking. While a comprehensive model has been developed for condensation on micro/nanostructured surfaces, it cannot be applied for EFE condensation due to the dynamic droplet-vapor-electric field interactions. In this work, we developed a comprehensive physical model for EFE condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces by incorporating individual droplet motion, electrode geometry, jumping frequency, field strength, and condensate vapor-flow dynamics. As a first step toward our model, we simulated jumping droplet motion with no external electric field and validated our theoretical droplet trajectories to experimentally obtained trajectories, showing excellent temporal and spatial agreement. We then incorporated the external electric field into our model and considered the effects of jumping droplet size, electrode size and geometry, condensation heat flux, and droplet jumping direction. Our model suggests that smaller jumping droplet sizes and condensation heat fluxes require less work input to be removed by the external fields. Furthermore, the results suggest that EFE electrodes can be optimized such that the work input is minimized depending on the condensation heat flux. To analyze overall efficiency, we defined an incremental coefficient of performance and showed that it is very high (∼10(6)) for EFE condensation. We finally proposed mechanisms

  13. Modeling and measurement of boiling point elevation during water vaporization from aqueous urea for SCR applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan, Ho Jin; Lee, Joon Sik [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Understanding of water vaporization is the first step to anticipate the conversion process of urea into ammonia in the exhaust stream. As aqueous urea is a mixture and the urea in the mixture acts as a non-volatile solute, its colligative properties should be considered during water vaporization. The elevation of boiling point for urea water solution is measured with respect to urea mole fraction. With the boiling-point elevation relation, a model for water vaporization is proposed underlining the correction of the heat of vaporization of water in the urea water mixture due to the enthalpy of urea dissolution in water. The model is verified by the experiments of water vaporization as well. Finally, the water vaporization model is applied to the water vaporization of aqueous urea droplets. It is shown that urea decomposition can begin before water evaporation finishes due to the boiling-point elevation.

  14. Influence of surface wettability on transport mechanisms governing water droplet evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhenhai; Weibel, Justin A; Garimella, Suresh V

    2014-08-19

    Prediction and manipulation of the evaporation of small droplets is a fundamental problem with importance in a variety of microfluidic, microfabrication, and biomedical applications. A vapor-diffusion-based model has been widely employed to predict the interfacial evaporation rate; however, its scope of applicability is limited due to incorporation of a number of simplifying assumptions of the physical behavior. Two key transport mechanisms besides vapor diffusion-evaporative cooling and natural convection in the surrounding gas-are investigated here as a function of the substrate wettability using an augmented droplet evaporation model. Three regimes are distinguished by the instantaneous contact angle (CA). In Regime I (CA ≲ 60°), the flat droplet shape results in a small thermal resistance between the liquid-vapor interface and substrate, which mitigates the effect of evaporative cooling; upward gas-phase natural convection enhances evaporation. In Regime II (60 ≲ CA ≲ 90°), evaporative cooling at the interface suppresses evaporation with increasing contact angle and counterbalances the gas-phase convection enhancement. Because effects of the evaporative cooling and gas-phase convection mechanisms largely neutralize each other, the vapor-diffusion-based model can predict the overall evaporation rates in this regime. In Regime III (CA ≳ 90°), evaporative cooling suppresses the evaporation rate significantly and reverses entirely the direction of natural convection induced by vapor concentration gradients in the gas phase. Delineation of these counteracting mechanisms reconciles previous debate (founded on single-surface experiments or models that consider only a subset of the governing transport mechanisms) regarding the applicability of the classic vapor-diffusion model. The vapor diffusion-based model cannot predict the local evaporation flux along the interface for high contact angle (CA ≥ 90°) when evaporative cooling is strong and the

  15. Walking droplets in linear channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filoux, Boris; Hubert, Maxime; Schlagheck, Peter; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    When a droplet is placed onto a vertically vibrated bath, it can bounce without coalescing. Upon an increase of the forcing acceleration, the droplet is propelled by the wave it generates and becomes a walker with a well-defined speed. We investigate the confinement of a walker in different rectangular cavities, used as waveguides for the Faraday waves emitted by successive droplet bounces. By studying the walker velocities, we discover that one-dimensional confinement is optimal for narrow channels of width of D ≃1.5 λF . Thereby, the walker follows a quasilinear path. We also propose an analogy with waveguide models based on the observation of the Faraday instability within the channels.

  16. Snell's law and walking droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, John; Pucci, Giuseppe; Aubin, Benjamin; Brun, Pierre-Thomas; Faria, Luiz

    2016-11-01

    Droplets walking on the surface of a vibrating bath have been shown to exhibit a number of quantum-like features. We here present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of such droplets crossing a linear step corresponding to a reduction in bath depth. When the step is sufficiently large, the walker reflects off the step; otherwise, it is refracted as it crosses the step. Particular attention is given to an examination of the regime in which the droplet obeys a form of Snell's Law, a behavior captured in accompanying simulations. Attempts to provide theoretical rationale for the dependence of the effective refractive index on the system parameters are described. Supported by NSF through CMMI-1333242.

  17. Soft substrates suppress droplet splashing

    CERN Document Server

    Howland, Christopher J; Style, Robert W; Castrejón-Pita, A A

    2015-01-01

    Droplets splash when they impact dry, flat substrates above a critical velocity that depends on parameters such as droplet size, viscosity and air pressure. We show that substrate stiffness also impacts the splashing threshold by imaging ethanol drops impacting silicone gels of different stiffnesses. Splashing is significantly suppressed: droplets on the softest substrates need over 70% more kinetic energy to splash than they do on rigid substrates. We show that splash suppression is likely to be due to energy losses caused by deformations of soft substrates during the first few microseconds of impact. We find that solids with Youngs modulus $\\lesssim O(10^5)$Pa suppress splashing, in agreement with simple scaling arguments. Thus materials like soft gels and elastomers can be used as simple coatings for effective splash prevention.

  18. Multiplexed operation of a micromachined ultrasonic droplet ejector array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Thomas P; Degertekin, F Levent; Fedorov, Andrei G

    2007-10-01

    A dual-sample ultrasonic droplet ejector array is developed for use as a soft-ionization ion source for multiplexed mass spectrometry (MS). Such a multiplexed ion source aims to reduce MS analysis time for multiple analyte streams, as well as allow for the synchronized ejection of the sample(s) and an internal standard for quantitative results and mass calibration. Multiplexing is achieved at the device level by division of the fluid reservoir and separating the active electrodes of the piezoelectric transducer for isolated application of ultrasonic wave energy to each domain. The transducer is mechanically shaped to further reduce the acoustical crosstalk between the domains. Device design is performed using finite-element analysis simulations and supported by experimental characterization. Isolated ejection of approximately 5 microm diameter water droplets from individual domains in the micromachined droplet ejector array at around 1 MHz frequency is demonstrated by experiments. The proof-of-concept demonstration using a dual-sample device also shows potential for multiplexing with larger numbers of analytes.

  19. Ultrasound emulsification: effect of ultrasonic and physicochemical properties on dispersed phase volume and droplet size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Shashank G; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2008-04-01

    Ultrasonic emulsification of oil and water was carried out and the effect of irradiation time, irradiation power and physicochemical properties of oil on the dispersed phase volume and dispersed phase droplet size has been studied. The increase in the irradiation time increases the dispersed phase volume while decreases the dispersed phase droplets size. With an increase in the ultrasonic irradiation power, there is an increase in the fraction of volume of the dispersed phase while the droplet size of the dispersed phase decreases. The fractional volume of the dispersed phase increases for the case of groundnut oil-water system while it is low for paraffin (heavy) oil-water system. The droplet size of soyabean oil dispersed in water is found to be small while that of paraffin (heavy) oil is found to be large. These variations could be explained on the basis of varying physicochemical properties of the system, i.e., viscosity of oil and the interfacial tension. During the ultrasonic emulsification, coalescence phenomenon which is only marginal, has been observed, which can be attributed to the collision of small droplets when the droplet concentration increases beyond a certain number and the acoustic streaming strength increases.

  20. Evaporation of elongated droplets on chemically stripe-patterned surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.P.; Zandvliet, H.J.W.; Kooij, E.S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the evaporation of elongated droplets on chemically striped patterned surfaces. Variation of elongation is achieved by depositing droplets on surfaces with varying ratios of hydrophobic and hydrophilic stripe widths. Elongated droplets evaporate faster than more spherical droplets. Bo

  1. Materials science: Droplets leap into action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    What could cause a water droplet to start bouncing on a surface? It seems that a combination of evaporation and a highly water-repellent surface induces droplet bouncing when ambient pressure is reduced. See Letter p.82

  2. Droplet migration characteristics in confined oscillatory microflows

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhury, Kaustav; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the migration characteristics of a droplet in an oscillatory flow field in a parallel plate micro-confinement. Using phase filed formalism, we capture the dynamical evolution of the droplet over a wide range of the frequency of the imposed oscillation in the flow field, drop size relative to the channel gap, and the capillary number. The latter two factors imply the contribution of droplet deformability, commonly considered in the study of droplet migration under steady shear flow conditions. We show that the imposed oscillation brings in additional time complexity in the droplet movement, realized through temporally varying drop-shape, flow direction and the inertial response of the droplet. As a consequence, we observe a spatially complicated pathway of the droplet along the transverse direction, in sharp contrast to the smooth migration under a similar yet steady shear flow condition. Intuitively, the longitudinal component of the droplet movement is in tandem with the flow continuity and evolve...

  3. Smart DNA Fabrication Using Sound Waves: Applying Acoustic Dispensing Technologies to Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanigowska, Paulina; Shen, Yue; Zheng, Yijing; Rosser, Susan; Cai, Yizhi

    2016-02-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) technology uses focused acoustic energy to transfer nanoliter-scale liquid droplets with high precision and accuracy. This noncontact, tipless, low-volume dispensing technology minimizes the possibility of cross-contamination and potentially reduces the costs of reagents and consumables. To date, acoustic dispensers have mainly been used in screening libraries of compounds. In this paper, we describe the first application of this powerful technology to the rapidly developing field of synthetic biology, for DNA synthesis and assembly at the nanoliter scale using a Labcyte Echo 550 acoustic dispenser. We were able to successfully downscale PCRs and the popular one-pot DNA assembly methods, Golden Gate and Gibson assemblies, from the microliter to the nanoliter scale with high assembly efficiency, which effectively cut the reagent cost by 20- to 100-fold. We envision that acoustic dispensing will become an instrumental technology in synthetic biology, in particular in the era of DNA foundries.

  4. Mechanical vibrations of pendant liquid droplets

    OpenAIRE

    Temperton, Robert H.; Smith, Michael I.; Sharp, James S.

    2015-01-01

    A simple optical deflection technique was used to monitor the vibrations of microlitre pendant droplets of deuterium oxide, formamide, and 1,1,2,2-tetrabromoethane. Droplets of different volumes of each liquid were suspended from the end of a microlitre pipette and vibrated using a small puff of nitrogen gas. A laser was passed through the droplets and the scattered light was collected using a photodiode. Vibration of the droplets resulted in the motion of the scattered beam and time-dependen...

  5. Floating Droplet Array: An Ultrahigh-Throughput Device for Droplet Trapping, Real-time Analysisand Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louai Labanieh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe the design, fabrication and use of a dual-layered microfluidic device for ultrahigh-throughput droplet trapping, analysis, and recovery using droplet buoyancy. To demonstrate the utility of this device for digital quantification of analytes, we quantify the number of droplets, which contain a β-galactosidase-conjugated bead among more than 100,000 immobilized droplets. In addition, we demonstrate that this device can be used for droplet clustering and real-time analysis by clustering several droplets together into microwells and monitoring diffusion of fluorescein, a product of the enzymatic reaction of β-galactosidase and its fluorogenic substrate FDG, between droplets.

  6. Droplet size influences division of mammalian cell factories in droplet microfluidic cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Periyannan Rajeswari, Prem Kumar; Joensson, Haakan N.; Svahn, Helene Andersson

    2017-01-01

    The potential of using droplet microfluidics for screening mammalian cell factories has been limited by the difficulty in achieving continuous cell division during cultivation in droplets. Here, we report the influence of droplet size on mammalian cell division and viability during cultivation......, making them a more suitable droplet size for 72-h cultivation. This study shows a direct correlation of microfluidic droplet size to the division and viability of mammalian cells. This highlights the importance of selecting suitable droplet size for mammalian cell factory screening assays....... in droplets. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, the most widely used mammalian host cells for biopharmaceuticals production were encapsulated and cultivated in 33, 180 and 320 pL droplets for 3 days. Periodic monitoring of the droplets during incubation showed that the cell divisions in 33 pL droplets stopped...

  7. Evaporation of Binary Sessile Drops: Infrared and Acoustic Methods To Track Alcohol Concentration at the Interface and on the Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pin; Toubal, Malika; Carlier, Julien; Harmand, Souad; Nongaillard, Bertrand; Bigerelle, Maxence

    2016-09-27

    Evaporation of droplets of three pure liquids (water, 1-butanol, and ethanol) and four binary solutions (5 wt % 1-butanol-water-based solution and 5, 25, and 50 wt % ethanol-water-based solutions) deposited on hydrophobic silicon was investigated. A drop shape analyzer was used to measure the contact angle, diameter, and volume of the droplets. An infrared camera was used for infrared thermal mapping of the droplet's surface. An acoustic high-frequency echography technique was, for the first time, applied to track the alcohol concentration in a binary-solution droplet. Evaporation of pure alcohol droplets was executed at different values of relative humidity (RH), among which the behavior of pure ethanol evaporation was notably influenced by the ambient humidity as a result of high hygrometry. Evaporation of droplets of water and binary solutions was performed at a temperature of 22 °C and a mean humidity of approximately 50%. The exhaustion times of alcohol in the droplets estimated by the acoustic method and the visual method were similar for the water-1-butanol mixture; however, the time estimated by the acoustic method was longer when compared with that estimated by the visual method for the water-ethanol mixture due to the residual ethanol at the bottom of the droplet.

  8. Droplet based cavities and lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    The self-organized and molecularly smooth surface on liquid microdroplets makes them attractive as optical cavities with very high quality factors. This chapter describes the basic theory of optical modes in spherical droplets. The mechanical properties including vibrational excitation are also d...

  9. Salt stains from evaporating droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahidzadeh, N.; Schut, M.F.L.; Desarnaud, J.; Prat, M.; Bonn, D.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the behavior of sessile droplets on solid substrates is not only associated with common everyday phenomena, such as the coffee stain effect, limescale deposits on our bathroom walls, but also very important in many applications such as purification of pharmaceuticals, deicing of airplan

  10. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shpak, O.; Verweij, M.; Jong, de N.; Versluis, M.; Escoffre, J.M.; Bouakaz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to

  11. Intensive evaporation and boiling of a heterogeneous liquid droplet with an explosive disintegration in high-temperature gas area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piskunov Maxim V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The using of the high-speed (not less than 105 frames per second video recording tools (“Phantom” and the software package ("TEMA Automotive" allowed carrying out an experimental research of laws of intensive vaporization with an explosive disintegration of heterogeneous (with a single solid nontransparent inclusion liquid droplet (by the example of water in high-temperature (500-800 K gases (combustion products. Times of the processes under consideration and stages (liquid heat-up, evaporation from an external surface, bubble boiling at internal interfaces, growth of bubble sizes, explosive droplet breakup were established. Necessary conditions of an explosive vaporization of a heterogeneous droplet were found out. Mechanisms of this process and an influence of properties of liquid and inclusion material on them were determined.

  12. Active surfaces: Ferrofluid-impregnated surfaces for active manipulation of droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Karim; Mahmoudi, Seyed Reza; Abu-Dheir, Numan; Varanasi, Kripa

    2014-11-01

    Droplet manipulation and mobility on non-wetting surfaces is of practical importance for diverse applications ranging from micro-fluidic devices, anti-icing, dropwise condensation, and biomedical devices. The use of active external fields has been explored via electric, acoustic, and vibrational, yet moving highly conductive and viscous fluids remains a challenge. Magnetic fields have been used for droplet manipulation; however, usually, the fluid is functionalized to be magnetic, and requires enormous fields of superconducting magnets when transitioning to diamagnetic materials such as water. Here we present a class of active surfaces by stably impregnating active fluids such as ferrofluids into a textured surface. Droplets on such ferrofluid-impregnated surfaces have extremely low hysteresis and high mobility such that they can be propelled by applying relatively low magnetic fields. Our surface is able to manipulate a variety of materials including diamagnetic, conductive and highly viscous fluids, and additionally solid particles.

  13. The contact angle for a droplet on homogeneous and spherical concave surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ai-Jun; Lv, Bao-Zhan; Wang, Xiao-Song; Zhou, Long

    2016-03-01

    Wetting of droplets on homogeneous and spherical concave rough surfaces is investigated based on thermodynamics. In this study, neglecting the droplet gravity and the thickness of the precursor film of the liquid-vapor interface, the three-phase system is divided into six parts using Gibbs concept of dividing surface. The system Helmholtz free energy is established based on thermodynamics. Supposing the temperature and chemical potential to be constant, a new generalized Young’s equation of the equilibrium contact angle for a spherical droplet on a spherical concave rough surfaces is obtained including the line tension effects. Under certain conditions, this generalized Young’s equation is the same as the Rusanov’s equation.

  14. Analysis of experimental data for the nucleation rate of water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashchiev, Dimo

    2006-07-01

    A formula for the stationary nucleation rate J is proposed and used for analysis of experimental data for the dependence of J on the supersaturation ratio S in isothermal homogeneous nucleation of water droplets in vapors. It is found that the experimental data are described quite successfully by the proposed formula which is based on (i) the Gibbs presentation of the nucleation work in terms of overpressure, (ii) the Girshick-Chiu [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1273 (1990); 94, 826 (1991)] self-consistency correction to the equilibrium cluster size distribution, and (iii) the Reguera-Rubi [J. Chem. Phys. 115, 7100 (2001)] kinetic accounting of the nucleus translational-rotational motion. The formula, like that of Wölk and Strey [J. Phys. Chem. B 105, 11683 (2001)], could be used as a semiempirical relation describing the J(S ) dependence for nucleation in vapors of single-component droplets or crystals of substances with insufficiently well known equations of state.

  15. Parameter passing between molecular dynamics and continuum models for droplets on solid substrates: the static case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, Nikita; Müller, Marcus; Todorova, Desislava; Thiele, Uwe

    2013-02-14

    We study equilibrium properties of polymer films and droplets on a solid substrate employing particle-based simulation techniques (molecular dynamics) and a continuum description. Parameter-passing techniques are explored that facilitate a detailed comparison of the two models. In particular, the liquid-vapor, solid-liquid, and solid-vapor interface tensions, and the Derjaguin or disjoining pressure are determined by molecular dynamics simulations. This information is then introduced into continuum descriptions accounting for (i) the full curvature and (ii) a long-wave approximation of the curvature (thin film model). A comparison of the dependence of the contact angle on droplet size indicates that the theories agree well if the contact angles are defined in a compatible manner.

  16. Thermophoresis of water droplets inside carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, Harvey; Walther, Jh; Oyarzua, Elton; Rojano, Andres

    2016-11-01

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) offer unique possibilities as fluid conduits with applications ranging from lab on a chip devices to encapsulation media for drug delivery. CNTs feature high mechanical strength, chemical and thermal stability and biocompatibility therefore they are promising candidates for nanodevice fabrication. Thermal gradients have been proposed as mechanism to drive particles, fullerenes and droplets inside CNTs. Here, by conducting Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, we study thermophoresis of water droplets inside CNTs. We systematically change the size of the droplets, the axial thermal gradient and CNT chirality. We find that the droplet motion in the armchair CNTs exhibits two clearly delimited stages, a regime wherein the droplet is accelerated and subsequently, a regime wherein the droplet moves with constant velocity. Inside the zig zag CNTs, the droplet accelerates during a very short time and then it moves with constant velocity. We compute the net force during the droplet acceleration and find a correlation between the droplet acceleration and the magnitude of the thermal gradient without any dependence on the droplet size. Moreover, we conduct velocity constrained MD simulations to determine the friction and thermophoretic forces acting on the droplet. We acknowledge partial funding from FONDECYT through the Project No. 11130559 and from VRID Universidad de Concepcion.

  17. Dynamics of droplet motion under electrowetting actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annapragada, S Ravi; Dash, Susmita; Garimella, Suresh V; Murthy, Jayathi Y

    2011-07-05

    The static shape of droplets under electrowetting actuation is well understood. The steady-state shape of the droplet is obtained on the basis of the balance of surface tension and electrowetting forces, and the change in the apparent contact angle is well characterized by the Young-Lippmann equation. However, the transient droplet shape behavior when a voltage is suddenly applied across a droplet has received less attention. Additional dynamic frictional forces are at play during this transient process. We present a model to predict this transient behavior of the droplet shape under electrowetting actuation. The droplet shape is modeled using the volume of fluid method. The electrowetting and dynamic frictional forces are included as an effective dynamic contact angle through a force balance at the contact line. The model is used to predict the transient behavior of water droplets on smooth hydrophobic surfaces under electrowetting actuation. The predictions of the transient behavior of droplet shape and contact radius are in excellent agreement with our experimental measurements. The internal fluid motion is explained, and the droplet motion is shown to initiate from the contact line. An approximate mathematical model is also developed to understand the physics of the droplet motion and to describe the overall droplet motion and the contact line velocities.

  18. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  19. Enhanced Droplet Control by Transition Boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grounds, Alex; Still, Richard; Takashina, Kei

    2012-10-01

    A droplet of water on a heated surface can levitate over a film of gas produced by its own evaporation in the Leidenfrost effect. When the surface is prepared with ratchet-like saw-teeth topography, these droplets can self-propel and can even climb uphill. However, the extent to which the droplets can be controlled is limited by the physics of the Leidenfrost effect. Here, we show that transition boiling can be induced even at very high surface temperatures and provide additional control over the droplets. Ratchets with acute protrusions enable droplets to climb steeper inclines while ratchets with sub-structures enable their direction of motion to be controlled by varying the temperature of the surface. The droplets' departure from the Leidenfrost regime is assessed by analysing the sound produced by their boiling. We anticipate these techniques will enable the development of more sophisticated methods for controlling small droplets and heat transfer.

  20. Uptake of water droplets by nonwetting capillaries

    CERN Document Server

    Willmott, Geoff R; Hendy, Shaun C

    2010-01-01

    We present direct experimental evidence that water droplets can spontaneously penetrate non-wetting capillaries, driven by the action of Laplace pressure due to high droplet curvature. Using high-speed optical imaging, microcapillaries of radius 50 to 150 micron, and water microdroplets of average radius between 100 and 1900 micron, we demonstrate that there is a critical droplet radius below which water droplets can be taken up by hydrophobised glass and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) capillaries. The rate of capillary uptake is shown to depend strongly on droplet size, with smaller droplets being absorbed more quickly. Droplet size is also shown to influence meniscus motion in a pre-filled non-wetting capillary, and quantitative measurements of this effect result in a derived water-PTFE static contact angle between 96 degrees and 114 degrees. Our measurements confirm recent theoretical predictions and simulations for metal nanodroplets penetrating carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The results are relevant to a wide ...

  1. Dancing droplets: Autonomous surface tension-driven droplet motion

    OpenAIRE

    Cira, Nate J.; Benusiglio, Adrien; Prakash, Manu

    2014-01-01

    International audience; When droplets of water and food coloring at different concentrations are deposited on a clean glass slide they enter a complex dance. We reproduce this phenomenon by using a two-component mixture of propylene glycol and water deposited on corona treated (Electro-TechnicBD-20AC) glass slides and record the phenomena using a Cannon 5D Mark II camera with a 50mm macro lens

  2. Volatility of methylglyoxal cloud SOA formed through OH radical oxidation and droplet evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Montalvo, Diana L.; Schwier, Allison N.; Lim, Yong B.; McNeill, V. Faye; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2016-04-01

    The volatility of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed through cloud processing (aqueous hydroxyl radical (radOH) oxidation and droplet evaporation) of methylglyoxal (MGly) was studied. Effective vapor pressure and effective enthalpy of vaporization (ΔHvap,eff) were determined using 1) droplets containing MGly and its oxidation products, 2) a Vibrating Orifice Aerosol Generator (VOAG) system, and 3) Temperature Programmed Desorption Aerosol-Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TPD Aerosol-CIMS). Simulated in-cloud MGly oxidation (for 10-30 min) produces an organic mixture of higher and lower volatility components with an overall effective vapor pressure of (4 ± 7) × 10-7 atm at pH 3. The effective vapor pressure decreases by a factor of 2 with addition of ammonium hydroxide (pH 7). The fraction of organic material remaining in the particle-phase after drying was smaller than for similar experiments with glycolaldehyde and glyoxal SOA. The ΔHvap,eff of pyruvic acid and oxalic acid + methylglyoxal in the mixture (from TPD Aerosol-CIMS) were smaller than the theoretical enthalpies of the pure compounds and smaller than that estimated for the entire precursor/product mix after droplet evaporation. After 10-30 min of aqueous oxidation (one cloud cycle) the majority of the MGly + radOH precursor/product mix (even neutralized) will volatilize during droplet evaporation; neutralization and at least 80 min of oxidation at 10-12 M radOH (or >12 h at 10-14 M) is needed before low volatility ammonium oxalate exceeds pyruvate.

  3. Dynamics of Water Absorption and Evaporation During Methanol Droplet Combustion in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Nayagam, Vedha; Williams, Forman A.

    2012-01-01

    The combustion of methanol droplets is profoundly influenced by the absorption and evaporation of water, generated in the gas phase as a part of the combustion products. Initially there is a water-absorption period of combustion during which the latent heat of condensation of water vapor, released into the droplet, enhances its burning rate, whereas later there is a water-evaporation period, during which the water vapor reduces the flame temperature suffciently to extinguish the flame. Recent methanol droplet-combustion experiments in ambient environments diluted with carbon dioxide, conducted in the Combustion Integrated Rack on the International Space Station (ISS), as a part of the FLEX project, provided a method to delineate the water-absorption period from the water-evaporation period using video images of flame intensity. These were obtained using an ultra-violet camera that captures the OH* radical emission at 310 nm wavelength and a color camera that captures visible flame emission. These results are compared with results of ground-based tests in the Zero Gravity Facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center which employed smaller droplets in argon-diluted environments. A simplified theoretical model developed earlier correlates the transition time at which water absorption ends and evaporation starts. The model results are shown to agree reasonably well with experiment.

  4. Integrated microfluidic system capable of size-specific droplet generation with size-dependent droplet separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangmin; Hong, Seok Jun; Yoo, Hyung Jung; Ahn, Jae Hyun; Cho, Dong-il Dan

    2013-06-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics is receiving much attention in biomedical research area due to its advantage in uniform size droplet generation. Our previous results have reported that droplet size plays an important role in drug delivery actuated by flagellated bacteria. Recently, many research groups have been reported the size-dependent separation of emulsion droplets by a microfluidic system. In this paper, an integrated microfluidic system is proposed to produce and sort specificsized droplets sequentially. Operation of the system relies on two microfluidic transport processes: initial generation of droplets by hydrodynamic focusing and subsequent separation of droplets by a T-junction channel. The microfluidic system is fabricated by the SU-8 rapid prototyping method and poly-di-methyl-siloxane (PDMS) replica molding. A biodegradable polymer, poly-capro-lactone (PCL), is used for the droplet material. Using the proposed integrated microfluidic system, specific-sized droplets which can be delivered by flagellated bacteria are successfully generated and obtained.

  5. Evaporation and Vapor Formation of Graphite Suspensions Based on Water in a High-Temperature Gas Environment: an Experimental Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borisova Anastasia G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed an experimental research on evaporation and vapor formation of water droplets containing large (2 mm in size and small (0.05 mm and 0.2 mm in diameter graphite inclusions, when heated in a high-temperature gas environment. We applied a high-speed (up to 104 fps video recording to establish mechanisms of the processes considered. Moreover, we revealed the positive influence of addition of small graphite inclusions on intensifying the evaporation of heterogeneous suspension droplets. In addition, we made the assumption on the formation of vapor layer around the 10 and 15 μl suspension droplets, as well as its negative influence on the lifetimes of suspension droplets τh (increasing the times in a high-temperature gas environment.

  6. Study on the effect of subcooling on vapor film collapse on high temperature particle surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Yutaka; Tochio, Daisuke; Yanagida, Hiroshi [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Yamagata Univ., Yonezawa, Yamagata (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    Thermal detonation model is proposed to describe vapor explosion. According to this model, vapor film on pre-mixed high temperature droplet surface is needed to be collapsed for the trigger of the vapor explosion. It is pointed out that the vapor film collapse behavior is significantly affected by the subcooling of low temperature liquid. However, the effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism of vapor film collapse behavior is not experimentally well identified. The objective of the present research is to experimentally investigate the effect of subcooling on micro-mechanism of film boiling collapse behavior. As the results, it is experimentally clarified that the vapor film collapse behavior in low subcooling condition is qualitatively different from the vapor film collapse behavior in high subcooling condition. In case of vapor film collapse by pressure pulse, homogeneous vapor generation occurred all over the surface of steel particle in low subcooling condition. On the other hand, heterogeneous vapor generation was observed for higher subcooling condition. In case of vapor film collapse spontaneously, fluctuation of the gas-liquid interface after quenching propagated from bottom to top of the steel particle heterogeneously in low subcooling condition. On the other hand, simultaneous vapor generation occurred for higher subcooling condition. And the time transient of pressure, particle surface temperature, water temperature and visual information were simultaneously measured in the vapor film collapse experiment by external pressure pulse. Film thickness was estimated by visual data processing technique with the pictures taken by the high-speed video camera. Temperature and heat flux at the vapor-liquid interface were estimated by solving the heat condition equation with the measured pressure, liquid temperature and vapor film thickness as boundary conditions. Movement of the vapor-liquid interface were estimated with the PIV technique with the visual observation

  7. Collapsing criteria for vapor film around solid spheres as a fundamental stage leading to vapor explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freud, Roy [Nuclear Research Center - Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel)], E-mail: freud@bgu.ac.il; Harari, Ronen [Nuclear Research Center - Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Sher, Eran [Pearlstone Center for Aeronautical Studies, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva (Israel)

    2009-04-15

    Following a partial fuel-melting accident, a Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) can result with the fragmentation of the melt into tiny droplets. A vapor film is then formed between the melt fragments and the coolant, while preventing a contact between them. Triggering, propagation and expansion typically follow the premixing stage. In the triggering stage, vapor film collapse around one or several of the fragments occurs. This collapse can be the result of fragments cooling, a sort of mechanical force, or by any other means. When the vapor film collapses and the coolant re-establishes contact with the dry surface of the hot melt, it may lead to a very rapid and rather violent boiling. In the propagation stage the shock wave front leads to stripping of the films surrounding adjacent droplets which enhance the fragmentation and the process escalates. During this process a large quantity of liquid vaporizes and its expansion can result in destructive mechanical damage to the surrounding structures. This multiphase thermal detonation in which high pressure shock wave is formed is regarded as 'vapor explosion'. The film boiling and its possible collapse is a fundamental stage leading to vapor explosion. If the interaction of the melt and the coolant does not result in a film boiling, no explosion occurs. Many studies have been devoted to determine the minimum temperature and heat flux that is required to maintain a film boiling. The present experimental study examines the minimum temperature that is required to maintain a film boiling around metal spheres immersed into a liquid (subcooled distilled water) reservoir. In order to simulate fuel fragments that are small in dimension and has mirror-like surface, small spheres coated with anti-oxidation layer were used. The heat flux from the spheres was calculated from the sphere's temperature profiles and the sphere's properties. The vapor film collapse was associated with a sharp rise of the heat flux

  8. Walking droplets in confined geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filoux, Boris; Mathieu, Olivier; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2014-11-01

    When gently placing a droplet onto a vertically vibrated bath, coalescence may be avoided: the drop bounces permanently. Upon increasing forcing acceleration, a drop interacts with the wave it generates, and becomes a ``walker'' with a well defined velocity. In this work, we investigate the confinement of a walker in a mono-dimensional geometry. The system consists of linear submarine channels used as waveguides for a walker. By studying the dynamics of walkers in those channels, we discover some 1D-2D transition. We also propose a model based on an analogy with ``Quantum Wires.'' Finally, we consider the situation of a walker in a circular submarine channel, and examine the behavior of several walking droplets in this system. We show the quantization of the drop distances, and correlate it to their bouncing modes.

  9. Shape-Shifting Droplet Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Wan, Duanduan; Schwarz, J. M.; Bowick, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    We consider a three-dimensional network of aqueous droplets joined by single lipid bilayers to form a cohesive, tissuelike material. The droplets in these networks can be programed to have distinct osmolarities so that osmotic gradients generate internal stresses via local fluid flows to cause the network to change shape. We discover, using molecular dynamics simulations, a reversible folding-unfolding process by adding an osmotic interaction with the surrounding environment which necessarily evolves dynamically as the shape of the network changes. This discovery is the next important step towards osmotic robotics in this system. We also explore analytically and numerically how the networks become faceted via buckling and how quasi-one-dimensional networks become three dimensional.

  10. A comparative study of the mass and heat transfer dynamics of evaporating ethanol/water, methanol/water, and 1-propanol/water aerosol droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Rebecca J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2006-02-23

    The mass and heat transfer dynamics of evaporating multicomponent alcohol/water droplets have been probed experimentally by examining changes in the near surface droplet composition and average droplet temperature using cavity-enhanced Raman scattering (CERS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The CERS technique provides a sensitive measure of the concentration of the volatile alcohol component in the outer shell of the droplet, due to the exponential relationship between CERS intensity and species concentration. Such volatile droplets, which are probed on a millisecond time scale, evaporate nonisothermally, resulting in both temperature and concentration gradients, as confirmed by comparisons between experimental measurements and quasi-steady state model calculations. An excellent agreement between the experimental evaporation trends and quasi-steady state model predictions is observed. An unexpectedly slow evaporation rate is observed for the evaporation of 1-propanol from a multicomponent droplet when compared to the model; possible explanations for this observation are discussed. In addition, the propagation depth of the CERS signal, and, therefore, the region of the droplet from which compositional measurements are made, can be estimated. Such measurements, when considered in conjunction with quasi-steady state theory, can allow droplet temperature gradients to be measured and vapor pressures and activity coefficients of components within the droplet to be determined.

  11. Indirect radiative forcing of aerosols via water vapor above non-precipitating maritime cumulus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Pfeffer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol-cloud-water vapor interactions in clean maritime air have been described for different aerosol sources using the WRF-Chem atmospheric model. The simulations were made over the Lesser Antilles in the region of the RICO measurement campaign where the clouds are low, patchy, typical trade-wind cumuli. In this very clean air, sea salt and DMS are found to have greater effects than anthropogenic pollution on the cloud droplets' effective radii and longwave and shortwave outgoing top of atmosphere radiation. The changes in radiation due to each aerosol source are a function of how each source influences aerosol concentration, cloud droplet number concentration, cloud droplet sizes, and water vapor concentration. Changes in outgoing shortwave radiation are due predominantly to changes in the clouds, followed by the direct aerosol effect which is about 2/3 as important, followed by the effects of water vapor which is in turn about 2/3 as important as the direct effect. Changes in outgoing longwave radiation are due predominantly to changes in the clouds, with changes in water vapor being about 1/10 as important. The simulated changes in water vapor concentration are due to the competing effects of aerosol particles being able to both enhance condensation of available water vapor and enhance evaporation of smaller droplets. These changes are independent of precipitation effects as there is essentially no drizzle in the domain. It is expected that the indirect radiative forcing of aerosols via water vapor may be stronger in dirtier and more strongly convective conditions.

  12. A Comparison of the Computation Times of Thermal Equilibrium and Non-equilibrium Models of Droplet Field in a Two-Fluid Three-Field Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ik Kyu; Cho, Heong Kyu; Kim, Jong Tae; Yoon, Han Young; Jeong, Jae Jun

    2007-12-15

    A computational model for transient, 3 dimensional 2 phase flows was developed by using 'unstructured-FVM-based, non-staggered, semi-implicit numerical scheme' considering the thermally non-equilibrium droplets. The assumption of the thermally equilibrium between liquid and droplets of previous studies was not used any more, and three energy conservation equations for vapor, liquid, liquid droplets were set up. Thus, 9 conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy were established to simulate 2 phase flows. In this report, the governing equations and a semi-implicit numerical sheme for a transient 1 dimensional 2 phase flows was described considering the thermally non-equilibrium between liquid and liquid droplets. The comparison with the previous model considering the thermally non-equilibrium between liquid and liquid droplets was also reported.

  13. Vortices catapult droplets in atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, J. John Soundar; Marty, Sylvain; Matas, Jean-Philippe; Zaleski, Stéphane; Hoepffner, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    A droplet ejection mechanism in planar two-phase mixing layers is examined. Any disturbance on the gas-liquid interface grows into a Kelvin-Helmholtz wave, and the wave crest forms a thin liquid film that flaps as the wave grows downstream. Increasing the gas speed, it is observed that the film breaks up into droplets which are eventually thrown into the gas stream at large angles. In a flow where most of the momentum is in the horizontal direction, it is surprising to observe these large ejection angles. Our experiments and simulations show that a recirculation region grows downstream of the wave and leads to vortex shedding similar to the wake of a backward-facing step. The ejection mechanism results from the interaction between the liquid film and the vortex shedding sequence: a recirculation zone appears in the wake of the wave and a liquid film emerges from the wave crest; the recirculation region detaches into a vortex and the gas flow over the wave momentarily reattaches due to the departure of the vortex; this reattached flow pushes the liquid film down; by now, a new recirculation vortex is being created in the wake of the wave—just where the liquid film is now located; the liquid film is blown up from below by the newly formed recirculation vortex in a manner similar to a bag-breakup event; the resulting droplets are catapulted by the recirculation vortex.

  14. Vortices catapult droplets in atomization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerome, J. John Soundar, E-mail: soundar@dalembert.upmc.fr; Zaleski, Stéphane; Hoepffner, Jérôme [Institut Jean Le Rond d' Alembert, UPMC Univ. Paris 06 and CNRS-UMR 7190, F-75005 Paris (France); Marty, Sylvain; Matas, Jean-Philippe [Laboratoire des Écoulements Géophysiques et Industriels (LEGI), Univ. Grenoble Alpes and CNRS - UMR 5519, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2013-11-15

    A droplet ejection mechanism in planar two-phase mixing layers is examined. Any disturbance on the gas-liquid interface grows into a Kelvin-Helmholtz wave, and the wave crest forms a thin liquid film that flaps as the wave grows downstream. Increasing the gas speed, it is observed that the film breaks up into droplets which are eventually thrown into the gas stream at large angles. In a flow where most of the momentum is in the horizontal direction, it is surprising to observe these large ejection angles. Our experiments and simulations show that a recirculation region grows downstream of the wave and leads to vortex shedding similar to the wake of a backward-facing step. The ejection mechanism results from the interaction between the liquid film and the vortex shedding sequence: a recirculation zone appears in the wake of the wave and a liquid film emerges from the wave crest; the recirculation region detaches into a vortex and the gas flow over the wave momentarily reattaches due to the departure of the vortex; this reattached flow pushes the liquid film down; by now, a new recirculation vortex is being created in the wake of the wave—just where the liquid film is now located; the liquid film is blown up from below by the newly formed recirculation vortex in a manner similar to a bag-breakup event; the resulting droplets are catapulted by the recirculation vortex.

  15. Grating droplets with a mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Dan; Le Helloco, Antoine; Clanet, Cristophe; Quere, David; Varanasi, Kripa

    2016-11-01

    A drop thrown against a mesh can pass through its holes if impacting with enough inertia. As a result, although part of the droplet may remain on one side of the sieve, the rest will end up grated through the other side. This inexpensive method to break up millimetric droplets into micrometric ones may be of particular interest in a wide variety of applications: enhancing evaporation of droplets launched from the top of an evaporative cooling tower or preventing drift of pesticides sprayed above crops by increasing their initial size and atomizing them at the very last moment with a mesh. In order to understand how much liquid will be grated we propose in this presentation to start first by studying a simpler situation: a drop impacting a plate pierced with a single off centered hole. The study of the role of natural parameters such as the radius drop and speed or the hole position, size and thickness allows us to discuss then the more general situation of a plate pierced with multiple holes: the mesh.

  16. Bouncing of polymeric droplets on liquid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gier, S.; Dorbolo, S.; Terwagne, D.; Vandewalle, N.; Wagner, C.

    2012-12-01

    The effect of polymers on the bouncing behavior of droplets in a highly viscous, vertically shaken silicone oil bath was investigated in this study. Droplets of a sample liquid were carefully placed on a vibrating bath that was maintained well below the threshold of Faraday waves. The bouncing threshold of the plate acceleration depended on the acceleration frequency. For pure water droplets and droplets of aqueous polymer solutions, a minimum acceleration amplitude was observed in the acceleration threshold curves as a function of frequency. The bouncing acceleration amplitude for a droplet of a dilute aqueous polymer solution was higher than the acceleration amplitude for a pure water droplet. Measurements of the center of mass trajectory and the droplet deformations showed that the controlling parameter in the bouncing process was the oscillating elongational rate of the droplet. This parameter can be directly related to the elongational viscosity of the polymeric samples. The large elongational viscosity of the polymer solution droplets suppressed large droplet deformations, resulting in less chaotic bouncing.

  17. Modeling Droplet Heat and Mass Transfer during Spray Bar Pressure Control of the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) Tank in Normal Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartuzova, O.; Kassemi, M.

    2016-01-01

    A CFD model for simulating pressure control in cryogenic storage tanks through the injection of a subcooled liquid into the ullage is presented and applied to the 1g MHTB spray bar cooling experiments. An Eulerian-Lagrangian approach is utilized to track the spray droplets and capture the interaction between the discrete droplets and the continuous ullage phase. The spray model is coupled with the VOF model by performing particle tracking in the ullage, removing particles from the ullage when they reach the interface, and then adding their contributions to the liquid. A new model for calculating the droplet-ullage heat and mass transfer is developed. In this model, a droplet is allowed to warm up to the saturation temperature corresponding to the ullage vapor pressure, after which it evaporates while remaining at the saturation temperature. The droplet model is validated against the results of the MHTB spray-bar cooling experiments with 50% and 90% tank fill ratios. The predictions of the present T-sat based model are compared with those of a previously developed kinetic-based droplet mass transfer model. The predictions of the two models regarding the evolving tank pressure and temperature distributions, as well as the droplets' trajectories and temperatures, are examined and compared in detail. Finally, the ullage pressure and local vapor and liquid temperature evolutions are validated against the corresponding data provided by the MHTB spray bar mixing experiment.

  18. Vibration-induced droplet atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukasinovic, Bojan

    The atomization of liquid drops is investigated experimentally using laser vibrometry, high-speed imaging, and particle tracking techniques. The spray is generated by a novel vibration-induced droplet atomization (VIDA) process in which a sessile drop is atomized by an underlying vibrating thin metal diaphragm, resulting in rapid ejection of small secondary droplets from the free surface of the primary drop. Under some conditions, the primary drop can be atomized extremely rapidly by a bursting-like mechanism (e.g., a 0.1 ml water drop can be atomized in 0.4 seconds). The present research has focused on four major areas: global characteristics of VIDA process, instability modes and free surface dynamics of the forced drop, mechanisms of the interface breakup, and parametric characterization of the ensuing spray. Prior to atomization, the drop free surface undergoes three transitions: from axisymmetric standing waves to azimuthal waves, to a newly-observed lattice mode, and to a disordered pre-ejection state. The droplet ejection results from localized collapse of surface troughs and initiation and ultimate breakup of momentary liquid spikes. Breakup begins with capillary pinch-off from spike tips and can be followed by additional pinching of liquid droplets. For a relatively low-viscosity liquid, e.g., water, a capillary-wave instability of the spike is observed in some cases, while for a very viscous liquid, e.g., a glycerin/water solution, the first breakup occurs near the stem of the spike, with or without subsequent breakup of the detached, elongated thread. Different mechanisms dominating the primary breakup of the spike are operative in the low- and high-viscosity ejection regimes. When ejection of the secondary droplets is triggered, the evolution and rate of atomization depend on the coupled dynamics of the primary drop and the vibrating diaphragm. Due to these dynamics, the process can be either self-intensifying or self-decaying. The resulting VIDA spray

  19. [Micro-droplet characterization and its application for amino acid detection in droplet microfluidic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huiling; Dong, Libing; Tu, Ran; Du, Wenbin; Ji, Shiru; Wang, Qinhong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the droplet microfluidic system attracts interests due to its high throughput and low cost to detect and screen. The picoliter micro-droplets from droplet microfluidics are uniform with respect to the size and shape, and could be used as monodispensed micro-reactors for encapsulation and detection of single cell or its metabolites. Therefore, it is indispensable to characterize micro-droplet and its application from droplet microfluidic system. We first constructed the custom-designed droplet microfluidic system for generating micro-droplets, and then used the micro-droplets to encapsulate important amino acids such as glutamic acid, phenylalanine, tryptophan or tyrosine to test the droplets' properties, including the stability, diffusivity and bio-compatibility for investigating its application for amino acid detection and sorting. The custom-designed droplet microfluidic system could generate the uniformed micro-droplets with a controllable size between 20 to 50 microm. The micro-droplets could be stable for more than 20 h without cross-contamination or fusion each other. The throughput of detection and sorting of the system is about 600 micro-droplets per minute. This study provides a high-throughput platform for the analysis and screening of amino acid-producing microorganisms.

  20. Electroporation of cells in microfluidic droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yihong; Wang, Jun; Bao, Ning; Lu, Chang

    2009-03-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics has raised a lot of interest recently due to its wide applications to screening biological/chemical assays with high throughput. Despite the advances on droplet-based assays involving cells, gene delivery methods that are compatible with the droplet platform have been lacking. In this report, we demonstrate a simple microfluidic device that encapsulates cells into aqueous droplets and then electroporates the encapsulated cells. The electroporation occurs when the cell-containing droplets (in oil) flow through a pair of microelectrodes with a constant voltage established in between. We investigate the parameters and characteristics of the electroporation. We demonstrate delivering enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) plasmid into Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We envision the application of this technique to high-throughput functional genomics studies based on droplet microfluidics.

  1. Quantifying activation of perfluorocarbon-based phase-change contrast agents using simultaneous acoustic and optical observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sinan; Lin, Shengtao; Cheng, Yi; Matsunaga, Terry O; Eckersley, Robert J; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2015-05-01

    Phase-change contrast agents in the form of nanoscale droplets can be activated into microbubbles by ultrasound, extending the contrast beyond the vasculature. This article describes simultaneous optical and acoustical measurements for quantifying the ultrasound activation of phase-change contrast agents over a range of concentrations. In experiments, decafluorobutane-based nanodroplets of different dilutions were sonicated with a high-pressure activation pulse and two low-pressure interrogation pulses immediately before and after the activation pulse. The differences between the pre- and post-interrogation signals were calculated to quantify the acoustic power scattered by the microbubbles activated over a range of droplet concentrations. Optical observation occurred simultaneously with the acoustic measurement, and the pre- and post-microscopy images were processed to generate an independent quantitative indicator of the activated microbubble concentration. Both optical and acoustic measurements revealed linear relationships to the droplet concentration at a low concentration range <10(8)/mL when measured at body temperature. Further increases in droplet concentration resulted in saturation of the acoustic interrogation signal. Compared with body temperature, room temperature was found to produce much fewer and larger bubbles after ultrasound droplet activation.

  2. Self-propelled chemotactic ionic liquid droplets

    OpenAIRE

    Francis, Wayne; Fay, Cormac; Florea, Larisa; Diamond, Dermot

    2015-01-01

    Herein we report the chemotactic behaviour of self-propelled droplets composed solely of the ionic liquid trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium chloride ([P6,6,6,14][Cl]). These droplets spontaneously move along an aqueous-air boundary in the direction of chloride gradients to specific destinations due to asymmetric release of [P6,6,6,14]+ cationic surfactant from the droplet into the aqueous phase.

  3. Thermophoresis of water droplets inside carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey; Walther, Jens Honore; Oyarzua, Elton

    2016-01-01

    Carbon Nanotubes(CNTs) offer unique possibilities as fluid conduits with applications ranging from lab on a chip devices to encapsulation media for drug delivery. CNTs feature high mechanical strength, chemical and thermalstability and biocompatibility therefore they are promising candidates...... for nanodevice fabrication. Thermal gradients have been proposed as mechanism to drive particles, fullerenes and droplets inside CNTs. Here, by conducting Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, we study thermophoresis of water droplets inside CNTs. We systematically change the size of the droplets, the axial...

  4. Droplets as reaction compartments for protein nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devenish, Sean R A; Kaltenbach, Miriam; Fischlechner, Martin; Hollfelder, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Extreme miniaturization of biological and chemical reactions in pico- to nanoliter microdroplets is emerging as an experimental paradigm that enables more experiments to be carried out with much lower sample consumption, paving the way for high-throughput experiments. This review provides the protein scientist with an experimental framework for (a) formation of polydisperse droplets by emulsification or, alternatively, of monodisperse droplets using microfluidic devices; (b) construction of experimental rigs and microfluidic chips for this purpose; and (c) handling and analysis of droplets.

  5. Gas sensing with surface acoustic wave devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S. J.; Schweizer, K. S.; Ricco, A. J.; Zipperian, T. E.

    1985-03-01

    The use of a ZnO-on-Si surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator as a gas sensor is discussed. In particular, the sensitivity of the device to organic vapors is examined. The planar nature of the SAW device, in which the acoustic energy is confined to within roughly one acoustic wavelength of the surface, makes the device extremely sensitive to surface perturbations. This characteristic has been exploited in the construction of SAW gas sensors in which the surface wave propagation characteristics are altered by species adsorbed from the ambient gas. The porous nature of the sputtered ZnO film, in conjunction with the microbalance capability of the SAW device, gives the sensor the ability to distinguish molecules on the basis of both size and mass.

  6. Liquid Droplets on a Highly Deformable Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Rafael; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2015-11-01

    We present measurements of the deformation produced by micro-droplets atop thin elastomeric and glassy free-standing films. Due to the Laplace pressure, the droplets deform the elastic membrane thereby forming a bulge. Thus, there are two angles that define the droplet/membrane geometry: the angle the liquid surface makes with the film and the angle the deformed bulge makes with the film. The contact line geometry is well captured by a Neumann construction which includes contributions from interfacial and mechanical tensions. Finally, we show that a droplet atop a film with biaxial tension assumes an equilibrium shape which is elongated along the axis of high tension.

  7. Droplet evaporation with complexity of evaporation modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Jin Young; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-01-01

    Evaporation of a sessile droplet often exhibits a mixed evaporation mode, where the contact radius and the contact angle simultaneously vary with time. For sessile water droplets containing polymers with different initial polymer concentrations, we experimentally study their evaporation dynamics by measuring mass and volume changes. We show how diffusion-limited evaporation governs droplet evaporation, regardless of the complexity of evaporation behavior, and how the evaporation rate depends on the polymer concentration. Finally, we suggest a unified expression for a diffusion-limited evaporation rate for a sessile droplet with complexity in evaporation dynamics.

  8. Compound droplet manipulations on fiber arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Weyer, Floriane; Dreesen, Laurent; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Recent works demonstrated that fiber arrays may constitue the basis of an open digital microfluidics. Various processes, such as droplet motion, fragmentation, trapping, release, mixing and encapsulation, may be achieved on fiber arrays. However, handling a large number of tiny droplets resulting from the mixing of several liquid components is still a challenge for developing microreactors, smart sensors or microemulsifying drugs. Here, we show that the manipulation of tiny droplets onto fiber networks allows for creating compound droplets with a high complexity level. Moreover, this cost-effective and flexible method may also be implemented with optical fibers in order to develop fluorescence-based biosensor.

  9. Dissonant Black Droplets and Black Funnels

    CERN Document Server

    Fischetti, Sebastian; Way, Benson

    2016-01-01

    A holographic field theory on a fixed black hole background has a gravitational dual represented by a black funnel or a black droplet. These states are "detuned" when the temperature of the field theory near the horizon does not match the temperature of the background black hole. In particular, the gravitational dual to the Boulware state must be a detuned solution. We construct detuned droplets and funnels dual to a Schwarzschild background and show that the Boulware phase is represented by a droplet. We also construct hairy black droplets associated to a low-temperature scalar condensation instability and show that they are thermodynamically preferred to their hairless counterparts.

  10. Evaporation of nanofluid droplet on heated surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeung Chan Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an experiment on the evaporation of nanofluid sessile droplet on a heated surface was conducted. A nanofluid of 0.5% volumetric concentration mixed with 80-nm-sized CuO powder and pure water were used for experiment. Droplet was applied to the heated surface, and images of the evaporation process were obtained. The recorded images were analyzed to find the volume, diameter, and contact angle of the droplet. In addition, the evaporative heat transfer coefficient was calculated from experimental result. The results of this study are summarized as follows: the base diameter of the droplet was maintained stably during the evaporation. The measured temperature of the droplet was increased rapidly for a very short time, then maintained constantly. The nanofluid droplet was evaporated faster than the pure water droplet under the experimental conditions of the same initial volume and temperature, and the average evaporative heat transfer coefficient of the nanofluid droplet was higher than that of pure water. We can consider the effects of the initial contact angle and thermal conductivity of nanofluid as the reason for this experimental result. However, the effect of surface roughness on the evaporative heat transfer of nanofluid droplet appeared unclear.

  11. Quantitative DNA Analysis Using Droplet Digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossen, Rolf H A M; White, Stefan J

    2017-01-01

    Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) is based on the isolated amplification of thousands of individual DNA molecules simultaneously, with each molecule compartmentalized in a droplet. The presence of amplified product in each droplet is indicated by a fluorescent signal, and the proportion of positive droplets allows the precise quantification of a given sequence. In this chapter we briefly outline the basis of ddPCR, and describe two different applications using the Bio-Rad QX200 system: genotyping copy number variation and quantification of Illumina sequencing libraries.

  12. A Theory of Shape-Shifting Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Pierre; Goldstein, Raymond; Smoukov, Stoyan; Denkov, Nikolai

    2016-11-01

    Recent observations of cooled oil emulsion droplets uncovered a remarkable array of shape transformations: the initially spherical droplets flatten into polygonal shapes, first hexagons, then triangles or quadrilaterals that ultimately grow thin protrusions from their corners. These transformations are driven by a partial phase transition of the bulk liquid phase. In this talk, we explore theoretically the simplest geometric competition between this phase transition and surface tension in planar polygons. We recover the experimental sequence of shapes and predict shape statistics in qualitative agreement with experiments. Extending the model to capture some of the three-dimensional structure of the droplets, we analyse the topological transition of droplet puncture observed in experiments.

  13. Stick-Jump (SJ) Evaporation of Strongly Pinned Nanoliter Volume Sessile Water Droplets on Quick Drying, Micropatterned Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debuisson, Damien; Merlen, Alain; Senez, Vincent; Arscott, Steve

    2016-03-22

    We present an experimental study of stick-jump (SJ) evaporation of strongly pinned nanoliter volume sessile water droplets drying on micropatterned surfaces. The evaporation is studied on surfaces composed of photolithographically micropatterned negative photoresist (SU-8). The micropatterning of the SU-8 enables circular, smooth, trough-like features to be formed which causes a very strong pinning of the three phase (liquid-vapor-solid) contact line of an evaporating droplet. This is ideal for studying SJ evaporation as it contains sequential constant contact radius (CCR) evaporation phases during droplet evaporation. The evaporation was studied in nonconfined conditions, and forced convection was not used. Micropatterned concentric circles were defined having an initial radius of 1000 μm decreasing by a spacing ranging from 500 to 50 μm. The droplet evaporates, successively pinning and depinning from circle to circle. For each pinning radius, the droplet contact angle and volume are observed to decrease quasi-linearly with time. The experimental average evaporation rates were found to decrease with decreasing pining radii. In contrast, the experimental average evaporation flux is found to increase with decreasing droplet radii. The data also demonstrate the influence of the initial contact angle on evaporation rate and flux. The data indicate that the total evaporation time of a droplet depends on the specific micropattern spacing and that the total evaporation time on micropatterned surfaces is always less than on flat, homogeneous surfaces. Although the surface patterning is observed to have little effect on the average droplet flux-indicating that the underlying evaporation physics is not significantly changed by the patterning-the total evaporation time is considerably modified by patterning, up to a factor or almost 2 compared to evaporation on a flat, homogeneous surface. The closely spaced concentric circle pinning maintains a large droplet radius and

  14. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  15. Acoustic cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  16. Acoustic telemetry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  17. Droplet dynamics on patterned substrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Dupuis; J M Yeomans

    2005-06-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann algorithm which can be used to explore the spreading of droplets on chemically and topologically patterned substrates. As an example we use the method to show that the final configuration of a drop on a substrate comprising hydrophobic and hydrophilic stripes can depend sensitively on the dynamical pathway by which the state is reached. We also consider a substrate covered with micron-scale posts and investigate how this can lead to superhydrophobic behaviour. Finally we model how a Namibian desert beetle collects water from the wind.

  18. Parameterization of cloud droplet formation for global and regional models: including adsorption activation from insoluble CCN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Sokolik, I. N.; Nenes, A.

    2009-04-01

    Dust and black carbon aerosol have long been known to exert potentially important and diverse impacts on cloud droplet formation. Most studies to date focus on the soluble fraction of these particles, and overlook interactions of the insoluble fraction with water vapor (even if known to be hydrophilic). To address this gap, we developed a new parameterization that considers cloud droplet formation within an ascending air parcel containing insoluble (but wettable) particles externally mixed with aerosol containing an appreciable soluble fraction. Activation of particles with a soluble fraction is described through well-established Köhler theory, while the activation of hydrophilic insoluble particles is treated by "adsorption-activation" theory. In the latter, water vapor is adsorbed onto insoluble particles, the activity of which is described by a multilayer Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) adsorption isotherm modified to account for particle curvature. We further develop FHH activation theory to i) find combinations of the adsorption parameters AFHH, BFHH which yield atmospherically-relevant behavior, and, ii) express activation properties (critical supersaturation) that follow a simple power law with respect to dry particle diameter. The new parameterization is tested by comparing the parameterized cloud droplet number concentration against predictions with a detailed numerical cloud model, considering a wide range of particle populations, cloud updraft conditions, water vapor condensation coefficient and FHH adsorption isotherm characteristics. The agreement between parameterization and parcel model is excellent, with an average error of 10% and R2~0.98. A preliminary sensitivity study suggests that the sublinear response of droplet number to Köhler particle concentration is not as strong for FHH particles.

  19. Ultrasonic atomization of liquids in drop-chain acoustic fountains

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Julianna C.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    When focused ultrasound waves of moderate intensity in liquid encounter an air interface, a chain of drops emerges from the liquid surface to form what is known as a drop-chain fountain. Atomization, or the emission of micro-droplets, occurs when the acoustic intensity exceeds a liquid-dependent threshold. While the cavitation-wave hypothesis, which states that atomization arises from a combination of capillary-wave instabilities and cavitation bubble oscillations, is currently the most accep...

  20. The epididymis, cytoplasmic droplets and male fertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Trevor G Cooper

    2011-01-01

    The potential of spermatozoa to become motile during post-testicular maturation,and the relationship between the cytoplasmic droplet and fertilizing capacity are reviewed.Post-testicular maturation of spermatozoa involves the autonomous induction of motility,which can occur in vivo in testes with occluded excurrent ducts and in vitro in testicular explants,and artefactual changes in morphology that appear to occur in the testis in vitro.Both modifications may reflect time-dependent oxidation of disulphide bonds of head and tail proteins.Regulatory volume decrease(RVD),which counters sperm swelling at ejaculation,is discussed in relation to loss of cytoplasmic droplets and consequences for fertility.It is postulated that:(i)fertile males possess spermatozoa with sufficient osmolytes to drive RVD at ejaculation,permitting the droplet to round up and pinch off without membrane rupture; and(ⅱ)infertile males possess spermatozoa with insufficient osmolytes so that RVD is inadequate,the droplet swells and the resulting flagellar angulation prevents droplet loss.Droplet retention at ejaculation is a harbinger of infertility caused by failure of the spermatozoon to negotiate the uterotubal junction or mucous and reach the egg.In this hypothesis,the epididymis regulates fertility indirectly by the extent of osmolyte provision to spermatozoa,which influences RVD and therefore droplet loss.Man is an exception,because ejaculated human spermatozoa retain their droplets.This may reflect their short midpiece,approximating head length,permitting a swollen droplet to extend along the entire midpiece; this not only obviates droplet migration and flagellar angulation but also hampers droplet loss.

  1. AMTEC vapor-vapor series connected cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Mark L.; Williams, Roger M.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Nakamura, Barbara J.; Oconnor, Dennis E.

    1995-08-01

    An alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) having a plurality of cells structurally connected in series to form a septum dividing a plenum into two chambers, and electrically connected in series, is provided with porous metal anodes and porous metal cathodes in the cells. The cells may be planar or annular, and in either case a metal alkali vapor at a high temperature is provided to the plenum through one chamber on one side of the wall and returned to a vapor boiler after condensation at a chamber on the other side of the wall in the plenum. If the cells are annular, a heating core may be placed along the axis of the stacked cells. This arrangement of series-connected cells allows efficient generation of power at high voltage and low current.

  2. Vapor Control Layer Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-09-08

    This information sheet describes the level of vapor control required on the interior side of framed walls with typical fibrous cavity insulation (fibreglass, rockwool, or cellulose, based on DOE climate zone of construction.

  3. Gasoline Vapor Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Gasoline is volatile and some of it evaporates during storage, giving off hydrocarbon vapor. Formerly, the vapor was vented into the atmosphere but anti-pollution regulations have precluded that practice in many localities, so oil companies and storage terminals are installing systems to recover hydrocarbon vapor. Recovery provides an energy conservation bonus in that most of the vapor can be reconverted to gasoline. Two such recovery systems are shown in the accompanying photographs (mid-photo at right and in the foreground below). They are actually two models of the same system, although.configured differently because they are customized to users' needs. They were developed and are being manufactured by Edwards Engineering Corporation, Pompton Plains, New Jersey. NASA technological information proved useful in development of the equipment.

  4. Vortices catapult droplets in atomization

    CERN Document Server

    Jerome, J John Soundar; Matas, Jean-Philippe; Zaleski, Stéphane; Hoepffner, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    A droplet ejection mechanism in planar two-phase mixing layers is examined. Any disturbance on the gas-liquid interface grows into a Kelvin-Helmholtz wave, and the wave crest forms a thin liquid film that flaps as the wave grows downstream. Increasing the gas speed, it is observed that the film breaks up into droplets which are eventually thrown into the gas stream at large angles. In a flow where most of the momentum is in the horizontal direction, it is surprising to observe these large ejection angles. Our experiments and simulations show that a recirculation region grows downstream of the wave and leads to vortex shedding similar to the wake of a backward-facing step. The ejection mechanism results from the interaction between the liquid film and the vortex shedding sequence: a recirculation zone appears in the wake of the wave and a liquid film emerges from the wave crest; the recirculation region detaches into a vortex and the gas flow over the wave momentarily reattaches due to the departure of the vor...

  5. Forces Acting on Sessile Droplet on Inclined Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Annapragada, S. Ravi; Murthy, Jayathi Y.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2009-01-01

    Although many analytical, experimental and numerical studies have focused on droplet motion, the mechanics of the droplet while still in its static state, and just before motion starts, are not well understood. A study of static droplets would shed light on the threshold voltage (or critical inclination) for initiating electrically (or gravitationally) induced droplet motion. Before the droplet starts to move, the droplet shape changes such that the forces acting at the triple contact line ba...

  6. Exotic states of bouncing and walking droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind-Willassen, Øistein; Moláček, Jan; Harris, Daniel M.;

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of an integrated experimental and theoretical investigation of droplets bouncing on a vibrating fluid bath. A comprehensive series of experiments provides the most detailed characterisation to date of the system's dependence on fluid properties, droplet size, and vibrationa...

  7. Droplets bouncing over a vibrating fluid layer

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera-Garcia, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    This is an entry for the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 65st Annual Meeting of the APS-DFD (fluid dynamics video). This video shows the motion of levitated liquid droplets. The levitation is produced by the vertical vibration of a liquid container. We made visualizations of the motion of many droplets to study the formation of clusters and their stability.

  8. Analysis of coalescence behavior for compressed droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung Woong; Lee, Dong Eon; Lee, Woo Il; Kim, Han Sang

    2017-03-01

    Coalescence of droplets is a significant phenomenon, and it has been adapted to many applications such as raindrop formation, emulsion polymerization, ink-jet printing, coating, and multiphase flows. In this study, the morphological characteristics of two compressed adjacent droplets between two parallel plates were investigated to study the phenomenon of coalescence of droplets. By controlling the distance of the dispensed droplets, various results for coalescence of droplets were evaluated, especially, from the view of the minor axis, major axis, and meniscus liquid bridge of the coalesced droplet. Experimental results show that the length of the meniscus liquid bridge rapidly increases and then the rate of increase slows with time. The increase rate of the major and minor axes is largely influenced by the meniscus liquid bridge, which is mainly due to the curvature between the droplets. The numerical modeling of the coalescence of the two compressed droplets between two parallel plates was presented and simulation was conducted to realize the coalescence behavior. Comparison with numerical simulation showed that there was a good agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Driving Droplets by Curvi-Propulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Lv, Cunjing; Chuang, Yin-Chuan; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Yin, Yajun; Grey, Francois; Zheng, Quanshui

    2012-01-01

    How to make small liquid droplets move spontaneously and directionally on solid surfaces is a challenge in lab-on-chip technologies, DNA analysis, and heat exchangers. The best-known mechanism, a wettability gradient, does not move droplets rapidly enough for most purposes and cannot move droplets smaller than a critical size defined by the contact angle hysteresis. Here we report on a mechanism using curvature gradients, which we show is particularly effective at accelerating small droplets, and works for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. Experiments for water droplets on glass cones in the sub-millimeter range show a maximum speed of 0.28 m/s, two orders of magnitude higher than obtained by wettability gradient. From simple considerations of droplet surface area change, we show that the force exerted on a droplet on a conical surface scales as the curvature gradient. This force therefore diverges for small droplets near the tip of a cone. We illustrate this using molecular dynamics simulations, and...

  10. Dynamic Morphologies of Microscale Droplet Interface Bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mruetusatorn, Prachya [ORNL; Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Sarles, Stephen A [ORNL; Venkatesan, Guru [The University of Tennessee; Hayes, Douglas G [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) are a powerful platform for studying the dynamics of synthetic cellular membranes; however, very little has been done to exploit the unique dynamical features of DIBs. Here, we generate microscale droplet interface bilayers ( DIBs) by bringing together femtoliter-volume water droplets in a microfluidic oil channel, and characterize morphological changes of the DIBs as the droplets shrink due to evaporation. By varying the initial conditions of the system, we identify three distinct classes of dynamic morphology. (1) Buckling and Fission: When forming DIBs using the lipid-out method (lipids in oil phase), lipids in the shrinking monolayers continually pair together and slide into the bilayer to conserve their mass. As the bilayer continues to grow, it becomes confined, buckles, and eventually fissions one or more vesicles. (2) Uniform Shrinking: When using the lipid-in method (lipids in water phase) to form DIBs, lipids uniformly transfer from the monolayers and bilayer into vesicles contained inside the water droplets. (3) Stretching and Unzipping: Finally, when the droplets are pinned to the wall(s) of the microfluidic channel, the droplets become stretched during evaporation, culminating in the unzipping of the bilayer and droplet separation. These findings offer a better understanding of the dynamics of coupled lipid interfaces.

  11. The Statistical Theory of Relaxation and the Metastable Vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerman, Peter L.

    A generalization to equilibrium statistical thermodynamics is proposed, capable of describing the relaxation of a system to its equilibrium state. This theory, referred to as the "statistical theory of relaxation" (STR), is centered around a macroscopic diffusion equation, which involves a fluctuating entropy, as well as certain "diffusion constants". Although STR is a phenomenological theory, an underlying microscopic picture is presented as well, which "enriches" STR by suggesting a microscopic prescription for the entropy and symmetry conditions on the diffusion constants. An H-theorem also is proved, which places additional "irreversibility conditions" on the diffusion constants, and which can be interpreted as a statistical generalization to the entropy-production theorem of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. STR is employed to describe the statistical collapse (through nucleation) of a metastable vapor. Two mechanisms are proposed: "nucleation through liquid growth" (NLG), whereby a liquid droplet fluctuates past a critical size, and "nucleation through vapor collapse" (NVC), whereby a quantity of vapor larger than the critical size, homogeneously fluctuates to its liquid state. Both mechanisms contribute to the collapse of the metastable vapor state. It is found that for shallow "quenches", NLG predominates, yielding results similar to classical nucleation theory, although with certain differences in the "prefactor terms". For deep quenches, it is found that NVC predominates, yielding the result that the lifetime of the metastable state goes to zero (exactly) at the spinodal point. This confirms the notion of the spinodal point being the absolute limit to the metastable state, and also is consistent with the results of other approaches that predict the appearance of "ramified" droplets in deep quenches. The nucleation rate (as a function of temperature and time) is calculated with the aid of a computer for water vapor, yielding results in excellent agreement

  12. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton;

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design...... for the acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design...... was simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  13. Springer Handbook of Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Rossing, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and others. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents spanning: animal acoustics including infrasound and ultrasound, environmental noise control, music and human speech and singing, physiological and psychological acoustics, architectural acoustics, physical and engineering acoustics, signal processing, medical acoustics, and ocean acoustics. This handbook reviews the most important areas of acoustics, with emphasis on current research. The authors of the various chapters are all experts in their fields. Each chapter is richly illustrated with figures and tables. The latest rese...

  14. New models for droplet heating and evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Sazhin, Sergei S.

    2013-02-01

    A brief summary of new models for droplet heating and evaporation, developed mainly at the Sir Harry Ricardo Laboratory of the University of Brighton during 2011-2012, is presented. These are hydrodynamic models for mono-component droplet heating and evaporation, taking into account the effects of the moving boundary due to evaporation, hydrodynamic models of multi-component droplet heating and evaporation, taking and not taking into account the effects of the moving boundary, new kinetic models of mono-component droplet heating and evaporation, and a model for mono-component droplet evaporation, based on molecular dynamics simulation. The results, predicted by the new models are compared with experimental data and the prehctions of the previously developed models where possible. © 2013 Asian Network for Scientific Information.

  15. Preparation and nucleation of spherical metallic droplet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-ge Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and solidification of metallic droplets attract more and more attention for their significance in both engineering and scientific fields. In this paper, the preparation and characterization of Sn-based alloy droplets using different methods such as atomization and consumable electrode direct current arc (CDCA technique are reviewed. The morphology and structure of these droplets were determined by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The solidification behavior of single droplet was systematically studied by means of scanning calorimetry (DSC, and the nucleation kinetics was also calculated. In particular, the development of fast scanning calorimetry (FSC made it possible to investigate the evolution of undercooling under ultrafast but controllable heating and cooling conditions. The combination of CDCA technique and FSC measurements opens up a new door for quantitative studies on droplet solidification, which is accessible to demonstrate some theories by experiments.

  16. Statistical steady state in turbulent droplet condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Siewert, Christoph; Krstulovic, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the early stages of clouds and other systems in which droplets grow and shrink in a turbulence-driven supersaturation field, we investigate the problem of turbulent condensation using direct numerical simulations. The turbulent fluctuations of the supersaturation field offer different conditions for the growth of droplets which evolve in time due to turbulent transport and mixing. Based on that, we propose a Lagrangian stochastic model for condensation and evaporation of small droplets in turbulent flows. It consists of a set of stochastic integro-differential equations for the joint evolution of the squared radius and the supersaturation along the droplet trajectories. The model has two parameters fixed by the total amount of water and the thermodynamic properties, as well as the Lagrangian integral timescale of the turbulent supersaturation. The model reproduces very well the droplet size distributions obtained from direct numerical simulations and their time evolution. A noticeable result is t...

  17. Acoustic Spatiality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon LaBelle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of listening can be appreciated as intensely relational, bringing us into contact with surrounding events, bodies and things. Given that sound propagates and expands outwardly, as a set of oscillations from a particular source, listening carries with it a sensual intensity, whereby auditory phenomena deliver intrusive and disruptive as well as soothing and assuring experiences. The physicality characteristic of sound suggests a deeply impressionistic, locational "knowledge structure" – that is, the ways in which listening affords processes of exchange, of being in the world, and from which we extend ourselves. Sound, as physical energy reflecting and absorbing into the materiality around us, and even one's self, provides a rich platform for understanding place and emplacement. Sound is always already a trace of location.Such features of auditory experience give suggestion for what I may call an acoustical paradigm – how sound sets in motion not only the material world but also the flows of the imagination, lending to forces of signification and social structure, and figuring us in relation to each other. The relationality of sound brings us into a steady web of interferences, each of which announces the promise or problematic of being somewhere.

  18. Acoustic Neurinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Faraji Rad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic neuromas (AN are schwann cell-derived tumors that commonly arise from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve also known as vestibular schwannoma(VS causes unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo and unsteadiness. In many cases, the tumor size may remain unchanged for many years following diagnosis, which is typically made by MRI. In the majority of cases the tumor is small, leaving the clinician and patient with the options of either serial scanning or active treatment by gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR or microneurosurgery. Despite the vast number of published treatment reports, comparative studies are few. The predominant clinical endpoints of AN treatment include tumor control, facial nerve function and hearing preservation. Less focus has been put on symptom relief and health-related quality of life (QOL. It is uncertain if treating a small tumor leaves the patient with a better chance of obtaining relief from future hearing loss, vertigo or tinnitus than by observing it without treatment.   In this paper we review the literature for the natural course, the treatment alternatives and the results of AN. Finally, we present our experience with a management strategy applied for more than 30 years.

  19. Microscopic droplet formation and energy transport analysis of condensation on scalable superhydrophobic nanostructured copper oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, GuanQiu; Alhosani, Mohamed H; Yuan, ShaoJun; Liu, HaoRan; Ghaferi, Amal Al; Zhang, TieJun

    2014-12-01

    Utilization of nanotechnologies in condensation has been recognized as one opportunity to improve the efficiency of large-scale thermal power and desalination systems. High-performance and stable dropwise condensation in widely-used copper heat exchangers is appealing for energy and water industries. In this work, a scalable and low-cost nanofabrication approach was developed to fabricate superhydrophobic copper oxide (CuO) nanoneedle surfaces to promote dropwise condensation and even jumping-droplet condensation. By conducting systematic surface characterization and in situ environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) condensation experiments, we were able to probe the microscopic formation physics of droplets on irregular nanostructured surfaces. At the early stages of condensation process, the interfacial surface tensions at the edge of CuO nanoneedles were found to influence both the local energy barriers for microdroplet growth and the advancing contact angles when droplets undergo depinning. Local surface roughness also has a significant impact on the volume of the condensate within the nanostructures and overall heat transfer from the vapor to substrate. Both our theoretical analysis and in situ ESEM experiments have revealed that the liquid condensate within the nanostructures determines the amount of the work of adhesion and kinetic energy associated with droplet coalescence and jumping. Local and global droplet growth models were also proposed to predict how the microdroplet morphology within nanostructures affects the heat transfer performance of early-stage condensation. Our quantitative analysis of microdroplet formation and growth within irregular nanostructures provides the insight to guide the anodization-based nanofabrication for enhancing dropwise and jumping-droplet condensation performance.

  20. The Leidenfrost temperature increase for impacting droplets on carbon-nanofiber surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Hrudya; Staat, Hendrik J J; Tran, Tuan; van Houselt, Arie; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2014-04-07

    Droplets impacting on a superheated surface can either exhibit a contact boiling regime, in which they make direct contact with the surface and boil violently, or a film boiling regime, in which they remain separated from the surface by their own vapor. The transition from the contact to the film boiling regime depends not only on the temperature of the surface and the kinetic energy of the droplet, but also on the size of the structures fabricated on the surface. Here we experimentally show that surfaces covered with carbon-nanofibers delay the transition to film boiling to much higher temperatures compared to smooth surfaces. We present physical arguments showing that, because of the small scale of the carbon fibers, they are cooled by the vapor flow just before the liquid impact, thus permitting contact boiling up to much higher temperatures than on smooth surfaces. We also show that as long as the impact is in the film boiling regime, the spreading factor of impacting droplets is consistent with the We(3/10) scaling (with We being the Weber number) as predicted for large We by a scaling analysis.

  1. Leidenfrost temperature increase for impacting droplets on carbon-nanofiber surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Nair, Hrudya; Tran, Tuan; van Houselt, Arie; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2013-01-01

    Droplets impacting on a superheated surface can either exhibit a contact boiling regime, in which they make direct contact with the surface and boil violently, or a film boiling regime, in which they remain separated from the surface by their own vapor. The transition from the contact to the film boiling regime depends not only on the temperature of the surface and kinetic energy of the droplet, but also on the size of the structures fabricated on the surface. Here we experimentally show that surfaces covered with carbon-nanofibers delay the transition to film boiling to much higher temperature compared to smooth surfaces. We present physical arguments showing that, because of the small scale of the carbon fibers, they are cooled by the vapor flow just before the liquid impact, thus permitting contact boiling up to much higher temperatures than on smooth surfaces. We also show that, as long as the impact is in the film boiling regime, the spreading factor of impacting droplets follows the same $\\We^{3/10}$ sc...

  2. Molecular dynamics analysis of a equilibrium nanoscale droplet on a solid surface with periodic roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Yuma; Surblys, Donatas; Yamaguchi, Yastaka

    2016-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the equilibrium wetting behavior of hemi-cylindrical argon droplets on solid surfaces with a periodic roughness were carried out. The rough solid surface is located at the bottom of the calculation cell with periodic boundary conditions in surface lateral directions and mirror boundary condition at the top boundary. Similar to on a smooth surface, the change of the cosine of the droplet contact angle was linearly correlated to the potential well depth of the inter-atomic interaction between liquid and solid on a surface with a short roughness period while the correlation was deviated on one with a long roughness period. To further investigate this feature, solid-liquid, solid-vapor interfacial free energies per unit projected area of solid surface were evaluated by using the thermodynamic integration method in independent quasi-one-dimensional simulation systems with a liquid-solid interface or vapor-solid interface on various rough solid surfaces at a constant pressure. The cosine of the apparent contact angles estimated from the density profile of the droplet systems corresponded well with ones calculated from Young's equation using the interfacial energies evaluated in the quasi-one dimensional systems.

  3. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  4. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  5. Droplet condensation on chemically homogeneous and heterogeneous surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Amir; Moosavi, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Nucleation and growth of condensing droplets on horizontal surfaces are investigated via a 2-D double distribution function thermal lattice Boltzmann method. First, condensation on completely uniform surface is investigated and different mechanisms which cause dropwise and filmwise condensation are studied. The results reveal the presence of cooled vapor layer instability in the condensation on completely smooth surfaces. In the second step, condensation on chemically heterogeneous surfaces is investigated. Moreover, the effect of non-uniformity in the surface temperature is also studied. The results indicate that the vapor layer instability and the nucleation start from the heterogeneities. The effects of different numbers of heterogeneities, their distance, and hydrophobicity on the condensation are also inspected. It is shown that by increasing the hydrophobicity of the heterogeneities and considering an optimum space between the heterogeneities, maximum condensation performance can be achieved. Finally, condensation on wettability gradient surfaces is studied and the effects of the gradient form and contact angle of the core region on the condensation are studied. It is shown that hydrophobicity of the core region plays a key role in increasing the condensation performance. A heat transfer analysis and flow dynamics of dropwise condensation as a function of time is also presented and it is shown that the results are in good agreements with the previous theoretical and experimental results.

  6. Growth and Division of Active Droplets: A Model for Protocells

    CERN Document Server

    Zwicker, David; Weber, Christoph A; Hyman, Anthony A; Jülicher, Frank

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that during the early steps in the origin of life, small droplets could have formed via the segregation of molecules from complex mixtures by phase separation. These droplets could have provided chemical reaction centers. However, whether these droplets could divide and propagate is unclear. Here we examine the behavior of droplets in systems that are maintained away from thermodynamic equilibrium by an external supply of energy. In these systems, droplets grow by the addition of droplet material generated by chemical reactions. Surprisingly, we find that chemically driven droplet growth can lead to shape instabilities that trigger the division of droplets into two smaller daughters. Therefore, chemically active droplets can exhibit cycles of growth and division that resemble the proliferation of living cells. Dividing active droplets could serve as a model for prebiotic protocells, where chemical reactions in the droplet play the role of a prebiotic metabolism.

  7. Ultrasonic attenuation spectroscopy of emulsions with droplet sizes greater than 10 microm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Andreas; Voigt, Tino; Ripperger, Siegfried

    2007-11-15

    Ultrasonic attenuation measurement is a frequently used tool for non-destructive determination of dispersion characteristics. Useful information like particle or droplet size and their concentration can be obtained, if the relation between size and attenuation of the dispersion is known. In this work, the theoretical model by Faran for the intermediate sound wave regime (IWR) is presented in combination with experimental data. In the IWR, the acoustic behavior is governed by elastic scattering rather than by dissipative effects. Experiments with emulsion of droplet sizes greater than 10 mum were carried out. Silicone oil, sunflower oil and olive oil were selected for the disperse phase of the oil-in-water emulsions. First, emulsions having droplets in the micrometer range were created. Afterwords, attenuation measurements of different concentrated emulsion were carried out. Some adjustments reflecting concentration influence were performed to outline the agreement between calculations and measurements. The validity of the model can be confirmed, if the volume fraction of the disperse phase is considered as a variable. Finally, droplet size distributions from theoretical attenuation spectra could be calculated based on a log-normal distribution.

  8. Numerical simulations of pendant droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Carlos; Kahouadji, Lyes; Matar, Omar; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon

    2015-11-01

    We simulate the evolution of a three-dimensional pendant droplet through pinch-off using a new parallel two-phase flow solver called BLUE. The parallelization of the code is based on the technique of algebraic domain decomposition where the velocity field is solved by a parallel GMRes method for the viscous terms and the pressure by a parallel multigrid/GMRes method. Communication is handled by MPI message passing procedures. The method for the treatment of the fluid interfaces uses a hybrid Front Tracking/Level Set technique which defines the interface both by a discontinuous density field as well as by a local triangular Lagrangian mesh. This structure allows the interface to undergo large deformations including the rupture and coalescence of fluid interfaces. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  9. Self-propelled droplet behavior during condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Fuqiang; Wu, Xiaomin; Zhu, Bei; Zhang, Xuan

    2016-05-01

    Self-propelled droplet motion has applications in various engineering fields such as self-cleaning surfaces, heat transfer enhancement, and anti-icing methods. A superhydrophobic surface was fabricated using two simultaneous chemical reactions with droplet condensation experiments performed on the horizontal superhydrophobic surface to characterize the droplet behavior. The droplet behavior is classified into three types based on their motion features and leftover marks as immobile droplet coalescence, self-propelled droplet jumping, and self-propelled droplet sweeping. This study focuses on the droplet sweeping that occurs due to the ultra-small rolling angle of the superhydrophobic surface, where the resulting droplet sweeps along the surface, merging with all the droplets it meets and leaving a long, narrow, clear track with a large droplet at the end of the track. An easy method is developed to predict the droplet sweeping direction based on the relative positions of the droplets just before coalescence. The droplet sweeping always absorbs dozens of droplets and is not limited by the surface structures; thus, this sweeping has many useful applications. In addition, the relationships between the droplet behavior and the number of participating droplets are also analyzed statistically.

  10. Acoustic signature analysis of the interaction between a dc plasma jet and a suspension liquid jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rat, V; Coudert, J F [SPCTS-CNRS UMR 6638, University of Limoges, 123 av. A Thomas 87060 Limoges cedex (France)

    2009-10-07

    Suspension plasma spraying allows forming finely structured coatings by injecting suspensions of ceramic particles within a dc plasma jet. The electric arc motion in dc plasma torch is the main acoustic source which is modified by the injection of suspension. The analyses of cross-correlations between the arc voltage and the acoustic signal show a decrease in time propagations due to local cooling of the plasma jet when injecting suspensions. Moreover, power spectra highlight acoustic amplifications below a certain frequency threshold and attenuations above. A simplified model of the frequency acoustic response of a two-phase vaporizing mixture is used to interpret experimental measurements. These acoustic effects are due to the dynamics of thermal transfers between vaporizing liquid and plasma.

  11. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices as Chemical Vapor Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-26

    found that an exposure time of 3.3 seconds with a development in LDD -26W of 70 seconds produced a number of good devices. Examples of these devices are...IDTs, but the cor- responding input IDTs were completely unusable. This could have been a result of uneven photoresist dispersal across the wafer

  12. A Rocket-Like Coaxial Injector in an Acoustic Field Under Sub- and Supercritical Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-03

    water potassium iodide solution with helium , how- ever, obeys very nearly the trends for the subcritical data points (i.e., 25M-0.2 ). Considering...between the propellant jets, droplet for- mation, and vaporization are all affected by the pres- sure and, particularly, ve- locity fluctuations

  13. Vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization of azides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verevkin, Sergey P., E-mail: sergey.verevkin@uni-rostock.de [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Rostock, Dr-Lorenz-Weg 1, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Emel' yanenko, Vladimir N. [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Rostock, Dr-Lorenz-Weg 1, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Algarra, Manuel [Centro de Geologia do Porto, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Manuel Lopez-Romero, J. [Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Malaga. Campus de Teatinos s/n, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Aguiar, Fabio; Enrique Rodriguez-Borges, J.; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C.G. [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica (CIQ-UP), Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > We prepared and measured vapor pressures and vaporization enthalpies of 7 azides. > We examined consistency of new and available in the literature data. > Data for geminal azides and azido-alkanes selected for thermochemical calculations. - Abstract: Vapor pressures of some azides have been determined by the transpiration method. The molar enthalpies of vaporization {Delta}{sub l}{sup g}H{sub m} of these compounds were derived from the temperature dependencies of vapor pressures. The measured data sets were successfully checked for internal consistency by comparison with vaporization enthalpies of similarly structured compounds.

  14. Self-arraying of charged levitating droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, Paul; Nussbaumer, Jérémie; Masse, Alain; Jeandey, Christian; Grateau, Henri; Pham, Pascale; Reyne, Gilbert; Haguet, Vincent

    2011-06-01

    Diamagnetic levitation of water droplets in air is a promising phenomenon to achieve contactless manipulation of chemical or biochemical samples. This noncontact handling technique prevents contaminations of samples as well as provides measurements of interaction forces between levitating reactors. Under a nonuniform magnetic field, diamagnetic bodies such as water droplets experience a repulsive force which may lead to diamagnetic levitation of a single or few micro-objects. The levitation of several repulsively charged picoliter droplets was successfully performed in a ~1 mm(2) adjustable flat magnetic well provided by a centimeter-sized cylindrical permanent magnet structure. Each droplet position results from the balance between the centripetal diamagnetic force and the repulsive Coulombian forces. Levitating water droplets self-organize into satellite patterns or thin clouds, according to their charge and size. Small triangular lattices of identical droplets reproduce magneto-Wigner crystals. Repulsive forces and inner charges can be measured in the piconewton and the femtocoulomb ranges, respectively. Evolution of interaction forces is accurately followed up over time during droplet evaporation.

  15. Burning Behavior of Liquid Fuel Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Shahood Alam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ignition of flammable liquids by hot surfaces is well known to automotive and aviation industries. However, only a limited data regarding hot surface ignition (HSI of pure and commercial fuels is available in literature. Further, relatively few studies have determined the ignition delay and to our knowledge the combustion lifetime. In the present work, we have generated results from an efficient, reproducible, yet simple experimental setup involving a liquid fuel droplet, a horizontal heated stainless steel plate and quiescent environment. Tests were conducted for diesel, biodiesel and its blends as well as vegetable oils, applied/used as single droplets under variety of conditions to the heated surface. The droplet size range was approximately between 1500 micron to 2000 micron. The objective of this experiment was to determine the minimum temperatures for HSI and also the temperatures where 100% probability of ignition was expected. Further, from this experiment, we were also able to obtain the ignition delay and droplet lifetime. As an extension to this study, a separate droplet combustion model was developed to closely study the general burning behavior of these droplets by generating temperature and species concentration profiles. The droplet mass burning rate was also determined. The results obtained in the present work were in a general agreement with the experimental and modeling observations of other studies.

  16. Mechanical vibration of viscoelastic liquid droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, James; Harrold, Victoria

    2014-03-01

    The resonant vibrations of viscoelastic sessile droplets supported on different substrates were monitored using a simple laser light scattering technique. In these experiments, laser light was reflected from the surfaces of droplets of high Mw poly acrylamide-co-acrylic acid (PAA) dissolved in water. The scattered light was allowed to fall on the surface of a photodiode detector and a mechanical impulse was applied to the drops using a vibration motor mounted beneath the substrates. The mechanical impulse caused the droplets to vibrate and the scattered light moved across the surface of the photodiode. The resulting time dependent photodiode signal was then Fourier transformed to obtain the mechanical vibrational spectra of the droplets. The frequencies and widths of the resonant peaks were extracted for droplets containing different concentrations of PAA and with a range of sizes. This was repeated for PAA loaded water drops on surfaces which displayed different values of the three phase contact angle. The results were compared to a simple model of droplet vibration which considers the formation of standing wave states on the surface of a viscoelastic droplet. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Leverhulme trust under grant number RPG-2012-702.

  17. Development of high effectiveness droplet heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, W. J., III; Sekins, K. M.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1985-04-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation has been carried out to assess the feasibility of developing high effectiveness, high temperature droplet heat exchangers and to identify practical applications for this type of direct contact heat exchanger. The droplet heat exchanger (DHX) concept studies uses a counterflowing gas and droplet configuration, uniformly sized droplets or particles, and a uniform dispersion of droplets in gas to achieve high heat exchanger effectiveness. Direct contact between the heat transfer media eliminates the solid heat transfer surfaces that are used in conventional heat exchangers and is expected to make very high temperature heat transfer practical. Low temperature simulation tests and analysis have been used to demonstrate that uniformly sized droplets can be generated over a wide range of fluid properties and operating conditions appropriate for high temperature droplet heat exchanger applications. One- and two-dimensional, two-phase flow and heat transfer computer models have been developed and used to characterize both individual component configurations and overall DHX heat transfer rates and effectiveness. The computer model and test data began to diverge as the operating pressure was increased, indicating a need for more general transport rate correlations and a better understanding of the two-phase flows that govern DHX operation.

  18. Atlantic Herring Acoustic Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC Advanced Sampling Technologies Research Group conducts annual fisheries acoustic surveys using state-of-the-art acoustic, midwater trawling, and underwater...

  19. High Velocity Droplet Rebound On Liquid Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doak, William; Laiacona, Danielle; Chiarot, Paul; German, Guy

    2015-11-01

    Rebound of high velocity, periodic droplet streams off viscous liquid pools is studied experimentally. Droplets, approximately 60 micrometers in diameter, impact the oil surface at velocities up to 13 m/s and at angles between 2-25 degrees. The oil surface does not degrade or lose its ability to provide rebound even after millions of droplet impacts. The oil was varied to examine the effect that surface tension and viscosity had on droplet rebound. Stable rebound is achievable on oils varying in dynamic viscosity in the range 13-970 Pa.s and surface tensions in the range 19-28 mN/m. When rebound occurs, a consistent 29% loss of droplet kinetic energy is observed. This is a surprising relationship due to the fact that it holds true for all cases of stable rebound regardless of the oil used. We further observe an upper inertial limit where droplets no longer provide stable rebound and instead become fully entrained in the oil pool. This limit is governed by the Rayleigh-Plateau instability and can be characterized and predicted using a modified version of the Weber number. The droplet rebound presented in this study is unique due to the size, velocity, and frequency of the droplets used. Another unique feature is that the rebound manifests itself as an effectively static phenomenon. No motion of the interface - oscillations, waves, or otherwise - was observed during rebound. The quasi-static nature of rebound enabled distinctions to be made regarding energy dissipation and the transition from droplet rebound to entrainment.

  20. From Single Droplet to Column Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The technique state to design counter-current extraction columns is based on the performance of pilot plant experiments. The modelling is then either with the equilibrium or dispersion model, whereas in the latter the dispersion coefficient accounts for all hydrodynamic non-idealities. A new approach uses single droplet experiments to obtain the basic laws and functions governing droplet breakage, coalescence,relative velocity, and axial dispersion when using droplet populance balance models (DPBM). The hydrodynamics simulation results show that the mean Sauter diameter, hold-up, and concentration profiles could be well predicted, which promotes the use of DPBM models for further applications in industrial scale.

  1. Electronically droplet energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers

    KAUST Repository

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud Al

    2012-01-01

    A report is presented on free falling droplet energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers. The harvester incorporates a multimorph clamped-free cantilever which is composed of five layers of lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric thick films. During the impact, the droplet kinetic energy is transferred into the form of mechanical stress forcing the piezoelectric structure to vibrate. Experimental results show energy of 0.3 μJ per droplet. The scenario of moderate falling drop intensity, i.e. 230 drops per second, yields a total energy of 400 μJ. © 2012 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  2. Orbiting droplets on a vibrated bath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampara, Naresh; Burger, Loic; Gilet, Tristan; Microfluidics, university of liege Team

    2015-11-01

    A millimeter-sized oil droplet can bounce on a vertically vibrated liquid bath for unlimited time. It may couple to the surface wave it emits; leading to horizontal self-propulsion called walking. When several walkers coexist close to one another, they either repel or attract each other, in response to the superposition of the waves they generate. Attraction leads to various bound states, including droplets that orbit around each other. We have experimentally investigated the variety of quantized orbital motions exhibited by two, three and more identical walkers, as a function of forcing acceleration. Each motion is quantified in terms of droplet and wave energy.

  3. Nonisothermal desorption of droplets of complex compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakoryakov Vladimir E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the process of nonstationary evaporation of aqueous solutions of LiBr-H2O, CaCl2-H2O, NaCl-H2O droplets on a horizontal heating surface. The following typical stages of heat and mass transfer depending on wall temperature have been considered: evaporation below boiling temperature and nucleate boiling. The significant decrease in desorption intensity with a rise of initial mass concentration of salt has been observed. Formation of a surface crystallization front at evaporation of a droplet has been detected. We have developed the experimental method for direct measurements of the mass of evaporating droplet.

  4. Numerical Investigation of the Main Characteristics of Heat and Mass Transfer while Heating the Heterogeneous Water Droplet in the Hot Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piskunov Maxim V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes of heat and evaporation of heterogeneous water droplet with solid (by the example of carbon inclusion in hot (from 800 K to 1500 K gases were investigated by the developed models of heat and mass transfer. We defined the limited conditions, characteristics of the droplet and the gas medium which are sufficient for implementing the “explosive” destruction of heterogeneous droplet due to intensive vaporization on an inner interface, and intensive evaporation of liquid from an external (free droplet surface. The values of the main characteristic of the process (period from start of heating to “explosive” destruction obtained in response to using various heat and mass transfer models were compared.

  5. Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    develop and demonstrate emerging undersea acoustic communication technologies at operationally useful ranges and data rates. The secondary objective...Technology Demonstration program (ACOMMS ATD) was to demonstrate long range and moderate data rate underwater acoustic communications between a submarine...moderate data rate acoustic communications capability for tactical use between submarines, surface combatants, unmanned undersea vehicles (UUVs), and other

  6. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  7. Mixing high-viscosity fluids via acoustically driven bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbay, Sinem; Ozcelik, Adem; Lata, James; Kaynak, Murat; Wu, Mengxi; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-01

    We present an acoustofluidic micromixer which can perform rapid and homogeneous mixing of highly viscous fluids in the presence of an acoustic field. In this device, two high-viscosity polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions were co-injected into a three-inlet PDMS microchannel with the center inlet containing a constant stream of nitrogen flow which forms bubbles in the device. When these bubbles were excited by an acoustic field generated via a piezoelectric transducer, the two solutions mixed homogenously due to the combination of acoustic streaming, droplet ejection, and bubble eruption effects. The mixing efficiency of this acoustofluidic device was evaluated using PEG-700 solutions which are ~106 times more viscous than deionized (DI) water. Our results indicate homogenous mixing of the PEG-700 solutions with a ~0.93 mixing index. The acoustofluidic micromixer is compact, inexpensive, easy to operate, and has the capacity to mix highly viscous fluids within 50 ms.

  8. The Tibetan singing bowl : an acoustics and fluid dynamics investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Terwagne, Denis

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the acoustics and fluid dynamics of Tibetan singing bowls. Their acoustic behavior is rationalized in terms of the related dynamics of standing bells and wine glasses. Striking or rubbing a fluid-filled bowl excites wall vibrations, and concomitant waves at the fluid surface. Acoustic excitation of the bowl's natural vibrational modes allows for a controlled study in which the evolution of the surface waves with increasing forcing amplitude is detailed. Particular attention is given to rationalizing the observed criteria for the onset of edge-induced Faraday waves and droplet generation via surface fracture. Our study indicates that drops may be levitated on the fluid surface, induced to bounce on or skip across the vibrating fluid surface.

  9. Analysis of droplet jumping phenomenon with lattice Boltzmann simulation of droplet coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Benli; Wang, Sifang; Lan, Zhong; Xu, Wei; Wen, Rongfu; Ma, Xuehu

    2013-04-01

    Droplet jumping from condensing surfaces induced by droplet coalescence during dropwise condensation of mixed steam on a superhydrophobic surface can significantly enhance condensation heat transfer of mixed steam with non-condensable gas. This phenomenon was visually observed and theoretically analyzed in the present paper. The dynamic evolution of droplet and the velocity distribution inside the droplet during coalescence were simulated using multiphase lattice Boltzmann method. The energy distribution released by droplet coalescence was calculated statistically, and the jumping height induced by droplet coalescence on a superhydrophobic surface was predicted based on the energy conservation method. The theoretical predictions obtained by the modified model proposed in this paper agree well with the experimental observations.

  10. Self-propelled oil droplets consuming "fuel" surfactant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyota, Taro; Maru, Naoto; Hanczyc, Martin M

    2009-01-01

    A micrometer-sized oil droplet of 4-octylaniline containing 5 mol % of an amphiphilic catalyst exhibited a self-propelled motion, producing tiny oil droplets, in an aqueous dispersion of an amphiphilic precursor of 4-octylaniline. The tiny droplets on the surface of the self-propelled droplet wer...

  11. Water droplet evaporation and dynamics in a mini-channel under action of the gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isachenko, E. A.; Orlik, E. V.; Bykovskaya, E. F.

    2016-10-01

    An experimental setup was developed to study the vaporization and dynamics of liquid droplets, blown by the gas flow in a mini-channel. The shadow method was the main method of measurement; a drop was also observed from the top. A series of experiments was carried out with single water drops with volumes varying from 60 to 150 gl in the channel of 6 mm height on the polished stainless steel substrate. The experiments have resulted in the dependences of evaporation rate in the temperature range of the substrate surface from 25 to 70°C and Reynolds numbers of the gas flow from 0 to 2500. The advancing and receding contact angles were measured depending on the Re number of the gas flow. The gas flow rate at which the droplet motion over the substrate starts was determined depending on the surface temperature at different drop volumes.

  12. Quasistatic packings of droplets in flat microfluidic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadivar, Erfan

    2016-02-01

    As observed in recent experiments, monodisperse droplets self-assemble spontaneously in different ordered packings. In this work, we present a numerical study of the droplet packings in the flat rectangular microfluidic channels. Employing the boundary element method, we numerically solve the Stokes equation in two-dimension and investigate the appearance of droplet packing and transition between one and two-row packings of monodisperse emulsion droplets. By calculating packing force applied on the droplet interface, we investigate the effect of flow rate, droplet size, and surface tension on the packing configurations of droplets and transition between different topological packings.

  13. Electrostatic charging and control of droplets in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongbo; Yao, Shuhuai

    2013-03-07

    Precharged droplets can facilitate manipulation and control of low-volume liquids in droplet-based microfluidics. In this paper, we demonstrate non-contact electrostatic charging of droplets by polarizing a neutral droplet and splitting it into two oppositely charged daughter droplets in a T-junction microchannel. We performed numerical simulation to analyze the non-contact charging process and proposed a new design with a notch at the T-junction in aid of droplet splitting for more efficient charging. We experimentally characterized the induced charge in droplets in microfabricated devices. The experimental results agreed well with the simulation. Finally, we demonstrated highly effective droplet manipulation in a path selection unit appending to the droplet charging. We expect our work could enable precision manipulation of droplets for more complex liquid handling in microfluidics and promote electric-force based manipulation in 'lab-on-a-chip' systems.

  14. The role of the droplet deformations in the bouncing droplet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terwagne, D.; Ludewig, F.; Vandewalle, N.; Dorbolo, S.

    2013-12-01

    Droplets bouncing on a vibrated liquid bath open ways to methods of manipulating droplets, creating double emulsion, and performing pilot wave model experiments. In this work, we focus on the role of the droplet deformations in the vertical bouncing dynamics by neglecting the deformation of the surface of the bath. To be under this favorable condition, low viscous oil droplets are dropped over a highly viscous oil bath that is vibrated. These droplets bounce vertically on the surface of the bath and exhibit many periodic trajectories and resonant modes when tuning the forcing parameters, i.e., the oscillation of the bath. This complex dynamics emphasizes the interplay between elastic energy storage and energy dissipation in droplets at each bounce. We propose to model droplets using a bouncing mass-spring-damper system that mimics a deformable droplet bouncing on a non-deformable liquid bath. From the experimental measurements, we constructed bifurcation diagrams of the bouncing trajectories and challenged our bouncing spring model. The agreement between experiment and the spring model reveals that this model can be used to rationalize and predict a variety of bouncing droplets behaviors involving multi-periodicities.

  15. Mechanisms of suppressing cup-burner flame with water vapor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CONG BeiHua; LIAO GuangXuan

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms of suppressing a laminar methane-air co-flow diffusion flame formed on a cup burner with water vapor have been studied experimentally and numerically. The methane burned in a steel cup surrounded by a glass chimney. A mist generator produced fine droplets delivered though the glass chimney with air. These droplets were heated into water vapor when they went though the diffuser. The extinguishing limit was obtained by gradually increasing the amount of water vapor to replace the air in the coflowing oxidizer stream. Results showed that the agent concentration required for extinguishment was constant over a wide range of the oxidizer velocity, i.e., a so-called "plateau region". The measured extinguishing mass fractions of the agents were: (16.7±0.6)% for H2O, (15.9±0.6)% for CO2, and (31.9±0.6)% for N2. The computation used the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) de-veloped by the NIST. The numerical simulations showed that the predicted water vapor extinguishing limits and the flickering frequency were in good agreements with the experimental observations and, more importantly, revealed that the sup-pression of cup-burner flames occurred via a partial extinction mechanism (in which the flame base drifts downstream and then blows off) rather than the global extinction mechanism of typical counter-flow diffusion flames. And the flame-base oscillation just before the blow-off was the key step for the non-premixed flame extinction in the cup burner.

  16. Mechanisms of suppressing cup-burner flame with water vapor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms of suppressing a laminar methane-air co-flow diffusion flame formed on a cup burner with water vapor have been studied experimentally and numerically. The methane burned in a steel cup surrounded by a glass chimney. A mist generator produced fine droplets delivered though the glass chimney with air. These droplets were heated into water vapor when they went though the diffuser. The extinguishing limit was obtained by gradually increasing the amount of water vapor to replace the air in the coflowing oxidizer stream. Results showed that the agent concentration required for extinguishment was constant over a wide range of the oxidizer velocity, i.e., a so-called "plateau region". The measured extinguishing mass fractions of the agents were: (16.7 ± 0.6)% for H2O, (15.9 ± 0.6)% for CO2, and (31.9 ± 0.6)% for N2. The computation used the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) de- veloped by the NIST. The numerical simulations showed that the predicted water vapor extinguishing limits and the flickering frequency were in good agreements with the experimental observations and, more importantly, revealed that the sup- pression of cup-burner flames occurred via a partial extinction mechanism (in which the flame base drifts downstream and then blows off) rather than the global extinction mechanism of typical counter-flow diffusion flames. And the flame-base oscillation just before the blow-off was the key step for the non-premixed flame extinction in the cup burner.

  17. CFD Modeling of LNG Spill: Humidity Effect on Vapor Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannissi, S. G.; Venetsanos, A. G.; Markatos, N.

    2015-09-01

    The risks entailed by an accidental spill of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) should be indentified and evaluated, in order to design measures for prevention and mitigation in LNG terminals. For this purpose, simulations are considered a useful tool to study LNG spills and to understand the mechanisms that influence the vapor dispersion. In the present study, the ADREA-HF CFD code is employed to simulate the TEEX1 experiment. The experiment was carried out at the Brayton Fire Training Field, which is affiliated with the Texas A&M University system and involves LNG release and dispersion over water surface in open- obstructed environment. In the simulation the source was modeled as a two-phase jet enabling the prediction of both the vapor dispersion and the liquid pool spreading. The conservation equations for the mixture are solved along with the mass fraction for natural gas. Due to the low prevailing temperatures during the spill ambient humidity condenses and this might affect the vapor dispersion. This effect was examined in this work by solving an additional conservation equation for the water mass fraction. Two different models were tested: the hydrodynamic equilibrium model which assumes kinetic equilibrium between the phases and the non hydrodynamic equilibrium model, in order to assess the effect of slip velocity on the prediction. The slip velocity is defined as the difference between the liquid phase and the vapor phase and is calculated using the algebraic slip model. Constant droplet diameter of three different sizes and a lognormal distribution of the droplet diameter were applied and the results are discussed and compared with the measurements.

  18. Droplet Microfluidics for Chip-Based Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan V. I. S. Kaler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Droplet microfluidics (DMF is a fluidic handling technology that enables precision control over dispensing and subsequent manipulation of droplets in the volume range of microliters to picoliters, on a micro-fabricated device. There are several different droplet actuation methods, all of which can generate external stimuli, to either actively or passively control the shape and positioning of fluidic droplets over patterned substrates. In this review article, we focus on the operation and utility of electro-actuation-based DMF devices, which utilize one or more micro-/nano-patterned substrates to facilitate electric field-based handling of chemical and/or biological samples. The underlying theory of DMF actuations, device fabrication methods and integration of optical and opto-electronic detectors is discussed in this review. Example applications of such electro-actuation-based DMF devices have also been included, illustrating the various actuation methods and their utility in conducting chip-based laboratory and clinical diagnostic assays.

  19. Immersed Boundary Simulations of Active Fluid Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Whitfield, Carl A

    2016-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of active fluid droplets immersed in an external fluid in 2-dimensions. We use an Immersed Boundary method to simulate the fluid droplet interface as a Lagrangian mesh. We present results from two example systems, firstly a droplet filled with an active polar fluid with polar anchoring at the droplet interface. Secondly, an active isotropic fluid consisting of particles that can bind and unbind from the interface and generate surface tension gradients through active contractility. These two systems demonstrate spontaneous symmetry breaking and steady state dynamics resembling cell motility and division and show complex feedback mechanisms with minimal degrees of freedom. The simulations outlined here will be useful for quantifying the wide range of dynamics observable in these active systems and modelling the effects of confinement in a consistent and adaptable way.

  20. Manipulation of microfluidic droplets by electrorheological fluid

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Menying

    2009-09-01

    Microfluidics, especially droplet microfluidics, attracts more and more researchers from diverse fields, because it requires fewer materials and less time, produces less waste and has the potential of highly integrated and computer-controlled reaction processes for chemistry and biology. Electrorheological fluid, especially giant electrorheological fluid (GERF), which is considered as a kind of smart material, has been applied to the microfluidic systems to achieve active and precise control of fluid by electrical signal. In this review article, we will introduce recent results of microfluidic droplet manipulation, GERF and some pertinent achievements by introducing GERF into microfluidic system: digital generation, manipulation of "smart droplets" and droplet manipulation by GERF. Once it is combined with real-time detection, integrated chip with multiple functions can be realized. © 2009 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  1. Dynamics of bouncing droplets in annular cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Zachary Louis; Jalali, Mir Abbas; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-11-01

    In a cylindrical bath of silicon oil, vertically excited by a frequency of 45 Hz, we trace the motion of bouncing droplets as they fill an annular region. We compute the mean tangential and radial velocity components of the droplets and show that the maximum tangential velocity is larger than the maximum radial velocity by one order of magnitude. Velocity dispersions have almost equal levels in the radial and tangential directions, and their mean values are 1/4 times smaller than the mean tangential velocity. These results show that bouncing droplets undergo random motions within annular cavities determined by the interference patterns of self-induced circumferential waves. We derive analytical relations between the velocity dispersion and the wavelength of surface waves, and calculate the mean tangential velocity of droplets using the random kicks that they experience at the boundaries of the cavity by inward and outward traveling waves.

  2. Capillary droplets on Leidenfrost micro-ratchets

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Alvaro G; Römer, Gertwillem R B E; Pathiraj, B; Veld, Albertus Huis in 't; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Leidenfrost ratchets are structures with the ability of transporting liquid droplets when heated over the critical Leidenfrost temperature. Once this temperature is reached, the droplet levitates over the surface and moves in the direction marked by the slope of the ratchet at terminal velocities around 10 cm/s. Here we provide new experiments with micron-sized ratchets, which have been produced with picosecond pulse laser ablation. In the following work, we use a simple method to measure the thrust driving droplets of capillary size over the micro-ratchets. The mechanism responsible for the force acting on the drop on superheated ratchets has been recently under debate. We extend the recently proposed 'viscous mechanism' proposed by Dupeaux et al. [Europhys. Lett., 96, 58001 (2011)] to capillary droplets and find good agreement with our measurements.

  3. Catching proteins in liquid helium droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Kupser, Peter; Meijer, Gerard; von Helden, Gert

    2010-01-01

    An experimental approach is presented that allows for the incorporation of large mass/charge selected ions in liquid helium droplets. It is demonstrated that droplets can be efficiently doped with a mass/charge selected amino acid as well as with the much bigger m$\\approx$12 000 amu protein Cytochrome C in selected charge states. The sizes of the ion-doped droplets are determined via electrostatic deflection. Under the experimental conditions employed, the observed droplet sizes are very large and range, dependent on the incorporated ion, from 10$^{10}$ helium atoms for protonated Phenylalanine to 10$^{12}$ helium atoms for Cytochrome C. As a possible explanation, a simple model based on the size- and internal energy-dependence of the pickup efficiency is given.

  4. Janus droplet as a catalytic micromotor

    CERN Document Server

    Shklyaev, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Self-propulsion of a Janus droplet in a solution of surfactant, which reacts on a half of a drop surface, is studied theoretically. The droplet acts as a catalytic motor creating a concentration gradient, which generates its surface-tension-driven motion; the self-propulsion speed is rather high, $60\\; {\\rm \\mu m/s}$ and more. This catalytic motor has several advantages over other micromotors: simple manufacturing, easily attained neutral buoyancy. In contrast to a single-fluid droplet, which demonstrates a self-propulsion as a result of symmetry breaking instability, for Janus one no stability threshold exists; hence, the droplet radius can be scaled down to micrometers. The paper was finalized and submitted by Denis S. Goldobin after Sergey Sklyaev had sadly passed away on June 2, 2014.

  5. Manipulation of microfluidic droplets by electrorheological fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Menying; Gong, Xiuqing; Wen, Weijia

    2009-09-01

    Microfluidics, especially droplet microfluidics, attracts more and more researchers from diverse fields, because it requires fewer materials and less time, produces less waste and has the potential of highly integrated and computer-controlled reaction processes for chemistry and biology. Electrorheological fluid, especially giant electrorheological fluid (GERF), which is considered as a kind of smart material, has been applied to the microfluidic systems to achieve active and precise control of fluid by electrical signal. In this review article, we will introduce recent results of microfluidic droplet manipulation, GERF and some pertinent achievements by introducing GERF into microfluidic system: digital generation, manipulation of "smart droplets" and droplet manipulation by GERF. Once it is combined with real-time detection, integrated chip with multiple functions can be realized.

  6. Micro-droplets lubrication film thickness dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerre, Axel; Theodoly, Olivier; Cantat, Isabelle; Leshansky, Alexander; Valignat, Marie-Pierre; Jullien, Marie-Caroline; MMN Team; LAI Team; IPR Team; Department of Chemical Engineering Team

    2014-11-01

    The motion of droplets or bubbles in confined geometries has been extensively studied; showing an intrinsic relationship between the lubrication film thickness and the droplet velocity. When capillary forces dominate, the lubrication film thickness evolves non linearly with the capillary number due to viscous dissipation between meniscus and wall. However, this film may become thin enough that intermolecular forces come into play and affect classical scalings. We report here the first experimental evidence of the disjoining pressure effect on confined droplets by measuring droplet lubrication film thicknesses in a microfluidic Hele-Shaw cell. We find and characterize two distinct dynamical regimes, dominated respectively by capillary and intermolecular forces. In the former case rolling boundary conditions at the interface are evidenced through film thickness dynamics, interface velocity measurement and film thickness profile.

  7. Reducing-Agent-Free Instant Synthesis of Carbon-Supported Pd Catalysts in a Green Leidenfrost Droplet Reactor and Catalytic Activity in Formic Acid Dehydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Park, Jong-Soo

    2016-05-20

    The development of green synthesis methods for supported noble metal catalysts remains important challenges to improve their sustainability. Here we first synthesized carbon-supported Pd catalysts in a green Leidenfrost droplet reactor without reducing agents, high-temperature calcination and reduction procedures. When the aqueous solution containing Pd nitrate precursor, carbon support, and water is dripped on a hot plate, vapor layer is formed between a solution droplet and hot surface, which allow the solution droplet to be levitated on the hot surface (Leidenfrost phenomena). Subsequently, Pd nanoparticles can be prepared without reducing agents in a weakly basic droplet reactor created by the Leidenfrost phenomena, and then the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles are loaded on carbon supports during boiling down the droplet on hot surface. Compared to conventional incipient wetness and chemical synthetic methods, the Leidenfrost droplet reactor does not need energy-consuming, time-consuming, and environmentally unfriendly procedures, which leads to much shorter synthesis time, lower carbon dioxide emission, and more ecofriendly process in comparison with conventional synthesis methods. Moreover, the catalysts synthesized in the Leidenfrost droplet reactor provided much better catalytic activity for room-temperature formic acid decomposition than those prepared by the incipient wetness method.

  8. Reducing-Agent-Free Instant Synthesis of Carbon-Supported Pd Catalysts in a Green Leidenfrost Droplet Reactor and Catalytic Activity in Formic Acid Dehydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Park, Jong-Soo

    2016-05-01

    The development of green synthesis methods for supported noble metal catalysts remains important challenges to improve their sustainability. Here we first synthesized carbon-supported Pd catalysts in a green Leidenfrost droplet reactor without reducing agents, high-temperature calcination and reduction procedures. When the aqueous solution containing Pd nitrate precursor, carbon support, and water is dripped on a hot plate, vapor layer is formed between a solution droplet and hot surface, which allow the solution droplet to be levitated on the hot surface (Leidenfrost phenomena). Subsequently, Pd nanoparticles can be prepared without reducing agents in a weakly basic droplet reactor created by the Leidenfrost phenomena, and then the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles are loaded on carbon supports during boiling down the droplet on hot surface. Compared to conventional incipient wetness and chemical synthetic methods, the Leidenfrost droplet reactor does not need energy-consuming, time-consuming, and environmentally unfriendly procedures, which leads to much shorter synthesis time, lower carbon dioxide emission, and more ecofriendly process in comparison with conventional synthesis methods. Moreover, the catalysts synthesized in the Leidenfrost droplet reactor provided much better catalytic activity for room-temperature formic acid decomposition than those prepared by the incipient wetness method.

  9. Acoustic elliptical cylindrical cloaks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Hua; Qu Shao-Bo; Xu Zhuo; Wang Jia-Fu

    2009-01-01

    By making a comparison between the acoustic equations and the 2-dimensional (2D) Maxwell equations, we obtain the material parameter equations (MPE) for acoustic elliptical cylindrical cloaks. Both the theoretical results and the numerical results indicate that an elliptical cylindrical cloak can realize perfect acoustic invisibility when the spatial distributions of mass density and bulk modulus are exactly configured according to the proposed equations. The present work is the meaningful exploration of designing acoustic cloaks that are neither sphere nor circular cylinder in shape, and opens up possibilities for making complex and multiplex acoustic cloaks with simple models such as spheres, circular or elliptic cylinders.

  10. Indoor acoustic gain design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha-Abarca, Justo Andres

    2002-11-01

    The design of sound reinforcement systems includes many variables and usually some of these variables are discussed. There are criteria to optimize the performance of the sound reinforcement systems under indoor conditions. The equivalent acoustic distance, the necessary acoustic gain, and the potential acoustic gain are parameters which must be adjusted with respect to the loudspeaker array, electric power and directionality of loudspeakers, the room acoustics conditions, the distance and distribution of the audience, and the type of the original sources. The design and installation of front of the house and monitoring systems have individual criteria. This article is about this criteria and it proposes general considerations for the indoor acoustic gain design.

  11. Programmable Electrowetting with Channels and Droplets

    OpenAIRE

    Ananda Banerjee; Joo Hyon Noh; Yuguang Liu; Philip D. Rack; Ian Papautsky

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate continuous and discrete functions in a digital microfluidic platform in a programmed manner. Digital microfluidics is gaining popularity in biological and biomedical applications due to its ability to manipulate discrete droplet volumes (nL–pL), which significantly reduces the need for a costly and precious biological and physiological sample volume and, thus, diagnostic time. Despite the importance of discrete droplet volume handling, the ability of continuous mi...

  12. Numerical simulation of droplet impact on interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahouadji, Lyes; Che, Zhizhao; Matar, Omar; Shin, Seungwon; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir

    2015-11-01

    Simulations of three-dimensional droplet impact on interfaces are carried out using BLUE, a massively-parallel code based on a hybrid Front-Tracking/Level-Set algorithm for Lagrangian tracking of arbitrarily deformable phase interfaces. High resolution numerical results show fine details and features of droplet ejection, crown formation and rim instability observed under similar experimental conditions. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  13. Droplets climbing a rotating helical fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Texier, Baptiste Darbois

    2015-01-01

    A liquid droplet is placed on a rotating helical fiber. We find that the droplet may slide down, attach or climb up the fiber. We inspect experimentally the domain of existence of these three behaviors as a function of the geometrical characteristics of the fiber, its angle relatively to the horizontal, the wetting properties of the fluid and the rotating speed of the helix. A theoretical model is proposed in order to capture the boundaries of the experimental phase diagram.

  14. Combustion Behavior of Free Boron Slurry Droplets,

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    weak disruptive behavior while pure JP-1t burn quiescently, except for a flash extinction which occurs at the termination of combustion. The...I AD-R158 628 COMBUSTION BEHAVIOR OF FREE BORON SLURRY DROPLETS(U) i/i I PRINCETON UNIV NJ DEPT OF MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENINEERIN., F TAKAHASHI...COMBUSTION BEHAVIOR OF FREE BORON SLURRY DROPLETS TAM by F. Takahashi, F.L. Dryer, and F.A. Williams Department of M~echanical and keyosase Engineering

  15. Whole Teflon valves for handling droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulski, Olgierd; Jakiela, Slawomir; Garstecki, Piotr

    2016-06-21

    We propose and test a new whole-Teflon gate valve for handling droplets. The valve allows droplet plugs to pass through without disturbing them. This is possible due to the geometric design, the choice of material and lack of any pulses of flow generated by closing or opening the valve. The duct through the valve resembles a simple segment of tubing, without constrictions, change in lumen or side pockets. There are no extra sealing materials with different wettability or chemical resistance. The only material exposed to liquids is FEP Teflon, which is resistant to aggressive chemicals and fully biocompatible. The valve can be integrated into microfluidic systems: we demonstrate a complex system for culturing bacteria in hundreds of microliter droplet chemostats. The valve effectively isolates modules of the system to increase precision of operations on droplets. We verified that the valve allowed millions of droplet plugs to safely pass through, without any cross-contamination with bacteria between the droplets. The valve can be used in automating complex microfluidic systems for experiments in biochemistry, biology and organic chemistry.

  16. Predicting Droplet Formation on Centrifugal Microfluidic Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebius, Jacob Alfred

    Centrifugal microfluidics is a widely known research tool for biological sample and water quality analysis. Currently, the standard equipment used for such diagnostic applications include slow, bulky machines controlled by multiple operators. These machines can be condensed into a smaller, faster benchtop sample-to-answer system. Sample processing is an important step taken to extract, isolate, and convert biological factors, such as nucleic acids or proteins, from a raw sample to an analyzable solution. Volume definition is one such step. The focus of this thesis is the development of a model predicting monodispersed droplet formation and the application of droplets as a technique for volume definition. First, a background of droplet microfluidic platforms is presented, along with current biological analysis technologies and the advantages of integrating such technologies onto microfluidic platforms. Second, background and theories of centrifugal microfluidics is given, followed by theories relevant to droplet emulsions. Third, fabrication techniques for centrifugal microfluidic designs are discussed. Finally, the development of a model for predicting droplet formation on the centrifugal microfluidic platform are presented for the rest of the thesis. Predicting droplet formation analytically based on the volumetric flow rates of the continuous and dispersed phases, the ratios of these two flow rates, and the interfacial tension between the continuous and dispersed phases presented many challenges, which will be discussed in this work. Experimental validation was completed using continuous phase solutions of different interfacial tensions. To conclude, prospective applications are discussed with expected challenges.

  17. Programmable Electrowetting with Channels and Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananda Banerjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we demonstrate continuous and discrete functions in a digital microfluidic platform in a programmed manner. Digital microfluidics is gaining popularity in biological and biomedical applications due to its ability to manipulate discrete droplet volumes (nL–pL, which significantly reduces the need for a costly and precious biological and physiological sample volume and, thus, diagnostic time. Despite the importance of discrete droplet volume handling, the ability of continuous microfluidics to process larger sample volumes at a higher throughput cannot be easily reproduced by merely using droplets. To bridge this gap, in this work, parallel channels are formed and programmed to split into multiple droplets, while droplets are programmed to be split from one channel, transferred and merged into another channel. This programmable handling of channels and droplets combines the continuous and digital paradigms of microfluidics, showing the potential for a wider range of microfluidic functions to enable applications ranging from clinical diagnostics in resource-limited environments, to rapid system prototyping, to high throughput pharmaceutical applications.

  18. Mechanical vibrations of pendant liquid droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperton, Robert H; Smith, Michael I; Sharp, James S

    2015-07-01

    A simple optical deflection technique was used to monitor the vibrations of microlitre pendant droplets of deuterium oxide, formamide, and 1,1,2,2-tetrabromoethane. Droplets of different volumes of each liquid were suspended from the end of a microlitre pipette and vibrated using a small puff of nitrogen gas. A laser was passed through the droplets and the scattered light was collected using a photodiode. Vibration of the droplets resulted in the motion of the scattered beam and time-dependent intensity variations were recorded using the photodiode. These time-dependent variations were Fourier transformed and the frequencies and widths of the mechanical droplet resonances were extracted. A simple model of vibrations in pendant/sessile drops was used to relate these parameters to the surface tension, density and viscosity of the liquid droplets. The surface tension values obtained from this method were found to be in good agreement with results obtained using the standard pendant drop technique. Damping of capillary waves on pendant drops was shown to be similar to that observed for deep liquid baths and the kinematic viscosities obtained were in agreement with literature values for all three liquids studied.

  19. Combustion of Interacting Droplet Arrays Being Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Daniel L.

    2002-01-01

    The combustion of liquid fuels is a major source of energy in the world today, and the majority of these fuels are burned in the form of a spray. This droplet combustion project at the NASA Glenn Research Center has the overall goal of providing a better understanding of spray combustion by extending existing studies of single droplets to a regime where droplet interactions are important (as occurs in a practical spray). The Combustion of Interacting Droplet Arrays is a collaborative effort between Glenn and the National Center for Microgravity Research. The group at Glenn also collaborates with scientists at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology in Hokkaido, Japan. The project is studying the combustion of a small number of droplets suspended on small quartz fibers in a 0.1-atm combustion chamber. Data consist primarily of video images of the flames and droplets. The tests are being conducted in Glenn's reduced-gravity facilities (2.2-sec and 5.2-sec drop towers) and in the Japan Microgravity Center's 10-sec drop tower (JAMIC).

  20. Lipid droplets, lipophagy, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Wen

    2016-08-01

    Lipids are essential components for life. Their various structural and physical properties influence diverse cellular processes and, thereby, human health. Lipids are not genetically encoded but are synthesized and modified by complex metabolic pathways, supplying energy, membranes, signaling molecules, and hormones to affect growth, physiology, and response to environmental insults. Lipid homeostasis is crucial, such that excess fatty acids (FAs) can be harmful to cells. To prevent such lipotoxicity, cells convert excess FAs into neutral lipids for storage in organelles called lipid droplets (LDs). These organelles do not simply manage lipid storage and metabolism but also are involved in protein quality management, pathogenesis, immune responses, and, potentially, neurodegeneration. In recent years, a major trend in LD biology has centered around the physiology of lipid mobilization via lipophagy of fat stored within LDs. This review summarizes key findings in LD biology and lipophagy, offering novel insights into this rapidly growing field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon.

  1. An Experimental Investigation of Vibration-Induced Single Droplet Ejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Range, Kai; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1998-11-01

    Vibration-induced droplet atomization occurs when small secondary droplets are ejected from the free surface of a larger droplet placed on a vibrating membrane. To model a single ejection event, a liquid droplet is placed on a small piston and vibrated using an electromagnetic driver. The droplet oscillates in a characteristic mode shape that depends on the driving frequency and amplitude, the properties of the liquid, and the size of the droplet. When the excitation amplitude is large enough, a small secondary droplet is ejected from the primary droplet. Observations of this process using high-speed digital video imaging show that droplet ejection occurs when a small liquid column or jet appears on the primary droplet and a secondary droplet forms on the column by a capillary-pinching mechanism. The liquid column or jet emanates from a crater in the primary droplet. As the driving frequency increases, this crater becomes smaller and the diameter of the ejected droplet decreases. We shall present results showing how the ejected droplet diameter and speed depends on the driving frequency and amplitude, the liquid properties, and the primary droplet volume.

  2. Thermally induced acoustic waves in porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilchenko, Iryna V.; Shulimov, Yuriy G.; Skryshevsky, Valeriy A. [Radiophysics Department, Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, Kyiv (Ukraine); Benilov, Arthur I. [Radiophysics Department, Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, Kyiv (Ukraine); Laboratoire d' Electronique, Optoelectronique et Microsystemes, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Ecully (France)

    2009-07-15

    Thermally induced acoustic waves in structures with porous silicon have been studied. Two different schemas of acoustic phenomena recording are compared: in the first one a signal from microphone was measured as function of output frequency, in second one the resistance of porous silicon was measured using Wheatstone bridge. For both methods, the resonance peak is situated in same frequencies depending on difference in thermal properties between porous silicon and c-Si as well as geometry of studied structures. 1.0 kHz shifting of resonance peak in saturated alcohol vapors comparing to ambient air is observed. It can be applied as new transducer for chemical sensors based on porous silicon. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Investigation of spreading characteristics of nano-droplet on solid substrate using MD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Nahid

    Surface wettability and spreading of liquid droplets on solid surfaces are of significant fundamental and practical importance in various fields of science and technology, ranging from classical coating and spray systems to the modern micro and nanofluidic devices, and biotechnology. Due to the complexity of solid/liquid/vapor interfaces, there are still difficulties in accurately predicting the behavior of liquid droplets on solid surfaces. Droplet spreading on a surface represents a multi-scale phenomenon with scales ranging from continuum to molecular. In this thesis, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been employed to investigate wetting and spreading characteristics of a nanodroplet on solid surfaces. The work focuses on the development of correlations and scaling laws to examine the effect of droplet size on the spreading characters. The dynamic spreading of an initially spherical liquid droplet in contact with a solid surface and surrounded by ambient gas has been studied under forced and spontaneous spreading. An efficient algorithm has been developed to track the liquid-phase interface and the dynamic contact angle. The algorithm was demonstrated to reproduce the entire wetting regime by varying the solid-liquid interaction energy parameters. Extensive simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of surface and liquid droplet characteristics on the wetting phenomena and contact angle. In the first set of the simulations, liquid droplet, solid surface and ambient gas were modeled using argon atoms. The next set of simulations was performed using more realistic potential functions to simulate water SVS-B molecules for liquid, silicon crystal for solid surface, and nitrogen molecules for the ambient gas. Results for the argon droplet indicate a highly complex relationship between the contact angle and surface and liquid parameters. The spreading behavior was analyzed in terms of the temporal evolution of the dynamic contact angle and

  4. Growing InAs/GaAs quantum dots by droplet epitaxy under MOVPE conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surnina, M. A.; Akchurin, R. Kh.; Marmalyuk, A. A.; Bagaev, T. A.; Sizov, A. L.

    2016-07-01

    Results of studying the formation of InAs quantum dots (QDs) on GaAs(100) substrates by droplet epitaxy using trimethylindium and arsine (AsH3) as precursors are presented. The growth process was carried out at temperatures within 230-400°C in a horizontal reactor for metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) using high-purity hydrogen as the carrier gas. Data on the influence of process temperature on the QD size and the density of QD array and results of investigation of the low-temperature photoluminescence of obtained samples are presented.

  5. CFD modelling of condensation process of water vapor in supersonic flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, Chuang; Walther, Jens Honore; Yan, Yuying;

    2016-01-01

    -liquid phase change both in space and in time. The spontaneous condensation of water vapor will not appear immediately when the steam reaches the saturation state. Instead, it occurs further downstream the nozzle throat, where the steam is in the state of supersaturation.......The condensation phenomenon of vapor plays an important role in various industries, such as the steam flow in turbines and refrigeration system. A mathematical model is developed to predict the spontaneous condensing phenomenon in the supersonic conditions using the nucleation and droplet growth...

  6. Compact Raman Lidar Measurement of Liquid and Vapor Phase Water Under the Influence of Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiina Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact Raman lidar has been developed for studying phase changes of water in the atmosphere under the influence of ionization radiation. The Raman lidar is operated at the wavelength of 349 nm and backscattered Raman signals of liquid and vapor phase water are detected at 396 and 400 nm, respectively. Alpha particles emitted from 241Am of 9 MBq ionize air molecules in a scattering chamber, and the resulting ions lead to the formation of liquid water droplets. From the analysis of Raman signal intensities, it has been found that the increase in the liquid water Raman channel is approximately 3 times as much as the decrease in the vapor phase water Raman channel, which is consistent with the theoretical prediction based on the Raman cross-sections. In addition, the radius of the water droplet is estimated to be 0.2 μm.

  7. Theory of supercompression of vapor bubbles and nanoscale thermonuclear fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigmatulin, Robert I.; Akhatov, Iskander Sh.; Topolnikov, Andrey S.; Bolotnova, Raisa Kh.; Vakhitova, Nailya K.; Lahey, Richard T.; Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2005-10-01

    This paper provides the theoretical basis for energetic vapor bubble implosions induced by a standing acoustic wave. Its primary goal is to describe, explain, and demonstrate the plausibility of the experimental observations by Taleyarkhan et al. [Science 295, 1868 (2002); Phys. Rev. E 69, 036109 (2004)] of thermonuclear fusion for imploding cavitation bubbles in chilled deuterated acetone. A detailed description and analysis of these data, including a resolution of the criticisms that have been raised, together with some preliminary HYDRO code simulations, has been given by Nigmatulin et al. [Vestnik ANRB (Ufa, Russia) 4, 3 (2002); J. Power Energy 218-A, 345 (2004)] and Lahey et al. [Adv. Heat Transfer (to be published)]. In this paper a hydrodynamic shock (i.e., HYDRO) code model of the spherically symmetric motion for a vapor bubble in an acoustically forced liquid is presented. This model describes cavitation bubble cluster growth during the expansion period, followed by a violent implosion during the compression period of the acoustic cycle. There are two stages of the bubble dynamics process. The first, low Mach number stage, comprises almost all the time of the acoustic cycle. During this stage, the radial velocities are much less than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid, the vapor pressure is very close to uniform, and the liquid is practically incompressible. This process is characterized by the inertia of the liquid, heat conduction, and the evaporation or condensation of the vapor. The second, very short, high Mach number stage is when the radial velocities are the same order, or higher, than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid. In this stage high temperatures, pressures, and densities of the vapor and liquid take place. The model presented herein has realistic equations of state for the compressible liquid and vapor phases, and accounts for nonequilibrium evaporation/condensation kinetics at the liquid/vapor interface. There are interacting

  8. Modeling of Droplet Evaporation on Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Heitor C M; Vainstein, Mendeli H; Brito, Carolina

    2015-07-14

    When a drop of water is placed on a rough surface, there are two possible extreme regimes of wetting: the one called Cassie-Baxter (CB) with air pockets trapped underneath the droplet and the one called the Wenzel (W) state characterized by the homogeneous wetting of the surface. A way to investigate the transition between these two states is by means of evaporation experiments, in which the droplet starts in a CB state and, as its volume decreases, penetrates the surface's grooves, reaching a W state. Here we present a theoretical model based on the global interfacial energies for CB and W states that allows us to predict the thermodynamic wetting state of the droplet for a given volume and surface texture. We first analyze the influence of the surface geometric parameters on the droplet's final wetting state with constant volume and show that it depends strongly on the surface texture. We then vary the volume of the droplet, keeping the geometric surface parameters fixed to mimic evaporation and show that the drop experiences a transition from the CB to the W state when its volume reduces, as observed in experiments. To investigate the dependency of the wetting state on the initial state of the droplet, we implement a cellular Potts model in three dimensions. Simulations show very good agreement with theory when the initial state is W, but it disagrees when the droplet is initialized in a CB state, in accordance with previous observations which show that the CB state is metastable in many cases. Both simulations and the theoretical model can be modified to study other types of surfaces.

  9. Vibration-Induced Droplet Atomization --- A Theoretical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Ashley; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1997-11-01

    The atomization of a liquid droplet placed on a vibrating membrane starts with the development of Faraday free surface waves. As the excitation amplitude increases, the waves grow in amplitude and ultimately begin to eject smaller secondary droplets from the wave crests. The rate of droplet ejection can be large enough to completely drain the primary droplet, an event we call bursting. The evolution of the droplet ejection process depends on a coupled system dynamic between the droplet and the membrane. When droplets are ejected the resonant frequency of the system increases. This changes the acceleration felt by the droplet and, in turn, the rate of droplet ejection. Depending on the excitation frequency and amplitude, various types of bursting or droplet ejection processes may occur. A simple, single degree-of-freedom model of this coupled system is presented. The model is used to illustrate the effect of the excitation frequency and amplitude and the initial droplet size on the acceleration of the membrane and the droplet ejection rate. The results of the model will be compared to our experimental data on droplet ejection. Additional work is directed towards an understanding of the mechanism behind the droplet ejection process.

  10. Thermocapillary migration of an isolated droplet and interaction of two droplets in zero gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhendal, Yousuf; Turan, Ali; Kalendar, Abdulrahim

    2016-09-01

    Fluid transfer within a stagnant liquid presents a significant challenge in zero-gravity conditions due to the lack of buoyancy effects. This challenge can be overcome by the utilisation of the Marangoni effect, or more specifically thermocapillary migration. The thermocapillary migration of droplets is driven by temperature gradients within the multiphase system which bring about a surface tension gradient driving the flow from the cold to the hot region. The migration speed of the droplet is significantly impacted by the heat transfer both inside the droplet and in its surroundings. This paper presents the analysis of drop movement in a stagnant liquid using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The commercial software package Ansys-Fluent v.13 [1] is used to solve the governing continuum conservation equations for two-phase flow using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method to track the liquid/liquid interface in 2D domain. This approach has been shown to be a valuable tool for studying the phenomena of liquid-liquid interaction. A strong agreement has been found with experimental observations conducted in microgravity. The inherent velocity of drops has been found to decrease with increasing Marangoni number. This finding is in line with the previous space experiments of Xie et al. (2005) [2] and in contrast to the numerical results of Ma (1999) [3] using the same liquid for the droplet and the host liquid. Data obtained in the present numerical study has been used to derive an expression predicting the scaled droplet velocity as a function of Marangoni number. A numerical study of the interaction of two spherical droplets undergoing thermocapillary migration in microgravity is also presented. The temperature thrust from the leading droplet towards the trailing droplet was found to disturb its migration velocity, but the trailing droplet was found to have no influence on the migration of the leading droplet.

  11. Vibro-acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume book gives a thorough and comprehensive presentation of vibration and acoustic theories. Different from traditional textbooks which typically deal with some aspects of either acoustic or vibration problems, it is unique of this book to combine those two correlated subjects together. Moreover, it provides fundamental analysis and mathematical descriptions for several crucial phenomena of Vibro-Acoustics which are quite useful in noise reduction, including how structures are excited, energy flows from an excitation point to a sound radiating surface, and finally how a structure radiates noise to a surrounding fluid. Many measurement results included in the text make the reading interesting and informative. Problems/questions are listed at the end of each chapter and the solutions are provided. This will help the readers to understand the topics of Vibro-Acoustics more deeply. The book should be of interest to anyone interested in sound and vibration, vehicle acoustics, ship acoustics and inter...

  12. Springer handbook of acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and electronics. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is also in his 2nd edition an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents. This new edition of the Handbook features over 11 revised and expanded chapters, new illustrations, and 2 new chapters covering microphone arrays  and acoustic emission.  Updated chapters contain the latest research and applications in, e.g. sound propagation in the atmosphere, nonlinear acoustics in fluids, building and concert hall acoustics, signal processing, psychoacoustics, computer music, animal bioacousics, sound intensity, modal acoustics as well as new chapters on microphone arrays an...

  13. Bouncing droplets on a billiard table

    CERN Document Server

    Shirokoff, David

    2012-01-01

    In a set of experiments, Couder et. al. demonstrate that an oscillating fluid bed may propagate a bouncing droplet through the guidance of the surface waves. We present a dynamical systems model, in the form of an iterative map, for a droplet on an oscillating bath. We examine the droplet bifurcation from bouncing to walking, and prescribe general requirements for the surface wave to support stable walking states. We show that in addition to walking, there is a region of large forcing that may support the chaotic bouncing of the droplet. Using the map, we then investigate the droplet trajectories for two different wave responses in a square (billiard ball) domain. We show that for waves which are quickly damped in space, the long time trajectories in a square domain are either non-periodic dense curves, or approach a quasiperiodic orbit. In contrast, for waves which extend over many wavelengths, at low forcing, trajectories tend to approach an array of circular attracting sets. As the forcing increases, the a...

  14. MODEL OF LASER INTERACTION WITH LIQUID DROPLET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Volkov,

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. A mathematical model of optical breakdown in the dielectric liquid droplets when exposed to pulsed laser radiation was developed. The process is considered in several stages: heating, evaporation of the particle, forming a steam halo, ionization of the steam halo. Numerical study was carried out on the basis of the mathematical model to determine the threshold characteristics of the laser pulse. Main Results.Distributions of pressure, density and temperature of the particle steam halo were obtained by means of a calculation. The temperature field around the liquid droplet was determined. It has been found that at high energies in the gas bubble, the conditions are provided for thermal gas ionization and start of the electron avalanche, leading to plasma formation. Due to the volumetric heat generation, the droplet is overheated and is in a metastable state. The plasma cloud is almost opaque to radiation that causes an abrupt increase of temperature. As a result, an explosion occurs inside the droplet with the formation of a shock wave that is propagating outward. Practical Relevance.The results can be used to assess the performance of high-power laser scanning (LIDAR under the presence of liquid droplets in the atmosphere and other suspensions. Lasers can be used in fire and explosion aerospace systems. Obtained findings can be applied also in the systems of laser ignition and detonation initiation.

  15. Simulation of sliding of liquid droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alen, Saif Khan; Farhat, Nazia; Rahman, Md. Ashiqur

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulations of sliding behavior of liquid droplets on flat and periodic microgrooved surfaces with a range of groove geometry are conducted. A numerical model is developed which is capable of predicting the critical sliding angle of the drop by comparing the advancing and the receding angles obtained from numerical and experimental findings. The effect of microgroove topography, droplet size and inclination angle on the droplet sliding characteristics is analysed. Using an open-source platform (Surface Evolver), a 3D drop-shape model is developed to numerically determine the drop stability and contact angle hysteresis on tilted surfaces. In this numerical model, the three phase contact line of the drop is obtained by numerically calculating the vertex force and local contact angle at each vertex of the base contour. Several numerical models are developed based on various assumptions of base contour shape (circular or elliptical) and implementation of gravitational force to the droplet. Droplet shapes and critical sliding angles, obtained from these numerical models, are compared with those of experimental results and are found to be in very good agreement.

  16. Droplet impact on soft viscoelastic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Longquan; Bonaccurso, Elmar; Deng, Peigang; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we experimentally investigate the impact of water droplets onto soft viscoelastic surfaces with a wide range of impact velocities. Several impact phenomena, which depend on the dynamic interaction between the droplets and viscoelastic surfaces, have been identified and analyzed. At low We , complete rebound is observed when the impact velocity is between a lower and an upper threshold, beyond which droplets are deposited on the surface after impact. At intermediate We , entrapment of an air bubble inside the impinging droplets is found on soft surfaces, while a bubble entrapment on the surface is observed on rigid surfaces. At high We , partial rebound is only identified on the most rigid surface at We ≳92 . Rebounding droplets behave similarly to elastic drops rebounding on superhydrophobic surfaces and the impact process is independent of surface viscoelasticity. Further, surface viscoelasticity does not influence drop spreading after impact—as the surfaces behave like rigid surfaces—but it does affect drop recoiling. Also, the postimpact drop oscillation on soft viscoelastic surfaces is influenced by dynamic wettability of these surfaces. Comparing sessile drop oscillation with a damped harmonic oscillator allows us to conclude that surface viscoelasticity affects the damping coefficient and liquid surface tension sets the spring constant of the system.

  17. Structural Transitions in Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ye; Bukusoglu, Emre; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose A.; Rahimi, Mohammad; Roberts, Tyler F.; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Xiaoguang; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-07-01

    Confinement of cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLC) into droplets leads to a delicate interplay between elasticity, chirality, and surface energy. In this work, we rely on a combination of theory and experiments to understand the rich morphological behavior that arises from that balance. More specifically, a systematic study of micrometer-sized ChLC droplets is presented as a function of chirality and surface energy (or anchoring). With increasing chirality, a continuous transition is observed from a twisted bipolar structure to a radial spherical structure, all within a narrow range of chirality. During such a transition, a bent structure is predicted by simulations and confirmed by experimental observations. Simulations are also able to capture the dynamics of the quenching process observed in experiments. Consistent with published work, it is found that nanoparticles are attracted to defect regions on the surface of the droplets. For weak anchoring conditions at the nanoparticle surface, ChLC droplets adopt a morphology similar to that of the equilibrium helical phase observed for ChLCs in the bulk. As the anchoring strength increases, a planar bipolar structure arises, followed by a morphological transition to a bent structure. The influence of chirality and surface interactions are discussed in the context of the potential use of ChLC droplets as stimuli-responsive materials for reporting molecular adsorbates.

  18. Bead mediated separation of microparticles in droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Ki-Joo; Lin, Xiaoxia Nina; Burns, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Exchange of components such as particles and cells in droplets is important and highly desired in droplet microfluidic assays, and many current technologies use electrical or magnetic fields to accomplish this process. Bead-based microfluidic techniques offer an alternative approach that uses the bead’s solid surface to immobilize targets like particles or biological material. In this paper, we demonstrate a bead-based technique for exchanging droplet content by separating fluorescent microparticles in a microfluidic device. The device uses posts to filter surface-functionalized beads from a droplet and re-capture the filtered beads in a new droplet. With post spacing of 7 μm, beads above 10 μm had 100% capture efficiency. We demonstrate the efficacy of this system using targeted particles that bind onto the functionalized beads and are, therefore, transferred from one solution to another in the device. Binding capacity tests performed in the bulk phase showed an average binding capacity of 5 particles to each bead. The microfluidic device successfully separated the targeted particles from the non-targeted particles with up to 98% purity and 100% yield. PMID:28282412

  19. Droplet breakup dynamics of weakly viscoelastic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Kristin; Walker, Travis

    2016-11-01

    The addition of macromolecules to solvent, even in dilute quantities, can alter a fluid's response in an extensional flow. For low-viscosity fluids, the presence of elasticity may not be apparent when measured using a standard rotational rheometer, yet it may still alter the response of a fluid when undergoing an extensional deformation, especially at small length scales where elastic effects are enhanced. Applications such as microfluidics necessitate investigating the dynamics of fluids with elastic properties that are not pronounced at large length scales. In the present work, a microfluidic cross-slot configuration is used to study the effects of elasticity on droplet breakup. Droplet breakup and the subsequent iterated-stretching - where beads form along a filament connecting two primary droplets - were observed for a variety of material and flow conditions. We present a relationship on the modes of bead formation and how and when these modes will form based on key parameters such as the properties of the outer continuous-phase fluid. The results are vital not only for simulating the droplet breakup of weakly viscoelastic fluids but also for understanding how the droplet breakup event can be used for characterizing the extensional properties of weakly-viscoelastic fluids.

  20. SPH Modeling of Droplet Impact on Solid Boundary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李大鸣; 白玲; 李玲玲; 赵明宇

    2014-01-01

    A droplet undergoes spreading, rebounding or splashing when it impacts solid boundary, which is a typical phenomenon of free surface flow that exists widely in modern industry. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method is applied to numerically study the dynamical behaviors of the droplet impacting solid boundary, and both the spreading and rebounding phenomena of the droplet are reproduced in the simulation. The droplet deformation, flow fields and pressure fields inside the droplet at different moments are analyzed. Two important factors, the initial veloc-ity and diameter, are discussed in determining the maximum spreading factor, revealing that the maximum spreading factor increases with the increase of the impact velocity and droplet diameter respectively.

  1. Dynamics of Coalescence-Induced Jumping Water Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N

    2013-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video shows the different interaction mechanisms of coalescence-induced droplet jumping during condensation on a nanostructured superhydrophobic surface. High speed imaging was used to show jumping behavior on superhydrophobic copper oxide and carbon nanotube surfaces. Videos demonstrating multi-jumping droplets, jumping droplet return to the surface, and droplet-droplet electrostatic repulsions were analyzed. Experiments using external electric fields in conjunction with high speed imaging in a custom built experimental chamber were used to show that all coalescence-induced jumping droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces become positively charged upon leaving the surface, which is detailed in the video.

  2. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-30

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-043016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to...improve our understanding. During the past few years, the physics effects studied have been three-dimensional propagation on global scales, deep water

  3. Nearfield Acoustical Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Sabih I.

    Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is a method by which a set of acoustic pressure measurements at points located on a specific surface (called a hologram) can be used to image sources on vibrating surfaces on the acoustic field in three-dimensional space. NAH data are processed to take advantage of the evanescent wavefield to image sources that are separated less that one-eighth of a wavelength.

  4. Acoustic Interaction Forces and Torques Acting on Suspended Spheres in an Ideal Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, J Henrique; Azarpeyvand, Mahdi; Silva, Glauber T

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the acoustic interaction forces and torques exerted by an arbitrary time-harmonic wave on a set of N objects suspended in an inviscid fluid are theoretically analyzed. We utilize the partial-wave expansion method with translational addition theorem and re-expansion of multipole series to solve the related multiple scattering problem. We show that the acoustic interaction force and torque can be obtained using the farfield radiation force and torque formulas. To exemplify the method, we calculate the interaction forces exerted by an external traveling and standing plane wave on an arrangement of two and three olive-oil droplets in water. The droplets' radii are comparable to the wavelength (i.e., Mie scattering regime). The results show that the acoustic interaction forces present an oscillatory spatial distribution which follows the pattern formed by interference between the external and rescattered waves. In addition, acoustic interaction torques arise on the absorbing droplets whenever a nonsymmetric wavefront is formed by the external and rescattered waves' interference.

  5. Laboratory for Structural Acoustics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where acoustic radiation, scattering, and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures are...

  6. Handbook of Engineering Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Möser, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book examines the physical background of engineering acoustics, focusing on empirically obtained engineering experience as well as on measurement techniques and engineering methods for prognostics. Its goal is not only to describe the state of art of engineering acoustics but also to give practical help to engineers in order to solve acoustic problems. It deals with the origin, the transmission and the methods of the abating different kinds of air-borne and structure-borne sounds caused by various mechanisms – from traffic to machinery and flow-induced sound. In addition the modern aspects of room and building acoustics, as well as psychoacoustics and active noise control, are covered.

  7. Acoustic Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains an electro-magnetic worldwide data collection and field measurement capability in the area of acoustic technology. Outfitted by NASA Langley...

  8. Localized acoustic surface modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  9. Shallow Water Acoustic Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where high-frequency acoustic scattering and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures...

  10. Localized Acoustic Surface Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-08-04

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes (ASMs). We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  11. Acoustic Signals and Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics will compile the techniques and applications of signal processing as they are used in the many varied areas of Acoustics. The Handbook will emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Each Section of the Handbook...... will present topics on signal processing which are important in a specific area of acoustics. These will be of interest to specialists in these areas because they will be presented from their technical perspective, rather than a generic engineering approach to signal processing. Non-specialists, or specialists...

  12. Droplet sizes, dynamics and deposition in vertical annular flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, J C.B.; Dukler, A E

    1985-10-01

    The role of droplets in vertical upwards annular flow is investigated, focusing on the droplet size distributions, dynamics, and deposition phenomena. An experimental program was performed based on a new laser optical technique developed in these laboratories and implemented here for annular flow. This permitted the simultaneous measurement of droplet size, axial and radial velocity. The dependence of droplet size distributions on flow conditions is analyzed. The Upper-Log Normal function proves to be a good model for the size distribution. The mechanism controlling the maximum stable drop size was found to result from the interaction of the pressure fluctuations of the turbulent flow of the gas core with the droplet. The average axial droplet velocity showed a weak dependence on gas rates. This can be explained once the droplet size distribution and droplet size-velocity relationship are analyzed simultaneously. The surprising result from the droplet conditional analysis is that larger droplet travel faster than smaller ones. This dependence cannot be explained if the drag curves used do not take into account the high levels of turbulence present in the gas core in annular flow. If these are considered, then interesting new situations of multiplicity and stability of droplet terminal velocities are encountered. Also, the observed size-velocity relationship can be explained. A droplet deposition is formulated based on the particle inertia control. This permitted the calculation of rates of drop deposition directly from the droplet size and velocities data.

  13. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of droplet evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo

    2014-09-04

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. We study the utility and validity of lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations to explore droplet evaporation driven by a concentration gradient. Using a binary-fluid lattice-Boltzmann algorithm based on Cahn-Hilliard dynamics, we study the evaporation of planar films and 3D sessile droplets from smooth solid surfaces. Our results show that LB simulations accurately reproduce the classical regime of quasi-static dynamics. Beyond this limit, we show that the algorithm can be used to explore regimes where the evaporative and diffusive timescales are not widely separated, and to include the effect of boundaries of prescribed driving concentration. We illustrate the method by considering the evaporation of a droplet from a solid surface that is chemically patterned with hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes. This journal is

  14. Effect of water droplet in solvent sublation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Yu Bi; Hui Ru Dong; Nan Nan Wang

    2008-01-01

    Aqueous phase layer around bubble and water droplet are two additional processes in solvent sublation. In the dynamic processof mass transfer, they are always neglected, but they are very important in the investigation of thermodynamic equilibrium. In thispaper, the effect of water droplet in solvent sublation was discussed in detail, and the previous mathematical model of solventsubaltion was improved. Matlab 6.5 was used to simulate the process of water droplets, and the comparison between the previoushypothesis and the improvement in this paper showed the superiority, especially in the investigation of thermodynamic equilibrium.Moreover, the separation and concentration of the complex compound dithizone-Co(Ⅱ) from aqueous phase to n-octanol by solventsublation also proved the improved mathematical model was reasonable.2008 Hui Ru Dong. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  15. The dynamics of laser droplet generation

    CERN Document Server

    Krese, Blaz; Govekar, Edvard

    2010-01-01

    We propose an experimental setup allowing for the characterization of laser droplet generation in terms of the underlying dynamics, primarily showing that the latter is deterministically chaotic by means of nonlinear time series analysis methods. In particular, we use a laser pulse to melt the end of a properly fed vertically placed metal wire. Due to the interplay of surface tension, gravity force and light-metal interaction, undulating pendant droplets are formed at the molten end, which eventually completely detach from the wire as a consequence of their increasing mass. We capture the dynamics of this process by employing a high-speed infrared camera, thereby indirectly measuring the temperature of the wire end and the pendant droplets. The time series is subsequently generated as the mean value over the pixel intensity of every infrared snapshot. Finally, we employ methods of nonlinear time series analysis to reconstruct the phase space from the observed variable and test it against determinism and stati...

  16. Versatile microfluidic droplets array for bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shan-Wen; Xu, Bi-Yi; Ye, Wei-Ke; Xia, Xing-Hua; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Xu, Jing-Juan

    2015-01-14

    We propose a novel method to obtain versatile droplets arrays on a regional hydrophilic chip that is fabricated by PDMS soft lithography and regional plasma treatment. It enables rapid liquid dispensation and droplets array formation just making the chip surface in contact with solution. By combining this chip with a special Christmas Tree structure, the droplets array with concentrations in gradient is generated. It possesses the greatly improved performance of convenience and versatility in bioscreening and biosensing. For example, high throughput condition screening of toxic tests of CdSe quantum dots on HL-60 cells are conducted and cell death rates are successfully counted quickly and efficiently. Furthermore, a rapid biosensing approach for cancer biomarkers carcinoma embryonic antigen (CEA) is developed via magnetic beads (MBs)-based sandwich immunoassay methods.

  17. Vapor pressure of ionic liquids at low temperatures from AC-chip-calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrenberg, Mathias; Beck, Martin; Neise, Christin; Keßler, Olaf; Kragl, Udo; Verevkin, Sergey P; Schick, Christoph

    2016-08-03

    The very low vapor pressure of ionic liquids is challenging to measure. At elevated temperatures the liquids might start to decompose, and at relatively low temperatures the vapor pressure becomes too low to be measured by conventional methods. In this work we developed a highly sensitive method for mass loss determination at temperatures starting from 350 K. This technique is based on an alternating current calorimeter equipped with a chip sensor that consists of a free-standing SiNx-membrane (thickness measuring area with lateral dimensions of the order of 1 mm. A small droplet (diameter ca. 600 μm) of an ionic liquid is vaporized isothermally from the chip sensor in a vacuum-chamber. The surface-to-volume-ratio of such a droplet is large and the relative mass loss due to evaporation is therefore easy to monitor by the changing heat capacity (J K(-1)) of the remaining liquid. The vapor pressure is determined from the measured mass loss rates using the Langmuir equation. The method was successfully tested for the determination of the vapor pressure and the vaporization enthalpy of an archetypical ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([EMIm][NTf2]). The data set created in this way in an extremely broad temperature range from 358 K to 780 K has allowed the estimation of the boiling temperature of [EMIm][NTf2]. The value (1120 ± 50) K should be considered as the first reliable boiling point of the archetypical ionic liquid obtained from experimental vapor pressures measured in the most possible close proximity to the normal boiling temperature.

  18. Simulation of Interpersonal Transport of Expiratory Droplets and Droplet Nuclei between Two Standing Manikins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Y, Li,

    2012-01-01

    numerical breathing thermal manikins and a full-scale test room model. Displacement ventilation with a ventilation rate of 6 h-1 was used to introduce ventilation air into the room. Two manikins were set to breathing periodically and their breathing functions were identical and synchronized. The number...... of droplet nuclei inhaled by the susceptible manikin and the numbers of droplet nuclei deposited on the surfaces of the susceptible manikin, e.g. face, front, etc. were recorded at separation distances of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 3.0 m. In our preliminary study, for one breath from the source person, 1,600 droplets...... with an initial diameter of 100 μm were released. All the droplets became droplet nuclei within 16 seconds. Three (3) and nine (9) droplet nuclei were inhaled by the susceptible person at a mutual distance of 0.5 and 1.0 m, respectively. No droplet nuclei were inhaled at 1.5 and 3.0 m. This result illustrates...

  19. Investigation of thermal acoustic effects on SRF cavities within CM1 at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    McGee, M W; Klebaner, A; Leibfritz, J; Martinez, A; Pischalnikov, Y; Schappert, W

    2016-01-01

    Radio Frequency (RF) power studies are in progress following the cryogenic commissioning of Cryomodule #1 (CM1) at Fermilab's Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. These studies are complemented by the characterization of thermal acoustic effects on cavity microphonics manifested by apparent noisy boiling of helium involving vapor bubble and liquid vibration. The thermal acoustic measurements also consider pressure and temperature spikes which drive the phenomenon at low and high frequencies.

  20. Investigation of Thermal Acoustic Effects on SRF Cavities within CM1 at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, Mike [Fermilab; Harms, Elvin [Fermilab; Klebaner, Arkadiy [Fermilab; Leibfritz, Jerry [Fermilab; Martinez, Alex [Fermilab; Pischalnikov, Yuriy [Fermilab; Schappert, Warren [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Two TESLA-style 8-cavity cryomodules have been operated at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST), formerly the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. Operational instabilities were revealed during Radio Frequency (RF) power studies. These observations were complemented by the characterization of thermal acoustic effects on cavity microphonics manifested by apparent noisy boiling of helium involving vapor bubble and liquid vibration. The thermal acoustic measurements also consider pressure and temperature spikes which drive the phenomenon at low and high frequencies.

  1. Burning of droplets and particles of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondrikov, B.N. [Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    Small droplets of organic diazides investigated by C.K. Law and coworkers burn in hot gas at 1 atm with rates inversely proportional to the droplet diameter presumably owing to leading chemical reaction proceeds in gas phase. These burning rates are obviously much lower than those obtained by extrapolation of the results measured for the some substances in glass tubes (at pressure of about 10{sup -2}-10{sup -1} atm, and temperature 0-100 deg C) on the burning conditions of the droplets. Kinetic constants estimated using Zel`dovich equation for the burning rate in gas phase and Semenov relation for delay time of the droplets micro-explosion in liquid phase are about the same: E {approx_equal} 0.17 MJ/mol, log{sub 10}k{sub o} {approx_equal} 15(S{sup -1}). In both of the cases the leading chemical reaction is supposed to be of the first order. Landau instability is assumed to be reflected in distortion of the droplets at burning but, as opposed to the liquids pools or columns burning, it is not followed by the burning rate augmentation or (as it is observed sometimes) by the combustion extinguishment. Simple dependence of burning rate of droplets of diazides of the row of normal alkanes on their enthalpy of formation is obtained. Burning rate of ball-shaped particles of polyvinyl-nitrate estimated by A. Merzhanov and collaborators is about the same as measured by the data E.I. Maximov, the member of the same team, for PVN strands, at extrapolation of his results on the suggested preheating temperature of the particle. Probably it is a result of the leading chemical reaction proceeding in condensed phase. (author) 10 refs.

  2. Vitrification and devitrification of micro-droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoun Youn, Jae; Song, Young Seok

    2012-11-01

    Vitrification can be achieved by flash freezing and thawing (i.e. quenching) when ice crystal formation is inhibited in a cryogenic environment. Such ultra-rapid cooling and rewarming occurs due to the large temperature difference between the liquid and its surrounding medium. Here, we analyze the crystallization behavior of a droplet (i.e. vitrification and devitrification) by using a numerical model. The numerical results were found to explain the experimental observations successfully. The findings showed that for successful cryopreservation not only sufficiently fast cooling, but also rewarming processes should be designed and controlled to avoid devitrification of a droplet.

  3. Recent Advances in Applications of Droplet Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Lung Chou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Droplet-based microfluidics is a colloidal and interfacial system that has rapidly progressed in the past decade because of the advantages of low fabrication costs, small sample volumes, reduced analysis durations, high-throughput analysis with exceptional sensitivity, enhanced operational flexibility, and facile automation. This technology has emerged as a new tool for many recently used applications in molecular detection, imaging, drug delivery, diagnostics, cell biology and other fields. Herein, we review recent applications of droplet microfluidics proposed since 2013.

  4. Free running droplets on packed powder beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, Catherine P.; Bian, Xun; Sedev, Rossen

    2013-06-01

    We observed that water drops placed on horizontal beds of fine molybdenite particles move freely over the bed surface for about 1 second. The drops collect an irregular coating of unevenly distributed particles as they bounce and roll. We manipulated the distance that the drops travel, and hence the area of the droplet surface coated with particles, by varying the water surface tension and the kinetic energy of the initial droplet impact on the bed surface. Our results highlight the role of contact angle hysteresis in particle encapsulation of liquid drops.

  5. Simulation of Droplet Trains in Microfluidic Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Behzad, Mehran Djalali; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2009-01-01

    In this work we show that in a microfluidic network and in low Reynolds numbers a system can be irreversible because of hysteresis effects.The network, which is employed in our simulations, is taken from recent experiments. The network consists of one loop connected to input and output pipes. A train of droplets enter the system at a uniform rate, but they may leave it in different patterns, e.g. periodic or even chaotic. The out put pattern depends on the time interval among the incoming droplets as well as the network geometry and for some parameters the system is not reversible.

  6. Nucleation and ultrafast vaporization dynamics of laser-activated polymeric microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajoinie, Guilaume; Gelderblom, Erik; Chlon, Ceciel; Boehmer, Marcel; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; de Jong, Nico; Manohar, Srirang; Versluis, Michel

    2014-11-01

    Precision control of vaporization, both in space and time, has many potential applications; however, the physical mechanisms underlying controlled boiling are not well understood. The reason is the combined microscopic length scales and ultra-short timescales associated with the initiation and subsequent dynamical behavior of the vapor bubbles formed. Here we study the nanoseconds vapor bubble dynamics of laser-heated single oil-filled microcapsules using coupled optical and acoustic detection. Pulsed laser excitation leads to vapor formation and collapse, and a simple physical model captures the observed radial dynamics and resulting acoustic pressures. Continuous wave laser excitation leads to a sequence of vaporization and condensation cycles, the result of absorbing microcapsule fragments moving in and out of the laser beam. A model incorporating thermal diffusion from the capsule shell into the oil core and surrounding water reveals the mechanisms behind the onset of vaporization. Excellent agreement is observed between the modeled dynamics and experiment. This work is supported by NanoNextNL, a micro and nanotechnology consortium of the Government of the Netherlands and 130 partners.

  7. 3D Lattice Boltzmann Modeling of Nanoparticle Self-Assembly in Evaporating Droplets and Rivulets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingfei; Yong, Xin

    2016-11-01

    In this work, a three-dimensional free-energy-based multiphase lattice Boltzmann method-Lagrangian particle tracking hybrid model is presented to simulate nanoparticle-laden droplets and rivulets undergoing evaporation. The 3D model enables the development of the 3D flow structures in the evaporating droplets, as well as allows us to capture the axial flows in the evaporating rivulets. We first model non-evaporating droplets and rivulets loaded with nanoparticles and the effects of particle-fluid interaction parameters on particle dynamics are characterized. By implementing evaporation, we probe the self-assembly of nanoparticles inside the fluid mass or at the liquid-vapor interface. The 3D microstructure of nanoparticle assemblies is quantified through radial distribution functions and structure factors. In particular, the final deposit of evaporating rivulets with oscillatory axial flows is revealed, resembling the flow field in printed rivulets in experiments. Our findings offer a theoretical framework to explore the dynamics of nanoparticle self-assembly in evaporating fluid mass.

  8. Open-atmosphere sustenance of highly volatile attoliter-size droplets on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliker, Patrick; Schneider, Julian; Rüthemann, Lukas; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2013-08-13

    The controlled formation and handling of minute liquid volumes on surfaces is essential to the success of microfluidics in biology, chemistry, and materials applications. Even though current methods have demonstrated their potential in a variety of experimental assays, there remain significant difficulties concerning breadth of applicability, standardization, throughput, and economics. Here we introduce a unique microfluidic paradigm in which microscopic volatile droplets are formed, sustained, and manipulated in size and content at any desired spot on unpatterned substrates. Their sustainability is warranted by continuous replacement of the rapidly vaporizing sessile fluid through controlled equivalent volume deposition of smaller discrete liquid entities by an electrohydrodynamic nanodripping process. Using nanoparticle inks we show that the concentration of solutes in so-stabilized droplets can be linearly increased at isochoric conditions and user-defined rates. An intriguing insensitivity of the droplet shape toward surface heterogeneities ensures robustness and experimental reproducibility, even when handling attoliter quantities. The unique capabilities and technical simplicity of the presented method introduce a high degree of flexibility and make it pertinent to a diverse range of applications.

  9. Unusual behavior in magnesium-copper cluster matter produced by helium droplet mediated deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, S. B., E-mail: samuel.emery@navy.mil; Little, B. K. [University of Dayton Research Institute, 300 College Park, Dayton, Ohio 45469 (United States); Air Force Research Laboratory, Munitions Directorate, 2306 Perimeter Rd., Eglin AFB, Florida 32542 (United States); Xin, Y. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Ridge, C. J.; Lindsay, C. M. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Munitions Directorate, 2306 Perimeter Rd., Eglin AFB, Florida 32542 (United States); Buszek, R. J. [ERC Inc., Edwards AFB, California 93524 (United States); Boatz, J. A. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Aerospace System Directorate, Edwards AFB, California 93524 (United States); Boyle, J. M. [Naval Surface Warfare Center Indian Head Explosive Ordnance Technology Division, Indian Head, Maryland 20640 (United States)

    2015-02-28

    We demonstrate the ability to produce core-shell nanoclusters of materials that typically undergo intermetallic reactions using helium droplet mediated deposition. Composite structures of magnesium and copper were produced by sequential condensation of metal vapors inside the 0.4 K helium droplet baths and then gently deposited onto a substrate for analysis. Upon deposition, the individual clusters, with diameters ∼5 nm, form a cluster material which was subsequently characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Results of this analysis reveal the following about the deposited cluster material: it is in the un-alloyed chemical state, it maintains a stable core-shell 5 nm structure at sub-monolayer quantities, and it aggregates into unreacted structures of ∼75 nm during further deposition. Surprisingly, high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images revealed that the copper appears to displace the magnesium at the core of the composite cluster despite magnesium being the initially condensed species within the droplet. This phenomenon was studied further using preliminary density functional theory which revealed that copper atoms, when added sequentially to magnesium clusters, penetrate into the magnesium cores.

  10. Evaluating the capabilities and uncertainties of droplet measurements for the fog droplet spectrometer (FM-100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Spiegel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Droplet size spectra measurements are crucial to obtain a quantitative microphysical description of clouds and fog. However, cloud droplet size measurements are subject to various uncertainties. This work focuses on the evaluation of two key measurement uncertainties arising during cloud droplet size measurements with a conventional droplet size spectrometer (FM-100: first, we addressed the precision with which droplets can be sized with the FM-100 on the basis of Mie theory. We deduced error assumptions and proposed how to correct measured size distributions for these errors by redistributing the measured droplet size distribution using a stochastic approach. Second, based on a literature study, we derived corrections for particle losses during sampling with the FM-100. We applied both corrections to cloud droplet size spectra measured at the high alpine site Jungfraujoch for a temperature range from 0 °C to 11 °C. We show that Mie scattering led to spikes in the droplet size distributions using the default sizing procedure, while the stochastic approach reproduced the ambient size distribution adequately. A detailed analysis of the FM-100 sampling efficiency revealed that particle losses were typically below 10% for droplet diameters up to 10 μm. For larger droplets, particle losses can increase up to 90% for the largest droplets of 50 μm at ambient windspeeds below 4.4 m s−1 and even to >90% for larger angles between the instrument orientation and the wind vector (sampling angle at higher wind speeds. Comparisons of the FM-100 to other reference instruments revealed that the total liquid water content (LWC measured by the FM-100 was more sensitive to particle losses than to re-sizing based on Mie scattering, while the total number concentration was only marginally influenced by particle losses. As a consequence, for further LWC measurements with the FM-100 we strongly recommend to consider (1 the error arising due to Mie

  11. Evaluating the capabilities and uncertainties of droplet measurements for the fog droplet spectrometer (FM-100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Spiegel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Droplet size spectra measurements are crucial to obtain a quantitative microphysical description of clouds and fog. However, cloud droplet size measurements are subject to various uncertainties. This work focuses on the error analysis of two key measurement uncertainties arising during cloud droplet size measurements with a conventional droplet size spectrometer (FM-100: first, we addressed the precision with which droplets can be sized with the FM-100 on the basis of the Mie theory. We deduced error assumptions and proposed a new method on how to correct measured size distributions for these errors by redistributing the measured droplet size distribution using a stochastic approach. Second, based on a literature study, we summarized corrections for particle losses during sampling with the FM-100. We applied both corrections to cloud droplet size spectra measured at the high alpine site Jungfraujoch for a temperature range from 0 °C to 11 °C. We showed that Mie scattering led to spikes in the droplet size distributions using the default sizing procedure, while the new stochastic approach reproduced the ambient size distribution adequately. A detailed analysis of the FM-100 sampling efficiency revealed that particle losses were typically below 10% for droplet diameters up to 10 μm. For larger droplets, particle losses can increase up to 90% for the largest droplets of 50 μm at ambient wind speeds below 4.4 m s−1 and even to >90% for larger angles between the instrument orientation and the wind vector (sampling angle at higher wind speeds. Comparisons of the FM-100 to other reference instruments revealed that the total liquid water content (LWC measured by the FM-100 was more sensitive to particle losses than to re-sizing based on Mie scattering, while the total number concentration was only marginally influenced by particle losses. Consequently, for further LWC measurements with the FM-100 we strongly recommend to consider (1 the

  12. Numerical Investigation of the Flow Dynamics and Evaporative Cooling of Water Droplets Impinging onto Heated Surfaces: An Effective Approach To Identify Spray Cooling Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Nan; Zhang, Zhen; Xu, Rui-Na; Ouyang, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Pei-Xue

    2016-09-13

    Numerical investigations of the dynamics and evaporative cooling of water droplets impinging onto heated surfaces can be used to identify spray cooling mechanisms. Droplet impingement dynamics and evaporation are simulated using the presented numerical model. Volume-of-fluid method is used in the model to track the free surface. The contact line dynamics was predicted from a dynamic contact angle model with the evaporation rate predicted by a kinetic theory model. A species transport equation was solved in the gas phase to describe the vapor convection and diffusion. The numerical model was validated by experimental data. The physical effects including the contact angle hysteresis and the thermocapillary effect are analyzed to offer guidance for future numerical models of droplet impingement cooling. The effects of various parameters including surface wettability, surface temperature, droplet velocity, droplet size, and droplet temperature were numerically studied from the standpoint of spray cooling. The numerical simulations offer profound analysis and deep insight into the spray cooling heat transfer mechanisms.

  13. Droplet motion driven by electro-elasto-capillary effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Jaymeen; Yang, Xin; Sun, Ying

    2013-11-01

    The motion of droplets on natural and synthetic fibers underlines many technological applications including flexible displays, insulation, and smart filters. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of the coupled electrical, elastic, and capillary forces on droplets in fiber networks. In the present study, the motion of a water droplet suspended between two electrically insulated fibers of different Young's modulus, lengths and diameters are examined under electric fields. The results on rigid fibers reveal a critical voltage, under which the droplet remain stationary. Above this critical voltage, droplet self-propulsion is observed as a result of the interplay of electro, elasto and capillary forces on the droplet. The effects of the inter-fiber distance and Young's modulus on droplet motion are also discussed. The controllable motion of droplets can be used to manipulate or transport liquid at small scales.

  14. Heat transfer and phase change in an impinging droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangchian, Aysan; Shirazi, Nikki L.; Kavehpour, H. Pirouz

    2016-11-01

    Non isothermal droplet impact on solid surfaces has several industrial applications such as spray cooling and 3D printing. Impinging of a droplet on a surface involves an initial phase of spreading followed by a subsequent return to the equilibrium shape. Thermal energy exchanged within the droplet fluid as well as between liquid/solid during the impact has been studied using an ultra high speed infrared camera. Variable parameters in the experiment include droplet temperature and kinetic energy of the droplet during the impact. The evolution of droplet shape viewed by IR camera is similar to what previously observed by high speed photography. The thermal map of droplet over time in these experiments agrees with previously reported numerical simulation. In addition, spacial and temporal temperature variations of liquid droplets on a surface as they solidify are presented. IR camera provides an accurate temperature diagram as the phase change occurs, which is essential for understanding the physics of 3D printing.

  15. Droplet Velocity in an Electrowetting on Dielectric Digital Microfluidic Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mun Mun Nahar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In many electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD based microfluidics devices, droplet actuation speed is a crucial performance-controlling parameter. Our present study aims to characterize and study droplet speed in a typical EWOD device. First, a practical droplet speed measurement method has been methodically demonstrated and some related velocity terms have been introduced. Next, influence of electrode shape on droplet speed has been studied and a new design to enhance droplet speed has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Instead of using square shaped electrodes, rectangular electrodes with smaller widths are used to actuate droplets. Additionally, different schemes of activating electrodes are studied and compared for the same applied voltage. The experiments show that a particular scheme of activating the array of rectangular electrodes enhances the droplet speed up to 100% in comparison to the droplet speed in a conventional device with square shaped electrodes.

  16. Combinatorial microfluidic droplet engineering for biomimetic material synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawazer, Lukmaan A.; McNally, Ciara S.; Empson, Christopher J.; Marchant, William J.; Comyn, Tim P.; Niu, Xize; Cho, Soongwon; McPherson, Michael J.; Binks, Bernard P.; deMello, Andrew; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-01-01

    Although droplet-based systems are used in a wide range of technologies, opportunities for systematically customizing their interface chemistries remain relatively unexplored. This article describes a new microfluidic strategy for rapidly tailoring emulsion droplet compositions and properties. The approach uses a simple platform for screening arrays of droplet-based microfluidic devices and couples this with combinatorial selection of the droplet compositions. Through the application of genetic algorithms over multiple screening rounds, droplets with target properties can be rapidly generated. The potential of this method is demonstrated by creating droplets with enhanced stability, where this is achieved by selecting carrier fluid chemistries that promote titanium dioxide formation at the droplet interfaces. The interface is a mixture of amorphous and crystalline phases, and the resulting composite droplets are biocompatible, supporting in vitro protein expression in their interiors. This general strategy will find widespread application in advancing emulsion properties for use in chemistry, biology, materials, and medicine.

  17. Acoustic fluidization for earthquakes?

    OpenAIRE

    Sornette, D.; Sornette, A.

    2000-01-01

    Melosh [1996] has suggested that acoustic fluidization could provide an alternative to theories that are invoked as explanations for why some crustal faults appear to be weak. We show that there is a subtle but profound inconsistency in the theory that unfortunately invalidates the results. We propose possible remedies but must acknowledge that the relevance of acoustic fluidization remains an open question.

  18. Sensitive and predictable separation of microfluidic droplets by size using in-line passive filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ruihua; Ung, W Lloyd; Heyman, John A; Weitz, David A

    2017-01-01

    Active manipulation of droplets is crucial in droplet microfluidics. However, droplet polydispersity decreases the accuracy of active manipulation. We develop a microfluidic "droplet filter" that accurately separates droplets by size. The droplet filter has a sharp size cutoff and is capable of distinguishing droplets differing in volume by 20%. A simple model explains the behavior of the droplets as they pass through the filter. We show application of the filter in improving dielectric sorting efficiency.

  19. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, A. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus are presented for measuring the acoustic impedance of a surface in which the surface is used to enclose one end of the chamber of a Helmholz resonator. Acoustic waves are generated in the neck of the resonator by a piston driven by a variable speed motor through a cam assembly. The acoustic waves are measured in the chamber and the frequency of the generated acoustic waves is measured by an optical device. These measurements are used to compute the compliance and conductance of the chamber and surface combined. The same procedure is followed with a calibration plate having infinite acoustic impedance enclosing the chamber of the resonator to compute the compliance and conductance of the chamber alone. Then by subtracting, the compliance and conductance for the surface is obtained.

  20. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.