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Sample records for acidic uranium-contaminated aquifer

  1. contaminant migration in a sand aquifer near an inactive uranium tailings impoundment, Elliot Lake, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, K.A.; Cherry, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation of the movement of contaminated groundwater from inactive uranium tailings through a sand aquifer is being conducted at the Nordic Main tailings impoundment near Elliot Lake, Ontario. During 1979 and 1980, multilevel bundle-type piezometers were installed at several locations around the edge of the tailings impoundment. Chemical analysis of water samples from the bundle piezometers indicate that a major contaminant plume extends outward through a sand aquifer from the southeastern part of the Nordic Main impoundment dam. In the vincinity of the contaminant plume, the sand aquifer varies in thickness from about 9 to 15 m. The plume has two distinct segments, referred to as the inner core and the outer zone. The inner core, which has a pH of 4.3-5.0 and extends about 15 m from the foot of the tailings dam, contains several grams per litre of iron and sulfate, and tens of pCi/L of 226 Ra and 210 Pb. Water levels in piezometers within the inner core show that groundwater is moving horizontally, away from the tailings impoundment, with a velocity of up to several hundred metres per year. The outer zone, which extends a few hundred metres downgradient from the dam, is characterized by hundreds to thousands of milligrams per litre of iron and sulfate, less than 15pCi/L of 226 Ra, and a pH greater than 5.7. Comparison of 1979 and 1980 data shows that the front of the inner core is advancing a few metres per year, which is less than a few percent of the groundwater velocity. This retardation of movement of the inner core is caused by neutralization of the acidic water as a result of dissolution of calcium carbonate in the sand. With the rise in pH, precipitation of iron carbonate and possibly some iron hydroxide occurs and the contaminants of main concern such as 226 Ra, 210 Pb, and uranium are removed from solution by adsorption or coprecipitation

  2. Understanding Uranium Behavior in a Reduced Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janot, N.; Lezama-Pacheco, J. S.; Williams, K. H.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Long, P. E.; Davis, J. A.; Fox, P. M.; Yang, L.; Giammar, D.; Cerrato, J. M.; Bargar, J.

    2012-12-01

    Uranium contamination of groundwater is a concern at several US Department of Energy sites, such Old Rifle, CO. Uranium transport in the environment is mainly controlled by its oxidation state, since oxidized U(VI) is relatively mobile, whereas U(IV) is relatively insoluble. Bio-remediation of contaminated aquifers aims at immobilizing uranium in a reduced form. Previous laboratory and field studies have shown that adding electron donor (lactate, acetate, ethanol) to groundwater stimulates the activity of metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria, which promotes U(VI) reduction in contaminated aquifers. However, obtaining information on chemical and physical forms of U, Fe and S species for sediments biostimulated in the field, as well as kinetic parameters such as U(VI) reduction rate, is challenging due to the low concentration of uranium in the aquifers (typically bio-remediation experiment at the Old Rifle site, CO, from early iron-reducing conditions to the transition to sulfate-reducing conditions. Several in-well chromatographic columns packed with sediment were deployed and were sampled at different days after the start of bio-reduction. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray microscopy were used to obtain information on Fe, S and U speciation and distribution. Chemical extractions of the reduced sediments have also been performed, to determine the rate of Fe(II) and U(IV) accumulation.

  3. Decontamination of uranium-contaminated waste oil using supercritical fluid and nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, J.; Kim, J.; Lee, Y.; Seol, J.; Ryu, J.; Park, K.

    2011-01-01

    The waste oil used in nuclear fuel processing is contaminated with uranium because of its contact with materials or environments containing uranium. Under current law, waste oil that has been contaminated with uranium is very difficult to dispose of at a radioactive waste disposal site. To dispose of the uranium-contaminated waste oil, the uranium was separated from the contaminated waste oil. Supercritical R-22 is an excellent solvent for extracting clean oil from uranium-contaminated waste oil. The critical temperature of R-22 is 96.15 deg. C and the critical pressure is 49.9 bar. In this study, a process to remove uranium from the uranium-contaminated waste oil using supercritical R-22 was developed. The waste oil has a small amount of additives containing N, S or P, such as amines, dithiocarbamates and dialkyldithiophosphates. It seems that these organic additives form uranium-combined compounds. For this reason, dissolution of uranium from the uranium-combined compounds using nitric acid was needed. The efficiency of the removal of uranium from the uranium-contaminated waste oil using supercritical R-22 extraction and nitric acid treatment was determined. (authors)

  4. Uranium series geochemistry in aquifers: quantification of transport mechanisms of uranium and daughter products: the chalk aquifer (Champagne, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, A.

    2005-09-01

    With the increase of contaminant flux of radionuclides in surface environment (soil, river, aquifer...), there is a need to understand and model the processes that control the distribution of uranium and its daughter products during transport within aquifers. We have used U-series disequilibria as an analogue for the transport of uranium and its daughter products in aquifer to understand such mechanisms. The measurements of uranium ( 234 U et 238 U), thorium ( 230 Th et 232 Th), 226 Ra and 222 Rn isotopes in the solid and liquid phases of the chalk aquifer in Champagne (East of France) allows us to understand the processes responsible for fractionation within the uranium decay chain. Fractionations are induced by physical and chemical properties of the elements (leaching, adsorption) but also by radioactive properties (recoil effect during α-decay). For the first time a comprehensive sampling of the solid phase has been performed, allowing quantifying mechanisms responsible for the long term evolution of the aquifer. A non steady state 1D model has been developed which takes into account leaching, adsorption processes as well as radioactive filiation and α-recoil effect. Retardation coefficients have been calculated for uranium, thorium and radium. The aquifer is characterised by a double porosity, and the contribution of fracture and matrix porosity on the water/rock interaction processes has been estimated. (author)

  5. Uranium partitioning under acidic conditions in a sandy soil aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.H.; Serkiz, S.M.; Johnson, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    The partitioning of uranium in an aquifer down gradient of two large mixed waste sites was examined with respect to the solution and soil chemistry (e.g., pH redox potential and contaminant concentration) and aqueous-phase chemical speciation. This involved generation of field-derived, batch sorption, and reactive mineral surface sorption data. Field-derived distribution coefficients for uranium at these waste sites were found to vary between 0.40 and 15,000. Based on thermodynamic speciation modeling and a comparison of field and laboratory data, gibbsite is a potential reactive mineral surface present in modified soils at the sites. Uranium partitioning data are presented from field samples and laboratory studies of background soil and the mineral surface gibbsite. Mechanistic and empirical sorption models fit to the field-derived uranium partitioning data show an improvement of over two orders of magnitude, as measured by the normalized sum of errors squared, when compared with the single K d model used in previous risk work. Models fit to batch sorption data provided a better fit of sorbed uranium than do models fit to the field-derived data

  6. Uranium contamination in the Great Miami Aquifer at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidle, W.C.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water investigations at a former US Department of Energy nuclear weapons complex near Fernald, in southwestern Ohio, included the delineation of uranium contamination above the USEPA proposed drinking water standard of 20 microg/l. Contamination occurs in a buried valley and has migrated >1.5 km south-southeast of the facility boundary. Flooring of the plume(s) appears to be ≅ 32 m below the water table of the Great Miami Aquifer. U 6+ predominates in the modeled U-O 2 -CO 2 -H 2 O system and U retardation decreases at depth. U 234 /U 238 disequilibria analyses complement hydrogeologic studies which suggest that U leakage through the clayey till cap is less significant than the predominant transport pathway of infiltration via drainage channels incised into the aquifer

  7. Uranium Leaching from Contaminated Soil Utilizing Rhamnolipid, EDTA, and Citric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Asselin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactants have recently gained attention as “green” agents that can be used to enhance the remediation of heavy metals and some organic matter in contaminated soils. The overall objective of this paper was to investigate rhamnolipid, a microbial produced biosurfactant, and its ability to leach uranium present in contaminated soil from an abandoned mine site. Soil samples were collected from two locations in northern Arizona: Cameron (site of open pit mining and Leupp (control—no mining. The approach taken was to first determine the total uranium content in each soil using a hydrofluoric acid digestion, then comparing the amount of metal removed by rhamnolipid to other chelating agents EDTA and citric acid, and finally determining the amount of soluble metal in the soil matrix using a sequential extraction. Results suggested a complex system for metal removal from soil utilizing rhamnolipid. It was determined that rhamnolipid at a concentration of 150 μM was as effective as EDTA but not as effective as citric acid for the removal of soluble uranium. However, the rhamnolipid was only slightly better at removing uranium from the mining soil compared to a purified water control. Overall, this study demonstrated that rhamnolipid ability to remove uranium from contaminated soil is comparable to EDTA and to a lesser extent citric acid, but, for the soils investigated, it is not significantly better than a simple water wash.

  8. Delineation of the extent of milling-related contamination in a naturally contaminated aquifer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downs, William F.; Storms, Erik F.

    1992-01-01

    Uranium mill tailings from the Susquehanna-Western mill near Falls City, Texas, were pumped to tailings ponds located in abandoned open pit uranium mines. The ores from these mines were oxidized. Uranium and the associated hazardous constituents were present in these ores as relatively soluble secondary minerals. Because the tailings piles are located on the outcrops of the units designated as the uppermost aquifer, there is no upgradient aquifer from which to establish 'background' water quality. The widespread mineralization in the area naturally imposes a large variability in water quality in these units. It was necessary to demonstrate to State and Federal regulators that selected downgradient wells were beyond the influence of milling operations, and to develop a series of 'indicator parameters' that could be used to differentiate milling contaminated groundwater from that native to the aquifer. (author)

  9. Modelling of contaminant migration in acidic groundwater plumes at uranium tailings impoundments: ADNEUT3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherry, J.A.; Morin, K.A.; Dubrovsky, N.M.

    1984-06-01

    This report describes the creation and application of ADNEUT3, the latest addition to the ADNEUT (Acid-Drainage NEUTralization) family of computer programs for simulating acid-drainage transport and neutralization. The creation of ADNEUT3 involved the expansion of ADNEUT1 to allow variable input conditions such as changing input solution with time, variable initial amounts of minerals through the simulated streamtube, variable velocities through the streamtube, and variable solubilities for relevant minerals dependent on aqueous chemical composition. Concepts for simulating acid-drainage neutralization are reviewed and ADNEUT3 is then applied to a field-study site of acidic contaminant migration from the Nordic Main uranium-tailings impoundment near Elliot Lake, Ontario. A sensitivity study is first implemented to calibrate ADNEUT3 to the results of the 1979 to 1983 field studies. Then ADNEUT3 is used to define probable past conditions at the site which are not reliably known. In particular, ADNEUT3 is used to help identify: 1) the approximate year when acidic seepage began leaving the tailings impoundment (1966-1967), 2) the past chemical composition of the seepage (somewhat more acidic for a short period of time), and 3) the location of the source area within the tailings for the acidic seepage (near the impoundment dam, close to the field site). Finally, ADNEUT3 is used to predict future contaminant migration. Results indicate that hundreds of years are required under present conditions for the most acidic water with associated high levels of contaminants to migrate about 100 m from the tailings impoundment. The cause of this slow movement is the significant neutralization capacity of the aquifer. If acid production within the tailings decreases in the future, migration rates of contaminants will also decrease

  10. Modelling of contaminant release from a uranium mine tailings site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahnt, Rene; Metschies, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Uranium mining and milling continuing from the early 1960's until 1990 close to the town of Seelingstaedt in Eastern Germany resulted in 4 tailings impoundments with a total tailings volume of about 105 Mio. m 3 . Leakage from these tailings impoundments enters the underlying aquifers and is discharged into surface water streams. High concentration of salts, uranium and several heavy metals are released from the tailings. At present the tailings impoundments are reshaped and covered. For the identification of suitable remediation options predictions of the contaminant release for different remediation scenarios have to be made. A compartment model representing the tailings impoundments and the surrounding aquifers for the calculation of contaminant release and transport was set up using the software GOLDSIM. This compartment model describes the time dependent hydraulic conditions within the tailings and the surrounding aquifers taking into account hydraulic and geotechnical processes influencing the hydraulic properties of the tailings material. A simple geochemical approach taking into account sorption processes as well as retardation by applying a k d -approach was implemented to describe the contaminant release and transport within the hydraulic system. For uranium as the relevant contaminant the simple approach takes into account additional geochemical conditions influencing the mobility. Alternatively the model approach allows to include the results of detailed geochemical modelling of the individual tailings zones which is than used as source term for the modelling of the contaminant transport in the aquifer and to the receiving streams. (authors)

  11. Sequential extraction of uranium metal contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murry, M.M.; Spitz, H.B.; Connick, W.B.

    2016-01-01

    Samples of uranium contaminated dirt collected from the dirt floor of an abandoned metal rolling mill were analyzed for uranium using a sequential extraction protocol involving a series of five increasingly aggressive solvents. The quantity of uranium extracted from the contaminated dirt by each reagent can aid in predicting the fate and transport of the uranium contamination in the environment. Uranium was separated from each fraction using anion exchange, electrodeposition and analyzed by alpha spectroscopy analysis. Results demonstrate that approximately 77 % of the uranium was extracted using NH 4 Ac in 25 % acetic acid. (author)

  12. Elevated Uranium in Aquifers of the Jacobsville Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, H.; Gierke, J.

    2003-12-01

    The EPA has announced a new standard for uranium in drinking water of 30 parts per billion (ppb). This maximum contaminant level (MCL) takes effect for community water supplies December 2003. The EPA's ruling has heightened awareness among residential well owners that uranium in drinking water may increase the risk of kidney disease and cancer and has created a need for a quantified, scientific understanding of the occurrence and distribution of uranium isotopes in aquifers. The authors are investigating the occurrence of elevated uranium in northern Michigan aquifers of the Middle Proterozoic Jacobsville sandstone, a red to mottled sequence of sandstones, conglomerates, siltstones and shales deposited as basin fill in the 1.1 Ga Midcontinent rift. Approximately 25% of 300 well water samples tested for isotopic uranium have concentrations above the MCL. Elevated uranium occurrences are distributed throughout the Jacobsville sandstone aquifers stretching across Michigan's Upper Peninsula. However, there is significant variation in well water uranium concentrations (from 0.01 to 190 ppb) and neighboring wells do not necessarily have similar concentrations. The authors are investigating hydrogeologic controls on ground water uranium concentrations in the Jacobsville sandstone, e.g. variations in lithology, mineralogy, groundwater residence time and geochemistry. Approximately 2000' of Jacobsville core from the Amoco St. Amour well was examined in conjunction with the spectral gamma ray log run in the borehole. Spikes in equivalent uranium (eU) concentration from the log are frequently associated with clay and heavy mineral layers in the sandstone core. The lithology and mineralogy of these layers will be determined by analysis of thin sections and x-ray diffraction. A portable spectrometer, model GRS-2000/BL, will be used on the sandstone cliffs along Lake Superior to characterize depositional and lithologic facies of the Jacobsville sandstone in terms of

  13. Aquifer restoration at uranium in situ leach sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastasi, F.S.; Williams, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    In situ mining of uranium involves injection of a leaching solution (lixiviant) into an ore-bearing aquifer. Frequently, the ground water in the mined aquifer is a domestic or livestock water supply. As the lixiviant migrates through the ore body, uranium and various associated elements such as arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, vanadium and radium-226 are mobilized in the ground water. Aquifer restoration after in situ mining is not fully understood. Several methods have been developed to restore mined aquifers to pre-mining (baseline) quality. Commonly used methods include ground water sweeping, clean water injection, and treatment by ion exchange and reverse osmosis technologies. Ammonium carbonate lixiviant was used at one RandD in situ mine. Attempts were made to restore the aquifer using a variety of methods. Efforts were successful in reducing concentrations of the majority of contaminants to baseline levels. Concentrations of certain parameters, however, remained at levels above baseline six months after restoration ceased. Relatively large quantities of ground water were processed in the restoration attempt considering the small size of the project (1.25 acre). More thorough characterization of the hydrogeology of the site may have enhanced the effectiveness of restoration and reduced potential environmental impacts associated with the project. This paper presents some of the findings of a research project conducted by the Mineral Resources Waste Management Team at the University of Idaho in Moscow, Idaho. Views contained herein do not reflect U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission policy

  14. The supposed radioactive contamination of the Puelche aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martini, Leopoldo E.

    2005-01-01

    The paper attempts to clarify the supposed radioactive contamination of the Puelche Aquifer in the Ezeiza Atomic Center Area, Ezeiza, province of Buenos Aires (Argentina). Reports are listed that show categorically that no anthropogenic uranium contamination is present. As far as the nitrates contamination is concerned, it is not generated by the Ezeiza Atomic Center, because the Center is downward from the contaminated zone. It is possible that the contamination is produced by houses in the area without suitable sewage. In the present case the best contribution to the environmental right, besides the adaptation and the systematization of the different legal instruments, is to found the analysis of the facts on the scientific and technical knowledge. (author) [es

  15. Uranium series geochemistry in aquifers: quantification of transport mechanisms of uranium and daughter products: the chalk aquifer (Champagne, France); Desequilibres des series de l'uranium dans les aquiferes: quantification des mecanismes de transport de l'uranium et de ses descendants: cas de l'aquifere de la craie (Champagne, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, A

    2005-09-15

    With the increase of contaminant flux of radionuclides in surface environment (soil, river, aquifer...), there is a need to understand and model the processes that control the distribution of uranium and its daughter products during transport within aquifers. We have used U-series disequilibria as an analogue for the transport of uranium and its daughter products in aquifer to understand such mechanisms. The measurements of uranium ({sup 234}U et {sup 238}U), thorium ({sup 230}Th et {sup 232}Th), {sup 226}Ra and {sup 222}Rn isotopes in the solid and liquid phases of the chalk aquifer in Champagne (East of France) allows us to understand the processes responsible for fractionation within the uranium decay chain. Fractionations are induced by physical and chemical properties of the elements (leaching, adsorption) but also by radioactive properties (recoil effect during {alpha}-decay). For the first time a comprehensive sampling of the solid phase has been performed, allowing quantifying mechanisms responsible for the long term evolution of the aquifer. A non steady state 1D model has been developed which takes into account leaching, adsorption processes as well as radioactive filiation and {alpha}-recoil effect. Retardation coefficients have been calculated for uranium, thorium and radium. The aquifer is characterised by a double porosity, and the contribution of fracture and matrix porosity on the water/rock interaction processes has been estimated. (author)

  16. Selective Removal of Uranium from the Washing Solution of Uranium-Contaminated Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Han, G. S.; Kim, G. N.; Koo, D. S.; Jeong, J. W.; Choi, J. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This study examined selective removal methods of uranium from the waste solution by ion exchange resins or solvent extraction methods to reduce amount of the 2{sup nd} waste. Alamine-336, known as an excellent extraction reagent of uranium from the leaching solution of uranium ore, did not remove uranium from the acidic washing solution of soil. Uranyl ions in the acidic waste solution were sorbed on ampholyte resin with a high sorption efficiency, and desorbed from the resin by a washing with 0.5 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution at 60 .deg. C. However, the uranium dissolved in the sulfuric acid solution was not sorbed onto the strong anion exchanger resins. A great amount of uranium-contaminated (U-contaminated) soil had been generated from the decommissioning of a uranium conversion plant. Our group has developed a decontamination process with washing and electrokinetic methods to decrease the amount of waste to be disposed of. However, this process generates a large amount of waste solution containing various metal ions.

  17. Uranium Concentration of Contaminated Zone due to the Cover Depth for Self-Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Dae Seo; Sung, Hyun Hee; Kim, Gye Nam; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Il Gook; Han, Gyu Seong; Choi, Jong Won

    2016-01-01

    To acquire radiation dose under self disposal from them, the study on decontamination of some uranium contaminated soil and concrete wastes was performed using electrokinetic-electrodialytic. In this study, we evaluated radiation dose due to cover depth on contaminated zone such as uranium contaminated soil and concrete wastes under radiation dose limit using RESRAD Version 6.5. At first, the calculation of the radiation dose on the contaminated zone are carried out. The second, the uranium concentration of contaminated zone due to the cover depth are also analyzed. The uranium contaminated soil and concrete wastes under radiation dose limit by decontaminating them have application to self-disposal of contaminated zone. The area of contaminated zone is 1,500 m"2. The thickness of contaminated zone is 2 m. The length parallel to aquifer flow is 43.702m. The age of the residents on contaminated zone is 15 years old. The period of evaluation on the contaminated zone is from regulation exemption of uranium contaminated soil and concrete wastes till 1,000 years. The calculation of the radiation dose on contaminated zone are carried out. The uranium concentration of contaminated zone due to the cover depth was also analyzed. as the cover depth increases, the uranium concentration has an increasing trend. As the cover depth increases, radiation dose of a person has a decreasing trend. As the cover depth increases, the radiation dose of residents has also a decreasing trend.

  18. Uranium Concentration of Contaminated Zone due to the Cover Depth for Self-Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Dae Seo; Sung, Hyun Hee; Kim, Gye Nam; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Il Gook; Han, Gyu Seong; Choi, Jong Won [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To acquire radiation dose under self disposal from them, the study on decontamination of some uranium contaminated soil and concrete wastes was performed using electrokinetic-electrodialytic. In this study, we evaluated radiation dose due to cover depth on contaminated zone such as uranium contaminated soil and concrete wastes under radiation dose limit using RESRAD Version 6.5. At first, the calculation of the radiation dose on the contaminated zone are carried out. The second, the uranium concentration of contaminated zone due to the cover depth are also analyzed. The uranium contaminated soil and concrete wastes under radiation dose limit by decontaminating them have application to self-disposal of contaminated zone. The area of contaminated zone is 1,500 m{sup 2}. The thickness of contaminated zone is 2 m. The length parallel to aquifer flow is 43.702m. The age of the residents on contaminated zone is 15 years old. The period of evaluation on the contaminated zone is from regulation exemption of uranium contaminated soil and concrete wastes till 1,000 years. The calculation of the radiation dose on contaminated zone are carried out. The uranium concentration of contaminated zone due to the cover depth was also analyzed. as the cover depth increases, the uranium concentration has an increasing trend. As the cover depth increases, radiation dose of a person has a decreasing trend. As the cover depth increases, the radiation dose of residents has also a decreasing trend.

  19. Bioremediation of uranium contaminated soils and wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.

    1998-01-01

    Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from uranium mill tailings, nuclear fuel manufacturing and nuclear weapons production is a major concern. Studies of the mechanisms of biotransformation of uranium and toxic metals under various microbial process conditions has resulted in the development of two treatment processes: (1) stabilization of uranium and toxic metals with reduction in waste volume and (2) removal and recovery of uranium and toxic metals from wastes and contaminated soils. Stabilization of uranium and toxic metals in wastes is accomplished by exploiting the unique metabolic capabilities of the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. The radionuclides and toxic metals are solubilized by the bacteria directly by enzymatic reductive dissolution, or indirectly due to the production of organic acid metabolites. The radionuclides and toxic metals released into solution are immobilized by enzymatic reductive precipitation, biosorption and redistribution with stable mineral phases in the waste. Non-hazardous bulk components of the waste volume. In the second process uranium and toxic metals are removed from wastes or contaminated soils by extracting with the complexing agent citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, followed by photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. The toxic metals and uranium are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in clean-up and disposal costs

  20. Recovering uranium from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Wet-process phosphoric acid contains a significant amount of uranium. This uranium totals more than 1,500 tons/yr in current U.S. acid output--and projections put the uranium level at 8,000 tons/yr in the year 2000. Since the phosphoric acid is a major raw material for fertilizers, uranium finds its way into those products and is effectively lost as a resource, while adding to the amount of radioactive material that can contaminate the food chain. So, resource-conservation and environmental considerations both make recovery of the uranium from phosphoric acid desirable. This paper describes the newly developed process for recovering uranium from phosphoric acid by using solvent-extraction technique. After many extractants had been tested, the researchers eventually selected the combination of di (2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (DEPA) and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) as the most suitable. The flowscheme of the process is included

  1. Building Conceptual Models of Field-Scale Uranium Reactive Transport in a Dynamic Vadose Zone-Aquifer-River System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Subsurface simulation is being used to build, test, and couple conceptual process models to better understand controls on a 0.4 km by 1.0 km uranium plume that has persisted above the drinking water standard in the groundwater of the Hanford 300 Area over the last 15 years. At this site, uranium-contaminated sediments in the vadose zone and aquifer are subject to significant variations in water levels and velocities driven by the diurnal, weekly, seasonal, and episodic Columbia River stage dynamics. Groundwater flow reversals typically occur twice a day with significant exchange of river water and groundwater in the near-river aquifer. Mixing of the dilute solution chemistry of the river with the groundwater complicates the uranium sorption behavior as the mobility of U(VI) has been shown experimentally to be a function of pH, carbonate, calcium, and uranium. Furthermore, uranium mass transfer between solid and aqueous phases has been observed to be rate-limited in the context of the high groundwater velocities resulting from the river stage fluctuations and the highly transmissive sediments (hydraulic conductivities ∼1500 m/d). One- and two-dimensional vertical cross-sectional simulations of variably-saturated flow and reactive transport, based on laboratory-derived models of distributed rate mass transfer and equilibrium multicomponent surface complexation, are used to assess uranium transport at the dynamic vadose zone aquifer interface as well as changes to uranium mobility due to incursions of river water into the aquifer

  2. Oxidation of naturally reduced uranium in aquifer sediments by dissolved oxygen and its potential significance to uranium plume persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. A.; Smith, R. L.; Bohlke, J. K.; Jemison, N.; Xiang, H.; Repert, D. A.; Yuan, X.; Williams, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of naturally reduced zones is common in alluvial aquifers in the western U.S.A. due to the burial of woody debris in flood plains. Such reduced zones are usually heterogeneously dispersed in these aquifers and characterized by high concentrations of organic carbon, reduced mineral phases, and reduced forms of metals, including uranium(IV). The persistence of high concentrations of dissolved uranium(VI) at uranium-contaminated aquifers on the Colorado Plateau has been attributed to slow oxidation of insoluble uranium(IV) mineral phases found in association with these reducing zones, although there is little understanding of the relative importance of various potential oxidants. Four field experiments were conducted within an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River near Rifle, CO, wherein groundwater associated with the naturally reduced zones was pumped into a gas-impermeable tank, mixed with a conservative tracer (Br-), bubbled with a gas phase composed of 97% O2 and 3% CO2, and then returned to the subsurface in the same well from which it was withdrawn. Within minutes of re-injection of the oxygenated groundwater, dissolved uranium(VI) concentrations increased from less than 1 μM to greater than 2.5 μM, demonstrating that oxygen can be an important oxidant for uranium in such field systems if supplied to the naturally reduced zones. Dissolved Fe(II) concentrations decreased to the detection limit, but increases in sulfate could not be detected due to high background concentrations. Changes in nitrogen species concentrations were variable. The results contrast with other laboratory and field results in which oxygen was introduced to systems containing high concentrations of mackinawite (FeS), rather than the more crystalline iron sulfides found in aged, naturally reduced zones. The flux of oxygen to the naturally reduced zones in the alluvial aquifers occurs mainly through interactions between groundwater and gas phases at the water table

  3. On the migration of uranium isotopes in sandstone aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehlich, K.; Gellermann, R.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of natural 238 U and 234 U activity in groundwater of sandstone aquifers have been used to study the migration of these uranium isotopes. Regarding the uranium exchange between liquid phase and rock surface during migration, two different models were applied for evaluating the experimental results. Values of corresponding parameters (retardation factor K, removal rate R) reflecting different behaviour concerning this exchange were determined. For example, the values obtained for 238 U in a Triassic sandstone aquifer of the GDR are K = 8.6 x 10 6 and R = 1.3 x 10 -3 a -1 , respectively. It was found that, under the conditions of the sandstone aquifer concerned, the removal rate model is better suited for calculating uranium-isotope migration in groundwater. (author)

  4. Modeling subsurface contamination at Fernald

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.W.; Flinn, J.C.; Ruwe, P.R.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Fernald site is located about 20 miles northwest of Cincinnati. Fernald produced refined uranium metal products from ores between 1953 and 1989. The pure uranium was sent to other DOE sites in South Carolina, Tennessee, Colorado,and Washington in support of the nation's strategic defense programs. Over the years of large-scale uranium production, contamination of the site's soil and groundwater occurred.The contamination is of particular concern because the Fernald site is located over the Great Miami Aquifer, a designated sole-source drinking water aquifer. Contamination of the aquifer with uranium was found beneath the site, and migration of the contamination had occurred well beyond the site's southern boundary. As a result, Fernald was placed on the National Priorities (CERCLA/Superfund) List in 1989. Uranium production at the site ended in 1989,and Fernald's mission has been changed to one of environmental restoration. This paper presents information about computerized modeling of subsurface contamination used for the environmental restoration project at Fernald

  5. Uranium accumulation in Brassica rapa L. and effect of citric acid and humic acids as chelating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez del R, H.; Perez C, G. A.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F.; Rodriguez H, G.

    2016-09-01

    Phyto extraction is a technique that makes use of plants for the remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals. In this study the uranium incorporation in the Brassica rapa L. species was evaluated, in artificially contaminated inert soils with 40 mg U/kg, and the effect of adding of the natural chelating agents citric acid and humic acids in the accumulation of uranium was analyzed. Soil free of organic matter and biologically inert was obtained by controlled calcination s of natural soil. Cultures in the prepared soil consisted of five growth treatments: 1) cultivation without uranium or additives; 2) cultivation in the uranium presence; 3) cultivation with uranium and citric acid (2 g/kg); 4) cultivation with uranium and humic acids (10 g/kg); 5) uranium cultivation and combination of citric and humic acids at the same concentrations. There was no adverse effect on plant growth with the presence of uranium at the given concentration. Regarding the controls, the total biomass in the presence of uranium was slightly higher, while the addition of humic acids significantly stimulated the production of biomass with respect to the citric acid. The combined action of organic acids produced the highest amount of biomass. The efficiency of phyto extraction followed the order Humic acids (301 μg U/g) > Non-assisted (224 μg U/g) >> Citric acid + Humic acids (68 μg U/g) > Citric acid (59 μg U/g). The values of uranium concentration in the total biomass show that the species Brassica rapa L. has the capacity of phyto extraction of uranium in contaminated soils. The addition of humic acids increases the uranium extraction while the addition of citric acid disadvantages it. (Author)

  6. Study on remediation for uranium contaminated soils enhanced by chelator using brassica mustard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Qinfang; Pan Ning; Jin Yongdong; Xia Chuanqin

    2012-01-01

    Screening of perfect hyperaccumulators is the key to the application of this technology. Through the previous stage study, mustard was found to be good at absorption and accumulation of uranium among 51 species, the plant grows fast with wide adaptability and large biomass. Researches will focus on the following two aspects: 1. Simulating U- contaminated soils was prepared by two different ways to add uranium. (1). UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 . 6H 2 O solution was sprayed into soil when the plant was grown in the soil; (2). Above U-contaminated soils after planting and placed for a year. Study on whether the way of adding uranium can effect mustard accumulate uranium. Results found: in the first Phytoremediation, U-contaminated concentration at 100 mg/kg, U concentration in shoots reaches 1103.42 mg/kg, roots reach 1909.49 mg/kg, annual removal rate is 7.81%; in the second Phytoremediation, U-contaminated concentration at 100 mg/kg, U concentration in shoots reach 295.83 mg/kg, roots reach 268.42 mg/kg, annual removal rate is 2.52%. Led to the difference between the twice remediation is the speciation of uranium m soils has changed, respectively, Tessier-five step continuous extraction method for determination of uranium speciation in soils and found available uranium (exchangeable uranium, uranium carbonate) in the soil of the first phytoremediation was 52% higher than the second phytoremediation. 2. Study on chelators (Citric acids, Malic acids) and soil amendments (Organic fertilizer, microbe fertilizer. Humic acid organic fertilizer, Urea) whether effect mustard accumulate uranium, found organic fertilizer can reduce shoots accumulate uranium, Citric acid and microbe fertilizer increase shoots enrichment of uranium. (authors)

  7. Uranium recovery from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    In the field of metallurgy, specifically processes for recovering uranium from wet process phosphoric acid solution derived from the acidulation of uraniferous phosphate ores, problems of imbalance of ion exchange agents, contamination of recycled phosphoric acid with process organics and oxidizing agents, and loss and contamination of uranium product, are solved by removing organics from the raffinate after ion exchange conversion of uranium to uranous form and recovery thereof by ion exchange, and returning organics to the circuit to balance mono and disubstituted ester ion exchange agents; then oxidatively stripping uranium from the agent using hydrogen peroxide; then after ion exchange recovery of uranyl and scrubbing, stripping with sodium carbonate and acidifying the strip solution and using some of it for the scrubbing; regenerating the sodium loaded agent and recycling it to the uranous recovery step. Economic recovery of uranium as a by-product of phosphate fertilizer production is effected. (author)

  8. Field Evaluation of the Restorative Capacity of the Aquifer Downgradient of a Uranium In-Situ Recovery Mining Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-22

    A two-part field study was conducted in Smith Ranch-Highland in-situ recovery (ISR) near Douglas, Wyoming, to evaluate the restorative capacity of the aquifer downgradient (i.e., hydrologically downstream) of a Uranium ISR mining site with respect to the transport of uranium and other potential contaminants in groundwater after mining has ceased. The study was partially conducted by checking the Uranium content and the alkalinity of separate wells, some wells had been restored and others had not. A map and in-depth procedures of the study are included.

  9. Biotransformation involved in sustained reductive removal of uranium in contaminant aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes progress made from August 2004 to July 2005. During this period research focused primarily on obtaining a better understanding of the factors controlling the reduction of U(VI) during in situ uranium bioremediation as well as investigating the potential for using electrodes as an alternative electron donor to promote in situ uranium reduction. Analysis of the 2003 experiment at the field study site in Rifle, CO was completed. The results demonstrated the substantial heterogeneity of the zone undergoing bioremediation, both in terms of geochemistry and microbiology. The lack of U(VI) reduction under sulfate-reducing conditions was clearly documented. The need for more detailed sampling both with time and with depth in the aquifer was demonstrated. For the first time a comparison between the composition of the microbial community in the sediments and the microbes in the corresponding groundwater was attempted. The findings from this study are important not only in further demonstrating the potential for in situ uranium bioremediation, but also for indicating how methods and sampling approaches should be improved in the future. A manuscript summarizing these findings has been accepted for publication in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. In summer of 2004 a new field experiment was conducted at the Rifle site. A novel feature of this study was much more intensive sampling in order to better define the progression of microbial processes during in situ uranium bioremediation. The results demonstrated that stimulation of in situ uranium bioremediation with added acetate was a repeatable phenomenon and that U(VI) reduction was clearly linked to the presence and activity of microorganisms in the family Geobacteraceae. A manuscript summarizing these results is in preparation. A surprising result of the field studies at the Rifle site was that although Geobacter species actively reduced U(VI) in the groundwater, removing it from solution, a high

  10. Ion exchange technology in the remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater at Fernald

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, Chris; Glassmeyer, Cathy; Bozich, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Using pump and treat methodology, uranium contaminated groundwater is being removed from the Great Miami Aquifer at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) per the FEMP Record of Decision (ROD) that defines groundwater cleanup. Standard extraction wells pump about 3900 gallons-per-minute (gpm) from the aquifer through five ion exchange treatment systems. The largest treatment system k the Advanced Wastewater Treatment (AWWT) Expansion System with a capacity of 1800 gpm, which consists of three trains of two vessels. The trains operate in parallel treating 600 gpm each, The two vessels in each train operate in series, one in lead and one in lag. Treated groundwater is either reinfected back into the aquifer to speed up the aquifer cleanup processor discharged to the Great Miami River. The uranium regulatory ROD limit for discharge to the river is 20 parts per billion (ppb), and the FEMP uranium administrative action level for reinfection is 10 ppb. Spent (i.e., a resin that no longer adsorbs uranium) ion exchange resins must either be replaced or regenerated. The regeneration of spent ion exchange resins is considerably more cost effective than their replacement. Therefore, a project was undertaken to learn how best to regenerate the resins in the groundwater vessels. At the outset of this project, considerable uncertainty existed as to whether a spent resin could be regenerated successfully enough so that it performed as well as new resin relative to achieving very low uranium concentrations in the effluent. A second major uncertain y was whether the operational lifetime of a regenerated resin would be similar to that of a new resin with respect to uranium loading capacity and effluent concentration behavior. The project was successful in that a method for regenerating resins has been developed that is operationally efficient, that results in regenerated resins yielding uranium concentrations much lower than regulatory limits, and that results in

  11. Risk assessment and management of an oil contaminated aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braxein, A.; Daniels, H.; Rouve, G.; Rubin, H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper concerns the provision of the basic information needed for the decision making process regarding the remedial measures leading to reutilization of an oil contaminated aquifer. The study refers to the case history of jet fuel contamination of an aquifer comprising part of the coastal aquifer of Israel. Due to that contamination two major water supply wells were abandoned. This study examines the use of numerical simulations in order to restore the contamination history of the aquifer. Such simulations also provide quantitative information needed for the decision making process regarding the future management of the contaminated aquifer

  12. Hydrochemistry of the Falls City uranium mine tailings remedial action project, Karnes County, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, T.J.; Kreitler, C.W.

    1994-01-01

    Acidic tailings and tailings solutions, created by sulfuric acid processing of uranium ores, were disposed of on the outcrop of the Whitsett Formation (Eocene). These solutions have recharged the sandstones of the Whitsett since the 1960's. Previous workers found a larger, complex, and unexplained pattern of contamination. Our study determined the extent and nature of contamination by (1) characterizing the geology and hydrology of the two shallow aquifers at the site, (2) determining the chemistry of the contaminant source (tailings solutions), and (3) identifying geochemical reactions that have altered the composition of contaminant plumes within each aquifer. The tailings solutions are composed of sodium chloride and neutral sulfate salts of aluminum and ammonium, with lesser amounts of iron, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium sulfate. Hydrolysis of aluminum sulfate produces an acid pH (3 to 4). Also, aluminum sulfate is a pH buffer, and it controls acidity of the tailings solutions. Cation exchange and neutralization by calcite modify the tailings solutions as they migrate through the aquifers. These reactions explain chemical patterns, which delineate five separate contaminant plumes in the aquifers. In the Deweesville sandstone, cation exchange has removed ammonium from acidic contaminant plumes. However, neutralization is incomplete because of the paucity of calcite in the Deweesville. In contrast, in the calcite-rich Conquista fossilferous sandstone, cation exchange and complete neutralization by calcite have removed most contaminant ions. Those contaminant plumes are delineated by elevated concentrations of calcium and carbon dioxide. The amount of contamination in both aquifers is much smaller than that estimated previously

  13. Assessing the Vulnerability of Public-Supply Wells to Contamination: Central Valley Aquifer System near Modesto, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Jurgens, Bryant C.; Burow, Karen R.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well in Modesto, California. The well selected for study pumps on average about 1,600 gallons per minute from the Central Valley aquifer system during peak summer demand. Water samples were collected at the public-supply well and at monitoring wells installed in the Modesto vicinity. Samples from the public-supply wellhead contained the undesirable constituents uranium, nitrate, arsenic, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and pesticides, although none were present at concentrations exceeding drinking-water standards. Of these contaminants, uranium and nitrate pose the most significant water-quality risk to the public-supply well because human activities have caused concentrations in groundwater to increase over time. Overall, study findings point to four primary factors that affect the movement and (or) fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well in Modesto: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer); (2) irrigation and agricultural and municipal pumping that drives contaminants downward into the primary production zone of the aquifer; (3) short-circuiting of contaminated water down the public-supply well during the low-pumping season; and (4) natural geochemical conditions of the aquifer. A local-scale computer model of groundwater flow and transport to the public-supply well was constructed to simulate long-term nitrate and uranium concentrations reaching the well. With regard to nitrate, two conflicting processes influence concentrations in the area contributing recharge to the well: (1) Beneath land that is being farmed or has recently been farmed (within the last 10 to 20 years), downward-moving irrigation waters contain elevated nitrate concentrations; yet (2) the proportion of agricultural land has decreased and the proportion of urban land has increased since 1960. Urban land use is associated with low nitrate

  14. Environmental proteomics reveals early microbial community responses to biostimulation at a uranium- and nitrate-contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Nissen, Silke [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Pffifner, Susan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Loeffler, Frank E [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    High performance mass spectrometry instrumentation coupled with improved protein extraction techniques enable metaproteomics to identify active members of soil and groundwater microbial communities. Metaproteomics workflows were applied to study the initial responses (i.e., 4 days post treatment) of the indigenous aquifer microbiota to biostimulation with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) at a uranium-contaminated site. Members of the Betaproteobacteria (i.e., Dechloromonas, Ralstonia, Rhodoferax, Polaromonas, Delftia, Chromobacterium) and Firmicutes dominated the biostimulated aquifer community. Proteome characterization revealed distinct differences in protein expression between the microbial biomass collected from groundwater influenced by biostimulation and groundwater collected up-gradient of the EVO injection points. In particular, proteins involved in ammonium assimilation, EVO degradation, and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granule formation were prominent following biostimulation. Interestingly, the atypical NosZ of a Dechloromonas sp. was highly expressed suggesting active nitrous oxide (N2O) respiration. c-type cytochromes were barely detected, as was citrate synthase, a biomarker for hexavalent uranium reduction activity, suggesting that metal reduction has not commenced 4 days post EVO delivery. Environmental metaproteomics identified microbial community responses to biostimulation and elucidated active pathways demonstrating the value of this technique for complementing nucleic acid-based approaches.

  15. Seasonal Hydrologic Controls on Uranium and Iron Biogeochemistry in a Riparian Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, M.; Williams, K. H.; Danczak, R. E.; Yabusaki, S.; Fang, Y.; Hobson, C.

    2015-12-01

    The maintenance of geochemically reducing conditions is generally optimal for the formation and preservation of reduced metals and mineral phases that can limit contaminant fate and transport. At a riparian aquifer near Rifle, CO, we tracked over six months the biogeochemical response within the aquifer to an annual pulse of dissolved oxygen (DO) that results from snowmelt-driven changes in Colorado River stage. In reduced portions of the aquifer (naturally reduced zones; NRZs) the re-oxidation of abundant iron sulfide minerals was the dominant oxygen-consuming process, and resulted in little DO intrusion into the deeper aquifer. In less reduced areas, DO intruded through the entire vertical profile of the aquifer. Across both regions, these perturbations resulted in changes to the microbial community structure, and aqueous metal pools. Two potentially different mechanisms of uranium mobilization were observed; (1) re-oxidation of reduced U(IV) phases in response to DO intrusion, and (2) mobilization of U(VI) from the vadose zone during water table rise. This high-resolution, long-term monitoring of aquifer biogeochemistry at the Rifle site has revealed dynamic microbial and geochemical responses to predictable, annual hydrologic perturbations, and offers an opportunity to further refine modeling approaches for such regions.

  16. Solubility measurement of uranium in uranium-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Elless, M.; Hoffman, F.

    1993-08-01

    A short-term equilibration study involving two uranium-contaminated soils at the Fernald site was conducted as part of the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. The goal of this study is to predict the behavior of uranium during on-site remediation of these soils. Geochemical modeling was performed on the aqueous species dissolved from these soils following the equilibration study to predict the on-site uranium leaching and transport processes. The soluble levels of total uranium, calcium, magnesium, and carbonate increased continually for the first four weeks. After the first four weeks, these components either reached a steady-state equilibrium or continued linearity throughout the study. Aluminum, potassium, and iron, reached a steady-state concentration within three days. Silica levels approximated the predicted solubility of quartz throughout the study. A much higher level of dissolved uranium was observed in the soil contaminated from spillage of uranium-laden solvents and process effluents than in the soil contaminated from settling of airborne uranium particles ejected from the nearby incinerator. The high levels observed for soluble calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate are probably the result of magnesium and/or calcium carbonate minerals dissolving in these soils. Geochemical modeling confirms that the uranyl-carbonate complexes are the most stable and dominant in these solutions. The use of carbonate minerals on these soils for erosion control and road construction activities contributes to the leaching of uranium from contaminated soil particles. Dissolved carbonates promote uranium solubility, forming highly mobile anionic species. Mobile uranium species are contaminating the groundwater underlying these soils. The development of a site-specific remediation technology is urgently needed for the FEMP site

  17. Aquifer restoration at in-situ leach uranium mines: evidence for natural restoration processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, W.J.; Serne, R.J.; Bell, N.E.; Martin, W.J.

    1983-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted experiments with aquifer sediments and leaching solution (lixiviant) from an in-situ leach uranium mine. The data from these laboratory experiments and information on the normal distribution of elements associated with roll-front uranium deposits provide evidence that natural processes can enhance restoration of aquifers affected by leach mining. Our experiments show that the concentration of uranium (U) in solution can decrease at least an order of magnitude (from 50 to less than 5 ppM U) due to reactions between the lixiviant and sediment, and that a uranium solid, possibly amorphous uranium dioxide, (UO 2 ), can limit the concentration of uranium in a solution in contact with reduced sediment. The concentrations of As, Se, and Mo in an oxidizing lixiviant should also decrease as a result of redox and precipitation reactions between the solution and sediment. The lixiviant concentrations of major anions (chloride and sulfate) other than carbonate were not affected by short-term (less than one week) contact with the aquifer sediments. This is also true of the total dissolved solids level of the solution. Consequently, we recommend that these solution parameters be used as indicators of an excursion of leaching solution from the leach field. Our experiments have shown that natural aquifer processes can affect the solution concentration of certain constituents. This effect should be considered when guidelines for aquifer restoration are established

  18. Intrinsic bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a gas condensate-contaminated aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieg, L.M.; McInerney; Tanner, R.S.; Harris, S.H. Jr.; Sublette, K.L.; Suflita, J.M.; Kolhatkar, R.V.

    1999-01-01

    A study was designed to determine if the intrinsic bioremediation of gas condensate hydrocarbons represented an important fate process in a shallow aquifer underlying a natural gas production site. For over 4 yr, changes in the groundwater, sediment, and vadose zone chemistry in the contaminated portion of the aquifer were interpreted relative to a background zone. Changes included decreased dissolved oxygen and sulfate levels and increased alkalinity, Fe(II), and methane concentrations in the contaminated groundwater, suggesting that aerobic heterotrophic respiration depleted oxygen reserves leaving anaerobic conditions in the hydrocarbon-impacted subsurface. Dissolved hydrogen levels in the contaminated groundwater indicated that sulfate reduction and methanogenesis were predominant biological processes, corroborating the geochemical findings. Furthermore, 10--1000-fold higher numbers of sulfate reducers and methanogens were enumerated in the contaminated sediment relative to background. Putative metabolites were also detected in the contaminated groundwater, including methylbenzylsuccinic acid, a signature intermediate of anaerobic xylene decay. Laboratory incubations showed that benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and each of the xylene isomers were biodegraded under sulfate-reducing conditions as was toluene under methanogenic conditions. These results coupled with a decrease in hydrocarbon concentrations in contaminated sediment confirm that intrinsic bioremediation contributes to the attenuation of hydrocarbons in this aquifer

  19. Uranium isotopes in carbonate aquifers of arid region setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshamsi, D.M.; Murad, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater in arid and semiarid regions is vital resource for many uses and therefore information about concentrations of uranium isotopes among other chemical parameters are necessary. In the study presented here, distribution of 238 U and 235 U in groundwater of four selected locations in the southern Arabian peninsula, namely at two locations within the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and two locations in Oman are discussed. The analyses of the uranium isotopes were performed using ICP-MS and the results indicated a range of concentrations for 235 U and 238 U at 3-39 ng L -1 (average: 18 ng L -1 ) and 429-5,293 ng L -1 (average: 2,508 ng L -1 ) respectively. These uranium concentrations are below the higher permissible WHO limit for drinking water and also comparable to averages found in groundwater from similar aquifers in Florida and Tunisia. Negative correlation between rainfall and uranium concentrations suggests that in lithologically comparable aquifers, climate may influence the concentration of uranium in subtropical to arid regions. (author)

  20. Optimal Aquifer Pumping Policy to Reduce Contaminant Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Different sources of ground water contamination lead to non-uniform distribution of contaminant concentration in the aquifer. If elimination or containment of pollution sources was not possible, the distribution of contaminant concentrations could be modified in order to eliminate peak concentrations using optimal water pumping discharge plan. In the present investigation Visual MODFLOW model was used to simulate the flow and transport in a hypothetic aquifer. Genetic Algorithm (GA also was applied to optimize the location and pumping flow rate of wells in order to reduce contaminants peak concentrations in aquifer.

  1. Advanced remediation of uranium-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S S; Han, G S; Kim, G N; Koo, D S; Kim, I G; Choi, J W

    2016-11-01

    The existing decontamination method using electrokinetic equipment after acidic washing for uranium-contaminated soil requires a long decontamination time and a significant amount of electric power. However, after soil washing, with a sulfuric acid solution and an oxidant at 65 °C, the removal of the muddy solution using a 100 mesh sieve can decrease the radioactivity of the remaining coarse soil to the clearance level. Therefore, only a small amount of fine soil collected from the muddy solution requires the electrokinetic process for its decontamination. Furthermore, it is found that the selective removal of uranium from the sulfuric washing solution is not obtained using an anion exchanger but rather using a cation exchanger, unexpectedly. More than 90% of the uranium in the soil washing solutions is adsorbed on the S-950 resin, and 87% of the uranium adsorbed on S-950 is desorbed by washing with a 0.5 M Na 2 CO 3 solution at 60 °C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Variation of uranium isotopes in some carbonate aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowart, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    The 234 U/ 238 U alpha activity ratio (AR) and uranium concentrations are reported for 83 springs that issue from carbonate aquifers in Florida, Texas, Nevada-California, and Israel. Data for each aquifer fall within more or less mutually exclusive fields. In general, the spring in a humid climate have AR's approaching secular equilibrium, whereas those in more arid climates have AR's differing greatly from equilibrium

  3. Uranium mining in the North Bohemia, Straz, Czech Republic and geological evaluation prior to remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopecky, P.; Slezak, J.

    2002-01-01

    The Straz uranium deposits are located in sedimentary rocks and within important aquifers. One of these is of drinking water quality. The deposits were exploited by both conventional and in situ leach (ISL) methods in two mines: the Hamr-North underground and the Straz (ISL) mine. They are located in an aquifer within sedimentary Cenomanian formation. Between 1967 and 2000 the Straz ISL mine produced over 16 000 tonnes U by injecting a total of 4.1 million tonnes of sulphuric acid, 315 000 t of nitric acid, 112 000 of ammonia, 26 000 of hydrofluoric acid, and 1400 of hydrochloric acid. This enormous amount of acid is creating a major rehabilitation problem and a potential risk for another aquifer: the Turonian drinking water quality aquifer. The problem is now being addressed by completing a complete hydrogeological assessment. Contaminated water is being treated to reduce the present contamination levels of 5-110g/l TDS to less than 10g/l TDS. The rehabilitation will be influenced by economic factors, as well as the development of new technologies. (author)

  4. Uranium-contaminated soil pilot treatment study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turney, W.R.J.R.; Mason, C.F.V.; Michelotti, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    A pilot treatment study is proving to be effective for the remediation of uranium-contaminated soil from a site at the Los Alamos National Laboratory by use of a two-step, zero-discharge, 100% recycle system. Candidate uranium-contaminated soils were characterized for uranium content, uranium speciation, organic content, size fractionization, and pH. Geochemical computer codes were used to forecast possible uranium leach scenarios. Uranium contamination was not homogenous throughout the soil. In the first step, following excavation, the soil was sorted by use of the ThemoNuclean Services segmented gate system. Following the sorting, uranium-contaminated soil was remediated in a containerized vat leach process by use of sodium-bicarbonate leach solution. Leach solution containing uranium-carbonate complexes is to be treated by use of ion-exchange media and then recycled. Following the treatment process the ion exchange media will be disposed of in an approved low-level radioactive landfill. It is anticipated that treated soils will meet Department of Energy site closure guidelines, and will be given open-quotes no further actionclose quotes status. Treated soils are to be returned to the excavation site. A volume reduction of contaminated soils will successfully be achieved by the treatment process. Cost of the treatment (per cubic meter) is comparable or less than other current popular methods of uranium-contamination remediation

  5. Radionuclides, Heavy Metals and Fluoride Contamination in Al Bahira Aquifer, Youssoufia Area, Morocco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agma, T. T; Bouchaou, L.; Ettayfi, N.; Lgourna, Z.; Boutaleb, S. [Ibn Zohr University, Applied Geology and Geo-Environment Laboratory, Cite Dakhla, Agadir 80060 (Morocco); Warner, N.; Vengosh, A. [Duke University, Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    This study investigates the geochemistry and quantity of trace metals and naturally occurring radionuclides (Ra, U) in the shallow groundwater in the western part of the Al Bahira aquifer (Phosphate Plateau) located in west central Morocco. Groundwater is characterized by a wide salinity range (TDS of 540 to 9286 mg/l) and shows systematic linear relationships between the major dissolved constituents. These relationships suggest that the mixing of a single saline source and fresh water controls the quality of groundwater. Fluoride, uranium, selenium, and arsenic concentrations are also correlated with salinity. The activity concentrations of Radium-226 exceed the US-EPA drinking water standard. Radium-226 activity in the groundwater is not directly related to salinity and might be affected by other factors such as water temperature. The low ratios of the short lived Ra-224 to Ra-223 ({approx}2) indicate that Ra was derived from a uranium rich source with a low Th/U ratio in the rock source, which is consistent with the Urich lithology of the aquifer (e.g., phosphate rocks). The high levels of contaminants found in the shallow groundwater samples have important health implications for the local population, as shallow groundwater is used for drinking water in the rural communities northwest of Marrakech and these contaminants pose potential serious health problems (e.g., dental fluorosis, kidney disease, and bone cancer). (author)

  6. Remediation of uranium contaminated soils with bicarbonate extraction and microbial U(VI) reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, E.J.P.; Landa, E.R.; Lovley, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for concentrating uranium from contaminated soils in which the uranium is first extracted with bicarbonate and then the extracted uranium is precipitated with U(VI)-reducing microorganisms was evaluated for a variety of uranium-contaminated soils. Bicarbonate (100 mM) extracted 20-94% of the uranium that was extracted with nitric acid. The U(VI)-reducing microorganism, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans reduced the U(VI) to U(IV) in the bicarbonate extracts. In some instances unidentified dissolved extracted components, presumably organics, gave the extract a yellow color and inhibited U(VI) reduction and/or the precipitation of U(IV). Removal of the dissolved yellow material with the addition of hydrogen peroxide alleviated this inhibition. These results demonstrate that bicarbonate extraction of uranium from soil followed by microbial U(VI) reduction might be an effective mechanism for concentrating uranium from some contaminated soils. (author)

  7. Physicochemical and mineralogical characterization of uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Integrated Demonstration Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.; Timpson, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    An integrated approach that utilizes various characterization technologies has been developed for the Uranium Soil Integrated Demonstration program. The Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation site near Cincinnati, Ohio, was selected as the host facility for this demonstration. Characterization of background, untreated contaminated, and treated contaminated soils was performed to assess the contamination and the effect of treatment efforts to remove uranium from these soils. Carbonate minerals were present in the contaminated soils (added for erosion control) but were absent in the nearby background soils. Because of the importance of the carbonate anion to uranium solubility, the occurrence of carbonate minerals in these soils will be an important factor in the development of a successful remediation technology. Uranium partitioning data among several particle-size fractions indicate that conventional soil washing will be ineffective for remediation of these soils and that chemical extraction will be necessary to lower the uranium concentration to the target level (52 mg/kg). Carbonate-based (sodium carbonate/bicarbonate) and acid-based (sulfuric and citric acids) lixiviants were employed for the selective removal of uranium from these soils. Characterization results have identified uranium phosphate minerals as the predominant uranium mineral form in both the untreated and treated soils. The low solubility associated with phosphate minerals is primarily responsible for their occurrence in the posttreated soils. Artificial weathering of the treated soils caused by the treatments, particularly acid-based lixiviants, was documented by their detrimental effects on several physicochemical characteristics of these soils (e.g., soil pH, particle-size distribution, and mineralogy)

  8. Tracers Detect Aquifer Contamination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Enfield, Carl

    1995-01-01

    The EPA's National Laboratory (NRMRL) at Ada, OK, along with the University of Florida and the University of Texas, have developed a tracer procedure to detect the amount of contamination in aquifer formations...

  9. Estimation of uranium migration parameters in sandstone aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malov, A I

    2016-03-01

    The chemical composition and isotopes of carbon and uranium were investigated in groundwater samples that were collected from 16 wells and 2 sources in the Northern Dvina Basin, Northwest Russia. Across the dataset, the temperatures in the groundwater ranged from 3.6 to 6.9 °C, the pH ranged from 7.6 to 9.0, the Eh ranged from -137 to +128 mV, the total dissolved solids (TDS) ranged from 209 to 22,000 mg L(-1), and the dissolved oxygen (DO) ranged from 0 to 9.9 ppm. The (14)C activity ranged from 0 to 69.96 ± 0.69 percent modern carbon (pmC). The uranium content in the groundwater ranged from 0.006 to 16 ppb, and the (234)U:(238)U activity ratio ranged from 1.35 ± 0.21 to 8.61 ± 1.35. The uranium concentration and (234)U:(238)U activity ratio increased from the recharge area to the redox barrier; behind the barrier, the uranium content is minimal. The results were systematized by creating a conceptual model of the Northern Dvina Basin's hydrogeological system. The use of uranium isotope dating in conjunction with radiocarbon dating allowed the determination of important water-rock interaction parameters, such as the dissolution rate:recoil loss factor ratio Rd:p (a(-1)) and the uranium retardation factor:recoil loss factor ratio R:p in the aquifer. The (14)C age of the water was estimated to be between modern and >35,000 years. The (234)U-(238)U age of the water was estimated to be between 260 and 582,000 years. The Rd:p ratio decreases with increasing groundwater residence time in the aquifer from n × 10(-5) to n × 10(-7) a(-1). This finding is observed because the TDS increases in that direction from 0.2 to 9 g L(-1), and accordingly, the mineral saturation indices increase. Relatively high values of R:p (200-1000) characterize aquifers in sandy-clayey sediments from the Late Pleistocene and the deepest parts of the Vendian strata. In samples from the sandstones of the upper part of the Vendian strata, the R:p value is ∼ 24, i.e., sorption processes are

  10. A study on the decontamination of the gravels contaminated by uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ukryang; Kim, Gyenam; Kim, Seungsoo; Moon, Jaikwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The amount of gravels contaminated by uranium is usually about 10% of the contaminated soil. Since such contaminated gravels show different kinds and volumes, it would cost a considerable amount of money if they are to be disposed of without going through any special process. Also, there has not been any particular way or technology for processing the gravels contaminated by uranium. Therefore, various fundamental experiments and researches have been carried out for the decontamination of the gravels contaminated by uranium. Through such experiments and researches, it has been possible to obtain some significant results. The acid cleaning process, which is based on the application of the soil cleaning method, can be regarded as one of the major ways used for decontamination. When the gravels contaminated by uranium are cleaned as they are, most of them tend to show an extremely-low level of decontamination. Therefore, it could be said that the inside of each gravel is also contaminated by uranium. As a result, the gravels contaminated by uranium need to be crushed before being cleaned, which would result in a higher level of efficiency for decontamination compared to the previous way. Therefore, it is more effective to crush the subject gravels before cleaning them in terms of decontamination. However, such test results can only be applied to the gravels contaminated by an average level of uranium concentration. Regarding the gravels showing a higher level of uranium concentration than the average, it is still necessary to carry out more researches. Therefore, this study focused on the level of efficiency for decontamination after the contaminated gravels were crushed before being cleaned, in order to find a way to effectively dispose of the gravels contaminated by high-concentration uranium and secure a high level of efficiency for decontamination. In order to decontaminate the gravels which were contained in the soil contaminated by uranium and showed a higher

  11. Remediation of uranium contaminated soils with bicarbonate extraction and microbial U(VI) reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips , Elizabeth J.P.; Landa, Edward R.; Lovely, Derek R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for concentrating uranium from contaminated soils in which the uranium is first extracted with bicarbonate and then the extracted uranium is precipitated with U(VI)-reducing microorganisms was evaluated for a variety of uranuum-contaminated soils. Bicarbonate (100 mM) extracted 20–94% of the uranium that was extracted with nitric acid. The U(VI)-reducing microorganism,Desulfovibrio desulfuricans reduced the U(VI) to U(IV) in the bicarbonate extracts. In some instances unidentified dissolved extracted components, presumably organics, gave the extract a yellow color and inhibited U(VI) reduction and/or the precipitation of U(IV). Removal of the dissolved yellow material with the addition of hydrogen peroxide alleviated this inhibition. These results demonstrate that bicarbonate extraction of uranium from soil followed by microbial U(VI) reduction might be an effective mechanism for concentrating uranium from some contaminated soils.

  12. Reduction of radioactive waste from remediation of uranium-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Gook; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Gye Nam; Han, Gyu Seong; Choi, Jong Won [Decontamination and Decommissioning Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Great amounts of solid radioactive waste (second waste) and waste solution are generated from the remediation of uranium-contaminated soil. To reduce these, we investigated washing with a less acidic solution and recycling the waste solution after removal of the dominant elements and uranium. Increasing the pH of the washing solution from 0.5 to 1.5 would be beneficial in terms of economics. A high content of calcium in the waste solution was precipitated by adding sulfuric acid. The second waste can be significantly reduced by using sorption and desorption techniques on ampholyte resin S-950 prior to the precipitation of uranium at pH 3.0.

  13. Reduction of radioactive waste from remediation of uranium-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Il Gook; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Gye Nam; Han, Gyu Seong; Choi, Jong Won

    2016-01-01

    Great amounts of solid radioactive waste (second waste) and waste solution are generated from the remediation of uranium-contaminated soil. To reduce these, we investigated washing with a less acidic solution and recycling the waste solution after removal of the dominant elements and uranium. Increasing the pH of the washing solution from 0.5 to 1.5 would be beneficial in terms of economics. A high content of calcium in the waste solution was precipitated by adding sulfuric acid. The second waste can be significantly reduced by using sorption and desorption techniques on ampholyte resin S-950 prior to the precipitation of uranium at pH 3.0

  14. Precipitation behavior of uranium in multicomponent solution by oxalic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y.J.; Kim, I.S.; Lee, W.K.; Shin, H.S.; Ro, S.G.

    1996-01-01

    A study on the precipitation of uranium by oxalic acid was carried out in a multicomponent solution. The precipitation method is usually applied to the treatment of radioactive waste and the recovery of uranium from a uranium-scrap contaminated with impurities. In these cases, the problem is how to increase the precipitation yield of target element and to prevent impurities from coprecipitation. The multicomponent solution in the present experiment was prepared by dissolving U, Nd, Cs and Sr in nitric acid. The effects of concentrations of oxalic acid and ascorbic acid on the precipitation yield and purity of uranium were observed. As results of the study, the maximum precipitation yield of uranium is revealed to be about 96.5% and the relative precipitation ratio of Nd, Cs and Sr versus uranium are discussed at the condition of the maximum precipitation yield of uranium, respectively. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  15. Remediation of uranium in-situ leaching area at Straz Pod Ralskem, Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vokal, Vojtech; Muzak, Jiri; Ekert, Vladimir [DIAMO, s. e., TUU, Pod Vinici 84, Straz pod Ralskem, 471 27 (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-01

    A large-scale development in exploration and production of uranium ores in the Czech Republic was done in the 2nd half of the 20. century. Many uranium deposits were discovered in the territory of the Czech Republic. One of the most considerable deposits in the Czech Republic is the site Hamr na Jezere - Straz pod Ralskem where both mining methods - the underground mining and the acidic in-situ leaching - were used. The extensive production of uranium led to widespread environmental impacts and contamination of ground waters. Over the period of 'chemical' leaching of uranium (ca. 32 years), a total of more than 4 million tons of sulphuric acid and other chemicals have been injected into the ground. Most of the products (approx. 99.5 %) of the acids reactions with the rocks are located in the Cenomanian aquifer. The contamination of Cenomanian aquifer covers the area larger then 27 km{sup 2}. The influenced volume of groundwater is more than 380 million m{sup 3}. The total amount of dissolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} is about 3.6 million tons. After 1990 a large-scale environmental program was established and the Czech government decided to liquidate the ISL Mine and start the remediation in 1996. The remediation consists of contaminated groundwater pumping, removing of the contaminants and discharging or reinjection of treated water. Nowadays four main remedial technological installations with sufficient capacity for reaching of the target values of remedial parameters in 2037 are used - the 'Station for Acid Solutions Liquidation No. One', the 'Mother liquor reprocessing' station, the 'Neutralization and Decontamination Station NDS 6' and the 'Neutralization and Decontamination Station NDS 10'. It is expected that the amount of withdrawn contaminants will vary from 80 000 to 120 000 tons per year. Total costs of all remediation activities are expected to be in excess of 2 billion EUR. (authors)

  16. Biotransformations Involved in Sustained Reductive Removal of Uranium in Contaminated Aquifers. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2008-01-01

    The studies completed under this grant significantly advanced the understanding and design of strategies for in situ uranium bioremediation. Novel strategies identified show promise to make in situ uranium bioremediation technically simpler and less expensive. As detailed, important findings included: (1) Development of an electron donor delivery strategy to prolong the in situ activity of Geobacter species and enhance the removal of uranium from the groundwater; (2) Demonstration that reproducible year-to-year field experiments were possible at the ERSP study site in Rifle, CO, making hypothesis-driven field experimentation possible; (3) Elucidation of the geochemical and microbiological heterogeneities with the subsurface during in situ uranium bioremediation, which must be accounted for to accurately model the bioremediation process; (4) The discovery that most of the U(VI) contamination at the Rifle site is sediment-associated rather than mobile in the groundwater, as previously considered; (5) The finding that unlike soluble U(VI), sediment-associated U(VI) is not microbially reducible; (6) The demonstration that electrodes may be an effective alternative to acetate as an electron donor to promote microbial U(VI) reduction in the subsurface with the added benefit that electrode-promoted microbial U(VI) reduction offers the possibility of removing the immobilized uranium from the subsurface; and (7) The finding that, after extended acetate inputs, U(VI) continues to be removed from groundwater long after the introduction of acetate into the subsurface is terminated and that this appears to be due to adsorption onto biomass. This potentially will make in situ uranium bioremediation much less expensive than previously envisioned.

  17. Remediation of a contaminated thin aquifer by horizontal wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breh, W.; Suttheimer, J.; Hoetzl, H. [Univ. of Karlsruhe (Germany); Frank, K. [GEO-Service GmbH, Rheinmuenster (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    At an industrial site in Bruchsal (Germany) a huge trichloroethene contamination was found. After common remedial actions proved to be widely ineffective, new investigations led to a highly contaminated thin aquifer above the main aquifer. The investigation and the beginning of the remediation of the thin aquifer by two horizontal wells is described in this paper. Special attention was given to the dependence between precipitation and the flow direction in the thin aquifer and to hydraulic connections between the thin and the main aquifer. Also a short introduction into a new remedial technique by horizontal wells and first results of the test phase of the horizontal wells are given.

  18. Microbial communities associated with uranium in-situ recovery mining process are related to acid mine drainage assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coral, Thomas; Descostes, Michaël; De Boissezon, Hélène; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; de Alencastro, Luiz Felippe; Rossi, Pierre

    2018-07-01

    A large fraction (47%) of the world's uranium is mined by a technique called "In Situ Recovery" (ISR). This mining technique involves the injection of a leaching fluid (acidic or alkaline) into a uranium-bearing aquifer and the pumping of the resulting solution through cation exchange columns for the recovery of dissolved uranium. The present study reports the in-depth alterations brought to autochthonous microbial communities during acidic ISR activities. Water samples were collected from a uranium roll-front deposit that is part of an ISR mine in operation (Tortkuduk, Kazakhstan). Water samples were obtained at a depth of ca 500 m below ground level from several zones of the Uyuk aquifer following the natural redox zonation inherited from the roll front deposit, including the native mineralized orebody and both upstream and downstream adjacent locations. Samples were collected equally from both the entrance and the exit of the uranium concentration plant. Next-generation sequencing data showed that the redox gradient shaped the community structures, within the anaerobic, reduced, and oligotrophic habitats of the native aquifer zones. Acid injection induced drastic changes in the structures of these communities, with a large decrease in both cell numbers and diversity. Communities present in the acidified (pH values acid mine drainage, with the dominance of Sulfobacillus sp., Leptospirillum sp. and Acidithiobacillus sp., as well as the archaean Ferroplasma sp. Communities located up- and downstream of the mineralized zone under ISR and affected by acidic fluids were blended with additional facultative anaerobic and acidophilic microorganisms. These mixed biomes may be suitable communities for the natural attenuation of ISR mining-affected subsurface through the reduction of metals and sulfate. Assessing the effect of acidification on the microbial community is critical to evaluating the potential for natural attenuation or active bioremediation strategies

  19. Effects of natural and human factors on groundwater quality of basin-fill aquifers in the southwestern United States-conceptual models for selected contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bexfield, Laura M.; Thiros, Susan A.; Anning, David W.; Huntington, Jena M.; McKinney, Tim S.

    2011-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program, the Southwest Principal Aquifers (SWPA) study is building a better understanding of the factors that affect water quality in basin-fill aquifers in the Southwestern United States. The SWPA study area includes four principal aquifers of the United States: the Basin and Range basin-fill aquifers in California, Nevada, Utah, and Arizona; the Rio Grande aquifer system in New Mexico and Colorado; and the California Coastal Basin and Central Valley aquifer systems in California. Similarities in the hydrogeology, land- and water-use practices, and water-quality issues for alluvial basins within the study area allow for regional analysis through synthesis of the baseline knowledge of groundwater-quality conditions in basins previously studied by the NAWQA Program. Resulting improvements in the understanding of the sources, movement, and fate of contaminants are assisting in the development of tools used to assess aquifer susceptibility and vulnerability.This report synthesizes previously published information about the groundwater systems and water quality of 15 information-rich basin-fill aquifers (SWPA case-study basins) into conceptual models of the primary natural and human factors commonly affecting groundwater quality with respect to selected contaminants, thereby helping to build a regional understanding of the susceptibility and vulnerability of basin-fill aquifers to those contaminants. Four relatively common contaminants (dissolved solids, nitrate, arsenic, and uranium) and two contaminant classes (volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticide compounds) were investigated for sources and controls affecting their occurrence and distribution above specified levels of concern in groundwater of the case-study basins. Conceptual models of factors that are important to aquifer vulnerability with respect to those contaminants and contaminant classes were subsequently formed. The

  20. Uranium Release from Acidic Weathered Hanford Sediments: Single-Pass Flow-Through and Column Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong; Wang, Zheming; Reinoso-Maset, Estela; Washton, Nancy M; Mueller, Karl T; Perdrial, Nicolas; O'Day, Peggy A; Chorover, Jon

    2017-10-03

    The reaction of acidic radioactive waste with sediments can induce mineral transformation reactions that, in turn, control contaminant fate. Here, sediment weathering by synthetic uranium-containing acid solutions was investigated using bench-scale experiments to simulate waste disposal conditions at Hanford's cribs (Hanford, WA). During acid weathering, the presence of phosphate exerted a strong influence over uranium mineralogy and a rapidly precipitated, crystalline uranium phosphate phase (meta-ankoleite [K(UO 2 )(PO 4 )·3H 2 O]) was identified using spectroscopic and diffraction-based techniques. In phosphate-free system, uranium oxyhydroxide minerals such as K-compreignacite [K 2 (UO 2 ) 6 O 4 (OH) 6 ·7H 2 O] were formed. Single-pass flow-through (SPFT) and column leaching experiments using synthetic Hanford pore water showed that uranium precipitated as meta-ankoleite during acid weathering was strongly retained in the sediments, with an average release rate of 2.67 × 10 -12 mol g -1 s -1 . In the absence of phosphate, uranium release was controlled by dissolution of uranium oxyhydroxide (compreignacite-type) mineral with a release rate of 1.05-2.42 × 10 -10 mol g -1 s -1 . The uranium mineralogy and release rates determined for both systems in this study support the development of accurate U-release models for the prediction of contaminant transport. These results suggest that phosphate minerals may be a good candidate for uranium remediation approaches at contaminated sites.

  1. Uranium Release from Acidic Weathered Hanford Sediments: Single-Pass Flow-Through and Column Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Um, Wooyong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, South Korea; Wang, Zheming [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Reinoso-Maset, Estela [Sierra; Washton, Nancy M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Mueller, Karl T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Perdrial, Nicolas [Department; Department; O’Day, Peggy A. [Sierra; Chorover, Jon [Department

    2017-09-21

    The reaction of acidic radioactive waste with sediments can induce mineral transformation reactions that, in turn, control contaminant fate. Here, sediment weathering by synthetic uranium-containing acid solutions was investigated using bench-scale experiments to simulate waste disposal conditions at Hanford’s cribs, USA. During acid weathering, the presence of phosphate exerted a strong influence over uranium mineralogy and a rapidly precipitated, crystalline uranium phosphate phase (meta-ankoleite [K(UO2)(PO4)·3H2O]) was identified using spectroscopic and diffraction-based techniques. In phosphate-free system, uranium oxyhydroxide minerals such as K-compreignacite [K2(UO2)6O4(OH)6·7H2O] were formed. Single-pass flow-through (SPFT) and column leaching experiments using synthetic Hanford pore water showed that uranium precipitated as meta-ankoleite during acid weathering was strongly retained in the sediments, with an average release rate of 2.67E-12 mol g-1 s-1. In the absence of phosphate, uranium release was controlled by dissolution of uranium oxyhydroxide (compreignacite-type) mineral with a release rate of 1.05-2.42E-10 mol g-1 s-1. The uranium mineralogy and release rates determined for both systems in this study support the development of accurate U-release models for prediction of contaminant transport. These results suggest that phosphate minerals may be a good candidate for uranium remediation approaches at contaminated sites.

  2. Aquifer restoration techniques for in-situ leach uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, W.J.; Bell, N.E.; Mercer, B.W.; Serne, R.J.; Shade, J.W.; Tweeton, D.R.

    1984-02-01

    In-situ leach uranium mines and pilot-scale test facilities are currently operating in the states of Wyoming, Texas, New Mexico and Colorado. This report summarizes the technical considerations involved in restoring a leached ore zone and its aquifer to the required level. Background information is provided on the geology and geochemistry of mineralized roll-front deposits and on the leaching techniques used to extract the uranium. 13 references, 13 figures, 4 tables

  3. Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

    1993-02-01

    Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60 degree C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO 4 in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium

  4. Fast formation of supergene Mn oxides/hydroxides under acidic conditions in the oxic/anoxic transition zone of a shallow aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäffner, F; Merten, D; Pollok, K; Wagner, S; Knoblauch, S; Langenhorst, F; Büchel, G

    2015-12-01

    Extensive uranium mining in the former German Democratic Republic (GDR) in eastern Thuringia and Saxony took place during the period of 1946-1990. During mining activities, pelitic sediments rich in organic carbon and uranium were processed and exposed to oxygen. Subsequent pyrite oxidation and acidic leaching lead to partial contamination of the area with heavy metals and acid mine drainage (AMD) even few years after completion of remediation. One of those areas is the former heap Gessen (Ronneburg, Germany) were the residual contamination can be found 10 m under the base of the former heap containing partly permeable drainage channels. Actually, in such a system, a rapid but locally restricted mineralization of Mn oxides takes place under acidic conditions. This formation can be classified as a natural attenuation process as certain heavy metals, e.g., Cd (up to 6 μg/g), Ni (up to 311 μg/g), Co (up to 133 μg/g), and Zn (up to 104 μg/g) are bound to this phases. The secondary minerals occur as colored layers close to the shallow aquifer in glacial sediments and could be identified as birnessite and todorokite as Mn phase. The thermodynamic model shows that even small changes in the system are sufficient to shift either the pH or the Eh in the direction of stable Mn oxide phases in this acidic system. As a consequence of 9-15-year-long formation process (or even less), the supergene mineralization provides a cost-efficient contribution for remediation (natural attenuation) strategies of residual with heavy metals (e.g., Cd, Co, Ni, Zn) contaminated substrates.

  5. Potential for Methanosarcina to contribute to uranium reduction during acetate-promoted groundwater bioremediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, Dawn E; Orellana, Roberto; Giloteaux, Ludovic

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies of acetate-promoted bioremediation of uranium-contaminated aquifers focused on Geobacter because no other microorganisms that can couple the oxidation of acetate with U(VI) reduction had been detected in situ. Monitoring the levels of methyl CoM reductase subunit A (mcrA) transcr......Previous studies of acetate-promoted bioremediation of uranium-contaminated aquifers focused on Geobacter because no other microorganisms that can couple the oxidation of acetate with U(VI) reduction had been detected in situ. Monitoring the levels of methyl CoM reductase subunit A (mcr......(VI) reduction was observed in inactive controls. These results demonstrate that Methanosarcina species could play an important role in the long-term bioremediation of uranium-contaminated aquifers after depletion of Fe(III) oxides limits the growth of Geobacter species. The results also suggest...

  6. Groundwater Contamination by Uranium and Mercury at the Ridaura Aquifer (Girona, NE Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Navarro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Elevated concentrations of uranium and mercury have been detected in drinking water from public supply and agricultural wells in alluvial and granitic aquifers of the Ridaura basin located at Catalan Coastal Ranges (CCR. The samples showed high concentrations of U above the U.S. standards and the World Health Organization regulations which set a maximum value of 30 µg/L. Further, high mercury concentrations above the European Drinking Water Standards (1 μg/L were found. Spatial distribution of U in groundwater and geochemical evolution of groundwater suggest that U levels appear to be highest in granitic areas where groundwater has long residence times and a significant salinity. The presence of high U concentrations in alluvial groundwater samples could be associated with hydraulic connection through fractures between the alluvial system and deep granite system. According to this model, oxidizing groundwater moving through fractures in the leucocratic/biotitic granite containing anomalous U contents are the most likely to acquire high levels of U. The distribution of Hg showed concentrations above 1 μg/L in 10 alluvial samples, mainly located near the limit of alluvial aquifer with igneous rocks, which suggests a possible migration of Hg from granitic materials. Also, some samples showed Hg concentrations comprised between 0.9 and 1.5 μg/L, from wells located in agricultural areas.

  7. Potential Risks of Freshwater Aquifer Contamination with Geosequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Robert

    2013-09-30

    Substantial leakage of CO{sub 2} from deep geological strata to shallow potable aquifers is likely to be rare, but chemical detection of potential leakage nonetheless remains an integral component of any safe carbon capture and storage system. CO{sub 2} that infiltrates an unconfined freshwater aquifer will have an immediate impact on water chemistry by lowering pH in most cases and by altering the concentration of total dissolved solids. Chemical signatures in affected waters provide an important opportunity for early detection of leaks. In the presence of CO{sub 2}, trace elements such as Mn, Fe, and Ca can increase by an order of magnitude or more above control concentrations within 100 days. Therefore, these and other elements should be monitored along with pH as geochemical markers of potential CO{sub 2} leaks. Dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity can also be rapidly responsive to CO{sub 2} and are stable indicators of a leak. Importantly, such changes may be detectable long before direct changes in CO{sub 2} are observed. The experimental results also suggest that the relative severity of the impact of leaks on overlying drinking-water aquifers should be considered in the selection of CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. One primary selection criteria should be metal and metalloid availability, such as uranium and arsenic abundance, to carefully monitor chemical species that could trigger changes above maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Overall, the risks of leakage from underground CO{sub 2} storage are real but appear to be manageable if systems are closely monitored.

  8. Remediation of soils contaminated with particulate depleted uranium by multi stage chemical extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crean, Daniel E. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Centre for Radiochemistry Research, School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Livens, Francis R.; Sajih, Mustafa [Centre for Radiochemistry Research, School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Stennett, Martin C. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia N. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Hyatt, Neil C., E-mail: n.c.hyatt@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Batch leaching was examined to remediate soils contaminated with munitions depleted uranium. • Site specific maximum extraction was 42–50% total U in single batch with NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3}. • Analysis of residues revealed partial leaching and secondary carbonate phases. • Sequential batch leaching alternating between NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3} and citric acid was designed. • Site specific extraction was increased to 68–87% total U in three batch steps. -- Abstract: Contamination of soils with depleted uranium (DU) from munitions firing occurs in conflict zones and at test firing sites. This study reports the development of a chemical extraction methodology for remediation of soils contaminated with particulate DU. Uranium phases in soils from two sites at a UK firing range, MOD Eskmeals, were characterised by electron microscopy and sequential extraction. Uranium rich particles with characteristic spherical morphologies were observed in soils, consistent with other instances of DU munitions contamination. Batch extraction efficiencies for aqueous ammonium bicarbonate (42–50% total DU extracted), citric acid (30–42% total DU) and sulphuric acid (13–19% total DU) were evaluated. Characterisation of residues from bicarbonate-treated soils by synchrotron microfocus X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed partially leached U(IV)-oxide particles and some secondary uranyl-carbonate phases. Based on these data, a multi-stage extraction scheme was developed utilising leaching in ammonium bicarbonate followed by citric acid to dissolve secondary carbonate species. Site specific U extraction was improved to 68–87% total U by the application of this methodology, potentially providing a route to efficient DU decontamination using low cost, environmentally compatible reagents.

  9. Experience with restoration of ore-bearing aquifers after in situ leach uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazikov, V.G.; Zabaznov, V.U.

    2002-01-01

    In many cases the most important environmental issue for in situ leach uranium mining technology is the impact on groundwater. Usually the greatest issue is the chemical condition of the ore bearing aquifer following the completion of leaching. Based on experience gained during post leach monitoring, it has been found that in properly selected sites the impact following leaching is greatly reduced because of the process of self restoration, otherwise known as natural attenuation. This paper provides ground water monitoring data from 1985 to 1997 following completion of leaching at the Irkol uranium deposit, Kazakhstan. It shows the evolution of the pH, and other chemical parameters over this period. The monitoring results demonstrate that at this site the process of natural attenuation appears to have effectively reduced the impact on groundwater at the site, as well as to keep contaminated leaching fluids from moving more than a few hundreds of metres from the wellfield. (author)

  10. Review on phytoremediation of uranium-contaminated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xueli; Wang Erqi

    2008-01-01

    Phytoremediation, a promising technology using plants to remove radioactive contaminants from the environment or to render them harmless, has become a hot topic in current research. Studies on phytoremediation of uranium-contaminated environment are reviewed with special focuses on several subsets including types of phytoremediation of uranium (such as phytoextraction, rhizofiltration and phytostabilization), influencing factors (such as plant species, soil properties, microorganism, soil amendments, fertilization and uranium speciation) of uranium accumulation by plants, cases studies and trend in phytoremediation of uranium. (authors)

  11. Uranium Sequestration During Biostimulated Reduction and In Response to the Return of Oxic Conditions In Shallow Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Christopher C.; Johnson, Kelly J.; Akstin, Katherine; Singer, David M.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Fuhrmann, M.

    2015-01-01

    A proposed approach for groundwater remediation of uranium contamination is to generate reducing conditions by stimulating the growth of microbial populations through injection of electron donor compounds into the subsurface. Sufficiently reducing conditions will result in reduction of soluble hexavalent uranium, U(VI), and precipitation of the less soluble +4 oxidation state uranium, U(IV). This process is termed biostimulated reduction. A key issue in the remediation of uranium (U) contamination in aquifers by biostimulated reduction is the long term stability of the sequestered uranium. Three flow-through column experiments using aquifer sediment were used to evaluate the remobilization of bioreduced U sequestered under conditions in which biostimulation extended well into sulfate reduction to enhance precipitation of reduced sulfur phases such as iron sulfides. One column received added ferrous iron, Fe(II), increasing production of iron sulfides, to test their effect on remobilization of the sequestered uranium, either by serving as a redox buffer by competing for dissolved oxygen, or by armoring the reduced uranium. During biostimulation of the ambient microbial population with acetate, dissolved uranium was lowered by a factor of 2.5 or more with continued removal for over 110 days of biostimulation, well after the onset of sulfate reduction at ~30 days. Sequestered uranium was essentially all U(IV) resulting from the formation of nano-particulate uraninite that coated sediment grains to a thickness of a few 10’s of microns, sometimes in association with S and Fe. A multicomponent biogeochemical reactive transport model simulation of column effluents during biostimulation was generally able to describe the acetate oxidation, iron, sulfate, and uranium reduction for all three columns using parameters derived from simulations of field scale biostimulation experiments. Columns were eluted with artificial groundwater at equilibrium with atmospheric oxygen to

  12. In situ leaching of uranium in South Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, D.

    1998-01-01

    The proposed two new uranium mines at Beverley and Honeymoon, South Australia plan to use the cheap but potentially polluting process of in situ leaching (ISL) and permission has already been given for experimental underground leaching at Beverley. The mining industry describes ISL as environmentally benign because, instead of excavating, a corrosive liquid such as sulphuric acid is used. The liquid, sometimes 10000 times more acid than the aquifer water, is pumped into the ground in order to leach out the uranium and the resulting solution is then pumped to the surface where the uranium is extracted. Because the groundwater is salty and radioactive, the mining companies regard it as useless, so its contamination by ISL is considered of no concern. Salty radioactive water can be purified or desalinated and such processes are commonly used by mining companies such as Western Mining Corporation at Roxby Downs. (author)

  13. Characterization of Uranium Contamination, Transport, and Remediation at Rocky Flats - Across Remediation into Post-Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecky, D. R.; Boylan, J.; Murrell, M. T.

    2009-12-01

    The Rocky Flats Site is a former nuclear weapons production facility approximately 16 miles northwest of Denver, Colorado. Built in 1952 and operated by the Atomic Energy Commission and then Department of Energy, the Site was remediated and closed in 2005, and is currently undergoing long-term surveillance and monitoring by the DOE Office of Legacy Management. Areas of contamination resulted from roughly fifty years of operation. Of greatest interest, surface soils were contaminated with plutonium, americium, and uranium; groundwater was contaminated with chlorinated solvents, uranium, and nitrates; and surface waters, as recipients of runoff and shallow groundwater discharge, have been contaminated by transport from both regimes. A region of economic mineralization that has been referred to as the Colorado Mineral Belt is nearby, and the Schwartzwalder uranium mine is approximately five miles upgradient of the Site. Background uranium concentrations are therefore elevated in many areas. Weapons-related activities included work with enriched and depleted uranium, contributing anthropogenic content to the environment. Using high-resolution isotopic analyses, Site-related contamination can be distinguished from natural uranium in water samples. This has been instrumental in defining remedy components, and long-term monitoring and surveillance strategies. Rocky Flats hydrology interlinks surface waters and shallow groundwater (which is very limited in volume and vertical and horizontal extent). Surface water transport pathways include several streams, constructed ponds, and facility surfaces. Shallow groundwater has no demonstrated connection to deep aquifers, and includes natural preferential pathways resulting primarily from porosity in the Rocky Flats alluvium, weathered bedrock, and discontinuous sandstones. In addition, building footings, drains, trenches, and remedial systems provide pathways for transport at the site. Removal of impermeable surfaces (buildings

  14. Radioactive Seepage through Groundwater Flow from the Uranium Mines, Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamiru Abiye

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The study focused on the seepage of uranium from unlined tailing dams into the alluvial aquifer in the Gawib River floodplain in Namibia where the region solely relies on groundwater for its economic activities as a result of arid climatic condition. The study reviewed previous works besides water sample collection and analyses for major ions, metals and environmental isotopes in addition to field tests on physico-chemical parameters (pH, Electrical Conductivity, Redox and T. Estimation of seepage velocity (true velocity of groundwater flow has been conducted in order to understand the extent of radioactive plume transport. The hydrochemistry, stable isotopes and tritium results show that there is uranium contamination from the unlined uranium tailings in the Gawib shallow aquifer system which suggests high permeability of the alluvial aquifer facilitating groundwater flow in the arid region. The radioactive contaminants could spread into the deeper aquifer system through the major structures such as joints and faults. The contamination plume could also spread downstream into the Swakop River unless serious interventions are employed. There is also a very high risk of the plume to reach the Atlantic Ocean through seasonal flash floods that occurs in the area.

  15. Remediation of soils contaminated with particulate depleted uranium by multi stage chemical extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crean, Daniel E; Livens, Francis R; Sajih, Mustafa; Stennett, Martin C; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia N; Hyatt, Neil C

    2013-12-15

    Contamination of soils with depleted uranium (DU) from munitions firing occurs in conflict zones and at test firing sites. This study reports the development of a chemical extraction methodology for remediation of soils contaminated with particulate DU. Uranium phases in soils from two sites at a UK firing range, MOD Eskmeals, were characterised by electron microscopy and sequential extraction. Uranium rich particles with characteristic spherical morphologies were observed in soils, consistent with other instances of DU munitions contamination. Batch extraction efficiencies for aqueous ammonium bicarbonate (42-50% total DU extracted), citric acid (30-42% total DU) and sulphuric acid (13-19% total DU) were evaluated. Characterisation of residues from bicarbonate-treated soils by synchrotron microfocus X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed partially leached U(IV)-oxide particles and some secondary uranyl-carbonate phases. Based on these data, a multi-stage extraction scheme was developed utilising leaching in ammonium bicarbonate followed by citric acid to dissolve secondary carbonate species. Site specific U extraction was improved to 68-87% total U by the application of this methodology, potentially providing a route to efficient DU decontamination using low cost, environmentally compatible reagents. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Bioremediation of uranium contaminated Fernald soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delwiche, M.E.; Wey, J.E.; Torma, A.E.

    1994-01-01

    This study investigated the use of microbial bioleaching for removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The ability of bacteria to assist in oxidation and solubilization of uranium was compared to the ability of fungi to produce complexing compounds which have the same effect. Biosorption of uranium by fungi was also measured. Soil samples were examined for changes in mineralogical properties due to these processes. On the basis of these laboratory scale studies a generalized flow sheet is proposed for bioremediation of contaminated Fernald soils

  17. 3D Geospatial Models for Visualization and Analysis of Groundwater Contamination at a Nuclear Materials Processing Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirewalt, G. L.; Shepherd, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    Analysis of hydrostratigraphy and uranium and nitrate contamination in groundwater at a former nuclear materials processing facility in Oklahoma were undertaken employing 3-dimensional (3D) geospatial modeling software. Models constructed played an important role in the regulatory decision process of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) because they enabled visualization of temporal variations in contaminant concentrations and plume geometry. Three aquifer systems occur at the site, comprised of water-bearing fractured shales separated by indurated sandstone aquitards. The uppermost terrace groundwater system (TGWS) aquifer is composed of terrace and alluvial deposits and a basal shale. The shallow groundwater system (SGWS) aquifer is made up of three shale units and two sandstones. It is separated from the overlying TGWS and underlying deep groundwater system (DGWS) aquifer by sandstone aquitards. Spills of nitric acid solutions containing uranium and radioactive decay products around the main processing building (MPB), leakage from storage ponds west of the MPB, and leaching of radioactive materials from discarded equipment and waste containers contaminated both the TGWS and SGWS aquifers during facility operation between 1970 and 1993. Constructing 3D geospatial property models for analysis of groundwater contamination at the site involved use of EarthVision (EV), a 3D geospatial modeling software developed by Dynamic Graphics, Inc. of Alameda, CA. A viable 3D geohydrologic framework model was initially constructed so property data could be spatially located relative to subsurface geohydrologic units. The framework model contained three hydrostratigraphic zones equivalent to the TGWS, SGWS, and DGWS aquifers in which groundwater samples were collected, separated by two sandstone aquitards. Groundwater data collected in the three aquifer systems since 1991 indicated high concentrations of uranium (>10,000 micrograms/liter) and nitrate (> 500 milligrams

  18. Recovering of uranium from phosphoric acid produced by the wet process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreiro, A.J.; Lyon, W.L.; Holleman, R.A.; Randell, C.C.

    1977-01-01

    Process for recovering uranium as from an aqueous solution of phosphoric acid arising from a wet process, with a scrubbing agent essentially composed of a hydrocarbon whose boiling point is situated between 150 0 C and 300 0 C, which reacts with the contaminents formed in the sludge in the phosphoric acid, in an efficient enough quantity to wash the contamination products forming the phosphoric acid sludge, give a sludge phase and a purified phosphoric acid phase, after which the sludge phase is extracted [fr

  19. Isotopic ratio method for determining uranium contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, R.E.; Sieben, A.K.

    1994-01-01

    The presence of high concentrations of uranium in the subsurface can be attributed either to contamination from uranium processing activities or to naturally occurring uranium. A mathematical method has been employed to evaluate the isotope ratios from subsurface soils at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant (RFP) and demonstrates conclusively that the soil contains uranium from a natural source and has not been contaminated with enriched uranium resulting from RFP releases. This paper describes the method used in this determination which has widespread application in site characterizations and can be adapted to other radioisotopes used in manufacturing industries. The determination of radioisotope source can lead to a reduction of the remediation effort

  20. Epigenetic zonation and fluid flow history of uranium-bearing fluvial aquifer systems, south Texas uranium province. Report of Investigations No. 119

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, W.E.

    1982-01-01

    The Oligocene-Miocene fluvial uranium host aquifers of the South Texas uranium province were deposited principally as syndepositionally oxidized sands and muds. Early intrusion of reactive sulfide-enriched waters produced large intrastratal islands of epigenetic sulfidic alteration, which contain isotopically heavy pyrite exhibiting unique replacement textures. The only known reservoir containing such sulfidic waters is the deeply buried Mesozoic carbonate section beneath the thick, geopressured Tertiary basin fill. Thermobaric waters were expulsed upward along major fault zones into shallow aquifers in response to a pressure head generated by compaction and dehydration in the abyssal ground-water regime. Vertical migration of gaseous hydrogen sulfide was less important. Repeated flushing of the shallow aquifers by oxidizing meteoric waters containing anomalous amounts of uranium, selenium, and molybdenum alternating with sulfidic thermobaric waters caused cyclic precipitation and oxidation of iron disulfide. Uranium deposits formed along hydrologically active oxidation interfaces separating epigenetic sulfidic and epigenetic oxidation zones. Multiple epigenetic events are recorded in imperfectly superimposed, multiple mineralization fronts, in regional and local geometric relations between different alteration zones, and in the bulk matrix geochemistry and mineralogy of alteration zones. The dynamic mineralization model described in this report may reflect processes active in many large, depositionally active basins

  1. Bioremediation of a diesel fuel contaminated aquifer: simulation studies in laboratory aquifer columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, A.; Höhener, P.; Hunkeler, D.; Zeyer, J.

    1996-08-01

    The in situ bioremediation of aquifers contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons is commonly based on the infiltration of groundwater supplemented with oxidants (e.g., O 2, NO 3-) and nutrients (e.g., NH 4+, PO 43-). These additions stimulate the microbial activity in the aquifer and several field studies describing the resulting processes have been published. However, due to the heterogeneity of the subsurface and due to the limited number of observation wells usually available, these field data do not offer a sufficient spatial and temporal resolution. In this study, flow-through columns of 47-cm length equipped with 17 sampling ports were filled with homogeneously contaminated aquifer material from a diesel fuel contaminated in situ bioremediation site. The columns were operated over 96 days at 12°C with artificial groundwater supplemented with O 2, NO 3- and PO 43-. Concentration profiles of O 2, NO 3-, NO 2-, dissolved inorganic and organic carbon (DIC and DOC, respectively), protein, microbial cells and total residual hydrocarbons were measured. Within the first 12 cm, corresponding to a mean groundwater residence time of < 3.6 h, a steep O 2 decrease from 4.6 to < 0.3 mg l -1, denitrification, a production of DIC and DOC, high microbial cell numbers and a high removal of hydrocarbons were observed. Within a distance of 24 to 40.5 cm from the infiltration, O 2 was below 0.1 mg l -1 and a denitrifying activity was found. In the presence and in the absence of O 2, n-alkanes were preferentially degraded compared to branched alkanes. The results demonstrate that: (1) infiltration of aerobic groundwater into columns filled with aquifer material contaminated with hydrocarbons leads to a rapid depletion of O 2; (2) O 2 and NO 3- can serve as oxidants for the mineralization of hydrocarbons; and (3) the modelling of redox processes in aquifers has to consider denitrifying activity in presence of O 2.

  2. Uranium mill tailings neutralization: contaminant complexation and tailings leaching studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opitz, B.E.; Dodson, M.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1985-05-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to compare the effectiveness of limestone (CaCO 3 ) and hydrated lime [Ca(OH) 2 ] for improving waste water quality through the neutralization of acidic uranium mill tailings liquor. The experiments were designed to also assess the effects of three proposed mechanisms - carbonate complexation, elevated pH, and colloidal particle adsorption - on the solubility of toxic contaminants found in a typical uranium mill waste solution. Of special interest were the effects each of these possible mechanisms had on the solution concentrations of trace metals such as Cd, Co, Mo, Zn, and U after neutralization. Results indicated that the neutralization of acidic tailings to a pH of 7.3 using hydrated lime provided the highest overall waste water quality. Both the presence of a carbonate source or elevating solution pH beyond pH = 7.3 resulted in a lowering of previously achieved water quality, while adsorption of contaminants onto colloidal particles was not found to affect the solution concentration of any constituent investigated. 24 refs., 8 figs., 19 tabs

  3. Process of recovering uranium from wet process acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    York, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    Entrainment of contaminated water in the organic phase and poor phase disengagement is prevented in the second cycle scrubber, in a two cycle uranium recovery process, by washing the organic solvent stream containing entrained H 3 PO 4 from the second cycle extractor, with a dilute aqueous sulfuric or nitric acid solution in an acid scrubber, prior to passing the solvent stream into the second cycle stripper. (author)

  4. Assessment of microbial in situ activity in contaminated aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaestner, M. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Bioremediation, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Fischer, A.; Nijenhuis, I.; Stelzer, N.; Bombach, P.; Richnow, H.H. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Isotopenbiogeochemie, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Geyer, R. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Umweltmikrobiologie, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Tebbe, C.C. [Institut fuer Agraroekologie, Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft (FAL), D-38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    Microbial ecologists and environmental engineers share the interest in identifying the key microorganisms responsible for compound turnover in the environment and in estimating the respective transformation rates. For the successful application of Natural Attenuation processes, a reliable assessment of the in situ turnover of a contaminant in an aquifer is essential. Here, we review and present new details of two recently developed approaches concerning the assessment of in situ biodegradation: (i) determination of biodegradation caused by microbial metabolism in a contamination plume by stable isotope fractionation analysis (SIFA) and (ii) determination of the actual degradation under the respective environmental conditions in the aquifer by using in situ microcosms (BACTRAPS registered) amended with {sup 13}C-labeled substrates as tracer compounds. Based on stable isotope fractionation analysis, the degradation occurring under anoxic biogeochemical conditions at a respective site can be calculated for the entire plume. This has been shown for benzene and toluene at the Zeitz site and partly for chlorobenzene at the Bitterfeld site. By use of the in situ microcosm approach with {sup 13}C-labeled compounds, the microbial in situ degradation under strictly anaerobic conditions could be proven for benzene and toluene in Zeitz and for chlorobenzene in Bitterfeld. The transformation of {sup 13}C-carbon of the labeled substrate into microbial fatty acids confirmed the assimilation of the pollutant resulting in the formation of biomass. In addition, metabolites such as benzylsuccinic acid were found in the toluene-amended microcosms indicating anaerobic degradation of toluene. This result corresponds to the geochemical conditions found at the field site and therefore, the microcosm approach with {sup 13}C-labeled compounds can be used to assign the predominant in situ degradation pathways in a contaminated aquifer. Since fatty acids profiles alone are often too

  5. Washing technology development for gravel contaminated with uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Uk Ryang; Kim, Gye Nam; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Wan Suk; Moon, Jai Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The soil washing method has a short decontamination time and is economical. In addition, methods including phytoremediation, solidification/stabilization and bioremediation exist. Phytoremediation and bioremediation are economical, but have low remedial efficiency. In addition, bioremediation causes washing wastewater because it requires a washing process for the separation of microorganisms from the soils. In addition, solidification/stabilization is a commonly used methods, but eventually increases the volume of wastes. As mentioned above, many researches involved in the decontamination of radioactively contaminated soils have been actively processed. On the other hand, researches for decontaminating radioactively contaminated gravels are not being currently processed. In this study, we performed basic experiments using decontamination methods to decontaminate radioactively contaminated gravel. First, we measured the concentration of uranium in gravel included in uranium-contaminated soils and performed a washing experiment to monitor the tendency of uranium removal. In addition, when managing gravel with a low uranium-decontamination rate, we tried to satisfy the radioactivity concentration criteria for self-disposal in the wastes (0.4Bq/g or less) by performing a washing experiment after only a physical crushing process. We performed washing experiments to satisfy the radioactivity concentration criteria for self-disposal (0.4 Bq/g or less) in gravel included in radioactively contaminated soil. We performed washing experiments for gravel whose initial average concentration of uranium was 1.3Bq/g. In addition, the average concentration of uranium was 0.8Bq/g. Too increase the decontamination rate, we crushed the gravel with a jaw crusher and performed the washing experiments. The results were similar to the results without crushing. In addition, it was determined that the smaller the size of the gravel particles, the more efficient the uranium decontamination

  6. Prediction of uranium and technetium sorption during titration of contaminated acidic groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fan, E-mail: zhangfan@itpcas.ac.cn [Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Parker, Jack C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Brooks, Scott C.; Watson, David B. [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6038 (United States); Jardine, Philip M. [Biosystems Engineering and Soil Science Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Gu, Baohua [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6038 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    This study investigates uranium and technetium sorption onto aluminum and iron hydroxides during titration of acidic groundwater. The contaminated groundwater exhibits oxic conditions with high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U, Tc, and various metal cations. More than 90% of U and Tc was removed from the aqueous phase as Al and Fe precipitated above pH 5.5, but was partially resolublized at higher pH values. An equilibrium hydrolysis and precipitation reaction model adequately described variations in aqueous concentrations of metal cations. An anion exchange reaction model was incorporated to simulate sulfate, U and Tc sorption onto variably charged (pH-dependent) Al and Fe hydroxides. Modeling results indicate that competitive sorption/desorption on mixed mineral phases needs to be considered to adequately predict U and Tc mobility. The model could be useful for future studies of the speciation of U, Tc and co-existing ions during pre- and post-groundwater treatment practices.

  7. Bioreduction of Uranium(VI) Complexed with Citric Acid by Clostridia Affects its Structure and Mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.; Dodge, C.

    2008-01-01

    Uranium contamination of the environment from mining and milling operations, nuclear-waste disposal, and ammunition use is a widespread global problem. Natural attenuation processes such as bacterial reductive precipitation and immobilization of soluble uranium is gaining much attention. However, the presence of naturally occurring organic ligands can affect the precipitation of uranium. Here, we report that the anaerobic spore-forming bacteria Clostridia, ubiquitous in soils, sediments, and wastes, capable of reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II), Mn(IV) to Mn(II), U(VI) to U(IV), Pu(IV) to Pu(III), and Tc(VI) to Tc(IV); reduced U(VI) associated with citric acid in a dinuclear 2:2 U(VI):citric acid complex to a biligand mononuclear 1:2 U(IV):citric acid complex, which remained in solution, in contrast to reduction and precipitation of uranium. Our findings show that U(VI) complexed with citric acid is readily accessible as an electron acceptor despite the inability of the bacterium to metabolize the complexed organic ligand. Furthermore, it suggests that the presence of organic ligands at uranium-contaminated sites can affect the mobility of the actinide under both oxic and anoxic conditions by forming such soluble complexes.

  8. A generic model of contaminant migration from uranium tailings impoundments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, T.A.; Brown, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical hydrogeochemical model based upon acid consumption-neutralization front movement. The development of contaminant plumes is discussed and distinct zones within these plumes are identified and characterized. The most important process influencing the rate and extent of contaminant migration at acid-leach uranium tailings impoundments is the neutralization of seepage water by soils along ground water flow paths. The chemical characteristics of the ground water is determined in order to identify and characterize zones within migrating plumes of tailings-derived water. It is concluded that the characterization of specific zones is useful in the interpretation of existing conditions, in the evaluation of future migration, and in the determination of appropriate models for the specific situation

  9. Uranium pollution in an estuary affected by pyrite acid mine drainage and releases of naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, M.; Manjon, G.; Hurtado, S.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Huelva estuary is affected by former phosphogypsum releases and pyrite acid mine drainage. → Time evolution of uranium concentration is analyzed after halting of NORM releases. → Two new contamination sources are preventing the complete uranium cleaning: (1) The leaching of phosphogypsum stacks located close to Tinto River. (2) Pyrite acid mine drainage. → High uranium concentrations are dissolved in water and precipitate subsequently. - Abstract: After the termination of phosphogypsum discharges to the Huelva estuary (SW Spain), a unique opportunity was presented to study the response of a contaminated environmental compartment after the cessation of its main source of pollution. The evolution over time of uranium concentrations in the estuary is presented to supply new insights into the decontamination of a scenario affected by Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) discharges. The cleaning of uranium isotopes from the area has not taken place as rapidly as expected due to leaching from phosphogypsum stacks. An in-depth study using various techniques of analysis, including 234 U/ 238 U and 230 Th/ 232 Th ratios and the decreasing rates of the uranium concentration, enabled a second source of uranium contamination to be discovered. Increased uranium levels due to acid mine drainage from pyrite mines located in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Spain) prevent complete uranium decontamination and, therefore, result in levels nearly twice those of natural background levels.

  10. In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications

  11. Approaches to surface complexation modeling of Uranium(VI) adsorption on aquifer sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J.A.; Meece, D.E.; Kohler, M.; Curtis, G.P.

    2004-01-01

    Uranium(VI) adsorption onto aquifer sediments was studied in batch experiments as a function of pH and U(VI) and dissolved carbonate concentrations in artificial groundwater solutions. The sediments were collected from an alluvial aquifer at a location upgradient of contamination from a former uranium mill operation at Naturita, Colorado (USA). The ranges of aqueous chemical conditions used in the U(VI) adsorption experiments (pH 6.9 to 7.9; U(VI) concentration 2.5 ?? 10-8 to 1 ?? 10-5 M; partial pressure of carbon dioxide gas 0.05 to 6.8%) were based on the spatial variation in chemical conditions observed in 1999-2000 in the Naturita alluvial aquifer. The major minerals in the sediments were quartz, feldspars, and calcite, with minor amounts of magnetite and clay minerals. Quartz grains commonly exhibited coatings that were greater than 10 nm in thickness and composed of an illite-smectite clay with occluded ferrihydrite and goethite nanoparticles. Chemical extractions of quartz grains removed from the sediments were used to estimate the masses of iron and aluminum present in the coatings. Various surface complexation modeling approaches were compared in terms of the ability to describe the U(VI) experimental data and the data requirements for model application to the sediments. Published models for U(VI) adsorption on reference minerals were applied to predict U(VI) adsorption based on assumptions about the sediment surface composition and physical properties (e.g., surface area and electrical double layer). Predictions from these models were highly variable, with results overpredicting or underpredicting the experimental data, depending on the assumptions used to apply the model. Although the models for reference minerals are supported by detailed experimental studies (and in ideal cases, surface spectroscopy), the results suggest that errors are caused in applying the models directly to the sediments by uncertain knowledge of: 1) the proportion and types of

  12. Uranium in waters and aquifer rocks at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, R.A.; Rosholt, J.N.

    1978-01-01

    Previous chemical, geological, and hydrological information describing the physical and chemical environment of the Nevada Test Site has been combined with new radiochemical and isotope data for water and rock samples in order to explain the behavior of uranium during alteration of thick sequences of rhyolitic volcanic rocks and associated volcanielastic sediments. A model is proposed in which uranium mobility is controlled by two competing processes. Uranium is liberated from the volcanic rocks through dissolution of the glassy constituents and is carried in solution as a uranyl carbonate complex. Uranium is subsequently removed from solution by adsorption on secondary oxides of iron, titanium, and manganese, as observed in fission-track maps of aquifer rocks. The model explains the poor correlation of dissolved uranium with depth within tuffaceous sequences in which percolation of ground water is predominantly downward. Good positive correlation of dissolved uranium with dissolved Na, total dissolved solids, and total carbonate supports the glass dissolution model, while inverse correlation of dissolved uranium with 234 U/ 238 U ratios of water implies uranium is being absorbed by a relatively insoluble, surficial phase. Alpha radioactivity of Test Site water is primarily caused by high 234 U contents, and beta activity is highly correlated with dissolved K ( 40 K). Smallamounts of dissolved radium, 216 Pb, and 210 Po are present but no evidence was found for alpha activity sources related to nuclear testing (Pu, 235 U). A filtered but unacidified carbonate solution of uranium was found to be stable (+-10 percent of original U concentration) for years when stored in acid-washed polyethylene bottles. 5 tables, 2 figs

  13. Assessing the Vulnerability of Public-Supply Wells to Contamination: Floridan Aquifer System Near Tampa, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Katz, Brian G.; Crandall, Christy A.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well in Temple Terrace, Florida, northeast of Tampa. The well selected for study typically produces water at the rate of 700 gallons per minute from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Water samples were collected at the public-supply well and at monitoring wells installed in or near the simulated zone of contribution to the supply well. Samples of untreated water from the public-supply wellhead contained the undesirable constituents nitrate, arsenic, uranium, radon-222, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and pesticides, although all were detected at concentrations less than established drinking-water standards, where such standards exist. Overall, study findings point to four primary factors that affect the movement and fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well in Temple Terrace: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer); (2) short-circuiting of contaminated water through sinkholes; (3) natural geochemical processes within the aquifer; and (4) pumping stress. Although the public-supply well is completed in the Upper Floridan aquifer, it produces water with concentrations of nitrate, VOCs, and the natural contaminant radon that are intermediate between the typical composition of water from the Upper Floridan aquifer and that of the overlying surficial aquifer system. Mixing calculations show that the water produced by the public-supply well could consist of upwards of 50 percent water from the surficial aquifer system mixed with water from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Anthropogenically affected water from the surficial aquifer system travels rapidly to depth through sinkholes that must be directly connected to the cavernous zone intersected by the public-supply well (and several other production wells in the region). Such solution features serve as fast pathways to the well and circumvent the natural attenuation of nitrate and

  14. Advanced oxidative process with ozone of effluents contaminated by MN and other heavy metals originated in the acid drainage in uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Mirna Marienne Suzin e

    2016-01-01

    During a mine exploration the environment can be affected by different ways being one of them the mine acid drainage(DAM), that is formed by the exposition of sulphated minerals to the atmospheric air, water and iron-oxidation microorganisms. This exposition results in oxidation reactions and formation of sulphuric acid that dissolves all kind of metals present at the mineral that will result in the contamination of the ground and waters. The object of this research work is to test a technological solution of the mine acid drainage problem applying ozone advanced oxidation of the heavy metals present at the mine drainage of a uranium mine with special focus in the manganese removal. This study is applied to the material from the uranium mine of the Brazilian Nuclear Industry - INB, at Caldas- MG. The INB Industry has serious DAM contamination being the main contaminants of the superficial waters the elements, aluminium (Al), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), sulfates(SO 4 +2 ), fluorides(F-), rare earth metals besides uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The Caldas unity is being used as research and testing field for the treatment of areas with environment degradation formed by the mining activity. The ozone testing showed a high efficiency for the removal of iron(Fe), manganese(Mn) and cerium (Ce) up to 99%. The manganese total concentration was reduced to values bellow the ones determined by CONAMA resolution. Elements as neodymium (Nd), zinc (Zn) and lanthanium (La) are also oxidated in presence of ozone but with lower efficiency. The aluminium remained unaffected by the ozone while Thorium and Uranium show an initial decay but at the end present only a concentration slight lower than the initial. The solid material formed after the ozone treatment consists mainly of manganese oxide (85%). In order to dispose, after the ozonization, the liquid effluent to the environment is necessary a pH correction in order to be within the CONAMA legislation, being used less

  15. The Effects of Surfactants on the Desorption of Organic Contaminants from Aquifer Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    costs for remediating a contaminated aquifer can be reduced by 50-80 percent using this system. A preflush of 0.1-1.0 percent concentration potassium ...use of polymers such as polyacrylic acid and polyacrylamide as sacrificial adsorbates to decrease the adsorption of a mixed nonionic and anionic...cribed by Chapman (1965) in Methods of Soils Analysis was used to determine the masses of extractable sodium, potassium , calcium and mag- nesium

  16. Uranium accumulation in Brassica rapa L. and effect of citric acid and humic acids as chelating agents; Acumulacion de uranio en Brassica rapa L. y efecto del acido citrico y acidos humicos como agentes quelantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez del R, H.; Perez C, G. A.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98060 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Rodriguez H, G., E-mail: hlopezdelrio@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Agronomia, Carretera Zacatecas-Guadalajara Km 15.5, Cieneguillas, Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    Phyto extraction is a technique that makes use of plants for the remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals. In this study the uranium incorporation in the Brassica rapa L. species was evaluated, in artificially contaminated inert soils with 40 mg U/kg, and the effect of adding of the natural chelating agents citric acid and humic acids in the accumulation of uranium was analyzed. Soil free of organic matter and biologically inert was obtained by controlled calcination s of natural soil. Cultures in the prepared soil consisted of five growth treatments: 1) cultivation without uranium or additives; 2) cultivation in the uranium presence; 3) cultivation with uranium and citric acid (2 g/kg); 4) cultivation with uranium and humic acids (10 g/kg); 5) uranium cultivation and combination of citric and humic acids at the same concentrations. There was no adverse effect on plant growth with the presence of uranium at the given concentration. Regarding the controls, the total biomass in the presence of uranium was slightly higher, while the addition of humic acids significantly stimulated the production of biomass with respect to the citric acid. The combined action of organic acids produced the highest amount of biomass. The efficiency of phyto extraction followed the order Humic acids (301 μg U/g) > Non-assisted (224 μg U/g) >> Citric acid + Humic acids (68 μg U/g) > Citric acid (59 μg U/g). The values of uranium concentration in the total biomass show that the species Brassica rapa L. has the capacity of phyto extraction of uranium in contaminated soils. The addition of humic acids increases the uranium extraction while the addition of citric acid disadvantages it. (Author)

  17. Medical effects of internal contamination with uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraković, A

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to present an outline of the metabolic pathways of uranium isotopes and compounds, medical consequences of uranium poisoning, and an evaluation of the therapeutic alternatives in uranium internal contamination. The chemical toxicity of uranium has been recognized for more than two centuries. Animal experiments and human studies are conclusive about metabolic adverse affects and nephro- toxicity of uranium compounds. Radiation toxicity of uranium isotopes has been recognized since the beginning of the nuclear era, with well documented evidence of reproductive and developmental toxicity, as well as mutagenic and carcinogenic consequences of uranium internal contamination. Natural uranium (238U), an alpha emitter with a half-life of 4.5x10(9) years, is one of the primordial substances of the universe. It is found in the earth's crust, combined with 235U and 234U, alpha, beta, and gamma emitters with respective half-lives of 7.1x10(8) and 2.5x10(5) years. A special emphasis of this paper concerns depleted uranium. The legacy of radioactive waste, environmental and health hazards in the nuclear industry, and, more recently, the military use of depleted uranium in the tactical battlefield necessitates further insight into the toxicology of depleted uranium. The present controversy over the radiological and chemical toxicity of depleted uranium used in the Gulf War warrants further experimental and clinical investigations of its effects on the biosphere and human organisms.

  18. Determination of Background Uranium Concentration in the Snake River Plain Aquifer under the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Radioactive Waste Management Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molly K. Leecaster; L. Don Koeppen; Gail L. Olson

    2003-01-01

    Uranium occurs naturally in the environment and is also a contaminant that is disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. To determine whether uranium concentrations in the Snake River Plain Aquifer, which underlies the laboratory, are elevated as a result of migration of anthropogenic uranium from the Subsurface Disposal Area in the RWMC, uranium background concentrations are necessary. Guideline values are calculated for total uranium, 234U, 235U, and 238U from analytical results from up to five datasets. Three of the datasets include results of samples analyzed using isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) and two of the datasets include results obtained using alpha spectrometry. All samples included in the statistical testing were collected from aquifer monitoring wells located within 10 miles of the RWMC. Results from ID-TIMS and alpha spectrometry are combined when the data are not statistically different. Guideline values for total uranium were calculated using four of the datasets, while guideline values for 234U were calculated using only the alpha spectrometry results (2 datasets). Data from all five datasets were used to calculate 238U guideline values. No limit is calculated for 235U because the ID-TIMS results are not useful for comparison with routine monitoring data, and the alpha spectrometry results are too close to the detection limit to be deemed accurate or reliable for calculating a 235U guideline value. All guideline values presented represent the upper 95% coverage 95% confidence tolerance limits for background concentration. If a future monitoring result is above this guideline, then the exceedance will be noted in the quarterly monitoring report and assessed with respect to other aquifer information. The guidelines (tolerance limits) for total U, 234U, and 238U are 2.75 pCi/L, 1.92 pCi/L, and 0.90 pCi/L, respectively

  19. Feasibility testing of in situ vitrification of uranium-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuse, H.; Tsuchino, S.; Tasaka, H.; Timmerman, C.L.

    1989-01-01

    Process feasibility studies using in situ vitrification (ISV) were successfully performed on two different uranium-contaminated wastes. In situ vitrification is a thermal treatment process that converts contaminated soils into durable glass and crystalline form. Of the two different wastes, one waste was uranium mill tailings, while the other was uranium-contaminated soils which had high water contents. Analyses of the data from the two tests are presented

  20. The application of illite supported nanoscale zero valent iron for the treatment of uranium contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, C; Landsberger, S; Li, Y L

    2017-09-01

    In this study, nanoscale zero valent iron I-NZVI was investigated as a remediation strategy for uranium contaminated groundwater from the former Cimarron Fuel Fabrication Site in Oklahoma, USA. The 1 L batch-treatment system was applied in the study. The result shows that 99.9% of uranium in groundwater was removed by I-NZVI within 2 h. Uranium concentration in the groundwater stayed around 27 μg/L, and there was no sign of uranium release into groundwater after seven days of reaction time. Meanwhile the release of iron was significantly decreased compared to NZVI which can reduce the treatment impact on the water environment. To study the influence of background pH of the treatment system on removal efficiency of uranium, the groundwater was adjusted from pH 2-10 before the addition of I-NZVI. The pH of the groundwater was from 2.1 to 10.7 after treatment. The removal efficiency of uranium achieved a maximum in neutral pH of groundwater. The desorption of uranium on the residual solid phase after treatment was investigated in order to discuss the stability of uranium on residual solids. After 2 h of leaching, 0.07% of the total uranium on residual solid phase was leached out in a HNO 3 leaching solution with a pH of 4.03. The concentration of uranium in the acid leachate was under 3.2 μg/L which is below the EPA's maximum contaminant level of 30 μg/L. Otherwise, the concentration of uranium was negligible in distilled water leaching solution (pH = 6.44) and NaOH leaching solution (pH = 8.52). A desorption study shows that an acceptable amount of uranium on the residuals can be released into water system under strong acid conditions in short terms. For long term disposal management of the residual solids, the leachate needs to be monitored and treated before discharge into a hazardous landfill or the water system. For the first time, I-NZVI was applied for the treatment of uranium contaminated groundwater. These results provide proof that I-NZVI has

  1. Water Treatment for Uranium at the U.S. Department of Energy's Legacy Management Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayvault, J.; Bush, R.; Ribeiro, T.; Surovchak, S.; Powell, J.; Bartlett, T.; Carpenter, C.; Jacobson, C.; Miller, D.; Morrison, S.; Boylan, J.; Broberg, K.; Glassmeyer, C.; Hertel, W.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Legacy Management (LM) Program is responsible for 82 sites as of September 30, 2008, more than 30 of which contain uranium contamination in the ground water. The compliance strategy for some of the uranium-contaminated ground-water systems is monitored natural attenuation (MNA); however, five sites have active ground-water remediation systems for uranium. Active remediation methods, goals, and scales vary widely among sites. This paper discusses and contrasts methods used to treat ground water contaminated with uranium at LM sites. At a former uranium milling site in Monticello, Utah, uranium-contaminated ground water is pumped through two reaction vessels containing a total of 7.6 cubic meters (m 3 ) of a mixture of gravel and zero-valent iron (ZVI). The flow rate is typically about 38 liters per minute (lpm), and the influent uranium concentration is about 300 micrograms per liter (μg/L). About 5.9 kilograms (kg) of uranium is removed from the aquifer per year. The system is monitored by a telemetry system and requires minimal maintenance; however, the reactive media requires replacement every 1 to 2 years. Some treated ground water is discharged back to the aquifer to enhance MNA, and some is discharged to a nearby creek. At the Rocky Flats Site near Denver, Colorado, contaminated ground water is collected in subsurface drains and pumped through a reaction vessel containing 136 m3 of a mixture of sawdust and ZVI, followed by a second reactor containing 40 m 3 of a mixture of gravel and ZVI. Microbial activity in the sawdust/ZVI reactor removes nitrate and some uranium, and the ZVI/gravel reactor removes the remainder of the uranium. The flow rate is typically about 1.9 lpm. The typical influent uranium concentration is about 40 μg/L, and the effluent concentration is less than 5 μg/L. Treated water is discharged to an infiltration gallery that feeds to a nearby creek. The system is removing approximately 0.05 kg of uranium per

  2. Position paper on the applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer at the Uranium Mill Tailings Vitro Processing Site, Salt Lake City, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    This report documents the results of the evaluation of the potential applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer underlying the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, Vitro Processing Site, Salt Lake City, Utah. There are two goals for this evaluation: provide the landowner with information to make an early qualitative decision on the possible use of the Vitro property, and evaluate the proposed application of supplemental standards as the ground water compliance strategy at the site. Justification of supplemental standards is based on the contention that the uppermost aquifer is of limited use due to wide-spread ambient contamination not related to the previous site processing activities. In support of the above, this report discusses the site conceptual model for the uppermost aquifer and related hydrogeological systems and establishes regional and local background water quality. This information is used to determine the extent of site-related and ambient contamination. A risk-based evaluation of the contaminants' effects on current and projected land uses is also provided. Reports of regional and local studies and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site investigations provided the basis for the conceptual model and established background ground water quality. In addition, a limited field effort (4 through 28 March 1996) was conducted to supplement existing data, particularly addressing the extent of contamination in the northwestern portion of the Vitro site and site background ground water quality. Results of the field investigation were particularly useful in refining the conceptual site model. This was important in light of the varied ground water quality within the uppermost aquifer. Finally, this report provides a critical evaluation, along with the related uncertainties, of the applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer at the Salt Lake City Vitro processing site

  3. Geochemical behavior of uranium mill tailings leachate in the subsurface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookins, D.G.

    1993-01-01

    Leachate generated from surface disposal of acidic uranium mill tailings at Maybell, CO has impacted groundwater quality within the underlying mineralized Browns Park Formation. The extent of groundwater contamination, however, is located directly beneath the tailings impoundment. The milling process consisted of sulfuric acid extraction of uranium from the feed ore by a complex chemical leaching and precipitation process. Tailings leachate at the site contains elevated concentrations of Al, As, Cd, Mo, Ni, NO 3 , Se, U, and other solutes. From column leach tests, the concentrations of contaminants within tailings pore fluid are SO 4 >NH 4 >NO 3 >U>Se>Ni>As>Cd at pH 4.0. The carbonate buffering capacity of the tailings subsoil has decreased because of calcite dissolution in the presence of acidic leachate. Groundwater quality data, mineralogical and microbiological studies, and geochemical modeling suggest that As, NO 3 , Se, U and other solutes are being removed from solution through precipitation, adsorption, and denitrification processes under reducing conditions. Presence of hydrogen sulfide, liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons, dissolved organic, and abundant pyrite within the Browns Park Formations have maintained reducing conditions subjacent to the tailings impoundment. Groundwater is in close equilibrium with coffinite and uraninite, the primary U(IV) minerals extracted from the Browns Parks Formation. Denitrifying bacteria identified in this study catalyze redox reactions involving NO 3 . Subsequently, contaminant distributions of NO 3 decrease 1000 times beneath the tailings impoundment. Applying geochemical and biochemical processes occurring at Maybell provides an excellent model for in situ aquifer restoration programs considered at other uranium tailings and heavy-metal-mixed waste contaminated sites. (author) 4 figs., 4 tabs., 27 refs

  4. Treatment of Uranium-Contaminated Concrete for Reducing Secondary Radioactive Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Han, G. S; Park, U. K; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A volume reduction of the concrete waste by appropriate treatment technologies will decrease the amount of waste to be disposed of and result in a reduction of the disposal cost and an enhancement of the efficiency of the disposal site. Our group has developed a decontamination process for uranium-contaminated (U-contaminated) concrete, and some experiments were performed to reduce the second radioactive waste. A decontamination process was developed to remove uranium from concrete waste. The yellow or brown colored surface of the wall brick with high concentration of uranium was removed by a chisel until the radioactivity of remaining block reached less than 1 Bq/g. The concrete waste coated with epoxy was directly burned by an oil flame, and the burned surface was then removed using the same method as the treatment of the brick. The selective mechanical removal of the concrete block reduced the amount of secondary radioactive waste. The concrete blocks without an epoxy were crushed to below 30 mm and sifted to 1 mm. When the concrete pieces larger than 1 mm were sequentially washed with a clear recycle solution and 1.0 M of nitric acid, their radioactivity reached below the limit value of uranium for self-disposal. For the concrete pieces smaller than 1 mm, a rotary washing machine and electrokinetic equipment were also used.

  5. Treatment of Uranium-Contaminated Concrete for Reducing Secondary Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Han, G. S; Park, U. K; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    A volume reduction of the concrete waste by appropriate treatment technologies will decrease the amount of waste to be disposed of and result in a reduction of the disposal cost and an enhancement of the efficiency of the disposal site. Our group has developed a decontamination process for uranium-contaminated (U-contaminated) concrete, and some experiments were performed to reduce the second radioactive waste. A decontamination process was developed to remove uranium from concrete waste. The yellow or brown colored surface of the wall brick with high concentration of uranium was removed by a chisel until the radioactivity of remaining block reached less than 1 Bq/g. The concrete waste coated with epoxy was directly burned by an oil flame, and the burned surface was then removed using the same method as the treatment of the brick. The selective mechanical removal of the concrete block reduced the amount of secondary radioactive waste. The concrete blocks without an epoxy were crushed to below 30 mm and sifted to 1 mm. When the concrete pieces larger than 1 mm were sequentially washed with a clear recycle solution and 1.0 M of nitric acid, their radioactivity reached below the limit value of uranium for self-disposal. For the concrete pieces smaller than 1 mm, a rotary washing machine and electrokinetic equipment were also used

  6. Uranium Isotopes as a Tracer of Groundwater Evolution in the Complexe Terminal Aquifer of Southern Tunisia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadj Ammar, F. [Laboratory of Radio-Analysis and Environment, National School of Engineering of Sfax, Sfax (Tunisia); Centre Europeen de Recherche et d' Enseignement de Geosciences de l' Environnement, Aix en Provence (France); Deschamps, P.; Hamelin, B. [Centre Europeen de Recherche et d' Enseignement de Geosciences de l' Environnement, Aix en Provence (France); Chkir, N.; Zouari, K. [Laboratory of Radio-Analysis and Environment, National School of Engineering of Sfax, Sfax (Tunisia)

    2013-07-15

    The Complexe Terminal (CT) aquifer system is the main water supply for remote areas of southern Tunisia. Its exploitation has resulted in significant draw-down of the water table. The CT aquifer is a multilayered aquifer lodged in Miocene sand deposits, Senonian limestones and Turonian carbonates. Little is known about the relationships and exchanges between the different layers. Here, uranium isotopic measurements carried out in groundwater samples from the CT aquifer are presented in order to constrain models for mixing of water masses, water-rock interaction and groundwater flow. Analyses were performed using a VG54 (TIMS) at the CEREGE. Results indicate a range in {sup 238}U concentration and {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios of 1.5 to 8 ppb and 1.1 to 3.2 respectively. Together with major and trace analyses, uranium isotopic compositions provide important insights into the factors controlling the chemical evolution of groundwater and shows very distinct patterns between carbonate and sandstone layers. (author)

  7. Lab-scale investigation on remediation of diesel-contaminated aquifer using microwave energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falciglia, Pietro P; Maddalena, Riccardo; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Messina, Valeria; Vagliasindi, Federico G A

    2016-02-01

    Aquifer contamination with diesel fuel is a worldwide environmental problem, and related available remediation technologies may not be adequately efficient, especially for the simultaneous treatment of both solid and water phases. In this paper, a lab-scale 2.45 GHz microwave (MW) treatment of an artificially diesel-contaminated aquifer was applied to investigate the effects of operating power (160, 350 and 500 W) and time on temperature profiles and contaminant removal from both solid and water phases. Results suggest that in diesel-contaminated aquifer MW remediation, power significantly influences the final reachable temperature and, consequently, contaminant removal kinetics. A maximum temperature of about 120 °C was reached at 500 W. Observed temperature values depended on the simultaneous irradiation of both aquifer grains and groundwater. In this case, solid phase heating is limited by the maximum temperature that interstitial water can reach before evaporation. A minimal residual diesel concentration of about 100 mg kg(-1) or 100 mg L(-1) was achieved by applying a power of 500 W for a time of 60 min for the solid or water phase, respectively. Measured residual TPH fractions showed that MW heating resulted in preferential effects of the removal of different TPH molecular weight fractions and that the evaporation-stripping phenomena plays a major role in final contaminant removal processes. The power low kinetic equation shows an excellent fit (r(2) > 0.993) with the solid phase residual concentration observed for all the powers investigated. A maximum diesel removal of 88 or 80% was observed for the MW treatment of the solid or water phase, respectively, highlighting the possibility to successfully and simultaneously remediate both the aquifer phases. Consequently, MW, compared to other biological or chemical-physical treatments, appears to be a better choice for the fast remediation of diesel-contaminated aquifers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  8. Obtaining Samples Representative of Contaminant Distribution in an Aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schalla, Ronald; Spane, Frank A.; Narbutovskih, Susan M.; Conley, Scott F.; Webber, William D.

    2002-01-01

    Historically, groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells have been assumed to provide average indications of contaminant concentrations within the aquifer over the well-screen interval. In-well flow circulation, heterogeneity in the surrounding aquifer, and the sampling method utilized, however, can significantly impact the representativeness of samples as contaminant indicators of actual conditions within the surrounding aquifer. This paper identifies the need and approaches essential for providing cost-effective and technically meaningful groundwater-monitoring results. Proper design of the well screen interval is critical. An accurate understanding of ambient (non-pumping) flow conditions within the monitoring well is essential for determining the contaminant distribution within the aquifer. The ambient in-well flow velocity, flow direction and volumetric flux rate are key to this understanding. Not only do the ambient flow conditions need to be identified for preferential flow zones, but also the probable changes that will be imposed under dynamic conditions that occur during groundwater sampling. Once the in-well flow conditions are understood, effective sampling can be conducted to obtain representative samples for specific depth zones or zones of interest. The question of sample representativeness has become an important issue as waste minimization techniques such as low flow purging and sampling are implemented to combat the increasing cost of well purging and sampling at many hazardous waste sites. Several technical approaches (e.g., well tracer techniques and flowmeter surveys) can be used to determine in-well flow conditions, and these are discussed with respect to both their usefulness and limitations. Proper fluid extraction methods using minimal, (low) volume and no purge sampling methods that are used to obtain representative samples of aquifer conditions are presented

  9. Assessment of water quality around Jaduguda uranium tailings ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, A.K.; Gurunadha Rao, V.V.S.; Ramesh, G.; Surinaidu, L.; Thama Rao, G.; Dhakate, R.; Sarangi, A.K.; Nair, R.N.

    2010-01-01

    The environmental impacts of uranium mining and milling activities are of great concern in many countries for the last three decades. These impacts range from the creation of massive stockpiles of radioactive and toxic waste rock and sand-like tailings to serious contamination of surface and groundwater with radioactive and toxic pollutants, and releases of conventional, toxic and radioactive air pollutants. Uranium mining is also associated with high concentrations of highly toxic heavy metals, which are a major source of surface and groundwater contamination. Depending upon the hydraulic properties of the fractures involved, contaminated ground water may be transported many miles from its point of origin before feeding into an aquifer. Tailings pond may contaminate the groundwater regime by continuous seepage and leaching of radionuclides and other toxic metals due to interaction of rain water through the tailings ponds. The uranium milling and tailings pond operations were started at Jaduguda since 1968. A comprehensive geological and geophysical investigation has been carried out in the Jaduguda watershed covering the tailings ponds to understand the geohydrological characteristics of the region. High resolution electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys have been carried out to delineate the aquifer geometry. Water quality analyses were carried out in three seasons covering from premonsoon to postmonsoon period during 2008-2009. Uranium concentrations have been observed in the dug wells, surface water and monitoring wells

  10. Potentially bioavailable natural organic carbon and hydrolyzable amino acids in aquifer sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lashun K.; Widdowson, Mark A.; Novak, John T.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Benner, Ronald; Kaiser, Karl

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between concentrations of operationally defined potentially bioavailable organic -carbon (PBOC) and hydrolyzable amino acids (HAAs) in sediments collected from a diverse range of chloroethene--contaminated sites. Concentrations of PBOC and HAA were measured using aquifer sediment samples collected at six selected study sites. Average concentrations of total HAA and PBOC ranged from 1.96 ± 1.53 to 20.1 ± 25.6 mg/kg and 4.72 ± 0.72 to 443 ± 65.4 mg/kg, respectively. Results demonstrated a statistically significant positive relationship between concentrations of PBOC and total HAA present in the aquifer sediment (p amino acids are known to be readily biodegradable carbon compounds, this relationship suggests that the sequential chemical extraction procedure used to measure PBOC is a useful indicator of bioavailable carbon in aquifer sediments. This, in turn, is consistent with the interpretation that PBOC measurements can be used for estimating the amount of natural organic carbon available for driving the reductive dechlorination of chloroethenes in groundwater systems.

  11. Arsenic, microbes and contaminated aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Stolz, John F.

    2005-01-01

    The health of tens of millions of people world-wide is at risk from drinking arsenic-contaminated well water. In most cases this arsenic occurs naturally within the sub-surface aquifers, rather than being derived from identifiable point sources of pollution. The mobilization of arsenic into the aqueous phase is the first crucial step in a process that eventually leads to human arsenicosis. Increasing evidence suggests that this is a microbiological phenomenon.

  12. Uranium extraction from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Figueiredo, C. de

    1984-01-01

    The recovery of uranium from phosphoric liquor by two extraction process is studied. First, uranium is reduced to tetravalent condition and is extracted by dioctypyrophosphoric acid. The re-extraction is made by concentrated phosphoric acid with an oxidizing agent. The re-extract is submitted to the second process and uranium is extracted by di-ethylhexilphosphoric acid and trioctylphosphine oxide. (M.A.C.) [pt

  13. Uranium uptake and accumulation in plants from soil contaminated with uranium in different concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Luxue; Tang Yongjin; Luo Xuegang

    2014-01-01

    The plants of Medicago sativa L., Hibiscus esulentus L, Waterspinach, Amaranthus retroflexus and Abutilon theophrasti Medic were employed as the indicator to investigate the uranium uptake and accumulation from soils contaminated with uranium (UO_2 (CH_3COO)_2 · 2H_2O) of 25 mg · kg"-"l, 75 mg · kg"-"1, 125 mg · kg"-"l, 175 mg · kg"-"l respectively, in a pot experiment. The result shows that, U concentration in the aerial part and underground part of the whole plant increased with the rise of uranium concentration in the soils. In the contaminated soils with 25∼125 mg · kg"-"l concentrations of uranium, U content of Medicago sativa L is the highset (6.78 mg · kg"-"l, 61.53 mg · kg"-"l, 74.06 mg · kg"-"l separately). While in the 175 mg · kg"-"l concentration of uranium contaminated soils, U content of Hibiscus esulentus L is the highest (86.72 mg · kg"-"1), which is mainly because of U concentration in its roots have higher level of uranium (388.16 mg · kg"-"l). Comprehensive analysis shows that Medicago sativa L. is a good plant for phytoextraction and Hibiscus esulentus L is a good immobilizing plant for phytoremediation. The results can provide some theoretical basis and technical support for remedying U-contaminated soils in different areas of our country. (authors)

  14. Application of a precipitation method for uranium recovery from Abu-Zaabal phosphoric acid plant, egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hazek, N.M.T.; Hussein, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    Current industrial recovery of uranium from 30% phosphoric acid-produced by the dihydrate process-is based on solvent extraction method. Uranium recovery from concentrated phosphoric acid (45-52% P 2 O 5 ) produced by evaporation of the 30% acid or directly produced by the hemihydrate process, by solvent extraction is difficult to apply in practice. In addition to possible contamination of the acid by the organic solvents and/or their deterioration. This paper investigates the possibility of applying a precipitation method (Weterings and Janssen, 1985) for uranium recovery from both low (28% P 2 O 2 ) and high (48% P 2 O 5 ) concentration phosphoric acids produced by abu-Zaabal phosphoric acid plant (abu-Zaabal fertilizers and chemicals Co., Egypt). The 28% acid produced by H 2 SO 4 dihydrate method and the 48% acid produced by evaporation of the 28% acid

  15. Semianalytical solutions for contaminant transport under variable velocity field in a coastal aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohbor, Behshad; Fahs, Marwan; Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad; Simmons, Craig T.; Younes, Anis

    2018-05-01

    Existing closed-form solutions of contaminant transport problems are limited by the mathematically convenient assumption of uniform flow. These solutions cannot be used to investigate contaminant transport in coastal aquifers where seawater intrusion induces a variable velocity field. An adaptation of the Fourier-Galerkin method is introduced to obtain semi-analytical solutions for contaminant transport in a confined coastal aquifer in which the saltwater wedge is in equilibrium with a freshwater discharge flow. Two scenarios dealing with contaminant leakage from the aquifer top surface and contaminant migration from a source at the landward boundary are considered. Robust implementation of the Fourier-Galerkin method is developed to efficiently solve the coupled flow, salt and contaminant transport equations. Various illustrative examples are generated and the semi-analytical solutions are compared against an in-house numerical code. The Fourier series are used to evaluate relevant metrics characterizing contaminant transport such as the discharge flux to the sea, amount of contaminant persisting in the groundwater and solute flux from the source. These metrics represent quantitative data for numerical code validation and are relevant to understand the effect of seawater intrusion on contaminant transport. It is observed that, for the surface contamination scenario, seawater intrusion limits the spread of the contaminant but intensifies the contaminant discharge to the sea. For the landward contamination scenario, moderate seawater intrusion affects only the spatial distribution of the contaminant plume while extreme seawater intrusion can increase the contaminant discharge to the sea. The developed semi-analytical solution presents an efficient tool for the verification of numerical models. It provides a clear interpretation of the contaminant transport processes in coastal aquifers subject to seawater intrusion. For practical usage in further studies, the full

  16. Total effective dose equivalent associated with fixed uranium surface contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogard, J.S.; Hamm, R.N.; Ashley, J.C.; Turner, J.E.; England, C.A.; Swenson, D.E.; Brown, K.S.

    1997-04-01

    This report provides the technical basis for establishing a uranium fixed-contamination action level, a fixed uranium surface contamination level exceeding the total radioactivity values of Appendix D of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, part 835 (10CFR835), but below which the monitoring, posting, and control requirements for Radiological Areas are not required for the area of the contamination. An area of fixed uranium contamination between 1,000 dpm/100 cm 2 and that level corresponding to an annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) of 100 mrem requires only routine monitoring, posting to alert personnel of the contamination, and administrative control. The more extensive requirements for monitoring, posting, and control designated by 10CFR835 for Radiological Areas do not have to be applied for these intermediate fixed-contamination levels

  17. The role indigenous bacterial isolates for bioremediation agent in the uranium contaminated aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochd Yazid

    2014-01-01

    A Research on the role of indigenous bacterial isolates for bio-remediation agent of the uranium contaminated in the aquatic environment has been conducted. The objective of the research is to study the role of Pseudomonas sp and Bacillus sp. have been isolated from low level uranium waste for bioremediation agent in their environment, such as the determination of efficiency of the uranium binding compared by the non indigenous bacterial, location of these binding and the influences of added acethyl acid stimulant. The uranium reduction studied was measured by weighting bacterial biomass and uranium concentration was measured by spectrophotometer. The acethyl acid stimulant addition has been done with the variation of concentration and volume. The efficiency of the uranium reduction by indigenous bacterial isolate such as Pseudomonas sp were 84.99 % and Bacillus sp were 52.70 %, so the reduction efficiency by non indigenous bacterial such as Pseudomonas aerogenes were 78.47 % and Bacillus subtilis were 45.22 % for 54 hours incubation time. The result of this research can be concluded that Pseudomonas sp and Bacillus sp. Indigenous bacterial have been isolates from the liquid uranium waste can contributed in bioremediation agent for uranium radionuclide in the environment for 60 ppm concentration with reduction efficiency 52.70 %-84.99 %, that is higher non indigenous bacterial for 54 hours incubation time, the stimulant addition of acethyl acid, the efficiency can be increased up to 99.8 %. (author)

  18. Application of a precipitation method for uranium recovery from abu-zaabal phosphoric acid plant, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-hazek, N.M.T.; Hussein, E.M.

    1995-01-01

    Current industrial recovery of uranium from 30% phosphoric acid-produced by the dihydrate process-is based on solvent extraction method. Uranium recovery from concentrated phosphoric acid (45-52% p o5 ) produced by evaporation of the 30% acid or directly produced by the hemihydrate process, by solvent extraction is difficult to apply in practice. In addition to possible contamination of the acid by the organic solvents and/or their deterioration. This paper investigates the possibility of applying a precipitation method (Weterings and Janssen, 1985) for uranium recovery from both low (28% P 2 O 5 ) and high (48% P 2 O 5 ) concentration phosphoric acids produced by abu-zaabal phosphoric acid plant (Abuzaabal fertilizers and chemicals Co., Egypt). The 28% acid produced by H 2 SO 4 dihydrate method and the 48% acid produced by evaporation of the 28% acid The applied precipitation method depends on using NH 4 F as a uranium precipitant from both low and high concentration phosphoric acids in presence of acetone as a dispersing agent. All the relevant factors have been studied

  19. Natural uranium toxicology - evaluation of internal contamination in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalabreysse, J.

    1968-01-01

    After reminding the physical and chemical properties of natural uranium which might affect its toxicology, a comprehensive investigation upon natural uranium metabolism and toxicity and after applying occupational exposure standards to this particular poison, it has been determined, from accident reports and human experience reported in the related literature, a series of formulae obtained by theoretical mathematical development giving principles for internal contamination monitoring and disclosure by determining uranium in the urine of occupationally exposed individuals. An assay is performed to determine individual internal contamination according to the various contamination cases. The outlined purposes, mainly practical, required some options and extrapolations. The proposed formula allows a preliminary approach and also to determine shortly a contamination extent or to discuss the systematical urinalysis results as compared with individual radio-toxicology monitoring professional standards. (author) [fr

  20. Sedimentological analysis of a contaminated groundwater aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towse, D.

    1991-01-01

    The use of sedimentological reservoir analysis techniques adapted from standard oilfield practice can improve the efficiency and reduce the costs of the evaluation of groundwater aquifers and the design of restoration programs. An evaluation/restoration program at a site in California drilled over 200 test wells in about 750 ac. All wells were logged lithologically and with wireline. The shallow aquifer is a complex braided alluvial floodplain deposit of Late Quaternary age. Analysis demonstrates depositional and erosional responses to periodic hinterland uplifts and to changing climatic conditions. Channel, overbank, lacustrine, and minor deltaic deposits can be recognized. The aquifer architecture has been interpreted to explain the movement of fuel and halogenated hydrocarbon solvents in the sediments and water. Routine engineering geology techniques and hydrologic tests were used to evaluate contamination and to design experimental restoration processes. As demonstrated here, sedimentological techniques show promise in reducing the costs and time required for this type of study. The abundant detailed data will be used in an attempt to develop a microcomputer-based expert system for rapid preliminary analyses of similar aquifers or reservoirs

  1. The measurement test of uranium in a uranium-contaminated waste by passive gamma-rays measurement method

    CERN Document Server

    Sukegawa, Y; Ohki, K; Suzuki, S; Yoshida, M

    2002-01-01

    This report is completed about the measurement test and the proofreading of passive gamma - rays measurement method for Non - destructive assay of uranium in a uranium-contaminated waste. The following are the results of the test. 1) The estimation of the amount of uranium by ionization survey meter is difficult for low intensity of gamma-rays emitted from uranium under about 50g. 2) The estimation of the amount of uranium in the waste by NaI detector is possible in case of only uranium, but the estimation from mixed spectrums with transmission source (60-cobalt) is difficult to confirm target peaks. 3) If daughter nuclides of uranium and thorium chain of uranium ore exist, measurement by NaI detector is affected by gamma-rays from the daughter nuclides seriously-As a result, the estimation of the amount of uranium is difficult. 4) The measurement of uranium in a uranium-contaminated waste by germanium detector is possible to estimate of uranium and other nuclides. 5) As to estimation of the amount of uranium...

  2. Protists from a sewage‐contaminated aquifer on cape cod, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novarino, Gianfranco; Warren, Alan; Kinner, Nancy E.; Harvey, Ronald W.

    1994-01-01

    Several species of flagellates (genera Bodo, Cercomonas, Cryptaulax, Cyathomonas, Goniomonas, Spumella) have been identified in cultures from a plume of organic contamination (treated sewage effluent) within an aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Amoebae and numerous unidentifiable 2‐ to 3‐μm flagellates have also been observed. As a rule, flagellates were associated with solid surfaces, or were capable of temporary surface attachment, corroborating earlier observations from in situ and column transport experiments suggesting that protists in the Massachusetts aquifer have a high propensity for association with sediment grain surfaces. Based on the fact that cultures from the uncontaminated part of the aquifer yielded only a few species of protists, it is hypothesized that the greater abundance and variety of food sources in the contaminant plume is capable of supporting a greater number of protistan species.

  3. Operating and life-cycle costs for uranium-contaminated soil treatment technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douthat, D.M.; Armstrong, A.Q.

    1995-09-01

    The development of a nuclear industry in the US required mining, milling, and fabricating a large variety of uranium products. One of these products was purified uranium metal which was used in the Savannah River and Hanford Site reactors. Most of this feed material was produced at the US Department of Energy (DOE) facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald, Ohio. During operation of this facility, soils became contaminated with uranium from a variety of sources. To avoid disposal of these soils in low-level radioactive waste burial sites, increasing emphasis has been placed on the remediating soils contaminated with uranium and other radionuclides. To address remediation and management of uranium-contaminated soils at sites owned by DOE, the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) evaluates and compares the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems designed to characterize and remediate uranium-contaminated soils. Each technology must be able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from soil, (3) treat or dispose of resulting waste streams, (4) meet necessary state and federal regulations, and (5) meet performance assessment objectives. The role of the performance assessment objectives is to provide the information necessary to conduct evaluations of the technologies. These performance assessments provide the basis for selecting the optimum system for remediation of large areas contaminated with uranium. One of the performance assessment tasks is to address the economics of full-scale implementation of soil treatment technologies. The cost of treating contaminated soil is one of the criteria used in the decision-making process for selecting remedial alternatives

  4. Removal of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils -- Phase 1: Bench-scale testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, C.W.

    1993-09-01

    To address the management of uranium-contaminated soils at Fernald and other DOE sites, the DOE Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program. The USID has five major tasks. These include the development and demonstration of technologies that are able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from the soil, (3) treat the soil and dispose of any waste, (4) establish performance assessments, and (5) meet necessary state and federal regulations. This report deals with soil decontamination or removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The report was compiled by the USID task group that addresses soil decontamination; includes data from projects under the management of four DOE facilities [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Savannah River Plant (SRP)]; and consists of four separate reports written by staff at these facilities. The fundamental goal of the soil decontamination task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil's physicochemical characteristics or generating waste forms that are difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Emphasis in research was placed more strongly on chemical extraction techniques than physical extraction techniques

  5. Groundwater isotopic variations in a uranium mining site: subsidies for contamination studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, V. P. de

    2017-01-01

    The Caetite Experimental Basin (CEB), located in the semi-arid region of Northeastern Brazil, faces not only the challenges associated with water scarcity but also the potential contamination processes due to mining activity. The only active uranium production center in Brazil (URA) is located in this watershed and the sustainability of mining and milling operations, as well as the survival of the local community, is highly dependent on the availability of groundwater resources. This paper analyzes the stable isotopes variation of Deuterium ("2H) and Oxygen-18 ("1"8O) in CEB's groundwater to investigate its dynamics and mixing of water sources as part of initial efforts to characterize the hydrogeology of this area for future contamination and recharge studies. Measurements of δ"2H, δ"1"8O, total dissolved solids (TDS), pH, and electrical conductivity (EC) were carried out in water samples from 27 wells. A total of 98 groundwater samples were analyzed during the dry and wet seasons from 2012 to 2014. All the groundwater samples plotted below the local meteoric line toward more enriched δ"1"8O values, an indicative of evaporation process. "2H and "1"8O data suggests that the main source of groundwater recharge is local precipitation and there is no mixing of infiltrating rainwater with older groundwater. These results provide evidence that the aquifer system in the CEB has a relatively fast turnover time, which contribute to the vulnerability of the aquifer to contamination. These findings are corroborated by the low TDS and EC values indicative of short time in water-rock interaction. (author)

  6. Groundwater isotopic variations in a uranium mining site: subsidies for contamination studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, V. P. de [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Divisao de Engenharia Nuclear; Sobrinho, G.A.N.; Freitas, L.D.; Franklin, M.R., E-mail: mariza@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-09-01

    The Caetite Experimental Basin (CEB), located in the semi-arid region of Northeastern Brazil, faces not only the challenges associated with water scarcity but also the potential contamination processes due to mining activity. The only active uranium production center in Brazil (URA) is located in this watershed and the sustainability of mining and milling operations, as well as the survival of the local community, is highly dependent on the availability of groundwater resources. This paper analyzes the stable isotopes variation of Deuterium ({sup 2}H) and Oxygen-18 ({sup 18}O) in CEB's groundwater to investigate its dynamics and mixing of water sources as part of initial efforts to characterize the hydrogeology of this area for future contamination and recharge studies. Measurements of δ{sup 2}H, δ{sup 18}O, total dissolved solids (TDS), pH, and electrical conductivity (EC) were carried out in water samples from 27 wells. A total of 98 groundwater samples were analyzed during the dry and wet seasons from 2012 to 2014. All the groundwater samples plotted below the local meteoric line toward more enriched δ{sup 18}O values, an indicative of evaporation process. {sup 2}H and {sup 18}O data suggests that the main source of groundwater recharge is local precipitation and there is no mixing of infiltrating rainwater with older groundwater. These results provide evidence that the aquifer system in the CEB has a relatively fast turnover time, which contribute to the vulnerability of the aquifer to contamination. These findings are corroborated by the low TDS and EC values indicative of short time in water-rock interaction. (author)

  7. Immobilization of uranium in contaminated soil by natural apatite addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrdakovic Popic, Jelena; Stojanovic, Mirjana; Milosevic, Sinisa; Iles, Deana; Zildzovic, Snezana

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Serbian natural mineral apatite as soil additive for reducing the migration of uranium from contaminated sediments. In laboratory study we investigated the sorption properties of domestic apatite upon different experimental conditions, such as pH, adsorbent mass, reaction period, concentration of P 2 O 5 in apatite, solid/liquid ratio. In second part of study, we did the quantification of uranium in soil samples, taken from uranium mine site 'Kalna', by sequential extraction method. The same procedure was, also, used for uranium determination in contaminated soil samples after apatite addition, in order to determine the changes in U distribution in soil fraction. The obtained results showed the significant level of immobilization (96.7%) upon certain conditions. Increase of %P 2 O 5 in apatite and process of mechano-chemical activation led to increase of immobilization capacity from 17.50% till 91.64%. The best results for uranium binding were obtained at pH 5.5 and reaction period 60 days (98.04%) The sequential extraction showed the presence of uranium (48.2%) in potentially available soil fractions, but with the apatite addition uranium content in these fractions decreased (30.64%), what is considering environmental aspect significant fact. In situ immobilization of radionuclide using inexpensive sequestering agents, such as apatite, is very adequate for big contaminated areas of soil with low level of contamination. This investigation study on natural apatite from deposit 'Lisina' Serbia was the first one of this type in our country. Key words: apatite, uranium, immobilization, soil, contamination. (authors)

  8. Influence of attrition scrubbing, ultrasonic treatment, and oxidant additions on uranium removal from contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timpson, M.E.; Elless, M.P.; Francis, C.W.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration Project being conducted by the US Department of Energy, bench-scale investigations of selective leaching of uranium from soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project site in Ohio were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Two soils (storage pad soil and incinerator soil), representing the major contaminant sources at the site, were extracted using carbonate- and citric acid-based lixiviants. Physical and chemical processes were used in combination with the two extractants to increase the rate of uranium release from these soils. Attrition scrubbing and ultrasonic dispersion were the two physical processes utilized. Potassium permanganate was used as an oxidizing agent to transform tetravalent uranium to the hexavalent state. Hexavalent uranium is easily complexed in solution by the carbonate radical. Attrition scrubbing increased the rate of uranium release from both soils when compared with rotary shaking. At equivalent extraction times and solids loadings, however, attrition scrubbing proved effective only on the incinerator soil. Ultrasonic treatments on the incinerator soil removed 71% of the uranium contamination in a single extraction. Multiple extractions of the same sample removed up to 90% of the uranium. Additions of potassium permanganate to the carbonate extractant resulted in significant changes in the extractability of uranium from the incinerator soil but had no effect on the storage pad soil

  9. Study on phytoremediation in the uranium contaminated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Dejuan; Zhu Yean; Hua Rong; Yu Yue; Luo Mingbiao; Liu Qingcheng; Huang Dechao

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms of phytoremediation in the uranium contaminated environment are described, and a worldwide overview of the content and progress of the related research topics is provided. Based on the analysis, it is pointed out that we should strengthen the research of plant-microbial coexistence system as well as the research of the related molecular biology and genetic engineering in order to enhance the phytoremediation's efficiency in the uranium contaminated environment. (authors)

  10. Uranium: properties and biological effects after internal contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souidi, M.; Tissandie, E.; Racine, R.; Ben Soussan, H.; Rouas, C.; Grignard, E.; Dublineau, I.; Gourmelon, P.; Lestaevel, P.; Gueguen, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium is a radionuclide present in the environment since the origin of the Earth. In addition to natural uranium, recent deposits from industrial or military activities are acknowledged. Uranium's toxicity is due to a combination of its chemical (heavy metal) and radiological properties (emission of ionizing radiations). Acute toxicity induces an important weight loss and signs of renal and cerebral impairment. Alterations of bone growth, modifications of the reproductive system and carcinogenic effects are also often seen. On the contrary, the biological effects of a chronic exposure to low doses are unwell known. However, results from different recent studies suggest that a chronic contamination with low levels of uranium induces subtle but significant levels. Indeed, an internal contamination of rats for several weeks leads to detection of uranium in many cerebral structures, in association with an alteration of short-term memory and an increase of anxiety level. Biological effects of uranium on the metabolisms of xenobiotics, steroid hormones and vitamin D were described in the liver, testis and kidneys. These recent scientific data suggest that uranium could participate to increase of health risks linked to environmental pollution. (authors)

  11. Assessing the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination--Glacial aquifer system in Woodbury, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Brown, Craig J.; Starn, J. Jeffrey; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2010-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well in Woodbury, Connecticut. The well typically produces water at the rate of 72 gallons per minute from the glacial aquifer system in the Pomperaug River Basin. Water samples were collected at the public-supply well and at monitoring wells installed in or near the simulated zone of contribution to the supply well. Samples of untreated water from the public-supply wellhead contained several types of undesirable constituents, including 11 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrate, pesticides, uranium, and radon. Most of these constituents were detected at concentrations below drinking-water standards, where such standards exist. Only concentrations of the VOC trichlorethylene exceeded the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 5 micrograms per liter (ug/L) established by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Radon concentrations exceeded a proposed-but not finalized-MCL of 300 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). Overall, the study findings point to four main factors that affect the movement and fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well in Woodbury: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer); (2) the percentage of recharge received through urban areas; (3) the percentage of recharge received through dry wells and their proximity to the public-supply well; and (4) natural geochemical processes occurring within the aquifer system; that is, processes that affect the amounts and distribution of chemical substances in aquifer sediments and groundwater. A computer-model simulation of groundwater flow to the public-supply well was used to estimate the age of water particles entering the well along the length of the well screen. About 90 percent of the simulated flow to the well consists of water that entered the aquifer 9 or fewer years ago. Such young water is vulnerable to contaminants resulting from human activities

  12. Carbonate heap leach of uranium-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turney, W.R.; Mason, C.F.V.; Longmire, P.

    1994-01-01

    A new approach to removal of uranium from soils based on existing heap leach mining technologies proved highly effective for remediation of soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) near Cincinnati, Ohio. In laboratory tests, remediation of uranium-contaminated soils by heap leaching with carbonate salt solutions was demonstrated in column experiments. An understanding of the chemical processes that occur during carbonate leach of uranium from soils may lead to enhancement of uranium removal. Carbonate leaching requires the use of an integrated and closed circuit process, wherein the leach solutions are recycled and the reagents are reused, resulting in a minimum secondary waste stream. Carbonate salt leach solution has two important roles. Primarily, the formation of highly soluble anionic carbonate uranyl species, including uranyl dicarbonate (UO 2 CO 32 = ) and uranyl tricarbonate (UO 2 CO 33 4- ), allows for high concentration of uranium in a leachate solution. Secondly, carbonate salts are nearly selective for dissolution of uranium from uranium contaminated soils. Other advantages of the carbonate leaching process include (1) the high solubility, (2) the selectivity, (3) the purity of the solution produced, (4) the relative ease with which a uranium product can be precipitated directly from the leachate solution, and (5) the relatively non-corrosive and safe handling characteristics of carbonate solutions. Experiments conducted in the laboratory have demonstrated the effectiveness of carbonate leach. Efficiencies of uranium removal from the soils have been as high as 92 percent. Higher molar strength carbonate solutions (∼0.5M) proved more effective than lower molar strength solutions (∼ 0.1M). Uranium removal is also a function of lixiviant loading rate. Furthermore, agglomeration of the soils with cement resulted in less effective uranium removal

  13. Comparison of willow and sunflower for uranium phytoextraction induced by citric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan Mihalik; National Radiation Protection Institute, Prague; CZU, FAPPZ, Prague; Pavel Tlustos; Jirina Szakova

    2010-01-01

    This study deals with an efficiency of a low dose of citric acid soil application on phytoextraction of uranium. Willow (Salix spp.) and sunflower (Helianthus annus L.) were tested in this experiment with contaminated soil. The enhancing of uranium bioaccumulation was confirmed, but in contrast to previous studies, the highest quantity of uranium was accumulated in leaves. After 5 weeks of citric acid treatment, willow was more efficient in the uptake and translocation of uranium than sunflower. The transfer coefficient calculated for leaves increased from 0.033 (control) to 0.74, or 0.56 after five doses of 5 mmol of citric acid per 1 kg of soil for willow or sunflower, respectively. The uptake characterized by the total U content achieved 88 and 108 mg kg -1 in relation to the above ground parts of sunflower and willow, respectively. Even though both plants accumulated U in their above ground parts in significant rate, they employed diverse ways to achieve it. At the end of the treatment, the physiological condition of the plants enabled us to continue this method. (author)

  14. The distribution of depleted uranium contamination in Colonie, NY, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, N.S.; Chenery, S.R.N.; Parrish, R.R.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium oxide particles were dispersed into the environment from a factory in Colonie (NY, USA) by prevailing winds during the 1960s and '70s. Uranium concentrations and isotope ratios from bulk soil samples have been accurately measured using inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) without the need for analyte separation chemistry. The natural range of uranium concentrations in the Colonie soils has been estimated as 0.7-2.1 μg g -1 , with a weighted geometric mean of 1.05 μg g -1 ; the contaminated soil samples comprise uranium up to 500 ± 40 μg g -1 . A plot of 236 U/ 238 U against 235 U/ 238 U isotope ratios describes a mixing line between natural uranium and depleted uranium (DU) in bulk soil samples; scatter from this line can be accounted for by heterogeneity in the DU particulate. The end-member of DU compositions aggregated in these bulk samples comprises (2.05 ± 0.06) x 10 -3235 U/ 238 U, (3.2 ± 0.1) x 10 -5236 U/ 238 U, and (7.1 ± 0.3) x 10 -6234 U/ 238 U. The analytical method is sensitive to as little as 50 ng g -1 DU mixed with the natural uranium occurring in these soils. The contamination footprint has been mapped northward from site, and at least one third of the uranium in a soil sample from the surface 5 cm, collected 5.1 km NNW of the site, is DU. The distribution of contamination within the surface soil horizon follows a trend of exponential decrease with depth, which can be approximated by a simple diffusion model. Bioturbation by earthworms can account for dispersal of contaminant from the soil surface, in the form of primary uranium oxide particulates, and uranyl species that are adsorbed to organic matter. Considering this distribution, the total mass of uranium contamination emitted from the factory is estimated to be c. 4.8 tonnes.

  15. The distribution of depleted uranium contamination in Colonie, NY, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, N.S., E-mail: nsl3@alumni.leicester.ac.uk [Department of Geology, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Chenery, S.R.N. [British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Parrish, R.R. [Department of Geology, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-20

    Uranium oxide particles were dispersed into the environment from a factory in Colonie (NY, USA) by prevailing winds during the 1960s and '70s. Uranium concentrations and isotope ratios from bulk soil samples have been accurately measured using inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) without the need for analyte separation chemistry. The natural range of uranium concentrations in the Colonie soils has been estimated as 0.7-2.1 {mu}g g{sup -1}, with a weighted geometric mean of 1.05 {mu}g g{sup -1}; the contaminated soil samples comprise uranium up to 500 {+-} 40 {mu}g g{sup -1}. A plot of {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U against {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U isotope ratios describes a mixing line between natural uranium and depleted uranium (DU) in bulk soil samples; scatter from this line can be accounted for by heterogeneity in the DU particulate. The end-member of DU compositions aggregated in these bulk samples comprises (2.05 {+-} 0.06) x 10{sup -3235}U/{sup 238}U, (3.2 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup -5236}U/{sup 238}U, and (7.1 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6234}U/{sup 238}U. The analytical method is sensitive to as little as 50 ng g{sup -1} DU mixed with the natural uranium occurring in these soils. The contamination footprint has been mapped northward from site, and at least one third of the uranium in a soil sample from the surface 5 cm, collected 5.1 km NNW of the site, is DU. The distribution of contamination within the surface soil horizon follows a trend of exponential decrease with depth, which can be approximated by a simple diffusion model. Bioturbation by earthworms can account for dispersal of contaminant from the soil surface, in the form of primary uranium oxide particulates, and uranyl species that are adsorbed to organic matter. Considering this distribution, the total mass of uranium contamination emitted from the factory is estimated to be c. 4.8 tonnes.

  16. Uranium recovery and uranium remove from acid mine waters by ion exchange resin; Remocao e recuperacao de uranio de aguas acidas de mina com resina de troca ionica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Marcos R.L. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao do Laborarorio; Fatibello Filho, Orlando [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    1999-11-01

    Ion exchange using resins is one of few processes capable of reducing contaminants in effluents to very low levels according to environmental legislation. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The presence of pyrite in the waste rock piles, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants. Including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by an anionic exchanger. Studies of uranium sorption without treatment, and with lime pretreatment of water to precipitate the iron and recovery uranium as commercial product, are presented. Uranium elution was done with NaCl solutions. Saline concentration and retention time were the parameters studied. the uranium decontaminations level in the effluents from acid mine water was 94%. (author) 10 refs., 6 tabs., 3 figs.

  17. Bioremediation of Uranium-Contaminated Groundwater using Engineered Injection and Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, J. A.; Neupauer, R.; Ye, M.; Kasprzyk, J. R.; Mays, D. C.; Curtis, G. P.

    2017-12-01

    During in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater, a treatment chemical is injected into the contaminated groundwater to react with and degrade the contaminant, with reactions occurring where the treatment chemical contacts the contaminant. Traditional in-situ groundwater remediation relies on background groundwater flow for spreading of treatment chemicals into contaminant plumes. Engineered Injection and Extraction (EIE), in which time-varying induced flow fields are used to actively spread the treatment chemical into the contaminant plume, has been developed to increase contact between the contaminant and treatment chemical, thereby enhancing contaminant degradation. EIE has been investigated for contaminants that degrade through irreversible bimolecular reaction with a treatment chemical, but has not been investigated for a contaminant governed by reversible reactions. Uranium primarily occurs in its aqueous, mobile form, U(VI), in the environment but can be bioreduced to its sparingly soluble, immobile form, U(IV), by iron reducing bacteria stimulated by an acetate amendment. In this study, we investigate the ability of EIE to facilitate and sustain favorable conditions to immobilize uranium during remediation, and to prevent re-mobilization of uranium into the aqueous phase after active remediation has ended. Simulations in this investigation are conducted using a semi-synthetic model based on physical and chemical conditions at the Naturita Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site in southwestern Colorado and the Old Rifle UMTRA site in western Colorado. The EIE design is optimized for the synthetic model using the Borg multi-objective evolutionary algorithm.

  18. Development of an improved two-cycle process for recovering uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.M.; Chen, H.J.; Tsai, Y.M.; Lee, T.W.; Ting, G.

    1987-01-01

    An improved two-cycle separation process for the recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid by extraction with bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) plus dibutyl butylphosphonate (DBBP) in kerosene has been developed and demonstrated successfully in bench-scale, continuous mixer-settler tests. The sulfuric acid and water scrubbing steps for the recycled extraction in the second cycle solve the problems of the contamination and dilution of the phosphoric acid by the ammonium ion and water and also avoid the formation of undesirable phosphatic precipitates during the subsequent extraction of uranium by recycled organic extractant

  19. Non-radiological contaminants from uranium mining and milling at Ranger, Jabiru, Northern Territory, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noller, B N

    1991-10-01

    Protection from the hazards from radioactivity is of prime importance in the management of uranium mine and mill wastes. Such wastes also contain non-radiological contaminants (heavy metals, acids and neutralising agents) which give rise to potential long-term health and environmental hazards and short-term hazards to the aquatic ecosystem, e.g. as a result of release of waste water. This study seeks to identify non-radiological contaminants (elements) transferred to waste water at the Ranger uranium mine/mill complex at Jabiru, which are likely to hazardous to the aquatic environment.The two principal sources of contaminants are: (i) ore and waste rock mobilised from mining; and (ii) process reagents used in the milling and mineral extraction process. These substances may or may not already be present in the natural environment but may lead to deleterious effects on the aquatic environment if increased above threshold levels.Rhenium, derived from the ore body, was found to be significantly enriched in waste water from Ranger, indicating its suitability as an indicator element for water originating from the mining and milling process, but only uranium, likewise derived from the ore, and magnesium, manganese and sulfur (as sulfate) from the milling process were found to be significant environmental contaminants.

  20. Sustainable Technologies and Social Costs for Eliminating Contamination of an Aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Schirmer

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This case study deals with long-term contamination of the Leuna aquifer, which is intended to be restored using sustainable technologies financed by the state. The contamination can only be solved using active rather than passive intervention, because the aquifer has an extraordinarily low natural attenuation capacity for the specific pollutants. Due to the longevity of the contamination source, the groundwater treatment technology that was chosen for the site must operate for a minimum of 20 years but probably much longer. Since the polluter-pay principle cannot be applied, the estimated dynamic primary remediation costs must be accepted as a political or social cost, which must be paid by current and future generations.

  1. Groundwater Remediation in a Floodplain Aquifer at Shiprock, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Dave [Navarro Research and Engineering; Miller, David [Navarro Research and Engineering; Kautsky, Mark [U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Dander, David [Navarro Research and Engineering; Nofchissey, Joni [Navajo Nation Division of Natural Resources

    2016-03-06

    A uranium- and vanadium-ore-processing mill operated from 1954 to 1968 within the Navajo Nation near Shiprock, New Mexico. By September 1986, all tailings and structures on the former mill property were encapsulated in a disposal cell built on top of two existing tailings piles on the Shiprock site (the site) [1]. Local groundwater was contaminated by multiple inorganic constituents as a result of the milling operations. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took over management of the site in 1978 as part of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The DOE Office of Legacy Management currently manages ongoing activities at the former mill facility, including groundwater remediation. Remediation activities are designed primarily to reduce the concentrations and total plume mass of the mill-related contaminants sulfate, uranium, and nitrate. In addition to contaminating groundwater in alluvial and bedrock sediments directly below the mill site, ore processing led to contamination of a nearby floodplain bordering the San Juan River. Groundwater in a shallow alluvial aquifer beneath the floodplain is strongly influenced by the morphology of the river channel as well as changing flows in the river, which provides drainage for regional runoff from the San Juan Mountains of Colorado. As part of a recent study of the floodplain hydrology, a revised conceptual model was developed for the alluvial aquifer along with an updated status of contaminant plumes that have been impacted by more than 10 years of groundwater pumping for site remediation purposes. Several findings from the recent study will be discussed here.

  2. Carbonate and citric acid leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Pilot-scale studies (Phase II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.H.; Chernikoff, R.; DeMarco, W.D.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the results of the soil decontamination demonstration conducted at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site by the Fernald Environmental Restoration and Management Corporation (FERMCO) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This demonstration, which began in November 1993 and ended in October 1994, involved the removal of uranium from contaminated soil sampled from two FEMP sites. The demonstration was conducted so as to meet the requirements of the Fernald Site Integrated Demonstration program, as well as all environmental, safety, and health requirements of the site

  3. Potential for Methanosarcina to contribute to uranium reduction during acetate-promoted groundwater bioremediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, Dawn E; Orellana, Roberto; Giloteaux, Ludovic

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies of in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater with acetate injections have focused on the role of Geobacter species in U(VI) reduction because of a lack of other abundant known U(VI)-reducing microorganisms. Monitoring the levels of methyl CoM reductase subunit...... an important role in the long-term bioremediation of uranium-contaminated aquifers after depletion of Fe(III) oxides limits the growth of Geobacter species. The results also suggest that Methanosarcina have the potential to influence uranium geochemistry in a diversity of anaerobic sedimentary environments....

  4. Natural uranium toxicology - evaluation of internal contamination in man; Toxicologie de l'uranium naturel - essai d'evaluation de la contamination interne chez l'homme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalabreysse, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Pierrelatte (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    After reminding the physical and chemical properties of natural uranium which might affect its toxicology, a comprehensive investigation upon natural uranium metabolism and toxicity and after applying occupational exposure standards to this particular poison, it has been determined, from accident reports and human experience reported in the related literature, a series of formulae obtained by theoretical mathematical development giving principles for internal contamination monitoring and disclosure by determining uranium in the urine of occupationally exposed individuals. An assay is performed to determine individual internal contamination according to the various contamination cases. The outlined purposes, mainly practical, required some options and extrapolations. The proposed formula allows a preliminary approach and also to determine shortly a contamination extent or to discuss the systematical urinalysis results as compared with individual radio-toxicology monitoring professional standards. (author) [French] Apres le rappel des caracteristiques physiques et des proprietes chimiques de l'uranium naturel pouvant avoir une influence sur sa toxicologie, l'etude detaillee de son metabolisme et de sa toxicite, puis l'application des normes professionnelles d'exposition au cas particulier de ce toxique, il est etabli, a partir des comptes rendus d'accidents et de l'experimentation humaine rapportes dans la litterature, une serie de formules obtenues par developpement mathematique theorique qui posent les principes de la surveillance et de la mise en evidence de la contamination interne par la recherche et le dosage de l'uranium dans les urines d'individus professionnellement exposes. Un essai d'evaluation de la contamination interne individuelle suivant les differents cas de contamination est effectue. Le formulaire propose permet de faire une premiere approximation et d'apprecier rapidement l'importance d'une contamination ou bien d'interpreter les resultats d

  5. Uranium extraction in phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Figueiredo, C. de

    1984-01-01

    Uranium is recovered from the phosphoric liquor produced from the concentrate obtained from phosphorus-uraniferous mineral from Itataia mines (CE, Brazil). The proposed process consists of two extraction cycles. In the first one, uranium is reduced to its tetravalent state and then extracted by dioctylpyrophosphoric acid, diluted in Kerosene. Re-extraction is carried out with concentrated phosphoric acid containing an oxidising agent to convert uranium to its hexavalent state. This extract (from the first cycle) is submitted to the second cycle where uranium is extracted with DEPA-TOPO (di-2-hexylphosphoric acid/tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide) in Kerosene. The extract is then washed and uranium is backextracted and precipitated as commercial concentrate. The organic phase is recovered. Results from discontinuous tests were satisfactory, enabling to establish operational conditions for the performance of a continuous test in a micro-pilot plant. (Author) [pt

  6. Colloidal behavior of goethite nanoparticles modified with humic acid and implications for aquifer reclamation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiraferri, Alberto; Saldarriaga Hernandez, Laura Andrea; Bianco, Carlo; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea, E-mail: rajandrea.sethi@polito.it [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Land, Environment, and Infrastructure Engineering (DIATI) (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    Nanosized colloids of iron oxide adsorb heavy metals, enhance the biodegradation of contaminants, and represent a promising technology to clean up contaminated aquifers. Goethite particles for aquifer reclamation were recently synthesized with a coating of humic acids to reduce aggregation. This study investigates the stability and the mobility in porous media of this material as a function of aqueous chemistry, and it identifies the best practices to maximize the efficacy of the related remediation. Humic acid-coated nanogoethite (hydrodynamic diameter ∼90 nm) displays high stability in solutions of NaCl, consistent with effective electrosteric stabilization. However, particle aggregation is fast when calcium is present and, to a lesser extent, also in the presence of magnesium. This result is rationalized with complexation phenomena related to the interaction of divalent cations with humic acid, inducing rapid flocculation and sedimentation of the suspensions. The calcium dose, i.e., the amount of calcium ions with respect to solids in the dispersion, is the parameter governing stability. Therefore, more concentrated slurries may be more stable and mobile in the subsurface than dispersions of low particle concentration. Particle concentration during field injection should be thus chosen based on concentration and proportion of divalent cations in groundwater.

  7. Influence of acidified acidity to uranium bioleaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiang; Liu Yajie; Zheng Zhihong; Yuan Baohua; Shen Chuan; Shi Weijun

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between the acidified acidity and the acid consumption and uranium leaching rate in the process of uranium bioleaching is investigated. Results indicate that higher uranium leaching rate is obtained when the relatively high acidity was applied at beginning. For different minerals, although the original acidity should be different, lower original acidity was not better for shortening leaching period and improving uranium leaching rate. It confirms 30-40 g/L sulfuric acid as the original acidity was more suitable and more than 30 g/ L should be applied if the mineral particle sizes were larger. (authors)

  8. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, J.; Dong, W.; Tokunaga, T.K.

    2011-02-01

    Acidic uranium (U) contaminated plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining and milling operations. A sustainable method for in-situ immobilization of U under acidic conditions is not yet available. Here, we propose to use humic acids (HAs) for in-situ U immobilization in acidic waste plumes. Our laboratory batch experiments show that HA can adsorb onto aquifer sediments rapidly, strongly and practically irreversibly. Adding HA greatly enhanced U adsorption capacity to sediments at pH below 5.0. Our column experiments using historically contaminated sediments from the Savannah River Site under slow flow rates (120 and 12 m/y) show that desorption of U and HA were non-detectable over 100 pore-volumes of leaching with simulated acidic groundwaters. Upon HA-treatment, 99% of the contaminant [U] was immobilized at pH < 4.5, compared to 5% and 58% immobilized in the control columns at pH 3.5 and 4.5, respectively. These results demonstrated that HA-treatment is a promising in-situ remediation method for acidic U waste plumes. As a remediation reagent, HAs are resistant to biodegradation, cost effective, nontoxic, and easily introducible to the subsurface.

  9. A melt refining method for uranium-contaminated aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, T.; Iba, H.; Hanawa, K.

    1986-01-01

    Melt refining of uranium-contaminated aluminum which has been difficult to decontaminate because of the high reactivity of aluminum, was experimentally studied. Samples of contaminated aluminum and its alloys were melted after adding various halide fluxes at various melting temperatures and various melting times. Uranium concentration in the resulting ingots was determined. Effective flux compositions were mixtures of chlorides and fluorides, such as LiF, KCl, and BaCl 2 , at a fluoride/chloride mole ratio of 1 to 1.5. The removal of uranium from aluminum (the ''decontamination effect'') increased with decreasing melting temperature, but the time allowed for reaction had little influence. Pure aluminum was difficult to decontaminate from uranium; however, uranium could be removed from alloys containing magnesium. This was because the activity of the aluminum was decreased by formation of the intermetallic compound Al-Mg. With a flux of LiF-KCl-BaCl 2 and a temperature of 800 0 C, uranium added to give an initial concentration of 500 ppm was removed from a commercial alloy of aluminum, A5056, which contains 5% magnesium, to a final concentration of 0.6 ppm, which is near that in the initial aluminum alloy

  10. Monitoring an in-situ uranium mining site with radio tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolarczyk, L.; Mondt, W.; Mays, W.

    1991-01-01

    A field test site has been developed to monitor ground water restoration in an in-situ uranium mining project. Uranium deposited in a shallow buried fluvial sandstone channel (aquifer) has been mined by the injection and recovery of ammonia carbonate leachant from a constellation of drillholes. Ground water restoration is accomplished by injecting clean water into a well and recovering contaminated water from companion wells. The restoration process exchanges clean water for contaminated water in the aquifer. The stratigraphic cross section of the aquifer and the hydro-dynamics of the ground water restoration process is currently being investigated with radio wave tomography. Crosshole continuous wave (CW) radio signals are propagated from a well to a second well in the constellation of drillholes. The magnitude and phase of the radio wave are measured in the second well with Radio Imaging Method (RIM) instruments. The acquired data is processed in tomography algorithms to determine the EM wave propagation constants (attenuation rate [α] and phase constant [β]) in each pixel that covers the image plane between wells. The in-situ electrical conductivity values are computed from the pixel propagation constants. Contaminated ground water causes the conductivity of the local zone of the aquifer to increase. This paper describes the initial radio tomography mapping of the deposit lithology and compares radio tomography and E log conductivity values

  11. Uranium investigation in an alluvial aquifer with direct push methods - 59281

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Weirdt, Fabian

    2012-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The U.S. EPA has established a maximum contaminant level of 30 ug/l for uranium in drinking water due to its toxicity as a heavy metal. This regulation has affected many small public water supply systems in the US and several of them are struggling to come into compliance with the new standard. One such community is Clarks, NE, US which is situated on the alluvial deposits of the Platte River that are underlain by the Cretaceous Age Niobrara formation. Geoprobe Systems coordinated with the Nebraska Dept. of Health and Human Services, Water Well Stds. Program to investigate the cause of the elevated uranium in the groundwater that supplies drinking water to the village of Clarks. Initially hydraulic profiling tool (HPT) logs were obtained at selected locations across the Clarks well field. The HPT probe was advanced to depths of almost 36 m (120 ft) at several locations and the logs provided detailed information about the hydro-stratigraphy of the local aquifer not available from the drillers logs. The HPT logs were used to guide selection of screen depths for small diameter wells that were installed with direct push (DP) methods. A total of nine wells were installed at two locations at the facility with well depths ranging from as little as 6 m (20 ft) to a maximum of 36 m (118 ft). All wells were grouted bottom-up with a tremie tube using 25% solids bentonite slurry to assure screen interval isolation. (author)

  12. Applicability of slug interference testing of hydraulic characterization of contaminated aquifer sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spane, F.A.; Swanson, L.C.

    1993-10-01

    Aquifer test methods available for characterizing hazardous waste sites are sometimes restricted because of problems with disposal of contaminated groundwater. These problems, in part, have made slug tests a more desirable method of determining hydraulic properties at such sites. However, in higher permeability formations (i.e., transmissivities ≥ 1 x 10 -3 m 2 /s), slug test results often cannot be analyzed and give, at best, only a lower limit for transmissivity. A need clearly exists to develop test methods that can be used to characterize higher permeability aquifers without removing large amounts of contaminated groundwater. One hydrologic test method that appears to hold promise for characterizing such sites is the slug interference test. To assess the applicability of this test method for use in shallow alluvial aquifer systems, slug interference tests have been conducted, along with more traditional aquifer testing methods, at several Hanford multiple-well sites. Transmissivity values estimated from the slug interference tests were comparable (within a factor of 2 to 3) to values calculated using traditional testing methods, and made it possible to calculate the storativity or specific yield for the intervening test formation. The corroboration of test results indicates that slug interference testing is a viable hydraulic characterization method in transmissive alluvial aquifers, and may represent one of the few test methods that can be used in sensitive areas where groundwater is contaminated

  13. Adaptations of indigenous bacteria to fuel contamination in karst aquifers in south-central Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byl, Thomas D.; Metge, David W.; Agymang, Daniel T.; Bradley, Michael W.; Hileman, Gregg; Harvey, Ronald W.

    2014-01-01

    The karst aquifer systems in southern Kentucky can be dynamic and quick to change. Microorganisms that live in these unpredictable aquifers are constantly faced with environmental changes. Their survival depends upon adaptations to changes in water chemistry, taking advantage of positive stimuli and avoiding negative environmental conditions. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in 2001 to determine the capability of bacteria to adapt in two distinct regions of water quality in a karst aquifer, an area of clean, oxygenated groundwater and an area where the groundwater was oxygen depleted and contaminated by jet fuel. Water samples containing bacteria were collected from one clean well and two jet fuel contaminated wells in a conduit-dominated karst aquifer. Bacterial concentrations, enumerated through direct count, ranged from 500,000 to 2.7 million bacteria per mL in the clean portion of the aquifer, and 200,000 to 3.2 million bacteria per mL in the contaminated portion of the aquifer over a twelve month period. Bacteria from the clean well ranged in size from 0.2 to 2.5 mm, whereas bacteria from one fuel-contaminated well were generally larger, ranging in size from 0.2 to 3.9 mm. Also, bacteria collected from the clean well had a higher density and, consequently, were more inclined to sink than bacteria collected from contaminated wells. Bacteria collected from the clean portion of the karst aquifer were predominantly (,95%) Gram-negative and more likely to have flagella present than bacteria collected from the contaminated wells, which included a substantial fraction (,30%) of Gram-positive varieties. The ability of the bacteria from the clean portion of the karst aquifer to biodegrade benzene and toluene was studied under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in laboratory microcosms. The rate of fuel biodegradation in laboratory studies was approximately 50 times faster under aerobic conditions as compared to anaerobic, sulfur-reducing conditions. The

  14. Contamination in fractured-rock aquifers: Research at the former Naval Air Warfare Center, West Trenton, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Daniel J.; Tiedeman, Claire; Lacombe, Pierre J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Shapiro, Allen M.; Chapelle, Francis H.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and cooperators are studying chlorinated solvents in a fractured sedimentary rock aquifer underlying the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, New Jersey. Fractured-rock aquifers are common in many parts of the United States and are highly susceptible to contamination, particularly at industrial sites. Compared to 'unconsolidated' aquifers, there can be much more uncertainty about the direction and rate of contaminant migration and about the processes and factors that control chemical and microbial transformations of contaminants. Research at the NAWC is improving understanding of the transport and fate of chlorinated solvents in fractured-rock aquifers and will compare the effectiveness of different strategies for contaminant remediation.

  15. Uranium recovery from mine water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, K.M.

    1984-01-01

    In many plant trials it has been proven that very small amounts (10 to 20 ppm) of uranium dissolved in mine water can be effectively recovered by the use of ion exchange resins and this uranium recovery has many advantages. In this paper an economic analysis at different levels of uranium contamination and at different market prices of uranium are described. For this study an operating mine-mill complex with a sulphuric acid leach circuit, followed by solvent extraction (SX) process, is considered, where contaminated mine water is available in excess of process requirements. It is further assumed that the sulphuric acid eluant containing uranium would be mixed with the mill pregnant liquor stream that proceeds to the SX plant for final uranium recovery

  16. Removal of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils -- Phase 1: Bench-scale testing. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, C. W.

    1993-09-01

    To address the management of uranium-contaminated soils at Fernald and other DOE sites, the DOE Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program. The USID has five major tasks. These include the development and demonstration of technologies that are able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from the soil, (3) treat the soil and dispose of any waste, (4) establish performance assessments, and (5) meet necessary state and federal regulations. This report deals with soil decontamination or removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The report was compiled by the USID task group that addresses soil decontamination; includes data from projects under the management of four DOE facilities [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Savannah River Plant (SRP)]; and consists of four separate reports written by staff at these facilities. The fundamental goal of the soil decontamination task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste forms that are difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Emphasis in research was placed more strongly on chemical extraction techniques than physical extraction techniques.

  17. In situ bioreduction of technetium and uranium in a nitrate-contaminated aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IstokD, Jonathan; Senko, J.M.; Krumholz, Lee R.; Watson, David B.; Bogle, Mary Anna; Peacock, Aaron D.; Change, Y.J.; White, David C.

    2004-01-01

    The potential to stimulate an indigenous microbial community to reduce a mixture of U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of high (120 mM) initial NO 3 - co-contamination was evaluated in a shallow unconfined aquifer using a series of single-well, push-pull tests. In the absence of added electron donor, NO 3 - , Tc(VII), and U(VI) reduction was not detectable. However, in the presence of added ethanol, glucose, or acetate to serve as electron donor, rapid NO 3 - utilization was observed. The accumulation of NO 2 - , the absence of detectable NH 4 + accumulation, and the production of N 2 O during in situ acetylene-block experiments suggest that NO 3 - was being consumed via denitrification. Tc(VII) reduction occurred concurrently with NO 3 - reduction, but U(VI) reduction was not observed until two or more donor additions resulted in iron-reducing conditions, as detected by the production of Fe(II). Reoxidation/remobilization of U(IV) was also observed in tests conducted with high (120 mM) but not low (1 mM) initial NO 3 - concentrations and not during acetylene-block experiments conducted with high initial NO 3 - . These results suggest that NO 3 - -dependent microbial U(IV) oxidation may inhibit or reverse U(VI) reduction and decrease the stability of U(IV) in this environment. Changes in viable biomass, community composition, metabolic status, and respiratory state of organisms harvested from down-well microbial samplers deployed during these tests were consistent with the conclusions that electron donor additions resulted in microbial growth, the creation of anaerobic conditions, and an increase in activity of metal-reducing organisms (e.g., Geobacter). The results demonstrate that it is possible to stimulate the simultaneous bioreduction of U(VI) and Tc(VII) mixtures commonly found with NO 3 - co-contamination at radioactive waste sites.

  18. Effects of Subsurface Microbial Ecology on Geochemical Evolution of a Crude-Oil Contaminated Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekins, B. A.; Cozzarelli, I. M.; Godsy, E. M.; Warren, E.; Hostettler, F. D.

    2001-12-01

    We have identified several subsurface habitats for microorganisms in a crude oil contaminated located near Bemidji, Minnesota. These aquifer habitats include: 1) the unsaturated zone contaminated by hydrocarbon vapors, 2) the zones containing separate-phase crude oil, and 3) the aqueous-phase contaminant plume. The surficial glacial outwash aquifer was contaminated when a crude oil pipeline burst in 1979. We analyzed sediment samples from the contaminated aquifer for the most probable numbers of aerobes, iron reducers, fermenters, and three types of methanogens. The microbial data were then related to gas, water, and oil chemistry, sediment extractable iron, and permeability. The microbial populations in the various contaminated subsurface habitats each have special characteristics and these affect the aquifer and contaminant chemistry. In the eight-meter-thick, vapor-contaminated vadose zone, a substantial aerobic population has developed that is supported by hydrocarbon vapors and methane. Microbial numbers peak in locations where access to both hydrocarbons and nutrients infiltrating from the surface is maximized. The activity of this population prevents hydrocarbon vapors from reaching the land surface. In the zone where separate-phase crude oil is present, a consortium of methanogens and fermenters dominates the populations both above and below the water table. Moreover, gas concentration data indicate that methane production has been active in the oily zone since at least 1986. Analyses of the extracted separate-phase oil show that substantial degradation of C15 -C35 n-alkanes has occurred since 1983, raising the possibility that significant degradation of C15 and higher n-alkanes has occurred under methanogenic conditions. However, lab and field data suggest that toxic inhibition by crude oil results in fewer acetate-utilizing methanogens within and adjacent to the separate-phase oil. Data from this and other sites indicate that toxic inhibition of

  19. Sulfur cycling in contaminated aquifers: What can we learn from oxygen isotopes in sulfate? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoeller, K.; Vogt, C.; Hoth, N.

    2009-12-01

    Bacterial reduction of dissolved sulfate (BSR) is a key process determining the natural attenuation in many contaminated aquifers. For example, in groundwater bodies affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) BSR reduces the contaminant load by producing alkalinity and facilitating a sustainable fixation of sulfur in the sediment. In aquifers contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons sulfate may act as a terminal electron acceptor for the anaerobic oxidation of the organic contaminants to carbon dioxide and water. Due to the isotope selectivity of sulfate reducing bacteria, BSR shows the most pronounced isotope fractionation within the sulfur cycle. While sulfur displays a straightforward kinetic enrichment in the residual sulfate described by the enrichment factor epsilon (ɛ), the mechanism of oxygen isotope fractionation is still being discussed controversially. Nevertheless, it is agreed on that oxygen isotope exchange between ambient water and residual sulfate occurs during BSR in natural environments. With respect to this potential isotope exchange, the fractionation parameter theta (θ) is introduced instead of the kinetic enrichment factor epsilon (ɛ). The dual isotope system considering both sulfate-sulfur and sulfate-oxygen isotope fractionation and the respective fractionation parameters ɛ and θ provides an excellent tool for the recognition and quantification of BSR. Beyond that, the dual isotope approach may help identify and estimate interfering sulfur transformations such as re-oxidation and disproportionation processes which is especially vital for the understanding of the overall natural attenuation potential of the investigated aquifers. We present two examples from different field studies showing the benefits of applying the combination of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in dissolved sulfate to reveal the details of the sulfur cycle. The first case study is concerned with the evaluation of the potential for BSR in an AMD-affected aquifer close to an

  20. Bioremediation of ground water contaminants at a uranium mill tailings site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, L.L.; Nuttall, H.E.; Thomson, B.M.; Lutze, W.

    1995-01-01

    Ground water contaminated with uranium from milling operations must be remediated to reduce the migration of soluble toxic compounds. At the mill tailings site near Tuba City, Arizona (USA) the approach is to employ bioremediation for in situ immobilization of uranium by bacterial reduction of uranyl, U(VI), compounds to uraninite, U(IV). In this initial phase of remediation, details are provided to indicate the magnitude of the contamination problem and to present preliminary evidence supporting the proposition that bacterial immobilization of uranium is possible. Additionally, consideration is given to contaminating cations and anions that may be at toxic levels in ground water at this uranium mill tailing site and detoxification strategies using bacteria are addressed. A model concept is employed so that results obtained at the Tuba City site could contribute to bioremediation of ground water at other uranium mill tailings sites

  1. Mobilization of uranium isotopes in Brazilian aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, Daniel Marcos

    1994-01-01

    The uranium isotopes 234 U and 238 U have been extensively used to study geochemical problems, mainly related to the hydrological medium. Active dissolution of these isotopes is occurring in groundwaters from several aquifers at southeastern region of Brazil. The dissolved uranium concentration showed variability related to the rainwater infiltration with the U content of groundwaters increasing during wet periods. The amount of uranium mobilized during rainwater infiltration showed an inverse correlation with the thickness of unsaturated silty clay at Morro do Ferro area. The experimental data favour the possibility of formation of soluble complexes of U and dissolved organic compounds at Morro do Ferro area, and also some absorption of U by clays during rainwater infiltration. Enhanced 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios for dissolved uranium have been found and explained in terms of combined chemical etch and leach processes for groundwaters of the Pocos de Caldas alkaline complex. These processes are considered responsible for the bulk dissolution of rock matrix rather then alpha-recoil effects. Several direct correlations have been found for groundwaters of Agua da Prata, which supported the effectiveness of etch/lead mechanisms, for example, between 234 U/ 238 U activity ratio and dissolved solids, ionic strength, C O 2 partial pressure, 'traditional' index of base exchange and 'new' index of base exchange (involving the anion fluoride). A higher 234 U/ 238 U activity ratio was found to be directly related to a higher value of dissolution rate and a higher value of 222 Rn content was found to be related with a higher value of specific surface area. These relationships explained a good inverse logarithmic correlation between 234 U/ 238 U activity ratio and 222 Rn content of the spring waters of Aguas da Prata. (author)

  2. Modeling contaminant plumes in fractured limestone aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosthaf, Klaus; Brauns, Bentje; Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann

    Determining the fate and transport of contaminant plumes from contaminated sites in limestone aquifers is important because they are a major drinking water resource. This is challenging because they are often heavily fractured and contain chert layers and nodules, resulting in a complex transport...... model. The paper concludes with recommendations on how to identify and employ suitable models to advance the conceptual understanding and as decision support tools for risk assessment and the planning of remedial actions....... behavior. Improved conceptual models are needed for this type of site. Here conceptual models are developed by combining numerical models with field data. Several types of fracture flow and transport models are available for the modeling of contaminant transport in fractured media. These include...... the established approaches of the equivalent porous medium, discrete fracture and dual continuum models. However, these modeling concepts are not well tested for contaminant plume migration in limestone geologies. Our goal was to develop and evaluate approaches for modeling the transport of dissolved contaminant...

  3. Spectroscopic Evidence of Uranium Immobilization in Acidic ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6-5.8) conditions using U L3-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U-C bond distance at ~2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulating the SRS wetland process, U immobilization on roots was 2 orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was reoxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication on the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands. There were several former U processing facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC. As a result of their operations, uranium has entered the surrounding environments. For example, approximately 45,000 kg o

  4. Considerations in the extraction of uranium from a fresh-water aquifer - Miocene Oakville Sandstone, south Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, C.D.; Galloway, W.E.; Smith, G.E.

    1982-01-01

    The Miocene Oakville Sandstone is a major aquifer and uranium host beneath the Texas Coastal Plain. Present and future uranium mining by either surface or in situ methods could affect the availability and quality of Oakville ground water unless the mining is designed properly. Possible effects of mining, potential natural mitigation of these effects, and approaches to minimizing the impact of mining on the aquifer system are discussed. Both solution and surface mining may affect the availability of ground water by altering recharge characteristics and permeability. Because the volume of the aquifer affected by mining is small compared with its total volume, availability of Oakville ground water will probably not be reduced significantly, except in wells immediately adjacent to a mine. Mining may affect the quality of ground water by introducing chemicals that are not indigenous to the aquifer or by inducing chemical reactions that do not occur naturally or that occur at much slower rates. Most mining companies no longer use concentrated, ammonium-based leaches because of known problems in restoring water to its original chemistry. Natural and induced release of trace elements such as molybdenum is known to occur, but the geochemical controls on mobility and potential mitigating reactions in the aquifer are poorly understood. Because the affected aquifer volume is small, any deterioration of water quality will probably be localized. Observations and recommendations are presented on: regional and local baseline studies, determination of aquifer sensitivity, methods and goals of monitoring during and after mining, and need for research on poorly understood aspects of mining impact. Such impacts include chemical reactions and processes that affect the long-term release of trace elements

  5. Derived surface contamination limits for the uranium mining and milling industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ching, S.H.

    1984-10-01

    Derived Surface Contamination Limits (DSCL) are proposed for the control of surface contamination at the work place for the uranium mining and milling industry. They have been derived by a method incorporating recent ICRP recommendations and consideration of the radiation exposure pathways of ingestion, inhalation and external irradiation of the basal layer of skin. A generalized DSCL of 10 5 Bq/m 2 of beta activity is recommended for all contaminants likely to be found in uranium mine and mill workplaces except for fresh uranium concentrates. In the latter case, the DSCL is expressed in terms of alpha activity because the ratio of beta to alpha activities for fresh uranium concentrates is variable; the beta activity increases with the ingrowth of U-238 daughter products (Th-234 and Pa-234m) until secular equilibrium is re-established in about six months. A surface contamination limit of 10 4 Bq/m 2 of beta activity is proposed for the release of non-porous materials and equipment with no detectable loose contamination to the public domain

  6. Radioactive ground-water contamination from an enriched-uranium cold scrap recovery operation, Wood River Junction, Rhode Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, B.J.; Kipp, K.L. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid wastes from a uranium-bearing cold scrap recovery plant at an industrial site in Wood River Junction, Rhode Island were discharged to the environment through evaporation ponds from 1966 to 1980. Leakage from the polyethylene- and polyvinylchloride-lined ponds resulted in a plume of contaminated ground water that extends from the ponds northwestward to the Pawcatuck River through a highly permeable sand and gravel aquifer of glacial origin. Contaminants include: strontium 90, technetium 99, boron, nitrate and potassium. Water quality data from more than 100 observation wells indicate that the plume of contamination is approximately 700 meters long, 100 meters wide, and is confined to the upper 25 meters of saturated thickness where sediments consist of medium to coarse sand and gravel. No contamination has been detected in fine sands and silts underlying the coarser materials. Piezometric-head and water-quality data from wells screened at multiple depths on both sides of the river indicate that contaminants discharge both to the river and to a swampy area at the west edge of the river. Dilution precludes detection of contaminants once they have entered the river, which has an average flow of 5 cubic meters per second

  7. Uranium-contaminated soils: Ultramicrotomy and electron beam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Uranium contaminated soils from the Fernald Operation Site, Ohio, have been examined by a combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and analytical electron microscopy (AEM). A method is described for preparing of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin sections by ultramicrotomy. By using these thin sections, SEM and TEM images can be compared directly. Uranium was found in iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite. Little uranium was associated with clays. The distribution of uranium phases was found to be inhomogeneous at the microscopic level

  8. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  9. Remediation of soil/concrete contaminated with uranium and radium by biological method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gye-Nam Kim; Seung-Su Kim; Hye-Min Park; Won-Suk Kim; Uk-Ryang Park; Jei-Kwon Moon

    2013-01-01

    Biological method was studied for remediation of soil/concrete contaminated with uranium and radium. Optimum experiment conditions for mixing ratios of penatron and soil, and the pH of soil was obtained through several bioremediations with soil contaminated with uranium and radium. It was found that an optimum mixing ratio of penatron for bioremediation of uranium soil was 1 %. Also, the optimum pH condition for bioremediation of soil contaminated with uranium and radium was 7.5. The removal efficiencies of uranium and radium from higher concentration of soil were rather reduced in comparison with those from lower concentration of soil. Meanwhile, the removal of uranium and radium in concrete by bioremediation is possible but the removal rate from concrete was slower than that from soil. The removal efficiencies of uranium and radium from soil under injection of 1 % penatron at pH 7.5 for 120 days were 81.2 and 81.6 %, respectively, and the removal efficiencies of uranium and radium from concrete under the same condition were 63.0 and 45.2 %, respectively. Beyond 30 days, removal rates of uranium and radium from soil and concrete by bioremediation was very slow. (author)

  10. Experiment on Physical Desalinisation of Uranium-contaminated Gravel Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Uk-Ryang; Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Han, Gyu-Seong; Moon, Jai-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    As a result, the method to wash uranium-contaminated gravels could not get satisfactory desalinization rate. During the long oxidization process it was judged that uranium penetrated inside the gravels, so we tried to increase the desalinization rate by fragmentizing them into pieces and then washing them. The desalinization rate after fragmentizing the gravels into pieces and washing them brought a satisfactory result.. However, we could obtain desired concentration for gravels with high uranium concentration by fragmentizing them and breaking them further into even smaller pieces. Likewise, desalinization using soil washing process is complicated and has to go through multiple washing steps, resulting in too much of waste fluid generated accordingly. The increase of waste fluid generated leads to the increase in by-products of the final disposal process later on, bringing a not good economic result. Furthermore, taking into account that the desalinization rate is 65% during soil washing process, it is expected that gravel washing will show a similar desalinization result; it is considered uneasy to have a perfect desalinization only by soil washing. The grinding method is actually used in the primary desalinization process in order to desalinize radioactivity-contaminated concrete. This method does desalinization by grinding the radioactivity-contaminated area of the concrete surface with desalinization equipment, which enables a near-to-perfect desalinization for relatively thinly contaminated surface. Likewise, this research verified the degree of desalinization by applying the grinding method and comparing it to the fragmentizing-washing method, and attempted to find a method to desalinize uranium-contaminated gravels more effectively. In order to desalinize uranium-contaminated gravels more effectively and compare to the existing washing-desalinization method, we conducted a desalinization experiment with grinding method that grinds gravel surface. As a

  11. The relationship of uranium isotopes to oxidation/reduction in the Edwards carbonate aquifer of Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowart, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    The concentration of dissolved uranium and 234 U/ 238 U alpha activity ratio ( A.R. ) were determined in water samples from 23 locations in the Edwards carbonate aquifer of south central Texas by isotope dilution methods and alpha spectrometry. (orig./ME)

  12. Global aquifers dominated by fossil groundwaters but wells vulnerable to modern contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasechko, Scott; Perrone, Debra; Befus, Kevin M.; Bayani Cardenas, M.; Ferguson, Grant; Gleeson, Tom; Luijendijk, Elco; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.; Taylor, Richard G.; Wada, Yoshihide; Kirchner, James W.

    2017-06-01

    The vulnerability of groundwater to contamination is closely related to its age. Groundwaters that infiltrated prior to the Holocene have been documented in many aquifers and are widely assumed to be unaffected by modern contamination. However, the global prevalence of these `fossil' groundwaters and their vulnerability to modern-era pollutants remain unclear. Here we analyse groundwater carbon isotope data (12C, 13C, 14C) from 6,455 wells around the globe. We show that fossil groundwaters comprise a large share (42-85%) of total aquifer storage in the upper 1 km of the crust, and the majority of waters pumped from wells deeper than 250 m. However, half of the wells in our study that are dominated by fossil groundwater also contain detectable levels of tritium, indicating the presence of much younger, decadal-age waters and suggesting that contemporary contaminants may be able to reach deep wells that tap fossil aquifers. We conclude that water quality risk should be considered along with sustainable use when managing fossil groundwater resources.

  13. Uranium extraction from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lounis, A.

    1983-05-01

    A study has been carried out for the extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid produced in Algeria. First of all, the Algerian phosphoric acid produced in Algeria by SONATRACH has been characterised. This study helped us to synthesize a phosphoric acid that enabled us to pass from laboratory tests to pilot scale tests. We have then examined extraction and stripping parameters: diluent, DZEPHA/TOPO ratio and oxidising agent. The laboratory experiments enabled us to set the optimum condition for the choice of diluent, extractant concentration, ratio of the synergic mixture, oxidant concentration, redox potential. The equilibrium isotherms lead to the determination of the number of theoretical stages for the uranium extraction and stripping of uranium, then the extraction from phosphoric acid has been verified on a pilot scale (using a mixer-settler)

  14. New methodology to investigate potential contaminant mass fluxes at the stream-aquifer interface by combining integral pumping tests and streambed temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalbus, E.; Schmidt, C.; Bayer-Raich, M.; Leschik, S.; Reinstorf, F.; Balcke, G.U.; Schirmer, M.

    2007-01-01

    The spatial pattern and magnitude of mass fluxes at the stream-aquifer interface have important implications for the fate and transport of contaminants in river basins. Integral pumping tests were performed to quantify average concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in an unconfined aquifer partially penetrated by a stream. Four pumping wells were operated simultaneously for a time period of 5 days and sampled for contaminant concentrations. Streambed temperatures were mapped at multiple depths along a 60 m long stream reach to identify the spatial patterns of groundwater discharge and to quantify water fluxes at the stream-aquifer interface. The combined interpretation of the results showed average potential contaminant mass fluxes from the aquifer to the stream of 272 μg m -2 d -1 MCB and 71 μg m -2 d -1 DCB, respectively. This methodology combines a large-scale assessment of aquifer contamination with a high-resolution survey of groundwater discharge zones to estimate contaminant mass fluxes between aquifer and stream. - We provide a new methodology to quantify the potential contaminant mass flux from an aquifer to a stream

  15. Distribution of rare earth elements in an alluvial aquifer affected by acid mine drainage: the Guadiamar aquifer (SW Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olias, M.; Ceron, J.C.; Fernandez, I.; Rosa, J. de la

    2005-01-01

    This work analyses the spatial distribution, the origin, and the shale-normalised fractionation patterns of the rare earth elements (REE) in the alluvial aquifer of the Guadiamar River (south-western Spain). This river received notoriety in April 1998 for a spill that spread a great amount of slurry (mainly pyrites) and acid waters in a narrow strip along the river course. Groundwaters and surface waters were sampled to analyse, among other elements, the REEs. Their spatial distribution shows a peak close to the mining region, in an area with low values of pH and high concentrations of sulphates and other metals such as Zn, Cu, Co, Ni, Pb, and Cd. The patterns of shale-normalised fractionation at the most-contaminated points show an enrichment in the middle rare earth elements (MREE) with respect to the light (LREE) and heavy (HREE) ones, typical of acid waters. The Ce-anomaly becomes more negative as pH increases, due to the preferential fractionation of Ce in oxyhydroxides of Fe. - Pollution of the aquifer with rare earth elements is documented at a site of a major spill from a mining operation

  16. Natural uranium toxicology - evaluation of internal contamination in man; Toxicologie de l'uranium naturel - essai d'evaluation de la contamination interne chez l'homme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalabreysse, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Pierrelatte (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    After reminding the physical and chemical properties of natural uranium which might affect its toxicology, a comprehensive investigation upon natural uranium metabolism and toxicity and after applying occupational exposure standards to this particular poison, it has been determined, from accident reports and human experience reported in the related literature, a series of formulae obtained by theoretical mathematical development giving principles for internal contamination monitoring and disclosure by determining uranium in the urine of occupationally exposed individuals. An assay is performed to determine individual internal contamination according to the various contamination cases. The outlined purposes, mainly practical, required some options and extrapolations. The proposed formula allows a preliminary approach and also to determine shortly a contamination extent or to discuss the systematical urinalysis results as compared with individual radio-toxicology monitoring professional standards. (author) [French] Apres le rappel des caracteristiques physiques et des proprietes chimiques de l'uranium naturel pouvant avoir une influence sur sa toxicologie, l'etude detaillee de son metabolisme et de sa toxicite, puis l'application des normes professionnelles d'exposition au cas particulier de ce toxique, il est etabli, a partir des comptes rendus d'accidents et de l'experimentation humaine rapportes dans la litterature, une serie de formules obtenues par developpement mathematique theorique qui posent les principes de la surveillance et de la mise en evidence de la contamination interne par la recherche et le dosage de l'uranium dans les urines d'individus professionnellement exposes. Un essai d'evaluation de la contamination interne individuelle suivant les differents cas de contamination est effectue. Le formulaire propose permet de faire une premiere approximation et d'apprecier rapidement l'importance d

  17. Determining uranium speciation in contaminated soils by molecular spectroscopic methods: Examples from the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, P.G.; Berg, J.M.; Chisholm-Brause, C.J.; Conradson, S.D.; Donohoe, R.J.; Morris, D.E.; Musgrave, J.A.; Tait, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's former uranium production facility located at Fernald, OH (18 mi NW of Cincinnati) is the host site for an Integrated Demonstration for remediation of uranium-contaminated soils. A wide variety of source terms for uranium contamination have been identified reflecting the diversity of operations at the facility. Most of the uranium contamination is contained in the top ∼1/2 m of soil, but uranium has been found in perched waters indicating substantial migration. In support of the development of remediation technologies and risk assessment, we are conducting uranium speciation studies on untreated and treated soils using molecular spectroscopies. Untreated soils from five discrete sites have been analyzed. We have found that ∼80--90% of the uranium exists as hexavalent UO 2 2+ species even though many source terms consisted of tetravalent uranium species such as UO 2 . Much of the uranium exists as microcrystalline precipitates (secondary minerals). There is also clear evidence for variations in uranium species from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale. However, similarities in speciation at sites having different source terms suggest that soil and groundwater chemistry may be as important as source term in defining the uranium speciation in these soils. Characterization of treated soils has focused on materials from two sites that have undergone leaching using conventional extractants (e.g., carbonate, citrate) or novel chelators such as Tiron. Redox reagents have also been used to facilitate the leaching process. Three different classes of treated soils have been identified based on the speciation of uranium remaining in the soils. In general, the effective treatments decrease the total uranium while increasing the ratio of U(IV) to U(VI) species

  18. Removing and recovering of uranium from the acid mine waters by using ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Marcos Roberto Lopes do

    1998-01-01

    Ion exchange using resins is one of the few processes capable of reducing ionic contaminants in effluents to very low levels. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The local mineralogical features, allied to the biogeochemical phenomena, owing to presence of pyrite in the rock piles, moreover another factors, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants, including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by anionic exchanger. The iron interference is eliminated by lime pretreatment of water, increasing pH from 2.6 to 3.3-3.8 to precipitate this cation, without changing the uranium amount. Eight anionic resins were tested, based on the uranium loading, in sorption studies. Retention time, and pH influence was verified for the exchanger chose. With breakthrough of 1 mg U/L and 10 mg U/l in the feed solution, the uranium decontamination level was 94%. Typical values of loading resin were 20-30 g U/l and 70-90 g SO 4 /l. Uranium elution was done with Na Cl solution. Retention time, saline, and acid concentration were the parameters studied. The concentrate, obtained from the eluate by ammonia precipitation, presented uranium (86,8% as U 3 O 8 ) and impurities within commercial specifications. (author)

  19. Quality of Nevada's aquifers and their susceptibility to contamination, 1990-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: In 1999, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency introduced a rule to protect the quality of ground water in areas other than source-water protection areas. These other sensitive ground-water areas (OSGWA) are areas that are not currently but could eventually be used as a source of drinking water. To help determine whether a well is in an OSGWA, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection needs statewide information on the susceptibility and vulnerability of Nevada's aquifer systems to contamination. This report presents an evaluation of the quality of ground water and susceptibility of Nevada's aquifer systems to anthropogenic contamination. Chemical tracers and statistical methods were used to assess the susceptibility of aquifer systems in Nevada. Chemical tracers included nitrate, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), dissolved gases, and isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen. Ground-water samples were collected from 133 wells during August 2002 through October 2003. Logistic regression was done to estimate the probability of detecting nitrate above concentrations typically found in undeveloped areas. Nitrate is one of the most common anthropogenic contaminants that degrades ground-water quality, is commonly measured and is persistent, except in reducing conditions. These characteristics make nitrate a good indicator of aquifer susceptibility. Water-quality data for 5,528 wells were compiled into a database. The area around each well was characterized using information on explanatory variables that could be related to nitrate concentrations. Data also were used to characterize the quality of ground water in Nevada, including dissolved solids, nitrate, pesticide, and VOC concentrations.

  20. Determination of timescales of nitrate contamination by groundwater age models in a complex aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, E. H.; Lee, E.; Kaown, D.; Lee, K. K.; Green, C. T.

    2017-12-01

    Timing and magnitudes of nitrate contamination are determined by various factors like contaminant loading, recharge characteristics and geologic system. Information of an elapsed time since recharged water traveling to a certain outlet location, which is defined as groundwater age, can provide indirect interpretation related to the hydrologic characteristics of the aquifer system. There are three major methods (apparent ages, lumped parameter model, and numerical model) to date groundwater ages, which differently characterize groundwater mixing resulted by various groundwater flow pathways in a heterogeneous aquifer system. Therefore, in this study, we compared the three age models in a complex aquifer system by using observed age tracer data and reconstructed history of nitrate contamination by long-term source loading. The 3H-3He and CFC-12 apparent ages, which did not consider the groundwater mixing, estimated the most delayed response time and a highest period of the nitrate loading had not reached yet. However, the lumped parameter model could generate more recent loading response than the apparent ages and the peak loading period influenced the water quality. The numerical model could delineate various groundwater mixing components and its different impacts on nitrate dynamics in the complex aquifer system. The different age estimation methods lead to variations in the estimated contaminant loading history, in which the discrepancy in the age estimation was dominantly observed in the complex aquifer system.

  1. Uranium-contaminated soils: Ultramicrotomy and electron beam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

    1994-02-01

    Uranium-contaminated soils from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Site, Ohio, have been examined by a combination of scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron imaging (SEM/BSE) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM). The inhomogeneous distribution of particulate uranium phases in the soil required the development of a method for using ultramicrotomy to prepare transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin sections of the SEM mounts. A water-miscible resin was selected that allowed comparison between SEM and TEM images, permitting representative sampling of the soil. Uranium was found in iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite (UO 2 ). No uranium was detected in association with phyllosilicates in the soil

  2. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Lowman, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established health and environmental regulations to correct and prevent groundwater contamination resulting from former uranium processing activities at inactive uranium processing sites (40 CFR 192). According to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for assessing the inactive uranium processing sites. The DOE has decided that each assessment shall include information on hydrogeologic site characterization. The water resources protection strategy that describes how the proposed action will comply with the EPA groundwater protection standards is presented in Attachment 4. Site characterization activities discussed in this section include: Definition of the hydrogeologic characteristics of the environment, including hydrostratigraphy, aquifer parameters, areas of aquifer recharge and discharge, potentiometric surfaces, and groundwater velocities. Definition of background groundwater quality and comparison with the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards. Evaluation of the physical and chemical characteristics of the contaminant source and/or residual radioactive materials. Definition of existing groundwater contamination by comparison with the EPA groundwater protection standards. Description of the geochemical processes that affect the downward migration of the source contaminants at the processing site. Description of water resource utilization, including availability, current and future use and value, and alternate water supplies

  3. Application of phytoextraction for uranium contaminated soil in korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Y.; Han, Y.; Lee, M.

    2013-12-01

    The soils having high concentration of uranium, sampled from Goesan Deokpyungri area in Korea, were identified with the uranium removal efficiency of phytoextraction by using several plants. According to the results of physicochemical properties, uranium concentration from soil was 28.85mg/kg, pH 5.43 and soil texture was "Sand". Results of SEP(Sequential Extraction Procedure) test, uranium concentrations ratio of soil in the status of exchangeable/carbonate was 13.4%. Five plants such as Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L.), Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam), Radish (Raphanus sativus), Sesame (Perilla frutescens var. japonica) were cultivated during 56 days in phytotron. All the cultivation processes were conducted in a growth chamber at 25 degrees celsius, 70% relative humidity, 4000 Lux illumination (16 hours/day) and CO2 concentration of 600 ppm. Four times at intervals of 2 weeks leaves and roots collected were analyzed for uranium concentration. Ranges of uranium concentration of the roots and leaves from the five plants were measured to 206.81-721.22μg/kg and 3.45-10.21μg/kg respectively. The majority of uranium was found to accumulate in the roots. Uranium concentration in the leaves, regardless of the type of plants were presented below standard of drinking water(30μg/l) by U.S EPA. Phytoextraction pot experiments with citric acid were conducted. Citric acid as chelating agent was applied to soil to enhance uranium accumulation in five crop plants. 6 days before harvest crops, Each citric acid 25mM and 50mM was injected into the soil by 300ml. After injecting citric acid 25mM , pH of the soil was reduced to 4.95. Uranium concentration of leaves and roots collected from five plants was increased to 2-4times and 7-30times compared to control soil. Injected with citric acid 50mM , pH of the soil was reduced to 4.79. Uranium concentration of leaves and roots collected from five plants was increased to 3-10times and 10

  4. Method of separation of uranium from contaminating ions in an aqueous feed liquid containing uranyl ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundar, P.S.; Elikan, L.; Lyon, W.L.

    1975-01-01

    A coupled cationic/anionic method for the separation of uranium from contaminated aqueous solutions which contain uranyl ions is proposed. The fluid is extracted using an organic solvent containing a reagent which, together with the uranyl ions, forms a soluble aggregate in that solvent. As an example, 0.1 - 1 Mol/l Di-2-ethyl-hexyl-phosphorous acid in kerosene is mentioned. The organic solvent is then treated with a sealing liquid (volume ratio 20 - 35). For separation, an aqueous carbonate solution or a sulfuric acid solution can be used; the most favorable pH-values and concentrations for both cases are mentioned. The U +4 -ion at the sulfuric acid separation is subsequently oxidized to the uranyl ion with air. In each case, an extraction with an amine follows; after that, the amine is separated using an ammonium-carbonate solution and the uranium aggregate is precipitated, for example as ammonium uranyl tricarbonate, and then further processed to uranium oxide. The solvents and fluids used are led back in closed circuit; a flow diagram is given. (UWI) [de

  5. Uranium recovery from wet-process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCullough, J.F.; Phillips, J.F. Jr.; Tate, L.R.

    1979-01-01

    A method of recovering uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid is claimed where the acid is treated with a mixture of an ammonium salt or ammonia, a reducing agent, and then a miscible solvent. Solids are separated from the phosphoric acid liquid phase. The solid consists of a mixture of metal phosphates and uranium. It is washed free of adhering phosphoric acid with fresh miscible solvent. The solid is dried and dissolved in acid whereupon uranium is recovered from the solution. Miscible solvent and water are distilled away from the phosphoric acid. The distillate is rectified and water discarded. All miscible solvent is recovered for recycle. 5 claims

  6. Phylogenetic and functional diversity within toluene-degrading, sulphate-reducing consortia enriched from a contaminated aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppardt, Anke; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Vogt, Carsten; Lüders, Tillmann; Harms, Hauke; Chatzinotas, Antonis

    2014-08-01

    Three toluene-degrading microbial consortia were enriched under sulphate-reducing conditions from different zones of a benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) plume of two connected contaminated aquifers. Two cultures were obtained from a weakly contaminated zone of the lower aquifer, while one culture originated from the highly contaminated upper aquifer. We hypothesised that the different habitat characteristics are reflected by distinct degrader populations. Degradation of toluene with concomitant production of sulphide was demonstrated in laboratory microcosms and the enrichment cultures were phylogenetically characterised. The benzylsuccinate synthase alpha-subunit (bssA) marker gene, encoding the enzyme initiating anaerobic toluene degradation, was targeted to characterise the catabolic diversity within the enrichment cultures. It was shown that the hydrogeochemical parameters in the different zones of the plume determined the microbial composition of the enrichment cultures. Both enrichment cultures from the weakly contaminated zone were of a very similar composition, dominated by Deltaproteobacteria with the Desulfobulbaceae (a Desulfopila-related phylotype) as key players. Two different bssA sequence types were found, which were both affiliated to genes from sulphate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria. In contrast, the enrichment culture from the highly contaminated zone was dominated by Clostridia with a Desulfosporosinus-related phylotype as presumed key player. A distinct bssA sequence type with high similarity to other recently detected sequences from clostridial toluene degraders was dominant in this culture. This work contributes to our understanding of the niche partitioning between degrader populations in distinct compartments of BTEX-contaminated aquifers.

  7. Treatment of uranium contaminated wastewater – a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulama, M.; Iordache, M.; Deneanu, N.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents a study of the treatment techniques used for uranium recovery from aqueous solutions, such as: precipitation, ion exchange processes, sorption processes, solvent extractions, separation by liquid membrane, nanofiltration and reverse osmosis. The necessary elements for rigorous treatment experiments that can be used to define innovative procedure for uranium contaminated wastewater treatment are described in this review. The published data were summarized and the areas for further research were identified in order to be able to propose an environmental friendly technology in the field of uranium production and recovery cycle. (authors)

  8. Spectroscopic confirmation of uranium(VI)-carbonato adsorption complexes on hematite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargar, John R.; Reitmeyer, Rebecca; Davis, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluating societal risks posed by uranium contamination from waste management facilities, mining sites, and heavy industry requires knowledge about uranium transport in groundwater, often the most significant pathway of exposure to humans. It has been proposed that uranium mobility in aquifers may be controlled by adsorption of U(VI)−carbonato complexes on oxide minerals. The existence of such complexes has not been demonstrated, and little is known about their compositions and reaction stoichiometries. We have used attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies to probe the existence, structures, and compositions of ≡FeOsurface−U(VI)−carbonato complexes on hematite throughout the pH range of uranyl uptake under conditions relevant to aquifers. U(VI)−carbonato complexes were found to be the predominant adsorbed U(VI) species at all pH values examined, a much wider pH range than previously postulated based on analogy to aqueous U(VI)−carbonato complexes, which are trace constituents at pH carbonato complexes may be of major importance to the groundwater transport of similar actinide contaminants such as neptunium and plutonium.

  9. Glacial recharge, salinisation and anthropogenic contamination in the coastal aquifers of Recife (Brazil)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatton, E., E-mail: eliot.chatton@gmail.com [Géosciences Rennes, Université Rennes 1-CNRS, UMR 6118, adress: 263 av du général Leclerc, Campus de Beaulieu, bat 15, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Aquilina, L., E-mail: luc.aquilina@univ-rennes1.fr [Géosciences Rennes, Université Rennes 1-CNRS, UMR 6118, adress: 263 av du général Leclerc, Campus de Beaulieu, bat 15, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Pételet-Giraud, E., E-mail: e.petelet@brgm.fr [Bureau de Recherches Géologiques et Minières (BRGM), adress: 3 avenue Claude-Guillemin, BP 36009, 45060 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Cary, L., E-mail: l.cary@brgm.fr [Bureau de Recherches Géologiques et Minières (BRGM), adress: 3 avenue Claude-Guillemin, BP 36009, 45060 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Bertrand, G., E-mail: guillaume353@gmail.com [Instituto de Geociências, CEPAS (Groundwater Research Center), University of São Paulo, adress: Rua do lago 562, 05508-080 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Labasque, T., E-mail: thierry.labasque@univ-rennes1.fr [Géosciences Rennes, Université Rennes 1-CNRS, UMR 6118, adress: 263 av du général Leclerc, Campus de Beaulieu, bat 15, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); and others

    2016-11-01

    Implying large residence times and complex water origins deep coastal aquifers are of particular interest as they are remarkable markers of climate, water use and land use changes. Over the last decades, the Metropolitan Region of Recife (Brazil) went through extensive environmental changes increasing the pressure on water resources and giving rise to numerous environmental consequences on the coastal groundwater systems. We analysed the groundwater of the deep aquifers Cabo and Beberibe that are increasingly exploited. The processes potentially affecting groundwater residence times and flow paths have been studied using a multi-tracer approach (CFCs, SF6, noble gases, 14C, 2H and 18O). The main findings of these investigations show that: (1) Groundwaters of the Cabo and Beberibe aquifers have long residence times and were recharged about 20,000 years ago. (2) Within these old groundwaters we can find palaeo-climate evidences from the last glacial period at the tropics with lower temperatures and dryer conditions than the present climate. (3) Recently, the natural slow dynamic of these groundwater systems was significantly affected by mixing processes with contaminated modern groundwater coming from the shallow unconfined Boa Viagem aquifer. (4) The large exploitation of these aquifers leads to a modification of the flow directions and causes the intrusion through palaeo-channels of saline water probably coming from the Capibaribe River and from the last transgression episodes. These observations indicate that the current exploitation of the Cabo and Beberibe aquifers is unsustainable regarding the long renewal times of these groundwater systems as well as their ongoing contamination and salinisation. The groundwater cycle being much slower than the human development rhythm, it is essential to integrate the magnitude and rapidity of anthropogenic impacts on this extremely slow cycle to the water management concepts. - Highlights: • Study of anthropogenic impacts

  10. Glacial recharge, salinisation and anthropogenic contamination in the coastal aquifers of Recife (Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatton, E.; Aquilina, L.; Pételet-Giraud, E.; Cary, L.; Bertrand, G.; Labasque, T.

    2016-01-01

    Implying large residence times and complex water origins deep coastal aquifers are of particular interest as they are remarkable markers of climate, water use and land use changes. Over the last decades, the Metropolitan Region of Recife (Brazil) went through extensive environmental changes increasing the pressure on water resources and giving rise to numerous environmental consequences on the coastal groundwater systems. We analysed the groundwater of the deep aquifers Cabo and Beberibe that are increasingly exploited. The processes potentially affecting groundwater residence times and flow paths have been studied using a multi-tracer approach (CFCs, SF6, noble gases, 14C, 2H and 18O). The main findings of these investigations show that: (1) Groundwaters of the Cabo and Beberibe aquifers have long residence times and were recharged about 20,000 years ago. (2) Within these old groundwaters we can find palaeo-climate evidences from the last glacial period at the tropics with lower temperatures and dryer conditions than the present climate. (3) Recently, the natural slow dynamic of these groundwater systems was significantly affected by mixing processes with contaminated modern groundwater coming from the shallow unconfined Boa Viagem aquifer. (4) The large exploitation of these aquifers leads to a modification of the flow directions and causes the intrusion through palaeo-channels of saline water probably coming from the Capibaribe River and from the last transgression episodes. These observations indicate that the current exploitation of the Cabo and Beberibe aquifers is unsustainable regarding the long renewal times of these groundwater systems as well as their ongoing contamination and salinisation. The groundwater cycle being much slower than the human development rhythm, it is essential to integrate the magnitude and rapidity of anthropogenic impacts on this extremely slow cycle to the water management concepts. - Highlights: • Study of anthropogenic impacts

  11. Uranium isotopes in groundwater: their use in prospecting for sandstone-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowart, J.B.; Osmond, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    The relative abundances of dissolved 238 U and its daughter 234 U appear to be greatly affected as the uranium is transported downdip in sandstone aquifers. In an actively forming uranium accumulation at a reducing barrier, an input of 234 U occurs in proximity to the isotopically non-selective precipitation of uranium from the water. The result is a downdip water much lower in uranium concentration but relatively enriched in 234 U. The measurement of isotopic as well as concentration changes may increase the effectiveness of hydrogeochemical exploration of uranium. The investigation includes the uranium isotopic patterns in aquifers associated with known uranium orebodies in the Powder River and Shirley Basins, Wyoming, and Karnes County, Texas, USA. In addition, the Carrizo sandstone aquifer of Texas was studied in detail and the presence of an uranium accumulation inferred

  12. Perched aquifers - their potential impact on contaminant transport in the southern High Plains, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullican, W.F. III; Fryar, A.E.; Johns, N.D.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the hydrogeology and hydrochemistry of perched aquifers at potential and known contaminated waste sites has become increasingly important because of the impact these aquifers may have on contaminant transport independent of regional aquifer processes. Investigations of a perched aquifer above the Ogallala aquifer are being conducted in the region of the U.S. Department of Energy's Pantex Plant, a proposed Superfund site, located approximately 20 mi northeast of Amarillo, Texas. Since the early 1950s, a small playa basin located on the Pantex Plant has been used as a waste-water discharge pond with daily discharge rates ranging from 400,000 to 1 million gal. The focus of this investigation is an unconfined, perched aquifer that overlies a thick silty clay sequence within the upper, mostly unsaturated part of the Ogallala Formation (Neogene). In the area of the Pantex Plant, measured depths to the perched aquifer range from 200 to 300 ft below land surface, whereas depth to the regional Ogallala aquifer ranges from 375 to 500 ft. The potentiometric surface of the perched aquifer typically represents groundwater mounds proximal to the playas and thins into trough in the interplaya areas. Hydrologic gradients of the primary mound under investigation are relatively high, ranging from 28 to 45 ft/mi. Calculated transmissivities have a geometric mean of 54 ft 2 /day, with saturated thicknesses ranging from 4 to 1000 ft. Modeling of the perched aquifer was designed to determine how much, if any, discharge to the small playa basin has enhanced recharge to the perched aquifers and increased the vertical and lateral extent of the perched aquifer. Preliminary results indicate that measurements of vertical conductance through the perching silty-clay sequence and recharge rates through playas are critical for calibrating the model. Accurate delineation of rates and flow directions in the perched aquifer is critical to any successful remediation effort

  13. Uranium phytoextraction induced by citric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalik, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The study was aimed at enhancing uranium availability in soil and its uptake by sunflowers and willows. The soil was modified with citric acid. Low citric acid doses (5 mmol/kg soil) were applied to avoid a deep impact on plant physiology. Uranium concentrations increased substantially in the two plants, the increase being most marked in the plant leaves. Uranium uptake by the plants was also simulated by the DGT (diffusion gradients in thin films) method. (orig.)

  14. Biodegradation of uranium-contaminated waste oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hary, L.F.

    1983-01-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant routinely generates quantities of uranium-contaminated waste oil. The current generation rate of waste oil is approximately 2000 gallons per year. The waste is presently biodegraded by landfarming on open field soil plots. However, due to the environmental concerns associated with this treatment process, studies were conducted to determine the optimum biodegradation conditions required for the destruction of this waste. Tests using respirometric flasks were conducted to determine the biodegradation rate for various types of Portsmouth waste oil. These tests were performed at three different loading rates, and on unfertilized and fertilized soil. Additional studies were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of open field landfarming versus treatment at a greenhouse-like enclosure for the purpose of maintaining soil temperatures above ambient conditions. The respirometric tests concluded that the optimum waste oil loading rate is 10% weight of oil-carbon/weight of soil (30,600 gallons of uranium-contaminated waste oil/acre) on soils with adjusted carbon:nitrogen and carbon:phosphorus ratios of 60:1 and 800:1, respectively. Also, calculational results indicated that greenhouse technology does not provide a significant increase in biodegradation efficiency. Based on these study results, a 6300 ft. 2 abandoned anaerobic digester sludge drying bed is being modified into a permanent waste oil biodegradation facility. The advantage of using this area is that uranium contamination will be contained by the bed's existing leachate collection system. This modified facility will be capable of handling approximately 4500 gallons of waste oil per year; accordingly current waste generation quantities will be satisfactorily treated. 15 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Characterization of Predominant Reductants in an Anaerobic Leachate-Contaminated Aquifer by Nitroaromatic Probe Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rügge, Kirsten; Hofstetter, Thomas B.; Haderlein, Stefan B.

    1998-01-01

    The biogeochemical processes controlling the reductive transformation of contaminants in an anaerobic aquifer were inferred from the relative reactivity patterns of redox-sensitive probe compounds. The fate of five nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) was monitored under different redox conditions in a...... results suggest that Fe(ll) associated with ferric iron minerals is a highly reactive reductant in anaerobic aquifers, which may also determine the fate of other classes of reducible contaminants such as halogenated solvents, azo compounds, sulfoxides, chromate, or arsenate....

  16. Predictive geochemical modeling of uranium and other contaminants in laboratory columns in relatively oxidizing, carbonate-rich solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longmire, P.; Turney, W.R.; Mason, C.F.V.

    1994-01-01

    Carbonate heap leaching of uranium-contaminated soils and sediments represents a viable, cost-effective remediation technology. Column experiments have been conducted using 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 M Na 2 CO 3 /NaHCO 3 solutions for leaching uranium from soils located adjacent to an incinerator at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site. Results from column experiments and geochemical modeling are used to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of heap leaching. Leach efficiencies of up to 72 wt.% of total uranium in CaO-agglomerated soil result from dissolution of uranium (U(VI)-dominated) minerals, formation of the soluble complex UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- , and uranium desorption from clay minerals, ferric hydroxides, and humic acids. Parameters that control the extent of uranium extraction include pH, Eh, temperature, carbonate concentration, lixiviant-flow rate, pore-solution chemistry, solid phases, and soil texture

  17. Radon distribution in a gasoline-contaminated aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, K.; Kuo, T.; Han, Y.; Chen, C.; Lin, C.; Lee, C.

    2007-01-01

    Naturally occurring radon-222 gas in groundwater was investigated as a partitioning tracer to detect non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in a gasoline-contaminated aquifer. The radon-222 activity of groundwater decreased significantly from an average of 7.38+/-1.68BqL -1 measured in monitoring wells located upgradient in the uncontaminated zone to an average of 2.30+/-0.60BqL -1 measured in monitoring wells inside the NAPL source zone. Meanwhile, the radium-226 concentrations measured in aquifer matrix were virtually homogeneous at several locations both upgradient of and inside the NAPL source zone. Furthermore, the NAPL concentration obtained from the Radon Deficit Factor agrees reasonably with the results derived from direct sampling and chemical analysis of soil samples taken from the residual NAPL source zone. The field results of this study confirmed the general applicability of groundwater radon to detect residual NAPL source zone

  18. Laboratory studies on natural restoration of ground water after in-situ leach uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, N.E.; Deutsch, W.J.; Serne, R.J.

    1983-05-01

    When uranium is mined using in-situ leach techniques, the chemical quality of the ground water in the ore-zone aquifer is affected. This could lead to long-term degradation of the ground water if restoration techniques are not applied after the leaching is completed. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), is conducting an NRC-sponsored research project on natural restoration and induced-restoration techniques. Laboratory studies were designed to evaluate the ability of the natural system (ore-zone sediments and groundwater) to mitigate the effects of mining on aquifer chemistry. Using batch and flow-through column experiments [performed with lixiviant (leaching solution) and sediments from the reduced zone of an ore-zone aquifer], we found that the natural system can lower uranium and bicarbonate concentrations in solutions and reduce the lixiviant redox potential (Eh). The change in redox potential could cause some of the contaminants that were dissolved during the uranium leaching operation to precipitate, thereby lowering their solution concentration. The concentrations of other species such as calcium, potassium, and sulfate increased, possibly as a result of mineral dissolution and ion exchange. In this paper, we describe the experimentally determined mobility of contaminants after in-situ leach mining, and discuss the possible chemical process affecting mobility

  19. Laboratory studies on natural restoration of ground water after in-situ leach uranium mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, N.E.; Deutsch, W.J.; Serne, R.J.

    1983-05-01

    When uranium is mined using in-situ leach techniques, the chemical quality of the ground water in the ore-zone aquifer is affected. This could lead to long-term degradation of the ground water if restoration techniques are not applied after the leaching is completed. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), is conducting an NRC-sponsored research project on natural restoration and induced-restoration techniques. Laboratory studies were designed to evaluate the ability of the natural system (ore-zone sediments and groundwater) to mitigate the effects of mining on aquifer chemistry. Using batch and flow-through column experiments (performed with lixiviant (leaching solution) and sediments from the reduced zone of an ore-zone aquifer), we found that the natural system can lower uranium and bicarbonate concentrations in solutions and reduce the lixiviant redox potential (Eh). The change in redox potential could cause some of the contaminants that were dissolved during the uranium leaching operation to precipitate, thereby lowering their solution concentration. The concentrations of other species such as calcium, potassium, and sulfate increased, possibly as a result of mineral dissolution and ion exchange. In this paper, we describe the experimentally determined mobility of contaminants after in-situ leach mining, and discuss the possible chemical process affecting mobility.

  20. Process for recovering a uranium containing concentrate and purified phosphoric acid from a wet process phosphoric acid containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weterings, C.A.M.; Janssen, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    A process is claimed for recovering from a wet process phosphoric acid which contains uranium, a uranium containing concentrate and a purified phosphoric acid. The wet process phosphoric acid is treated with a precipitant in the presence of a reducing agent and an aliphatic ketone

  1. Process for recovering a uranium containing concentrate and purified phosphoric acid from a wet process phosphoric acid containing uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weterings, C.A.M.; Janssen, J.A.

    1985-04-30

    A process is claimed for recovering from a wet process phosphoric acid which contains uranium, a uranium containing concentrate and a purified phosphoric acid. The wet process phosphoric acid is treated with a precipitant in the presence of a reducing agent and an aliphatic ketone.

  2. Dynamic Succession of Groundwater Sulfate-Reducing Communities during Prolonged Reduction of Uranium in a Contaminated Aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ping [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); He, Zhili [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Van Nostrand, Joy D. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Qin, Yujia [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Deng, Ye [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Wu, Liyou [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Tu, Qichao [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China); Wang, Jianjun [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Nanjing (China); Schadt, Christopher W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); W. Fields, Matthew [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Hazen, Terry C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Arkin, Adam P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Stahl, David A. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Zhou, Jizhong [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China)

    2017-03-16

    To further understand the diversity and dynamics of SRB in response to substrate amendment, we sequenced in this paper genes coding for the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrA) in groundwater samples collected after an emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) amendment, which sustained U(VI)-reducing conditions for one year in a fast-flowing aquifer. EVO amendment significantly altered the composition of groundwater SRB communities. Sequences having no closely related-described species dominated (80%) the indigenous SRB communities in nonamended wells. After EVO amendment, Desulfococcus, Desulfobacterium, and Desulfovibrio, known for long-chain-fatty-acid, short-chain-fatty-acid and H2 oxidation and U(VI) reduction, became dominant accounting for 7 ± 2%, 21 ± 8%, and 55 ± 8% of the SRB communities, respectively. Succession of these SRB at different bioactivity stages based on redox substrates/products (acetate, SO4–2, U(VI), NO3, Fe(II), and Mn(II)) was observed. Desulfovibrio and Desulfococcus dominated SRB communities at 4–31 days, whereas Desulfobacterium became dominant at 80–140 days. By the end of the experiment (day 269), the abundance of these SRB decreased but the overall diversity of groundwater SRB was still higher than non-EVO controls. Up to 62% of the SRB community changes could be explained by groundwater geochemical variables, including those redox substrates/products. A significant (P < 0.001) correlation was observed between groundwater U(VI) concentrations and Desulfovibrio abundance. Finally, our results showed that the members of SRB and their dynamics were correlated significantly with slow EVO biodegradation, electron donor production and maintenance of U(VI)-reducing conditions in the aquifer.

  3. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Groundwater Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Gunnison, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated monitor wells at the processing site. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium.

  4. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Groundwater Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Gunnison, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated monitor wells at the processing site. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium

  5. Reactive dispersive contaminant transport in coastal aquifers: Numerical simulation of a reactive Henry problem

    KAUST Repository

    Nick, H.M.

    2013-02-01

    The reactive mixing between seawater and terrestrial water in coastal aquifers influences the water quality of submarine groundwater discharge. While these waters come into contact at the seawater groundwater interface by density driven flow, their chemical components dilute and react through dispersion. A larger interface and wider mixing zone may provide favorable conditions for the natural attenuation of contaminant plumes. It has been claimed that the extent of this mixing is controlled by both, porous media properties and flow conditions. In this study, the interplay between dispersion and reactive processes in coastal aquifers is investigated by means of numerical experiments. Particularly, the impact of dispersion coefficients, the velocity field induced by density driven flow and chemical component reactivities on reactive transport in such aquifers is studied. To do this, a hybrid finite-element finite-volume method and a reactive simulator are coupled, and model accuracy and applicability are assessed. A simple redox reaction is considered to describe the degradation of a contaminant which requires mixing of the contaminated groundwater and the seawater containing the terminal electron acceptor. The resulting degradation is observed for different scenarios considering different magnitudes of dispersion and chemical reactivity. Three reactive transport regimes are found: reaction controlled, reaction-dispersion controlled and dispersion controlled. Computational results suggest that the chemical components\\' reactivity as well as dispersion coefficients play a significant role on controlling reactive mixing zones and extent of contaminant removal in coastal aquifers. Further, our results confirm that the dilution index is a better alternative to the second central spatial moment of a plume to describe the mixing of reactive solutes in coastal aquifers. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Recharge processes drive sulfate reduction in an alluvial aquifer contaminated with landfill leachate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, M.A.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Christenson, S.C.

    2006-01-01

    Natural attenuation of contaminants in groundwater depends on an adequate supply of electron acceptors to stimulate biodegradation. In an alluvial aquifer contaminated with leachate from an unlined municipal landfill, the mechanism of recharge infiltration was investigated as a source of electron acceptors. Water samples were collected monthly at closely spaced intervals in the top 2 m of the saturated zone from a leachate-contaminated well and an uncontaminated well, and analyzed for ??18O, ??2H, non-volatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC), SO42-, NO3- and Cl-. Monthly recharge amounts were quantified using the offset of the ??18O or ??2H from the local meteoric water line as a parameter to distinguish water types, as evaporation and methanogenesis caused isotopic enrichment in waters from different sources. Presence of dissolved SO42- in the top 1 to 2??m of the saturated zone was associated with recharge; SO42- averaged 2.2??mM, with maximum concentrations of 15??mM. Nitrate was observed near the water table at the contaminated site at concentrations up to 4.6??mM. Temporal monitoring of ??2H and SO42- showed that vertical transport of recharge carried SO42- to depths up to 1.75??m below the water table, supplying an additional electron acceptor to the predominantly methanogenic leachate plume. Measurements of ??34S in SO42- indicated both SO42- reduction and sulfide oxidation were occurring in the aquifer. Depth-integrated net SO42- reduction rates, calculated using the natural Cl- gradient as a conservative tracer, ranged from 7.5 ?? 10- 3 to 0.61??mM??d- 1 (over various depth intervals from 0.45 to 1.75??m). Sulfate reduction occurred at both the contaminated and uncontaminated sites; however, median SO42- reduction rates were higher at the contaminated site. Although estimated SO42- reduction rates are relatively high, significant decreases in NVDOC were not observed at the contaminated site. Organic compounds more labile than the leachate NVDOC may be

  7. Recharge processes drive sulfate reduction in an alluvial aquifer contaminated with landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Martha A; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M; Christenson, Scott C

    2006-08-10

    Natural attenuation of contaminants in groundwater depends on an adequate supply of electron acceptors to stimulate biodegradation. In an alluvial aquifer contaminated with leachate from an unlined municipal landfill, the mechanism of recharge infiltration was investigated as a source of electron acceptors. Water samples were collected monthly at closely spaced intervals in the top 2 m of the saturated zone from a leachate-contaminated well and an uncontaminated well, and analyzed for delta(18)O, delta(2)H, non-volatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC), SO(4)(2-), NO(3)(-) and Cl(-). Monthly recharge amounts were quantified using the offset of the delta(18)O or delta(2)H from the local meteoric water line as a parameter to distinguish water types, as evaporation and methanogenesis caused isotopic enrichment in waters from different sources. Presence of dissolved SO(4)(2-) in the top 1 to 2 m of the saturated zone was associated with recharge; SO(4)(2-) averaged 2.2 mM, with maximum concentrations of 15 mM. Nitrate was observed near the water table at the contaminated site at concentrations up to 4.6 mM. Temporal monitoring of delta(2)H and SO(4)(2-) showed that vertical transport of recharge carried SO(4)(2-) to depths up to 1.75 m below the water table, supplying an additional electron acceptor to the predominantly methanogenic leachate plume. Measurements of delta(34)S in SO(4)(2-) indicated both SO(4)(2-) reduction and sulfide oxidation were occurring in the aquifer. Depth-integrated net SO(4)(2-) reduction rates, calculated using the natural Cl(-) gradient as a conservative tracer, ranged from 7.5x10(-3) to 0.61 mM.d(-1) (over various depth intervals from 0.45 to 1.75 m). Sulfate reduction occurred at both the contaminated and uncontaminated sites; however, median SO(4)(2-) reduction rates were higher at the contaminated site. Although estimated SO(4)(2-) reduction rates are relatively high, significant decreases in NVDOC were not observed at the contaminated

  8. Bio-chemical remediation of under-ground water contaminated by uranium in-situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qingliang; Li Qian; Zhang Hongcan; Hu Eming; Chen Yongbo

    2014-01-01

    In the process of uranium in-situ leaching, it was serious that strong acid, uranium and heavy metals, and SO_4"2"-, NO_3"- could contaminate underground water. To remedy these pollutants, conventional methods are high-cost and low-efficient, so a bio-chemical remediation method was proposed to cope with the under-ground water pollution in this study. The results showed, in the chemical treatment with Ca(OH)_2 neutralization, pH went up from 2.0 to 7.0, the removal rates of U, Mn"2"+, Zn"2"+, Pb"2"+, SO_4"2"-, NO_3"- were 91.5%, 78.3%, 85.1%, 100%, 71.4% and 2.6% respectively, SO_4"2"- and NO_3"- need to be treated again by bio-method. In the biological process, the Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) of bioreactor was controlled at 42 h, and 100% NO_3"- and 70% SO_4"2"- in the contaminated water were removed; Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. f) liquid to H_2S showed better absorption effect, can fully meet the process requirements of H_2S removal. (authors)

  9. Evaluation of residual uranium contamination in the dirt floor of an abandoned metal rolling mill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassford, Eric; Spitz, Henry; Lobaugh, Megan; Spitler, Grant; Succop, Paul; Rice, Carol

    2013-02-01

    A single, large, bulk sample of uranium-contaminated material from the dirt floor of an abandoned metal rolling mill was separated into different types and sizes of aliquots to simulate samples that would be collected during site remediation. The facility rolled approximately 11,000 tons of hot-forged ingots of uranium metal approximately 60 y ago, and it has not been used since that time. Thirty small mass (≈ 0.7 g) and 15 large mass (≈ 70 g) samples were prepared from the heterogeneously contaminated bulk material to determine how measurements of the uranium contamination vary with sample size. Aliquots of bulk material were also resuspended in an exposure chamber to produce six samples of respirable particles that were obtained using a cascade impactor. Samples of removable surface contamination were collected by wiping 100 cm of the interior surfaces of the exposure chamber with 47-mm-diameter fiber filters. Uranium contamination in each of the samples was measured directly using high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry. As expected, results for isotopic uranium (i.e., U and U) measured with the large-mass and small-mass samples are significantly different (p 0.05) from results for the large- or small-mass samples. Large-mass samples are more reliable for characterizing heterogeneously distributed radiological contamination than small-mass samples since they exhibit the least variation compared to the mean. Thus, samples should be sufficiently large in mass to insure that the results are truly representative of the heterogeneously distributed uranium contamination present at the facility. Monitoring exposure of workers and the public as a result of uranium contamination resuspended during site remediation should be evaluated using samples of sufficient size and type to accommodate the heterogeneous distribution of uranium in the bulk material.

  10. Bioimmobilization of uranium-practical tools for field applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istok, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Extensive laboratory and field research has conclusively demonstrated that it is possible to stimulate indigenous microbial activity and create conditions favorable for the reductive precipitation of uranium from groundwater, reducing aqueous U concentrations below regulatory levels. A wide variety of complex and coupled biogeochemical processes have been identified and specific reaction mechanisms and parameters have been quantified for a variety of experimental systems including pure, mixed, and natural microbial cultures, and single mineral, artificial, and natural sediments, and groundwater aquifers at scales ranging from very small (10s nm) to very large (10s m). Multicomponent coupled reactive transport models have also been developed to simulate various aspects of this process in 3D heterogeneous environments. Nevertheless, full-scale application of reductive bioimmobilization of uranium (and other radionuclides and metals) remains problematical because of the technical and logistical difficulties in creating and maintaining reducing environment in the many large U contaminated groundwater aquifers currently under aerobic and oxidizing conditions and often containing high concentrations of competing and more energetically favorable electron acceptors (esp. nitrate). This talk will discuss how simple tools, including small-scale in situ testing and geochemical reaction path modeling, can be used to quickly assess the feasibility of applying bioimmobilization to remediate U contaminated groundwater aquifers and provide data needed for full-scale design.

  11. Application of groundwater residence time tracers and broad screening for micro-organic contaminants in the Indo-Gangetic aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapworth, Dan; Das, Prerona; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Petersen, Jade; Gooddy, Daren; Krishan, Gopal

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater abstracted from aquifers underlying urban centres across India provide a vital source of domestic water. Abstraction from municipal and private supplies is considerable and growing rapidly with ever increasing demand for water from expanding urban populations. This trend is set to continue. The vulnerability of deeper aquifers (typically >100 m below ground) used for domestic water to contamination migration from often heavily contaminated shallow aquifer systems has not been studies in detail in India. This paper focusses on the occurrence of micro-organic contaminants within sedimentary aquifers beneath urban centres which are intensively pumped for drinking water and domestic use. New preliminary results from a detailed case study undertaken across Varanasi, a city with an estimated population of ca. 1.5 million in Uttar Pradesh. Micro -organic groundwater quality status and evolution with depth is investigated through selection of paired shallow and deep sites across the city. These results are considered within the context of paired groundwater residence time tracers within the top 150m within the sedimentary aquifer system. Groundwater emerging contaminant results are compared with surface water quality from the Ganges which is also used for drinking water supply. Broad screening for >800 micro-organic compounds was undertaken. Age dating tools were employed to constrain and inform a conceptual model of groundwater recharge and contaminant evolution within the sedimentary aquifer system.

  12. Phytoextraction for clean-up of low-level uranium contaminated soil evaluated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenhove, H.; Hees, M. van

    2004-01-01

    Spills in the nuclear fuel cycle have led to soil contamination with uranium. In case of small contamination just above release levels, low-cost yet sufficiently efficient remedial measures are recommended. This study was executed to test if low-level U contaminated sandy soil from a nuclear fuel processing site could be phytoextracted in order to attain the required release limits. Two soils were tested: a control soil (317 Bq 238 U kg -1 ) and the same soil washed with bicarbonate (69 Bq 238 U kg -1 ). Ryegrass (Lolium perenne cv. Melvina) and Indian mustard (Brassica juncea cv. Vitasso) were used as test plants. The annual removal of soil activity by the biomass was less than 0.1%. The addition of citric acid (25 mmol kg -1 ) 1 week before the harvest increased U uptake up to 500-fold. With a ryegrass and mustard yield of 15,000 and 10,000 kg ha -1 , respectively, up to 3.5% and 4.6% of the soil activity could be removed annually by the biomass. With a desired activity reduction level of 1.5 and 5 for the bicarbonate-washed and control soil, respectively, it would take 10-50 years to attain the release limit. However, citric acid addition resulted in a decreased dry weight production

  13. Stochastic Management of Non-Point Source Contamination: Joint Impact of Aquifer Heterogeneity and Well Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henri, C. V.; Harter, T.

    2017-12-01

    Agricultural activities are recognized as the preeminent origin of non-point source (NPS) contamination of water bodies through the leakage of nitrate, salt and agrochemicals. A large fraction of world agricultural activities and therefore NPS contamination occurs over unconsolidated alluvial deposit basins offering soil composition and topography favorable to productive farming. These basins represent also important groundwater reservoirs. The over-exploitation of aquifers coupled with groundwater pollution by agriculture-related NPS contaminant has led to a rapid deterioration of the quality of these groundwater basins. The management of groundwater contamination from NPS is challenged by the inherent complexity of aquifers systems. Contaminant transport dynamics are highly uncertain due to the heterogeneity of hydraulic parameters controlling groundwater flow. Well characteristics are also key uncertain elements affecting pollutant transport and NPS management but quantifying uncertainty in NPS management under these conditions is not well documented. Our work focuses on better understanding the joint impact of aquifer heterogeneity and pumping well characteristics (extraction rate and depth) on (1) the transport of contaminants from NPS and (2) the spatio-temporal extension of the capture zone. To do so, we generate a series of geostatistically equivalent 3D heterogeneous aquifers and simulate the flow and non-reactive solute transport from NPS to extraction wells within a stochastic framework. The propagation of the uncertainty on the hydraulic conductivity field is systematically analyzed. A sensitivity analysis of the impact of extraction well characteristics (pumping rate and screen depth) is also conducted. Results highlight the significant role that heterogeneity and well characteristics plays on management metrics. We finally show that, in case of NPS contamination, the joint impact of regional longitudinal and transverse vertical hydraulic gradients and

  14. A two-reagent neutralization scheme for controlling the migration of contaminants from a uranium mill tailing disposal pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodson, M.E.; Opitz, B.E.; Sherwood, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques for reducing contaminant migration from tailings liquor impoundments and evaporation ponds are being investigated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Uranium Research and Recovery Program. Building upon previous studies investigating single-reagent neutralization, laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of a two-reagent neutralization scheme for the treatment of acidic uranium mill tailings liquors. Acidic tailings liquor, pH 3 neutralization to pH 4.0 followed by continued neutralization with lime to pH 7.3, resulted in the highest solution quality with respect to the Environmental Protection Agency's water quality guidelines. Furthermore, the two-reagent neutralization scheme is the most cost-effective treatment procedure tested to date

  15. Investigating sources and pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in aquifers in Tokyo using multiple tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Keisuke; Murakami, Michio; Oguma, Kumiko; Takada, Hideshige; Takizawa, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    We employed a multi-tracer approach to investigate sources and pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in urban groundwater, based on 53 groundwater samples taken from confined aquifers and unconfined aquifers in Tokyo. While the median concentrations of groundwater PFAAs were several ng/L, the maximum concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, 990 ng/L), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA, 1800 ng/L) and perfluorononanoate (PFNA, 620 ng/L) in groundwater were several times higher than those of wastewater and street runoff reported in the literature. PFAAs were more frequently detected than sewage tracers (carbamazepine and crotamiton), presumably owing to the higher persistence of PFAAs, the multiple sources of PFAAs beyond sewage (e.g., surface runoff, point sources) and the formation of PFAAs from their precursors. Use of multiple methods of source apportionment including principal component analysis–multiple linear regression (PCA–MLR) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acid ratio analysis highlighted sewage and point sources as the primary sources of PFAAs in the most severely polluted groundwater samples, with street runoff being a minor source (44.6% sewage, 45.7% point sources and 9.7% street runoff, by PCA–MLR). Tritium analysis indicated that, while young groundwater (recharged during or after the 1970s, when PFAAs were already in commercial use) in shallow aquifers (< 50 m depth) was naturally highly vulnerable to PFAA pollution, PFAAs were also found in old groundwater (recharged before the 1950s, when PFAAs were not in use) in deep aquifers (50–500 m depth). This study demonstrated the utility of multiple uses of tracers (pharmaceuticals and personal care products; PPCPs, tritium) and source apportionment methods in investigating sources and pathways of PFAAs in multiple aquifer systems. - Highlights: • Aquifers in Tokyo had high levels of perfluoroalkyl acids (up to 1800 ng/L). • PFAAs were more frequently detected than sewage

  16. Investigating sources and pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in aquifers in Tokyo using multiple tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Keisuke, E-mail: keisukekr@gmail.com [Department of Urban Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Murakami, Michio [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Oguma, Kumiko [Department of Urban Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takada, Hideshige [Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry (LOG), Institute of Symbiotic Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Takizawa, Satoshi [Department of Urban Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    We employed a multi-tracer approach to investigate sources and pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in urban groundwater, based on 53 groundwater samples taken from confined aquifers and unconfined aquifers in Tokyo. While the median concentrations of groundwater PFAAs were several ng/L, the maximum concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, 990 ng/L), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA, 1800 ng/L) and perfluorononanoate (PFNA, 620 ng/L) in groundwater were several times higher than those of wastewater and street runoff reported in the literature. PFAAs were more frequently detected than sewage tracers (carbamazepine and crotamiton), presumably owing to the higher persistence of PFAAs, the multiple sources of PFAAs beyond sewage (e.g., surface runoff, point sources) and the formation of PFAAs from their precursors. Use of multiple methods of source apportionment including principal component analysis–multiple linear regression (PCA–MLR) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acid ratio analysis highlighted sewage and point sources as the primary sources of PFAAs in the most severely polluted groundwater samples, with street runoff being a minor source (44.6% sewage, 45.7% point sources and 9.7% street runoff, by PCA–MLR). Tritium analysis indicated that, while young groundwater (recharged during or after the 1970s, when PFAAs were already in commercial use) in shallow aquifers (< 50 m depth) was naturally highly vulnerable to PFAA pollution, PFAAs were also found in old groundwater (recharged before the 1950s, when PFAAs were not in use) in deep aquifers (50–500 m depth). This study demonstrated the utility of multiple uses of tracers (pharmaceuticals and personal care products; PPCPs, tritium) and source apportionment methods in investigating sources and pathways of PFAAs in multiple aquifer systems. - Highlights: • Aquifers in Tokyo had high levels of perfluoroalkyl acids (up to 1800 ng/L). • PFAAs were more frequently detected than sewage

  17. Two-reagent neutralization scheme for controlling the migration of contaminants from a uranium mill tailings disposal pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodson, M.E.; Opitz, B.E.; Sherwood, D.R.

    1984-11-01

    Techniques for reducing contaminant migration from tailings liquor impoundments and evaporation ponds are being investigated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Uranium Research and Recovery Program. Building upon previous studies investigating single-reagent neutralization, laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of a two-reagent neutralization scheme for the treatment of acidic uranium mill tailings liquors. Acidic tailings liquor, pH 3 neutralization to pH 4.0 followed by continued neutralization with lime to pH 7.3, resulted in the highest solution quality with respect to the Environmental Protection Agency's water quality guidelines. Furthermore, the two-reagent neutralization scheme is the most cost-effective treatment procedure tested to date. 13 references, 1 table

  18. Enrichment of specific protozoan populations during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Dawn; Giloteaux, L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Thompson, Courtney A.; Roper, Thomas J.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek

    2013-07-28

    The importance of bacteria in the anaerobic bioremediation of groundwater polluted with organic and/or metal contaminants is well-recognized and in some instances so well understood that modeling of the in situ metabolic activity of the relevant subsurface microorganisms in response to changes in subsurface geochemistry is feasible. However, a potentially significant factor influencing bacterial growth and activity in the subsurface that has not been adequately addressed is protozoan predation of the microorganisms responsible for bioremediation. In field experiments at a uranium-contaminated aquifer located in Rifle, CO, acetate amendments initially promoted the growth of metal-reducing Geobacter species followed by the growth of sulfate-reducers, as previously observed. Analysis of 18S rRNA gene sequences revealed a broad diversity of sequences closely related to known bacteriovorous protozoa in the groundwater prior to the addition of acetate. The bloom of Geobacter species was accompanied by a specific enrichment of sequences most closely related to the amoeboid flagellate, Breviata anathema, which at their peak accounted for over 80% of the sequences recovered. The abundance of Geobacter species declined following the rapid emergence of B. anathema. The subsequent growth of sulfate-reducing Peptococcaceae was accompanied by another specific enrichment of protozoa, but with sequences most similar to diplomonadid flagellates from the family Hexamitidae, which accounted for up to 100% of the sequences recovered during this phase of the bioremediation. These results suggest a prey-predator response with specific protozoa responding to increased availability of preferred prey bacteria. Thus, quantifying the influence of protozoan predation on the growth, activity, and composition of the subsurface bacterial community is essential for predictive modeling of in situ uranium bioremediation strategies.

  19. Evaluation of ethyl tert-butyl ether biodegradation in a contaminated aquifer by compound-specific isotope analysis and in situ microcosms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bombach, Petra, E-mail: petra.bombach@ufz.de [UFZ – Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Isodetect GmbH Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5b, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Nägele, Norbert [Kuvier the Biotech Company S.L., Ctra. N-I, p.k. 234–P.E. INBISA 23" a, E-09001 Burgos (Spain); Rosell, Mònica [UFZ – Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Grup de Mineralogia Aplicada i Medi Ambient, Departament de Cristallografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona (UB), C/Martí i Franquès s/n, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Richnow, Hans H. [UFZ – Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Fischer, Anko [Isodetect GmbH Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5b, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • In situ biodegradation of ETBE was investigated in a fuel contaminated aquifer. • Degradation was studied by CSIA and in situ microcosms in combination with TLFA-SIP. • ETBE was degraded when ETBE was the main groundwater contaminant. • ETBE was also degraded in the presence of BTEX and MTBE. • Hydrochemical analysis indicated aerobic and anaerobic ETBE biodegradation. - Abstract: Ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) is an upcoming groundwater pollutant in Europe whose environmental fate has been less investigated, thus far. In the present study, we investigated the in situ biodegradation of ETBE in a fuel-contaminated aquifer using compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA), and in situ microcosms in combination with total lipid fatty acid (TLFA)-stable isotope probing (SIP). In a first field investigation, CSIA revealed insignificant carbon isotope fractionation, but low hydrogen isotope fractionation of up to +14‰ along the prevailing anoxic ETBE plume suggesting biodegradation of ETBE. Ten months later, oxygen injection was conducted to enhance the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) at the field site. Within the framework of this remediation measure, in situ microcosms loaded with [{sup 13}C{sub 6}]-ETBE (BACTRAP{sup ®}s) were exposed for 119 days in selected groundwater wells to assess the biodegradation of ETBE by TLFA-SIP under the following conditions: (i) ETBE as main contaminant; (ii) ETBE as main contaminant subjected to oxygen injection; (iii) ETBE plus other PH; (iv) ETBE plus other PH subjected to oxygen injection. Under all conditions investigated, significant {sup 13}C-incorporation into microbial total lipid fatty acids extracted from the in situ microcosms was found, providing clear evidence of ETBE biodegradation.

  20. Evaluation of ethyl tert-butyl ether biodegradation in a contaminated aquifer by compound-specific isotope analysis and in situ microcosms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombach, Petra; a, E-09001 Burgos (Spain))" data-affiliation=" (Kuvier the Biotech Company S.L., Ctra. N-I, p.k. 234–P.E. INBISA 23a, E-09001 Burgos (Spain))" >Nägele, Norbert; Rosell, Mònica; Richnow, Hans H.; Fischer, Anko

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • In situ biodegradation of ETBE was investigated in a fuel contaminated aquifer. • Degradation was studied by CSIA and in situ microcosms in combination with TLFA-SIP. • ETBE was degraded when ETBE was the main groundwater contaminant. • ETBE was also degraded in the presence of BTEX and MTBE. • Hydrochemical analysis indicated aerobic and anaerobic ETBE biodegradation. - Abstract: Ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) is an upcoming groundwater pollutant in Europe whose environmental fate has been less investigated, thus far. In the present study, we investigated the in situ biodegradation of ETBE in a fuel-contaminated aquifer using compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA), and in situ microcosms in combination with total lipid fatty acid (TLFA)-stable isotope probing (SIP). In a first field investigation, CSIA revealed insignificant carbon isotope fractionation, but low hydrogen isotope fractionation of up to +14‰ along the prevailing anoxic ETBE plume suggesting biodegradation of ETBE. Ten months later, oxygen injection was conducted to enhance the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) at the field site. Within the framework of this remediation measure, in situ microcosms loaded with [ 13 C 6 ]-ETBE (BACTRAP ® s) were exposed for 119 days in selected groundwater wells to assess the biodegradation of ETBE by TLFA-SIP under the following conditions: (i) ETBE as main contaminant; (ii) ETBE as main contaminant subjected to oxygen injection; (iii) ETBE plus other PH; (iv) ETBE plus other PH subjected to oxygen injection. Under all conditions investigated, significant 13 C-incorporation into microbial total lipid fatty acids extracted from the in situ microcosms was found, providing clear evidence of ETBE biodegradation

  1. Using enteric pathogens to assess sources of fecal contamination in the Silurian Dolomite Aquifer: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Maureen A; Borchardt, Mark A.; Spencer, Susan K.; Hunt, Randall J.; Owens, David

    2018-01-01

    The fractured Silurian dolomite aquifer is an important, but vulnerable, source of drinking water in northeast Wisconsin (Sherrill in Geology and ground water in Door County, Wisconsin, with emphasis on contamination potential in the Silurian dolomite, 1978; Bradbury and Muldoon in Hydrogeology and groundwater monitoring of fractured dolomite in the Upper Door Priority Watershed, Door County, Wisconsin, 1992; Muldoon and Bradbury in Assessing seasonal variations in recharge and water quality in the Silurian aquifer in areas with thicker soil cover. p 45, 2010). Areas underlain by the Silurian dolomite aquifer are extremely vulnerable to groundwater contamination from various land-use activities, especially the disposal of human wastewater and dairy manure. Currently there is no consensus as to which source of wastewater generates the greater impact to the aquifer.

  2. Remediation of uranium contaminated water and soil by PIMS approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raicevic, S.; Raicevic, J.; Smiciklas, I. . E-mail address of corresponding author: raich@beotel.yu; Raicevic, S.)

    2005-01-01

    Contamination of soil by uranium (U) represents a permanent threat for food and water resources. For this reason, remediation is a very important measure for protection of the health of the population living in the vicinity of these contaminated sites. Phosphate- Induced Metal Stabilization (PIMS) represents one of the powerful methods for remediation of soil and water contaminated by U, including depleted uranium (DU). By this approach it is possible to stabilize metals in the form of phosphate phases and other low soluble phases that are stable over geological time. PIMS is based on application of a special form of apatite of biological origin, Apatite II, to clean up metal and radionuclide contamination, in situ or ex situ. This biogenic apatite can be emplaced as a down-gradient permeable reactive barrier, mixed into contaminated soil or waste or used as a disposal liner. Here we will briefly describe the PIMS remediation protocol. (author)

  3. Composition and Distribution of Tramp Uranium Contamination on BWR and PWR Fuel Rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schienbein, Marcel; Zeh, Peter; Hurtado, Antonio; Rosskamp, Matthias; Mailand, Irene; Bolz, Michael

    2012-09-01

    In a joint research project of VGB and AREVA NP GmbH the behaviour of alpha nuclides in nuclear power plants with light water reactors has been investigated. Understanding the source and the behaviour of alpha nuclides is of big importance for planning radiation protection measures for outages and upcoming dismantling projects. Previous publications have shown the correlation between plant specific alpha contamination of the core and the so called 'tramp fuel' or 'tramp uranium' level which is linked to the defect history of fuel assemblies and accordingly the amount of previously washed out fuel from defective fuel rods. The methodology of tramp fuel estimation is based on fission product concentrations in reactor coolant but also needs a good knowledge of tramp fuel composition and in-core distribution on the outer surface of fuel rods itself. Sampling campaigns of CRUD deposits of irradiated fuel assemblies in different NPPs were performed. CRUD analyses including nuclide specific alpha analysis have shown systematic differences between BWR and PWR plants. Those data combined with literature results of fuel pellet investigations led to model improvements showing that a main part of fission products is caused by fission of Pu-239 an activation product of U-238. CRUD investigations also gave a better picture of the in-core composition and distribution of the tramp uranium contamination. It was shown that the tramp uranium distribution in PWR plants is time dependent. Even new fuel assemblies will be notably contaminated after only one cycle of operation. For PWR applies the following logic: the higher the local power the higher the contamination. With increasing burnup the local rod power usually decreases leading to decreasing tramp uranium contamination on the fuel rod surface. This is not applicable for tramp uranium contamination in BWR. CRUD contamination (including the tramp fuel deposits) is much more fixed and is constantly increasing

  4. Solvent extraction of uranium from high acid leach solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadevi, G.; Sreenivas, T.; Navale, A.S.; Padmanabhan, N.P.H.

    2010-01-01

    A significant part of the total uranium reserves all over the world is contributed by refractory uranium minerals. The refractory oxides are highly stable and inert to attack by most of the commonly used acids under normal conditions of acid strength, pressure and temperature. Quantitative dissolution of uranium from such ores containing refractory uranium minerals requires drastic operating conditions during chemical leaching like high acid strength, elevated pressures and temperatures. The leach liquors produced under these conditions normally have high free acidity, which affects the downstream operations like ion exchange and solvent extraction

  5. Oxidation-extraction of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawes, B.C.

    1985-01-01

    The invention involves an improvement to the reductive stripping process for recovering uranium values from wet-process phosphoric acid solution, where uranium in the solution is oxidized to uranium (VI) oxidation state and then extracted from the solution by contact with a water immiscible organic solvent, by adding sufficient oxidant, hydrogen peroxide, to obtain greater than 90 percent conversion of the uranium to the uranium (VI) oxidation state to the phosphoric acid solution and simultaneously extracting the uranium (VI)

  6. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

    2014-04-29

    An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

  7. Uranium recovery from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrington, O.F.; Pyrih, R.Z.; Rickard, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Improvement in the process for recovering uranium from wetprocess phosphoric acid solution derived from the acidulation of uraniferous phosphate ores by the use of two ion exchange liquidliquid solvent extraction circuits in which in the first circuit (A) the uranium is reduced to the uranous form; (B) the uranous uranium is recovered by liquid-liquid solvent extraction using a mixture of mono- and di-(Alkyl-phenyl) esters of orthophosphoric acid as the ion exchange agent; and (C) the uranium oxidatively stripped from the agent with phosphoric acid containing an oxidizing agent to convert uranous to uranyl ions, and in the second circuit (D) recovering the uranyl uranium from the strip solution by liquid-liquid solvent extraction using di(2ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid in the presence of trioctylphosphine oxide as a synergist; (E) scrubbing the uranium loaded agent with water; (F) stripping the loaded agent with ammonium carbonate, and (G) calcining the formed ammonium uranyl carbonate to uranium oxide, the improvement comprising: (1) removing the organics from the raffinate of step (B) before recycling the raffinate to the wet-process plant, and returning the recovered organics to the circuit to substantially maintain the required balance between the mono and disubstituted esters; (2) using hydogren peroxide as the oxidizing agent in step (C); (3) using an alkali metal carbonate as the stripping agent in step (F) following by acidification of the strip solution with sulfuric acid; (4) using some of the acidified strip solution as the scrubbing agent in step (E) to remove phosphorus and other impurities; and (5) regenerating the alkali metal loaded agent from step (F) before recycling it to the second circuit

  8. Effect of Co-Contaminants Uranium and Nitrate on Iodine Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lee, Brady D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lawter, Amanda R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Resch, Charles T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baum, Steven R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Leavy, Ian I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Freedman, Vicky L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the significance of co-contaminants on the migration and transformation of iodine species in the Hanford subsurface environment. These impacts are relevant because remedies that target individual contaminants like iodine, may not only impact the fate and transport of other contaminants in the subsurface, but also inhibit the effectiveness of a targeted remedy. For example, iodine (as iodate) co-precipitates with calcite, and has been identified as a potential remedy because it immobilizes iodine. Since uranium also co-precipitates with calcite in field sediments, the presence of uranium may also inhibit iodine co-precipitation. Another potentially significant impact from co-existing contaminants is iodine and nitrate. The presence of nitrate has been shown to promote biogeochemical reduction of iodate to iodide, thereby increasing iodine species subsurface mobility (as iodide exhibits less sorption). Hence, this study reports on both laboratory batch and column experiments that investigated a) the change in iodate uptake mass and rate of uptake into precipitating calcite due to the presence of differing amounts of uranium, b) the amount of change of the iodate bio-reduction rate due to the presence of differing nitrate concentrations, and c) whether nitrite can reduce iodate in the presence of microbes and/or minerals acting as catalysts.

  9. Radon measurements over a natural-gas contaminated aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, D.; Fusella, E.; Avila, Y.; Salas, J.; Teixeira, D.; Fernández, G.; Salas, A.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Greaves, E.; Barros, H.; Bolívar, M.; Regalado, J.

    2013-01-01

    Radon and thoron concentrations in soil pores in a gas production region of the Anzoategui State, Venezuela, were determined by active and passive methods. In this region, water wells are contaminated by natural gas and gas leaks exist in the nearby river. Based on soil gas Radon data surface hydrocarbon seeps were identified. Radon and thoron concentration maps show anomalously high values near the river gas leaks decreasing in the direction of water wells where natural gas is also detected. The area where the highest concentrations of 222 Rn were detected seems to indicate the surface projection of the aquifer contaminated with natural gas. The Radon/Thoron ratio revealed a micro-localized anomaly, indicating the area where the gas comes from deep layers of the subsoil. The radon map determined by the passive method showed a marked positive anomaly around abandoned gas wells. The high anomalous Radon concentration localized near the trails of ascending gas bubbles at the river indicates the zone trough where natural gases are ascending with greater ease, associated with a deep geological fault, being this the main source of methane penetration into the aquifer. It is suggested that the source of the natural gas may be due to leaks at deep sites along the structure of some of the abandoned wells located at the North-East of the studied area. - Highlights: ► High Radon/Thoron ratios were localized near the natural-gas emanations in a river. ► Natural gases are ascending trough a deep geological fault. ► Apparently, the radon anomaly shows the site where natural gas enters the aquifer. ► Natural gas source may be related to leaks in the structure of abandoned gas wells

  10. Evolution of Uranium Isotopic Compositions of the Groundwater and Rock in a Sandy-Clayey Aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I. Malov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Uranium isotopes have been used as mechanistic or time scale tracers of natural processes. This paper describes the occurrence and redistribution of U in the Vendian aquifer of a paleo-valley in NW Russia. Forty-four rock samples were collected from nine boreholes with depths up to 160 m, and 25 groundwater samples were collected from 23 boreholes with depths up to 300 m. The U, Fe concentration, and 234U/238U activity ratio were determined in the samples. Estimations were made of the 14C and 234U-238U residence time of groundwater in the aquifer. It has been established that the processes of chemical weathering of Vendian deposits led to the formation of a strong oxidation zone, developed above 250 m.b.s.l. The inverse correlation between the concentrations of uranium and iron is a result of removal of U from paleo-valley slopes in oxidizing conditions, accumulation of U at the bottom of the paleo-valley in reducing conditions, and accumulation of Fe on the slopes and removal from the bottom of the paleo-valley. Almost all U on the slopes has been replaced by a newly formed hydrogenic U with a higher 234U/238U activity ratio. After, dissolution and desorption of hydrogenic U occurred from the slopes during periods with no glaciations and marine transgressions. Elevated concentrations of U are preserved in reduced lenses at the paleo-valley bottom. In these areas, the most dangerous aspect is the flow of groundwater from the underlying horizons, since during the operation of water supply wells it can lead to the creation of local zones of oxidizing conditions in the perforated screens zone and the transition of uranium into solution. For groundwater under oxidizing conditions, an increase in the concentration of uranium is characteristic of an increase in the residence time (age of water in the aquifer. Also, the 234U/238U activity ratio increases with increasing radioactivity of groundwater. Therefore, the most rational approach is to use

  11. Groundwater leaching of neutralized and untreated acid-leached uranium-mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gee, G.W.; Begej, C.W.; Campbell, A.C.; Sauter, N.N.; Opitz, B.E.; Sherwood, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Tailings neutralization was examined to determine the effect of neutralization on contaminant release. Column leaching of acid extracted uranium mill tailings from Exxon Highland Mill, Wyoming, Pathfinder Gas Hills Mill, Wyoming, and the Dawn Midnite Mill, Washington, resulted in the flushing of high concentrations of salts in the first four pore volumes of leachate, followed by a steady decrease to the original groundwater salt concentrations. Neutralization decreased the concentration of salts and radionuclides leaching from the tailings and decreased the volume of solution required to return the solution to the groundwater pH and EC. Radium-226 and uranium-238 leached quickly from the tailings in the initial pore volumes of both neutralized and unneutralized tailings, and then decreased significantly. 6 figures, 5 tables

  12. System-Scale Model of Aquifer, Vadose Zone, and River Interactions for the Hanford 300 Area - Application to Uranium Reactive Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Bacon, Diana H.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Parker, Kyle R.; Waichler, Scott R.; Williams, Mark D.

    2013-10-01

    This report represents a synthesis and integration of basic and applied research into a system-scale model of the Hanford 300 Area groundwater uranium plume, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Richland Operations (DOE-RL) office. The report integrates research findings and data from DOE Office of Science (DOE-SC), Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), and DOE-RL projects, and from the site remediation and closure contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH). The three-dimensional, system-scale model addresses water flow and reactive transport of uranium for the coupled vadose zone, unconfined aquifer, and Columbia River shoreline of the Hanford 300 Area. The system-scale model of the 300 Area was developed to be a decision-support tool to evaluate processes of the total system affecting the groundwater uranium plume. The model can also be used to address “what if” questions regarding different remediation endpoints, and to assist in design and evaluation of field remediation efforts. For example, the proposed cleanup plan for the Hanford 300 Area includes removal, treatment, and disposal of contaminated sediments from known waste sites, enhanced attenuation of uranium hot spots in the vadose and periodically rewetted zone, and continued monitoring of groundwater with institutional controls. Illustrative simulations of polyphosphate infiltration were performed to demonstrate the ability of the system-scale model to address these types of questions. The use of this model in conjunction with continued field monitoring is expected to provide a rigorous basis for developing operational strategies for field remediation and for defining defensible remediation endpoints.

  13. Contamination of wells completed in the Roubidoux aquifer by abandoned zinc and lead mines, Ottawa County, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Scott C.

    1995-01-01

    The Roubidoux aquifer in Ottawa County Oklahoma is used extensively as a source of water for public supplies, commerce, industry, and rural water districts. Water in the Roubidoux aquifer in eastern Ottawa County has relatively low dissolved-solids concentrations (less than 200 mg/L) with calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate as the major ions. The Boone Formation is stratigraphically above the Roubidoux aquifer and is the host rock for zinc and lead sulfide ores, with the richest deposits located in the vicinity of the City of Picher. Mining in what became known as the Picher mining district began in the early 1900's and continued until about 1970. The water in the abandoned zinc and lead mines contains high concentrations of calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, sulfate, fluoride, cadmium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, nickel, and zinc. Water from the abandoned mines is a potential source of contamination to the Roubidoux aquifer and to wells completed in the Roubidoux aquifer. Water samples were collected from wells completed in the Roubidoux aquifer in the Picher mining district and from wells outside the mining district to determine if 10 public supply wells in the mining district are contaminated. The chemical analyses indicate that at least 7 of the 10 public supply wells in the Picher mining district are contaminated by mine water. Application of the Mann-Whitney test indicated that the concentrations of some chemical constituents that are indicators of mine-water contamination are different in water samples from wells in the mining area as compared to wells outside the mining area. Application of the Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed that the concentrations of some chemical constituents that are indicators of mine-water contamination were higher in current (1992-93) data than in historic (1981-83) data, except for pH, which was lower in current than in historic data. pH and sulfate, alkalinity, bicarbonate, magnesium, iron, and tritium concentrations consistently

  14. A process for uranium recovery in phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte Neto, J.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented about studies carried out envisaging the development of a process for uranium recovery from phosphoric acid, produced from the concentrate obtained from phosphorus-uraniferous mineral from Itataia mines (CE, Brazil). This process uses a mixture of DEPA-TOPO as extractant and the extraction cycle involves the following stages: acid pre-treatment; adjustment of the oxidation potential so to ensure that all uranium is hexavalent; extraction of uranium from the acid; screening of the solvent to remove undesirable impurities; uranium re-extraction and precipitation; solvent recovery. A micro-pilot plant for continuous processing was built up. Data collected showed that uranium can be recovered with an yield greater than 99%, thus proving the feasibility of the process and encouraging the construction of a bigger scale plant. (Author) [pt

  15. Process for recovery of uranium from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiewiorowski, T.K.; Thornsberry, W.L. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Process is claimed for the recovery of uranium from wet process phosphoric acid solution in which an organic extractant, containing uranium values and dissolved iron impurities and comprising a dialkylphosphoric acid and a trialkylphosphine oxide dissolved in a water immiscible organic solvent, is contacted with a substantially iron-free dilute aqueous phosphoric acid to remove said iron impurities. The removed impurities are bled from the system by feeding the resulting iron-loaded phosphoric acid to a secondary countercurrent uranium extraction operation from which they leave as part of the uranium-depleted acid raffinate. Also, process for recovering uranium in which the extractant, after it has been stripped of uranium values by aqueous ammonium carbonate, is contacted with a dilute aqueous acid selected from the group consisting of H 2 SO 4 , HCl, HNO 3 and iron-free H 3 PO 4 to improve the extraction efficiency of the organic extractant

  16. The use of carbonate lixiviants to remove uranium from uranium-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, C.W.; Lee, S.Y.; Wilson, J.H.; Timpson, M.E.; Elless, M.P.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this research was to design an extraction media and procedure that would selectively remove uranium without adversely affecting the soils' physicochemical characteristics or generating secondary waste forms difficult to manage or dispose of. Investigations centered around determining the best lixivant and how the various factors such as pH, time, and temperature influenced extraction efficiency. Other factors investigated included the influence of attrition scrubbing, the effect of oxidants and reductants and the recycling of lixiviants. Experimental data obtained at the bench- and pilot-scale levels indicated 80 to 95% of the uranium could be removed from the uranium-contaminated soils by using a carbonate lixiviant. The best treatment was three successive extractions with 0.25 M carbonate-bicarbonate (in presence of KMnO 4 as an oxidant) at 40 C followed with two water rinses

  17. Uranium recovery from wet-process phosphoric acid with octylphenyl acid phosphate. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, W.D.; McKamey, D.R.; Baes, C.F.

    1980-01-01

    Studies were continued of a process for recovering uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid with octylphenyl acid phosphate (OPAP), a mixture of mono- and dioctylphenyl phosphoric acids. The mixture contained at least nine impurities, the principal one being octyl phenol, and also material that readily hydrolyzed to octyl phenol and orthophosphoric acid. The combination of mono- and dioctylphenyl phosphoric acids was the principal uranium extractant, but some of the impurities also extracted uranium. Hydrolysis of the extractant had little effect on uranium extraction, as did the presence of moderate concentrations of octyl phenol and trioctylphenyl phosphate. Diluent choice among refined kerosenes, naphthenic mixtures, and paraffinic hydrocarbons also had little effect on uranium extraction, but extraction was much lower when an aromatic diluent was used. Purified OPAP fractions were sparingly soluble in aliphatic hydrocarbon diluents. The solubility was increased by the presence of impurities such as octyl phenol, and by the addition of water or an acidic solution to the extractant-diluent mixture. In continuous stability tests, extractant loss by distribution to the aqueous phase was much less to wet-process phosphoric acid than to reagent grade acid. Uranium recovery from wet-process acid decreased steadily because of the combined effects of extractant poisoning and precipitation of the extractant as a complex with ferric iron. Unaccountable losses of organic phase volume occurred in the continuous tests. While attempts to recover the lost organic phase were unsuccessful, the test results indicate it was not lost by entrainment or dissolution in the phosphoric acid solutions. 21 figures, 8 tables

  18. Biodegradation: Updating the Concepts of Control for Microbial Cleanup in Contaminated Aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Elsner, Martin; Griebler, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation is one of the most favored and sustainable means of removing organic pollutants from contaminated aquifers but the major steering factors are still surprisingly poorly understood. Growing evidence questions some of the established concepts for control of biodegradation. Here, we...... on the controls of biodegradation in contaminant plumes. These include the plume fringe concept, transport limitations, and transient conditions as currently underestimated processes affecting biodegradation....

  19. Melt refining of uranium contaminated copper, nickel, and mild steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Xinwen; Liu Wencang; Zhang Yuan

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the experiment results on melt refining of uranium contaminated metallic discards such as copper, nickel, and mild steel. Based on recommended processes, uranium contents in ingots shall decrease below 1 ppm; metal recovery is higher than 96%; and slag production is below 5% in weight of the metal to be refined. The uranium in the slag is homogeneously distributed. The slag seems to be hard ceramics, insoluble in water, and can be directly disposed of after proper packaging

  20. Spore-forming, Desulfosporosinus-like sulphate-reducing bacteria from a shallow aquifer contaminated with gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, W J; Franzmann, P D; Mee, B J

    2000-02-01

    Previous studies on the geochemistry of a shallow unconfined aquifer contaminated with hydrocarbons suggested that the degradation of some hydrocarbons was linked to bacterial sulphate reduction. There was attenuation of naphthalene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB), toluene, p-xylene and ethylbenzene in the groundwater with concomitant loss of sulphate. Here, the recovery of eight strains of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) from the contaminated site is reported. All were straight or curved rod-shaped cells which formed endospores. Amplification and sequencing of the 16S rDNA indicated that the strains were all sulphate reducers of the Gram-positive line of descent, and were most closely related to Desulfosporosinus (previously Desulfotomaculum) orientis DSM 8344 (97-98.9% sequence similarity). The strains clustered in three phylogenetic groups based on 16S rRNA sequences. Whole cell fatty acid compositions were similar to those of D. orientis DSM 8344, and were consistent with previous studies of fatty acids in soil and groundwater from the site. Microcosms containing groundwater from this aquifer indicated a role for sulphate reduction in the degradation of [ring-UL-14C]toluene, but not for the degradation of [UL-14C]benzene which could also be degraded by the microcosms. Adding one of the strains that was isolated from the groundwater (strain T2) to sulphate-enriched microcosms increased the rate of toluene degradation four- to 10-fold but had no effect on the rate of benzene degradation. The addition of molybdate, an inhibitor of sulphate reduction, to the groundwater samples decreased the rate of toluene mineralization. There was no evidence to support the mineralization of [UL-14C]benzene, [ring-UL-14C]toluene or unlabelled m-xylene, p-xylene, ethylbenzene, TMB or naphthalene by any of the strains in pure culture. Growth of all the strains was completely inhibited by 100 micromol l-1 TMB.

  1. Radioactivity in groundwater associated with uranium and phosphate mining and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, R.F.

    1981-01-01

    From 1975 to 1980 USEPA investigations of the uranium and phosphate mining and milling industries addressed associated changes in the radionuclide content of nearby water resources. Available data for 226 Ra in central Florida aquifers show no significant difference in phosphate mineralized vs. nonmineralized areas. Apparently neither mineralization nor the industry cause significant increase in the Ra content of groundwater. Uranium mining and milling in a number of Western States (e.g. New Mexico, Wyoming, Colorado, Washington) cause locally increased levels of U, Ra and Th in shallow groundwater, but potable water supplies have not been adversely affected. Contamination of deep aquifers does not appear to occur, although elevated levels of Ra and U are present in many mine water discharges as a result of ore body oxidation and leaching. Model underground and surface U mines were used to evaluate chemical loading of 238 U, 226 Ra, 210 Pb and 210 Po to local and regional hydrographic units. Infiltration of mine water to potable groundwater and suspension/solution of contaminants in flood water constitute the principal elements of the aqueous pathway

  2. Examination of health status of population from Uranium contaminated regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milacic, S.; Jovicic, D.; Pantelic, G.; Kovacevic, R.; Pavlovic, M.; Tanaskovic, I.

    2002-01-01

    Uranium is widely distributed in the natural environment: in the soil, air and food. And thus all people on the planet inhale or ingest small quantities of uranium every day. However, depleted uranium (DU) is industrial product. It is used in medicine, aviation, astronomy, oil exploitation, as well as for military purposes for penetrating ammunition. America is not the only country that applies depleted uranium ammunition. It is a part of the military arsenal in France, England, Turkey, Israel, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and Thailand. Depleted uranium is toxic for both humans and animals for two basic reasons: as a heavy metal, it has toxic chemical effects, and as an alpha-emitter, it also has radioactive effects. Although it is considered less radioactive than natural uranium, its toxicity is high due to high LET (linear energetic transfer) irradiation, tissue deposition (bones, kidneys, blood, lungs) and elimination time (5000 days). Radiation limit above which adverse health effects are initiated (radiation carcinogenic risk), depends on the quantity and contamination time (how much and how long), including also other factors, such as age, sex, previous health status, exposure to other materials, genetic predisposition and radiosensitivity (lack of indicators), diet and stress. According to ICRP recommendations, carcinogenic risk for the occupationally exposed individuals is minimal if the exposure is limited to the effective dose of 100 mSv for five years and not above 50 in a single year, being five times lower for general population. In average annual effective dose per population, from all sources is below 1mSv, carcinogenic risk will range from 1 per 10 000 to 1 per 100 000, and in occupationally exposed individuals exposed to maximum permitted doses (MPD), the risk of cancer with fatal outcome is below 3 per 100 000). Immediate effects of population exposure to low uranium doses do not result in evident clinical picture. Late consequences include

  3. Flotation separation of uranium from contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, M.; Mehta, R.; Garcia, H.; Chai, C.D.; Smith, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    The volume of low-level contaminated soil at the Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapon Sites are in the order of several million tons. Most of the contaminants are uranium, plutonium, other heavy metals and organic compounds. Selected physical separation processes have shown demonstrated potential in concentrating the radionuclides in a small fraction of the soil. Depending upon the size, nature of bonding and distributions of radionuclides, more than 90% of the radionuclide activity can be concentrated in a small volume of fraction of the soil. The physico-chemical separation processes such as flotation in a mechanical and microbubble tall column cell have shown promising applications in cleaning up the high volume contaminated soil

  4. An experimental and modeling study of grain-scale uranium desorption from field-contaminated sediments and the potential influence of microporosity on mass-transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliker, D.; Liu, C.; Kent, D. B.; Zachara, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The aquifer below the 300-Area of the Hanford site (Richland, WA, USA) is plagued by a persistent plume of dissolved uranium (U(VI)) in excess of the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water maximum contamination level even after the removal of highly contaminated sediments. The aquifer sediments in the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone act as both a source and sink for uranium during stage changes in the nearby Columbia River. Diffusion limitation of uranium mass-transfer within these sediments has been cited as a potential cause of the plume's persistence. Equilibrium U(VI) sorption is a strong function of variable chemical conditions, especially carbonate, hydrogen, and uranyl ion activities. Field-contaminated sediments from the site require up to 1,000 hours to reach equilibrium in static batch reactors. Increases in U(VI) concentrations over longer time-scales result from changes in chemical conditions, which drive reactions with sediments that favor U(VI) desorption. Grain-scale U(VI) sorption/desorption rates are slow, likely owing to diffusion of U(VI) and other solutes through intra-granular pore domains. In order to improve understanding of the impact of intra-granular diffusion and chemical reactions controlling grain-scale U(VI) release, experiments were conducted on individual particle size fractions of a single set of constant chemical conditions with multiple stop-flow events, were similar for all size fractions displacement from equilibrium and multiple diffusion domains were described with a two-parameter lognormal distribution of mass-transfer rate coefficients. Parameters describing mass transfer were the same for all size fractions reaction models calibrated with individual size fractions predicted U(VI) and chemical composition as a function of time for the bulk sediment sample. Volumes of pores less than 2.4 nm, quantified using nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, were the same for all size fractions < 2 mm, nearly double

  5. Fast Oxidation Processes in a Naturally Reduced Aquifer Zone Caused by Dissolved Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. A.; Jemison, N. E.; Williams, K. H.; Hobson, C.; Bush, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of naturally reduced zones is quite common in alluvial aquifers in the western U.S.A. due to the burial of woody debris in flood plains. The naturally reduced zones are heterogeneously dispersed in such aquifers and are characterized by high concentrations of organic carbon and reduced phases, including iron sulfides and reduced forms of metals, including uranium(IV). The persistence of high concentrations of dissolved uranium(VI) at uranium-contaminated aquifers on the Colorado Plateau has been attributed to slow oxidation of insoluble uranium(IV) mineral phases that are found in association with these natural reducing zones, although there is little understanding of the relative importance of various potential oxidants. Three field experiments were conducted within an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River near Rifle, CO wherein groundwater associated with naturally reduced zones was pumped into a gas-impermeable tank, mixed with a conservative tracer (Br-), bubbled with a gas phase composed of 97% O2 and 3% CO2, and then returned to the subsurface in the same well from which it was withdrawn. Within minutes of re-injection of the oxygenated groundwater, dissolved uranium(VI) concentrations increased from less than 1 μM to greater than 2.5 μM, demonstrating that oxygen can be an important oxidant for uranium in these field systems if supplied to the naturally reduced zones. Small concentrations of nitrate were also observed in the previously nitrate-free groundwater, and Fe(II) decreased to the detection limit. These results contrast with other laboratory and field results in which oxygen was introduced to systems containing high concentrations of mackinawite (FeS) rather than the more crystalline iron sulfides found in aged, naturally reduced zones. The flux of oxygen to the naturally reduced zones in the alluvial aquifers occurs mainly through interactions between groundwater and gas phases at the water table, and seasonal variations

  6. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site Salt Lake City, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah, evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium ore processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell located at Clive, Utah, in 1987 by the US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate residual ground water contamination at the former uranium processing site, known as the Vitro processing site. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the appropriate remedial action for contaminated ground water at the site.

  7. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site Salt Lake City, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah, evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium ore processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell located at Clive, Utah, in 1987 by the US Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate residual ground water contamination at the former uranium processing site, known as the Vitro processing site. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the appropriate remedial action for contaminated ground water at the site

  8. Obtention of uranium-molybdenum alloy ingots technique to avoid carbon contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrosa, Tercio A.; Paula, Joao Bosco de; Reis, Sergio C.; Brina, Jose Giovanni M.; Faeda, Kelly Cristina M.; Ferraz, Wilmar B., E-mail: tap@cdtn.b, E-mail: jbp@cdtn.b, E-mail: jgmb@cdtn.b, E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The replacement of high enriched uranium (U{sup 235} > 85 wt%) by low enriched uranium (U{sup 235} < 20wt%) nuclear fuels in research and test reactors is being implemented as an initiative of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, conceived in the USA since mid-70s, in order to avoid nuclear weapons proliferation. Such replacement implies in the use of compounds or alloys with higher uranium densities. Among the several uranium alloys investigated since then, U-Mo presents great application potential due to its physical properties and good behavior during irradiation, which makes it an important option as a nuclear fuel material for the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor - RMB. The development of the plate-type nuclear fuel based on U-Mo alloy is being performed at the Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN) and also at IPEN. The carbon contamination of the alloy is one of the great concerns during the melting process. It was observed that U-Mo alloy is more critical considering carbon contamination when using graphite crucibles. Alternative melting technique was implemented at CDTN in order to avoid carbon contamination from graphite crucible using Yttria stabilized ZrO{sub 2} crucibles. Ingots with low carbon content and good internal quality were obtained. (author)

  9. Effect of Particle-size Distribution on Chemical Washing Experiment of Uranium Contaminated Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wan Suk; Kim, Gye Nam; Shon, Dong Bin; Park, Hye Min; Kim, Ki Hong; Lee, Kun Woo; Lee, Ki Won; Moon, Jei Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Taken down of nuclear institution was radioactive contaminated concrete over 70% of whole waste. Advanced countries have realized the importance of waste processing. Nuclear institutions keep a lot of radioactive contaminated concrete in internal waste storage. Therefore radioactive contaminated concrete disport to whole waste and reduce for self-processing standard concentration may be disposed of inexpensive more than radioactive waste storage. This study uses mechanical and thermal technology for a uranium contaminated concrete process in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute's radioactive waste storage. Mechanical and thermal technologies are divided based on particle size. Each particles-sized concrete analyzed for uranium contamination using an MCA instrument. A chemical washing experiment was carried out

  10. Evaluation of neutralization treatment processes and their use for uranium tailings solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.R.; Opitz, B.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The potential for groundwater contamination from the typically acidic mill wastes that are disposed of in tailings impoundments is of primary concern at uranium mill sites in the US. Solution-treatment processes provide a system for limiting the environmental impact from acidic seepage. Treatment of uranium tailings solutions from evaporation ponds, underdrains, and surface seeps could aid in decommissioning active sites or be used as an emergency measure to avert possible uncontrolled discharges. At present, neutralization processes appear to be best suited for treating uranium mill tailings solution because they can, at a reasonable cost, limit the solution concentration of many contaminants and thus reduce the potential for groundwater contamination. However, the effectiveness of the neutralization process depends on the reagent used as well as the chemistry of the waste stream. This article provides a description of neutralization processes, an assessment of their performance on acidic uranium tailings leachates, and recommendations for their use at US uranium mill sites

  11. Environmental fate of depleted uranium at three sites contaminated during the balkan conflict

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radenkovic, M.; Joksic, J.; Todorovic, D.; Kovacevic, M.

    2006-01-01

    A study on depleted uranium fate in the sites contaminated during the 1999 war conflict in Serbia was conducted in phases until the clean up activities were completed. The ammunition remains found at the locations in the surface soil were collected in the first phase during the radiation survey of the affected areas. The most of depleted uranium penetrators left buried deep into the ground exposed to the weathering and corrosion processes. The contamination level in the air, water, soil and bio -indicators was controlled all the time by routine gamma and alpha spectrometry measurements. Depleted uranium migration was studied through the soil profile surrounding the penetrator during the 2001 at the Bratoselce location showing the contamination level fall to the 1% of its value at approximately 15 cm distance to the source. The samples taken from the soil layers at different distances in the profile are subjected to a modified Tessiers five-step sequential extraction procedure. The uranium and heavy metals contents were determined in the obtained fractions. Results have specified carbonates and iron hydrous-oxides as the most probable substrates for uranium physical/chemical associations formed in the soil for the time elapsed. A very strong dependence of substrate onto contamination level was found. The correlation of uranium and other heavy metals was obtained. The 234 U/ 238 U and 235 U/ 238 U ratios are determined in extracts by alpha spectrometry after appropriate radiochemical separation procedure and thin alpha sources electroplating. The analysis has shown the share of depleted in total uranium content in exchangeable, carbonate, hydrous or crystalline iron/manganese, organic and residue phases indicating the bioavailability of depleted uranium present in the soil. The results are discussed related to detailed geochemical analysis of the particular soil type common for this region. Depleted uranium content in soil samples taken at the locations after the

  12. Uranium Contamination in the Subsurface Beneath the 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Mark D.

    2008-02-29

    This report provides a description of uranium contamination in the subsurface at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The principal focus is a persistence plume in groundwater, which has not attenuated as predicted by earlier remedial investigations. Included in the report are chapters on current conditions, hydrogeologic framework, groundwater flow modeling, and geochemical considerations. The report is intended to describe what is known or inferred about the uranium contamination for the purpose of making remedial action decisions.

  13. Cola soft drinks for evaluating the bioaccessibility of uranium in contaminated mine soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lottermoser, Bernd G; Schnug, Ewald; Haneklaus, Silvia

    2011-08-15

    There is a rising need for scientifically sound and quantitative as well as simple, rapid, cheap and readily available soil testing procedures. The purpose of this study was to explore selected soft drinks (Coca-Cola Classic®, Diet Coke®, Coke Zero®) as indicators of bioaccessible uranium and other trace elements (As, Ce, Cu, La, Mn, Ni, Pb, Th, Y, Zn) in contaminated soils of the Mary Kathleen uranium mine site, Australia. Data of single extraction tests using Coca-Cola Classic®, Diet Coke® and Coke Zero® demonstrate that extractable arsenic, copper, lanthanum, manganese, nickel, yttrium and zinc concentrations correlate significantly with DTPA- and CaCl₂-extractable metals. Moreover, the correlation between DTPA-extractable uranium and that extracted using Coca-Cola Classic® is close to unity (+0.98), with reduced correlations for Diet Coke® (+0.66) and Coke Zero® (+0.55). Also, Coca-Cola Classic® extracts uranium concentrations near identical to DTPA, whereas distinctly higher uranium fractions were extracted using Diet Coke® and Coke Zero®. Results of this study demonstrate that the use of Coca-Cola Classic® in single extraction tests provided an excellent indication of bioaccessible uranium in the analysed soils and of uranium uptake into leaves and stems of the Sodom apple (Calotropis procera). Moreover, the unconventional reagent is superior in terms of availability, costs, preparation and disposal compared to traditional chemicals. Contaminated site assessments and rehabilitation of uranium mine sites require a solid understanding of the chemical speciation of environmentally significant elements for estimating their translocation in soils and plant uptake. Therefore, Cola soft drinks have potential applications in single extraction tests of uranium contaminated soils and may be used for environmental impact assessments of uranium mine sites, nuclear fuel processing plants and waste storage and disposal facilities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier

  14. Spectroscopic Confirmation of Uranium (VI)-Carbonato Adsorption Complexes on Hematite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargar, John R

    1999-01-01

    Evaluating societal risks posed by uranium contamination from waste management facilities, mining sites, and heavy industry requires knowledge about uranium transport in groundwater, often the most significant pathway of exposure to humans. It has been proposed that uranium mobility in aquifers may be controlled by adsorption of U(VI)-carbonato complexes on oxide minerals. The existence of such complexes has not been demonstrated, and little is known about their compositions and reaction stoichiometries. We have used Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies to probe the existence, structures, and compositions of FeO surface -U(VI)-carbonato complexes on hematite throughout the pH range of uranyl uptake under conditions relevant to aquifers. U(VI)-carbonato complexes were found to be the predominant adsorbed U(VI) species at all pH values examined, a much wider pH range than previously postulated based on analogy to aqueous U(VI)-carbonato complexes, which are trace constituents at pH < 6. This result indicates the inadequacy of the common modeling assumption that the compositions and predominance of adsorbed species can be inferred from aqueous species. By extension, adsorbed carbonato complexes may be of major importance to the groundwater transport of similar actinide contaminants such as neptunium and plutonium

  15. Phyto remediation of Depleted Uranium from Contaminated Soil and Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Saad, K.A.; Amr, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Seedlings of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) was used to test the effect of ph, citric acid, phosphoric acid, and ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the uptake and the translocation of depleted uranium (DU). The experiments was performed in hydroponic cultures and environmental soil samples collected from Qatar. The results of hydroponic experiment indicated that DU accumulated more in the roots than leaves, in the plants that was grown in contaminated water. The presence of phosphoric acid, citric acid, or EDTA showed different patterns of DU uptake. Higher transfer factor was observed when phosphoric acid was added. When EDTA was added, higher DU uptake was observed. The data suggested the DU was mostly retained to the root when EDTA was added. Also, the experiments were applied on environmental soil samples collected from Qatar. The presence of phosphoric acid, citric acid, or EDTA showed different patterns of DU uptake for the three different soil samples. The addition of EDTA increased the DU uptake in the sunflowers planted in the three types of soils. The results indicated that, generally, DU accumulated more in the roots compared to leaves and stems, except when soil was spiked with phosphoric acid. The translocation ratio was limited but highest ( 1.4) in the sunflower planted in soil S2705 when spiked with phosphoric acid. In the three soils tested, the result suggested higher DU translocation of sunflower with the presence of phosphoric acid.

  16. Radiological contamination by depleted uranium in the Al-Tahreer tower building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ataby, N.R.; Aisa, B.H.; Jebir, H.M.; Hatem, J.N.

    2011-01-01

    The research plan included assessment of the radioactivity of the Al-Tahreer Tower Building (the Turkish restaurant recent) through direct measurements and sampling of soil for the four floors (1th,2th,3th,4th) of the building, which contains fourteen floor in addition to the basement, by using portable radiation detection equipment to know the increasing in the levels of exposure and contamination resulting from the bombing a Al-Tahreer Tower building by depleted uranium bullets, the results of radiological surveys by using the portable contamination radiation detection (CAB) indicated readings of contaminated soil reached to 60 c/sec, and parts of shells of depleted uranium reached to 90 c/ sec , while the natural contamination rate in the area is (0.5 c/sec), the natural exposure rate in the area is 9 μR/ hr but the higher exposure rate reached to 60 μR / hr when the device (Ludlum) putting on the contaminated regions(distance about 0.5 cm). The radiological analyses of the collected soil samples were done in the laboratory of the center of Radiological Researches in the Ministry of sciences and Technology by using gamma spectrometry (which contains High-purity Germanium Detector) with a efficiency of 40% and resolution 2 keV for Energy, 1.33 Mev,collection,preparations and tests of soil samples were all done according to IAEA.The normal concentration for Th 234 and Pa 234 m in the soil samples taken from areas near to the building (can consider as background radiation region) is in range 41 Bq /Kg for Th 234 ,and nil for pa 234 m ,while higher concentration of Th 234 in contaminated soil is 1194 Bq/kg,and 1664 Bq/kg for pa 234 m which is a clear indication of the presence of high concentrations an isotope of uranium 238 as they are supposed to be in equilibrium radiation. The major aim of this study include removal the contaminated regions in the building, to protect the population and the environment from the effect of radiological contamination which

  17. Both Phosphorus Fertilizers and Indigenous Bacteria Enhance Arsenic Release into Groundwater in Arsenic-Contaminated Aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Wei, Chia-Cheng; Huang, Chi-Wei; Chang, Chun-Han; Hsu, Fu-Lan; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2016-03-23

    Arsenic (As) is a human carcinogen, and arsenic contamination in groundwater is a worldwide public health concern. Arsenic-affected areas are found in many places but are reported mostly in agricultural farmlands, yet the interaction of fertilizers, microorganisms, and arsenic mobilization in arsenic-contaminated aquifers remains uncharacterized. This study investigates the effects of fertilizers and bacteria on the mobilization of arsenic in two arsenic-contaminated aquifers. We performed microcosm experiments using arsenic-contaminated sediments and amended with inorganic nitrogenous or phosphorus fertilizers for 1 and 4 months under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The results show that microcosms amended with 100 mg/L phosphorus fertilizers (dipotassium phosphate), but not nitrogenous fertilizers (ammonium sulfate), significantly increase aqueous As(III) release in arsenic-contaminated sediments under anaerobic condition. We also show that concentrations of iron, manganese, potassium, sodium, calcium, and magnesium are increased in the aqueous phase and that the addition of dipotassium phosphate causes a further increase in aqueous iron, potassium, and sodium, suggesting that multiple metal elements may take part in the arsenic release process. Furthermore, microbial analysis indicates that the dominant microbial phylum is shifted from α-proteobacteria to β- and γ-proteobacteria when the As(III) is increased and phosphate is added in the aquifer. Our results provide evidence that both phosphorus fertilizers and microorganisms can mediate the release of arsenic to groundwater in arsenic-contaminated sediments under anaerobic condition. Our study suggests that agricultural activity such as the use of fertilizers and monitoring phosphate concentration in groundwater should be taken into consideration for the management of arsenic in groundwater.

  18. Recuperation of uranium from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero, G.; Jodra, L.G.; Otero, J.L.; Josa, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The Spanish capacity for phosphoric acid production is 500.000 t P 2 O 5 /yr. This acid has an average concentration of 365 g U 3 O 8 / t P 2 O 5 . Therefore about 180 t U 3 O 8 /yr are dissolved. In 1969, the Junta de Energia Nuclear (JEN) developed, in bench scale, a solvent extraction process to recover the uranium from the phosphoric acid. The solvent used was a synergistic mixture of D2EHPA and TOPO. The results were very promising with good recovery and very high quality for the uranium concentrate. Later, the J.E.N. continued the studies in a pilot plant scale. For this purpose, was built an experimental facility in Huelva; it can treat about 7 cu. m/day of brown acid. Fosforico Espanol, S.A. (FESA) collaborated in the studies and agreed to setting up these installations in their factory. They also provided fresh phosphoric acid for the tests. In this pilot plant we studied the following stages: a) Clarification and conditioning of the phosphoric acid; b) Uranium extraction followed by stripping in a reducing medium; c) Purification by extraction and washing; d) Obtention of the concentrate by stripping with ammonia and CO 2 gas, followed by crystallization of the ammonium uranyl tricarbonate (AUT); and e) Calcination of the concentrate to decompose the AUT to uranium oxides. The results confirmed the laboratory test data. Recuperation levels were between 85 and 90%. The AUT calcined at 550 0 C. gave a product with 96-98% U 3 O 8 . In view of the pilot plant results we have prepared a black book for an industrial plant to treat about 3700 cu. m/day of phosphoric acid. At the present time the financial aspects of this installation are being studied [es

  19. Manual of acid in situ leach uranium mining technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-08-01

    In situ leaching (ISL) technology recovers uranium using two alternative chemical leaching systems - acid and alkaline. This report brings together information from several technical disciplines that are an essential part of ISL technology. They include uranium geology, geohydrology, chemistry as well as reservoir engineering and process engineering. This report provides an extensive description of acid ISL uranium mining technology

  20. Manual of acid in situ leach uranium mining technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-08-01

    In situ leaching (ISL) technology recovers uranium using two alternative chemical leaching systems - acid and alkaline. This report brings together information from several technical disciplines that are an essential part of ISL technology. They include uranium geology, geohydrology, chemistry as well as reservoir engineering and process engineering. This report provides an extensive description of acid ISL uranium mining technology.

  1. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    This report evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells to determine the potential for immediate human health and environmental impacts. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated groundwater that flows beneath the processing site towards the Gunnison River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentration of most contaminants are used in this risk assessment. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium

  2. Acid Dissolution of Depleted Uranium from Catalyst using Microwave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Jin Hyun; Jeong, Seong Gi; Park, Kwang Heon [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The separation process of uranium is one of the most important fields in nuclear industry because uranium is used primary in nuclear power plants. Uranium ores are treated by either acid or alkaline reagents. Uranium can be dissolved by acid or alkaline solutions. There are two oxidation states in which the hexavalent form, the oxide of which is UO{sub 3}, and the tetravalent form, the oxide of which is UO{sub 2}. However, depleted uranium(DU) has also been used as a catalyst in specialized chemical reaction such as ammoxidation. The preferred catalyst for propylene oxidation with ammonia was a uranium oxide-antimony oxide composition. The active phase of catalyst was known as USbO{sub 5} and USb{sub 3}O{sub 10}. There is pentavalent form. Waste catalyst containing DU was generated and stored in chemical industry. In this work, we removed DU from catalyst by acid dissolution

  3. Evaluation of maximum radionuclide concentration from decay chains migration in aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino Branco, O.E. de.

    1983-01-01

    The mathematical formulation of the mechanisms involved in the transport of contaminants in aquifers is presented. The methodology employed is described. A method of calculation the maximum concentration of radionuclides migrating in the underground water, and resulting from one decay chain, is then proposed. As an example, the methodology is applied to a waste basin, built to receive effluents from a hypothectical uranium ore mining and milling facility. (M.A.C.) [pt

  4. A Limited Microbial Consortium Is Responsible for Extended Bioreduction of Uranium in a Contaminated Aquifer ▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gihring, Thomas M.; Zhang, Gengxin; Brandt, Craig C.; Brooks, Scott C.; Campbell, James H.; Carroll, Susan; Criddle, Craig S.; Green, Stefan J.; Jardine, Phil; Kostka, Joel E.; Lowe, Kenneth; Mehlhorn, Tonia L.; Overholt, Will; Watson, David B.; Yang, Zamin; Wu, Wei-Min; Schadt, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    Subsurface amendments of slow-release substrates (e.g., emulsified vegetable oil [EVO]) are thought to be a pragmatic alternative to using short-lived, labile substrates for sustained uranium bioimmobilization within contaminated groundwater systems. Spatial and temporal dynamics of subsurface microbial communities during EVO amendment are unknown and likely differ significantly from those of populations stimulated by soluble substrates, such as ethanol and acetate. In this study, a one-time EVO injection resulted in decreased groundwater U concentrations that remained below initial levels for approximately 4 months. Pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR of 16S rRNA from monitoring well samples revealed a rapid decline in groundwater bacterial community richness and diversity after EVO injection, concurrent with increased 16S rRNA copy levels, indicating the selection of a narrow group of taxa rather than a broad community stimulation. Members of the Firmicutes family Veillonellaceae dominated after injection and most likely catalyzed the initial oil decomposition. Sulfate-reducing bacteria from the genus Desulforegula, known for long-chain fatty acid oxidation to acetate, also dominated after EVO amendment. Acetate and H2 production during EVO degradation appeared to stimulate NO3−, Fe(III), U(VI), and SO42− reduction by members of the Comamonadaceae, Geobacteriaceae, and Desulfobacterales. Methanogenic archaea flourished late to comprise over 25% of the total microbial community. Bacterial diversity rebounded after 9 months, although community compositions remained distinct from the preamendment conditions. These results demonstrated that a one-time EVO amendment served as an effective electron donor source for in situ U(VI) bioreduction and that subsurface EVO degradation and metal reduction were likely mediated by successive identifiable guilds of organisms. PMID:21764967

  5. Technology of uranium recovery from wet-process phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Katsutoshi [Saga Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science and Engineering; Nakashio, Fumiyuki

    1982-12-01

    Rock phosphate contains from 0.005 to 0.02 wt.% of uranium. Though the content is a mere 5 to 10 % of that in uranium ore, the total recovery of uranium is significant since it is used for fertilizer manufacture in a large quantity. Wet-process phosphoric acid is produced by the reaction of rock phosphate with sulfuric acid. The recovery of uranium from this phosphoric acid is mostly by solvent extraction at present. According to U/sup 4 +/ or UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ as the form of its existence, the technique of solvent extraction differs. The following matters are described: processing of rock phosphate; recovery techniques including the extraction by OPPA-octyl pyrophosphoric acid for U/sup 4 +/, and by mixed DEHPA-Di-(2)-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid and TOPO-tryoctyl phosphine oxide for UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/, and by OPAP-octylphenyl acid phosphate for U/sup 4 +/; the recent progress of the technology as seen in patents.

  6. Evaluation of Different Modeling Approaches to Simulate Contaminant Transport in a Fractured Limestone Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosthaf, K.; Rosenberg, L.; Balbarini, N.; Broholm, M. M.; Bjerg, P. L.; Binning, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    It is important to understand the fate and transport of contaminants in limestone aquifers because they are a major drinking water resource. This is challenging because they are highly heterogeneous; with micro-porous grains, flint inclusions, and being heavily fractured. Several modeling approaches have been developed to describe contaminant transport in fractured media, such as the discrete fracture (with various fracture geometries), equivalent porous media (with and without anisotropy), and dual porosity models. However, these modeling concepts are not well tested for limestone geologies. Given available field data and model purpose, this paper therefore aims to develop, examine and compare modeling approaches for transport of contaminants in fractured limestone aquifers. The model comparison was conducted for a contaminated site in Denmark, where a plume of a dissolved contaminant (PCE) has migrated through a fractured limestone aquifer. Multilevel monitoring wells have been installed at the site and available data includes information on spill history, extent of contamination, geology and hydrogeology. To describe the geology and fracture network, data from borehole logs was combined with an analysis of heterogeneities and fractures from a nearby excavation (analog site). Methods for translating the geological information and fracture mapping into each of the model concepts were examined. Each model was compared with available field data, considering both model fit and measures of model suitability. An analysis of model parameter identifiability and sensitivity is presented. Results show that there is considerable difference between modeling approaches, and that it is important to identify the right one for the actual scale and model purpose. A challenge in the use of field data is the determination of relevant hydraulic properties and interpretation of aqueous and solid phase contaminant concentration sampling data. Traditional water sampling has a bias

  7. Metagenome-based metabolic reconstruction reveals the ecophysiological function of Epsilonproteobacteria in a hydrocarbon-contaminated sulfidic aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hardy Keller

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The population genome of an uncultured bacterium assigned to the Campylobacterales (Epsilonproteobacteria was reconstructed from a metagenome dataset obtained by whole-genome shotgun pyrosequencing. Genomic DNA was extracted from a sulfate-reducing, m-xylene-mineralizing enrichment culture isolated from groundwater of a benzene-contaminated sulfidic aquifer. The identical epsilonproteobacterial phylotype has previously been detected in toluene- or benzene-mineralizing, sulfate-reducing consortia enriched from the same site. Previous stable isotope probing experiments with 13C6-labeled benzene suggested that this phylotype assimilates benzene-derived carbon in a syntrophic benzene-mineralizing consortium that uses sulfate as terminal electron acceptor. However, the type of energy metabolism and the ecophysiological function of this epsilonproteobacterium within aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading consortia and in the sulfidic aquifer are poorly understood.Annotation of the epsilonproteobacterial population genome suggests that the bacterium plays a key role in sulfur cycling as indicated by the presence of a sqr gene encoding a sulfide quinone oxidoreductase and psr genes encoding a polysulfide reductase. It may gain energy by using sulfide or hydrogen/formate as electron donors. Polysulfide, fumarate, as well as oxygen are potential electron acceptors. Auto- or mixotrophic carbon metabolism seems plausible since a complete reductive citric acid cycle was detected. Thus the bacterium can thrive in pristine groundwater as well as in hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifers. In hydrocarbon-contaminated sulfidic habitats, the epsilonproteobacterium may generate energy by coupling the oxidation of hydrogen or formate and highly abundant sulfide with the reduction of fumarate and/or polysulfide, accompanied by efficient assimilation of acetate produced during fermentation or incomplete oxidation of hydrocarbons. The highly efficient assimilation of acetate was

  8. Metagenome-Based Metabolic Reconstruction Reveals the Ecophysiological Function of Epsilonproteobacteria in a Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Sulfidic Aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Andreas H; Schleinitz, Kathleen M; Starke, Robert; Bertilsson, Stefan; Vogt, Carsten; Kleinsteuber, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The population genome of an uncultured bacterium assigned to the Campylobacterales (Epsilonproteobacteria) was reconstructed from a metagenome dataset obtained by whole-genome shotgun pyrosequencing. Genomic DNA was extracted from a sulfate-reducing, m-xylene-mineralizing enrichment culture isolated from groundwater of a benzene-contaminated sulfidic aquifer. The identical epsilonproteobacterial phylotype has previously been detected in toluene- or benzene-mineralizing, sulfate-reducing consortia enriched from the same site. Previous stable isotope probing (SIP) experiments with (13)C6-labeled benzene suggested that this phylotype assimilates benzene-derived carbon in a syntrophic benzene-mineralizing consortium that uses sulfate as terminal electron acceptor. However, the type of energy metabolism and the ecophysiological function of this epsilonproteobacterium within aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading consortia and in the sulfidic aquifer are poorly understood. Annotation of the epsilonproteobacterial population genome suggests that the bacterium plays a key role in sulfur cycling as indicated by the presence of an sqr gene encoding a sulfide quinone oxidoreductase and psr genes encoding a polysulfide reductase. It may gain energy by using sulfide or hydrogen/formate as electron donors. Polysulfide, fumarate, as well as oxygen are potential electron acceptors. Auto- or mixotrophic carbon metabolism seems plausible since a complete reductive citric acid cycle was detected. Thus the bacterium can thrive in pristine groundwater as well as in hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifers. In hydrocarbon-contaminated sulfidic habitats, the epsilonproteobacterium may generate energy by coupling the oxidation of hydrogen or formate and highly abundant sulfide with the reduction of fumarate and/or polysulfide, accompanied by efficient assimilation of acetate produced during fermentation or incomplete oxidation of hydrocarbons. The highly efficient assimilation of acetate was recently

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lakeview, Oregon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lake view, Oregon evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site

  10. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lakeview, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lake view, Oregon evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site.

  11. New Technique for Speciation of Uranium in Sediments Following Acetate-Stimulated Bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-06-22

    Acetate-stimulated bioremediation is a promising new technique for sequestering toxic uranium contamination from groundwater. The speciation of uranium in sediments after such bioremediation attempts remains unknown as a result of low uranium concentration, and is important to analyzing the stability of sequestered uranium. A new technique was developed for investigating the oxidation state and local molecular structure of uranium from field site sediments using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), and was implemented at the site of a former uranium mill in Rifle, CO. Glass columns filled with bioactive Rifle sediments were deployed in wells in the contaminated Rifle aquifer and amended with a hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) stock solution to increase uranium concentration while maintaining field conditions. This sediment was harvested and XAS was utilized to analyze the oxidation state and local molecular structure of the uranium in sediment samples. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data was collected and compared to known uranium spectra to determine the local molecular structure of the uranium in the sediment. Fitting was used to determine that the field site sediments did not contain uraninite (UO{sub 2}), indicating that models based on bioreduction using pure bacterial cultures are not accurate for bioremediation in the field. Stability tests on the monomeric tetravalent uranium (U(IV)) produced by bioremediation are needed in order to assess the efficacy of acetate-stimulation bioremediation.

  12. Uranium complex recycling method of purifying uranium liquors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elikan, L.; Lyon, W.L.; Sundar, P.S.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium is separated from contaminating cations in an aqueous liquor containing uranyl ions. The liquor is mixed with sufficient recycled uranium complex to raise the weight ratio of uranium to said cations preferably to at least about three. The liquor is then extracted with at least enough non-interfering, water-immiscible, organic solvent to theoretically extract about all of the uranium in the liquor. The organic solvent contains a reagent which reacts with the uranyl ions to form a complex soluble in the solvent. If the aqueous liquor is acidic, the organic solvent is then scrubbed with water. The organic solvent is stripped with a solution containing at least enough ammonium carbonate to precipitate the uranium complex. A portion of the uranium complex is recycled and the remainder can be collected and calcined to produce U 3 O 8 or UO 2

  13. The impact of low-temperature seasonal aquifer thermal energy storage (SATES) systems on chlorinated solvent contaminated groundwater: Modeling of spreading and degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, K.G.; Hartog, N.; Valstar, J.; Post, V.E.A.; Breukelen, B.M. van

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater systems are increasingly used for seasonal aquifer thermal energy storage (SATES) for periodic heating and cooling of buildings. Its use is hampered in contaminated aquifers because of the potential environmental risks associated with the spreading of contaminated groundwater, but

  14. Characterization of uranium- and plutonium-contaminated soils by electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.; Brown, N.R.

    1995-01-01

    Electron beam techniques have been used to characterize uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Site in Ohio, and also plutonium-bearing 'hot particles, from Johnston Island in the Pacific Ocean. By examining Fernald samples that had undergone chemical leaching it was possible to observe the effect the treatment had on specific uranium-bearing phases. The technique of Heap leaching, using carbonate solution, was found to be the most successful in removing uranium from Fernald soils, the Heap process allows aeration, which facilitates the oxidation of uraninite. However, another refractory uranium(IV) phase, uranium metaphosphate, was not removed or affected by any soil-washing process. Examination of ''hot particles'' from Johnston Island revealed that plutonium and uranium were present in 50--200 nm particles, both amorphous and crystalline, within a partially amorphous aluminum oxide matrix. The aluminum oxide is believed to have undergone a crystalline-to-amorphous transition caused by alpha-particle bombardment during the decay of the plutonium

  15. Integrated Assessment of Shallow-Aquifer Vulnerability to Multiple Contaminants and Drinking-Water Exposure Pathways in Holliston, Massachusetts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Claus Henn

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Half of U.S. drinking water comes from aquifers, and very shallow ones (<20 feet to water table are especially vulnerable to anthropogenic contamination. We present the case of Holliston, a Boston, Massachusetts suburb that draws its drinking water from very shallow aquifers, and where metals and solvents have been reported in groundwater. Community concerns focus on water discolored by naturally occurring manganese (Mn, despite reports stating regulatory aesthetic compliance. Epidemiologic studies suggest Mn is a potentially toxic element (PTE for children exposed by the drinking-water pathway at levels near the regulatory aesthetic level. We designed an integrated, community-based project: five sites were profiled for contaminant releases; service areas for wells were modeled; and the capture zone for one vulnerable well was estimated. Manganese, mercury, and trichloroethylene are among 20 contaminants of interest. Findings show that past and/or current exposures to multiple contaminants in drinking water are plausible, satisfying the criteria for complete exposure pathways. This case questions the adequacy of aquifer protection and monitoring regulations, and highlights the need for integrated assessment of multiple contaminants, associated exposures and health risks. It posits that community-researcher partnerships are essential for understanding and solving complex problems.

  16. On the chemical identification and visualization of uranium species in biofilms and Euglena mutabilis cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockmann, Sina

    2013-01-01

    For risk assessment of anthropogenic uranium contaminations in the environment a detailed knowledge of the migration and immobilization behavior is required to prevent health hazards for humans and animals caused by an uncontrolled discharge of uranium. Hence, comprehensive studies on the interactions of uranium with the environment are required. Besides the influences of the geological materials, there is a huge effect of the biosphere, especially the interactions with microorganisms and biofilms, on the properties of uranium in the environment. The aim of this study was to investigate and to describe naturally occurring biofilms from real uranium contaminated areas and their influence on the uranium migration. The investigations in this study on the localization and the speciation of the uranium in the biosystems were primarily done with a coupled system of laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS). Natural biofilms collected from two uranium contaminated acid mine drainage (AMD) environments, the former uranium mine in Koenigstein (Saxony, Germany) and the former Gessenheap near Ronneburg (Thuringia,Germany), were investigated in this study. The chosen samples represent typical biofilm communities living in AMD water and are exemplary for potentially occurring scenarios of contaminated mining water both in the underground and on the surface. The investigation on the interactions between uranium and Euglena mutabilis, which is a typical unicellular microorganism that can be found in acidic, uranium and other heavy metal containing waters, was another important part of this study. Bioaccumulation experiments of uranium on living Euglena mutabilis cells depending on the pH (pH 3 - 6) and on the background media in sodium perchlorate (9 g/l) or sodium sulfate (3.48 g/l) solution containing 0.01 mM uranium show an effective immobilization of uranium. At the acidic pH-values (pH 3 - 4) over 90 % of the added uranium was

  17. Contaminant transport, revegetation, and trace element studies at inactive uranium mill tailings piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesen, D.R.; Marple, M.L.; Kelley, N.E.

    1978-01-01

    The stabilization of inactive uranium mill tailings piles is presently under study. These studies have included investigations of stabilizing tailings by attempting to establish native vegetation without applying irrigation. Examination of processes which transport tailings or associated contaminants into the environment has been undertaken to better understand the containment provided by various stabilization methods. The uptake of toxic trace elements and radionuclides by vegetation has been examined as a mechanism of contaminant transport. The source terms of 222 Rn from inactive piles have been determined as well as the attenuation of radon flux provided by shallow soil covers. The possibility of shallow ground water contamination around an inactive pile has been examined to determine the significance of ground water transport as a mode of contaminant migration. The rationale in support of trace element studies related to uranium milling activities is presented including the enrichment, migration, and toxicities of trace elements often associated with uranium deposits. Some concepts for the stabilization of inactive piles are presented to extrapolate from research findings to practical applications. 25 references, 8 tables

  18. Uranium leaching using mixed organic acids produced by Aspergillus niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong-dong Wang; Guang-yue Li; De-xin Ding; Zhi-xiang Zhou; Qin-wen Deng; Nan Hu; Yan Tan

    2013-01-01

    Both of culture temperature and pH value had impacts on the degree of uranium extraction through changing types and concentrations of mixed organic acids produced by Aspergillus niger, and significant interactions existed between them though pH value played a leading role. And with the change of pH value of mixed organic acids, the types and contents of mixed organic acids changed and impacted on the degree of uranium extraction, especially oxalic acid, citric acid and malic acid. The mean degree of uranium extraction rose to peak when the culture temperature was 25 deg C (76.14 %) and pH value of mixed organic acids was 2.3 (82.40 %) respectively. And the highest one was 83.09 %. The optimal culture temperature (25 deg C) of A. niger for uranium leaching was different from the most appropriate growing temperature (37 deg C). (author)

  19. Evaluation of modeling approaches to simulate contaminant transport in a fractured limestone aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosthaf, Klaus; Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Broholm, Mette Martina

    in fractured limestone aquifers. The model comparison is conducted for a contaminated site in Denmark, where a plume of dissolved PCE has migrated through a fractured limestone aquifer. Field data includes information on spill history, distribution of the contaminant (multilevel sampling), geology...... and hydrogeology. To describe the geology and fracture system, data from borehole logs and cores was combined with an analysis of heterogeneities and fractures from a nearby excavation and pump test data. We present how field data is integrated into the different model concepts. A challenge in the use of field...... and remediation strategies. Each model is compared with field data, considering both model fit and model suitability. Results show a considerable difference between the approaches, and that it is important to select the right one for the actual modeling purpose. The comparison with data showed how much...

  20. Hydrophysical logging: A new wellbore technology for hydrogeologic and contaminant characterization of aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedler, W.H.; Williams, L.L.; Head, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    In the continuing search for improved groundwater characterization technologies, a new wellbore fluid logging method has recently been developed to provide accurate and cost effective hydrogeologic and contaminant characterization of bedrock aquifers. This new technique, termed hydrophysical logging, provides critical information for contaminated site characterization and water supply studies and, in addition, offers advantages compared to existing industry standards for aquifer characterization. Hydrophysical logging is based on measuring induced electrical conductivity changes in the fluid column of a wellbore by employing advanced downhole water quality instrumentation specifically developed for the dynamic borehole environment. Hydrophysical logging contemporaneously identifies the locations of water bearing intervals, the interval-specific inflow rate during pumping, and in-situ hydrochemistry of the formation waters associated with each producing interval. In addition, by employing a discrete point downhole fluid sampler during hydrophysical logging, this technique provides evaluation of contaminant concentrations and migration of contaminants vertically within the borehole. Recently, hydrophysical logging was applied in a deep bedrock wellbore at an industrial site in New Hampshire contaminated with dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). The results of the hydrophysical logging, conducted as part of a hydrogeologic site investigation and feasibility study, facilitated investigation of the site by providing information which indicated that the contamination had not penetrated into deeper bedrock fractures at concentrations of concern. This information was used to focus the pending Remedial Action Plan and to provide a more cost-effective remedial design

  1. Environmental aspects of sulphuric acid in situ leach uranium mining in the permafrost zone (Vitim District, Russian Federation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazlullin, M.I.; Boitsov, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    Currently in situ leaching pilot tests are in progress at the Khiagda deposit, Vitim District, Russian Federation. The deposit is of the sandstone basal channel type, or paleovalley type in the Russian classification. It contains about 15 000 mt U at an ore grade averaging 0.05% U. Mineralization occurs in permeable unconsolidated Neogene fluvial sediments located below the permafrost which extends to 100 m deep. The basement rock is Paleozoic granite. Neogene-Quaternary basalts overlap the ore hosting sediments. The thickness of the ore host horizon varies from a few meters to 120 m. The depth of mineralization averages 170 m. Ore bodies are of lens and strataform shape. The following types of underground waters have been identified: groundwaters of the near surface or active layer, the aquifer in the Neogene volcanics, the ore host aquifer of the Neogene permeable sediments and fault related waters. The permeability in the ore bearing horizon varies from 0.1 to 20 m/day (averages 2 to 3 m/day). The waters of the productive aquifer are not suitable for industrial nor potable water supply due to their initial chemical composition. The ore host horizons occur between two impermeable horizons, which confine leaching solutions. Using sulphuric acid solutions as leaching reagent decreases the pH and increases Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) of the groundwaters within the leaching area due to concentration of sulphate-ion and other dissolved components. Principal components contaminating the underground waters are sulphates of aluminium, manganese, nickel and chrome. Their content during leaching significantly exceeds initial values. The available information on residual acid migration with the ground water shows that the concentration of contaminants significantly decreases away from the leaching contour. This occurs due to precipitation of contaminants during migration of the underground water from ISL sites. The external contour of the contamination aureole is defined

  2. Geology, geochemistry, and geophysics of the Fry Canyon uranium/copper project site, southeastern Utah - Indications of contaminant migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otton, James K.; Zielinski, Robert A.; Horton, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    well field suggest that the paleochannel persists at least 900 m to the north of the heap leach and pond sites. Contamination of groundwater beneath the stream terraces may extend at least that far. Fry Creek surface water (six samples), seeps and springs (six samples), and wells (eight samples) were collected during a dry period of April 16-19, 2007. The most uranium-rich (18.7 milligrams per liter) well water on the site displays distinctive Ca-Mg-SO4-dominant chemistry indicating the legacy of heap leaching copper-uranium ores with sulfuric acid. This same water has strongly negative d34S of sulfate (-13.3 per mil) compared to most local waters of -2.4 to -5.4 per mil. Dissolved uranium species in all sampled waters are dominantly U(VI)-carbonate complexes. All waters are undersaturated with respect to U(VI) minerals. The average 234U/238U activity ratio (AR) in four well waters from the site (0.939 + or ? 0.011) is different from that of seven upstream waters (1.235 + or ? 0.069). This isotopic contrast permits quantitative estimates of mixing of site-derived uranium with natural uranium in waters collected downstream. At the time of sampling, uranium in downstream surface water was mostly (about 67 percent) site-derived and subject to further concentration by evaporation. Three monitoring wells located approximately 0.4 kilometer downstream contained dominantly (78-87 percent) site-derived uranium. Distinctive particles of chalcopyrite (CuFeS) and variably weathered pyrite (FeS2) are present in tailings at the stream edge on the site and are identified in stream sediments 1.3 kilometers downstream, based on inspection of polished grain mounts of magnetic mineral separates.

  3. Cola soft drinks for evaluating the bioaccessibility of uranium in contaminated mine soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lottermoser, Bernd G.; Schnug, Ewald; Haneklaus, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    There is a rising need for scientifically sound and quantitative as well as simple, rapid, cheap and readily available soil testing procedures. The purpose of this study was to explore selected soft drinks (Coca-Cola Classic (registered) , Diet Coke (registered) , Coke Zero (registered) ) as indicators of bioaccessible uranium and other trace elements (As, Ce, Cu, La, Mn, Ni, Pb, Th, Y, Zn) in contaminated soils of the Mary Kathleen uranium mine site, Australia. Data of single extraction tests using Coca-Cola Classic (registered) , Diet Coke (registered) and Coke Zero (registered) demonstrate that extractable arsenic, copper, lanthanum, manganese, nickel, yttrium and zinc concentrations correlate significantly with DTPA- and CaCl 2 -extractable metals. Moreover, the correlation between DTPA-extractable uranium and that extracted using Coca-Cola Classic (registered) is close to unity (+ 0.98), with reduced correlations for Diet Coke (registered) (+ 0.66) and Coke Zero (registered) (+ 0.55). Also, Coca-Cola Classic (registered) extracts uranium concentrations near identical to DTPA, whereas distinctly higher uranium fractions were extracted using Diet Coke (registered) and Coke Zero (registered) . Results of this study demonstrate that the use of Coca-Cola Classic (registered) in single extraction tests provided an excellent indication of bioaccessible uranium in the analysed soils and of uranium uptake into leaves and stems of the Sodom apple (Calotropis procera). Moreover, the unconventional reagent is superior in terms of availability, costs, preparation and disposal compared to traditional chemicals. Contaminated site assessments and rehabilitation of uranium mine sites require a solid understanding of the chemical speciation of environmentally significant elements for estimating their translocation in soils and plant uptake. Therefore, Cola soft drinks have potential applications in single extraction tests of uranium contaminated soils and may be used for

  4. Cola soft drinks for evaluating the bioaccessibility of uranium in contaminated mine soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottermoser, Bernd G., E-mail: Bernd.Lottermoser@utas.edu.au [School of Earth Sciences, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 79, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); Schnug, Ewald; Haneklaus, Silvia [Institute for Crop and Soil Science, Federal Institute for Cultivated Plants, Julius Kuehn-Institute (JKI), Bundesallee 50, D-38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    There is a rising need for scientifically sound and quantitative as well as simple, rapid, cheap and readily available soil testing procedures. The purpose of this study was to explore selected soft drinks (Coca-Cola Classic (registered) , Diet Coke (registered) , Coke Zero (registered) ) as indicators of bioaccessible uranium and other trace elements (As, Ce, Cu, La, Mn, Ni, Pb, Th, Y, Zn) in contaminated soils of the Mary Kathleen uranium mine site, Australia. Data of single extraction tests using Coca-Cola Classic (registered) , Diet Coke (registered) and Coke Zero (registered) demonstrate that extractable arsenic, copper, lanthanum, manganese, nickel, yttrium and zinc concentrations correlate significantly with DTPA- and CaCl{sub 2}-extractable metals. Moreover, the correlation between DTPA-extractable uranium and that extracted using Coca-Cola Classic (registered) is close to unity (+ 0.98), with reduced correlations for Diet Coke (registered) (+ 0.66) and Coke Zero (registered) (+ 0.55). Also, Coca-Cola Classic (registered) extracts uranium concentrations near identical to DTPA, whereas distinctly higher uranium fractions were extracted using Diet Coke (registered) and Coke Zero (registered) . Results of this study demonstrate that the use of Coca-Cola Classic (registered) in single extraction tests provided an excellent indication of bioaccessible uranium in the analysed soils and of uranium uptake into leaves and stems of the Sodom apple (Calotropis procera). Moreover, the unconventional reagent is superior in terms of availability, costs, preparation and disposal compared to traditional chemicals. Contaminated site assessments and rehabilitation of uranium mine sites require a solid understanding of the chemical speciation of environmentally significant elements for estimating their translocation in soils and plant uptake. Therefore, Cola soft drinks have potential applications in single extraction tests of uranium contaminated soils and may be used for

  5. Modeling the migration of radioactive contaminants in groundwater of in situ leaching uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chunguang; Tai Kaixuan

    2011-01-01

    The radioactive contamination of groundwater from in situ leaching (ISL) of uranium mining is a widespread environmental problem. This paper analyzed the monitor results of groundwater contaminations for a in situ leaching uranium mine. A dynamic model of contaminants transport in groundwater in ISL well field was established. The processes and mechanisms of contaminant transport in groundwater were simulated numerically for a ISL well field. A small quantity of U and SO 4 2- migrate to outside of well field during ISL production stage. But the migration velocity and distance of contaminations is small, and the concentration is low. Contaminants migrate as anomalistic tooth-shape. The migration trend of U and SO 4 2- is consistent. Numerical modeling can provide an effective approach to analyse the transport mechanism, and forecast and control the migration of contaminants in groundwater in ISL well field. (authors)

  6. Polarography of uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salah, El-Maraghy B.

    1980-01-01

    Uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system has been studied polarographically in perchloric acid medium. Varying concentrations of HClO 4 and salicylic acid have been used. The nature of the polarographic waves is irreversible. (author)

  7. Polarography of uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salah, E M.B. [Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt). Faculty of Education

    1980-08-01

    Uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system has been studied polarographically in perchloric acid medium. Varying concentrations of HClO/sub 4/ and salicylic acid have been used. The nature of the polarographic waves is irreversible.

  8. Contamination Control of Freeze Shoe Coring System for Collection of Aquifer Sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homola, K.; van Geen, A.; Spivack, A. J.; Grzybowski, B.; Schlottenmier, D.

    2017-12-01

    We have developed and tested an original device, the freeze-shoe coring system, designed to recover undisturbed samples of water contained in sand-dominated aquifers. Aquifer sands are notoriously difficult to collect together with porewater from coincident depths, as high hydraulic permeability leads to water drainage and mixing during retrieval. Two existing corer designs were reconfigured to incorporate the freeze-shoe system; a Hydraulic Piston (HPC) and a Rotary (RC) Corer. Once deployed, liquid CO­2 contained in an interior tank is channeled to coils at the core head where it changes phase, rapidly cooling the deepest portion of the core. The resulting frozen core material impedes water loss during recovery. We conducted contamination tests to examine the integrity of cores retrieved during a March 2017 yard test deployment. Perfluorocarbon tracer (PFC) was added to the drill fluid and recovered cores were subsampled to capture the distribution of PFC throughout the core length and interior. Samples were collected from two HPC and one RC core and analyzed for PFC concentrations. The lowest porewater contamination, around 0.01% invasive fluid, occurs in the center of both HPC cores. The greatest contamination (up to 10%) occurs at the disturbed edges where core material contacts drill fluid. There was lower contamination in the core interior than top, bottom, and edges, as well as significantly lower contamination in HPC cores that those recovered with the RC. These results confirm that the freeze-shoe system, proposed for field test deployments in West Bengal, India, can successfully collect intact porewater and sediment material with minimal if any contamination from drill fluid.

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    This risk assessment evaluates the possibility of health and environmental risks from contaminated ground water at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado. The former uranium processing site's contaminated soil and material were removed and placed at a disposal site located in Body Canyon, Colorado, during 1986--1991 by the US Departments of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating the nature and extent of ground water contamination at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach similar to that used by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The first step is to determine what site-related contaminants are found in ground water samples. The next step in the risk assessment is to determine how much of these contaminants people might ingest if they got their drinking water from a well on the site. In accordance with standard practice for this type of risk assessment, the highest contaminant concentrations from the most contaminated wells are used. The risk assessment then explains the possible health problems that could result from this amount of contamination

  10. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    This risk assessment evaluates the possibility of health and environmental risks from contaminated ground water at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado. The former uranium processing site`s contaminated soil and material were removed and placed at a disposal site located in Body Canyon, Colorado, during 1986--1991 by the US Departments of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating the nature and extent of ground water contamination at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach similar to that used by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The first step is to determine what site-related contaminants are found in ground water samples. The next step in the risk assessment is to determine how much of these contaminants people might ingest if they got their drinking water from a well on the site. In accordance with standard practice for this type of risk assessment, the highest contaminant concentrations from the most contaminated wells are used. The risk assessment then explains the possible health problems that could result from this amount of contamination.

  11. Correlating phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) in a landfill leachate polluted aquifer with biogeochemical factors by multivariate statistical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Liselotte; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Rootzén, Helle

    1997-01-01

    Different multivariate statistical analyses were applied to phospholipid fatty acids representing the biomass composition and to different biogeochemical parameters measured in 37 samples from a landfill contaminated aquifer at Grindsted Landfill (Denmark). Principal component analysis...... and correspondence analysis were used to identify groups of samples showing similar patterns with respect to biogeochemical variables and phospholipid fatty acid composition. The principal component analysis revealed that for the biogeochemical parameters the first principal component was linked to the pollution...... was used to allocate samples of phospholipid fatty acids into predefined classes. A large percentages of samples were classified correctly when discriminating samples into groups of dissolved organic carbon and specific conductivity, indicating that the biomass is highly influenced by the pollution...

  12. Use of gamma camera for measurement of the internal contamination with depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaic, R.; Markovic, S.; Pavlovic, S.; Pavlovic, R.; Ajdinovic, B.; Baskot, B.; Djurovic, B.

    2000-01-01

    Depleted uranium from radioactive wastes is used for manufacturing bullets used in Iraq, Republic of Serbia and Yugoslavia. These bullets are extremely dense and capable of penetrating heavily armored vehicles. Their medical importance lies in the fact that the bullets contain seventy percent depleted uranium which creates aerosolized particles less than five microns in diameter, small enough to be inhaled, after spontaneous bullet burn at impact. Nuclear medicine scientists must be aware of this and be prepared to measure internal contamination of persons exposed to this radioactive material. Whole body counters (WBC) represent appropriate equipment for this purpose but their availability in developing countries is not sufficient. Gamma camera is an alternative. The minimum detectable activity (MDA) of depleted uranium, iodine and technetium for gamma cameras was measured in this paper. Low energy X-ray 100 KeV with 20% windows are used for the depleted uranium detection. About 40% gamma emissions from depleted uranium fall within these limits. The activities measured (50-100 Bq) are about ten times higher then on WBC (5 Bq). This does not limit the use of gamma cameras for measurement of lung or whole body internal contamination with depleted uranium. (author)

  13. Evaluating the rate of migration of an uranium deposition front within the Uitenhage Aquifer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vogel

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available of Geochemical Exploration 66 (1999) 269?276 www.elsevier.com/locate/jgeoexp Evaluating the rate of migration of an uranium deposition front within the Uitenhage Aquifer J.C. Vogel a,A.S.Talmaa, T.H.E. Heaton b, J. Kronfeld c,* a Quaternary Dating Research Unit... stream_source_info vogel_1999.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 18078 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name vogel_1999.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ELSEVIER Journal...

  14. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This report evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1986 by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Groundwater Project. This risk assessment follows the approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the floodplain groundwater are arsenic, magnesium, manganese, nitrate, sodium, sulfate, and uranium. The complete list of contaminants associated with the terrace groundwater could not be determined due to the lack of the background groundwater quality data. However, uranium, nitrate, and sulfate are evaluated since these chemicals are clearly associated with uranium processing and are highly elevated compared to regional waters. It also could not be determined if the groundwater occurring in the terrace is a usable water resource, since it appears to have originated largely from past milling operations. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if a drinking well were installed in the contaminated groundwater or if there were exposure to surface expressions of contaminated water. Potential exposures to surface water include incidental contact with contaminated water or sediments by children playing on the floodplain and consumption of meat and milk from domestic animals grazed and watered on the floodplain

  15. Process for extracting uranium from phosphoric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The description is given of a method for extracting uranium from phosphoric acid solutions whereby the previously oxided acid is treated with an organic solvent constituted by a mixture of dialkylphosphoric acid and trialkylphosphine oxide in solution in a non-reactive inert solvent so as to obtain de-uraniated phosphoric acid and an organic extract constituted by the solvent containing most of the uranium. The uranium is then separated from the extract as uranyl ammonium tricarbonate by reaction with ammonia and ammonium carbonate and the extract de-uraniated at the extraction stage is recycled. The extract is treated in a re-extraction apparatus comprising not less than two stages. The extract to be treated is injected at the top of the first stage. At the bottom of the first stage, ammonia is introduced counter current as gas or as an aqueous solution whilst controlling the pH of the first stage so as to keep it to 8.0 or 8.5 and at the bottom of the last stage an ammonium carbonate aqueous solution is injected in a quantity representing 50 to 80% of the stoichiometric quantity required to neutralize the dialkylphosphoric acid contained in the solvent and transform the uranium into uranyl ammonium tricarbonate [fr

  16. Radium, uranium and metals in acidic or alkaline uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somot, St.

    1997-01-01

    Uranium mill study sites have been chosen in function of their different characteristics: deposits age, treatment nature (alkaline or acid), mill origin. The realization of specific drilling allowed the simultaneous study of the interstitial water and the solid fraction of samples, cut at determined deep. A radiation imbalance between 230 Th and 226 Ra is observed in the acid treatment residues. The trace elements concentration spectrum is directly bound to the nature of the ore. Diamagnetic evolutions are observed in residues. The uranium concentrations are higher in carbonated waters than in calcic sulfated waters. The selective sequential lixiviation showed that the 226 Ra activity of the interstitial water is controlled by the Gypsum in acid treatment residues. In other hand in the alkaline treatment waters, the carbonates occur. The Ra retention is largely bound to the Fe and Mn oxy-hydroxides. (A.L.B.)

  17. Fast-track aquifer characterization and bioremediation of groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, S.B.; Erskine, J.A.; Adkisson, C.

    1995-01-01

    A short duration step-drawdown pumping test has been used to characterize a highly permeable aquifer contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons in support of an in situ, closed loop extraction and reinjection bioremediation system for groundwater. The short-term pumping test produces a manageable quantity of contaminated groundwater while yielding a range of values for transmissivity and specific yield parameters. This range of aquifer coefficients is used in an analytical model to estimate a range of groundwater extraction rates that provide a suitable radius of influence for the extraction and reinjection system. A multi-enzyme complex catalyzed bioremediation process has been used to aerobically degrade petroleum hydrocarbons. Enzymes, amino acids, and biosurfactants are supplied to the extracted groundwater to significantly speed up the degradation by naturally occurring bacteria. During the process, amino acids promote the rapid growth of the microbial population while enzymes and bacteria attach to hydrocarbons forming a transformation state complex that degrades to fatty acids, carbon dioxide, and water. This paper presents a case study of a fast-track bioremediation using pumping test data, analytical modeling, and an enzyme technology

  18. Uranium and radium activities in samples of aquifers of the main cities of the Estado de Chihuahua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villalba, L.; Colmenero S, L.; Montero C, M.E.

    2003-01-01

    The natural uranium is in four valence states +3, +4, +5 and +6 being the hexavalent state the more soluble, which plays an important role in the transport of the uranium in the environment. The high concentrations of uranium in water not only in near waters to uranium mines, but also are in some mineral waters or in waters that are extracted of deep wells as it happens in the State of Chihuahua, where the underground waters are the fundamental source of consumption. The radium is a disintegration product of the uranium, the radio content in water is considered the second source of natural radioactivity. The distribution of radium in water is in function of the uranium content present in the aquifer. It was determined the uranium and radium content in samples of underground water of the main cities of the State of Chihuahua according to their number of inhabitants. The extraction methods for uranium and sulfates precipitation of Ba-Ra by means of the addition of barium carriers for the radium were used. The measures of the activities of uranium and radium were carried out by means of a portable liquid scintillation detector trade mark Thiathler-OY HIDEX. The obtained results have demonstrated that the content of uranium and radium in dissolution are in most of the sampling wells above the permissible maximum levels that manage the Mexican regulations. The high contents of uranium and radio can be attributed since to the influence of the geologic substrate characteristic of the zone in the State of Chihuahua they exist but of 50 uranium deposits. (Author)

  19. Assessment Of Depleted Uranium Contamination In Selective IRAQI Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, A.A.; Hussien, A.Sh.M.; Tawfiq, N.F.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this research was to measure the radiation exposure rates in three selected Locations in southren part of Iraq (two in Nassireya, and one in Amara) resulted from the existence of depleted uranium in soil and metal pieces have been taken from destroyed tank and study mathmatically the concentration of Depleted Uranium by its dispersion from soil surface by winds and rains from 2003 to 2007. The exposure rates were measured using inspector device, while depleted uranium concentration in soil samples and tank's matal pieces were detected with Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors(SSNTDs). The wind and rain effects were considered in the calculation of dispersion effect on depleted uranium concentration in soil, where the wind effect were calculated with respect to the sites nature and soil conditions, and rain effect with respect to dispersive-convective equation for radionuclide in soil. The results obtained for the exposure rates were high near the penetrated surfac, moderate and low in soil and metal pices. The Depleted Uranium concentration in soil and metal pieces have the highest value in Nassireya. The results from dispersion calculation (wind & rain) showed that the depleted uranium concentration in 2008 will be less than the danger level and in allowable contamination range

  20. Microbial ecology of a crude oil contaminated aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekins, B.A.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Warren, E.; Godsy, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    Detailed microbial analyses of a glacial outwash aquifer contaminated by crude oil provide insights into the pattern of microbial succession from iron reducing to methanogenic in the anaerobic portion of the contaminant plume. We analysed sediments from this area for populations of aerobes, iron reducers, fermenters and methanogens, using the most probable number method. On the basis of the microbial data the anaerobic area can be divided into distinct physiological zones dominated by either iron-reducers or a consortium of fermenters and methanogens. Chemistry and permeability data show that methanogenic conditions develop first in areas of high hydrocarbon flux. Thus, we find methanogens both in high permeability horizons and also where separate-phase crude oil is present in either the saturated or unsaturated zone. Microbial numbers peak at the top of the separate-phase oil suggesting that growth is most rapid in locations with access to both hydrocarbons and nutrients infiltrating from the surface.

  1. Anaerobic U(IV) Bio-oxidation and the Resultant Remobilization of Uranium in Contaminated Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coates, John D.

    2005-01-01

    A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites is based on immobilizing U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Due to the use of nitric acid in the processing of nuclear fuels, nitrate is often a co-contaminant found in many of the environments contaminated with uranium. Recent studies indicate that nitrate inhibits U(VI) reduction in sediment slurries. However, the mechanism responsible for the apparent inhibition of U(VI) reduction is unknown, i.e. preferential utilization of nitrate as an electron acceptor, direct biological oxidation of U(IV) coupled to nitrate reduction, and/or abiotic oxidation by intermediates of nitrate reduction. Recent studies indicates that direct biological oxidation of U(IV) coupled to nitrate reduction may exist in situ, however, to date no organisms have been identified that can grow by this metabolism. In an effort to evaluate the potential for nitrate-dependent bio-oxidation of U(IV) in anaerobic sedimentary environments, we have initiated the enumeration of nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing bacteria. Sediments, soils, and groundwater from uranium (U) contaminated sites, including subsurface sediments from the NABIR Field Research Center (FRC), as well as uncontaminated sites, including subsurface sediments from the NABIR FRC and Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant, Texas, lake sediments, and agricultural field soil, sites served as the inoculum source. Enumeration of the nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing microbial population in sedimentary environments by most probable number technique have revealed sedimentary microbial populations ranging from 9.3 x 101 - 2.4 x 103 cells (g sediment)-1 in both contaminated and uncontaminated sites. Interestingly uncontaminated subsurface sediments (NABIR FRC Background core FB618 and Longhorn Texas Core BH2-18) both harbored the most numerous nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing population 2.4 x 103 cells (g sediment)-1

  2. Removal of Uranium by Exchanger Resins from Soil Washing Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Han, G. S.; Kim, G. N.; Koo, D. S.; Jeong, J. W.; Moon, J. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Uranyl ions in the acidic waste solution were sorbed on AM-resin resin with a high sorption efficiency, and desorbed from the resin by a batch-type washing with a 60 .deg. C heated 0.5 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution. However, the uranium dissolved in the sulfuric acid solution was not sorbed onto the strong anion exchanger resins. Our group has developed a decontamination process with washing and electrokinetic methods for uranium-contaminated (U-contaminated) soil. However, this process generates a large amount of waste solution containing various metal ions. If the uranium selectively removed from the waste solution, a very small amount of the 2nd waste would be generated. Thus, selective sorption of uranium by ion exchange resins was examined in this study.

  3. Remediation of uranium contaminated sites: clean-up activities in Serbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raicevic, S.; Raicevic, J. . E-mail address of corresponding author: raich@beotel.yu; Raicevic, S.)

    2005-01-01

    One of the serious environmental problems in Serbia represent sites contaminated with depleted uranium (DU) during past war activities. According to UNEP reports and our findings there are two types of contamination: (i) localized points of high, concentrated contamination where DU penetrators enter the soil, and (ii) low level of widespread DU contamination, which indicates that during the conflict DU dust was dispersed into the environment. Remediation of these sites is an urgent need because they represent a permanent threat to the population living in this area. Here we give a brief description of approaches commonly used in remediation of DU contaminated sites, and an overview of current clean-up activities performed in Serbia. (author)

  4. Determining Changes in Groundwater Quality during Managed Aquifer Recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, T.; Houlihan, M.; Fakhreddine, S.; Dadakis, J.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is becoming an increasingly prevalent technology for improving the sustainability of freshwater supply. However, recharge water can alter the geochemical conditions of the aquifer, mobilizing contaminants native to the aquifer sediments. Geochemical alterations on deep (>300 m) injection of highly treated recycled wastewater for MAR has received limited attention. We aim to determine how residual disinfectants used in water treatment processes, specifically the strong oxidants chloramine and hydrogen peroxide, affect metal mobilization within deep injection wells of the Orange County Water District. Furthermore, as the treated recharge water has very low ionic strength (44.6 mg L-1 total dissolved solids), we tested how differing concentrations of magnesium chloride and calcium chloride affected metal mobilization within deep aquifers. Continuous flow experiments were conducted on columns dry packed with sediments from a deep injection MAR site in Orange County, CA. The effluent was analyzed for shifts in water quality, including aqueous concentrations of arsenic, uranium, and chromium. Interaction between the sediment and oxic recharge solution causes naturally-occurring arsenopyrite to repartition onto iron oxides. The stability of arsenic on the newly precipitated iron oxides is dependent on pH changes during recharge.

  5. Acid lixiviation of phophorite minerals for uranium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linzama, H.; Rivas, J.

    1988-01-01

    Lixiviation studies of the phosphorite mineral, found in the north of Chile, using sulfuric acid solutions are described. These minerals contain 62.0 ppm of Uranium, 24% of Silice, 18.9% of P 2 O 5 and other metal-oxides. The influence of the acid concentration, the amount of acid used, granulometry, and the lixiviation yield as a function of the H 3 PO 4 and uranium concentrations was evaluated. In addition, the thermodinamic parameters of the lixiviation process were also evaluated. (author) [pt

  6. Uranium Mill Tailings Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at the Fifth Symposium on Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Advances made with regard to uranium mill tailings management, environmental effects, regulations, and reclamation are reviewed. Topics considered include tailings management and design (e.g., the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, environmental standards for uranium mill tailings disposal), surface stabilization (e.g., the long-term stability of tailings, long-term rock durability), radiological aspects (e.g. the radioactive composition of airborne particulates), contaminant migration (e.g., chemical transport beneath a uranium mill tailings pile, the interaction of acidic leachate with soils), radon control and covers (e.g., radon emanation characteristics, designing surface covers for inactive uranium mill tailings), and seepage and liners (e.g., hydrologic observations, liner requirements)

  7. Attenuation of landfill leachate by UK Triassic sandstone aquifer materials. 1. Fate of inorganic pollutants in laboratory columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Steven F.; Tellam, John H.; Lerner, David N.

    2000-05-01

    The attenuation of inorganic contaminants in acetogenic and methanogenic landfill leachate by calcareous and carbonate-deficient, oxide-rich Triassic sandstone aquifer materials from the English Midlands was examined in laboratory columns. Aqueous equilibrium speciation modelling, simple transport modelling and chemical mass balance approaches are used to evaluate the key processes and aquifer geochemical properties controlling contaminant fate. The results indicate that leachate-rock interactions are dominated by ion-exchange processes, acid-base and redox reactions and sorption/precipitation of metal species. Leachate NH 4 is attenuated by cation exchange with the aquifer sediments; however, NH 4 migration could be described with a simple model using retardation factors. Organic acids in the acetogenic leachate buffered the system pH at low levels during flushing of the calcareous aquifer material. In contrast, equilibrium with Al oxyhydroxide phases initially buffered pH (˜4.5) during flushing of the carbonate-deficient sandstone with methanogenic leachate. This led to the mobilisation of sorbed and oxide-bound heavy metals from the aquifer sediment which migrated as a concentrated pulse at the leachate front. Abiotic reductive dissolution of Mn oxyhydroxides on each aquifer material by leachate Fe 2+ maintains high concentrations of dissolved Mn and buffers the leachate inorganic redox system. This feature is analogous to the Mn-reducing zones found in leachate plumes and in the experiments provides a sink for the leachate Fe load and other heavy metals. The availability of reactive solid phase Mn oxyhydroxides limits the duration of redox buffering and Fe attenuation by these aquifer sediments. Aquifer pH and redox buffering capacity exert a fundamental influence on leachate inorganic contaminant fate in these systems. The implications for the assessment of aquifer vulnerability at landfills are discussed and simple measurements of aquifer properties which

  8. Denitrification and dilution along fracture flowpaths influence the recovery of a bedrock aquifer from nitrate contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jonathan J.; Comstock, Jeff; Ryan, Peter; Heindel, Craig; Koenigsberger, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    In 2000, elevated nitrate concentrations ranging from 12 to 34 mg/L NO_3−N were discovered in groundwater from numerous domestic bedrock wells adjacent to a large dairy farm in central Vermont. Long-term plots and contours of nitrate vs. time for bedrock wells showed “little/no”, “moderate”, and “large” change patterns that were spatially separable. The metasedimentary bedrock aquifer is strongly anisotropic and groundwater flow is controlled by fractures, bedding/foliation, and basins and ridges in the bedrock surface. Integration of the nitrate concentration vs. time data and the physical and chemical aquifer characterization suggest two nitrate sources: a point source emanating from a waste ravine and a non-point source that encompasses the surrounding fields. Once removed, the point source of NO_3 (manure deposited in a ravine) was exhausted and NO_3 dropped from 34 mg/L to 10 mg/L. Our multidisciplinary methods of aquifer characterization are applicable to groundwater contamination in any complexly-deformed and metamorphosed bedrock aquifer. - Highlights: • Bedrock wells contaminated with nitrates at a dairy farm in Vermont, U.S.A. • Nitrate concentration vs. time patterns for wells were spatially separable. • Multidisciplinary aquifer characterization used physical and chemical methods. • Denitrification dominant over dilution along fracture flowpaths • Conceptual model shows exhaustion of a nitrate point-source over 12 years.

  9. Elemental hydrochemistry and hydro geochemistry of the uranium isotopes in Alter do Chao formation, Manaus (Amazon - Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Marcio Luiz da; Bonotto, Daniel Marcos

    2006-01-01

    The water exploitation at Manaus city, Amazonas State, Brazil, takes place from Negro River and tubular wells, being performed by a private company. This paper evaluates the hydrochemistry and geochemical behavior of uranium isotopes ( 238 U and 234 U) in groundwaters from Manaus city, with the aim to characterize the contaminants or pollutants that possibly are affecting the quality of the underground hydrological resources, as well as to evaluate the potential use of the natural U-isotopes as hydrological tracers in the aquifer studied. The U-isotopes analysis allowed to determine 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios of 1.2-4.4, and dissolved uranium concentration of 0.003-1.1 μg.L -1 (ppb). These results and those concerning the others parameters indicated that the waters are appropriate for human consumption, permitting to classify the hydrological system as acid-reducing, and to say that the waters leach minerals in strata containing low U content.(author)

  10. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This document evaluates potential impacts to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1989 by the US DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination in this risk assessment.

  11. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This document evaluates potential impacts to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1989 by the US DOE's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination in this risk assessment

  12. Feasibility studies on electrochemical recovery of uranium from solid wastes contaminated with uranium using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazorium chloride as an electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Yusuke, E-mail: ohhashi.yusuke@jaea.go.jp [Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1550 Kamisaibara, Kagamino-cho, Tomata-gun, Okayama 708-0698 (Japan); Harada, Masayuki [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-34 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Asanuma, Noriko [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Ikeda, Yasuhisa [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-34 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The uranium component of steel wastes and spent NaF adsorbent are easily dissolved into BMICl. • The uranyl(VI) species in BMICl are reduced to U(V) irreversibly around −0.8 to −1.3 V. • The dissolved uranium species in BMICl are recovered as black deposits electrolytically. • The deposit is the mixtures of U(IV) and U(VI) compounds containing O, F, Cl, and N elements. - Abstract: In order to examine feasibility of the electrochemical deposition method for recovering uranium from the solid wastes contaminated with uranium using ionic liquid as electrolyte, we have studied the electrochemical behavior of each solution prepared by soaking the spent NaF adsorbents and the steel waste contaminated with uranium in BMICl (1-butyl-3-methyl- imidazolium chloride). The uranyl(VI) species in BMICl solutions were found to be reduced to U(V) irreversibly around −0.8 to −1.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The resulting U(V) species is followed by disproportionation to U(VI) and U(IV). Based on the electrochemical data, we have performed potential controlled electrolysis of each solution prepared by soaking the spent NaF adsorbents and steel wastes in BMICl at −1.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Black deposit was obtained, and their composition analyses suggest that the deposit is the mixtures of U(IV) and U(VI) compounds containing O, F, Cl, and N elements. From the present study, it is expected that the solid wastes contaminated with uranium can be decontaminated by treating them in BMICl and the dissolved uranium species are recovered electrolytically.

  13. Using artificial sweeteners to identify contamination sources and infiltration zones in a coupled river-aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichler, Andrea; Muellegger, Christian; Hofmann, Thilo

    2014-05-01

    In shallow or unconfined aquifers the infiltration of contaminated river water might be a major threat to groundwater quality. Thus, the identification of possible contamination sources in coupled surface- and groundwater systems is of paramount importance to ensure water quality. Micropollutants like artificial sweeteners are promising markers for domestic waste water in natural water bodies. Compounds, such as artificial sweeteners, might enter the aquatic environment via discharge of waste water treatment plants, leaky sewer systems or septic tanks and are ubiquitously found in waste water receiving waters. The hereby presented field study aims at the (1) identification of contamination sources and (2) delineation of infiltration zones in a connected river-aquifer system. River bank filtrate in the groundwater body was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively using a combined approach of hydrochemical analysis and artificial sweeteners (acesulfame ACE) as waste water markers. The investigated aquifer lies within a mesoscale alpine head water catchment and is used for drinking water production. It is hypothesized that a large proportion of the groundwater flux originates from bank filtrate of a nearby losing stream. Water sampling campaigns in March and July 2012 confirmed the occurrence of artificial sweeteners at the investigated site. The municipal waste water treatment plant was identified as point-source for ACE in the river network. In the aquifer ACE was present in more than 80% of the monitoring wells. In addition, water samples were classified according to their hydrochemical composition, identifying two predominant types of water in the aquifer: (1) groundwater influenced by bank filtrate and (2) groundwater originating from local recharge. In combination with ACE concentrations a third type of water could be discriminated: (3) groundwater influence by bank filtrate but infiltrated prior to the waste water treatment plant. Moreover, the presence of ACE

  14. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This report evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells to determine the potential for immediate human health and environmental impacts. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated groundwater that flows beneath the processing site towards the Gunnison River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentration of most contaminants are used in this risk assessment. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium.

  15. Residual contamination and corrosion on electrochemically marked uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seals, R.D.; Bullock, J.S.; Bennett, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    Residual contamination and potential corrosion problems on uranium parts resulting from PHB-1 and PHB-1E electroetchants have been investigated using ion microprobe mass analysis (IMMA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and light microscopy (LM). The effectiveness of various solvent cleaning sequences and the influence of the use of an abrasive cleaner were evaluated. The marking thicknesses and chlorine distributions were determined

  16. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan [Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Luo, Wensui [ORNL; Parker, Jack C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  17. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fan; Luo Wensui; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C.; Watson, David B.; Jardine, Philip M.; Gu Baohua

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO 3 - , SO 4 2- , U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  18. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fan, E-mail: zhangfan@itpcas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing, 100085 (China); Luo Wensui [Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen, 361021 (China); Parker, Jack C. [Institute for a Secure and Sustainable Environment, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Brooks, Scott C.; Watson, David B. [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Jardine, Philip M. [Biosystems Engineering and Soil Science Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Gu Baohua [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  19. Potentiometric titration of free acid in uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, M. Y.; Kim, W. H.; Kim, J. S.; Sohn, S. C.; Eom, T. Y.; Lee, C. H.; Jeon, Y. S.; Han, S. H.

    1998-02-01

    Hydrolysis properties of metal cations and fundamental principles of the potentiometric titration of free acid in aqueous solutions containing metal cations were described. The published papers and reports for the alkalimetric and acidimetric titration of free acid were surveyed, and the applicability of these titration methods to the uranium and/or plutonium solutions were discussed. This technical report also includes the various results obtained from the authors' researches to establish the alkalimetric and acidimetric titration methods for the determination of free acid in nitric acid solutions containing uranium and/or oxalic acid, and aluminum. The procedure manuals used in chemical processes and the newly prepared manuals based on the authors' researches are appended. (author). 26 refs., 54 figs

  20. Potentiometric titration of free acid in uranium solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, M. Y.; Kim, W. H.; Kim, J. S.; Sohn, S. C.; Eom, T. Y.; Lee, C. H.; Jeon, Y. S.; Han, S. H.

    1998-02-01

    Hydrolysis properties of metal cations and fundamental principles of the potentiometric titration of free acid in aqueous solutions containing metal cations were described. The published papers and reports for the alkalimetric and acidimetric titration of free acid were surveyed, and the applicability of these titration methods to the uranium and/or plutonium solutions were discussed. This technical report also includes the various results obtained from the authors` researches to establish the alkalimetric and acidimetric titration methods for the determination of free acid in nitric acid solutions containing uranium and/or oxalic acid, and aluminum. The procedure manuals used in chemical processes and the newly prepared manuals based on the authors` researches are appended. (author). 26 refs., 54 figs.

  1. Advances in treatment methods for uranium contaminated soil and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    Water and soil contaminated with actinides, such as uranium and plutonium, are an environmental concern at most U.S. Department of Energy sites, as well as other locations in the world. Remediation actions are on going at many sites, and plans for cleanup are underway at other locations. This paper will review work underway at Clemson University in the area of treatment and remediation of soil and water contaminated with actinide elements. (author)

  2. Ionic flotation of uranium contained in industrial phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jdid; Blazy; Bessiere

    1983-01-01

    A new process for uranium recovery from industrial phosphoric acid at 30% of P 2 O 5 is applied by the ionic flotation process. Research is carried out on determination of the nature of ionic species of U in H 3 PO 4 5.5 M and the behavior of reagents from CECA Co. in very acid media. Reagents able to form complexes directly with uranium and stable in phosphoric acid selected are: potassium ethylene diamine tetra (methylene phosphonate) (INIPOL AD32) and sodium dialkyldiphosphonate (34S). Uranium IV, obtained by reduction of uranium VI with iron powder, is precipitated by these reagents. Flotation of the precipitate obtained with INIPOL AD 32 is realized by addition of hexylamino bis (methylene phosphonic acid). A recovery of 80 wt% is obtained. Flotation of the coprecipitate 34S-U(IV) is obtained without any other additions because 34S is a surfactant. Metal recovery is better than 90% and the coprecipitate contains more than 10% U. The process is fast precipitation 10 minutes and flotation 5 minutes and is efficient even at 60 0 C [fr

  3. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico. Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This report evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1986 by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Groundwater Project. This risk assessment follows the approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the floodplain groundwater are arsenic, magnesium, manganese, nitrate, sodium, sulfate, and uranium. The complete list of contaminants associated with the terrace groundwater could not be determined due to the lack of the background groundwater quality data. However, uranium, nitrate, and sulfate are evaluated since these chemicals are clearly associated with uranium processing and are highly elevated compared to regional waters. It also could not be determined if the groundwater occurring in the terrace is a usable water resource, since it appears to have originated largely from past milling operations. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if a drinking well were installed in the contaminated groundwater or if there were exposure to surface expressions of contaminated water. Potential exposures to surface water include incidental contact with contaminated water or sediments by children playing on the floodplain and consumption of meat and milk from domestic animals grazed and watered on the floodplain.

  4. Modeling the potential impact of seasonal and inactive multi-aquifer wells on contaminant movement to public water-supply wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R.L.; Clark, B.R.; Landon, M.K.; Kauffman, L.J.; Eberts, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Wells screened across multiple aquifers can provide pathways for the movement of surprisingly large volumes of groundwater to confined aquifers used for public water supply (PWS). Using a simple numerical model, we examine the impact of several pumping scenarios on leakage from an unconfined aquifer to a confined aquifer and conclude that a single inactive multi-aquifer well can contribute nearly 10% of total PWS well flow over a wide range of pumping rates. This leakage can occur even when the multi-aquifer well is more than a kilometer from the PWS well. The contribution from multi-aquifer wells may be greater under conditions where seasonal pumping (e.g., irrigation) creates large, widespread downward hydraulic gradients between aquifers. Under those conditions, water can continue to leak down a multi-aquifer well from an unconfined aquifer to a confined aquifer even when those multi-aquifer wells are actively pumped. An important implication is that, if an unconfined aquifer is contaminated, multi-aquifer wells can increase the vulnerability of a confined-aquifer PWS well.

  5. Health surveillance of personnel engaged in decontamination of depleted uranium contaminated regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djurovic, B. [Military Medical Academy, Radiological Protection Dept., Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia); Spasic-Jokic, V. [ESLA Accelerator Installation, Lab. of Physics, VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia); Fortuna, D.; Milenkovic, M. [NBH Military Educational Center, Krusevac, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia)

    2006-07-01

    After the NATO actions against Serbia and Montenegro, 112 locations were highly contaminated with depleted uranium-112 locations in Kosovo, 7 in the south of Serbia and 1 in Montenegro. Contaminated regions were marked, isolated and some of them decontaminated. In this paper we present the health surveillance protocol created for personnel engaged in decontamination of contaminated regions of Pljackovica and Bratoselce. They were examined and selected before decontamination and only healthy professionals (36 and 28) were engaged. Examination included: general clinical assessment, complete blood count with differential white blood cells; biochemical analysis of blood and urine, specifically renal and liver functions tests, cytogenetic tests (chromosomal aberration and micronucleus test), and laser fluorometry of 24-h urine sample and gamma spectrometry of the same if the levels were elevated. After the decontamination in the first group no clinical or biochemical changes were found, but in 3 of 36 were found unstable chromosomal aberrations. In the second group, in 3 of 28 were found unstable chromosomal aberrations and in 3 of them laser fluorometry analysis showed elevated levels of uranium (>3 {mu}g/l in two, and >5 {mu}g/l in one of them). Gamma spectrometry showed that it was not depleted, but naturally occurring uranium. Additionally performed analysis showed they were from the same village which is in the zone of highly elevated uranium level in ground and water. Three months later no chromosomal changes were found. (authors)

  6. Estimating contaminant discharge rates from stabilized uranium tailings embankments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    Estimates of contaminant discharge rates from stabilized uranium tailings embankments are essential in evaluating long-term impacts of tailings disposal on groundwater resources. Contaminant discharge rates are a function of water flux through tailings covers, the mass and distribution of tailings, and the concentrations of contaminants in percolating pore fluids. Simple calculations, laboratory and field testing, and analytical and numerical modeling may be used to estimate water flux through variably-saturated tailings under steady-state conditions, which develop after consolidation and dewatering have essentially ceased. Contaminant concentrations in water discharging from the tailings depend on tailings composition, leachability and solubility of contaminants, geochemical conditions within the embankment, tailings-water interactions, and flux of water through the embankment. These concentrations may be estimated based on maximum reported concentrations, pore water concentrations, extrapolations of column leaching data, or geochemical equilibria and reaction pathway modeling. Attempts to estimate contaminant discharge rates should begin with simple, conservative calculations and progress to more-complicated approaches, as necessary

  7. Uranium, thorium and rare earth elements distribution from different iron quadrangle spring waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Cláudia A.; Palmieri, Helena E.L.; Menezes, Maria A. de B.C.; Rodrigues, Paulo C.H.

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the concentrations of thorium, uranium and the rare earth elements (REE) in 26 spring waters, as well as the patterns of the REE of the samples from the Cercadinho, Moeda and Caue aquifers in different municipalities of the Iron Quadrangle (Quadrilatero Ferrifero), located in the central-southeast of Minas Gerais state. The pH value of the ground waters ranged from 3.8 to 7.0, indicating an acid nature of most of the spring waters. The investigation of REE speciation showed that all the REEs exist in the free X"3"+ ionic forms, under the prevailing Eh and pH conditions. In the studied samples the uranium concentrations ( 1000 ng L"-"1) originating from aquifers located in Sabara, Barao de Cocais, Santa Barbara, Mario Campos, Congonhas and Lavras Novas. The REEs patterns in the spring waters from the Cercadinho, Caue and Moeda aquifers are characterized by middle REE (MREE) enrichment compared to light REE (LREE) and heavy REEs (HREE), negative Ce anomalies (except for one sample) and positive Eu anomalies in all three aquifers studied. (author)

  8. Uranium in groundwater--Fertilizers versus geogenic sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesch, Tanja; Hinrichsen, Sören; Goldscheider, Nico

    2015-12-01

    Due to its radiological and toxicological properties even at low concentration levels, uranium is increasingly recognized as relevant contaminant in drinking water from aquifers. Uranium originates from different sources, including natural or geogenic, mining and industrial activities, and fertilizers in agriculture. The goal of this study was to obtain insights into the origin of uranium in groundwater while differentiating between geogenic sources and fertilizers. A literature review concerning the sources and geochemical processes affecting the occurrence and distribution of uranium in the lithosphere, pedosphere and hydrosphere provided the background for the evaluation of data on uranium in groundwater at regional scale. The state of Baden-Württemberg, Germany, was selected for this study, because of its hydrogeological and land-use diversity, and for reasons of data availability. Uranium and other parameters from N=1935 groundwater monitoring sites were analyzed statistically and geospatially. Results show that (i) 1.6% of all water samples exceed the German legal limit for drinking water (10 μg/L); (ii) The range and spatial distribution of uranium and occasional peak values seem to be related to geogenic sources; (iii) There is a clear relation between agricultural land-use and low-level uranium concentrations, indicating that fertilizers generate a measurable but low background of uranium in groundwater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A Geochemical Reaction Model for Titration of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater at the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F.; Parker, J. C.; Gu, B.; Luo, W.; Brooks, S. C.; Spalding, B. P.; Jardine, P. M.; Watson, D. B.

    2007-12-01

    This study investigates geochemical reactions during titration of contaminated soil and groundwater at the Oak Ridge Reservation in eastern Tennessee. The soils and groundwater exhibits low pH and high concentrations of aluminum, calcium, magnesium, manganese, various trace metals such as nickel and cobalt, and radionuclides such as uranium and technetium. The mobility of many of the contaminant species diminishes with increasing pH. However, base additions to increase pH are strongly buffered by various precipitation/dissolution and adsorption/desorption reactions. The ability to predict acid-base behavior and associated geochemical effects is thus critical to evaluate remediation performance of pH manipulation strategies. This study was undertaken to develop a practical but generally applicable geochemical model to predict aqueous and solid-phase speciation during soil and groundwater titration. To model titration in the presence of aquifer solids, an approach proposed by Spalding and Spalding (2001) was utilized, which treats aquifer solids as a polyprotic acid. Previous studies have shown that Fe and Al-oxyhydroxides strongly sorb dissolved Ni, U and Tc species. In this study, since the total Fe concentration is much smaller than that of Al, only ion exchange reactions associated with Al hydroxides are considered. An equilibrium reaction model that includes aqueous complexation, precipitation, ion exchange, and soil buffering reactions was developed and implemented in the code HydroGeoChem 5.0 (HGC5). Comparison of model results with experimental titration curves for contaminated groundwater alone and for soil- water systems indicated close agreement. This study is expected to facilitate field-scale modeling of geochemical processes under conditions with highly variable pH to develop practical methods to control contaminant mobility at geochemically complex sites.

  10. Surface and subsurface characterization of uranium contamination at the Fernald environmental management site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilk, A.J.; Perkins, R.W.; Abel, K.H.; Brodzinski, R.L.

    1993-04-01

    The past operations of uranium production and support facilities at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites have occasionally resulted in the local contamination of some surface and subsurface soils, and the three-dimensional distribution of the uranium at these sites must be thoroughly characterized before any effective remedial protocols can be established. To this end, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked by the DOE's Office of Technology Development with adapting, developing, and demonstrating technologies for the measurement of uranium in surface and subsurface soils at the Fernald Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration site. These studies are detailed in this report

  11. Uranium problem in production of wet phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorecka, H; Gorecki, H [Politechnika Wroclawska (Poland)

    1980-01-01

    The balance of the uranium in the wet dihydrate method was presented. This balance shows that a large quantity of the uranium compounds shift from mineral phosphate rock to liquid phase of decomposition pulp (about 70-85% U) and the rest moves to phosphogypsum (about 15-25% U). The contents of uranium in phosphate rock imported for our country and in products and by-products of the fertilizer industry, were determined. Concentration of uranium in the phosphogypsum is dependent on the type of mineral rock and the process of phosphogypsum crystallization. Analysis of the uranium contents in phosphogypsum samples and results of the sedimentation analysis indicated influence of the specific surface of phosphogypsum crystals on the uranium concentration. Investigation of the sets of samples obtained in the industrial plant proved that phosphogypsum cake washed counter-currently on the filter contained from 10 to 20 ..mu..g U/g. The radioactivity of these samples fluctuated from 35 to 60 pCi/g. Using solution sulphuric acid of concentration in range 2-4% by weight H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ to washing and repulpation of the phosphogypsum enables to reduce its radioactivity to level below 25 pCi/g. This processing makes possible to utilize this waste material in the building industry. Extraction of uranium from the wet phosphoric acid using kerosen solution of the reaction product between octanol -1 and phosphorus pentaoxide showed possibility to recover over 80% of uranium contained in phosphate rock.

  12. Consequences of preferential flow in cracking clay soils for contamination-risk of shallow aquifers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostindie, K.; Bronswijk, J.J.B.

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented to asses the contamination risk of aquifers covered with cracking clay soils, with special emphasis on preferential flow through shrinkage cracks. A water extraction area was divided into units with homogeneous soil types and hydrological conditions. For each unit, a

  13. Simulation of ground-water flow in the St. Peter aquifer in an area contaminated by coal-tar derivatives, St. Louis Park, Minnesota. Water Resources Investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, D.L.; Stark, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    A model constructed to simulate ground-water flow in part of the Prairie du Chien-Jordan and St. Peter aquifers, St. Louis Park, Minnesota, was used to test hypotheses about the movement of ground water contaminated with coal-tar derivatives and to simulate alternatives for reducing the downgradient movement of contamination in the St. Peter aquifer. The model, constructed for a previous study, was applied to simulate the effects of current ground-water withdrawals on the potentiometric surface of the St. Peter aquifer. Model simulations predict that the multiaquifer wells have the potential to limit downgradient migration of contaminants in the St. Peter aquifer caused by cones of depression created around the multiaquifer wells. Differences in vertical leakage to the St. Peter aquifer may exist in areas of bedrock valleys. Model simulations indicate that these differences are not likely to affect significantly the general patterns of ground-water flow

  14. Effects of long-term radionuclide and heavy metal contamination on the activity of microbial communities, inhabiting uranium mining impacted soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boteva, Silvena; Radeva, Galina; Traykov, Ivan; Kenarova, Anelia

    2016-03-01

    Ore mining and processing have greatly altered ecosystems, often limiting their capacity to provide ecosystem services critical to our survival. The soil environments of two abandoned uranium mines were chosen to analyze the effects of long-term uranium and heavy metal contamination on soil microbial communities using dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities as indicators of metal stress. The levels of soil contamination were low, ranging from 'precaution' to 'moderate', calculated as Nemerow index. Multivariate analyses of enzyme activities revealed the following: (i) spatial pattern of microbial endpoints where the more contaminated soils had higher dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities, (ii) biological grouping of soils depended on both the level of soil contamination and management practice, (iii) significant correlations between both dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase activities and soil organic matter and metals (Cd, Co, Cr, and Zn, but not U), and (iv) multiple relationships between the alkaline than the acid phosphatase and the environmental factors. The results showed an evidence of microbial tolerance and adaptation to the soil contamination established during the long-term metal exposure and the key role of soil organic matter in maintaining high microbial enzyme activities and mitigating the metal toxicity. Additionally, the results suggested that the soil microbial communities are able to reduce the metal stress by intensive phosphatase synthesis, benefiting a passive environmental remediation and provision of vital ecosystem services.

  15. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Grand Junction, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Grand Junction, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the EPA. the first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the contaminants of potential concern in the ground water are arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, sulfate, uranium, vanadium, zinc, and radium-226. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if they drank from a well installed in the contaminated ground water at the former processing site.

  16. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Grand Junction, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Grand Junction, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the EPA. the first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the contaminants of potential concern in the ground water are arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, sulfate, uranium, vanadium, zinc, and radium-226. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if they drank from a well installed in the contaminated ground water at the former processing site

  17. Contaminant distributions at typical U.S. uranium milling facilities and their effect on remedial action decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamp, S.; Dotson, P.W.

    1995-01-01

    Past operations at uranium processing sites throughout the US have resulted in local contamination of soils and ground water by radionuclides, toxic metals, or both. Understanding the origin of contamination and how the constituents are distributed is a basic element for planning remedial action decisions. This report describes the radiological and nonradiological species found in ground water at a typical US uranium milling facility. The report will provide the audience with an understanding of the vast spectrum of contaminants that must be controlled in planning solutions to the long-term management of these waste materials

  18. Thermally enhanced bioremediation of a gasoline-contaminated aquifer using toluene oxidizing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deeb, R.; Alvarez-Cohen, L.

    1994-01-01

    The combined application of steam injection and vacuum extraction has proved to be very effective for the in situ remediation of a gasoline contaminated aquifer. It is expected that the steam treated zone with its near-sterile nature, increased temperature, and decreased level of contaminant concentration will provide a superior environment for enhanced bioremediation, and will favor the survival of an introduced microbial culture for the destruction of residual gasoline hydrocarbons and especially BTEX compounds (Benzene, Toluene, Ethyl benzene, and Xylene). A mixed microbial culture seeded from the pre-steamed aquifer material was enriched in a laboratory chemostat on toluene, a major gasoline aromatic. Studies were conducted to determine the optimal conditions for microbial growth and activity. Growth rate studies conducted at different temperatures revealed that cell growth was optimal at 35 C, a temperature at which the aquifer can be maintained using the existing steam injection wells. The enriched culture was shown to degrade all BTEX compounds successfully both individually and in mixtures. Substrate toxicity was observed for some of the gasoline aromatics but at concentration levels well above those found in groundwater. When cells were exposed to mixtures of BTEX compounds, the biodegradation of xylene, the most recalcitrant aromatic among BTEX compounds, was stimulated. When cells were exposed to gasoline, BTEX degradation proceeded with no apparent inhibition by gasoline aliphatics; little aliphatic degradation took place, however, suggesting the absence of monooxygenase enzymes in the mixed culture. In mixtures of both toluene and propane enriched cultures, only dioxygenase activity was observed

  19. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination from past activities at the former uranium processing site in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. The US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has placed contaminated material from this site in an on-site disposal cell. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the UMTRA Ground Water Project. Currently, no domestic or drinking water well tap into contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the unconsolidated materials and the bedrock. Because there is no access, no current health or environmental risks are associated with the direct use of the contaminated ground water. However, humans and ecological organisms could be exposed to contaminated ground water if a domestic well were to be installed in the unconsolidated materials in that part of the site being considered for public use (Area C). The first step is evaluating ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. For the Canonsburg site, this evaluation showed the contaminants in ground water exceeding background in the unconsolidated materials in Area C are ammonia, boron, calcium, manganese, molybdenum, potassium, strontium, and uranium

  20. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination from past activities at the former uranium processing site in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. The US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has placed contaminated material from this site in an on-site disposal cell. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the UMTRA Ground Water Project. Currently, no domestic or drinking water well tap into contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the unconsolidated materials and the bedrock. Because there is no access, no current health or environmental risks are associated with the direct use of the contaminated ground water. However, humans and ecological organisms could be exposed to contaminated ground water if a domestic well were to be installed in the unconsolidated materials in that part of the site being considered for public use (Area C). The first step is evaluating ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. For the Canonsburg site, this evaluation showed the contaminants in ground water exceeding background in the unconsolidated materials in Area C are ammonia, boron, calcium, manganese, molybdenum, potassium, strontium, and uranium.

  1. Itaconic acid based potential sorbent for uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyan, Y.; Naidu, G.R.K.; Das, Sadananda; Pandey, A.K.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2010-01-01

    Cross-linked hydrogels and adsorptive membranes containing Itaconic acid, Acrylamide, Penta erythritol tetra acrylate and α, α-dimethyl- α-phenyl aceto phenone were prepared by UV-initiated bulk polymerization. These hydrogels and adsorptive membranes were characterized for pH uptake, sorption and desorption kinetics and selectivity towards uranium. The sorption ability of the sorbents towards uranyl ion was thoroughly examined. The developed itaconic acid based sorbents were evaluated for the recovery of uranium from lean sources like sea water. (author)

  2. Desorption of uranium from titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent with acidic eluent, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Sakane, Kohji; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1984-01-01

    The desorption of uranium from the granular titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent (concentration of uranium: 25.5 mg/1-Ad), which adsorbed uranium from natural sea water, was examined by the column process with acidic eluent at room temperature. The column operation was able to be carried out without destruction of the granular adsorbent by the generation of the carbon dioxide, and free from disturbance of the eluent flow by precipitate of calcium sulfate dihydrate with sulfuric acid eluent. The amount of acid consumption by the adsorbent was 0.87 eq/1-Ad. The alkaline earth metals were eluted in the range of elution volume below 2 1/1-Ad, whereas uranium, iron, and titanium were eluted above 2 1/1-Ad. Therefore, uranium was separable from the alkaline earth metals which were adsorbed in the most quantity in the adsorbent. In the range of elution volume 2 to 12 1/1-Ad, the percentage of desorbed uranium and the concentration ratio of uranium were 80 %, 680 with 0.5 N sulfuric acid, and 59 %, 490 with 0.5 N hydrochloric acid, respectively. The percentage of dissolved titanium (DTI) was 0.3 % with 0.5 N sulfuric acid, 0.26 % with 0.5 N hydrochloric acid in the same range. (author)

  3. The use of geochemical barriers for reducing contaminants emanating from uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groffman, A.R.; Longmire, P.; Mukhopadhyay, B.; Downs, W.

    1991-01-01

    A problem facing the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action (UMTRA) Project is the contamination of local ground water by leachate emanating form the tailings piles. These fluids have a low pH and contain heavy metals and trace elements such as arsenic, molybdenum, nitrate, selenium, and uranium. In order to meet ground water standards low hydraulic conductivity covers are installed over the tailings embankment. in some cases it may be necessary to install a geochemical barrier down gradient from the tailings embankment in order to remove the hazardous constituents. By using geochemical barriers to reduce undesirable species form a contaminant plume, fluids emanating form beneath a repository can in effect be scrubbed before entering the water table. Materials containing adsorbing clays, iron oxyhydroxides and zeolites, and reducing materials such as coal and peat, are being used effectively to attenuate contaminants form uranium mill tailings. Experiments to directly determine attenuation capacities of selected buffer/adsorption materials were conducted in the laboratory. Batch leach tests were conducted in lieu of column tests when the hydraulic conductivity of materials was too low to use in columns and shales

  4. Separation of uranium and other metals from commercial phosphoric acid by ion-exchange and voltammetric determination of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, J.B.C.; Carvalho, F.M.S. de; Abrao, A.

    1985-11-01

    The separation of metals from crude commercial phosphoric acid is achieved by simple dilution and percolation through a strong cationic ion exchanger. Uranium, calcium, magnesium, manganese, iron and aluminum are quantitatively fixed by the exchanger and can be detected or analysed after their complete elution with 6 M HCI. Titanium and zirconium are only partially retained. Specially for its separation and determination uranium is retained selectively by the resin from the phosphoric acid-EDTA solution, the column is washed with water and then eluted with hydrochloric acid. Uranium is analyzed by voltametry with the hanging drop mercury electrode. (Author) [pt

  5. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Tuba City, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This document evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1990 by the US Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine what remedial actions are necessary for contaminated ground water at the site

  6. A convenient method for estimating the contaminated zone of a subsurface aquifer resulting from radioactive waste disposal into ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Masami; Katsurayama, Kousuke; Uchida, Shigeo.

    1981-01-01

    Studies were conducted to estimate the contamination spread resulting from the radioactive waste disposal into a subsurface aquifer. A general equation, expressing the contaminated zone as a function of radioactive decay, the physical and chemical parameters of soil is presented. A distribution coefficient was also formulated which can be used to judge the suitability of a site for waste disposal. Moreover, a method for predicting contaminant concentration in groundwater at a site boundary is suggested for a heterogeneous media where the subsurface aquifer has different values of porosity, density, flow velocity, distribution coefficient and so on. A general equation was also developed to predict the distribution of radionuclides resulting from the disposal of a solid waste material. The distributions of contamination was evaluated for 90 Sr and 239 Pu which obey a linear adsorption model and a first order kinetics respectively. These equations appear to have practical utility for easily estimating groundwater contamination. (author)

  7. Contribution of the surface contamination of uranium-materials on the quantitative analysis results by electron probe microbeam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonino, O.; Fournier, C.; Fucili, C.; Dugne, O.; Merlet, C.

    2000-01-01

    The analytical testing of uranium materials is necessary for quality research and development in nuclear industry applications (enrichment, safety studies, fuel, etc). Electron Probe Microbeam Analysis Wavelength Dispersive Spectrometry (EPMA-WDS) is a dependable non-destructive analytical technology. The characteristic X-ray signal is measured to identify and quantify the sample components, and the analyzed volume is about one micron cube. The surface contamination of uranium materials modifies and contributes to the quantitative analysis results of EPMA-WDS. This contribution is not representative of the bulk. A thin oxidized layer appears in the first instants after preparation (burnishing, cleaning) as well as a carbon contamination layer, due to metallographic preparation and carbon cracking under the impact of the electron probe. Several analytical difficulties subsequently arise, including an overlapping line between the carbon Ka ray and the Uranium U NIVOVI ray. Sensitivity and accuracy of the quantification of light elements like carbon and oxygen are also reduced by the presence of uranium. The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy of quantitative analysis on uranium materials by EPMA-WDS by taking account of the contribution of surface contamination. The first part of this paper is devoted to the study of the contaminated surface of the uranium materials U, UFe 2 and U 6 Fe a few hours after preparation. These oxidation conditions are selected so as to reproduce the same contamination surfaces occurring in microprobe analytical conditions. Surface characterization techniques were SIMS and Auger spectroscopy. The contaminated surfaces are shown. They consist of successive layers: a carbon layer, an oxidized iron layer, followed by an iron depletion layer (only in UFe 2 and U 6 Fe), and a ternary oxide layer (U-Fe-O for UFe 2 et U 6 Fe and UO 2+x for uranium). The second part of the paper addresses the estimation of the errors in quantitative

  8. Nitrate Contamination of Deep Aquifers in the Salinas Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, J. E.; Esser, B. K.; Hillegonds, D. J.; Holtz, M.; Roberts, S. K.; Singleton, M. J.; Visser, A.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Belitz, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Salinas Valley, known as 'the salad bowl of the world', has been an agricultural center for more than 100 years. Irrigated row crops such as lettuce and strawberries dominate both land use and water use. Groundwater is the exclusive supply for both irrigation and drinking water. Some irrigation wells and most public water supply wells in the Salinas Valley are constructed to draw water from deep portions of the aquifer system, where contamination by nitrate is less likely than in the shallow portions of the aquifer system. However, a number of wells with top perforations greater than 75 m deep, screened below confining or semi-confining units, have nitrate concentrations greater than the Maximum Contaminant Limit (MCL) of 45 mg/L as NO3-. This study uses nitrate concentrations from several hundred irrigation, drinking water, and monitoring wells (Monterey County Water Resources Agency, 1997), along with tritium-helium groundwater ages acquired at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory through the State of California Groundwater Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) program (reported in Kulongoski et al., 2007 and in Moran et al., in press), to identify nitrate 'hot spots' in the deep aquifer and to examine possible modes of nitrate transport to the deep aquifer. In addition, observed apparent groundwater ages are compared with the results of transport simulations that use particle tracking and a stochastic-geostatistical framework to incorporate aquifer heterogeneity to determine the distribution of travel times from the water table to each well (Fogg et al., 1999). The combined evidence from nitrate, tritium, tritiogenic 3He, and radiogenic 4He concentrations, reveals complex recharge and flow to the capture zone of the deep drinking water wells. Widespread groundwater pumping for irrigation accelerates vertical groundwater flow such that high nitrate groundwater reaches some deep drinking water wells. Deeper portions of the wells often draw in water that recharged

  9. Assessment of surface contamination level in an operating uranium ore processing facility of Jaduguda, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meena, J.S.; Patnaik, R.L.; Jha, V.N.; Sahoo, S.K.; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Radiological concern of the occupational workers and the area is given priority over other safety issue in confirmation with the stipulated guideline of national regulatory agency (AERB/FEFCF/SG-2, 2007). The key concern from the radiological hazard evaluation point of view is air activity, external gamma level and surface contamination. Present investigations was carried out to ascertain the surface contamination level of uranium ore processing facility at Jaduguda, Jharkhand. For a low grade uranium ore processing industry surface contamination is a major concern in product precipitation and recovery section. In view of this, the ore processing plant can broadly be classified into three areas i.e. ion exchange area, precipitation and product recovery section and other areas. The monitoring results incorporate the level of surface contamination of the plant during the last five years. The geometric mean activity of surface contamination level was 31.1, 34.5 and 9.8 Bq dm -2 in ion exchange, product precipitation and recovery and other areas with GSD of 2, 2.5 and 1.9. In most of the cases the surface contamination level was well within the recommended limit of 100 Bq dm -2 for M class uranium compound. Occasional cases of surface contamination levels exceeding the recommended limit were addressed and areas were decontaminated. Based on the study, modification in the design feature of the surface of the finished product section was also suggested so that the decontamination procedure can be more effectively implemented

  10. Multi-isotope (carbon and chlorine) analysis for fingerprinting and site characterization at a fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by chlorinated ethenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, Jordi, E-mail: jordi.palau@unine.ch [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Marchesi, Massimo [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Chambon, Julie C.C. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Aravena, Ramon [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Canals, Àngels [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Binning, Philip J.; Bjerg, Poul L. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert [Departament de Cristal.lografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, s/n 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-03-01

    The use of compound specific multi-isotope approach (C and Cl) in the characterization of a chlorinated ethenes contaminated fractured aquifer allows the identification of several sources and contaminant plumes, as well as the occurrence of biodegradation and mixing processes. The study site is located in Spain with contamination resulting in groundwater concentrations of up to 50 mg/L of trichloroethene (TCE), the most abundant chlorinated ethene, and 7 mg/L of tetrachloroethene (PCE). The potential sources of contamination including abandoned barrels, an underground tank, and a disposal lagoon, showed a wide range in δ{sup 13}C values from − 15.6 to − 40.5‰ for TCE and from − 18.5 to − 32.4‰ for PCE, allowing the use of isotope fingerprinting for tracing of the origin and migration of these contaminants in the aquifer. In contrast, there is no difference between the δ{sup 37}Cl values for TCE in the contaminant sources, ranging from + 0.53 to + 0.66‰. Variations of δ{sup 37}Cl and δ{sup 13}C in the different contaminant plumes were used to investigate the role of biodegradation in groundwater. Moreover, the isotopic data were incorporated into a reactive transport model for determination of whether the isotope pattern observed downstream from the tank's source could be explained by the simultaneous effect of mixing and biodegradation. The results demonstrate that a multi-isotope approach is a valuable tool for characterization of complex sites such as fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by multiple sources, providing important information which can be used by consultants and site managers to prioritize and design more successful remediation strategies. - Highlights: • Origin and fate of CAHs in groundwater by means of multi CSIA ({sup 13}C,{sup 35}Cl) survey • Innovative/new approach tested in a fractured bedrock site • Differentiation of distinct CAH sources • Biodegradation and source mixing recognition in the aquifer.

  11. Multi-isotope (carbon and chlorine) analysis for fingerprinting and site characterization at a fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by chlorinated ethenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palau, Jordi; Marchesi, Massimo; Chambon, Julie C.C.; Aravena, Ramon; Canals, Àngels; Binning, Philip J.; Bjerg, Poul L.; Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The use of compound specific multi-isotope approach (C and Cl) in the characterization of a chlorinated ethenes contaminated fractured aquifer allows the identification of several sources and contaminant plumes, as well as the occurrence of biodegradation and mixing processes. The study site is located in Spain with contamination resulting in groundwater concentrations of up to 50 mg/L of trichloroethene (TCE), the most abundant chlorinated ethene, and 7 mg/L of tetrachloroethene (PCE). The potential sources of contamination including abandoned barrels, an underground tank, and a disposal lagoon, showed a wide range in δ 13 C values from − 15.6 to − 40.5‰ for TCE and from − 18.5 to − 32.4‰ for PCE, allowing the use of isotope fingerprinting for tracing of the origin and migration of these contaminants in the aquifer. In contrast, there is no difference between the δ 37 Cl values for TCE in the contaminant sources, ranging from + 0.53 to + 0.66‰. Variations of δ 37 Cl and δ 13 C in the different contaminant plumes were used to investigate the role of biodegradation in groundwater. Moreover, the isotopic data were incorporated into a reactive transport model for determination of whether the isotope pattern observed downstream from the tank's source could be explained by the simultaneous effect of mixing and biodegradation. The results demonstrate that a multi-isotope approach is a valuable tool for characterization of complex sites such as fractured bedrock aquifer contaminated by multiple sources, providing important information which can be used by consultants and site managers to prioritize and design more successful remediation strategies. - Highlights: • Origin and fate of CAHs in groundwater by means of multi CSIA ( 13 C, 35 Cl) survey • Innovative/new approach tested in a fractured bedrock site • Differentiation of distinct CAH sources • Biodegradation and source mixing recognition in the aquifer

  12. Comparison of different modeling approaches to simulate contaminant transport in a fractured limestone aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosthaf, Klaus; Rosenberg, L.; Balbarini, Nicola

    . Given available field data and model purpose, this paper therefore aims to develop, examine and compare modeling approaches for transport of contaminants in fractured limestone aquifers. The model comparison was conducted for a contaminated site in Denmark, where a plume of a dissolved contaminant (PCE...... was combined with an analysis of heterogeneities and fractures from a nearby excavation (analog site). Methods for translating the geological information and fracture mapping into each of the model concepts were examined. Each model was compared with available field data, considering both model fit...... of field data is the determination of relevant hydraulic properties and interpretation of aqueous and solid phase contaminant concentration sampling data. Traditional water sampling has a bias towards fracture sampling, however concentrations in the limestone matrix are needed for assessing contaminant...

  13. Preliminary Study Contamination of Organochlorine Pesticide (Heptachlor) and Heavy Metal (Arsenic) in Shallow Groundwater Aquifer of Semarang Coastal Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochaddi, Baskoro; Adhi Suryono, Chrisna; Atmodjo, Warsito; Satriadi, Alfi

    2018-02-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the level of pesticide and heavy metal contamination in shallow aquifer of Semarang coastal areas. Results indicated that Heptachlor and Arsenic were detected in the water samples in the range 0.023-0.055 μg L-1 and 0,03-1,63 μg L-1, respectively. Compared to the standard limits of the organochlorine contents in the water sample by World Health Organization (WHO) limits and Indonesian Drinking and Domestic Water Quality Standard for Ground Water (IWQS), groundwater of Semarang Coastal Areas was contaminated with pesticide and heavy metal. This study has proven the presence of organochlorine and heavy metal contamination of some shallow aquifer supplies in the coastal areas of Semarang.

  14. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) of microorganisms in hydrocarbon contaminated aquifer sediment samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, Karolin; Zeder, Michael; Klug, Rebecca; Pernthaler, Jakob; Schattenhofer, Martha; Harms, Hauke; Wendeberg, Annelie

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater ecosystems are the most important sources of drinking water worldwide but they are threatened by contamination and overexploitation. Petroleum spills account for the most common source of contamination and the high carbon load results in anoxia and steep geochemical gradients. Microbes play a major role in the transformation of petroleum hydrocarbons into less toxic substances. To investigate microbial populations at the single cell level, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is now a well-established technique. Recently, however, catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH has been introduced for the detection of microbes from oligotrophic environments. Nevertheless, petroleum contaminated aquifers present a worst case scenario for FISH techniques due to the combination of high background fluorescence of hydrocarbons and the presence of small microbial cells caused by the low turnover rates characteristic of groundwater ecosystems. It is therefore not surprising that studies of microorganisms from such sites are mostly based on cultivation techniques, fingerprinting, and amplicon sequencing. However, to reveal the population dynamics and interspecies relationships of the key participants of contaminant degradation, FISH is an indispensable tool. In this study, a protocol for FISH was developed in combination with cell quantification using an automated counting microscope. The protocol includes the separation and purification of microbial cells from sediment particles, cell permeabilization and, finally, CARD-FISH in a microwave oven. As a proof of principle, the distribution of Archaea and Bacteria was shown in 60 sediment samples taken across the contaminant plume of an aquifer (Leuna, Germany), which has been heavily contaminated with several ten-thousand tonnes of petroleum hydrocarbons since World War II. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Riverton, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This Risk Assessment evaluated potential impacts to public health or the environment caused by ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. In the first phase of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, the tailing and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell near the Gas Hills Plant in 1990. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document to evaluate potential health and environmental risks for the Riverton site under the Ground Water Project; it will help determine whether remedial actions are needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

  16. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Riverton, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This Risk Assessment evaluated potential impacts to public health or the environment caused by ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. In the first phase of the U.S. Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, the tailing and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell near the Gas Hills Plant in 1990. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document to evaluate potential health and environmental risks for the Riverton site under the Ground Water Project; it will help determine whether remedial actions are needed for contaminated ground water at the site

  17. Inorganic-Organic hybrid materials for uranium extraction from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Mourabit, Sabah

    2013-01-01

    Phosphate rocks are industrially processed in large quantities to produce phosphoric acid and fertilisers. These rocks contain significant concentration of uranium (50 to 300 ppm) which could be interesting for nuclear industry. This work deals with the valorisation of uranium as a by-product from fertiliser industry. The aim of this study is to develop a hybrid material, constituted of an inorganic solid support grafted with an extractant (complexing molecule), which can extract selectively uranium from phosphoric acid medium. The first step of our approach was to identify an inorganic support which is stable under these particular conditions (strong acidity and complexing medium). The chemical and mechanical stability of different meso-porous materials, such as silica, glass and carbon was studied. In a second phase, we focused on the identification and the optimisation of complexing molecules, specific of uranium in phosphoric acid. These ligands were then grafted on the most stable solids. Finally, the efficiency of these hybrid systems was evaluated through different tests of extraction, selectivity and de-extraction. (author) [fr

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards.

  19. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards

  20. Identification of critical contaminants in wastewater effluent for managed aquifer recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jie; Van Dyke, Michele I; Huck, Peter M

    2017-04-01

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) using highly treated effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants has been recognized as a promising strategy for indirect potable water reuse. Treated wastewater effluent can contain a number of residual contaminants that could have adverse effects on human health, and some jurisdictions have regulations in place to govern these. For those that do not, but where reuse may be under consideration, it is of crucial importance to develop a strategy for identifying priority contaminants, which can then be used to understand the water treatment technologies that might be required. In this study, a multi-criteria approach to identify critical contaminants in wastewater effluent for MAR was developed and applied using a case study site located in southern Ontario, Canada. An important aspect of this approach was the selection of representative compounds for each group of contaminants, based on potential for occurrence in wastewater and expected health or environmental impacts. Due to a lack of MAR regulations in Canada, the study first proposed potential recharge water quality targets. Predominant contaminants, potential additional contaminants, and potential emerging contaminants, which together comprise critical contaminants for MAR with reclaimed water, were then selected based on the case study wastewater effluent monitoring data and literature data. This paper proposes an approach for critical contaminant selection, which will be helpful to guide future implementation of MAR projects using wastewater treatment plant effluents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Decontamination of Uranium-Contaminated Soil Sand Using Supercritical CO2 with a TBP–HNO3 Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangheon Park

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An environmentally friendly decontamination process for uranium-contaminated soil sand is proposed. The process uses supercritical CO2 as the cleaning solvent and a TBP–HNO3 complex as the reagent. Four types of samples (sea sand and coarse, medium, and fine soil sand were artificially contaminated with uranium. The effects of the amount of the reagent, sand type, and elapsed time after the preparation of the samples on decontamination were examined. The extraction ratios of uranium in all of the four types of sand samples were very high when the time that elapsed after preparation was less than a few days. The extraction ratio of uranium decreased in the soil sand with a higher surface area as the elapsed time increased, indicating the possible formation of chemisorbed uranium on the surface of the samples. The solvent of supercritical CO2 seemed to be very effective in the decontamination of soil sand. However, the extraction of chemisorbed uranium in soil sand may need additional processes, such as the application of mechanical vibration and the addition of bond-breaking reagents.

  2. Removal of uranium from contaminated soil using indoor electrokinetic decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gye-Nam Kim; Ilgook Kim; Seung-Soo Kim; Jong-Won Choi

    2016-01-01

    Indoor electrokinetic decontamination equipment was manufactured to treat 1.2 tons of uranium-contaminated soil. For a reduction of waste electrolyte and metal oxide, waste electrolyte was reused and the optimum pH was adjusted to minimize metal oxide volume in the cathode chamber. It was found that the optimum pH of the waste electrolyte in a cathode chamber was below 2.35 at 25 deg C. When the initial uranium concentrations in the soils were 7.0-27.0 Bq/g, the reuse periods of waste electrolyte required for uranium concentrations in the soils to reach below 5.0 Bq/g were 5-25 days. In addition, when the initial concentrations in the soils were 7.0-20.0 Bq/g, the periods required to reach below the clearance concentration level were 25-40 days.

  3. Assessment of the environmental radioactive contamination levels by depleted uranium after NATO aggression on FR Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovic, S.; Pavlovic, R.; Markovic, S; Plecas, I.

    2001-01-01

    During NATO aggression on FR Yugoslavia various ammunition have been used, some of them for the first time. Among others, 30 mm bullets with depleted uranium (DU) penetrators have been used. Radioactivity contamination surveys have started during the war due to indications that DU is used in cruise missiles. Besides that, there were a lot of radioactivity analysis of food, drinking water etc. Some of the obtained results are presented in this paper. Depleted uranium ammunition can permanently contaminate environment and so produce effects on population. Relation of the international radiation and environmental protection standards and contamination levels are discussed as well. (author)

  4. Groundwater contamination from an inactive uranium mill tailings pile. 2. Application of a dynamic mixing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narashimhan, T.N.; White, A.F.; Tokunaga, T.

    1986-01-01

    At Riverton, Wyoming, low pH process waters from an abandoned uranium mill tailings pile have been infiltrating into and contaminating the shallow water table aquifer. The contamination process has been governed by transient infiltration rates, saturated-unsaturated flow, as well as transient chemical reactions between the many chemical species present in the mixing waters and the sediments. In the first part of this two-part series the authors presented field data as well as an interpretation based on a static mixing models. As an upper bound, the authors estimated that 1.7% of the tailings water had mixed with the native groundwater. In the present work they present the results of numerical investigation of the dynamic mixing process. The model, DYNAMIX (DYNamic MIXing), couples a chemical speciation algorithm, PHREEQE, with a modified form of the transport algorithm, TRUMP, specifically designed to handle the simultaneous migration of several chemical constituents. The overall problem of simulating the evolution and migration of the contaminant plume was divided into three sub problems that were solved in sequential stages. These were the infiltration problem, the reactive mixing problem, and the plume-migration problem. The results of the application agree reasonably with the detailed field data. The methodology developed in the present study demonstrates the feasibility of analyzing the evolution of natural hydrogeochemical systems through a coupled analysis of transient fluid flow as well as chemical reactions. It seems worthwhile to devote further effort toward improving the physicochemical capabilities of the model as well as to enhance its computational efficiency

  5. Initiation in the study of uranium recovery from the phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anchondo Adalid, J M

    1974-01-01

    The loss of considerable amounts of uranium in the Mexican phosphoric acid industry makes it important to study economic methods of recovery; the studies can serve as a basis for the construction and operation of a pilot plant as a normal preliminary to larger-scale projects. Routine experimental techniques for solvent extraction were employed. Extraction efficiencies of the order of 90-95% were obtained using 0.09-0.18M solutions of a mixture of phosphoric octyl esters applied to 4 and 6M solutions of phosphoric acid (reagent grade) containing uranium in concentrations of 0.05-0.50g of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ per litre of acid. The conclusion was reached that phosphoric octyl esters can be used for recovering uranium in satisfactory quantities from phosphoric acid solutions by means of solvent extraction, and that the uranium can be separated from the solvent by the established procedures.

  6. Initiation in the study of uranium recovery from the phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anchondo Adalid, J.M.

    1974-01-01

    The loss of considerable amounts of uranium in the Mexican phosphoric acid industry makes it important to study economic methods of recovery; the studies can serve as a basis for the construction and operation of a pilot plant as a normal preliminary to larger-scale projects. Routine experimental techniques for solvent extraction were employed. Extraction efficiencies of the order of 90-95% were obtained using 0.09-0.18M solutions of a mixture of phosphoric octyl esters applied to 4 and 6M solutions of phosphoric acid (reagent grade) containing uranium in concentrations of 0.05-0.50g of U 3 O 8 per litre of acid. The conclusion was reached that phosphoric octyl esters can be used for recovering uranium in satisfactory quantities from phosphoric acid solutions by means of solvent extraction, and that the uranium can be separated from the solvent by the established procedures. (author)

  7. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailing site Maybell, Colorado. Attachment 3, ground water hydrology report, Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established health and environmental regulations to correct and prevent ground water contamination resulting from former uranium processing activities at inactive uranium processing sites (40 CFR Part 192 (1993)) (52 FR 36000 (1978)). According to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (42 USC section 7901 et seq.), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for assessing the inactive uranium processing sites. The DOE has decided that each assessment will include information on hydrogeologic site characterization. The water resources protection strategy that describes the proposed action compliance with the EPA ground water protection standards is presented in Attachment 4, Water Resources Protection Strategy. Site characterization activities discussed in this section include the following: (1) Definition of the hydrogeologic characteristics of the environment, including hydrostratigraphy, aquifer parameters, areas of aquifer recharge and discharge, potentiometric surfaces, and ground water velocities. (2) Definition of background ground water quality and comparison with proposed EPA ground water protection standards. (3) Evaluation of the physical and chemical characteristics of the contaminant source and/or residual radioactive materials. (4) Definition of existing ground water contamination by comparison with the EPA ground water protection standards. (5) Description of the geochemical processes that affect the migration of the source contaminants at the processing site. (6) Description of water resource use, including availability, current and future use and value, and alternate water supplies

  8. Mobilization of arsenic and other naturally occurring contaminants in groundwater of the Main Ethiopian Rift aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rango, Tewodros; Vengosh, Avner; Dwyer, Gary; Bianchini, Gianluca

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates the mechanisms of arsenic (As) and other naturally occurring contaminants (F(-), U, V, B, and Mo) mobilization from Quaternary sedimentary aquifers of the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) and their enrichment in the local groundwater. The study is based on systematic measurements of major and trace elements as well as stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in groundwater, coupled with geochemical and mineralogical analyses of the aquifer rocks. The Rift Valley aquifer is composed of rhyolitic volcanics and Quaternary lacustrine sediments. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) results revealed that MER rhyolites (ash, tuff, pumice and ignimbrite) and sediments contain on average 72 wt. % and 65 wt. % SiO2, respectively. Petrographic studies of the rhyolites indicate predominance of volcanic glass, sanidine, pyroxene, Fe-oxides and plagioclase. The As content in the lacustrine sediments (mean = 6.6 mg/kg) was higher than that of the rhyolites (mean: 2.5 mg/kg). The lacustrine aquifers of the Ziway-Shala basin in the northern part of MER were identified as high As risk zones, where mean As concentration in groundwater was 22.4 ± 33.5 (range of 0.60-190 μg/L) and 54% of samples had As above the WHO drinking water guideline value of 10 μg/L. Field As speciation measurements showed that most of the groundwater samples contain predominantly (~80%) arsenate-As(V) over arsenite-As(III) species. The As speciation together with field data of redox potential (mean Eh = +73 ± 65 mV) and dissolved-O2 (6.6 ± 2.2 mg/L) suggest that the aquifer is predominantly oxidative. Water-rock interactions, including the dissolution of volcanic glass produces groundwater with near-neutral to alkaline pH (range 6.9-8.9), predominance of Na-HCO3 ions, and high concentration of SiO2 (mean: 85.8 ± 11.3 mg/L). The groundwater data show high positive correlation of As with Na, HCO3, U, B, V, and Mo (R(2) > 0.5; p groundwater indicates that Fe-oxides and oxyhydroxides minerals were saturated

  9. Hydrogeology, water quality, and potential for contamination of the Upper Floridan aquifer in the Silver Springs ground-water basin, central Marion County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, G.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Upper Floridan aquifer, composed of a thick sequence of very porous limestone and dolomite, is the principal source of water supply in the Silver Springs ground-water basin of central Marion County, Florida. The karstic nature of the local geology makes the aquifer susceptible to contaminants from the land surface. Contaminants can enter the aquifer by seepage through surficial deposits and through sinkholes and drainage wells. Potential contaminants include agricultural chemicals, landfill leachates and petroleum products from leaking storage tanks and accidental spills. More than 560 sites of potential contamination sources were identified in the basin in 1990. Detailed investigation of four sites were used to define hydrologic conditions at representative sites. Ground-water flow velocities determined from dye trace studies ranged from about 1 foot per hour under natural flow conditions to about 10 feet per hour under pumping conditions, which is considerably higher than velocities estimated using Darcy's equation for steady-state flow in a porous medium. Water entering the aquifer through drainage wells contained bacteria, elevated concentrations of nutrients, manganese and zinc, and in places, low concentrations of organic compounds. On the basis of results from the sampling of 34 wells in 1989 and 1990, and from the sampling of water entering the Upper Floridan aquifer through drainage wells, there has been no widespread degradation of water quality in the study area. In an area of karst, particularly one in which fracture flow is significant, evaluating the effects from contaminants is difficult and special care is required when interpolating hydrogeologic data from regional studies to a specific. (USGS)

  10. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Shiprock, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    This baseline risk assessment at the former uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico, evaluates the potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an on-site disposal cell in 1986 through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. There are no domestic or drinking water wells in the contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the contaminated ground water in the San Juan River floodplain alluvium below the site and the contaminated ground water in the terrace alluvium area where the disposal cell is located. Because no one is drinking the affected ground water, there are currently no health or environmental risks directly associated with the contaminated ground water. However, there is a potential for humans, domestic animals, and wildlife to the exposed to surface expressions of ground water in the seeps and pools in the area of the San Juan River floodplain below the site. For these reasons, this risk assessment evaluates potential exposure to contaminated surface water and seeps as well as potential future use of contaminated ground water

  11. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    For the UMTRA Project site located near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania (the Canonsburg site), the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1983 to 1985, and involved removing the uranium processing mill tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials from their original locations and placing them in a disposal cell located on the former Canonsburg uranium mill site. This disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The Ground Water Project will evaluate the nature and the extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing at the former Canonsburg uranium mill site, and will determine a ground water strategy for complying with the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Canonsburg site, an evaluation was made to determine whether exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing could affect people's health. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Canonsburg site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Canonsburg site will be used to determine how to protect public health and the environment, and how to comply with the EPA standards

  12. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    For the UMTRA Project site located near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania (the Canonsburg site), the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1983 to 1985, and involved removing the uranium processing mill tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials from their original locations and placing them in a disposal cell located on the former Canonsburg uranium mill site. This disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The Ground Water Project will evaluate the nature and the extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing at the former Canonsburg uranium mill site, and will determine a ground water strategy for complying with the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Canonsburg site, an evaluation was made to determine whether exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing could affect people`s health. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Canonsburg site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Canonsburg site will be used to determine how to protect public health and the environment, and how to comply with the EPA standards.

  13. Linking AS, SE, V, and MN Behavior to Natural Biostimulated Uranium Cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keimowitz, Alison [Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY (United States); Ranville, James [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Mailloux, Brian [Barnard College, New York, NY (United States); Figueroa, Linda [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-16

    The project “Linking As, Se, V, and Mn behavior to Natural and Biostimulated Uranium Cycling” successfully investigated Arsenic cycling the Rifle Colorado IFRC. This project trained undergraduate and graduate students at the Colorado School of Mines, Vassar College, and Barnard College. This resulted in both undergraduate theses and a PhD thesis and multiple publications. The science was highly successful and we were able to test the main hypotheses. We have shown that (H1) under reducing conditions that promote uranium immobilization arsenic is readily mobilized, that (H2) thioarsenic species are abundant during this mobilization, and (H3) we have examined arsenic mobilization for site sediment. At the Rifle IFRC Acetate was added during experiments to immobilize Uranium. These experiments successfully immobilized uranium but unfortunately would mobilize arsenic. We developed robust sampling and analysis methods for thioarsenic species. We showed that the mobilization occurred under sulfate reducing conditions and the majority of the arsenic was in the form of thioarsenic species. Previous studies had predicted the presence of thioarsenic species but this study used robust field and laboratory methods to quantitatively determine the presence of thioarsenic species. During stimulation in wells with high arsenic the primary species were trithioarsenate and dithioarsenate. In wells with low levels of arsenic release thioarsenates were absent or minor components. Fortunately after the injection of acetate ended the aquifer would become less reducing and the arsenic concentrations would decrease to pre-injection levels. In aquifers where organic carbon is being added as a remedial method or as a contaminant the transient mobility of arsenic during sulfidogenesis should be considered especially in sulfate rich aquifers as this could impact downgradient water quality.

  14. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Human health risk may result from exposure to ground water contaminated from uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur from drinking water obtained from a well placed in the areas of contamination. Furthermore, environmental risk may result from plant or animal exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water

  15. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Human health risk may result from exposure to ground water contaminated from uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur from drinking water obtained from a well placed in the areas of contamination. Furthermore, environmental risk may result from plant or animal exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water.

  16. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the UMTRA Project site near Lakeview, Oregon, was completed in 1989. The mill operated from February 1958 to November 1960. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Ecological risks to plants or animals may result from exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the ecological environment.

  17. Determination of dominant biogeochemical processes in a contaminated aquifer-wetland system using multivariate statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez-Cazull, S. E.; McGuire, J.T.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Voytek, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Determining the processes governing aqueous biogeochemistry in a wetland hydrologically linked to an underlying contaminated aquifer is challenging due to the complex exchange between the systems and their distinct responses to changes in precipitation, recharge, and biological activities. To evaluate temporal and spatial processes in the wetland-aquifer system, water samples were collected using cm-scale multichambered passive diffusion samplers (peepers) to span the wetland-aquifer interface over a period of 3 yr. Samples were analyzed for major cations and anions, methane, and a suite of organic acids resulting in a large dataset of over 8000 points, which was evaluated using multivariate statistics. Principal component analysis (PCA) was chosen with the purpose of exploring the sources of variation in the dataset to expose related variables and provide insight into the biogeochemical processes that control the water chemistry of the system. Factor scores computed from PCA were mapped by date and depth. Patterns observed suggest that (i) fermentation is the process controlling the greatest variability in the dataset and it peaks in May; (ii) iron and sulfate reduction were the dominant terminal electron-accepting processes in the system and were associated with fermentation but had more complex seasonal variability than fermentation; (iii) methanogenesis was also important and associated with bacterial utilization of minerals as a source of electron acceptors (e.g., barite BaSO4); and (iv) seasonal hydrological patterns (wet and dry periods) control the availability of electron acceptors through the reoxidation of reduced iron-sulfur species enhancing iron and sulfate reduction. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  18. Determination of uranium in human hair by acid digestion and FIAS-ICPMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonnen, R.; Kol, R.; Laichter, Y.; Marcus, P.; Lorber, A.; Karpas, Z.; Halicz, L.

    2000-01-01

    The content of heavy metals in human hair may serve as an indicator of occupational or environmental exposure of metal compounds. However, before such exposure can be determined, the level of the element in a 'normal' population must be established. The concentration of uranium in human hair was measured by flow injection - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FIAS-ICPMS) after acid digestion of the hair samples. All hair samples were rinsed in order to remove external contamination prior to the digestion in a 2:1 solution of concentrated nitric acid and 30% hydrogen peroxide. The limit of detection of the method, for a 50 mg hair sample, was 0.015 μg/g, mainly due to the presence of impurities in the hydrogen peroxide. The range of uranium concentration in the initial test group was found to be 0.01-0.18 μg/g. The mean and median values of the entire study population were 0.062 and 0.050 μg U/g hair, respectively. Differences between the following sub-populations: male and female, smokers and non-smokers and people below and above 45 years of age were examined. The only statistically significant difference was found in the latter group (p=0.03). (author)

  19. Contribution to the study of renal load and its therapeutic modifications during acute uranium contaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourguignon, M.H.N.

    1977-01-01

    The renal load during acute experimental contaminations in rats and the possible effects of treatment with chelators (DTPA) and bicarbonates are estinated. The following points are examined in turn: kidney uptake of uranyl nitrate and therapeutic tests; in vitro solubility of oxides UO 3 and U 3 O 8 in synthetic serum, their kidney uptake and therapeutic tests. The experimental values of the in vitro uranium oxide dissolution method were checked against in vivo observations. These experiments lead to the following conclusions: concerning the solubility of uranium compounds the strong solubility of UO 3 and much lesser solubility of U 3 O 8 in biological media are confirmed; with regard to the kidney uptake of uranium derivatives the fixation is proportional to the amount injected when the compound (uranyl nitrate) is soluble, which would correspond to the dissolved fraction in the case of more or less insoluble oxide. The right-left uptake is symmetrical. The therapeutic conclusions are as follows: the effectiveness of DTPA, in clearing the organism, especially from bone contamination is proved, but the renal uranium load is neither increased nor reduced; single injections of bicarbonates appear to reduce the kidney load in cases of U 3 O 8 contamination but are ineffective for UO 3 and UO 2 ++ . This difference may be explained by the low circulating concentration, due to weak contamination and low solubility, of U 3 O 8 as compared with the other two compounds [fr

  20. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Slick Rock, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, evaluates potential public health and environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former North Continent (NC) and Union Carbide (UC) uranium mill processing sites. The tailings at these sites will be placed in a disposal cell at the proposed Burro Canyon, Colorado, site. The US Department of Energy (DOE) anticipates the start of the first phase remedial action by the spring of 1995 under the direction of the DOE's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project will evaluate ground water contamination. This baseline risk assessment is the first site-specific document for these sites under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the compliance strategy for contaminated ground water at the site. In addition, surface water and sediment are qualitatively evaluated in this report

  1. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Slick Rock, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, evaluates potential public health and environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former North Continent (NC) and Union Carbide (UC) uranium mill processing sites. The tailings at these sites will be placed in a disposal cell at the proposed Burro Canyon, Colorado, site. The US Department of Energy (DOE) anticipates the start of the first phase remedial action by the spring of 1995 under the direction of the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project will evaluate ground water contamination. This baseline risk assessment is the first site-specific document for these sites under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the compliance strategy for contaminated ground water at the site. In addition, surface water and sediment are qualitatively evaluated in this report.

  2. Short-term hepatic effects of depleted uranium on xenobiotic and bile acid metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueguen, Y.; Souidi, M.; Baudelin, C.; Dudoignon, N.; Grison, S.; Dublineau, I.; Marquette, C.; Voisin, P.; Gourmelon, P.; Aigueperse, J.

    2006-01-01

    The toxicity of uranium has been demonstrated in different organs, including the kidneys, skeleton, central nervous system, and liver. However, few works have investigated the biological effects of uranium contamination on important metabolic function in the liver. In vivo studies were conducted to evaluate its effects on cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes involved in the metabolism of cholesterol and xenobiotics in the rat liver. The effects of depleted uranium (DU) contamination on Sprague-Dawley were measured at 1 and 3 days after exposure. Biochemical indicators characterizing liver and kidney functions were measured in the plasma. The DU affected bile acid CYP activity: 7α-hydroxycholesterol plasma level decreased by 52% at day 3 whereas microsomal CYP7A1 activity in the liver did not change significantly and mitochondrial CYP27A1 activity quintupled at day 1. Gene expression of the nuclear receptors related to lipid metabolism (FXR and LXR) also changed, while PPARα mRNA levels did not. The increased mRNA levels of the xenobiotic-metabolizing CYP3A enzyme at day 3 may be caused by feedback up-regulation due to the decreased CYP3A activity at day 1. CAR mRNA levels, which tripled on day 1, may be involved in this up-regulation, while mRNA levels of PXR did not change. These results indicate that high levels of depleted uranium, acting through modulation of the CYP enzymes and some of their nuclear receptors, affect the hepatic metabolism of bile acids and xenobiotics. (orig.)

  3. Bicarbonate Impact on U(VI) Bioreduction in a Shallow Alluvial Aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.; Berman, Elena S.; Gupta, Manish; Chandler, Darrell P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Giloteaux, L.; Handley, Kim M.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al. 2003, Williams et al. 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al. 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggested the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, that the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ~3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in aquifers.

  4. Bicarbonate impact on U(VI) bioreduction in a shallow alluvial aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.; Berman, Elena S. F.; Gupta, Manish; Chandler, Darrell P.; Murray, Chris; Peacock, Aaron D.; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Handley, Kim M.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al., 2003; Williams et al., 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al., 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggested the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer sediments desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ∼3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction in the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in

  5. Chemical barriers for controlling groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, S.J.; Spangler, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical barriers are being explored as a low-cost means of controlling groundwater contamination. The barrier can intercept a contaminant plume and prevent migration by transferring contaminants from the groundwater to immobile solids. A chemical barrier can be emplaced in a landfill liner or in an aquifer cutoff wall or can be injected into a contaminant plume. Chemical barriers can be classified as either precipitation barriers or sorption barriers depending upon the dominant mode of contaminant extraction. In a precipitation barrier, contaminants are bound in the structures of newly formed phases; whereas, in a sorption barrier, contaminants attach to the surfaces of preexisting solids by adsorption or some other surface mechanism. Sorption of contaminants is pH dependent. A precipitation barrier can control the pH of the system, but alkaline groundwater may dominate the pH in a sorption barrier. A comparison is made of the characteristics of precipitation and sorption barriers. Experimental data on the extraction of uranium and molybdenum from simulated groundwater are used to demonstrate these concepts. 10 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  6. Solid phase extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid. Kinetic and thermodynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed Fawzy [Nuclear Materials Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Organic Chemistry

    2017-07-01

    There is a high interest to develop suitable solid phase extractants for uranium separation from aqueous solutions in order to reduce cost and enhance the efficiency. This paper describes solid phase extraction of uranium(VI) from aqueous phosphoric acid solution using MCM-41 based D2HEPA-TOPO organophosphorous extractants. The mixture of D2HEPA (di-2-ethyl-hexylphosphoric acid) and TOPO (tri-n-octylphosphine oxide) was impregnated into the pores of MCM-41 and the synthesized sorbent was fully characterized. The influences of different factors such as synergistic mixture ratio, phosphoric acid concentration, mixing time and temperature were investigated. The results showed that 90% of uranium(VI) extraction can be achieved within 5 min, using D2HEPA-TOPO rate at MCM-41 (mass ratio 2:1 w/w) from 1 M phosphoric acid containing 64 ppm of uranium at room temperature. High adsorption capacity of uranium(VI) have been achieved at the mentioned conditions. The rate constant for the chemical adsorption of uranium(VI) was 0.988 g mg{sup -1} min{sup -1} calculated by the pseudo-second order rate equation. The obtained thermodynamics parameters showed that uranium(VI) adsorption from H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is an exothermic and spontaneous process.

  7. Distribution of uranium and radium isotopes in an aquifer of a semi-arid region (Manouba-Essijoumi, Northern Tunisia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Added, A.; Ben Mammou, A.; Fernex, F.; Rezzoug, S.; Bernat, M.

    2005-01-01

    Groundwaters from the Sebkhet Essijoumi drainage basin, situated in northern Tunisia, West of the city of Tunis, were sampled and analyzed for uranium and radium isotopes. Low 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios coupled with relatively high 228 Ra and 238 U concentrations were found in the Manouba plain phreatic aquifer, at the northern part of the basin, where remote sensing has indicated that this plain corresponds to the main humid zone of the area. Low 234 U/ 238 U ratios probably reflected short residence time for waters in the Manouba plain, and high ratios longer residence time in the south, where water reaching the phreatic aquifer seems to have previously circulated in rocks constituting the southern hills. Assuming that, in the Manouba plain aquifer, the groundwater flows downstream from the Oued Lill pass area to the South-West of the Sebkha, the difference in the 228 Ra/ 226 Ra activity ratio suggests that the residence time of water has been 2.8 years longer near the Sebkha than upstream

  8. Distribution of uranium and radium isotopes in an aquifer of a semi-arid region (Manouba-Essijoumi, Northern Tunisia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Added, A; Ben Mammou, A; Fernex, F; Rezzoug, S; Bernat, M

    2005-01-01

    Groundwaters from the Sebkhet Essijoumi drainage basin, situated in northern Tunisia, West of the city of Tunis, were sampled and analyzed for uranium and radium isotopes. Low (234)U/(238)U activity ratios coupled with relatively high (228)Ra and (238)U concentrations were found in the Manouba plain phreatic aquifer, at the northern part of the basin, where remote sensing has indicated that this plain corresponds to the main humid zone of the area. Low (234)U/(238)U ratios probably reflected short residence time for waters in the Manouba plain, and high ratios longer residence time in the south, where water reaching the phreatic aquifer seems to have previously circulated in rocks constituting the southern hills. Assuming that, in the Manouba plain aquifer, the groundwater flows downstream from the Oued Lill pass area to the South-West of the Sebkha, the difference in the (228)Ra/(226)Ra activity ratio suggests that the residence time of water has been 2.8 years longer near the Sebkha than upstream.

  9. Synthesis of dihydroxamic acid chelating polymers and adsorptive property for uranium in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Takahiro; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1985-01-01

    Preparation of new chelating polymers bearing dihydroxamic acid groups and the adsorptive ability for uranium in seawater are described. Chloromethylated polystryrene crosslinked with divinylbenzene was treated with diethyl malonate in N,N-dimethylformamide to give the polymer having diethyl malonate groups. This polymer was then treated with hydroxylamine in methanol to afford the dihydroxamic acid polymer. The presence of hydroxamic acid groups was confirmed by the appearance of IR peak at 1680 cm -1 . The dihydroxamic acid groups contained carboxylic acid groups as well as hydroxamic acid ones, and the contents of caboxylic acid and hydroxamic acid groups were estimated from elemental analysis to be 2-3 mmol/g and 2-4 mmol/g, respectively. The polymer showed the adsorptive ability of 40 μg/U/g in 8 d for uranium in sea water. In addition, the polymer showed the selective adsorptivity for iron, nickel, copper, and zinc as well as uranium. The macroreticular type polymer showed much higher adsoption rate for the uranium than the gel type ones, suggesting that the rate depends on the diffusion of the uranium in the polymer support. (author)

  10. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Monument Valley, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site near Monument Valley, Arizona. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being relocated and stabilized in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah, through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The tailings removal is planned for completion by spring 1994. After the tailings are removed, groundwater contamination at the site will continue to be evaluated. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Groundwater Project. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site

  11. Molecular analysis of microbial community structures in pristine and contaminated aquifers--Field and laboratory microcosm experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y.; Zwolinski, M.D.; Schreiber, M.E.; Bahr, J.M.; Sewell, G.W.; Hickey, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    Molecular Analysis of Microbial Community Structures in Pristine and Contaminated Aquifers: Field and Laboratory Microcosm Experimentsvar callbackToken='531E8ACDB6C8511'; var subCode='asmjournal_sub'; var OAS_sitepage = 'aem.asm.org'; This study used phylogenetic probes in hybridization analysis to (i) determine in situ microbial community structures in regions of a shallow sand aquifer that were oxygen depleted and fuel contaminated (FC) or aerobic and noncontaminated (NC) and (ii) examine alterations in microbial community structures resulting from exposure to toluene and/or electron acceptor supplementation (nitrate). The latter objective was addressed by using the NC and FC aquifer materials for anaerobic microcosm studies in which phylogenetic probe analysis was complemented by microbial activity assays. Domain probe analysis of the aquifer samples showed that the communities were predominantlyBacteria; Eucarya and Archaea were not detectable. At the phylum and subclass levels, the FC and NC aquifer material had similar relative abundance distributions of 43 to 65% β- and γ-Proteobacteria (B+G), 31 to 35% α-Proteobacteria (ALF), 15 to 18% sulfate-reducing bacteria, and 5 to 10% high G+C gram positive bacteria. Compared to that of the NC region, the community structure of the FC material differed mainly in an increased abundance of B+G relative to that of ALF. The microcosm communities were like those of the field samples in that they were predominantly Bacteria (83 to 101%) and lacked detectable Archaea but differed in that a small fraction (2 to 8%) of Eucarya was detected regardless of the treatment applied. The latter result was hypothesized to reflect enrichment of anaerobic protozoa. Addition of nitrate and/or toluene stimulated microbial activity in the microcosms, but only supplementation of toluene alone significantly altered community structures. For the NC material, the dominant subclass shifted from B+G to ALF, while in the FC microcosms 55 to 65

  12. Desorption of uranium from titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent with acidic eluent, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Sakane, Kohji; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was carried out on the desorption of uranium from titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent with acidic eluent by the batch process. The rate of desorption of uranium with acidic eluent depended on temperature, showing an increase as the temperature was raised. But the rate of desorption with acidic eluent was less dependent on temperature than that obtained when mixed eluent of sodium carbonate-sodium hydrogencarbonate was used. The rate of desorption of uranium did not vary in the range of concentration from 0.3 to 0.5 N, and the rate of desorption with sulfuric acid was slightly higher than that obtained when hydrochloric acid was used. The amount of dissolved titanium decreased as the ratio of adsorbent to eluent (RAE) was increased. At RAE of 10 %, the percentage of dissolved titanium (DTI) was below 0.38 % with sulfuric acid, below 0.7 % with hydrochloric acid. These values were found to be higher than the ones with the carbonate eluent. The elements except uranium, which were adsorbed on the adsorbent, were eluted simultaneously with acidic eluent. The regeneration of the adsorbent after desorption, therefore, was found to be unnecessary. In a repeated test of adsorption-desorption treatment up to five times, the percentage of uranium adsorbed from natural sea water was approximately constant of 85 %. From these results, the application of column process to the desorption of uranium with acidic eluent at room temperature was proposed to be feasible. (author)

  13. Desorption of uranium from titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent with acidic eluent, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Sakane, Kohji; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was carried out on the desorption of uranium from titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent with acidic eluent by the batch process. The rate of desorption of uranium with acidic eluent depended on temperature, showing an increase as the temperature was raised. But the rate of desorption with acidic eluent was less dependent on temperature than that obtained when mixed eluent of sodium carbonate-sodium hydrogencarbonate was used. The difference of the rate of desorption of uranium in the range of concentration from 0.3 to 0.5N was not found, and the rate of desorption with sulfuric acid was slightly higher than that obtained when hydrochloric acid was used. The amount of dissolved titanium decreased as the ratio of adsorbent to eluent (RAE) was increased. At RAE of 10%, the percentage of dissolved titanium (DTI) was below 0.38% with sulfuric acid, below 0.7% with hydrochloric acid. These values were found to be higher than the ones with the carbonate eluent. The elements except uranium, which were adsorbed on the adsorbent, were eluted simultaneously with acidic eluent. The regeneration of the adsorbent after desorption, therefore, was found to be unnecessary. In a repeated test of adsorption-desorption treatment up to five times, the percentage of uranium adsorbed from natural sea water was approximately constant of 85%. From these results, the application of column process to the desorption of uranium with acidic eluent at room temperature was proposed to be feasible. (author)

  14. Recovery of uranium in the production of concentrated phosphoric acid by a hemihydrate process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, S.; Miyamoto, M.

    1983-01-01

    Nissan Chemical Industries as manufacturers of phosphoric acid have studied the recovery of uranium, based on a concentrated phosphoric acid production process. The process consists of two stages, a hemihydrate stage with a formation of hemihydrate and a filtration section, followed by a dihydrate stage with hydration and a filtration section. In the hemihydrate stage, phosphate is treated with a mixture of phosphoric acid and sulphuric acid to produce phosphoric acid and hydrous calcium sulphate; the product is recovered in the filtration section and its concentration is 40-50% P 2 O 3 . In the dihydrate stage, the hemihydrate is transformed by re-dissolution and hydration, producing hydrous calcium sulphate, i.e. gypsum. This process therefore comprises two parts, each with different acid concentrations. As the extraction of uranium is easier in the case of a low concentration of phosphoric acid, the process consists of the recovery of uranium starting from the filtrate of the hydration section. The tests have shown that the yield of recovery of uranium was of the order of 80% disregarding the handling losses and no disadvantageous effect has been found in the combination of the process of uranium extraction with the process of concentrated phosphoric acid production. Compared with the classical process where uranium is recovered from acid with 30% P 2 O 5 , the process of producing high-concentration phosphoric acid such as the Nissan process, in which the uranium recovery is effected from acid with 15% P 2 O 5 from the hydration section, presents many advantages [fr

  15. A complete remediation process for a uranium-contaminated site and application to other sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, C.F.V.; Lu, N.; Kitten, H.D.; Williams, M.; Turney, W.R.J.R.

    1998-01-01

    During the summer of 1996 the authors were able to test, at the pilot scale, the concept of leaching uranium (U) from contaminated soils. The results of this pilot scale operation showed that the system they previously had developed at the laboratory scale is applicable at the pilot scale. The paper discusses these results, together with laboratory scale results using soil from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), Ohio. These FEMP results show how, with suitable adaptations, the process is widely applicable to other sites. The purpose of this paper is to describe results that demonstrate remediation of uranium-contaminated soils may be accomplished through a leach scheme using sodium bicarbonate

  16. A complete remediation process for a uranium-contaminated site and application to other sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, C.F.V.; Lu, N.; Kitten, H.D.; Williams, M.; Turney, W.R.J.R.

    1998-12-31

    During the summer of 1996 the authors were able to test, at the pilot scale, the concept of leaching uranium (U) from contaminated soils. The results of this pilot scale operation showed that the system they previously had developed at the laboratory scale is applicable at the pilot scale. The paper discusses these results, together with laboratory scale results using soil from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), Ohio. These FEMP results show how, with suitable adaptations, the process is widely applicable to other sites. The purpose of this paper is to describe results that demonstrate remediation of uranium-contaminated soils may be accomplished through a leach scheme using sodium bicarbonate.

  17. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    Surface cleanup at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Lakeview, Oregon was completed in 1989. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Ecological risks to plants or animals may result from exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the ecological environment

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Surface cleanup at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Lakeview, Oregon was completed in 1989. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Ecological risks to plants or animals may result from exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the ecological environment.

  19. Uranium mill decommissioning - an update on the Edgemont experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, Th.K.; Chart, E.J.; Cummings, G.W.; Tappan, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the Edgemont Uranium Mill Decommissioning Project. An estimated 5.4 million tons of contaminated material including approximately 2.5 million tons of uranium mill tailings will be moved to a disposal site approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The decommissioning activities will be carried out by Silver King Mines, Inc., under a management services contract to the Tennessee Valley Authority. The primary advantages of the disposal site chosen are the short distance from the existing site and the approximately 650 feet of relatively dense impermeable shales above the shallowest known aquifer. Three large ore stockpiles containing about 100,000 pounds of uranium have been moved from the mill site to a proposed mine site. The decommissioning project will be carried out by using the existing labor force to the maximum extent possible thus preventing a population influx and the accompanying socioeconomic input to the city of Edgemont, SD

  20. Potential synergy between two renal toxicants: DTPA and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, D.; Houpert, P.; Henge Napoli, M.H.; Paquet, F.; Muller, D.; Henge Napoli, M.H.; Metivier, H.

    2006-01-01

    At present, the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat an accidental contamination with plutonium and uranium oxide mixture (MOX) is administration of diethylene-triamine-penta-acetate acid (DTPA) in order to accelerate plutonium excretion. As uranium and DTPA are both nephro-toxic compounds, the administration of DTPA after a contamination containing uranium could enhance the nephro-toxic effects of uranium. The aim of the present work was to study in vitro on a kidney proximal tubule cell line (LLC-PK 1 ) the cytotoxicity induced by increasing concentrations of uranium in presence of 3 different chemical forms of DTPA. The results showed that the DTPA used alone induced no cytotoxicity at the concentration used here (420 μM). However, this concentration of DTPA increased the cytotoxicity induced by uranium. This increase was maximal for uranium concentrations close to the lethal concentration for 50% of the cells and reached 37, 31 and 28% for anhydrous DTPA, Na 3 CaDTPA and Na 3 ZnDTPA, respectively. These results suggest that administration of DTPA could enhance the nephrotoxicity induced by uranium. (authors)

  1. Extraction of uranium from aqueous solution by phosphonic acid-imbedded polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katragadda, S.; Gesser, H.D.; Chow, A.

    1997-01-01

    Phenylphosphonic acid was imbedded into the matrix of the polyurethane foam during the fabrication process of the polymer. The extraction of uranium by phosphonic acid-imbedded polyurethane foam and blank polyurethane (i.e., foam without phosphonic acid functional groups) was investigated. Phosphonic acid-imbedded foam showed superior extractability of uranium from solutions with pH = 7.0 ± 1.5 over a wide range of temperatures. (author)

  2. Separation of uranium from molybdenum by alkyl phosphoric acid extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhongshi, Li

    1986-08-01

    The regularities of separation of uranium from molybdenum by alkyl phosphoric acid extraction are described. Two parameters, i.e., density ratio of uranium to molybdenum in organic phase at first stage and density of uranium in raffinate at last stage are presented. The relationship between these parameters and purity of molybdenum and uranium products is given. The method of adjusting and controlling these parameters in experiments and production is worked out. The technical key problem in comprehensive utilization of sedimentary type uranium ore containing molybdenum with close concentration of these to elements has been solved.

  3. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination of the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas, evaluates potential impact to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former Susquehanna Western, Inc. (SWI), uranium mill processing site. This document fulfills the following objectives: determine if the site presents immediate or potential future health risks, determine the need for interim institutional controls, serve as a key input to project planning and prioritization, and recommend future data collection efforts to more fully characterize risk. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has begun its evaluation of ground water contamination at the Falls City site. This risk assessment is one of the first documents specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. The first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at or near the site. Evaluation of these data show the main contaminants in the Dilworth ground water are cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, nickel, sulfate, and uranium. The data also show high levels of arsenic and manganese occur naturally in some areas.

  4. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination of the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas, evaluates potential impact to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former Susquehanna Western, Inc. (SWI), uranium mill processing site. This document fulfills the following objectives: determine if the site presents immediate or potential future health risks, determine the need for interim institutional controls, serve as a key input to project planning and prioritization, and recommend future data collection efforts to more fully characterize risk. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has begun its evaluation of ground water contamination at the Falls City site. This risk assessment is one of the first documents specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. The first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at or near the site. Evaluation of these data show the main contaminants in the Dilworth ground water are cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, nickel, sulfate, and uranium. The data also show high levels of arsenic and manganese occur naturally in some areas

  5. Recovering uranium from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abodishish, H.A.; Ritchey, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    Precipitation of Fe 3 HN 4 H 8 (PO 4 ) 6 is prevented in the second cycle extractor, in a two cycle uranium recovery process, by washing ammonia laden organic solvent stream, from the second cycle stripper, with first cycle raffinate iron stream containing phosphoric acid, prior to passing the solvent stream into the second cycle extractor. (author)

  6. Molecular analysis of phosphate limitation in Geobacteraceae during the bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N' Guessan, L.A.; Elifantz, H.; Nevin, K.P.; Mouser, P.J.; Methe, B.; Woodard, T. L.; Manley, K.; Williams, K. H.; Wilkins, M. J.; Larsen, J.T.; Long, P. E.; Lovley, D. R.

    2009-09-01

    Nutrient limitation is an environmental stress that may reduce the effectiveness of bioremediation strategies, especially when the contaminants are organic compounds or when organic compounds are added to promote microbial activities such as metal reduction. Genes indicative of phosphate-limitation were identified via microarray analysis of chemostat cultures of Geobacter sulfureducens. This analysis revealed that genes in the pst-pho operon, which is associated with a high affinity phosphate uptake system in other microorganisms, had significantly higher transcript abundance under phosphate-limiting conditions, with the genes pstB and phoU the most up-regulated. Quantitative PCR analysis of pstB and phoU transcript levels in G. sulfurreducens grown in chemostats demonstrated that the expression of these genes increased when phosphate was removed from the culture medium. Transcripts of pstB and phoU within the subsurface Geobacter species predominating during an in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment were more abundant than in chemostat cultures of G. sulfurreducens that were not limited for phosphate. Addition of phosphate to incubations of subsurface sediments did not stimulate dissimilatory metal reduction. The added phosphate was rapidly adsorbed onto the sediments. The results demonstrate that Geobacter species can effectively reduce U(VI) even when experiencing suboptimal phosphate concentrations and that increasing phosphate availability with phosphate additions is difficult to achieve due to the high reactivity of this compound. This transcript-based approach developed for diagnosing phosphate limitation should be applicable to assessing the potential need for additional phosphate in other bioremediation processes.

  7. Acid leaching of uranium present in a residue from mining industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braulio, Walace S.; Ladeira, Ana C.Q. [Center for Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. of Mineral Technology

    2011-07-01

    The acid mine drainage is one of the most important environmental problems associated with mining of ores containing sulfides. The treatment of these acid effluents, which contains high concentrations of dissolved metals and anions, is generally by liming. The wastes generated in the liming process may present significant toxicity and their storage in inappropriate places waiting for treatment is a common issue that requires solution. Osamu Utsumi Mine located in the city of Caldas, Minas Gerais, has been facing this problem. The residue of this mine consists of an alkaline sludge generated from the neutralization of the pH of acid mine drainage and is rich in various metals, including uranium. The main concern is the long term stability of this residue, which is in permanent contact with the acid water in the open pit. The recovery of uranium by hydrometallurgical techniques, such as acid leaching, can be a viable alternative on the reuse of this material. This study aimed at establishing a specific leaching process for the recovery of uranium present in the sludge from Caldas uranium mine. Some parameters such as solid/liquid ratio (0.09 to 0.17), time of leaching (1 to 24 hours) and concentration of sulfuric acid (pH from 0 to 3.0) were assessed. The results showed that it is possible to extract 100% of uranium present in the sludge. The concentration of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in the residue was 0.25%, similar to the content of the vein ores which is around 0.20% to 1.0%. The best experimental leaching condition is solid/liquid ratio of 0.17, pH 1.0 and 2 hours of reaction at room temperature (25 deg C). The content of uranium in the liquor is around 440 mgL{sup -1}. The recovery of the uranium from the liquor is under investigation by ionic exchange. (author)

  8. Acid leaching of uranium present in a residue from mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braulio, Walace S.; Ladeira, Ana C.Q.

    2011-01-01

    The acid mine drainage is one of the most important environmental problems associated with mining of ores containing sulfides. The treatment of these acid effluents, which contains high concentrations of dissolved metals and anions, is generally by liming. The wastes generated in the liming process may present significant toxicity and their storage in inappropriate places waiting for treatment is a common issue that requires solution. Osamu Utsumi Mine located in the city of Caldas, Minas Gerais, has been facing this problem. The residue of this mine consists of an alkaline sludge generated from the neutralization of the pH of acid mine drainage and is rich in various metals, including uranium. The main concern is the long term stability of this residue, which is in permanent contact with the acid water in the open pit. The recovery of uranium by hydrometallurgical techniques, such as acid leaching, can be a viable alternative on the reuse of this material. This study aimed at establishing a specific leaching process for the recovery of uranium present in the sludge from Caldas uranium mine. Some parameters such as solid/liquid ratio (0.09 to 0.17), time of leaching (1 to 24 hours) and concentration of sulfuric acid (pH from 0 to 3.0) were assessed. The results showed that it is possible to extract 100% of uranium present in the sludge. The concentration of U 3 O 8 in the residue was 0.25%, similar to the content of the vein ores which is around 0.20% to 1.0%. The best experimental leaching condition is solid/liquid ratio of 0.17, pH 1.0 and 2 hours of reaction at room temperature (25 deg C). The content of uranium in the liquor is around 440 mgL -1 . The recovery of the uranium from the liquor is under investigation by ionic exchange. (author)

  9. Investigation of shallow groundwater contamination near East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmichael, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    Alluvial soils of the flood plain of East Fork Poplar Creek in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, are contaminated with mercury and other metals, organic compounds, and radionuclides originating from the Y-12 Plant, a nuclear-processing facility located within the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation. Observation wells were installed in the shallow aquifer of the flood plain, and water quality samples were collected to determine if contaminants are present in the shallow groundwater. Groundwater in the shallow aquifer occurs under water-table conditions. Recharge is primarily from precipitation and discharge is to East Fork Poplar Creek. Groundwater levels fluctuate seasonally in response to variations in recharge and evapotranspiration. During extremely dry periods, the water table drops below the base of the shallow aquifer in some flood-plain areas. Contaminants were found in water samples from several of the wells in concentrations which equaled or exceeded drinking-water standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency are antimony, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, phenols, and strontium-90. Total and dissolved uranium concentrations exceeded the analytical detection limit in nearly 70% of the wells in the flood plain. The results of water quality determinations demonstrate that elevated concentrations of most trace metals (and possibly organic compounds and radionuclides) were caused by contaminated sediments in the samples. The presence of contaminated sediment in samples is suspected to be the result of borehole contamination during well installation. 21 refs., 20 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Post monitoring of a cyclodextrin remeditated chlorinated solvent contaminated aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanford, W. J.

    2006-12-01

    Hydroxypropyl-â-cyclodextrin (HPâCD) has been tested successfully in the laboratory and in the field for enhanced flushing of low-polarity contaminants from aquifers. The cyclodextrin molecule forms a toroidal structure, which has a hydrophobic cavity. Within this cavity, organic compounds of appropriate shape and size can form inclusion complexes, which is the basis for the use of cyclodextrin in groundwater remediation. The hydrophilic exterior of the molecule makes cyclodextrin highly water-soluble. The solubility of cyclodextrins can be further enhanced by adding functional groups, such as hydroxypropyl groups, to the cyclodextrin core. The aqueous solubility of HPâCD exceeds 950 g/L. These high solubilities are advantageous for field applications because they permit relatively high concentrations of the flushing agent. In order for cyclodextrin to become a feasible remediative alternative, it must be demonstrate a short term resistance to biodegradation during field application, but ultimately biodegrade so as not to pose a long term presence in the aquifer. The potential for degradation of cyclodextrin as well as changes in the chlorinated solvents and groundwater geochemistry were examined during the post monitoring of a field demonstration in a shallow aquifer at Little Creek Naval Amphibious Base in Virginia. It was found that a portion of the cyclodextrin remaining in the aquifer after the cessation of field activities biodegraded during the 425 days of post monitoring. This degradation also led to the degradation of the chlorinated solvents trichloroethylene and 1,1-trichloroethane through both biological and chemical processes. The aquifer remained anaerobic with average dissolved oxygen levels below 0.5 mg/L. Dissolved nitrate and sulfate concentrations within the cyclodextrin plume decreased due their being used as terminal electron acceptors during the degradation of the cyclodextrin. The concentrations of total iron at the field site showed no

  11. Potential impacts of leakage from deep CO2 geosequestration on overlying freshwater aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Mark G; Jackson, Robert B

    2010-12-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage may use deep saline aquifers for CO(2) sequestration, but small CO(2) leakage could pose a risk to overlying fresh groundwater. We performed laboratory incubations of CO(2) infiltration under oxidizing conditions for >300 days on samples from four freshwater aquifers to 1) understand how CO(2) leakage affects freshwater quality; 2) develop selection criteria for deep sequestration sites based on inorganic metal contamination caused by CO(2) leaks to shallow aquifers; and 3) identify geochemical signatures for early detection criteria. After exposure to CO(2), water pH declines of 1-2 units were apparent in all aquifer samples. CO(2) caused concentrations of the alkali and alkaline earths and manganese, cobalt, nickel, and iron to increase by more than 2 orders of magnitude. Potentially dangerous uranium and barium increased throughout the entire experiment in some samples. Solid-phase metal mobility, carbonate buffering capacity, and redox state in the shallow overlying aquifers influence the impact of CO(2) leakage and should be considered when selecting deep geosequestration sites. Manganese, iron, calcium, and pH could be used as geochemical markers of a CO(2) leak, as their concentrations increase within 2 weeks of exposure to CO(2).

  12. Key players and team play: anaerobic microbial communities in hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Schleinitz, Kathleen M; Vogt, Carsten

    2012-05-01

    Biodegradation of anthropogenic pollutants in shallow aquifers is an important microbial ecosystem service which is mainly brought about by indigenous anaerobic microorganisms. For the management of contaminated sites, risk assessment and control of natural attenuation, the assessment of in situ biodegradation and the underlying microbial processes is essential. The development of novel molecular methods, "omics" approaches, and high-throughput techniques has revealed new insight into complex microbial communities and their functions in anoxic environmental systems. This review summarizes recent advances in the application of molecular methods to study anaerobic microbial communities in contaminated terrestrial subsurface ecosystems. We focus on current approaches to analyze composition, dynamics, and functional diversity of subsurface communities, to link identity to activity and metabolic function, and to identify the ecophysiological role of not yet cultured microbes and syntrophic consortia. We discuss recent molecular surveys of contaminated sites from an ecological viewpoint regarding degrader ecotypes, abiotic factors shaping anaerobic communities, and biotic interactions underpinning the importance of microbial cooperation for microbial ecosystem services such as contaminant degradation.

  13. Microbial bioremediation of Uranium: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, Celin

    2015-01-01

    Uranium contamination is a worldwide problem. Preventing uranium contamination in the environment is quite challenging and requires a thorough understanding of the microbiological, ecological and biogeochemical features of the contaminated sites. Bioremediation of uranium is largely dependent on reducing its bioavailability in the environment. In situ bioremediation of uranium by microbial processes has been shown to be effective for immobilizing uranium in contaminated sites. Such microbial processes are important components of biogeochemical cycles and regulate the mobility and fate of uranium in the environment. It is therefore vital to advance our understanding of the uranium-microbe interactions to develop suitable bioremediation strategies for uranium contaminated sites. This article focuses on the fundamental mechanisms adopted by various microbes to mitigate uranium toxicity which could be utilized for developing various approaches for uranium bioremediation. (author)

  14. Evaluation of the fate of arsenic-contaminated groundwater at different aquifers of Thar coalfield Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Jamshed; Kazi, Tasneem G; Baig, Jameel A; Afridi, Hassan I; Arain, Mariam S; Ullah, Naeem; Brahman, Kapil D; Arain, Sadaf S; Panhwar, Abdul H

    2015-12-01

    In present study, the ground water at different aquifers was evaluated for physicochemical parameters, iron, total arsenic, total inorganic arsenic and arsenic species (arsenite and arsenate). The samples of groundwater were collected at different depths, first aquifer (AQ1) 50-60 m, second aquifer (AQ2) 100-120 m, and third aquifer (AQ3) 200-250 m of Thar coalfield, Pakistan. Total inorganic arsenic was determined by solid phase extraction using titanium dioxide as an adsorbent. The arsenite was determined by cloud point extraction using ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate as a chelating reagent, and resulted complex was extracted by Triton X-114. The resulted data of groundwater were reported in terms of basic statistical parameters, principal component, and cluster analysis. The resulted data indicated that physicochemical parameters of groundwater of different aquifers were exceeded the World Health Organization provisional guideline for drinking water except pH and SO4(2-). The positive correlation was observed between arsenic species and physicochemical parameters of groundwater except F(-) and K(+), which might be caused by geochemical minerals. Results of cluster analysis indicated that groundwater samples of AQ1 was highly contaminated with arsenic species as compared to AQ2 and AQ3 (p > 0.05).

  15. Metabolomics identifies a biological response to chronic low-dose natural uranium contamination in urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, Stéphane; Favé, Gaëlle; Maillot, Matthieu; Manens, Line; Delissen, Olivia; Blanchardon, Eric; Banzet, Nathalie; Defoort, Catherine; Bott, Romain; Dublineau, Isabelle; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Gourmelon, Patrick; Martin, Jean-Charles; Souidi, Maâmar

    2013-01-01

    Because uranium is a natural element present in the earth's crust, the population may be chronically exposed to low doses of it through drinking water. Additionally, the military and civil uses of uranium can also lead to environmental dispersion that can result in high or low doses of acute or chronic exposure. Recent experimental data suggest this might lead to relatively innocuous biological reactions. The aim of this study was to assess the biological changes in rats caused by ingestion of natural uranium in drinking water with a mean daily intake of 2.7 mg/kg for 9 months and to identify potential biomarkers related to such a contamination. Subsequently, we observed no pathology and standard clinical tests were unable to distinguish between treated and untreated animals. Conversely, LC-MS metabolomics identified urine as an appropriate biofluid for discriminating the experimental groups. Of the 1,376 features detected in urine, the most discriminant were metabolites involved in tryptophan, nicotinate, and nicotinamide metabolic pathways. In particular, N -methylnicotinamide, which was found at a level seven times higher in untreated than in contaminated rats, had the greatest discriminating power. These novel results establish a proof of principle for using metabolomics to address chronic low-dose uranium contamination. They open interesting perspectives for understanding the underlying biological mechanisms and designing a diagnostic test of exposure.

  16. Influence of acid/ore relation in the uranium-silicate ore treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antaki, C.; Cipriani, M.; Bruno, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    The estimation of acid addition effect (Kg of H 2 SO 4 /t of ore) in uranium extraction from an uranium-silicate ore, with a view to the control of silica concentration in leach under 0,6 g/l is presented. The analysis was effected based on bench-scale tests, with different quantities of sulfuric acid addition. (Author) [pt

  17. The dendroanalysis of oak trees as a method of biomonitoring past and recent contamination in an area influenced by uranium mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märten, Arno; Berger, Dietrich; Köhler, Mirko; Merten, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    We reconstructed the contamination history of an area influenced by 40 years of uranium mining and subsequent remediation actions using dendroanalysis (i.e., the determination of the elemental content of tree rings). The uranium content in the tree rings of four individual oak trees (Quercus sp.) was determined by laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). This technique allows the investigation of trace metals in solid samples with a spatial resolution of 250 μm and a detection limit below 0.01 μg/g for uranium. The investigations show that in three of the four oaks sampled, there were temporally similar uranium concentrations. These were approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher (0.15 to 0.4 μg/g) than those from before the period of active mining (concentrations below 0.01 μg/g). After the mining was terminated and the area was restored, the uranium contents in the wood decreased by approximately 1 order of magnitude. The similar radial uranium distribution patterns of the three trees were confirmed by correlation analysis. In combination with the results of soil analyses, it was determined that there was a heterogeneous contamination in the forest investigated. This could be confirmed by pre-remediation soil uranium contents from literature. The uranium contents in the tree rings of the oaks investigated reflect the contamination history of the study area. This study demonstrates that the dendrochemical analysis of oak tree rings is a suitable technique for investigating past and recent uranium contamination in mining areas.

  18. Assessments of aquifer sensitivity on Navajo Nation and adjacent lands and ground-water vulnerability to pesticide contamination on the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project, Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Paul J.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requested that the Navajo Nation conduct an assessment of aquifer sensitivity on Navajo Nation lands and an assessment of ground-water vulnerability to pesticide contamination on the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project. Navajo Nation lands include about 17,000 square miles in northeastern Arizona, northwestern New Mexico, and southeastern Utah. The Navajo Indian Irrigation Project in northwestern New Mexico is the largest area of agriculture on the Navajo Nation. The Navajo Indian Irrigation Project began operation in 1976; presently (2001) about 62,000 acres are available for irrigated agriculture. Numerous pesticides have been used on the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project during its operation. Aquifer sensitivity is defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as 'The relative ease with which a contaminant [pesticide] applied on or near a land surface can migrate to the aquifer of interest. Aquifer sensitivity is a function of the intrinsic characteristics of the geologic material in question, any underlying saturated materials, and the overlying unsaturated zone. Sensitivity is not dependent on agronomic practices or pesticide characteristics.' Ground-water vulnerability is defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as 'The relative ease with which a contaminant [pesticide] applied on or near a land surface can migrate to the aquifer of interest under a given set of agronomic management practices, pesticide characteristics, and aquifer sensitivity conditions.' The results of the aquifer sensitivity assessment on Navajo Nation and adjacent lands indicated relative sensitivity within the boundaries of the study area. About 22 percent of the study area was not an area of recharge to bedrock aquifers or an area of unconsolidated deposits and was thus assessed to have an insignificant potential for contamination. About 72 percent of the Navajo Nation study area was assessed to be in the categories of most potential

  19. Uranium biomineralization by a metal resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from contaminated mine waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Sangeeta [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Sar, Pinaki, E-mail: sarpinaki@yahoo.com [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2011-02-15

    Uranium biomineralization by a metal-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from uranium mine waste was characterized for its potential in bioremediation. Uranium resistance, its cellular localization and chemical nature of uranium-bacteria interaction were elucidated. Survival and uranium biomineralization from mine water were investigated using microcosm experiments. The selected bacterium showed U resistance and accumulation (maximum of 275 mg U g{sup -1} cell dry wt.) following incubation in 100 mg U L{sup -1}, pH 4.0, for 6 h. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that bioaccumulated uranium was deposited within the cell envelope as needle shaped U-phosphate compounds that attain crystallinity only at pH 4.0. A synergistic involvement of deprotonated phosphate and carboxyl moieties in facilitating bioprecipitation of uranium was evident from FTIR analysis. Based on these findings we attribute the localized U sequestration by this bacterium as innocuous complex to its possible mechanism of uranium resistance. Microcosm data confirmed that the strain can remove soluble uranium (99%) and sequester it as U oxide and phosphate minerals while maintaining its viability. The study showed that indigenous bacteria from contaminated site that can survive uranium and other heavy metal toxicity and sequester soluble uranium as biominerals could play important role in uranium bioremediation.

  20. Elimination of natural uranium and 226Ra from contaminated waters by rhizofiltration using Helianthus annuus L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera Tome, F.; Blanco Rodriguez, P.; Lozano, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    The elimination of natural uranium and 226 Ra from contaminated waters by rhizofiltration was tested using Helianthus annuus L. (sunflower) seedlings growing in a hydroponic medium. Different experiments were designed to determine the optimum age of the seedlings for the remediation process, and also to study the principal way in which the radionuclides are removed from the solution by the sunflower roots. In every trial a precipitate appeared which contained a major fraction of the natural uranium and 226 Ra. The results indicated that the seedlings themselves induced the formation of this precipitate. When four-week-old seedlings were exposed to contaminated water, a period of only 2 days was sufficient to remove the natural uranium and 226 Ra from the solution: about 50% of the natural uranium and 70% of the 226 Ra were fixed in the roots, and essentially the rest was found in the precipitate, with only very small percentages fixed in the shoots and left in solution

  1. The selection of hyperaccumulators for phytoremediation of uranium-contaminated soils and their uranium-accumulating characters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Li; Ren Yamin; Xu Jun; Yao Zhongwei; Xia Chuanqin; Bo Yun; Deng Dachao

    2009-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the possibility for phytoremediation of U-contaminated soils. The plants of cruciferae (8 species), malvaceae or compositae were planted for 55 days in the U-contaminated soils (100 mg·kg -1 ). The samples were analyzed using an inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). The results showed that U concentration was the highest in shoots of Chinese mustard (var.Texuanzhacai, 1115 mg·kg -1 ), the highest U removal from U-contaminated soils to plants occurred in the shoots of Artemisia argyi(1113 μg per pot). For the Chinese mustard (var.Paoqingcai, var. Texuanzhacai), uranium concentration in shoots was higher than in roots, and bioaccumulation factors (BFs) and transfer factors (TFs) were more than one. They showed better suitability for phytoremediation of U than other plants due to their high U accumulation in the aboveground tissues. (authors)

  2. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Monument Valley, Arizona. Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site near Monument Valley, Arizona. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being relocated and stabilized in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah, through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The tailings removal is planned for completion by spring 1994. After the tailings are removed, groundwater contamination at the site will continue to be evaluated. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Groundwater Project. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site.

  3. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site, Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    The Gunnison Baseline Risk Assessment for Groundwater Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site was performed to determine if long-term use of groundwater from domestic wells near the site has a potential for adverse health effects. The risk assessment was based on the results of sampling domestic wells during 1989--1990. A risk assessment evaluates health risks by comparing the amount of a contaminant taken in by a person with the amount of the contaminant that may be toxic. The Gunnison Risk Assessment used high intake values to estimate the maximum levels a person might be exposed to. The results of the risk assessment are divided into cancer (carcinogenic) risks and non-carcinogenic risks. Five key contaminants were evaluated for adverse health risks: uranium, manganese, lead antimony, and cadmium. Due to the potential health risks and the unavoidable uncertainties associated with limited groundwater and toxicity data, it is prudent public health policy to provide a permanent alternate water supply. Additionally, providing a permanent alternate water supply is cost-effective compared to long-term routine monitoring

  4. Zero-valent iron nanoparticles in treatment of acid mine water from in situ uranium leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimkova, Stepanka; Cernik, Miroslav; Lacinova, Lenka; Filip, Jan; Jancik, Dalibor; Zboril, Radek

    2011-02-01

    Acid mine water from in situ chemical leaching of uranium (Straz pod Ralskem, Czech Republic) was treated in laboratory scale experiments by zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI). For the first time, nZVI were applied for the treatment of the real acid water system containing the miscellaneous mixture of pollutants, where the various removal mechanisms occur simultaneously. Toxicity of the treated saline acid water is caused by major contaminants represented by aluminum and sulphates in a high concentration, as well as by microcontaminants like As, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, U, V, and Zn. Laboratory batch experiments proved a significant decrease in concentrations of all the monitored pollutants due to an increase in pH and a decrease in oxidation-reduction potential related to an application of nZVI. The assumed mechanisms of contaminants removal include precipitation of cations in a lower oxidation state, precipitation caused by a simple pH increase and co-precipitation with the formed iron oxyhydroxides. The possibility to control the reaction kinetics through the nature of the surface stabilizing shell (polymer vs. FeO nanolayer) is discussed as an important practical aspect. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of complex electrokinetic decontamination method for soil contaminated with uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Park, Hye-Min; Kim, Wan-Suk; Moon, Jei-Kwon; Hyeon, Jay-Hyeok

    2012-01-01

    520L complex electrokinetic soil decontamination equipment was manufactured to clean up uranium contaminated soils from Korean nuclear facilities. To remove uranium at more than 95% from the radioactive soil through soil washing and electrokinetic technology, decontamination experiments were carried out. To reduce the generation of large quantities of metal oxides in cathode, a pH controller is used to control the pH of the electrolyte waste solution between 0.5 and 1 for the formation of UO 2+ . More than 80% metal oxides were removed through pre-washing, an electrolyte waste solution was circulated by a pump, and a metal oxide separator filtered the metal oxide particles. 80–85% of the uranium was removed from the soil by soil washing as part of the pre-treatment. When the initial uranium concentration of the soil was 21.7 Bq/g, the required electrokinetic decontamination time was 25 days. When the initial concentration of 238 U in the soil was higher, a longer decontamination time was needed, but the removal rate of 238 U from the soil was higher.

  6. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Spook, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Ground water in the uppermost aquifer beneath and downgradient from the Spook site was contaminated by uranium-processing activities that occurred from 1962 until 1966. Contamination from the tailings pile and the acid pond (including uranium, selenium, nitrate, and radium-226 and -228) leached into the subsurface by infiltration and migrated into ground water, forming a plume extending approximately 2,500 feet (ft) (760 meters [m]) downgradient from the site. The surface remedial action at the Spook site under Subpart A of 40 CFR Part 192 consisted of stabilizing the uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials in a disposal cell in the bottom of the Spook open-pit mine and covering the cell with overburden material. The ground water protection strategy was supplemental standards based on Class 3 ground water in the uppermost aquifer because of widespread ambient contamination. The proposed ground water protection strategy to comply with Subpart B of 40 CFR Part 192 at the Spook site is to perform no remediation. This strategy is based on ground water in the uppermost aquifer (also the zone of contamination) being classified as Class 3, which allows the application of supplemental standards. Class 3 ground water beneath the Spook site is neither a current nor a potential source of drinking water because of widespread, ambient contamination that cannot be cleaned up using treatment methods reasonably employed in public water supply systems

  7. Studies on the interference of hydrofluoric acid and phosphoric acid in the determination of uranium using Ti(III) reduction method-biamperometry end point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiny, T.S.; Rajalakshmi, A.; Phal, D.G.; Charyulu, M.M.; Ramakumar, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate and precise determination of uranium in nuclear materials is necessary for chemical quality control as well as for nuclear material accounting purposes. Different types of uranium samples are received for the measurements. Depending upon the nature of the sample dissolution procedure is selected. Mixed oxide samples of uranium and plutonium, for example, are dissolved in nitric acid containing hydrofluoric acid under IR lamp. The fluoride ions are removed by repeated evaporation of the solution. However, some fluoride ions are left in the solutions depending on the conditions of evaporation. Uranium samples and alloy samples are dissolved in dilute hydrochloric acid. The rate of dissolution depends on concentration of acid. Sometimes a mixture of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is used for the dissolution metal alloy samples, which may contain silica. Another method of dissolution of these samples is using a mixture of phosphoric acid and 1% hydrofluoric acid. It is necessary to study the interference of hydrofluoric acid and phosphoric acid on the determination of uranium

  8. Process for recovering uranium using an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid and alkaline stripping solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worthington, R.E.; Magdics, A.

    1987-01-01

    A process is described for stripping uranium for a pregnant organic extractant comprising an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in a substantially water-immiscible organic diluent. The organic extractant contains tetravalent uranium and an alcohol or phenol modifier in a quantity sufficient to retain substantially all the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid in solution in the diluent during stripping. The process comprises adding an oxidizing agent to the organic extractant and thereby oxidizing the tetravalent uranium to the +6 state in the organic extractant, and contacting the organic extractant containing the uranium in the +6 state with a stripping solution comprising an aqueous solution of an alkali metal or ammonium carbonate or hydroxide thereby stripping uranium from the organic extractant into the stripping solution. The resulting barren organic extractant containing substantially all of the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in the diluent is separated from the stripping solution containing the stripped uranium, the barren extractant being suitable for recycle

  9. Contamination risk and drinking water protection for a large-scale managed aquifer recharge site in a semi-arid karst region, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanke, Julian; Liesch, Tanja; Goeppert, Nadine; Klinger, Jochen; Gassen, Niklas; Goldscheider, Nico

    2017-09-01

    Karst aquifers in semi-arid regions are particularly threatened by surface contamination, especially during winter seasons when extremely variable rainfall of high intensities prevails. An additional challenge is posed when managed recharge of storm water is applied, since karst aquifers display a high spatial variability of hydraulic properties. In these cases, adapted protection concepts are required to address the interaction of surface water and groundwater. In this study a combined protection approach for the surface catchment of the managed aquifer recharge site at the Wala reservoir in Jordan and the downstream Hidan wellfield, which are both subject to frequent bacteriological contamination, is developed. The variability of groundwater quality was evaluated by correlating contamination events to rainfall, and to recharge from the reservoir. Both trigger increased wadi flow downstream of the reservoir by surface runoff generation and groundwater seepage, respectively. A tracer test verified the major pathway of the surface flow into the underground by infiltrating from pools along Wadi Wala. An intrinsic karst vulnerability and risk map was adapted to the regional characteristics and developed to account for the catchment separation by the Wala Dam and the interaction of surface water and groundwater. Implementation of the proposed protection zones for the wellfield and the reservoir is highly recommended, since the results suggest an extreme contamination risk resulting from livestock farming, arable agriculture and human occupation along the wadi. The applied methods can be transferred to other managed aquifer recharge sites in similar karstic environments of semi-arid regions.

  10. Development of Practical Remediation Process for Uranium-Contaminated Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. S.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    A volume reduction of the concrete waste by the appropriate treatment technologies will decrease the amount of waste to be disposed of and result in a reduction of the disposal cost and an enhancement of the efficiency of the disposal site. Our group has developed a 100 drums/year decontamination process and facilities for the decontamination of radioactive concrete. This practical scale process is little known. A practical decontamination process was developed to remove uranium from concrete pieces generated from the decommissioning of a uranium conversion plant. The concrete pieces are divided into two groups: concrete coated with and without epoxy. For the removal of epoxy from the concrete, direct burning by an oil flame is preferable to an electric heating method. The concrete blocks are crushed to below 30 mm and sifted to 1 mm. When the concrete pieces larger than 1 mm are sequentially washed with a clear washing solution and 1.0 M of nitric acid, most of their radioactivity reaches below the limit value of uranium for self-disposal. The concrete pieces smaller than 1 mm are decontaminated in a rotary washing machine by nitric acid, and an electrokinetic equipment is also used if their radioactivity is high.

  11. Development of Practical Remediation Process for Uranium-Contaminated Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. S.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K.

    2013-01-01

    A volume reduction of the concrete waste by the appropriate treatment technologies will decrease the amount of waste to be disposed of and result in a reduction of the disposal cost and an enhancement of the efficiency of the disposal site. Our group has developed a 100 drums/year decontamination process and facilities for the decontamination of radioactive concrete. This practical scale process is little known. A practical decontamination process was developed to remove uranium from concrete pieces generated from the decommissioning of a uranium conversion plant. The concrete pieces are divided into two groups: concrete coated with and without epoxy. For the removal of epoxy from the concrete, direct burning by an oil flame is preferable to an electric heating method. The concrete blocks are crushed to below 30 mm and sifted to 1 mm. When the concrete pieces larger than 1 mm are sequentially washed with a clear washing solution and 1.0 M of nitric acid, most of their radioactivity reaches below the limit value of uranium for self-disposal. The concrete pieces smaller than 1 mm are decontaminated in a rotary washing machine by nitric acid, and an electrokinetic equipment is also used if their radioactivity is high

  12. The technique for determination of surface contamination by uranium on U3Si2-Al plate-type fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shulan; He Fengqi; Wang Qingheng; Han Jingquan

    1993-04-01

    The NDT method for determining the surface contamination by uranium on U 3 Si 2 -Al plate-type fuel elements, the process of standard specimen preparation and the graduation curve are described. The measurement results of U 3 Si 2 -Al plate-type fuel elements show that the alpha counting method to measure the surface contamination by uranium on fuel plate is more reliable. The UB-1 type surface contamination meter, which was recently developed, has many advantages such as high sensitivity to determine the uranium pollution, short time in measuring, convenience for operation, and the minimum detectable amount of uranium is 5 x 10 -10 g/cm 2 . The measuring device is controlled by a microcomputer. Besides data acquisition and processing, it has functions of statistics, output data on terminal or to printer and alarm. The procedures of measurement are fully automatic. All of these will meet the measuring needs in batch process

  13. Regional hydrodynamics and hydrochemistry of the uranium-bearing Oakville aquifer (Miocene) of south Texas. Report of investigations No. 124

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.E.; Galloway, W.E.; Henry, C.D.

    1982-01-01

    The Oakville Formation consists of sediments deposited by several major fluvial systems that traversed the Texas Coastal Plain during the Miocene Epoch. Facies geometry and composition, together with superimposed structure and topography, are important determinants of ground-water flow, aquifer transmissivity, and regional hydrochemical evolution. Topographically high areas along the Oakville outcrop are ground-water recharge zones. Downdip movement of ground water is deflected along strike into major incised stream valleys and modified by local ground-water pumping, resulting in discharge of Oakville water from relatively shallow sections of the