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Sample records for acids improve cholinergic

  1. Alleviating effects of Bushen-Yizhi formula on ibotenic acid-induced cholinergic impairments in rat.

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    Hou, Xue-Qin; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Cong; Rong, Cui-Ping; He, Wen-Qing; Zhang, Chun-Xia; Li, Shi; Su, Ru-Yu; Chang, Xiang; Qin, Ji-Huan; Chen, Yun-Bo; Xian, Shao-Xiang; Wang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    This study explored the curative effect and underlying mechanisms of a traditional Chinese medicine compound prescription, Bushen-Yizhi formula (BSYZ), in ibotenic acid (IBO)-induced rats. Morris water maze and novel object recognition tests showed that BSYZ significantly improved spatial and object memory. Brain immunohistochemistry staining showed that BSYZ significantly up-regulated expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in the hippocampus and cortex. The protein tyrosine kinase high-affinity receptor TrkA was slightly increased in the hippocampus and cortex, and significantly enhanced in the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM) after BSYZ intervention. The immunoreactivity of the p75 low-affinity receptor in BSYZ-treated rats was significantly strengthened in the cortex. Similar expression trends of nerve growth factor (NGF), TrkA, and p75 mRNA were observed in the hippocampus and cortex. Additionally, BSYZ reversed IBO-induced disorders of acetylcholine (ACh) levels, ChAT, and cholinesterase (ChE) in the cortex, which was consistent with the changes in mRNA levels of ChAT and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Expression of ChAT and AChE proteins and mRNA in the hippocampus was up-regulated, whereas the apoptosis-relative protein cleaved caspase-3 was decreased after administration of BSYZ. Moreover, changes in cell death were confirmed by histological morphology. Thus, the results indicated that the BSYZ formula could ameliorate memory impairments in IBO-induced rats, and it exerted its therapeutic action probably by modulating cholinergic pathways, NGF signaling, and anti-apoptosis. Overall, it is suggested that the BSYZ formula might be a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other cholinergic impairment-related diseases.

  2. Houttuynia cordata Improves Cognitive Deficits in Cholinergic Dysfunction Alzheimer's Disease-Like Models.

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    Huh, Eugene; Kim, Hyo Geun; Park, Hanbyeol; Kang, Min Seo; Lee, Bongyong; Oh, Myung Sook

    2014-05-01

    Cognitive impairment is a result of dementia of diverse causes, such as cholinergic dysfunction and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Houttuynia cordata Thunb. (Saururaceae) has long been used as a traditional herbal medicine. It has biological activities including protective effects against amyloid beta (Aβ) toxicity, via regulation of calcium homeostasis, in rat hippocampal cells. To extend previous reports, we investigated the effects of water extracts of H. cordata herb (HCW) on tauopathies, also involving calcium influx. We then confirmed the effects of HCW in improving memory impairment and neuronal damage in mice with Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. We also investigated the effects of HCW against scopolamine-induced cholinergic dysfunction in mice. In primary neuronal cells, HCW inhibited the phosphorylation of tau by regulating p25/p35 expression in Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. In mice with Aβ-induced neurotoxicity, HCW improved cognitive impairment, as assessed with behavioral tasks, such as novel object recognition, Y-maze, and passive avoidance tasks. HCW also inhibited the degeneration of neurons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus in Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, HCW, which had an IC50 value of 79.7 μg/ml for acetylcholinesterase inhibition, ameliorated scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment significantly in Y-maze and passive avoidance tasks. These results indicate that HCW improved cognitive impairment, due to cholinergic dysfunction, with inhibitory effects against tauopathies and cholinergic antagonists, suggesting that HCW may be an interesting candidate to investigate for the treatment of AD.

  3. Cholinergic stimulation with pyridostigmine improves autonomic function in infarcted rats.

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    de La Fuente, Raquel N; Rodrigues, Bruno; Moraes-Silva, Ivana C; Souza, Leandro E; Sirvente, Raquel; Mostarda, Cristiano; De Angelis, Kátia; Soares, Pedro P; Lacchini, Silvia; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia

    2013-09-01

    In the present study we evaluated the effects of short-term pyridostigmine bromide (0.14 mg/mL) treatment started early after myocardial infarction (MI) on left ventricular (LV) and autonomic functions in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control, pyridostigmine, infarcted and infarcted + pyridostigmine-treated groups. Pyridostigmine was administered in the drinking water, starting immediately after MI or sham operation, for 11 days. Left ventricular function was evaluated indirectly by echocardiography and directly by LV catheterization. Cardiovascular autonomic control was evaluated by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), heart rate variability (HRV) and pharmacological blockade. All evaluations started after 7 days pyridostigmine treatment and were finalized after 11 days treatment. Pyridostigmine prevented the impairment of +dP/dT and reduced the MI area in infarcted + pyridostigmine compared with infarcted rats (7 ± 3% vs 17 ± 4%, respectively). Mean blood pressure was restored in infarcted + pyridostigmine compared with infarcted rats (103 ± 3 vs 94 ± 3 mmHg, respectively). In addition, compared with the infarcted group, pyridostigmine improved BRS, as evaluated by tachycardic (1.6 ± 0.2 vs 2.5 ± 0.2 b.p.m./mmHg, respectively) and bradycardic (-0.42 ± 0.01 vs -1.9 ± 0.1 b.p.m./mmHg) responses, and reduced the low frequency/high frequency ratio of HRV (0.81 ± 0.11 vs 0.24 ± 0.14, respectively). These improvements are probably associated with increased vagal tone and reduced sympathetic tone in infarcted + pyridostigmine compared with infarcted rats. In conclusion, the data suggest that short-term pyridostigmine treatment started early after MI can improve BRS, HRV and parasympathetic and sympathetic tone in experimental rats. These data may have potential clinical implications because autonomic markers have prognostic significance after MI.

  4. Altitude acclimatization improves submaximal cognitive performance in mice and involves an imbalance of the cholinergic system.

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    Guerra-Narbona, R; Delgado-García, J M; López-Ramos, J C

    2013-06-15

    The aim of this work was to reveal a hypothetical improvement of cognitive abilities in animals acclimatized to altitude and performing under ground level conditions, when looking at submaximal performance, once seen that it was not possible when looking at maximal scores. We modified contrasted cognitive tasks (object recognition, operant conditioning, eight-arm radial maze, and classical conditioning of the eyeblink reflex), increasing their complexity in an attempt to find performance differences in acclimatized animals vs. untrained controls. In addition, we studied, through immunohistochemical quantification, the expression of choline acetyltransferase and acetyl cholinesterase, enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of acetylcholine, in the septal area, piriform and visual cortexes, and the hippocampal CA1 area of animals submitted to acute hypobaric hypoxia, or acclimatized to this simulated altitude, to find a relationship between the cholinergic system and a cognitive improvement due to altitude acclimatization. Results showed subtle improvements of the cognitive capabilities of acclimatized animals in all of the tasks when performed under ground-level conditions (although not before 24 h), in the three tasks used to test explicit memory (object recognition, operant conditioning in the Skinner box, and eight-arm radial maze) and (from the first conditioning session) in the classical conditioning task used to evaluate implicit memory. An imbalance of choline acetyltransferase/acetyl cholinesterase expression was found in acclimatized animals, mainly 24 h after the acclimatization period. In conclusion, altitude acclimatization improves cognitive capabilities, in a process parallel to an imbalance of the cholinergic system.

  5. Mangifera indica Fruit Extract Improves Memory Impairment, Cholinergic Dysfunction, and Oxidative Stress Damage in Animal Model of Mild Cognitive Impairment

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    Jintanaporn Wattanathorn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, the effective preventive paradigm against mild cognitive impairment (MCI is required. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether Mangifera indica fruit extract, a substance possessing antioxidant and cognitive enhancing effects, could improve memory impairment, cholinergic dysfunction, and oxidative stress damage in animal model of mild cognitive impairment. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180–200 g, were orally given the extract at doses of 12.5, 50, and 200 mg·kg−1 BW for 2 weeks before and 1 week after the bilateral injection of AF64A (icv. At the end of study, spatial memory, cholinergic neurons density, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px enzymes in hippocampus were determined. The results showed that all doses of extract could improve memory together with the decreased MDA level and the increased SOD and GSH-Px enzymes activities. The increased cholinergic neurons density in CA1 and CA3 of hippocampus was also observed in rats treated with the extract at doses of 50 and 200 mg·kg−1 BW. Therefore, our results suggested that M. indica, the potential protective agent against MCI, increased cholinergic function and the decreased oxidative stress which in turn enhanced memory. However, further researches are essential to elucidate the possible active ingredients and detail mechanism.

  6. Catecholaminergic and cholinergic systems of mouse brain are modulated by LMN diet, rich in theobromine, polyphenols and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

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    Fernández-Fernández, Laura; Esteban, Gerard; Giralt, Mercedes; Valente, Tony; Bolea, Irene; Solé, Montse; Sun, Ping; Benítez, Susana; Morelló, José Ramón; Reguant, Jordi; Ramírez, Bartolomé; Hidalgo, Juan; Unzeta, Mercedes

    2015-04-01

    The possible modulatory effect of the functional LMN diet, rich in theobromine, polyphenols and polyunsaturated fatty acids, on the catecholaminergic and cholinergic neurotransmission, affecting cognition decline during aging has been studied. 129S1/SvlmJ mice were fed for 10, 20, 30 and 40 days with either LMN or control diets. The enzymes involved in catecholaminergic and cholinergic metabolism were determined by both immunohistological and western blot analyses. Noradrenalin, dopamine and other metabolites were quantified by HPLC analysis. Theobromine, present in cocoa, the main LMN diet component, was analysed in parallel using SH-SY5Y and PC12 cell lines. An enhanced modulatory effect on both cholinergic and catecholaminergic transmissions was observed on 20 day fed mice. Similar effect was observed with theobromine, besides its antioxidant capacity inducing SOD-1 and GPx expression. The enhancing effect of the LMN diet and theobromine on the levels of acetylcholine-related enzymes, dopamine and specially noradrenalin confirms the beneficial role of this diet on the "cognitive reserve" and hence a possible reducing effect on cognitive decline underlying aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  7. PRO-CHOLINERGIC, HYPO-CHOLESTEROLEMIC AND MEMORY IMPROVING EFFECTS OF CLOVE

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    Parle Milind

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Clove is found to possess useful medicinal properties, such as anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic and anti-oxidant. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of Syzygium aromaticum (Clove on cognitive functions in mice. Clove powder was administered orally along with diet in three doses (400, 800, 1600mg/kg for seven successive days. 250 Swiss young mice divided in 50 groups and 100 aged mice divided in 20 groups were employed in the present study. The learning and memory parameters were assessed using elevated plus maze, passive avoidance apparatus and Hebb-Williams maze. Clove showed significant improvement in the memory of young and aged animals as reflected by decreased TL as well as TRC and increased SDL values. It also reversed the amnesia caused by ethanol (1.0 g/kg, i.p. and diazepam (1mg/kg, i.p.. Furthermore, Clove reduced significantly the brain cholinesterase activity in young mice by 50.5 % and aged mice by 21.25 % at the dose of 800 mg/kg. Clove also showed remarkable reduction to the extent of 33% and 66.32 % in the total cholesterol levels of young and aged mice at the dose of 800 mg/kg. Diminished cholinergic transmission and high cholesterol levels appear to be responsible for the development of dementia in Alzheimer patients. Since Clove powder enhanced Ach levels and lowered cholesterol levels in the present study; it appears to be a promising candidate for improving memory. Thus it would be worthwhile to explore the potential of this spice (Clove clinically in the management of Alzheimer’s disease.

  8. Cholinergic dermographism.

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    Mayou, S C; Kobza Black, A; Eady, R A; Greaves, M W

    1986-09-01

    We report a patient with cholinergic urticaria in whom stroking the skin produced a band of erythema studded with the small weals characteristics of cholinergic urticaria. This response was suppressed by pre-treatment with topical scopolamine. Light and electron microscopy of the weal showed mast cell degranulation and a moderate mononuclear cell infiltrate.

  9. INTRAHIPPOCAMPAL ADMINISTRATION OF IBOTENIC ACID INDUCED CHOLINERGIC DYSFUNCTION via NR2A/NR2B EXPRESSION: IMPLICATIONS OF RESVERATROL AGAINST ALZHEIMER DISEASE PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

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    Chennakesavan eKarthick

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although several drugs revealed moderate amelioration of symptoms, none of them have sufficient potency to prevent or reverse the progression towards Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathology. Resveratrol (RSV, a polyphenolic compound has shown an outstanding therapeutic effect on a broad spectrum of diseases like age-associated neurodegeneration, inflammation etc. The present study was thus conducted to assess the therapeutic efficacy of RSV in ameliorating the deleterious effects of Ibotenic acid (IBO in male Wistar rats. Stereotactic intrahippocampal administration of IBO (5µg/µl lesioned rats impairs cholinergic transmission, learning and memory performance that is rather related to AD and thus chosen as a suitable model to understand the drug efficacy in preventing AD pathophysiology. Since IBO is an agonist of glutamate, it is expected to exhibit an excitotoxic effect by altering glutamatergic receptors like NMDA receptor. The current study displayed significant alterations in the mRNA expression of NR2A and NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors, and further it is surprising to note that cholinergic receptors decreased in expression particularly α7-nAChR with increased m1AChR. RSV administration (20mg/kg body weight, i.p significantly reduced these changes in IBO induced rats. Glutamatergic and cholinergic receptor alterations were associated with significant changes in the behavioral parameters of rats induced by IBO. While RSV improved spatial learning performance, attenuated immobility and improvised open field activity in IBO induced rats. NR2B activation in the present study might mediate cell death through oxidative stress that form the basis of abnormal behavioral pattern in IBO induced rats. Interestingly, RSV that could efficiently encounter oxidative stress have significantly decreased stress markers viz., nitrite, PCO, and MDA levels by enhancing antioxidant status. Histopathological analysis displayed significant reduction in the

  10. Intrahippocampal Administration of Ibotenic Acid Induced Cholinergic Dysfunction via NR2A/NR2B Expression: Implications of Resveratrol against Alzheimer Disease Pathophysiology.

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    Karthick, Chennakesavan; Periyasamy, Sabapathy; Jayachandran, Kesavan S; Anusuyadevi, Muthuswamy

    2016-01-01

    Although several drugs revealed moderate amelioration of symptoms, none of them have sufficient potency to prevent or reverse the progression toward Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Resveratrol (RSV), a polyphenolic compound has shown an outstanding therapeutic effect on a broad spectrum of diseases like age-associated neurodegeneration, inflammation etc. The present study was thus conducted to assess the therapeutic efficacy of RSV in ameliorating the deleterious effects of Ibotenic acid (IBO) in male Wistar rats. Stereotactic intrahippocampal administration of IBO (5 μg/μl) lesioned rats impairs cholinergic transmission, learning and memory performance that is rather related to AD and thus chosen as a suitable model to understand the drug efficacy in preventing AD pathophysiology. Since IBO is an agonist of glutamate, it is expected to exhibit an excitotoxic effect by altering glutamatergic receptors like NMDA receptor. The current study displayed significant alterations in the mRNA expression of NR2A and NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors, and further it is surprising to note that cholinergic receptors decreased in expression particularly α7-nAChR with increased m1AChR. RSV administration (20 mg/kg body weight, i.p.) significantly reduced these changes in IBO induced rats. Glutamatergic and cholinergic receptor alterations were associated with significant changes in the behavioral parameters of rats induced by IBO. While RSV improved spatial learning performance, attenuated immobility, and improvised open field activity in IBO induced rats. NR2B activation in the present study might mediate cell death through oxidative stress that form the basis of abnormal behavioral pattern in IBO induced rats. Interestingly, RSV that could efficiently encounter oxidative stress have significantly decreased stress markers viz., nitrite, PCO, and MDA levels by enhancing antioxidant status. Histopathological analysis displayed significant reduction in the hippocampal

  11. Hyperbaric Oxygen Prevents Cognitive Impairments in Mice Induced by D-Galactose by Improving Cholinergic and Anti-apoptotic Functions.

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    Chen, Chunxia; Huang, Luying; Nong, Zhihuan; Li, Yaoxuan; Chen, Wan; Huang, Jianping; Pan, Xiaorong; Wu, Guangwei; Lin, Yingzhong

    2017-01-11

    Our previous study demonstrated that hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) improved cognitive impairments mainly by regulating oxidative stress, inflammatory responses and aging-related gene expression. However, a method for preventing cognitive dysfunction has yet to be developed. In the present study, we explored the protective effects of HBO on the cholinergic system and apoptosis in D-galactose (D-gal)-treated mice. A model of aging was established via systemic intraperitoneal injection of D-gal daily for 8 weeks. HBO was administered during the last 2 weeks of D-gal injection. Our results showed that HBO in D-gal-treated mice significantly improved behavioral performance on the open field test and passive avoidance task. Studies on the potential mechanisms of this effect showed that HBO significantly reduced oxidative stress and blocked the nuclear factor-κB pathway. Moreover, HBO significantly increased the levels of choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholine and decreased the activity of acetylcholinesterase in the hippocampus. Furthermore, HBO markedly increased expression of the anti-apoptosis protein Bcl-2 and glial fibrillary acidic protein meanwhile decreased expression of the pro-apoptosis proteins Bax and caspase-3. Importantly, there was a significant reduction in expression of Aβ-related genes, such as amyloid precursor protein, β-site amyloid cleaving enzyme-1 and cathepsin B mRNA. These decreases were accompanied by significant increases in expression of neprilysin and insulin-degrading enzyme mRNA. Moreover, compared with the Vitamin E group, HBO combined with Vitamin E exhibited significant difference in part of the above mention parameters. These findings suggest that HBO may act as a neuroprotective agent in preventing cognitive impairments.

  12. The quantitative evaluation of cholinergic markers in spatial memory improvement induced by nicotine-bucladesine combination in rats.

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    Azami, Kian; Etminani, Maryam; Tabrizian, Kaveh; Salar, Fatemeh; Belaran, Maryam; Hosseini, Asieh; Hosseini-Sharifabad, Ali; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2010-06-25

    We previously showed that post-training intra-hippocampal infusion of nicotine-bucladesine combination enhanced spatial memory retention in the Morris water maze. Here we investigated the role of cholinergic markers in nicotine-bucladesine combination-induced memory improvement. We assessed the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) in CA1 region of the hippocampus and medial septal area (MSA) of the brain. Post-training bilateral infusion of a low concentration of either nicotine or bucladesine into the CA1 region of the hippocampus did not affect spatial memory significantly. Quantitative immunostaining analysis of optical density in CA1 regions and evaluation of immunopositive neurons in medial septal area of brain sections from all combination groups revealed a significant increase (Pnicotine and in a concentration dependent manner. Also, increase in the optical density and amount of ChAT and VAChT immunostaining correlated with the decrease in escape latency and traveled distance in rats treated with nicotine and low dose of bucladesine. Taken together, these results suggest that significant increases of ChAT and VAChT protein expressions in the CA1 region and medial septal area are the possible mechanisms of spatial memory improvement induced by nicotine-bucladesine combination.

  13. Cholinergic modulation of non-N-methyl-D-aspartic acid glutamatergic transmission in the chick ventral lateral geniculate nucleus.

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    Guo, J-Z; Sorenson, E M; Chiappinelli, V A

    2010-03-17

    Neurotransmission between glutamatergic terminals of retinal ganglion cells and principal neurons of the ventral lateral geniculate nucleus (LGNv) was examined with patch clamp recordings in chick brain slices during electrical stimulation of the optic tract. Since muscarinic and nicotinic receptors are present in high densities in LGNv, the present study examined possible roles of both receptors in modulating retinogeniculate transmission. During whole-cell recordings from LGNv neurons, acetylcholine (ACh, 100 microM) caused an initial increase in amplitudes of optic tract-evoked non-N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) glutamatergic postsynaptic currents (PSCs). This increase was unchanged when 1 microM atropine was present, indicating that this initial enhancement of PSCs was due entirely to activation of nicotinic receptors. However, during washout of ACh the amplitudes of evoked PSCs became significantly decreased by 40.4+/-5.0% for several minutes before recovering to their original amplitudes, an effect blocked by 1 microM atropine. Exogenously applied muscarine (10 microM) markedly depressed optic tract-evoked PSCs, and this decrease in amplitude was blocked by atropine. In a second set of experiments, we examined effects of releasing endogenous ACh prior to optic tract stimulation. This was accomplished by stimulation of the lateral portion of LGNv via a separate conditioning electrode. Following a brief train of low intensity conditioning stimuli, non-NMDA glutamatergic PSCs evoked by optic tract stimulation were potentiated. However, at higher conditioning stimulus intensities the PSCs were markedly decreased compared with control, and this decrease was partially blocked by atropine (1 microM). Neither ACh nor muscarine altered amplitudes of PSCs elicited by exogenously applied glutamate. Muscarine significantly reduced the frequency but not the amplitudes of miniature PSCs, consistent with a presynaptic location for muscarinic receptors mediating these

  14. Improvements in Memory after Medial Septum Stimulation Are Associated with Changes in Hippocampal Cholinergic Activity and Neurogenesis

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    Da Un Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS has been found to have therapeutic effects in patients with dementia, but DBS mechanisms remain elusive. To provide evidence for the effectiveness of DBS as a treatment for dementia, we performed DBS in a rat model of dementia with intracerebroventricular administration of 192 IgG-saporins. We utilized four groups of rats, group 1, unlesioned control; group 2, cholinergic lesion; group 3, cholinergic lesion plus medial septum (MS electrode implantation (sham stimulation; group 4, cholinergic lesions plus MS electrode implantation and stimulation. During the probe test in the water maze, performance of the lesion group decreased for measures of time spent and the number of swim crossings over the previous platform location. Interestingly, the stimulation group showed an equivalent performance to the normal group on all measures. And these are partially reversed by the electrode implantation. Acetylcholinesterase activity in the hippocampus was decreased in lesion and implantation groups, whereas activity in the stimulation group was not different from the normal group. Hippocampal neurogenesis was increased in the stimulation group. Our results revealed that DBS of MS restores spatial memory after damage to cholinergic neurons. This effect is associated with an increase in hippocampal cholinergic activity and neurogenesis.

  15. Acid-gastric antisecretory effect of the ethanolic extract from Arctium lappa L. root: role of H(+), K(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+) influx and the cholinergic pathway.

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    da Silva, Luisa Mota; Burci, Ligia de Moura; Crestani, Sandra; de Souza, Priscila; da Silva, Rita de Cássia Melo Vilhena de Andrade Fonseca; Dartora, Nessana; de Souza, Lauro Mera; Cipriani, Thales Ricardo; da Silva-Santos, José Eduardo; André, Eunice; Werner, Maria Fernanda de Paula

    2017-07-28

    Arctium lappa L., popularly known as burdock, is a medicinal plant used worldwide. The antiulcer and gastric-acid antisecretory effects of ethanolic extract from roots of Arctium lappa (EET) were already demonstrated. However, the mechanism by which the extract reduces the gastric acid secretion remains unclear. Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the antisecretory mode of action of EET. The effects of EET on H(+), K(+)-ATPase activity were verified in vitro, whereas the effects of the extract on cholinergic-, histaminergic- or gastrinergic-acid gastric stimulation were assessed in vivo on stimulated pylorus ligated rats. Moreover, ex vivo contractility studies on gastric muscle strips from rats were also employed. The incubation with EET (1000 µg/ml) partially inhibited H(+), K(+)-ATPase activity, and the intraduodenal administration of EET (10 mg/kg) decreased the volume and acidity of gastric secretion stimulated by bethanechol, histamine, and pentagastrin. EET (100-1000 µg/ml) did not alter the gastric relaxation induced by histamine but decreased acetylcholine-induced contraction in gastric fundus strips. Interestingly, EET also reduced the increase in the gastric muscle tone induced by 40 mM KCl depolarizing solution, as well as the maximum contractile responses evoked by CaCl2 in Ca(2+)-free depolarizing solution, without impairing the effect of acetylcholine on fundus strips maintained in Ca(2+) -free nutritive solution. Our results reinforce the gastric antisecretory properties of preparations obtained from Arctium lappa, and indicate that the mechanisms involved in EET antisecretory effects include a moderate reduction of the H(+), K(+)-ATPase activity associated with inhibitory effects on calcium influx and of cholinergic pathways in the stomach muscle.

  16. Nicotine increases impulsivity and decreases willingness to exert cognitive effort despite improving attention in "slacker" rats: insights into cholinergic regulation of cost/benefit decision making.

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    Jay G Hosking

    Full Text Available Successful decision making in our daily lives requires weighing an option's costs against its associated benefits. The neuromodulator acetylcholine underlies both the etiology and treatment of a number of illnesses in which decision making is perturbed, including Alzheimer's disease, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and schizophrenia. Nicotine acts on the cholinergic system and has been touted as a cognitive enhancer by both smokers and some researchers for its attention-boosting effects; however, it is unclear whether treatments that have a beneficial effect on attention would also have a beneficial effect on decision making. Here we utilize the rodent Cognitive Effort Task (rCET, wherein animals can choose to allocate greater visuospatial attention for a greater reward, to examine cholinergic contributions to both attentional performance and choice based on attentional demand. Following the establishment of baseline behavior, four drug challenges were administered: nicotine, mecamylamine, scopolamine, and oxotremorine (saline plus three doses for each. As per previous rCET studies, animals were divided by their baseline preferences, with "worker" rats choosing high-effort/high-reward options more than their "slacker" counterparts. Nicotine caused slackers to choose even fewer high-effort trials than at baseline, but had no effect on workers' choice. Despite slackers' decreased willingness to expend effort, nicotine improved their attentional performance on the task. Nicotine also increased measures of motor impulsivity in all animals. In contrast, scopolamine decreased animals' choice of high-effort trials, especially for workers, while oxotremorine decreased motor impulsivity for all animals. In sum, the cholinergic system appears to contribute to decision making, and in part these contributions can be understood as a function of individual differences. While nicotine has been considered as a cognitive enhancer, these data suggest

  17. Laser Acupuncture at HT7 Acupoint Improves Cognitive Deficit, Neuronal Loss, Oxidative Stress, and Functions of Cholinergic and Dopaminergic Systems in Animal Model of Parkinson's Disease.

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    Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Sutalangka, Chatchada

    2014-01-01

    To date, the therapeutic strategy against cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) is still not in satisfaction level and requires novel effective intervention. Based the oxidative stress reduction and cognitive enhancement induced by laser acupuncture at HT7, the beneficial effect of laser acupuncture at HT7 against cognitive impairment in PD has been focused. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of laser acupuncture at HT7 on memory impairment, oxidative stress status, and the functions of both cholinergic and dopaminergic systems in hippocampus of animal model of PD. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180-220 g, were induced unilateral lesion at right substantianigra by 6-OHDA and were treated with laser acupuncture continuously at a period of 14 days. The results showed that laser acupuncture at HT7 enhanced memory and neuron density in CA3 and dentate gyrus. The decreased AChE, MAO-B, and MDA together with increased GSH-Px in hippocampus of a 6-OHDA lesion rats were also observed. In conclusion, laser acupuncture at HT7 can improve neuron degeneration and memory impairment in animal model of PD partly via the decreased oxidative stress and the improved cholinergic and dopaminergic functions. More researches concerning effect of treatment duration are still required.

  18. Cholinergic Mechanisms in Spinal Locomotion - Potential Target for Rehabilitation Approaches

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    L M Jordan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments implicate cholinergic brainstem and spinal systems in the control of locomotion. Our results demonstrate that the endogenous cholinergic propriospinal system, acting via M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors, is capable of consistently producing well-coordinated locomotor activity in the in vitro neonatal preparation, placing it in a position to contribute to normal locomotion and to provide a basis for recovery of locomotor capability in the absence of descending pathways. Tests of these suggestions, however, reveal that the spinal cholinergic system plays little if any role in the induction of locomotion, because MLR-evoked locomotion in decerebrate cats is not prevented by cholinergic antagonists. Furthermore, it is not required for the development of stepping movements after spinal cord injury, because cholinergic agonists do not facilitate the appearance of locomotion after spinal cord injury, unlike the dramatic locomotion-promoting effects of clonidine, a noradrenergic α-2 agonist. Furthermore, cholinergic antagonists actually improve locomotor activity after spinal cord injury, suggesting that plastic changes in the spinal cholinergic system interfere with locomotion rather than facilitating it. Changes that have been observed in the cholinergic innervation of motoneurons after spinal cord injury do not decrease motoneuron excitability, as expected. Instead, the development of a hyper-cholinergic state after spinal cord injury appears to enhance motoneuron output and suppress locomotion. A cholinergic suppression of afferent input from the limb after spinal cord injury is also evident from our data, and this may contribute to the ability of cholinergic antagonists to improve locomotion. Not only is a role for the spinal cholinergic system in supressing locomotion after SCI suggested by our results, but an obligatory contribution of a brainstem cholinergic relay to reticulospinal locomotor command systems is not confirmed

  19. Activation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 4 is Essential for Cholinergic Stimulation of Gastric Acid Secretion - Relation To D Cell/Somatostatin -

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    Koji Takeuchi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground/Aim: Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors exist in five subtypes (M1~M5, and they are widely expressed in various tissues to mediate diverse autonomic functions, including gastric secretion. In the present study, we demonstrated, using M1~M5 KO mice, the importance of M4 receptors in carbachol (CCh stimulation of acid secretion and investigated how the secretion is modulated by the activation of M4 receptors. Methods: C57BL/6J mice of wild-type (WT and M1-M5 KO were used. Under urethane anesthesia, acid secretion was measured in the stomach equipped with an acute fistula. CCh (30 µg/kg was given s.c. to stimulate acid secretion. Atropine or octreotide (a somatostatin analogue was given s.c. 20 min before the administration of CCh. CYN154806 (a somatostatin SST2 receptor antagonist was given i.p. 20 min before the administration of octreotide or CCh. Results: CCh caused an increase of acid secretion in WT mice, and the effect was totally inhibited by prior administration of atropine. The effect of CCh was similarly observed in the animals lacking M1, M2 or M5 receptors but significantly decreased in M3 or M4 KO mice. CYN154806, the SST2 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently and significantly reversed the decreased acid response to CCh in M4 but not M3 KO mice. Octreotide, the somatostatin analogue, inhibited the secretion of acid under CCh-stimulated conditions in WT mice. The immunohistochemical study showed the localization of M4 receptors on D cells in the stomach. Serum somatostatin levels in M4 KO mice were higher than WT mice under basal conditions, while those in WT mice were significantly decreased in response to CCh. Conclusions: These results suggest that under cholinergic stimulation the acid secretion is directly mediated by M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. It is assumed that the activation of M4 receptors inhibits the release of somatostatin from D cells and minimizes the acid inhibitory effect

  20. Cholinergic Potentiation and Audiovisual Repetition-Imitation Therapy Improve Speech Production and Communication Deficits in a Person with Crossed Aphasia by Inducing Structural Plasticity in White Matter Tracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo L. Berthier

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Donepezil (DP, a cognitive-enhancing drug targeting the cholinergic system, combined with massed sentence repetition training augmented and speeded up recovery of speech production deficits in patients with chronic conduction aphasia and extensive left hemisphere infarctions (Berthier et al., 2014. Nevertheless, a still unsettled question is whether such improvements correlate with restorative structural changes in gray matter and white matter pathways mediating speech production. In the present study, we used pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging to study treatment-induced brain changes in gray matter and white matter tracts in a right-handed male with chronic conduction aphasia and a right subcortical lesion (crossed aphasia. A single-patient, open-label multiple-baseline design incorporating two different treatments and two post-treatment evaluations was used. The patient received an initial dose of DP (5 mg/day which was maintained during 4 weeks and then titrated up to 10 mg/day and administered alone (without aphasia therapy during 8 weeks (Endpoint 1. Thereafter, the drug was combined with an audiovisual repetition-imitation therapy (Look-Listen-Repeat, LLR during 3 months (Endpoint 2. Language evaluations, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, and voxel-based morphometry (VBM were performed at baseline and at both endpoints in JAM and once in 21 healthy control males. Treatment with DP alone and combined with LLR therapy induced marked improvement in aphasia and communication deficits as well as in selected measures of connected speech production, and phrase repetition. The obtained gains in speech production remained well-above baseline scores even 4 months after ending combined therapy. Longitudinal DWI showed structural plasticity in the right frontal aslant tract and direct segment of the arcuate fasciculus with both interventions. VBM revealed no structural changes in other white matter tracts nor in cortical areas linked by these

  1. Tiliacora triandra, an Anti-Intoxication Plant, Improves Memory Impairment, Neurodegeneration, Cholinergic Function, and Oxidative Stress in Hippocampus of Ethanol Dependence Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattaporn Phunchago

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays an important role in brain dysfunctions induced by alcohol. Since less therapeutic agent against cognitive deficit and brain damage induced by chronic alcohol consumption is less available, we aimed to assess the effect of Tiliacora triandra extract, a plant possessing antioxidant activity, on memory impairment, neuron density, cholinergic function, and oxidative stress in hippocampus of alcoholic rats. Male Wistar rats were induced ethanol dependence condition by semivoluntary intake of alcohol for 15 weeks. Alcoholic rats were orally given T. triandra at doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg·kg−1BW for 14 days. Memory assessment was performed every 7 days while neuron density, activities of AChE, SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px and, MDA level in hippocampus were assessed at the end of study. Interestingly, the extract mitigated the increased escape latency, AChE and MDA level. The extract also mitigated the decreased retention time, SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px activities, and neurons density in hippocampus induced by alcohol. These data suggested that the extract improved memory deficit in alcoholic rats partly via the decreased oxidative stress and the suppression of AChE. Therefore, T. triandra is the potential reagent for treating brain dysfunction induced by alcohol. However, further researches are necessary to understand the detail mechanism and possible active ingredient.

  2. Flurbiprofen, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, reduces the brain arachidonic acid signal in response to the cholinergic muscarinic agonist, arecoline, in awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basselin, Mireille; Villacreses, Nelly E; Lee, Ho-Joo; Bell, Jane M; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2007-11-01

    Cholinergic muscarinic receptors, when stimulated by arecoline, can activate cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) to release arachidonic acid (AA) from membrane phospholipid. This signal can be imaged in the brain in vivo using quantitative autoradiography following the intravenous injection of radiolabeled AA, as an increment in a regional brain AA incorporation coefficient k*. Arecoline increases k* significantly in brain regions having muscarinic M(1,3,5) receptors in wild-type but not in cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 knockout mice. To further clarify the roles of COX enzymes in the AA signal, in this paper we imaged k* following arecoline (5 mg/kg i.p.) or saline in each of 81 brain regions of unanesthetized rats pretreated 6 h earlier with the non-selective COX inhibitor flurbiprofen (FB, 60 mg/kg s.c.) or with vehicle. Baseline values of k* were unaffected by FB treatment, which however reduced by 80% baseline brain concentrations of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and thromboxane B(2) (TXB(2)), eicosanoids preferentially derived from AA via COX-2 and COX-1, respectively. In vehicle-pretreated rats, arecoline increased the brain PGE(2) but not TXB(2) concentration, as well as values for k* in 77 of the 81 brain regions. FB-pretreatment prevented these arecoline-provoked changes. These results and those reported in COX-2 knockout mice suggest that the AA released in brain following muscarinic receptor-mediated activation is lost via COX-2 to PGE(2) but not via COX-1 to TXB(2), and that increments in k* following arecoline largely represent replacement by unesterified plasma AA of this loss.

  3. Nematode cholinergic pharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segerberg, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Nematode acetylcholine (ACh) receptors were characterized using both biochemical and electrophysiological techniques, including: (1) receptor binding studies in crude homogenates of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the parasitic nematode Ascaris lumbricoides with the high-affinity probe ({sup 3}H)N-methylscopolamine (({sup 3}H)NMS) which binds to muscarinic receptors in many vertebrate and invertebrate tissues (2) measurement of depolarization and contraction induced by a variety of cholinergic agents, including N-methylscopolamine (NMS), in an innervated dorsal muscle strip preparation of Ascaris; (3) examination of the antagonistic actions of d-tubocurarine (dTC) and NMS at dorsal neuromuscular junction; (4) measurement of input resistance changes in Ascaris commissural motorneurons induced by ACh, dTC, NMS, pilocarpine and other cholinergic drugs.

  4. Cholinergic imaging in dementia spectrum disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Roman; Niccolini, Flavia; Pagano, Gennaro; Politis, Marios [Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King' s College London, Neurodegeneration Imaging Group, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    The multifaceted nature of the pathology of dementia spectrum disorders has complicated their management and the development of effective treatments. This is despite the fact that they are far from uncommon, with Alzheimer's disease (AD) alone affecting 35 million people worldwide. The cholinergic system has been found to be crucially involved in cognitive function, with cholinergic dysfunction playing a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of dementia. The use of molecular imaging such as SPECT and PET for tagging targets within the cholinergic system has shown promise for elucidating key aspects of underlying pathology in dementia spectrum disorders, including AD or parkinsonian dementias. SPECT and PET studies using selective radioligands for cholinergic markers, such as [{sup 11}C]MP4A and [{sup 11}C]PMP PET for acetylcholinesterase (AChE), [{sup 123}I]5IA SPECT for the α{sub 4}β{sub 2} nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and [{sup 123}I]IBVM SPECT for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, have been developed in an attempt to clarify those aspects of the diseases that remain unclear. This has led to a variety of findings, such as cortical AChE being significantly reduced in Parkinson's disease (PD), PD with dementia (PDD) and AD, as well as correlating with certain aspects of cognitive function such as attention and working memory. Thalamic AChE is significantly reduced in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy, whilst it is not affected in PD. Some of these findings have brought about suggestions for the improvement of clinical practice, such as the use of a thalamic/cortical AChE ratio to differentiate between PD and PSP, two diseases that could overlap in terms of initial clinical presentation. Here, we review the findings from molecular imaging studies that have investigated the role of the cholinergic system in dementia spectrum disorders. (orig.)

  5. Cholinergic connectivity: it’s implications for psychiatric disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth eScarr

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine has been implicated in both the pathophysiology and treatment of a number of psychiatric disorders, with most of the data related to its role and therapeutic potential focussing on schizophrenia. However, there is little thought given to the consequences of the documented changes in the cholinergic system and how they may affect the functioning of the brain. This review looks at the cholinergic system and its interactions with the intrinsic neurotransmitters glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid as well as those with the projection neurotransmitters most implicated in the pathophysiologies of psychiatric disorders; dopamine and serotonin. In addition, with the recent focus on the role of factors normally associated with inflammation in the pathophysiologies of psychiatric disorders, links between the cholinergic system and these factors will also be examined. These interfaces are put into context, primarily for schizophrenia, by looking at the changes in each of these systems in the disorder and exploring, theoretically, whether the changes are interconnected with those seen in the cholinergic system. Thus, this review will provide a comprehensive overview of the connectivity between the cholinergic system and some of the major areas of research into the pathophysiologies of psychiatric disorders, resulting in a critical appraisal of the potential outcomes of a dysregulated central cholinergic system.

  6. Erucic acid rapeseed: 1. Prospects of improvements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanyal Anushree

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the current context of boosting production of high erucic acid rapeseed, because of the wide range of its industrial applications, this literature review is designed to provide a general overview of available varieties, current knowledge of plant improvement and paths of developing research to increase competitiveness of varieties with high erucic acid content. A limited market dominated by a few companies, cropping burdens of high erucic acid rapeseed varieties among the majority “00” varieties and the still low erucic acid content in rapeseed, explains the reduced and uncompetitive varietal offers. To improve this situation, new varieties could be developed, thanks to the classical methods of selection and biotechnology.

  7. [Cholinergic system of the heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kučera, Matej; Hrabovská, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The cholinergic system of the heart can be either of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. The neuronal cholinergic system in the heart is represented by preganglionic parasympathetic pathways, intracardiac parasympathetic ganglia and postganglionic parasympathetic neurons projecting to the atria, SA node and AV node. The non-neuronal cholinergic system consists of cardiomyocytes that have complete equipment for synthesis and secretion of acetylcholine. Current knowledge suggests that the non-neuronal cholinergic system in the heart affects the regulation of the heart during sympathetic activation. The non-neuronal cholinergic system of the heart plays also a role in the energy metabolism of cardimyocites. Acetylcholine of both neuronal and non-neuronal origin acts in the heart through muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. The effect of acetylcholine in the heart is terminated by cholinesterases acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase. Recently, papers suggest that the increased cholinergic tone in the heart by cholinesterase inhibitors has a positive effect on some cardiovascular disorders such as heart failure. For this reason, the cholinesterase inhibitors might be used in the treatment of certain cardiovascular disorders in the future.

  8. The acid steatocrit: a much improved method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, M; Forget, P; Van den Neucker, A; Strik, J; van Kreel, B; Kuijten, R

    1994-10-01

    The steatocrit method has recently been introduced as a simple screening test for steatorrhea. As it seemed likely that separation of fecal homogenate by centrifugation into a lipid phase, a watery phase, and a solid phase would be pH-dependent, we evaluated the effect of fecal acidification on steatocrit results. We also compared classical and acid steatocrit results in healthy children and in patients with cystic fibrosis and studied the relationship between two steatocrit methods and fecal fat content as measured by a reference chemical method. Steatocrit results increased with the degree of fecal acidification, and maximal results were obtained at the lowest fecal pH values. Means and SEM for classical and acid steatocrit values were 1.1 +/- 0.4% (classical) versus 3.8 +/- 1% (acid) in controls (n = 6) and 5.4 +/- 1.9% (classical) versus 26.9 +/- 4.3% (acid) in cystic fibrosis patients (n = 9). The correlations between fecal fat content measured chemically and steatocrit results were 0.18 (p = 0.35) and 0.81 (p < 0.0001) for classical and acid steatocrit, respectively. We conclude that acidification of fecal homogenates leads to a marked improvement in the steatocrit method.

  9. Physical urticarias and cholinergic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abajian, Marina; Schoepke, Nicole; Altrichter, Sabine; Zuberbier, Torsten; Zuberbier, H C Torsten; Maurer, Marcus

    2014-02-01

    Physical urticarias are a unique subgroup of chronic urticaria in which urticarial responses can be reproducibly induced by different specific physical stimuli acting on the skin. These conditions include urticaria factitia/symptomatic dermographism, delayed pressure urticaria, cold contact urticaria, heat contact urticaria, solar urticaria, and vibratory urticaria/angioedema. Physical urticarias and cholinergic urticarias are diagnosed based on the patients' history and provocation tests including trigger threshold testing where possible. Treatment is mainly symptomatic. Many patients benefit from avoiding eliciting triggers, and desensitization to these triggers can be helpful in some physical urticarias and in cholinergic urticaria.

  10. Cholinergic deficiency involved in vascular dementia:possible mechanism and strategy of treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan WANG; Hai-yan ZHANG; Xi-can TANG

    2009-01-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with a high prevalence.Several studies have recently reported that VaD patients present cholinergic deficits in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that may be closely related to the pathophysiology of cognitive impairment.Moreover,cholinergic therapies have shown promising effects on cognitive improvement in VaD patients.The precise mechanisms of these cholinergic agents are currently not fully understood;however,accumulating evidence indicates that these drugs may act through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway,in which the efferent vagus nerve signals suppress pro-inflammatory cytokine release and inhibit inflammation,although regulation of oxidative stress and energy metabolism,alleviation of apoptosis may also be involved.In this paper,we provide a brief overview of the cholinergic treatment strategy for VaD and its relevant mechanisms of anti-inflammation.

  11. Glial response in the rat models of functionally distinct cholinergic neuronal denervations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataveljic, Danijela; Petrovic, Jelena; Lazic, Katarina; Saponjic, Jasna; Andjus, Pavle

    2015-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves selective loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, particularly in the nucleus basalis (NB). Similarly, Parkinson's disease (PD) might involve the selective loss of pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) cholinergic neurons. Therefore, lesions of these functionally distinct cholinergic centers in rats might serve as models of AD and PD cholinergic neuropathologies. Our previous articles described dissimilar sleep/wake-state disorders in rat models of AD and PD cholinergic neuropathologies. This study further examines astroglial and microglial responses as underlying pathologies in these distinct sleep disorders. Unilateral lesions of the NB or the PPT were induced with rats under ketamine/diazepam anesthesia (50 mg/kg i.p.) by using stereotaxically guided microinfusion of the excitotoxin ibotenic acid (IBO). Twenty-one days after the lesion, loss of cholinergic neurons was quantified by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase histochemistry, and the astroglial and microglial responses were quantified by glia fibrillary acidic protein/OX42 immunohistochemistry. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the anatomofunctionally related astroglial response following unilateral excitotoxic PPT cholinergic neuronal lesion. Whereas IBO NB and PPT lesions similarly enhanced local astroglial and microglial responses, astrogliosis in the PPT was followed by a remote astrogliosis within the ipslilateral NB. Conversely, there was no microglial response within the NB after PPT lesions. Our results reveal the rostrorostral PPT-NB astrogliosis after denervation of cholinergic neurons in the PPT. This hierarchically and anatomofunctionally guided PPT-NB astrogliosis emerged following cholinergic neuronal loss greater than 17% throughout the overall rostrocaudal PPT dimension.

  12. Topical tranexamic acid improves the permeability barrier in rosacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaomin Zhong

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Topical tranexamic acid could improve the epidermal permeability barrier function and clinical signs of rosacea, likely resulting from inhibition of PAR-2 activation and consequent calcium influx. Thus, tranexamic acid could serve as an adjuvant therapy for rosacea.

  13. Development of cardiac parasympathetic neurons, glial cells, and regional cholinergic innervation of the mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregoso, S P; Hoover, D B

    2012-09-27

    Very little is known about the development of cardiac parasympathetic ganglia and cholinergic innervation of the mouse heart. Accordingly, we evaluated the growth of cholinergic neurons and nerve fibers in mouse hearts from embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5) through postnatal day 21(P21). Cholinergic perikarya and varicose nerve fibers were identified in paraffin sections immunostained for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Satellite cells and Schwann cells in adjacent sections were identified by immunostaining for S100β calcium binding protein (S100) and brain-fatty acid binding protein (B-FABP). We found that cardiac ganglia had formed in close association to the atria and cholinergic innervation of the atrioventricular junction had already begun by E18.5. However, most cholinergic innervation of the heart, including the sinoatrial node, developed postnatally (P0.5-P21) along with a doubling of the cross-sectional area of cholinergic perikarya. Satellite cells were present throughout neonatal cardiac ganglia and expressed primarily B-FABP. As they became more mature at P21, satellite cells stained strongly for both B-FABP and S100. Satellite cells appeared to surround most cardiac parasympathetic neurons, even in neonatal hearts. Mature Schwann cells, identified by morphology and strong staining for S100, were already present at E18.5 in atrial regions that receive cholinergic innervation at later developmental times. The abundance and distribution of S100-positive Schwann cells increased postnatally along with nerve density. While S100 staining of cardiac Schwann cells was maintained in P21 and older mice, Schwann cells did not show B-FABP staining at these times. Parallel development of satellite cells and cholinergic perikarya in the cardiac ganglia and the increase in abundance of Schwann cells and varicose cholinergic nerve fibers in the atria suggest that neuronal-glial interactions could be important for development of the parasympathetic nervous

  14. Huperzine A protects sepsis associated encephalopathy by promoting the deficient cholinergic nervous function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Sen-Zhi; Huang, Wei-Ping; Huang, Lin-Qiang; Han, Yong-Li; Han, Qian-Peng; Zhu, Gao-Feng; Wen, Miao-Yun; Deng, Yi-Yu; Zeng, Hong-Ke

    2016-09-19

    Neuroinflammatory deregulation in the brain plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE). Given the mounting evidence of anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of the cholinergic nervous system, it is surprising that there is little information about its changes in the brain during sepsis. To elucidate the role of the cholinergic nervous system in SAE, hippocampal choline acetyltransferase, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-1, acetylcholinesterase and acetylcholine were evaluated in LPS-induced sepsis rats. Expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, neuronal apoptosis, and animal cognitive performance were also assessed. Furthermore, therapeutic effects of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor Huperzine A (HupA) on the hippocampal cholinergic nervous function and neuroinflammation were evaluated. A deficiency of the cholinergic nervous function was revealed in SAE, accompanied with over-expressed pro-inflammatory cytokines, increase in neuronal apoptosis and brain cognitive impairment. HupA remarkably promoted the deficient cholinergic nervous function and attenuated the abnormal neuroinflammation in SAE, paralleled with the recovery of brain function. We suggest that the deficiency of the cholinergic nervous function and the abnormal neuroinflammation are synergistically implicated in the pathogenesis of SAE. Thus, HupA is a potential therapeutic candidate for SAE, as it improves the deficient cholinergic nervous function and exerts anti-inflammatory action.

  15. Alterations of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, cholinergic and antioxidant enzymes activity by protocatechuic acid in cadmium-induced neurotoxicity and oxidative stress in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adefegha, Stephen A; Oboh, Ganiyu; Omojokun, Olasunkanmi S; Adefegha, Omowunmi M

    2016-10-01

    This study assessed the possible protective mechanisms of protocatechuic acid (PCA) against cadmium (Cd)-induced oxidative stress and neurotoxicity in rats. Male wistar strain rats weighing between 150-160g were purchased and acclimatized for two weeks. The rats were divided into seven groups of seven each; NC group received normal saline, CAD group received 6mg/kg of Cd-solution, CAD+PSG group received Cd-solution and prostigmine (5mg/kg), CAD+PCA-10 and CAD+PCA-20 groups received Cd-solution and PCA (10mg/kg and 20mg/kg) respectively, PCA-10 and PCA-20 groups received 10mg/kg and 20mg/kg PCA each. Animals were administered normal saline, Cd and PCA daily by oral gavage for 21days. After which the animals were sacrificed, the brain excised, homogenized and centrifuged. The activities of enzymes (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, cholinesterases, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase) and levels of oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione) linked to neurodegeneration were subsequently assessed. Significant (penzyme activities and levels of oxidative stress markers were observed in CAD group when compared to the NC group. However, the activities of the enzymes were reversed in CAD+PSG and CAD+PCA groups. PCA may protect against cadmium-induced neurotoxicity by altering the activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase and endogenous antioxidant enzymes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang; Yongchun Tang; William A. Goddard

    2005-12-09

    In the past three years, we followed the work plan as we suggested in the proposal and made every efforts to fulfill the project objectives. Based on our large amount of creative and productive work, including both of experimental and theoretic aspects, we received important technical breakthrough on naphthenic acid removal process and obtained deep insight on catalytic decarboxylation chemistry. In detail, we established an integrated methodology to serve for all of the experimental and theoretical work. Our experimental investigation results in discovery of four type effective catalysts to the reaction of decarboxylation of model carboxylic acid compounds. The adsorption experiment revealed the effectiveness of several solid materials to naphthenic acid adsorption and acidity reduction of crude oil, which can be either natural minerals or synthesized materials. The test with crude oil also received promising results, which can be potentially developed into a practical process for oil industry. The theoretical work predicted several possible catalytic decarboxylation mechanisms that would govern the decarboxylation pathways depending on the type of catalysts being used. The calculation for reaction activation energy was in good agreement with our experimental measurements.

  17. Chronic treatment with taurine after intracerebroventricular streptozotocin injection improves cognitive dysfunction in rats by modulating oxidative stress, cholinergic functions and neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeta, K H; Singh, Devendra; Gupta, Y K

    2017-03-08

    The present study investigated the neuroprotective effects of taurine, an essential amino acid for growth and development of central nervous system. Intracerebroventricular streptozotocin (ICV-STZ) model of cognitive impairment was used in male Wistar rats (270 ± 20 g). Morris water maze, elevated plus maze and passive avoidance paradigm were used to assess cognitive performance. Taurine (40, 60 and 120 mg/kg) was administered orally for 28 days following STZ administration on day 1. Oxidative stress parameters (malondialdehyde, glutathione, nitric oxide and superoxide dismutase) and cholinesterases (acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase) activity were measured at end of the study in the cortex and hippocampus. Levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, expression of rho kinase-II (ROCK-II), glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) were studied in cortex and hippocampus. STZ caused significant cognitive impairment as compared to normal control. Chronic administration of taurine attenuated STZ-induced cognitive impairment. Increased oxidative stress and increased levels of TNF-α, IL-1β induced by STZ were also significantly attenuated by taurine. Taurine significantly (p < 0.05) decreased the STZ-induced increased expression of ROCK-II in cortex and hippocampus. Further, STZ-induced increased activity of cholinesterases was significantly (p < 0.001) mitigated by taurine. STZ decreased the expression of ChAT in hippocampus which was significantly (p < 0.05) reversed by taurine. However, GSK-3β expression was not altered by either STZ or taurine. The present study indicates that taurine exerts a neuroprotective role against STZ-induced cognitive impairment in rats. This effect is probably mediated by modulating oxidative stress, cholinesterases, inflammatory cytokines and expression of ROCK-II. Thus, this study suggests a potential of chronic taurine administration in cognitive impairment of Alzheimer's type.

  18. Transplantation of cholinergic neural stem cells in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing-hua; XU Ru-xiang; Seigo Nagao

    2005-01-01

    @@ It is believed that the degeneration of cholinergic cells in the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM) and the loss of cortical cholinergic innervation cause dementia of Alzheimer's disease (AD).1 Currently available therapeutic interventions are mainly aimed at alleviating the cholinergic deficits. Unfortunately, these strategies do not prevent the disease, but instead offer limited symptomatic improvement.2 A recent study demonstrated that transplantation of in vitro expanded neural stem cells (NSCs) in an animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD) resulted in functional recovery of the animals to some extent,2 suggesting that such neural precursors might offer a useful future therapy for AD. In this study, we tried to find whether mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell derived cholinergic NSCs grafted in the prefrontal and parietal cortex have effects on the disruption of spatial memory following development of lesion in NBM.

  19. IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang, William A. Goddard, Yongchun Tang

    2005-05-05

    In the second year of this project, we continued our effort to develop low temperature decarboxylation catalysts and investigate the behavior of these catalysts at different reaction conditions. We conducted a large number of dynamic measurements with crude oil and model compounds to obtain the information at different reaction stages, which was scheduled as the Task2 in our work plan. We developed a novel adsorption method to remove naphthenic acid from crude oil using naturally occurring materials such as clays. Our results show promise as an industrial application. The theoretical modeling proposed several possible reaction pathways and predicted the reactivity depending on the catalysts employed. From all of these studies, we obtained more comprehensive understanding about catalytic decarboxylation and oil upgrading based on the naphthenic acid removal concept.

  20. Developmental specification of forebrain cholinergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaway, Kathryn C; Machold, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons and basal forebrain cholinergic projection neurons, which together comprise the forebrain cholinergic system, regulate attention, memory, reward pathways, and motor activity through the neuromodulation of multiple brain circuits. The importance of these neurons in the etiology of neurocognitive disorders has been well documented, but our understanding of their specification during embryogenesis is still incomplete. All forebrain cholinergic projection neurons and interneurons appear to share a common developmental origin in the embryonic ventral telencephalon, a region that also gives rise to GABAergic projection neurons and interneurons. Significant progress has been made in identifying the key intrinsic and extrinsic factors that promote a cholinergic fate in this precursor population. However, how cholinergic interneurons and projection neurons differentiate from one another during development, as well as how distinct developmental programs contribute to heterogeneity within those two classes, is not yet well understood. In this review we summarize the transcription factors and signaling molecules known to play a role in the specification and early development of striatal and basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. We also discuss the heterogeneity of these populations and its possible developmental origins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of cholinergic markers in Alzheimer's disease and in a model of cholinergic deficit

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Cognitive deficits in neuropsychiatric disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), have been closely related to cholinergic deficits. We have compared different markers of cholinergic function to assess the best biomarker of cognitive deficits associated to cholinergic hypoactivity. In post-mortem frontal cortex from AD patients, acetylcholine (ACh) levels, cholinacetyltransferase (ChAT) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were all reduced compared to controls. Both ChAT and AChE activi...

  2. Hormonal and cholinergic influences on pancreatic lysosomal and digestive enzymes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evander, A; Ihse, I; Lundquist, I

    1983-01-01

    Hormonal and cholinergic influences on lysosomal and digestive enzyme activities in pancreatic tissue were studied in normal adult rats. Hormonal stimulation by the cholecystokinin analogue, caerulein, induced a marked enhancement of the activities of cathepsin D and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase in pancreatic tissue, whereas the activities of amylase and lipase tended to decrease. Acid phosphatase activity was not affected. Further, caerulein was found to induce a significant increase of cathepsin D output in bile-pancreatic juice. This output largely parallelled that of amylase. Cholinergic stimulation by the muscarinic agonist carbachol, at a dose level giving the same output of amylase as caerulein, did not affect pancreatic activities of cathepsin D and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. Further, cholinergic stimulation induced an increase of amylase activity and a slight decrease of acid phosphatase activity in pancreatic tissue. Lipase activity was not affected. No apparent effect on cathepsin D output in bile-pancreatic juice was encountered after cholinergic stimulation. The activities of neither the digestive nor the lysosomal enzymes were influenced by the administration of secretin. The results suggest a possible lysosomal involvement in caerulein-induced secretion and/or inactivation of pancreatic digestive enzymes, whereas cholinergic stimulation seems to act through different mechanisms.

  3. Alpha-lipoic acid-mediated activation of muscarinic receptors improves hippocampus- and amygdala-dependent memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboob, Aamra; Farhat, Syeda Mehpara; Iqbal, Ghazala; Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Zaidi, Najam-us-Sahar Sadaf; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Ahmed, Touqeer

    2016-04-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a neurotoxic agent which readily crosses the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and accumulates in the brain leading to neurodegenerative disorders, characterised by cognitive impairment. Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is an antioxidant and has a potential to improve cognitive functions. This study aimed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of ALA in AlCl3-induced neurotoxicity mouse model. Effect of ALA (25mg/kg/day) was evaluated in the AlCl3-induced neurotoxicity (AlCl3 150 mg/kg/day) mouse model on learning and memory using behaviour tests and on the expression of muscarinic receptor genes (using RT-PCR), in hippocampus and amygdala. Following ALA treatment, the expression of muscarinic receptor genes M1, M2 and choline acetyltransferase (ChaT) were significantly improved (pnovelty preference (p<0.001) comparative to the AlCl3-treated group. Fear extinction memory was remarkably restored (p<0.001) in ALA-treated group demonstrated by reduced freezing response as compared to the AlCl3-treated group which showed higher freezing. In-silico analysis showed that racemic mixture of ALA has higher binding affinity for M1 and M2 compared to acetylcholine. These novel findings highlight the potential role of ALA in cognitive functions and cholinergic system enhancement thus presenting it an enviable therapeutic candidate for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Postlesion estradiol treatment increases cortical cholinergic innervations via estrogen receptor-α dependent nonclassical estrogen signaling in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszegi, Zsombor; Szego, Éva M; Cheong, Rachel Y; Tolod-Kemp, Emeline; Ábrahám, István M

    2011-09-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) treatment exerts rapid, nonclassical actions via intracellular signal transduction system in basal forebrain cholinergic (BFC) neurons in vivo. Here we examined the effect of E2 treatment on lesioned BFC neurons in ovariectomized mice and the role of E2-induced nonclassical action in this treatment. Mice given an N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) injection into the substantia innominata-nucleus basalis magnocellularis complex (SI-NBM) exhibited cholinergic cell loss in the SI-NBM and ipsilateral cholinergic fiber loss in the cortex. A single injection of E2 after NMDA lesion did not have an effect on cholinergic cell loss in the SI-NBM, but it restored the ipsilateral cholinergic fiber density in the cortex in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The most effective cholinergic fiber restoration was observed with 33 ng/g E2 treatment at 1 h after NMDA lesion. The E2-induced cholinergic fiber restoration was absent in neuron-specific estrogen receptor-α knockout mice in vivo. Selective activation of nonclassical estrogen signaling in vivo by estren induced E2-like restorative actions. Selective blockade of the MAPK or protein kinase A pathway in vivo prevented E2's ability to restore cholinergic fiber loss. Finally, studies in intact female mice revealed an E2-induced restorative effect that was similar to that of E2-treated ovariectomized mice. These observations demonstrate that a single E2 treatment restores the BFC fiber loss in the cortex, regardless of endogenous E2 levels. They also reveal the critical role of nonclassical estrogen signaling via estrogen receptor-α and protein kinase A-MAPK pathways in E2-induced restorative action in the cholinergic system in vivo.

  5. GABAERGIC MODULATION OF STRIATAL CHOLINERGIC INTERNEURONS - AN IN-VIVO MICRODIALYSIS STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBOER, P; WESTERINK, BHC

    1994-01-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons have been shown to receive input from striatal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing cell elements. GABA is known to act on two different types of receptors, the GABA(A) and the GABA(B) receptor. Using in vivo microdialysis, we have studied the effect of intrast

  6. Periconceptional folic acid use: still room to improve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woude, Priscilla A Zetstra-van der; Walle, Hermien E K de; Berg, Lolkje T W de Jong-van den

    2012-02-01

    Folic acid use before and during pregnancy prevents neural tube defects. Since 1995, six surveys have been carried out among pregnant women to measure their knowledge and use of folic acid. The results of the most recent survey in 2009 will be discussed and compared with earlier surveys. Pregnant women in the Northern Netherlands were asked to fill out a questionnaire when visiting their midwife or gynecologist. Of the 515 participating women, 87.0% knew of folic acid before they became pregnant. Of all respondents, 51.6% reported to have used folic acid during the entire recommended period. Multivariate analysis showed that planned pregnancy (odds ratio [OR], 7.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.4-20.7), smoking (OR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.1-0.7), folic acid use during a former pregnancy (OR, 22.6; 95% CI, 5.5-92.8) and the number of previous children (per child OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3-0.9) were predicting factors for the recommended use of folic acid; 89.9% of women were sufficiently knowledgeable to start to use folic acid before pregnancy. The knowledge about folic acid has declined over recent years, and the use during the recommended period did not improve since the survey of 2005. Based on this survey, there is still room for improvement in the knowledge and actual use of folic acid before pregnancy. Attention to these aspects should focus on younger, low-educated women and should include information about family planning and contraceptives. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Quality Improvement of an Acid Treated Fuel Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Jumoke ETERIGHO

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The work on the quality improvement of fuel oil using acid treatment was carried out. The improvement of the fuel oil was done using sulphuric acid to remove contaminants. Sulphuric acid at different concentrations were mixed with the oil and kept at 45°C for four hours in the agitator vessel to allow reaction to take place. Acidic sludge was then drained off from the agitator and the oil was neutralized with sodium hydroxide. Centrifugation operation was used to extract the sulphonate dispersed in the oil. The treated and untreated oils were characterized for various properties and the results showed that the viscosity, total sulphur of fuel oil decreased from 6.0 to before 5.0 cst after acid treatment and 2.57 to 1.2225% w/w respectively while the flash point increased from 248 to 264°F. The water and sediment content increased from trace before to 0.6 after treatment. In addition, the calorific value increased from initial value of 44,368 to 44,805 and 44,715 kJ/kg at 50% and 75% conc. H2SO4 while decreasing with 85% and 90% conc. H2SO4. However, both carbon residue and ash content decreases with an increase in acid concentration.

  8. Fish oil supplementation improves docosahexaenoic acid status of malnourished infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, EN; Oelen, EA; Seerat, E; Boersma, ER; Muskiet, FAJ

    2000-01-01

    Aim-To investigate whether the low docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) status of malnourished, mostly breast fed, Pakistani children can be improved by fish oil (FO) supplementation. Methods-Ten malnourished children (aged 8-30 months) received 500 mg FO daily for nine weeks. The supplement contained 62.8 mo

  9. Fish oil supplementation improves docosahexaenoic acid status of malnourished infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, EN; Oelen, EA; Seerat, E; Boersma, ER; Muskiet, FAJ

    Aim-To investigate whether the low docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) status of malnourished, mostly breast fed, Pakistani children can be improved by fish oil (FO) supplementation. Methods-Ten malnourished children (aged 8-30 months) received 500 mg FO daily for nine weeks. The supplement contained 62.8

  10. Cholinergic regulation of the vasopressin neuroendocrine system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michels, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    To clarify the physical and functional relationship between the cholinergic system, and the neurodocrine cells of the supraoptic nucleus, a combination of experiments on receptor binding, localization and function were carried out. The putative nicotinic receptor probe (/sup 125/I)alpha bungarotoxin ((/sup 125/I)alpha BTX) bound with high affinity and specificity to the vasopressin and oxytocin magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus, nucleus circularis, and paraventricular nucleus. Binding of (/sup 125/I)alpha BTX within the neural lobe was very low. In contrast, the muscarinic cholinergic receptor probe (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinylbenzilate ((/sup 3/H)QNB) did not bind to magnocellular vasopressin and oxytocin cell groups. The median eminence, which contains the neurosecretory axons, and the neural lobe of the pituitary contain low levels of (/sup 3/H)QNB binding. The physiological significance of these cholinergic receptors in regulation of vasopressin release was tested using an in vitro preparation of the supraoptic - neural lobe system.

  11. Improvement in HPLC separation of acetic acid and levulinic acid in the profiling of biomass hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Rui; Tu, Maobing; Wu, Yonnie; Adhikari, Sushil

    2011-04-01

    5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and furfural could be separated by the Aminex HPX-87H column chromatography, however, the separation and quantification of acetic acid and levulinic acid in biomass hydrolysate have been difficult with this method. In present study, the HPLC separation of acetic acid and levulinic acid on Aminex HPX-87H column has been investigated by varying column temperature, flow rate, and sulfuric acid content in the mobile phase. The column temperature was found critical in resolving acetic acid and levulinic acid. The resolution for two acids increased dramatically from 0.42 to 1.86 when the column temperature was lowered from 60 to 30 °C. So did the capacity factors for levulinic acid that was increased from 1.20 to 1.44 as the column temperature dropped. The optimum column temperature for the separation was found at 45 °C. Variation in flow rate and sulfuric acid concentration improved not as much as the column temperature did.

  12. Rabbit Forebrain cholinergic system : Morphological characterization of nuclei and distribution of cholinergic terminals in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varga, C; Hartig, W; Grosche, J; Luiten, PGM; Seeger, J; Brauer, K; Harkany, T; Härtig, Wolfgang; Keijser, Jan N.

    2003-01-01

    Although the rabbit brain, in particular the basal forebrain cholinergic system, has become a common model for neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease, detailed neuroanatomical studies on the morphological organization of basal forebrain cholinergic nuclei and on their output p

  13. The cholinergic system, circadian rhythmicity, and time memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, R. A.; Van der Zee, E. A.

    2011-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the interaction between the mammalian cholinergic system and circadian system, and its possible role in time memory. Several studies made clear that circadian (daily) fluctuations in acetylcholine (ACh) release, cholinergic enzyme activity and cholinergic receptor

  14. Cholinergic modulation of cognition: Insights from human pharmacological functional neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Paul; Driver, Jon; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from lesion and cortical-slice studies implicate the neocortical cholinergic system in the modulation of sensory, attentional and memory processing. In this review we consider findings from sixty-three healthy human cholinergic functional neuroimaging studies that probe interactions of cholinergic drugs with brain activation profiles, and relate these to contemporary neurobiological models. Consistent patterns that emerge are: (1) the direction of cholinergic modulation of sensory cortex activations depends upon top-down influences; (2) cholinergic hyperstimulation reduces top-down selective modulation of sensory cortices; (3) cholinergic hyperstimulation interacts with task-specific frontoparietal activations according to one of several patterns, including: suppression of parietal-mediated reorienting; decreasing ‘effort’-associated activations in prefrontal regions; and deactivation of a ‘resting-state network’ in medial cortex, with reciprocal recruitment of dorsolateral frontoparietal regions during performance-challenging conditions; (4) encoding-related activations in both neocortical and hippocampal regions are disrupted by cholinergic blockade, or enhanced with cholinergic stimulation, while the opposite profile is observed during retrieval; (5) many examples exist of an ‘inverted-U shaped’ pattern of cholinergic influences by which the direction of functional neural activation (and performance) depends upon both task (e.g. relative difficulty) and subject (e.g. age) factors. Overall, human cholinergic functional neuroimaging studies both corroborate and extend physiological accounts of cholinergic function arising from other experimental contexts, while providing mechanistic insights into cholinergic-acting drugs and their potential clinical applications. PMID:21708219

  15. Acute and chronic effects of clozapine on cholinergic transmission in cultured mouse superior cervical ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saur, Taixiang; Cohen, Bruce M; Ma, Qi; Babb, Suzann M; Buttner, Edgar A; Yao, Wei-Dong

    Cholinergic dysfunction contributes to cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. The atypical antipsychotic clozapine improves cognition in patients with schizophrenia, possibly through modulation of the cholinergic system. However, little is known about specific underlying mechanisms. We investigated the acute and chronic effects of clozapine on cholinergic synaptic transmission in cultured superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons. Spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) were detected and were reversibly inhibited by the nicotinic receptor antagonist d-tubocurarine, confirming that the synaptic responses were primarily mediated by nicotinic receptors. Bath application of clozapine at therapeutic concentrations rapidly and reversely inhibited both the amplitude and frequency of sEPSCs in a concentration-dependent manner, without changing either rise or decay time, suggesting that clozapine effects have both presynaptic and postsynaptic origins. The acute effects of clozapine on sEPSCs were recapitulated by chronic treatment of SCG cultures with similar concentrations of clozapine, as clozapine treatment for 4 d reduced the frequency and amplitude of sEPSCs without affecting their kinetics. Cell survival analysis indicated that SCG neuron cell counts after chronic clozapine treatment were comparable to the control group. These results demonstrate that therapeutic concentrations of clozapine suppress nicotinic synaptic transmission in SCG cholinergic synapses, a simple in vitro preparation of cholinergic transmission.

  16. Internal cholinergic regulation of learning and recall in a model of olfactory processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licurgo Benemann Almeida

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the olfactory system, cholinergic modulation has been associated with contrast modulation and changes in receptive fields in the olfactory bulb, as well the learning of odor associations in olfactory cortex. Computational modeling and behavioral studies suggest that cholinergic modulation could improve sensory processing and learning while preventing pro-active interference when task demands are high. However, how sensory inputs and/or learning regulate incoming modulation has not yet been elucidated. We here use a computational model of the olfactory bulb, piriform cortex (PC and horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB to explore how olfactory learning could regulate cholinergic inputs to the system in a closed feedback loop. In our model, the novelty of an odor is reflected in firing rates and sparseness of cortical neurons in response to that odor and these firing rates can directly regulate learning in the system by modifying cholinergic inputs to the system. In the model, cholinergic neurons reduce their firing in response to familiar odors – reducing plasticity in the PC, but increase their firing in response to novel odor – increasing PC plasticity. Recordings from HDB neurons in awake behaving rats reflect predictions from the model by showing that a subset of neurons decrease their firing as an odor becomes familiar.

  17. Improved simultaneous gas-chromatographic analysis for homovanillic acid and vanillylmandelic acid in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiendecker-Foster, C; Freier, E F

    1981-12-01

    We describe an improved gas-chromatographic method for the simultaneous quantitation of the catecholamine metabolites, homovanillic acid (3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid) and vanillylmandelic acid (3-methoxy-4-hydroxymandelic acid). Our improvements in the method of Muskiet et al. (Clin. Chem. 23: 863, 1977) include a shorter program time and a longer silylation interval. Recovery and precision data obtained by this improved technique are similar to those of Muskiet et al. Vanillylmandelic acid results (y) were compared with those by the method of Pisano et al. (Clin. Chim. Acta 7: 285, 1962). The relation is expressed by the equation y = 0.52 + 1.05x (Sy . x = 2.33 mg/24 h and r = 0.997). Results for homovanillic acid (y) were compared with those by the method of Knight and Haymond (Clin. Chem. 23: 2007, 1977); the equation was y = 0.84 + 0.90x (Sy . x = 2.04 and r = 0.97). Retention times are also reported for several phenolic acids and other related compounds found in urine.

  18. GABAergic actions on cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, K A; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2010-01-01

    Cholinergic neurons of the pontine laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) play a critical role in regulation of behavioral state. Therefore, elucidation of mechanisms that control their activity is vital for understanding of how switching between wakefulness, sleep and anesthetic states is effectuated....... Therefore, we studied the actions of GABA agonists and antagonists on cholinergic LDT cells by performing patch clamp recordings in mouse brain slices. Under conditions where detection of Cl(-) -mediated events was optimized, GABA induced gabazine (GZ)-sensitive inward currents in the majority of LDT...

  19. Postnatal lead exposure and the cholinergic system: effects on cholinergically mediated behaviors and cholinergic development and plasticity in the hippocampus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfano, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    A review of previous evidence suggested the possibility of a functional association between the behavioral effect of early lead (Pb) exposure, hippocampal damage and cholinergic deficiency. To further assess this possibility, Long-Evans hooded rat pups were exposed to Pb for the first 25 postnatal days via the maternal milk. Beginning at 65 days of age, animals were tested on behavioral tasks sensitive to both Pb exposure and cholinergic deficiency. Exposure to both levels of Pb impaired passive avoidance acquisition and produced lower rates of spontaneous alternation. The anticholinergic scopolamine (0.4 mg/kg) impaired passive avoidance acquisition, lowered the rate of spontaneous alternation and decreased open field activity scores in control animals. At 30 days of age, the brains of High Pb and control animals were processed for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry. Morphometric evaluation of the molecular layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus indicated no effects of Pb on the development of the cholinergic innervation of this brain region. The results provide strong evidence for the involvement of deficient cholinergic functioning in the behavioral changes observed following postnatal Pb exposure. Further, these findings indicate that a decrease in neuroanatomical plasticity may be a critical brain mechanism underlying the learning deficits observed following exposure to Pb.

  20. Differential effects of selective lesions of cholinergic and dopaminergic neurons on serotonin-type 1 receptors in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirion, R.; Richard, J.

    1987-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT)-type1 receptor binding sites are discretely distributed in rat brain. High densities of (3H)5-HT1 binding sites are especially located in areas enriched with cholinergic and dopaminergic innervation, such as the substantia innominata/ventral pallidum, striatum, septal nuclei, hippocampus and substantia nigra. The possible association of (3H)5-HT1 binding sites with cholinergic or dopaminergic cell bodies and/or nerve fiber terminals was investigated by selective lesions of the substantia innominata/ventral pallidum-cortical and septohippocampal cholinergic pathways and the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection. (3H)5-HT1 receptor binding sites are possibly located on cholinergic cell bodies in the ventral pallidum-cortical pathway since (3H)5-HT1 binding in the substantia innominata/ventral pallidal area was markedly decreased following kainic acid lesions. Fimbriaectomies markedly decreased (3H)5-HT1 binding in the hippocampus, suggesting the presence of 5-HT1 binding sites on cholinergic nerve fiber terminals in the septohippocampal pathway. Lesions of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection did not modify (3H)5-HT1 binding in the substantia nigra and the striatum, suggesting that 5-HT1 receptors are not closely associated with dopaminergic cell bodies and nerve terminals in this pathway. These results demonstrate differential association between 5-HT1 receptors and cholinergic and dopaminergic innervation in rat brain.

  1. Muscarinic signaling influences the patterning and phenotype of cholinergic amacrine cells in the developing chick retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Andy J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies in the vertebrate retina have characterized the differentiation of amacrine cells as a homogenous class of neurons, but little is known about the genes and factors that regulate the development of distinct types of amacrine cells. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to characterize the development of the cholinergic amacrine cells and identify factors that influence their development. Cholinergic amacrine cells in the embryonic chick retina were identified by using antibodies to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT. Results We found that as ChAT-immunoreactive cells differentiate they expressed the homeodomain transcription factors Pax6 and Islet1, and the cell-cycle inhibitor p27kip1. As differentiation proceeds, type-II cholinergic cells, displaced to the ganglion cell layer, transiently expressed high levels of cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP and neurofilament, while type-I cells in the inner nuclear layer did not. Although there is a 1:1 ratio of type-I to type-II cells in vivo, in dissociated cell cultures the type-I cells (ChAT-positive and CRABP-negative out-numbered the type-II cells (ChAT and CRABP-positive cells by 2:1. The relative abundance of type-I to type-II cells was not influenced by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh, but was affected by compounds that act at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. In addition, the abundance and mosaic patterning of type-II cholinergic amacrine cells is disrupted by interfering with muscarinic signaling. Conclusion We conclude that: (1 during development type-I and type-II cholinergic amacrine cells are not homotypic, (2 the phenotypic differences between these subtypes of cells is controlled by the local microenvironment, and (3 appropriate levels of muscarinic signaling between the cholinergic amacrine cells are required for proper mosaic patterning.

  2. Rabbit forebrain cholinergic system: morphological characterization of nuclei and distribution of cholinergic terminals in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Csaba; Härtig, Wolfgang; Grosche, Jens; Keijser, Jan; Luiten, Paul G M; Seeger, Johannes; Brauer, Kurt; Harkany, Tibor

    2003-06-09

    Although the rabbit brain, in particular the basal forebrain cholinergic system, has become a common model for neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease, detailed neuroanatomical studies on the morphological organization of basal forebrain cholinergic nuclei and on their output pathways are still awaited. Therefore, we performed quantitative choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunocytochemistry to localize major cholinergic nuclei and to determine the number of respective cholinergic neurons in the rabbit forebrain. The density of ChAT-immunoreactive terminals in layer V of distinct neocortical territories and in hippocampal subfields was also measured. Another cholinergic marker, the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)), was also employed to identify subsets of cholinergic neurons. Double-immunofluorescence labeling of ChAT and p75(NTR), calbindin D-28k (CB), parvalbumin, calretinin, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), tyrosine hydroxylase, or substance P was used to elucidate the neuroanatomical borders of cholinergic nuclei and to analyze the neurochemical complexity of cholinergic cell populations. Cholinergic projection neurons with heterogeneous densities were found in the medial septum, vertical and horizontal diagonal bands of Broca, ventral pallidum, and magnocellular nucleus basalis (MBN)/substantia innominata (SI) complex; cholinergic interneurons were observed in the caudate nucleus, putamen, accumbens nucleus, and olfactory tubercule, whereas the globus pallidus was devoid of cholinergic nerve cells. Cholinergic interneurons were frequently present in the hippocampus and to a lesser extent in cerebral cortex. Cholinergic projection neurons, except those localized in SI, abundantly expressed p75(NTR), and a subset of cholinergic neurons in posterior MBN was immunoreactive for CB and nNOS. A strict laminar distribution pattern of cholinergic terminals was recorded both in the cerebral cortex and in CA1-CA3 and dentate gyrus

  3. Reducing cholinergic constriction: the major reversible mechanism in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Brusasco

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The airway narrowing in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD has often been misunderstood as being irreversible. However, a large proportion of patients with COPD do respond to bronchodilator agents with significant changes in lung function. Unlike in asthma, abnormalities in airway smooth muscle structure or function are not believed to play a key role in COPD airway narrowing. Although there are only limited data suggesting that cholinergic tone may be increased in COPD, the well-documented efficacy of antimuscarinic agents in increasing airway calibre suggests that cholinergic tone represents the major reversible component of airflow obstruction in these patients. Airway wall thickening and loss of airway-to-parenchyma interdependence are nonreversible components of airflow obstruction in COPD that may amplify the effect of changes in airway smooth muscle tone. Thus, keeping airway smooth muscle tone to a minimum might offer patients long-lasting airway patency and protection against breathlessness, which is the major complaint of patients with COPD. Receptor antagonism by anticholinergic agents can achieve effective relaxation of airway smooth muscle in COPD. According to a classical view of cholinergic receptor function and distribution, the ideal anticholinergic bronchodilator would be one that blocks both M1 and M3 receptors, which mediate airway smooth muscle contraction, but not the M2 receptor, stimulation of which reduces acetylcholine release from vagus nerve endings and prevents the airway smooth muscle from contracting by excessive increments. Agents with such pharmacodynamic selectivity are not available, but effective and prolonged inhibition of airway smooth muscle tone has been obtained with tiotropium, which binds to all three major muscarinic receptor subtypes, but for much longer to M3 than to M2 receptors. Recent data show that long-term treatment with tiotropium for 1 yr helps sustain 24-h airway patency. This

  4. Targeting the Cholinergic System to Develop a Novel Therapy for Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Gary X; Waldvogel, Henry J

    2016-12-15

    In this review, we outline the role of the cholinergic system in Huntington's disease, and briefly describe the dysfunction of cholinergic transmission, cholinergic neurons, cholinergic receptors and cholinergic survival factors observed in post-mortem human brains and animal models of Huntington's disease. We postulate how the dysfunctional cholinergic system can be targeted to develop novel therapies for Huntington's disease, and discuss the beneficial effects of cholinergic therapies in pre-clinical and clinical studies.

  5. Phytic acid reduction in soy protein improves zinc bioavailability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, J.R.; Wong, M.S.; Burns, R.A.; Erdman, J.W. Jr. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (United States) Mead Johnson Research Center, Evansville, IN (United States))

    1991-03-15

    The objective of this study was to confirm previous studies that have suggested that reduction of phytic acid in soy improved zinc bioavailability (BV). Two commercially-produced soybean isolates containing either a normal phytic acid level or a reduced level were formulated into diets so as to provide 6 or 9 ppm zinc. Control diets were egg white protein-based and contained 3, 6 or 9 ppm zinc from zinc carbonate. Weanling male rats were fed these diets for 21 days and food intake and weight gain monitored. Slope ratio analysis of total tibia zinc content compared to total zinc intake revealed that zinc BV from reduced phytic acid soy isolate-containing diets was indistinguishable from control egg white diets. In contrast, zinc BV from normal soy isolate diets was significantly reduced compared to reduced phytic acid and control diets. These results coupled with other results indicate that phytic acid is the inhibitory factor in soybean products that results in reduced zinc BV.

  6. Functional and laminar dissociations between muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic neuromodulation in the tree shrew primary visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Anwesha; Bießmann, Felix; Veit, Julia; Kretz, Robert; Rainer, Gregor

    2012-04-01

    Acetylcholine is an important neuromodulator involved in cognitive function. The impact of cholinergic neuromodulation on computations within the cortical microcircuit is not well understood. Here we investigate the effects of layer-specific cholinergic drug application in the tree shrew primary visual cortex during visual stimulation with drifting grating stimuli of varying contrast and orientation. We describe differences between muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic effects in terms of both the layer of cortex and the attribute of visual representation. Nicotinic receptor activation enhanced the contrast response in the granular input layer of the cortex, while tending to reduce neural selectivity for orientation across all cortical layers. Muscarinic activation modestly enhanced the contrast response across cortical layers, and tended to improve orientation tuning. This resulted in highest orientation selectivity in the supra- and infragranular layers, where orientation selectivity was already greatest in the absence of pharmacological stimulation. Our results indicate that laminar position plays a crucial part in functional consequences of cholinergic stimulation, consistent with the differential distribution of cholinergic receptors. Nicotinic receptors function to enhance sensory representations arriving in the cortex, whereas muscarinic receptors act to boost the cortical computation of orientation tuning. Our findings suggest close homology between cholinergic mechanisms in tree shrew and primate visual cortices.

  7. Rosmarinus officinalis polyphenols produce anti-depressant like effect through monoaminergic and cholinergic functions modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kazunori; El Omri, Abdelfatteh; Kondo, Shinji; Han, Junkyu; Isoda, Hiroko

    2013-02-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis (R. officinalis), a culinary aromatic and medicinal plant, is very rich in polyphenols and flavonoids with high antioxidant properties. This plant was reported to exert multiple benefits for neuronal system and alleviate mood disorder. In our previous study, we demonstrated that R. officinalis and its active compounds, luteolin (Lut), carnosic acid (CA), and rosmarinic acid (RA), exhibited neurotrophic effects and improved cholinergic functions in PC12 cells in correlation with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), ERK1/2 signaling pathway. The current study was conducted to evaluate and understand the anti-depressant effect of R. officinalis using tail suspension test (TST) in ICR mice and PC12 cells as in vitro neuronal model. Proteomics analysis of PC12 cells treated with R. officinalis polyphenols (ROP) Lut, CA, and RA revealed a significant upregulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and pyruvate carboxylase (PC) two major genes involved in dopaminergic, serotonergic and GABAergic pathway regulations. Moreover, ROP were demonstrated to protect neuronal cells against corticosterone-induced toxicity. These results were concordant with decreasing immobility time in TST and regulation of several neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin and acetylcholine) and gene expression in mice brain like TH, PC and MAPK phosphatase (MKP-1). To the best of our knowledge this is the first evidence to contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanism behind the anti-depressant effect of R. officinalis and its major active compounds.

  8. Lead/acid batteries in systems to improve power quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, P.; Butler, P.; Nerbun, W.

    Increasing dependence on computer technology is driving needs for extremely high-quality power to prevent loss of information, material, and workers' time that represent billions of dollars annually. This cost has motivated commercial and Federal research and development of energy storage systems that detect and respond to power-quality failures in milliseconds. Electrochemical batteries are among the storage media under investigation for these systems. Battery energy storage systems that employ either flooded lead/acid or valve-regulated lead/acid battery technologies are becoming commercially available to capture a share of this emerging market. Cooperative research and development between the US Department of Energy and private industry have led to installations of lead/acid-based battery energy storage systems to improve power quality at utility and industrial sites and commercial development of fully integrated, modular battery energy storage system products for power quality. One such system by AC Battery Corporation, called the PQ2000, is installed at a test site at Pacific Gas and Electric Company (San Ramon, CA, USA) and at a customer site at Oglethorpe Power Corporation (Tucker, GA, USA). The PQ2000 employs off-the-shelf power electronics in an integrated methodology to control the factors that affect the performance and service life of production-model, low-maintenance, flooded lead/acid batteries. This system, and other members of this first generation of lead/acid-based energy storage systems, will need to compete vigorously for a share of an expanding, yet very aggressive, power quality market.

  9. Effects of L-DOPA/benserazide co-treatment on colonic excitatory cholinergic motility and enteric inflammation following dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, C; Antonioli, L; Colucci, R; Tirotta, E; Gentile, D; Ippolito, C; Segnani, C; Levandis, G; Cerri, S; Blandini, F; Barocelli, E; Ballabeni, V; Bernardini, N; Blandizzi, C; Fornai, M

    2017-09-01

    The mainstay therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) relies on L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) plus a DOPA-decarboxylase inhibitor. However, their effects on colonic dysmotility and inflammation observed in PD are undetermined. This study examined the effects of L-DOPA plus benserazide (BE) on colonic motility and inflammation in rats with central nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation. Neurodegeneration was induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). 6-OHDA animals were treated orally with L-DOPA/BE for 28 days, starting 28 days after 6-OHDA injection. At the end of treatment, in vivo colonic transit was evaluated by a radiologic assay. Electrically stimulated (ES) cholinergic contractions were recorded in vitro from colonic preparations, while acetylcholine release was measured in the incubation medium. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression as well as eosinophil and mast cell density were examined in the colonic wall by immunohistochemistry. Colonic TNF and IL-1β levels were also assayed. 6-OHDA animals displayed: 1) decrease in in vivo colonic transit; 2) impairment of ES-stimulated cholinergic contractions; 3) decreased acetylcholine release from myenteric nerves; 4) decrease in ChAT and increase in GFAP myenteric immunopositivity; 5) increase in eosinophil and mast cell density; 6) increase in TNF and IL-1β levels. Treatment with L-DOPA/BE elicited an improvement of in vivo and in vitro colonic motor activity, a normalization of acetylcholine release, ChAT immunopositivity, as well as pro-inflammatory cytokine patterns, ganglionic GFAP levels, eosinophil and mast cell density. Under dopaminergic nigrostriatal denervation, treatment with L-DOPA/BE ameliorated colonic motility through a normalization of myenteric cholinergic neurotransmission, along with an improvement of colonic inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Glucocorticoid programing of the mesopontine cholinergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Sónia; Coimbra, Bárbara; Soares-Cunha, Carina; Ventura-Silva, Ana P; Pinto, Luisa; Carvalho, Miguel M; Pêgo, José-Miguel; Rodrigues, Ana João; Sousa, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    Stress perception, response, adaptation, and coping strategies are individually distinct, and the sequel of stress and/or glucocorticoids (GCs) is also distinct between subjects. In the last years, it has become clear that early life stress is a powerful modulator of neuroendocrine stress-responsive circuits, programing intrinsic susceptibility to stress, and potentiating the appearance of stress-related disorders such as depression, anxiety, and addiction. Herein we were interested in understanding how early life experiences reset the normal processing of negative stimuli, leading to emotional dysfunction. Animals prenatally exposed to GCs (in utero glucocorticoid exposure, iuGC) present hyperanxiety, increased fear behavior, and hyper-reactivity to negative stimuli. In parallel, we found a remarkable increase in the number of aversive 22 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations in response to an aversive cue. Considering the suggested role of the mesopontine tegmentum cholinergic pathway, arising from the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) and pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT), in the initiation of 22 kHz vocalizations and hypothetically in the control of emotional arousal and tone, we decided to evaluate the condition of this circuit in iuGC animals. Notably, in a basal situation, iuGC animals present increased choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) expression in the LDT and PPT, but not in other cholinergic nuclei, namely in the nucleus basalis of Meynert. In addition, and in accordance with the amplified response to an adverse stimulus of iuGC animals, we found marked changes in the cholinergic activation pattern of LDT and PPT regions. Altogether, our results suggest a specific cholinergic pathway programing by prenatal GC, and hint that this may be of relevance in setting individual stress vulnerability threshold.

  11. Glucocorticoid programming of the mesopontine cholinergic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia eBorges

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stress perception, response, adaptation and coping strategies are individually distinct, and the sequel of stress and/or glucocorticoids is also distinct between subjects. In the last years, it has become clear that early life stress is a powerful modulator of neuroendocrine stress-responsive circuits, programming intrinsic susceptibility to stress, and potentiating the appearance of stress-related disorders such as depression, anxiety and addiction. Herein we were interested in understanding how early life experiences reset the normal processing of negative stimuli, leading to emotional dysfunction. Animals prenatally exposed to glucocorticoids (iuGC present hyperanxiety, increased fear behaviour and hyper-reactivity to negative stimuli. In parallel, we found a remarkable increase in the number of aversive 22kHz ultrasonic vocalizations in response to an aversive cue. Considering the suggested role of the mesopontine tegmentum cholinergic pathway, arising from the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT and pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT, in the initiation of 22kHz vocalizations and hypothetically in the control of emotional arousal and tone, we decided to evaluate the condition of this circuit in iuGC animals. Notably, in a basal situation, iuGC animals present increased choline acetyltransferase (ChAT expression in the LDT and PPT, but not in other cholinergic nuclei, namely in the nucleus basalis of Meynert. In addition, and in accordance with the amplified response to an adverse stimulus of iuGC animals, we found marked changes in the cholinergic activation pattern of LDT and PPT regions. Altogether, our results suggest a specific cholinergic pathway programing by prenatal GC, and hint that this may be of relevance in setting individuals stress vulnerability threshold.

  12. Central cholinergic regulation of respiration: nicotinic receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuesi M SHAO; Jack L FELDMAN

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed in brainstem and spinal cord regions involved in the control of breathing. These receptors mediate central cholinergic regulation of respiration and effects of the exogenous ligand nicotine on respiratory pattern. Activation of a4* nAChRs in the preBotzinger Complex (preBotC), an essential site for normal respiratory rhythm generation in mammals, modulates excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission and depolarizes preBotC inspiratory neurons, leading to increases in respiratory frequency. nAChRs are also present in motor nuclei innervating respiratory muscles. Activation of post- and/or extra-synaptic a4* nAChRs on hypoglossal (XII) motoneurons depolarizes these neurons, potentiating tonic and respiratory-related rhythmic activity. As perinatal nicotine exposure may contribute to the pathogenesis of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), we discuss the effects of perinatal nicotine exposure on development of the cholinergic and other neurotransmitter systems involved in control of breathing. Advances in understanding of the mechanisms underlying central cholinergic/nicotinic modulation of respiration provide a pharmacological basis for exploiting nAChRs as therapeutic targets for neurological disorders related to neural control of breathing such as sleep apnea and SIDS.

  13. Slagment Cement Improve the Cement Resistance Toward Acids Attack During Acidizing Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nik Khairul Irfan Bin Nik Ab. Lah.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Acidizing treatment in past experience shows several zonal isolation problems after the treatment. This study presents the effect of the acid treatment toward class G cement and slagment cement as the improvement method to improve the cement resistance toward the acid. Lab experiments were conducted by immerge the respective cement cubes into 12% HCl/3% HF solution for 40 min before several analysis were conducted. Based on the result, the mass loss and compressive strength loss of the cement cubes decrease as the curing temperature and pressure increase due to more evenly distributed cement chemical composition crystal in high curing condition as shown in Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM analysis. From X-Ray Diffraction (XRD and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF analysis, only the first layer of the cement cubes shows chemical component change due to the reaction between the acid. This study found that, replacing class G cement to slagment cement can reduce the mass loss and compressive strength loss up to 72% and 82%, respectively.

  14. Phosphonic Acid-Functionalized Polyurethane Dispersions with Improved Adhesion Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breucker, Laura; Landfester, Katharina; Taden, Andreas

    2015-11-11

    A facile route to phosphorus-functionalized polyurethane dispersions (P-PUDs) with improved adhesion properties is presented. (Bis)phosphonic acid moieties serve as adhesion promoting sites that are covalently attached via an end-capping reaction to isocyanate-reactive polyurethane particles under aqueous conditions. The synthetic approach circumvents solubility issues, offers great flexibility in terms of polyurethane composition, and allows for the synthesis of semicrystalline systems with thermomechanical response due to reversible physical cross-linking. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used to investigate the effect of functionalization on the semicrystallinity. The end-capping conversion was determined via inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and was surprisingly found to be almost independent of the stoichiometry of reaction, suggesting an adsorption-dominated process. Particle charge detection (PCD) experiments reveal that a dense surface coverage of phosphonic acid groups can be attained and that, at high functionalization degrees, the phosphonic adhesion moieties are partially dragged inside the colloidal P-PUD particle. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCMD) investigations conducted with hydroxyapatite (HAP) and stainless steel sensors as model surfaces show a greatly enhanced affinity of the aqueous P-PUDs and furthermore indicate polymer chain rearrangements and autonomous film formation under wet conditions. Due to their facile synthesis, significantly improved adhesion, and variable film properties, P-PUD systems such as the one described here are believed to be of great interest for multiple applications, e.g., adhesives, paints, anticorrosion, or dentistry.

  15. Long-term effects of cholinergic basal forebrain lesions on neuropeptide Y and somatostatin immunoreactivity in rat neocortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaykema, R.P.A.; Compaan, J.C.; Nyakas, C.; Horvath, E.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of cholinergic basal forebrain lesions on immunoreactivity to somatostatin (SOM-i) and neuropeptide-Y (NPY-i) was investigated in the rat parietal cortex, 16-18 months after multiple bilateral ibotenic acid injections in the nucleus basalis complex. As a result of the lesion, the choliner

  16. Rabbit Forebrain cholinergic system: Morphological characterization of nuclei and distribution of cholinergic terminals in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    C. Varga; Hartig, W.; Grosche, J.; Luiten, PGM; Seeger, J.; K. Brauer; Harkany, T.; Härtig, Wolfgang; Keijser, Jan N.

    2003-01-01

    Although the rabbit brain, in particular the basal forebrain cholinergic system, has become a common model for neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease, detailed neuroanatomical studies on the morphological organization of basal forebrain cholinergic nuclei and on their output pathways are still awaited. Therefore, we performed quantitative choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunocytochemistry to localize major cholinergic nuclei and to determine the number of respective c...

  17. Improved texture of polycrystalline hexaferrites using gluconic acid dispersant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obi, O.; Burns, L.; Andalib, P.; Chang, H.; Chen, Y.; Harris, V. G.

    2014-05-01

    In this work, gluconic acid (GA), a low molecular weight, inexpensive and environmentally friendly solvent, was systematically investigated to determine its viability in enhancing the orientation of ferrite particles. Submicron-scale barium hexaferrite (BaM) powders were thoroughly dispersed via sonication for 30 min in various concentrations of GA (0, 2, 2.5, 5, 10, and 25 vol. %) in deionized water. An increase of ˜18% in squareness (SQ) and ˜69% in energy product ((BH)max) was observed with increase in GA concentration from 0 to 5 vol. %. However, further increase in GA concentration led to a decrease in SQ and (BH)max confirming that the effect of GA stems from an improved viscosity of the dispersant, which balances the freely rotating and stationary particles under dynamic compaction within a magnetic field.

  18. Reduction of brain kynurenic acid improves cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Rouba; Campbell, Brian M; Strick, Christine A; Horner, Weldon; Hoffmann, William E; Kiss, Tamas; Chapin, Douglas S; McGinnis, Dina; Abbott, Amanda L; Roberts, Brooke M; Fonseca, Kari; Guanowsky, Victor; Young, Damon A; Seymour, Patricia A; Dounay, Amy; Hajos, Mihaly; Williams, Graham V; Castner, Stacy A

    2014-08-06

    The elevation of kynurenic acid (KYNA) observed in schizophrenic patients may contribute to core symptoms arising from glutamate hypofunction, including cognitive impairments. Although increased KYNA levels reduce excitatory neurotransmission, KYNA has been proposed to act as an endogenous antagonist at the glycine site of the glutamate NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and as a negative allosteric modulator at the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Levels of KYNA are elevated in CSF and the postmortem brain of schizophrenia patients, and these elevated levels of KYNA could contribute to NMDAR hypofunction and the cognitive deficits and negative symptoms associated with this disease. However, the impact of endogenously produced KYNA on brain function and behavior is less well understood due to a paucity of pharmacological tools. To address this issue, we identified PF-04859989, a brain-penetrable inhibitor of kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT II), the enzyme responsible for most brain KYNA synthesis. In rats, systemic administration of PF-04859989 dose-dependently reduced brain KYNA to as little as 28% of basal levels, and prevented amphetamine- and ketamine-induced disruption of auditory gating and improved performance in a sustained attention task. It also prevented ketamine-induced disruption of performance in a working memory task and a spatial memory task in rodents and nonhuman primates, respectively. Together, these findings support the hypotheses that endogenous KYNA impacts cognitive function and that inhibition of KAT II, and consequent lowering of endogenous brain KYNA levels, improves cognitive performance under conditions considered relevant for schizophrenia.

  19. Cortical cholinergic decline parallels the progression of Borna virus encephalitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gies, U; Gorcs, TJ; Mulder, J; Planz, O; Stitz, L; Bilzer, T; Luiten, PGM; Harkany, T; Görcs, Tamás J.

    2001-01-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV)-induced meningoencephalitis is associated with the dysfunction of the cholinergic system. Temporal development of this cholinergic decline during pre-encephalitic and encephalitic stages of BDV infection remains however elusive. Changes in choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)

  20. Cholinergic interneurons control local circuit activity and cocaine conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Ilana B; Lin, Shih-Chun; Brodsky, Matthew; Prakash, Rohit; Diester, Ilka; Anikeeva, Polina; Gradinaru, Viviana; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Deisseroth, Karl

    2010-12-17

    Cholinergic neurons are widespread, and pharmacological modulation of acetylcholine receptors affects numerous brain processes, but such modulation entails side effects due to limitations in specificity for receptor type and target cell. As a result, causal roles of cholinergic neurons in circuits have been unclear. We integrated optogenetics, freely moving mammalian behavior, in vivo electrophysiology, and slice physiology to probe the cholinergic interneurons of the nucleus accumbens by direct excitation or inhibition. Despite representing less than 1% of local neurons, these cholinergic cells have dominant control roles, exerting powerful modulation of circuit activity. Furthermore, these neurons could be activated by cocaine, and silencing this drug-induced activity during cocaine exposure (despite the fact that the manipulation of the cholinergic interneurons was not aversive by itself) blocked cocaine conditioning in freely moving mammals.

  1. Chlorogenic acid from honeysuckle improves hepatic lipid dysregulation and modulates hepatic fatty acid composition in rats with chronic endotoxin infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Ruan, Zheng; Wen, Yanmei; Yang, Yuhui; Mi, Shumei; Zhou, Lili; Wu, Xin; Ding, Sheng; Deng, Zeyuan; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2016-03-01

    Chlorogenic acid as a natural hydroxycinnamic acid has protective effect for liver. Endotoxin induced metabolic disorder, such as lipid dysregulation and hyperlipidemia. In this study, we investigated the effect of chlorogenic acid in rats with chronic endotoxin infusion. The Sprague-Dawley rats with lipid metabolic disorder (LD group) were intraperitoneally injected endotoxin. And the rats of chlorogenic acid-LD group were daily received chlorogenic acid by intragastric administration. In chlorogenic acid-LD group, the area of visceral adipocyte was decreased and liver injury was ameliorated, as compared to LD group. In chlorogenic acid-LD group, serum triglycerides, free fatty acids, hepatic triglycerides and cholesterol were decreased, the proportion of C20:1, C24:1 and C18:3n-6, Δ9-18 and Δ6-desaturase activity index in the liver were decreased, and the proportion of C18:3n-3 acid was increased, compared to the LD group. Moreover, levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I, and fatty acid β-oxidation were increased in chlorogenic acid-LD group compared to LD rats, whereas levels of fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase were decreased. These findings demonstrate that chlorogenic acid effectively improves hepatic lipid dysregulation in rats by regulating fatty acid metabolism enzymes, stimulating AMP-activated protein kinase activation, and modulating levels of hepatic fatty acids.

  2. The basal forebrain cholinergic system in aging and dementia : Rescuing cholinergic neurons from neurotoxic amyloid-beta 42 with memantine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyakas, Csaba; Granic, Ivica; Halmy, Laszlo G.; Banerjee, Pradeep; Luiten, Paul G. M.

    2011-01-01

    The dysfunction and loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and their cortical projections are among the earliest pathological events in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The evidence pointing to cholinergic impairments come from studies that report a decline in the activity of choli

  3. [Modulation of the cholinergic system during inflammation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhinskaia, G I; Vladykin, A L; Sapronov, N S

    2008-01-01

    This review describes the effects of realization of the central and peripheral "cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway" in a model of endotoxic and anaphylactic shock. Under endotoxic shock conditions, a pharmacological correction by means of the central m-cholinomimetic action (electrical stimulation of the distal ends of nervus vagus after bilateral cervical vagotomy, surgical implantation of the stimulant devise, activation of efferent vagal neurons by means of muscarinic agonist) is directed toward the elimination of LPS-induced hypotension. During the anaphylaxis, peripheral effects of the cholinergic system induced by blocking m-AChR on the target cells (neuronal and non-neuronal lung cells) and acetylcholinesterase inhibition are related to suppression of the bronchoconstrictor response. The role of immune system in the pathogenesis of endotoxic shock is associated with the production of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages, increase in IgM concentration, and complement activation, while the role in the pathogenesis of anaphylactic shock is associated with IgE, IgG1 augmentation. Effects of B cell stimulation may be important in hypoxia and in the prophylaxis of stress ulcers and other diseases. Plasma proteins can influence the effects of the muscarinic antagonist methacine: IgG enhance its action while albumin and CRP abolish it.

  4. Utilisation of coal ash to improve acid soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Kato

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The study on utilization of coal ash to improve acid soil was carried out in a greenhouse at the Land Development Regional Office 1, Pathum Thani Province, Central Thailand, from January-May 2003. Fly ash mixture (fly ash plus gypsum and lime at the proportion 5:4:1 and clinker ash mixture (clinker ash plus gypsum and lime at the proportion 5:4:1 were used as soil amendments at varying rates i.e., 0, 6.25,12.5, 18.75 and 25 t/ha to improve the soil. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of application of coal ash on acid soil and the growth of a vegetable (Chinese kale. Chinese kale cultivars were planted in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Pak Chong soil series (Ultisols was used as the growth medium. Twenty-day-old seedlings were transplanted in 270 pots (two plants per pot containing acid soil with different treatments of coal ash mixture which were as follows: 1 control, 2 fly ash mixture 6.25 t/ha, 3 fly ash mixture 12.5 t/ha, 4 fly ash mixture 18.75 t/ha, 5 fly ash mixture 25 t/ha, 6 clinker ash mixture 6.25 t/ha, 7 clinker ash mixture 12.5 t/ha, 8 clinker ash mixture 18.75 t/ha and 9 clinker ash mixture 25 t/ha. Chemical fertilizers were applied at the rate of 250 kg/ha using a grade of 15-15-15 of N, P and K, respectively. Plants were harvested 40 days after transplanting. Among the treatments, application of fly ashmixture at a rate of 25t/ha (4t/rai substantially increased soil pH up to 5.7. Fly ash was found more effective than clinker ash in increasing soil pH. The highest yield of Chinese kale was also obtained when fly ash mixture was applied at a rate of 25 t/ha followed by fly ash mixture at 18.75 t/ha and clinker ash mixture at 18.75 t/ha with an average yield per plant of 4.980, 3.743 and 3.447 grams, respectively. It can be concluded that the application of coal ash mixture, either fly- or clinker ash, at 18.75-25 t/ha (3-4 t/rai was the most effective in terms of plant yield. The use of

  5. Improved physical stability of amorphous state through acid base interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telang, Chitra; Mujumdar, Siddharthya; Mathew, Michael

    2009-06-01

    To investigate role of specific interactions in aiding formation and stabilization of amorphous state in ternary and binary dispersions of a weakly acidic drug. Indomethacin (IMC), meglumine (MU), and polyvinyl pyrollidone (PVP) were the model drug, base, and polymer, respectively. Dispersions were prepared using solvent evaporation. Physical mixtures were cryogenically coground. XRPD, PLM, DSC, TGA, and FTIR were used for characterization. MU has a high crystallization tendency and is characterized by a low T(g) (17 degrees C). IMC crystallization was inhibited in ternary dispersion with MU compared to IMC/PVP alone. An amorphous state formed readily even in coground mixtures. Spectroscopic data are indicative of an IMC-MU amorphous salt and supports solid-state proton transfer. IMC-MU salt displays a low T(g) approximately 50 degrees C, but is more physically stable than IMC, which in molecular mixtures with MU, resisted crystallization even when present in stoichiometric excess of base. This is likely due to a disrupted local structure of amorphous IMC due to specific interactions. IMC showed improved physical stability on incorporating MU in polymer, in spite of low T(g) of the base indicating that chemical interactions play a dominant role in physical stabilization. Salt formation could be induced thermally and mechanically.

  6. Rapid desensitization with autologous sweat in cholinergic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaru, Takeshi; Fukunaga, Atsushi; Taguchi, Kumiko; Ogura, Kanako; Nagano, Tohru; Oka, Masahiro; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Nishigori, Chikako

    2011-09-01

    The majority of patients with cholinergic urticaria presents with strong hypersensitivity to autologous sweat. Patients with severe cholinergic urticaria are frequently resistant to H(1) antagonists which are used in conventional therapies for various types of urticaria. It has been reported that desensitization using partially purified sweat antigen was effective in a patient with cholinergic urticaria. The aim of this study is to determine the usefulness of rapid desensitization with autologous sweat in severe cholinergic urticaria, because rapid desensitization has proven to be a quick and effective immunotherapy for allergies to various allergens. Six patients with severe cholinergic urticaria who are resistant to H(1) antagonists and have sweat hypersensitivity were enrolled in a rapid desensitization protocol. In all six patients, the responses for skin tests with autologous sweat were attenuated after rapid desensitization with autologous sweat. Two of the three cholinergic urticaria patients showed reduced histamine release with autologous sweat after the rapid desensitization with autologous sweat. Further, the rapid desensitization and subsequent maintenance treatment reduced the symptoms in five of the six patients. This study provides evidence that rapid desensitization with autologous sweat is beneficial for treating cholinergic urticaria patients resistant to conventional therapy who have sweat hypersensitivity.

  7. Cholinergic systems mediate action from movement to higher consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Nancy J; Butcher, Larry L

    2011-08-10

    There is a fundamental link between cholinergic neurotransmitter function and overt and covert actions. Major cholinergic systems include peripheral motor neurons organizing skeletal muscle movements into overt behaviors and cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain and mesopontine regions that mediate covert actions realized as states of consciousness, arousal, selective attention, perception, and memory. Cholinergic interneurons in the striatum appear to integrate conscious and unconscious actions. Neural network models involving cholinergic neurons, as well as neurons using other neurotransmitters, emphasize connective circuitry as being responsible for both motor programs and neural correlates of higher consciousness. This, however, is only a partial description. At a more fundamental level lie intracellular mechanisms involving the cytoskeleton, which are common to both muscle contraction and neuroplastic responses in targets of central cholinergic cells attendant with higher cognition. Acetylcholine, acting through nicotinic receptors, triggers interactions between cytoskeletal proteins in skeletal muscle cells, as has been long known. There is also evidence that acetylcholine released at central sites acts through muscarinic and nicotinic receptors to initiate responses in actin and microtubule proteins. These effects and their implications for cholinergic involvement in higher cognition are explored in this review.

  8. Omega-3 fatty acids improve psychomotor performance via mechanism not related to nitric acid production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan S. M. Al-Nimer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 fatty acids (ω-3FAs are essential polyunsaturated fats that protect the brain from cognitive impairment. It increases the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthetase (eNOS and thereby increases the nitric acid (NO production. This study aimed to explore the effect of ω-3FAs on psychomotor performance and to relate this effect to the reactive nitrogen species. This study was conducted in Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Al-Mustansiriya University in Baghdad, Iraq. Twenty healthy subjects, allocated randomly from medical college students, were participated in the single blind clinical trial. Participants were divided into two groups, each of ten subjects to receive either placebo or (ω-3FAs (750 mg single oral dose daily for 5 days. They were asked to perform psychomotor performance before and after 5 days of treatment, and venous blood was obtained for determination of serum nitric oxide (NO and peroxynitrite (ONOO. ω-3FAs treated group was significantly different from placebo-treated group in reducing choice and motor reaction times as well as the critical flicker frequency threshold. The serum levels of NO and ONOO in ω-3FAs-treated group did not significantly differ from placebo-treated group. Short term supplementation of ω-3FAs improves the psychomotor performance in young healthy subjects via a mechanism not related to the production of nitric oxide production. Inflorescence is a panicle few flowered and fruit is a capsule. The data of the results obtained were presented and discussed.

  9. Local cholinergic and non-cholinergic neural pathways to the rat supraoptic nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeker, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    An estimated two thirds of the input to the supraoptic nucleus of the rat hypothalamus (SON) including a functionally significant cholinergic innervation, arise from local sources of unknown origin. The sources of these inputs were identified utilizing Golgi-Cox, retrograde tracing, choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemistry and anterograde tracing methodologies. Multipolar Golgi impregnated neurons located dorsal and lateral to the SON extend spiney processes into the nucleus. Injections of the retrograde tracers, wheat germ agglutinin or wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase, into the SON labeled cells bilaterally in the arcuate nucleus, and ipsilaterally in the lateral hypothalamus, anterior hypothalamus, nucleus of the diagonal band, subfornical organ, medial preoptic area, lateral preoptic area and in the region dorsolateral to the nucleus. Immunocytochemistry for choline acetyltransferase revealed cells within the ventro-caudal portion of cholinergic cell group, Ch4, which cluster dorsolateral to the SON, and extend axon- and dendrite-like processes into the SON. Cells double-labeled by choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemistry and retrograde tracer injections into the SON are localized within the same cholinergic cell group dorsolateral to the SON. Injections of the anterograde tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, deposited dorsolateral to the SON results in labeled pre-and post-synaptic processes within the SON. The identification and characterization of endogenous immunoglobulin within the SON and other neurons innervating areas lacking a blood-brain barrier established a novel and potentially important system for direct communication of the supraoptic cells with blood-borne constitutents.

  10. Basic and modern concepts on cholinergic receptor: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Tiwari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cholinergic system is an important system and a branch of the autonomic nervous system which plays an important role in memory, digestion, control of heart beat, blood pressure, movement and many other functions. This article serves as both structural and functional sources of information regarding cholinergic receptors and provides a detailed understanding of the determinants governing specificity of muscarinic and nicotinic receptor to researchers. The study helps to give overall information about the fundamentals of the cholinergic system, its receptors and ongoing research in this field.

  11. Origin of the slow afterhyperpolarization and slow rhythmic bursting in striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Charles J; Goldberg, Joshua A

    2006-01-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons recorded in slices exhibit three different firing patterns: rhythmic single spiking, irregular bursting, and rhythmic bursting. The rhythmic single-spiking pattern is governed mainly by a prominent brief afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) that follows single spikes. The mAHP arises from an apamin-sensitive calcium-dependent potassium current. A slower AHP (sAHP), also present in these neurons, becomes prominent during rhythmic bursting or driven firing. Although not apamin sensitive, the sAHP is caused by a calcium-dependent potassium conductance. It is not present after blockade of calcium current with cadmium or after calcium is removed from the media or when intracellular calcium is buffered with bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid. It reverses at the potassium equilibrium potential. It can be generated by subthreshold depolarizations and persists after blockade of sodium currents by tetrodotoxin. It is slow, being maximal approximately 1 s after depolarization onset, and takes several seconds to decay. It requires >300-ms depolarizations to become maximally activated. Its voltage sensitivity is sigmoidal, with a half activation voltage of -40 mV. We conclude the sAHP is a high-affinity apamin-insensitive calcium-dependent potassium conductance, triggered by calcium currents partly activated at subthreshold levels. In combination with those calcium currents, it accounts for the slow oscillations seen in a subset of cholinergic interneurons exhibiting rhythmic bursting. In all cholinergic interneurons, it contributes to the slowdown or pause in firing that follows driven activity or prolonged subthreshold depolarizations and is therefore a candidate mechanism for the pause response observed in cholinergic neurons in vivo.

  12. Improved synthesis of isostearic acid using zeolite catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isostearic acids are unique and important biobased products with superior properties. Unfortunately, they are not widely utilized in industry because they are produced as byproducts from a process called clay-catalyzed oligomerization of tall oil fatty acids. Generally, this clay method results in...

  13. Periconceptional folic acid use : Still room to improve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zetstra-van der Woude, P.A.; de Walle, H.E.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.

    BACKGROUND: Folic acid use before and during pregnancy prevents neural tube defects. Since 1995, six surveys have been carried out among pregnant women to measure their knowledge and use of folic acid. The results of the most recent survey in 2009 will be discussed and compared with earlier

  14. Periconceptional folic acid use : Still room to improve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zetstra-van der Woude, P.A.; de Walle, H.E.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Folic acid use before and during pregnancy prevents neural tube defects. Since 1995, six surveys have been carried out among pregnant women to measure their knowledge and use of folic acid. The results of the most recent survey in 2009 will be discussed and compared with earlier surveys.

  15. Periconceptional folic acid use : Still room to improve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zetstra-van der Woude, P.A.; de Walle, H.E.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Folic acid use before and during pregnancy prevents neural tube defects. Since 1995, six surveys have been carried out among pregnant women to measure their knowledge and use of folic acid. The results of the most recent survey in 2009 will be discussed and compared with earlier surveys.

  16. Cholinergic, Glutamatergic, and GABAergic Neurons of the Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus Have Distinct Effects on Sleep/Wake Behavior in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Daniel; Ferrari, Loris L; Petit, Gaetan; Mahoney, Carrie E; Fuller, Patrick M; Arrigoni, Elda; Scammell, Thomas E

    2017-02-01

    The pedunculopontine tegmental (PPT) nucleus has long been implicated in the regulation of cortical activity and behavioral states, including rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep. For example, electrical stimulation of the PPT region during sleep leads to rapid awakening, whereas lesions of the PPT in cats reduce REM sleep. Though these effects have been linked with the activity of cholinergic PPT neurons, the PPT also includes intermingled glutamatergic and GABAergic cell populations, and the precise roles of cholinergic, glutamatergic, and GABAergic PPT cell groups in regulating cortical activity and behavioral state remain unknown. Using a chemogenetic approach in three Cre-driver mouse lines, we found that selective activation of glutamatergic PPT neurons induced prolonged cortical activation and behavioral wakefulness, whereas inhibition reduced wakefulness and increased non-REM (NREM) sleep. Activation of cholinergic PPT neurons suppressed lower-frequency electroencephalogram rhythms during NREM sleep. Last, activation of GABAergic PPT neurons slightly reduced REM sleep. These findings reveal that glutamatergic, cholinergic, and GABAergic PPT neurons differentially influence cortical activity and sleep/wake states. More than 40 million Americans suffer from chronic sleep disruption, and the development of effective treatments requires a more detailed understanding of the neuronal mechanisms controlling sleep and arousal. The pedunculopontine tegmental (PPT) nucleus has long been considered a key site for regulating wakefulness and REM sleep. This is mainly because of the cholinergic neurons contained in the PPT nucleus. However, the PPT nucleus also contains glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons that likely contribute to the regulation of cortical activity and sleep-wake states. The chemogenetic experiments in the present study reveal that cholinergic, glutamatergic, and GABAergic PPT neurons each have distinct effects on sleep/wake behavior, improving our

  17. Overexpression of ESBP6 improves lactic acid resistance and production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Minetaka; Akase, Shin-Pei; Nakanishi, Ryota; Kaneko, Yoshinobu; Harashima, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    Polylactic acid plastics are receiving increasing attention for the control of atmospheric CO2 emissions. Lactic acid, the building block for polylactic acid, is produced by fermentation technology from renewable carbon sources. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, harboring the lactate dehydrogenases gene (LDH), produces lactic acid at a large scale due to its strong acid resistance, to its simple nutritional requirements and to its ease of genetic engineering. Since improvement of lactic acid resistance is correlated with an increase of lactic acid production under non-neutralizing condition, we isolated a novel gene that enhances lactic acid resistance using a multi-copy yeast genomic DNA library. In this study, we identified the ESBP6 gene, which increases lactic acid resistance when overexpressed and which encodes a protein with similarity to monocarboxylate permeases. Although ESBP6 was not induced in response to lactic acid stress, it caused weak but reproducible sensitivity to lactic acid when disrupted. Furthermore, intracellular pH in the ESBP6 overexpressing strain was higher than that in the wild-type strain under lactic acid stressed condition, suggesting that Esbp6 plays some roles in lactic acid adaptation response. The ESBP6 overexpressing strain carrying the LDH gene induced 20% increase in lactic acid production compared with the wild-type strain carrying the LDH gene under non-neutralizing conditions. These results indicate that overexpression of ESBP6 provides a novel and useful tool to improve lactic acid resistance and lactic acid production in yeast.

  18. Neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway ameliorates disease in rat collagen-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakov A Levine

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The inflammatory reflex is a physiological mechanism through which the nervous system maintains immunologic homeostasis by modulating innate and adaptive immunity. We postulated that the reflex might be harnessed therapeutically to reduce pathological levels of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis by activating its prototypical efferent arm, termed the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. To explore this, we determined whether electrical neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway reduced disease severity in the collagen-induced arthritis model. METHODS: Rats implanted with vagus nerve cuff electrodes had collagen-induced arthritis induced and were followed for 15 days. Animals underwent active or sham electrical stimulation once daily from day 9 through the conclusion of the study. Joint swelling, histology, and levels of cytokines and bone metabolism mediators were assessed. RESULTS: Compared with sham treatment, active neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway resulted in a 52% reduction in ankle diameter (p = 0.02, a 57% reduction in ankle diameter (area under curve; p = 0.02 and 46% reduction overall histological arthritis score (p = 0.01 with significant improvements in inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage destruction, and bone erosion (p = 0.02, accompanied by numerical reductions in systemic cytokine levels, not reaching statistical significance. Bone erosion improvement was associated with a decrease in serum levels of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL from 132±13 to 6±2 pg/mL (mean±SEM, p = 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: The severity of collagen-induced arthritis is reduced by neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway delivered using an implanted electrical vagus nerve stimulation cuff electrode, and supports the rationale for testing this approach in human inflammatory disorders.

  19. Cholinergic drugs as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in affective disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, M; Riemann, D; Krieg, C

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis of a significant involvement of the cholinergic system in the pathogenesis of affective disorders still lacks strong experimental support. This is mainly because of missing specific peripheral markers of the central nervous activity of the cholinergic system and the lack of specific cholinergic agonists and antagonists without severe peripheral side effects. As the direct cholinergic agonist RS 86 seems to be more suitable because of its minor side effects, long half-life and oral applicability, it was tested for its antimanic property and its effect on the hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal system and the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep-generating system. RS 86 exhibited antimanic and REM sleep-inducing properties, but failed to stimulate the cortisol system.

  20. Disruption of cardiac cholinergic neurons enhances susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungen, Christiane; Scherschel, Katharina; Eickholt, Christian; Kuklik, Pawel; Klatt, Niklas; Bork, Nadja; Salzbrunn, Tim; Alken, Fares; Angendohr, Stephan; Klene, Christiane; Mester, Janos; Klöcker, Nikolaj; Veldkamp, Marieke W.; Schumacher, Udo; Willems, Stephan; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Meyer, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The parasympathetic nervous system plays an important role in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation. Catheter ablation, a minimally invasive procedure deactivating abnormal firing cardiac tissue, is increasingly becoming the therapy of choice for atrial fibrillation. This is inevitably associated with the obliteration of cardiac cholinergic neurons. However, the impact on ventricular electrophysiology is unclear. Here we show that cardiac cholinergic neurons modulate ventricular electrophysiology. Mechanical disruption or pharmacological blockade of parasympathetic innervation shortens ventricular refractory periods, increases the incidence of ventricular arrhythmia and decreases ventricular cAMP levels in murine hearts. Immunohistochemistry confirmed ventricular cholinergic innervation, revealing parasympathetic fibres running from the atria to the ventricles parallel to sympathetic fibres. In humans, catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation, which is accompanied by accidental parasympathetic and concomitant sympathetic denervation, raises the burden of premature ventricular complexes. In summary, our results demonstrate an influence of cardiac cholinergic neurons on the regulation of ventricular function and arrhythmogenesis. PMID:28128201

  1. Suppression of glucocorticoid secretion enhances cholinergic transmission in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Kazushige; Shoji, Hirotaka; Ikeda, Ryuji; Tanaka, Yayoi; Maruyama, Wakako; Tabira, Takeshi

    2008-08-15

    We previously demonstrated that suppression of glucocorticoid secretion by adrenalectomy (ADX) impaired prefrontal cortex-sensitive working memory, but not reference memory. Since the cholinergic system in the hippocampus is also involved in these memories, we examined the effects of glucocorticoid suppression on cholinergic transmission in the rat hippocampus. A microdialysis study revealed that ADX did not affect the basal acetylcholine release, but enhanced the KCl-evoked response. This enhanced response was reversed by the corticosterone replacement treatment. The extracellular choline concentrations increased under both basal and KCl-stimulated conditions in the ADX rats, and these increases were also reversed by the corticosterone replacement. These results indicate that suppression of glucocorticoid secretion enhances cholinergic transmission in the hippocampus in response to stimuli. It is possible that this enhanced cholinergic transmission may not contribute to the ADX-induced working memory impairment, but it may be involved in maintenance of reference memory.

  2. Striatal cholinergic interneurons Drive GABA release from dopamine terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Alexandra B; Hammack, Nora; Yang, Cindy F; Shah, Nirao M; Seal, Rebecca P; Kreitzer, Anatol C

    2014-04-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons are implicated in motor control, associative plasticity, and reward-dependent learning. Synchronous activation of cholinergic interneurons triggers large inhibitory synaptic currents in dorsal striatal projection neurons, providing one potential substrate for control of striatal output, but the mechanism for these GABAergic currents is not fully understood. Using optogenetics and whole-cell recordings in brain slices, we find that a large component of these inhibitory responses derive from action-potential-independent disynaptic neurotransmission mediated by nicotinic receptors. Cholinergically driven IPSCs were not affected by ablation of striatal fast-spiking interneurons but were greatly reduced after acute treatment with vesicular monoamine transport inhibitors or selective destruction of dopamine terminals with 6-hydroxydopamine, indicating that GABA release originated from dopamine terminals. These results delineate a mechanism in which striatal cholinergic interneurons can co-opt dopamine terminals to drive GABA release and rapidly inhibit striatal output neurons.

  3. Personalized genetics of the cholinergic blockade of neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simchovitz, Alon; Heneka, Michael T; Soreq, Hermona

    2017-03-21

    Acetylcholine signaling is essential for cognitive functioning and blocks inflammation. To maintain homeostasis, cholinergic signaling is subjected to multi-leveled and bidirectional regulation by both proteins and non-coding microRNAs ('CholinomiRs'). CholinomiRs coordinate the cognitive and inflammatory aspects of cholinergic signaling by targeting major cholinergic transcripts including the acetylcholine hydrolyzing enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Notably, AChE inhibitors are the only currently approved line of treatment for Alzheimer's disease patients. Since cholinergic signaling blocks neuroinflammation which is inherent to Alzheimer's disease, genomic changes modifying AChE's properties and its susceptibility to inhibitors and/or to CholinomiRs regulation may affect the levels and properties of inflammasome components such as NLRP3. This calls for genomic-based medicine approaches based on genotyping of both coding and non-coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes involved in cholinergic signaling. An example is a SNP in a recognition element for the primate-specific microRNA-608 within the 3' untranslated region of the AChE transcript. Carriers of the minor allele of that SNP present massively elevated brain AChE levels, increased trait anxiety and inflammation, accompanied by perturbed CholinomiR-608 regulatory networks and elevated prefrontal activity under exposure to stressful insults. Several additional SNPs in the AChE and other cholinergic genes await further studies, and might likewise involve different CholinomiRs and pathways including those modulating the initiation and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. CholinomiRs regulation of the cholinergic system thus merits in-depth interrogation and is likely to lead to personalized medicine approaches for achieving better homeostasis in health and disease. This is an article for the special issue XVth International Symposium on Cholinergic Mechanisms.

  4. Astrocytes mediate in vivo cholinergic-induced synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Navarrete

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic transmission represents the cellular basis of learning and memory. Astrocytes have been shown to regulate synaptic transmission and plasticity. However, their involvement in specific physiological processes that induce LTP in vivo remains unknown. Here we show that in vivo cholinergic activity evoked by sensory stimulation or electrical stimulation of the septal nucleus increases Ca²⁺ in hippocampal astrocytes and induces LTP of CA3-CA1 synapses, which requires cholinergic muscarinic (mAChR and metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR activation. Stimulation of cholinergic pathways in hippocampal slices evokes astrocyte Ca²⁺ elevations, postsynaptic depolarizations of CA1 pyramidal neurons, and LTP of transmitter release at single CA3-CA1 synapses. Like in vivo, these effects are mediated by mAChRs, and this cholinergic-induced LTP (c-LTP also involves mGluR activation. Astrocyte Ca²⁺ elevations and LTP are absent in IP₃R2 knock-out mice. Downregulating astrocyte Ca²⁺ signal by loading astrocytes with BAPTA or GDPβS also prevents LTP, which is restored by simultaneous astrocyte Ca²⁺ uncaging and postsynaptic depolarization. Therefore, cholinergic-induced LTP requires astrocyte Ca²⁺ elevations, which stimulate astrocyte glutamate release that activates mGluRs. The cholinergic-induced LTP results from the temporal coincidence of the postsynaptic activity and the astrocyte Ca²⁺ signal simultaneously evoked by cholinergic activity. Therefore, the astrocyte Ca²⁺ signal is necessary for cholinergic-induced synaptic plasticity, indicating that astrocytes are directly involved in brain storage information.

  5. Cholinergic depletion and basal forebrain volume in primary progressive aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolien Schaeverbeke

    2017-01-01

    In the PPA group, only LV cases showed decreases in AChE activity levels compared to controls. Surprisingly, a substantial number of SV cases showed significant AChE activity increases compared to controls. BF volume did not correlate with AChE activity levels in PPA. To conclude, in our sample of PPA patients, LV but not SV was associated with cholinergic depletion. BF atrophy in PPA does not imply cholinergic depletion.

  6. Amyloid-β depresses excitatory cholinergic synaptic transmission in Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liqun Fang; Jingjing Duan; Dongzhi Ran; Zihao Fan; Ying Yan; Naya Huang; Huaiyu Gu; Yulan Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Objective Decline,disruption,or alterations of nicotinic cholinergic mechanisms contribute to cognitive dysfunctions like Alzheimer's disease (AD).Although amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation is a pathological hallmark of AD,the mechanisms by which Aβ peptides modulate cholinergic synaptic transmission and memory loss remain obscure.This study was aimed to investigate the potential synaptic modulation by Aβ of the cholinergic synapses between olfactory receptor neurons and projection neurons (PNs) in the olfactory lobe of the fruit fly.Methods Cholinergic spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) were recorded with whole-cell patch clamp from PNs in Drosophila AD models expressing Aβ40,Aβ42,or Aβ42Arc peptides in neural tissue.Results In fly pupae (2 days before eclosion),overexpression of Aβ42 or Aβ42Arc,but not Aβ40,led to a significant decrease of mEPSC frequency,while overexpression of Aβ40,Aβ42,or Aβ42Arc had no significant effect on mEPSC amplitude.In contrast,Pavlovian olfactory associative learning and lifespan assays showed that both short-term memory and lifespan were decreased in the Drosophila models expressing Aβ40,Aβ42,or Aβ42Arc.Conclusion Both electrophysiological and behavioral results showed an effect of Aβ peptide on cholinergic synaptic transmission and suggest a possible mechanism by which Aβ peptides cause cholinergic neuron degeneration and the consequent memory loss.

  7. Vagotomy diminishes obesity in cafeteria rats by decreasing cholinergic potentiation of insulin release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbo, Sandra Lucinei; Ribeiro, Rosane Aparecida; Mendes, Mariana Carla; Lubaczeuski, Camila; Maller, Ana Claudia Paiva Alegre; Carneiro, Everardo Magalhães; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia

    2016-12-01

    Herein, we investigated whether subdiaphragmatic vagotomy has benefits on obesity, body glucose homeostasis, and insulin secretion in cafeteria (CAF)-obese rats. Wistar rats were fed a standard or CAF diet for 12 weeks. Subsequently, CAF rats were randomly submitted to truncal vagotomy (CAF Vag) or sham operation (CAF Sham). CAF Sham rats were hyperphagic, obese, and presented metabolic disturbances, including hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Twelve weeks after vagotomy, CAF Vag rats presented reductions in body weight and perigonadal fat stores. Vagotomy did not modify glucose tolerance but normalized fed glycemia, insulinemia, and insulin sensitivity. Isolated islets from CAF Sham rats secreted more insulin in response to the cholinergic agent, carbachol, and when intracellular cyclic adenine monophosphate (cAMP) is enhanced by forskolin or 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. Vagotomy decreased glucose-induced insulin release due to a reduction in the cholinergic action on β-cells. This effect also normalized islet secretion in response to cAMP. Therefore, vagotomy in rats fed on a CAF-style diet effectively decreases adiposity and restores insulin sensitivity. These effects were mainly associated with the lack of cholinergic action on the endocrine pancreas, which decreases insulinemia and may gradually reduce fat storage and improve insulin sensitivity.

  8. Effects of diazinon on the lymphocytic cholinergic system of Nile tilapia fish (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Ibarra, G A; Díaz-Resendiz, K J G; Pavón-Romero, L; Rojas-García, A E; Medina-Díaz, I M; Girón-Pérez, M I

    2016-08-01

    Fish rearing under intensive farming conditions can be easily disturbed by pesticides, substances that have immunotoxic properties and may predispose to infections. Organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) are widely used in agricultural activities; however, the mechanism of immunotoxicity of these substances is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of diazinon pesticides (OPs) on the cholinergic system of immune cells as a possible target of OP immunotoxicity. We evaluated ACh levels and cholinergic (nicotinic and muscarinic) receptor concentration. Additionally, AChE activity was evaluated in mononuclear cells of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), a freshwater fish mostly cultivated in tropical regions around the world. The obtained results indicate that acute exposure to diazinon induces an increase in ACh concentration and a decrease in nAChR and mAChR concentrations and AChE activity in fish immune cells, This suggests that the non-neuronal lymphocytic cholinergic system may be the main target in the mechanism of OP immunotoxicity. This study contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms of immunotoxicity of pollutants and may help to take actions for animal health improvement.

  9. Separation and recovery of nucleic acids with improved biological activity by acid-degradable polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Kyung; Kwon, Young Jik

    2010-05-01

    One of the fundamental challenges in studying biomacromolecules (e.g. nucleic acids and proteins) and their complexes in a biological system is isolating them in their structurally and functionally intact forms. Electrophoresis offers convenient and efficient separation and analysis of biomacromolecules but recovery of separated biomacromolecules is a significant challenge. In this study, DNAs of various sizes were separated by electrophoresis in an acid-degradable polyacrylamide gel. Almost 100% of the nucleic acids were recovered after the identified gel bands were hydrolyzed under a mildly acidic condition and purified using anion exchange resin. Further concentration by centrifugal filtration and a second purification using ion exchange column chromatography yielded 44-84% of DNA. The second conventional (non-degradable) gel electrophoresis confirmed that the nucleic acids recovered from acid-degradable gel bands preserved their electrophoretic properties through acidic gel hydrolysis, purification, and concentration processes. The plasmid DNA recovered from acid-degradable gel transfected cells significantly more efficiently than the starting plasmid DNA (i.e. improved biological activity via acid-degradable PAGE). Separation of other types of nucleic acids such as small interfering RNA using this convenient and efficient technique was also demonstrated.

  10. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to improve succinic acid production based on metabolic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuma; Hirasawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    We performed metabolic engineering on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for enhanced production of succinic acid. Aerobic succinic acid production in S. cerevisiae was achieved by disrupting the SDH1 and SDH2 genes, which encode the catalytic subunits of succinic acid dehydrogenase. Increased succinic acid production was achieved by eliminating the ethanol biosynthesis pathways. Metabolic profiling analysis revealed that succinic acid accumulated intracellularly following disruption of the SDH1 and SDH2 genes, which suggests that enhancing the export of intracellular succinic acid outside of cells increases succinic acid production in S. cerevisiae. The mae1 gene encoding the Schizosaccharomyces pombe malic acid transporter was introduced into S. cerevisiae, and as a result, succinic acid production was successfully improved. Metabolic profiling analysis is useful in producing chemicals for metabolic engineering of microorganisms.

  11. Improvement of ruthenium based decarboxylation of carboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The removal of oxygen atoms from biobased carboxylic acids is an attractive route to provide the drop in replacement feedstocks that industry needs to continue to provide high performance products. Through the use of ruthenium catalysis, an efficient method where this process can be accomplished on ...

  12. Biotechnology for improving hydroxy fatty acid production in lesquerella

    Science.gov (United States)

    P Lesquerella [Physaria fendleri (A. Gray)], formerly Lesquerella fendleri, (Brassicaceae), being developed as a new industrial oilseed crop in the southwestern region of the United States, is valued for its unusual hydroxy fatty acid (HFA) in seed. The majority of HFA in lesquerella is lesquerolic...

  13. Monitoring cholinergic activity during attentional performance in mice heterozygous for the choline transporter: a model of cholinergic capacity limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolone, Giovanna; Mallory, Caitlin S; Koshy Cherian, Ajeesh; Miller, Thomas R; Blakely, Randy D; Sarter, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Reductions in the capacity of the human choline transporter (SLC5A7, CHT) have been hypothesized to diminish cortical cholinergic neurotransmission, leading to risk for cognitive and mood disorders. To determine the acetylcholine (ACh) release capacity of cortical cholinergic projections in a mouse model of cholinergic hypofunction, the CHT+/- mouse, we assessed extracellular ACh levels while mice performed an operant sustained attention task (SAT). We found that whereas SAT-performance-associated increases in extracellular ACh levels of CHT+/- mice were significantly attenuated relative to wildtype littermates, performance on the SAT was normal. Tetrodotoxin-induced blockade of neuronal excitability reduced both dialysate ACh levels and SAT performance similarly in both genotypes. Likewise, lesions of cholinergic neurons abolished SAT performance in both genotypes. However, cholinergic activation remained more vulnerable to the reverse-dialyzed muscarinic antagonist atropine in CHT+/- mice. Additionally, CHT+/- mice displayed greater SAT-disrupting effects of reverse dialysis of the nAChR antagonist mecamylamine. Receptor binding assays revealed a higher density of α4β2* nAChRs in the cortex of CHT+/- mice compared to controls. These findings reveal compensatory mechanisms that, in the context of moderate cognitive challenges, can overcome the performance deficits expected from the significantly reduced ACh capacity of CHT+/- cholinergic terminals. Further analyses of molecular and functional compensations in the CHT+/- model may provide insights into both risk and resiliency factors involved in cognitive and mood disorders.

  14. Deletion of JJJ1 improves acetic acid tolerance and bioethanol fermentation performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuechang; Zhang, Lijie; Jin, Xinna; Fang, Yahong; Zhang, Ke; Qi, Lei; Zheng, Daoqiong

    2016-07-01

    To improve tolerance to acetic acid that is present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates and affects bioethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with improved tolerance to acetic acid were obtained through deletion of the JJJ1 gene. The lag phase of the JJJ1 deletion mutant BYΔJJJ1 was ~16 h shorter than that of the parent strain, BY4741, when the fermentation medium contained 4.5 g acetic acid/l. Additionally, the specific ethanol production rate of BYΔJJJ1 was increased (0.057 g/g h) compared to that of the parent strain (0.051 g/g h). Comparative transcription and physiological analyses revealed higher long chain fatty acid, trehalose, and catalase contents might be critical factors responsible for the acetic acid resistance of JJJ1 knockout strains. JJJ1 deletion improves acetic acid tolerance and ethanol fermentation performance of S. cerevisiae.

  15. Improving gluten-free bread quality by enrichment with acidic food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Carlos A; Ronda, Felicidad; Pérez, Blanca; Pando, Valentín

    2011-08-01

    An experimental design has been developed to improve gluten-free bread formulation, on the basis of rice flour and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) as alternative baking ingredients. In order to improve the quality of gluten-free bread, several levels of acidic food additives (acetic acid, lactic acid, citric acid and monosodium phosphate) have been tested. The influence of these compounds on the dough and on bread properties has been determined, including a hedonic sensory test of appearance, odour, taste and texture of bread. Results suggest that monosodium phosphate yields bread producing better texture scores, associated with the highest volumes of the loaf. Discussions are made on the basis of CO2 transport pathway across the HPMC network and simultaneous interactions with acidic food additives present. Chemical properties of the acids justify the bread's alveolus size and the preservative effects of acetic acid in the dough.

  16. Improvement of productivity in acetic acid fermentation with Clostridium thermoaceticum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, M.M.; Cheryan, M. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Production of acetic acid by a mutant strain of Clostridium thermoaceticum was compared in three types of membrane cell-recycle bioreactors. A modified fed-batch bioreactor (where the product is partially removed at the end of fermentation, but the cells are retained), and a two-stage CSTR (with product being removed continuously and the cells being recycled from the second to the first stage) resulted in better performance than a one-stage CSTR or batch fermenter. The difference in performance was greater at higher acetate concentration. With 45 g/L of glucose in the feed, productivity was 0.75-1.12 g/L-h and acetic acid concentrations were 34-38 g/L. This is more than double the batch system. The nutrient supply rate also appeared to have a strong influence on productivity of the microorganism.

  17. Acetic acid pretreatment improves the hardness of cooked potato slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenlin; Shehzad, Hussain; Yan, Shoulei; Li, Jie; Wang, Qingzhang

    2017-08-01

    The effects of acetic acid pretreatment on the texture of cooked potato slices were investigated in this work. Potato slices were pretreated with acetic acid immersion (AAI), distilled water immersion (DWI), or no immersion (NI). Subsequently, the cell wall material of the pretreated samples was isolated and fractioned to evaluate changes in the monosaccharide content and molar mass (MM), and the hardness and microscopic structure of the potato slices in different pretreatments before and after cooking were determined. The results showed that the highest firmness was obtained with more intact structure of the cell wall for cooked potato slices with AAI pretreatment. Furthermore, the MM and sugar ratio demonstrated that the AAI pretreated potato slices contained a higher content of the small molecular polysaccharides of cell walls, especially in the hemicellulose fraction. This work may provide a reference for potato processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Striatal cholinergic interneuron regulation and circuit effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Austin Lim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The striatum plays a central role in motor control and motor learning. Appropriate responses to environmental stimuli, including pursuit of reward or avoidance of aversive experience all require functional striatal circuits. These pathways integrate synaptic inputs from limbic and cortical regions including sensory, motor and motivational information to ultimately connect intention to action. Although many neurotransmitters participate in striatal circuitry, one critically important player is acetylcholine (ACh. Relative to other brain areas, the striatum contains exceptionally high levels of ACh, the enzymes that catalyze its synthesis and breakdown, as well as both nicotinic and muscarinic receptor types that mediate its postsynaptic effects. The principal source of striatal ACh is the cholinergic interneuron (ChI, which comprises only about 1-2% of all striatal cells yet sends dense arbors of projections throughout the striatum. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the factors affecting the excitability of these neurons through acute effects and long term changes in their synaptic inputs. In addition, we discuss the physiological effects of ACh in the striatum, and how changes in ACh levels may contribute to disease states during striatal dysfunction.

  19. Ursodeoxycholic acid improves gastrointestinal motility defects in gallstone patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Colecchia; G Mazzella; L Sandri; F Azzaroli; M Magliuolo; P Simoni; ML Bacchi-Reggiani; E Roda; D Festi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To simultaneously evaluate the presence of defects in gallbladder and gastric emptying, as well as in intestinal transit in gallstone patients (GS) and the effect of chronic ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) administration on these parameters and on serum bile acids and clinical outcome in GS and controls (CTR).METHODS: After a standard liquid test meal, gallbladder and gastric emptying (by ultrasound), oroileal transit time (OI∏) (by an immunoenzymatic technique)and serum bile acids (by HPLC) were evaluated before and after 3 mo of UDCA (12 mg/kg bw/d) or placebo administration in 10 symptomatic GS and 10 matched healthy CTR.RESULTS: OI∏ was longer in GS than in CTR (P <0.0001); UDCA significantly reduced OI∏ in GS (P <0.0001), but not in CTR. GS had longer gastric halfemptying time (t1/2) than CTR (P < 0.0044) at baseline;after UDCA, t1/2 significantly decreased (P < 0.006) in GS but not in CTR. Placebo administration had no effect on gastric emptying and intestinal transit in both GS and CTR.CONCLUSION: The gallstone patient has simultaneous multiple impairments of gallbladder and gastric emptying, as well as of intestinal transit. UDCA administration restores these defects in GS, without any effect in CTR. These results confirm the pathogenetic role of gastrointestinal motility in gallstone disease and suggest an additional mechanism of action for UDCA in reducing bile cholesterol supersaturation.

  20. Intrinsic cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus: fact or artefact?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Krzysztof Blusztajn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is generally agreed that hippocampal acetylcholine (ACh is synthesized and released exclusively from the terminals of the long-axon afferents whose cell bodies reside in the medial septum and diagonal band. The search for intrinsic cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus has a long history; however evidence for the existence of these neurons has been inconsistent, with most investigators failing to detect them using in situ hybridization or immunohistochemical staining of the cholinergic markers, choline acetyltransferase (CHAT or vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VACHT. Advances in the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mice expressing a reporter protein under the control of the genomic elements of the Chat gene (Chat-BAC mice have facilitated studies of cholinergic neurons. Such mice show robust and faithful expression of the reporter proteins in all known cholinergic cell populations. The availability of the Chat-BAC mice re-ignited interest in hippocampal cholinergic interneurons, because a small number of such reporter-expressing cells is frequently observed in the hippocampus of these mice. However, to date, attempts to confirm that these neurons co-express the endogenous cholinergic markers CHAT or VACHT, or release ACh, have been unsuccessful. Without such confirmatory evidence it is best to conclude that there are no cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus. Similar considerations apply to other BAC transgenic lines, whose utility as a discovery tool for cell populations heretofore not known to express the genes of interest encoded by the BACs, must be validated by methods that detect expression of the endogenous genes.

  1. Cholinergic Neurons Excite Cortically Projecting Basal Forebrain GABAergic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; McKenna, James T.; Zant, Janneke C.; Winston, Stuart; Basheer, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in the control of cortical activation and attention. Understanding the modulation of BF neuronal activity is a prerequisite to treat disorders of cortical activation involving BF dysfunction, such as Alzheimer's disease. Here we reveal the interaction between cholinergic neurons and cortically projecting BF GABAergic neurons using immunohistochemistry and whole-cell recordings in vitro. In GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, BF cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase-positive) neurons were intermingled with GABAergic (GFP+) neurons. Immunohistochemistry for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter showed that cholinergic fibers apposed putative cortically projecting GABAergic neurons containing parvalbumin (PV). In coronal BF slices from GAD67-GFP knock-in or PV-tdTomato mice, pharmacological activation of cholinergic receptors with bath application of carbachol increased the firing rate of large (>20 μm diameter) BF GFP+ and PV (tdTomato+) neurons, which exhibited the intrinsic membrane properties of cortically projecting neurons. The excitatory effect of carbachol was blocked by antagonists of M1 and M3 muscarinic receptors in two subpopulations of BF GABAergic neurons [large hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) and small Ih, respectively]. Ion substitution experiments and reversal potential measurements suggested that the carbachol-induced inward current was mediated mainly by sodium-permeable cation channels. Carbachol also increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic neurons/fibers caused a mecamylamine- and atropine-sensitive inward current in putative GABAergic neurons. Thus, cortically projecting, BF GABAergic/PV neurons are excited by neighboring BF and/or brainstem cholinergic neurons. Loss of cholinergic neurons in Alzheimer's disease may impair cortical activation, in part, through disfacilitation of BF cortically

  2. Excitatory and inhibitory actions of isoflurane on the cholinergic ascending arousal system of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hai-Long; Fukuda, Satoru; Murata, Eri; Higuchi, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    The cholinergic arousal systems are known to critically regulate the state of consciousness. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of isoflurane on the inhibitory or excitatory neurotransmitters efflux in important nuclei within the cholinergic arousal system using in vivo intracerebral microdialysis. The efflux of glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), or acetylcholine in the posterior hypothalamus (PH), the basal forebrain (BF), and the somatosensory cortex (S1BF) of rats was detected using intracerebral microdialysis under an awake condition and at 0.5-2.0 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) isoflurane anesthesia. The intrabasalis perfusion of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate on the cortical acetylcholine effluxes was also examined under both conditions. Isoflurane had no influence on the glutamate and GABA efflux in the PH, whereas in the BF, it dose-dependently increased glutamate efflux and decreased GABA efflux. A transient increase in glutamate efflux at 1.0 MAC and a decrease in GABA at 0.5-1.5 MAC were observed in the S1BF. Isoflurane dose-dependently decreased acetylcholine efflux in the S1BF. Perfusion of the BF with AMPA increased acetylcholine efflux in the S1BF with electroencephalographic activation during 0.75 MAC isoflurane anesthesia, suggesting an inhibitory action of isoflurane on AMPA receptors in the BF. However, N-methyl-D-aspartate had no effect on these parameters. Isoflurane induces both excitatory and inhibitory actions in the cholinergic arousal system. The predominant inhibitory action of isoflurane over its excitatory action at the BF would result in the decrease in the acetylcholine efflux in the S1BF.

  3. Evolution of the genetic code by incorporation of amino acids that improved or changed protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Brian R

    2013-10-01

    Fifty years have passed since the genetic code was deciphered, but how the genetic code came into being has not been satisfactorily addressed. It is now widely accepted that the earliest genetic code did not encode all 20 amino acids found in the universal genetic code as some amino acids have complex biosynthetic pathways and likely were not available from the environment. Therefore, the genetic code evolved as pathways for synthesis of new amino acids became available. One hypothesis proposes that early in the evolution of the genetic code four amino acids-valine, alanine, aspartic acid, and glycine-were coded by GNC codons (N = any base) with the remaining codons being nonsense codons. The other sixteen amino acids were subsequently added to the genetic code by changing nonsense codons into sense codons for these amino acids. Improvement in protein function is presumed to be the driving force behind the evolution of the code, but how improved function was achieved by adding amino acids has not been examined. Based on an analysis of amino acid function in proteins, an evolutionary mechanism for expansion of the genetic code is described in which individual coded amino acids were replaced by new amino acids that used nonsense codons differing by one base change from the sense codons previously used. The improved or altered protein function afforded by the changes in amino acid function provided the selective advantage underlying the expansion of the genetic code. Analysis of amino acid properties and functions explains why amino acids are found in their respective positions in the genetic code.

  4. Endogenous cholinergic neurotransmission contributes to behavioral sensitization to morphine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusica Bajic

    Full Text Available Neuroplasticity in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system is critical for behavioral adaptations associated with opioid reward and addiction. These processes may be influenced by cholinergic transmission arising from the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDTg, a main source of acetylcholine to mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons. To examine this possibility we asked if chronic systemic morphine administration affects expression of genes in ventral and ventrolateral periaqueductal gray at the level of the LDTg using rtPCR. Specifically, we examined gene expression changes in the area of interest using Neurotransmitters and Receptors PCR array between chronic morphine and saline control groups. Analysis suggested that chronic morphine administration led to changes in expression of genes associated, in part, with cholinergic neurotransmission. Furthermore, using a quantitative immunofluorescent technique, we found that chronic morphine treatment produced a significant increase in immunolabeling of the cholinergic marker (vesicular acetylcholine transporter in neurons of the LDTg. Finally, systemic administration of the nonselective and noncompetitive neuronal nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (0.5 or 2 mg/kg dose-dependently blocked the expression, and to a lesser extent the development, of locomotor sensitization. The same treatment had no effect on acute morphine antinociception, antinociceptive tolerance or dependence to chronic morphine. Taken together, the results suggest that endogenous nicotinic cholinergic neurotransmission selectively contributes to behavioral sensitization to morphine and this process may, in part, involve cholinergic neurons within the LDTg.

  5. Cholinergic and adrenergic influence on the teleost heart in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, M; Ehrenström, F; Nilsson, S

    1987-01-01

    The tonical cholinergic and adrenergic influence on the heart rate was investigated in vivo in seven species of marine teleosts (pollack, Pollachius pollachius; cuckoo wrasse, Labrus mixtus; ballan wrasse, Labrus berggylta; five-bearded rockling, Ciliata mustela; tadpole fish, Raniceps raninus; eel-pout, Zoarces viviparus and short-spined sea scorpion, Myoxocephalus scor pius) during rest and, in two of the species (P. pollachius and L. mixtus), also during moderate swimming exercise in a Blazka-type swim tunnel. Ventral aortic blood pressure and heart rate were recorded via a catheter implanted in an afferent branchial artery, and the influence of the cholinergic and adrenergic tonus on the heart rate was assessed by injection of atropine and sotalol respectively. During rest the adrenergic tonus was higher than the cholinergic tonus in all species except L. berggylta, where the reverse was true. In P. pollachius and L. mixtus, exercise appeared to produce a lowering of the cholinergic tonus on the heart and, possibly, a slight increase of the adrenergic tonus. The nature of the adrenergic tonus (humoral or neural) is not clear, but the low plasma concentrations of catecholamines both during rest and exercise could be interpreted in favour of a mainly neural adrenergic tonus on the teleost heart. These experiments are compatible with the view that both a cholinergic inhibitory tonus and an adrenergic excitatory tonus are general features in the control of the teleost heart in vivo, both at rest and during moderate swimming exercise.

  6. Engineering crassulacean acid metabolism to improve water-use efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, Anne M; Hartwell, James; Weston, David J; Schlauch, Karen A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C

    2014-05-01

    Climatic extremes threaten agricultural sustainability worldwide. One approach to increase plant water-use efficiency (WUE) is to introduce crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) into C3 crops. Such a task requires comprehensive systems-level understanding of the enzymatic and regulatory pathways underpinning this temporal CO2 pump. Here we review the progress that has been made in achieving this goal. Given that CAM arose through multiple independent evolutionary origins, comparative transcriptomics and genomics of taxonomically diverse CAM species are being used to define the genetic 'parts list' required to operate the core CAM functional modules of nocturnal carboxylation, diurnal decarboxylation, and inverse stomatal regulation. Engineered CAM offers the potential to sustain plant productivity for food, feed, fiber, and biofuel production in hotter and drier climates.

  7. High dose folic acid supplementation improves arterial endothelial function of coronary patients independent of homocysteine level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KS Woo; P Chook; M Qiao; AKY Chan; LLT Chan; WWM Chan; DS Celermajer

    2003-01-01

    @@ Background Hyperhomocysteinemia (prevalent in rural northern China)is an emerging risk factor for arterial endothelial dysfunction in CAD, which can be improved with folic acid supplementation. Such homocysteine-lowerying dosage of folio acid ( < 1 mg/d ) can reduce restenosis after PTCA, but not the cardiovascular events.Folic acid has additional vascular protection in antixidation, NO synthase protection, angiogenesis-promotion and cytokines reduction.

  8. Improvement in ionic conductivities of poly-(2-vinylpyridine) by treatment with crotonic acid and vinyl acetic acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anna Gogoi; Neelotpal Sen Sarma

    2015-06-01

    The synthesis, characterization and improved ionic conductivities of the salts of poly-(2-vinylpyridine) with crotonic acid and vinyl acetic acid are reported here. In this study, the alternating current conductivity measurements were carried out within the temperature range of 30–90° C and the frequency range of 1 Hz–100 kHz in solid state. A two- to three-fold increase in conductivity was observed for vinyl acetic acid salt whereas one- to twofold increase was observed for crotonic acid salt. The ionic transport numbers of the salts were measured with the help of the Wagner polarization technique which reveals that the percentage of ionic character of the salts are significantly higher compared with the polymer. The percentage of water uptake by the polymer and its salts were also observed.

  9. Satureja bachtiarica ameliorate beta-amyloid induced memory impairment, oxidative stress and cholinergic deficit in animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soodi, Maliheh; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Hajimehdipoor, Homa; Dashti, Abolfazl; Sepand, Mohammad Reza; Moradi, Shahla

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular deposition of Beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is the main finding in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which damages cholinergic neurons through oxidative stress and reduces the cholinergic neurotransmission. Satureja bachtiarica is a medicinal plant from the Lamiaceae family which was widely used in Iranian traditional medicine. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible protective effects of S. bachtiarica methanolic extract on Aβ induced spatial memory impairment in Morris Water Maze (MWM), oxidative stress and cholinergic neuron degeneration. Pre- aggregated Aβ was injected into the hippocampus of each rat bilaterally (10 μg/rat) and MWM task was performed 14 days later to evaluate learning and memory function. Methanolic extract of S.bachtiarica (10, 50 and 100 mg/Kg) was injected intraperitoneally for 19 consecutive days, after Aβ injection. After the probe test the brain tissue were collected and lipid peroxidation, Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and Cholin Acetyl Transferees (ChAT) immunorectivity were measured in the hippocampus. Intrahipocampal injection of Aβ impaired learning and memory in MWM in training days and probe trail. Methanolic extract of S. bachtiarica (50 and 100 mg/Kg) could attenuate Aβ-induced memory deficit. ChAT immunostaining revealed that cholinergic neurons were loss in Aβ- injected group and S. bachtiarica (100 mg/Kg) could ameliorate Aβ- induced ChAT reduction in the hippocampus. Also S. bachtiarica could ameliorate Aβ-induced lipid peroxidation and AChE activity increase in the hippocampus. In conclusion our study represent that S.bachtiarica methanolic extract can improve Aβ-induced memory impairment and cholinergic loss then we recommended this extract as a candidate for further investigation in treatment of AD.

  10. Ascorbic acid supplementation does not improve efficacy of meso-dimercaptosuccinic acid treatment in lead-exposed suckling rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnai, Veda Marija; Piasek, Martina; Blanusa, Maja; Juresa, Dijana; Sarić, Marija; Kostial, Krista

    2003-10-01

    It was suggested that ascorbic acid as a natural chelating agent can influence lead toxicokinetics and improve chelating properties of dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) in adult rats. In this paper potential benefits of ascorbic acid supplementation, alone or combined with DMSA, in decreasing lead retention in suckling rats were evaluated. Such data in young mammals are not available. L-Ascorbic acid (daily dose 650 mg/kg b.wt.) and/or DMSA (daily dose 91 mg/kg b.wt.) were administered orally to suckling Wistar rats either during ongoing 8-day oral lead exposure (as acetate; daily dose 2 mg lead/kg b.wt.) or after 3-day lead exposure (total dose 12 mg lead/kg b.wt.). Lead concentrations were analysed in the carcass (skeleton), liver, kidneys and brain by atomic absorption spectrometry. By ascorbic acid supplementation lead retention was not reduced under either lead exposure condition. Lead concentration was even increased in the carcass. Treatment with DMSA under both exposure conditions significantly reduced lead in all analysed tissues. Combined treatment with ascorbic acid and DMSA during ongoing lead exposure was substantially less effective than DMSA treatment alone, and did not affect DMSA efficacy when administered after lead exposure. It was concluded that ascorbic acid administered either during or after lead exposure in suckling rats has no beneficial effect on either lead retention or DMSA chelation effectiveness.

  11. Administration of MPTP to the common marmoset does not alter cortical cholinergic function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garvey, J.; Petersen, M.; Waters, C.M.; Rose, S.P.; Hunt, S.; Briggs, R.; Jenner, P.; Marsden, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    The administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) to common marmosets induced persistent motor deficits and decreased concentrations of dopamine, homovanillic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and (TH)dopamine uptake in the caudate-putamen. There was an 80% reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive cells in substantia nigra. At 10 days following the start of MPTP administration, the activity of choline acetyltransferase in the thalamus and frontal cortex was unchanged compared with control animals. Similarly, specific (TH)QNB binding was unaltered. At 4-6 weeks following the start of MPTP treatment, choline acetyltransferase activity and (TH)QNB binding in the frontal cortex and thalamus remained unaffected. There was no evidence for cell loss in the nucleus basalis of Meynert or alteration in the intensity of staining for acetylcholinesterase. MPTP treatment of the common marmoset produces a nigrostriatal lesion. In contrast, MPTP did not alter cortical cholinergic function and was not neurotoxic to the cholinergic cells in the nucleus basalis of Meynert.

  12. Morphine dependence and withdrawal induced changes in cholinergic signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Nichole M.; Einstein, Emily B.; Lopez, Maria B.; McClure-Begley, Tristan D.; Mineur, Yann S.; Picciotto, Marina R.

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic signaling is thought to be involved in morphine dependence and withdrawal, but the specific mechanisms involved remain unclear. The current study aimed to identify alterations in the cholinergic system that may contribute to the development of morphine dependence and withdrawal. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and [3H]-epibatidine binding were evaluated in order to determine if morphine dependence and withdrawal induces alterations in cholinergic signaling or expression of high affinity nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the midbrain (MB), medial habenula (MHb) and interpeduncular nucleus (IPN). The effect of cholinergic signaling through nAChRs on morphine-withdrawal induced jumping behavior was then determined. Lastly, the contribution of β4-containing nAChRs receptors in the MHb to morphine-withdrawal induced jumping behavior and neuronal activity as indicated by c-fos expression was assessed. Chronic morphine administration decreased AChE activity in MB and MHb, an effect that was no longer present following precipitated withdrawal. Morphine dependent mice showed increased nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) levels in MB. Further, nicotine (0.4 mg/kg) and lobeline (3 mg/kg) decreased jumping behavior while mecamylamine (1 mg/kg) had no effect. Knock-down of β4 subunit-containing nAChRs in the MHb attenuated c-fos activation, but did not decrease morphine withdrawal-induced jumping. Thus, morphine withdrawal induces cholinergic signaling in the MHb, but this does not appear to be responsible for the effects of cholinergic drugs on somatic signs of opiate withdrawal, as measured by jumping behavior. PMID:23651795

  13. Ventral tegmental area GABA projections pause accumbal cholinergic interneurons to enhance associative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew T C; Tan, Kelly R; O'Connor, Eoin C; Nikonenko, Irina; Muller, Dominique; Lüscher, Christian

    2012-12-20

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) are essential for learning about environmental stimuli associated with motivationally relevant outcomes. The task of signalling such events, both rewarding and aversive, from the VTA to the NAc has largely been ascribed to dopamine neurons. The VTA also contains GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-releasing neurons, which provide local inhibition and also project to the NAc. However, the cellular targets and functional importance of this long-range inhibitory projection have not been ascertained. Here we show that GABA-releasing neurons of the VTA that project to the NAc (VTA GABA projection neurons) inhibit accumbal cholinergic interneurons (CINs) to enhance stimulus-outcome learning. Combining optogenetics with structural imaging and electrophysiology, we found that VTA GABA projection neurons selectively target NAc CINs, forming multiple symmetrical synaptic contacts that generated inhibitory postsynaptic currents. This is remarkable considering that CINs represent a very small population of all accumbal neurons, and provide the primary source of cholinergic tone in the NAc. Brief activation of this projection was sufficient to halt the spontaneous activity of NAc CINs, resembling the pause recorded in animals learning stimulus-outcome associations. Indeed, we found that forcing CINs to pause in behaving mice enhanced discrimination of a motivationally important stimulus that had been associated with an aversive outcome. Our results demonstrate that VTA GABA projection neurons, through their selective targeting of accumbal CINs, provide a novel route through which the VTA communicates saliency to the NAc. VTA GABA projection neurons thus emerge as orchestrators of dopaminergic and cholinergic modulation in the NAc.

  14. Interaction of nerve agent antidotes with cholinergic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, O; Tobin, G; Kumar, U K; Binder, J; Proska, J; Jun, D; Fusek, J; Kuca, K

    2010-01-01

    The poisoning with organophosphorus compounds represents a life threatening danger especially in the time of terroristic menace. No universal antidote has been developed yet and other therapeutic approaches not related to reactivation of acetylcholinesterase are being investigated. This review describes the main features of the cholinergic system, cholinergic receptors, cholinesterases and their inhibitors. It also focuses on the organophosphorus nerve agents, their properties, effects and a large part describes various possibilities in treatments, mainly traditional oxime therapies based on reactivation of AChE. Furthermore, non-cholinesterase coupled antidotal effects of the oximes are thoroughly discussed. These antidotal effects principally include oxime interactions with muscarinic and nicotinic receptors.

  15. Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System and Orexin Neurons: Effects on Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villano, Ines; Messina, Antonietta; Valenzano, Anna; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Esposito, Teresa; Monda, Vincenzo; Esposito, Maria; Precenzano, Francesco; Carotenuto, Marco; Viggiano, Andrea; Chieffi, Sergio; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Monda, Marcellino; Messina, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic system has an important role in attentive functions. The cholinergic system can be activated by different inputs, and in particular, by orexin neurons, whose cell bodies are located within the postero-lateral hypothalamus. Recently the orexin-producing neurons have been proved to promote arousal and attention through their projections to the BF. The aim of this review article is to summarize the evidence showing that the orexin system contributes to attentional processing by an increase in cortical acetylcholine release and in cortical neurons activity. PMID:28197081

  16. Ruminal fatty acid metabolism : altering rumen biohydrolgenation to improve milk fatty acid profile of dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, A.R.

    2011-01-01

    Nutritional guidelines promote a reduced intake of saturated fatty acids (FA) and increased intake of unsaturated FA by humans. Milk and dairy products contain a high proportion of saturated FA caused by extensive alterations of dietary lipids in the rumen through the processes of lipolysis and

  17. Cholinergic basis of memory improving effect of Ocimum tenuiflorum linn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is one of the age-related mental problems and a characteristic symptom of Alzheimer′s disease. Nootropic agents are used in situations where there is organic disorder in learning abilities. The present work was undertaken to assess the potential of Ocimum tenuiflorum Linn. as a nootropic and anticholinesterase agent in mice. Ethanol extract of dried whole plant of O. tenuiflorum Linn. ameliorated the amnesic effect of scopolamine (0.4 mg/kg and aging-induced memory deficits in mice. Passive avoidance paradigm served as the exteroceptive behavioural model. O. tenuiflorum extract increased step-down latency and acetyl cholinesterase inhibition significantly. Hence, O. tenuiflorum can be employed in the treatment of cognitive disorders such as dementia and Alzheimer′s disease.

  18. Gallic acid improves glucose tolerance and triglyceride concentration in diet-induced obesity mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jinmoon; Jang, Sungil; Woo, Gye-Hyeong; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Yoo, Yun-Jung; Cha, Jeong-Heon

    2013-12-01

    Gallic acid, a phenolic phytochemical, has been shown to exert a variety of effects, including anti-oxidative, anti- carcinogenic, anti-allergic, and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we attempted to determine whether gallic acid affects metabolic syndrome such as obesity and diabetes. Diet-induced obesity mice were treated intraperitoneally once per day with gallic acid (10 mg/kg/day). After 2 weeks of treatment, the mice were sacrificed to collect the blood for metabolic parameter assessments, and the adipose tissues and liver to weigh and analyze. The triglyceride concentrations were significantly improved in the gallic acid group relative to those measured in the control group. And most importantly, the blood glucose concentrations in the gallic acid group were significantly improved. In the epididymal white adipose tissue of the gallic acid group, adipocyte size was reduced, PPARγ expression was induced, and the Akt signaling pathway was activated. Our results demonstrate that gallic acid improves glucose tolerance and lipid metabolism in the obesity mice, thereby showing evidence of anti-hyperglycemic activity. The findings of an upregulation of PPARγ expression and Akt activation also contribute to our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the effects of gallic acid on glucose metabolism.

  19. Improving ethanol production from alfalfa stems via ambient-temperature acid pretreatment and washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shengfei; Weimer, Paul J; Hatfield, Ronald D; Runge, Troy M; Digman, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The concept of co-production of liquid fuel (ethanol) along with animal feed on farm was proposed, and the strategy of using ambient-temperature acid pretreatment, ensiling and washing to improve ethanol production from alfalfa stems was investigated. Alfalfa stems were separated and pretreated with sulfuric acid at ambient-temperature after harvest, and following ensiling, after which the ensiled stems were subjected to simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) for ethanol production. Ethanol yield was improved by ambient-temperature sulfuric acid pretreatment before ensiling, and by washing before SSF. It was theorized that the acid pretreatment at ambient temperature partially degraded hemicellulose, and altered cell wall structure, resulted in improved cellulose accessibility, whereas washing removed soluble ash in substrates which could inhibit the SSF. The pH of stored alfalfa stems can be used to predict the ethanol yield, with a correlation coefficient of +0.83 for washed alfalfa stems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Improving fatty acid availability for bio-hydrocarbon production in Escherichia coli by metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fengming; Chen, Yu; Levine, Robert; Lee, Kilho; Yuan, Yingjin; Lin, Xiaoxia Nina

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of producing fatty-acid-derived hydrocarbons in Escherichia coli. However, product titers and yields remain low. In this work, we demonstrate new methods for improving fatty acid production by modifying central carbon metabolism and storing fatty acids in triacylglycerol. Based on suggestions from a computational model, we deleted seven genes involved in aerobic respiration, mixed-acid fermentation, and glyoxylate bypass (in the order of cyoA, nuoA, ndh, adhE, dld, pta, and iclR) to modify the central carbon metabolic/regulatory networks. These gene deletions led to increased total fatty acids, which were the highest in the mutants containing five or six gene knockouts. Additionally, when two key enzymes in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway were over-expressed, we observed further increase in strain △cyoA△adhE△nuoA△ndh△pta△dld, leading to 202 mg/g dry cell weight of total fatty acids, ~250% of that in the wild-type strain. Meanwhile, we successfully introduced a triacylglycerol biosynthesis pathway into E. coli through heterologous expression of wax ester synthase/acyl-coenzyme:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) enzymes. The added pathway improved both the amount and fuel quality of the fatty acids. These new metabolic engineering strategies are providing promising directions for future investigation.

  1. Muscarinic and dopaminergic receptor subtypes on striatal cholinergic interneurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, V.L.; Dawson, T.M.; Wamsley, J.K. (Neuropsychiatric Research Institute, Fargo, ND (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Unilateral stereotaxic injection of small amounts of the cholinotoxin, AF64A, caused minimal nonselective tissue damage and resulted in a significant loss of the presynaptic cholinergic markers (3H)hemicholinium-3 (45% reduction) and choline acetyltransferase (27% reduction). No significant change from control was observed in tyrosine hydroxylase or tryptophan hydroxylase activity; presynaptic neuronal markers for dopamine- and serotonin-containing neurons, respectively. The AF64A lesion resulted in a significant reduction of dopamine D2 receptors as evidenced by a decrease in (3H)sulpiride binding (42% reduction) and decrease of muscarinic non-M1 receptors as shown by a reduction in (3H)QNB binding in the presence of 100 nM pirenzepine (36% reduction). Saturation studies revealed that the change in (3H)sulpiride and (3H)QNB binding was due to a change in Bmax not Kd. Intrastriatal injection of AF64A failed to alter dopamine D1 or muscarinic M1 receptors labeled with (3H)SCH23390 and (3H)pirenzepine, respectively. In addition, no change in (3H)forskolin-labeled adenylate cyclase was observed. These results demonstrate that a subpopulation of muscarinic receptors (non-M1) are presynaptic on cholinergic interneurons (hence, autoreceptors), and a subpopulation of dopamine D2 receptors are postsynaptic on cholinergic interneurons. Furthermore, dopamine D1, muscarinic M1 and (3H)forskolin-labeled adenylate cyclase are not localized to striatal cholinergic interneurons.

  2. Cellular mechanisms underlying spatiotemporal features of cholinergic retinal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kevin J.; Félix, Aude L.; Feller, Marla B.

    2012-01-01

    Prior to vision, a transient network of recurrently connected cholinergic interneurons, called starburst amacrine cells (SACs), generates spontaneous retinal waves. Despite an absence of robust inhibition, cholinergic retinal waves initiate infrequently and propagate within finite boundaries. Here we combine a variety of electrophysiological and imaging techniques and computational modeling to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these spatial and temporal properties of waves in developing mouse retina. Waves initiate via rare spontaneous depolarizations of SACs. Waves propagate through recurrent cholinergic connections between SACs and volume release of ACh as demonstrated using paired recordings and a cell-based ACh optical sensor. Perforated patch recordings and two-photon calcium imaging reveal that individual SACs have slow afterhyperpolarizations that induce SACs to have variable depolarizations during sequential waves. Using a computational model in which the properties of SACs are based on these physiological measurements, we reproduce the slow frequency, speed, and finite size of recorded waves. This study represents a detailed description of the circuit that mediates cholinergic retinal waves and indicates that variability of the interneurons that generate this network activity may be critical for the robustness of waves across different species and stages of development. PMID:22262883

  3. Cypermethrin Poisoning and Anti-cholinergic Medication- A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Sudip Parajuli

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A 30 years old male was brought to emergency department of Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal with alleged history of consumption of pyrethroid compound ‘cypermethrin’. It was found to be newer insecticide poisoning reported in Nepal. We reported this case to show effectiveness of anti-cholinergic like hyosciane and chlorpheniramine maleate in the treatment of cypermethrin poisoning.

  4. The cholinergic system, sigma-1 receptors and cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, Aren; Ramakrishnan, Nisha K.; Rybczynska, Anna A.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Nijholt, Ingrid M.; Luiten, Paul G. M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an overview of present knowledge regarding the relationship between the cholinergic system and sigma-1 receptors, and discusses potential applications of sigma-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of memory deficits and cognitive disorders. Sigma-1 receptors, initially consider

  5. The catecholaminergic-cholinergic balance hypothesis of bipolar disorder revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Janowsky, David S; Olivier, Berend; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A

    2015-04-15

    Bipolar disorder is a unique illness characterized by fluctuations between mood states of depression and mania. Originally, an adrenergic-cholinergic balance hypothesis was postulated to underlie these different affective states. In this review, we update this hypothesis with recent findings from human and animal studies, suggesting that a catecholaminergic-cholinergic hypothesis may be more relevant. Evidence from neuroimaging studies, neuropharmacological interventions, and genetic associations support the notion that increased cholinergic functioning underlies depression, whereas increased activations of the catecholamines (dopamine and norepinephrine) underlie mania. Elevated functional acetylcholine during depression may affect both muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in a compensatory fashion. Increased functional dopamine and norepinephrine during mania on the other hand may affect receptor expression and functioning of dopamine reuptake transporters. Despite increasing evidence supporting this hypothesis, a relationship between these two neurotransmitter systems that could explain cycling between states of depression and mania is missing. Future studies should focus on the influence of environmental stimuli and genetic susceptibilities that may affect the catecholaminergic-cholinergic balance underlying cycling between the affective states. Overall, observations from recent studies add important data to this revised balance theory of bipolar disorder, renewing interest in this field of research.

  6. Selective optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic axons in neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmbach, Abigail; Hedrick, Tristan; Waters, Jack

    2012-04-01

    Acetylcholine profoundly affects neocortical function, being involved in arousal, attention, learning, memory, sensory and motor function, and plasticity. The majority of cholinergic afferents to neocortex are from neurons in nucleus basalis. Nucleus basalis also contains projecting neurons that release other transmitters, including GABA and possibly glutamate. Hence, electrical stimulation of nucleus basalis evokes the release of a mixture of neurotransmitters in neocortex, and this lack of selectivity has impeded research on cholinergic signaling in neocortex. We describe a method for the selective stimulation of cholinergic axons in neocortex. We used the Cre-lox system and a viral vector to express the light-activated protein channelrhodopsin-2 in cholinergic neurons in nucleus basalis and their axons in neocortex. Labeled neurons depolarized on illumination with blue light but were otherwise unchanged. In anesthetized mice, illumination of neocortex desynchronized the local field potential, indicating that light evoked release of ACh. This novel technique will enable many new studies of the cellular, network, and behavioral physiology of ACh in neocortex.

  7. Ursolic acid improves domoic acid-induced cognitive deficits in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Dong-mei [School of Environment and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008, Jiangsu Province (China); Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China); Lu, Jun, E-mail: lu-jun75@163.com [Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhang, Yan-qiu [School of Environment and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008, Jiangsu Province (China); Zheng, Yuan-lin, E-mail: ylzheng@xznu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China); Hu, Bin [Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China); Cheng, Wei [School of Environment and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhang, Zi-feng; Li, Meng-qiu [Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2013-09-01

    Our previous findings suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction is the mechanism underlying cognitive deficits induced by domoic acid (DA). Ursolic acid (UA), a natural triterpenoid compound, possesses many important biological functions. Evidence shows that UA can activate PI3K/Akt signaling and suppress Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) activity. FoxO1 is an important regulator of mitochondrial function. Here we investigate whether FoxO1 is involved in the oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in DA-treated mice and whether UA inhibits DA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficits through regulating the PI3K/Akt and FoxO1 signaling pathways. Our results showed that FoxO1 knockdown reversed the mitochondrial abnormalities and cognitive deficits induced by DA in mice through decreasing HO-1 expression. Mechanistically, FoxO1 activation was associated with oxidative stress-induced JNK activation and decrease of Akt phosphorylation. Moreover, UA attenuated the mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficits through promoting Akt phosphorylation and FoxO1 nuclear exclusion in the hippocampus of DA-treated mice. LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K/Akt signaling, significantly decreased Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus of DA/UA mice, which weakened UA actions. These results suggest that UA could be recommended as a possible candidate for the prevention and therapy of cognitive deficits in excitotoxic brain disorders. - Highlights: • Ursolic acid (UA) is a naturally triterpenoid compound. • UA attenuated the mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficits. • Mechanistically, UA activates PI3K/Akt signaling and suppresses FoxO1 activity. • UA could be recommended as a possible candidate for anti-excitotoxic brain disorders.

  8. Contribution of the Cholinergic System to Verbal Memory Performance in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Jessica; Lahr, Jacob; Minkova, Lora; Lauer, Eliza; Grothe, Michel J; Teipel, Stefan; Köstering, Lena; Kaller, Christoph P; Heimbach, Bernhard; Hüll, Michael; Normann, Claus; Nissen, Christoph; Reis, Janine; Klöppel, Stefan

    2016-06-18

    Acetylcholine is critically involved in modulating learning and memory function, which both decline in neurodegeneration. It remains unclear to what extent structural and functional changes in the cholinergic system contribute to episodic memory dysfunction in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), in addition to hippocampal degeneration. A better understanding is critical, given that the cholinergic system is the main target of current symptomatic treatment in mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. We simultaneously assessed the structural and functional integrity of the cholinergic system in 20 patients with MCI and 20 matched healthy controls and examined their effect on verbal episodic memory via multivariate regression analyses. Mediating effects of either cholinergic function or hippocampal volume on the relationship between cholinergic structure and episodic memory were computed. In MCI, a less intact structure and function of the cholinergic system was found. A smaller cholinergic structure was significantly correlated with a functionally more active cholinergic system in patients, but not in controls. This association was not modulated by age or disease severity, arguing against compensational processes. Further analyses indicated that neither functional nor structural changes in the cholinergic system influence verbal episodic memory at the MCI stage. In fact, those associations were fully mediated by hippocampal volume. Although the cholinergic system is structurally and functionally altered in MCI, episodic memory dysfunction results primarily from hippocampal neurodegeneration, which may explain the inefficiency of cholinergic treatment at this disease stage.

  9. Reduced cholinergic olfactory centrifugal inputs in patients with neurodegenerative disorders and MPTP-treated monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundiñano, Iñaki-Carril; Hernandez, Maria; Dicaudo, Carla; Ordoñez, Cristina; Marcilla, Irene; Tuñon, Maria-Teresa; Luquin, Maria-Rosario

    2013-09-01

    Olfactory impairment is a common feature of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Olfactory bulb (OB) pathology in these diseases shows an increased number of olfactory dopaminergic cells, protein aggregates and dysfunction of neurotransmitter systems. Since cholinergic denervation might be a common underlying pathophysiological feature, the objective of this study was to determine cholinergic innervation of the OB in 27 patients with histological diagnosis of PD (n = 5), AD (n = 14), DLB (n = 8) and 8 healthy control subjects. Cholinergic centrifugal inputs to the OB were clearly reduced in all patients, the most significant decrease being in the DLB group. We also studied cholinergic innervation of the OB in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated monkeys (n = 7) and 7 intact animals. In MPTP-monkeys, we found that cholinergic innervation of the OB was reduced compared to control animals (n = 7). Interestingly, in MPTP-monkeys, we also detected a loss of cholinergic neurons and decreased dopaminergic innervation in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band, which is the origin of the centrifugal cholinergic input to the OB. All these data suggest that cholinergic damage in the OB might contribute, at least in part, to the olfactory dysfunction usually exhibited by these patients. Moreover, decreased cholinergic input to the OB found in MPTP-monkeys suggests that dopamine depletion in itself might reduce the cholinergic tone of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons.

  10. Colonic mucosal mediators from patients with irritable bowel syndrome excite enteric cholinergic motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, B; Vicini, R; Cremon, C; Zecchi, L; Dothel, G; Vasina, V; De Giorgio, R; Paccapelo, A; Pastoris, O; Stanghellini, V; Corinaldesi, R; De Ponti, F; Tonini, M; Barbara, G

    2012-12-01

    Mediators released in the mucosal milieu have been suggested to be involved in visceral hypersensitivity and abdominal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, their impact on myenteric neurons remains unsettled. Mucosal biopsies were obtained from the descending colon of patients with IBS and controls. Mucosal mast cells were identified immunohistochemically. The impact of spontaneously released mucosal mediators on guinea pig electrically stimulated longitudinal muscle myenteric plexus (LMMP) preparations was assessed in vitro by means of selective receptor antagonists and inhibitors. Patients with IBS showed an increased mast cell count compared with controls. Application of mucosal mediators of IBS to LMMPs potentiated cholinergic twitch contractions, an effect directly correlated with mast cell counts. Enhanced contractions were inhibited by 50.3% with the prostaglandin D2 antagonist BW A868C, by 31.3% and 39% with the TRPV1 antagonists capsazepine and HC-030031, respectively, and by 60.5% with purinergic P2X antagonist pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid. Conversely, the serotonin1-4, histamine1-3, tachykinin1-3 receptor blockade, and serine protease inhibition had no significant effect. Colonic mucosal mediators from patients with IBS excite myenteric cholinergic motor neurons. These effects were correlated with mast cell counts and mediated by activation of prostanoid receptors, TRPV1, and P2X receptors. These results support the role of mucosal inflammatory mediators and mast cell activation in altered motor function of IBS. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Improved flotation performance of hematite fines using citric acid as a dispersant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xi-mei; Yin, Wan-zhong; Sun, Chuan-yao; Wang, Nai-ling; Ma, Ying-qiang; Wang, Yun-fan

    2016-10-01

    In this study, citric acid was used as a dispersant to improve the flotation performance of hematite fines. The effect and mechanism of citric acid on the reverse flotation of hematite fines were investigated by flotation tests, sedimentation experiments, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), zeta-potential measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results of SEM analysis and flotation tests reveal that a strong heterocoagulation in the form of slime coating or coagulation in hematite fine slurry affects the beneficiation of hematite ores by froth flotation. The addition of a small amount of citric acid (less than 300 g/t) favorably affects the reverse flotation of hematite fines by improving particle dispersion. The results of sedimentation experiments, zeta-potential measurements, and XPS measurements demonstrate that citric acid adsorbs onto hematite and quartz surfaces via hydrogen bonding, thereby reducing the zeta potentials of mineral surfaces, strengthening the electrical double-layer repulsion between mineral particles, and dispersing the pulp particles.

  12. Brainstem cholinergic modulation of muscle tone in infant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Andrew J; Poremba, Amy; Blumberg, Mark S

    2007-06-01

    In week-old rats, lesions of the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum (DLPT) and nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) have opposing effects on nuchal muscle tone. Specifically, pups with DLPT lesions exhibit prolonged bouts of nuchal muscle atonia (indicative of sleep) and pups with PnO lesions exhibit prolonged bouts of high nuchal muscle tone (indicative of wakefulness). Here we test the hypothesis that nuchal muscle tone is modulated, at least in part, by cholinergically mediated interactions between these two regions. First, in unanesthetized pups, we found that chemical infusion of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (22 mm, 0.1 microL) within the DLPT produced high muscle tone. Next, chemical lesions of the PnO were used to produce a chronic state of high nuchal muscle tone, at which time the cholinergic antagonist scopolamine (10 mm, 0.1 microL) was infused into the DLPT. Scopolamine effectively decreased nuchal muscle tone, thus suggesting that lesions of the PnO increase muscle tone via cholinergic activation of the DLPT. Using 2-deoxyglucose autoradiography, metabolic activation throughout the DLPT was observed after PnO lesions. Finally, consistent with the hypothesis that PnO inactivation produces high muscle tone, infusion of the sodium channel blocker lidocaine (2%) into the PnO of unanesthetized pups produced rapid increases in muscle tone. We conclude that, even early in infancy, the DLPT is critically involved in the regulation of muscle tone and behavioral state, and that its activity is modulated by a cholinergic mechanism that is directly or indirectly controlled by the PnO.

  13. Improved pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass using enzymatically-generated peracetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, DeLu Tyler; Jing, Qing; AlDajani, Waleed Wafa; Duncan, Shona; Tschirner, Ulrike; Schilling, Jonathan; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2011-04-01

    Release of sugars from lignocellulosic biomass is inefficient because lignin, an aromatic polymer, blocks access of enzymes to the sugar polymers. Pretreatments remove lignin and disrupt its structure, thereby enhancing sugar release. In previous work, enzymatically generated peracetic acid was used to pretreat aspen wood. This pretreatment removed 45% of the lignin and the subsequent saccharification released 97% of the sugars remaining after pretreatment. In this paper, the amount of enzyme needed is reduced tenfold using first, an improved enzyme variant that makes twice as much peracetic acid and second, a two-phase reaction to generate the peracetic acid, which allows enzyme reuse. In addition, the eight pretreatment cycles are reduced to only one by increasing the volume of peracetic acid solution and increasing the temperature to 60 °C and the reaction time to 6h. For the pretreatment step, the weight ratio of peracetic acid to wood determines the amount of lignin removed.

  14. Cholinergically mediated augmentation of cerebral perfusion in Alzheimer's disease and related cognitive disorders: the cholinergic-vascular hypothesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, J.A.H.R.; Jansen, R.W.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    The treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) is based on the cholinergic hypothesis. This hypothesis fails to account for the global nature of the clinical effects of ChEIs, for the replication of these effects in other dementias, and for the strong and

  15. Improved soybean oil quality by targeted mutagenesis of the fatty acid desaturase 2 gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, William; Coffman, Andrew; Clasen, Benjamin M; Demorest, Zachary L; Lowy, Anita; Ray, Erin; Retterath, Adam; Stoddard, Thomas; Juillerat, Alexandre; Cedrone, Frederic; Mathis, Luc; Voytas, Daniel F; Zhang, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Soybean oil is high in polyunsaturated fats and is often partially hydrogenated to increase its shelf life and improve oxidative stability. The trans-fatty acids produced through hydrogenation pose a health threat. Soybean lines that are low in polyunsaturated fats were generated by introducing mutations in two fatty acid desaturase 2 genes (FAD2-1A and FAD2-1B), which in the seed convert the monounsaturated fat, oleic acid, to the polyunsaturated fat, linoleic acid. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) were engineered to recognize and cleave conserved DNA sequences in both genes. In four of 19 transgenic soybean lines expressing the TALENs, mutations in FAD2-1A and FAD2-1B were observed in DNA extracted from leaf tissue; three of the four lines transmitted heritable FAD2-1 mutations to the next generation. The fatty acid profile of the seed was dramatically changed in plants homozygous for mutations in both FAD2-1A and FAD2-1B: oleic acid increased from 20% to 80% and linoleic acid decreased from 50% to under 4%. Further, mutant plants were identified that lacked the TALEN transgene and only carried the targeted mutations. The ability to create a valuable trait in a single generation through targeted modification of a gene family demonstrates the power of TALENs for genome engineering and crop improvement.

  16. Evidence for the gut microbiota short-chain fatty acids as key pathophysiological molecules improving diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puddu, Alessandra; Sanguineti, Roberta; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Viviani, Giorgio Luciano

    2014-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, increased inflammation, and oxidative stress were shown to be associated with the progressive deterioration of beta-cell function and mass. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are organic fatty acids produced in the distal gut by bacterial fermentation of macrofibrous material that might improve type 2 diabetes features. Their main beneficial activities were identified in the decrease of serum levels of glucose, insulin resistance as well as inflammation, and increase in protective Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. In this review, we updated evidence on the effects of SCFAs potentially improving metabolic control in type 2 diabetes.

  17. Evidence for the Gut Microbiota Short-Chain Fatty Acids as Key Pathophysiological Molecules Improving Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Puddu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In type 2 diabetes, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, increased inflammation, and oxidative stress were shown to be associated with the progressive deterioration of beta-cell function and mass. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs are organic fatty acids produced in the distal gut by bacterial fermentation of macrofibrous material that might improve type 2 diabetes features. Their main beneficial activities were identified in the decrease of serum levels of glucose, insulin resistance as well as inflammation, and increase in protective Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 secretion. In this review, we updated evidence on the effects of SCFAs potentially improving metabolic control in type 2 diabetes.

  18. Coordination of glycerol utilization and clavulanic acid biosynthesis to improve clavulanic acid production in Streptomyces clavuligerus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dekun; Zhao, Youbao; Yang, Keqian

    2013-07-01

    The glycerol utilization (gyl) operon is involved in clavulanic acid (CA) production by Streptomyces clavuligerus, and possibly supplies the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P) precursor for CA biosynthesis. The gyl operon is regulated by GylR and is induced by glycerol. To enhance CA production in S. clavuligerus, an extra copy of ccaR expressed from Pgyl (the gyl promoter) was integrated into the chromosome of S. clavuligerus NRRL 3585. This construct coordinated the transcription of CA biosynthetic pathway genes with expression of the gyl operon. In the transformants carrying the Pgyl-controlled regulatory gene ccaR, CA production was enhanced 3.19-fold in glycerol-enriched batch cultures, relative to the control strain carrying an extra copy of ccaR controlled by its own promoter (PccaR). Consistent with enhanced CA production, the transcription levels of ccaR, ceas2 and claR were significantly up-regulated in the transformants containing Pgyl-controlled ccaR.

  19. Membrane engineering via trans unsaturated fatty acids production improves Escherichia coli robustness and production of biorenewables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zaigao; Yoon, Jong Moon; Nielsen, David R; Shanks, Jacqueline V; Jarboe, Laura R

    2016-05-01

    Constructing microbial biocatalysts that produce biorenewables at economically viable yields and titers is often hampered by product toxicity. For production of short chain fatty acids, membrane damage is considered the primary mechanism of toxicity, particularly in regards to membrane integrity. Previous engineering efforts in Escherichia coli to increase membrane integrity, with the goal of increasing fatty acid tolerance and production, have had mixed results. Herein, a novel approach was used to reconstruct the E. coli membrane by enabling production of a novel membrane component. Specifically, trans unsaturated fatty acids (TUFA) were produced and incorporated into the membrane of E. coli MG1655 by expression of cis-trans isomerase (Cti) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. While the engineered strain was found to have no increase in membrane integrity, a significant decrease in membrane fluidity was observed, meaning that membrane polarization and rigidity were increased by TUFA incorporation. As a result, tolerance to exogenously added octanoic acid and production of octanoic acid were both increased relative to the wild-type strain. This membrane engineering strategy to improve octanoic acid tolerance was found to require fine-tuning of TUFA abundance. Besides improving tolerance and production of carboxylic acids, TUFA production also enabled increased tolerance in E. coli to other bio-products, e.g. alcohols, organic acids, aromatic compounds, a variety of adverse industrial conditions, e.g. low pH, high temperature, and also elevated styrene production, another versatile bio-chemical product. TUFA permitted enhanced growth due to alleviation of bio-product toxicity, demonstrating the general effectiveness of this membrane engineering strategy towards improving strain robustness.

  20. Valproic acid improves second-line regimen of small cell lung carcinoma in preclinical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Hubaux

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With 5-year survival rates below 5%, small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC has very poor prognosis and requires improved therapies. Despite an excellent overall response to first-line therapy, relapses are frequent and further treatments are disappointing. The goal of the study was to improve second-line therapy of SCLC. The effect of chemotherapeutic agents was evaluated in cell lines (apoptosis, reactive oxygen species, and RNA and protein expression and in mouse models (tumour development. We demonstrate here that valproic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, improves the efficacy of a second-line regimen (vindesine, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide in SCLC cells and in mouse models. Transcriptomic profiling integrating microRNA and mRNA data identifies key signalling pathways in the response of SCLC cells to valproic acid, opening new prospects for improved therapies.

  1. Improved stability and antidiabetic potential of insulin containing folic acid functionalized polymer stabilized multilayered liposomes following oral administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrawal, Ashish Kumar; Harde, Harshad; Thanki, Kaushik;

    2014-01-01

    The present study reports the folic acid (FA) functionalized insulin loaded stable liposomes with improved bioavailability following oral administration. Liposomes were stabilized by alternating coating of negatively charged poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and positively charged poly(allyl amine...

  2. Drug resistance marker-aided genome shuffling to improve acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dao-Qiong; Wu, Xue-Chang; Wang, Pin-Mei; Chi, Xiao-Qin; Tao, Xiang-Lin; Li, Ping; Jiang, Xin-Hang; Zhao, Yu-Hua

    2011-03-01

    Acetic acid existing in a culture medium is one of the most limiting constraints in yeast growth and viability during ethanol fermentation. To improve acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, a drug resistance marker-aided genome shuffling approach with higher screen efficiency of shuffled mutants was developed in this work. Through two rounds of genome shuffling of ultraviolet mutants derived from the original strain 308, we obtained a shuffled strain YZ2, which shows significantly faster growth and higher cell viability under acetic acid stress. Ethanol production of YZ2 (within 60 h) was 21.6% higher than that of 308 when 0.5% (v/v) acetic acid was added to fermentation medium. Membrane integrity, higher in vivo activity of the H+-ATPase, and lower oxidative damage after acetic acid treatment are the possible reasons for the acetic acid-tolerance phenotype of YZ2. These results indicated that this novel genome shuffling approach is powerful to rapidly improve the complex traits of industrial yeast strains.

  3. Improvement Of Salt Tolerance In Some Varieties Of Rice By Ascorbic Acid Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Arfiani Barus

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Salinity stress is one of the serious abiotic stress and lead to reduced productivity and plant growth. The effect of salinity stress and its interaction with ascorbic acid was investigated on some morphological traits. Ascorbate is a strong antioxidant which has remarkable biological effects on plants growth including an improvement in plants tolerance under salinity stress conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of ascorbic acid application to improve salt tolerance of rice on saline soil. This research was down as a factorial based on randomized block design with 3 replications. In this research were tested eight varieties of Rice Ciherang V1 IR 64 V2 Lambur V4 Batanghari V5 Banyuasin V6 IR 42 V8 Inpara 10 V9 and Margasari V10 and Ascorbic Acid is applied at concentrations of 0 A0 500 ppm A1 1000 ppm A2 and 1500 ppm A3. Ascorbic acid is applied in 4 times with at the age of 15 35 55 and 75 days after sowing. All concentrations of ascorbic acid generally has a positive effect on morphological characters. However the best response was found at 1500 ppm A3 concentration of ascorbic acid on Banyuasin variety.

  4. Functional differentiation of cholinergic and noradrenergic modulation in a biophysical model of olfactory bulb granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoshi; Linster, Christiane; Cleland, Thomas A

    2015-12-01

    Olfactory bulb granule cells are modulated by both acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE), but the effects of these neuromodulators have not been clearly distinguished. We used detailed biophysical simulations of granule cells, both alone and embedded in a microcircuit with mitral cells, to measure and distinguish the effects of ACh and NE on cellular and microcircuit function. Cholinergic and noradrenergic modulatory effects on granule cells were based on data obtained from slice experiments; specifically, ACh reduced the conductance densities of the potassium M current and the calcium-dependent potassium current, whereas NE nonmonotonically regulated the conductance density of an ohmic potassium current. We report that the effects of ACh and NE on granule cell physiology are distinct and functionally complementary to one another. ACh strongly regulates granule cell firing rates and afterpotentials, whereas NE bidirectionally regulates subthreshold membrane potentials. When combined, NE can regulate the ACh-induced expression of afterdepolarizing potentials and persistent firing. In a microcircuit simulation developed to investigate the effects of granule cell neuromodulation on mitral cell firing properties, ACh increased spike synchronization among mitral cells, whereas NE modulated the signal-to-noise ratio. Coapplication of ACh and NE both functionally improved the signal-to-noise ratio and enhanced spike synchronization among mitral cells. In summary, our computational results support distinct and complementary roles for ACh and NE in modulating olfactory bulb circuitry and suggest that NE may play a role in the regulation of cholinergic function.

  5. Functional differentiation of cholinergic and noradrenergic modulation in a biophysical model of olfactory bulb granule cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linster, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory bulb granule cells are modulated by both acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE), but the effects of these neuromodulators have not been clearly distinguished. We used detailed biophysical simulations of granule cells, both alone and embedded in a microcircuit with mitral cells, to measure and distinguish the effects of ACh and NE on cellular and microcircuit function. Cholinergic and noradrenergic modulatory effects on granule cells were based on data obtained from slice experiments; specifically, ACh reduced the conductance densities of the potassium M current and the calcium-dependent potassium current, whereas NE nonmonotonically regulated the conductance density of an ohmic potassium current. We report that the effects of ACh and NE on granule cell physiology are distinct and functionally complementary to one another. ACh strongly regulates granule cell firing rates and afterpotentials, whereas NE bidirectionally regulates subthreshold membrane potentials. When combined, NE can regulate the ACh-induced expression of afterdepolarizing potentials and persistent firing. In a microcircuit simulation developed to investigate the effects of granule cell neuromodulation on mitral cell firing properties, ACh increased spike synchronization among mitral cells, whereas NE modulated the signal-to-noise ratio. Coapplication of ACh and NE both functionally improved the signal-to-noise ratio and enhanced spike synchronization among mitral cells. In summary, our computational results support distinct and complementary roles for ACh and NE in modulating olfactory bulb circuitry and suggest that NE may play a role in the regulation of cholinergic function. PMID:26334007

  6. Improvement of the antifungal activity of lactic acid bacteria by addition to the growth medium of phenylpyruvic acid, a precursor of phenyllactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Francesca; Di Biase, Mariaelena; Lattanzio, Veronica M T; Lavermicocca, Paola

    2016-04-02

    The aim of the current study was to improve the antifungal activity of eight lactic acid bacterial (LAB) strains by the addition of phenylpyruvic acid (PPA), a precursor of the antifungal compound phenyllactic acid (PLA), to a defined growth medium (DM). The effect of PPA addition on the LABs antifungal activity related to the production of organic acids (PLA, d-lactic, l-lactic, acetic, citric, formic and 4-hydroxy-phenyllactic acids) and of other phenylpyruvic-derived molecules, was investigated. In the presence of PPA the inhibitory activity (expressed as growth inhibition percentage) against fungal bread contaminants Aspergillus niger and Penicillium roqueforti significantly increased and was, even if not completely, associated to PLA increase (from a mean value of 0.44 to 0.93 mM). While the inhibitory activity against Endomyces fibuliger was mainly correlated to the low pH and to lactic, acetic and p-OH-PLA acids. When the PCA analysis based on data of growth inhibition percentage and organic acid concentrations was performed, strains grown in DM+PPA separated from those grown in DM and the most active strains Lactobacillus plantarum 21B, Lactobacillus fermentum 18B and Lactobacillus brevis 18F grouped together. The antifungal activity resulted to be strain-related, based on a different mechanism of action for filamentous fungi and the yeast and was not exclusively associated to the increase of PLA. Therefore, a further investigation on the unique unidentified peak in HPLC-UV chromatograms, was performed by LC-MS/MS analysis. Actually, full scan mass spectra (negative ion mode) recorded at the retention time of the unknown compound, showed a main peak of m/z 291.0 which was consistent with the nominal mass of the molecular ion [M-H](-) of polyporic acid, a PPA derivative whose antifungal activity has been previously reported (Brewer et al., 1977). In conclusion, the addition of PPA to the growth medium contributed to improve the antifungal activity of LAB

  7. Applications for biotechnology: present and future improvements in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, L L; Baldwin, K A

    1990-09-01

    The lactic acid bacteria are involved in the manufacture of fermented foods from raw agricultural materials such as milk, meat, vegetables, and cereals. These fermented foods are a significant part of the food processing industry and are often prepared using selected strains that have the ability to produce desired products or changes efficiently. The application of genetic engineering technology to improve existing strains or develop novel strains for these fermentations is an active research area world-wide. As knowledge about the genetics and physiology of lactic acid bacteria accumulates, it becomes possible to genetically construct strains with characteristics shaped for specific purposes. Examples of present and future applications of biotechnology to lactic acid bacteria to improve product quality are described. Studies of the basic biology of these bacteria are being actively conducted and must be continued, in order for the food fermentation industry to reap the benefits of biotechnology.

  8. Acid etching and plasma sterilization fail to improve osseointegration of grit blasted titanium implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Mikkel Saksø; Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Saksø, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between implant surface and surrounding bone influences implant fixation. We attempted to improve the bone-implant interaction by 1) adding surface micro scale topography by acid etching, and 2) removing surface-adherent pro-inflammatory agents by plasma cleaning. Implant fixation...... compared with acid etched grit blasted implants. In the second study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants that were further treated with plasma sterilization. Implant performance was evaluated by histomorphometrical investigation (tissue-to-implant contact, peri......-implant tissue density) and mechanical push-out testing after four weeks observation time.Neither acid etching nor plasma sterilization of the grit blasted implants enhanced osseointegration or mechanical fixation in this press-fit canine implant model in a statistically significant manner....

  9. Improving itaconic acid production through genetic engineering of an industrial Aspergillus terreus strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuenian; Lu, Xuefeng; Li, Yueming; Li, Xia; Li, Jian-Jun

    2014-08-11

    Itaconic acid, which has been declared to be one of the most promising and flexible building blocks, is currently used as monomer or co-monomer in the polymer industry, and produced commercially by Aspergillus terreus. However, the production level of itaconic acid hasn't been improved in the past 40 years, and mutagenesis is still the main strategy to improve itaconate productivity. The genetic engineering approach hasn't been applied in industrial A. terreus strains to increase itaconic acid production. In this study, the genes closely related to itaconic acid production, including cadA, mfsA, mttA, ATEG_09969, gpdA, ATEG_01954, acoA, mt-pfkA and citA, were identified and overexpressed in an industrial A. terreus strain respectively. Overexpression of the genes cadA (cis-aconitate decarboxylase) and mfsA (Major Facilitator Superfamily Transporter) enhanced the itaconate production level by 9.4% and 5.1% in shake flasks respectively. Overexpression of other genes showed varied effects on itaconate production. The titers of other organic acids were affected by the introduced genes to different extent. Itaconic acid production could be improved through genetic engineering of the industrially used A. terreus strain. We have identified some important genes such as cadA and mfsA, whose overexpression led to the increased itaconate productivity, and successfully developed a strategy to establish a highly efficient microbial cell factory for itaconate protuction. Our results will provide a guide for further enhancement of the itaconic acid production level through genetic engineering in future.

  10. Engineering plastid fatty acid biosynthesis to improve food quality and biofuel production in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, Marcelo; Carrer, Helaine

    2011-06-01

    The ability to manipulate plant fatty acid biosynthesis by using new biotechnological approaches has allowed the production of transgenic plants with unusual fatty acid profile and increased oil content. This review focuses on the production of very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLCPUFAs) and the increase in oil content in plants using molecular biology tools. Evidences suggest that regular consumption of food rich in VLCPUFAs has multiple positive health benefits. Alternative sources of these nutritional fatty acids are found in cold-water fishes. However, fish stocks are in severe decline because of decades of overfishing, and also fish oils can be contaminated by the accumulation of toxic compounds. Recently, there is also an increase in oilseed use for the production of biofuels. This tendency is partly associated with the rapidly rising costs of petroleum, increased concern about the environmental impact of fossil oil and the attractive need to develop renewable sources of fuel. In contrast to this scenario, oil derived from crop plants is normally contaminant free and less environmentally aggressive. Genetic engineering of the plastid genome (plastome) offers a number of attractive advantages, including high-level foreign protein expression, marker-gene excision and transgene containment because of maternal inheritance of plastid genome in most crops. Here, we describe the possibility to improve fatty acid biosynthesis in plastids, production of new fatty acids and increase their content in plants by genetic engineering of plastid fatty acid biosynthesis via plastid transformation.

  11. Designed Amino Acid Feed in Improvement of Production and Quality Targets of a Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Torkashvand

    Full Text Available Cell culture feeds optimization is a critical step in process development of pharmaceutical recombinant protein production. Amino acids are the basic supplements of mammalian cell culture feeds with known effect on their growth promotion and productivity. In this study, we reported the implementation of the Plackett-Burman (PB multifactorial design to screen the effects of amino acids on the growth promotion and productivity of a Chinese hamster ovary DG-44 (CHO-DG44 cell line producing bevacizumab. After this screening, the amino acid combinations were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM to determine the most effective concentration in feeds. Through this strategy, the final monoclonal antibody (mAb titre was enhanced by 70%, compared to the control group. For this particular cell line, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine and glycine had the highest positive effects on the final mAb titre. Simultaneously, the impact of the designed amino acid feed on some critical quality attributes of bevacizumab was examined in the group with highest productivity. The product was analysed for N-glycan profiles, charge variant distribution, and low molecular weight forms. The results showed that the target product quality has been improved using this feeding strategy. It was shown how this strategy could significantly diminish the time and number of experiments in identifying the most effective amino acids and related concentrations in target product enhancement. This model could be successfully applied to other components of culture media and feeds.

  12. Uric acid measurement improves prediction of cardiovascular mortality in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Ambarish; Henley, William; Pilling, Luke C; Wallace, Robert B; Melzer, David

    2013-03-01

    To estimate the association between uric acid and cardiovascular mortality in older adults, independent of traditional risk factors, and to estimate the risk prediction gain by adding uric acid measurements to the Framingham Cardiovascular Risk Score (FCRS). Longitudinal observational study of two population-based cohorts. The Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly, Iowa (Iowa-EPESE) and the Third National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES III). One thousand twenty-eight Iowa-EPESE participants and 1,316 NHANES III participants. Selected participants were aged 70 and older without overt cardiovascular disease, renal dysfunction, or diuretic use who lived for 3 years or longer after baseline. Outcome was age at cardiovascular death during follow-up (12–20 years). Uric acid and cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, systolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, obesity, serum cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were measured at baseline. High serum uric acid (>7.0 mg/dL) was associated with male sex, obesity, lipid levels, and estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline. Fully adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for cardiovascular death with high uric acid versus normal were 1.36 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10–1.69) in Iowa-EPESE and 1.43 (95% CI = 1.04–1.99) in NHANES III; pooled HR was 1.38 (95% CI = 1.16–1.61). The net reclassification improvement achieved by adding uric acid measurement to the FCRS was 9% to 20%. In individuals aged 70 and older without overt CVD, renal dysfunction, or diuretic use, serum uric acid greater than 7.0 mg/dL was associated with greater CVD mortality independent of classic CVD risk factors. Adding uric acid measurement to the FCRS would improve prediction in older adults.

  13. The response of GABAergic and cholinergic neurons to transient cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, A; Pulsinelli, W

    1982-07-15

    The vulnerability of striatal and hippocampal neurons to ischemia was studied by measuring the activity of neurotransmitter-related enzymes after transient forebrain ischemia in rats. Activities of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and choline acetyltransferase (CAT) were measured 6 h to 8 days after 20, 30 or 40 min of forebrain ischemia, as markers for GABAergic and cholinergic neurons respectively. Transient forebrain ischemia resulted in depression of striatal GAD activity while striatal CAT and hippocampal GAD activities were unaffected. Striatal GAD activity progressively decreased during the first 24 h postischemia and remained depressed 5--8 days later, suggesting irreversible damage to this population of neurons. The stability of striatal CAT and hippocampal GAD activity indicates that these cells were resistant to the present ischemic conditions.

  14. Mathematical modelling of the enteric nervous network. 1: Cholinergic neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miftakhov, R N; Wingate, D L

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical model is proposed to describe the coupled electrochemical mechanisms of nerve-pulse transmission via cholinergic synapse. Based on pharmacological and morphophysiological data, the model describes the dynamics of the propagation of the electric signal along the unmyelinated geometrically non-uniform axon of the neuron and the chemical mechanisms of the transformation of the electrical signal in the synaptic zone into the postsynaptic output. The combined nonlinear system of partial and ordinary differential equations has been obtained and solved numerically. The results of numerical simulation of the function of the cholinergic neuron quantitatively and qualitatively describe the dynamics of Ca2+ ions influx into the terminal, acetylcholine release from the vesicles, accumulation of its free fraction, diffusion into the synaptic cleft, and binding with the receptors on the postsynaptic structures with the generation of the fast excitatory postsynaptic potential. They are in good agreement with the observed experimental findings.

  15. Cholinergic modulation of the hippocampal region and memory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haam, Juhee; Yakel, Jerrel L

    2017-08-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) plays an important role in memory function and has been implicated in aging-related dementia, in which the impairment of hippocampus-dependent learning strongly manifests. Cholinergic neurons densely innervate the hippocampus, mediating the formation of episodic as well as semantic memory. Here, we will review recent findings on acetylcholine's modulation of memory function, with a particular focus on hippocampus-dependent learning, and the circuits involved. In addition, we will discuss the complexity of ACh actions in memory function to better understand the physiological role of ACh in memory. This is an article for the special issue XVth International Symposium on Cholinergic Mechanisms. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. Modulation of the Cholinergic Mechanisms in the Bronchial Smooth Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    Ginsborg and Hirst, 1q72; Sawynok and Jhamandas, 1976), although theopylline has not shown to be a specific adenosine receptor antagonist in all the tissues... theopylline and other cyclic nucletide phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Acta Pharmacol. Toxicol. 45, 336-344. Fredholm, B.B. and P. Hedqvist, 1980...51 mM) evoked release of [3H]-Ach from cholinergic nerves in the bronchial smooth muscle. The effect of theopylline (I mM) on the response to

  17. Atopic predisposition in cholinergic urticaria patients and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altrichter, S; Koch, K; Church, M K; Maurer, M

    2016-12-01

    Cholinergic urticaria (CholU) is a frequent chronic urticaria disorder with itchy weal and flare-type skin reactions in response to physical exercise or passive warming. A higher frequency of atopy among CholU patients has been reported, but the significance of this observation is unclear. To assess the prevalence and relevance of atopy in CholU patients. Thirty CholU patients were assessed for atopic skin diathesis (atopic predisposition) by use of the Erlangen Atopy Score and divided into atopic and non-atopic predisposed CholU individuals. Both groups were assessed for disease severity (CholUSI) and activity (CholUAS7), quality of life impairment [Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and CU-Q2 OL], seasonal exacerbation, total and specific serum IgE and comorbidities. CholU patients were found to exhibit high rates of atopic predisposition (57%), with higher prevalence and scores in female than in male patients. High Erlangen Atopy Scores were linked to high CholU severity, activity and impact on QoL. Atopic predisposed CholU patients show different seasonal exacerbation patterns, IgE specificity and comorbidity profiles as compared to non-atopic CholU patients. Atopic predisposition and cholinergic urticaria appear to be linked more closely than previously thought, which suggests shared pathogenetic mechanisms. Atopic patients with cholinergic urticaria have more severe disease and poorer quality of life than those who do not. Thus, all cholinergic urticaria patients should be assessed for atopic predisposition. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  18. Cholinergic Urticaria with Anaphylaxis: An Underrecognized Clinical Entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadas, Peter; Sinilaite, Angela; Chaim, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Cholinergic urticaria is a form of physical urticaria triggered by high ambient temperature, strenuous physical activity, and strong emotion. These same triggers may cause multisystem reactions that can be life-threatening. A study of patients with cholinergic urticaria with anaphylaxis was undertaken to describe the demographic and clinical features of this form of anaphylaxis. To describe a cohort of patients with anaphylaxis triggered by high ambient temperature, exertion, and stress. Patients from an academic allergy practice in a university teaching hospital were identified by retrospective chart review. A total of 19 patients with recurrent episodes of anaphylaxis due to cholinergic triggers were identified. The female:male ratio was 15:4 (79% females). The mean age of onset was 27.5 years. Patients experienced a mean of 9.41 episodes per year. All 19 patients (100%) reported anaphylaxis triggered by high ambient temperature, 89.5% reported anaphylaxis triggered by strenuous exertion, and 78.9% reported anaphylaxis triggered by stress. Cutaneous involvement was present in 94.7%; 78.9% had upper airway obstructive symptoms, 78.9% had lower airway involvement, 57.9% had gastrointestinal involvement, and 78.9% had cardiovascular manifestations. Anaphylaxis severity scores were grade 1 (mild) in 11.1%, grade 2 (moderate) in 44.4%, and grade 3 (severe) in 44.4%. Baseline tryptase levels were normal in all but 1 patient. Anaphylaxis due to cholinergic triggers is underreported, with only several case reports in the literature. Reactions are multisystem with cutaneous, upper and lower airway, and cardiovascular involvement in most patients. Manifestations may be life-threatening, and reactions are often severe. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. In vivo cholinergic circuit evaluation in frontotemporal and Alzheimer dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lazzaro, V; Pilato, F; Dileone, M; Saturno, E; Oliviero, A; Marra, C; Daniele, A; Ranieri, F; Gainotti, G; Tonali, P A

    2006-04-11

    The test of short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) of the motor cortex is helpful in demonstrating dysfunction of central cholinergic circuits in Alzheimer disease (AD). The authors evaluated SAI in 20 patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and compared data with those from 20 patients with AD and 20 controls. SAI was normal in FTD, whereas it was reduced in AD. SAI may represent an additional tool to discriminate FTD from AD.

  20. BRAINSTEM CHOLINERGIC MODULATION OF MUSCLE TONE IN INFANT RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Gall, Andrew J.; Poremba, Amy; Blumberg, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    In week-old rats, lesions of the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum (DLPT) and nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) have opposing effects on nuchal muscle tone. Specifically, pups with DLPT lesions exhibit prolonged bouts of nuchal muscle atonia (indicative of sleep) and pups with PnO lesions exhibit prolonged bouts of high nuchal muscle tone (indicative of wakefulness). Here we test the hypothesis that nuchal muscle tone is modulated, at least in part, by cholinergically mediated interactions between the...

  1. Dopaminergic and Cholinergic Modulation of Striatal Tyrosine Hydroxylase Interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Xenias, Harry S.; Tepper, James M.; Koós, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    The recent electrophysiological characterization of TH-expressing GABAergic interneurons (THINs) in the neostriatum revealed an unexpected degree of diversity of interneurons in this brain area (Ibáñez-Sandoval et al., 2010, Unal et al., 2011, 2013). Despite being relatively few in number, THINs may play a significant role in transmitting and distributing extra- and intrastriatal neuromodulatory signals in the striatal circuitry. Here we investigated the dopaminergic and cholinergic regulatio...

  2. An amino acid substitution-selection model adjusts residue fitness to improve phylogenetic estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huai-Chun; Susko, Edward; Roger, Andrew J

    2014-04-01

    Standard protein phylogenetic models use fixed rate matrices of amino acid interchange derived from analyses of large databases. Differences between the stationary amino acid frequencies of these rate matrices from those of a data set of interest are typically adjusted for by matrix multiplication that converts the empirical rate matrix to an exchangeability matrix which is then postmultiplied by the amino acid frequencies in the alignment. The result is a time-reversible rate matrix with stationary amino acid frequencies equal to the data set frequencies. On the basis of population genetics principles, we develop an amino acid substitution-selection model that parameterizes the fitness of an amino acid as the logarithm of the ratio of the frequency of the amino acid to the frequency of the same amino acid under no selection. The model gives rise to a different sequence of matrix multiplications to convert an empirical rate matrix to one that has stationary amino acid frequencies equal to the data set frequencies. We incorporated the substitution-selection model with an improved amino acid class frequency mixture (cF) model to partially take into account site-specific amino acid frequencies in the phylogenetic models. We show that 1) the selection models fit data significantly better than corresponding models without selection for most of the 21 test data sets; 2) both cF and cF selection models favored the phylogenetic trees that were inferred under current sophisticated models and methods for three difficult phylogenetic problems (the positions of microsporidia and breviates in eukaryote phylogeny and the position of the root of the angiosperm tree); and 3) for data simulated under site-specific residue frequencies, the cF selection models estimated trees closer to the generating trees than a standard Г model or cF without selection. We also explored several ways of estimating amino acid frequencies under neutral evolution that are required for these selection

  3. Radiotherapy improves serum fatty acids and lipid profile in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Sana; Channa, Naseem Aslam; Talpur, Farha Naz; Younis, Muhammad; Tabassum, Naila

    2017-05-18

    Breast cancer is a disease with diverse clinical symptoms, molecular profiles, and its nature to response its therapeutic treatments. Radiotherapy (RT), along with surgery and chemotherapy is a part of treatment in breast cancer. The aim of present study was to investigate pre and post treatment effects of radiotherapy in serum fatty acids and its lipids profile in patients with breast cancer. In this comparative as well as follow up study, Serum fatty acids were performed by gas chromatography to investigate fatty acids and Microlab for analysis of lipid profile. Among serum free and total fatty acids the major saturated fatty acids (SFAs) in serum lipids of breast cancer patients (pre and post treated) were stearic acid (18:0) and palmitic acid (16:0). These fatty acids contributed about 35-50% of total fatty acids. The decreased concentrations of linoleic acid (C18:2) and arachidonic acid (C20:4) with a lower ratio of C18:2/C18:1 was found in pretreated breast cancer patients as compared to controls. The n-3/n-6 ratio of breast cancer patients was decreased before treatment but it was 35% increased after treatment. In addition, plasma activity of D6 desaturase was increased in the breast cancer patients, while the activity of D5 desaturase was decreased. Increased levels of SFAs, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and decreased polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) levels in breast cancer patients (pre and post treated) as compared to controls. Serum total cholesterol (TC) (224.4 mg/dL) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (142.9 mg/dL) were significantly increased in pretreated breast cancer patients but after the radiotherapy treatment, the TC (150.2 mg/dL) and LDL-C (89.8 mg/dL) were decreased. It seems that RT would have played a potential role in the treatment of BC. After RT the serum levels of PUFAs, TC, and LDL-C are improved. Our study reinforces the important role of RT in the management of BC. The level of PUFAs, TC, and LDL-C can be

  4. Basal forebrain cholinergic input is not essential for lesion-induced plasticity in mature auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamke, Marc R; Brown, Mel; Irvine, Dexter R F

    2005-11-23

    The putative role of the basal forebrain cholinergic system in mediating lesion-induced plasticity in topographic cortical representations was investigated. Cholinergic immunolesions were combined with unilateral restricted cochlear lesions in adult cats, demonstrating the consequence of cholinergic depletion on lesion-induced plasticity in primary auditory cortex (AI). Immunolesions almost eliminated the cholinergic input to AI, while cochlear lesions produced broad high-frequency hearing losses. The results demonstrate that the near elimination of cholinergic input does not disrupt reorganization of the tonotopic representation of the lesioned (contralateral) cochlea in AI and does not affect the normal representation of the unlesioned (ipsilateral) cochlea. It is concluded that cholinergic basal forebrain input to AI is not essential for the occurrence of lesion-induced plasticity in AI.

  5. Segregated cholinergic transmission modulates dopamine neurons integrated in distinct functional circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautan, Daniel; Souza, Albert S; Huerta-Ocampo, Icnelia; Valencia, Miguel; Assous, Maxime; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl; Tepper, James M; Bolam, J Paul; Gerdjikov, Todor V; Mena-Segovia, Juan

    2016-08-01

    Dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) receive cholinergic innervation from brainstem structures that are associated with either movement or reward. Whereas cholinergic neurons of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) carry an associative/motor signal, those of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) convey limbic information. We used optogenetics and in vivo juxtacellular recording and labeling to examine the influence of brainstem cholinergic innervation of distinct neuronal subpopulations in the VTA. We found that LDT cholinergic axons selectively enhanced the bursting activity of mesolimbic dopamine neurons that were excited by aversive stimulation. In contrast, PPN cholinergic axons activated and changed the discharge properties of VTA neurons that were integrated in distinct functional circuits and were inhibited by aversive stimulation. Although both structures conveyed a reinforcing signal, they had opposite roles in locomotion. Our results demonstrate that two modes of cholinergic transmission operate in the VTA and segregate the neurons involved in different reward circuits.

  6. A cholinergic hypothesis of the unconscious in affective disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa eVakalopoulos

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between distinct pharmacological systems are proposed as a key dynamic in the formation of unconscious memories underlying rumination and mood disorder, but also reflect the plastic capacity of neural networks that can aid recovery. An inverse and reciprocal relationship is postulated between cholinergic and monoaminergic receptor subtypes. M1-type muscarinic receptor transduction facilitates encoding of unconscious, prepotent behavioural repertoires at the core of affective disorders and ADHD. Behavioural adaptation to new contingencies is mediated by the classic prototype receptor: 5-HT1A (Gi/o and its modulation of m1-plasticity. Reversal of learning is dependent on increased phasic activation of midbrain monoaminergic nuclei and is a function of hippocampal theta. Acquired hippocampal dysfunction due to abnormal activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis predicts deficits in hippocampal-dependent memory and executive function and further impairments to cognitive inhibition. Encoding of explicit memories is mediated by Gq/11 and Gs signalling of monoamines only. A role is proposed for the phasic activation of the basal forebrain cholinergic nucleus by cortical projections from the complex consisting of the insula and claustrum. Although controversial. recent studies suggest a common ontogenetic origin of the two structures and a functional coupling. Lesions of the region result in loss of motivational behaviour and familiarity based judgements. A major hypothesis of the paper is that these lost faculties result indirectly, from reduced cholinergic tone.

  7. Animal model of vascular dementia and its cholinergic mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Wen-hui; LI Lu-si; LIU Zhi-rong; ZHU Hong-yan; CHEN Kang-ning

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To establish a model of vascular dementia (VD) in aging rats and study primarily the cholinergic mechanism of hypomnesia. Methods: Chronic hypoperfusion of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the forebrain was performed in aging rats with permanent bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (PBCCAO). Then the rats were tested with a computerized shuttle-training case. The changes of cerebrovascular system were observed with digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The brain tissues were studied with immunohistochemical method with cholinergic acetyltransferase (ChAT) as a marker. Results: The cognitive function of rats was obviously reduced in 2 months after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and became worse 2 months later, showing a more marked decrease of ChAT positive neurons and fibers in CA1 of the hippocampus as compared with the rats of the control, which had a significant positive correlation with memory ability. Conclusion: This rat model is successfully established to imitate human VD induced with chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. The mechanism of the hypomnesia of VD might be the impairment of cholinergic neurons in frontal cortex and hippocampus.

  8. Modulatory compartments in cortex and local regulation of cholinergic tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Jennifer J; Ward, Nicholas J; Jadi, Monika P; Disney, Anita A

    2016-09-01

    Neuromodulatory signaling is generally considered broad in its impact across cortex. However, variations in the characteristics of cortical circuits may introduce regionally-specific responses to diffuse modulatory signals. Features such as patterns of axonal innervation, tissue tortuosity and molecular diffusion, effectiveness of degradation pathways, subcellular receptor localization, and patterns of receptor expression can lead to local modification of modulatory inputs. We propose that modulatory compartments exist in cortex and can be defined by variation in structural features of local circuits. Further, we argue that these compartments are responsible for local regulation of neuromodulatory tone. For the cholinergic system, these modulatory compartments are regions of cortical tissue within which signaling conditions for acetylcholine are relatively uniform, but between which signaling can vary profoundly. In the visual system, evidence for the existence of compartments indicates that cholinergic modulation likely differs across the visual pathway. We argue that the existence of these compartments calls for thinking about cholinergic modulation in terms of finer-grained control of local cortical circuits than is implied by the traditional view of this system as a diffuse modulator. Further, an understanding of modulatory compartments provides an opportunity to better understand and perhaps correct signal modifications that lead to pathological states.

  9. PET study of cholinergic system in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinotoh, Hitoshi [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-01-01

    Recently, we have developed a method to measure acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, a functional marker for cholinergic system, by positron emission tomography (PET) and carbon-11 labeled N-methyl-4-piperidyl acetate. Kinetic analysis of the radioactivity in the brain and the plasma yielded a rate constant ``k 3`` as an index of AChE activity. The ratios for the k 3 values for the cerebral cortex/thalamus/cerebellum/striatum found in healthy participants were 1/ 3/ 8/ 10, respectively, corresponding well with AChE activity ratios in the brain at necropsy (1/ 3/ 8/ 38), except for the striatum. In 23 healthy volunteers (age range: 24-89 years), there was no age-related decline of k 3 values in the cerebral cortex, suggesting AChE activity is preserved in aged cerebral cortex. In 11 patients with Alzheimer`s disease, there was a significant reduction (-24%) of k 3 values in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, suggesting a loss of ascending cholinergic system from the basal forebrain to the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In 16 patients with Parkinson`s disease, there was a significant reduction (-18%) of k 3 values in the cerebral cortex. In 10 patients with progressive supra nuclear palsy, there was a significant reduction (-38%) of k 3 values in the thalamus. This technique is useful for investigating central cholinergic system in neuro degenerative disorders with dementia. (author)

  10. Decreased Consumption of Branched-Chain Amino Acids Improves Metabolic Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Fontana

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein-restricted (PR, high-carbohydrate diets improve metabolic health in rodents, yet the precise dietary components that are responsible for these effects have not been identified. Furthermore, the applicability of these studies to humans is unclear. Here, we demonstrate in a randomized controlled trial that a moderate PR diet also improves markers of metabolic health in humans. Intriguingly, we find that feeding mice a diet specifically reduced in branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs is sufficient to improve glucose tolerance and body composition equivalently to a PR diet via metabolically distinct pathways. Our results highlight a critical role for dietary quality at the level of amino acids in the maintenance of metabolic health and suggest that diets specifically reduced in BCAAs, or pharmacological interventions in this pathway, may offer a translatable way to achieve many of the metabolic benefits of a PR diet.

  11. Improvement of glucaric acid production in E. coli via dynamic control of metabolic fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene M. Brockman Reizman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available D-glucaric acid can be used as a building block for biopolymers as well as in the formulation of detergents and corrosion inhibitors. A biosynthetic route for production in Escherichia coli has been developed (Moon et al., 2009, but previous work with the glucaric acid pathway has indicated that competition with endogenous metabolism may limit carbon flux into the pathway. Our group has recently developed an E. coli strain where phosphofructokinase (Pfk activity can be dynamically controlled and demonstrated its use for improving yields and titers of the glucaric acid precursor myo-inositol on glucose minimal medium. In this work, we have explored the further applicability of this strain for glucaric acid production in a supplemented medium more relevant for scale-up studies, both under batch conditions and with glucose feeding via in situ enzymatic starch hydrolysis. It was found that glucaric acid titers could be improved by up to 42% with appropriately timed knockdown of Pfk activity during glucose feeding. The glucose feeding protocol could also be used for reduction of acetate production in the wild type and modified E. coli strains.

  12. Emission control for precursors causing acid rain(V):Improvement of acid soil with the bio-briquette combustion ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Xu-hui; SAKAMOTO Kazuhiko; WANG Wei; GAO Shi-dong; ISOBE Yugo

    2004-01-01

    The bio-briquette technique which mixes coal, biomass and sulfur fixation agent and bio-briquettes under 3-5 t/cm2 line pressure has aroused people's attention in view of controlling the air pollution and the acid rain. In this paper, the physicochemical properties of bio-briquette and its ash were investigated. And the acid soil was improved by the bio-briquette combustion ash, which contained nutritive substances such as P, N, K and had the acid-neutralizing capacity(ANC). The pH, EC, effective nutrient elements(Ca, Mg, K, P and N), heavy metal elements(Al, Cu, Cd, Cr, Zn and Mn) and acid-neutralizing capacity change of ash-added soils within the range of 0%-10%, were also studied. Specially, when 5% bio-briquette combustion ash was added to the tested soil, the content of the effective elements such as Ca, Mg and K rose by 100 times, 7 times and twice, respectively. The total nitrogen also increased by about twice. The results showed the oxyanions such as that of Al, Cu, Cd, Cr, Zn and Mn were not potentially dangerous, because they were about the same as the averages of them in Chinese soil. It is shown that the ANC became stronger, though the ANC hardly increases in the ash-added soil. On the basis of the evaluation indices, it is concluded that the best mixture ratio is to add 2.5%-8% of the bio-briquette combustion ash to the tested soil.

  13. Improved Acetic Acid Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Overexpression of the WHI2 Gene Identified through Inverse Metabolic Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingying; Stabryla, Lisa; Wei, Na

    2016-01-29

    Development of acetic acid-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for economically viable production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, but the goal remains a critical challenge due to limited information on effective genetic perturbation targets for improving acetic acid resistance in the yeast. This study employed a genomic-library-based inverse metabolic engineering approach to successfully identify a novel gene target, WHI2 (encoding a cytoplasmatic globular scaffold protein), which elicited improved acetic acid resistance in S. cerevisiae. Overexpression of WHI2 significantly improved glucose and/or xylose fermentation under acetic acid stress in engineered yeast. The WHI2-overexpressing strain had 5-times-higher specific ethanol productivity than the control in glucose fermentation with acetic acid. Analysis of the expression of WHI2 gene products (including protein and transcript) determined that acetic acid induced endogenous expression of Whi2 in S. cerevisiae. Meanwhile, the whi2Δ mutant strain had substantially higher susceptibility to acetic acid than the wild type, suggesting the important role of Whi2 in the acetic acid response in S. cerevisiae. Additionally, overexpression of WHI2 and of a cognate phosphatase gene, PSR1, had a synergistic effect in improving acetic acid resistance, suggesting that Whi2 might function in combination with Psr1 to elicit the acetic acid resistance mechanism. These results improve our understanding of the yeast response to acetic acid stress and provide a new strategy to breed acetic acid-resistant yeast strains for renewable biofuel production.

  14. Improved Acetic Acid Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Overexpression of the WHI2 Gene Identified through Inverse Metabolic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingying; Stabryla, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Development of acetic acid-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for economically viable production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, but the goal remains a critical challenge due to limited information on effective genetic perturbation targets for improving acetic acid resistance in the yeast. This study employed a genomic-library-based inverse metabolic engineering approach to successfully identify a novel gene target, WHI2 (encoding a cytoplasmatic globular scaffold protein), which elicited improved acetic acid resistance in S. cerevisiae. Overexpression of WHI2 significantly improved glucose and/or xylose fermentation under acetic acid stress in engineered yeast. The WHI2-overexpressing strain had 5-times-higher specific ethanol productivity than the control in glucose fermentation with acetic acid. Analysis of the expression of WHI2 gene products (including protein and transcript) determined that acetic acid induced endogenous expression of Whi2 in S. cerevisiae. Meanwhile, the whi2Δ mutant strain had substantially higher susceptibility to acetic acid than the wild type, suggesting the important role of Whi2 in the acetic acid response in S. cerevisiae. Additionally, overexpression of WHI2 and of a cognate phosphatase gene, PSR1, had a synergistic effect in improving acetic acid resistance, suggesting that Whi2 might function in combination with Psr1 to elicit the acetic acid resistance mechanism. These results improve our understanding of the yeast response to acetic acid stress and provide a new strategy to breed acetic acid-resistant yeast strains for renewable biofuel production. PMID:26826231

  15. Improving evolutionary models for mitochondrial protein data with site-class specific amino acid exchangeability matrices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Dunn

    Full Text Available Adequate modeling of mitochondrial sequence evolution is an essential component of mitochondrial phylogenomics (comparative mitogenomics. There is wide recognition within the field that lineage-specific aspects of mitochondrial evolution should be accommodated through lineage-specific amino-acid exchangeability matrices (e.g., mtMam for mammalian data. However, such a matrix must be applied to all sites and this implies that all sites are subject to the same, or largely similar, evolutionary constraints. This assumption is unjustified. Indeed, substantial differences are expected to arise from three-dimensional structures that impose different physiochemical environments on individual amino acid residues. The objectives of this paper are (1 to investigate the extent to which amino acid evolution varies among sites of mitochondrial proteins, and (2 to assess the potential benefits of explicitly modeling such variability. To achieve this, we developed a novel method for partitioning sites based on amino acid physiochemical properties. We apply this method to two datasets derived from complete mitochondrial genomes of mammals and fish, and use maximum likelihood to estimate amino acid exchangeabilities for the different groups of sites. Using this approach we identified large groups of sites evolving under unique physiochemical constraints. Estimates of amino acid exchangeabilities differed significantly among such groups. Moreover, we found that joint estimates of amino acid exchangeabilities do not adequately represent the natural variability in evolutionary processes among sites of mitochondrial proteins. Significant improvements in likelihood are obtained when the new matrices are employed. We also find that maximum likelihood estimates of branch lengths can be strongly impacted. We provide sets of matrices suitable for groups of sites subject to similar physiochemical constraints, and discuss how they might be used to analyze real data. We

  16. Improving Evolutionary Models for Mitochondrial Protein Data with Site-Class Specific Amino Acid Exchangeability Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Katherine A.; Jiang, Wenyi; Field, Christopher; Bielawski, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    Adequate modeling of mitochondrial sequence evolution is an essential component of mitochondrial phylogenomics (comparative mitogenomics). There is wide recognition within the field that lineage-specific aspects of mitochondrial evolution should be accommodated through lineage-specific amino-acid exchangeability matrices (e.g., mtMam for mammalian data). However, such a matrix must be applied to all sites and this implies that all sites are subject to the same, or largely similar, evolutionary constraints. This assumption is unjustified. Indeed, substantial differences are expected to arise from three-dimensional structures that impose different physiochemical environments on individual amino acid residues. The objectives of this paper are (1) to investigate the extent to which amino acid evolution varies among sites of mitochondrial proteins, and (2) to assess the potential benefits of explicitly modeling such variability. To achieve this, we developed a novel method for partitioning sites based on amino acid physiochemical properties. We apply this method to two datasets derived from complete mitochondrial genomes of mammals and fish, and use maximum likelihood to estimate amino acid exchangeabilities for the different groups of sites. Using this approach we identified large groups of sites evolving under unique physiochemical constraints. Estimates of amino acid exchangeabilities differed significantly among such groups. Moreover, we found that joint estimates of amino acid exchangeabilities do not adequately represent the natural variability in evolutionary processes among sites of mitochondrial proteins. Significant improvements in likelihood are obtained when the new matrices are employed. We also find that maximum likelihood estimates of branch lengths can be strongly impacted. We provide sets of matrices suitable for groups of sites subject to similar physiochemical constraints, and discuss how they might be used to analyze real data. We also discuss how

  17. Improvement of Physiological Characteristic of Selenium-Enriched Candida utilis with Amino Acids Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Xiaoguang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of amino acids addition on cell growth, glutathione biosynthesis, glutathione distribution, and the intracellular oxidation-reduction environment of Candida utilis SZU 07-01 during selenium enrichment were investigated in this study. Most amino acids under appropriate concentrations have positive effects on cell growth of the yeast strain, except for phenylalanine and proline, compared with the control without amino acid addition. The bioconversion of selenite to organic selenium induced the reduction of glutathione synthesis and intracellular distribution of glutathione. However, amino acids including cysteine, glutamine, glutamic acid, isoleucine, leucine, and tyrosine could effectively promote the selenium-enriched yeast to elevate glutathione production, especially increasing the intracellular glutathione content. Moreover, addition of these six different amino acids apparently decreased malondialdehyde concentration and recovered the normal intracellular redox environment of the selenium-enriched C. utilis SZU 07-01. The improvement of physiological characteristic of the selenium-enriched yeast by increasing intracellular glutathione content and lowering malondialdehyde content will undoubtedly help to widen application of selenium-enriched yeast as food or feed additives.

  18. Boswellic Acid Improves Cognitive Function in a Rat Model Through Its Antioxidant Activity - Neuroprotective effect of Boswellic acid -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Ebrahimpour

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Boswellic acid (BA, a compound isolated from the gum-resin of Boswellia carterii, is a pentacyclic terpenoid that is active against many inflammatory diseases, including cancer, arthritis, chronic colitis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, and memory impairment, but the mechanism is poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of boswellic acid on spatial learning and memory impairment induced by trimethyltin (TMT in Wistar rats. Methods: Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: Normal group, TMT-administrated rats (8.0 mg/kg, Intraperitoneally, i.p. and TMT + BA (40, 80 and 160 mg/kg, i.p.-administrated rats. BA was used daily for 21 days. To evaluate the cognitive improving of BA, we performed the Morris water maze test. Moreover, to investigate the neuroprotective effect of BA, we determined the acetylcholinesterase (AchE activity, the malondialdehyde (MDA level as a marker of lipid peroxidation, and the glutathione (GSH content in the cerebral cortex. Results: Treatment with TMT impaired learning and memory, and treatment with BA at a dose of 160 mg/kg produced a significant improvement in learning and memory abilities in the water maze tasks. Consistent with behavioral data, the activity of AChE was significantly increased in the TMT-injected rats compared to the control group (P < 0.01 whereas all groups treated with BA presented a more significant inhibitory effect against AChE than the TMT-injected animals. In addition, TMT reduced the GSH content and increased the MDA level in the cerebral cortex as compared to the control group P < 0.01. On the other hand, treatment with BA at 160 mg/kg slightly increased the GSH content and reduced the MDA level in comparison to the TMT-administered group (P < 0.01. Conclusion: The above results suggest that the effect of BA in improving the cognitive function may be mediated through its antioxidant activity.

  19. Heart failure causes cholinergic transdifferentiation of cardiac sympathetic nerves via gp130-signaling cytokines in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Hideaki; Ieda, Masaki; Kimura, Kensuke; Arai, Takahide; Kawaguchi-Manabe, Haruko; Matsuhashi, Tomohiro; Endo, Jin; Sano, Motoaki; Kawakami, Takashi; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Monkawa, Toshiaki; Hayashi, Matsuhiko; Iwanami, Akio; Okano, Hideyuki; Okada, Yasunori; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Ogawa, Satoshi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2010-02-01

    Although several cytokines and neurotrophic factors induce sympathetic neurons to transdifferentiate into cholinergic neurons in vitro, the physiological and pathophysiological roles of this remain unknown. During congestive heart failure (CHF), sympathetic neural tone is upregulated, but there is a paradoxical reduction in norepinephrine synthesis and reuptake in the cardiac sympathetic nervous system (SNS). Here we examined whether cholinergic transdifferentiation can occur in the cardiac SNS in rodent models of CHF and investigated the underlying molecular mechanism(s) using genetically modified mice. We used Dahl salt-sensitive rats to model CHF and found that, upon CHF induction, the cardiac SNS clearly acquired cholinergic characteristics. Of the various cholinergic differentiation factors, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and cardiotrophin-1 were strongly upregulated in the ventricles of rats with CHF. Further, LIF and cardiotrophin-1 secreted from cultured failing rat cardiomyocytes induced cholinergic transdifferentiation in cultured sympathetic neurons, and this process was reversed by siRNAs targeting Lif and cardiotrophin-1. Consistent with the data in rats, heart-specific overexpression of LIF in mice caused cholinergic transdifferentiation in the cardiac SNS. Further, SNS-specific targeting of the gene encoding the gp130 subunit of the receptor for LIF and cardiotrophin-1 in mice prevented CHF-induced cholinergic transdifferentiation. Cholinergic transdifferentiation was also observed in the cardiac SNS of autopsied patients with CHF. Thus, CHF causes target-dependent cholinergic transdifferentiation of the cardiac SNS via gp130-signaling cytokines secreted from the failing myocardium.

  20. Brain Cholinergic Function and Response to Rivastigmine in Patients With Chronic Sequels of Traumatic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östberg, Anna; Virta, Jere; Rinne, Juha O

    2017-01-01

    subjects for more than 1 year after at least moderate traumatic brain injury. Ten of the subjects were respondents and 7 nonrespondents to cholinergic medication. DESIGN:: Cholinergic function was assessed with [methyl-C] N-methylpiperidyl-4-acetate-PET (C-MP4A-PET), which reflects the activity...... was notably lower throughout the cortex in both respondents and nonrespondents, without significant differences between them. CONCLUSION:: Our study suggests that frontal cholinergic dysfunction is associated with the clinical response to cholinergic stimulation in patients with traumatic brain injury....

  1. Delirium Accompanied by Cholinergic Deficiency and Organ Failure in a 73-Year-Old Critically Ill Patient: Physostigmine as a Therapeutic Option

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Zujalovic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Delirium is a common problem in ICU patients, resulting in prolonged ICU stay and increased mortality. A cholinergic deficiency in the central nervous system is supposed to be a relevant pathophysiologic process in delirium. Acetylcholine is a major transmitter of the parasympathetic nervous system influencing several organs (e.g., heart and kidneys and the inflammatory response too. This perception might explain that delirium is not an individual symptom, but rather a part of a symptom complex with various disorders of the whole organism. The cholinergic deficiency could not be quantified up to now. Using the possibility of bedside determination of the acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE activity, we assumed to objectify the cholinergic homeostasis within minutes. As reported here, the postoperative delirium was accompanied by a massive hemodynamic and renal deterioration of unclear genesis. We identified the altered AChE activity as a plausible pathophysiological mechanism. The pharmacological intervention with the indirect parasympathomimetic physostigmine led to a quick and lasting improvement of the patient’s cognitive, hemodynamic, and renal status. In summary, severe delirium is not always an attendant phenomenon of critical illness. It might be causal for multiple organ deterioration if it is based on cholinergic deficiency and has to be treated at his pathophysiological roots whenever possible.

  2. Medial-to-lateral gradient of neostriatal NGF receptors: relationship to cholinergic neurons and NGF-like immunoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altar, C A; Dugich-Djordjevic, M; Armanini, M; Bakhit, C

    1991-03-01

    High-affinity binding sites for recombinant human NGF (rhNGF) were studied in the caudate-putamen of the adult rat and rabbit. Displaceable 125I-rhNGF binding sites were densely distributed throughout the caudate-putamen and were 2-3-fold more prevalant in the ventrolateral and lateral than in the medial caudate-putamen. The amount of nondisplaceable binding did not vary throughout the caudate-putamen. The medial-to-lateral receptor gradient was correlated (r = +0.99) with a 2-3-fold medial-to-lateral increase in ChAT activity. In contrast, NGF-like immunoreactivity (NGF-LI) was prevalent but uniformly distributed in the caudate-putamen. Lesions of intrinsic cholinergic neurons by quinolinic acid produced extensive gliosis in the medial, central, and lateral caudate-putamen, yet 125I-rhNGF binding was decreased in each of these regions. The activity of ChAT and 125I-rhNGF binding throughout the caudate-putamen were each decreased by 40% following quinolinic acid. Binding was not changed after 70-77% dopamine nerve terminal depletions induced by 6-hydroxydopamine, demonstrating a nonglial, nondopaminergic locus for striatal NGF binding sites. The cholinergiclike topography of NGF binding sites throughout the intact caudate-putamen, the parallel decreases of cholinergic neurons and NGF binding sites following intrinsic neuronal loss, and the uniform neostriatal gradient of NGF-LI are consistent with the trophic role of endogenous NGF for cholinergic interneurons of the caudate-putamen.

  3. Improved process for the production of cellulose sulfate using sulfuric acid/ethanol solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Jun; Chen, Hongwen

    2013-06-05

    An improved process for production of cellulose sulfate (CS) was developed by using sulfuric acid/ethanol solution as sulfonating agent and Na2SO4 as water absorbent. The FTIR, SEM and TG analysis were used to characterize the CS prepared. The total degree of substitution and viscosity of the product solution (2%, w/v) were ranging from 0.28 to 0.77 and from 115 to 907 mPa s, respectively, by changing the process parameters such as the amount of Na2SO4, the reaction time, the temperature, the sulfuric acid/alcohol ratio and liquid/solid ratio. The results indicated that the product with DS (0.28-0.77) and η2% (115-907) mPa s could be produced by using this improved process and more cellulose sulfate could be produced when cellulose was sulfonated for 3-4 h at -2 °C in sulfuric acid/ethanol (1.4-1.6) solution with addition of 0.8 g Na2SO4. The (13)C NMR indicated that the sulfate group of CS produced using sulfuric acid/ethanol solution was at C6 position.

  4. Acidic electrolyzed water efficiently improves the flavour of persimmon (Diospyros kaki L. cv. Mopan) wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wanqi; Zhu, Baoqing; Li, Yao; Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Bolin; Fan, Junfeng

    2016-04-15

    The ability of acidic (AcW) and alkaline electrolyzed waters (AlW) to improve the flavour of persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.) wine was evaluated. Wines made with AcW (WAcW) were significantly better than wines made with AlW or pure water (PW) in aroma, taste, and colour. Volatile analysis showed that WAcW has high alcohol and ester contents, including 2-phenylethanol, isopentanol, isobutanol, ethyl dodecanoate, phenethyl acetate, and butanedioic acid diethyl ester. The total amino acid content of persimmon slurry soaked with AcW reached 531.2 mg/l, which was much higher than those of the slurries soaked in AlW (381.3 mg/l) and PW (182.7 mg/l). The composition of major amino acids in the AcW-soaked slurry may contribute to the strong ester flavour of WAcW. This is the first report to suggest that electrolyzed functional water (EFW) can be used to improve wine flavour, leading to the possible use of EFW in food processing.

  5. Clonidine, moxonidine, folic acid, and mecobalamin improve baroreflex function in stroke-prone, spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-juan MA; Fu-ming SHEN; Ai-jun LIU; Ke-yong SHI; Ying-liang WU; Ding-feng SU

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of clonidine, moxonidine, folic acid, and mecobalamin on arterial baroreflex (ABR) function in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-SP) and the possible mechanisms involved.Methods: Eighty-one SHR-SP were divided into 7 groups. Four groups weredesignated for the intragastric (ig) administration of clonidine (1.0 and 10.0 μg/kg), moxonidine (0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg), folic acid (1.0 mg/kg), and mecobalamin(1.0 mg/kg). Three groups were for the intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of clonidine (4 μg/4 μL), moxonidine (5 μg/4 μL), and mecobalamin (20 μg/4 μL).Blood pressure (BP) was recorded in the conscious state for 30 min and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was determined respectively before and after drug administration. Results: Clonidine and moxonidine significantly decreased BP,prolonged the heart period (HP), and increased BRS when administered as either ig or icv injections. Both BP and HP were unchanged by ig folic acid or mecobalamin injection. However, BRS was significantly increased by both.Conclusion: Clonidine, moxonidine, folic acid, and mecobalamin improved impaired ABR function in SHR-SP. The central mechanism was involved in this effect of either clonidine or moxonidine. Mecobalamin improved ABR function through the peripheral mechanism.

  6. Stearidonic and γ-linolenic acids in echium oil improves glucose disposal in insulin resistant monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, K; Flynn, D M; Jenkins, K A; Wilson, M D; Chilton, F H

    2013-07-01

    Echium oil (EO) contains stearidonic acid (18:4), a n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and gamma-linolenic acids (18:3), a n-6 PUFA that can be converted to long chain (LC)-PUFAs. We aimed to compare a safflower oil (SO)-enriched diet to EO- and fish oil (FO)-enriched diets on circulating and tissue PUFAs levels and glycemic, inflammatory, and cardiovascular health biomarkers in insulin resistant African green monkeys. In a Latin-square cross-over study, eight monkeys consumed matched diets for 6 weeks with 3-week washout periods. Monkeys consuming FO had significantly higher levels of n-3 LC-PUFAs and EO supplementation resulted in higher levels of circulating n-3 LC-PUFAs and a significant increase in dihomo-gamma linolenic acid (DGLA) in red blood cells and muscle. Glucose disposal was improved after EO consumption. These data suggest that PUFAs in EO supplementation have the capacity to alter circulating, RBC and muscle LC-PUFA levels and improve glucose tolerance in insulin-resistant monkeys.

  7. Coaxial electrospinning with acetic acid for preparing ferulic acid/zein composite fibers with improved drug release profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Mao; Zha, Liu-sheng; Yu, Deng-Guang; Liu, Jianyun

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated drug/zein composite fibers prepared using a modified coaxial electrospinning process. With unspinnable acetic acid as sheath liquid and an electrospinnable co-dissolving solution of zein and ferulic acid (FA) as core fluid, the modified coaxial process could run smoothly and continuously without any clogging. Compared with those from the single-fluid electrospinning process, the FA-loaded zein fibers from the modified process were rounder and possessed higher quality in terms of diameter and distribution, as verified by scanning electron microscopic observations of their surface and cross-section. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction showed that fibers from both processes similarly formed a composite with the FA present in the zein matrix in an amorphous state. The driving force of encapsulation of FA into zein fibers was hydrogen bonding, as evidenced by the attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectra. However, in vitro dissolution tests demonstrated that the fibers from the coaxial process exhibited better sustained-release profiles with a smaller initial burst effect and less tailing-off release compared with those from the single process. The modified coaxial electrospinning process is a useful tool for generating nanofibers with higher quality and improved functional performance.

  8. Synthetic Biolubricant Basestocks from Epoxidized Ricinoleic Acid: Improved Low Temperature Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Yousif, E.; Salih, N.; Salimon, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a series of structural modifications of epoxidized ricinoleic acid for biolubricant to improve the cold flow behavior and oxidation stability of vegetable oils through measurement of pour point (PP) and oxidation onset temperature (OT) and signal maximum temperature (SMT) of each synthetic compound. The results showed that butyl 10,12-dihydroxy-9-behenoxystearate with bulky ester behenyl mid-chain exhibited the most favorable low-temperature performance ϑPP=– 47 °C). On th...

  9. High-Temperature Synthesis of Ordered Mesoporous Aluminosilicates from ZSM-5 Nanoseeds with Improved Acidic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Hoan Vu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ordered mesoporous SBA-15 analogs with different Si/Al ratios were successfully prepared in a two-step process from self-assembly of ZSM-5 nanoseeds at high temperature in mildly acidic media (473 K, pH 3.5. The obtained products were characterized as SAXS, XRD, N2 sorption, FTIR, TEM, NH3-TPD, AAS and ICP. The results show that the initial Si/Al molar ratio of ZSM-5 precursors strongly affects the final materials’ properties. A highly condensed, well-ordered mesoporous SBA-15 analog with improved hydrothermal stability and acidic properties can be prepared from low aluminum containing ZSM-5 precursors (Si/Al ≥ 20. Reducing the initial Si/Al molar ratio to 10, however, leads to the formation of a disordered mesoporous SBA-15 type material accompanied by degraded textural and acidic properties. The gas phase cracking of cumene, carried out as probe reaction to evaluate Brønsted acidity, reveals that an increased density of Brønsted acid sites has been achieved over the SBA-15 analogs compared to conventional Al-SBA-15 due to the preservation of zeolite building units in the mesopore walls of the SBA-15 analogs.

  10. High-Temperature Synthesis of Ordered Mesoporous Aluminosilicates from ZSM-5 Nanoseeds with Improved Acidic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Xuan Hoan; Eckelt, Reinhard; Armbruster, Udo; Martin, Andreas

    2014-08-18

    Ordered mesoporous SBA-15 analogs with different Si/Al ratios were successfully prepared in a two-step process from self-assembly of ZSM-5 nanoseeds at high temperature in mildly acidic media (473 K, pH 3.5). The obtained products were characterized as SAXS, XRD, N₂ sorption, FTIR, TEM, NH₃-TPD, AAS and ICP. The results show that the initial Si/Al molar ratio of ZSM-5 precursors strongly affects the final materials' properties. A highly condensed, well-ordered mesoporous SBA-15 analog with improved hydrothermal stability and acidic properties can be prepared from low aluminum containing ZSM-5 precursors (Si/Al ≥ 20). Reducing the initial Si/Al molar ratio to 10, however, leads to the formation of a disordered mesoporous SBA-15 type material accompanied by degraded textural and acidic properties. The gas phase cracking of cumene, carried out as probe reaction to evaluate Brønsted acidity, reveals that an increased density of Brønsted acid sites has been achieved over the SBA-15 analogs compared to conventional Al-SBA-15 due to the preservation of zeolite building units in the mesopore walls of the SBA-15 analogs.

  11. Application of 10% Ascorbic Acid Improves Resin Shear Bond Stregth in Bleached Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamizar Kamizar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Restoration of the teeth immediately after bleaching with H2O2 35% is contraindicated due to the remnants of free radical that will stay inside dentin for 2-3 weeks which will compromise the adhesiveness of composite resin. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 10% ascorbic acid on shear bond strength of composite placed on bleached dentin. Methods:Twenty seven samples were divided equally into three groups. Group 1: dentin was etched with 35% phosphoric acid; Group 2: dentin was bleached with 35% H2O2 followed by etching with 35% phosphoric acid; Group 3: dentin was bleached with 35% H2O2, followed by application of 10% ascorbic acid and etched with 35% phosphoric acid. All samples were then stored at 370C for 24 hours. The Universal Testing Machine was used to measure shear bond strength and the results were analyzed with Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney test. Results: After nine independent experiments, 10% ascorbic acid application on bleached dentin resulted in highest increased in bond stregth (56.04±11.06MPa compared to Group 2 (29.09±7.63MPa and Group 1 (25.55±2.22MPa and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.05. Conclusion: Application of 10% ascorbic acid to the bleached dentin improved the shear bond strength of resin composite.

  12. Optimizing cellulase usage for improved mixing and rheological properties of acid-pretreated sugarcane bagasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Claudia C; Peterson, James J; Mullinnix, Michael T; Svoronos, Spyros A; Shanmugam, K T; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2010-12-01

    Consolidation of bioprocessing steps with lignocellulose is limited by hydrolysate toxicity, the fibrous nature of suspensions, and low activity of cellulase enzymes. Combinations of enzyme dose and treatment conditions improved the flow properties and pumping of acid-pretreated sugarcane bagasse slurries (10% dry weight). Low levels of cellulase enzyme (0.1 and 0.5 FPU/g dry weight acid-pretreated bagasse) were found to reduce viscosities by 77-95% after 6 h, solubilizing 3.5% of the bagasse dry weight. Flow of slurries through small funnels was a useful predictor of success with centrifugal and diaphragm pumps. Equations were derived that describe viscosity and solubilized carbohydrates as a function of time and cellulase dosage. Blending of acid-pretreated bagasse (10% dry weight) with suspensions of acid-pretreated bagasse (10% dry weight) that had been previously digested with cellulase enzymes (low viscosity) did not increase viscosity in a linear fashion. Viscosity of these mixtures remained relatively constant until a threshold level of new fiber was reached, followed by a rapid increase with further additions. Up to 35% fresh acid-pretreated bagasse could be blended with enzyme-digested fiber (5.0 FPU/g dry weight acid-pretreated fiber; 6 h) with only a modest increase in viscosity. The smooth surfaces of enzyme-treated fiber are proposed to hinder the frequency and extent of interactions between fibrils of fresh fiber particles (acid-pretreated) until a threshold concentration is achieved, after which fiber interactions and viscosity increase dramatically. These results were used to model the viscosity in an ideal continuous stirred tank reactor (liquefaction) as a function of residence time and enzyme dosage.

  13. Improvement of acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a zinc-finger-based artificial transcription factor and identification of novel genes involved in acetic acid tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cui; Wei, Xiaowen; Sun, Cuihuan; Zhang, Fei; Xu, Jianren; Zhao, Xinqing; Bai, Fengwu

    2015-03-01

    Acetic acid is present in cellulosic hydrolysate as a potent inhibitor, and the superior acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ensures good cell viability and efficient ethanol production when cellulosic raw materials are used as substrates. In this study, a mutant strain of S. cerevisiae ATCC4126 (Sc4126-M01) with improved acetic acid tolerance was obtained through screening strains transformed with an artificial zinc finger protein transcription factor (ZFP-TF) library. Further analysis indicated that improved acetic acid tolerance was associated with improved catalase (CAT) activity. The ZFP coding sequence associated with the improved phenotype was identified, and real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that three of the possible genes involved in the enhanced acetic acid tolerance regulated by this ZFP-TF, namely YFL040W, QDR3, and IKS1, showed decreased transcription levels in Sc4126-M01 in the presence of acetic acid, compared to those in the control strain. Sc4126-M01 mutants having QDR3 and IKS1 deletion (ΔQDR3 and ΔIKS1) exhibited higher acetic acid tolerance than the wild-type strain under acetic acid treatment. Glucose consumption rate and ethanol productivity in the presence of 5 g/L acetic acid were improved in the ΔQDR3 mutant compared to the wild-type strain. Our studies demonstrated that the synthetic ZFP-TF library can be used to improve acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae and that the employment of an artificial transcription factor can facilitate the exploration of novel functional genes involved in stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae.

  14. Effects of superoxide generating systems on muscle tone, cholinergic and NANC responses in cat airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, V; Nakajima, T; Pucovsky, V; Onoue, H; Ito, Y

    2000-02-14

    To study the possible role of reactive oxygen species in airway hyperreactivity, we examined the effects of the superoxide anion radical (O(2)(-)) generating systems, pyrogallol and xanthine with xanthine oxidase, on muscle tone, excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the cat airway. Smooth muscle contraction or non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) relaxation evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were measured before or after O(2)(-) generating systems with or without diethydithiocarbamic acid (DEDTCA), an inhibitor of endogenous superoxide dismutase (SOD). Resting membrane potential or excitatory junction potential (EJP) were also measured in vitro. Both pyrogallol and xanthine/xanthine oxidase produced biphasic changes in basal and elevated (by 5-HT) muscle tone. After SOD pretreatment, both systems consistently produced a prolonged contraction, thereby indicating that O(2)(-) was converted to H(2)O(2) by the action of SOD and as a result the actions of O(2)(-) were lost but those of H(2)O(2) introduced. The O(2)(-) showed no significant effect on smooth muscle contraction or EJP evoked by EFS, however after DEDTCA pretreatment, it evoked initial enhancement followed by suppression of the contraction and EJP. DEDTCA pretreatment ameliorated the inhibitory action of pyrogallol and xanthine/xanthine oxidase on the NANC relaxation, probably because O(2)(-) could combine with endogenous NO to form peroxynitrite. These results indicate that the O(2)(-) generating systems have multiple actions, presumably due to the presence and simultaneous action of at least two different reactive oxygen species (O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2)). While H(2)O(2) seems to be responsible for elevation of muscle tone and augmentation of smooth muscle contraction by EFS, O(2)(-) inhibits muscle tone, cholinergic and NANC neurotransmission.

  15. Nicotine-Induced Modulation of the Cholinergic Twitch Response in the Ileum of Guinea Pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnerer, Josef; Liebmann, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the direct drug effects of nicotine and its effects on the cholinergic twitch responses of the electrically stimulated longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus strip from the ileum of guinea pig were investigated. Nicotine dose-dependently (0.3-10 µmol/l) evoked the well-known contractile responses on its own. Whereas the interposed twitch responses remained present without a change in height at 1 µmol/l nicotine, a nicotine concentration of 3 µmol/l slightly and a concentration of 10 µmol/l markedly diminished the twitch during their presence. After the washout of 1-10 µmol/l nicotine, the height of the twitch response was also temporarily and significantly reduced by 30-77%. The P2X purinoceptor agonist αβ-methylene ATP (1-10 µmol/l) dose-dependently induced contractions on its own and reduced the twitch response during its presence in the organ bath; however, it did not diminish the twitch responses after washout of the drug as nicotine did. The P2X antagonist pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2'-4'-disulphonic acid, the NMDA channel blocker MK-801 and the inhibitor of small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK) channels apamin reduced the contractile effect of 1 µmol/l nicotine. Apamin also significantly prevented the 'post-nicotine inhibition of the twitch' following the washout of 1-3 µmol/l nicotine. As a conclusion, we provide evidence for a functional interaction between nicotinic receptors and the P2X receptors in the ileum of the guinea pig. The 'post-nicotine inhibition of the twitch' is not due to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor desensitization or transmitter depletion, but most probably the secondary effects of nicotine on SK channels determine the reduced cholinergic motor neuron excitability.

  16. VTA GABA neurons modulate specific learning behaviours through the control of dopamine and cholinergic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meaghan C Creed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mesolimbic reward system is primarily comprised of the ventral tegmental area (VTA and the nucleus accumbens (NAc as well as their afferent and efferent connections. This circuitry is essential for learning about stimuli associated with motivationally-relevant outcomes. Moreover, addictive drugs affect and remodel this system, which may underlie their addictive properties. In addition to DA neurons, the VTA also contains approximately 30% ɣ-aminobutyric acid (GABA neurons. The task of signalling both rewarding and aversive events from the VTA to the NAc has mostly been ascribed to DA neurons and the role of GABA neurons has been largely neglected until recently. GABA neurons provide local inhibition of DA neurons and also long-range inhibition of projection regions, including the NAc. Here we review studies using a combination of in vivo and ex vivo electrophysiology, pharmacogenetic and optogenetic manipulations that have characterized the functional neuroanatomy of inhibitory circuits in the mesolimbic system, and describe how GABA neurons of the VTA regulate reward and aversion-related learning. We also discuss pharmacogenetic manipulation of this system with benzodiazepines (BDZs, a class of addictive drugs, which act directly on GABAA receptors located on GABA neurons of the VTA. The results gathered with each of these approaches suggest that VTA GABA neurons bi-directionally modulate activity of local DA neurons, underlying reward or aversion at the behavioural level. Conversely, long-range GABA projections from the VTA to the NAc selectively target cholinergic interneurons (CINs to pause their firing and temporarily reduce cholinergic tone in the NAc, which modulates associative learning. Further characterization of inhibitory circuit function within and beyond the VTA is needed in order to fully understand the function of the mesolimbic system under normal and pathological conditions.

  17. Monitoring the Right Collection: The Central Cholinergic Neurons as an Instructive Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Hangya

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Some neurons are more equal than others: neuroscience relies heavily on the notion that there is a division of labor among different subtypes of brain cells. Therefore, it is important to recognize groups of neurons that participate in the same computation or share similar tasks. However, what the best ways are to identify such collections is not yet clear. Here, we argue that monitoring the activity of genetically defined cell types will lead to new insights about neural mechanisms and improve our understanding of disease vulnerability. Through highlighting how central cholinergic neurons encode reward and punishment that can be captured by a unified framework of reinforcement surprise, we hope to provide an instructive example of how studying a genetically defined cell type may further our understanding of neural function.

  18. Dynamic regulation of fatty acid pools for improved production of fatty alcohols in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Paulo Gonçalves; Ferreira, Raphael; Zhou, Yongjin J; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-03-15

    In vivo production of fatty acid-derived chemicals in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires strategies to increase the intracellular supply of either acyl-CoA or free fatty acids (FFAs), since their cytosolic concentrations are quite low in a natural state for this organism. Deletion of the fatty acyl-CoA synthetase genes FAA1 and FAA4 is an effective and straightforward way to disable re-activation of fatty acids and drastically increase FFA levels. However, this strategy causes FFA over-accumulation and consequential release to the extracellular medium, which results in a significant loss of precursors that compromises the process yield. In the present study, we aimed for dynamic expression of the fatty acyl-CoA synthetase gene FAA1 to regulate FFA and acyl-CoA pools in order to improve fatty alcohol production yields. We analyzed the metabolite dynamics of a faa1Δ faa4Δ strain constitutively expressing a carboxylic acid reductase from Mycobacterium marinum (MmCAR) and an endogenous alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh5) for in vivo production of fatty alcohols from FFAs. We observed production of fatty acids and fatty alcohols with different rates leading to high levels of FFAs not being converted to the final product. To address the issue, we expressed the MmCAR + Adh5 pathway together with a fatty acyl-CoA reductase from Marinobacter aquaeolei to enable fatty alcohol production simultaneously from FFA and acyl-CoA, respectively. Then, we expressed FAA1 under the control of different promoters in order to balance FFA and acyl-CoA interconversion rates and to achieve optimal levels for conversion to fatty alcohols. Expressing FAA1 under control of the HXT1 promoter led to an increased accumulation of fatty alcohols per OD600 up to 41% while FFA levels were decreased by 63% compared with the control strain. Fine-tuning and dynamic regulation of key metabolic steps can be used to improve cell factories when the rates of downstream reactions are limiting. This avoids loss of

  19. Chlorogenic acid from honeysuckle improves hepatic lipid dysregulation and modulates hepatic fatty acid composition in rats with chronic endotoxin infusion

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid as a natural hydroxycinnamic acid has protective effect for liver. Endotoxin induced metabolic disorder, such as lipid dysregulation and hyperlipidemia. In this study, we investigated the effect of chlorogenic acid in rats with chronic endotoxin infusion. The Sprague-Dawley rats with lipid metabolic disorder (LD group) were intraperitoneally injected endotoxin. And the rats of chlorogenic acid-LD group were daily received chlorogenic acid by intragastric administration. In ch...

  20. Effects of chronic alcohol consumption, withdrawal and nerve growth factor on neuropeptide Y expression and cholinergic innervation of the rat dentate hilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Pedro A; Rocha, João P; Cardoso, Armando; Vilela, Manuel; Sousa, Sérgio; Madeira, M Dulce

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the vulnerability of the hippocampal formation (HF) to chronic alcohol consumption and withdrawal. Among the brain systems that appear to be particularly vulnerable to the effects of these conditions are the neuropeptide Y (NPY)-ergic and the cholinergic systems. Because these two systems seem to closely interact in the HF, we sought to study the effects of chronic alcohol consumption (6months) and subsequent withdrawal (2months) on the expression of NPY and on the cholinergic innervation of the rat dentate hilus. As such, we have estimated the areal density and the somatic volume of NPY-immunoreactive neurons, and the density of the cholinergic varicosities. In addition, because alcohol consumption and withdrawal are associated with impaired nerve growth factor (NGF) trophic support and the administration of exogenous NGF alters the effects of those conditions on various cholinergic markers, we have also estimated the same morphological parameters in withdrawn rats infused intracerebroventricularly with NGF. NPY expression increased after withdrawal and returned to control values after NGF treatment. Conversely, the somatic volume of these neurons did not differ among all groups. On other hand, the expression of vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) was reduced by 24% in ethanol-treated rats and by 46% in withdrawn rats. The administration of NGF to withdrawn rats increased the VAChT expression to values above control levels. These results show that the effects of prolonged alcohol intake and protracted withdrawal on the hilar NPY expression differ from those induced by shorter exposures to ethanol and by abrupt withdrawal. They also suggest that the normalizing effect of NGF on NPY expression might rely on the NGF-induced improvement of cholinergic neurotransmission in the dentate hilus.

  1. Novel aspects of cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Sandra; Diener, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic receptors are not only expressed by excitable tissues, but have been identified in various epithelia. One aim of this study was to investigate the expression of nicotinic receptors and their involvement in the regulation of ion transport across colonic epithelium. Ussing chamber experiments with putative nicotinic agonists and antagonists were performed at rat colon combined with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detection of nicotinic receptor subunits within the epithelium. Dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) and nicotine induced a tetrodotoxin-resistant anion secretion leading to an increase in short-circuit current (Isc) across colonic mucosa. The response was suppressed by the nicotinic receptor antagonist hexamethonium. RT-PCR experiments revealed the expression of α2, α4, α5, α6, α7, α10, and β4 nicotinic receptor subunits in colonic epithelium. Choline, the product of acetylcholine hydrolysis, is known for its affinity to several nicotinic receptor subtypes. As a strong acetylcholinesterase activity was found in colonic epithelium, the effect of choline on Isc was examined. Choline induced a concentration-dependent, tetrodotoxin-resistant chloride secretion which was, however, resistant against hexamethonium, but was inhibited by atropine. Experiments with inhibitors of muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors revealed that choline-evoked secretion was mainly due to a stimulation of epithelial M3 receptors. Although choline proved to be only a partial agonist, it concentration-dependently desensitized the response to acetylcholine, suggesting that it might act as a modulator of cholinergically induced anion secretion. Thus the cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport – up to now solely explained by cholinergic submucosal neurons stimulating epithelial muscarinic receptors – is more complex than previously assumed. PMID:26236483

  2. Increased glycine-amidated hyocholic acid correlates to improved early weight loss after sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindel, Tammy L; Krause, Crystal; Helm, Melissa C; McBride, Corrigan L; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Thakare, Rhishikesh; Alamoudi, Jawaher; Kothari, Vishal; Alnouti, Yazen; Kohli, Rohit

    2017-08-04

    Bile acids (BAs) are post-prandial hormones that play an important role in glucose and lipid homeostasis as well as energy expenditure. Total and glycine-amidated BAs increase after sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and correlate to improved metabolic disease. No specific bile acid subtype has been shown conclusively to mediate the weight loss effect. Therefore, the objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the comprehensive changes in meal-stimulated BAs after SG and determine if a specific change in the BA profile correlates to the early weight loss response. Patients were prospectively enrolled at the University of Nebraska Medical Center who were undergoing a SG for treatment of morbid obesity. Primary and secondary plasma bile acids and their amidated (glycine, G-, or taurine, T-) subtypes were measured at fasting, 30 and 60 min after a liquid meal performed pre-op, and at 6 and 12 weeks post-op. Area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for the hour meal test for each bile acid subtype. BAs that were significantly increased post-op were correlated to body mass index (BMI) loss. Total BA AUC was significantly increased at 6 (p loss (p = 0.03). Increased G-hyocholic acid was significantly correlated to increased weight loss at both 6 (p = 0.05) and 12 weeks (p = 0.006). SG induced an early and persistent post-prandial surge in multiple bile acid subtypes. Increased G-hyocholic consistently correlated with greater early BMI loss. This study provides evidence for a role of BAs in the surgical weight loss response after SG.

  3. Cholinergic Interneurons Underlie Spontaneous Dopamine Release in Nucleus Accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorgason, Jordan T; Zeppenfeld, Douglas M; Williams, John T

    2017-02-22

    The release of dopamine from terminals in the NAc is regulated by a number of factors, including voltage-gated ion channels, D2-autoreceptors, and nAChRs. Cholinergic interneurons (CINs) drive dopamine release through activation of nAChRs on dopamine terminals. Using cyclic voltammetry in mouse brain slices, nAChR-dependent spontaneous dopamine transients and the mechanisms underlying the origin were examined in the NAc. Spontaneous events were infrequent (0.3 per minute), but the rate and amplitude were increased after blocking Kv channels with 4-aminopyridine. Although the firing frequency of CINs was increased by blocking glutamate reuptake with TBOA and the Sk blocker apamin, only 4-aminopyridine increased the frequency of dopamine transients. In contrast, inhibition of CIN firing with the μ/δ selective opioid [Met(5)]enkephalin (1 μm) decreased spontaneous dopamine transients. Cocaine increased the rate and amplitude of dopamine transients, suggesting that the activity of the dopamine transporter limits the detection of these events. In the presence of cocaine, the rate of spontaneous dopamine transients was further increased after blocking D2-autoreceptors. Blockade of muscarinic receptors had no effect on evoked dopamine release, suggesting that feedback inhibition of acetylcholine release was not involved. Thus, although spontaneous dopamine transients are reliant on nAChRs, the frequency was not strictly governed by the activity of CINs. The increase in frequency of spontaneous dopamine transients induced by cocaine was not due to an increase in cholinergic tone and is likely a product of an increase in detection resulting from decreased dopamine reuptake.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The actions of dopamine in the NAc are thought to be responsible for endogenous reward and the reinforcing properties of drugs of abuse, such as psychostimulants. The present work examines the mechanisms underlying nAChR-induced spontaneous dopamine release. This study

  4. Mechanisms mediating cholinergic antral circular smooth muscle contraction in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzos, Helena F; Tandon, Tarun; Ouyang, Ann

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the pathway (s) mediating rat antral circular smooth muscle contractile responses to the cholinomimetic agent, bethanechol and the subtypes of muscarinic receptors mediating the cholinergic contraction. METHODS: Circular smooth muscle strips from the antrum of Sprague-Dawley rats were mounted in muscle baths in Krebs buffer. Isometric tension was recorded. Cumulative concentration-response curves were obtained for (+)-cis-dioxolane (cD), a nonspecific muscarinic agonist, at 10-8-10-4 mol/L, in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10-7 mol/L). Results were normalized to cross sectional area. A repeat concentration-response curve was obtained after incubation of the muscle for 90 min with antagonists for M1 (pirenzepine), M2 (methoctramine) and M3 (darifenacin) muscarinic receptor subtypes. The sensitivity to PTX was tested by the ip injection of 100 mg/kg of PTX 5 d before the experiment. The antral circular smooth muscles were removed from PTX-treated and non-treated rats as strips and dispersed smooth muscle cells to identify whether PTX-linked pathway mediated the contractility to bethanechol. RESULTS: A dose-dependent contractile response observed with bethanechol, was not affected by TTX. The pretreatment of rats with pertussis toxin decreased the contraction induced by bethanechol. Lack of calcium as well as the presence of the L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, also inhibited the cholinergic contraction, with a reduction in response from 2.5 ± 0.4 g/mm2 to 1.2 ± 0.4 g/mm2 (P methocramine (M2) > pirenzepine (M1). CONCLUSION: The muscarinic receptors-dependent contraction of rat antral circular smooth muscles was linked to the signal transduction pathway(s) involving pertussis-toxin sensitive GTP-binding proteins and to extracellular calcium via L-type voltage gated calcium channels. The presence of the residual contractile response after the treatment with nifedipine, suggests that an additional pathway could mediate the

  5. Central cholinergic control of vasopressin release in conscious rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iitake, K.; Share, L.; Ouchi, Y.; Crofton, J.T.; Brooks, D.P.

    1986-08-01

    Intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of carbachol into conscious rats evoked a substantial increase in vasopressin secretion and blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were blocked by pretreatment with the muscarinic blocker, atropine (10 g icv), but not by the nicotinic blocker, hexamethonium (10 g icv). Hexamethonium did, however, block the increase in blood pressure, the decrease in heart rate, and they very small elevation in the plasma vasopressin concentration induced by nicotine (10 g icv). These results indicate that stimulation of either central nicotinic or muscarinic receptors can affect the cardiovascular system and suggest that the cholinergic stimulation of vasopressin secretion may involve primarily muscarinic receptors in the conscious rat.

  6. Mechanisms mediating cholinergic antral circular smooth muscle contraction in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helena F Wrzos; Tarun Tandon; Ann Ouyang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the pathway (s) mediating rat antral circular smooth muscle contractile responses to the cholinomimetic agent, bethanechol and the subtypes of muscarinic receptors mediating the cholinergic contraction.METHODS: Circular smooth muscle strips from the antrum of Sprague-Dawley rats were mounted in muscle baths in Krebs buffer. Isometric tension was recorded. Cumulative concentration-response curves were obtained for (+)-cisdioxolane (cD), a nonspecific muscarinic agonist, at 10-8-10-4 mol/L, in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10-7 mol/L).Results were normalized to cross sectional area. A repeat concentration-response curve was obtained after incubation of the muscle for 90 min with antagonists for M1 (pirenzepine),M2 (methoctramine) and M3 (darifenacin) muscarinic receptor subtypes. The sensitivity to PTX was tested by the ip injection of 100 mg/kg of PTX 5 d before the experiment. The antral circular smooth muscles were removed from PTX-treated and non-treated rats as strips and dispersed smooth muscle cells to identify whether PTX-linked pathway mediated the contractility to bethanechol.RESULTS: A dose-dependent contractile response observed with bethanechol, was not affected by TTX. The pretreatment of rats with pertussis toxin decreased the contraction induced by bethanechol. Lack of calcium as Well as the presence of the L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, also inhibited the cholinergic contraction, with a reduction in response from 2.5±0.4 g/mm2 to 1.2±0.4 g/mm2 (P<0.05). The doseresponse curves were shifted to the right by muscarinic antagonists in the following order of affinity: darifenacin(M3)>methocramine (M2)>pirenzepine (M1).CONCLUSION: The muscarinic receptors-dependent contraction of rat antral circular smooth muscles was linked to the signal transduction pathway(s) involving pertussis-toxin sensitive GTP-binding proteins and to extracellular calcium via L-type voltage gated calcium channels. The presence of the

  7. Cholinergic neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus regulate mouse brown adipose tissue metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hoon Jeong

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: DMH cholinergic neurons directly send efferent signals to sympathetic premotor neurons in the Rpa. Elevated cholinergic input to this area reduces BAT activity through activation of M2 mAChRs on serotonergic neurons. Therefore, the direct DMHACh–Rpa5-HT pathway may mediate physiological heat-defense responses to elevated environmental temperature.

  8. Ultrastructural localization of cholinergic muscarinic receptors in rat brain cortical capillaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, PGM; deJong, GI; VanderZee, EA; vanDijken, H; Dijken, H. van

    1996-01-01

    Cholinergic innervation of the cerebrovasculature is known to regulate vascular tone, perfusion rate and permeability of the microvascular wall. Notably the cholinergic innervation of cerebral capillaries is of interest since these capillaries form the blood-brain barrier. Although there is a genera

  9. Caffeic acid attenuates oxidative stress, learning and memory deficit in intra-cerebroventricular streptozotocin induced experimental dementia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Rahul; Kaundal, Madhu; Bansal, Vikas; Samardeep

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in cognitive decline as seen during normal aging and in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Caffeic acid, a polyphenolic compound, has been reported to possess potent antioxidant and neuroprotective properties. The role of caffeic acid in experimental dementia is not fully understood. Thus the present study was designed to investigate the therapeutic potential of caffeic acid in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced experimental dementia of Alzheimer's type in rats. Streptozotocin (STZ) was administered intracerebroventrically (ICV) on day 1 and 3 (3mg/kg, ICV bilaterally) in Wistar rats. Caffeic acid was administered (10, 20 and 40mg/kg/day p.o.) 1h following STZ infusion upto 21st day. Morris water maze and object recognition task were used to assess learning and memory in rats. Terminally, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and the levels of oxido-nitrosative stress markers were determined in cortical and hippocampal brain regions of rats. STZ produced significant (plearning and memory impairment, oxido-nitrosative stress and cholinergic deficit in rats. Whereas, caffeic acid treatment significantly (p<0.001) and dose dependently attenuated STZ induced behavioral and biochemical abnormalities in rats. The observed cognitive improvement following caffeic acid in STZ treated rats may be due to its antioxidant activity and restoration of cholinergic functions. Our results suggest the therapeutic potential of caffeic acid in cognitive disorders such as AD.

  10. Collagen tissue treated with chitosan solutions in carbonic acid for improved biological prosthetic heart valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallyamov, Marat O., E-mail: glm@spm.phys.msu.ru [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie gory 1–2, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Chaschin, Ivan S. [Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Khokhlova, Marina A. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie gory 1–2, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Grigorev, Timofey E. [Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Bakuleva, Natalia P.; Lyutova, Irina G.; Kondratenko, Janna E. [Bakulev Scientific Center for Cardiovascular Surgery of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Roublyevskoe Sh. 135, Moscow 121552 (Russian Federation); Badun, Gennadii A.; Chernysheva, Maria G. [Radiochemistry Division, Faculty of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie gory 1–2, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Khokhlov, Alexei R. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie gory 1–2, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-01

    Calcification of bovine pericardium dramatically shortens typical lifetimes of biological prosthetic heart valves and thus precludes their choice for younger patients. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate that the calcification is to be mitigated by means of treatment of bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid, i.e. water saturated with carbon dioxide at high pressure. This acidic aqueous fluid unusually combines antimicrobial properties with absolute biocompatibility as far as at normal pressure it decomposes spontaneously and completely into H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}. Yet, at high pressures it can protonate and dissolve chitosan materials with different degrees of acetylation (in the range of 16–33%, at least) without any further pretreatment. Even exposure of the bovine pericardium in pure carbonic acid solution without chitosan already favours certain reduction in calcification, somewhat improved mechanical properties, complete biocompatibility and evident antimicrobial activity of the treated collagen tissue. The reason may be due to high extraction ability of this peculiar compressed fluidic mixture. Moreover, exposure of the bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid introduces even better mechanical properties and highly pronounced antimicrobial activity of the modified collagen tissue against adherence and biofilm formation of relevant Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains. Yet, the most important achievement is the detected dramatic reduction in calcification for such modified collagen tissues in spite of the fact that the amount of the thus introduced chitosan is rather small (typically ca. 1 wt.%), which has been reliably detected using original tritium labelling method. We believe that these improved properties are achieved due to particularly deep and uniform impregnation of the collagen matrix with chitosan from its pressurised solutions in carbonic acid. - Highlights: • Treatment of GA

  11. Electroacupuncture-Induced Cholinergic Nerve Activation Enhances the Hypoglycemic Effect of Exogenous Insulin in a Rat Model of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore the mechanisms by which electroacupuncture (EA enhances the hypoglycemic effect of exogenous insulin in a streptozotocin- (STZ- diabetic rats. Animals in the EA group were anesthetized and subjected to the insulin challenge test (ICT and EA for 60 minutes. In the control group, rats were subjected to the same treatment with the exception of EA stimulation. Blood samples were drawn to measure changes in plasma glucose, free fatty acids (FFA, and insulin levels. Western blot was used to assay proteins involved in insulin signaling. Furthermore, atropine, hemicholinium-3 (HC-3, and Eserine were used to explore the relationship between EA and cholinergic nerve activation during ICT. EA augmented the blood glucose-lowering effects of EA by activating the cholinergic nerves in STZ rats that had been exposed to exogenous insulin. This phenomenon may be related to enhancement of insulin signaling rather than to changes in FFA concentration.

  12. Improvement of β-TCP/PLLA biodegradable material by surface modification with stearic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fengcang; Chen, Sai; Liu, Ping; Geng, Fang; Li, Wei; Liu, Xinkuan; He, Daihua; Pan, Deng

    2016-05-01

    Poly-L-lactide (PLLA) is a biodegradable polymer and used widely. Incorporation of beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) into PLLA can enhance its osteoinductive properties. But the interfacial layer between β-TCP particles with PLLA matrix is easy to be destroyed due to inferior interfacial compatibility of the organic/inorganic material. In this work, a method of β-TCP surface modification with stearic acid was investigated to improve the β-TCP/PLLA biomaterial. The effects of surface modification on the β-TCP were investigated by FTIR, XPS, TGA and CA. It was found that the stearic acid reacted with β-TCP and oxhydryl was formed during the surface modification. Hydrophilicity of untreated or modified β-TCP/PLLA composite was increased by the addition of 10 wt.% β-TCP, but it decreased as the addition amount increased from 10 wt.% to 20 wt.%. Two models were suggested to describe the effect of β-TCP concentration on CA of the composites. Mechanical properties of β-TCP/PLLA composites were tested by bending and tensile tests. Fractures of the composites after mechanical test were observed by SEM. It was found that surface modification with stearic acid improved bending and tensile strengths of the β-TCP/PLLA composites obviously. The SEM results indicated that surface modification decreased the probability of interface debonding between fillers and matrix under load.

  13. Improvement in skin wrinkles using a preparation containing human growth factors and hyaluronic acid serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Do Hyun; Oh, In Young; Koo, Kyo Tan; Suk, Jang Mi; Jung, Sang Wook; Park, Jin Oh; Kim, Beom Joon; Choi, Yoo Mi

    2015-02-01

    Skin aging is accompanied by wrinkle formation. At some sites, such as the periorbital skin, this is a relatively early phenomenon. We evaluated the anti-wrinkle effect of a preparation containing human growth factor and hyaluronic acid serum on periorbital wrinkles (crow's feet). In total, 23 Korean women (age range: 39-59 years), who were not pregnant, nursing, or undergoing any concurrent therapy, were enrolled in this study. All the patients completed an 8-week trial of twice-daily application of human growth factor and hyaluronic acid serum on the entire face. Efficacy was based on a global photodamage score, photographs, and image analysis using replicas and visiometer analysis every 4 weeks. The standard wrinkle and roughness parameters used in assessing skin by visiometer were calculated and statistically analyzed. Periorbital wrinkles were significantly improved after treatment, with improvements noted both by physician's assessment and visiometer analysis. Topical application of human growth factor and hyaluronic acid was beneficial in reducing periorbital wrinkles.

  14. Improved pinocembrin production in Escherichia coli by engineering fatty acid synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Weijia; Ma, Weichao; Zhang, Bowen; Wang, Xin; Chen, Kequan; Li, Yan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2016-04-01

    The development of efficient microbial processes for pinocembrin production has attracted considerable attention. However, pinocembrin biosynthetic efficiency is greatly limited by the low availability of the malonyl-CoA cofactor in Escherichia coli. Fatty acid biosynthesis is the only metabolic process in E. coli that consumes malonyl-CoA; therefore, we overexpressed the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway enzymes β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III (FabH) and β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II (FabF) alone and in combination, and investigated the effect on malonyl-CoA. Interestingly, overexpressing FabH, FabF or both enzymes in E. coli BL21 (DE3) decreased fatty acid synthesis and increased cellular malonyl-CoA levels 1.4-, 1.6-, and 1.2-fold, respectively. Furthermore, pinocembrin production was increased 10.6-, 31.8-, and 5.87-fold in recombinant strains overexpressing FabH, FabF and both enzymes, respectively. Overexpression of FabF, therefore, triggered the highest pinocembrin production and malonyl-CoA levels. The addition of cerulenin further increased pinocembrin production in the FabF-overexpressing strain, from 25.8 to 29.9 mg/L. These results demonstrated that overexpressing fatty acid synthases can increase malonyl-CoA availability and improve pinocembrin production in a recombinant E. coli host. This strategy may hold promise for the production of other important natural products in which cellular malonyl-CoA is rate limiting.

  15. Durability improvement assessment in different high strength bacterial structural concrete grades against different types of acids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramin Andalib; M Zaimi Abd Majid; A Keyvanfar; Amirreza Talaiekhozan; Mohd Warid Hussin; A Shafaghat; Rosli Mohd Zin; Chew Tin Lee; Mohammad Ali Fulazzaky; Hasrul Haidar Ismail

    2014-12-01

    This paper provides an insight into a new biotechnological method based on calcite precipitation for achieving high strength bio-concrete durability. It is very clear that mineral precipitation has the potential to enhance construction material resistance towards degradation procedures. The appropriate microbial cell concentration (30 * 105 cells/ml) was introduced onto different structural concrete grades (40, 45 and 50 MPa) by mixing water. In order to study the durability of structural concrete against aggressive agents, specimens were immersed in different types of acids solution (5% H2SO4 and HCl) to compare their effects on 60th, 90th and 120th day. In general, sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid are known to be the most aggressive natural threats from industrial waters which can penetrate concrete to transfer the soluble calcium salts away from the cement matrix. The experimental results demonstrated that bio-concrete has less weight and strength losses when compared to the ordinary Portland cement concrete without microorganism. It was also found that maximum compressive strength and weight loss occurred during H2SO4 acid immersion as compared to HCl immersion. The density and uniformity of bio-concrete were examined using ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) test. Microstructure chemical analysis was also quantified by energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) to justify the durability improvement in bacterial concrete. It was observed that less sulphur and chloride were noticed in bacterial concrete against H2SO4 and HCl, respectively in comparison to the ordinary Portland cement concrete due to calcite deposition.

  16. Improvement of Physicochemical Characteristics of Monoepoxide Linoleic Acid Ring Opening for Biolubricant Base Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumat Salimon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For environmental reasons, a new class of environmentally acceptable and renewable biolubricant based on vegetable oils is available. In this study, oxirane ring opening reaction of monoepoxide linoleic acid (MEOA was done by nucleophilic addition of oleic acid (OA with using p-toluene sulfonic acid (PTSA as a catalyst for synthesis of 9(12-hydroxy-10(13-oleoxy-12(9-octadecanoic acid (HYOOA and the physicochemical properties of the resulted HYOOA are reported to be used as biolubricant base oils. Optimum conditions of the experiment using D-optimal design to obtain high yield% of HYOOA and lowest OOC% were predicted at OA/MEOA ratio of 0.30 : 1 (w/w, PTSA/MEOA ratio of 0.50 : 1 (w/w, reaction temperature at 110∘C, and reaction time at 4.5 h. The results showed that an increase in the chain length of the midchain ester resulted in the decrease of pour point (PP −51∘C, increase of viscosity index (VI up to 153, and improvement in oxidative stability (OT to 180.94∘C.

  17. Improvement of physicochemical characteristics of monoepoxide linoleic acid ring opening for biolubricant base oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimon, Jumat; Salih, Nadia; Abdullah, Bashar Mudhaffar

    2011-01-01

    For environmental reasons, a new class of environmentally acceptable and renewable biolubricant based on vegetable oils is available. In this study, oxirane ring opening reaction of monoepoxide linoleic acid (MEOA) was done by nucleophilic addition of oleic acid (OA) with using p-toluene sulfonic acid (PTSA) as a catalyst for synthesis of 9(12)-hydroxy-10(13)-oleoxy-12(9)-octadecanoic acid (HYOOA) and the physicochemical properties of the resulted HYOOA are reported to be used as biolubricant base oils. Optimum conditions of the experiment using D-optimal design to obtain high yield% of HYOOA and lowest OOC% were predicted at OA/MEOA ratio of 0.30 : 1 (w/w), PTSA/MEOA ratio of 0.50 : 1 (w/w), reaction temperature at 110°C, and reaction time at 4.5 h. The results showed that an increase in the chain length of the midchain ester resulted in the decrease of pour point (PP) -51°C, increase of viscosity index (VI) up to 153, and improvement in oxidative stability (OT) to 180.94°C.

  18. Acid etching and plasma sterilization fail to improve osseointegration of grit blasted titanium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksø, Mikkel; Jakobsen, Stig S; Saksø, Henrik; Baas, Jørgen; Jakobsen, Thomas; Søballe, Kjeld

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between implant surface and surrounding bone influences implant fixation. We attempted to improve the bone-implant interaction by 1) adding surface micro scale topography by acid etching, and 2) removing surface-adherent pro-inflammatory agents by plasma cleaning. Implant fixation was evaluated by implant osseointegration and biomechanical fixation.The study consisted of two paired animal sub-studies where 10 skeletally mature Labrador dogs were used. Grit blasted titanium alloy implants were inserted press fit in each proximal tibia. In the first study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants. In the second study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants that were further treated with plasma sterilization. Implant performance was evaluated by histomorphometrical investigation (tissue-to-implant contact, peri-implant tissue density) and mechanical push-out testing after four weeks observation time.Neither acid etching nor plasma sterilization of the grit blasted implants enhanced osseointegration or mechanical fixation in this press-fit canine implant model in a statistically significant manner.

  19. Enhance nisin yield via improving acid-tolerant capability of Lactococcus lactis F44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Caiyin, Qinggele; Feng, Wenjing; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Bin; Zhao, Guangrong; Qiao, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, nisin was produced industrially by using Lactococcus lactis in the neutral fermentation process. However, nisin showed higher activity in the acidic environment. How to balance the pH value for bacterial normal growth and nisin activity might be the key problem. In this study, 17 acid-tolerant genes and 6 lactic acid synthetic genes were introduced in L. lactis F44, respectively. Comparing to the 2810 IU/mL nisin yield of the original strain F44, the nisin titer of the engineered strains over-expressing hdeAB, ldh and murG, increased to 3850, 3979 and 4377 IU/mL, respectively. These engineered strains showed more stable intracellular pH value during the fermentation process. Improvement of lactate production could partly provide the extra energy for the expression of acid tolerance genes during growth. Co-overexpression of hdeAB, murG, and ldh(Z) in strain F44 resulted in the nisin titer of 4913 IU/mL. The engineered strain (ABGL) could grow on plates with pH 4.2, comparing to the surviving pH 4.6 of strain F44. The fed-batch fermentation showed nisin titer of the co-expression L. lactis strain could reach 5563 IU/mL with lower pH condition and longer cultivation time. This work provides a novel strategy of constructing robust strains for use in industry process. PMID:27306587

  20. Folic acid and polyunsaturated fatty acids improve cognitive function and prevent depression, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease--but how and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Undurti N

    2008-01-01

    Low blood folate and raised homocysteine concentrations are associated with poor cognitive function. Folic acid supplementation improves cognitive function. Folic acid enhances the plasma concentrations of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). EPA, DHA, and arachidonic acid (AA) are of benefit in dementia and Alzheimer's disease by up-regulating gene expression concerned with neurogenesis, neurotransmission and connectivity, improving endothelial nitric oxide (eNO) generation, enhancing brain acetylcholine levels, and suppressing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. EPA, DHA, and AA also form precursors to anti-inflammatory compounds such as lipoxins, resolvins, and neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1) that protect neurons from the cytotoxic action of various noxious stimuli. Furthermore, various neurotrophins and statins enhance the formation of NPD1 and thus, protect neurons from oxidative stress and prevent neuronal apoptosis Folic acid improves eNO generation, enhances plasma levels of EPA/DHA and thus, could augment the formation of NPD1. These results suggest that a combination of EPA, DHA, AA and folic acid could be of significant benefit in dementia, depression, and Alzheimer's disease and improve cognitive function.

  1. A cellular and regulatory map of the cholinergic nervous system of C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Laura; Kratsios, Paschalis; Serrano-Saiz, Esther; Sheftel, Hila; Mayo, Avi E; Hall, David H; White, John G; LeBoeuf, Brigitte; Garcia, L Rene; Alon, Uri; Hobert, Oliver

    2015-12-25

    Nervous system maps are of critical importance for understanding how nervous systems develop and function. We systematically map here all cholinergic neuron types in the male and hermaphrodite C. elegans nervous system. We find that acetylcholine (ACh) is the most broadly used neurotransmitter and we analyze its usage relative to other neurotransmitters within the context of the entire connectome and within specific network motifs embedded in the connectome. We reveal several dynamic aspects of cholinergic neurotransmitter identity, including a sexually dimorphic glutamatergic to cholinergic neurotransmitter switch in a sex-shared interneuron. An expression pattern analysis of ACh-gated anion channels furthermore suggests that ACh may also operate very broadly as an inhibitory neurotransmitter. As a first application of this comprehensive neurotransmitter map, we identify transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that control cholinergic neurotransmitter identity and cholinergic circuit assembly.

  2. Reciprocal cholinergic and GABAergic modulation of the small ventrolateral pacemaker neurons of Drosophila's circadian clock neuron network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelito, Katherine R; Shafer, Orie T

    2012-04-01

    The relatively simple clock neuron network of Drosophila is a valuable model system for the neuronal basis of circadian timekeeping. Unfortunately, many key neuronal classes of this network are inaccessible to electrophysiological analysis. We have therefore adopted the use of genetically encoded sensors to address the physiology of the fly's circadian clock network. Using genetically encoded Ca(2+) and cAMP sensors, we have investigated the physiological responses of two specific classes of clock neuron, the large and small ventrolateral neurons (l- and s-LN(v)s), to two neurotransmitters implicated in their modulation: acetylcholine (ACh) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Live imaging of l-LN(v) cAMP and Ca(2+) dynamics in response to cholinergic agonist and GABA application were well aligned with published electrophysiological data, indicating that our sensors were capable of faithfully reporting acute physiological responses to these transmitters within single adult clock neuron soma. We extended these live imaging methods to s-LN(v)s, critical neuronal pacemakers whose physiological properties in the adult brain are largely unknown. Our s-LN(v) experiments revealed the predicted excitatory responses to bath-applied cholinergic agonists and the predicted inhibitory effects of GABA and established that the antagonism of ACh and GABA extends to their effects on cAMP signaling. These data support recently published but physiologically untested models of s-LN(v) modulation and lead to the prediction that cholinergic and GABAergic inputs to s-LN(v)s will have opposing effects on the phase and/or period of the molecular clock within these critical pacemaker neurons.

  3. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway delays TLR-induced skin allograft rejection in mice: cholinergic pathway modulates alloreactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Sadis

    Full Text Available Activation of innate immunity through Toll-like receptors (TLR can abrogate transplantation tolerance by revealing hidden T cell alloreactivity. Separately, the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway has the capacity to dampen macrophage activation and cytokine release during endotoxemia and ischemia reperfusion injury. However, the relevance of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR-dependent anti-inflammatory pathway in the process of allograft rejection or maintenance of tolerance remains unknown. The aim of our study is to investigate whether the cholinergic pathway could impact T cell alloreactivity and transplant outcome in mice. For this purpose, we performed minor-mismatched skin allografts using donor/recipient combinations genetically deficient for the α7nAChR. Minor-mismatched skin grafts were not rejected unless the mice were housed in an environment with endogenous pathogen exposure or the graft was treated with direct application of imiquimod (a TLR7 ligand. The α7nAChR-deficient recipient mice showed accelerated rejection compared to wild type recipient mice under these conditions of TLR activation. The accelerated rejection was associated with enhanced IL-17 and IFN-γ production by alloreactive T cells. An α7nAChR-deficiency in the donor tissue facilitated allograft rejection but not in recipient mice. In addition, adoptive T cell transfer experiments in skin-grafted lymphopenic animals revealed a direct regulatory role for the α7nAChR on T cells. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the cholinergic pathway regulates alloreactivity and transplantation tolerance at multiple levels. One implication suggested by our work is that, in an organ transplant setting, deliberate α7nAChR stimulation of brain dead donors might be a valuable approach for preventing donor tissue inflammation prior to transplant.

  4. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway delays TLR-induced skin allograft rejection in mice: cholinergic pathway modulates alloreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadis, Claude; Detienne, Sophie; Vokaer, Benoît; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Lemaître, Philippe; Spilleboudt, Chloé; Delbauve, Sandrine; Kubjak, Carole; Flamand, Véronique; Field, Kenneth A; Goldman, Michel; Benghiat, Fleur S; Le Moine, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Activation of innate immunity through Toll-like receptors (TLR) can abrogate transplantation tolerance by revealing hidden T cell alloreactivity. Separately, the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway has the capacity to dampen macrophage activation and cytokine release during endotoxemia and ischemia reperfusion injury. However, the relevance of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR)-dependent anti-inflammatory pathway in the process of allograft rejection or maintenance of tolerance remains unknown. The aim of our study is to investigate whether the cholinergic pathway could impact T cell alloreactivity and transplant outcome in mice. For this purpose, we performed minor-mismatched skin allografts using donor/recipient combinations genetically deficient for the α7nAChR. Minor-mismatched skin grafts were not rejected unless the mice were housed in an environment with endogenous pathogen exposure or the graft was treated with direct application of imiquimod (a TLR7 ligand). The α7nAChR-deficient recipient mice showed accelerated rejection compared to wild type recipient mice under these conditions of TLR activation. The accelerated rejection was associated with enhanced IL-17 and IFN-γ production by alloreactive T cells. An α7nAChR-deficiency in the donor tissue facilitated allograft rejection but not in recipient mice. In addition, adoptive T cell transfer experiments in skin-grafted lymphopenic animals revealed a direct regulatory role for the α7nAChR on T cells. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the cholinergic pathway regulates alloreactivity and transplantation tolerance at multiple levels. One implication suggested by our work is that, in an organ transplant setting, deliberate α7nAChR stimulation of brain dead donors might be a valuable approach for preventing donor tissue inflammation prior to transplant.

  5. Dynamic regulation of fatty acid pools for improved production of fatty alcohols in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teixeira, Paulo Goncalves; Ferreira, Raphael; Zhou, Yongjin J.

    2017-01-01

    faa4 Delta strain constitutively expressing a carboxylic acid reductase from Mycobacterium marinum (MmCAR) and an endogenous alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh5) for in vivo production of fatty alcohols from FFAs. We observed production of fatty acids and fatty alcohols with different rates leading to high...... loss of precursors that compromises the process yield. In the present study, we aimed for dynamic expression of the fatty acyl-CoA synthetase gene FAA1 to regulate FFA and acyl-CoA pools in order to improve fatty alcohol production yields. Results: We analyzed the metabolite dynamics of a faa1 Delta...... levels of FFAs not being converted to the final product. To address the issue, we expressed the MmCAR + Adh5 pathway together with a fatty acyl-CoA reductase from Marinobacter aquaeolei to enable fatty alcohol production simultaneously from FFA and acyl-CoA, respectively. Then, we expressed FAA1 under...

  6. Improved method for the analysis of the composition of polysaccharides by total acid hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochtar, M.; Delavier, H.J.; Oei Ban Liang

    1985-06-20

    The analysis of the composition of polysaccharides, i.e. dextran, by total acid hydrolysis, in the presence or absence of oxygen, and by different methods of neutralization of the hydrolysate, is presented. It was found that hydrolysis of polysaccharides under nitrogen atmosphere, in the absence of oxygen, diminishes the possibility of a decomposition of monosaccharides formed during hydrolysis. The neutralization of the acid hydrolysate by passing it through a column of weak-base ion exchange resin. Amberlite IRA-94, instead of neutralizing the hydrolysate by Ba(OH)/sub 2/ diminishes the possibility of epimerization of glucose to other saccharides. This improved method gives more reliable results, even in the presence of readily decomposed polysaccharides.

  7. Particle size control of Pd/C for improved electrocatalytic activity in a formic acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Seunghee; Kim, In; Bong, Sungyool; Lee, Jaeyoung; Kim, Hasuck

    2011-08-01

    Carbon-supported Pd electrocatalyst is prepared by an improved aqueous impregnation method applying a reducing agent of HCHO and an acidic sedimentation promoter of HCl. We investigate the effect of a solution pH on the zeta potential of both Pd particles and carbon support. The opposite sign of zeta potential results in uniform dispersion of Pd on carbon surface without aggregation problem. TEM analysis shows that optimal solution pH of 4.27 adjusted by NaOH provides a mean particle diameter of 3.2 nm with narrow size distribution. Cyclic voltammograms indicate that home-made Pd/C catalyst exhibits significantly higher electrochemical active surface area and better stability compared with commercial 40 wt.% Pd/C in a formic acid oxidation.

  8. Linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA improves learning impairment in SAMP8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaguchi, Takahiro; Nagata, Tetsu; Mukasa, Takeshi; Fujikawa, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Iso, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2006-01-23

    In the water-maze test, the linoleic acid derivative, 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), significantly shortened the prolonged latency for accelerated-senescence-prone mice 8 (SAMP8), reaching a level similar to the latency for accelerated-senescence-resistant mice 1 (SAMR1) as control. In the open-field test to assess motor activity, it was confirmed that the DCP-LA effect is not due to increased motor activity. In the passive avoidance test to assess fear memory, DCP-LA had no effect on the latency of acquisition and retention for SAMP8. The results of the present study, thus, suggest that DCP-LA could improve age-related learning impairment by enhancing cognitive functions.

  9. Cholinergic Signaling Exerts Protective Effects in Models of Sympathetic Hyperactivity-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavioli, Mariana; Lara, Aline; Almeida, Pedro W. M.; Lima, Augusto Martins; Damasceno, Denis D.; Rocha-Resende, Cibele; Ladeira, Marina; Resende, Rodrigo R.; Martinelli, Patricia M.; Melo, Marcos Barrouin; Brum, Patricia C.; Fontes, Marco Antonio Peliky; Souza Santos, Robson A.; Prado, Marco A. M.; Guatimosim, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic control of the heart is exerted by two distinct branches; the autonomic component represented by the parasympathetic nervous system, and the recently described non-neuronal cardiomyocyte cholinergic machinery. Previous evidence has shown that reduced cholinergic function leads to deleterious effects on the myocardium. Yet, whether conditions of increased cholinergic signaling can offset the pathological remodeling induced by sympathetic hyperactivity, and its consequences for these two cholinergic axes are unknown. Here, we investigated two models of sympathetic hyperactivity: i) the chronic beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation evoked by isoproterenol (ISO), and ii) the α2A/α2C-adrenergic receptor knockout (KO) mice that lack pre-synaptic adrenergic receptors. In both models, cholinergic signaling was increased by administration of the cholinesterase inhibitor, pyridostigmine. First, we observed that isoproterenol produces an autonomic imbalance characterized by increased sympathetic and reduced parasympathetic tone. Under this condition transcripts for cholinergic proteins were upregulated in ventricular myocytes, indicating that non-neuronal cholinergic machinery is activated during adrenergic overdrive. Pyridostigmine treatment prevented the effects of ISO on autonomic function and on the ventricular cholinergic machinery, and inhibited cardiac remodeling. α2A/α2C-KO mice presented reduced ventricular contraction when compared to wild-type mice, and this dysfunction was also reversed by cholinesterase inhibition. Thus, the cardiac parasympathetic system and non-neuronal cardiomyocyte cholinergic machinery are modulated in opposite directions under conditions of increased sympathetic drive or ACh availability. Moreover, our data support the idea that pyridostigmine by restoring ACh availability is beneficial in heart disease. PMID:24992197

  10. Cholinergic signaling exerts protective effects in models of sympathetic hyperactivity-induced cardiac dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Gavioli

    Full Text Available Cholinergic control of the heart is exerted by two distinct branches; the autonomic component represented by the parasympathetic nervous system, and the recently described non-neuronal cardiomyocyte cholinergic machinery. Previous evidence has shown that reduced cholinergic function leads to deleterious effects on the myocardium. Yet, whether conditions of increased cholinergic signaling can offset the pathological remodeling induced by sympathetic hyperactivity, and its consequences for these two cholinergic axes are unknown. Here, we investigated two models of sympathetic hyperactivity: i the chronic beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation evoked by isoproterenol (ISO, and ii the α2A/α2C-adrenergic receptor knockout (KO mice that lack pre-synaptic adrenergic receptors. In both models, cholinergic signaling was increased by administration of the cholinesterase inhibitor, pyridostigmine. First, we observed that isoproterenol produces an autonomic imbalance characterized by increased sympathetic and reduced parasympathetic tone. Under this condition transcripts for cholinergic proteins were upregulated in ventricular myocytes, indicating that non-neuronal cholinergic machinery is activated during adrenergic overdrive. Pyridostigmine treatment prevented the effects of ISO on autonomic function and on the ventricular cholinergic machinery, and inhibited cardiac remodeling. α2A/α2C-KO mice presented reduced ventricular contraction when compared to wild-type mice, and this dysfunction was also reversed by cholinesterase inhibition. Thus, the cardiac parasympathetic system and non-neuronal cardiomyocyte cholinergic machinery are modulated in opposite directions under conditions of increased sympathetic drive or ACh availability. Moreover, our data support the idea that pyridostigmine by restoring ACh availability is beneficial in heart disease.

  11. Long-term relationships between cholinergic tone, synchronous bursting and synaptic remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Kaufman

    Full Text Available Cholinergic neuromodulation plays key roles in the regulation of neuronal excitability, network activity, arousal, and behavior. On longer time scales, cholinergic systems play essential roles in cortical development, maturation, and plasticity. Presumably, these processes are associated with substantial synaptic remodeling, yet to date, long-term relationships between cholinergic tone and synaptic remodeling remain largely unknown. Here we used automated microscopy combined with multielectrode array recordings to study long-term relationships between cholinergic tone, excitatory synapse remodeling, and network activity characteristics in networks of cortical neurons grown on multielectrode array substrates. Experimental elevations of cholinergic tone led to the abrupt suppression of episodic synchronous bursting activity (but not of general activity, followed by a gradual growth of excitatory synapses over hours. Subsequent blockage of cholinergic receptors led to an immediate restoration of synchronous bursting and the gradual reversal of synaptic growth. Neither synaptic growth nor downsizing was governed by multiplicative scaling rules. Instead, these occurred in a subset of synapses, irrespective of initial synaptic size. Synaptic growth seemed to depend on intrinsic network activity, but not on the degree to which bursting was suppressed. Intriguingly, sustained elevations of cholinergic tone were associated with a gradual recovery of synchronous bursting but not with a reversal of synaptic growth. These findings show that cholinergic tone can strongly affect synaptic remodeling and synchronous bursting activity, but do not support a strict coupling between the two. Finally, the reemergence of synchronous bursting in the presence of elevated cholinergic tone indicates that the capacity of cholinergic neuromodulation to indefinitely suppress synchronous bursting might be inherently limited.

  12. Improvement of electrocatalytic performance of carbon supported Pd anodic catalyst in direct formic acid fuel cell by ethylenediamine-tetramethylene phosphonic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Liang; Li, Huanzhi; Hong, Yujie; Luo, Yafen; Tang, Yawen; Lu, Tianhong

    2012-07-01

    The direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC) has two major shortcomings that limit its lifespan and performance: (i) the poor electrocatalytic stability of the carbon supported Pd (Pd/C) catalyst for the oxidation of formic acid and (ii) rapid decomposition of formic acid over the Pd/C catalyst. To solve the problems, the Pd/C catalyst is modified with ethylenediamine-tetramethylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP). The resulting catalyst is designated as Pd/C-E catalyst. It is found that the Pd/C-E catalyst can inhibit the decomposition of formic acid and promote the oxidation of formic acid through the direct pathway. Consistently, the Pd/C-E catalyst is significantly protected from CO poisoning. As compared to the Pd/C catalyst, the electrocatalytic performance of the Pd/C-E catalyst is significantly superior. These results provide the first proof of the concept that DFAFC can be significantly improved by Pd/C-E catalyst.

  13. Effects of Ce3+ on improvement of spectral characteristics and function of chloroplasts damaged by linolenic acid in spinach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiaoqing; ZE Yuguan; LIU Chao; ZHOU Min; LI Na; DUAN Yanmei; YIN Sitao; HONG Fashui

    2009-01-01

    Linolenic acid has great effects on the structure and function of chloroplast. We studied the effects of Ce3+ on the improvement of chloroplast spectral characteristics and oxygen evolution damaged by linolenic acid in spinach. Results showed that Ce3+ could decrease the light absorption increased by linolenic acid and promote the distribution of excitation energy to PS Ⅱ and alleviate the decrease of PS Ⅱ fluo-rescence yield caused by linolenic acid. The linolenic acid treatments in various concentrations reduced the oxygen-evolving rate of chloro-plasts, but the rate was accelerated since adding Ce3+.

  14. A Reaction-Diffusion Model of Cholinergic Retinal Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdell, Benjamin; Ford, Kevin; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Prior to receiving visual stimuli, spontaneous, correlated activity in the retina, called retinal waves, drives activity-dependent developmental programs. Early-stage waves mediated by acetylcholine (ACh) manifest as slow, spreading bursts of action potentials. They are believed to be initiated by the spontaneous firing of Starburst Amacrine Cells (SACs), whose dense, recurrent connectivity then propagates this activity laterally. Their inter-wave interval and shifting wave boundaries are the result of the slow after-hyperpolarization of the SACs creating an evolving mosaic of recruitable and refractory cells, which can and cannot participate in waves, respectively. Recent evidence suggests that cholinergic waves may be modulated by the extracellular concentration of ACh. Here, we construct a simplified, biophysically consistent, reaction-diffusion model of cholinergic retinal waves capable of recapitulating wave dynamics observed in mice retina recordings. The dense, recurrent connectivity of SACs is modeled through local, excitatory coupling occurring via the volume release and diffusion of ACh. In addition to simulation, we are thus able to use non-linear wave theory to connect wave features to underlying physiological parameters, making the model useful in determining appropriate pharmacological manipulations to experimentally produce waves of a prescribed spatiotemporal character. The model is used to determine how ACh mediated connectivity may modulate wave activity, and how parameters such as the spontaneous activation rate and sAHP refractory period contribute to critical wave size variability. PMID:25474327

  15. Pathway engineering of Propionibacterium jensenii for improved production of propionic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Long; Guan, Ningzi; Zhu, Gexin; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-27

    Propionic acid (PA) is an important chemical building block widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries. In our previous study, a shuttle vector was developed as a useful tool for engineering Propionibacterium jensenii, and two key enzymes-glycerol dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase-were overexpressed to improve PA titer. Here, we aimed to improve PA production further via the pathway engineering of P. jensenii. First, the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene (ppc) from Klebsiella pneumoniae was overexpressed to access the one-step synthesis of oxaloacetate directly from phosphoenolpyruvate without pyruvate as intermediate. Next, genes encoding lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) and pyruvate oxidase (poxB) were deleted to block the synthesis of the by-products lactic acid and acetic acid, respectively. Overexpression of ppc and deleting ldh improved PA titer from 26.95 ± 1.21 g·L(-1) to 33.21 ± 1.92 g·L(-1) and 30.50 ± 1.63 g·L(-1), whereas poxB deletion decreased it. The influence of this pathway engineering on gene transcription, enzyme expression, NADH/NAD(+) ratio, and metabolite concentration was also investigated. Finally, PA production in P. jensenii with ppc overexpression as well as ldh deletion was investigated, which resulted in further increases in PA titer to 34.93 ± 2.99 g·L(-1) in a fed-batch culture.

  16. Eicosapentaenoic acid improves glycemic control in elderly bedridden patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Susumu; Abe, Takaaki; Nako, Kazuhiro; Okamura, Masashi; Senda, Miho; Sakamoto, Takuya; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are ω3-polyunsaturated fatty acids mainly contained in the blue-backed fish oil, and are effective in decreasing the lipids disorder and the cardiovascular incidence among diabetic patients. Moreover, it has been suggested that EPA and DHA may improve the insulin resistance and glucose metabolism. However, the clinical effects of EPA and DHA on glucose metabolism remain unclear. We aimed to clarify the effects of EPA/DHA treatment on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study was a multicenter prospective randomized controlled trial involving 30 elderly type 2 diabetic patients on a liquid diet. Their exercises were almost zero and the content of their meals was strictly managed and understood well. Therefore, the difference by the individual's life was a minimum. The subjects were divided into two groups: those receiving EPA/DHA-rich liquid diet [EPA/DHA (+)] or liquid diet lacking EPA/DHA [EPA/DHA (-)]. Changes in factors related to glucose and lipid metabolism were assessed after the three-month study. Serum concentrations of EPA rose in EPA/DHA (+), although the levels of DHA and fasting C-peptide remained unchanged in EPA/DHA (+). In addition, there was a significant decline in the fasting plasma glucose (FPG), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting remnant-like particles and apolipoprotein (apo) B in EPA/DHA (+), compared with the values in EPA/DHA (-). EPA/DHA-rich diet might improve glucose metabolism in elderly type 2 diabetic patients on a liquid diet. This phenomenon may be due to the improved insulin resistance mediated by the rise in serum EPA concentrations.

  17. Ethephon use and application timing of abscisic acid for improving color of 'Rubi' table grape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Ruffo Roberto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of ethephon and of abscisic acid (ABA application timing on the color of 'Rubi' Table grape. Eight treatments were evaluated: control, without application; ethephon 500 mg L‑1 applied seven days after veraison (7 DAV; and two concentrations of ABA (200 and 400 mg L‑1 arranged with three application timings at 7 DAV, at 15 days before harvest (DBH, and at 7 DAV + 15 DBH. ABA does not modify physical‑chemical characteristics of the cluster and improves the color of grapes, especially when applied twice (7 DAV + 15 DBH at the concentration of 400 mg L‑1.

  18. Phytic acid and myo-inositol support adipocyte differentiation and improve insulin sensitivity in 3T3-L1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Nam; Han, Sung Nim; Kim, Hye-Kyeong

    2014-08-01

    Phytic acid, also known as myo-inositol hexaphosphate, has been shown to lower blood glucose levels and to improve insulin sensitivity in rodents. We investigated the effects of phytic acid and myo-inositol on differentiation, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, and lipolysis of adipocytes to test the hypothesis that the antidiabetic properties of phytic acid and myo-inositol are mediated directly through adipocytes. 3T3-L1 cells were treated with 10, 50, or 200 μmol/L of phytic acid or myo-inositol. Oil Red O staining and an intracellular triacylglycerol assay were used to determine lipid accumulation during adipocyte differentiation. Immunoblotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed to evaluate expression of transcription factors, a target protein, and insulin signaling molecules. Phytic acid and myo-inositol exposures increased lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner (P acid synthase increased upon treatments with phytic acid and myo-inositol (P phytic acid and myo-inositol treatments (P phytic acid and myo-inositol treatments. In fully differentiated adipocytes, phytic acid and myo-inositol reduced basal lipolysis dose dependently (P phytic acid and myo-inositol increase insulin sensitivity in adipocytes by increasing lipid storage capacity, improving glucose uptake, and inhibiting lipolysis.

  19. Improved zeolite regeneration processes for preparing saturated branched-chain fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrierite zeolite solid is an excellent catalyst for the skeletal isomerization of unsaturated linear-chain fatty acids (i.e., oleic acid) to unsaturated branched-chain fatty acids (i.e., iso-oleic acid) follow by hydrogenation to give saturated branched-chain fatty acids (i.e., isostearic acid). ...

  20. Biological Function of Acetic Acid-Improvement in Obesity and Glucose Tolerance by Acetic Acid in Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-07-29

    Fatty acids derived from adipose tissue are oxidized by β-oxidation to form ketone bodies as final products under the starving condition. Previously, we found that free acetic acid was formed concomitantly with the production of ketone bodies in isolated rat liver perfusion, and mitochondrial acetyl CoA hydrolase was appeared to be involved with the acetic acid production. It was revealed that acetic acid was formed as a final product of enhanced β-oxidation of fatty acids and utilized as a fuel in extrahepatic tissues under the starving condition. Under the fed condition, β-oxidation is suppressed and acetic acid production is decreased. When acetic acid was taken daily by obesity-linked type 2 diabetic Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats under the fed condition, it protected OLETF rats against obesity. Furthermore, acetic acid contributed to protect from the accumulation of lipid in the liver as well as abdominal fat in OLETF rats. Transcripts of lipogenic genes in the liver were decreased, while transcripts of myoglobin and Glut4 genes in abdominal muscles were increased in the acetic acid-administered OLETF rats. It is indicated that exogenously administered acetic acid would have effects on lipid metabolism in both the liver and the skeletal muscles, and have function that works against obesity and obesity-linked type 2 diabetes.

  1. Metabolic pathways regulated by abscisic acid, salicylic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid in association with improved drought tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are known to play roles in regulating plant stress responses. This study was conducted to determine metabolites and associated pathways regulated by ABA, SA and GABA that could contribute to drought tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera). Plants were foliar sprayed with ABA (5 μM), GABA (0.5 mM) and SA (10 μM) or water (untreated control) prior to 25 days drought stress in controlled growth chambers. Application of ABA, GABA or SA had similar positive effects on alleviating drought damages, as manifested by the maintenance of lower electrolyte leakage and greater relative water content in leaves of treated plants relative to the untreated control. Metabolic profiling showed that ABA, GABA and SA induced differential metabolic changes under drought stress. ABA mainly promoted the accumulation of organic acids associated with tricarboxylic acid cycle (aconitic acid, succinic acid, lactic acid and malic acid). SA strongly stimulated the accumulation of amino acids (proline, serine, threonine and alanine) and carbohydrates (glucose, mannose, fructose and cellobiose). GABA enhanced the accumulation of amino acids (GABA, glycine, valine, proline, 5-oxoproline, serine, threonine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid) and organic acids (malic acid, lactic acid, gluconic acid, malonic acid and ribonic acid). The enhanced drought tolerance could be mainly due to the enhanced respiration metabolism by ABA, amino acids and carbohydrates involved in osmotic adjustment (OA) and energy metabolism by SA, and amino acid metabolism related to OA and stress-defense secondary metabolism by GABA.

  2. Synthetic Biolubricant Basestocks from Epoxidized Ricinoleic Acid: Improved Low Temperature Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousif, E.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a series of structural modifications of epoxidized ricinoleic acid for biolubricant to improve the cold flow behavior and oxidation stability of vegetable oils through measurement of pour point (PP and oxidation onset temperature (OT and signal maximum temperature (SMT of each synthetic compound. The results showed that butyl 10,12-dihydroxy-9-behenoxystearate with bulky ester behenyl mid-chain exhibited the most favorable low-temperature performance ϑPP=– 47 °C. On the other hand, butyl 10,12-dihydroxy-9-octyloxystearate exhibited higher oxidation stability (ϑOT = 221 °C than the other synthetic esters. It was discovered that increasing chain length of the mid-chain ester had a positive influence on the low temperature properties of synthesized compounds. Improved oxidation stability is achieved when the chain length of the mid-chain ester decreases. The synthesized ester structures were confirmed by NMR and FTIR analysis.

  3. Poly-Acrylic Acid Derivatives as Diesel Flow Improver for Paraffin-Based Daqing Diesel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cuiyu Jiang; Ming Xu; Xiaoli Xi; Panlun Qi; Hongyan Shang

    2006-01-01

    Since the diesel products from paraffin-based Daqing crude oil showed low sensitivity to certain commercial diesel pour point depressant (PPDs) that resulted from the high content of paraffin, certain poly-acrylic acid derivatives (PADE) with-COOR,-COOH,-CONHR, and -COO-NH3+R groups by molecular design on the mechanics of diesel; PPDs were synthesized and evaluated as cold flow improver for Daqing 0# diesel in this paper. The pure PADE was superior to the commercial PPDs and displayed a substantial ability of wax crystals dispersion. There was a synergistic effect among the PADE and T1804 and secondary amine. The synergism clearly improved the low temperature performance of Daqing diesel products and could reduce the cold filter plugging point of 0# diesel by 6-7 ℃.

  4. Phosphoric acid pretreatment of Achyranthes aspera and Sida acuta weed biomass to improve enzymatic hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siripong, Premjet; Duangporn, Premjet; Takata, Eri; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Achyranthes aspera and Sida acuta, two types of weed biomass are abundant and waste in Thailand. We focus on them as novel feedstock for bio-ethanol production because they contain high-cellulose content (45.9% and 46.9%, respectively) and unutilized material. Phosphoric acid (70%, 75%, and 80%) was employed for the pretreatment to improve by enzymatic hydrolysis. The pretreatment process removed most of the xylan and a part of the lignin from the weeds, while most of the glucan remained. The cellulose conversion to glucose was greater for pretreated A. aspera (86.2 ± 0.3%) than that of the pretreated S. acuta (82.2 ± 1.1%). Thus, the removal of hemicellulose significantly affected the efficiency of the enzymatic hydrolysis. The scanning electron microscopy images showed the exposed fibrous cellulose on the cell wall surface, and this substantial change of the surface structure contributed to improving the enzyme accessibility.

  5. The Gatekeepers in the Mouse Ophthalmic Artery: Endothelium-Dependent Mechanisms of Cholinergic Vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manicam, Caroline; Staubitz, Julia; Brochhausen, Christoph; Grus, Franz H; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Gericke, Adrian

    2016-02-02

    Cholinergic regulation of arterial luminal diameter involves intricate network of intercellular communication between the endothelial and smooth muscle cells that is highly dependent on the molecular mediators released by the endothelium. Albeit the well-recognized contribution of nitric oxide (NO) towards vasodilation, the identity of compensatory mechanisms that maintain vasomotor tone when NO synthesis is deranged remain largely unknown in the ophthalmic artery. This is the first study to identify the vasodilatory signalling mechanisms of the ophthalmic artery employing wild type mice. Acetylcholine (ACh)-induced vasodilation was only partially attenuated when NO synthesis was inhibited. Intriguingly, the combined blocking of cytochrome P450 oxygenase (CYP450) and lipoxygenase (LOX), as well as CYP450 and gap junctions, abolished vasodilation; demonstrating that the key compensatory mechanisms comprise arachidonic acid metabolites which, work in concert with gap junctions for downstream signal transmission. Furthermore, the voltage-gated potassium ion channel, Kv1.6, was functionally relevant in mediating vasodilation. Its localization was found exclusively in the smooth muscle. In conclusion, ACh-induced vasodilation of mouse ophthalmic artery is mediated in part by NO and predominantly via arachidonic acid metabolites, with active involvement of gap junctions. Particularly, the Kv1.6 channel represents an attractive therapeutic target in ophthalmopathologies when NO synthesis is compromised.

  6. Effects of cholinergic and noradrenergic agents on locomotion in the mudpuppy (Necturus maculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, M; Stein, R B

    2002-08-01

    Some neurotransmitters act consistently on the central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion in a wide range of vertebrates. In contrast, acetylcholine (ACh) and noradrenaline (NA) have various effects on locomotion in different preparations. The roles of ACh and NA have not been studied in amphibian walking, so we examined their effects in an isolated spinal cord preparation of the mudpuppy ( Necturus maculatus). This preparation contains a CPG that produces locomotor activity when N-methyl- D-aspartic acid (NMDA), an excitatory amino acid agonist, is added to the bath. The addition of carbachol, a long acting ACh agonist, to the bath disrupted the walking rhythm induced by NMDA, while not changing the level of activity in flexor and extensor motoneurons. Adding clonidine, an alpha(2)-noradrenergic agonist, had no effect on the NMDA-induced walking rhythm. Physostigmine, an ACh-esterase inhibitor, disrupted the walking rhythm, presumably by potentiating the effects of endogenously released ACh. Atropine, an ACh antagonist that binds to muscarinic ACh receptors, blocked the effects of carbachol, indicating that the action is mediated, at least in part, by muscarinic receptors. In the absence of carbachol, atropine had no effect. Locomotion was not induced by carbachol, atropine or clonidine in a resting spinal cord preparation. Cholinergic actions do not seem to be essential to the CPG for walking in the mudpuppy, but ACh may convert a rhythmic walking state to a more tonic state with occasional bursts of EMG activity for postural adjustments.

  7. Improving Phosphorus Availability in an Acid Soil Using Organic Amendments Produced from Agroindustrial Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huck Ywih Ch’ng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In acid soils, soluble inorganic phosphorus is fixed by aluminium and iron. To overcome this problem, acid soils are limed to fix aluminium and iron but this practice is not economical. The practice is also not environmentally friendly. This study was conducted to improve phosphorus availability using organic amendments (biochar and compost produced from chicken litter and pineapple leaves, resp. to fix aluminium and iron instead of phosphorus. Amending soil with biochar or compost or a mixture of biochar and compost increased total phosphorus, available phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus fractions (soluble inorganic phosphorus, aluminium bound inorganic phosphorus, iron bound inorganic phosphorus, redundant soluble inorganic phosphorus, and calcium bound phosphorus, and organic phosphorus. This was possible because the organic amendments increased soil pH and reduced exchangeable acidity, exchangeable aluminium, and exchangeable iron. The findings suggest that the organic amendments altered soil chemical properties in a way that enhanced the availability of phosphorus in this study. The amendments effectively fixed aluminium and iron instead of phosphorus, thus rendering phosphorus available by keeping the inorganic phosphorus in a bioavailable labile phosphorus pool for a longer period compared with application of Triple Superphosphate without organic amendments.

  8. SULFATION OF PACHYMAN WITH CHLOROSULFONIC ACID USING THE IMPROVED WOLFROM METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun Chen; Ai-yun Wang; Tian-tong Li; Cheng-fu Li; Qing-cai Jiao

    2006-01-01

    High purity polysaccharide of pachyman was isolated from the powder of Poria cocos sclerotium with an yield of 77.8%. The intrinsic viscosity of polysaccharide was found to be 78.95 mL/g in DMSO solution at 25℃. The isolated polysaccharide was reacted with chlorosulfonic acid to obtain pachyman sulfate using the improved Wolfrom method. The results of the orthogonality experiment on the sulfation reaction identified that the effectiveness of the reaction conditions on the degree of sulfation and the value of intrinsic viscosity is in the following order: molar ratio of chlorosulfonic acid to glucoside (3-5) > reaction temperature (60-80℃) > reaction time (1-2 h). The kinetic studies of the pachyman sulfationindicated that the hydrolysis is accompanied with the sulfation process. The decrease in intrinsic viscosity of the sulfated pachyman is proportional to the increase in the degree of sulfation under the mild reaction conditions of < 80℃,chlorosulfonic acid/glucoside mole ratio < 5, and reaction time < 2 h. Beyond the above reaction conditions, excessive loss of -OH group occurs during hydrolysis. The NMR results indicated a complete sulfation on C-6 and a partial sulfation on the C-2 and C-4 of glucoside.

  9. GLUTAMIC ACID IMPROVES BODY WEIGHT GAIN AND INTESTINAL MORPHOLOGY OF BROILER CHICKENS SUBMITTED TO HEAT STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ML Porto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of 1% dietary glutamic acid on the body weight, intestinal morphometry, and anti-Newcastle antibody titers of broiler chickens submitted to heat stress. One-d-old male broiler chicks (n=120 were distributed according to a 2 x 2 factorial design with two environmental temperatures (thermoneutral or heat stress and two diets (with 0 or 1% glutamic acid. Heat stress temperature was constantly maintained (24h/day 5 ºC higher than the thermoneutral temperature. Diets supplied the nutritional requirements of broilers in the pre-starter (1 to 7d and starter (8 to 21d phases. Birds were vaccinated against Newcastle disease on d 7 via eye drop. On days 5, 10, 15, and 20, individual body weight was determined, serum samples were collected from five birds, and duodenum samples were collected from four birds per treatment. Serum anti-Newcastle antibody titers were determined by enzyme immunoassay and transformed into log10. Villus height, crypt depth, and villus: crypt ratio were measured in the duodenum. Data were analyzed by ANOVA. Chronic heat stress negatively affected body weight and intestinal morphometry during the pre-starter and starter phases, but had no effect on antibody titers. Dietary glutamic acid supplementation (1% improved body weight and intestinal integrity of birds submitted to heat stress when compared with non-supplemented and heat-stressed birds.

  10. Microfluidic Preparation of Polymer-Nucleic Acid Nanocomplexes Improves Nonviral Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigsby, Christopher L.; Ho, Yi-Ping; Lin, Chao; Engbersen, Johan F. J.; Leong, Kam W.

    2013-11-01

    As the designs of polymer systems used to deliver nucleic acids continue to evolve, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the basic bulk manufacturing techniques of the past will be insufficient to produce polymer-nucleic acid nanocomplexes that possess the uniformity, stability, and potency required for their successful clinical translation and widespread commercialization. Traditional bulk-prepared products are often physicochemically heterogeneous and may vary significantly from one batch to the next. Here we show that preparation of bioreducible nanocomplexes with an emulsion-based droplet microfluidic system produces significantly improved nanoparticles that are up to fifty percent smaller, more uniform, and are less prone to aggregation. The intracellular integrity of nanocomplexes prepared with this microfluidic method is significantly prolonged, as detected using a high-throughput flow cytometric quantum dot Förster resonance energy transfer nanosensor system. These physical attributes conspire to consistently enhance the delivery of both plasmid DNA and messenger RNA payloads in stem cells, primary cells, and human cell lines. Innovation in processing is necessary to move the field toward the broader clinical implementation of safe and effective nonviral nucleic acid therapeutics, and preparation with droplet microfluidics represents a step forward in addressing the critical barrier of robust and reproducible nanocomplex production.

  11. Improving phosphorus availability in an acid soil using organic amendments produced from agroindustrial wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Huck Ywih; Ahmed, Osumanu Haruna; Majid, Nik Muhamad Ab

    2014-01-01

    In acid soils, soluble inorganic phosphorus is fixed by aluminium and iron. To overcome this problem, acid soils are limed to fix aluminium and iron but this practice is not economical. The practice is also not environmentally friendly. This study was conducted to improve phosphorus availability using organic amendments (biochar and compost produced from chicken litter and pineapple leaves, resp.) to fix aluminium and iron instead of phosphorus. Amending soil with biochar or compost or a mixture of biochar and compost increased total phosphorus, available phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus fractions (soluble inorganic phosphorus, aluminium bound inorganic phosphorus, iron bound inorganic phosphorus, redundant soluble inorganic phosphorus, and calcium bound phosphorus), and organic phosphorus. This was possible because the organic amendments increased soil pH and reduced exchangeable acidity, exchangeable aluminium, and exchangeable iron. The findings suggest that the organic amendments altered soil chemical properties in a way that enhanced the availability of phosphorus in this study. The amendments effectively fixed aluminium and iron instead of phosphorus, thus rendering phosphorus available by keeping the inorganic phosphorus in a bioavailable labile phosphorus pool for a longer period compared with application of Triple Superphosphate without organic amendments.

  12. Folic acid supplementation improves microvascular function in older adults through nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Alexander, Lacy M; Kenney, W Larry

    2015-07-01

    Older adults have reduced vascular endothelial function, evidenced by attenuated nitric oxide (NO)-dependent cutaneous vasodilatation. Folic acid and its metabolite, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF), are reported to improve vessel function. We hypothesized that (i) local 5-MTHF administration and (ii) chronic folic acid supplementation would improve cutaneous microvascular function in ageing through NO-dependent mechanisms. There were two separate studies in which there were 11 young (Y: 22 ± 1 years) and 11 older (O: 71 ± 3 years) participants. In both studies, two intradermal microdialysis fibres were placed in the forearm skin for local delivery of lactated Ringer's solution with or without 5 mM 5-MTHF. Red cell flux was measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry. Cutaneous vascular conductance [CVC=red cell flux/mean arterial pressure] was normalized as percentage maximum CVC (%CVCmax) (28 mM sodium nitroprusside, local temperature 43°C). In study 1 after CVC plateaued during local heating, 20 mM NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) was perfused at each site to quantify NO-dependent vasodilatation. The local heating plateau (%CVCmax: O = 82 ± 3 vs Y = 96 ± 1, P = 0.002) and NO-dependent vasodilatation (%CVCmax: O = 26 ± 6% vs Y = 49 ± 5, P = 0.03) were attenuated in older participants. 5-MTHF augmented the overall (%CVCmax = 91 ± 2, P = 0.03) and NO-dependent (%CVCmax = 43 ± 9%, P = 0.04) vasodilatation in older but not young participants. In study 2 the participants ingested folic acid (5 mg/day) or placebo for 6 weeks in a randomized, double-blind, crossover design. A rise in oral temperature of 1°C was induced using a water-perfused suit, body temperature was held and 20 mM L-NAME was perfused at each site. Older participants had attenuated reflex (%CVCmax: O = 31 ± 8 vs Y = 44 ± 5, P = 0.001) and NO-dependent (%CVCmax: O = 9 ± 2 vs Y = 21 ± 2, P = 0.003) vasodilatation. Folic acid increased CVC (%CVCmax = 47 ± 5%, P = 0.001) and NO

  13. In Vitro bile acid binding of kale, mustard greens, broccoli, cabbage and green bell pepper improves with microwave cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bile acid binding potential of foods and food fractions has been related to lowering the risk of heart disease and that of cancer. Sautéing or steam cooking has been observed to significantly improve bile acid binding of green/leafy vegetables. It was hypothesized that microwave cooking could impr...

  14. Improved cellular activity of antisense peptide nucleic acids by conjugation to a cationic peptide-lipid (CatLip) domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Shiraishi, Takehiko; Zachar, Vladimir;

    2008-01-01

    Conjugation to cationic cell penetrating peptides (such as Tat, Penetratin, or oligo arginines) efficiently improves the cellular uptake of large hydrophilic molecules such as oligonucleotides and peptide nucleic acids, but the cellular uptake is predominantly via an unproductive endosomal pathwa...

  15. Evidence for activation of both adrenergic and cholinergic nervous pathways by yohimbine, an alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, H; Chale, J J; Guyen, L N; Tran, M A; Berlan, M; Montastruc, J L

    1995-01-01

    Adrenoceptors are involved in the control of the activity of the autonomic nervous system and especially the sympathetic nervous system. Activation of alpha 2-adrenoceptors decreases sympathetic tone whereas their blockade has an opposite effect. However, previous investigations have shown that yohimbine (a potent alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist) increases salivary secretion through activation of cholinergic pathways. The aim of the present experiment was to investigate the involvement of both the sympathetic and the parasympathetic system in several pharmacological effects of yohimbine. For this purpose, salivary secretion and various endocrino-metabolic parameters (noradrenaline and insulin secretions, lipomobilization) were evaluated in conscious fasting dogs before and after blockade of either the sympathetic (with the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist agent nadolol) or the parasympathetic (with the anticholinergic agent atropine) systems. Yohimbine alone (0.4 mg.kg-1, i.v.) increased within 5-15 minutes, plasma noradrenaline (600%), insulin levels (300%), free-fatty acids (79%) and salivary secretion (143%). Atropine (0.2 mg.kg-1, i.v.) suppressed yohimbine-induced salivary secretion (90%) but did not significantly modify the yohimbine induced changes in noradrenaline (312%), insulin (277%) and free-fatty acids (102%) plasma levels. Administration of nadolol (1 mg.kg-1, i.v.) did not change the magnitude of the increase in both noradrenaline plasma levels (550%) and salivary secretion (300%) induced by yohimbine. However, nadolol totally blunted the increase in insulin (15%) and free-fatty acids (4%) plasma levels. These results show that yohimbine-induced increase in salivary secretion is a cholinergic effect whereas the increase in insulin and free fatty acids can be explained by an increase in sympathetic tone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Cholinergic enhancement of visual attention and neural oscillations in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Markus; Kluge, Christian; Bach, Dominik; Bradbury, David; Heinze, Hans Jochen; Dolan, Raymond J; Driver, Jon

    2012-03-06

    Cognitive processes such as visual perception and selective attention induce specific patterns of brain oscillations. The neurochemical bases of these spectral changes in neural activity are largely unknown, but neuromodulators are thought to regulate processing. The cholinergic system is linked to attentional function in vivo, whereas separate in vitro studies show that cholinergic agonists induce high-frequency oscillations in slice preparations. This has led to theoretical proposals that cholinergic enhancement of visual attention might operate via gamma oscillations in visual cortex, although low-frequency alpha/beta modulation may also play a key role. Here we used MEG to record cortical oscillations in the context of administration of a cholinergic agonist (physostigmine) during a spatial visual attention task in humans. This cholinergic agonist enhanced spatial attention effects on low-frequency alpha/beta oscillations in visual cortex, an effect correlating with a drug-induced speeding of performance. By contrast, the cholinergic agonist did not alter high-frequency gamma oscillations in visual cortex. Thus, our findings show that cholinergic neuromodulation enhances attentional selection via an impact on oscillatory synchrony in visual cortex, for low rather than high frequencies. We discuss this dissociation between high- and low-frequency oscillations in relation to proposals that lower-frequency oscillations are generated by feedback pathways within visual cortex. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of voluntary running on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cholinergic lesioned mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawe Gavin S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholinergic neuronal dysfunction of the basal forebrain is observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease and dementia, and has been linked to decreased neurogenesis in the hippocampus, a region involved in learning and memory. Running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. This study aims to address the effect of running on hippocampal neurogenesis in lesioned mice, where septohippocampal cholinergic neurones have been selectively eliminated in the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca of the basal forebrain by infusion of mu-p75-saporin immunotoxin. Results Running increased the number of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in cholinergic denervated mice compared to non-lesioned mice 24 hours after injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU. Although similar levels of surviving cells were present in cholinergic depleted animals and their respective controls four weeks after injection of BrdU, the majority of progenitors that proliferate in response to the initial period of running were not able to survive beyond one month without cholinergic input. Despite this, the running-induced increase in the number of surviving neurones was not affected by cholinergic depletion. Conclusion The lesion paradigm used here models aspects of the cholinergic deficits associated with Alzheimer's Disease and aging. We showed that running still increased the number of newborn cells in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus in this model of neurodegenerative disease.

  18. Overnight fasting regulates inhibitory tone to cholinergic neurons of the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Groessl

    Full Text Available The dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH contributes to the regulation of overall energy homeostasis by modulating energy intake as well as energy expenditure. Despite the importance of the DMH in the control of energy balance, DMH-specific genetic markers or neuronal subtypes are poorly defined. Here we demonstrate the presence of cholinergic neurons in the DMH using genetically modified mice that express enhanced green florescent protein (eGFP selectively in choline acetyltransferase (Chat-neurons. Overnight food deprivation increases the activity of DMH cholinergic neurons, as shown by induction of fos protein and a significant shift in the baseline resting membrane potential. DMH cholinergic neurons receive both glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic input, but the activation of these neurons by an overnight fast is due entirely to decreased inhibitory tone. The decreased inhibition is associated with decreased frequency and amplitude of GABAergic synaptic currents in the cholinergic DMH neurons, while glutamatergic synaptic transmission is not altered. As neither the frequency nor amplitude of miniature GABAergic or glutamatergic postsynaptic currents is affected by overnight food deprivation, the fasting-induced decrease in inhibitory tone to cholinergic neurons is dependent on superthreshold activity of GABAergic inputs. This study reveals that cholinergic neurons in the DMH readily sense the availability of nutrients and respond to overnight fasting via decreased GABAergic inhibitory tone. As such, altered synaptic as well as neuronal activity of DMH cholinergic neurons may play a critical role in the regulation of overall energy homeostasis.

  19. Synaptic connectivity of the cholinergic axons in the olfactory bulb of the cynomolgus monkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa eLiberia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The olfactory bulb of mammals receives cholinergic afferents from the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca. At present, the synaptic connectivity of the cholinergic axons on the circuits of the olfactory bulb has only been investigated in the rat. In this report, we analyze the synaptic connectivity of the cholinergic axons in the olfactory bulb of the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis. Our aim is to investigate whether the cholinergic innervation of the bulbar circuits is phylogenetically conserved between macrosmatic and microsmatic mammals. Our results demonstrate that the cholinergic axons form synaptic contacts on interneurons. In the glomerular layer, their main targets are the periglomerular cells, which receive axo-somatic and axo-dendritic synapses. In the inframitral region, their main targets are the granule cells, which receive synaptic contacts on their dendritic shafts and spines. Although the cholinergic boutons were frequently found in close vicinity of the dendrites of principal cells, we have not found synaptic contacts on them. From a comparative perspective, our data indicate that the synaptic connectivity of the cholinergic circuits is highly preserved in the olfactory bulb of macrosmatic and microsmatic mammals.

  20. Sex differences in brain cholinergic activity in MSG-obese rats submitted to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagae, Sara Cristina; Grassiolli, Sabrina; Raineki, Charlis; Balbo, Sandra Lucinei; Marques da Silva, Ana Carla

    2011-11-01

    Obesity is an epidemic disease most commonly caused by a combination of increased energy intake and lack of physical activity. The cholinergic system has been shown to be involved in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure. Moreover, physical exercise promotes a reduction of fat pads and body mass by increasing energy expenditure, but also influences the cholinergic system. The aim of this study is to evaluate the interaction between physical exercise (swimming) and central cholinergic activity in rats treated with monosodium glutamate (MSG, a model for obesity) during infancy. Our results show that MSG treatment is able to induce obesity in male and female rats. Specifically, MSG-treated rats presented a reduced body mass and nasoanal length, and increased perigonadal and retroperitoneal fat pads in relation to the body mass. Physical exercise was able to reduce body mass in both male and female rats, but did not change the fat pads in MSG-treated rats. Increased food intake was only seen in MSG-treated females submitted to exercise. Cholinergic activity was increased in the cortex of MSG-treated females and physical exercise was able to reduce this activity. Thalamic cholinergic activity was higher in sedentary MSG-treated females and exercised MSG-treated males. Hypothalamic cholinergic activity was higher in male and female MSG-treated rats, and was not reduced by exercise in the 2 sexes. Taken together, these results show that MSG treatment and physical exercise have different effects in the cholinergic activity of males and females.

  1. Improved Experimental Techniques for Analyzing Nucleic Acid Transport Through Protein Nanopores in Planar Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Justin A.

    The translocation of nucleic acid polymers across cell membranes is a fundamental requirement for complex life and has greatly contributed to genomic molecular evolution. The diversity of pathways that have evolved to transport DNA and RNA across membranes include protein receptors, active and passive transporters, endocytic and pinocytic processes, and various types of nucleic acid conducting channels known as nanopores. We have developed a series of experimental techniques, collectively known as "Wicking", that greatly improves the biophysical analysis of nucleic acid transport through protein nanopores in planar lipid bilayers. We have verified the Wicking method using numerous types of classical ion channels including the well-studied chloride selective channel, CLIC1. We used the Wicking technique to reconstitute α-hemolysin and found that DNA translocation events of types A and B could be routinely observed using this method. Furthermore, measurable differences were observed in the duration of blockade events as DNA length and composition was varied, consistent with previous reports. Finally, we tested the ability of the Wicking technology to reconstitute the dsRNA transporter Sid-1. Exposure to dsRNAs of increasing length and complexity showed measurable differences in the current transitions suggesting that the charge carrier was dsRNA. However, the translocation events occurred so infrequently that a meaningful electrophysiological analysis was not possible. Alterations in the lipid composition of the bilayer had a minor effect on the frequency of translocation events but not to such a degree as to permit rigorous statistical analysis. We conclude that in many instances the Wicking method is a significant improvement to the lipid bilayer technique, but is not an optimal method for analyzing transport through Sid-1. Further refinements to the Wicking method might have future applications in high throughput DNA sequencing, DNA computation, and molecular

  2. Iron-rich drinking water and ascorbic acid supplementation improved hemolytic anemia in experimental Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Richa; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Banerjee, Saumen; Bhattacharjee, Chira R; Raul, Prasanta; Borah, Kusum; Singh, Lokendra; Veer, Vijay

    2014-11-01

    Anemia is a frequent problem in both the primary and secondary health care programs. In contrast, most areas of northeast India are vulnerable to iron toxicity. In the present study, we documented the effect of administration of iron rich water on hemolytic anemia in a Wistar rats' animal model. Hemolytic anemia was induced by phenyl hydrazine through intraperitoneal route and diagnosed by the lowering of blood hemoglobin. After inducing the hemolytic anemia, 24 Wistar rats (n = 6 in four groups) were randomly assigned to 1 mg/l, 5 mg/l, and 10 mg/l ferric oxide iron along with 1 mg/ml ascorbic acid administered through drinking water; a control group was treated with iron-free water. The hematological and biochemical parameters, iron levels in liver, spleen, and kidney were estimated after 30 d of treatment. In the group treated with 5 mg/l iron and ascorbic acid, a significant increase of serum iron and ferritin, and a decrease of TIBC (total iron binding capacity) were observed without changes in other biochemical parameters and histopathological findings. However, in the group treated with 10 mg/l iron and ascorbic acid, hematological changes with significantly higher values for white blood cell count, serum glutamic phospho transaminase, serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, glucose, splenic, and liver iron content, indicate potential toxicity at this supplementation level. Data suggest that the optimum concentration of iron (5 mg/l) and ascorbic acid solution may improve anemic conditions and may be therapeutically beneficial in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia without any negative impact, while 10 mg/l in drinking water seems to be the threshold for the initiation of toxicity.

  3. Puerarin partly counteracts the inflammatory response after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion via activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojie Liu; Zhigang Mei; Jingping Qian; Yongbao Zeng; Mingzhi Wang

    2013-01-01

    Puerarin, a major isoflavonoid derived from the Chinese medical herb radix puerariae (Gegen), has been reported to inhibit neuronal apoptosis and play an anti-inflammatory role in focal cerebral ischemia model rats. Recent findings regarding stroke pathophysiology have recognized that an-ti-inflammation is an important target for the treatment of ischemic stroke. The cholinergic an-ti-inflammatory pathway is a highly robust neural-immune mechanism for inflammation control. This study was to investigate whether activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway can be in-volved in the mechanism of inhibiting the inflammatory response during puerarin-induced cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rats. Results showed that puerarin pretreatment (intravenous injection) re-duced the ischemic infarct volume, improved neurological deficit after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion and decreased the levels of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-αin brain tissue. Pretreatment with puerarin (intravenous injection) attenuated the inflammatory response in rats, which was accompanied by janus-activated kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) inhibition. These observa-tions were inhibited by the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR) antagonistα-bungarotoxin (α-BGT). In addition, puerarin pretreatment increased the expression of α7nAchR mRNA in ischemic cerebral tissue. These data demonstrate that puerarin pretreatment strongly protects the brain against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and inhibits the inflammatory re-sponse. Our results also indicated that the anti-inflammatory effect of puerarin may partly be me-diated through the activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

  4. Orexin Receptor Activation Generates Gamma Band Input to Cholinergic and Serotonergic Arousal System Neurons and Drives an Intrinsic Ca2+-Dependent Resonance in LDT and PPT Cholinergic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Masaru; Gumenchuk, Iryna; Kang, Bryan; Steger, Catherine; Lynn, Elizabeth; Molina, Nancy E.; Eisenberg, Leonard M.; Leonard, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of the waking state is a shift in EEG power to higher frequencies with epochs of synchronized intracortical gamma activity (30–60 Hz) – a process associated with high-level cognitive functions. The ascending arousal system, including cholinergic laterodorsal (LDT) and pedunculopontine (PPT) tegmental neurons and serotonergic dorsal raphe (DR) neurons, promotes this state. Recently, this system has been proposed as a gamma wave generator, in part, because some neurons produce high-threshold, Ca2+-dependent oscillations at gamma frequencies. However, it is not known whether arousal-related inputs to these neurons generate such oscillations, or whether such oscillations are ever transmitted to neuronal targets. Since key arousal input arises from hypothalamic orexin (hypocretin) neurons, we investigated whether the unusually noisy, depolarizing orexin current could provide significant gamma input to cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, and whether such input could drive Ca2+-dependent oscillations. Whole-cell recordings in brain slices were obtained from mice expressing Cre-induced fluorescence in cholinergic LDT and PPT, and serotonergic DR neurons. After first quantifying reporter expression accuracy in cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, we found that the orexin current produced significant high frequency, including gamma, input to both cholinergic and serotonergic neurons. Then, by using a dynamic clamp, we found that adding a noisy orexin conductance to cholinergic neurons induced a Ca2+-dependent resonance that peaked in the theta and alpha frequency range (4–14 Hz) and extended up to 100 Hz. We propose that this orexin current noise and the Ca2+ dependent resonance work synergistically to boost the encoding of high-frequency synaptic inputs into action potentials and to help ensure cholinergic neurons fire during EEG activation. This activity could reinforce thalamocortical states supporting arousal, REM sleep, and intracortical gamma. PMID

  5. Orexin Receptor Activation Generates Gamma Band Input to Cholinergic and Serotonergic Arousal System Neurons and Drives an Intrinsic Ca(2+)-Dependent Resonance in LDT and PPT Cholinergic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Masaru; Gumenchuk, Iryna; Kang, Bryan; Steger, Catherine; Lynn, Elizabeth; Molina, Nancy E; Eisenberg, Leonard M; Leonard, Christopher S

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of the waking state is a shift in EEG power to higher frequencies with epochs of synchronized intracortical gamma activity (30-60 Hz) - a process associated with high-level cognitive functions. The ascending arousal system, including cholinergic laterodorsal (LDT) and pedunculopontine (PPT) tegmental neurons and serotonergic dorsal raphe (DR) neurons, promotes this state. Recently, this system has been proposed as a gamma wave generator, in part, because some neurons produce high-threshold, Ca(2+)-dependent oscillations at gamma frequencies. However, it is not known whether arousal-related inputs to these neurons generate such oscillations, or whether such oscillations are ever transmitted to neuronal targets. Since key arousal input arises from hypothalamic orexin (hypocretin) neurons, we investigated whether the unusually noisy, depolarizing orexin current could provide significant gamma input to cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, and whether such input could drive Ca(2+)-dependent oscillations. Whole-cell recordings in brain slices were obtained from mice expressing Cre-induced fluorescence in cholinergic LDT and PPT, and serotonergic DR neurons. After first quantifying reporter expression accuracy in cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, we found that the orexin current produced significant high frequency, including gamma, input to both cholinergic and serotonergic neurons. Then, by using a dynamic clamp, we found that adding a noisy orexin conductance to cholinergic neurons induced a Ca(2+)-dependent resonance that peaked in the theta and alpha frequency range (4-14 Hz) and extended up to 100 Hz. We propose that this orexin current noise and the Ca(2+) dependent resonance work synergistically to boost the encoding of high-frequency synaptic inputs into action potentials and to help ensure cholinergic neurons fire during EEG activation. This activity could reinforce thalamocortical states supporting arousal, REM sleep, and intracortical gamma.

  6. Orexin receptor activation generates gamma band input to cholinergic and serotonergic arousal system neurons and drives an intrinsic Ca2+-dependent resonance in LDT and PPT cholinergic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru eIshibashi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of the waking state is a shift in EEG power to higher frequencies with epochs of synchronized intracortical gamma activity (30-60 Hz - a process associated with high-level cognitive functions. The ascending arousal system, including cholinergic laterodorsal (LDT and pedunculopontine (PPT tegmental neurons and serotonergic dorsal raphe (DR neurons, promotes this state. Recently, this system has been proposed as a gamma wave generator, in part, because some neurons produce high-threshold, Ca2+-dependent oscillations at gamma frequencies. However, it is not known whether arousal-related inputs to these neurons generate such oscillations, or whether such oscillations are ever transmitted to neuronal targets. Since key arousal input arises from hypothalamic orexin (hypocretin neurons, we investigated whether the unusually noisy, depolarizing orexin current could provide significant gamma input to cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, and whether such input could drive Ca2+-dependent oscillations. Whole-cell recordings in brain slices were obtained from mice expressing Cre-induced fluorescence in cholinergic LDT and PPT, and serotonergic DR neurons. After first quantifying reporter expression accuracy in cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, we found that the orexin current produced significant high frequency, including gamma, input to both cholinergic and serotonergic neurons. Then, by using a dynamic clamp, we found that adding a noisy orexin conductance to cholinergic neurons induced a Ca2+-dependent resonance that peaked in the theta and alpha frequency range (4 - 14 Hz and extended up to 100 Hz. We propose that this orexin current noise and the Ca2+ dependent resonance work synergistically to boost the encoding of high-frequency synaptic inputs into action potentials and to help ensure cholinergic neurons fire during EEG activation. This activity could reinforce thalamocortical states supporting arousal, REM sleep and intracortical

  7. Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome Affect the Cholinergic Transmission a nd Cognitive Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Ilenia; Tomassoni, Daniele; Moruzzi, Michele; Traini, Enea; Amenta, Francesco; Tayebati, Seyed Khosrow

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, at least 2.8 million people die each year as a result of being overweight or obese. Obesity leads to metabolic syndrome, a pathological condition characterized by adverse metabolic effects on blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides and insulin resistance. Population- based investigations have suggested that obesity and metabolic syndrome may be associated with poorer cognitive performance. A structured search of bibliographic source (PubMed) was undertaken. The following terms "inflammation and obesity and brain", "cholinergic system and obesity", "cholinergic system and metabolic syndrome", "Cognitive impairment and obesity" and "metabolic syndrome and brain" were used as search strings. Over 200 papers, mainly published in the past 10 years were analysed. The major results regarded keyword "metabolic syndrome and brain" followed by, "Cognitive impairment and obesity", "inflammation and obesity and brain", "cholinergic system and obesity" and "cholinergic system and metabolic syndrome". Most papers were pre-clinical but, in general, they were inhomogeneous. Therefore, the results were cited according their contribution to clarify the molecular involvement of obesity and/or metabolic syndrome in cholinergic impairment. This review focuses on the correlation between brain cholinergic system alterations and high-fat diet, describing the involvement of cholinergic system in inflammatory processes related to metabolic syndrome and obesity, which may lead to cognitive decline. Metabolic syndrome has been suggested as a risk factor for cerebrovascular diseases and has been associated with cognitive impairment in different functional brain domains. Preclinical and clinical studies have identified the cholinergic system as a specific target of metabolic syndrome and obesity. The modifications of cholinergic neurotransmission and its involvement in neuro-inflammation may be related to cognitive impairment that affects obese patients. Copyright© Bentham

  8. Structural basis for cholinergic regulation of neural circuits in the mouse olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Masakazu; Kiyokage, Emi; Sohn, Jaerin; Hioki, Hiroyuki; Harada, Tamotsu; Toida, Kazunori

    2017-02-15

    Odor information is regulated by olfactory inputs, bulbar interneurons, and centrifugal inputs in the olfactory bulb (OB). Cholinergic neurons projecting from the nucleus of the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca and the magnocellular preoptic nucleus are one of the primary centrifugal inputs to the OB. In this study, we focused on cholinergic regulation of the OB and analyzed neural morphology with a particular emphasis on the projection pathways of cholinergic neurons. Single-cell imaging of a specific neuron within dense fibers is critical to evaluate the structure and function of the neural circuits. We labeled cholinergic neurons by infection with virus vector and then reconstructed them three-dimensionally. We also examined the ultramicrostructure of synapses by electron microscopy tomography. To further clarify the function of cholinergic neurons, we performed confocal laser scanning microscopy to investigate whether other neurotransmitters are present within cholinergic axons in the OB. Our results showed the first visualization of complete cholinergic neurons, including axons projecting to the OB, and also revealed frequent axonal branching within the OB where it innervated multiple glomeruli in different areas. Furthermore, electron tomography demonstrated that cholinergic axons formed asymmetrical synapses with a morphological variety of thicknesses of the postsynaptic density. Although we have not yet detected the presence of other neurotransmitters, the range of synaptic morphology suggests multiple modes of transmission. The present study elucidates the ways that cholinergic neurons could contribute to the elaborate mechanisms involved in olfactory processing in the OB. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:574-591, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Acetylsalicylic acid and ascorbic acid combination improves cognition; via antioxidant effect or increased expression of NMDARs and nAChRs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Yusuf; Doguc, Duygu Kumbul; Kulac, Esin; Gultekin, Fatih

    2014-05-01

    Chronic inflammation occurs systematically in the central nervous system during ageing, it has been shown that neuroinflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative disorders. Aspirin, a nonselective COX inhibitor, as well as ascorbic acid, has been purported to protect cerebral tissue. We investigated the effects of subchronic aspirin and ascorbic acid usage on spatial learning, oxidative stress and expressions of NR2A, NR2B, nAChRα7, α4 and β2. Forty male rats (16-18 months) were divided into 4 groups, namely, control, aspirin-treated, ascorbic acid-treated, aspirin+ascorbic acid-treated groups. Following 10-weeks administration period, rats were trained and tested in the Morris water maze. 8-Hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine and malondialdehyde were evaluated by ELISA and HPLC, respectively. Receptor expressions were assessed by western blotting of hippocampi. Spatial learning performance improved partially in the aspirin group, but significant improvement was seen in the aspirin+ascorbic acid group (p acid group as compared to the control group (p acid in aged rats was shown to enhance cognitive performance and increase the expressions of several receptors related to learning and memory process.

  10. Inverse metabolic engineering based on transient acclimation of yeast improves acid-containing xylose fermentation and tolerance to formic and acetic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Sakamoto, Takatoshi; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Improving the production of ethanol from xylose is an important goal in metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, S. cerevisiae must produce ethanol in the presence of weak acids (formate and acetate) generated during pre-treatment of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, weak acid-containing xylose fermentation was significantly improved using cells that were acclimated to the weak acids during pre-cultivation. Transcriptome analyses showed that levels of transcripts for transcriptional/translational machinery-related genes (RTC3 and ANB1) were enhanced by formate and acetate acclimation. Recombinant yeast strains overexpressing RTC3 and ANB1 demonstrated improved ethanol production from xylose in the presence of the weak acids, along with improved tolerance to the acids. Novel metabolic engineering strategy based on the combination of short-term acclimation and system-wide analysis was developed, which can develop stress-tolerant strains in a short period of time, although conventional evolutionary engineering approach has required long periods of time to isolate inhibitor-adapted strains.

  11. The involvement of cholinergic neurons in the spreading of tau pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eSimon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Long time ago, it was described the selective loss of cholinergic neurons during the development of Alzheimer disease. Recently, it has been suggested that tau protein may play a role in that loss of cholinergic neurons through a mechanism involving the interaction of extracellular tau with M1/M3 muscarinic receptors present in the cholinergic neurons. This interaction between tau and muscarinic receptors may be a way, although not the only one, to explain the spreading of tau pathology occurring in Alzheimer disease.

  12. Tolerance of nestin+ cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain against colchicine-induced cytotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Yu; Kaihua Guo; Dongpei Li; Jinhai Duan; Juntao Zou; Junhua Yang; Zhibin Yao

    2011-01-01

    In the present study we injected colchicine into the lateral ventricle of Sprague-Dawley rats to investigate the effects of colchicine on the number of different-type neurons in the basal forebrain and to search for neurons resistant to injury. After colchicine injection, the number of nestin+ cholinergic neurons was decreased at 1 day, but increased at 3 days and peaked at 14-28 days. The quantity of nestin- cholinergic neurons, parvalbumin-positive neurons and choline acetyl transferase-positive neurons decreased gradually. Our results indicate that nestin+ cholinergic neurons possess better tolerance to colchicine-induced neurotoxicity.

  13. Serum bile acids are higher in humans with prior gastric bypass: potential contribution to improved glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Houten, Sander M; Bianco, Antonio C;

    2009-01-01

    .02) and peak glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) (r = 0.58, P lipid metabolism in patients......The multifactorial mechanisms promoting weight loss and improved metabolism following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GB) surgery remain incompletely understood. Recent rodent studies suggest that bile acids can mediate energy homeostasis by activating the G-protein coupled receptor TGR5 and the type 2...... thyroid hormone deiodinase. Altered gastrointestinal anatomy following GB could affect enterohepatic recirculation of bile acids. We assessed whether circulating bile acid concentrations differ in patients who previously underwent GB, which might then contribute to improved metabolic homeostasis. We...

  14. A combined supplementation of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids across two generations improves cardiometabolic variables in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaire, Amrita; Rathod, Richa; Randhir, Karuna; Kale, Anvita; Joshi, Sadhana

    2016-09-14

    Our earlier studies indicate that micronutrients (vitamin B12, folic acid) and omega-3 fatty acids especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are interlinked in one carbon cycle. The present study examines the effects of a sustained vitamin B12 deficiency/supplementation in the presence of omega-3 fatty acids across two generations on the pregnancy outcome and cardiometabolic profile [blood pressure, plasma lipid profile (cholesterol and triglycerides), plasma/liver fatty acid profile and hepatic lipid metabolism] in the second generation adult Wistar rat offspring. Two generations of animals were fed the following diets: control; vitamin B12 deficient; vitamin B12 supplemented; vitamin B12 deficient diet supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids; vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplemented diets. Male offspring were sacrificed at 3 months of age. Vitamin B12 deficiency lowered the weight gain (p B12 supplementation showed weight gain, blood pressure and the fatty acid profile similar to the control. However, it increased (p B12 deficient group lowered the weight gain although the levels of cardiometabolic variables were comparable to the control. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in the presence of vitamin B12 improved the pregnancy outcome and all cardio-metabolic variables. Our study highlights the adverse effects of sustained vitamin B12 deficiency across two generations on the pregnancy outcome, fatty acid profile and blood pressure while a combined supplementation of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids is beneficial.

  15. Improving co-amorphous drug formulations by the addition of the highly water soluble amino acid proline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine Birgitte Tarp; Löbmann, Korbinian; Rades, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    by combining the model drug, naproxen (NAP), with an amino acid to physically stabilize the co-amorphous system (tryptophan, TRP, or arginine, ARG) and a second highly soluble amino acid (proline, PRO) for an additional improvement of the dissolution rate. Co-amorphous drug-amino acid blends were prepared......Co-amorphous drug amino acid mixtures were previously shown to be a promising approach to create physically stable amorphous systems with the improved dissolution properties of poorly water-soluble drugs. The aim of this work was to expand the co-amorphous drug amino acid mixture approach...... by ball milling and investigated for solid state characteristics, stability and the dissolution rate enhancement of NAP. All co-amorphous mixtures were stable at room temperature and 40 °C for a minimum of 84 days. PRO acted as a stabilizer for the co-amorphous system, including NAP–TRP, through enhancing...

  16. Has Stewart approach improved our ability to diagnose acid-base disorders in critically ill patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masevicius, Fabio D; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2015-02-04

    conventional methods. Although the introduction of the Stewart approach was a new insight into acid-base physiology, the method has not significantly improved our ability to understand, diagnose, and treat acid-base alterations in critically ill patients.

  17. Cholinergic urethral brush cells are widespread throughout placental mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckmann, Klaus; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Rafiq, Amir; Herden, Christine; Wichmann, Judy; Knauf, Sascha; Nassenstein, Christina; Grevelding, Christoph G; Dorresteijn, Adriaan; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Bschleipfer, Thomas; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    We previously identified a population of cholinergic epithelial cells in murine, human and rat urethrae that exhibits a structural marker of brush cells (villin) and expresses components of the canonical taste transduction signaling cascade (α-gustducin, phospholipase Cβ2 (PLCβ2), transient receptor potential cation channel melanostatin 5 (TRPM5)). These cells serve as sentinels, monitoring the chemical composition of the luminal content for potentially hazardous compounds such as bacteria, and initiate protective reflexes counteracting further ingression. In order to elucidate cross-species conservation of the urethral chemosensory pathway we investigated the occurrence and molecular make-up of urethral brush cells in placental mammals. We screened 11 additional species, at least one in each of the five mammalian taxonomic units primates, carnivora, perissodactyla, artiodactyla and rodentia, for immunohistochemical labeling of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), villin, and taste cascade components (α-gustducin, PLCβ2, TRPM5). Corresponding to findings in previously investigated species, urethral epithelial cells with brush cell shape were immunolabeled in all 11 mammals. In 8 species, immunoreactivities against all marker proteins and ChAT were observed, and double-labeling immunofluorescence confirmed the cholinergic nature of villin-positive and chemosensory (TRPM5-positive) cells. In cat and horse, these cells were not labeled by the ChAT antiserum used in this study, and unspecific reactions of the secondary antiserum precluded conclusions about ChAT-expression in the bovine epithelium. These data indicate that urethral brush cells are widespread throughout the mammalian kingdom and evolved not later than about 64.5millionyears ago.

  18. Impact of basal forebrain cholinergic inputs on basolateral amygdala neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Cagri T; Pare, Denis; Zaborszky, Laszlo

    2015-01-14

    In addition to innervating the cerebral cortex, basal forebrain cholinergic (BFc) neurons send a dense projection to the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA). In this study, we investigated the effect of near physiological acetylcholine release on BLA neurons using optogenetic tools and in vitro patch-clamp recordings. Adult transgenic mice expressing cre-recombinase under the choline acetyltransferase promoter were used to selectively transduce BFc neurons with channelrhodopsin-2 and a reporter through the injection of an adeno-associated virus. Light-induced stimulation of BFc axons produced different effects depending on the BLA cell type. In late-firing interneurons, BFc inputs elicited fast nicotinic EPSPs. In contrast, no response could be detected in fast-spiking interneurons. In principal BLA neurons, two different effects were elicited depending on their activity level. When principal BLA neurons were quiescent or made to fire at low rates by depolarizing current injection, light-induced activation of BFc axons elicited muscarinic IPSPs. In contrast, with stronger depolarizing currents, eliciting firing above ∼ 6-8 Hz, these muscarinic IPSPs lost their efficacy because stimulation of BFc inputs prolonged current-evoked afterdepolarizations. All the effects observed in principal neurons were dependent on muscarinic receptors type 1, engaging different intracellular mechanisms in a state-dependent manner. Overall, our results suggest that acetylcholine enhances the signal-to-noise ratio in principal BLA neurons. Moreover, the cholinergic engagement of afterdepolarizations may contribute to the formation of stimulus associations during fear-conditioning tasks where the timing of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli is not optimal for the induction of synaptic plasticity.

  19. Omega-3 fatty acids plus rosuvastatin improves endothelial function in South Asians with dyslipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin Mindrescu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Catalin Mindrescu1,2,3, Rakesh P Gupta1,3, Eileen V Hermance1, Mary C DeVoe1, Vikas R Soma1, John T Coppola1,2, Cezar S Staniloae1,21Comprehensive Cardiovascular Center, Saint Vincent’s Hospital Manhattan, New York, NY, USA; 2New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, USA; 3Rakesh P Gupta and Catalin Mindrescu contributed equally to this article.Background: The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of statins plus omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs on endothelial function and lipid profile in South Asians with dyslipidemia and endothelial dysfunction, a population at high risk for premature coronary artery disease.Methods: Thirty subjects were randomized to rosuvastatin 10 mg and omega-3-PUFAs 4 g or rosuvastatin 10 mg. After 4 weeks, omega-3-PUFAs were removed from the first group and added to subjects in the second group. All subjects underwent baseline, 4-, and 8-week assessment of endothelial function and lipid profile.Results: Compared to baseline, omega-3-PUFAs plus rosuvastatin improved endothelial-dependent vasodilation (EDV: −1.42% to 11.36%, p = 0.001, and endothelial-independent vasodilation (EIV: 3.4% to 17.37%, p = 0.002. These effects were lost when omega-3-PUFAs were removed (EDV: 11.36% to 0.59%, p = 0.003. In the second group, rosuvastatin alone failed to improve both EDV and EIV compared to baseline. However, adding omega-3-PUFAs to rosuvastatin, significantly improved EDV (−0.66% to 14.73%, p = 0.001 and EIV (11.02% to 24.5%, p = 0.001. Addition of omega-3-PUFAs further improved the lipid profile (triglycerides 139 to 91 mg/dl, p = 0.006, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol 116 to 88 mg/dl, p = 0.014.Conclusions: Combined therapy with omega-3-PUFAs and rosuvastatin improves endothelial function in South Asian subjects with dyslipidemia and endothelial dysfunction.Keywords: omega-3 fatty acids, endothelial function, South Asians, dyslipidemia, rosuvastatin

  20. Improvement of Vegetative and Reproductive Growth of ‘Camarosa’ Strawberry: Role of Humic Acid, Zn, and B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaye Rafeii

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted with the aim to improve vegetative and reproductive growth of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch. cv. ‘Camarosa’ using humic acid, zinc sulfate (ZnSO4, and boric acid. We evaluated applications of humic acid at 0, 20 and 40 mg·L-1, ZnSO4 at 0, 50 and 100 mg·L-1, and boric acid at 0, 50 and 100 mg·L-1 at 30 days after planting and blooming stage on growth of strawberry cv. ‘Camarosa’. Results indicated that humic acid, ZnSo4, and boric acid application improved reproductive and vegetative characteristics compared to control treatment. The results showed, that plants treated with humic acid, ZnSO4, and boric acid at higher their concentrations exhibited generally higher dry weight of roots and shoots, number of flowers and inflorescences, leaf area, length of roots and shoots, length of flowering period, yield, weight of primary and secondary fruits and number of their achenes. Total yield was significantly increased by all treatments compared to control treatment at both stages of application, especially at blooming stage. Moreover, conclusion showed that the mentioned materials could have impact on vegetative and reproductive growth of strawberry generally. In this study humic acid at 40 mg L-1 at blooming stage resulted in best effects on development of strawberry cv. ‘Camarosa’.

  1. Cholinergic and non-cholinergic projections from the pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei to the medial geniculate body in guinea pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan D Motts

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The midbrain tegmentum is the source of cholinergic innervation of the thalamus and has been associated with arousal and control of the sleep/wake cycle. In general, the innervation arises bilaterally from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT and the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT. While this pattern has been observed for many thalamic nuclei, a projection from the LDT to the medial geniculate body (MG has been questioned in some species. We combined retrograde tracing with immunohistochemistry for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT to identify cholinergic projections from the brainstem to the MG in guinea pigs. Double-labeled cells (retrograde and immunoreactive for ChAT were found in both the PPT (74% and the LDT (26%. In both nuclei, double-labeled cells were more numerous on the ipsilateral side. About half of the retrogradely labeled cells were immunonegative, suggesting they are non-cholinergic. The distribution of these immunonegative cells was similar to that of the immunopositive ones: more were in the PPT than the LDT and more were on the ipsilateral than the contralateral side. The results indicate that both the PPT and the LDT project to the MG, and suggest that both cholinergic and non-cholinergic cells contribute substantially to these projections.

  2. Improved Proteomic Analysis Following Trichloroacetic Acid Extraction of Bacillus anthracis Spore Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Brooke LD; Wunschel, David S.; Sydor, Michael A.; Warner, Marvin G.; Wahl, Karen L.; Hutchison, Janine R.

    2015-08-07

    Proteomic analysis of bacterial samples provides valuable information about cellular responses and functions under different environmental pressures. Proteomic analysis is dependent upon efficient extraction of proteins from bacterial samples without introducing bias toward extraction of particular protein classes. While no single method can recover 100% of the bacterial proteins, selected protocols can improve overall protein isolation, peptide recovery, or enrich for certain classes of proteins. The method presented here is technically simple and does not require specialized equipment such as a mechanical disrupter. Our data reveal that for particularly challenging samples, such as B. anthracis Sterne spores, trichloroacetic acid extraction improved the number of proteins identified within a sample compared to bead beating (714 vs 660, respectively). Further, TCA extraction enriched for 103 known spore specific proteins whereas bead beating resulted in 49 unique proteins. Analysis of C. botulinum samples grown to 5 days, composed of vegetative biomass and spores, showed a similar trend with improved protein yields and identification using our method compared to bead beating. Interestingly, easily lysed samples, such as B. anthracis vegetative cells, were equally as effectively processed via TCA and bead beating, but TCA extraction remains the easiest and most cost effective option. As with all assays, supplemental methods such as implementation of an alternative preparation method may provide additional insight to the protein biology of the bacteria being studied.

  3. Clavulanic acid production by Streptomyces clavuligerus: biogenesis, regulation and strain improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradkar, Ashish

    2013-07-01

    Clavulanic acid (CA) is a potent β-lactamase inhibitor produced by Streptomyces clavuligerus and has been successfully used in combination with β-lactam antibiotics (for example, Augmentin) to treat infections caused by β-lactamase-producing pathogens. Since the discovery of CA in the late 1970s, significant information has accumulated on its biosynthesis, and regarding molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of its production. Notably, the genes directing CA biosynthesis are clustered along with the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of the β-lactam antibiotic, cephamycin C, and co-regulated, which makes this organism unique in that the production of an antibiotic and production of a small molecule to protect the antibiotic from its enzymatic degradation are controlled by shared mechanisms. Traditionally, the industrial strain improvement programs have relied significantly on random mutagenesis and selection approach. However, the recent availability of the genome sequence of S. clavuligerus along with the capability to build metabolic models, and ability to engineer the organism by directed approaches, has created exciting opportunities to improve strain productivity more efficiently. This review will include focus mainly on the gene organization of the CA biosynthetic genes, regulatory mechanisms that affect its production, and will include perspectives on improving strain productivity.

  4. Significant improvement in the pore properties of SBA-15 brought about by carboxylic acids and hydrothermal treatment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Milan Kanti Naskar; M Eswaramoorthy

    2008-01-01

    A comparative study of the pore properties of SBA-15 samples prepared under nonhydrothermal and hydrothermal conditions, in the absence and presence of carboxylic acids such as succinic, tartaric and citric acids has been carried out. In the absence of carboxylic acid, flake-like and spheroid particles were generally obtained irrespective of the preparative procedures. On the other hand, stirring of the pre-mix induces a rod-like morphology in presence of carboxylic acids. The samples prepared under non-hydrothermal conditions exhibit a higher degree of silicate condensation compared to those synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. SBA-15 samples prepared under hydrothermal conditions show higher values of the d (100) spacing independent of the presence of carboxylic acids. Presence of carboxylic acids as well as hydrothermal treatment improves the pore properties of SBA-15.

  5. Improving phosphorus uptake and wheat productivity by phosphoric acid application in alkaline calcareous soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Muhammad; Yaqub, Muhammad; Naeem, Asif; Ashraf, Muhammad; Hernandez, Vicente Espinosa

    2016-08-01

    Low phosphorus (P) efficiency from existing granular fertilisers necessitates searching for efficient alternatives to improve wheat productivity in calcareous soil. Multi-location trials have shown that phosphoric acid (PA) produced 16% higher wheat grain over commercial P fertilisers, i.e. diammonium phosphate (DAP) and triple superphosphate (TSP). Methods of P application significantly influenced grain yield and the efficiency of methods was observed in the order: PA placement below seed > PA, DAP or TSP fertigation > DAP or TSP broadcast. The sub-surface application of PA produced highest grain yields (mean of all rates), i.e. 4669, 4158 and 3910 kg ha(-1) in Bagh, Bhalwal and Shahpur soil series, respectively. Phosphoric acid at 66 kg P2 O5 ha(-1) was found more effective in increasing gain yield over that of control. Trend in grain P uptake was found similar to that observed for grain yield. Maximum P uptake by grain was recorded at the highest P rate and the lowest at zero P. The significant increase in P uptake with P rates was generally related to the increase in yield rather than its concentration in grain. Phosphorus agronomic efficiency (PAE) and phosphorus recovery efficiency (PRE) were found higher at lower P rate (44 kg P2 O5 ha(-1) ) and decreased with P application. However, PA applied by the either method resulted in higher PAE and PRE compared to DAP and TSP. Phosphoric acid is suggested as an efficient alternative to commercial granular P fertilisers for wheat production in alkaline calcareous soils. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Supportless, bismuth-modified palladium nanotubes with improved activity and stability for formic acid oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson III, Robert [University of Tennessee (UT); ST John, Samuel [ORNL; Dyck, OndrejK [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Unocic, Kinga A [ORNL; Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL; Burke, Colten [Tennessee Technological University (TTU); Cisco, Joshua [Tennessee Technological University (TTU); Rice, Cynthia [Tennessee Technological University (TTU); Zawodzinski, Thomas A [ORNL; Papandrew, Alexander B [ORNL

    2015-07-22

    Palladium nanotubes (PdNTs) were synthesized by templated vapor deposition and investigated for formic acid electrooxidation. Annealed PdNTs are 2.4 times more active (2.19 mA/cm2) than commercial carbon-supported palladium (0.91 mA/cm2) at 0.3 V vs RHE. Bismuth modification improved nanotube performance over 4 times (3.75 mA/cm2) vs Pd/C and nearly 2 times vs unmodified PdNTs. A surface Bi coverage of 80% results in optimal site-specific activity by drastically reducing surface-poisoning CO generation during formic acid electrooxidation. The Bi-modified PdNTs are exceptionally stable, maintaining 2 times the area-normalized current density as Pd/C after 24 h at 0.2 V vs RHE. As a result, we attribute the enhanced activity and stability of the nanotube catalysts to the presence of highly coordinated surfaces, mimicking a flat polycrystal while retaining high surface area geometry.

  7. Salicylic Acid and Calcium Treatments Improves Wheat Vigor, Lipids and Phenolics Under High Salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel Candan, Nilgün; Heybet Elif, Haklı

    2016-12-01

    Seed vigor is a complex physiological trait required to ensure the rapid and uniform emergence of plants in the field under different environmental conditions. Therefore, salicylic acid (SA, 0.5 mM) and calcium (Ca2+, 50 mM) priming were used as exogenous growth enhancers to stimulate wheat (Triticum durum Desf. cv. Yelken) seed vigor under high salinity. The main aim was to address whether priming of wheat with SA, Ca2+ and SA+Ca (SA, 0.5 mM + Ca2+, 50 mM; their combination) could bring about supplementary agronomic benefits particularly under stressful environments such as salinity. Exogenous application of SA or Ca2+ alone improved plant behavior in the presence of salinity stress. Nevertheless, the best results in terms of growth, seed vigor and total phenolic - flavonoids, chlorophyll - carotenoids contents and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), ascorbic acide oxidase (AAO) activities and lipid peroxidation levels (LPO) were obtained in response to the combined SA+Ca treatment.

  8. Field experience and improvements with thin tubular-plate lead/acid technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merz, K.D. [CMP Batteries, Bolton (United Kingdom)

    1998-05-18

    The Classic 25 is the product name for a motive-power lead/acid cell using thin positive tubular plates. This cell was developed for use in electric vehicles and other applications where high specific energy and reliable cycle life is required. It would appear that the best approach is to provide a lead/acid battery that has the highest specific energy while still maintaining excellent cycle life. This technology was implemented by use of 6 V modules, followed by a 2-V design. Since this was first introduced in 1989, more than 20 000 cells and monoblocs have been delivered to various electric vehicle applications such as vans, trucks, and buses. The field experience with this product is therefore excellent, and development is continuing on the battery design and manufacturing techniques to improve performance and life even further. Today, a wide range of products using this technology is available, and the latest developments are a new 6 V monobloc and some maintenance-free cells. (orig.)

  9. Lecithin-Based Nano-emulsification Improves the Bioavailability of Conjugated Linoleic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Wan; Kim, Jun Ho; Pan, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Young Jun

    2016-02-17

    In this study, we investigated the effects of lecithin-based nano-emulsification on the heat stability and bioavailability of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in different free fatty acid (FFA) and triglyceride (TG) forms. CLA nano-emulsion in TG form exhibited a small droplet size (70-120 nm) compared to CLA nano-emulsion in FFA form (230-260 nm). Nano-emulsification protected CLA isomers in TG form, but not in free form, against thermal decomposition during the heat treatment. The in vitro bioavailability test using monolayers of Caco-2 human intestinal cells showed that nano-emulsification increased the cellular uptake of CLA in both FFA and TG forms. More importantly, a rat feeding study showed that CLA content in small intestinal tissues or plasma was higher when CLA was emulsified, indicating an enhanced oral bioavailability of CLA by nano-emulsification. These results provide important information for development of nano-emulsion-based delivery systems that improve thermal stability and bioavailability of CLA.

  10. Improved production, characterization and flocculation properties of poly (-glutamic acid produced from Bacillus Subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhunia B

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus subtilis 2063 produced extracellular biopolymer whichshowed excellent flocculation activity. The biopolymer wasconfirmed as poly (γ-glutamic acid (PGA by using productcharacterization. HPLC profile showed that molecular weight ofPGA was found to be 5.8×106 Da. Improved production,Characterization and flocculation properties of PGA produced byBacillus species were studied. PGA produced by B. subtilis wasdevoid of any polysaccharides. The flocculating activity wasmarkedly stimulated by the addition of cations. The pH of reaction mixture also influenced the flocculating activity. Glycerol and ammonium chloride were found to be most useful carbon and nitrogen sources. An overall 4.24-fold increase in protease production was achieved in the design medium composed with Glycerol and ammonium chloride as a carbon and nitrogen sources as compared with basal media. PGA production increased significantly with optimized medium (21.42 gl-1 when compared with basal medium (5.06 gl-1.

  11. Interaction of lactic acid bacteria with metal ions: opportunities for improving food safety and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrvčić, Jasna; Stanzer, Damir; Solić, Ema; Stehlik-Tomas, Vesna

    2012-09-01

    Certain species of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), as well as other microorganisms, can bind metal ions to their cells surface or transport and store them inside the cell. Due to this fact, over the past few years interactions of metal ions with LAB have been intensively investigated in order to develop the usage of these bacteria in new biotechnology processes in addition to their health and probiotic aspects. Preliminary studies in model aqueous solutions yielded LAB with high absorption potential for toxic and essential metal ions, which can be used for improving food safety and quality. This paper provides an overview of results obtained by LAB application in toxic metal ions removing from drinking water, food and human body, as well as production of functional foods and nutraceutics. The biosorption abilities of LAB towards metal ions are emphasized. The binding mechanisms, as well as the parameters influencing the passive and active uptake are analyzed.

  12. Fuzzy approach for improved recognition of citric acid induced piglet coughing from continuous registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hirtum, A.; Berckmans, D.

    2003-09-01

    A natural acoustic indicator of animal welfare is the appearance (or absence) of coughing in the animal habitat. A sound-database of 5319 individual sounds including 2034 coughs was collected on six healthy piglets containing both animal vocalizations and background noises. Each of the test animals was repeatedly placed in a laboratory installation where coughing was induced by nebulization of citric acid. A two-class classification into 'cough' or 'other' was performed by the application of a distance function to a fast Fourier spectral sound analysis. This resulted in a positive cough recognition of 92%. For the whole sound-database however there was a misclassification of 21%. As spectral information up to 10000 Hz is available, an improved overall classification on the same database is obtained by applying the distance function to nine frequency ranges and combining the achieved distance-values in fuzzy rules. For each frequency range clustering threshold is determined by fuzzy c-means clustering.

  13. New, improved lanthanide-based methods for the ultrastructural localization of acid and alkaline phosphatase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbhuber, K J; Zimmermann, N; Linss, W

    1988-01-01

    New, improved techniques for the ultrastructural localization of acid and alkaline phosphatase activity using lanthanide cations as the trapping agent were developed. Delayed penetration of the capture ions and the incubation constituents into cellular compartments was prevented by pretreating specimens with borohydride/saponin. Both the concentration of the capture agent in the incubation medium and the incubation time of the tissue specimens were optimized to achieve a satisfactory cytochemical reaction and to avoid precipitation artefacts caused by local matrix effects. The conversion of cerium phosphate into the almost insoluble cerium fluoride minimized losses of the reaction product during postincubation processing. Moreover, lanthanum itself as well as lanthanides other than cerium, e.g., gadolinium and didymium (praseodymium, neodymium), were successfully applied and can be recommended as capture agents for phosphatase cytochemistry.

  14. Screening and Improving the Recombinant Nitrilases and Application in Biotransformation of Iminodiacetonitrile to Iminodiacetic Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Qiang Liu

    Full Text Available In this study, several nitrilase genes from phylogenetically distinct organisms were expressed and purified in E. coli in order to study their ability to mediate the biotransformation of nitriles. We identified three nitrilases: Acidovorax facilis nitrilase (AcN; Alcaligenes fecalis nitrilase (AkN; and Rhodococcus rhodochrous nitrilase (RkN, which catalyzed iminodiacetonitrile (IDAN to iminodiacetic acid (IDA. AcN demonstrated 8.8-fold higher activity for IDAN degradation as compared to AkN and RkN. Based on homology modeling and previously described 'hot spot' mutations, several AcN mutants were screened for improved activity. One mutant M3 (F168V/L201N/S192F was identified, which demonstrates a 41% enhancement in the conversion as well as a 2.4-fold higher catalytic efficiency towards IDAN as compared to wild-type AcN.

  15. Improved cadmium uptake and accumulation in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii:the impact of citric acid and tartaric acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-li LU; Sheng-ke TIAN; Xiao-e YANG; Hong-yun PENG; Ting-qiang LI

    2013-01-01

    The elucidation of a natural strategy for metal hyperaccumulation enables the rational design of technologies for the clean-up of metal-contaminated soils.Organic acid has been suggested to be involved in toxic metallic element tolerance,translocation,and accumulation in plants.The impact of exogenous organic acids on cadmium(Cd)uptake and translocation in the zinc(Zn)/Cd co-hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii was investigated in the present study.By the addition of organic acids,short-term(2 h)root uptake of 109Cd increased significantly,and higher 109Cd contents in roots and shoots were noted 24 h after uptake,when compared to controls.About 85% of the 109Cd taken up was distributed to the shoots in plants with citric acid(CA)treatments,as compared with 75% within controls.No such effect was observed for tartaric acid(TA).Reduced growth under Cd stress was significantly alleviated by low CA.Long-term application of the two organic acids both resulted in elevated Cd in plants,but the effects varied with exposure time and levels.The results imply that CA may be involved in the processes of Cd uptake,translocation and tolerance in S.alfredii,whereas the impact of TA is mainly on the root uptake of Cd.

  16. Improved mitochondrial function with diet-induced increase in either docosahexaenoic acid or arachidonic acid in membrane phospholipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramzi J Khairallah

    Full Text Available Mitochondria can depolarize and trigger cell death through the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP. We recently showed that an increase in the long chain n3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n3 and depletion of the n6 PUFA arachidonic acid (ARA; 20:4n6 in mitochondrial membranes is associated with a greater Ca(2+ load required to induce MPTP opening. Here we manipulated mitochondrial phospholipid composition by supplementing the diet with DHA, ARA or combined DHA+ARA in rats for 10 weeks. There were no effects on cardiac function, or respiration of isolated mitochondria. Analysis of mitochondrial phospholipids showed DHA supplementation increased DHA and displaced ARA in mitochondrial membranes, while supplementation with ARA or DHA+ARA increased ARA and depleted linoleic acid (18:2n6. Phospholipid analysis revealed a similar pattern, particularly in cardiolipin. Tetralinoleoyl cardiolipin was depleted by 80% with ARA or DHA+ARA supplementation, with linoleic acid side chains replaced by ARA. Both the DHA and ARA groups had delayed Ca(2+-induced MPTP opening, but the DHA+ARA group was similar to the control diet. In conclusion, alterations in mitochondria membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition caused by dietary DHA or ARA was associated with a greater cumulative Ca(2+ load required to induced MPTP opening. Further, high levels of tetralinoleoyl cardiolipin were not essential for normal mitochondrial function if replaced with very-long chain n3 or n6 PUFAs.

  17. Triiodothyronine activates lactate oxidation without impairing fatty acid oxidation and improves weaning from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Kajimoto, Hidemi; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides a rescue for children with severe cardiac failure. We previously showed that triiodothyronine (T3) improves cardiac function by modulating pyruvate oxidation during weaning. This study was focused on fatty acid (FA) metabolism modulated by T3 for weaning from ECMO after cardiac injury. Methods: Nineteen immature piglets (9.1-15.3 kg) were separated into 3 groups with ECMO (6.5 hours) and wean: normal circulation (Group-C);transient coronary occlusion (10 minutes) followed by ECMO (Group-IR); and IR with T3 supplementation (Group-IR-T3). 13-Carbon labeled lactate, medium-chain and long-chain FAs were infused as oxidative substrates. Substrate fractional contribution to the citric acid cycle (FC) was analyzed by 13-Carbon nuclear magnetic resonance. Results: ECMO depressed circulating T3 levels to 40% baseline at 4 hours and were restored in Group-IR-T3. Group-IR decreased cardiac power, which was not fully restorable and 2 pigs were lost because of weaning failure. Group-IR also depressed FC-lactate, while the excellent contractile function and energy efficiency in Group-IR-T3 occurred along with a marked FC-lactate increase and [ATP]/[ADP] without either decreasing FC-FAs or elevating myocardial oxygen consumption over Group-C or -IR. Conclusions: T3 releases inhibition of lactate oxidation following ischemia-reperfusion injury without impairing FA oxidation. These findings indicate that T3 depression during ECMO is maladaptive, and that restoring levels improves metabolic flux and enhances contractile function during weaning.

  18. The association of cholinergic and cold-induced urticaria: diagnosis and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Bahar; Ben-Shoshan, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Physical urticaria is often challenging to diagnose and manage. We present a case of both cholinergic and cold-induced urticaria and discuss the diagnosis and management strategies of these two important conditions. PMID:25694628

  19. Outcome of Patients with Cholinergic Insecticide Poisoning Treated with Gastric Lavage: A Prospective Observational Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mekkattukunnel Andrews

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Number or timing of GL does not show any association with mortality while multiple GL had protective effect against development of late RF and IMS. Hence, GL might be beneficial in cholinergic insecticide poisoning.

  20. Optogenetic activation of cholinergic neurons in the PPT or LDT induces REM sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dort, Christa J; Zachs, Daniel P; Kenny, Jonathan D; Zheng, Shu; Goldblum, Rebecca R; Gelwan, Noah A; Ramos, Daniel M; Nolan, Michael A; Wang, Karen; Weng, Feng-Ju; Lin, Yingxi; Wilson, Matthew A; Brown, Emery N

    2015-01-13

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is an important component of the natural sleep/wake cycle, yet the mechanisms that regulate REM sleep remain incompletely understood. Cholinergic neurons in the mesopontine tegmentum have been implicated in REM sleep regulation, but lesions of this area have had varying effects on REM sleep. Therefore, this study aimed to clarify the role of cholinergic neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) and laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) in REM sleep generation. Selective optogenetic activation of cholinergic neurons in the PPT or LDT during non-REM (NREM) sleep increased the number of REM sleep episodes and did not change REM sleep episode duration. Activation of cholinergic neurons in the PPT or LDT during NREM sleep was sufficient to induce REM sleep.

  1. Folic acid ingestion improves skeletal muscle blood flow during graded handgrip and plantar flexion exercise in aged humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Steven A; Gagnon, Daniel; Adams, Amy N; Moralez, Gilbert; Kouda, Ken; Jaffery, Manall F; Cramer, Matthew N; Crandall, Craig G

    2017-09-01

    Skeletal muscle blood flow is attenuated in aged humans performing dynamic exercise, which is due, in part, to impaired local vasodilatory mechanisms. Recent evidence suggests that folic acid improves cutaneous vasodilation during localized and whole body heating through nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms. However, it is unclear whether folic acid improves vasodilation in other vascular beds during conditions of increased metabolism (i.e., exercise). The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that folic acid ingestion improves skeletal muscle blood flow in aged adults performing graded handgrip and plantar flexion exercise via increased vascular conductance. Nine healthy, aged adults (two men and seven women; age: 68 ± 5 yr) performed graded handgrip and plantar flexion exercise before (control), 2 h after (acute, 5 mg), and after 6 wk (chronic, 5 mg/day) folic acid ingestion. Forearm (brachial artery) and leg (superficial femoral artery) blood velocity and diameter were measured via Duplex ultrasonography and used to calculate blood flow. Acute and chronic folic acid ingestion increased serum folate (both P < 0.05 vs. control). During handgrip exercise, acute and chronic folic acid ingestion increased forearm blood flow (both conditions P < 0.05 vs. control) and vascular conductance (both P < 0.05 vs. control). During plantar flexion exercise, acute and chronic folic acid ingestion increased leg blood flow (both P < 0.05 vs. control), but only acute folic acid ingestion increased vascular conductance (P < 0.05 vs. control). Taken together, folic acid ingestion increases blood flow to active skeletal muscle primarily via improved local vasodilation in aged adults.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Our findings demonstrate that folic acid ingestion improves blood flow via enhanced vascular conductance in the exercising skeletal muscle of aged humans. These findings provide evidence for the therapeutic use of folic acid to improve skeletal muscle blood flow, and perhaps

  2. Designing improved poly lactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres for a malarial vaccine: incorporation of alginate and polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Aiala; Igartua, Manoli; Hernández, Rosa María; Pedraz, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination using proteins and peptides is currently gaining importance. One of the major drawbacks of this approach is the lack of an efficient immune response when the antigens are administered without adjuvants. In this study, we have taken the advantage of a combined adjuvant system in order to improve the immunogenicity of the SPf66 malarial antigen. For that purpose, we have combined poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid microspheres, alginate, and polyinosinic polycytidilic acid. Our results show that microspheres can enhance the IgG production obtained with Freund's complete adjuvant. We have attributed this improvement to the presence of polyinosinic polycytidilic acid, since formulations comprising this adjuvant overcame the immune response from the others. In addition, our microspheres produced both IgG1 and IgG2a, leading to mixed Th1/Th2 activation, optimal for malaria vaccination. In conclusion, we have designed a preliminary formulation with a high potential for the treatment of malaria.

  3. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid treatment affects citrate and amino acid accumulation to improve fruit quality and storage performance of postharvest citrus fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Ling; Shen, Dandan; Luo, Yi; Sun, Xiaohua; Wang, Jinqiu; Luo, Tao; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Juan; Deng, Xiuxin; Cheng, Yunjiang

    2017-02-01

    The loss of organic acids during postharvest storage is one of the major factors that reduces the fruit quality and economic value of citrus. Citrate is the most important organic acid in citrus fruits. Molecular evidence has proved that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt plays a key role in citrate metabolism. Here, we investigated the effects of exogenous GABA treatment on citrate metabolism and storage quality of postharvest citrus fruit. The content of citrate was significantly increased, which was primarily attributed to the inhibition of the expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). Amino acids, including glutamate, alanine, serine, aspartate and proline, were also increased. Moreover, GABA treatment decreased the fruit rot rate. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and the content of energy source ATP were affected by the treatment. Our results indicate that GABA treatment is a very effective approach for postharvest quality maintenance and improvement of storage performance in citrus production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Lactic Acid Fermentation Improved Textural Behaviour, Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Chia (Salvia hispanica L. Dough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Yanina Bustos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, autochthonous lactic acid bacteria (LAB were isolated from chia (Salvia hispanica L. dough and selected on the basis of the kinetics of acidifi cation and proteolytic activity. Strain no. C8, identifi ed as Lactobacillus plantarum C8, was selected and used as starte r to obtain chia sourdough. Lactic acid fermentation increased the organic acid mass fractions (lactic, acetic and phenyl lactic acids to 12.3 g, 1.0 g and 23.8 μg per kg of dough respectively, and antioxidant activities, which increased by approx. 33–40 % compared to unfermented chia fl our dough. In addition, total phenolic content increased 25 % and its composition was strongly modifi ed aft er 24 h of fermentation by L. plantarum C8. Chlorogenic acid was only found in the fermented dough (2.5 mg/g, while ferulic acid was detected from the beginning of fermentation, being 32 % higher in chia sourdough (5.6 mg/g. The use of fermented chia sourdough improved the overall characteristics of white bread, including physical (e.g. reduced hardness and chewiness of the crumb and antioxidant properties (25 % on average, compared to the white bread. These results indicate that the use of chia sourdough could be a promising alternative to improve the technological and antioxidant properties of wheat bread. In addition, this work has shown, for the fi rst time, that lactic acid bacterium is able to ferment chia dough, improving its overall characteristics.

  5. Determination of organic acids evolution during apple cider fermentation using an improved HPLC analysis method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, H.; Zhou, F.; Ji, B.; Nout, M.J.R.; Fang, Q.; Zhang, Z.

    2008-01-01

    An efficient method for analyzing ten organic acids in food, namely citric, pyruvic, malic, lactic, succinic, formic, acetic, adipic, propionic and butyric acids, using HPLC was developed. Boric acid was added into the mobile phase to separate lactic and succinic acids, and a post-column buffer

  6. Determination of organic acids evolution during apple cider fermentation using an improved HPLC analysis method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, H.; Zhou, F.; Ji, B.; Nout, M.J.R.; Fang, Q.; Zhang, Z.

    2008-01-01

    An efficient method for analyzing ten organic acids in food, namely citric, pyruvic, malic, lactic, succinic, formic, acetic, adipic, propionic and butyric acids, using HPLC was developed. Boric acid was added into the mobile phase to separate lactic and succinic acids, and a post-column buffer solu

  7. Improved drug targeting of cancer cells by utilizing actively targetable folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zheyu; Li, Yan; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Oneill, Brian; Bi, Jingxiu

    2011-01-01

    Folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres (FA-AN) have been developed to provide an actively targetable drug delivery system for improved drug targeting of cancer cells with reduced side effects. The nanospheres were prepared by conjugating folic acid onto the surface of albumin nanospheres using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as a catalyst. To test the efficacy of these nanospheres as a potential delivery platform, doxorubicin-loaded albumin nanospheres (DOX-AN) and doxorubicin-loaded FA-AN (FA-DOX-AN) were prepared by entrapping DOX (an anthracycline, antibiotic drug widely used in cancer chemotherapy that works by intercalating DNA) into AN and FA-AN nanoparticles. Cell uptake of the DOX was then measured. The results show that FA-AN was incorporated into HeLa cells (tumor cells) only after 2.0h incubation, whereas HeLa cells failed to incorporate albumin nanospheres without conjugated folic acid after 4.0h incubation. When HeLa cells were treated with the DOX-AN, FA-DOX-AN nanoparticles or free DOX, cell viability decreased with increasing culture time (i.e. cell death increases with time) over a 70h period. Cell viability was always the lowest for free DOX followed by FA-DOX-AN4 and then DOX-AN. In a second set of experiments, HeLa cells washed to remove excess DOX after an initial incubation for 2h were incubated for 70h. The corresponding cell viability was slightly higher when the cells were treated with FA-DOX-AN or free DOX whilst cells treated with DOX-AN nanoparticles remained viable. The above experiments were repeated for non-cancerous, aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMC). As expected, cell viability of the HeLa cells (with FA receptor alpha, FRα) and AoSMC cells (without FRα) decreased rapidly with time in the presence of free DOX, but treatment with FA-DOX-AN resulted in selective killing of the tumor cells. These results indicated that FA-AN may be used as a promising actively targetable drug delivery system to improve drug

  8. Omega-3 fatty acids improve liver and pancreas function in postoperative cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Axel R; Rössel, Thomas; Gottschlich, Birgit; Tiebel, Oliver; Menschikowski, Mario; Litz, Rainer J; Zimmermann, Thomas; Koch, Thea

    2004-09-10

    Epidemiologic studies have indicated that high intake of saturated fat and/or animal fat increases the risk of colon and breast cancer. Omega-3 PUFAs in fish oil (FO) can inhibit the growth of human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These effects are related to the uptake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) into the cellular substrate pool and their competitive metabolism with arachidonic acid (AA) at the cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase levels. The metabolites of EPA and DHA have less inflammatory and immunosuppressant potency than the substances derived from AA. Based on previous experimental data, we hypothesized that FO supplementation after major abdominal cancer surgery would improve hepatic and pancreatic function. Ours was a prospective, randomized, double-blinded clinical trial on 44 patients undergoing elective major abdominal surgery, randomly assigned to receive total parenteral nutrition (TPN) supplemented with either soybean oil (SO 1.0 g/kg body weight daily, n = 20) for 5 days or a combination of FO and SO (FO 0.2 + SO 0.8 g/kg body weight daily, n = 24). Compared to pure SO supplementation in the postoperative period, FO significantly reduced ASAT [0.8 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.5 +/- 0.1 mmol/(l. sec)], ALAT [0.9 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.6 +/- 0.1 mmol/(l. sec)], bilirubin (16.1 +/- 5.3 vs. 6.9 +/- 0.6 mmol/l), LDH (7.7 +/- 0.4 vs. 6.7 +/- 0.4 mmol/(l. sec) and lipase (0.6 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.4 +/- 0.1 micromol/(l. sec) in the postoperative course. Moreover, patients with increased risk of sepsis (IL-6/IL-10 ratio >8) showed a tendency to shorter ICU stay (18 hr) under omega-3 PUFA treatment. Weight loss as encountered after the SO emulsion of 1.1 +/- 2.2 kg was absent in the FO group. After major abdominal tumor surgery, FO supplementation improved liver and pancreas function, which might have contributed to the faster recovery of patients.

  9. Improvement of glassy sol-gel sensors for preventive conservation of historical materials against acidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmona, N.

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Sensors based on sol-gel glassy coatings doped with 2[4-(dimethyl-amino phenylazo] benzoic acid are able to change their optical absorption when they are submitted to different concentration of H3O+ and OH-. The sensors behaviour in field tests was studied in Cracow (Poland, varying the normal procedure of operation to improve their response. Both the sensors optical parameters and the environmental conditions (temperature, humidity, pressure, SO2 and NOx concentrations were measured. The sensors response was analysed in terms of their visible absorbance changes, which are due to local neutralisation reactions in the sensors surface by the join effect of acid pollutants and humidity. Correlations between the main acid pollutant (SO2 concentration and the sensors response are established to provide a relation between the optical absorption and the environmental pH. The sensors are able to detect and monitorise environmental acidity, as well as to alert on the pollutant concentration that may damage most of the historical materials.

    Los sensores a base de recubrimientos vítreos sol-gel dopados con ácido 2[4-(dimetil-amino fenilazo] benzoico son capaces de cambiar su absorción óptica cuando se someten a distintas concentraciones de iones H3O+ y OH-. La respuesta de los sensores en ensayos de campo se estudió en Cracovia (Polonia variando el procedimiento normal de uso, con el fin de mejorar su respuesta. Se midieron tanto los parámetros ópticos de los sensores como las condiciones ambientales (temperatura, humedad, presión y concentraciones de SO2 y de NOx. La respuesta de los sensores se analizó en términos de los cambios de su absorción visible. Dichos cambios se deben a reacciones locales de neutralización que tienen lugar en la superficie de los sensores, debido al efecto conjunto de los contaminantes de carácter ácido y a la humedad ambiental. Se establecieron correlaciones entre la concentración del contaminante

  10. GABAergic inputs from direct and indirect striatal projection neurons onto cholinergic interneurons in the primate putamen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Kalynda Kari; Pare, Jean-Francois; Wichmann, Thomas; Smith, Yoland

    2013-08-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) are involved in reward-dependent learning and the regulation of attention. The activity of these neurons is modulated by intrinsic and extrinsic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and glutamatergic afferents, but the source and relative prevalence of these diverse regulatory inputs remain to be characterized. To address this issue, we performed a quantitative ultrastructural analysis of the GABAergic and glutamatergic innervation of ChIs in the postcommissural putamen of rhesus monkeys. Postembedding immunogold localization of GABA combined with peroxidase immunostaining for choline acetyltransferase showed that 60% of all synaptic inputs to ChIs originate from GABAergic terminals, whereas 21% are from putatively glutamatergic terminals that establish asymmetric synapses, and 19% from other (non-GABAergic) sources of symmetric synapses. Double pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy using substance P and Met-/Leu-enkephalin antibodies to label GABAergic terminals from collaterals of "direct" and "indirect" striatal projection neurons, respectively, revealed that 47% of the indirect pathway terminals and 36% of the direct pathway terminals target ChIs. Together, substance P- and enkephalin-positive terminals represent 24% of all synapses onto ChIs in the monkey putamen. These findings show that ChIs receive prominent GABAergic inputs from multiple origins, including a significant contingent from axon collaterals of direct and indirect pathway projection neurons. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. EEG sleep in depression and in remission and the REM sleep response to the cholinergic agonist RS 86.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann, D; Berger, M

    1989-06-01

    A comparison of the sleep EEG patterns of patients with a major depressive disorder intraindividually between remitted and depressed state revealed an improvement of parameters of sleep continuity and a tendency for normalization of rapid eye movement (REM) latency and REM density in the former. Additional application of the cholinergic agonist RS 86 prior to sleep did not reveal a heightened sensitivity of the REM sleep system in the remitted sample. Whereas a group of presently ill depressives displayed a drastic reduction of REM latency, results of the remitted patients were comparable to healthy controls. Furthermore, RS 86 significantly reduced slow-wave sleep in all groups investigated and had a differential impact on the density of the first REM period and early morning awakening in actively ill patients as compared to remitted patients. The results do not favor the hypothesis of a trait specificity of REM sleep abnormalities for depressive disorders. Furthermore they support the model of a cholinergic supersensitivity, as measured by REM induction after RS 86, as a state but not a trait marker of affective illness. Generalization of the present study may, however, be limited by the fact that the remitted patients were free of symptomatology and psychoactive medication for a long period (mean 3 years), therefore constituting an untypical group of formerly depressed patients with a seemingly low risk of relapse.

  12. Slight Fermentation with Lactobacillus fermentium Improves the Taste (Sugar:Acid Ratio) of Citrus (Citrus reticulata cv. chachiensis) Juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuanshan; Xiao, Gengsheng; Xu, Yujuan; Wu, Jijun; Fu, Manqin; Wen, Jing

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that fermentation with Lactobacillus fermentium, which can metabolize citric acid, could be applied in improving the taste (sugar:acid ratio) of citrus juice. During fermentation, the strain of L. fermentium can preferentially utilize citric acid of citrus (Citrus reticulata cv. Chachiensis) juice to support the growth without the consumption of sugar. After 6 h of fermentation with L. fermentium at 30 °C, the sugar:acid ratio of citrus juice increased to 22:1 from 12:1, which resulted in that the hedonic scores of sweetness, acidity and overall acceptability of fermented-pasteurized citrus juice were higher than the unfermented-pasteurized citrus juice. Compared with unfermented-pasteurized citrus juice, the ORAC value and total amino acid showed a reduction, and no significant change (P > 0.05) in the L*, a*, b*, total soluble phenolics and ascorbic acid (Vc) content in the fermented-pasteurized citrus juice was observed as compared with unfermented-pasteurized citrus juice. Hence, slight fermentation with L. fermentium can be used for improving the taste (sugar:acid ratio) of citrus juice with the well retaining of quality.

  13. Cholinergic basal forebrain structures are involved in the mediation of the arousal effect of noradrenaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelkes, Zoltán; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Stenberg, Dag

    2013-12-01

    Cholinergic basal forebrain structures are implicated in cortical arousal and regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Cholinergic neurones are innervated by noradrenergic terminals, noradrenaline excites them via alpha-1 receptors and microinjection of noradrenaline into the basal forebrain enhances wakefulness. However, it is not known to what extent the cholinergic versus non-cholinergic basal forebrain projection neurones contribute to the arousing effects of noradrenaline. To elucidate the roles of cholinergic basal forebrain structures we administered methoxamine, an alpha-1-adrenergic agonist into the basal forebrain, in intact animals and again after selective destruction of the basal forebrain cholinergic cells by 192 IgG-saporin. In eight male Han-Wistar rats implanted with electroencephalogram/electromyogram electrodes, a microdialysis probe targeted into the basal forebrain was perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid for 6 h on a baseline day, and with cerebrospinal fluid in the first and with methoxamine in the second 3-h period of the subsequent day. The sleep-wake activity was recorded for 24 h on both days. Saporin was then injected into the basal forebrain and 2 weeks later the same experimental schedule (with cerebrospinal fluid and methoxamine) was repeated. In the intact animals, methoxamine exhibited a robust arousing effect and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and REM sleep was suppressed. Lesioning of the basal forebrain cholinergic neurones abolished almost completely the NREM sleep-suppressing effect of methoxamine, whereas the REM sleep-suppressing effect remained intact. Thus, the basal forebrain cholinergic neurones mediate, at least in part, cortical arousal and non-REM sleep-suppression, but they are not involved in the REM sleep-suppressing effects of noradrenaline. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  14. Cholinergic axon length reduced by 300 meters in the brain of an Alzheimer mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Gitte; Jensen, Morten Skovgaard; West, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Modern stereological techniques have been used to show that the total length of the cholinergic fibers in the cerebral cortex of the APPswe/PS1deltaE9 mouse is reduced by almost 300 meters at 18 months of age and has a nonlinear relationship to the amount of transgenetically-induced amyloidosis. ....... These data provide rigorous quantitative morphological evidence that Alzheimer's-like amyloidosis affects the axons of the cholinergic enervation of the cerebral cortex....

  15. Cholinergic axon length reduced by 300 meters in the brain of an Alzheimer mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Gitte; Jensen, Morten Skovgaard; West, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Modern stereological techniques have been used to show that the total length of the cholinergic fibers in the cerebral cortex of the APPswe/PS1deltaE9 mouse is reduced by almost 300 meters at 18 months of age and has a nonlinear relationship to the amount of transgenetically-induced amyloidosis. ....... These data provide rigorous quantitative morphological evidence that Alzheimer's-like amyloidosis affects the axons of the cholinergic enervation of the cerebral cortex....

  16. Improved proteomic analysis following trichloroacetic acid extraction of Bacillus anthracis spore proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L; Wunschel, David S; Sydor, Michael A; Warner, Marvin G; Wahl, Karen L; Hutchison, Janine R

    2015-11-01

    Proteomic analysis of bacterial samples provides valuable information about cellular responses and functions under different environmental pressures. Analysis of cellular proteins is dependent upon efficient extraction from bacterial samples, which can be challenging with increasing complexity and refractory characteristics. While no single method can recover 100% of the bacterial proteins, selected protocols can improve overall protein isolation, peptide recovery, or enrichment for certain classes of proteins. The method presented here is technically simple, does not require specialized equipment such as a mechanical disrupter, and is effective for protein extraction of the particularly challenging sample type of Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores. The ability of Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) extraction to isolate proteins from spores and enrich for spore-specific proteins was compared to the traditional mechanical disruption method of bead beating. TCA extraction improved the total average number of proteins identified within a sample as compared to bead beating (547 vs 495, respectively). Further, TCA extraction enriched for 270 spore proteins, including those typically identified by first isolating the spore coat and exosporium layers. Bead beating enriched for 156 spore proteins more typically identified from whole spore proteome analyses. The total average number of proteins identified was equal using TCA or bead beating for easily lysed samples, such as B. anthracis vegetative cells. As with all assays, supplemental methods such as implementation of an alternative preparation method may simplify sample preparation and provide additional insight to the protein biology of the organism being studied.

  17. Chilling Tolerance Improving of Watermelon Seedling by Salicylic Acid Seed and Foliar Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad SAYYARI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chilling temperatures lead to numerous physiological disturbances in the cells of chilling-sensitive plants and result in chilling injury and death of tropical and subtropical plants such as watermelon. In this study, the possibility of cold stress tolerance enhancing of watermelon seedling (Citrullus lanatus by exogenous application of Salicylic acid (SA was investigated. SA was applied through seed soaking or foliar spray at 0, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mM concentration. After SA treatment, the seedlings were subjected to chilling 5 h/day at 4°C for 5 days. Statistical analysis showed significant effects of the application methods and SA concentrations on plant growth parameters, photosynthetic pigments, electrolyte leakage, proline and chilling injury index. SA application improved growth parameters and increased chlorophyll content of watermelon seedling subjected to chilling stress and provided significant protection against chilling stress compared to non-SA-treated seedlings. Although two SA application methods improved chilling stress tolerance, seed soaking method provided better protection compared to foliar spray method. SA ameliorated the injury caused by chilling stress via inhibiting proline accumulation and leaf electrolyte leakage. The highest cold tolerance was obtained with 0.5 mM SA application. Results indicate that SA could be used effectively to protect watermelon seedling from damaging effects of chilling stress at the early stages of growth.

  18. Polylactic acid with improved heat deflection temperatures and self-healing properties for durable goods applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, J T; Mauldin, T C; Boday, D J

    2014-11-12

    A method to recover fracture toughness after failure and increase thermal properties of polylactic acid (PLA) for use within durable goods applications is presented. Microcapsules were incorporated into PLA to form a composite material in which the microcapsules served the dual purpose of (1) releasing self-healing additives to fracture regions and (2) serving as nucleating agents to improve the PLA composite's thermal tolerance. Self-healing was achieved though embedment of dicyclopentadiene-filled microcapsules and Grubbs' first generation ruthenium metathesis catalyst, the former being autonomically released into damage volumes and undergoing polymerization in the presence of the catalyst. This approach led to up to 84% recovery of the polymer composite's initial fracture toughness. Additionally, PLA's degree of crystallinity and heat deflection temperature were improved by ∼ 11% and ∼ 21 °C, respectively, relative to nonfilled virgin PLA, owing to microcapsule-induced nucleation. The self-healing system developed here overcomes many property limitations of PLA that can potentially lead to its incorporation into various durable goods.

  19. Chilling Tolerance Improving of Watermelon Seedling by Salicylic Acid Seed and Foliar Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad SAYYARI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chilling temperatures lead to numerous physiological disturbances in the cells of chilling-sensitive plants and result in chilling injury and death of tropical and subtropical plants such as watermelon. In this study, the possibility of cold stress tolerance enhancing of watermelon seedling (Citrullus lanatus by exogenous application of Salicylic acid (SA was investigated. SA was applied through seed soaking or foliar spray at 0, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mM concentration. After SA treatment, the seedlings were subjected to chilling 5 h/day at 4°C for 5 days. Statistical analysis showed significant effects of the application methods and SA concentrations on plant growth parameters, photosynthetic pigments, electrolyte leakage, proline and chilling injury index. SA application improved growth parameters and increased chlorophyll content of watermelon seedling subjected to chilling stress and provided significant protection against chilling stress compared to non-SA-treated seedlings. Although two SA application methods improved chilling stress tolerance, seed soaking method provided better protection compared to foliar spray method. SA ameliorated the injury caused by chilling stress via inhibiting proline accumulation and leaf electrolyte leakage. The highest cold tolerance was obtained with 0.5 mM SA application. Results indicate that SA could be used effectively to protect watermelon seedling from damaging effects of chilling stress at the early stages of growth.

  20. Improved microscopical detection of acid-fast bacilli by the modified bleach method in lymphnode aspirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annam Vamseedhar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To improve the smear microscopy for detection of acid-fast bacilli (AFB in fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC of lymph node using the bleach method and also to compare this with cytological diagnosis and the conventional Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN method. Study Design: In 99 consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of tuberculosis (TB presenting with lymphadenopathy, FNACs were performed. Smears from the aspirates were processed for routine cytology and the conventional ZN method. The remaining material in the needle hub and/or the syringe was used for the bleach method. The significance of the bleach method over the conventional ZN method and cytology was analyzed using the χ2 test. Results: Of 99 aspirates, 93 were studied and the remaining six were excluded from the study due to diagnosis of malignancy in 4.04% (4/6 and inadequate aspiration in 2.02% (2/6. Among the 93 aspirates, 33.33% (31/93 were positive for AFB on conventional ZN method, 41.94% (39/93 were indicative of TB on cytology and the smear positivity increased to 63.44% (59/93 on bleach method. Conclusion: The bleach method is simple, inexpensive and potent disinfectant, also limiting the risk of laboratory-acquired infections. The implementation of the bleach method clearly improves microscopic detection and can be a useful contribution to routine cytology.

  1. Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids improve brain function and structure in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, A Veronica; Kerti, Lucia; Hermannstädter, Henrike M; Fiebach, Jochen B; Schreiber, Stephan J; Schuchardt, Jan Philipp; Hahn, Andreas; Flöel, Agnes

    2014-11-01

    Higher intake of seafish or oil rich in long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-n3-FA) may be beneficial for the aging brain. We tested in a prospective interventional design whether high levels of supplementary LC-n3-FA would improve cognition, and addressed potential mechanisms underlying the effects. Sixty-five healthy subjects (50-75 years, 30 females) successfully completed 26 weeks of either fish oil (2.2 g/day LC-n3-FA) or placebo intake. Before and after the intervention period, cognitive performance, structural neuroimaging, vascular markers, and blood parameters were assayed. We found a significant increase in executive functions after LC-n3-FA compared with placebo (P = 0.023). In parallel, LC-n3-FA exerted beneficial effects on white matter microstructural integrity and gray matter volume in frontal, temporal, parietal, and limbic areas primarily of the left hemisphere, and on carotid intima media thickness and diastolic blood pressure. Improvements in executive functions correlated positively with changes in omega-3-index and peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and negatively with changes in peripheral fasting insulin. This double-blind randomized interventional study provides first-time evidence that LC-n3-FA exert positive effects on brain functions in healthy older adults, and elucidates underlying mechanisms. Our findings suggest novel strategies to maintain cognitive functions into old age.

  2. Partition dataset according to amino acid type improves the prediction of deleterious non-synonymous SNPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jing; Li, Yuan-Yuan [School of Biotechnology, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Shanghai Center for Bioinformation Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China); Li, Yi-Xue, E-mail: yxli@sibs.ac.cn [School of Biotechnology, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Shanghai Center for Bioinformation Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China); Ye, Zhi-Qiang, E-mail: yezq@pkusz.edu.cn [Laboratory of Chemical Genomics, School of Chemical Biology and Biotechnology, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Key Laboratory of Systems Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proper dataset partition can improve the prediction of deleterious nsSNPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Partition according to original residue type at nsSNP is a good criterion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar strategy is supposed promising in other machine learning problems. -- Abstract: Many non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) are associated with diseases, and numerous machine learning methods have been applied to train classifiers for sorting disease-associated nsSNPs from neutral ones. The continuously accumulated nsSNP data allows us to further explore better prediction approaches. In this work, we partitioned the training data into 20 subsets according to either original or substituted amino acid type at the nsSNP site. Using support vector machine (SVM), training classification models on each subset resulted in an overall accuracy of 76.3% or 74.9% depending on the two different partition criteria, while training on the whole dataset obtained an accuracy of only 72.6%. Moreover, the dataset was also randomly divided into 20 subsets, but the corresponding accuracy was only 73.2%. Our results demonstrated that partitioning the whole training dataset into subsets properly, i.e., according to the residue type at the nsSNP site, will improve the performance of the trained classifiers significantly, which should be valuable in developing better tools for predicting the disease-association of nsSNPs.

  3. Basal forebrain neurons suppress amygdala kindling via cortical but not hippocampal cholinergic projections in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencz, I; Leanza, G; Nanobashvili, A; Kokaia, M; Lindvall, O

    2000-06-01

    Intraventricular administration of the immunotoxin 192 IgG-saporin in rats has been shown to cause a selective loss of cholinergic afferents to the hippocampus and cortical areas, and to facilitate seizure development in hippocampal kindling. Here we demonstrate that this lesion also accelerates seizure progression when kindling is induced by electrical stimulations in the amygdala. However, whereas intraventricular 192 IgG-saporin facilitated the development of the initial stages of hippocampal kindling, the same lesion promoted the late stages of amygdala kindling. To explore the role of various parts of the basal forebrain cholinergic system in amygdala kindling, selective lesions of the cholinergic projections to either hippocampus or cortex were produced by intraparenchymal injections of 192 IgG-saporin into medial septum/vertical limb of the diagonal band or nucleus basalis, respectively. Cholinergic denervation of the cortical regions caused acceleration of amygdala kindling closely resembling that observed after the more widespread lesion induced by intraventricular 192 IgG-saporin. In contrast, removal of the cholinergic input to the hippocampus had no effect on the development of amygdala kindling. These data indicate that basal forebrain cholinergic neurons suppress kindling elicited from amygdala, and that this dampening effect is mediated via cortical but not hippocampal projections.

  4. Cholinergic Depletion in Alzheimer’s Disease Shown by [18F]FEOBV Autoradiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime J. Parent

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. Alzheimer’s Disease (AD is a neurodegenerative condition characterized in part by deficits in cholinergic basalocortical and septohippocampal pathways. [18F]Fluoroethoxybenzovesamicol ([18F]FEOBV, a Positron Emission Tomography ligand for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT, is a potential molecular agent to investigate brain diseases associated with presynaptic cholinergic losses. Purpose. To demonstrate this potential, we carried out an [18F]FEOBV autoradiography study to compare postmortem brain tissues from AD patients to those of age-matched controls. Methods. [18F]FEOBV autoradiography binding, defined as the ratio between regional grey and white matter, was estimated in the hippocampus (13 controls, 8 AD and prefrontal cortex (13 controls, 11 AD. Results. [18F]FEOBV binding was decreased by 33% in prefrontal cortex, 25% in CA3, and 20% in CA1. No changes were detected in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, possibly because of sprouting or upregulation toward the resilient glutamatergic neurons of the dentate gyrus. Conclusion. This is the first demonstration of [18F]FEOBV focal binding changes in cholinergic projections to the cortex and hippocampus in AD. Such cholinergic synaptic (and more specifically VAChT alterations, in line with the selective basalocortical and septohippocampal cholinergic losses documented in AD, indicate that [18F]FEOBV is indeed a promising ligand to explore cholinergic abnormalities in vivo.

  5. Evaluating the evidence surrounding pontine cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin P Grace

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement (REM sleep - characterized by vivid dreaming, motor paralysis, and heightened neural activity - is one of the fundamental states of the mammalian central nervous system. Initial theories of rapid eye movement (REM sleep generation posited that induction of the state required activation of the ‘pontine REM sleep generator’ by cholinergic inputs. Here we review and evaluate the evidence surrounding cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation. We submit that: (i the capacity of pontine cholinergic neurotransmission to generate REM sleep has been firmly established by gain-of-function experiments, (ii the function of endogenous cholinergic input to REM sleep generating sites cannot be determined by gain-of-function experiments; rather, loss-of-function studies are required, (iii loss-of-function studies show that endogenous cholinergic input to the PFT is not required for REM sleep generation, and (iv Cholinergic input to the pontine REM sleep generating sites serve an accessory role in REM sleep generation: reinforcing non-REM-to-REM sleep transitions making them quicker and less likely to fail.

  6. Impact of the NGF maturation and degradation pathway on the cortical cholinergic system phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Simon; Leon, Wanda C; Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Bruno, Martin A; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Cuello, A Claudio

    2012-02-08

    Cortical cholinergic atrophy plays a significant role in the cognitive loss seen with aging and in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the mechanisms leading to it remain unresolved. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is the neurotrophin responsible for the phenotypic maintenance of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in the mature and fully differentiated CNS. In consequence, its implication in cholinergic atrophy has been suspected; however, no mechanistic explanation has been provided. We have previously shown that the precursor of NGF (proNGF) is cleaved extracellularly by plasmin to form mature NGF (mNGF) and that mNGF is degraded by matrix metalloproteinase 9. Using cognitive-behavioral tests, Western blotting, and confocal and electron microscopy, this study demonstrates that a pharmacologically induced chronic failure in extracellular NGF maturation leads to a reduction in mNGF levels, proNGF accumulation, cholinergic degeneration, and cognitive impairment in rats. It also shows that inhibiting NGF degradation increases endogenous levels of the mature neurotrophin and increases the density of cortical cholinergic boutons. Together, the data point to a mechanism explaining cholinergic loss in neurodegenerative conditions such as AD and provide a potential therapeutic target for the protection or restoration of this CNS transmitter system in aging and AD.

  7. Cholinergic systems are essential for late-stage maturation and refinement of motor cortical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Dhakshin S; Conner, James M; Anilkumar, Arjun A; Tuszynski, Mark H

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies reported that early postnatal cholinergic lesions severely perturb early cortical development, impairing neuronal cortical migration and the formation of cortical dendrites and synapses. These severe effects of early postnatal cholinergic lesions preclude our ability to understand the contribution of cholinergic systems to the later-stage maturation of topographic cortical representations. To study cholinergic mechanisms contributing to the later maturation of motor cortical circuits, we first characterized the temporal course of cortical motor map development and maturation in rats. In this study, we focused our attention on the maturation of cortical motor representations after postnatal day 25 (PND 25), a time after neuronal migration has been accomplished and cortical volume has reached adult size. We found significant maturation of cortical motor representations after this time, including both an expansion of forelimb representations in motor cortex and a shift from proximal to distal forelimb representations to an extent unexplainable by simple volume enlargement of the neocortex. Specific cholinergic lesions placed at PND 24 impaired enlargement of distal forelimb representations in particular and markedly reduced the ability to learn skilled motor tasks as adults. These results identify a novel and essential role for cholinergic systems in the late refinement and maturation of cortical circuits. Dysfunctions in this system may constitute a mechanism of late-onset neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett syndrome and schizophrenia.

  8. Lesions of the basal forebrain cholinergic system in mice disrupt idiothetic navigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam S Hamlin

    Full Text Available Loss of integrity of the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons is a consistent feature of Alzheimer's disease, and measurement of basal forebrain degeneration by magnetic resonance imaging is emerging as a sensitive diagnostic marker for prodromal disease. It is also known that Alzheimer's disease patients perform poorly on both real space and computerized cued (allothetic or uncued (idiothetic recall navigation tasks. Although the hippocampus is required for allothetic navigation, lesions of this region only mildly affect idiothetic navigation. Here we tested the hypothesis that the cholinergic medial septo-hippocampal circuit is important for idiothetic navigation. Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons were selectively lesioned in mice using the toxin saporin conjugated to a basal forebrain cholinergic neuronal marker, the p75 neurotrophin receptor. Control animals were able to learn and remember spatial information when tested on a modified version of the passive place avoidance test where all extramaze cues were removed, and animals had to rely on idiothetic signals. However, the exploratory behaviour of mice with cholinergic basal forebrain lesions was highly disorganized during this test. By contrast, the lesioned animals performed no differently from controls in tasks involving contextual fear conditioning and spatial working memory (Y maze, and displayed no deficits in potentially confounding behaviours such as motor performance, anxiety, or disturbed sleep/wake cycles. These data suggest that the basal forebrain cholinergic system plays a specific role in idiothetic navigation, a modality that is impaired early in Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Origin and immunolesioning of cholinergic basal forebrain innervation of cat primary auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamke, Marc R; Brown, Mel; Irvine, Dexter R F

    2005-08-01

    Numerous studies have implicated the cholinergic basal forebrain (cBF) in the modulation of auditory cortical responses. This study aimed to accurately define the sources of cBF input to primary auditory cortex (AI) and to assess the efficacy of a cholinergic immunotoxin in cat. Three anaesthetized cats received multiple injections of horseradish-peroxidase conjugated wheatgerm-agglutin into physiologically identified AI. Following one to two days survival, tetramethylbenzidine histochemistry revealed the greatest number of retrogradely labeled cells in ipsilateral putamen, globus pallidus and internal capsule, and smaller numbers in more medial nuclei of the basal forebrain (BF). Concurrent choline acetyltransferase immunohistochemistry showed that almost 80% of the retrogradely labeled cells in BF were cholinergic, with the vast majority of these cells arising from the more lateral BF nuclei identified above. In the second part of the study, unilateral intraparenchymal injections of the cholinergic immunotoxin ME20.4-SAP were made into the putamen/globus pallidus nuclei of six cats. Immuno- and histochemistry revealed a massive reduction in the number of cholinergic cells in and around the targeted area, and a corresponding reduction in the density of cholinergic fibers in auditory cortex. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for investigations of the role of the cBF in cortical plasticity.

  10. Evaluating the Evidence Surrounding Pontine Cholinergic Involvement in REM Sleep Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Kevin P; Horner, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep - characterized by vivid dreaming, motor paralysis, and heightened neural activity - is one of the fundamental states of the mammalian central nervous system. Initial theories of REM sleep generation posited that induction of the state required activation of the "pontine REM sleep generator" by cholinergic inputs. Here, we review and evaluate the evidence surrounding cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation. We submit that: (i) the capacity of pontine cholinergic neurotransmission to generate REM sleep has been firmly established by gain-of-function experiments, (ii) the function of endogenous cholinergic input to REM sleep generating sites cannot be determined by gain-of-function experiments; rather, loss-of-function studies are required, (iii) loss-of-function studies show that endogenous cholinergic input to the PTF is not required for REM sleep generation, and (iv) cholinergic input to the pontine REM sleep generating sites serve an accessory role in REM sleep generation: reinforcing non-REM-to-REM sleep transitions making them quicker and less likely to fail.

  11. Acupuncture Stimulation Alleviates Corticosterone-Induced Impairments of Spatial Memory and Cholinergic Neurons in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bombi Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine whether acupuncture improves spatial cognitive impairment induced by repeated corticosterone (CORT administration in rats. The effect of acupuncture on the acetylcholinergic system was also investigated in the hippocampus. Male rats were subcutaneously injected with CORT (5 mg/kg once daily for 21 days. Acupuncture stimulation was performed at the HT7 (Sinmun acupoint for 5 min before CORT injection. HT7 acupoint is located at the end of transverse crease of ulnar wrist of forepaw. In CORT-treated rats, reduced spatial cognitive function was associated with significant increases in plasma CORT level (+36% and hippocampal CORT level (+204% compared with saline-treated rats. Acupuncture stimulation improved the escape latency for finding the platform in the Morris water maze. Consistently, the acupuncture significantly alleviated memory-associated decreases in cholinergic immunoreactivity and mRNA expression of BDNF and CREB in the hippocampus. These findings demonstrate that stimulation of HT7 acupoint produced significant neuroprotective activity against the neuronal impairment and memory dysfunction.

  12. Hippocampal cholinergic interneurons visualized with the choline acetyltransferase promoter: anatomical distribution, intrinsic membrane properties, neurochemical characteristics, and capacity for cholinergic modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Feng eYi; Elizabeth eCatudio-Garrett; Robert eGabriel; Marta eWilhelm; Ferenc eErdelyi; Gabor eSzabo; Karl eDeisseroth; Josh eLawrence

    2015-01-01

    Release of acetylcholine (ACh) in the hippocampus (HC) occurs during exploration, arousal, and learning. Although the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca (MS-DBB) is the major extrinsic source of cholinergic input to the HC, cholinergic neurons intrinsic to the HC also exist but remain poorly understood. Here, ChAT-tauGFP and ChAT-CRE/Rosa26YFP (ChAT-Rosa) mice were examined in HC. The HC of ChAT-tauGFP mice was densely innervated with GFP-positive axons, often accompanied by large GFP-posit...

  13. Hippocampal “cholinergic interneurons” visualized with the choline acetyltransferase promoter: anatomical distribution, intrinsic membrane properties, neurochemical characteristics, and capacity for cholinergic modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Feng; Catudio-Garrett, Elizabeth; Gábriel, Robert; Wilhelm, Marta; Erdelyi, Ferenc; Szabo, Gabor; Deisseroth, Karl; Lawrence, Josh

    2015-01-01

    Release of acetylcholine (ACh) in the hippocampus (HC) occurs during exploration, arousal, and learning. Although the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca (MS-DBB) is the major extrinsic source of cholinergic input to the HC, cholinergic neurons intrinsic to the HC also exist but remain poorly understood. Here, ChAT-tauGFP and ChAT-CRE/Rosa26YFP (ChAT-Rosa) mice were examined in HC. The HC of ChAT-tauGFP mice was densely innervated with GFP-positive axons, often accompanied by large GFP-posit...

  14. Improved extraction of saturated fatty acids but not omega-3 fatty acids from sheep red blood cells using a one-step extraction procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Edward H; Gulliver, Catherine E; Piltz, John W; Taylor, Robert D; Blake, Robert J; Meyer, Richard G

    2012-07-01

    Several methods are available to extract total lipid and methylate fatty acids from a range of samples including red blood cells (RBC). Fatty acid analysis of human RBC can be undertaken using a two-step extraction and methylation or a combined one-step extraction and methylation procedure. The lipid composition of sheep RBC differs significantly from that of humans and may affect their extraction. The purpose of the current study was to examine the efficiency of extraction of lipid and detection of fatty acids from sheep RBC using a one-step procedure. Fatty acids were analysed using a one-step extraction and methylation procedure using methanol:toluene and acetyl chloride in comparison with a two-step procedure involving extraction of lipid using chloroform:methanol and separate methylation. Concentrations of saturated fatty acids including C16:0 and C18:0 were significantly higher (42.6 and 33.9 % respectively) following extraction using the one-step procedure compared with the two-step procedure. However, concentrations of some polyunsaturated fatty acids, including C20:5n-3 and C22:6n-3 were not significantly different between either procedure. The improved detection of fatty acids may be related to the ability of different solvents to extract different lipid fractions. The differential extraction of lipids and detection of fatty acids from sheep RBC may have important implications in studies examining the effect of dietary treatment on the possible health benefits of fatty acids.

  15. Improving the physical and moisture barrier properties of Lepidium perfoliatum seed gum biodegradable film with stearic and palmitic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedi, Samira; Koocheki, Arash; Mohebbi, Mohebbat; Zahedi, Younes

    2015-01-01

    Stearic and palmitic fatty acids (10%, 20% and 30%, W/W gum) were used to improve the barrier properties of Lepidium perfoliatum seed gum (LPSG) film. The impact of the incorporation of fatty acids into the film matrix was studied by investigating the physical, mechanical, and barrier properties of the films. Addition of stearic and palmitic fatty acids to LPSG films reduced their water vapor permeability (WVP), moisture content, water solubility and water adsorption. Increasing fatty acid concentration from 10% to 30%, reduced the elongation at break (EB). Lower values of tensile strength (TS) and elastic modulus (EM) were obtained in the presence of higher fatty acids concentrations. Incorporation of fatty acids led to production of opaque films and the opacity increased as function of fatty acids concentration. Results showed that moisture content, water solubility and WVP decreased as the chain length of fatty acid increased. Therefore, LPSG-fatty acids composite film could be used for packaging in which a low affinity toward water is needed.

  16. Improving Co-Amorphous Drug Formulations by the Addition of the Highly Water Soluble Amino Acid, Proline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrine Tarp Jensen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Co-amorphous drug amino acid mixtures were previously shown to be a promising approach to create physically stable amorphous systems with the improved dissolution properties of poorly water-soluble drugs. The aim of this work was to expand the co-amorphous drug amino acid mixture approach by combining the model drug, naproxen (NAP, with an amino acid to physically stabilize the co-amorphous system (tryptophan, TRP, or arginine, ARG and a second highly soluble amino acid (proline, PRO for an additional improvement of the dissolution rate. Co-amorphous drug-amino acid blends were prepared by ball milling and investigated for solid state characteristics, stability and the dissolution rate enhancement of NAP. All co-amorphous mixtures were stable at room temperature and 40 °C for a minimum of 84 days. PRO acted as a stabilizer for the co-amorphous system, including NAP–TRP, through enhancing the molecular interactions in the form of hydrogen bonds between all three components in the mixture. A salt formation between the acidic drug, NAP, and the basic amino acid, ARG, was found in co-amorphous NAP–ARG. In comparison to crystalline NAP, binary NAP–TRP and NAP–ARG, it could be shown that the highly soluble amino acid, PRO, improved the dissolution rate of NAP from the ternary co-amorphous systems in combination with either TRP or ARG. In conclusion, both the solubility of the amino acid and potential interactions between the molecules are critical parameters to consider in the development of co-amorphous formulations.

  17. Minor amounts of plasma medium-chain fatty acids and no improved time trial performance after consuming lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Bodil; Nybo, L.; Xu, Xuebing;

    2003-01-01

    % of maximum 02 uptake during which they ingested CHO or CHO plus specific structured triacylglycerols. Immediately after the constant-load cycling, the subjects performed a time trial of similar to50-min duration. Breath and blood samples were obtained regularly during the experiment. Fatty acid composition...... of plasma triacylglycerols, fatty acids, and phospholipids was determined. Performance was similar after administration of CHO plus specific structured triacylglycerol [medium-, long-, and medium-chain fatty acid (MLM)] compared with CHO (50.0 +/- 1.8 and 50.8 +/- 3.6 min, respectively). No plasma 8......:0 was detected in the plasma lipid classes, but the amount of phospholipid fatty acids was significantly higher after CHO+MLM compared with CHO intake. The lacking time trial improvement after intake of medium-chain fatty acids might be due to no available 8:0 in the systemic circulation. A higher level...

  18. Exposure to omega-3 fatty acids at early age accelerate bone growth and improve bone quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Netta; Simsa-Maziel, Stav; Shahar, Ron; Schwartz, Betty; Monsonego-Ornan, Efrat

    2014-06-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) are essential nutritional components that must be obtained from foods. Increasing evidence validate that omega-3 FAs are beneficial for bone health, and several mechanisms have been suggested to mediate their effects on bone, including alterations in calcium absorption and urinary calcium loss, prostaglandin synthesis, lipid oxidation, osteoblast formation and inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. However, to date, there is scant information regarding the effect of omega-3 FAs on the developing skeleton during the rapid growth phase. In this study we aim to evaluate the effect of exposure to high levels of omega-3 FAs on bone development and quality during prenatal and early postnatal period. For this purpose, we used the fat-1 transgenic mice that have the ability to convert omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids and the ATDC5 chondrogenic cell line as models. We show that exposure to high concentrations of omega-3 FAs at a young age accelerates bone growth through alterations of the growth plate, associated with increased chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. We further propose that those effects are mediated by the receptors G-protein coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) and hepatic nuclear factor 4α, which are expressed by chondrocytes in culture. Additionally, using a combined study on the structural and mechanical bone parameters, we show that high omega-3 levels contribute to superior trabecular and cortical structure, as well as to stiffer bones and improved bone quality. Most interestingly, the fat-1 model allowed us to demonstrate the role of maternal high omega-3 concentration on bone growth during the gestation and postnatal period. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Improvement of daptomycin production via increased resistance to decanoic acid in Streptomyces roseosporus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Kwon; Kim, Hong Rip; Jin, Ying-Yu; Yang, Seung Hwan; Suh, Joo-Won

    2016-10-01

    Daptomycin, a cyclic anionic lipopeptide compound produced by Streptomyces roseosporus, is used to treat skin infections caused by multi-drug resistant gram-positive pathogens. The biosynthesis of daptomycin is initiated by the condensation of decanoic acid (DA, a 10-carbon unit fatty acid) and the N-terminal l-tryptophan. So, the addition of DA to the fermentation medium is essential for increasing daptomycin production. However, increasing of DA concentration in the fermentation medium was not possible due to the high toxicity of DA. The previous studies reported that the cell growth of S. roseosporus was halted from 1 mM DA. In order to improve daptomycin production with increasing DA concentration in the medium, the DA-resistant S. roseosporus was developed via a sequential-adaptation method. The DA-resistant strain (DAR) showed complete resistance to 1 mM DA, and the daptomycin production was increased 1.4-fold (40.5 ± 0.7 mg/L) compared with the wild-type (28.5 ± 0.8 mg/L) at 1 mM DA. Additionally, the initial step of the daptomycin biosynthesis was enhanced by the overexpression of dptE and dptF in DAR. The dptEF overexpression DAR showed 3.9-fold (156.3 ± 8.2 mg/L) increase in the daptomycin production compared with DAR (40.1 ± 2.6 mg/L) at 1 mM DA.

  20. Designer laying hen diets to improve egg fatty acid profile and maintain sensory quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Erin M; Ryland, Donna; Gibson, Robert A; Aliani, Michel; House, James D

    2013-07-01

    The fatty acid composition of eggs is highly reflective of the diet of the laying hen; therefore, nutritionally important fatty acids can be increased in eggs in order to benefit human health. To explore the factors affecting the hen's metabolism and deposition of fatty acids of interest, the current research was divided into two studies. In Study 1, the fatty acid profile of eggs from Bovan White hens fed either 8%, 14%, 20%, or 28% of the omega-6 fatty acid, linoleic acid (LA) (expressed as a percentage of total fatty acids), and an additional treatment of 14% LA containing double the amount of saturated fat (SFA) was determined. Omega-6 fatty acids and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) in the yolk were significantly (P hens fed either (1) 15% or 30% of the omega-3 fatty acid, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) (of total fatty acids), and (2) low (0.5), medium (1), or high (2) ratios of SFA: LA+OA. Increasing this ratio resulted in marked increases in lauric acid, ALA, EPA, DPA, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), with decreases in LA and arachidonic acid. Increasing the dietary ALA content from 15% to 30% (of total fatty acids) did not overcome the DHA plateau observed in the yolk. No significant differences (P ≥ 0.05) in aroma or flavor between cooked eggs from the different dietary treatments were observed among trained panelists (n = 8). The results showed that increasing the ratio of SFA: LA+OA in layer diets has a more favorable effect on the yolk fatty acid profile compared to altering the LA content at the expense of OA, all while maintaining sensory quality.

  1. Glycolic acid chemical peeling improves inflammatory acne eruptions through its inhibitory and bactericidal effects on Propionibacterium acnes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Yuko; Hayashi, Nobukazu; Takeda, Mikiko; Ashikaga, Sayaka; Kawashima, Makoto

    2012-04-01

    Glycolic acid chemical peeling is effective for treating comedones, and some clinical data show that it also improves inflammatory eruptions. The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanism of glycolic acid chemical peeling to improve inflammatory acne. To assess growth inhibitory and bactericidal effects of glycolic acid on Propionibacterium acnes in vitro, we used an agar diffusion method and a time-kill method. To reveal bactericidal effects in vivo, we established an agar-attached method which correlated well with the ordinary swab-wash method, and we used the agar-attached method to compare the numbers of propionibacteria on the cheek treated with glycolic acid chemical peeling. Our results show that 30% glycolic acid (at pH 1.5, 3.5 and 5.5) formed growth inhibitory circles in the agar diffusion method, but the diameters of those circles were smaller than with 1% nadifloxacin lotion or 1% clindamycin gel. In the time-kill method, 30% glycolic acid (at pH 1.5 and 3.5) or 1% nadifloxacin lotion reduced the number of P. acnes to less than 100 CFU/mL within 5 min. In contrast, in 30% glycolic acid (at pH 5.5) or in 1% clindamycin gel, P. acnes survived for more than 4 h. Chemical peeling with 35% glycolic acid (at pH 1.2) decreased the number of propionibacteria on the cheeks of patients compared with untreated controls (P glycolic acid has moderate growth inhibitory and bactericidal effects on P. acnes, and that chemical peeling with glycolic acid works on inflammatory acne via those effects.

  2. POSSIBLE RELATIONSHIP OF FOLIC ACID SUPPLEMENTATION AND IMPROVED FLOW-MEDIATED DILATION IN PREMENOPAUSAL, EUMENORRHEIC ATHLETIC WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Z. Hoch

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if six weeks of folic acid supplementation would improve brachial artery endothelial-dependent flow-mediated dilation in eumenorrheic female runners with previously normal serum folate levels. This was a prospective, double-blinded, randomized pilot study with convenience sampling. Sixteen eumenorrheic subjects who were not taking birth control pills and who ran at least 20 miles/week were randomly assigned to 10 mg/day of folic acid supplementation or placebo for at least 6 weeks. Serum folate levels and brachial artery measurements were made during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, in a sedentary state, following an 8 hour fast; a standard ultrasound technique was used. The brachial artery vasodilator response to reactive hyperemia was similar between the folic acid (6.6% ± 0.8%, mean ± SE and placebo groups (6.5% ± 0.7% at baseline. After six weeks, there was a significantly higher change in flow-mediated dilation for the folic acid group (3.5% ± 0.6% compared to the placebo group (0.1% ± 0.2% (p = 0.01. Serum folate levels also increased significantly in the folic acid group following six weeks of folic acid supplementation. This study demonstrates that brachial artery flow-mediated dilation improves significantly in eumenorrheic female runners with previously normal serum folate levels after 6 weeks of supplementation with folic acid

  3. Ursodeoxycholic acid treatment is associated with improvement of liver stiffness in cystic fibrosis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Feen, Cathelijne; van der Doef, Hubert P. J.; van der Ent, Cornelis K.; Houwen, Roderick H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) might prevent progression of cystic fibrosis liver disease, but objective parameters for its effect are lacking. Methods: We used liver stiffness measurements to evaluate the effect of Ursodeoxycholic acid. Results: Paired measurements of liver stiffness were

  4. Absence of Rtt109p, a fungal-specific histone acetyltransferase, results in improved acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhao, Xinqing; Zhang, Mingming; Bai, Fengwu

    2016-03-01

    RTT109 is a histone acetyltransferase for the acetylation of histone H3. It is still not clear whether RTT109 plays a role in regulation of gene expression under environmental stresses. In this study, the involvement of RTT109 in acetic acid stress tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. It was revealed that the absence of RTT109 enhanced resistance to 5.5 g L(-1) acetic acid, which was indicated by improved growth of RTT109Δ mutant compared with that of the wild-type BY4741 strain. Meanwhile, the lag phase was shortened for 48 h and glucose consumption completed 36 h in advance for RTT109Δ mutant compared to the wild-type strain, with ethanol production rate increased from 0.39 to 0.60 g L(-1) h(-1). Significantly, elevated transcription levels of HSP12, CTT1 and GSH1, as well as increased activities of antioxidant enzymes were observed in RTT109Δ under acetic acid stress. Improved flocculation of RTT109Δ compared to that of the control strain BY4741 under the acetic acid stress was also observed. These results suggest that the absence of RTT109 not only activates transcription of stress responsive genes, but also improves resistance to oxidative stress, which ultimately contributes to improved acetic acid tolerance in S. cerevisiae.

  5. Improvement of Physicochemical Characteristics of Monoepoxide Linoleic Acid Ring Opening for Biolubricant Base Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Jumat Salimon; Nadia Salih; Bashar Mudhaffar Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    For environmental reasons, a new class of environmentally acceptable and renewable biolubricant based on vegetable oils is available. In this study, oxirane ring opening reaction of monoepoxide linoleic acid (MEOA) was done by nucleophilic addition of oleic acid (OA) with using p-toluene sulfonic acid (PTSA) as a catalyst for synthesis of 9(12)-hydroxy-10(13)-oleoxy-12(9)-octadecanoic acid (HYOOA) and the physicochemical properties of the resulted HYOOA are reported to be used as biolubricant...

  6. Reduced by-product formation and modified oxygen availability improve itaconic acid production in Aspergillus niger.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, A.; Pfelzer, N.; Zuijderwijk, R.; Brickwedde, A.; Zeijl, C. van; Punt, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus niger has an extraordinary potential to produce organic acids as proven by its application in industrial citric acid production. Previously, it was shown that expression of the cis-aconitate decarboxylase gene (cadA) from Aspergillus terreus converted A. niger into an itaconic acid produ

  7. Machine learning and hurdle models for improving regional predictions of stream water acid neutralizing capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas A. Povak; Paul F. Hessburg; Keith M. Reynolds; Timothy J. Sullivan; Todd C. McDonnell; R. Brion Salter

    2013-01-01

    In many industrialized regions of the world, atmospherically deposited sulfur derived from industrial, nonpoint air pollution sources reduces stream water quality and results in acidic conditions that threaten aquatic resources. Accurate maps of predicted stream water acidity are an essential aid to managers who must identify acid-sensitive streams, potentially...

  8. Maximized PUFA measurements improve insight in changes in fatty acid composition in response to temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dooremalen, van C.; Pel, R.; Ellers, J.

    2009-01-01

    A general mechanism underlying the response of ectotherms to environmental changes often involves changes in fatty acid composition. Theory predicts that a decrease in temperature causes an increase in unsaturation of fatty acids, with an important role for long-chain poly-unsaturated fatty acids (P

  9. Summary of an International and a Regional Symposium: Acid-Related Diseases - Improving Treatment Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The author examines the clinical impact of findings from a key international workshop on acid peptic disorders, “Appropriate acid suppression for the healing of acid-related diseases,” and from an important meeting which summarized results of a cross-Canada study of the symptomatic treatment of dyspepsia due to esophagitis and duodenal ulcer disease.

  10. Pharmacological Mechanisms of Cortical Enhancement Induced by the Repetitive Pairing of Visual/Cholinergic Stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Il Kang

    Full Text Available Repetitive visual training paired with electrical activation of cholinergic projections to the primary visual cortex (V1 induces long-term enhancement of cortical processing in response to the visual training stimulus. To better determine the receptor subtypes mediating this effect the selective pharmacological blockade of V1 nicotinic (nAChR, M1 and M2 muscarinic (mAChR or GABAergic A (GABAAR receptors was performed during the training session and visual evoked potentials (VEPs were recorded before and after training. The training session consisted of the exposure of awake, adult rats to an orientation-specific 0.12 CPD grating paired with an electrical stimulation of the basal forebrain for a duration of 1 week for 10 minutes per day. Pharmacological agents were infused intracortically during this period. The post-training VEP amplitude was significantly increased compared to the pre-training values for the trained spatial frequency and to adjacent spatial frequencies up to 0.3 CPD, suggesting a long-term increase of V1 sensitivity. This increase was totally blocked by the nAChR antagonist as well as by an M2 mAChR subtype and GABAAR antagonist. Moreover, administration of the M2 mAChR antagonist also significantly decreased the amplitude of the control VEPs, suggesting a suppressive effect on cortical responsiveness. However, the M1 mAChR antagonist blocked the increase of the VEP amplitude only for the high spatial frequency (0.3 CPD, suggesting that M1 role was limited to the spread of the enhancement effect to a higher spatial frequency. More generally, all the drugs used did block the VEP increase at 0.3 CPD. Further, use of each of the aforementioned receptor antagonists blocked training-induced changes in gamma and beta band oscillations. These findings demonstrate that visual training coupled with cholinergic stimulation improved perceptual sensitivity by enhancing cortical responsiveness in V1. This enhancement is mainly mediated by n

  11. Effect of bilobalide B on cholinergic hippocampal neurons exposed to cholesterol and apoliprotein E4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xijuan Jiang; Bin Lu; Yingchang Fan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extracts of ginkgo biloba leaves have been reported to improve nerve function and activity in Alzheimer's disease, which is associated with reduced secretion of cholinergic neurotransmitter in hippocampal neurons.OBJECTIVE: To validate the protective effect of bilobalide B against in vitro injury of cholinergic neurons of the hippocampus induced by combined cholesterol and apoE4DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This randomized, controlled animal experiment was performed in the Pathology Laboratory, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine from July 2003 to July 2006.MATERIALS: Neonatal Wistar rats, 1-day-old, both male and female, and mean body mass of 5g were selected for this study. Cholesterol and apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) were purchased from Sigma Company (USA), bilobalide B was purchased from Tianjin Zhongyi Pharmaceutical Factory, batch number 20050312.METHODS: Hippocampal neurons were divided into three groups; a normal control group (routinely added media), a model group (exposed to media containing 40mg/L cholesterol and 30mg/L apoE4 for 24 hours) and a bilobalide B group (exposed to media containing 160mg/L bilobalide B for 16 hours, and then with addition of 40mg/L cholesterol and 30mg/L apoE4 for an additional 24 hours).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Levels of acetylcholine (ACh) and activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in hippocampal neurons were determined by microdosage hydroxylamine colorimetry, hydroxylamine colorimetry and radiological chemistry, respectively.RESULTS: The ACh level was significantly lower in the model group than that in the normal control group (P0.05). Activity of ChAT was significantly lower in the model group than in the normal control group (P<0.01), while the activity was significantly higher in the bilobalide B group than in the model group (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Bilobalide B can enhance the ACh level of hippocampal neurons damaged by combined cholesterol and apoE4, by promoting

  12. Improvement of pea biomass and seed productivity by simultaneous increase of phloem and embryo loading with amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lizhi; Garneau, Matthew G; Majumdar, Rajtilak; Grant, Jan; Tegeder, Mechthild

    2015-01-01

    The development of sink organs such as fruits and seeds strongly depends on the amount of nitrogen that is moved within the phloem from photosynthetic-active source leaves to the reproductive sinks. In many plant species nitrogen is transported as amino acids. In pea (Pisum sativum L.), source to sink partitioning of amino acids requires at least two active transport events mediated by plasma membrane-localized proteins, and these are: (i) amino acid phloem loading; and (ii) import of amino acids into the seed cotyledons via epidermal transfer cells. As each of these transport steps might potentially be limiting to efficient nitrogen delivery to the pea embryo, we manipulated both simultaneously. Additional copies of the pea amino acid permease PsAAP1 were introduced into the pea genome and expression of the transporter was targeted to the sieve element-companion cell complexes of the leaf phloem and to the epidermis of the seed cotyledons. The transgenic pea plants showed increased phloem loading and embryo loading of amino acids resulting in improved long distance transport of nitrogen, sink development and seed protein accumulation. Analyses of root and leaf tissues further revealed that genetic manipulation positively affected root nitrogen uptake, as well as primary source and sink metabolism. Overall, the results suggest that amino acid phloem loading exerts regulatory control over pea biomass production and seed yield, and that import of amino acids into the cotyledons limits seed protein levels.

  13. Improved cellular response of ion modified poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) substrates for mouse fibroblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikari, Ananta Raj, E-mail: aa8381@gmail.com [Department of Sciences, Wentworth Institute of Technology, Boston MA 02115 (United States); Geranpayeh, Tanya [Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Chu, Wei Kan [Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Otteson, Deborah C. [Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Department of Basic and Vision Sciences, College of Optometry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    In this report, the effects of argon (Ar) ion irradiation on poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) substrates on biocompatibility were studied. PLGA scaffold substrates were prepared by spin coating glass surfaces with PLGA dissolved in anhydrous chloroform. Previously, we showed that surface modifications of PLGA films using ion irradiation modulate the inherent hydrophobicity of PLGA surface. Here we show that with increasing ion dose (1 × 10{sup 12} to 1 × 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}), hydrophobicity and surface roughness decreased. Biocompatibility for NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells was increased by argon irradiation of PLGA substrates. On unirradiated PLGA films, fibroblasts had a longer doubling time and cell densities were 52% lower than controls after 48 h in vitro. Argon irradiated PLGA substrates supported growth rates similar to control. Despite differences in cell cycle kinetics, there was no detectible cytotoxicity observed on any substrate. This demonstrates that argon ion irradiation can be used to tune the surface microstructure and generate substrates that are more compatible for the cell growth and proliferation. - Highlights: • Argon irradiation modifies surface chemistry and increases hydrophilicity of poly(lactic-glycolic) acid (PLGA) films. • Both native and irradiated PLGA films were not cytotoxic for mouse fibroblasts. • Fibroblast proliferation increased on PLGA substrates modified with higher doses of Argon irradiation. • Surface modification with Argon irradiation increases biocompatibility of PLGA films.

  14. Anti-inflammatory, anti-cholinergic and cytotoxic effects of Sida rhombifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Siau Hui; Teh, Soek Sin; Ee, Gwendoline Cheng Lian

    2017-12-01

    Sida (Malvaceae) has been used as a traditional remedy for the treatment of diarrhoea, malarial, gastrointestinal dysentery, fevers, asthma and inflammation. This study evaluates the anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic and anti-cholinergic activities of Sida rhombifolia Linn. whole plant for the first time. S. rhombifolia whole plant was extracted by n-hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol using Soxhlet apparatus. The plant extracts were evaluated for their antioxidant (DPPH, FIC and FRAP), anti-inflammatory (NO and protein denaturation inhibitions), cytotoxic (MTT) and anti-cholinesterase (AChE) properties in a range of concentrations to obtain IC50 values. GC-MS analysis was carried out on the n-hexane extract. The ethyl acetate extract exhibited the most significant antioxidant activities by scavenging DPPH radicals and ferrous ions with EC50 of 380.5 and 263.4 μg/mL, respectively. In contrast, the n-hexane extract showed the strongest anti-inflammatory activity with IC50 of 52.16 and 146.03 μg/mL for NO and protein denaturation inhibition assays, respectively. The same extract also revealed the strongest effects in anti-cholinesterase and cytotoxic tests at the concentration of 100 μg/mL, AChE enzyme inhibition was 58.55% and human cancer cells, SNU-1 and Hep G2 inhibition was 68.52% and 47.82%, respectively. The phytochemicals present in the n-hexane extract are palmitic acid, linoleic acid and γ-sitosterol. The present study revealed that the n-hexane extract possessed relatively high pharmacological activities in anti-inflammation, cytotoxicity and anti-cholinesterase assays. Thus, further work on the detail mechanism of the bioactive phytochemicals which contribute to the biological properties are strongly recommended.

  15. Improving Escherichia coli membrane integrity and fatty acid production by expression tuning of FadL and OmpF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zaigao; Black, William; Yoon, Jong Moon; Shanks, Jacqueline V; Jarboe, Laura R

    2017-02-28

    Construction of microbial biocatalysts for the production of biorenewables at economically viable yields and titers is frequently hampered by product toxicity. Membrane damage is often deemed as the principal mechanism of this toxicity, particularly in regards to decreased membrane integrity. Previous studies have attempted to engineer the membrane with the goal of increasing membrane integrity. However, most of these works focused on engineering of phospholipids and efforts to identify membrane proteins that can be targeted to improve fatty acid production have been unsuccessful. Here we show that deletion of outer membrane protein ompF significantly increased membrane integrity, fatty acid tolerance and fatty acid production, possibly due to prevention of re-entry of short chain fatty acids. In contrast, deletion of fadL resulted in significantly decreased membrane integrity and fatty acid production. Consistently, increased expression of fadL remarkably increased membrane integrity and fatty acid tolerance while also increasing the final fatty acid titer. This 34% increase in the final fatty acid titer was possibly due to increased membrane lipid biosynthesis. Tuning of fadL expression showed that there is a positive relationship between fadL abundance and fatty acid production. Combinatorial deletion of ompF and increased expression of fadL were found to have an additive role in increasing membrane integrity, and was associated with a 53% increase the fatty acid titer, to 2.3 g/L. These results emphasize the importance of membrane proteins for maintaining membrane integrity and production of biorenewables, such as fatty acids, which expands the targets for membrane engineering.

  16. Use of tannins to improve fatty acids profile of meat and milk quality in ruminants: A review

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    Rodrigo Morales

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews how tannins, through their effects on rumen lipid metabolism, can affect the composition of ruminants' meat and milk fat. Tannins are a heterogeneous group of plant secondary compounds known for both beneficial and detrimental effects on animals' digestive physiology. Tannins supplementation of ruminants' diets alters both in vivo and in vitro unsaturated fatty acids biohydrogenation and hence the profile of fatty acids outflowing the rumen, which can influence milk and meat content of beneficial fatty acids such as linolenic acid (c9,c12,c15-18:3, vaccenic acid (ti 1-18:1 and rumenic acid (c9,t11-18:2, among others. Published information indicates that tannins could inhibit biohydrogenation though affecting ruminal microorganisms. Some studies found increments in linolenic, rumenic and/or vaccenic acids in meat and milk fat using different sources of tannins; however, the effects of tannins supplementation on milk and meat fatty acid profile are not consistent, and there are contradictory results published in the literature. Effects of tannin supplementation on fatty acids biohydrogenation are affected by the chemical type of tannins, the complexity of their interactions with dietary components, and the potential microbial adaptation to tannins. In addition, the duration of the tannins-feeding period may also affect milk and meat fatty acid profile. Characterizing the effects of each specific tannic compound on different biohydrogenation steps and on the microbial species conducting them, as well as the interaction between specific tannin compounds and other dietary components can help to take greater advantage of tannins potential to contribute to improve human health through promoting beneficial fatty acids in ruminants products.

  17. Retinoic acid improves morphology of cultured peritoneal mesothelial cells from patients undergoing dialysis.

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    Carmen Retana

    Full Text Available Patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis are classified according to their peritoneal permeability as low transporter (low solute permeability or High transporter (high solute permeability. Factors that determine the differences in permeability between them have not been fully disclosed. We investigated morphological features of cultured human peritoneal mesothelial cells from low or high transporter patients and its response to All trans retinoic Acid (ATRA, vitamin A active metabolite, as compared to non-uremic human peritoneal mesothelial cells. Control cells were isolated from human omentum. High or low transporter cells were obtained from dialysis effluents. Cells were cultured in media containing ATRA (0, 50, 100 or 200 nM. We studied length and distribution of microvilli and cilia (scanning electron microscopy, epithelial (cytokeratin, claudin-1, ZO-1 and occludin and mesenchymal (vimentin and α-smooth muscle actin transition markers by immunofluorescence and Western blot, and transforming growth factor β1 expression by Western blot. Low and high transporter exhibited hypertrophic cells, reduction in claudin-1, occludin and ZO-1 expression, cytokeratin and vimentin disorganization and positive α-smooth muscle actin label. Vimentin, α-smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor-β1 were overexpressed in low transporter. Ciliated cells were diminished in low and high transporters. Microvilli number and length were severely reduced in high transporter. ATRA reduced hypertrophic cells number in low transporter. It also improved cytokeratin and vimentin organization, decreased vimentin and α-smooth muscle actin expression, and increased claudin 1, occludin and ZO-1 expression, in low and high transporter. In low transporter, ATRA reduced transforming growth factor-β1 expression. ATRA augmented percentage of ciliated cells in low and high transporter. It also augmented cilia length in high transporter

  18. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence

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    Lingjun Zuo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4. These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4, CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD.

  19. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lingjun; Garcia-Milian, Rolando; Guo, Xiaoyun; Zhong, Chunlong; Tan, Yunlong; Wang, Zhiren; Wang, Jijun; Wang, Xiaoping; Kang, Longli; Lu, Lu; Chen, Xiangning; Li, Chiang-Shan R.; Luo, Xingguang

    2016-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND) and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD) in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs) and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4). These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4, CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD. PMID:27827986

  20. Photocolorimetric Biosensor for Detection of Cholinergic Organophosphorus Compounds

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    Kamila Vymazalová

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available To detect nerve agents in practice, the analytical methods such as gas, liquid and thin-layer chromatography, mass spectrometry or capillary electrophoresis are usually used. Apart from these analytical methods, we developed an analytical device (tape photocolorimetric biosensor based on the modified Ellman's cholinesterase biochemical reaction for multidetection of cholinergic organophosphorus compounds. Enzyme butyrylcholinesterase was used as a biorecognizing component and its activity was evaluated by red, blue, green (RGB sensor. This method eliminates errors in the evaluation and provides automatic data collection with their subsequent evaluation. The unique method of dosing allows appropriate dispensing of reagents in microlitres volumes and the whole system is simple to operate. Suitability of the constructed biosensors was evaluated using the six organophosphates (Tabun, sarin, Soman, cyclosin, VX and R33 compound. Biosensor showed the ability to measure substances at concentrations ranging between ~ 1×10-8 mg/l - 1×10-6 mg/l in the air, according to their inhibition effect.Defence Science Journal, 2012, 62(6, pp.399-403, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.62.2589

  1. Cholinergic modulation of cognitive processing: insights drawn from computational models

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    Ehren L Newman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine plays an important role in cognitive function, as shown by pharmacological manipulations that impact working memory, attention, episodic memory and spatial memory function. Acetylcholine also shows striking modulatory influences on the cellular physiology of hippocampal and cortical neurons. Modeling of neural circuits provides a framework for understanding how the cognitive functions may arise from the influence of acetylcholine on neural and network dynamics. We review the influences of cholinergic manipulations on behavioral performance in working memory, attention, episodic memory and spatial memory tasks, the physiological effects of acetylcholine on neural and circuit dynamics, and the computational models that provide insight into the functional relationships between the physiology and behavior. Specifically, we discuss the important role of acetylcholine in governing mechanisms of active maintenance in working memory tasks and in regulating network dynamics important for effective processing of stimuli in attention and episodic memory tasks. We also propose that theta rhythm play a crucial role as an intermediary between the physiological influences of acetylcholine and behavior in episodic and spatial memory tasks. We conclude with a synthesis of the existing modeling work and highlight future directions that are likely to be rewarding given the existing state of the literature for both empiricists and modelers.

  2. Characterization of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human peripheral lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, J.W.; Halonen, M.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1988-02-01

    The authors have characterized the muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human peripheral lung membranes using the selective muscarinic antagonist (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine ((/sup 3/H)PZ) and the classical muscarinic antagonist (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinuclidinyl benzilate. High-affinity binding with pharmacologic specificity was demonstrated for both radioligands. The high affinity Kd for (/sup 3/H)PZ binding determined from saturation isotherms was 5.6 nM, and the Kd for (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding was 14.3 pM. Approximately 62% of the total muscarinic binding sites in human peripheral lung bind (/sup 3/H)PZ with high affinity. There was no significant effect of the guanine nucleotide, guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate, on the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinyclidinyl benzilate binding by the muscarinic agonist carbachol in peripheral lung membranes. If the muscarinic receptor with high affinity for PZ has an important role in bronchoconstriction, its characterization could result in the development of more selective bronchodilators.

  3. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lingjun; Garcia-Milian, Rolando; Guo, Xiaoyun; Zhong, Chunlong; Tan, Yunlong; Wang, Zhiren; Wang, Jijun; Wang, Xiaoping; Kang, Longli; Lu, Lu; Chen, Xiangning; Li, Chiang-Shan R; Luo, Xingguang

    2016-11-07

    It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND) and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD) in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs) and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4). These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4,CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD.

  4. Improved Resin–Zirconia Bonding by Room Temperature Hydrofluoric Acid Etching

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    Mun-Hwan Lee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study was conducted to evaluate the shear bond strength of “non-self-adhesive” resin to dental zirconia etched with hydrofluoric acid (HF at room temperature and to compare it to that of air-abraded zirconia. Sintered zirconia plates were air-abraded (control or etched with 10%, 20%, or 30% HF for either 5 or 30 min. After cleaning, the surfaces were characterized using various analytical techniques. Three resin cylinders (Duo-Link were bonded to each treated plate. All bonded specimens were stored in water at 37 °C for 24 h, and then half of them were additionally thermocycled 5000 times prior to the shear bond-strength tests (n = 12. The formation of micro- and nano-porosities on the etched surfaces increased with increasing concentration and application time of the HF solution. The surface wettability of zirconia also increased with increasing surface roughness. Higher concentrations and longer application times of the HF solution produced higher bond-strength values. Infiltration of the resin into the micro- and nano-porosities was observed by scanning electron microscopy. This in vitro study suggests that HF slowly etches zirconia ceramic surfaces at room temperature, thereby improving the resin–zirconia bond strength by the formation of retentive sites.

  5. Topical application of dressing with amino acids improves cutaneous wound healing in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsetti, Giovanni; D'Antona, Giuseppe; Dioguardi, Francesco Saverio; Rezzani, Rita

    2010-09-01

    The principal goal in treating surgical and non-surgical wounds, in particular for aged skin, is the need for rapid closure of the lesion. Cutaneous wound healing processes involve four phases including an inflammatory response with the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. If inflammation develops in response to bacterial infection, it can create a problem for wound closure. Reduced inflammation accelerates wound closure with subsequent increased fibroblast function and collagen synthesis. On the contrary, prolonged chronic inflammation results in very limited wound healing. Using histological and immunohistochemical techniques, we investigated the effects of a new wound dressing called Vulnamin that contains four essential amino acids for collagen and elastin synthesis plus sodium ialuronate (Na-Ial), compared with Na-Ial alone, in closure of experimental cutaneous wounds of aged rats. Our results showed that the application of Vulnamin dressings modulated the inflammatory response with a reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) immunolocalisation, while increasing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) immunolocalisation. Furthermore, the dressing increased the distribution density of fibroblasts and aided the synthesis of thin collagen fibers resulting in a reduction in healing time. The nutritive approach using this new wound dressing can provide an efficacious and safe strategy to accelerate wound healing in elderly subjects, simplifying therapeutic procedures and leading to an improved quality of life. 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. An improved HPLC-DAD method for clavulanic acid quantification in fermentation broths of Streptomyces clavuligerus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Malule, Howard; Junne, Stefan; López, Carlos; Zapata, Julian; Sáez, Alex; Neubauer, Peter; Rios-Estepa, Rigoberto

    2016-02-20

    Clavulanic acid (CA) is an important secondary metabolite commercially produced by cultivation of Streptomyces clavuligerus (Sc). It is a potent inhibitor of bacterial β-lactamases. In this work, a specific and improved high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method, using a C-18 reversed phase column, diode array detector and gradient elution for CA quantification in fermentation broths of Sc, was developed and successfully validated. Samples were imidazole-derivatized for the purpose of creating a stable chromophore (clavulanate-imidazole). The calibration curve was linear over a typical range of CA concentration between 0.2 and 400mg/L. The detection and quantification limits were 0.01 and 0.02mg/L, respectively. The precision of the method was evaluated for CA spiked into production media and a recovery of 103.8%, on average, was obtained. The clavulanate-imidazole complex was not stable when the samples were not cooled during the analysis. The recovery rate was 39.3% on average. This assay was successfully tested for CA quantification in samples from Sc fermentation, using both, a chemically defined and a complex medium.

  7. Polylactide/Poly(ω-hydroxytetradecanoic acid) Reactive Blending: A Green Renewable Approach to Improving Polylactide Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinella, Stephen; Cai, Jiali; Samuel, Cedric; Zhu, Jianhui; McCallum, Scott A; Habibi, Youssef; Raquez, Jean-Marie; Dubois, Philippe; Gross, Richard A

    2015-06-08

    A green manufacturing technique, reactive extrusion (REx), was employed to improve the mechanical properties of polylactide (PLA). To achieve this goal, a fully biosourced PLA based polymer blend was conceived by incorporating small quantities of poly(ω-hydroxytetradecanoic acid) (PC14). PLA/PC14 blends were compatibilized by transesterification reactions promoted by 200 ppm titanium tetrabutoxide (Ti(OBu)4) during REx. REx for 15 min at 150 rpm and 200 °C resulted in enhanced blend mechanical properties while minimizing losses in PLA molecular weight. SEM analysis of the resulting compatibilized phase-separated blends showed good adhesion between dispersed PC14 phases within the continuous PLA phase. Direct evidence for in situ synthesis of PLA-b-PC14 copolymers was obtained by HMBC and HSQC NMR experiments. The size of the dispersed phase was tuned by the screw speed to "tailor" the blend morphology. In the presence of 200 ppm Ti(OBu)4, inclusion of only 5% PC14 increased the elongation at break of PLA from 3 to 140% with only a slight decrease in the tensile modulus (3200 to 2900 MPa). Furthermore, PLA's impact strength was increased by 2.4× that of neat PLA for 20% PC14 blends prepared by REx. Blends of PLA and PC14 are expected to expand the potential uses of PLA-based materials.

  8. Salvianolic Acids Attenuate Rat Hippocampal Injury after Acute CO Poisoning by Improving Blood Flow Properties

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    Li Guan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO poisoning causes the major injury and death due to poisoning worldwide. The most severe damage via CO poisoning is brain injury and mortality. Delayed encephalopathy after acute CO poisoning (DEACMP occurs in forty percent of the survivors of acute CO exposure. But the pathological cause for DEACMP is not well understood. And the corresponding therapy is not well developed. In order to investigate the effects of salvianolic acid (SA on brain injury caused by CO exposure from the view point of hemorheology, we employed a rat model and studied the dynamic of blood changes in the hemorheological and coagulative properties over acute CO exposure. Compared with the groups of CO and 20% mannitol + CO treatments, the severe hippocampal injury caused by acute CO exposure was prevented by SA treatment. These protective effects were associated with the retaining level of hematocrit (Hct, plasma viscosity, fibrinogen, whole blood viscosities and malondialdehyde (MDA levels in red blood cells (RBCs. These results indicated that SA treatment could significantly improve the deformation of erythrocytes and prevent the damage caused by CO poisoning. Meanwhile, hemorheological indexes are good indicators for monitoring the pathological dynamic after acute CO poisoning.

  9. Improved focal liver lesion detection by increasing flip angle during gadoxetic acid-enhancement in MRI

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    Lee, Se Jy [Dept. of Medical science Graduate school, Chonnam National University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Keun [Dept. of Radiotechnology, Gwang-ju Health university, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To study the differences of focal liver lesion image detection at 3 minute, 10 minute and 15 minute time points on gadoxetic acid (GA)’s enhanced MR imaging with a flip angle (FA) of 30° compared with a 11°. The subjects were 69 patients evaluated with GA enhanced MR imaging with 3.0T MR scanner. The patients are total 35(23 men and 7 women at the mean age of 60.4 years), hepatocellular carcinoma(23) and metastsis(12) except for normal, cyst and hemangioma. After GA was injected, FA 11° and 30° images were obtained at 3 minute, 10 minute and 15 minute time points respectively. After quantitative and qualitative assessment of each image was done, statistical analysis was performed by using the independent sample T-test. From both quantitative and qualitative assessment of 3 minute and 10 minute MR images after the injection of GA, FA 30° images was found to be superior than FA 11°, but there were no statistical significance. However, at 15 minute time point, Statistically significant FA 30° image(p<0.05) was better than FA 11° therefore, the FA 30° improves the focal liver lesion detection. FA 30° of MR image can detect liver lesion more sensitively than the existing FA11° image after GA contrast enhancement at 15 minute time point.

  10. Whole-brain mapping of inputs to projection neurons and cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingchun; Wang, Daqing; He, Xiaobin; Feng, Qiru; Lin, Rui; Xu, Fuqiang; Fu, Ling; Luo, Minmin

    2015-01-01

    The dorsal striatum integrates inputs from multiple brain areas to coordinate voluntary movements, associative plasticity, and reinforcement learning. Its projection neurons consist of the GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that express dopamine receptor type 1 (D1) or dopamine receptor type 2 (D2). Cholinergic interneurons account for a small portion of striatal neuron populations, but they play important roles in striatal functions by synapsing onto the MSNs and other local interneurons. By combining the modified rabies virus with specific Cre- mouse lines, a recent study mapped the monosynaptic input patterns to MSNs. Because only a small number of extrastriatal neurons were labeled in the prior study, it is important to reexamine the input patterns of MSNs with higher labeling efficiency. Additionally, the whole-brain innervation pattern of cholinergic interneurons remains unknown. Using the rabies virus-based transsynaptic tracing method in this study, we comprehensively charted the brain areas that provide direct inputs to D1-MSNs, D2-MSNs, and cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum. We found that both types of projection neurons and the cholinergic interneurons receive extensive inputs from discrete brain areas in the cortex, thalamus, amygdala, and other subcortical areas, several of which were not reported in the previous study. The MSNs and cholinergic interneurons share largely common inputs from areas outside the striatum. However, innervations within the dorsal striatum represent a significantly larger proportion of total inputs for cholinergic interneurons than for the MSNs. The comprehensive maps of direct inputs to striatal MSNs and cholinergic interneurons shall assist future functional dissection of the striatal circuits.

  11. Illuminating the role of cholinergic signaling in circuits of attention and emotionally salient behaviors

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    Antonio eLuchicchi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh signaling underlies specific aspects of cognitive functions and behaviors, including attention, learning, memory and motivation. Alterations in ACh signaling are involved in the pathophysiology of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders. In the central nervous system, ACh transmission is mainly guaranteed by dense innervation of select cortical and subcortical regions from disperse groups of cholinergic neurons within the basal forebrain (e.g. diagonal band, medial septal, nucleus basalis and the pontine-mesencephalic nuclei, respectively. Despite the fundamental role of cholinergic signaling in the CNS and the long standing knowledge of the organization of cholinergic circuitry, remarkably little is known about precisely how ACh release modulates cortical and subcortical neural activity and the behaviors these circuits subserve. Growing interest in cholinergic signaling in the CNS focuses on the mechanism(s of action by which endogenously released ACh regulates cognitive functions, acting as a neuromodulator and /or as a direct transmitter via nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. The development of optogenetic techniques has provided a valuable toolbox with which we can address these questions, as it allows the selective manipulation of the excitability of cholinergic inputs to the diverse array of cholinergic target fields within cortical and subcortical domains. Here, we review recent papers that use the light-sensitive opsins in the cholinergic system to elucidate the role of ACh in circuits related to attention and emotionally salient behaviors. In particular, we highlight recent optogenetic studies which have tried to disentangle the precise role of ACh in the modulation of cortical-, hippocampal- and striatal-dependent functions.

  12. Neuroligin 2 is expressed in synapses established by cholinergic cells in the mouse brain.

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    Virág T Takács

    Full Text Available Neuroligin 2 is a postsynaptic protein that plays a critical role in the maturation and proper function of GABAergic synapses. Previous studies demonstrated that deletion of neuroligin 2 impaired GABAergic synaptic transmission, whereas its overexpression caused increased inhibition, which suggest that its presence strongly influences synaptic function. Interestingly, the overexpressing transgenic mouse line showed increased anxiety-like behavior and other behavioral phenotypes, not easily explained by an otherwise strengthened GABAergic transmission. This suggested that other, non-GABAergic synapses may also express neuroligin 2. Here, we tested the presence of neuroligin 2 at synapses established by cholinergic neurons in the mouse brain using serial electron microscopic sections double labeled for neuroligin 2 and choline acetyltransferase. We found that besides GABAergic synapses, neuroligin 2 is also present in the postsynaptic membrane of cholinergic synapses in all investigated brain areas (including dorsal hippocampus, somatosensory and medial prefrontal cortices, caudate putamen, basolateral amygdala, centrolateral thalamic nucleus, medial septum, vertical- and horizontal limbs of the diagonal band of Broca, substantia innominata and ventral pallidum. In the hippocampus, the density of neuroligin 2 labeling was similar in GABAergic and cholinergic synapses. Moreover, several cholinergic contact sites that were strongly labeled with neuroligin 2 did not resemble typical synapses, suggesting that cholinergic axons form more synaptic connections than it was recognized previously. We showed that cholinergic cells themselves also express neuroligin 2 in a subset of their input synapses. These data indicate that mutations in human neuroligin 2 gene and genetic manipulations of neuroligin 2 levels in rodents will potentially cause alterations in the cholinergic system as well, which may also have a profound effect on the functional properties

  13. Therapeutic potential and limitations of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanashiro, Alexandre; Sônego, Fabiane; Ferreira, Raphael G; Castanheira, Fernanda V S; Leite, Caio A; Borges, Vanessa F; Nascimento, Daniele C; Cólon, David F; Alves-Filho, José Carlos; Ulloa, Luis; Cunha, Fernando Q

    2017-03-01

    Sepsis is one of the main causes of mortality in hospitalized patients. Despite the recent technical advances and the development of novel generation of antibiotics, severe sepsis remains a major clinical and scientific challenge in modern medicine. Unsuccessful efforts have been dedicated to the search of therapeutic options to treat the deleterious inflammatory components of sepsis. Recent findings on neuronal networks controlling immunity raised expectations for novel therapeutic strategies to promote the regulation of sterile inflammation, such as autoimmune diseases. Interesting studies have dissected the anatomical constituents of the so-called "cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway", suggesting that electrical vagus nerve stimulation and pharmacological activation of beta-2 adrenergic and alpha-7 nicotinic receptors could be alternative strategies for improving inflammatory conditions. However, the literature on infectious diseases, such as sepsis, is still controversial and, therefore, the real therapeutic potential of this neuroimmune pathway is not well defined. In this review, we will discuss the beneficial and detrimental effects of neural manipulation in sepsis, which depend on the multiple variables of the immune system and the nature of the infection. These observations suggest future critical studies to validate the clinical implications of vagal parasympathetic signaling in sepsis treatment.

  14. Ameliorative Effect of Ginsenoside Rg1 on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Cognitive Impairment: Role of Cholinergic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yang; Peng, Jian; Wang, Xiaona; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Tianyin

    2017-01-11

    Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can induce systemic inflammation, and therefore disrupt learning and memory processes. Ginsenoside Rg1, a major bioactive component of ginseng, is shown to greatly improve cognitive function. The present study was designed to further investigate whether administration of ginsenoside Rg1 can ameliorate LPS-induced cognitive impairment in the Y-maze and Morris water maze (MWM) task, and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Results showed that exposure to LPS (500 μg/kg) significantly impaired working and spatial memory and that repeated treatment with ginsenoside Rg1 (200 mg/kg/day, for 30 days) could effectively alleviate the LPS-induced cognitive decline as indicated by increased working and spatial memory in the Y-maze and MWM tests. Furthermore, ginsenoside Rg1 treatment prevented LPS-induced decrease of acetylcholine (ACh) levels and increase of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Ginsenoside Rg1 treatment also reverted the decrease of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) protein expression in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus of LPS-treated rats. These findings suggest that ginsenoside Rg1 has protective effect against LPS-induced cognitive deficit and that prevention of LPS-induced changes in cholinergic system is crucial to this ameliorating effect.

  15. Positive effects of cholinergic stimulation favor young APOE epsilon4 carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Natalie L; King, Sarah L; Tabet, Naji; Rusted, Jennifer M

    2010-04-01

    The potential of putative cognitive-enhancing compounds to improve mental processing both in healthy and vulnerable populations is an area of growing interest to scientific and clinical communities. The possible influence of individual genetic differences on efficacy of these compounds has yet to be considered. We sought to investigate the profile of young-adult apolipoprotein E (APOE) varepsilon4 carriers across cognitive domains given that possession of this gene variant increases risk of developing dementia in later life. We also explored whether APOE genotype interacts with the cognitive enhancer, nicotine. A total of 1 mg of the cholinergic agonist nicotine was administered through nasal spray to healthy non-smoking young adults (aged 18-30) with either varepsilon3/varepsilon3 (N=29) or varepsilon4 (at least one varepsilon4 allele, N=27) genotype. Participants were matched on age, sex, and IQ in a placebo-controlled, double-blind 2 (drug: placebo, nicotine) x 2 (genotype: varepsilon3, varepsilon4) between subjects design. Here, we show that, paradoxically, possession of the varepsilon4 allele confers a cognitive advantage on tasks mediated by the frontal lobe, and that young carriers of the varepsilon4 allele show larger cognitive benefit from procholinergic nicotinic stimulation. These results are the first to show that genetic differences influence the efficacy of a cognitive enhancer.

  16. Thermostability Improvement of a Streptomyces Xylanase by Introducing Proline and Glutamic Acid Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Tian, Jian; Turunen, Ossi; Huang, Huoqing; Shi, Pengjun; Hua, Huifang; Wang, Caihong; Wang, Shuanghe

    2014-01-01

    Protein engineering is commonly used to improve the robustness of enzymes for activity and stability at high temperatures. In this study, we identified four residues expected to affect the thermostability of Streptomyces sp. strain S9 xylanase XynAS9 through multiple-sequence analysis (MSA) and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS). Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to construct five mutants by replacing these residues with proline or glutamic acid (V81P, G82E, V81P/G82E, D185P/S186E, and V81P/G82E/D185P/S186E), and the mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in Pichia pastoris. Compared to the wild-type XynAS9, all five mutant enzymes showed improved thermal properties. The activity and stability assays, including circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry, showed that the mutations at positions 81 and 82 increased the thermal performance more than the mutations at positions 185 and 186. The mutants with combined substitutions (V81P/G82E and V81P/G82E/D185P/S186E) showed the most pronounced shifts in temperature optima, about 17°C upward, and their half-lives for thermal inactivation at 70°C and melting temperatures were increased by >9 times and approximately 7.0°C, respectively. The mutation combination of V81P and G82E in adjacent positions more than doubled the effect of single mutations. Both mutation regions were at the end of long secondary-structure elements and probably rigidified the local structure. MDS indicated that a long loop region after positions 81 and 82 located at the end of the inner β-barrel was prone to unfold. The rigidified main chain and filling of a groove by the mutations on the bottom of the active site canyon may stabilize the mutants and thus improve their thermostability. PMID:24463976

  17. Tolerance to acetic acid is improved by mutations of the TATA-binding protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jieun; Kwon, Hyeji; Kim, Eunjung; Lee, Young Mi; Ko, Hyeok Jin; Park, Hongjae; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2015-03-01

    Screening a library of overexpressing mutant alleles of the TATA-binding gene SPT15 yielded two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (MRRC 3252 and 3253) with enhanced tolerance to acetic acid. They were also tolerant to propionic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Transcriptome profile analysis identified 58 upregulated genes and 106 downregulated genes in MRRC 3252. Stress- and protein synthesis-related transcription factors were predominantly enriched in the upregulated and downregulated genes respectively. Eight deletion mutants for some of the highly downregulated genes were acetic acid-tolerant. The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species was considerably lessened in MRRC 3252 and 3253 upon exposure to acetic acid. Metabolome profile analysis revealed that intracellular concentrations of 5 and 102 metabolites were increased and decreased, respectively, in MRRC 3252, featuring a large increase of urea and a significant decrease of amino acids. The dur1/2Δmutant, in which the urea degradation gene DUR1/2 is deleted, displayed enhanced tolerance to acetic acid. Enhanced tolerance to acetic acid was also observed on the medium containing a low concentration of amino acids. Taken together, this study identified two SPT15 alleles, nine gene deletions and low concentration of amino acids in the medium that confer enhanced tolerance to acetic acid.

  18. MyPyramid-omega-3 fatty acid nutrition education intervention may improve food groups and omega-3 fatty acid consumption in university middle-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Wan-Ju J; Lewis, Nancy M

    2013-02-01

    This study was conducted to assess the impact of a nutrition education intervention on food groups and omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid consumption in middle-aged women. We hypothesized that participants who received educational materials about n-3 fatty acids would have a higher consumption of foods rich in n-3 fatty acids than the MyPyramid group. The first phase of this study used the qualitative method to identify the beliefs and interests of middle-aged women about the topic of nutrition. Data were collected using semistructured individual interviews. Phase 2 was a quantitative study to assess the effectiveness of MyPyramid to improve dietary intake and self-efficacy after a 6-week online nutrition education intervention using a blog for university middle-aged female staff. The impact of n-3 fatty acid education on food consumption and self-efficacy was also assessed. Eight female staff (aged 45-65 years) in a Midwestern university participated in the interviews. Data were coded, and 3 themes emerged: "health," "lifestyle," and "availability." Eighty-eight middle-aged women participated in the intervention study and were randomized into either an intervention group or a control group. The overall consumption of the food groups was lower than the MyPyramid recommendation, except in the meat and beans group. There was a trend that participants were less certain to include n-3 fatty acids than whole grains in their diets. Using MyPyramid and supplementary information about n-3 fatty acids did not significantly affect participants' dietary consumption or self-efficacy to increase consumption from the food groups or to increase n-3 fatty acid consumption. Blog-based nutrition education is acceptable for this target population.

  19. Wetlands serve as natural sources for improvement of stream ecosystem health in regions affected by acid deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Katrina L; Lawrence, Gregory B; Passy, Sophia I

    2013-09-01

    For over 40 years, acid deposition has been recognized as a serious international environmental problem, but efforts to restore acidified streams and biota have had limited success. The need to better understand the effects of different sources of acidity on streams has become more pressing with the recent increases in surface water organic acids, or 'brownification,' associated with climate change and decreased inorganic acid deposition. Here, we carried out a large scale multi-seasonal investigation in the Adirondacks, one of the most acid-impacted regions in the United States, to assess how acid stream producers respond to local and watershed influences and whether these influences can be used in acidification remediation. We explored the pathways of wetland control on aluminum chemistry and diatom taxonomic and functional composition. We demonstrate that streams with larger watershed wetlands have higher organic content, lower concentrations of acidic anions, and lower ratios of inorganic to organic monomeric aluminum, all beneficial for diatom biodiversity and guilds producing high biomass. Although brownification has been viewed as a form of pollution, our results indicate that it may be a stimulating force for biofilm producers with potentially positive consequences for higher trophic levels. Our research also reveals that the mechanism of watershed control of local stream diatom biodiversity through wetland export of organic matter is universal in running waters, operating not only in hard streams, as previously reported, but also in acid streams. Our findings that the negative impacts of acid deposition on Adirondack stream chemistry and biota can be mitigated by wetlands have important implications for biodiversity conservation and stream ecosystem management. Future acidification research should focus on the potential for wetlands to improve stream ecosystem health in acid-impacted regions and their direct use in stream restoration, for example, through

  20. Wetlands serve as natural sources for improvement of stream ecosystem health in regions affected by acid deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Katrina L; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Passy, Sophia I.

    2013-01-01

    For over 40 years, acid deposition has been recognized as a serious international environmental problem, but efforts to restore acidified streams and biota have had limited success. The need to better understand the effects of different sources of acidity on streams has become more pressing with the recent increases in surface water organic acids, or 'brownification' associated with climate change and decreased inorganic acid deposition. Here, we carried out a large scale multi-seasonal investigation in the Adirondacks, one of the most acid-impacted regions in the United States, to assess how acid stream producers respond to local and watershed influences and whether these influences can be used in acidification remediation. We explored the pathways of wetland control on aluminum chemistry and diatom taxonomic and functional composition. We demonstrate that streams with larger watershed wetlands have higher organic content, lower concentrations of acidic anions, and lower ratios of inorganic to organic monomeric aluminum, all beneficial for diatom biodiversity and guilds producing high biomass. Although brownification has been viewed as a form of pollution, our results indicate that it may be a stimulating force for biofilm producers with potentially positive consequences for higher trophic levels. Our research also reveals that the mechanism of watershed control of local stream diatom biodiversity through wetland export of organic matter is universal in running waters, operating not only in hard streams, as previously reported, but also in acid streams. Our findings that the negative impacts of acid deposition on Adirondack stream chemistry and biota can be mitigated by wetlands have important implications for biodiversity conservation and stream ecosystem management. Future acidification research should focus on the potential for wetlands to improve stream ecosystem health in acid-impacted regions and their direct use in stream restoration, for example, through

  1. Chemical and physical characteristics of a soybean beverage with improved flavor by addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available A new method to obtain a soybean (SB with improved flavor characteristics was developed by adding ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA. The SB was evaluated for pH, viscosity and density, as well as for protein, oil and ash contents, fatty acid composition and lipoxygenase activity. A water/bean ratio of 4.5:1 was selected because it provided the best protein (4.22 g 100 ml-1 and total solids (8.80 g 100 ml-1 contents. Sensory ratings for flavor and aroma intensities were also determined and compared with those of a commercial soymilk and a soybean beverage without EDTA. Samples from SB had the lowest ratings for green/beany and rancid flavors. The results indicated that the addition of EDTA may reduce off-flavors in soybean products.Se ha desarrollado un nuevo método para obtener un alimento líquido de soja (ALS con mejores cualidades organolépticas mediante adición de ácido etilendiaminotetraacético (EDTA. En el producto obtenido se evaluaron el pH, la viscosidad y la densidad, así como también los contenidos de proteínas, grasas y cenizas, la composición en ácidos grasos y la actividad de lipoxigenasa. Se seleccionó una relación agua/haba de soja equivalente a 4.5:1 puesto que la misma produjo los más altos contenidos de proteínas (4.22 g 100 ml-1 y sólidos totales (8.80 g 100 ml-1. Se realizó una evaluación sensorial, mediante pruebas de aceptabilidad, del aroma y sabor del ALS y se compararon con los de una «leche de soja» comercial y un alimento líquido de soja sin agregado de EDTA. Las muestras de ALS presentaron las evaluaciones más bajas para sabores rancio y «afrijolado». Los resultados obtenidos indicaron que la adición de EDTA puede reducir sabores desagradables en productos de soja.

  2. Improvement of l-lactic acid productivity from sweet sorghum juice by repeated batch fermentation coupled with membrane separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Meng, Hongyu; Cai, Di; Wang, Bin; Qin, Peiyong; Wang, Zheng; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-07-01

    In order to efficiently produce l-lactic acid from non-food feedstocks, sweet sorghum juice (SSJ), which is rich of fermentable sugars, was directly used for l-lactic acid fermentation by Lactobacillus rhamnosus LA-04-1. A membrane integrated repeated batch fermentation (MIRB) was developed for productivity improvement. High-cell-density fermentation was achieved with a final cell density (OD620) of 42.3, and the CCR effect was overcomed. When SSJ (6.77gL(-1) glucose, 4.51gL(-1) fructose and 50.46gL(-1) sucrose) was used as carbon source in MIRB process, l-lactic acid productivity was increased significantly from 1.45gL(-1)h(-1) (batch 1) to 17.55gL(-1)h(-1) (batch 6). This process introduces an effective way to produce l-lactic acid from SSJ.

  3. Improvement of L: -Lactic Acid Production under Glucose Feedback Controlled Culture by Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Lu, JiKe; Zhao, Liqiang; Xiao, Kai; Tan, Tianwei

    2010-11-01

    In this study, a glucose feedback controller had been designed. Under the controller, the glucose concentration in l-lactic acid culture could be automatically controlled at 15 ± 1 g/L. Furthermore, l-lactic acid production by Lactobacillus rhamnosus LA-04-1 in fed-batch culture was significantly increased to 170 g/L l-lactic acid using the controller compared with 130 g/L l-lactic acid in pulse fed-batch and 135 g/L in l-lactic acid constant feed rate fed-batch cultures. The results showed that the controller was effective at glucose control in l-lactic acid culture. The control strategy could also be used in other fermentation processes.

  4. Improvement of Biodegradable Biocide’s Activity of Peroxyacetic Acid Basis Using Surfactants: Characterization and Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Asensio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the study of the kinetics decomposition reaction of the peroxyacetic acid under influence of surfactant additives. The peroxyacetic acid shows a decomposition rate of 1.70 × 10−3 h−1 and its activation energy is 66 kJ mol−1. The influence of temperature on the reaction of spontaneous decomposition of peroxyacetic acid was studied at two seasonal periods. Peroxyacetic acid standard and four prototypes of biocide samples with known concentration of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide were studied. Finally, a factorial analysis ANOVA was carried out to establish significant differences (p<0.003 between the four biocide samples over time with respect to peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide concentration. From the study carried out, it can be concluded that the biocide with surfactant substances in its composition offers the best stability and its difference versus the other biocides may guarantee a better behaviour.

  5. Chronically Increased Amino Acids Improve Insulin Secretion, Pancreatic Vascularity, and Islet Size in Growth-Restricted Fetal Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura D; Davis, Melissa; Wai, Sandra; Wesolowski, Stephanie R; Hay, William W; Limesand, Sean W; Rozance, Paul J

    2016-10-01

    Placental insufficiency is associated with reduced supply of amino acids to the fetus and leads to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). IUGR fetuses are characterized by lower glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, smaller pancreatic islets with less β-cells, and impaired pancreatic vascularity. To test whether supplemental amino acids infused into the IUGR fetus could improve these complications of IUGR we used acute (hours) and chronic (11 d) direct fetal amino acid infusions into a sheep model of placental insufficiency and IUGR near the end of gestation. IUGR fetuses had attenuated acute amino acid-stimulated insulin secretion compared with control fetuses. These results were confirmed in isolated IUGR pancreatic islets. After the chronic fetal amino acid infusion, fetal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and islet size were restored to control values. These changes were associated with normalization of fetal pancreatic vascularity and higher fetal pancreatic vascular endothelial growth factor A protein concentrations. These results demonstrate that decreased fetal amino acid supply contributes to the pathogenesis of pancreatic islet defects in IUGR. Moreover, the results show that pancreatic islets in IUGR fetuses retain their ability to respond to increased amino acids near the end of gestation after chronic fetal growth restriction.

  6. Folic acid and prevention of neural tube defects in 2000 improved awareness--low peri-conceptional uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleary, M; Donnell, R M; Johnson, H

    2001-06-01

    Eight years have passed since recommendations were made by the Irish Department of Health on the importance of folic acid in the prevention of neural tube defects (NTD). There is currently no mandatory fortification of foodstuffs with folic acid in Ireland, with reliance placed on campaigns promoting increased dietary folate intake and supplements. We assessed knowledge and use of folic acid among 300 women attending ante-natal clinics in Dublin maternity hospitals in the year 2000 using an interviewer administered questionnaire. Qualitative information was obtained through means of a focus group. Ninety two percent of respondents had heard of folic acid and 67% knew it could prevent NTD. Thirty per cent were advised to take it peri-conceptionally but overall only 18% did so; 39% of women had planned their pregnancy. The focus group indicated that folic acid was not 'visible' enough and that fortification of food was more realistic. This study shows that improved folic acid awareness has not been accompanied by corresponding peri-conceptional uptake in 2000. Folic acid promotional campaigns should be continuous and targeted. Mandatory food fortification should be strongly considered.

  7. Improving Pharmacy Students' Understanding and Long-term Retention of Acid-Base Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Roche, Victoria F.

    2007-01-01

    Despite repeated exposure to the principles underlying the behavior of organic acids and bases in aqueous solution, some pharmacy students remain confused about the topic of acid-base chemistry. Since a majority of organic drug molecules have acid-base character, the ability to predict their reactivity and the extent to which they will ionize in a given medium is paramount to students' understanding of essentially all aspects of drug action in vivo and in vitro. This manuscript presents a med...

  8. INHIBITION OF BILE ACID ACCUMULATION DECREASED THE EXCESSIVE HEPATOCYTE APOPTOSIS AND IMPROVED THE LIVER SECRETION FUNCTIONS ON OBSTRUCTIVE JAUNDICE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akmal Taher

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Excessive hepatocyte apoptosis induced by bile acid accumulation occurred in severe obstructive jaundice, and impair the liver secretion function. The objective of this study is to determine whether the inhibition of bile acid accumulation through bile duct decompression affect the excessive hepatocyte apoptosis and caused improvement the liver secretion functions on human model. In this study we use a before and after study on severe obstructive jaundice patients due to extra hepatic bile duct tumor was decompressed. Bile duct decompression was performed as a model of the role of inhibition of bile acid accumulation inhibition bile acid accumulation and excessive hepatocyte apoptosis. Bile acid and marker of liver secretion functions were serially measured. Liver biopsy pre and post decompression was performed for Hepatocyte apoptosis pathologic examination by TUNEL fluorescing, which measured by 2 people in double blinded system. Total bile acid, and liver secretion functions were measured by automated chemistry analyzer. The result of this study shows that twenty one severe obstructive jaundice patients were included. After decompression the hepatocyte apoptosis index decreased from an average of 53.1 (SD 105 to 11.7 (SD 13.6 (p < 0.05. Average of bile acid serum decreased from 96.4 (SD 53.8 to 19.9 (SD 39.5 until 13.0 (SD 12.6 μmol/L (p < 0.05 Total ilirubin decreased from 20.0 (SD 8.9 to 13.3 (SD 5.0 until 6.2 (SD 4.0 mg/dL (p < 0.05, while the phosphates alkaline (ALP and γ-glutamil transpeptidase (γ-GT activities also decreased ignificantly. In conclusion, bile acids accumulation and excessive hepatocyte poptosis through bile duct decompression improve the liver secretion functions by inhibition mechanism.

  9. Improving surface functional properties of tofu whey-derived peptides by chemical modification with fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matemu, Athanasia Oswald; Katayama, Shigeru; Kayahara, Hisataka; Murasawa, Hisashi; Nakamura, Soichiro

    2012-04-01

    Effect of acylation with saturated fatty acids on surface functional properties of tofu whey-derived peptides was investigated. Tofu whey (TW) and soy proteins (7S, 11S, and acid-precipitated soy protein [APP]) were hydrolyzed by Protease M 'Amano' G, and resulting peptide mixtures were acylated with esterified fatty acids of different chain length (6C to 18C) to form a covalent linkage between the carboxyl group of fatty acid and the free amino groups of peptide. Acylation significantly (P whey ultra filtered fraction (UFTW proteins.

  10. Reduction of phytic acid in soybean products improves zinc bioavailability in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J R; Fordyce, E J; Raboy, V; Dickinson, D B; Wong, M S; Burns, R A; Erdman, J W

    1992-12-01

    The inhibitory effect of phytic acid in soybean products on zinc bioavailability was evaluated in two experiments in rats. In Experiment 1, soybean flours containing different natural phytic acid levels produced by sand culture techniques that limited phosphorus during growth of the soybean plants were formulated into diets. The rats fed a higher phytic acid level diet had lower food intake, depressed weight gain, and lower tibia zinc gain (P phytic acid level was found. In Experiment 2, two commercially produced soybean isolates containing either normal phytic acid level or a reduced level were formulated into diets. Slope ratio analysis revealed that relative zinc bioavailability from phytic acid-containing soybean isolate-based diets was significantly reduced (P phytic acid soybean isolate-containing diets resulted in a significant increase of zinc bioavailability compared with normal phytic acid diets (P phytic acid is the primary inhibitory factor in soybean products that results in reduced zinc bioavailability and that phytate reduction in soybean protein increases zinc bioavailability.

  11. The cholinergic REM induction test with RS 86 after scopolamine pretreatment in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann, D; Hohagen, F; Fleckenstein, P; Schredl, M; Berger, M

    1991-09-01

    A shortened latency of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is one of the most stable biological abnormalities described in depressive patients. According to the reciprocal interaction model of non-REM and REM sleep regulation, REM sleep disinhibition at the beginning of the night in depression is a consequence of heightened central nervous system cholinergic transmitter activity in relation to aminergic transmitter activity. A recent study has indicated that muscarinic supersensitivity, rather than quantitatively enhanced cholinergic activity, may be the primary cause of REM sleep abnormalities in depression. The present study tested this hypothesis by treating healthy volunteers for 3 days with a cholinergic antagonist (scopolamine) in the morning, in an effort to induce muscarinic receptor supersensitivity. On the last day of scopolamine administration, RS 86, an orally active cholinergic agonist, was administered before bedtime to test whether this procedure would induce sleep onset REM periods. Whereas scopolamine treatment tended to advance REM sleep and to heighten REM density in healthy controls in comparison to NaCl administration, the additional cholinergic stimulation did not provoke further REM sleep disinhibition. This result underlines the need to take a hypofunction of aminergic transmitter systems into account in attempts to explain the pronounced advance of REM sleep typically seen in depressives.

  12. Caffeine elicits c-Fos expression in horizontal diagonal band cholinergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznikov, Leah R; Pasumarthi, Ravi K; Fadel, Jim R

    2009-12-09

    Caffeine is a widely self-administered psychostimulant with purported neuroprotective and procognitive effects in rodent models of aging. The cholinergic basal forebrain is important for arousal and attention and is implicated in age-related cognitive decline. Accordingly, we determined the effects of caffeine on cholinergic neuron activation in the rat basal forebrain. Young adult (age 2 months) male rats were treated with caffeine (0, 10, or 50 mg/kg) and killed 2 h later. Caffeine significantly increased c-Fos expression in cholinergic neurons of the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca but not other basal forebrain regions such as the medial septum or substantia innominata. The horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca provides cholinergic innervation to the olfactory bulb, suggesting that deficits in this structure may contribute to diminished olfactory function observed in Alzheimer's disease patients. These results suggest that part of the cognitive-enhancing effects of caffeine may be mediated through activation of this part of the cholinergic basal forebrain.

  13. Cholinergic involvement in Alzheimer's disease. A link with NGF maturation and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuello, A Claudio; Bruno, Martin A; Allard, Simon; Leon, Wanda; Iulita, M Florencia

    2010-01-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons are highly dependent on nerve growth factor (NGF) supply for the maintenance of their cholinergic phenotype as well as their cholinergic synaptic integrity. The precursor form of NGF, proNGF, abounds in the CNS and is highly elevated in Alzheimer's disease. In order to obtain a deeper understanding of the NGF biology in the CNS, we have performed a series of ex vivo and in vivo investigations to elucidate the mechanisms of release, maturation and degradation of this neurotrophin. In this short review, we describe this NGF metabolic pathway, its significance for the maintenance of basal cholinergic neurons, and its dysregulation in Alzheimer's disease. We are proposing that the conversion of proNGF to mature NGF occurs in the extracellular space by the coordinated action of zymogens, convertases, and endogenous regulators, which are released in the extracellular space in an activity-dependent fashion. We further discuss our findings of a diminished conversion of the NGF precursor molecule to its mature form in Alzheimer's disease as well as an augmented degradation of mature NGF. These combined effects on NGF metabolism would explain the well-known cholinergic atrophy found in Alzheimer's disease and would offer new therapeutic opportunities aimed at correcting the NGF dysmetabolism along with Abeta-induced inflammatory responses.

  14. Upregulating Nonneuronal Cholinergic Activity Decreases TNF Release from Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW264.7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lv

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonneuronal cholinergic system plays a primary role in maintaining homeostasis. It has been proved that endogenous neuronal acetylcholine (ACh could play an anti-inflammatory role, and exogenous cholinergic agonists could weaken macrophages inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation through activation of α7 subunit-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR. We assumed that nonneuronal cholinergic system existing in macrophages could modulate inflammation through autocrine ACh and expressed α7nAChR on the cells. Therefore, we explored whether LPS continuous stimulation could upregulate the nonneuronal cholinergic activity in macrophages and whether increasing autocrine ACh could decrease TNF release from the macrophages. The results showed that, in RAW264.7 cells incubated with LPS for 20 hours, the secretion of ACh was significantly decreased at 4 h and then gradually increased, accompanied with the enhancement of α7nAChR expression level. The release of TNF was greatly increased from RAW264.7 cells at 4 h and 8 h exposure to LPS; however, it was suppressed at 20 h. Upregulating choline acetyltransferase (ChAT expression through ChAT gene transfection could enhance ACh secretion and reduce TNF release from the infected RAW264. 7cells. The results indicated that LPS stimulation could modulate the activity of nonneuronal cholinergic system of RAW264.7 cells. Enhancing autocrine ACh production could attenuate TNF release from RAW264.7 cells.

  15. Chronic Cerebral Ischaemia Forms New Cholinergic Mechanisms of Learning and Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Zakharova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was a comparative analysis of cholinergic synaptic organization following learning and memory in normal and chronic cerebral ischaemic rats in the Morris water maze model. Choline acetyltransferase and protein content were determined in subpopulations of presynapses of “light” and “heavy” synaptosomal fractions of the cortex and the hippocampus, and the cholinergic projective and intrinsic systems of the brain structures were taken into consideration. We found a strong involvement of cholinergic systems, both projective and intrinsic, in all forms of cognition. Each form of cognition had an individual cholinergic molecular profile and the cholinergic synaptic compositions in the ischaemic rat brains differed significantly from normal ones. Our data demonstrated that under ischaemic conditions, instead of damaged connections new key synaptic relationships, which were stable against pathological influences and able to restore damaged cognitive functions, arose. The plasticity of neurochemical links in the individual organization of certain types of cognition gave a new input into brain pathology and can be used in the future for alternative corrections of vascular and other degenerative dementias.

  16. Optogenetic identification of an intrinsic cholinergically driven inhibitory oscillator sensitive to cannabinoids and opioids in hippocampal CA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagode, Daniel A; Tang, Ai-Hui; Yang, Kun; Alger, Bradley E

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal electrical oscillations in the theta (4-14 Hz) and gamma (30-80 Hz) ranges are necessary for the performance of certain animal behaviours and cognitive processes. Perisomatic GABAergic inhibition is prominently involved in cortical oscillations driven by ACh release from septal cholinergic afferents. In neocortex and hippocampal CA3 regions, parvalbumin (PV)-expressing basket cells, activated by ACh and glutamatergic agonists, largely mediate oscillations. However, in CA1 hippocampus in vitro, cholinergic agonists or the optogenetic release of endogenous ACh from septal afferents induces rhythmic, theta-frequency inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in pyramidal cells, even with glutamatergic transmission blocked. The IPSCs are regulated by exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids, suggesting that they arise from type 1 cannabinoid receptor-expressing (CB1R+) interneurons - mainly cholecystokinin (CCK)-expressing cells. Nevertheless, an occult contribution of PV-expressing interneurons to these rhythms remained conceivable. Here, we directly test this hypothesis by selectively silencing CA1 PV-expressing cells optogenetically with halorhodopsin or archaerhodopsin. However, this had no effect on theta-frequency IPSC rhythms induced by carbachol (CCh). In contrast, the silencing of glutamic acid decarboxylase 2-positive interneurons, which include the CCK-expressing basket cells, strongly suppressed inhibitory oscillations; PV-expressing interneurons appear to play no role. The low-frequency IPSC oscillations induced by CCh or optogenetically stimulated ACh release were also inhibited by a μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist, which was unexpected because MORs in CA1 are not usually associated with CCK-expressing cells. Our results reveal novel properties of an inhibitory oscillator circuit within CA1 that is activated by muscarinic agonists. The oscillations could contribute to behaviourally relevant, atropine-sensitive, theta rhythms and link cannabinoid and

  17. Improvement of yeast tolerance to acetic acid through Haa1 transcription factor engineering: towards the underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnen, Steve; Henriques, Sílvia F; Shrestha, Ranjan; Ho, Ping-Wei; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Nevoigt, Elke

    2017-01-09

    Besides being a major regulator of the response to acetic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Haa1 is an important determinant of the tolerance to this acid. The engineering of Haa1 either by overexpression or mutagenesis has therefore been considered to be a promising avenue towards the construction of more robust strains with improved acetic acid tolerance. By applying the concept of global transcription machinery engineering to the regulon-specific transcription factor Haa1, a mutant allele containing two point mutations could be selected that resulted in a significantly higher acetic acid tolerance as compared to the wild-type allele. The level of improvement obtained was comparable to the level obtained by overexpression of HAA1, which was achieved by introduction of a second copy of the native HAA1 gene. Dissection of the contribution of the two point mutations to the phenotype showed that the major improvement was caused by an amino acid exchange at position 135 (serine to phenylalanine). In order to further study the mechanisms underlying the tolerance phenotype, Haa1 translocation and transcriptional activation of Haa1 target genes was compared between Haa1 mutant, overproduction and wild-type strains. While the rapid Haa1 translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus in response to acetic acid was not affected in the Haa1(S135F) mutant strain, the levels of transcriptional activation of four selected Haa1-target genes by acetic acid were significantly higher in cells of the mutant strain as compared to cells of the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the time-course of transcriptional activation in response to acetic acid was comparable for the mutant and wild-type strain whereas the maximum mRNA levels obtained correlate with each strain's tolerance level. Our data confirms that engineering of the regulon-specific transcription factor Haa1 allows the improvement of acetic acid tolerance in S. cerevisiae. It was also shown that the

  18. Engineering cellular redox balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for improved production of L-lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Young; Kang, Chang Duk; Lee, Seung Hyun; Park, Young Kyoung; Cho, Kwang Myung

    2015-04-01

    Owing to the growing market for the biodegradable and renewable polymer, polylactic acid, world demand for lactic acid is rapidly increasing. However, the very high concentrations desired for industrial production of the free lactic acid create toxicity and low pH concerns for manufacturers. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most well characterized eukaryote, a preferred microbial cell factory for the largest industrial biotechnology product (bioethanol), and a robust, commercially compatible workhorse to be exploited for the production of diverse chemicals. S. cerevisiae has also been explored as a host for lactic acid production because of its high acid tolerance. Here, we constructed an L-lactic acid-overproducing S. cerevisiae by redirecting cellular metabolic fluxes to the production of L-lactic acid. To this end, we deleted the S. cerevisiae genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase 1 (PDC1), L-lactate cytochrome-c oxidoreductase (CYB2), and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1), replacing them with a heterologous L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) gene. Two new target genes encoding isoenzymes of the external NADH dehydrogenase (NDE1 and NDE2), were also deleted from the genome to re-engineer the intracellular redox balance. The resulting strain was found to produce L-lactic acid more efficiently (32.6% increase in final L-lactic acid titer). When tested in a bioreactor in fed-batch mode, this engineered strain produced 117 g/L of L-lactic acid under low pH conditions. This result demonstrates that the redox balance engineering should be coupled with the metabolic engineering in the construction of L-lactic acid-overproducing S. cerevisiae.

  19. Valproic Acid Use During Radiation Therapy for Glioblastoma Associated With Improved Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Christopher A., E-mail: barkerc@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bishop, Andrew J.; Chang, Maria; Beal, Kathryn; Chan, Timothy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Valproic acid (VA) is an antiepileptic drug (AED) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor taken by patients with glioblastoma (GB) to manage seizures, and it can modulate the biologic effects of radiation therapy (RT). We investigated whether VA use during RT for GB was associated with overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Medical records of 544 adults with GB were retrospectively reviewed. Analyses were performed to determine the association of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RTOG RPA) class, seizure history, and concurrent temozolomide (TMZ) and AED use during RT with OS. Results: Seizures before the end of RT were noted in 217 (40%) patients, and 403 (74%) were taking an AED during RT; 29 (7%) were taking VA. Median OS in patients taking VA was 16.9 months (vs 13.6 months taking another AED, P=.16). Among patients taking an AED during RT, OS was associated with VA (P=.047; hazard ratio [HR], 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27-1.07), and RTOG RPA class (P<.0001; HR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.37-1.61). Of the 5 most common AEDs, only VA was associated with OS. Median OS of patients receiving VA and TMZ during RT was 23.9 months (vs 15.2 months for patients taking another AED, P=.26). When the analysis was restricted to patients who received concurrent TMZ, VA use was marginally associated with OS (P=.057; HR, 0.54; 95% CI, −0.09 to 1.17), independently of RTOG RPA class and seizure history. Conclusions: VA use during RT for GB was associated with improved OS, independently of RTOG RPA, seizure history, and concurrent TMZ use. Further studies of treatment that combines HDAC inhibitors and RT are warranted.

  20. Improving drought and salinity tolerance in barley by application of salicylic acid and potassium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalaf Ali Fayez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth and physiological activities of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Gustoe grown in soil cultures were evaluated to recognize the ameliorative role of salicylic acid (SA and KNO3 against the negative effects of salt and water deficit stresses. Barley plants were subjected to three levels of NaCl (50, 100 and 150 mM, three levels of water stress (80%, 70% and 50% of the soil water content (SWC and the combination of 150 mM NaCl + 50 μM SA, 150 mM NaCl + 10 mM KNO3, 50% SWC + 50 μM SA and 50% SWC + 10 mM KNO3 for two weeks. Salt and water deficit stresses reduced the shoot growth, leaf photosynthetic pigments, K+ contents and provoked oxidative stress in leaves confirmed by considerable changes in soluble carbohydrate, proline, malondialdehyde (MDA, total phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity and Na+ contents. Leaf soluble protein of salt and water deficit treated plants was unaffected. The Na+/K+ ratio increased with increasing salt and water deficit treated plants. Application of 50 μM SA or 10 mM KNO3 to150 mM NaCl and/or 50% SWC treated plants improved these attributes under salt and water stresses. Soluble carbohydrates in stressed plants may have a significant role in osmotic adjustment. It can be concluded that the addition of SA or KNO3 can ameliorate the oxidative stress in barley stressed plants. This ameliorative effect might be maintained through low MDA contents and decreased Na+/K+ ratio in leaves. This study also provided evidence for the ability of barley cultivation in salt and water deficit soils due to its capacity for osmotic adjustment.

  1. Lignosulfonate Improves Photostability and Bioactivity of Abscisic Acid under Ultraviolet Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Yu, Sha; Tao, Qun; Tan, Weiming; Duan, Liusheng; Li, Zhaohu; Cui, Haixin

    2017-09-13

    Abscisic acid (ABA), as a commonly used plant growth regulator, is easy to be degraded and lose its bioactivity under sunshine. To select an eco-friendly and efficient photoprotectant for the improvement of photostability and bioactivity of ABA when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light, we tested the effects of three biodegradable natural-derived high polymers, sodium lignosulfonates 3A [molecular weight (MW) > 50000, with degree of sulfonation (DS) of 0.48] and NA (20000 < MW < 50000, with DS of 0.7) and calcium lignosulfonate CASA (MW < 20000, with DS of 0.7), on the photodegradation of ABA. Lignosulfonates 3A, NA, and CASA showed significant photostabilizing capability on ABA. Lignosulfonate 3A showed preferable photostabilizing effects on ABA compared to CASA, while NA showed an intermediate effect. That indicated that lignosulfonate with a high MW and low DS had a stronger UV absorption and the hollow aggregate micelles formatted by lignosulfonate protect ABA from UV damage. Approximately 50% more ABA was kept when 280 mg/L ABA aqueous solution was irradiated by UV light for 2 h in the presence of 2000 mg/L lignosulfonate 3A. The bioactivity on wheat (JIMAI 22) seed germination was greatly kept by 3A in comparison to that of ABA alone. The 300 times diluent of 280 mg/L ABA plus 2000 mg/L 3A after 2 h of irradiation showed 20.8, 19.3, and 9.3% more inhibition on shoot growth, root growth, and root numbers of wheat seed, separately, in comparison to ABA diluent alone. We conclude that lignosulfonate 3A was an eco-friendly and efficient agent to keep ABA activity under UV radiation. This research could be used in UV-sensitive and water-soluble agrichemicals and to optimize the application times and dosages of ABA products.

  2. Particle size tailoring of ursolic acid nanosuspensions for improved anticancer activity by controlled antisolvent precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yancai; Song, Ju; Chow, Shing Fung; Chow, Albert H L; Zheng, Ying

    2015-10-15

    The present study was aimed at tailoring the particle size of ursolic acid (UA) nanosuspension for improved anticancer activity. UA nanosuspensions were prepared by antisolvent precipitation using a four-stream multi-inlet vortex mixer (MIVM) under defined conditions of varying solvent composition, drug feeding concentration or stream flow rate. The resulting products were characterized for particle size and polydispersity. Two of the UA nanosuspensions with mean particle sizes of 100 and 300 nm were further assessed for their in-vitro activity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells using fluorescence microscopy with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, as well as flow cytometry with propidium (PI) staining and with double staining by fluorescein isothiocyanate. It was revealed that the solvent composition, drug feeding concentration and stream flow rate were critical parameters for particle size control of the UA nanosuspensions generated with the MIVM. Specifically, decreasing the UA feeding concentration or increasing the stream flow rate or ethanol content resulted in a reduction of particle size. Excellent reproducibility for nanosuspension production was demonstrated for the 100 and 300 nm UA preparations with a deviation of not more than 5% in particle size from the mean value of three independent batches. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry revealed that these two different sized UA nanosuspensions, particularly the 300 nm sample, exhibited a higher anti-proliferation activity against the MCF-7 cells and afforded a larger population of these cells in both early and late apoptotic phases. In conclusion, MIVM is a robust and pragmatic tool for tailoring the particle size of the UA nanosuspension. Particle size appears to be a critical determinant of the anticancer activity of the UA nanoparticles.

  3. Short-duration intermittent hypoxia enhances endurance capacity by improving muscle fatty acid metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Junichi

    2016-04-01

    This study was designed to (1) investigate the effects of acute short-duration intermittent hypoxia on musclemRNAand microRNAexpression levels; and (2) clarify the mechanisms by which short-duration intermittent hypoxia improves endurance capacity. Experiment-1: Male mice were subjected to either acute 1-h hypoxia (12% O2), acute short-duration intermittent hypoxia (12% O2for 15 min, room air for 10 min, 4 times, Int-Hypo), or acute endurance exercise (Ex). The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-AmRNAwas significantly greater than the control at 0 h post Ex and 6 h post Int-Hypo in the deep red region of the gastrocnemius muscle. miR-16 expression levels were significantly lower at 6 and 10 h post Int-Hypo. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α)mRNAlevels were significantly greater than the control at 3 h post Ex and 6 h post Int-Hypo. miR-23a expression levels were lower than the control at 6-24 h post Int-Hypo. Experiment-2: Mice were subjected to normoxic exercise training with or without intermittent hypoxia for 3 weeks. Increases in maximal exercise capacity were significantly greater by training with short-duration intermittent hypoxia (IntTr) than without hypoxia. Both 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA-dehydrogenase and total carnitine palmitoyl transferase activities were significantly enhanced in IntTr. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta andPGC-1α mRNAlevels were both significantly greater in IntTr than in the sedentary controls. These results suggest that exercise training under normoxic conditions with exposure to short-duration intermittent hypoxia represents a beneficial strategy for increasing endurance performance by enhancing fatty acid metabolism in skeletal muscle.

  4. Long-chain n-3 fatty acids - New anabolic compounds improving protein metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous animal studies demonstrated that chronic feeding of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFA) that modifies muscle membrane fatty acid composition promotes protein anabolism by blunting the age-associated deterioration in insulin sensitivity. The current study assessed, as a pr...

  5. Microfluidic Preparation of Polymer-Nucleic Acid Nanocomplexes Improves Nonviral Gene Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigsby, C.L.; Ho, Y.P.; Lin, C.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Leong, K.W.

    2013-01-01

    As the designs of polymer systems used to deliver nucleic acids continue to evolve, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the basic bulk manufacturing techniques of the past will be insufficient to produce polymer-nucleic acid nanocomplexes that possess the uniformity, stability, and potency

  6. Fast pyrolysis of organic acid leached wood, straw, hay and bagasse: Improved oil and sugar yields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudenhoven, S.R.G; Westerhof, R.J.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Organic acid leaching of pine wood, straw, bagasse and hay effectively reduced the amount of catalytically active alkali and alkaline earth metals (AAEMs). Using the (acetic) acid produced by pyrolysis as leaching agent, the AAEMs content could be reduced to 90–600 mg/kg. Tests with AAEMs impregnate

  7. Postnatal Development of Hippocampal and Neocortical Cholinergic and Serotonergic Innervation in Rat : Effects of Nitrite-Induced Prenatal Hypoxia and Nimodipine Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyakas, C.; Buwalda, B.; Kramers, R.J.K.; Traber, J.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1994-01-01

    Postnatal development of ingrowing cholinergic and serotonergic fiber patterns were studied in the rat hippocampus and parietal cortex employing a histochemical procedure for acetylcholinesterase as a cholinergic fiber marker, and immunocytochemistry of serotonin for serotonergic fiber staining. The

  8. Midazolam-ketamine dual therapy stops cholinergic status epilepticus and reduces Morris water maze deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niquet, Jerome; Baldwin, Roger; Norman, Keith; Suchomelova, Lucie; Lumley, Lucille; Wasterlain, Claude G

    2016-09-01

    Pharmacoresistance remains an unsolved therapeutic challenge in status epilepticus (SE) and in cholinergic SE induced by nerve agent intoxication. SE triggers a rapid internalization of synaptic γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA ) receptors and externalization of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors that may explain the loss of potency of standard antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). We hypothesized that a drug combination aimed at correcting the consequences of receptor trafficking would reduce SE severity and its long-term consequences. A severe model of SE was induced in adult Sprague-Dawley rats with a high dose of lithium and pilocarpine. The GABAA receptor agonist midazolam, the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, and/or the AED valproate were injected 40 min after SE onset in combination or as monotherapy. Measures of SE severity were the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were acute neuronal injury, spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS), and Morris water maze (MWM) deficits. Midazolam-ketamine dual therapy was more efficient than double-dose midazolam or ketamine monotherapy or than valproate-midazolam or valproate-ketamine dual therapy in reducing several parameters of SE severity, suggesting a synergistic mechanism. In addition, midazolam-ketamine dual therapy reduced SE-induced acute neuronal injury, epileptogenesis, and MWM deficits. This study showed that a treatment aimed at correcting maladaptive GABAA receptor and NMDA receptor trafficking can stop SE and reduce its long-term consequences. Early midazolam-ketamine dual therapy may be superior to monotherapy in the treatment of benzodiazepine-refractory SE. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Libidibia ferrea mature seeds promote antinociceptive effect by peripheral and central pathway: possible involvement of opioid and cholinergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Luis Armando; Monteiro, Vanessa Sâmia da Conçeição; Rabelo, Guilherme Rodrigues; Dias, Germana Bueno; Da Cunha, Maura; do Nascimento, José Luiz Martins; Bastos, Gilmara de Nazareth Tavares

    2014-01-01

    Libidibia ferrea (LF) is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF), partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueous extract or LPLF was administered systemically at the doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg. LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties. Also, the use of atropine (5 mg/kg), naloxone (5 mg/kg) in the abdominal writhing test was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of the LPLF, indicating that at least one of LF lipids components is responsible for the dose related antinociceptive action in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies.

  10. Libidibia ferrea Mature Seeds Promote Antinociceptive Effect by Peripheral and Central Pathway: Possible Involvement of Opioid and Cholinergic Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Armando Sawada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Libidibia ferrea (LF is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF, partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueous extract or LPLF was administered systemically at the doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg. LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties. Also, the use of atropine (5 mg/kg, naloxone (5 mg/kg in the abdominal writhing test was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of the LPLF, indicating that at least one of LF lipids components is responsible for the dose related antinociceptive action in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies.

  11. A model of cholinergic modulation in olfactory bulb and piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Licurgo; Idiart, Marco; Linster, Christiane

    2013-03-01

    In this work we investigate in a computational model how cholinergic inputs to the olfactory bulb (OB) and piriform cortex (PC) modulate odor representations. We use experimental data derived from different physiological studies of ACh modulation of the bulbar and cortical circuitry and the interaction between these two areas. The results presented here indicate that cholinergic modulation in the OB significantly increases contrast and synchronization in mitral cell output. Each of these effects is derived from distinct neuronal interactions, with different groups of interneurons playing different roles. Both bulbar modulation effects contribute to more stable learned representations in PC, with pyramidal networks trained with cholinergic-modulated inputs from the bulb exhibiting more robust learning than those trained with unmodulated bulbar inputs. This increased robustness is evidenced as better recovery of memories from corrupted patterns and lower-concentration inputs as well as increased memory capacity.

  12. Selective Activation of Cholinergic Interneurons Enhances Accumbal Phasic Dopamine Release: Setting the Tone for Reward Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Cachope

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine plays a critical role in motor control, addiction, and reward-seeking behaviors, and its release dynamics have traditionally been linked to changes in midbrain dopamine neuron activity. Here, we report that selective endogenous cholinergic activation achieved via in vitro optogenetic stimulation of nucleus accumbens, a terminal field of dopaminergic neurons, elicits real-time dopamine release. This mechanism occurs via direct actions on dopamine terminals, does not require changes in neuron firing within the midbrain, and is dependent on glutamatergic receptor activity. More importantly, we demonstrate that in vivo selective activation of cholinergic interneurons is sufficient to elicit dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Therefore, the control of accumbal extracellular dopamine levels by endogenous cholinergic activity results from a complex convergence of neurotransmitter/neuromodulator systems that may ultimately synergize to drive motivated behavior.

  13. Cholinergic Neurons - Keeping Check on Amyloid beta in the Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saak V. Ovsepian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The physiological relevance of the uptake of ligands with no apparent trophic functions via the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR remains unclear. Herein, we propose a homeostatic role for this in clearance of amyloid β (Aβ in the brain. We hypothesize that uptake of Aβ in conjunction with p75NTR followed by its degradation in lysosomes endows cholinergic basalo-cortical projections enriched in this receptor a facility for maintaining physiological levels of Aβ in target areas. Thus, in addition to the diffuse modulator influence and channeling of extra-thalamic signals, cholinergic innervations could supply the cerebral cortex with an elaborate system for Aβ drainage. Interpreting the emerging relationship of new molecular data with established role of cholinergic modulator system in regulating cortical network dynamics should provide new insights into the brain physiology and mechanisms of neuro-degenerative diseases.

  14. Cholinergic neuromuscular junctions in Brachionus calyciflorus and Lecane quadridentata (Rotifera:Monogononta)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ignacio Alejandro Prez-Legaspi; Alma Lilin Guerrero-Barrera; Ivn Jos Galvn-Mendoza; Jos Luis Quintanar; Roberto Rico-Martnez

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To identify the presence of joint muscular and cholinergic systems in two freshwater rotifer species, Brachionus calyciflorus and Lecane quadridentata. Methods: The muscle actin fibers were stained with phalloidin-linked fluorescent dye, and acetylcholine was detected with Amplex Red Acetylcholine/Acetylcholinesterase Assay Kit, and then confocal scanning laser microscopy was used. Results:The musculature of Brachionus calyciflorus showed a pattern similar to other species of the same genus, while that of Lecane quadridentata was different from other rotifer genera described previously. The cholinergic system was determined by co-localization of both muscles and acetylcholine labels in the whole rotifer, suggesting the presence of neuromuscular junctions. Conclusions: The distribution pattern of muscular and acetylcholine systems showed considerable differences between the two species that might be related to different adaptations to particular ecological niches. The confirmation of a cholinergic system in rotifers contributes to the development of potential neuro-pharmacological and toxicological studies using rotifers as model organism.

  15. Asynchronous Cholinergic Drive Correlates with Excitation-Inhibition Imbalance via a Neuronal Ca2+ Sensor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keming Zhou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Excitation-inhibition imbalance in neural networks is widely linked to neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, how genetic factors alter neuronal activity, leading to excitation-inhibition imbalance, remains unclear. Here, using the C. elegans locomotor circuit, we examine how altering neuronal activity for varying time periods affects synaptic release pattern and animal behavior. We show that while short-duration activation of excitatory cholinergic neurons elicits a reversible enhancement of presynaptic strength, persistent activation results to asynchronous and reduced cholinergic drive, inducing imbalance between endogenous excitation and inhibition. We find that the neuronal calcium sensor protein NCS-2 is required for asynchronous cholinergic release in an activity-dependent manner and dampens excitability of inhibitory neurons non-cell autonomously. The function of NCS-2 requires its Ca2+ binding and membrane association domains. These results reveal a synaptic mechanism implicating asynchronous release in regulation of excitation-inhibition balance.

  16. Urotensin II modulates rapid eye movement sleep through activation of brainstem cholinergic neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huitron-Resendiz, Salvador; Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard; Sánchez-Alavez, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Urotensin II (UII) is a cyclic neuropeptide with strong vasoconstrictive activity in the peripheral vasculature. UII receptor mRNA is also expressed in the CNS, in particular in cholinergic neurons located in the mesopontine tegmental area, including the pedunculopontine tegmental (PPT) and lateral...... dorsal tegmental nuclei. This distribution suggests that the UII system is involved in functions regulated by acetylcholine, such as the sleep-wake cycle. Here, we tested the hypothesis that UII influences cholinergic PPT neuron activity and alters rapid eye movement (REM) sleep patterns in rats. Local...... blood flow. Moreover, whole-cell recordings from rat-brain slices show that UII selectively excites cholinergic PPT neurons via an inward current and membrane depolarization that were accompanied by membrane conductance decreases. This effect does not depend on action potential generation or fast...

  17. Stability improvement of natural food colors: Impact of amino acid and peptide addition on anthocyanin stability in model beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Cheryl; Rojanasasithara, Thananunt; Mutilangi, William; McClements, David Julian

    2017-03-01

    Anthocyanins are prone to chemical degradation and color fading in the presence of vitamin C. The potential of three amino acids (l-phenylalanine, l-tyrosine, l-tryptophan) and a polypeptide (ε-poly-l-lysine) in prolonging the color stability of purple carrot anthocyanins (0.025%) in model beverages (0.05% l-ascorbic acid, citric acid, pH 3.0) stored at elevated temperature (40°C/7 days) was examined. In the absence of amino acids or peptides, anthocyanin degraded at first-order reaction rate. Addition of amino acids or peptide (0.1%) increased the color stability of anthocyanins, with the most significant improvement observed for l-tryptophan. The average half-life of anthocyanin color increased from 2 days to 6 days with l-tryptophan addition. Fluorescence quenching measurements revealed that the l-tryptophan interacted with anthocyanins mainly through hydrogen bonding, although some hydrophobic interaction may also have been involved. Overall, this study suggests that amino acid or peptide addition may prolong the color stability of anthocyanin in beverage products.

  18. Solid state fermentation with lactic acid bacteria to improve the nutritional quality of lupin and soya bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkiene, Elena; Krungleviciute, Vita; Juodeikiene, Grazina; Vidmantiene, Daiva; Maknickiene, Zita

    2015-04-01

    The ability of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS)-producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to degrade biogenic amines as well as to produce L(+) and D(-)-lactic acid during solid state fermentation (SSF) of lupin and soya bean was investigated. In addition, the protein digestibility and formation of organic acids during SSF of legume were investigated. Protein digestibility of fermented lupin and soya bean was found higher on average by 18.3% and 15.9%, respectively, compared to untreated samples. Tested LAB produced mainly L-lactic acid in soya bean and lupin (D/L ratio 0.38-0.42 and 0.35-0.54, respectively), while spontaneous fermentation gave almost equal amounts of both lactic acid isomers (D/L ratio 0.82-0.98 and 0.92, respectively). Tested LAB strains were able to degrade phenylethylamine, spermine and spermidine, whereas they were able to produce putrescine, histamine and tyramine. SSF improved lupin and soya bean protein digestibility. BLIS-producing LAB in lupin and soya bean medium produced a mixture of D- and L-lactic acid with a major excess of the latter isomer. Most toxic histamine and tyramine in fermented lupin and soya bean were found at levels lower those causing adverse health effects. Selection of biogenic amines non-producing bacteria is essential in the food industry to avoid the risk of amine formation. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Butter blend containing fish oil improves the level of n-3 fatty acids in biological tissues of hamster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsgaard, Trine; Overgaard, Jesper; Krogh, Anne Louise

    2007-01-01

    Many studies have shown beneficial effects of long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on human health. Regardless of the positive effects of n-3 PUFA, the intake of these fatty acids remains low. An approach to increase the intake of n-3 PUFA in the population is to incorporate fish oil......, erythrocytes, and liver. The incorporation of n-3 PUFA was significantly higher in phospholipids than in triacylglycerols. The results suggest that enriching butter blends with small amounts of fish oil can be used as an alternative method for improving the level of n-3 PUFA in biological tissues....

  20. Maximized PUFA measurements improve insight in changes in fatty acid composition in response to temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dooremalen, Coby; Pel, Roel; Ellers, Jacintha

    2009-10-01

    A general mechanism underlying the response of ectotherms to environmental changes often involves changes in fatty acid composition. Theory predicts that a decrease in temperature causes an increase in unsaturation of fatty acids, with an important role for long-chain poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). However, PUFAs are particularly unstable and susceptible to peroxidation, hence subtle differences in fatty acid composition can be challenging to detect. We determined the fatty acid composition in springtail (Collembola) in response to two temperatures (5 degrees C and 25 degrees C). First, we tested different sample preparation methods to maximize PUFAs. Treatments consisted of different solvents for primary lipid extraction, mixing with antioxidant, flushing with inert gas, and using different temperature exposures during saponification. Especially slow saponification at low temperature (90 min at 70 degrees C) in combination with replacement of headspace air with nitrogen during saponification and methylation maximized PUFAs for GC analysis. Applying these methods to measure thermal responses in fatty acid composition, the data showed that the (maximized) proportion of C(20) PUFAs increased at low acclimation temperature. However, C(18) PUFAs increased at high acclimation temperature, which is contrary to expectations. Our study illustrates that PUFA levels in lipids may often be underestimated and this may hamper a correct interpretation of differential responses of fatty acid composition.

  1. Improvement on stability of square planar rhodium (Ⅰ) complexes for carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋华; 潘平来; 袁国卿; 陈新滋

    1999-01-01

    A series of square planar cis-dicarbonyl polymer coordinated rhodium complexes with uncoordinated donors near the central rhodium atoms for carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid are reported. Data of IR, XPS and thermal analysis show that these complexes are very stable. The intramolecular substitution reaction is proposed for their high stability. These complexes show excellent catalytic activity, selectivity and less erosion to the equipment for the methanol carbonylation to acetic acid. The distillation process may be used instead of flash vaporization in the manufacture of acetic acid, which reduces the investment on the equipment.

  2. Compared with stearic acid, palmitic acid increased the yield of milk fat and improved feed efficiency across production level of cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, J E; Allen, M S; Lock, A L

    2014-02-01

    -hydroxybutyrate were not altered by the treatments. Results demonstrate that palmitic acid is more effective than stearic acid in improving milk fat concentration and yield as well as efficiency of feed conversion to milk. Responses were independent of production level and without changes in body condition score or body weight. Further studies are required to test the consistency of these responses across different types of diets.

  3. Sox2 regulates cholinergic amacrine cell positioning and dendritic stratification in the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Irene E; Keeley, Patrick W; St John, Ace J; Kautzman, Amanda G; Kay, Jeremy N; Reese, Benjamin E

    2014-07-23

    The retina contains two populations of cholinergic amacrine cells, one positioned in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and the other in the inner nuclear layer (INL), that together comprise ∼1/2 of a percent of all retinal neurons. The present study examined the genetic control of cholinergic amacrine cell number and distribution between these two layers. The total number of cholinergic amacrine cells was quantified in the C57BL/6J and A/J inbred mouse strains, and in 25 recombinant inbred strains derived from them, and variations in their number and ratio (GCL/INL) across these strains were mapped to genomic loci. The total cholinergic amacrine cell number was found to vary across the strains, from 27,000 to 40,000 cells, despite little variation within individual strains. The number of cells was always lower within the GCL relative to the INL, and the sizes of the two populations were strongly correlated, yet there was variation in their ratio between the strains. Approximately 1/3 of that variation in cell ratio was mapped to a locus on chromosome 3, where Sex determining region Y box 2 (Sox2) was identified as a candidate gene due to the presence of a 6-nucleotide insertion in the protein-coding sequence in C57BL/6J and because of robust and selective expression in cholinergic amacrine cells. Conditionally deleting Sox2 from the population of nascent cholinergic amacrine cells perturbed the normal ratio of cells situated in the GCL versus the INL and induced a bistratifying morphology, with dendrites distributed to both ON and OFF strata within the inner plexiform layer.

  4. Cholinergic dysfunction and amnesia in patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Bergmann, Jürgen; De Blasi, Pierpaolo; Kronbichler, Martin; Kraus, Jörg; Caleri, Francesca; Tezzon, Frediano; Ladurner, Gunther; Golaszewski, Stefan

    2010-03-01

    The specific neurochemical substrate underlying the amnesia in patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is still poorly defined. Memory impairment has been linked to dysfunction of neurons in the cholinergic system. A transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol, the short latency afferent inhibition (SAI), may give direct information about the function of some cholinergic pathways in the human motor cortex. In the present study, we measured SAI in eight alcoholics with WKS and compared the data with those from a group of age-matched healthy individuals; furthermore, we correlated the individual SAI values of the WKS patients with memory and other cognitive functions. Mean SAI was significantly reduced in WKS patients when compared with the controls. SAI was increased after administration of a single dose of donezepil in a subgroup of four patients. The low score obtained in the Rey Complex Figure delayed recall test, the Digit Span subtest of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) and the Corsi's Block Span subtest of the WAIS-R documented a severe impairment in the anterograde memory and short-term memory. None of the correlations between SAI values and these neuropsychological tests reached significance. We provide physiological evidence of cholinergic involvement in WKS. However, this putative marker of central cholinergic activity did not significantly correlate with the memory deficit in our patients. These findings suggest that the cholinergic dysfunction does not account for the memory disorder and that damage to the cholinergic system is not sufficient to cause a persisting amnesic syndrome in WKS.

  5. Adenosine Inhibits the Excitatory Synaptic Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic, GABAergic and Parvalbumin Neurons in mice

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    Chun eYang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Coffee and tea contain the stimulants caffeine and theophylline. These compounds act as antagonists of adenosine receptors. Adenosine promotes sleep and its extracellular concentration rises in association with prolonged wakefulness, particularly in the basal forebrain (BF region involved in activating the cerebral cortex. However, the effect of adenosine on identified BF neurons, especially non-cholinergic neurons, is incompletely understood. Here we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices prepared from two validated transgenic mouse lines with fluorescent proteins expressed in GABAergic or parvalbumin (PV neurons to determine the effect of adenosine. Whole-cell recordings were made BF cholinergic neurons and from BF GABAergic & PV neurons with the size (>20 µm and intrinsic membrane properties (prominent H-currents corresponding to cortically projecting neurons. A brief (2 min bath application of adenosine (100 μM decreased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in all groups of BF cholinergic, GABAergic and PV neurons we recorded. In addition, adenosine decreased the frequency of miniature EPSCs in BF cholinergic neurons. Adenosine had no effect on the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in cholinergic neurons or GABAergic neurons with large H-currents but reduced them in a group of GABAergic neurons with smaller H-currents. All effects of adenosine were blocked by a selective, adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT, 1 μM. Adenosine had no postsynaptic effects. Taken together, our work suggests that adenosine promotes sleep by an A1-receptor mediated inhibition of glutamatergic inputs to cortically-projecting cholinergic and GABA/PV neurons. Conversely, caffeine and theophylline promote attentive wakefulness by inhibiting these A1 receptors in BF thereby promoting the high-frequency oscillations in the cortex required for

  6. Ventral tegmental area cholinergic mechanisms mediate behavioral responses in the forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy, N A; Nunes, E J; Wickham, R J

    2015-07-15

    Recent studies revealed a causal link between ventral tegmental area (VTA) phasic dopamine (DA) activity and pro-depressive and antidepressant-like behavioral responses in rodent models of depression. Cholinergic activity in the VTA has been demonstrated to regulate phasic DA activity, but the role of VTA cholinergic mechanisms in depression-related behavior is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine whether pharmacological manipulation of VTA cholinergic activity altered behavioral responding in the forced swim test (FST) in rats. Here, male Sprague-Dawley rats received systemic or VTA-specific administration of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine (systemic; 0.06 or 0.125mg/kg, intra-cranial; 1 or 2μg/side), the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antagonist scopolamine (2.4 or 24μg/side), or the nicotinic AChR antagonist mecamylamine (3 or 30μg/side), prior to the FST test session. In control experiments, locomotor activity was also examined following systemic and intra-cranial administration of cholinergic drugs. Physostigmine administration, either systemically or directly into the VTA, significantly increased immobility time in FST, whereas physostigmine infusion into a dorsal control site did not alter immobility time. In contrast, VTA infusion of either scopolamine or mecamylamine decreased immobility time, consistent with an antidepressant-like effect. Finally, the VTA physostigmine-induced increase in immobility was blocked by co-administration with scopolamine, but unaltered by co-administration with mecamylamine. These data show that enhancing VTA cholinergic tone and blocking VTA AChRs has opposing effects in FST. Together, the findings provide evidence for a role of VTA cholinergic mechanisms in behavioral responses in FST.

  7. Cholinergic Enhancement of Brain Activation in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI during Episodic Memory Encoding

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    Shannon L Risacher

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the physiological impact of treatment with donepezil (Aricept on neural circuitry supporting episodic memory encoding in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI using functional MRI (fMRI. Methods: 18 patients with MCI and 20 age-matched healthy controls (HC were scanned twice while performing an event-related verbal episodic encoding task. MCI participants were scanned before treatment and after approximately 3 months on donepezil; HC were untreated but rescanned at the same interval. Voxel-level analyses assessed treatment effects in activation profile relative to retest changes in non-treated HC. Changes in task-related connectivity in medial temporal circuitry were also evaluated, as were associations between brain activation pattern, task-related functional connectivity, task performance, and clinical measures of cognition.Results: At baseline, the MCI group showed reduced activation during encoding relative to HC in the right medial temporal lobe (MTL; hippocampal/parahippocampal and additional regions, as well as attenuated task-related deactivation, relative to rest, in a medial parietal lobe cluster. After treatment, the MCI group showed normalized MTL activation and improved parietal deactivation. These changes were associated with cognitive performance. After treatment, the MCI group also demonstrated increased task-related functional connectivity from the right MTL cluster seed region to a network of other sites including the basal nucleus/caudate and bilateral frontal lobes. Increased functional connectivity was associated with improved task performance.Conclusions: Pharmacologic enhancement of cholinergic function in amnestic MCI is associated with changes in brain activation pattern and functional connectivity during episodic memory processing which are in turn related to increased cognitive performance. fMRI is a promising biomarker for assessing treatment related changes in brain function.

  8. Development of an Acid-Resistant Salmonella Typhi Ty21a Attenuated Vector For Improved Oral Vaccine Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuille, Catherine M.; Starke, Carly Elizabeth C.; Bhagwat, Arvind A.; Stibitz, Scott; Kopecko, Dennis J.

    2016-01-01

    The licensed oral, live-attenuated bacterial vaccine for typhoid fever, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain Ty21a, has also been utilized as a vaccine delivery platform for expression of diverse foreign antigens that stimulate protection against shigellosis, anthrax, plague, or human papilloma virus. However, Ty21a is acid-labile and, for effective oral immunization, stomach acidity has to be either neutralized with buffer or by-passed with Ty21a in an enteric-coated capsule (ECC). Several studies have shown that efficacy is reduced when Ty21a is administered in an ECC versus as a buffered liquid formulation, the former limiting exposure to GI tract lymphoid tissues. However, the ECC was selected as a more practical delivery format for both packaging/shipping and vaccine administration ease. We have sought to increase Ty21a acid-resistance to allow for removal from the ECC and immune enhancement. To improve Ty21a acid-resistance, glutamate-dependent acid resistance genes (GAD; responsible for Shigella spp. survival at very low pH) were cloned on a multi-copy plasmid (pGad) under a controllable arabinose-inducible promoter. pGad enhanced acid survival of Ty21a by 5 logs after 3 hours at pH 2.5, when cells were pre-grown in arabinose and under conditions that promote an acid-tolerance response (ATR). For genetically 100% stable expression, we inserted the gad genes into the Ty21a chromosome, using a method that allowed for subsequent removal of a selectable antibiotic resistance marker. Further, both bacterial growth curves and survival assays in cultured human monocytes/macrophages suggest that neither the genetic methods employed nor the resulting acid-resistance conferred by expression of the Gad proteins in Ty21a had any effect on the existing attenuation of this vaccine strain. PMID:27673328

  9. Introduction of a bacterial acetyl-CoA synthesis pathway improves lactic acid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Song, Ji-Yoon; Park, Joon-Song; Kang, Chang Duk; Cho, Hwa-Young; Yang, Dongsik; Lee, Seunghyun; Cho, Kwang Myung

    2016-05-01

    Acid-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered to produce lactic acid by expressing heterologous lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) genes, while attenuating several key pathway genes, including glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase1 (GPD1) and cytochrome-c oxidoreductase2 (CYB2). In order to increase the yield of lactic acid further, the ethanol production pathway was attenuated by disrupting the pyruvate decarboxylase1 (PDC1) and alcohol dehydrogenase1 (ADH1) genes. Despite an increase in lactic acid yield, severe reduction of the growth rate and glucose consumption rate owing to the absence of ADH1 caused a considerable decrease in the overall productivity. In Δadh1 cells, the levels of acetyl-CoA, a key precursor for biologically applicable components, could be insufficient for normal cell growth. To increase the cellular supply of acetyl-CoA, we introduced bacterial acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (A-ALD) enzyme (EC 1.2.1.10) genes into the lactic acid-producing S. cerevisiae. Escherichia coli-derived A-ALD genes, mhpF and eutE, were expressed and effectively complemented the attenuated acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD)/acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) pathway in the yeast. The engineered strain, possessing a heterologous acetyl-CoA synthetic pathway, showed an increased glucose consumption rate and higher productivity of lactic acid fermentation. The production of lactic acid was reached at 142g/L with production yield of 0.89g/g and productivity of 3.55gL(-1)h(-1) under fed-batch fermentation in bioreactor. This study demonstrates a novel approach that improves productivity of lactic acid by metabolic engineering of the acetyl-CoA biosynthetic pathway in yeast.

  10. Improving the Keeping Quality and Vase Life of Cut Alstroemeria Flowers by Pre and Post-harvest Salicylic Acid Treatments

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    Elnaz SOLEIMANY-FARD

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Keeping quality and length of vase life are important factors for evaluation of cut flowers quality, for both domestic and export markets. Studding the effect of pre- and post-harvest salicylic acid applications on keeping quality and vase life of cut alstroemeria flowers during vase period is the approach taken. Aqueous solutions of salicylic acid at 0.0 (with distilled water, 1, 2 and 3 mM were sprayed to run-off (approximately 500 mL per plant, about two weeks before flowers harvest. The cut flowers were harvested in the early morning and both of cut flowers treated (sprayed and untreated were kept in vase solutions containing salicylic acid at 0.0 (with distilled water, 1, 2 and 3 mM. Sucrose at 4% was added to all treatments as a base solution. The changes in relative fresh weight, water uptake, water loss, water balance, total chlorophyll content and vase life were estimated during vase period. The results showed that the relative fresh weight, water uptake, water balance, total chlorophyll content and vase life decreased significantly while the water loss increased significantly during experiment for all treatments. A significant difference between salicylic acid and control treatments in all measured parameters is observed. During vase period, the salicylic acid treatments maintained significantly a more favourable relative fresh weight, water uptake, water balance, total chlorophyll content and supressed significantly water loss, as compared to control treatment. Also, the results showed that the using salicylic acid increased significantly the vase life cut alstroemeria flowers, over control. The highest values of measured parameters were found when plants were treated by pre + post-harvest application of salicylic acid at 3 mM. The result revealed that the quality attributes and vase life of cut alstroemeria flowers were improved by the use of salicylic acid treatment.

  11. Pathway for interferon-gamma to promote the differentiation of cholinergic neurons in rat embryonic basal forebrain/septal nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The supernatant of interferon-gamma (IFN γ ) co-cultured with neonatal rat cortical glia can promote the cells in embryonic basal forebrain/septal nuclei to differentiate into cholinergic neurons, but the mechanism is still unclear.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the pathways for IFN γ to promote the differentiation of primarily cultured cholinergic neurons in rat embryonic basal forebrain/septal nuclei through culture in different conditioned medium.DESIGN: A controlled experiment taking cells as the observational target.SETTINGS: Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Youjiang Medical College for Nationalities; Department of Cell Biology, Beijing University Health Science Center.MATERIALS: Sixty-four pregnant Wistar rats for 16 days (250 - 350 g) and 84 Wistar rats (either male or female, 5 - 7 g) of 0 - 1 day after birth were provided by the experimental animal department of Beijing University Health Science Center. Rat IFN γ were provided by Gibco Company; Glial fibrillary acidic protein by Huamei Company.METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the Department of Cell Biology, Beijing University Health Science Center and Daheng Image Company of Chinese Academy of Science from July 1995 to December 2002. ① Interventions: The nerve cells in the basal forebrain/septal nuclei of the pregnant Wistar rats for 16 days were primarily cultured, and then divided into four groups: Blank control group (not any supernatant and medium was added); Control group (added by mixed glial cell or astrocyte conditioned medium); IFN γ group (added by mixed glial cell or astrocyte conditioned medium+IFN γ ). Antibody group (added by mixed glial cell or astrocyte conditioned medium+IFN γ +Ab-IFN γ ). Mixed glial cell or astrocyte conditioned medium was prepared using cerebral cortex of Wistar rats of 0 - 1 day after birth. ② Evaluation: The immunohistochemical method was used to perform the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) staining of cholinergic neurons

  12. Co-expression of alpha7 and beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit mRNAs within rat brain cholinergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, L; Winzer-Serhan, U; Leslie, F M

    2003-01-01

    Nicotine enhances cognitive and attentional processes through stimulation of the basal forebrain cholinergic system. Although muscarinic cholinergic autoreceptors have been well characterized, pharmacological characterization of nicotinic autoreceptors has proven more difficult. The present study used double-labeling in situ hybridization to determine expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit mRNAs within basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in order to gain information about possible nAChR autoreceptor properties. Cholinergic cells of the mesopontine tegmentum and striatal interneurons were also examined, as were septohippocampal GABAergic neurons that interact with cholinergic neurons to regulate hippocampal activity. alpha7 and beta2 nAChR mRNAs were found to be co-expressed in almost all cholinergic cells and in the majority of GABAergic neurons examined. alpha4 nAChR mRNA expression was restricted to cholinergic cells of the nucleus basalis magnocellularis, and to non-cholinergic cells of the medial septum and mesopontine tegmentum. These data suggest possible regional differences in the pharmacological properties of nicotinic autoreceptors on cholinergic cells. Whereas most cholinergic cells express rapidly desensitizing alpha7 homomers or alpha7beta2 heteromers, cortical projection neurons may also express a pharmacologically distinct alpha4beta2 nAChR subtype. There may also be differential nAChR regulation of cholinergic and non-cholinergic cells within the mesopontine tegmentum that are implicated in acquisition of nicotine self-administration.

  13. Contribution of the cholinergic basal forebrain to proactive interference from stored odor memories during associative learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, E; Hasselmo, M E; Baxter, M G

    2001-04-01

    E. De Rosa and M. E. Hasselmo (2000) demonstrated that 0.25 mg/kg scopolamine (SCOP) selectively increased proactive interference (PI) from stored odor memories during learning. In the present study, rats with bilateral cholinergic lesions limited to the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca, made with 192 IgG-saporin, were not impaired in acquiring the same olfactory discrimination task relative to control rats. Rats with bilateral 192 IgG-saporin lesions to all basal forebrain cholinergic nuclei (BF) also showed no impairment in acquisition of this task. However, the BF-saporin rats were hypersensitive to oxotremorine-induced hypothermia and demonstrated an increased sensitivity to PI following a low dose of SCOP (0.125 mg/kg) relative to control rats. The results suggest that weaker cholinergic modulation after cholinergic BF lesions makes the system more sensitive to PI during blockade of the remaining cholinergic elements.

  14. Metabolic engineering of Ustilago trichophora TZ1 for improved malic acid production

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    Thiemo Zambanini

    2017-06-01

    These results open up a wide range of possibilities for further optimization, especially combinatorial metabolic engineering to increase the flux from pyruvate to malic acid and to reduce by-product formation.

  15. A poly(acrylic acid)-block-poly(L-glutamic acid) diblock copolymer with improved cell adhesion for surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bin; Yan, Shifeng; Zhang, Kunxi; Song, Zhijiang; Cao, Tian; Chen, Xuesi; Cui, Lei; Yin, Jingbo

    2011-07-07

    A novel PAA-b-PLGA diblock copolymer is synthesized and characterized that has excellent cell adhesion and biocompatibility. Fluorescent DiO labeling is used to monitor the attachment and growth of hASCs on the film surface, and cell proliferation over time is studied. Results show that PLLA modified by a CS/PAA-b-PLGA multilayer film can promote the attachment of human hASCs and provide an advantageous environment for their proliferation. The multilayer film presents excellent biocompatibility and cell adhesive properties, which will provide a new choice for improving the cell attachment in surface modification for tissue engineering. Hydroxyl, carboxyl and amine groups in the CS/PAA-b-PLGA multilayer film may be combined with drugs and growth factors for therapy and differentiation.

  16. Lactic acid bacteria in the quality improvement and depreciation of wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonvaud-Funel, A

    1999-01-01

    The winemaking process includes two main steps: lactic acid bacteria are responsible for the malolactic fermentation which follows the alcoholic fermentation by yeasts. Both types of microorganisms are present on grapes and on cellar equipment. Yeasts are better adapted to growth in grape must than lactic acid bacteria, so the alcoholic fermentation starts quickly. In must, up to ten lactic acid bacteria species can be identified. They belong to the Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Leuconostoc and Oenococcus genera. Throughout alcoholic fermentation, a natural selection occurs and finally the dominant species is O. oeni, due to interactions between yeasts and bacteria and between bacteria themselves. After bacterial growth, when the population is over 10(6) CFU/ml, malolactic transformation is the obvious change in wine composition. However, many other substrates can be metabolized. Some like remaining sugars and citric acid are always assimilated by lactic acid bacteria, thus providing them with energy and carbon. Other substrates such as some amino acids may be used following pathways restricted to strains carrying the adequate enzymes. Some strains can also produce exopolysaccharides. All these transformations greatly influence the sensory and hygienic quality of wine. Malic acid transformation is encouraged because it induces deacidification. Diacetyl produced from citric acid is also helpful to some extent. Sensory analyses show that many other reactions change the aromas and make malolactic fermentation beneficial, but they are as yet unknown. On the contrary, an excess of acetic acid, the synthesis of glucane, biogenic amines and precursors of ethylcarbamate are undesirable. Fortunately, lactic acid bacteria normally multiply in dry wines; moreover some of these activities are not widespread. Moreover, the most striking trait of wine lactic acid bacteria is their capacity to adapt to a hostile environment. The mechanisms for this are not yet completely elucidated

  17. Endophytic Fungi from Frankincense Tree Improves Host Growth and Produces Extracellular Enzymes and Indole Acetic Acid.

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    Abdul Latif Khan

    Full Text Available Boswellia sacra, an economically important frankincense-producing tree found in the desert woodlands of Oman, is least known for its endophytic fungal diversity and the potential of these fungi to produce extracellular enzymes and auxins. We isolated various fungal endophytes belonging to Eurotiales (11.8%, Chaetomiaceae (17.6%, Incertae sadis (29.5%, Aureobasidiaceae (17.6%, Nectriaceae (5.9% and Sporomiaceae (17.6% from the phylloplane (leaf and caulosphere (stem of the tree. Endophytes were identified using genomic DNA extraction, PCR amplification and sequencing the internal transcribed spacer regions, whereas a detailed phylogenetic analysis of the same gene fragment was made with homologous sequences. The endophytic colonization rate was significantly higher in the leaf (5.33% than the stem (0.262%. The Shannon-Weiner diversity index was H' 0.8729, while Simpson index was higher in the leaf (0.583 than in the stem (0.416. Regarding the endophytic fungi's potential for extracellular enzyme production, fluorogenic 4-methylumbelliferone standards and substrates were used to determine the presence of cellulases, phosphatases and glucosidases in the pure culture. Among fungal strains, Penicillum citrinum BSL17 showed significantly higher amounts of glucosidases (62.15±1.8 μM-1min-1mL and cellulases (62.11±1.6 μM-1min-1mL, whereas Preussia sp. BSL10 showed significantly higher secretion of glucosidases (69.4±0.79 μM-1min-1mL and phosphatases (3.46±0.31μM-1min-1mL compared to other strains. Aureobasidium sp. BSS6 and Preussia sp. BSL10 showed significantly higher potential for indole acetic acid production (tryptophan-dependent and independent pathways. Preussia sp. BSL10 was applied to the host B. sacra tree saplings, which exhibited significant improvements in plant growth parameters and accumulation of photosynthetic pigments. The current study concluded that endophytic microbial resources producing extracellular enzymes and auxin

  18. Endophytic Fungi from Frankincense Tree Improves Host Growth and Produces Extracellular Enzymes and Indole Acetic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al-Rawahi, Ahmed; Al-Farsi, Zainab; Al-Mamari, Aza; Waqas, Muhammad; Asaf, Sajjad; Elyassi, Ali; Mabood, Fazal; Shin, Jae-Ho; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Boswellia sacra, an economically important frankincense-producing tree found in the desert woodlands of Oman, is least known for its endophytic fungal diversity and the potential of these fungi to produce extracellular enzymes and auxins. We isolated various fungal endophytes belonging to Eurotiales (11.8%), Chaetomiaceae (17.6%), Incertae sadis (29.5%), Aureobasidiaceae (17.6%), Nectriaceae (5.9%) and Sporomiaceae (17.6%) from the phylloplane (leaf) and caulosphere (stem) of the tree. Endophytes were identified using genomic DNA extraction, PCR amplification and sequencing the internal transcribed spacer regions, whereas a detailed phylogenetic analysis of the same gene fragment was made with homologous sequences. The endophytic colonization rate was significantly higher in the leaf (5.33%) than the stem (0.262%). The Shannon-Weiner diversity index was H' 0.8729, while Simpson index was higher in the leaf (0.583) than in the stem (0.416). Regarding the endophytic fungi's potential for extracellular enzyme production, fluorogenic 4-methylumbelliferone standards and substrates were used to determine the presence of cellulases, phosphatases and glucosidases in the pure culture. Among fungal strains, Penicillum citrinum BSL17 showed significantly higher amounts of glucosidases (62.15±1.8 μM-1min-1mL) and cellulases (62.11±1.6 μM-1min-1mL), whereas Preussia sp. BSL10 showed significantly higher secretion of glucosidases (69.4±0.79 μM-1min-1mL) and phosphatases (3.46±0.31μM-1min-1mL) compared to other strains. Aureobasidium sp. BSS6 and Preussia sp. BSL10 showed significantly higher potential for indole acetic acid production (tryptophan-dependent and independent pathways). Preussia sp. BSL10 was applied to the host B. sacra tree saplings, which exhibited significant improvements in plant growth parameters and accumulation of photosynthetic pigments. The current study concluded that endophytic microbial resources producing extracellular enzymes and auxin could

  19. The art of strain improvement of industrial lactic acid bacteria without the use of recombinant DNA technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkx, Patrick M F; Janzen, Thomas; Sørensen, Kim I; Christensen, Jeffrey E; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Johansen, Eric

    2014-08-29

    The food industry is constantly striving to develop new products to fulfil the ever changing demands of consumers and the strict requirements of regulatory agencies. For foods based on microbial fermentation, this pushes the boundaries of microbial performance and requires the constant development of new starter cultures with novel properties. Since the use of ingredients in the food industry is tightly regulated and under close scrutiny by consumers, the use of recombinant DNA technology to improve microbial performance is currently not an option. As a result, the focus for improving strains for microbial fermentation is on classical strain improvement methods. Here we review the use of these techniques to improve the functionality of lactic acid bacteria starter cultures for application in industrial-scale food production. Methods will be described for improving the bacteriophage resistance of specific strains, improving their texture forming ability, increasing their tolerance to stress and modulating both the amount and identity of acids produced during fermentation. In addition, approaches to eliminating undesirable properties will be described. Techniques include random mutagenesis, directed evolution and dominant selection schemes.

  20. Dichotomous Distribution of Putative Cholinergic Interneurons in Mouse Accessory Olfactory Bulb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marking, Sarah; Krosnowski, Kurt; Ogura, Tatsuya; Lin, Weihong

    2017-01-01

    Sensory information processing in the olfactory bulb (OB) relies on diverse populations of bulbar interneurons. In rodents, the accessory OB (AOB) is divided into two bulbar regions, the anterior (aAOB) and posterior (pAOB), which differ substantially in their circuitry connections and associated behaviors. We previously identified and characterized a large number of morphologically diverse cholinergic interneurons in the main OB (MOB) using transgenic mice to visualize the cell bodies of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT-expressing neurons and immunolabeling (Krosnowski et al., 2012)). However, whether there are cholinergic neurons in the AOB is controversial and there is no detailed characterization of such neurons. Using the same line of ChAT(bacterial artificial chromosome, BAC)-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transgenic mice, we investigated cholinergic neurons in the AOB. We found significant differences in the number and location of GFP-expressing (GFP+), putative cholinergic interneurons between the aAOB and pAOB. The highest numbers of GFP+ interneurons were found in the aAOB glomerular layer (aGL) and pAOB mitral/tufted cell layer (pMCL). We also noted a high density of GFP+ interneurons encircling the border region of the pMCL. Interestingly, a small subset of glomeruli in the middle of the GL receives strong MCL GFP+ nerve processes. These local putative cholinergic-innervated glomeruli are situated just outside the aGL, setting the boundary between the pGL and aGL. Many but not all GFP+ neurons in the AOB were weakly labeled with antibodies against ChAT and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). We further determined if these GFP+ interneurons differ from other previously characterized interneuron populations in the AOB and found that AOB GFP+ interneurons express neither GABAergic nor dopaminergic markers and most also do not express the glutamatergic marker. Similar to the cholinergic interneurons of the MOB, some AOB GFP+ interneurons

  1. Thalamic cholinergic innervation is spared in Alzheimer disease compared to Parkinsonian disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotagal, Vikas; Müller, Martijn L.T.M.; Kaufer, Daniel I.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE There are two major sources of cholinergic projections in the brain. The nucleus basalis of Meynert provides the principal cholinergic input of the cortical mantle and the pedunculopontine nucleus-laterodorsal tegmental complex (PPN-LDTC; hereafter referred to as PPN) provides the major cholinergic input to the thalamus. Cortical cholinergic denervation has previously been shown to be part of Alzheimer and parkinsonian dementia but there is less information about subcortical thalamic cholinergic denervation. We investigated thalamic cholinergic afferent integrity by measuring PPN-Thalamic (PPN-Thal) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity via PET imaging in Alzheimer (AD), Parkinson disease without dementia (PD), Parkinson disease with dementia (PDD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). METHODS AD (n=13; mean age 75.4±5.5), PD (n=11; age 71.4±6.4), PDD (n=6; age 70.8±4.7), DLB (n=6; age 68.0±8.6) and normal controls (NC; n=14; age 69.0±7.5) subjects underwent AChE [11C]-methyl-4-piperidinyl propionate (PMP) PET imaging. PPN-Thal PET data were analyzed using the Nagatsuka method. RESULTS There were no significant differences in mean age between the groups (F=1.86, p=0.134). Kruskal-Wallis testing demonstrated a significant group effect for PPN-Thal AChE hydrolysis rates (F=9.62, P<0.0001). Compared to NC, reduced thalamic k3 hydrolysis rate was noted in subjects with PDD (−19.8%; AChE k3 hydrolysis rates 0.1072±0.0143 min−1), DLB (−17.4%; 0.1103±0.0112 min−1) and PD (−12.8%; 0.1165±0.0114 min−1). Each of these 3 subgroups were statistically different from AD subjects (−0.7%; 0.1326±0.0095 min−1) who showed relatively spared thalamic k3 hydrolysis rates which were comparable to NC (0.1336±0.0142 min−1). CONCLUSIONS Thalamic cholinergic denervation is present in PD, PDD, and DLB but not in AD. Neurodegenerative involvement of thalamic cholinergic afferent projections may contribute to disease-specific motor and cognitive

  2. Developmental and neurochemical features of cholinergic neurons in the murine cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becchetti Andrea

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The existence and role of intrinsic cholinergic cells in the cerebral cortex is controversial, because of their variable localization and morphology in different mammalian species. We have applied choline acetyltransferase (ChAT immunocytochemistry to study the distribution of cholinergic neurons in the murine cerebral cortex, in the adult and during postnatal development. For more precise neurochemical identification of these neurons, the possible colocalization of ChAT with different markers of cortical neuronal populations has been analyzed by confocal microscopy. This method was also used to verify the relationship between cholinergic cells and cortical microvessels. Results ChAT positive cells appeared at the end of the first postnatal week. Their density dramatically increased at the beginning of the second postnatal week, during which it remained higher than in perinatal and adult stages. In the adult neocortex, cholinergic neurons were particularly expressed in the somatosensory area, although their density was also significant in visual and auditory areas. ChAT positive cells tended to be scarce in other regions. They were mainly localized in the supragranular layers and displayed a fusiform/bipolar morphology. The colocalization of ChAT with pyramidal neuron markers was negligible. On the other hand, more than half of the cholinergic neurons contained calretinin, but none of them expressed parvalbumin or calbindin. However, only a fraction of the ChAT positive cells during development and very few in adulthood turned out to be GABAergic, as judged from expression of GABA and its biosynthetic enzymes GAD67/65. Consistently, ChAT showed no localization with interneurons expressing green fluorescent protein under control of the GAD67 promoter in the adult neocortex. Finally, the cortical cholinergic cells often showed close association with the microvessel walls, as identified with the gliovascular marker aquaporin 4

  3. Combination of glycolic acid peel and topical 20% azelaic acid cream in melasma patients: efficacy and improvement in quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Surabhi; Sahu, Priyadarshini; Dua, Ruchika

    2017-03-01

    Glycolic acid (GA) peel is one of the most versatile agents in the treatment of melasma. GA peeling alone or in combination with topical hypopigmenting agents has shown encouraging results. However, there is paucity of controlled trial demonstrating the efficacy of glycolic peel in conjunction with topical azelaic acid (AA). We therefore sought to highlight the efficacy and safety of this combination in melasma. To assess the clinical efficacy, safety and reduction in melasma quality of life (MELASQOL) scores on combining serial GA peels with topical 20% AA cream in epidermal melasma. Sixty patients of epidermal melasma were enrolled for 24 weeks. Patients were divided into two groups: (1) Study group received serial GA peel every 3 weeks with twice daily 20% AA cream, and (2) control group received only 20% AA cream. Clinical improvement was assessed objectively using Melasm